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1

Hazardous jarosite use in developing non-hazardous product for engineering application  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Jarosite released from zinc metal extraction process is hazardous in nature and its world wide disposal has become a major environmental concern. In this study, an attempt has been made to immobilise and recycle the jarosite released from Hindustan Zinc Limited, India, using CCRs, so called fly ash, and clay soil. Results revealed that the particle size of jarosite was finer than that of CCRs and had higher porosity and water holding capacity due to fine textured materials resulting in high surface area (10,496.18 ± 30.90 cm2/g). Jarosite contain higher concentration of toxic elements (lead, zinc, sulphur, cadmium, chromium and copper) than that of CCRs. Concentrations of radionuclides such as 226Ra, 40K and 228Ac in jarosite found less than in CCRs are similar to that of soil. Statistically designed experiments on solidified/stabilised (s/s) sintered jarosite-CCRs products confirmed that the compressive strength of jarosite bricks reached as high as 140 kg/cm2 with 14.5% water absorption capacity at the combination of 3:1 ratio of jarosite and clay, respectively, but, concentrations of all the toxic elements recommended by United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-Toxicity Leachate Characteristics Procedure (TCLP) standard are not within the permissible limits. However, it is confirmed that the toxic elements leaching potentials of s/s-sintered products developed using 2:1 jarosite clay ratio with 15% CCRs comply with the USEPA-TCLP limits and also meet the quality for engineering applications

2006-10-11

2

Hazardous jarosite use in developing non-hazardous product for engineering application  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Jarosite released from zinc metal extraction process is hazardous in nature and its world wide disposal has become a major environmental concern. In this study, an attempt has been made to immobilise and recycle the jarosite released from Hindustan Zinc Limited, India, using CCRs, so called fly ash, and clay soil. Results revealed that the particle size of jarosite was finer than that of CCRs and had higher porosity and water holding capacity due to fine textured materials resulting in high surface area (10,496.18 {+-} 30.90 cm{sup 2}/g). Jarosite contain higher concentration of toxic elements (lead, zinc, sulphur, cadmium, chromium and copper) than that of CCRs. Concentrations of radionuclides such as {sup 226}Ra, {sup 40}K and {sup 228}Ac in jarosite found less than in CCRs are similar to that of soil. Statistically designed experiments on solidified/stabilised (s/s) sintered jarosite-CCRs products confirmed that the compressive strength of jarosite bricks reached as high as 140 kg/cm{sup 2} with 14.5% water absorption capacity at the combination of 3:1 ratio of jarosite and clay, respectively, but, concentrations of all the toxic elements recommended by United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-Toxicity Leachate Characteristics Procedure (TCLP) standard are not within the permissible limits. However, it is confirmed that the toxic elements leaching potentials of s/s-sintered products developed using 2:1 jarosite clay ratio with 15% CCRs comply with the USEPA-TCLP limits and also meet the quality for engineering applications.

Asokan, Pappu [Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Habib Ganj Naka, Bhopal 462026 (India)]. E-mail: asokanp3@yahoo.co.in; Saxena, Mohini [Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Habib Ganj Naka, Bhopal 462026 (India); Asolekar, Shyam R. [CESE, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 400076 (India)

2006-10-11

3

Non-toxic amyloid beta formed in the presence of glypican-1 or its deaminatively generated heparan sulfate degradation products.  

Science.gov (United States)

The amyloid beta (A?) peptides (mainly A?40 and A?42), which are derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP), can oligomerize into antibody A11-positive, neurotoxic species, believed to be involved in Alzheimer's disease. Interestingly, APP binds strongly to the heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan (PG) glypican-1 (Gpc-1) in vitro and both proteins are colocalized inside cells. In endosomes, APP is proteolytically processed to yield A? peptides. The HS chains of S-nitrosylated (SNO) Gpc-1 PG are cleaved into anhydromannose (anMan)-containing di- and oligosaccharides by an NO-dependent reaction in the same compartments. Here, we have studied the toxicity of oligomers/aggregates of A?40 and A?42, as well as A?40/42 mixtures that were formed in the presence of immobilized Gpc-1 PG or immobilized HS oligosaccharides. Afterwards, A? was displaced from the matrices, analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and assayed for A11 immunoreactivity, for effects on growth of mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells and for membrane leakage in rat cortical neurons. HS generally promoted and accelerated A? multimerization into oligomers as well as larger aggregates that were mostly A11 positive and showed toxic effects. However, non-toxic A? was formed in the presence of Gpc-1 PG or when anMan-containing HS degradation products were simultaneously generated. Both toxic and non-toxic A? peptides were taken up by the cells but toxic forms appeared to enter the nuclei to a larger extent. The protection afforded by the presence of HS degradation products may reflect a normal intracellular function for the A? peptides. PMID:24026238

Cheng, Fang; Ruscher, Karsten; Fransson, Lars-Åke; Mani, Katrin

2013-12-01

4

Link between Domoic Acid Production and Cell Physiology after Exchange of Bacterial Communities between Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Non-Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima  

Science.gov (United States)

Bacteria are known to influence domoic acid (DA) production by Pseudo-nitzschia spp., but the link between DA production and physiology of diatoms requires more investigation. We compared a toxic P. multiseries to a non-toxic P. delicatissima, investigating links between DA production, physiological parameters, and co-occurring bacteria. Bacterial communities in cultures of both species were reduced by antibiotic treatment, and each of the diatoms was inoculated with the bacterial community of the other species. The physiology of P. delicatissima was minimally affected by the absence of bacteria or the presence of alien bacteria, and no DA was detected. P. multiseries grew faster without bacteria, did not produce a significant amount of DA, and exhibited physiological characteristics of healthy cells. When grown with alien bacteria, P. multiseries did not grow and produced more DA; the physiology of these cells was affected, with decreases in chlorophyll content and photosynthetic efficiency, an increase in esterase activity, and almost 50% mortality of the cells. The alien bacterial community had morphological and cellular characteristics very different from the original bacteria, and the number of free-living bacteria per algal cell was much higher, suggesting the involvement of bacteria in DA production.

Lelong, Aurelie; Hegaret, Helene; Soudant, Philippe

2014-01-01

5

Link between Domoic Acid Production and Cell Physiology after Exchange of Bacterial Communities between Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Non-Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Bacteria are known to influence domoic acid (DA production by Pseudo-nitzschia spp., but the link between DA production and physiology of diatoms requires more investigation. We compared a toxic P. multiseries to a non-toxic P. delicatissima, investigating links between DA production, physiological parameters, and co-occurring bacteria. Bacterial communities in cultures of both species were reduced by antibiotic treatment, and each of the diatoms was inoculated with the bacterial community of the other species. The physiology of P. delicatissima was minimally affected by the absence of bacteria or the presence of alien bacteria, and no DA was detected. P. multiseries grew faster without bacteria, did not produce a significant amount of DA, and exhibited physiological characteristics of healthy cells. When grown with alien bacteria, P. multiseries did not grow and produced more DA; the physiology of these cells was affected, with decreases in chlorophyll content and photosynthetic efficiency, an increase in esterase activity, and almost 50% mortality of the cells. The alien bacterial community had morphological and cellular characteristics very different from the original bacteria, and the number of free-living bacteria per algal cell was much higher, suggesting the involvement of bacteria in DA production.

Aurélie Lelong

2014-06-01

6

The production of hydrotalcite from magnesite ore as non-toxic heat stabiliser for polyvinyl chloride Hidrotalsiet, vervaardig uit magnesieterts, as niegiftige hittestabiliseerder vir polivinielchloried  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In recent years polyvinyl chloride (PVC processors had to submit to worldwide pressure to convert to environmentally friendly stabilisers such as hydrotalcite (HT, since most of the heat stabilisers currently in use contain heavy metals such as lead, cadmium or barium – these being highly toxic. The presently used HT production process is, however, very expensive as it involves the recovering of magnesium from seawater magnesia. The purpose of this study was to prove that it is indeed possible to produce cost effective and non-toxic HT from an alternative source. During this study the costing and heat stabilising ability of the hydrotalcite produced from magnesite was compared to that of commercially available heat stabilisers. The effect of the pre-mixing process, as well as the influence of particle size distribution was also investigated. A cost comparative and stabilising efficiency study indicated the cost effectiveness of HT produced from magnesite ore, in comparison with other commercially available stabilisers. The use of HT as produced from magnesite ore would indeed assist in the worldwide changeover to environmentally friendly stabilisers.Gedurende die afgelope paar jaar het die druk op polivinielchloried (PVC -verwerkers aansienlik toegeneem om na omgewingsvriendelike stabiliseerders soos hidrotalsiet (HT oor te skakel, aangesien die meeste hittestabiliseerders wat tans in gebruik is, giftige swaarmetale soos lood, kadmium, of barium bevat. Die vervaardigingsproses van HT is tans baie duur, aangesien dit die herwinning van magnesium uit seewatersoute behels. Hierdie studie is daarop gemik om te bewys dat dit wel moontlik is om meer bekostigbare en niegiftige HT uit magnesieterts te vervaardig. Tydens die studie is die doeltreffendheid en koste-implikasies van HT vervaardig uit magnesieterts, vergelyk met kommersieel beskikbare stabiliseerders asook HT-stabiliseerders soos vervaardig uit seewatersoute. Die effek van voorafvermengingsprosesse van die stabiliseerders en smeermiddels, asook partikelgrootteverspreiding op die finale stabiliseringsvermoë, is ook ondersoek. ’n Kostevergelykende studie het aangetoon dat PVC-verwerkers wel koste kan besnoei deur na hierdie plaaslik vervaardigde stabiliseerder oor te skakel. HT kan dus inderdaad as kostedoeltreffende en niegiftige stabiliseerder vir geplastiseerde PVC aangewend word. Die wêreldwye omskakeling na HT as omgewingsvriendelike stabiliseerder vir geplastiseerde PVC sal dus ekonomies meer lewensvatbaar word indien hierdie vorm van HT gebruik word.

J. van der Laan

2005-09-01

7

Non-toxic brominated perfluorocarbons radiopaque agents  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Non-toxic bromofluorocarbon radiopaque agents are disclosed. Certain monobrominated acyclic fluorocarbons, e.g., CF3(CF2)6CF2Br, are improved non-toxic radiopaque agents useful in diagnostic roentgenology, for example in visualizing the gastrointestinal tract, the tracheobronchial tree, the alveolar spaces or parenchyma of the lung, the spleen, the urinary bladder and ureters, the common bile duct and its radicals, the pancreatic ducts, the blood vessels, etc. 13 claims, no drawings

1976-01-01

8

The production of hydrotalcite from magnesite ore as non-toxic heat stabiliser for polyvinyl chloride Hidrotalsiet, vervaardig uit magnesieterts, as niegiftige hittestabiliseerder vir polivinielchloried  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In recent years polyvinyl chloride (PVC) processors had to submit to worldwide pressure to convert to environmentally friendly stabilisers such as hydrotalcite (HT), since most of the heat stabilisers currently in use contain heavy metals such as lead, cadmium or barium – these being highly toxic. The presently used HT production process is, however, very expensive as it involves the recovering of magnesium from seawater magnesia. The purpose of this study was to prove that it is indeed ...

2005-01-01

9

Radioiodine treatment for non-toxic goitre  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

There is no ideal treatment for benign multinodular goitre. Besides surgery, which is recommended for large goitres or when malignancy cannot be excluded, the non-surgical treatment options are levothyroxine therapy and radioiodine (131I) therapy. Conventional 131I therapy [without recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH)] has been used for more than a decade in symptomatic non-toxic multinodular goitre, and although it does lead to significant thyroid volume reduction, relativel...

Feldt-rasmussen, Ulla

2009-01-01

10

Radioiodine treatment of multinodular non-toxic goitre.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

OBJECTIVE--To investigate the long term effect of radioactive iodine on thyroid function and size in patients with non-toxic multinodular goitre. DESIGN--Consecutive patients with multinodular non-toxic goitre selected for radioactive iodine treatment and followed for a minimum of 12 months (median 48 months) after an intended dose of 3.7 MBq/g thyroid tissue corrected to a 100% uptake of iodine-131 in 24 hours. PATIENTS--69 patients with a growing multinodular non-toxic goitre causing local ...

1993-01-01

11

Ecological implications of the emergence of non-toxic subcultures from toxic Microcystis strains.  

Science.gov (United States)

Two toxic, microcystin-producing, Microcystis sp. strains KLL MG-K and KLL MB-K were isolated as single colonies on agar plates from Lake Kinneret, Israel. Two non-toxic subcultures, MG-J and MB-J spontaneously succeeded the toxic ones under laboratory conditions. Southern analyses showed that MG-J and MB-J are lacking at least 34 kb of the mcy region, encoding the microcystin synthetase. Analyses of the 16S rRNA genes, the intergenic spacer region between cpcB and cpcA and the patterns of the polymerase chain reaction products of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and highly iterated palindrome, and presence of mobile DNA elements did not allow unequivocal distinction between toxic and non-toxic subcultures. Laboratory and field experiments indicated an advantage of the toxic strain over its non-toxic successor. When grown separated by a membrane, which allowed passage of the media but not the cells, MG-K severely inhibited the growth of MG-J. Furthermore, when MG strains were placed in dialysis bags in Lake Kinneret during the season in which Microcystis is often observed, cells of MG-J lysed, whereas MG-K survived. Mechanisms whereby the non-toxic subcultures emerged and prevailed over the corresponding toxic ones under laboratory conditions, as well as a possible role of microcystin under natural conditions, are discussed. PMID:15892699

Schatz, D; Keren, Y; Hadas, O; Carmeli, S; Sukenik, A; Kaplan, A

2005-06-01

12

Chaetomium globosum, a non-toxic fungus: a potential source of protein (SCP)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Wheat straw cellulose was used as substrate for single cell protein (SCP) production using C. globosum, a non-toxic fungus. Both untreated and delignified powdered (60 mesh) substrate were used in submerged fermentation. The optimum cultural conditions for maximum conversion of wheat straw into SCP were 5 days, 37C, pH 5.0 and 400 mg/litre nitrogen in the form of sodium nitrate. 18 references.

Kahlon, S.S.; Kalra, K.L.

1986-01-01

13

Children's Ability to Recognise Toxic and Non-Toxic Fruits  

Science.gov (United States)

Children's ability to identify common plants is a necessary prerequisite for learning botany. However, recent work has shown that children lack positive attitudes toward plants and are unable to identify them. We examined children's (aged 10-17) ability to discriminate between common toxic and non-toxic plants and their mature fruits presented in…

Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

2011-01-01

14

131I treatment of nodular non-toxic goitre  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The traditional treatment of a growing nodular non-toxic goitre has for many years been surgical resection or levothyroxine suppressive treatment. During recent years, several studies have reported promising results of 131I treatment in terms of thyroid size reduction. This review outlines the different treatment modalities on non-toxic nodular goitre with special emphasis on 131I treatment. By the term nodular goitre the authors include glands with solitary or multiple thyroid nodules with uptake on a scintiscan. At what point of the natural history of non-toxic multinodular goitre 131I therapy should be used is not clear. In principle, the best result is obtained in smaller goitres and it is possible that the best effect of 131I is seen if treatment is given to patients with diffuse goitre before these become nodular. However, then there is a potential risk to swing in the direction to where 131I is used in an indiscriminate way, since the prevalence of non-toxic multinodular goitre is much higher than that of hyperthyroidism. Although we have data on the long-term hazards of 131I treatment in hyperthyroidism in terms of risk of cancer, we have only follow-up periods of 5 to 10 years for non-toxic goitres in small groups of patients and no data regarding the long-term risk of high-dose 131I treatment (>600 MBq) for this condition. Ideally, long term randomized studies comparing the effect, side effect and cost-benefit of surgery as opposed to 131I treatment should be performed. Awaiting this, it is at present mandatory that each individual patient be given a choice of treatment after proper information. 44 refs

1996-01-01

15

{sup 131}I treatment of nodular non-toxic goitre  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The traditional treatment of a growing nodular non-toxic goitre has for many years been surgical resection or levothyroxine suppressive treatment. During recent years, several studies have reported promising results of {sup 131}I treatment in terms of thyroid size reduction. This review outlines the different treatment modalities on non-toxic nodular goitre with special emphasis on {sup 131}I treatment. By the term nodular goitre the authors include glands with solitary or multiple thyroid nodules with uptake on a scintiscan. At what point of the natural history of non-toxic multinodular goitre {sup 131}I therapy should be used is not clear. In principle, the best result is obtained in smaller goitres and it is possible that the best effect of {sup 131}I is seen if treatment is given to patients with diffuse goitre before these become nodular. However, then there is a potential risk to swing in the direction to where {sup 131}I is used in an indiscriminate way, since the prevalence of non-toxic multinodular goitre is much higher than that of hyperthyroidism. Although we have data on the long-term hazards of {sup 131}I treatment in hyperthyroidism in terms of risk of cancer, we have only follow-up periods of 5 to 10 years for non-toxic goitres in small groups of patients and no data regarding the long-term risk of high-dose {sup 131}I treatment (>600 MBq) for this condition. Ideally, long term randomized studies comparing the effect, side effect and cost-benefit of surgery as opposed to {sup 131}I treatment should be performed. Awaiting this, it is at present mandatory that each individual patient be given a choice of treatment after proper information. 44 refs.

Nygaard, B.; Faber, J.; Hegdeues, L.; Hansen, J.M. [Herlev Hospital (Denmark)

1996-01-01

16

Treatment of non-toxic multinodular goiter with radioactive iodine  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Fourteen patients with large non-toxic multinodular goiters were treated with 20 to 100 mCi (740 to 3700 MBq) of radioactive iodine (iodine-131). In seven, the goiter had recurred after a partial thyroidectomy and four of these had had two operations. Eight had symptoms of respiratory obstruction, two had dysphagia, and the others sought treatment for cosmetic reasons. After administration of iodine-131, there was a significant decrease in goiter size in 11 of the 14 patients, and all those with obstructive symptoms showed improvement. No significant local side effects occurred, but hypothyroidism and Graves' disease each occurred once during follow-up from one to 13 years. Radioactive iodine in doses of 20 to 100 mCi is an effective, safe therapeutic alternative in patients with large non-toxic multinodular goiter, particularly when there is recurrence following surgery or when there are contraindications to surgery.

Kay, T.W.; d' Emden, M.C.; Andrews, J.T.; Martin, F.I.

1988-01-01

17

Radioiodine therapy in non-toxic multinodular goitre  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: The effect of radioiodine in the treatment of non-toxic multinodular goitre has not been adequately evaluated. The aim of the study was to see the effect of radioiodine on thyroid size and function in patients with non-toxic multinodular goitre. We prospectively studied 55 non-toxic multinodular goitre patients treated with radioiodine of which 15 were males and 40 were females with age ranged from 25 years to 60 years (mean ± SD 40.45 ± 10.70 years) for a minimum of 12 months. Patients who were selected were those with local compression symptoms or for cosmetic reasons and the treatment was chosen because of a high operative risk or refusal to be operated on. Thyroid volume and T3, T4, TSH of all patients were determined before treatment and 6 months interval after treatment. Radioiodine was given in the dose ranged from 333 MBq (9 mCi) to 555 MBq (15 mCi) (mean ± SD 11.45 ± 2.04 mCi). The mean thyroid volume was reduced from 44.75 ± 37.44 ml to 28.76 ± 27.25 ml at 12 months (p < 0.001) i.e., reduced by 35.73%. Thyroid volume reduction at 6 months was 21.07%. Hypothyroidism occurred in 9.1% of the patients at 12 months. Side effects were few. Three cases developed radiation thyroiditis and two cases developed hyperthyroidism that was managed conservatively. It has been concluded that radioiodine is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of non-toxic multinodular goitre and may be the treatment of choice in elderly patients, in patients in whom surgery is contraindicated and in patients who are unwilling to undergo surgery. (author)

2007-07-01

18

Predators promote defence of rhizosphere bacterial populations by selective feeding on non-toxic cheaters.  

Science.gov (United States)

Soil pseudomonads increase their competitiveness by producing toxic secondary metabolites, which inhibit competitors and repel predators. Toxin production is regulated by cell-cell signalling and efficiently protects the bacterial population. However, cell communication is unstable, and natural populations often contain signal blind mutants displaying an altered phenotype defective in exoproduct synthesis. Such mutants are weak competitors, and we hypothesized that their fitness depends on natural communities on the exoproducts of wild-type bacteria, especially defence toxins. We established mixed populations of wild-type and signal blind, non-toxic gacS-deficient mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 in batch and rhizosphere systems. Bacteria were grazed by representatives of the most important bacterial predators in soil, nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans) and protozoa (Acanthamoeba castellanii). The gacS mutants showed a negative frequency-dependent fitness and could reach up to one-third of the population, suggesting that they rely on the exoproducts of the wild-type bacteria. Both predators preferentially consumed the mutant strain, but populations with a low mutant load were resistant to predation, allowing the mutant to remain competitive at low relative density. The results suggest that signal blind Pseudomonas increase their fitness by exploiting the toxins produced by wild-type bacteria, and that predation promotes the production of bacterial defence compounds by selectively eliminating non-toxic mutants. Therefore, predators not only regulate population dynamics of soil bacteria but also structure the genetic and phenotypic constitution of bacterial communities. PMID:19322247

Jousset, Alexandre; Rochat, Laurène; Péchy-Tarr, Maria; Keel, Christoph; Scheu, Stefan; Bonkowski, Michael

2009-06-01

19

Novel Non-toxic Antifouling/Fouling Release Nanocomposite Materials  

Science.gov (United States)

Biofouling is a significant environmental problem. Traditional solutions to this problem have involved incorporation of toxic organometallic species into the paint. This approach while effective, is harmful to the environment. The resultant ban on the use of many of these coatings has created a need for alternative systems to control marine fouling. Silicones represent the only class of polymers currently used commercially, due to their inherently low surface energy, glass transition temperature, and modulus, combined with good chemical stability and ease of application. In this talk I will present our efforts to develop a new generation of practical, non-toxic coatings that combine antifouling/fouling release characteristics with good mechanical properties, ease of application and low cost. Specifically we have been focusing on a series of fouling release coatings based on PDMS-polyurea segmented copolymers and nanocomposites. The PDMS copolymers are much stronger than pure PDMS yet they exhibit fouling release performance comparable and, in some cases, better than pure PDMS.

Fang, Jason

2008-03-01

20

Non toxic additives for improved fabric filter performance  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The overall objective of this three-phase Small Business innovative Research (SBIR) program funded by the Department of Energy pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) is to commercialize a technology based upon the use of non-toxic, novel flue gas conditioning agents to improve particulate air toxic control and overall fabric filter performance. The ultimate objective of the Phase II program currently in progress is to demonstrate that the candidate additives are successful at full-scale on flue gas from a coal-fired utility boiler. This paper covers bench-scale field tests conducted during the period February through May, 1995. The bench-scale additives testing was conducted on a flue gas slipstream taken upstream of the existing particulate control device at a utility power plant firing a Texas lignite coal. These tests were preceded by extensive testing with additives in the laboratory using a simulated flue gas stream and re-dispersed flyash from the same power plant. The bench-scale field testing was undertaken to demonstrate the performance with actual flue gas of the bet candidate additives previously identified in the laboratory. Results from the bench-scale tests will be used to establish operating parameters for a larger-scale demonstration on either a single baghouse compartment or a full baghouse at the same site

1995-07-12

 
 
 
 
21

Non toxic additives for improved fabric filter performance  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The overall objective of this three-phase Small Business innovative Research (SBIR) program funded by the Department of Energy pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) is to commercialize a technology based upon the use of non-toxic, novel flue gas conditioning agents to improve particulate air toxic control and overall fabric filter performance. The ultimate objective of the Phase II program currently in progress is to demonstrate that the candidate additives are successful at full-scale on flue gas from a coal-fired utility boiler. This paper covers bench-scale field tests conducted during the period February through May, 1995. The bench-scale additives testing was conducted on a flue gas slipstream taken upstream of the existing particulate control device at a utility power plant firing a Texas lignite coal. These tests were preceded by extensive testing with additives in the laboratory using a simulated flue gas stream and re-dispersed flyash from the same power plant. The bench-scale field testing was undertaken to demonstrate the performance with actual flue gas of the bet candidate additives previously identified in the laboratory. Results from the bench-scale tests will be used to establish operating parameters for a larger-scale demonstration on either a single baghouse compartment or a full baghouse at the same site.

Bustard, C.J.; Baldrey, K.E.; Ebner, T.G. [ADA Technologies, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)] [and others

1995-11-01

22

Radioiodine therapy in non toxic multi nodular goitre, preliminary results  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Aim: Aim of our study was to assess the efficacy of 131I therapy in patients (pts) affected by non toxic multinodular goitre (NTMG). NTMG is a thyroid disease with a high prevalence, especially in low-iodine intake regions. Treatment of NTMG often requires surgery. However, thyroidectomy may be risky in some patients and radioiodine therapy could be an alternative treatment to reduce thyroid volume. We also evaluated if lithium administration can improve the efficacy of radioiodine treatment in this pts. Material and Methods: We enrolled 39 pts (8 males, 31 females; mean age 59 y, range 40-79 y) affected by NTMG. Mean thyroid volume (TV) at ultrasound was of 46.8 ml (range 18.5-87.3). Pts were randomised in 2 groups. Group 1: iodine therapy + lithium therapy 900 mg/die for 6 days; Group 2: iodine therapy alone. We also define 3 clusters of pts by TV. A:15-30 ml; B:31-40 ml; C: > 40 ml. The 131I activity (MBq) was calculated as follows: [4.44 (MBq) x 100/24 hours uptake (%)] x TV. All patients are evaluated for thyroid function and TV at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months after treatment, since we postulate that major reduction in thyroid volume will occur 1 year after 131I therapy. Results: Up to now 16 pts were treated with 131I (mean activity: 512 MBq) and no side effects from 131I and lithium therapy were reported. Four out of 5 pts evaluated at 3 months (2 of group 1 and 3 of group 2) had a reduction in TV (mean value: 8.8 ml). Five out of 10 pts had sub-clinical hyperthyroidism at 1 week, likely as a consequence of thyroid tissue destruction. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest the safety and effectiveness of 131I treatment in NTMG. We expect to clarify the role of lithium administration in improving 131I efficacy. This therapy could have a future role in patients with NTMG that can't be submitted to surgery

2002-09-01

23

Development of Non-hazardous Explosives for Security Training and Testing (NESTT)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The security force at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) routinely used canines to search for explosives and other contraband substances. The use of threat quantities of explosive for realistic training in populated or sensitive Laboratory areas has not been permitted because of the hazard. To overcome this limitation a series of non-hazardous materials with authentic signatures have been prepared and evaluated. A series of materials has been prepared that have authentic properties of explosives but are non-hazardous. These NESTT materials are prepared by coating a few micron thick layer of an explosive on a non-reactive substrate. This produces a formulation with an authentic vapor and molecular signature. Authentic x-ray and oxygen/nitrogen density signatures are obtained through the appropriate choice of a substrate. The signatures of NESTT TNT and NESTT Comp. C-4 have been verified by instrument and canine (K-9) detection in a Beta Test Program

1995-12-04

24

The thyroidal T4/T3 ratio and its regulation in non-toxic goitre  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In 35 patients with non-toxic goitre, surgically resected thyroid tissue was hydrolyzed with Pronase under anaerobic conditions in the presence of methylmercaptoimidazole. Total iodine, PBI, L-thyroxine (T3-RIA and T4 (D)) as well as triiodothyronine (T3-RIA) were determined in the tissue hydrolysates. The data obtained were compared with T4/T3 ratios in the serum, TRH test and thyroidal 131I uptake before operation. The total iodine, amounted to 112,6 +- 14.6 ?g/g tissue. The T4/T3 ratio was 11.37 +- 1.80. Using this procedure of tissue hydrolysis and RIA assays for iodothyronines, the yield for T4 and T3 is considerably higher than the one obtained with previous methods. As in animal experiments, evidence was given for human goitre that T3 is predominantly produced first in the case of decreased T4 production. Second in the case of iodine deficiency, and third in cases of increased TSH response after TRH. Patients with a large amount of iodine and T4 in their thyroids have a much smaller increase in serum TSH after TRH than do subjects with a much lower thyroidal T4 concentration. This occurs even through the thyroid hormone levels in serum in these groups are not different. No correlation between thyroidal T4/T3 ratio and serum T4/T3 ratio could be demonstrated even under extreme conditions. This finding favors the assumption of a predominant extrathyroidal regulation for T4/T3 ratio in serum. (orig.)

1976-09-01

25

Non-Toxic, Non-Flammable, -80 C Phase Change Materials  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of this effort was to develop a non-toxic, non-flammable, -80 C phase change material (PCM) to be used in NASA's ICEPAC capsules for biological sample preservation in flight to and from Earth orbit. A temperature of about -68 C or lower is a critical temperature for maintaining stable cell, tissue, and cell fragment storage.

Cutbirth, J. Michael

2013-01-01

26

Development of a non-toxic corrosion inhibitor for MEA plants  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A non-toxic corrosion inhibitor based on organic compounds was developed to replace a heavy metal toxic inhibitor in MEA plants. The tasks involved in the development program are presented in this paper. A search for non-toxic organic chemicals with potential inhibitive properties was performed first followed by the preliminary screening tests. The best three chemicals were then tested in an autoclave at several concentrations. Slow strain rate runs were also performed to test the susceptibility of welded as well as non-welded carbon steel specimens to stress corrosion cracking. The single best performing chemical was then tested under turbulent and laminar flow conditions in a flow loop. High alloys materials typically found in amine plants were also tested in an autoclave setting to determine if they were compatible with the inhibitor. The single best performing inhibitor was then finally tested in a refinery gas plant for 18 months. The corrosion rates data, analytical results and physical inspection of the field equipment showed that the non-toxic corrosion inhibitor was very effective in reducing corrosion. Based on the results of the laboratory and field testing program, it was decided to replace the previous toxic corrosion inhibitor by the newly developed non-toxic corrosion inhibitor.

Tebba, S.; Kane, R.D. [CM International, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shumaimriand, B.N.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K. [Kuwait National Petroleum Co., Ahmadi (Kuwait). Shuaiba Refinery

1998-12-31

27

High thermoelectric performance in non-toxic Earth-abundant copper sulfide.  

Science.gov (United States)

A new type of high performance thermoelectric material Cu2-x S composed of non-toxic and earth-abundant elements Cu and S is reported. Cu2-x S surprisingly has lower thermal conductivity and more strikingly reduced specific heat compared to the heavier Cu2 Se, leading to an increased zT to 1.7. PMID:24677586

He, Ying; Day, Tristan; Zhang, Tiansong; Liu, Huili; Shi, Xun; Chen, Lidong; Snyder, G Jeffrey

2014-06-01

28

Assessment of Cost Impacts of Using Non-Toxic Propulsion in Satellites  

Science.gov (United States)

The growing costs of space missions, the need for increased mission performance, and concerns associated with environmental issues deeply influence propulsion system design and propellant selection criteria. A propellant's performance was defined in the past exclusively in terms of specific impulse and density, but now high-performance, non-toxic, non-sophisticated mono- propellant systems are key drivers, and are considered for development to replace the traditional hydrazine (N2H4) mono-propellant thrusters. The mono-propellants under consideration are propellant formulations, which should be environmentally friendly, should have a high density, equal or better performance and better thermal characteristics than hydrazine. These considerations raised interest specially in the candidates of Hydroxylammonium Nitrate (HAN)-based propellants, Ammoniumdinitramide (ADN)-based propellants, Tri-ethanol (TEAN)-based propellants, Hydrazinium Nitroformate (HNF)-based propellants, Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2)-based propellants. A near-term objective in consideration of satellite related process optimisation is to significantly reduce on-ground operations costs and at the same time improve mission performance. A far-term objective is to obtain a system presenting a very high performance, illustrated by a high specific impulse. Moving to a "non-toxic" propulsion system seems to be a solution to these two goals. The sought after benefits for non-toxic spacecraft mono-propellant propulsion are under investigation taking into account the four main parameters which are mandatory for customer satisfaction while meeting the price constraints: - Reliability, availability, maintainability and safety, - Manufacturing, assembly, integration and test, - Launch preparation and support, - Ground support equipment. These benefits of non-toxic mono-propellants can be proven by various examples, like an expected reduction of development costs due the non-toxicity of propellants which might allow "easier" design, reducing some inhibits for ground safety, leading to a shorter development time, and consequently to reduced program costs. Operational costs could be reduced due to the use of non-toxic propellant. Their non-toxicity, in comparison to the traditional propellants, will avoid special safety procedures and also parallelisation of processes during all phases of AIT and launch preparations. The costs directly associated with propellant handling, transport and storage should be lower, also follow-on costs risk is minimised because of the elimination or significant reduction of toxic and carcinogenic characteristics of the propellants. The physical characteristic and properties of some of the propellants formulations mentioned, like a higher density than hydrazine, support the beneficial aspects: a global S/C weight reduction could be achieved due to smaller tanks.

Schiebener, P. J.; Gies, O.; Stuhlberger, J.; Schmitz, H.-D.

2002-01-01

29

Does prophylactic thyroxine treatment after operation for non-toxic goitre influence thyroid size?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In order to evaluate the influence of thyroxine treatment on thyroid volume after thyroidectomy for non-toxic goitre 110 consecutive patients were randomised to receive thyroxine (150 micrograms daily) or no treatment three months after operation. Thyroid volume determined by ultrasonography did not differ significantly between the two groups one year after operation. Nevertheless, a similar decrease in volume was seen from three to 12 months postoperatively in the thyroxine treated and no tr...

Hegedu?s, L.; Hansen, J. M.; Veiergang, D.; Karstrup, S.

1987-01-01

30

Natural fruit extracts as non-toxic fluorescent dyes for staining fungal chlamydospores.  

Science.gov (United States)

Currently, most synthetic dyes utilized for fungal fluorescent staining are toxic, carcinogenic, or harmful to animals, humans, and the environment. This study proposes non-toxic extracts of fruits from the genera Rhamnus, Ribes, Sambucus, Viburnum, Sorbus and Beta as simple, safe, and ecological alternatives to chemical fluorescent dye for efficient staining of Fusarium chlamydospore cells using, as test strains, five different pathogenic Fusarium species. PMID:22806815

Vujanovic, Silva; Goh, Yit Kheng; Vujanovic, Vladimir

2012-01-01

31

AMAP, the alleged non-toxic isomer of acetaminophen, is toxic in rat and human liver.  

Science.gov (United States)

N-acetyl-meta-aminophenol (AMAP) is generally considered as a non-toxic regioisomer of the well-known hepatotoxicant acetaminophen (APAP). However, so far, AMAP has only been shown to be non-toxic in mice and hamsters. To investigate whether AMAP could also be used as non-toxic analog of APAP in rat and human, the toxicity of APAP and AMAP was tested ex vivo in precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) of mouse, rat and human. Based on ATP content and histomorphology, APAP was more toxic in mouse than in rat and human PCLS. Surprisingly, although AMAP showed a much lower toxicity than APAP in mouse PCLS, AMAP was equally toxic as or even more toxic than APAP at all concentrations tested in both rat and human PCLS. The profile of proteins released into the medium of AMAP-treated rat PCLS was similar to that of APAP, whereas in the medium of mouse PCLS, it was similar to the control. Metabolite profiling indicated that mouse PCLS produced the highest amount of glutathione conjugate of APAP, while no glutathione conjugate of AMAP was detected in all three species. Mouse also produced ten times more hydroquinone metabolites of AMAP, the assumed proximate reactive metabolites, than rat or human. In conclusion, AMAP is toxic in rat and human liver and cannot be used as non-toxic isomer of APAP. The marked species differences in APAP and AMAP toxicity and metabolism underline the importance of using human tissues for better prediction of toxicity in man. PMID:22914986

Hadi, Mackenzie; Dragovic, Sanja; van Swelm, Rachel; Herpers, Bram; van de Water, Bob; Russel, Frans G M; Commandeur, Jan N M; Groothuis, Geny M M

2013-01-01

32

[Long-term effect of 131I therapy of multinodular non-toxic goiter].  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to investigate the long term effect of 131I treatment on thyroid function and size in patients with non-toxic multinodular goitre. The subjects were 69 consecutive patients with multinodular non-toxic goitre selected for 131I treatment and followed for a minimum of 12 months. Outcome measures were standard thyroid function variables and ultrasonically determined thyroid volume before and after treatment. Fifty-nine patients were treated with a single dose of 131I, 12 with two doses, and one with four doses. In 45 patients treated with one dose who remained euthyroid the median thyroid volume was reduced from 73 (interquartile range 50-106) ml to 29 (interquartile range 23-48) ml at 24 months. The median reduction was 40 (22-48) ml, half of which occurred within three months. Patients treated with two doses as well as those developing hypo- or hyper-thyroidism also had a significant reduction in thyroid volume. Eleven patients developed hypothyroidism (cumulative five year risk 22%). Side effects were few. In conclusion we find that 131I treatment of multinodular non-toxic goitre is an attractive alternative to surgery. PMID:7985257

Nygaard, B; Hegedüs, L; Gervil, M; Jensen, H H; Søe-Jensen, P; Hansen, J E

1994-09-26

33

Barriers to Practice of Non-Hazardous Solid Waste Minimization by Industries in Malaysia  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The Practice of waste minimization plays a significant role in sustainable development as the most acceptable method in the waste management hierarchy. This paper is a case study research on industrial non-hazardous wastes generated from different industrial activities in one of the major Malaysian industrial areas. This study is aimed at identifying the barriers of waste minimization practices in Malaysian industries. The combination of quantitative and qualitative methods were applied in the study through the use of a structured questionnaire prepared on Likert scale and semi-structured interviews with respondents across thirty (30 factories. Data collected through the questionnaire was analyzed using software and severity index tool. Findings reveal the barriers faced in practicing waste minimization by industries include the lack of time for separation of waste, absence of guidelines, regulations and limited accurate knowledge with severity index range of 62.5<=SI< 87.5, which were considered to be serious issues. Through the application of suitable educational and awareness programs for industrial stakeholders, an effective waste minimization practice can be achieved.

Shadi Kafi Mallak

2014-02-01

34

(WO/2004/104211) METHOD FOR DETECTING TOXIC AND NON-TOXIC CYANOBACTERIA  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This invention is related to a method for detecting toxic and non-toxic cyanobacteria. The method comprises that nucleic acid from a biological sample is brought into contact with an oligonucleotide designed to be specific for particular regions of the mcyE gene, the mcyE in combination with mcyD, and with an oligonucleotide designed to be specific for 16SrDNA, and the presence or absence of toxic cyanobacteria is detected by a suitable molecular biology method. The invention is related also ...

Sivonen, Kaarina; Rantala, Anne; Rouhianen, Leo; Fewer, David; Rajaniemi, Pirjo; Wilmotte, Annick; Boutte, Christophe; Grubisic, Stana; Balthasart, Pierre; Bellis, Gianluca; Rizzi, Ermano; Frosini, Andrea; Castiglioni, Bianca; Ventura, Stefano; Mugnai, Maria

2003-01-01

35

Oleuropein, a non-toxic olive iridoid, is an anti-tumor agent and cytoskeleton disruptor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Oleuropein, a non-toxic secoiridoid derived from the olive tree, is a powerful antioxidant and anti-angiogenic agent. Here, we show it to be a potent anti-cancer compound, directly disrupting actin filaments in cells and in a cell-free assay. Oleuropein inhibited the proliferation and migration of advanced-grade tumor cell lines in a dose-responsive manner. In a novel tube-disruption assay, Oleuropein irreversibly rounded cancer cells, preventing their replication, motility, and invasiveness; these effects were reversible in normal cells. When administered orally to mice that developed spontaneous tumors, Oleuropein completely regressed tumors in 9-12 days. When tumors were resected prior to complete regression, they lacked cohesiveness and had a crumbly consistency. No viable cells could be recovered from these tumors. These observations elevate Oleuropein from a non-toxic antioxidant into a potent anti-tumor agent with direct effects against tumor cells. Our data may also explain the cancer-protective effects of the olive-rich Mediterranean diet

2005-09-02

36

A high throughput live transparent animal bioassay to identify non-toxic small molecules or genes that regulate vertebrate fat metabolism for obesity drug development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The alarming rise in the obesity epidemic and growing concern for the pathologic consequences of the metabolic syndrome warrant great need for development of obesity-related pharmacotherapeutics. The search for such therapeutics is severely limited by the slow throughput of animal models of obesity. Amenable to placement into a 96 well plate, zebrafish larvae have emerged as one of the highest throughput vertebrate model organisms for performing small molecule screens. A method for visually identifying non-toxic molecular effectors of fat metabolism using a live transparent vertebrate was developed. Given that increased levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD via deletion of CD38 have been shown to prevent high fat diet induced obesity in mice in a SIRT-1 dependent fashion we explored the possibility of directly applying NAD to zebrafish. Methods Zebrafish larvae were incubated with daily refreshing of nile red containing media starting from a developmental stage of equivalent fat content among siblings (3 days post-fertilization, dpf and continuing with daily refreshing until 7 dpf. Results PPAR activators, beta-adrenergic agonists, SIRT-1 activators, and nicotinic acid treatment all caused predicted changes in fat, cholesterol, and gene expression consistent with a high degree of evolutionary conservation of fat metabolism signal transduction extending from man to zebrafish larvae. All changes in fat content were visually quantifiable in a relative fashion using live zebrafish larvae nile red fluorescence microscopy. Resveratrol treatment caused the greatest and most consistent loss of fat content. The resveratrol tetramer Vaticanol B caused loss of fat equivalent in potency to resveratrol alone. Significantly, the direct administration of NAD decreased fat content in zebrafish. Results from knockdown of a zebrafish G-PCR ortholog previously determined to decrease fat content in C. elegans support that future GPR142 antagonists may be effective non-toxic anti-obesity therapeutics. Conclusion Owing to the apparently high level of evolutionary conservation of signal transduction pathways regulating lipid metabolism, the zebrafish can be useful for identifying non-toxic small molecules or pharmacological target gene products for developing molecular therapeutics for treating clinical obesity. Our results support the promising potential in applying NAD or resveratrol where the underlying target protein likely involves Sirtuin family member proteins. Furthermore data supports future studies focused on determining whether there is a high concentration window for resveratrol that is effective and non-toxic in high fat obesity murine models.

Woollett Laura A

2008-08-01

37

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18

38

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements

39

Antimicrobial properties of a non-toxic glycoprotein (WSG) from Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha).  

Science.gov (United States)

A monomeric glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 28 kDa in SDS-PAGE was isolated from the Withania somnifera root tubers. The protein designated WSG (Withania somnifera glycoprotein) demonstrated potent antimicrobial activity against the phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria tested. Antifungal effect has been demonstrated in that WSG exerts a fungistastic effect by inhibiting spore germination and hyphal growth in the tested fungi. WSG showed potent antifungal activity against Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium oxysporum, F. verticilloides and antibacterial activity against Clvibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. WSG is an acidic, non-toxic (trypsin-chymotrypsin) protease inhibitor. These results encourage further studies of WSG as a potential therapeutic agent for its antifungal activity. PMID:17009292

Girish, K S; Machiah, K D; Ushanandini, S; Harish Kumar, K; Nagaraju, S; Govindappa, M; Vedavathi, M; Kemparaju, K

2006-01-01

40

Challenges for the Development of New Non-Toxic Antifouling Solutions  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Marine biofouling is of major economic concern to all marine industries. The shipping trade is particularly alert to the development of new antifouling (AF strategies, especially green AF paint as international regulations regarding the environmental impact of the compounds actually incorporated into the formulations are becoming more and more strict. It is also recognised that vessels play an extensive role in invasive species propagation as ballast waters transport potentially threatening larvae. It is then crucial to develop new AF solutions combining advances in marine chemistry and topography, in addition to a knowledge of marine biofoulers, with respect to the marine environment. This review presents the recent research progress made in the field of new non-toxic AF solutions (new microtexturing of surfaces, foul-release coatings, and with a special emphasis on marine natural antifoulants as well as the perspectives for future research directions.

Jean-Philippe Maréchal

2009-10-01

 
 
 
 
41

Active prey selection in two pelagic copepods feeding on potentially toxic and non-toxic dinoflagellates  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Grazing on two red tide dinoflagellates, the potentially toxic Karenia mikimotoi and the non-toxic Gyrodinium instriatum, was examined in two species of marine copepods, Pseudocalanus elongatus and Temora longicornis. Both copepods cleared K. mikimotoi at rates that were a little lower but comparable to those at which they cleared the slightly larger G. instriatum when the two dinoflagellates were offered separately. However, when feeding on mixtures of the two prey species, the clearance rates on K. mikimotoi were substantially reduced in both copepods while their clearances of G. instiatum remained unaltered, suggesting active prey selection. Video observations of individual prey capture and feeding events showed prey rejection frequencies (caught and then released cells) that did not differ between mixed and mono-specific diets. This suggests that the selection between prey cells occurs prior to capture and that it is based on remote characterization of the cells.

Schultz, Mette; Kiørboe, Thomas

2009-01-01

42

Potent inhibition of copper corrosion in neutral chloride media by novel non-toxic thiadiazole derivatives  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: •Two eco-friendly thiadiazole derivatives show high inhibition efficiency on copper. •Thermodynamic calculation indicates chemisorption obeys Langmuir isotherm. •Surface layers were also characterized by SEM coupled with EDX analysis. •Raman spectra reveals inhibitors suppress corrosion via formation of complex. •Relationships between inhibition efficiency and molecular orbital were calculated. -- Abstract: Inhibiting effect of two novel non-toxic thiadiazole derivatives on copper were investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution using weight loss and electrochemical measurements. Presence of inhibitors and increase of concentration greatly decrease corrosion rate, parameters determined from polarization curves and EIS plots show that inhibitors decrease both cathodic and anodic current densities, suppressing charge transfer process by adsorption on copper surface. Thermodynamic calculation indicates chemisorption obeys Langmuir isotherm. Surface layers were characterized by SEM coupled with EDX. Raman micro-spectroscopy reveals that inhibitor molecules suppress copper corrosion via formation of thiadiazole–Cu complex. Relationships between inhibition efficiency and molecular orbital were also evaluated

2013-08-01

43

Radioiodine therapy of benign non-toxic goitre. Potential role of recombinant human TSH  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This review provides an update on recombinant human TSH (rh-TSH) augmented radioiodine (¹³¹I) therapy and outlines its potential role in the treatment of symptomatic benign multinodular non-toxic goitre. In some countries, ¹³¹I has been used for three decades to reduce the size of nodular goitres. The feasibility of ¹³¹I therapy depends on an adequate thyroid ¹³¹I uptake. Based on a two-fold increase in thyroid ¹³¹I uptake, superiority studies have convincingly demonstrated that the absorbed thyroid ¹³¹I dose can be increased without increasing the administered ¹³¹I activity, resulting in a 35-56% amplification of goitre reduction at one-year post radioiodine compared to conventional (without rh-TSH) ¹³¹I therapy. Although patient satisfaction is not improved at one-year, this approach facilitates tracheal decompression and is particularly promising in large goitres. The majority of multinodular non-toxic goitre patients may not require amplified goitre reduction. But as an alternative strategy, rh-TSH allowsup to 80% reduction of the therapeutic ¹³¹I activity while still achieving goitre reduction comparable to that of conventional ¹³¹I therapy and maintaining high patient satisfaction. The dose-reduction (equality) strategy is attractive in terms of minimizing post-therapeutic restrictions and in reducing the potential risk of radiation-induced malignancy. Adverse effects like temporary thyroid swelling and thyroid hormone excess are to a large extent dose-dependent and generally 0.1mg rh-TSH or less is well tolerated. Based on these results we conclude that rh-TSH augmented ¹³¹I therapy is a promising new therapeutic principle allowing the tailoring of an optimal ¹³¹I therapy on the individual level.

Fast, S; Bonnema, S J

2011-01-01

44

Therapy for non-toxic multinodular goiter. Radioiodine therapy as attractive alternative to surgery  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The need for therapy for nodular goiter results from the growth of thyroid nodules over decades and from the possibility of tracheal compression and worsening of respiratory function. Given the high prevalence of non-toxic goiter, the epidemiologically low incidence of clinically apparent thyroid cancer justifies non-surgical strategies. Randomised studies have shown that levothyroxine offers limited therapeutic effects and is inferior to radioiodine therapy regarding goiter shrinkage. When indication for a definitive therapy is given, the choice between resection and radioiodine therapy should consider volume of goiter, severity of clinical symptoms, thyroid uptake, patient's age, co-morbidity, previous resection of goiter, patient's profession and patient's wish. Even in large goiters between 100 and 300 ml radioiodine therapy showed consistent results with goiter size reduction from 35-40% one year and 40-60% two years after radioiodine therapy. Thyroid hormones to prevent recurrence of goiter are not necessary. Recurrent goiters were seldom observed after radioiodine therapy and resulted from initially very large goiters or uptake in dominante nodules or from low {sup 131}I activities. Recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) offers the opportunity to enhance the effect of radioiodine therapy. Observational studies have shown that rhTSH increases low {sup 131}I uptake in case of high alimentary iodine-supply by the factor 4, causes a more homogenous {sup 131}I distribution within the goiter and improves goiter reduction. A phase I study for dose finding is running in the USA. Conclusion: radioiodine therapy for shrinkage of large non-toxic goiter should not be restricted to elderly patients, or to patients with co-morbidity or high operative risk, but is an attractive alternative to surgery in patients with special professions (singer, teacher, speaker) or with the wish for a non-invasive treatment modality. (orig.)

Dietlein, M.; Dederichs, B.; Kobe, C.; Theissen, P.; Schmidt, M.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. zu Koeln (Germany)

2006-07-01

45

Therapy for non-toxic multinodular goiter. Radioiodine therapy as attractive alternative to surgery  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The need for therapy for nodular goiter results from the growth of thyroid nodules over decades and from the possibility of tracheal compression and worsening of respiratory function. Given the high prevalence of non-toxic goiter, the epidemiologically low incidence of clinically apparent thyroid cancer justifies non-surgical strategies. Randomised studies have shown that levothyroxine offers limited therapeutic effects and is inferior to radioiodine therapy regarding goiter shrinkage. When indication for a definitive therapy is given, the choice between resection and radioiodine therapy should consider volume of goiter, severity of clinical symptoms, thyroid uptake, patient's age, co-morbidity, previous resection of goiter, patient's profession and patient's wish. Even in large goiters between 100 and 300 ml radioiodine therapy showed consistent results with goiter size reduction from 35-40% one year and 40-60% two years after radioiodine therapy. Thyroid hormones to prevent recurrence of goiter are not necessary. Recurrent goiters were seldom observed after radioiodine therapy and resulted from initially very large goiters or uptake in dominante nodules or from low 131I activities. Recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) offers the opportunity to enhance the effect of radioiodine therapy. Observational studies have shown that rhTSH increases low 131I uptake in case of high alimentary iodine-supply by the factor 4, causes a more homogenous 131I distribution within the goiter and improves goiter reduction. A phase I study for dose finding is running in the USA. Conclusion: radioiodine therapy for shrinkage of large non-toxic goiter should not be restricted to elderly patients, or to patients with co-morbidity or high operative risk, but is an attractive alternative to surgery in patients with special professions (singer, teacher, speaker) or with the wish for a non-invasive treatment modality. (orig.)

2006-01-01

46

Improved in vitro development of cloned bovine embryos using S-adenosylhomocysteine, a non-toxic epigenetic modifying reagent.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, fibroblast cells were stably transfected with mouse POU5F1 promoter-driven enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to investigate the effect of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), the reversible non-toxic inhibitor of DNA-methyltransferases (DNMTs), at different intervals post-fusion on in vitro development of cloned bovine embryos. Treatment with SAH for 12?hr resulted in 54.6?±?7.7% blastocyst production, which was significantly greater than in vitro fertilized embryos (IVF: 37.2?±?2.7%), cloned embryos treated with SAH for 72?hr (31.0?±?7.6%), and control cloned embryos (34.6?±?3.6%). The fluorescence intensities of the EGFP-POU5F1 reporter gene at all intervals of SAH treatment, except of 72?hr, were significantly higher than control somatic cell nuclear transfers (SCNT) embryos. The intensity of DNA-methylation in cloned embryos treated with SAH for 48?hr was similar to that of IVF embryos, and was significantly lower than the other SCNT groups. The levels of H3K9 acetylation in all SCNT groups were significantly lower than IVF embryos. Real-time PCR analysis of gene expression revealed significantly higher expression of POU5F1 in cloned versus IVF blastocysts. Neither embryo production method (SCNT vs. IVF) nor the SAH treatment interval affected expression of the BCL2 gene. Cloned embryos at all intervals of SAH treatment, except for 24?hr, had significantly increased VEGF transcript compared to IVF and control SCNT embryos. It was suggested that the time interval of DNMT inhibition may have important consequences on different in vitro features of bovine SCNT, and the improving effects of DNMT inhibition on developmental competency of cloned embryos are restricted to a specific period of time preceding de novo methylation. PMID:21721066

Jafari, Shahram; Hosseini, Morteza S; Hajian, Mahdi; Forouzanfar, Mohsen; Jafarpour, Farnoosh; Abedi, Parvaneh; Ostadhosseini, Somayyeh; Abbasi, Hassan; Gourabi, Hamid; Shahverdi, Abdol H; Dizaj, Ahmad Vosough Taghi; Anjomshoaa, Maryam; Haron, Wahid; Noorshariza, Noor; Yakub, Halimhatoon; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad H

2011-08-01

47

Crystal structure of a non-toxic mutant of heat-labile enterotoxin, which is a potent mucosal adjuvant.  

Science.gov (United States)

Two closely related bacterial toxins, heat-labile enterotoxin (LT-I) and cholera toxin (CT), not only invoke a toxic activity that affects many victims worldwide but also contain a beneficial mucosal adjuvant activity that significantly enhances the potency of vaccines in general. For the purpose of vaccine design it is most interesting that the undesirable toxic activity of these toxins can be eliminated by the single-site mutation Ser63Lys in the A subunit while the mucosal adjuvant activity is still present. The crystal structure of the Ser63Lys mutant of LT-I is determined at 2.0 A resolution. Its structure appears to be essentially the same as the wild-type LT-I structure. The substitution Ser63Lys was designed, based on the wild-type LT-I crystal structure, to decrease toxicity by interfering with NAD binding and/or catalysis. In the mutant crystal structure, the newly introduced lysine side chain is indeed positioned such that it could potentially obstruct the productive binding mode of the substrate NAD while at the same time its positive charge could possibly interfere with the critical function of nearby charged groups in the active site of LT-I. The fact that the Ser63Lys mutant of LT-I does not disrupt the wild-type LT-I structure makes the non-toxic mutant potentially suitable, from a structural point of view, to be used as a vaccine to prevent enterotoxigenic E. coli infections. The structural similarity of mutant and wild-type toxin might also be the reason why the inactive Ser63Lys variant retains its adjuvant activity. PMID:9416617

van den Akker, F; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R; Hol, W G

1997-12-01

48

XeBr excilamp based on a non-toxic component mixture  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper presents the results of experimental studies on obtaining UV luminescence of XeBr* molecules at the excitation of a non-toxic Xe-CsBr gas-vapour mixture by a longitudinal pulse-periodic discharge. Effective UV emission yield of the exciplex XeBr* molecules (spectral maximum at 282 nm) is observed within a wide range of excitation conditions. The spectral distribution in the UV emission under the optimal excitation conditions does not differ essentially from that in other XeBr excilamps based on toxic components. The emission of the B {yields} X band of the XeBr* molecules provides the main contribution to the total power of the discharge UV emission. The determined average power of the UV emission for the experimental discharge tube is 12 W at an efficiency of 1%. Spectral, power-related and time-dependent parameters of the laboratory excilamp are presented for a wide range of excitation parameters. A new mechanism of exciplex molecule formation at the excitation of a rare gas/alkali halide vapour mixture is discussed.

Kelman, V A; Shpenik, Yu O; Zhmenyak, Yu V, E-mail: mironkle@rambler.ru [Institute of Electron Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Universitetska 21, 88017 Uzhgorod (Ukraine)

2011-06-29

49

Non-toxic goitre: diagnostic role of aspiration cytology, antibodies and serum thyrotrophin.  

Science.gov (United States)

Fifty cases of bilateral non-toxic goitre, largely unselected, have been studied using fine needle aspiration cytology (without local anaesthesia); four techniques of thyroid antibody tests; serum thyroid biochemistry (including radioimmunoassay of TSH) and clinical evaluation. Autoimmune thyroiditis was found cytologically in 64%; simple colloid goitre in 24%; subacute thyroiditis of de Quervain in 10%. Aspiration cytology was the most sensitive means of detecting autoimmune thyroiditis and subacute thyroiditis. Two antibodies directed against the intra-cellular cytoplasmic antigen--the complement fixation test and an immunofluorescent antibody were of lesser value in detecting autoimmune thyroiditis (80% positivity) though equal to each other. Serum TSH was of some value--being elevated in 63% of cases of autoimmune thyroiditis and in no cases of simple colloid goitre. Two major cytological subtypes of autoimmune thyroiditis have been described--with significant differences in duration of goitre, mode of presentation, frequency of hypothyroidism, and response to thyroxine therapy. The high frequency of autoimmune thyroiditis in this series suggests that endemic goitre is unlikely in Western Australia. PMID:747891

Gutteridge, D H; Orell, S R

1978-12-01

50

TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT FOR CRITERIA AND PROCESSES FOR THE CERTIFICATION OF NON-RADIOACTIVE HAZARDOUS AND NON-HAZARDOUS WASTES  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This Technical Basis Document (TBD) identifies how the values presented in the ''Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes'' were derived. The original moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) applied only to hazardous wastes generated in Radioactive Materials Management Areas (RMMAs) that were destined for off-site Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities (TSDFs) that did not possess a radioactive materials license. Since its inception, the original moratorium document has become the de facto free-release procedure for potentially volumetrically contaminated materials of all varieties. This was promulgated in a February 4, 1992 memo from Jyle Lytle, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management, entitled ''Update: Moratorium on Shipment of Potentially Radioactive Hazardous and Toxic Wastes''. In this memo, Ms. Lytle states, ''While the moratorium does not apply to non-hazardous/non-TSCA solid wastes and non-waste materials, the same release criteria apply''. Over the past few years, a considerable quantity of data and operating experience has been developed, which has shown the limitations of UCRL-AR-109662. The original Moratorium is out of date, and many of the organizations and procedures that it references are no longer in existence. In addition, the original document lacked sufficient detail to be used as an LLNL-wide procedure for free release, as it only addressed hazardous wastes. The original moratorium document also used highly optimistic ''action limits'', which were based on theoretically achievable minimum detectable activity (MDA) levels for various matrices. Years of operating experience has shown that these action limits are simply not achievable for certain analyses in certain matrices, either due to limitations in sample size, or underestimates of the contribution of naturally-occurring radioactive materials, resulting in the mis-characterization of samples of these matrices as radioactive, when no radioactivity was added by LLNL operations. The new moratorium document updates the organizations involved in Moratorium Declarations, specifically addresses non-hazardous waste matrices, and allows for alternative types of analysis. The new moratorium document formalizes the process of release of potentially volumetrically-contaminated waste materials from radiological controls at LLNL.

Dominick, J; Gaylord, R

2007-02-13

51

Radioiodine - an attractive alternative to surgery in large non-toxic multinodular goitres  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Sporadic non-toxic goitre (SNG) is defined as thyroid enlargement in a euthyroid patient living in an area without endemic goitre. Because thyroid hormone function is within the reference range, the main problems are the signs of thyroid enlargement, thus reducing the size of the goitre is undoubtedly the primary goal of therapy. Although SNG is a common disease, there is no single optimal management of treatment strategy. L-thyroxine treatment, although only moderately effective and with reported reductions in goitre volume of less than 30%, is still used. Moreover, in patients over 60 years of age, long-term TSH-suppression treatment may cause iatrogenic hyperthyroidism and is associated with a significant risk of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation as well as osteoporosis, especially in postmenopausal women. In patients with huge goitres, the surgical removal of a gland is made most frequently. The great advantage of thyroid surgery is its immediate effect. Unfortunately, surgery carries a risk of goitre recurrence and complications, both surgical and anaesthesia-related. For those patients who do not want to be operated on, or have contraindications for invasive treatment, and taking into consideration the low efficacy of L-thyroxine treatment, the best option is radioiodine. Despite encouraging reports of the high efficacy of radioiodine in the treatment of SNG this method is still not commonly used by many clinicians. In our work we would like to point out the efficacy, adverse effects, and contraindications of using iodine-131. Going through the advantages and disadvantages of all accessible methods of treatment of SNG, we would like to focus on using radioiodine as an attractive alternative to surgery. (authors)

2009-01-01

52

Separation of non-hazardous, non-radioactive components from ICPP calcine via chlorination  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A pyrochemical treatment method for separating non-radioactive from radioactive components in solid granular waste accumulated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was investigated. The goal of this study was to obtain kinetic and chemical separation data on the reaction products of the chlorination of the solid waste, known as calcine. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were completed to verify that a separation of radioactive and non-radioactive calcine components was possible. Bench-scale chlorination experiments were completed subsequently in a variety of reactor configurations including: a fixed-bed reactor (reactive gases flowed around and not through the particle bed), a packed/fluidized-bed reactor, and a packed-bed reactor (reactive gases flowed through the particle bed). Chemical analysis of the reaction products generated during the chlorination experiments verified the predictions made by the equilibrium calculations. An empirical first-order kinetic rate expression was developed for each of the reactor configurations. 20 refs., 16 figs., 21 tabs

1995-01-01

53

Testing the Awareness of Hazardous Nature of Printmaking Materials among Printmaking Instructors in Traditional and Non-toxic Printmaking Programs  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In art education, printmaking is one area that mostly deals with toxic materials that are hazardous to human health. This study investigated printmaking instructor awareness of hazardous printmaking materials. A questionnaire was designed for printmaking instructors and was mailed to a 20 instructors from the non-toxic printmaking programs and 20 instructors from traditional printmaking programs. The questionnaire sought information on demographic characteristics of respondents and the awaren...

Radaydeh, Bassam N.; Otoom, Sameer A.

2005-01-01

54

A low-cost non-toxic post-growth activation step for CdTe solar cells.  

Science.gov (United States)

Cadmium telluride, CdTe, is now firmly established as the basis for the market-leading thin-film solar-cell technology. With laboratory efficiencies approaching 20 per cent, the research and development targets for CdTe are to reduce the cost of power generation further to less than half a US dollar per watt (ref. 2) and to minimize the environmental impact. A central part of the manufacturing process involves doping the polycrystalline thin-film CdTe with CdCl2. This acts to form the photovoltaic junction at the CdTe/CdS interface and to passivate the grain boundaries, making it essential in achieving high device efficiencies. However, although such doping has been almost ubiquitous since the development of this processing route over 25 years ago, CdCl2 has two severe disadvantages; it is both expensive (about 30 cents per gram) and a water-soluble source of toxic cadmium ions, presenting a risk to both operators and the environment during manufacture. Here we demonstrate that solar cells prepared using MgCl2, which is non-toxic and costs less than a cent per gram, have efficiencies (around 13%) identical to those of a CdCl2-processed control group. They have similar hole densities in the active layer (9 × 10(14) cm(-3)) and comparable impurity profiles for Cl and O, these elements being important p-type dopants for CdTe thin films. Contrary to expectation, CdCl2-processed and MgCl2-processed solar cells contain similar concentrations of Mg; this is because of Mg out-diffusion from the soda-lime glass substrates and is not disadvantageous to device performance. However, treatment with other low-cost chlorides such as NaCl, KCl and MnCl2 leads to the introduction of electrically active impurities that do compromise device performance. Our results demonstrate that CdCl2 may simply be replaced directly with MgCl2 in the existing fabrication process, thus both minimizing the environmental risk and reducing the cost of CdTe solar-cell production. PMID:25030171

Major, J D; Treharne, R E; Phillips, L J; Durose, K

2014-07-17

55

Prevalence of macroprolactinaemia in regularly menstruating women with non-toxic goitre or autoimmune thyroid disease  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The so called “big-big” prolactin (Prl, also known as macroprolactin is formed by Prl-immunoglobulin (Prl-IgG complexes and may cause elevation of serum Prl concentrations measured by standard assays, potentially leading to unnecessary investigations and/or treatment. In our study, we have endeavoured to assess the prevalence of macroprolactinaemia in euthyroid, regularly menstruating women with thyroid disease, as well as to assess whether autoimmune thyroid disease may result in an increased prevalence of macroprolactinaemia. Material and methods We measured serum Prl in 182 regularly menstruating women aged 32.7?±?7.5 years (mean?±?SD, range 17–46 years who attended endocrine clinic either for investigation of non-toxic goitre (n?=?86, age 33.2?±?7.8 years or with autoimmune thyroid disease (n?=?96, age 32.3?±?7.2 years. Autoimmune thyroid disease was defined as raised titre of at least one anti-thyroid antibody [anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg and/or anti-TSH-receptor (anti-TSH-R antibodies]. All women were clinically and biochemically euthyroid, either without or on treatment with L-thyroxine. In those with raised Prl (i.e., above 530 mIU/l we ruled out the presence of macroprolactinaemia by polyethylene glycol (PEG precipitation method. Results There was no significant age difference between women with and without autoimmune thyroid disease (p?=?0.84. Raised Prl concentrations were found in 10 women with thyroid disease (5.5%, and of those a significant macroprolactinaemia (i.e., reduction of Prl concentrations of more than 60% after PEG precipitation was found in 9 subjects (4.94%. There were no differences in the prevalence of macroprolactinaemia between women with autoimmune thyroid disease (4 out of 96, and without autoimmune thyroid disease (5 out of 86, p?=?0.75. Conclusions Approximately one out of twenty women with regular menses is likely to have raised serum Prl that is usually caused by the presence of macroprolactinaemia. Though structure of macroprolactin involves Prl-IgG complexes, there is no evidence that autoimmune thyroid disease is associated with raised prevalence of macroprolactinaemia.

Lewandowski Krzysztof C

2012-12-01

56

A non-toxic ligand for voxel-based MRI analysis of plaques in AD transgenic mice  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Amyloid plaques are a characteristic feature in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A novel non-toxic contrast agent is presented, Gd-DTPA-K6A?1–30, which is homologous to A?, and allows plaque detection in vivo. ?MRI was performed on AD model mice and controls prior to and following intra-carotid injection with Gd-DTPA-K6A?1–30 in mannitol solution, to transiently open the blood brain barrier. A gradient echo T2*-weighted sequence was used to provide 100 ?m isotropic resolution with imaging...

Sigurdsson, Einar M.; Wadghiri, Youssef Z.; Mosconi, Lisa; Blind, Jeffrey A.; Knudsen, Elin; Asuni, Ayodeji; Scholtzova, Henrieta; Tsui, Wai H.; Li, Yongsheng; Sadowski, Martin; Turnbull, Daniel H.; Leon, Mony J.; Wisniewski, Thomas

2008-01-01

57

The amino-acid sequence of two non-toxic mutants of diphtheria toxin: CRM45 and CRM197.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The amino-acid sequences of two diphtheria toxin-related, non-toxic proteins, CRM45 and CRM197 , were deduced from the complete sequence of their genes: tox 45 and tox 197. CRM45 lacks the last 149 C-terminal amino-acid residues, but is otherwise identical to diphtheria toxin: a single C----T transition introduces an "ochre" (TAA) termination signal in tox 45, after the codon for threonine-386. A single G----A transition was also found in tox 197, leading to the substitution of glycine-52, pr...

Giannini, G.; Rappuoli, R.; Ratti, G.

1984-01-01

58

Naphthoquinone-mediated inhibition of lysine acetyltransferase KAT3B/p300, basis for non-toxic inhibitor synthesis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Hydroxynaphthoquinone-based inhibitors of the lysine acetyltransferase KAT3B (p300), such as plumbagin, are relatively toxic. Here, we report that free thiol reactivity and redox cycling properties greatly contribute to the toxicity of plumbagin. A reactive 3rd position in the naphthoquinone derivatives is essential for thiol reactivity and enhances redox cycling. Using this clue, we synthesized PTK1, harboring a methyl substitution at the 3rd position of plumbagin. This molecule loses its thiol reactivity completely and its redox cycling ability to a lesser extent. Mechanistically, non-competitive, reversible binding of the inhibitor to the lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) domain of p300 is largely responsible for the acetyltransferase inhibition. Remarkably, the modified inhibitor PTK1 was a nearly non-toxic inhibitor of p300. The present report elucidates the mechanism of acetyltransferase activity inhibition by 1,4-naphthoquinones, which involves redox cycling and nucleophilic adduct formation, and it suggests possible routes of synthesis of the non-toxic inhibitor. PMID:24469461

Vasudevarao, Mohankrishna Dalvoy; Mizar, Pushpak; Kumari, Sujata; Mandal, Somnath; Siddhanta, Soumik; Swamy, Mahadeva M M; Kaypee, Stephanie; Kodihalli, Ravindra C; Banerjee, Amrita; Naryana, Chandrabhas; Dasgupta, Dipak; Kundu, Tapas K

2014-03-14

59

Synthesis of Boron Nanorods by Smelting Non-Toxic Boron Oxide in Liquid Lithium  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In contrast to the conventional bottom-up syntheses of boron nanostructures, a unique top-down and greener synthetic strategy is presented for boron nanorods involving nontoxic boron oxide powders ultrasonically smelted in liquid lithium under milder conditions. The product was thoroughly characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, atomic emission spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and, UV-Vis spectroscopy, including structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy...

2010-01-01

60

[Peculiar features of the clinical and metabolic status and its variations under the influence of rehabilitative treatment in the children with obesity and diffuse non-toxic goiter].  

Science.gov (United States)

A total of 120 children at the age of 10-15 years presenting with class I-II obesity were available for observation. Fifty two of them suffered diffuse non-toxic goiter. The combination of obesity and diffuse non-toxic goiter was associated with excessive body weight, insulin resistance, disturbances of lipid metabolism, and impaired tolerance of physical exercises. Differential therapeutic complexes have been proposed for the treatment of the children with diffuse nontoxic goiter. Their application was shown to induce positive dynamics of clinical conditions and laboratory characteristics of the patients. PMID:22693739

Stepanenko, N P; Kondrat'eva, E I; Cherepanova, N N; Barabash, L V; Dostovalova, O V; Shakhova, S S

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

Polymer solar cells - Non toxic processing and stable polymer photovoltaic materials  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The field of polymer solar cell has experienced enormous progress in the previous years, with efficiencies of small scale devices (approx1 mm2) now exceeding 8%. However, if the polymer solar cell is to achieve success as a renewable energy resource, mass production of sufficiently stable and efficient cell must be achieved. For a continuous success it is therefore essential to transfer the accomplishments from the laboratory to large scale facilities for actual production. In order to do so, several issues have to be approached. Among these are more environmentally friendly processing and development of more stable materials. The field of polymer solar cells has evolved around the use of toxic and carcinogenic solvents like chloroform, benzene, toluene, chlorobenzene, dichlorobenzene and xylene. As large scale production of organic solar cells is envisaged to production volumes corresponding to several GW{sub peek}, this is not a suitable approach from neither a production nor environmental point of view. As a consequence new materials, which can be processed from more environmentally friendly solvents (preferably water), need to be developed. In this thesis, the issue has been approached through synthesis of polymers carrying water coordinating side chains which allow for processing from semi-aqueous solution. A series of different side chains were synthesized and incorporated into the final polymers as thermocleavable tertiary esters. Using a cleavable side chain induces stability to solar cells as it slows down diffusion though the active layer, but just as important it renders the layer insoluble. This allows for further processing, using the same solvent, without dissolving already processed layers, and resulted in the first ever reported solar cells where all layers are processed from aqueous or semi-aqueous solution. As previously mentioned many advantages can be achieved by use of thermocleavable materials. Unfortunately the cleavage temperatures are too high to allow processing on flexible substrates like PET. As a final result, the reduction in cleavage temperature of thermocleavable thiophene polymers with ester side chains, through acid catalysis have been examined. The study shows that substantial lowering of the temperatures can be obtained for tertiary, secondary and primary esters, but further research needs to be performed in order to transfer the reaction to solar cells. From a stability point of view, the current state of the art polymers are not stable enough to be processed by large area processing methods like roll-to-roll (R2R) coating techniques, as this has to be performed in air. This calls for the development of new materials, which can endure such processing conditions, and in this context it would be preferable to have a guideline towards which properties of a polymer that either induces stability or causes it to degrade. As part of a larger study, aiming at mapping the relative stability influence of different donors and acceptors in low-band-gap polymers, four polymers were synthesized for examination of their photochemical stabilities. Two of these were furthermore optimized for R2R processing and were tested together with other cells, in an outdoor study involving 8 countries. Panels containing the cells encapsulated in polyurethane were manufactured, measured and installed by travelling between the different locations. Following 4 1/2 months outdoor exposure the trip was done again in order to dismount the panels for shipment back to Denmark, where final characterization was made. The use of polyurethane for encapsulation showed improved conservations of the cells compared to previous studies. (Author)

Soendergaard, R.

2012-07-01

62

Polymer Solar Cells â?? Non Toxic Processing and Stable Polymer Photovoltaic Materials  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The field of polymer solar cell has experienced enormous progress in the previous years, with efficiencies of small scale devices (~1 mm2) now exceeding 8%. However, if the polymer solar cell is to achieve success as a renewable energy resource, mass production of sufficiently stable and efficient cell must be achieved. For a continuous success it is therefore essential to transfer the accomplishments from the laboratory to large scale facilities for actual production. In order to do so, several issues have to be approached. Among these are more environmentally friendly processing and development of more stable materials. The field of polymer solar cells has evolved around the use of toxic and carcinogenic solvents like chloroform, benzene, toluene, chlorobenzene, dichlorobenzene and xylene. As large scale production of organic solar cells is envisaged to production volumes corresponding to several GWpeek, this is not a suitable approach from neither a production nor environmental point of view. As a consequence new materials, which can be processed from more environmentally friendly solvents (preferably water), need to be developed. In this thesis, the issue has been approached through synthesis of polymers carrying water coordinating side chains which allow for processing from semi-aqueous solution. A series of different side chains were synthesized and incorporated into the final polymers as thermocleavable tertiary esters. Using a cleavable side chain induces stability to solar cells as it slows down diffusion though the active layer, but just as important it renders the layer insoluble. This allows for further processing, using the same solvent, without dissolving already processed layers, and resulted in the first ever reported solar cells where all layers are processed from aqueous or semi-aqueous solution. As previously mentioned many advantages can be achieved by use of thermocleavable materials. Unfortunately the cleavage temperatures are too high to allow processing on flexible substrates like PET.As a final result, the reduction in cleavage temperature of thermocleavable thiophene polymers with ester side chains, through acid catalysis have been examined. The study shows that substantial lowering of the temperatures can be obtained for tertiary, secondary and primary esters, but further research needs to be performed in order to transfer the reaction to solar cells. From a stability point of view, the current state of the art polymers are not stable enough to be processed by large area processing methods like roll-to-roll (R2R) coating techniques, as this has to be performed in air. This calls for the development of new materials, which can endure such processing conditions, and in this context it would be preferable to have a guideline towards which properties of a polymer that either induces stability or causes it to degrade. As part of a larger study, aiming at mapping the relative stability influence of different donors and acceptors in low-band-gap polymers, four polymers were synthesized for examination of their photochemical stabilities. Two of these were furthermore optimized for R2R processing and were tested together with other cells, in an outdoor study involving 8 countries. Panels containing the cells encapsulated in polyurethane were manufactured, measured and installed by travelling between the different locations. Following 4½ months outdoor exposure the trip was done again in order to dismount the panels for shipment back to Denmark, where final characterization was made. The use of polyurethane for encapsulation showed improved conservations of the cells compared to previous studies.

Søndergaard, Roar

2012-01-01

63

Inorganic carbon acquisition in potentially toxic and non-toxic diatoms: the effect of pH-induced changes in the seawater carbonate chemistry.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The effects of pH-induced changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on inorganic carbon (C-i) acquisition and domoic acid (DA) production were studied in two potentially toxic diatom species, Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Nitzschia navis-varingica, and the non-toxic Stellarima stellaris. In vivo activities of carbonic anhydrase (CA), photosynthetic O-2 evolution and CO2 and HCO3- uptake rates were measured by membrane inlet MS in cells acclimated to low (7.9) and high pH (8.4 or 8.9). Species-specific differences in the mode of carbon acquisition were found. While extracellular carbonic anhydrase (eCA) activities increased with pH in P. multiseries and S. stellaris, N. navis-varingica exhibited low eCA activities independent of pH. Half-saturation concentrations (K-1/2) for photosynthetic O-2 evolution, which were highest in S. stellaris and lowest in P. multiseries, generally decreased with increasing pH. In terms of carbon source, all species took up both CO2 and HCO3-. K-1/2 values for inorganic carbon uptake decreased with increasing pH in two species, while in N. navis-varingica apparent affinities did not change. While the contribution of HCO3- to net fixation was more than 85% in S. stellaris, it was about 55% in P. multiseries and only approximately 30% in N. navis-varingica. The intracellular content of DA increased in P. multiseries and N. navis-varingica with increasing pH. Based on our data, we propose a novel role for eCA acting as C-i-recycling mechanism. With regard to pH-dependence of growth, the 'HCO3- user' S. stellaris was as sensitive as the 'CO2 user' N. navis-varingica. The suggested relationship between DA and carbon acquisition/C-i limitation could not be confirmed.

Trimborn, S; Lundholm, Nina

2008-01-01

64

Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging  

Science.gov (United States)

Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au25 clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au+ ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of ~5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f7/2~83.97 eV and Au 4f5/2~87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size ~1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size ~8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at ~674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 µg ml-1. Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR+ve oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au25 clusters were found internalized in significantly higher concentrations compared to the negative control cell lines. This study demonstrates the potential of using non-toxic fluorescent Au nanoclusters for the targeted imaging of cancer.

Retnakumari, Archana; Setua, Sonali; Menon, Deepthy; Ravindran, Prasanth; Muhammed, Habeeb; Pradeep, Thalappil; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

2010-02-01

65

Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au25 clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au+ ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of ?5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f7/2?83.97 eV and Au 4f5/2?87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size ?1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size ?8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at ?674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 ?g ml-1. Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR+ve oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au25 clusters were found internalized in significantly higher concentrations compared to the negative control cell lines. This study demonstrates the potential of using non-toxic fluorescent Au nanoclusters for the targeted imaging of cancer.

2010-02-05

66

Emulsifying activity and stability of a non-toxic bioemulsifier synthesized by Microbacterium sp. MC3B-10.  

Science.gov (United States)

A previously reported bacterial bioemulsifier, here termed microbactan, was further analyzed to characterize its lipid component, molecular weight, ionic character and toxicity, along with its bioemulsifying potential for hydrophobic substrates at a range of temperatures, salinities and pH values. Analyses showed that microbactan is a high molecular weight (700 kDa), non-ionic molecule. Gas chromatography of the lipid fraction revealed the presence of palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids; thus microbactan may be considered a glycolipoprotein. Microbactan emulsified aromatic hydrocarbons and oils to various extents; the highest emulsification index was recorded against motor oil (96%). The stability of the microbactan-motor oil emulsion model reached its highest level (94%) at 50 °C, pH 10 and 3.5% NaCl content. It was not toxic to Artemia salina nauplii. Microbactan is, therefore, a non-toxic and non-ionic bioemulsifier of high molecular weight with affinity for a range of oily substrates. Comparative phylogenetic assessment of the 16S rDNA gene of Microbacterium sp. MC3B-10 with genes derived from other marine Microbacterium species suggested that this genus is well represented in coastal zones. The chemical nature and stability of the bioemulsifier suggest its potential application in bioremediation of marine environments and in cosmetics. PMID:24065097

Camacho-Chab, Juan Carlos; Guézennec, Jean; Chan-Bacab, Manuel Jesús; Ríos-Leal, Elvira; Sinquin, Corinne; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; De la Rosa-García, Susana del C; Reyes-Estebanez, Manuela; Ortega-Morales, Benjamín Otto

2013-01-01

67

Emulsifying Activity and Stability of a Non-Toxic Bioemulsifier Synthesized by Microbacterium sp. MC3B-10  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A previously reported bacterial bioemulsifier, here termed microbactan, was further analyzed to characterize its lipid component, molecular weight, ionic character and toxicity, along with its bioemulsifying potential for hydrophobic substrates at a range of temperatures, salinities and pH values. Analyses showed that microbactan is a high molecular weight (700 kDa, non-ionic molecule. Gas chromatography of the lipid fraction revealed the presence of palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids; thus microbactan may be considered a glycolipoprotein. Microbactan emulsified aromatic hydrocarbons and oils to various extents; the highest emulsification index was recorded against motor oil (96%. The stability of the microbactan-motor oil emulsion model reached its highest level (94% at 50 °C, pH 10 and 3.5% NaCl content. It was not toxic to Artemia salina nauplii. Microbactan is, therefore, a non-toxic and non-ionic bioemulsifier of high molecular weight with affinity for a range of oily substrates. Comparative phylogenetic assessment of the 16S rDNA gene of Microbacterium sp. MC3B-10 with genes derived from other marine Microbacterium species suggested that this genus is well represented in coastal zones. The chemical nature and stability of the bioemulsifier suggest its potential application in bioremediation of marine environments and in cosmetics.

Benjamín Otto Ortega-Morales

2013-09-01

68

Effects of diuretics on iodine uptake in non-toxic goitre: comparison with low-iodine diet  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Low-iodine diet has been employed to achieve iodine depletion prior to radioiodine (RI) therapy. However, treatment with diuretics may be more effective than low-iodine diet in causing iodine depletion and subsequent increase in RI uptake by the thyroid. Fifty-five patients with non-toxic goitre were given 0.20 MBq RI p.o. on the first day of the study and thyroid uptake was measured. In 15 patients, a low-iodine diet was started and continued for 14 days. The remaining 40 patients received furosemide 40 mg/day orally for 5 days with an unrestricted diet. On the 15th day of the study, all patients were given 0.20 MBq RI p.o. and thyroid RI uptake was measured again. Additionally, 24-h urinary iodine excretion and RI clearance were measured on the 1st and 6th days in 21 patients from the furosemide group and on the 1st and 15th days in eight patients from the diet group. Furosemide administration led to a 58.40% increase in iodine uptake over the baseline value, which was significantly higher than the increase caused by low-iodine diet (17.22%) (P<0.0001). Urinary excretion of RI decreased in both groups similarly (furosemide, 29.45%; low-iodine diet, 21.06%; P=0.33). Iodine clearance also decreased in each group similarly (10.61% vs 7.53%, P=0.53). Treatment with furosemide prior to administration of RI increases the uptake of RI by the thyroid more effectively than does low-iodine diet. (orig.)

Kapucu, L.Ozlem; Azizoglu, Firat [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey); Ayvaz, Goksun; Karakoc, Ayhan [Department of Endocrinology, Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey)

2003-09-01

69

Start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism in toxic and non-toxic accessions of Jatropha curcas L. and development of a codominant SCAR marker.  

Science.gov (United States)

Thirty six start codon targeted (SCoT) primers were used for characterization of 48 accessions of Jatropha curcas from different countries and include material with genetic variation for levels of phorbol esters, yield, seed oil content, test weight and plant type. SCoT analysis revealed high polymorphism and 74% of the primers generated polymorphic profiles. The SCoT6 primer discriminated edible and toxic accessions in a single reaction while the SCoT26 and 27 primers produced amplicons specific to toxic and non-toxic accessions, respectively. The polymorphic SCoT markers obtained with these three primers were converted to sequence characterized amplicon regions (SCARs) which resulted in codominant SCARs with SCoT6 primer and dominant SCARs with SCoT 26 and 27 primers. The codominant nature of SCoT6 primer and the resultant SCAR6 primer were validated on intraspecific hybrids derived from a cross between non-toxic and toxic accessions. The accession JP38 from Madagascar was found to be distinct and showed accession specific bands with 9 different SCoT primers. Sequence analysis of polymorphic amplicons obtained with SCoT6 primer showed a 65 bp deletion in accessions with low/zero phorbol esters. Diversity analysis separated the toxic and non-toxic accessions into two groups and the accessions JP29 and JP48 from Mexico formed a third cluster. PMID:23602106

Mulpuri, Sujatha; Muddanuru, Tarakeswari; Francis, George

2013-06-01

70

GIS-modelling the distribution of Rattus norvegicus in urban areas using non toxic attractive baits  

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Full Text Available Abstract GIS supplies a useful way for analysing and modelling spatial distribution of brown rats Rattus norvegicus in urban areas, supplying maps that predict the occurrence of rats over larger areas. However, two alternative procedures can be used: landscape-based models, which use habitat variables derived from remote sensing satellites or other thematic maps, and interpolation techniques, which convert point samples of species abundance. The first procedure has been previously applied, while the second has never been used until now. In this study, we valued the effectiveness of the interpolating procedure by modelling the distribution of brown rats in a large urban area of northern Italy. During spring and autumn 2004, we positioned non toxic baits in 119 spots distributed over the whole urbanized area of the city and we generated maps of rat presence/absence for the two seasons. Brown rats were irregularly scattered over the city and concentrated mainly around rivers and ditches, as well in the historic centre, particularly where buildings suffer poor maintenance. Seasonal variation of rat occurrence was also detected. Brown rat occurrence may be reliably predicted by the interpolation procedure, which appeared to be a more efficient approach to rat distribution modelling compared with landscape-based procedures. Riassunto Modelli GIS della distribuzione di Rattus norvegicus in ambiente urbano con utilizzo di esche non tossiche. I programmi GIS rappresentano un utile strumento per analizzare e modellizzare la distribuzione del ratto delle chiaviche Rattus norvegicus nelle aree urbane, fornendo mappe in grado di predire la presenza di questa specie su vaste aree. A questo scopo possono essere impiegate due procedure alternative: i modelli basati sul paesaggio, che utilizzano le caratteristiche ambientali desunte da mappe tematiche o immagini satellitari oppure ii tecniche di interpolazione che convertono insiemi di punti di presenza accertata in stime di abbondanza. Il primo approccio è già stato utilizzato, mentre il secondo non ci risulta essere ancora stato applicato nella gestione del ratto delle chiaviche. In questo studio è valutata l’efficacia del metodo di interpolazione nel predire la distribuzione di questo roditore in una grande area urbana del nord Italia. Nel corso della primavera e dell’autunno 2004, sono state posizionate esche non tossiche in 119 punti distribuiti sull’intera area urbana. I dati così raccolti sono stati utilizzati per generare mappe di presenza/assenza della specie nelle due stagioni di indagine. I ratti delle chiaviche sono risultati irregolarmente distribuiti in città e concentrati principalmente lungo i corsi d’acqua e nel centro storico soprattutto in presenza di edifici soggetti a scarsa manutenzione. Nel corso dell’indagine sono emerse differenze nella distribuzione fra le due stagioni di ricerca. La presenza del ratto delle chiaviche può effettivamente essere predetta mediante il processo di interpolazione: questo metodo risulta essere più efficiente rispetto a quello basato sull’analisi delle sole caratteristiche ambientali.

Roberto Sacchi

2008-07-01

71

Study of 99mTc Pertechnetate Radiopharmaceuticals in Relation to Thyroid Hormone for Toxic and non-Toxic Diffuse Goiter  

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Full Text Available Abnormalities of the thyroid gland in the form of enlargement of the thyroid gland are called a goiter. Goiter is divided into two types, namely toxic and non-toxic diffuse goiter. Diagnosis could be done with thyroid scan (in vivo and test for thyroid hormone value (in vitro. Thyroid scan is applied by giving injection of 99mTc Pertechnetate as much as 2 - 5 mCi intravenally in the arm and then thyroid gland and salivary glands imaging were conducted in the fifth minute, tenth minute and fifteenth minute using gamma camera. Thyroid hormones test in blood is done with radioimmunoassay method. The same pattern showed the accumulation polad of the radioactive number from quotation of salivary glands. The accumulation percentage activity of 99mTc Pertechnetate in thyroid gland for the case of toxic diffuse goiter is larger than the case of non-toxic diffuse goiter. The results of this study indicate that the predictors for the case of toxic diffuse goiter could be characterized by high thyroid uptake which the the value of T3 hormone 3.3 ng/dl, the value of T4 hormone 165 nmol/l, and the value of TSH hormone 0.2 ?IU/ml. While the case of non-toxic diffuse goiter could be characterized by low thyroid uptake which the value of T3 hormone 1.2 ng/dl, the value of T4 hormone 90 nmol/l, and the value of TSH hormone 1.8 ?IU/ml

N.P. Viantri

2012-04-01

72

Visualization and enrichment of live putative cancer stem cell populations following p53 inactivation or Bax deletion using non-toxic fluorescent dyes  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Putative cancer stem cell (CSC) populations efflux dyes such as Hoechst 33342 giving rise to side populations (SP) that can be analyzed or isolated by flow cytometry. However, Hoechst 33342 is highly toxic, more so to non-SP cells, and thus presents difficulties in interpreting in vivo studies where non-SP cells appear less tumorigenic than SP cells in immunodeficient mice. We searched for non-toxic dyes to circumvent this problem as well as to image these putative CSCs. We found that the flu...

2009-01-01

73

Evaluation of suitability of non-toxic and detoxified Jatropha curcas L. meal as feed for fingerling common carp, Cyprinus carpio L., with reference to phytase application  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Jatropha curcas L. is a hardy plant which can thrive on marginal degraded lands. Jatropha seeds contain about 300-350g kg-1 oil, which is used as fuel or in transesterified form as a substitute for diesel; they also have considerable protein quality. However, Jatropha contains antinutrients such as lectins, trypsin inhibitors and phytic acids at high levels and in toxic varities phorbolesters cause detrimental effect. Common carp fed heat-treated non-toxic Jatropha meal (JM) has been shown to...

Richter, Nahid

2012-01-01

74

Evolution of autonomy in idiopathic non-toxic goiter, evaluated by regional suppressibility of sup(99m)Tc-uptake and TSH response to TRH  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Seventeen euthyroid patients with non-toxic goiter were studied, 7 had diffuse goiters and 10 had nodular goiters. The TSH response to TRH and the sup(99m)Tc-uptake were measured before and after T3 suppression. The uptake, measured with a gamma camera, was calculated for the whole gland and for a maximum of 6 regions within the thyroid gland. The suppressibility of sup(99m)Tc-uptake (percent change of uptake) ranged from 0 to 95%, it was significantly greater in patients with diffuse than in those with nodular goiters, and was alike in nodular and internodular tissue. The patients with diffuse goiter were significantly younger than those with nodular goiter. Abolished TSH response to TRH was seen in 2 patients with negative T3 suppression tests. In another 2 patients impaired TSH response was associated with impaired suppressibility. In 13 patients with normal TRH tests, the suppression of uptake was normal in 8 subnormal in 5. The results suggest that nodularity and functional autonomy may develop in non-toxic goiters. In some of these goiters the mass of autonomous tissue may be large enough to cause negative TRH tests, probably indicating hypersecretion of thyroid hormones, although not necessarily above the normal range. (orig.)

1976-08-01

75

Bacillus subtilis natto: a non-toxic source of poly-?-glutamic acid that could be used as a cryoprotectant for probiotic bacteria  

Science.gov (United States)

It is common practice to freeze dry probiotic bacteria to improve their shelf life. However, the freeze drying process itself can be detrimental to their viability. The viability of probiotics could be maintained if they are administered within a microbially produced biodegradable polymer - poly-?-glutamic acid (?-PGA) - matrix. Although the antifreeze activity of ?-PGA is well known, it has not been used for maintaining the viability of probiotic bacteria during freeze drying. The aim of this study was to test the effect of ?-PGA (produced by B. subtilis natto ATCC 15245) on the viability of probiotic bacteria during freeze drying and to test the toxigenic potential of B. subtilis natto. 10% ?-PGA was found to protect Lactobacillus paracasei significantly better than 10% sucrose, whereas it showed comparable cryoprotectant activity to sucrose when it was used to protect Bifidobacterium breve and Bifidobacterium longum. Although ?-PGA is known to be non-toxic, it is crucial to ascertain the toxigenic potential of its source, B. subtilis natto. Presence of six genes that are known to encode for toxins were investigated: three component hemolysin (hbl D/A), three component non-haemolytic enterotoxin (nheB), B. cereus enterotoxin T (bceT), enterotoxin FM (entFM), sphingomyelinase (sph) and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase (piplc). From our investigations, none of these six genes were present in B. subtilis natto. Moreover, haemolytic and lecithinase activities were found to be absent. Our work contributes a biodegradable polymer from a non-toxic source for the cryoprotection of probiotic bacteria, thus improving their survival during the manufacturing process.

2013-01-01

76

Bacillus subtilis natto: a non-toxic source of poly-?-glutamic acid that could be used as a cryoprotectant for probiotic bacteria.  

Science.gov (United States)

It is common practice to freeze dry probiotic bacteria to improve their shelf life. However, the freeze drying process itself can be detrimental to their viability. The viability of probiotics could be maintained if they are administered within a microbially produced biodegradable polymer - poly-?-glutamic acid (?-PGA) - matrix. Although the antifreeze activity of ?-PGA is well known, it has not been used for maintaining the viability of probiotic bacteria during freeze drying. The aim of this study was to test the effect of ?-PGA (produced by B. subtilis natto ATCC 15245) on the viability of probiotic bacteria during freeze drying and to test the toxigenic potential of B. subtilis natto. 10% ?-PGA was found to protect Lactobacillus paracasei significantly better than 10% sucrose, whereas it showed comparable cryoprotectant activity to sucrose when it was used to protect Bifidobacterium breve and Bifidobacterium longum. Although ?-PGA is known to be non-toxic, it is crucial to ascertain the toxigenic potential of its source, B. subtilis natto. Presence of six genes that are known to encode for toxins were investigated: three component hemolysin (hbl D/A), three component non-haemolytic enterotoxin (nheB), B. cereus enterotoxin T (bceT), enterotoxin FM (entFM), sphingomyelinase (sph) and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase (piplc). From our investigations, none of these six genes were present in B. subtilis natto. Moreover, haemolytic and lecithinase activities were found to be absent. Our work contributes a biodegradable polymer from a non-toxic source for the cryoprotection of probiotic bacteria, thus improving their survival during the manufacturing process. PMID:23829836

Bhat, Aditya R; Irorere, Victor U; Bartlett, Terry; Hill, David; Kedia, Gopal; Morris, Mark R; Charalampopoulos, Dimitris; Radecka, Iza

2013-01-01

77

N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase overexpression increases alkylation sensitivity by rapidly removing non-toxic 7-methylguanine adducts  

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Previous studies indicate that overexpression of N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG) dramatically sensitizes cells to alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity. We recently demonstrated that this sensitivity is preceded by an increased production of AP sites and strand breaks, confirming that overexpression of MPG disrupts normal base excision repair and causes cell death through overproduction of toxic repair intermediates. Here we establish through site-directed mutagenesis that MPG-induced se...

Rinne, M. L.; He, Y.; Pachkowski, B. F.; Nakamura, J.; Kelley, M. R.

2005-01-01

78

Phototransformations of non-toxic antioxidants, the derivatives of 1,2-dihydroquinolines, in homogeneous and micellar solutions  

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Full Text Available Reactions of transient species photogenerated from 6-R-2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinolines (TMDQ are very sensitive to medium variation. In anhydrous organic solvents, aminyl radicals were generated. They decay in the reaction of dimerization with the second-order rate constant decreasing in a row heptane>benzene>2-propanol. When passing from organic solvents to water, methanol, and water-alcohol solutions, the kinetics and the direction of the reaction crucially change. As a result of the photolysis, the product of the addition of a solvent to the double bond of heterocycle, 4-hydroxy- or 4-methoxy-6-R-2,2,4- tetramethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline is formed in water and methanol, respectively. The transformation is a complex reaction, and the formation of excited transient species is followed by a sequence of first-order and pseudo-first-order reactions. Unlike the photolysis in anhydrous organic solvents, the reaction in water and methanol does not involve aminyl radicals. In aqueous solutions, the first-order rate constants for the decay of transient species are higher in acidic and neutral solutions. At the pH close to pKa of the transient species, it drops, indicating that the neutral form is less reactive. The same product is formed over the whole range of pH. For the anionic surfactant (SDS in acidic and alkaline solutions, the apparent rate constant in the micellar solutions is lower than that in the aqueous (negative micellar catalysis. At the medium pH, a positive micellar catalysis is observed, and the rate constant of the decay depends linearly on the concentration of TMDQ in the micelles, indicative of the direct reaction between TMDQ and the cationic transient species.

T. D. Nekipelova

1999-01-01

79

LOS oligosaccharide modification enhances dendritic cell responses to meningococcal native outer membrane vesicles expressing a non-toxic lipid A.  

Science.gov (United States)

Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are released by many bacteria, and contain immunogenic antigens in addition to harmful inflammatory factors, like lipopolysaccharides. Chemically detoxified OMV have been used in vaccines against Neisseria meningitidis (Nm); however, little is known about their interaction with antigen presenting cells. In this study, we investigated the interaction of Nm OMV with human dendritic cells (DC) to gain further understanding of their biological activity. We engineered a novel serogroup B Nm that is unencapsulated (siaD), expresses pentacylated lipid A (lpxL1), hence conferring reduced toxicity, and expresses an lgtB oligosaccharide structure designed to target OMV to DC via DC-SIGN. We show that the lgtB moiety is critical for internalization of NOMV by DC. Furthermore, the lgtB moiety significantly enhances DC maturation, IL-10 and IL-23 production in the presence of a pentacylated lipid A. While different DC phenotypes were observed for each NOMV, this had little effect on Th1 and Th2 cell differentiation; however, lgtBsignificantly increased Th17 cell expansion in the presence of pentacylated lipid A. We believe that lpxL1/lgtB NOMV should be considered further as a vaccine vector, particularly considering the importance of lgtB in antigen uptake and further human studies on antigen-specific responses should be considered. PMID:24152255

Jones, Hannah E; Copland, Alastair; Hamstra, Hendrik Jan; Cohen, Jonathan; Brown, Jeremy; Klein, Nigel; van der Ley, Peter; Dixon, Garth

2014-04-01

80

A non-toxic reusable on-board propulsion system for orbiter upgrade and the human exploration and development of space  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A non-toxic on-board propulsion system for the Space Shuttle orbiter promises high payoffs in terms of safety, cost, reliability, reduced ground operations, and improved mission flexibility. Significant cost savings and safety enhancements can be realized by eliminating toxic propellant handling from the orbiter processing flow, including elimination of SCAPE suit operations, relaxing leakage concerns, and reducing propellant cost. Mission reliability and safety can be enhanced by reducing the number of critical components that must operate, while maintaining the same fault tolerance as the current propulsion systems. Mission flexibility and management of propellant reserves can be improved by combining the propellant storage and pressurization systems for the orbital maneuvering system (OMS) and the reaction control system (RCS). The reduction and automation of checkout requirements for the upgraded propulsion system can enhance operational ease and reduce the turnaround cost. System integration with the environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) and the power system may save additional turnaround costs by sharing common components such as the storage tanks. Finally, there can be commonality of this technology with Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) missions that utilize oxygen produced from in-situ planetary resources. This is a major advancement in the state-of-the-art. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Hurlbert, E.; Moreland, R. [Propulsion and Power Division---EP4 NASA/Johnson Space Center 2101 Nasa Road One Houston, Texas77058 (United States)

1997-01-01

 
 
 
 
81

Aislamiento y patogenicidad de un posible Pythium aphanidermatum en Jatropha Curcas L. no tóxica / Isolation and pathogenicity of a possible Pythium aphanidermatum in Jatropha Curcas L. non toxic  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Mexico | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Un cromista, posible Pythium aphanidermatum, fue aislado de semillas y plántulas recién emergidas de semillas de Jatropha curcas L. no tóxica severamente dañadas sembradas en la región tropical de Veracruz, México. Para estudiar su efecto sobre las etapas de pre y post-emergencia, el patógeno aislad [...] o fue inoculado en semillas y plántulas de reciente emergencia. Se corroboró un cierto potencial patogénico en la etapa de pre-emergencia, que no fue estadísticamente significativo en la etapa post-emergente a mediano plazo. Abstract in english A chromista, possible Pythium aphanidermatum, was isolated from severely damage seeds and seedlings recently started from Jatropha curcas L. non toxic seeds sown in the tropical area of Veracruz, Mexico. In order to study pathogenic Pythium aphanidermatum effects over pre-emergent and post-emergent [...] stages, seeds and young seedlings were inoculated with the isolated pathogen, and the chromista showed possible pathogenic activity against pre-emergency and recently started post-emergency; however, statistically significant damaged was not found in older seedlings.

Valdés Rodríguez, Ofelia Andrea; García Espinoza, Roberto; Sánchez Sánchez, Odilón; Pérez Vazquez, Arturo.

82

Radiolytic formation of non-toxic Cr(III) from toxic Cr(VI) in formate containing aqueous solutions: A system for water treatment  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr(VI) is radiolytically reduced to Cr(III) in presence formate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduction is pH, dose rate dependent. A mechanism is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr(VI) recovers when all the formate is consumed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Irradiation of wastewater can remove Cr(VI). - Abstract: Toxic hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in the form of potassium dichromate was radiolytically reduced to non-toxic trivalent chromium Cr(III) in N{sub 2}O-saturated aqueous solutions containing formate. This reduction by the electron donor (CO{sub 2}H{center_dot}/CO{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -}) produced by continuous radiolysis of water, was a linear function of the absorbed dose. This reaction was pH and dose rate dependent. pH was an important parameter in the reduction, as it affects both chemical speciation of Cr(VI) and formate. Possible mechanisms related to dose rate dependence of removal of Cr(VI) are presented. At pH 3 a decrease in the radiation induced reduction of Cr(VI) was observed with increasing hydrogen peroxide concentration. A mechanism to account for this variation is proposed. These findings suggest that irradiation of Cr(VI) solutions in presence of formate can be effective, economical and simple means for treatment of waste water contaminated with hexavalent Cr(VI).

Djouider, Fathi, E-mail: fdjouider@kau.edu.sa [Nuclear Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80204, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

2012-07-15

83

Radioiodine therapy in non-toxic multinodular goitre. The possibility of effect-amplification with recombinant human TSH (rhTSH)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

There is no consensus regarding the optimum treatment of benign non-toxic goitre. L-thyroxine suppressive therapy is widely used, but there is poor evidence of its efficacy, and it may have serious adverse effects on health. Surgery is first choice in large goitres or if malignancy is suspected. 131I therapy results in a one-year goitre reduction of around 40% in multinodular goitres, usually with a high degree of patient satisfaction and improvement of the inspiratory capacity. The effect is attenuated with increasing goitre size. The risk of hypothyroidism is 22-58% within 5-8 years. A sufficient thyroid 131I uptake is mandatory for 131I therapy to be feasible and pre-stimulation with recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) increases this considerably. This leads to an increased absorbed thyroid dose by approx.75%, mainly in those patients with the lowest thyroid 131I uptake, and a more homogeneous intrathyroidal isotope distribution. Pre-stimulation with even a small dose of rhTSH seems to allow a reduction of the 131I activity while still achieving a mean goitre reduction of approximately 40% within a year. A significantly lower extrathyroidal radiation is achieved by this approach. With an unchanged 131I activity, rhTSH pre-stimulation improves the goitre reduction by 30-50%. However, this is at the expense of a higher rate of hypothyroidism, cervical pain and transient thyrotoxicosis. Of particular concern is the observation made in healthy persons, that rhTSH results in a transient average thyroid volume increase of 35%. A similar goitre swelling may cause problems in susceptible patients during rhTSH-augmented 131I therapy. Thus, this concept still needs a closer evaluation before routine use

2006-12-01

84

Radioiodine therapy in non-toxic multinodular goitre. The possibility of effect-amplification with recombinant human TSH (rhTSH)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

There is no consensus regarding the optimum treatment of benign non-toxic goitre. L-thyroxine suppressive therapy is widely used, but there is poor evidence of its efficacy, and it may have serious adverse effects on health. Surgery is first choice in large goitres or if malignancy is suspected. {sup 131}I therapy results in a one-year goitre reduction of around 40% in multinodular goitres, usually with a high degree of patient satisfaction and improvement of the inspiratory capacity. The effect is attenuated with increasing goitre size. The risk of hypothyroidism is 22-58% within 5-8 years. A sufficient thyroid {sup 131}I uptake is mandatory for {sup 131}I therapy to be feasible and pre-stimulation with recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) increases this considerably. This leads to an increased absorbed thyroid dose by approx.75%, mainly in those patients with the lowest thyroid {sup 131}I uptake, and a more homogeneous intrathyroidal isotope distribution. Pre-stimulation with even a small dose of rhTSH seems to allow a reduction of the {sup 131}I activity while still achieving a mean goitre reduction of approximately 40% within a year. A significantly lower extrathyroidal radiation is achieved by this approach. With an unchanged {sup 131}I activity, rhTSH pre-stimulation improves the goitre reduction by 30-50%. However, this is at the expense of a higher rate of hypothyroidism, cervical pain and transient thyrotoxicosis. Of particular concern is the observation made in healthy persons, that rhTSH results in a transient average thyroid volume increase of 35%. A similar goitre swelling may cause problems in susceptible patients during rhTSH-augmented {sup 131}I therapy. Thus, this concept still needs a closer evaluation before routine use.

Bonnema, Steen J.; Nielsen, Viveque E.; Hegedues, Laszlo [Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Endocrinology and Metabolism

2006-12-15

85

Radioiodine therapy in non-toxic multinodular goitre. The possibility of effect-amplification with recombinant human TSH (rhTSH)  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

There is no consensus regarding the optimum treatment of benign non-toxic goitre. L-thyroxine suppressive therapy is widely used, but there is poor evidence of its efficacy, and it may have serious adverse effects on health. Surgery is first choice in large goitres or if malignancy is suspected. 131I therapy results in a one-year goitre reduction of around 40% in multinodular goitres, usually with a high degree of patient satisfaction and improvement of the inspiratory capacity. The effect is attenuated with increasing goitre size. The risk of hypothyroidism is 22-58% within 5-8 years. A sufficient thyroid 131I uptake is mandatory for 131I therapy to be feasible and pre-stimulation with recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) increases this considerably. This leads to an increased absorbed thyroid dose by approx.75%, mainly in those patients with the lowest thyroid 131I uptake, and a more homogeneous intrathyroidal isotope distribution. Pre-stimulation with even a small dose of rhTSH seems to allow a reduction of the 131I activity while still achieving a mean goitre reduction of approximately 40% within a year. A significantly lower extrathyroidal radiation is achieved by this approach. With an unchanged 131I activity, rhTSH pre-stimulation improves the goitre reduction by 30-50%. However, this is at the expense of a higher rate of hypothyroidism, cervical pain and transient thyrotoxicosis. Of particular concern is the observation made in healthy persons, that rhTSH results in a transient average thyroid volume increase of 35%. A similar goitre swelling may cause problems in susceptible patients during rhTSH-augmented 131I therapy. Thus, this concept still needs a closer evaluation before routine use.

Bonnema, Steen J; Nielsen, Viveque E

2006-01-01

86

Genetic polymorphism in brazilian microcystis spp. (Cyanobacteria) toxic and non-toxic through RFLP-PCR of the cpcBA-IGS  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese A ocorrência de florações de cianobactérias tóxicas demanda um melhor entendimento da variabilidade genética como um instrumento auxiliar na identificação de espécies colaborando, assim, com o monitoramento de águas destinadas ao abastecimento público. Este estudo objetivou o conhecimento do polimor [...] fismo genético de linhagens tóxicas e não tóxicas de espécies de Microcystis (Cyanobacteria), isoladas de diversas localidades brasileiras, utilizando a técnica molecular RFLP-PCR para o operon que codifica para a c-ficocianina e seu espaçador intergênico (cpcBA-IGS). Foram analisadas dezoito linhagens pertencentes as espécies Microcystis aeruginosa, M. panniformis, M. protocystis, M. wesenbergii e duas outras não identificadas através de dados morfológicos e moleculares. Os resultados moleculares formaram três agrupamentos com baixos valores de similaridade entre si os quais não foram relacionados à origem geográfica, toxicidade ou morfoespécies. As populações brasileiras de Microcystis spp. apresentaram alta diversidade genética quando comparadas com as da Austrália, Japão, Estados Unidos e Europa. Esta ampla diversidade genética pode ser vislumbrada através de diversos perfis eletroforéticos obtidos entre linhagens de uma mesma espécie. Nós encontramos a presença de linhagens tóxicas e não tóxicas em uma mesma espécie, como em M. aeruginosa. Abstract in english The escalating occurrence of cyanobacterial toxic blooms demands a better understanding of genetic variability as an auxiliary expedient in species identification, collaborating with the monitoring of water destined to public supply. This study aimed at the unraveling of genetic polymorphism in the [...] toxic and nontoxic strains of Microcystis (Cyanobacteria) species, isolated from diverse Brazilian localities through the RFLP-PCR technique applied to the c-phycocyanin encoding operon and its intergenic spacer (cpcBA-IGS). Eighteen strains belonging to M. aeruginosa, M. panniformis, M. protocystis and M. wesenbergii, plus two other unidentified strains, were analyzed by means of the morphological and molecular data. The molecular data constituted three groups with low similarity values unrelated to the geographical origin, toxicity or morphospecies. A high genetic variability among the studied populations was unveiled by the results. Brazilian populations of Microcystis spp. displayed high genetic diversity when compared to those from Australia, Japan, United States and Europe. This ample genetic diversity could be observed through the diverse eletrophoretic profiles obtained among the strains from a single species. The presence of toxic and non-toxic strains was observed in the same species, as M. aeruginosa.

Maria do Carmo, Bittencourt-Oliveira; Maristela Casé Costa, Cunha; Ariadne do Nascimento, Moura.

87

Heterologous expressed toxic and non-toxic peptide variants of toxin CssII are capable to produce neutralizing antibodies against the venom of the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus.  

Science.gov (United States)

Two toxic and one non-toxic recombinant peptide variants of the mammalian neurotoxin CssII was cloned into the expression vector pQE30 containing a 6His-tag and a Factor Xa proteolytic cleavage site. The toxic recombinant peptides rCssII, HisrCssII and the non-toxic rCssIIE15R were expressed under induction with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG), isolated using chromatographic techniques and folded correctly in vitro. The three recombinant variants showed similar secondary structures as the native CssII, but only the rCssIIE15R was not toxic to mice at concentrations up to 30microg/20g mouse body weight when injected intraperitoneally. All three recombinant peptides were capable of displacing the native CssII from their receptor sites in rat brain synaptosomes, suggesting that they had similar structural and functional characteristics of the native peptides. The three recombinant variants of CssII and the native one were used as antigens for immunization of New Zealand rabbits. The antibodies present in the rabbit antisera were able to recognize the native CssII. Additionally and more importantly, the sera of the immunized rabbits were able to neutralize both the native toxin CssII and the whole soluble venom of the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus. These results indicate that the recombinant peptides can be used to produce antidotes against the venom of this species of scorpion. PMID:19524619

Hernández-Salgado, Kenya; Estrada, Georgina; Olvera, Alejandro; Coronas, Fredy I; Possani, Lourival D; Corzo, Gerardo

2009-08-15

88

Keystones for attainment eco-efficiency of clean production  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The World Business Council for Sustainable Development guideline ‘reduce toxic dispersion’ is the weakest formulation of the seven and reflects the vigour with which some branches of the global industry have defended their products in spite of their prevalent unsafe for environment. Clean production is one way in which eco-efficiency has been put into effect. Yet the pressure to develop green chemicals and alternative non-toxic products has been intense and increasingly successful. Whe...

?????????, ???? ?????????????; ?????????, ???? ?????????????; Dmytrenko, Alla Oleksandrivna

2008-01-01

89

Mineralogical conversion of asbestos containing materials  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The principal objective of the Technical Task Plan (TTP) is to demonstrate a thermal-chemical mineralogical asbestos conversion unit at the Hanford Site, which converts non-radiological asbestos containing materials (ACMs) into an asbestos-free material. The permanent thermal-chemical mineralogical conversion of ACMs to a non-toxic, non-hazardous, potentially marketable end product should not only significantly reduce the waste stream volumes but terminate the open-quotes cradle to graveclose quotes ownership liabilities

1996-08-18

90

Relative quantification of PIK3CA gene expression level in fine-needle aspiration biopsy thyroid specimens collected from patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma and non-toxic goitre by real-time RT-PCR  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K signaling pathway is important regulator of many cellular events, including apoptosis, proliferation and motility. PI3K pathway alterations (PIK3CA gene mutations and/or amplification have been observed in various human tumours. In the majority of diagnosed cases, mutations are localized in one of the three "hot spots" in the gene, responsible for coding catalytic subunit ? of class I PI3K (PIK3CA. Mutations and amplification of PIK3CA gene are characteristic for thyroid cancer, as well. Methods The aim of our study was to examine a gene expression level of PIK3CA in fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB thyroid specimens in two types of thyroid lesions, papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC and non-toxic goitre (NTG. Following conventional cytological examination, 42 thyroid FNAB specimens, received from patients with PTC (n = 20 and NTG (n = 22, were quantitatively evaluated regarding PIK3CA expression level by real-time PCR in the ABI PRISM® 7500 Sequence Detection System. Results Significantly higher expression level (RQ of PIK3CA in PTC group has been noted in comparison with NTG group (p Conclusion These observations may suggest role of PIK3CA alterations in PTC carcinogenesis.

Wojciechowska-Durczy?ska Katarzyna

2010-08-01

91

Amino acid sequence and biological characterization of BlatPLA?, a non-toxic acidic phospholipase A? from the venom of the arboreal snake Bothriechis lateralis from Costa Rica.  

Science.gov (United States)

Bothriechis is considered a monophyletic, basal genus of arboreal Neotropical pitvipers distributed across Middle America. The four species found in Costa Rica (B. lateralis, B. schlegeli, B. nigroviridis, B. supraciliaris) differ in their venom proteomic profiles, suggesting that different Bothriechis taxa have evolved diverse trophic strategies. In this study, we isolated a phospholipase A? (PLA?) from B. lateralis venom, aiming at increasing our knowledge on the structural and functional characteristics of group II acidic PLA?s, whose toxic actions are generally more restricted than those displayed by basic PLA?s. The new acidic enzyme, BlatPLA?, occurs as a monomer of 13,917 Da, in contrast to many basic group II PLA?s which associate into dimers and often display myotoxicity and/or neurotoxicity. Its amino acid sequence of 122 residues predicts an isoelectric point of 4.7, and displays significant differences with previously characterized acidic PLA?s, with which it shows a maximum sequence identity of 78%. BlatPLA? is catalytically active but appears to be devoid of major toxic activities, lacking intravenous or intracerebroventricular lethality, myotoxicity, in vitro anticoagulant activity, and platelet aggregation or inhibition effects. Phylogenetic relationships with similar group II enzymes suggest that BlatPLA? may represent a basal sequence to other acidic PLA?s. Due to the metabolic cost of venom protein synthesis, the presence of a relatively abundant (9%) but non-toxic component is somewhat puzzling. Nevertheless, we hypothesize that BlatPLA? could have a role in the pre-digestion of prey, possibly having retained characteristics of ancestral PLA?s without evolving towards potent toxicity. PMID:23872034

Van der Laat, Marco; Fernández, Julián; Durban, Jordi; Villalobos, Eva; Camacho, Erika; Calvete, Juan J; Lomonte, Bruno

2013-10-01

92

Evaluation of recombinant forms of the shiga toxin variant Stx2eB subunit and non-toxic mutant Stx2e as vaccine candidates against porcine edema disease.  

Science.gov (United States)

Porcine edema disease (ED) is a communicable disease of shoats caused by infection with Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli. Stx2e is classified as a 1A5B-type toxin and is a decisive virulence determinant of ED. The single A subunit of Stx2e possesses enzymatic activity and is accompanied by a pentamer of B subunits, which binds to the host receptor and delivers the A subunit into the cell. In the present study, we used a mouse model to evaluate the immunogenicity of 3 ED vaccine candidates: a non-toxic mutant holotoxin mStx2e and 2 Stx2eB-based fusion proteins, Stx2eA2B-His and Stx2eB-His. Systemic inoculation of mice with mStx2e- and the Stx2eB-derived antigens induced anti-Stx2e IgG responses that were fully and partially capable of neutralizing Stx2e cellular cytotoxicity, respectively. Intranasal immunization with mStx2e protected the mice from subsequent intraperitoneal challenge with a lethal dose of Stx2e, whereas immunization with Stx2eA2B-His and Stx2eB-His afforded partial protection. Analysis of serum cytokines revealed that mStx2e, but not the Stx2eB-based antigens, was capable of inducing a Th2-type immune response. These results suggest that although the Stx2eB-based antigens elicited an immune response to Stx2e, they did so through a different mechanism to the Th2-type response induced by mStx2e. PMID:23728257

Sato, Toshio; Matsui, Takeshi; Takita, Eiji; Kadoyama, Yumiko; Makino, Sou-Ichi; Kato, Ko; Sawada, Kazutoshi; Hamabata, Takashi

2013-10-01

93

Production, Characterisation and Applications of Biosurfactants-Review  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Biosurfactants are surface active compounds released by microorganisms. They are biodegradable non-toxic and ecofreindly materials. In this review we have updated the information about different microbial surfactants. The biosurfactant production depends on the fermentation conditions, environmental factors and nutrient availability. The extraction of the biosurfactants from the cell-free supernatant using the solvent extraction procedure and the qualitative and quantitative analysis ha...

Rahman, Pattanathu K. S. M.; Edward Gakpe

2008-01-01

94

Biovalorization of technical lignins for added-value products and applications  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Lignin is an abundant non-toxic amorphous natural polymer. Nowadays it is available a great variety and large amounts of technical lignins as by-products from the pulp and paper industries. Some successful biotechnological applications of enzymatically modified lignins are described in the literature, namely for the production of lignin based copolymers, binders for wood composites, chelating agents, compositions for treating porous materials, coatings, paintings and others. From a new specie...

Duarte, J. C. Cardoso; Malcata, F.; Moreira, P.; Almeida-vara, E.; Sena-martins, G.

2005-01-01

95

Hydrogen production by hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for PEM fuel cells feeding  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In this work, hydrogen is produced by a hydrolysis process that uses sodium borohydride as a hydrogen carrier and storage media. High purity hydrogen is obtained at low temperatures with high volumetric and gravimetric storage efficiencies; reaction products are non-toxic. The produced hydrogen can be supply on-demand at specified flow by tailor made developed catalyst. Hydrogen feeding to a low power fuel cell was accomplished. According to experimental conditions conversion rates of 100% ar...

Silva, R. A.; Paiva, T. I.; Branquinho, M.; Carvalho, S.; Pinto, A. M. F. R.; Rangel, C. M.

2008-01-01

96

In vitro screening on beta-amyloid peptide production of plants used in traditional medicine for cognitive disorders.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

AIM OF THE STUDY: The aim of the study was to investigate the activity on beta-amyloid peptide production of crude extracts of 9 plant species traditionally used in Benin or in Madagascar for the treatment of cognitive disorders, in order to select candidates for Alzheimer's disease treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For each species, hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl-acetate and water extracts were tested, at non-toxic concentrations, on CHO cells overexpressing the human neuronal beta-amyloid p...

Hage, Salim; Kienlen-campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-noe?l; Quetin-leclercq, Joe?lle

2010-01-01

97

Traditional healthful fermented products of Japan.  

Science.gov (United States)

A variety of fermentation products, such as foods containing probiotic bacteria, black rice vinegar (kurosu), soy sauce (shoyu), soybean-barley paste (miso), natto and tempeh, are sold in food stores in Japan. These fermented food products are produced by traditional methods that exploit mixed cultures of various non-toxic microorganisms. These microorganisms include lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria, sake yeast, koji molds and natto bacteria. Many traditional fermented foods have been studied and their effects on metabolism and/or immune system have been demonstrated in animal and/or human cells. This review summarizes the scientific basis for the effects of these traditional food products, which are currently produced commercially in Japan. PMID:18461373

Murooka, Yoshikatsu; Yamshita, Mitsuo

2008-08-01

98

Hydrogen fuel. Production  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Hydrogen is a highly energetic and non-toxic gas capable to generate heat by direct combustion with water and nitrogen oxides as residues, and to generate electricity through fuel cells with water as unique residue. Hydrogen is, like electricity, an energy vector because it does not exist at the free state in nature but always in a combined state, mainly in water and hydrocarbons. This article treats of hydrogen production. Producing hydrogen requires to extract it from its compounds using an energy consuming chemical or physico-chemical process: 1 - exploited or directly exploitable processes: from fossil fuels (vapo-reforming, partial oxidation), derived methods (auto-thermal reforming, methanol reforming, water vapor pyrolysis and plasma reforming, small-scale hydrogen generation), water electrolysis; 2 - processes under study: water dissociation using a nuclear reactor (high temperature electrolysis, thermochemical cycles), water photo-electrolysis, thermochemical biomass transformation, production by photosynthetic microorganisms; 3 - purification; 4 - environmental impact: CO2 capture and storage, hydrogen as best auxiliary of renewable energy sources. (J.S.)

2005-01-01

99

Biodegradable multifunctional oil production chemicals: Thermal polyaspartates  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The paper deals with biodegradable oil production chemicals. Control of both mineral scale and corrosion with a single, environmentally acceptable material is an ambitious goal. Polyaspartate polymers represent a significant milestone in the attainment of this goal. Thermal polyaspartates (TPA) are polycarboxylate polymers derived via thermal condensation of the naturally occurring amino acid aspartic acid. These protein-like polymers are highly biodegradable and non-toxic, and are produced by an environmentally benign manufacturing process. TPAs exhibit excellent mineral scale inhibition activity and CO{sub 2} corrosion control. Laboratory data on scale inhibition and corrosion control in the North Sea oil field production applications is presented. 8 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Ross, R.J. [Donlar Corporation (United States); Ravenscroft, P.D. [BP Exploration Operating Company, (United Kingdom)

1996-12-31

100

Biosurfactant production using mixed cultures under non-aseptic conditions  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The use of surfactants is of increasing interest for remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater and soil. Surfactants increase the accessibility of adsorbed hydrocarbons and mobilize immiscible petroleum hydrocarbons for treatment. Biosurfactants have the advantage of biodegradability and non-toxicity over their synthetic counterparts, and can be produced from renewable sources. In this study the production of biosurfactant from molasses was investigated in continuously stirred batch reactors. The effects of substrate concentration, yeast extract and peptone on biomass accumulation and biosurfactant production were investigated. Biosurfactant production was quantified by surface tension reduction and critical micelle dilution (CMD). Biosurfactant production was directly correlated with biomass production, and was improved with the addition of yeast extract. Centrifugation of the whole broth reduced surface tension. The performance of the biosurfactant produced from molasses under non-aseptic condition is comparable to other published results

1994-04-04

 
 
 
 
101

Waterloo process for SCP production from waste biomass. [Single cell protein using Chaetomium cellulolyticum  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A novel fermentation process has been developed for the bioconversion of agricultural and forestry wastes into proteinaceous feed/food products. The process is based on the mass microbial cultivation of a new cellulolytic fungus, Chaetomium Cellulolyticum, in solid-substrate systems. Preliminary feeding trials indicate that the SCP products are suitably nutritious, digestible, and non-toxic in animal feed protein rations. Economic analyses indicate that the process could be operated at a profit for a range of realistic scenarios in both developed and developing countries. 12 references

Moo-Young, M.; Daugulis, A.J.; Chahal, D.S.; MacDonald, D.G.

1979-10-01

102

Properties prediction of non-toxic ice inhibitors  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Toxic de-icing compounds currently employed in jet fuels (ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and diethylene glycol monomethyl ether) dissolve in the water {open_quote}bottoms{close_quote} present in storage tanks, thus producing hazardous waste which requires expensive disposal. The fastest and most cost effective way to develop alternative compounds is to design desirable features theoretically and thus direct the synthesis of those candidates having sought after properties. Empirical and quantum mechanical approaches for partition coefficients calculations, as well as Quantitative Structure Property Relationship (QSAR) evaluations, were investigated. We demonstrate that molecular orbital calculations have to be used for a reliable prediction of partition coefficients, and moreover that the conformational response to solvent is significant. Although the values of the calculated partition coefficients are not in full agreement with experimental results, the trends are well reproduced. QSAR estimations to elucidate the toxicity of the proposed alternative compounds are reported and assessed. An approach for deriving phase diagrams of a binary mixture is outlined, where molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed on bulk systems consisting of pure water, pure de-icer, and binary mixtures of de-icer and water. Analysis of the NO trajectories yield insights into the de-icing mechanism and form a basis for comparison of different de-icers.

Pachter, R.; Trohalaki, S. [Wright Lab., Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States)

1996-10-01

103

ADVANCED NON-TOXIC SILICONE FOULING-RELEASE COATINGS  

Science.gov (United States)

This Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) project demonstrated and validated the use of the duplex silicone fouling-release coating system developed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), for use on boat hulls and power plant cooling water intake tunne...

104

Hypoallergenic and non-toxic emollient therapies for children.  

Science.gov (United States)

There are many anatomical and functional differences between the skin of young children and adult skin. As a consequence, the skin is more easily irritated by topical agents. There is also increased transcutaneous absorption; the latter effect is amplified by underlying conditions such as ichthyoses and atopic dermatitis with defects of the epidermal barrier. Common topical agents such as salicylic acid and lactic acid can cause life-threatening intoxications. The relevance of transcutaneous absorption of "hidden" ingredients such as polyethylene glycol and preservatives is unknown at present. By emulsifying endogenous barrier lipids, emulsifiers can promote skin dryness. We review the effects of common emollients and their suitability for skin care in children, particularly with the aim to reduce exposure to potential contact allergens and inadvertent emollient activity. PMID:19138296

Wolf, Gerd; Höger, Peter H

2009-01-01

105

Diacetone acrylamide-based non-toxic holographic photopolymer  

Science.gov (United States)

A new low-toxicity diacetone acrylamide-based photopolymer is developed and characterized. The environmentallycompatible photopolymer has been modified with the inclusion of glycerol. The incorporation of glycerol results in a uniform maximum refractive index modulation for recording intensities in the range of 1-20 mW/cm2. This may be attributed to glycerol's nature as a plasticizer, which allows for faster diffusion of un-reacted monomer within the grating during holographic recording. An optimum recording intensity of 0.5 mW/cm2 is observed for exposure energies of 20- 60 mW/cm2. The modified photopolymer achieves a refractive index modulation of 2.2×10-3, with diffraction efficiencies up to 90 % in 100 ?m layers. The photopolymer layers containing glycerol have improved stability and optical quality.

Cody, D.; Naydenova, I.; Mihaylova, E.

2012-05-01

106

Non-toxic invert analog glass compositions of high modulus  

Science.gov (United States)

Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi are described. They and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consist essentially of, in mols, 15 to 40% SiO2, 6 to 15% Li2O, 24 to 45% of at least two bivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Ca, NzO, MgO and CuO; 13 to 39% of at least two trivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, La2O3, and Y2O3 and up to 15% of one or more tetravelent oxides selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2. The high modulus, low density glass compositions contain no toxic elements. The composition, glass density, Young's modulus, and specific modulus for 28 representative glasses are presented. The fiber modulus of five glasses are given.

Bacon, J. F. (inventor)

1974-01-01

107

I-131-treatment of non-toxic goitre  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Radioiodine is a safe and effective treatment of thyroid enlargement with or - in the presence of significant amounts of autonomously functioning tissue - without true euthyroidism. The indications are esentially the same as for surgery, except the case of a goitre recidive and of recurrent nerve injury, for which radioiodine is the treatment of choise. On the contrary, large cold nodules and a suspicion of malignancy preclude it. The size reduction of about 40% is less than that obtained by surgery, but there are no side effects and no recurrences. Hypothyroidism occurs in 4% of the cases. Unfortunately, the number of specially equipped institutions that are allowed to perform radioiodine therapy is yet restricted. (orig.)

1990-12-01

108

Effect of various natural products on growth of bladder cancer cells: two promising mushroom extracts.  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite the availability of several therapeutic options, a safer and more effective modality is urgently needed for treatment of bladder cancer. Specific immunotherapy is effective, but severe side effects limit its clinical use and underscore the need for unconventional therapies using less toxic substances. Many natural substances are touted for their medicinal aspects and side effect profiles, and some of these have been well characterized for their biological and medicinal properties. Accordingly, the effects on bladder cancer cells in vitro were investigated. Eight commercially available natural products were tested for possible effects on the growth of human bladder cancer T24 cells. This study demonstrated that two mushroom extracts, GD- and PL-fractions, induced a significant (>90 percent) growth reduction in 72 hours, whereas the remaining six products had no effect. Interestingly, non-toxic concentrations of the GD- or PL-fractions, when combined with a non-toxic concentration of vitamin C, became highly cytotoxic, resulting in >90-percent cell death. Thus, vitamin C appears to act synergistically with these fractions to potentiate their bioactivity (cytotoxicity). No other products tested demonstrated such a synergistic potentiation with vitamin C. The present study indicates that GD- and PL-fractions appear to have the most potent cytotoxic effect on human bladder cancer T24 cells. It is thus plausible that these substances could be used, solely or combined with conventional modalities, for the treatment of superficial bladder cancer. PMID:17397268

Konno, Sensuke

2007-03-01

109

The use of NaCl addition for the improvement of polyhydroxyalkanoate production by Cupriavidus necator.  

Science.gov (United States)

External stress factors in the form of ionic species or temperature increases have been shown to produce a stress response leading to enhanced PHA production. The effect of five different NaCl concentrations, namely 3.5, 6.5, 9, 12 and 15g/l NaCl on PHA productivity using Cupriavidus necator has been investigated alongside a control (no added NaCl). A dielectric spectroscopy probe was used to measure PHA accumulation online in conjunction with the chemical offline analysis of PHA. The highest PHA production was obtained with the addition of 9g/l NaCl, which yielded 30% higher PHA than the control. Increasing the addition of NaCl to 15g/l was found to inhibit the production of PHA. NaCl addition can therefore be used as a simple, low cost, sustainable, non toxic and non reactive external stress strategy for increasing PHA productivity. PMID:24835740

Passanha, Pearl; Kedia, Gopal; Dinsdale, Richard M; Guwy, Alan J; Esteves, Sandra R

2014-07-01

110

Production, Characterisation and Applications of Biosurfactants-Review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Biosurfactants are surface active compounds released by microorganisms. They are biodegradable non-toxic and ecofreindly materials. In this review we have updated the information about different microbial surfactants. The biosurfactant production depends on the fermentation conditions, environmental factors and nutrient availability. The extraction of the biosurfactants from the cell-free supernatant using the solvent extraction procedure and the qualitative and quantitative analysis has been discussed with appropriate equipment details. The application of the biosurfactant includes biomedical, cosmetic and bioremediation. Rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa DS10-129 showed significant applications in the bioremediation of hydrocarbons in gasoline-spilled soil and petroleum oily sludge. Rhamnolipid biosurfactant enhanced the bioremediation process by releasing the weathered oil from the soil matrices and enhanced the bioavailability of hydrocarbons for microbial degradation. It is having potential applications in the remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites.

Pattanathu K.S.M. Rahman

2008-01-01

111

Application of fractional factorial design to levan production by Zymomonas mobilis Aplicação do planejamento fatorial fracionário para a produção de levana por Zymomonas mobilis  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Levan is a non-toxic, biologically active, extra cellular polysaccharide composed solely by fructose units. Optimization of levan production by Zymomonas mobilis strain ZAG-12 employing a 2(4-1) fractional factorial design was performed to analyze the influence of the temperature (20, 25 e 30ºC) agitation (50, 75 e 100 rpm), and the initial concentrations of both sucrose (150, 200 e 250 g.L-1) and yeast extract (2.0, 3.5 e 5.0g.L-1) on final levan concentration. Aerobic fermentation was perf...

Melo, I. R.; Pimentel, M. F.; Lopes, C. E.; Calazans, G. M. T.

2007-01-01

112

Production of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles in water extracts of the fungus Amylomyces rouxii strain KSU-09.  

Science.gov (United States)

A fungal strain, KSU-09, isolated from the roots of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera), was identified as Amylomyces rouxii based on sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of its rRNA genes. Mycelia-free water extracts obtained from mycelium suspended in water for 72h facilitated the production of stable, predominantly monodispersed and spherical silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the size range of 5-27nm upon addition of 1mM silver nitrate, as determined by the XRD, AFM and TEM. The AgNPs exhibited antimicrobial activity against Shigella dysenteriae type I, Staphylococcus aureus, Citrobacter sp., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Fusarium oxysporum. Thus, the strain KSU-09 could be used for simple, non-hazardous and efficient synthesis of antimicrobial AgNPs. PMID:20619641

Musarrat, Javed; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Singh, Braj Raj; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Azam, Ameer; Naqvi, Alim

2010-11-01

113

Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 6. Production of transforming growth factor 1 by human blood after ozone treatment.  

Science.gov (United States)

After exposing human whole blood from normal volunteers to ozone concentrations ranging from 22 to 156 micrograms/ml, we have shown that, upon incubation of up to 8 hours, there is a significant release of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta 1). In comparison to TGF-beta 1, TGF-beta 2 production is not influenced by ozone concentrations. In line with our previous findings it appears that blood, in the presence of heparin and 5mM Ca,2+ allows a consistent production of tumor necrosis factor a (TNF alpha) and the release of low and non-hazardous levels of free hemoglobin. These data support the contention that autohemotherapy performed after treating blood with ozone followed by reinfusion into the donor, may represent a valuable therapeutic approach for achieving immunoregulatory effects. PMID:7660851

Bocci, V; Luzzi, E; Corradeschi, F; Silvestri, S

1994-01-01

114

Diagnosis of solid waste of oil and natural gas exploration and production activities in Brazil offshore sedimentary basins; Diagnostico dos residuos solidos das atividades de exploracao e producao de petroleo e gas natural em bacias sedimentares maritimas no Brasil  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The objective of this study is to analyze the generation and disposal of solid waste from the exploration and production activities of oil and natural gas in Brazilian waters. We used data from the implementation reports of pollution control project of the activities licensed by IBAMA. During 2009 the activities related to exploration and production of offshore oil and gas produced a total of 44,437 tons of solid waste, with the main waste generated corresponding to: oily waste (16,002 t); Metal uncontaminated (11,085 t); contaminated waste (5630 t), non recycling waste (4935 t); Wood uncontaminated (1,861 t), chemicals (1,146 t). Considering the total waste generated by activities during the period analyzed, it was observed that 54.3% are made up of waste Class I (hazardous waste), 27.9% of Class II wastes (waste non-hazardous non-inert); and 17.8% of waste Class IIB (non-hazardous and inert waste). The results obtained in this work enabled the scenario of waste generation by the E and P offshore activities. As a result, the survey serves as a starting point for monitoring the progress in implementing the projects sought Pollution Control of licensed projects, as well as support the monitoring of reflexes arising from the intensification of activities in certain regions. (author)

Koehler, Pedro Henrique Wisniewski; Mendonca; Gilberto Moraes de

2012-07-01

115

Residual effect of a few herbicides on chlorophyll content and primary productivity of succeeding crops and associated weeds  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The residual effect of a few herbicides viz: Atrataf (atrazine, 2,4-D and Aresin (monolinuron sprayed in the previous season on the pigment concentration and primary productivity of the crops (viz: Zea mays and Cajanus cajan grown in rotation, as well as their associated weeds has been studied. The results indicate that the residues of all the three herbicides were non toxic to Zea mays and toxic to Cajanus cajan as an increase in chlorophyll content and primary productivity occurred in the former, whereas the contrary is true for the latter. Weeds from residual plots have shown a considerable decrease in the chlorophyll content and primary productivity. The most susceptible weed to all the three herbicides was Acalypha malabarica, while Echinochloa colonum is susceptible to the residues of Atrazine but is tolerant to the residues of the other two herbicides. Recommendations based on the observations are presented in the paper.

A. N. Rao

1982-06-01

116

Control of Ochratoxin A Production in Grapes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA is a mycotoxin commonly present in cereals, grapes, coffee, spices, and cocoa. Even though the main objective of the food and feed chain processors and distributors is to avoid the extended contamination of plant-derived foods and animal feeds with mycotoxins, until now, complete OTA removal from foods and feedstuffs is not feasible. Prevention through pre-harvest management is the best method for controlling mycotoxin contamination. However, in the case that the contamination occurs after this stage, the hazards associated with OTA must be managed through post-harvest strategies. Due to the increasing number of fungal strains resistant to chemical fungicides and the impact of these pesticides on the environment and human health, maximum levels of chemical residues have been regulated in many products. Alternative methods are necessary to substitute or complement treatments with fungicides to control fungi under field or storage conditions. Yeasts are considered one of the most potent biocontrol agents due to their biology and non-toxic properties. Epiphytic yeasts are the major component of the microbial community on the surface of grape berries and they are evolutionarily adapted to this ecological niche. Nowadays, several yeast species included in different genera are considered as potential biocontrol agents to control both, growth of ochratoxigenic Aspergillus species and OTA accumulation.

Sofía Chulze

2012-05-01

117

Control of ochratoxin A production in grapes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin commonly present in cereals, grapes, coffee, spices, and cocoa. Even though the main objective of the food and feed chain processors and distributors is to avoid the extended contamination of plant-derived foods and animal feeds with mycotoxins, until now, complete OTA removal from foods and feedstuffs is not feasible. Prevention through pre-harvest management is the best method for controlling mycotoxin contamination. However, in the case that the contamination occurs after this stage, the hazards associated with OTA must be managed through post-harvest strategies. Due to the increasing number of fungal strains resistant to chemical fungicides and the impact of these pesticides on the environment and human health, maximum levels of chemical residues have been regulated in many products. Alternative methods are necessary to substitute or complement treatments with fungicides to control fungi under field or storage conditions. Yeasts are considered one of the most potent biocontrol agents due to their biology and non-toxic properties. Epiphytic yeasts are the major component of the microbial community on the surface of grape berries and they are evolutionarily adapted to this ecological niche. Nowadays, several yeast species included in different genera are considered as potential biocontrol agents to control both, growth of ochratoxigenic Aspergillus species and OTA accumulation. PMID:22778906

Ponsone, María Lorena; Chiotta, María Laura; Palazzini, Juan Manuel; Combina, Mariana; Chulze, Sofía

2012-05-01

118

Biochemical and immunological characterization of the main products of crotoxin irradiation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Irradiation of crotoxin and its subunits with 2,000 Gy of ?-rays from 60 Co source leads to aggregation and generation of lower molecular wight breakdown products. Aggregates separated by gel filtration retain at least part of their higher-ordered structure, based on their reactivity with monoclonal antibodies known to react with conformation epitopes in native crotoxin. These same aggregates can serve as antigens to raise antisera that cross-reacts and neutralizes crotoxin. Compared with native crotoxin, aggregates appears less myotoxic, are largely devoid of phospholipase activity, and are virtually non-toxic in mice. These results indicate that irradiation of toxic proteins can promote significant detoxification, but still retain many of the original antigenic and immunological properties of native crotoxin. (author)

1995-01-01

119

A review on steam-iron process as a hydrogen production/purifying/storage option  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The fuel cell has the potential to become an important energy sector technology in the future, thanks to its ability to produce electrical energy from chemical energy with a high efficiency and without emission of pollutants. Fuel cells require pure hydrogen which is at the moment mainly produced by the steam methane reforming process. However, interest is growing in the steam iron process due to its ability to produce high purity hydrogen. The aim of this paper is to provide information on the steam iron process through a review of recent research on the subject. This review showed that 100% pure hydrogen can be produced with the steam iron process and that removal of contaminants is minimal in this process; in addition iron is a non-toxic, inexpensive and stable material. This review highlighted that the steam iron process can be a good alternative for hydrogen production, purification and storage.

Ort, Nesibe; Yoruk, Sedat [Ataturk University, Department of Chemical Engineering (Turkey)], e-mail: nesibe.ort@atauni.edu.tr, email: syoruk@atauni.edu.tr; Dilmac, Omer F. [Yyldyz Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering (Turkey)], email: omerfarukdl@yahoo.com

2011-07-01

120

Management of by-products from IGCC power generation  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report assesses current developments in the management of by-products from IGCC power generation. The sources of residues and other by-products in the different streams from IGCC processes are summarised. Variations in the chemical, physical, and geotechnical characteristics of the residues are examined with a view to optimising disposal or utilisation. Legislation and leaching tests used in different countries are compared, and disposal practices discussed. The leaching characteristics of various IGCC residues are examined. Available results indicate that most residues can be classified as non-hazardous wastes under present regulations. Landfill currnetly provides a simple way of disposing of most gasification residues, but in future dumping may be unacceptable. Possible applications for by-products from IGCC power generation include uses in agriculture, in building and structural materials, as industrial materials, and for materials recovery. Bonded applications, which afford the greatest protection to the environment against leaching of metals, are preferred in some countries. The successful management of IGCC residues requires detailed understanding of the nature and quantity of the waste products, knowledge of the legislative constraints that control the use and disposal of waste products and their leachates, and optimal disposal and utilisation methods in order to minimise environmental impact. The variability of some residues is a major handicap to commercialisation of their applications. Balanced management strategies for these residues need to be adopted for site-specific conditions and requirements. Slags currently comprise the bulk of IGCC residues from pilot and demonstration plants. It should be possible to utilise slags in many applications traditionally associated with conventional coal-use residues, as well as some new uses specifically suited to these by-products. 134 refs., 23 figs., 25 tabs.

Clarke, L.B.

1991-05-01

 
 
 
 
121

Hydrogen production from steam reforming of dimethoxymethane over CuZnO/Al2O3-niobium phosphate hybrid catalysts  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The high hydrogen content of dimethoxymethane (DMM) and non toxicity make it suitable as a resource for hydrogen production used for applications like mobile systems. In this work, samples of niobium phosphate with high surface areas were synthesized, characterized and tested for the hydrolysis of DMM and were used as acidic components for the reforming of DMM to produce H2. Ammonia adsorption micro-calorimetry and isopropanol conversion results showed the high acidity of niobium phosphate with high surface area (394 m2/g). When this sample was mixed mechanically with CuZnO/Al2O3, the conversion of DMM was greatly enhanced comparing with using CuZnO/Al2O3 alone. At 533 K, almost 100% theoretical yield to H2 was achieved and the corresponding hydrogen production rate was found to be 1100 ml.g-1.h-1. (authors)

2006-06-13

122

Prevention of quorum-sensing-mediated biofilm development and virulence factors production in Vibrio spp. by curcumin.  

Science.gov (United States)

The increasing occurrence of disease outbreaks caused by Vibrio spp. and the emergence of antibiotic resistance has led to a growing interest in finding alternative strategies to prevent vibriosis. Since the pathogenicity of vibrios is controlled in part by quorum-sensing (QS) system, interfering with this mechanism would prevent the pathogenicity of vibrios without developing resistance. Hence, a non-toxic phytochemical curcumin from Curcuma longa was assessed for its potential in reducing the production of QS-dependent virulence factors in Vibrio spp. The obtained results evidenced 88% reduction in bioluminescence of Vibrio harveyi by curcumin. Further, curcumin exhibited a significant inhibition in alginate, exopolysaccharides, motility, biofilm development and other virulence factors production in Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and V. harveyi. In in vivo analysis, curcumin enhanced the survival rate of Artemia nauplii up to 67% against V. harveyi infection by attenuating its QS-mediated virulence. PMID:23354447

Packiavathy, Issac Abraham Sybiya Vasantha; Sasikumar, Pitchaikani; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Veera Ravi, Arumugam

2013-12-01

123

Immobilization of an integral membrane protein for biotechnological phenylacetaldehyde production.  

Science.gov (United States)

Styrene oxide isomerase (SOI) has previously been shown to be an integral membrane protein performing a highly selective, hydrolytic ring opening reaction of epoxides to yield pure aldehydes. Earlier studies had also shown a high sensitivity of SOIs toward their product phenylacetaldehyde which caused an irreversible inhibition and finally complete loss of activity at higher aldehyde concentrations. Here we report on the covalent immobilization of a styrene oxide isomerase (SOI) on SBA-15 silica carriers. The production of the SOI from a Rhodococcus strain was optimized, the enzyme was enriched and immobilized, and finally the biocatalyst was applied in aqueous as well as in two-phase systems. Linkage of the protein to epoxide or amino groups on the SBA-based carriers led to relatively poor stabilization of the enzyme in an aqueous system. But, improved stability was observed toward organic phases like the non-toxic phthalate-related 1,2-cyclohexane dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester (Hexamol DINCH) which here to our knowledge was used for the first time in a biotechnological application. With this two-phase system and the immobilized SOI, 1.6-2.0× higher product yields were reached and the lifetime of the biocatalyst was tremendously increased. PMID:24480569

Oelschlägel, Michel; Riedel, Anika; Zniszczo?, Aurelia; Szyma?ska, Katarzyna; Jarz?bski, Andrzej B; Schlömann, Michael; Tischler, Dirk

2014-03-20

124

Fatty acid alkyl esters: perspectives for production of alternative biofuels.  

Science.gov (United States)

The global economy heads for a severe energy crisis: whereas the energy demand is going to rise, easily accessible sources of crude oil are expected to be depleted in only 10-20 years. Since a serious decline of oil supply and an associated collapse of the economy might be reality very soon, alternative energies and also biofuels that replace fossil fuels must be established. In addition, these alternatives should not further impair the environment and climate. About 90% of the biofuel market is currently captured by bioethanol and biodiesel. Biodiesel is composed of fatty acid alkyl esters (FAAE) and can be synthesized by chemical, enzymatic, or in vivo catalysis mainly from renewable resources. Biodiesel is already established as it is compatible with the existing fuel infrastructure, non-toxic, and has superior combustion characteristics than fossil diesel; and in 2008, the global production was 12.2 million tons. The biotechnological production of FAAE from low cost and abundant feedstocks like biomass will enable an appreciable substitution of petroleum diesel. To overcome high costs for immobilized enzymes, the in vivo synthesis of FAAE using bacteria represents a promising approach. This article points to the potential of different FAAE as alternative biofuels, e.g., by comparing their fuel properties. In addition to conventional production processes, this review presents natural and genetically engineered biological systems capable of in vivo FAAE synthesis. PMID:20033403

Röttig, Annika; Wenning, Leonie; Bröker, Daniel; Steinbüchel, Alexander

2010-02-01

125

Prospecting - production; Exploration - production  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In year 2000, the expenses concerning the prospecting and production, should increase of more than ten percent, to reach 100 G dollars. This investments recovery can be explained by the petroleum prices recovery since the OPEC decision in march 1999 of reducing the production. This document analyzes the prospecting-production market with data on investments drilling and production. An estimation of the world reserves is also proposed, illustrated by the production in many countries. Another domain is dealt: the petroleum deposits geological 3-D simulation with the development, by T-Surf, of a new software already validated by Texaco. (A.L.B.)

Laherrere, J.

2001-04-01

126

76 FR 15455 - Identification of Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials That Are Solid Waste  

Science.gov (United States)

...Administrative Procedure Act (APA). Sweeping formulations involving whether a process is within...law. EPA, and the courts, reject any formulation that under AMC I the statement that...painted wood (including lead-based paint). The study concludes that...

2011-03-21

127

75 FR 31843 - Identification of Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials That Are Solid Waste  

Science.gov (United States)

...wastes. EPA proposes this formulation for tires, but is asking for further comment on the ANPRM formulation that secondary material collected...Btu/lb, or stripping the paint off wood to...non-wastes. EPA believes that its formulation that secondary material...

2010-06-04

128

Chemical agents for conversion of chrysotile asbestos into non-hazardous materials  

Science.gov (United States)

A composition and methods for converting a chrysotile asbestos-containing material to a non-regulated environmentally benign solid which comprises a fluoro acid decomposing agent capable of dissociating the chrysotile asbestos to non-regulated components, wherein non-regulated components are non-reactive with the environment, and a binding agent which binds the non-regulated components to form an environmentally benign solid.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY); Petrakis, Leon (Port Jefferson, NY)

1998-06-09

129

Progress in the development of water-miscible non-hazardous liquid scintillation solvents  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) of aqueous samples presents problems of immiscibility between the water which is the solvent of the labelled molecules and the hydrophobic LSC solvents such as toluene and xylene. A water miscible LSC solvent would solve many problems of sample preparation currently encountered. This paper reports studies directed toward improving the "3H counting efficiency and fluidity of water miscible LSC solvents. Experiments with model compounds have shown that improved water miscible LSC solvents can be developed with fluidity up to 50 percent v/v added water. The length of the polyethylene chain is not critical beyond that needed to confer water miscibility. Relative scintillation yield studies indicate that termination of the polyethylene glycol chain of these water miscible LSC solvents with an ether group instead of a hydroxyl group should significantly increase "3H counting efficiency

1983-01-01

130

Management of by-products from fossil-fired power plants  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The world production of by-products from power plants is in excess of 500 Mt/year. Most of it consists of coal fly ash and bottom ash, but an increasing share is made up of by-products from flue gas desulfurization processes. In some countries less than 10% of the by-products are utilized, whereas the utilization ratio is as high as 90% in others. In the EU about half of the by-products is utilized, but according to the EU's policy the degree of utilization should be increased. Coal fly ash can be used in concrete pursuant to the provisions of the European standard EN 450, Fly Ash for Concrete. In addition quality fly ash can be used in the production of cement and gas concrete and in the building industry. Road construction and soil amendment can also make use of this material. Gypsum produced as a result of the flue gas desulfurization process can be used as wall boards, in the building industry and in the production of cement. Also other by-products from the flue gas desulfurization processes can be used for industrial purposes. By-products where utilization is no option will be disposed of. According to the EU's environmental legislation most of the by-products from the power plants are categorized as non-hazardous waste. This papers discusses how to design a landfill deposit for power plant residues in accordance with applicable EU-directives. However, as can be seen from the conclusion it will become increasingly difficult in the future to deposit these residues. This will urge power producers to cooperate with relevant industries to ensure utilization of a larger part of the by-products and to create solutions that will be profitable to both parties.

Kofod, J.

1998-07-01

131

Biocatalyzed Chemical Gels for Permeability Modification in Injection and Production Wells; FINAL  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Low oil production and excessive water production cause many domestic oil wells to reach their economic limit when they still contain one-half to two-thirds of the original oil. Gelled polymer systems traditionally used to treat these wells are highly toxic and technically difficult to use. Non-toxic gels are needed to treat these marginal wells so that domestic producers can economically recover additional oil. The research objective was to use biocatalysts to gel non-petroleum based chemical gelants. This eliminates toxic compounds from the gel systems and simplifies the gelation mechanism. The result is an environmentally friendly gel system that is applicable to more domestic oil wells. The gelant was formulated and the biocatalyst was optimized to drive the gelation reaction. Performance of the biocatalyzed gel for permeability modification was tested successfully in coreflood experiments. This technology can be used in waterfloods to improve injection profiles, increase sweep efficiency, and increase oil production from previously bypassed zones. It can be applied in production wells to decrease coning, shut off excess water production, and increase oil production

2000-01-01

132

Production of hydrogen in the reaction between aluminum and water in the presence of NaOH and KOH  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The objective of this work is to investigate the production of hydrogen as an energy source by means of the reaction of aluminum with water. This reaction only occurs in the presence of NaOH and KOH, which behave as catalysts. The main advantages of using aluminum for indirect energy storage are: recyclability, non-toxicity and easiness to shape. Alkali concentrations varying from 1 to 3 mol.L-1 were applied to different metallic samples, either foil (0.02 mm thick or plates (0.5 and 1 mm thick, and reaction temperatures between 295 and 345 K were tested. The results show that the reaction is strongly influenced by temperature, alkali concentration and metal shape. NaOH commonly promotes faster reactions and higher real yields than KOH.

C. B. Porciúncula

2012-06-01

133

Production of hydrogen in the reaction between aluminum and water in the presence of NaOH and KOH  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english The objective of this work is to investigate the production of hydrogen as an energy source by means of the reaction of aluminum with water. This reaction only occurs in the presence of NaOH and KOH, which behave as catalysts. The main advantages of using aluminum for indirect energy storage are: re [...] cyclability, non-toxicity and easiness to shape. Alkali concentrations varying from 1 to 3 mol.L-1 were applied to different metallic samples, either foil (0.02 mm thick) or plates (0.5 and 1 mm thick), and reaction temperatures between 295 and 345 K were tested. The results show that the reaction is strongly influenced by temperature, alkali concentration and metal shape. NaOH commonly promotes faster reactions and higher real yields than KOH.

Porciúncula, C. B.; Marcilio, N. R.; Tessaro, I. C.; Gerchmann, M..

134

Composting: a treatment channel, a mode of production ``The Arc-en-Ciel`` experiments  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In March 1991, the Arc-en-Ciel project presented by the CGEA ONYX-UTEC group (Generale des Eaux Group) won the competition organized by the Greater Nantes District for the design and development of a global line of treatment and disposal of non-hazardous household and industrial waste. This line should make it possible to optimize waste recycling and valorization. A high tonnage of ``clean`` green space waste is produced owing to a network of 10 disposal sites and to inputs from municipal services and private industries. In addition to this flow, a large portion (6 700 tonnes) of sludge production from the water treatment plants from Greater Nantes is supplied. This sludge is mixed with the green space waste and composted at a specific site. The operation focuses on the quality-based approach as the only rational way to achieve lasting outlets for the organic improvement produced by the composting unit. This approach is illustrated by the ORVAL association, a company that includes leading French experts in the production and commercialization of farming organic products. Preliminary trials lead to recommendations for the development of facilities designed to output a production in compliance with the finished product specifications. The production unit is operated under the supervision of the commercial partners, in compliance with rules that make this plant both a production unit and a waste transformation and disposal unit. A quality control system governs the control-monitoring of the process. Finally, since a sound knowledge of the finished product is a prerequisite for rational commercialization, the finished product has undergone an agronomical qualification. (author).

Jomier, Y.

1995-02-01

135

Hydrogen production  

Science.gov (United States)

The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

1975-01-01

136

Sustainable Energy Production from Jatropha Bio-Diesel  

Science.gov (United States)

The demand for petroleum has risen rapidly due to increasing industrialization and modernization of the world. This economic development has led to a huge demand for energy, where the major part of that energy is derived from fossil sources such as petroleum, coal and natural gas. Continued use of petroleum sourced fuels is now widely recognized as unsustainable because of depleting supplies. There is a growing interest in using Jatropha curcas L. oil as the feedstock for biodiesel production because it is non-edible and thus does not compromise the edible oils, which are mainly used for food consumption. Further, J. curcas L. seed has a high content of free fatty acids that is converted in to biodiesel by trans esterification with alcohol in the presence of a catalyst. The biodiesel produced has similar properties to that of petroleum-based diesel. Biodiesel fuel has better properties than petro diesel fuel; it is renewable, biodegradable, non-toxic, and essentially free of sulfur and aromatics. Biodiesel seems to be a realistic fuel for future. Biodiesel has the potential to economically, socially, and environmentally benefit communities as well as countries, and to contribute toward their sustainable development.

Yadav, Amit Kumar; Krishna, Vijai

2012-10-01

137

Study of mercury in by-products from a Dutch co-combustion power station.  

Science.gov (United States)

Fly ashes and gypsum are one of the main wastes produced in coal-fired power stations which may be sent to landfills for their disposal. In this work, leaching and speciation of mercury in fly ashes and gypsum from a modern co-combustion power plant equipped with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit in the Netherlands were studied. The mercury leachable contents were checked against different regulations, including Dutch, German and the Council Directive 2003/33/EC. The speciation of mercury in coal combustion products is essential not only to determine the risk when the wastes are finally disposed but also to understand the behaviour of mercury during combustion and therefore to select the appropriate mercury removal technology. A temperature-programmed decomposition technique was used in order to identify and quantify which mercury species are associated with coal combustion products. The main mercury species identified in fly ash samples was mercury sulphate, whereas in the gypsum sample the mercury present was mercury chloride. The quantitative mercury results carried out using the thermal desorption method may be considered accurate. The results obtained show that fly ash and gypsum samples from this power plant can be acceptable at landfills as a non-hazardous waste. PMID:19773118

Rallo, Manuela; Lopez-Anton, M Antonia; Meij, Ruud; Perry, Ron; Maroto-Valer, M Mercedes

2010-02-15

138

Biochemical and immunological characterization of the main products of crotoxin irradiation; Caracterizacao bioquimica e imunologica dos principais produtos gerados pela irradiacao de crotoxina  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Irradiation of crotoxin and its subunits with 2,000 Gy of {gamma}-rays from {sup 60} Co source leads to aggregation and generation of lower molecular wight breakdown products. Aggregates separated by gel filtration retain at least part of their higher-ordered structure, based on their reactivity with monoclonal antibodies known to react with conformation epitopes in native crotoxin. These same aggregates can serve as antigens to raise antisera that cross-reacts and neutralizes crotoxin. Compared with native crotoxin, aggregates appears less myotoxic, are largely devoid of phospholipase activity, and are virtually non-toxic in mice. These results indicate that irradiation of toxic proteins can promote significant detoxification, but still retain many of the original antigenic and immunological properties of native crotoxin. (author)

Nascimento, Nanci do

1995-07-01

139

productivity analysis  

Measurement error and data quality can also affect productivity estimates. .... \\more productive, and is a way of embodying new technology in the production \\process. • The DTI ... Chart 7 shows business investment in FDT manufacturing \\and in.

140

Product Charisma  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Consumers are attracted by product designs that feel “alive” and that contain surprise elements. The right expressions in a product contribute to its attractiveness or “charisma”. Today, these intangible product attributes are an important way to differentiate a product from competitor's products. Companies in mature markets, especially, have a competitive advantage when they succeed in integrating “expressions” or “messages” into the product design that touches its user. This...

Gotzsch, Josiena

2002-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

Release characteristics of reattached barnacles to non-toxic silicone coatings.  

Science.gov (United States)

Release mechanisms of barnacles (Amphibalanus amphitrite or Balanus amphitrite) reattached to platinum-cured silicone coatings were studied as a function of coating thickness (210-770 microm), elastic modulus (0.08-1.3 MPa), and shear rate (2-22 microm s(-1)). It was found that the shear stress of the reattached, live barnacles necessary to remove from the silicone coatings was controlled by the combined term (E/t)(0.5) of the elastic modulus (E) and thickness (t). As the ratio of the elastic modulus to coating thickness decreased, the barnacles were more readily removed from the silicone coatings, showing a similar release behavior to pseudobarnacles (epoxy glue). The barnacle mean shear stress ranged from 0.017 to 0.055 MPa whereas the pseudobarnacle mean shear stress ranged from 0.022 to 0.095 MPa. PMID:18568668

Kim, Jongsoo; Nyren-Erickson, Erin; Stafslien, Shane; Daniels, Justin; Bahr, James; Chisholm, Bret J

2008-01-01

142

Development of Novel, Reversible, Non-Toxic Anticoagulants for Greatly Extended Platelet Storage.  

Science.gov (United States)

The project to develop a novel anticoagulant for preservation of blood platelets was carried through the in vitro testing stages before termination due to Congressional budget restrictions. The next phase would have begun the toxicity and efficacy studies...

A. P. Bode

1988-01-01

143

Radioiodine treatment of non-toxic multinodular goitre: effects of combination with lithium  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This study aimed to evaluate the effects of radioiodine ({sup 131}I), alone or in combination with lithium, on thyroid volume and the prevention of radioiodine-induced thyrotoxicosis. This is the first clinical trial including only patients with multinodular goitre, normal TSH values and negative anti-thyroid auto-antibodies at baseline. Eighty consecutive patients were randomised to receive {sup 131}I plus lithium (group I+L) or {sup 131}I alone (group I). Thyroid ultrasonography and biochemical analyses were performed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after treatment. At 1-4 weeks after treatment, {sup 131}I-induced hyperthyroidism was observed in 58.8% of patients and was prevented by lithium administration. A low incidence of hypothyroidism (19%) was recorded at 24 months, whereas up to 44% of patients developed anti-thyroid antibodies. A significant reduction in thyroid volume was observed after {sup 131}I, with a mean decrease of 47.2% (median 48.2%) at 24 months, without differences between the groups. Moreover, it was shown that the decrease in thyroid volume after {sup 131}I was also due to the significant shrinkage of thyroid nodules. This demonstrates that adjunctive lithium is able to reduce radioiodine-induced hyperthyroidism. Therefore, such treatment appears to be safe in older patients and those with underlying cardiovascular disease. In the present large series, {sup 131}I therapy was demonstrated to be highly effective in reducing thyroid and nodular volume even in patients treated with low {sup 131}I doses (2.5 MBq/ml of thyroid tissue), further supporting the view that radioiodine therapy represents a real alternative to surgery. (orig.)

Vannucchi, Guia; Mannavola, Deborah; Dazzi, Davide; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Fugazzola, Laura [Ospedale Maggiore IRCCS (Pad. Granelli), Institute of Endocrine Sciences, Milan (Italy); Chiti, Arturo; Rodari, Marcello; Tadayyon, Sara [Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Milan (Italy)

2005-09-01

144

{sup 1}31{sup I} therapy of toxic and non-toxic goiters  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

For more than 50 years, {sup 1}31{sup I} has been recognized as an effective tool for controlling thyroid hyperplasia and hyperactivity. The fixed dose administration is the simplest method with doses of 111-370 MBq (3 to 10 mCi) {sup 1}31{sup I} being administered. More sophisticated methods aiming to deliver a well-defined amount of {sup 1}31{sup I} per gram of thyroid tissue are handicapped by problems related to the evaluation of the goiter size and the prediction of the sensitivity of thyroid cells to radiation. The use of {sup 1}31{sup I} in nontoxic multi nodular goiter is to be reserved for specific situations.

Beckers, C. [Brussels University of Louvain Medical School, Brussels (Belgium). Centre de Medicine Nucleaire

1999-12-01

145

/ Ranitidine Drugs as Non-Toxic Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel in Hydrochloric Acid Medium  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Portugal | Language: English Abstract in english Expired ranitidine was tested as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in 1 M HCl using different techniques: weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The polarization resistance (Rp) value increased with increase in the concentrati [...] on of the inhibitor. Results obtained revealed that ranitidine performed excellently as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in this medium at 303 K. The protection efficiency increased with increasing inhibitor concentration. The maximum protection efficiency of 90% has been obtained at 400 ppm. On the other hand, the efficiency decreases with increasing temperature. The adsorption of the inhibitor on the mild steel surface followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The activation and thermodynamic parameters of dissolution and adsorption were calculated and discussed. The negative value of ?Gads (-40 kJ mol-1) indicates spontaneous chemical adsorption. Results obtained from polarization, EIS and weight loss measurements are in good agreement with each other.

R.S., Abdel Hameed.

146

Effects of non-toxic cryoprotective agents on the viability of cord blood derived MNCs.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present work investigates the effects of a variety of natural cryoprotectants in combination on post-thaw viability and apoptosis of cryopreserved mononuclear cells (MNCs) derived from umbilical cord blood. The extracellular cryoprotectants (10 mM) namely trehalose, hydroxyl ethyl starch, polyvinyl pyrrolidine and intracellular CPAs (5 mM) like erythritol, taurine and ectoine were used to prepare different combinations of freezing medium following L9 (3(4)) Taguchi orthogonal array. Catalase, coenzyme Q10 and n-acetyl cystine (100 microg/m) were added as antioxidants. Among various combinations, freezing medium consisting of hydroxyl ethyl starch, ectoin and co-enzyme Q10 with 10% FBS is found to be most effective combination achieving maximum cell viability of 93%, 5.6% early apoptotic, 0.7% late apoptotic and 0.1% necrotic cells. SEM and phase contrast microscopy confirmed the normal cell morphology of the post-thaw cultured cells with retaining their membrane integrity. The survival rate of MNCs is higher than the rate achieved using conventional Me2SO. PMID:24448765

Bissoyi, Akalabya; Pramanik, K

2013-01-01

147

Noninvasive glucose measurement by fluorescence quenching of non toxic gold nanoparticles  

Science.gov (United States)

Effects of interaction of human body compatible gold nanoparticles with glucose on fluorescence emission spectra of the nanoparticles are investigated experimentally. It is observed that nanoparticles' fluorescence peak quenches and blue shifted because of such interaction. This procedure is sensitive even to low difference of glucose concentration. The results suggest that glucose could seriously affect the optical properties of gold nanoparticles. Furthermore, a linear range of relative shift of different fluorescence spectrum's peaks is obtained. Furthermore, comparison of fluorescence and absorption results shows that the former technique is as much as 20 times more sensitive to the variation of glucose concentration.

Bagheri, Z.; Massudi, R.; Ghanavi, J.

2014-06-01

148

Efficacy of non-toxic deletion mutants of protective antigen from Bacillus anthracis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Current human anthrax vaccines available in the United States and Europe consist of alum-precipitated supernatant material from cultures of a toxigenic, nonencapsulated strain of Bacillus anthracis. The major component of human anthrax vaccine that confers protection is protective antigen (PA). A second-generation human vaccine using the recombinant PA (rPA) is being developed. In this study, to prevent the toxicity and the degradation of the native rPA by proteases, we constructed two PA variants, delPA (163-168) and delPA (313-314), that lack trypsin (S(163)-R(164)-K(165)-K(166)-R(167)-S(168)) or chymotrypsin cleavage sequence (F(313)-F(314)), respectively. These proteins were expressed in Bacillus brevis 47-5Q. The delPAs were fractionated from the culture supernatant of B. brevis by ammonium sulfate at 70% saturation, followed by anion exchange chromatography on a Hitrap Q, Hiload 16/60 superdex 200 gel filtration column and phenyl sepharose hydrophobic interaction column. In accordance with previous reports, both delPA proteins combined with lethal factor protein did not show any cytotoxicity on J774A.1 cells. The delPA (163-168) and delPA (313-314) formulated either in Rehydragel HPA or MPL-TDM-CWS (Ribi-Trimix), elicited a comparable amount of anti-PA and neutralizing antibodies to those of native rPA in guinea pigs, and confers full protection of guinea pigs from 50xLD50 of fully virulent B. anthracis spore challenges. Ribi-Trimix was significantly more effective in inducing anti-PA and neutralizing antibodies than Rehydragel HPA. These results indicate the possibility of delPA (163-168) and delPA (313-314) proteins being developed into nontoxic, effective and stable recombinant vaccine candidates. PMID:16019195

Rhie, Gi-eun; Park, Young-Mia; Han, Ji-Sun; Yu, Jae-Yon; Seong, Won-Keun; Oh, Hee-Bok

2005-08-01

149

(2-Hydroxyethylammonium Lactates—Highly Biodegradable and Essentially Non-Toxic Ionic Liquids  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available (2-Hydroxyethylammonium lactates have been prepared by reactions of the corresponding (2-hydroxyethyl amines with lactic acid and characterized by their 1H NMR, IR, and mass spectra. They have been quantita- tively analyzed by HPLC, and their water contents have been determined by the Karl-Fischer method. The title salts are low-melting solids or viscous liquids, and they belong to the class of polar, hydrophilic ionic liquids. The toxicity and chemical and biological degradation of the synthesized ionic liquids have been evaluated by methods described in European Standards. The measurements showed these ionic liquids to be highly biodegradable and only slightly toxic substances. Condensation reactions of benzaldehyde with ethyl cyanoacetate and with acetophenone have been performed in these materials as solvents. The possibility of simultaneously applying these ionic liquids as both solvents and catalysts for the mentioned reactions has been demonstrated, as well as repeated use of the same ionic liquid for a number of condensation reactions without any purification.

Sanita Pavlovica

2011-08-01

150

(2-Hydroxyethyl)ammonium Lactates—Highly Biodegradable and Essentially Non-Toxic Ionic Liquids  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

(2-Hydroxyethyl)ammonium lactates have been prepared by reactions of the corresponding (2-hydroxyethyl) amines with lactic acid and characterized by their 1H NMR, IR, and mass spectra. They have been quantita- tively analyzed by HPLC, and their water contents have been determined by the Karl-Fischer method. The title salts are low-melting solids or viscous liquids, and they belong to the class of polar, hydrophilic ionic liquids. The toxicity and chemical and biological degradation of the syn...

2011-01-01

151

Neonatal Hydrocephalus in the Offspring of Rats Fed During Pregnancy Non-Toxic Amounts of Tellurium.  

Science.gov (United States)

Because of the consistency with which a rapidly progressing hydrocephalus internus can be produced in the offspring of rats fed on a diet containing tellurium during pregnancy, this heavy metal appears to be an easy to handle and promising tool for the in...

F. Garro A. Pentschew

1964-01-01

152

Opioid growth factor (OGF) for hepatoblastoma: a novel non-toxic treatment.  

Science.gov (United States)

Hepatoblastoma is the most common liver malignancy in children, typically diagnosed before age 2. The survival rate for hepatoblastoma has increased dramatically in the last 30 years, but the typical chemotherapeutic agents used for treatment are associated with significant toxicity. In this report, the authors present two cases of hepatoblastoma treated with surgical resection and a novel biotherapeutic regimen that included opioid growth factor (OGF). Case #1 is an infant diagnosed with a large mass on prenatal ultrasound. After subsequent diagnosis of hepatoblastoma, she was treated with one course of neoadjuvant chemotherapy at approximately 1 week of age. Following significant complications from the chemotherapy (neutropenic fever, pneumonia and sepsis), the patient's parents declined further chemotherapy, and the infant was treated with surgical resection and opioid growth factor (OGF)/low dose naltrexone (LDN). She is currently at close to 10 years disease-free survival. Case #2 is a child diagnosed with a liver mass on ultrasound at 20 months of age, later biopsy-proven to represent hepatoblastoma. Due to existing co-morbidities including autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and hypertension, and indications from the biopsy that the tumor might be insensitive to chemotherapy, the parents elected not to proceed with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The patient was treated with surgical resection and OGF/LDN, and is currently at more than 5 years disease-free survival. This case series highlights the need for less toxic treatment options than conventional chemotherapy. Modulation of the OGF-OGF receptor axis represents a promising safe and therapeutic avenue for effective treatment of hepatoblastoma. PMID:23275062

Rogosnitzky, Moshe; Finegold, Milton J; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

2013-08-01

153

Insilico structural analysis of parasporin 2 protein sequences of non-toxic bacillus thuringiensis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The unusual and remarkable property of parasporin 2 of non-insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis is specifically recognizing and selectively targeting human leukemic cell lines. The 37-kDa inactive nascent protein is proteolytically cleaved to the 30-kDa active form that loses both the N-terminal and the C-terminal segments. Accumulated cytological and biochemical observations on parasporin-2 imply that the protein is a pore-forming toxin. To confirm the hypothesis, insilico analysis was performed using homology modeling. The resulting model of parasporin 2 protein is unusually elongated and mainly comprises long ?-strands aligned with its long axis. It is similar to aerolysin-type ?-pore-forming toxins, which strongly reinforce the pore-forming hypothesis. The molecule can be divided into three domains. Domain 1, comprising a small ?-sheet sandwiched by short ?-helices, is probably the target-binding module. Two other domains are both ?-sandwiches and thought to be involved in oligomerization and pore formation. Domain 2 has a putative channel-forming ?-hairpin characteristic of aerolysin-type toxins. The surface of the protein has an extensive track of exposed side chains of serine and threonine residues. The track might orient the molecule on the cell membrane when domain 1 binds to the target until oligomerization and pore formation are initiated. The ?-hairpin has such a tight structure that it seems unlikely to reform as postulated in a recent model of pore formation developed for aerolysin-type toxins. Parasporin 2 (Accession no: BAD35170 protein sequence analysis indicated two different domains namely, aerolysin toxin and clostridium toxin domain based on different database searches (CDD and Pfam. It showed a close similarity with the available PDB template (PDB id: 2ZTB of parasporin which has cytocidal activity against MOLT-4, HL60 and Jurkat cell lines. Based on the PSI Blast analysis, 3D structures of the domains were predicted by using Swiss model server. Accuracy of the prediction of 3D structure of different domains of parasporin protein was further validated by Ramachandran plot and PROCHECK (G-value. The structure is dominated by ?-strands (67%, S1-12, most of which are remarkably extensive, running all or most of the longer axis of the molecule. This study helped to elucidate the 3D structure of parasporin 2 (Acc. No. BAD35170 which might enable to probe further its specific mechanism of action. Though the similarity is observed in the domain architecture, there is variation in the regions of the domains even among the same group of parasporin 2. Docking of this model structure and experimental structure with specific receptors of the cancer cells will facilitate to explore mechanism of parasporin 2 action and also provide information about its evolutionary relationship with toxic Cry proteins.

Ayyasamy Mahalakshmi

2010-04-01

154

Challenges for the Development of New Non-Toxic Antifouling Solutions  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Marine biofouling is of major economic concern to all marine industries. The shipping trade is particularly alert to the development of new antifouling (AF) strategies, especially green AF paint as international regulations regarding the environmental impact of the compounds actually incorporated into the formulations are becoming more and more strict. It is also recognised that vessels play an extensive role in invasive species propagation as ballast waters transport potentially threatening ...

Jean-Philippe Maréchal; Claire Hellio

2009-01-01

155

Discovery and Canine Preclinical Assessment of a Non-Toxic Procaspase-3-Activating Compound  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A critical event in the apoptotic cascade is the proteolytic activation of procaspases to active caspases. The caspase auto-activating compound PAC-1 induces cancer cell apoptosis and exhibits antitumor activity in murine xenograft models when administered orally as a lipid-based formulation or implanted subcutaneously as a cholesterol pellet. However, high doses of PAC-1 were found to induce neurotoxicity, prompting us to design and assess a novel PAC-1 derivative called S-PAC-1. Similar to ...

Peterson, Quinn P.; Hsu, Danny C.; Novotny, Chris J.; West, Diana C.; Kim, Dewey; Schmit, Joanna M.; Dirikolu, Levent; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Fan, Timothy M.

2010-01-01

156

Nanodiamonds with silicon vacancy defects for non-toxic photostable fluorescent labeling of neural precursor cells  

CERN Document Server

Nanodiamonds (NDs) containing silicon vacancy (SiV) defects were evaluated as a potential biomarker for the labeling and fluorescent imaging of neural precursor cells (NPCs). SiV-containing NDs were synthesized using chemical vapor deposition and silicon ion implantation. Spectrally, SiV-containing NDs exhibited extremely stable fluorescence and narrow bandwidth emission with an excellent signal to noise ratio exceeding that of NDs containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers. NPCs labeled with NDs exhibited normal cell viability and proliferative properties consistent with biocompatibility. We conclude that SiVcontaining NDs are a promising biomedical research tool for cellular labeling and optical imaging in stem cell research.

Merson, Tobias D; Aharonovich, Igor; Turbic, Alisa; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Turnley, Ann M

2013-01-01

157

Application of powder metallurgy techniques for the development of non-toxic ammunition. Final CRADA report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The purpose of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and Delta Frangible Ammunition (DFA), was to identify and evaluate composite materials for the development of small arms ammunition. Currently available small arms ammunition utilizes lead as the major component of the projectile. The introduction of lead into the environment by these projectiles when they are expended is a rapidly increasing environmental problem. At certain levels, lead is a toxic metal to the environment and a continual health and safety concern for firearm users as well as those who must conduct lead recovery operations from the environment. DFA is a leading supplier of high-density mixtures, which will be used to replace lead-based ammunition in specific applications. Current non-lead ammunition has several limitations that prevent it from replacing lead-based ammunition in many applications (such as applications that require ballistics, weapon recoil, and weapon function identical to that of lead-based ammunition). The purpose of the CRADA was to perform the research and development to identify cost-effective materials to be used in small arms ammunition that eventually will be used in commercially viable, environmentally conscious, non-lead, frangible and/or non-frangible, ammunition.

Lowden, R. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kelly, R. [Delta Defense, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1997-05-30

158

I-131-treatment of non-toxic goitre. Radiojodtherapie der Struma mit Euthyreose  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Radioiodine is a safe and effective treatment of thyroid enlargement with or - in the presence of significant amounts of autonomously functioning tissue - without true euthyroidism. The indications are esentially the same as for surgery, except the case of a goitre recidive and of recurrent nerve injury, for which radioiodine is the treatment of choise. On the contrary, large cold nodules and a suspicion of malignancy preclude it. The size reduction of about 40% is less than that obtained by surgery, but there are no side effects and no recurrences. Hypothyroidism occurs in 4% of the cases. Unfortunately, the number of specially equipped institutions that are allowed to perform radioiodine therapy is yet restricted. (orig.).

Leisner, B.; Grotefendt, M. (Allgemeines Krankenhaus St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin)

1990-12-01

159

Liquid clay emulsion--alternate daily cover and erosion  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Formula 480 Biodegradable Clay Based Product, developed in 1985, is a non-toxic liquid bentonite clay product that comes in concentrate form for dilution with water and/or leachate. The concentrate allows this product y to be used for erosion and dust control, grass seeding, as well as a daily or intermediate cover for landfills. It inhibits the activities of birds and vectors, while controlling dust, erosion, odor, and blowing debris. By varying the dilution of Formula 480, the product can be set up from porous and flexible, to durable and waterproof. Having a clay base, high cation exchange capacity offers nutrient stabilization for grass seeding. When using leachate for product dilution, it will percolate, waterproof, and be recycled back into the surface as a solid. The product is economical at $.03 to $.08/sq.ft., depending on thickness of application, smoothness of surface or compaction ratio. Application is done with a self-contained sprayer developed specifically for Formula 480. It can be sprayed with a high volume handgun or an economical and efficient spray boom. This product is cleared for use in over 15 states and is currently being used on hazardous and non-hazardous fills throughout the U.S. and Germany. Ease of application, economy, and effectiveness warrants people to look at this product for many uses.

Martell, L. [L/M Chemical Service, Ancona, IL (United States)

1995-12-31

160

Oxidation of MC-LR and -RR with chlorine and potassium permanganate: toxicity of the reaction products.  

Science.gov (United States)

Toxin-producing cyanobacteria are abundant in surface waters used as drinking water resources. Microcystins (MC) produced by certain cyanobacteria present acute and chronic toxicity, and their removal in drinking water treatment processes is of increasing concern. Previous studies have demonstrated that chlorine and potassium permanganate are feasible oxidants for the removal of MCs present in drinking water resources, although the oxidation might lead to toxic oxidation products. In this paper, the toxicity of the oxidation products of MC-LR and -RR has been studied using protein phosphatase 1 inhibition assay (PPIA). The HPLC and ELISA analyses correlated with the PPIA results for both toxins. The samples containing the oxidation products were fractionated by HPLC and the toxicity of the fractions was tested with PPIA. The results revealed that protein phosphatase 1 inhibition emerged only from intact MC, while the oxidation products were non-toxic. Similar results were obtained in experiments performed in natural waters: no reaction products or interactions exhibiting protein phosphatase 1 inhibition were detected. PMID:18037466

Rodríguez, Eva M; Acero, Juan L; Spoof, Lisa; Meriluoto, Jussi

2008-03-01

 
 
 
 
161

Selection and properties of alternative forming fluids for TRISO fuel kernel production  

Science.gov (United States)

Current Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs incorporate TRi-structural ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel, which consists of a spherical fissile fuel kernel surrounded by layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. An internal sol-gel process forms the fuel kernel using wet chemistry to produce uranium oxyhydroxide gel spheres by dropping a cold precursor solution into a hot column of trichloroethylene (TCE). Over time, gelation byproducts inhibit complete gelation, and the TCE must be purified or discarded. The resulting TCE waste stream contains both radioactive and hazardous materials and is thus considered a mixed hazardous waste. Changing the forming fluid to a non-hazardous alternative could greatly improve the economics of TRISO fuel kernel production. Selection criteria for a replacement forming fluid narrowed a list of ˜10,800 chemicals to yield ten potential replacement forming fluids: 1-bromododecane, 1-bromotetradecane, 1-bromoundecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, 1-chlorotetradecane, 1-iododecane, 1-iodododecane, 1-iodohexadecane, 1-iodooctadecane, and squalane. The density, viscosity, and surface tension for each potential replacement forming fluid were measured as a function of temperature between 25 °C and 80 °C. Calculated settling velocities and heat transfer rates give an overall column height approximation. 1-bromotetradecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, and 1-iodododecane show the greatest promise as replacements, and future tests will verify their ability to form satisfactory fuel kernels.

Baker, M. P.; King, J. C.; Gorman, B. P.; Marshall, D. W.

2013-01-01

162

Selection and Properties of Alternative Forming Fluids for TRISO Fuel Kernel Production  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Current Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs incorporate TRi-structural ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel, which consists of a spherical fissile fuel kernel surrounded by layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. An internal sol-gel process forms the fuel kernel using wet chemistry to produce uranium oxyhydroxide gel spheres by dropping a cold precursor solution into a hot column of trichloroethylene (TCE). Over time, gelation byproducts inhibit complete gelation, and the TCE must be purified or discarded. The resulting TCE waste stream contains both radioactive and hazardous materials and is thus considered a mixed hazardous waste. Changing the forming fluid to a non-hazardous alternative could greatly improve the economics of TRISO fuel kernel production. Selection criteria for a replacement forming fluid narrowed a list of ~10,800 chemicals to yield ten potential replacement forming fluids: 1-bromododecane, 1- bromotetradecane, 1-bromoundecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, 1-chlorotetradecane, 1-iododecane, 1-iodododecane, 1-iodohexadecane, 1-iodooctadecane, and squalane. The density, viscosity, and surface tension for each potential replacement forming fluid were measured as a function of temperature between 25 °C and 80 °C. Calculated settling velocities and heat transfer rates give an overall column height approximation. 1-bromotetradecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, and 1-iodododecane show the greatest promise as replacements, and future tests will verify their ability to form satisfactory fuel kernels.

Doug Marshall; M. Baker; J. King; B. Gorman

2013-01-01

163

Continuous low cost transesterification process for the production of coconut biodiesel  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Biodiesel, or alkyl ester, is an alternative renewable, biodegradable, and non-toxic diesel fuel produced by the catalytic transesterification of vegetable oil. Here we characterize a system for continuous transesterification of vegetable oil using five continuous stirring tank reactors. We tested residence times of 16-43 min, stirring speeds of 200-800 rpm, a catalyst concentration (KOH) of 0.25-1 wt% of oil (in gram), different total flow rates of the oil and MeOH, and on the production performance of the 5 stage continuous reactor for transesterification of vegetable oil. Using a molar ratio of oil:methanol of 1:7 and a reaction temperature of 65 {sup o}C, we show that a high stirring speed increased the reaction rate, but an excessive stir speed decreased the reaction rate and conversion to biodiesel. Furthermore, a higher catalyst percentage significantly increased the reaction rate and production capacity. A catalyst percentage of 1 wt% of oil gave the best conversion; 99.04 {+-} 0.05%. The resulting biodiesel esters were characterized for their physical and fuel properties including density, viscosity, iodine volume, acid volume, cloud point, pure point, gross heat of combustion, and volatility. The purity and conversion of the biodiesel was analyzed by HPLC. (author)

Kumar, G.; Kumar, D.; Singh, S.; Kothari, S.; Bhatt, S.; Singh, CH. P. [Department of Chemistry, Sahu Jain College, Najibabad, 246763 (India)

2010-07-01

164

Production and analysis of bio-diesel from non-edible oils. A review  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Bio-diesel has become more attractive recently because of its environmental benefits and it is derived from renewable resources, bio degradable and non-toxic in nature. Several bio-diesel production methods have been developed, among which transesterification using alkali catalyst gives high level of conversion of triglycerides to their corresponding methyl ester in short reaction time. The process of transesterification is affected by the reaction condition, molar ratio of alcohol to oil, type of alcohol, type and amount of catalysts, reaction time and temperature, purity of reactants free fatty acids and water content of oils or fats. In this work, an attempt has been made on review of bio-diesel production, methods of analyzing, bio-diesel standard, resources available, process developed performance in internal combustion engines, teardown analysis of bio-diesel B20 operated vehicle, recommendation for development of bio-fuels, environmental considerations, economic aspects and advantages. The technical tools and process for monitoring the transesterification reaction like TLC, GC, HPLC, GPC, {sup 1}H NMR and NIR have also been summarized in this paper. (author)

Murugesan, A.; Chinnusamy, T.R.; Krishnan, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, K.S. Rangasamy College of Technology, Tiruchengode 637215, Tamil Nadu (India); Umarani, C. [Department of Chemistry, Government Arts College, Salem (India); Subramanian, R. [Department of Automobile Engineering, Institute of Road and Transport Technology, Erode, Tamil Nadu (India); Neduzchezhain, N. [Sabbatical, Department of Mechanical Engineering, BITS, Pilani, Dubai (United Arab Emirates)

2009-05-15

165

Continuous Low Cost Transesterification Process for the Production of Coconut Biodiesel  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Biodiesel, or alkyl ester, is an alternative renewable, biodegradable, and non-toxic diesel fuel produced by the catalytic transesterification of vegetable oil. Here we characterize a system for continuous transesterification of vegetable oil using five continuous stirring tank reactors (5CSTRs. We tested residence times of 16–43min, stirring speeds of 200–800rpm, a catalyst concentration (KOH of 0.25–1 wt% of oil (in gram, different total flow rates of the oil and MeOH, and on the production performance of the 5 stage continuous reactor for transesterification of vegetable oil. Using a molar ratio of oil:methanol of 1:7 and a reaction temperature of 65 °C, we show that a high stirring speed increased the reaction rate, but an excessive stir speed decreased the reaction rate and conversion to biodiesel. Furthermore, a higher catalyst percentage significantly increased the reaction rate and production capacity. A catalyst percentage of 1 wt% of oil gave the best conversion; 99.04 ± 0.05%. The resulting biodiesel esters were characterized for their physical and fuel properties including density, viscosity, iodine volume, acid volume, cloud point, pure point, gross heat of combustion, and volatility. The purity and conversion of the biodiesel was analyzed by HPLC.

Chandra P. Singh

2010-01-01

166

Review of catalytic supercritical water gasification for hydrogen production from biomass  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Hydrogen is defined as an attractive energy carrier due to its potentially higher energy efficiency and low generation of pollutants, which can replace conventional fossil fuels in the future. The governments have invested huge funds and made great efforts on the research of hydrogen production. Among the various options, supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is a most promising method of hydrogen production from biomass. Supercritical water (SCW) has received a great deal of attention as a most suitable reaction medium for biomass gasification because it is safe, non-toxic, readily available, inexpensive and environmentally benign. However, high temperature and pressure are required to meet the minimum reaction condition. Therefore, the high operating cost has become the biggest obstacle to the development of this technology. To overcome this bottleneck, many researchers have carried out intensive research work on the catalytic supercritical water gasification (CSCWG). Based on the previous studies stated in the literature, the authors try to give an overview (but not an exhaustive review) on the recent investigations of CSCWG. Besides, the physicochemical properties of SCW and its contributions in subcritical and supercritical water reaction are also summarized. (author)

Guo, Y.; Wang, S.Z.; Xu, D.H.; Gong, Y.M.; Ma, H.H.; Tang, X.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

2010-01-15

167

Hydrogen Production  

Science.gov (United States)

This presentation provides an introduction to the basics of hydrogen production. Advantages of using hydrogen, information on current global hydrogen production, primary uses for hydrogen and hydrogen production processes are introduced. The presentation consists of 26 slides and may be downloaded in Microsoft Power Point file format.

2012-09-05

168

Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese tallow tree and tung tree. High seed yields from these species are possible because, there stature allows for a third dimension in yield (up). Harvest regimes have already been worked out with tung, and the large seed makes shedding of the seed with tree shakers possible. While tallow tree seed yields can be mind boggling (12,000 kg seed/ha at 40% oil), genotypes that shed seed easily are currently not known. Efficient methods were developed to isolate polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters from bio-diesel. The hypothesis to isolate this class of fatty acids, which are used as popular dietary supplements and prescription medicine (OMACOR), was that they bind transition metal ions much stronger than their harmful saturated analogs. AgBF4 has the highest extraction ability among all the metal ions tested. Glycerol is a key product from the production of biodiesel. It is produced during the transesterification process by cleaving the fatty acids from the glycerol backbone (the fatty acids are used as part of the biodiesel, which is a fatty acid methyl ester). Glycerol is a non-toxic compound with many uses; however, if a surplus exists in the future, more uses for the produced glycerol needs to be found. Another phase of the project was to find an add-on process to the biodiesel production process that will convert the glycerol by-product into more valuable substances for end uses other than food or cosmetics, focusing at present on 1,3-propanediol and lactic acid.All three MSU cultures produced products at concentrations below that of the benchmark microorganisms. There was one notable isolate the caught the eye of the investigators and that was culture J6 due to the ability of this microorganism to co-produce both products and one in particularly high concentrations. This culture with more understanding of its metabolic pathways could prove a useful biological agent for the conversion of glycerol. Heterogeneous catalysis was examined as an alternative to overcome the disadvantages of homogeneous transesterification, such as the presence of salts in the glycer

Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

2008-03-20

169

Oxidation of nitrogen-containing pollutants by novel ferrate(VI) technology: a review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Nitrogen-containing pollutants have been found in surface waters and industrial wastewaters due to their presence in pesticides, dyes, proteins, and humic substances. Treatment of these compounds by conventional oxidants produces disinfection by-products (DBP). Ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O(4)(2-), Fe(VI)) is a strong oxidizing agent and produces a non-toxic by-product Fe(III), which acts as a coagulant. Ferrate(VI) is also an efficient disinfectant and can inactivate chlorine resistant microorganisms. A novel ferrate(VI) technology can thus treat a wide range of pollutants and microorganisms in water and wastewater. The aim of this paper is to review the kinetics and products of the oxidation of nitrogen-containing inorganic (ammonia, hydroxylamine, hydrazine, and azide) and organic (amines, amino acids, anilines, sulfonamides, macrolides, and dyes) compounds by ferrate(VI) in order to demonstrate the feasibility of ferrate(VI) treatment of polluted waters of various origins. Several of the compounds can degraded in seconds to minutes by ferrate(VI) with the formation of non-hazardous products. The mechanism of oxidation involves either one-electron or two-electrons processes to yield oxidation products. Future research directions critical for the implementation of the ferrate(VI)-based technology for wastewater and industrial effluents treatment are recommended. PMID:20390913

Sharma, Virender K

2010-01-01

170

Selection and properties of alternative forming fluids for TRISO fuel kernel production  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: ? Forming fluid selection criteria developed for TRISO kernel production. ? Ten candidates selected for further study. ? Density, viscosity, and surface tension measured for first time. ? Settling velocity and heat transfer rates calculated. ? Three fluids recommended for kernel production testing. - Abstract: Current Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs incorporate TRi-structural ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel, which consists of a spherical fissile fuel kernel surrounded by layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. An internal sol–gel process forms the fuel kernel using wet chemistry to produce uranium oxyhydroxide gel spheres by dropping a cold precursor solution into a hot column of trichloroethylene (TCE). Over time, gelation byproducts inhibit complete gelation, and the TCE must be purified or discarded. The resulting TCE waste stream contains both radioactive and hazardous materials and is thus considered a mixed hazardous waste. Changing the forming fluid to a non-hazardous alternative could greatly improve the economics of TRISO fuel kernel production. Selection criteria for a replacement forming fluid narrowed a list of ?10,800 chemicals to yield ten potential replacement forming fluids: 1-bromododecane, 1-bromotetradecane, 1-bromoundecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, 1-chlorotetradecane, 1-iododecane, 1-iodododecane, 1-iodohexadecane, 1-iodooctadecane, and squalane. The density, viscosity, and surface tension for each potential replacement forming fluid were measured as a function of temperature between 25 °C and 80 °C. Calculated settling velocities and heat transfer rates give an overall column height approximation. 1-bromotetradecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, and 1-iodododecane show the greatest promise as replacements, and future tests will verify their ability to form satisfactory fuel kernels.

2013-01-01

171

Selection and properties of alternative forming fluids for TRISO fuel kernel production  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Forming fluid selection criteria developed for TRISO kernel production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ten candidates selected for further study. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Density, viscosity, and surface tension measured for first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Settling velocity and heat transfer rates calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three fluids recommended for kernel production testing. - Abstract: Current Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs incorporate TRi-structural ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel, which consists of a spherical fissile fuel kernel surrounded by layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. An internal sol-gel process forms the fuel kernel using wet chemistry to produce uranium oxyhydroxide gel spheres by dropping a cold precursor solution into a hot column of trichloroethylene (TCE). Over time, gelation byproducts inhibit complete gelation, and the TCE must be purified or discarded. The resulting TCE waste stream contains both radioactive and hazardous materials and is thus considered a mixed hazardous waste. Changing the forming fluid to a non-hazardous alternative could greatly improve the economics of TRISO fuel kernel production. Selection criteria for a replacement forming fluid narrowed a list of {approx}10,800 chemicals to yield ten potential replacement forming fluids: 1-bromododecane, 1-bromotetradecane, 1-bromoundecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, 1-chlorotetradecane, 1-iododecane, 1-iodododecane, 1-iodohexadecane, 1-iodooctadecane, and squalane. The density, viscosity, and surface tension for each potential replacement forming fluid were measured as a function of temperature between 25 Degree-Sign C and 80 Degree-Sign C. Calculated settling velocities and heat transfer rates give an overall column height approximation. 1-bromotetradecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, and 1-iodododecane show the greatest promise as replacements, and future tests will verify their ability to form satisfactory fuel kernels.

Baker, M.P. [Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); King, J.C., E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu [Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Gorman, B.P. [Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Marshall, D.W. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Fremont Avenue, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2013-01-15

172

Nanotechnology Based Environmentally Robust Primers  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An initiator device structure consisting of an energetic metallic nano-laminate foil coated with a sol-gel derived energetic nano-composite has been demonstrated. The device structure consists of a precision sputter deposition synthesized nano-laminate energetic foil of non-toxic and non-hazardous metals along with a ceramic-based energetic sol-gel produced coating made up of non-toxic and non-hazardous components such as ferric oxide and aluminum metal. Both the nano-laminate and sol-gel technologies are versatile commercially viable processes that allow the ''engineering'' of properties such as mechanical sensitivity and energy output. The nano-laminate serves as the mechanically sensitive precision igniter and the energetic sol-gel functions as a low-cost, non-toxic, non-hazardous booster in the ignition train. In contrast to other energetic nanotechnologies these materials can now be safely manufactured at application required levels, are structurally robust, have reproducible and engineerable properties, and have excellent aging characteristics.

Barbee, T W Jr; Gash, A E; Satcher, J H Jr; Simpson, R L

2003-03-18

173

Agriculture wastes conversion for biofertilizer production using beneficial microorganisms for sustainable agriculture applications  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Aims: The emphasis of this study is to generate new valuable bioproducts from non-toxic cleaning waste for environmental healing technology. Methodology and Results: Comparisons between different types of biofertilizer formulations and the field trial effectiveness were done. Results indicated that biofertilizer C contained the highest N value (1.8% when compared with biofertilizers B and A, which only contained 1.7% and 1.4%, respectively. Biofertilizer A showed significant difference in the total count of yeast, mould, ammonia oxidizing bacteria and nitrate oxidizing bacteria compared to biofertilizer B and C. Meanwhile, biofertilizer C was found to be significantly different from others in Lactobacillus sp. and nitrogen-fixing bacteria count. Photosynthetic total count and Actinomycetes sp. were not noticed in all formulations tested.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: The findings of this study suggest that biofertilizer A is suitable to be used as a promotional biofertilizer in flower and fruit production, biofertilizer B can be used for a leafy crop, while biofertilizer C is good for the growth of roots and stem of plants.

Ali, S. I. S.

2013-01-01

174

Hydrothermal pretreatment of switchgrass and corn stover for production of ethanol and carbon microspheres  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Pretreatment of biomass is viewed as a critical step to make the cellulose accessible to enzymes and for an adequate yield of fermentable sugars in ethanol production. Recently, hydrothermal pretreatment methods have attracted a great deal of attention because it uses water which is a inherently present in green biomass, non-toxic, environmentally benign, and inexpensive medium. Hydrothermal pretreatment of switchgrass and corn stover was conducted in a flow through reactor to enhance and optimize the enzymatic digestibility. More than 80% of glucan digestibility was achieved by pretreatment at 190 oC. Addition of a small amount of K2CO3 (0.45-0.9 wt.%) can enhance the pretreatment and allow use of lower temperatures. Switchgrass pretreated at 190 oC only with water had higher internal surface area than that pretreated in the presence of K2CO3, but both the substrates showed similar glucan digestibility. In comparison to switchgrass, corn stover required milder pretreatment conditions. The liquid hydrolyzate generated during pretreatment was converted into carbon microspheres by hydrothermal carbonization, providing a value-added byproduct. The carbonization process was further examined by GC-MS analysis to understand the mechanism of microsphere formation.

2011-02-01

175

Environmental impact of a coal combustion-desulphurisation plant: abatement capacity of desulphurisation process and environmental characterisation of combustion by-products.  

Science.gov (United States)

The fate of trace elements in a combustion power plant equipped with a wet limestone flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) installation was studied in order to evaluate its emission abatement capacity. With this aim representative samples of feed coal, boiler slag, fly ash, limestone, FGD gypsum and FGD process water and wastewater were analysed for major and trace elements using the following techniques: inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), ion chromatography (IC), ion selective electrode (ISE) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Mass balances were established allowing to determine the element partitioning behaviour. It was found that, together with S, Hg, Cl, F, Se and As were those elements entering in the FGD plant primarily as gaseous species. The abatement capacity of the FGD plant for such elements offered values ranged from 96% to 100% for As, Cl, F, S and Se, and about 60% for Hg. The environmental characterisation of combustion by-products (boiler slag, fly ash and FGD gypsum) were also established according to the Council Decision 2003/33/EC on waste disposal. To this end, water leaching tests (EN-12457-4) were performed, analysing the elements with environmental concern by means of the aforementioned techniques. According to the leaching behaviour of combustion by-products studied, these could be disposed of in landfills for non-hazardous wastes. PMID:16890268

Alvarez-Ayuso, E; Querol, X; Tomás, A

2006-12-01

176

Environmental impact of a coal combustion-desulphurisation plant: Abatement capacity of desulphurisation process and environmental characterisation of combustion by-products  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The fate of trace elements in a combustion power plant equipped with a wet limestone flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) installation was studied in order to evaluate its emission abatement capacity. With this aim representative samples of feed coal, boiler slag, fly ash, limestone, FGD gypsum and FGD process water and wastewater were analysed for major and trace elements using the following techniques: inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), ion chromatography (IC), ion selective electrode (ISE) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Mass balances were established allowing to determine the element partitioning behaviour. It was found that, together with S, Hg, Cl, F, Se and As were those elements entering in the FGD plant primarily as gaseous species. The abatement capacity of the FGD plant for such elements offered values ranged from 96% to 100% for As, Cl, F, S and Se, and about 60% for Hg. The environmental characterisation of combustion by-products (boiler slag fly ash and FGD gypsum) were also established according to the Council Decision 2003/33/EC on waste disposal. To this end, water leaching tests (EN-12457-4) were performed, analysing the elements with environmental concern by means of the aforementioned techniques. According to the leaching behaviour of combustion by-products studied, these could be disposed of in landfills for non-hazardous wastes.

Alvarez-Ayuso, E.; Querol, X.; Tomas, A. [Inst. of Earth Science Jaume Almera, (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Environmental Geology

2006-12-15

177

ABLEDATA: Products  

Science.gov (United States)

... desktop and laptop computers and other kinds of information technology. Major Categories : Software, Hardware, Computer Accessories. Controls Products ... people with disabilities to drive or ride in cars, vans, trucks and buses. Major Categories : Mass Transit ...

178

Product Evaluation  

Product Evaluation Over the last few years the NLS has developed a facility for testing and the development of biotechnology sensors for environmental monitoring. Current projects include an ammonia sensor.

179

The production of monovalent and anti-idiotype antivenom against Mesobuthus eupeus (Scorpionida: Buthidae) venom in rabbits.  

Science.gov (United States)

The antivenom production against poisonous creatures encounters a number of difficulties. Interestingly, according to the network theory the conventional antigens are not necessarily needed for producing antibodies against the venoms. In this investigation, the antivenom against Mesobuthus eupeus venom was produced based on the aforementioned theory. Polyclonal antibodies against M. eupeus venom were obtained from the immunized rabbits and the specific antibodies were isolated. After separation of Fab2, immunization process and production of the monovalent and anti-idiotype, these antivenoms were analyzed for the determination of their neutralizing power. The level of the produced antibodies in different stages of this study was also measured by ELISA assay. Four hundred and fifty micrograms of the venom can be neutralized by 4.2, 18 and 291 mg of monovalent, polyvalent and anti-idiotype antivenom, respectively. The ELISA results revealed that idiotypic antigens were six times more immunogenic than anti-idiotypes. The anti-idiotype antivenom can be produced on a large scale with minimum venom consumption. In addition, they are non-toxicant in immunized animals and can be used as a vaccine in people at the risk of scorpion stings. PMID:24055069

Khoobdel, M; Nayeri Fasaei, B; Zahraei Salehi, T; Khosravi, M; Taheri, M; Koochakzadeh, A; Masihipour, B; Motedayen, M H; Akbari, S

2013-12-15

180

Hydrogen production from formic acid decomposition at room temperature using a Ag-Pd core-shell nanocatalyst  

Science.gov (United States)

Formic acid (HCOOH) has great potential as an in situ source of hydrogen for fuel cells, because it offers high energy density, is non-toxic and can be safely handled in aqueous solution. So far, there has been a lack of solid catalysts that are sufficiently active and/or selective for hydrogen production from formic acid at room temperature. Here, we report that Ag nanoparticles coated with a thin layer of Pd atoms can significantly enhance the production of H2 from formic acid at ambient temperature. Atom probe tomography confirmed that the nanoparticles have a core-shell configuration, with the shell containing between 1 and 10 layers of Pd atoms. The Pd shell contains terrace sites and is electronically promoted by the Ag core, leading to significantly enhanced catalytic properties. Our nanocatalysts could be used in the development of micro polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells for portable devices and could also be applied in the promotion of other catalytic reactions under mild conditions.

Tedsree, Karaked; Li, Tong; Jones, Simon; Chan, Chun Wong Aaron; Yu, Kai Man Kerry; Bagot, Paul A. J.; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.; Smith, George D. W.; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

2011-05-01

 
 
 
 
181

Fiscal 1998 regional consortium R and D project (Regional consortium field). Report on R and D of production technology of hybrid-type biocompatible hard tissue replacing materials (1st fiscal year); 1998 nendo chiiki konsoshiamu kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki konsoshiamu bun'ya (hybrid gata seitai yugo kinosei kososhiki daitai sozai seizo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This project aims at development of high-strength high- biocompatible {beta}-type Ti alloy with lower modulli of elasticity composed of non-toxic elements, phosphate calcium ceramics for improving the biocompatibility and coating technology, and establishment of production technology of hybrid-type biocompatible hard tissue replacing materials. In fiscal 1998, the project promoted the following: Design of high-biocompatible {beta}-type Ti alloy materials, development of thermomechanical treatment for improving dynamic characteristics of such alloy, survey on practical melting and casting technologies and dental precision casting process, evaluation of the biocompatibility of the alloy by cytotoxicity, selection of tools for precision machining and surface finishing, control of contents, orientation and precipitation of biocompatible crystals such as {beta}- Ca(PO{sub 3}){sub 2} fibers for further improvement of the biocompatibility. This paper also outlines the survey results on the market needs, market size and market share for the feasibility of these materials. (NEDO)

NONE

1996-03-01

182

Factors affecting plasmid production in Escherichia coli from a resource allocation standpoint  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmids are being reconsidered as viable vector alternatives to viruses for gene therapies and vaccines because they are safer, non-toxic, and simpler to produce. Accordingly, there has been renewed interest in the production of plasmid DNA itself as the therapeutic end-product of a bioprocess. Improvement to the best current yields and productivities of such emerging processes would help ensure economic feasibility on the industrial scale. Our goal, therefore, was to develop a stoichiometric model of Escherichia coli metabolism in order to (1 determine its maximum theoretical plasmid-producing capacity, and to (2 identify factors that significantly impact plasmid production. Results Such a model was developed for the production of a high copy plasmid under conditions of batch aerobic growth on glucose minimal medium. The objective of the model was to maximize plasmid production. By employing certain constraints and examining the resulting flux distributions, several factors were determined that significantly impact plasmid yield. Acetate production and constitutive expression of the plasmid's antibiotic resistance marker exert negative effects, while low pyruvate kinase (Pyk flux and the generation of NADPH by transhydrogenase activity offer positive effects. The highest theoretical yield (592 mg/g resulted under conditions of no marker or acetate production, nil Pyk flux, and the maximum allowable transhydrogenase activity. For comparison, when these four fluxes were constrained to wild-type values, yields on the order of tens of mg/g resulted, which are on par with the best experimental yields reported to date. Conclusion These results suggest that specific plasmid yields can theoretically reach 12 times their current experimental maximum (51 mg/g. Moreover, they imply that abolishing Pyk activity and/or transhydrogenase up-regulation would be useful strategies to implement when designing host strains for plasmid production; mutations that reduce acetate production would also be advantageous. The results further suggest that using some other means for plasmid selection than antibiotic resistance, or at least weakening the marker's expression, would be beneficial because it would allow more precursor metabolites, energy, and reducing power to be put toward plasmid production. Thus far, the impact of eliminating Pyk activity has been explored experimentally, with significantly higher plasmid yields resulting.

Cunningham Drew S

2009-05-01

183

Phytosanitary products  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

One of a series of directories of Quebec universities, industrial and governmental agencies in Quebec actively involved in research and development of phytosanitary products or services derived from or associated with biomass products. This directory contained standardized entries for 79 organizations from the agriculture, forestry and environmental sectors, active in fields ranging from genetic engineering, fertilizers, crop diseases and pest management, forestry management, harvesting methods and bioconversion. Each entry provided information about major fields of research interest, principal technologies utilized, major equipment, personnel, and name and address of person to be contacted for further information. tabs

1995-01-01

184

Dilepton production  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The general features of dilepton production from nucleon-nucleon and nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Estimates are made of the thermal production rates arising from incoherent nucleon-nucleon scattering and from two-pion annihilation. It may be possible to infer the pion dispersion relation in hot and dense nuclear matter by measuring the invariant mass distribution of back-to-back electrons and positrons in the center of mass frame in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Comparison to the recent data on p + Be -> e/sup +/e/sup -/X at 4.9 GeV from the Bevalac is made.

Gale, C.; Kapusta, J.

1989-05-01

185

Product liability  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In these days of increasing legal actions against the medical profession, it is important for doctors to take heed of new regulations which affect the practice of medicine. The new Consumer Protection Act of 1987 covers product liability. This chapter stresses the importance for doctors of following the guidelines already laid down by the profession.

1991-01-01

186

Production balance  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In terms of the environment, the year 2011 was balanced in the company Slovenske elektrarne. The trend of a high share of electricity production from nuclear and hydro power plants persisted; therefore, a greater part of electricity supplies (88.5%) was not loaded by emissions of harmful substances into the atmosphere. (author)

2012-04-01

187

Iron(VI) and iron(V): environmentally-friendly oxidants in water and wastewater  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The paper summarizes the results of the studies on the treatment of water and wastewater by iron(VI) and iron(V). Fe(VI) and Fe(V) have high oxidizing power, selectivity, and a non-toxic by-product, Fe(III), that makes them environmentally-friendly oxidants. Rates of oxidation increase with a decrease in pH and are related to protonation of Fe(VI) and Fe(V). Oxidation of sulfur- and nitrogen-containing pollutants by Fe(VI) can be accomplished in seconds to minutes with formation of non-hazardous products. Fe(VI) can easily oxidize the amino acid components of microcystins and is a suitable disinfectant for detoxifying toxins in water. The oxidation of pollutants and amino acids with Fe(V) is 3-5 orders of magnitude faster than with Fe(VI). The use of ionizing radiation and photocatalytic techniques in the presence of Fe(VI) results in Fe(V) formation and may have synergistic effects on the oxidation of pollutants and removal of toxins in water and wastewater. (orig.)

Sharma, V.K. [Dept. of Chemistry, Florida Inst. of Tech., Melbourne, FL (United States)

2003-07-01

188

Lepton Production  

CERN Multimedia

*Participation in Soft Photon Study .ce HELIOS Collaboration This experiment aims to settle open questions in the hadronic production of electrons, muons and neutrinos. Prominent among these are e/@m universality, the contribution of charm decay to lepton pair production, and the ``anomalous'' low mass pairs.\\\\ \\\\ The experimental design aims to optimize the combination of: .point begin electron identification .point muon identification .point missing energy measurement for neutrinos .point vertex identification (for @t @= @t^c^h^a^r^m). .point end \\\\ \\\\ The major components of the apparatus are shown in the figure. In the vertex region a proton beam of transverse size @=50~@m impinges on a beryllium target of diameter 50~@m, and high precision tracking in the vertex region is achieved by silicon strip detectors. Charged particle momenta are measured using a dipole magnet and high resolution drift chambers. Electrons are identified by the combination of the transition radiation detector and the finely segment...

2002-01-01

189

Tequila production.  

Science.gov (United States)

Tequila is obtained from the distillation of fermented juice of agave plant, Agave tequilana, to which up to 49% (w/v) of an adjunct sugar, mainly from cane or corn, could be added. Agave plants require from 8 to 12 years to mature and during all this time cleaning, pest control, and slacken of land are required to produce an initial raw material with the appropriate chemical composition for tequila production. Production process comprises four steps: cooking to hydrolyze inulin into fructose, milling to extract the sugars, fermentation with a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert the sugars into ethanol and organoleptic compounds, and, finally, a two-step distillation process. Maturation, if needed, is carried out in white oak barrels to obtain rested or aged tequila in 2 or 12 months, respectively. PMID:7736598

Cedeño, M

1995-01-01

190

Hydrogen production  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Possible means of producing hydrogen are discussed. Emphasis is given on the electrolytic hydrogen production from water electrolysis, at large scale, via the use of renewable electricity (solar, wind, tidal, etc.). Its storage, transport and possible end-uses are also considered.Discutem-se processos de obtenção de hidrogénio. Em particular, considera-se a produção electrolítica de hidrogénio em meio aquoso, à escala industrial, e à custa de energia eléctrica renovável (solar,...

2010-01-01

191

Food production and nutrition in biosphere 2: results from the first mission September 1991 to September 1993  

Science.gov (United States)

The initial test of the Biosphere 2 agricultural system was to provide a nutritionally adequate diet for eight crew members during a two year closure experiment, 1991-1993. The overall results of that trial are presented in this paper. The 2000 m^2 cropping area provided about 80 percent of overall nutritional needs during the two years. Adaptation of the crew to the diet which averaged 2200 calories, 73 g. of protein and 32 g. of fat per person over the course of the two years. The diet was primarily vegetarian, with only small amounts of milk, meat and eggs from the system's domestic animals. The crew experienced 10-20 percent weight loss, most of which occurred in the first six months of the closure reflecting adaptation to the diet and lower caloric intake during that period. Since Biosphere 2 is a tightly sealed system, non-toxic methods of pest and disease control were employed and inedible plant material, domestic animal wastes and human waste-water were processed and nutrients returned to the soil. Crop pests and diseases, especially broad mites and rootknot nematode, reduced yields, and forced the use of alternative crops. Outstanding crops included rice, sweet potato, beets, banana, and papaya. The African pygmy goats were the most productive of the domestic animals. Overall, the agriculture and food processing required some 45% of the crew time.

Silverstone, S. E.; Nelson, M.

192

Food production and nutrition in Biosphere 2: results from the first mission September 1991 to September 1993.  

Science.gov (United States)

The initial test of the Biosphere 2 agricultural system was to provide a nutritionally adequate diet for eight crew members during a two year closure experiment, 1991-1993. The overall results of that trial are presented in this paper. The 2000 m2 cropping area provided about 80 percent of overall nutritional needs during the two years. Adaptation of the crew to the diet which averaged 2200 calories, 73 g. of protein and 32 g. of fat per person over the course of the two years. The diet was primarily vegetarian, with only small amounts of milk, meat and eggs from the system's domestic animals. The crew experienced 10-20 percent weight loss, most of which occurred in the first six months of the closure reflecting adaptation to the diet and lower caloric intake during that period. Since Biosphere 2 is a tightly sealed system, non-toxic methods of pest and disease control were employed and inedible plant material, domestic animal wastes and human waste-water were processed and nutrients returned to the soil. Crop pests and diseases, especially broad mites and rootknot nematode, reduced yields, and forced the use of alternative crops. Outstanding crops included rice, sweet potato, beets, banana, and papaya. The African pygmy goats were the most productive of the domestic animals. Overall, the agriculture and food processing required some 45% of the crew time. PMID:11538814

Silverstone, S E; Nelson, M

1996-01-01

193

Tandem accelerator production of Tb-149 for targeted cancer therapy  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: Alpha emitters are ideally suited to targeted cancer therapy of subclinical lesions as alpha particles have a high linear energy transfer (>100 keV?m) which is about 100 times that of a beta particle. As the range in tissue is several cell diameters, it is possible to limit the radiation dose to the normal tissue resulting in higher therapeutic ratio than is possible for beta particles. This offers a considerable advantage as the dose limiting tissue in radionuclide therapy are the stem cells in bone marrow. Currently, the only two actively researched alpha emitting radionuclides are 211At and 212Bi. We have produced a new class of alpha emitter, 149Tb, with a number of useful properties. The main features of 149Tb are a 17% alpha, 79% electron capture and 4% positron branching ratios, with non toxic daughters. The nuclide also has a number of gamma rays which can be used for imaging and detection during handling. We have produced 149Tb at ANU using the 141Pr(12C,4n)l49Tb reaction and 142Nd(12C,5n)149Dy?149Tb with the Tandem accelerator. In addition, a number of other isotopes are generated as a by-product of the reaction which can be useful, but which also contribute to the contamination of the desired product. Peak yields for 149Tb were found at 67 MeV and 100 MeV respectively. For a current of 1 ?A and operating at 5 MeV above the peak yield with a 10 MeV thick target, saturated activities of 2.5 ?Ci for Pr and 5.5 ?Ci for Nd targets are predicted. This Nd target value compares with a saturated activity of 3.6 ?Ci extrapolated from an half hour bombardment of a 14 MeV thick target with a 102 MeV, 0.33 ?A beam. With an expected efficacy of 100 times that of 131I for killing isolated cancer cells, the activity achievable on this accelerator should be adequate for in vitro tests of 149Tb-labelled monoclonal antibodies against leukemia cells

1996-11-10

194

Product Configuration Systems and Productivity  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Twelve companies have been interviewed with the purpose to get information about technical, economic and organisational matters in respect of Product Configuration Systems (PCS).Combinations of qualitative interviews and quantitative scoring have been used in ranking expected and realized results from implementing PCS. The three highest aggregated scoring expected benefits are: 1)improved quality in specifications, 2)lower turnaround time, 3)less resource intensity.

Pedersen, Jørgen Lindgaard; Edwards, Kasper

2004-01-01

195

Hydrogen production  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Portugal | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Discutem-se processos de obtenção de hidrogénio. Em particular, considera-se a produção electrolítica de hidrogénio em meio aquoso, à escala industrial, e à custa de energia eléctrica renovável (solar, vento, marés, etc.). Fazem-se ainda algumas previsões acerca do armazenamento, transporte e possív [...] eis aplicações do hidrogénio electrolítico. Abstract in english Possible means of producing hydrogen are discussed. Emphasis is given on the electrolytic hydrogen production from water electrolysis, at large scale, via the use of renewable electricity (solar, wind, tidal, etc.). Its storage, transport and possible end-uses are also considered. [...

César A. C., Sequeira; Diogo M. F., Santos.

196

Concrete products  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Increased strength and durability in concrete products can be achieved through the addition of fly ash during the manufacturing process. The properties of concrete are enhanced by fly ash. The benefits include cost and the environment. Fly ash is normally defined as finely divided residue resulting from the combustion of pulverized coal, carried from the combustion chamber to the furnace by exhaust gas. The main applications of fly ash in concrete products are ready mix concrete, bridge decks and support footing, precast structures, blocks and bricks, and pipes. The Canadian Standards Association (CSA) has published standards to ensure that the desired physical properties of the concrete are achieved and the standards are found in CSA A23.1, detailing the engineering materials and mix proportions. The type of fly ash to be used for specific properties is important. Finishing and curing operations must be performed with care. The free lime generated by cement hydration reacts with fly ash, forming additional calcium silicate hydrate. Permeability of the concrete is reduced since the calcium silicate hydrate fills the void resulting from the cement pour. Some of the benefits to be derived from fly ash in concrete are: water reduction, improved workability, high ultimate strength, improved pumpability, and reduced heat of hydration. In addition, the life cycle costs are lower, and great strength is obtained. An environmental benefit results from the reduction of natural resource consumption.

Anon

2002-01-01

197

Effects of addition glycerol co-product of biodiesel in the thermophysical properties of water-glycerol solution applied as secondary coolant  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper evaluates the effects of glycerol concentration on thermophysical properties of water-glycerol solution applied as a secondary coolant in refrigeration systems by expansion-indirect. The processing of triglycerides for biodiesel production generates glycerol as co-product and there are concerns of environmental and economic order on the surplus of glycerol. The addition of glycerol in water alters the colligative and thermophysical properties (melting point, mass, specific heat, thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity). There are studies that prove the feasibility of using glycerol as an additive and this paper has the goal to verify the changes on properties compared with pure water. This comparison was made from data obtained by the software simulation and they analyzed using graphs and tables. It was shown that glycerol increases the density and dynamic viscosity, and reduces the specific heat and thermal conductivity. This behavior of water-glycerol solution is proportional to the mass concentration of glycerol and it is justified because the glycerol has low values of specific heat, thermal conductivity and high viscosity when compared with water. Despite the losses in the thermophysical properties, glycerol shows its potential application, because of the cryoscopic effect and it is a non-toxic substance at low cost. (author)

Medeiros, Pedro Samuel Gomes; Barbosa, Cleiton Rubens Formiga; Fontes, Francisco de Assis Oliveira [Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil). Energy Laboratory. Thermal Systems Studies Group], e-mail: cleiton@ufrnet.br

2010-07-01

198

Identifying Recalled Products  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For ... Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting Products Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Identifying Recalled Products ...

199

On Demand Product Development Customized For Production  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The ultimate intention of this thesis was to analyze the present product development and production process at the client organization and to develop methods to improve the agility of the product development and production process. Thus the organization can be ready for on demand product development and corresponding customization in production by maintaining enough agility. The overall study will help the organization to comprehend the present process improvement potentials and guideline to ...

2012-01-01

200

Crystal structure of a non-toxic mutant of heat-labile enterotoxin, which is a potent mucosal adjuvant.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Two closely related bacterial toxins, heat-labile enterotoxin (LT-I) and cholera toxin (CT), not only invoke a toxic activity that affects many victims worldwide but also contain a beneficial mucosal adjuvant activity that significantly enhances the potency of vaccines in general. For the purpose of vaccine design it is most interesting that the undesirable toxic activity of these toxins can be eliminated by the single-site mutation Ser63Lys in the A subunit while the mucosal adjuvant activit...

Den Akker, F.; Pizza, M.; Rappuoli, R.; Hol, W. G.

1997-01-01

 
 
 
 
201

Ranitidine Drugs as <span class="hlt">Non-Toxic</span> Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel in Hydrochloric Acid Medium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Expired ranitidine was tested as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in 1 M HCl using different techniques: weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The polarization resistance (Rp) value increased with increase in the concentration of the inhibitor. Results obtained revealed that ranitidine performed excellently as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in this medium at 303 K. The protection efficiency increased with increa...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abdel Hameed, R. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23609760"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design of potent, <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> anticancer peptides based on the structure of the antimicrobial peptide, temporin-1CEa.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent advances in the search for novel anticancer agents have indicated that the positively charged antimicrobial peptides have emerged as promising agents offering several advantages over the conventional anticancer drugs. As a naturally occurring, cationic, ?-helical antimicrobial peptide, temproin-1CEa has been proved to exhibit a potent anticancer effect and a moderate hemolytic activity. In order to reduce the hemolytic activity of temporin-1CEa and improve its anticancer potency towards a range of human breast cancer cells, in the present study, six analogs of temporin-1CEa were rationally designed and synthesized. The amphipathicity levels and ?-helical structural patterns of peptides were reserved, while their cationic property and hydrophobicity were changed. The results of MTT and hemolysis assay indicated that the analog peptides displayed an improved anticancer activity and showed an overall optimized therapeutic index. The hydrophobicity of peptides was positively correlated with their hemolytic and antitumor activities. Moreover, the data suggest a strategy of increasing the cationicity while maintaining the moderate hydrophobicity of naturally occurring amphipathic ?-helical peptides to generate analogs with improved cytotoxicity against tumor cells but decreased activity against non-neoplastic cells such as human erythrocytes. This work highlights the potential for rational design and synthesis of improved antimicrobial peptides that have the capability to be used therapeutically for treatment of cancers. PMID:23609760</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Qing-Zhu; Wang, Che; Lang, Lei; Zhou, Yang; Wang, He; Shang, De-Jing</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:45045277"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation of <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> A? fibrils by small heat shock protein under heat-stress conditions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Highlights: ? We examined effect of the quaternary structure of yeast sHsp on A? aggregation. ? A? aggregation was inhibited by the oligomeric form of sHsp, but not by dimeric sHsp. ? The fibrillar amyloids consisted of both A? and dimeric sHsp. ? They exhibited different inner structure and cytotoxicity from authentic A? amyloids. ? These results suggest the formation of new type fibrillar A? amyloid by sHsp. -- Abstract: Small heat shock protein (sHsp) is a molecular chaperone with a conserved alpha-crystallin domain that can prevent protein aggregation. It has been shown that sHsps exist as oligomers (12–40 mer) and their dissociation into small dimers or oligomers is functionally important. Since several sHsps are upregulated and co-localized with amyloid-? (A?) in senile plaques of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), sHsps are thought to be involved in AD. Previous studies have also shown that sHsp can prevent A? aggregation in vitro. However, it remains unclear how the quaternary structure of sHsp influences A? aggregation. In this study, we report for the first time the effect of the quaternary structure of sHsp on A? aggregation using sHsp from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (SpHsp16.0) showing a clear temperature-dependent structural transition between an oligomer (30 °C) and dimer (50 °C) state. A? aggregation was inhibited by the oligomeric form of SpHsp16.0. In contrast, amyloid fibrils were formed in the presence of dimeric SpHsp16.0. Interestingly, these amyloid fibrils consisted of both A? and SpHsp16.0 and showed a low ThT intensity and low cytotoxicity due to their low binding affinity to the cell surface. These results suggest the formation of novel fibrillar A? amyloid with different characteristics from that of the authentic A? amyloid fibrils formed in the absence of sHsp. Our results also suggest the potential protective role of sHsp in AD under stress conditions</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:27012817"> <span id="translatedtitle">Determination of toxic and <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">toxic</span> elements in samples of drinking water supplied of urban areas of Hyderabad</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The quality of drinking water is regulated by most countries by recommended legal requirements. Of special importance for the developing countries is the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommendations of 1984 and onwards. Drinking water is most important material for the human consumption and as such must be free of bacterial pathogenic organism, toxic metals and compounds. In general ground water and surface water are used for drinking the scope of the examination must take into account the type of raw water. The control starts with the source from which the raw water is drawn, and continues through the storage reservoir and the various processing and distribution facilities, finally ending at the consumer end. In present study we have monitored raw water which supplied by canals from Indus River, to filter plant near Hyderabad and finally drinking water is consumed by people in Hyderabad area. The rapid and modern techniques of atomic absorption has been used to analyze and obtain interference free results of analytical interest. (author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=37307"> <span id="translatedtitle">In situ process converts toxic Cr{sup +6} to <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> Cr{sup +3}</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) is a known human carcinogen, and often exists as a soluble and highly reactive metal species. As a result, groundwater contaminated with Cr{sup +6} often requires reclamation. Recently, Groundwater Technology, Inc. (GWT; Trenton, N.J.) has successfully applied to traditional iron reduction and precipitation process in situ, to treat a ``perched`` aquifer (i.e., an aquifer whose geology isolates it from deeper aquifers or surface waters). That aquifer, and the overlying fill, at a former industrial site in Pennsylvania, had significant levels of Cr{sup +6} contamination. Analysis of soil and other granular debris at the site indicated pH of 13, total chromium concentrations of 22 g/kg, with an average Cr{sup +6} concentration of 6.5 g/kg. An estimated 1,500--1,700 yd{sup 3} of this tainted material was delineated over an area 110 by 50 ft, and extended to roughly, 6--10 ft below grade. A shallow, perched aquifer in Pennsylvania located roughly 10--12 ft below grade, discharges into a spillway that drains to the Delaware River. analysis indicated that roughly 75,000 to 100,000 gal of water had been impacted by Cr{sup +6} that had leached from the overlying fill. To remove the source of chromium leachate and gain better access to the shallow, perched aquifer, GWT excavated 1,700 yd{sup 3} of tainted soil (to an average depth of 8 ft), and sent it to a secure disposal facility for decontamination.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:45053705"> <span id="translatedtitle">Elucidating the energetics of the interaction of <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> dietary pigment curcumin with human serum albumin: A calorimetric study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Highlights: • Curcumin binds to HSA with affinity of the order of 105 M?1. • The binding was favoured by negative enthalpy and positive entropy changes. • The binding was dominated by non-polyelectrolytic forces. • Negative heat capacity value along with enthalpy–entropy compensation was observed. -- Abstract: Thermodynamic quantities for the interaction of the anticancer dietary pigment curcumin with human serum albumin were measured by using isothermal titration calorimetry. The equilibrium constant of the complex formation at T = 293.15 K was found to be (5.25 ± 0.05) 105 M?1. The binding was exothermic with T?S0 = (24.82 ± 0.01) kJ · mol?1, where ?S0 is the standard molar entropy change and ?Ho = ?(7.28 ± 0.04) kJ · mol?1, where ?Ho is the standard molar enthalpy change. The stoichiometry of binding was established to be 1:1. The equilibrium constant decreased with increasing Na+ concentration. The equilibrium constant decreased from (5.25 ± 0.05) · 105 M?1 to (2.88 ± 0.03) · 105 M?1 by increasing the salt concentration from (10 to 50) mM. Both polyelectrolytic and non-polyelectrolytic forces contributed to the standard molar Gibbs free energy change. However the contribution from the latter was dominant and almost invariant at all Na+ concentrations. The negative standard molar heat capacity change along with significant enthalpy–entropy compensation suggests the involvement of multiple weak non-covalent forces in the binding process</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=doajarticles::2151fc381b8ec147be12bfdf82e966ab"> <span id="translatedtitle">Emulsifying Activity and Stability of a <span class="hlt">Non-Toxic</span> Bioemulsifier Synthesized by Microbacterium sp. MC3B-10</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A previously reported bacterial bioemulsifier, here termed microbactan, was further analyzed to characterize its lipid component, molecular weight, ionic character and toxicity, along with its bioemulsifying potential for hydrophobic substrates at a range of temperatures, salinities and pH values. Analyses showed that microbactan is a high molecular weight (700 kDa), non-ionic molecule. Gas chromatography of the lipid fraction revealed the presence of palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids; thus ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Juan Carlos Camacho-Chab; Jean Guézennec; Manuel Jesús Chan-Bacab; Elvira Ríos-Leal; Corinne Sinquin; Raquel Muñiz-Salazar; La Rosa-garci?a, Susana Del C.; Manuela Reyes-Estebanez; Benjamín Otto Ortega-Morales</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_________7::d3043f3ac016249e48684c4e3dcadb0b"> <span id="translatedtitle">Emulsifying Activity and Stability of a <span class="hlt">Non-Toxic</span> Bioemulsifier Synthesized by Microbacterium sp MC3B-10</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A previously reported bacterial bioemulsifier, here termed microbactan, was further analyzed to characterize its lipid component, molecular weight, ionic character and toxicity, along with its bioemulsifying potential for hydrophobic substrates at a range of temperatures, salinities and pH values. Analyses showed that microbactan is a high molecular weight (700 kDa), non-ionic molecule. Gas chromatography of the lipid fraction revealed the presence of palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids; thus ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Camacho-chab, Juan Carlos; Guezennec, Jean; Chan-bacab, Manuel Jesus; Rios-leal, Elvira; Sinquin, Corinne; Muniz-salazar, Raquel; La Rosa-garcia, Susana Del C.; Reyes-estebanez, Manuela; Ortega-morales, Benjamin Otto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3972192&rendertype=abstract"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Engineered <span class="hlt">Non-Toxic</span> Superantigen Increases Cross Presentation of Hepatitis B Virus Nucleocapsids by Human Dendritic Cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Virus like particles (VLPs) are potent immunogens capable of priming strong protective antibody responses due to their repetitive structural arrangement and affinity for specific B cell receptors. By contrast, T cell responses to VLPs can be weak due to inefficient uptake and processing by antigen presenting cells. We report here a novel strategy for increasing the T cell reactivity of a VLP, the nucleocapsid of hepatitis B virus, through covalent coupling of M1, an engineered form of the Streptococcal superantigen SMEZ2, that binds MHC II with high affinity but lacks its T cell mitogenic capability. M1:HBcAg conjugates bound to dendritic cells and were efficiently endocytosed into late endosomes. Human dendritic cells pulsed with M1:HBcAgs stimulated HBV-specific CD8+ T cells more effectively than cells pulsed with native capsids indicating that the modified VLP was more effectively cross presented by APCs. Coupling of M1 was also able to induce significantly greater reactivity of human CD4+ T cells specific for a common T-helper epitope. These studies indicate the potential of recombinant superantigens to act as flexible molecular adjuvants that can be incorporated into various subunit vaccine platforms leading to enhanced T cell reactivity in humans.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McIntosh, Julie D.; Manning, Kristy; Chokshi, Shilpa; Naoumov, Nikolai V.; Fraser, John D.; Dunbar, P. Rod; Taylor, John A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=22224322"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation of <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> A? fibrils by small heat shock protein under heat-stress conditions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Highlights: ? We examined effect of the quaternary structure of yeast sHsp on A? aggregation. ? A? aggregation was inhibited by the oligomeric form of sHsp, but not by dimeric sHsp. ? The fibrillar amyloids consisted of both A? and dimeric sHsp. ? They exhibited different inner structure and cytotoxicity from authentic A? amyloids. ? These results suggest the formation of new type fibrillar A? amyloid by sHsp. -- Abstract: Small heat shock protein (sHsp) is a molecular chaperone with a conserved alpha-crystallin domain that can prevent protein aggregation. It has been shown that sHsps exist as oligomers (12–40 mer) and their dissociation into small dimers or oligomers is functionally important. Since several sHsps are upregulated and co-localized with amyloid-? (A?) in senile plaques of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), sHsps are thought to be involved in AD. Previous studies have also shown that sHsp can prevent A? aggregation in vitro. However, it remains unclear how the quaternary structure of sHsp influences A? aggregation. In this study, we report for the first time the effect of the quaternary structure of sHsp on A? aggregation using sHsp from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (SpHsp16.0) showing a clear temperature-dependent structural transition between an oligomer (30 °C) and dimer (50 °C) state. A? aggregation was inhibited by the oligomeric form of SpHsp16.0. In contrast, amyloid fibrils were formed in the presence of dimeric SpHsp16.0. Interestingly, these amyloid fibrils consisted of both A? and SpHsp16.0 and showed a low ThT intensity and low cytotoxicity due to their low binding affinity to the cell surface. These results suggest the formation of novel fibrillar A? amyloid with different characteristics from that of the authentic A? amyloid fibrils formed in the absence of sHsp. Our results also suggest the potential protective role of sHsp in AD under stress conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sakono, Masafumi [Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); PRESTO, JST, Saitama (Japan); Utsumi, Arata [Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei-shi, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Zako, Tamotsu, E-mail: zako@riken.jp [Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tetsuya; Yohda, Masafumi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei-shi, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Maeda, Mizuo [Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18801367"> <span id="translatedtitle">The influence of <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> concentrations of DDT and DDE on the old world vulture estrogen receptor alpha.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seven of the nine vulture species in South Africa are listed as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) red list. From these, the Cape Griffon vulture (Gyps corprotheres) is the most endangered species in the region. Although inadequate nutritional support has been blamed on the constant decline in populations, the process of vulture restaurants has failed to improve the population status over the last twenty years. One possible reason for the decline may be an underlying reproductive disorder as described in endocrine disruptive syndromes. Both DDT and p,p'-DDE have been detected previously at very high concentrations in the mid 1980s, with lower concentrations still being detectable as late as 2001. To establish the effect of DDT and DDE, the vulture estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) was sequenced from two species using 5' and 3' rapid amplification cDNA ends (RACE). Using transient transfected mammalian cell assays, vulture ERalpha estrogen-dependent transcription activity was validated using various estrogens and DDT derivatives. The receptor assay was sensitive to p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE with EC(50) of 2.41x10(-6), 3.47x10(-7) and 3.81x10(-5)M. When compared to results obtained from human, zebrafish, chicken, salamander and turtle, the vulture ERalpha showed high sensitivity to o,p'-DDT and intermediately responsive to p,p'-DDE. Vulture ERalpha is, however, not responsive to the DDT and DDE levels reported in the plasma of vultures from the last population survey, indicating that the Southern African vulture are not currently exposed to disruptive levels of these contaminants. PMID:18801367</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Naidoo, Vinny; Katsu, Yoshinao; Iguchi, Taisen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______642::80ecc030e6e9912aa83c4d973bc82bb8"> <span id="translatedtitle">The influence of <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> concentrations of DDT and DDE on the old world vulture estrogen receptor alpha</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seven of the nine vulture species in South Africa are listed as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) red list. From these, the Cape Griffon vulture (Gyps corprotheres) is the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23261462"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation of <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> A? fibrils by small heat shock protein under heat-stress conditions.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Small heat shock protein (sHsp) is a molecular chaperone with a conserved alpha-crystallin domain that can prevent protein aggregation. It has been shown that sHsps exist as oligomers (12-40 mer) and their dissociation into small dimers or oligomers is functionally important. Since several sHsps are upregulated and co-localized with amyloid-? (A?) in senile plaques of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), sHsps are thought to be involved in AD. Previous studies have also shown that sHsp can prevent A? aggregation in vitro. However, it remains unclear how the quaternary structure of sHsp influences A? aggregation. In this study, we report for the first time the effect of the quaternary structure of sHsp on A? aggregation using sHsp from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (SpHsp16.0) showing a clear temperature-dependent structural transition between an oligomer (30 °C) and dimer (50 °C) state. A? aggregation was inhibited by the oligomeric form of SpHsp16.0. In contrast, amyloid fibrils were formed in the presence of dimeric SpHsp16.0. Interestingly, these amyloid fibrils consisted of both A? and SpHsp16.0 and showed a low ThT intensity and low cytotoxicity due to their low binding affinity to the cell surface. These results suggest the formation of novel fibrillar A? amyloid with different characteristics from that of the authentic A? amyloid fibrils formed in the absence of sHsp. Our results also suggest the potential protective role of sHsp in AD under stress conditions. PMID:23261462</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sakono, Masafumi; Utsumi, Arata; Zako, Tamotsu; Abe, Tetsuya; Yohda, Masafumi; Maeda, Mizuo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=370211"> <span id="translatedtitle">Partition coefficients and phase behavior for <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> ice inhibitors from quantum mechanical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In our continuing efforts to design new anti-icing compounds for jet fuel, aircraft wings, and runways, we report values of the water-hexadecane partition coefficient calculated using AMSOL and COSMO and compare with experimental results whenever possible. In addition, we present phase-behavior results as predicted from the so-called mean-field lattice-gas Flory-Huggins (FH) theory. The FH interaction parameter, related to the cohesive energy density and the Hildebrand solubility parameter, was obtained from equilibrium molecular dynamics (NM) trajectories of mixed and de-mixed systems. Radial distribution functions for intermolecular oxygen-oxygen separations for hydrogen-bond donors and acceptors were also calculated from the MD trajectories. Integration over the peak indicative of hydrogen bonding yields the average number of nearest-neighbor water molecules, which correlates with the anti-icing performance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trohalaki, S.; Pachter, R. [Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_5x53uj&server=pvlbsrch12&v%3astate=root%7croot-20-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm182929.htm&rid=Ndoc29&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=f2236d5542a58b736925fab611783b4b&"> <span id="translatedtitle">FDA 101: <span class="hlt">Product</span> Recalls</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Archived ... Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol ? - Resources for You ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003973.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Urinary incontinence <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There are many <span class="hlt">products</span> to help you manage urinary incontinence . You can decide which <span class="hlt">product</span> to choose based ... clean and dry your skin. WHERE TO BUY URINARY INCONTINENCE <span class="hlt">PRODUCTS</span> You can find most <span class="hlt">products</span> at your ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_kn0Mmx&server=pvlbsrch10&v%3astate=root%7croot-10-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm248864.htm&rid=Ndoc19&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=efecfe7683356c55d68e7579d7655147&"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identifying Recalled <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates ... Drugs Food Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Identifying ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_kn0Mmx&server=pvlbsrch10&v%3astate=root%7croot-10-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm182929.htm&rid=Ndoc17&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=f2236d5542a58b736925fab611783b4b&"> <span id="translatedtitle">FDA 101: <span class="hlt">Product</span> Recalls</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Archived Content The content on this page ... Drugs Food Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol ? - Resources ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=20030570"> <span id="translatedtitle">Are plastic heat exchangers feasible for solar water heaters? Part 1: A review of the technology, codes and standards, and commercial <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As a first step toward assessing the possibility of using plastic heat exchangers in solar water heating systems, the authors present <span class="hlt">product</span> design specifications for water-to-water and antifreeze-to-water heat exchangers, review the plumbing codes and standards as they apply to use of heat exchangers and polymer components, and discuss the suitability of commercially available plastic heat exchangers. Analysis of overall heat transfer shows that a counterflow, tube-in-shell heat exchanger made of thin wall plastic tubes is capable of meeting the thermal requirements of a solar water heating system with less than a 50% increase in heat transfer surface area compared to a commercial copper heat exchanger. The plumbing codes allow use of approved polymer heat exchangers or piping in domestic solar water heating systems. Single wall heat exchangers can be used with a <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> heat transfer fluid, such as propylene glycol. Unfortunately, commercially available plastic heat exchangers are either prohibitively expensive, too small, or incapable of withstanding the pressure and temperature requirements of this application. A review of polymer materials for this application is given in part 2 of this paper.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Davidson, J.; Oberreit, D.; Liu, W.; Mantell, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21668515"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of bovine cytochrome P450 single-nucleotide polymorphism, forage type and body condition on <span class="hlt">production</span> traits in cattle.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Relating single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) to cows with acceptable <span class="hlt">productivity</span> could benefit cattle breeders in areas where tall fescue is the predominant forage. This study aimed to (i) identify SNPs in bovine cytochrome P450 3A28 (CYP3A28) and (ii) determine the associations between SNP genotype, forage and cow body condition (BC). Genotype (CC, CG or GG) and forage [Kentucky-31 wild-type endophyte-infected tall fescue (KY+) vs. bermudagrass] effects on milk volume and quality were determined in Herd 1 cows (123 cows); in Herd 2 (99 cows), genotype and BC (low vs. moderate) effects on ovarian follicle size, calving date and calving per cent were determined; and in Herd 3 (114 cows), effects of genotype and fescue cultivar [KY+ vs. <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> endophyte-infected tall fescue (HiMag4)] were related to calving per cent, calving date and weaning weights of both cow and her calf. A cytosine (C) to guanine (G) transversion at base 994 (C994G) in CYP3A28 was identified. There was a genotype × forage type interaction (p bermudagrass had greater milk protein percentage in relation to other cows in the herd. In Herd 2, BC and genotype × BC tended (p < 0.10) to influence follicle size and Julian calving date respectively. Diameter of the largest follicle tended to be larger in moderate BC than in low-BC cows; whereas, CC and CG cows in moderate BC and homozygous (CC and GG) cows in low BC tended to calve 14 days earlier in relation to CG cows in low BC. In Herd 3, there was a genotype × forage type interaction (p < 0.05) on calving per cent, Julian calving date and calf weaning weight. In this study, genetic alterations (G allele at C994G) coupled with nutritional factors (low BC and toxic tall fescue) resulted in overall lower <span class="hlt">productivity</span> in cows. PMID:21668515</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sales, M A; Larson, M J; Reiter, S T; Brown, A H; Brown, M A; Looper, M L; Coffey, K P; Rosenkrans, C F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:90%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> <div id="refine_search_form_div" style="right:140px"> <form id="simple_search_form" method="post" action="http://worldwidescience.org/cgi-bin/wwsproxy.pl" onsubmit="return ValidationUtils.validateSimpleSearch('refine_search_terms');"> <input name="viewId" value="view0" type="hidden" /><input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /> <input id="search_terms" name="expression" value="non-toxic non-hazardous product" class="TextInput" type="text" style="width:250; 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height:17pt"/> <input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /><button type="submit" class="search_submit" id="search_submit" title="New Search">Search</button> </form>  <br>  </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23891539"> <span id="translatedtitle">A review of current knowledge on toxic benthic freshwater cyanobacteria--ecology, toxin <span class="hlt">production</span> and risk management.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Benthic cyanobacteria are found globally in plethora of environments. Although they have received less attention than their planktonic freshwater counterparts, it is now well established that they produce toxins and reports of their involvement in animal poisonings have increased markedly during the last decade. Most of the known cyanotoxins have been identified from benthic cyanobacteria including: the hepatotoxic microcystins, nodularins and cylindrospermopsins, the neurotoxic saxitoxins, anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a and dermatotoxins, such as lyngbyatoxin. In most countries, observations of toxic benthic cyanobacteria are fragmented, descriptive and in response to animal toxicosis events. Only a limited number of long-term studies have aimed to understand why benthic proliferations occur, and/or how toxin <span class="hlt">production</span> is regulated. These studies have shown that benthic cyanobacterial blooms are commonly a mixture of toxic and <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> genotypes and that toxin concentrations can be highly variable spatially and temporally. Physiochemical parameters responsible for benthic proliferation vary among habitat type with physical disturbance (e.g., flow regimes, wave action) and nutrients commonly identified as important. As climatic conditions change and anthropogenic pressures on waterways increase, it seems likely that the prevalence of blooms of benthic cyanobacteria will increase. In this article we review current knowledge on benthic cyanobacteria: ecology, toxin-producing species, variables that regulate toxin <span class="hlt">production</span> and bloom formation, their impact on aquatic and terrestrial organisms and current monitoring and management strategies. We suggest research needs that will assist in filling knowledge gaps and ultimately allow more robust monitoring and management protocols to be developed. PMID:23891539</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Catherine, Quiblier; Susanna, Wood; Isidora, Echenique-Subiabre; Mark, Heath; Aurélie, Villeneuve; Jean-François, Humbert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______312::9d598a703e08277bdd6264747c128e7b"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Product</span> lines for digital information <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Digital information <span class="hlt">products</span> are an important class of widely used digital <span class="hlt">products</span>, whose core benefit is the delivery of information or education (e.g., electronic books, online newspapers, e-learning courses).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pankratius, Victor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od______1687::f263da2266ab97e0c7c278ec92018580"> <span id="translatedtitle">Labour <span class="hlt">productivity</span> and rice <span class="hlt">production</span> in Bangladesh</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we examine the significance of labour <span class="hlt">productivity</span> and use of inputs in explaining technical efficiency of rice <span class="hlt">production</span> in Bangladesh. We find that higher labour <span class="hlt">productivity</span> can stimulate high efficiency gains, but increased use of inputs (except land) induces negative marginal effect on technical efficiency. While more use of land, improved seeds and fertilizers contributes to the rate of labour-<span class="hlt">productivity</span> induced marginal efficiency gain, any additional labour depresses ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Selim, Sheikh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986RMTME.......35L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Productivity</span>, components of automated <span class="hlt">production</span> systems viewed</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The developmet and expanded use of robotics was initiated to increase labor <span class="hlt">productivity</span>, ensure stable high quality instruments and necessary safety equipment, and to reduce the cost of <span class="hlt">products</span>. Robotics was introduced to cold stamping machining, loading and unloading, transport and warehousing, etc. Approximately 200 robots were introduced which replaced 50 people. Robotics and robotized technology applied to industrial plants for automation flexible <span class="hlt">production</span> systems, increase <span class="hlt">productivity</span>, quality improvement, and reduction of manpower is discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Letsik, V. I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.environdec.com/en/PCR/Detail/?Pcr=7900"> <span id="translatedtitle">Absorbent hygiene <span class="hlt">products</span> - Environmental <span class="hlt">Product</span> Declarations - <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Absorbent Hygiene <span class="hlt">Products</span> are a subset of <span class="hlt">products</span> from UN CPC/division 32/subclass 32193: toilet paper, handkerchiefs, towels, serviettes, napkins for babies, tampons, and similar household, sanitary or hospital articles, and articles of apparel, of paper pulp, paper, cellulose wadding or ... Detailed information Replacing : PCR 2007:06 Absorbent hygiene <span class="hlt">products</span> (de-registered) Name: Absorbent hygiene <span class="hlt">products</span> CPC Code(s): 32193 Toilet paper, handkerchiefs, towels, serviettes, napkins for babies, tampons, and similar household, sanitary or hospital articles, and articles of apparel, of paper pulp, paper, cellulose ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.environdec.com/en/PCR/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules - Environmental <span class="hlt">Product</span> Declarations - <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">...vegetables, pulses and potatoes 2012-08-28 Fruits and nuts, except kiwi fruit 2012-08-24 Bakery <span class="hlt">products</span> 2012-04-17 Wood particle and fibreboards 2012-03-09 On-line text based information, on-line books ... 2012-01-09 Books, in print 2011-12-22 Builders' joinery and carpentry of wood 2011-12-19 Electricity, steam and hot/cold water generation and distrib... ...stones and minerals Textile and leather <span class="hlt">products</span>Furniture and other transportable goods Forestry, wood and paper <span class="hlt">products</span>Plastic, glass and chemical <span class="hlt">products</span> Metals and metal ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.environdec.com/en/PCR/Detail/?Pcr=5942"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cement - Environmental <span class="hlt">Product</span> Declarations - <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Cement - Environmental <span class="hlt">Product</span> Declarations - <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules /en/PCR/Detail/ Log on to environdec Remember me Not a member? Register here!... Login Using EPDs Creating EPDs <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules (PCR) En Español In Italiano På Svenska Türkçe V Ceštine Subscribe to our newsletter ...Register Sitemap Login PCR Search What are <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules? PCR Development PCR Forum Search Comment this PCR Post Using EPDs PCR Search ...Cement Search Pcr Cement PCR information This document provides <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules (PCR) for the assessment of the environmental performance of UN ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.environdec.com/en/PCR/Detail/?Pcr=7934"> <span id="translatedtitle">Beer - Environmental <span class="hlt">Product</span> Declarations - <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Beer - Environmental <span class="hlt">Product</span> Declarations - <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules Beer - Environmental <span class="hlt">Product</span> Declarations - <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules Log on to environdec Remember ...Development PCR Forum Search Comment this PCR Post Using EPDs PCR Search Beer Search Pcr Beer PCR information This document provides <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules ...PCR) for the assessment of the environmental performance of UN CPC 2431 Beer made from malt and the declaration of this performance by an EPD.... Detailed information Name: Beer CPC Code(s): 2431 Beer made from malt Approval date: 2011-12-01 Registration No: 2011:21 ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_5QjXTl&server=pvlbsrch13&v%3astate=root%7croot-50-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm182929.htm&rid=Ndoc53&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=f2236d5542a58b736925fab611783b4b&"> <span id="translatedtitle">FDA 101: <span class="hlt">Product</span> Recalls</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... Enter Search terms Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics ... Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_5QjXTl&server=pvlbsrch13&v%3astate=root%7croot-50-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm248864.htm&rid=Ndoc55&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=efecfe7683356c55d68e7579d7655147&"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identifying Recalled <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... Enter Search terms Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics ... Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_NqvuEu&server=pvlbsrch11&v%3astate=root%7croot-10-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm248864.htm&rid=Ndoc18&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=efecfe7683356c55d68e7579d7655147&"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identifying Recalled <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... Administration A to Z Index Follow FDA En Español Enter Search terms Home Food Drugs Medical Devices ... <span class="hlt">Products</span> Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Identifying Recalled <span class="hlt">Products</span> Search the Consumer Updates Section ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/ProtectingKidsfromTobacco/FlavoredTobacco/ucm183198.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Flavored Tobacco <span class="hlt">Product</span> Facts</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... around other flavored tobacco <span class="hlt">products</span> like bidis and hookahs have found that young smokers report choosing flavored ... want to be reminded of bubblegum.” 8 Health Effects All tobacco <span class="hlt">products</span>, including flavored tobacco <span class="hlt">products</span> are ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhDT.......143A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extremophile mediated hydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> for hydrogenation of substrates in aqueous media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Catalytic hydrogenation reactions are pervasive throughout our economy, from <span class="hlt">production</span> of margarine as food, liquid fuels for transportation and chiral drugs such as L-DOPA. H2 <span class="hlt">production</span> from non-fossil fuel feedstocks is highly desirable for transition to the "Hydrogen Economy". Also, the rates of hydrogenation reactions that involve a substrate, H 2 gas and a catalyst are often limited by the solubility of H2 in solvent. The present research thus envisioned designing water-soluble catalysts that could effectively utilize biologically produced H2 in a coupled system to hydrogenate substrates in homogeneous mode (two-phase system). Biological <span class="hlt">production</span> of H2 as an end <span class="hlt">product</span> or byproduct of the metabolism of organisms that operate under strict anaerobic conditions has been proposed. However, contrary to what was previously observed, Thermotoga neapolitana, belonging to the order of Thermotogales efficiently produces H2 gas under microaerobic conditions (Van Ooteghem et al. 2004). For H2 <span class="hlt">production</span> by T. neapolitana in the bacterial growth medium (DSM 5068) at an optimum temperature of 70 C, our results in batch mode show that: (1) H2 was produced from glucose though with 16% efficiency, the rest goes to biomass <span class="hlt">production</span>, (2) H2 gas was produced even when the cultures were inoculated under microaerobic conditions (up to 8% (v/v) O2) suggesting a protective mechanism for one or more [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases in T. neapolitana, (3) H2 <span class="hlt">production</span> was pH dependent but addition of simple, <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> physiological buffering additives such as Methylene succinic acid increased H2 <span class="hlt">production</span> and (4) H2 <span class="hlt">production</span> rate varied linearly in the 100--6800 kPa pressure range. We then screened various water-soluble metal catalysts in batch mode and selected the RhCl3.3H2O/TPPTS (TPPTS is a water-soluble ligand) system that achieved 86% hydrogenation of Methylene succinic acid (an olefin) in an aqueous medium pressurized with preformed H2. When water was replaced with the DSM 5068 medium containing cultures of T. neapolitana and no external H2 was added, hydrogenation was observed confirming the possibility of developing an integrated BioCat/ChemCat system. The 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to confirm the identity of Methyl succinic acid, the hydrogenated <span class="hlt">product</span> of the olefin. The concept was extended to Glycerol, a by-<span class="hlt">product</span> of biodiesel that was catalytically upgraded to mixed alcohols in an aqueous medium. The next logical step is to evaluate these results in a continuous flow mode. The demonstrated results have implications in the development of next-generation hydrogenation reaction systems that would lead to the <span class="hlt">production</span> of biofuels and other chemicals, depending on the substrate used.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anjom, Mouzhgun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.forskningsdatabasen.dk/Search.external?operation=search&search-query=ti:Micro+Products+-+Product+Development+and+Design"> <span id="translatedtitle">Micro <span class="hlt">Products</span> - <span class="hlt">Product</span> Development and Design</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://forskningsbasen.deff.dk/?lang=eng">DEFF Research Database (Denmark)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Innovation within the field of micro and nano technology is to a great extent characterized by cross-disciplinary skills. The traditional disciplines like e.g. physics, biology, medicine and engineering are united in a common development process that can only take place in the presence of multi-disciplinary competences. One example is sensors for chemical analysis of fluids, where chemistry, biology and flow mechanics all influence the design of the <span class="hlt">product</span> and thereby the industrial fabrication of the <span class="hlt">product</span> [1]. On the technological side the development has moved very fast, primarily driven by the need of the electronics industry to create still smaller chips with still larger capacity. Therefore the manufacturing technologies connected with micro/nano <span class="hlt">products</span> in silicon are relatively highly developed compared to the technologies used for manufacturing micro <span class="hlt">products</span> in metals, polymers and ceramics. For all technologies, however, it is a continuously increasing challenge to create the operational basis for an industrial <span class="hlt">production</span> of micro <span class="hlt">products</span>. As the <span class="hlt">products</span> through <span class="hlt">product</span> development processes are made applicable to a large number of customers, the pressure in regard to developing <span class="hlt">production</span> technologies that make it possible to produce the <span class="hlt">products</span> at a reasonable price and in large numbers is growing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hansen, Hans Nørgaard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ufpel.edu.br/revistas/index.php/cienciadamadeira/article/view/80"> <span id="translatedtitle">NATURAL <span class="hlt">PRODUCTS</span> AS PRESERVATIVES FOR FAST GROWTH WOODS - A REVIEW</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=searchArticles">Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabela normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Wood is a universal material, economic, historic and sustainable. The paucity of species resistant to biological degradation forced man to use other less durable, especially fast growing, from reforestation, as some species of Eucalyptus and Pinus. These species have moderate or no resistance to wood decay organisms need special treatment and preservatives. The <span class="hlt">products</span> currently used preservatives are highly toxic and are potential environmental hazards and human health. Thus, there is a growing need to develop effective chemicals, <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> to humans and the environment. The direction of research has aimed to develop environmentally friendly <span class="hlt">products</span> and economic viability, and an alternative is the use of Crude Tall Oil (CTO, which is a waste processing coniferous softwood pulp for the <span class="hlt">production</span> of kraft paper. The tall oil as a protective agent, has been considered a promising method for significantly reducing the capillary water absorption of sapwood, thereby removing one of the factors that favor the wood being attacked by fungi and insects: water, oxygen and nutrients. Research shows that the tall oil can be used neat, either fresh or distilled, or in combination with biocides.A madeira é um material universal, econômico, histórico e sustentável. A escassez de espécies resistentes à degradação biológica obrigou o homem a utilizar outras menos duráveis, principalmente de rápido crescimento, provenientes de reflorestamentos, como algumas espécies de Eucalyptus e de Pinus. Estas espécies possuem moderada ou nenhuma resistência ao ataque dos organismos xilófagos e necessitam de tratamentos preservantes. Os produtos preservantes utilizados atualmente possuem elevado grau de toxicidade, sendo potenciais riscos ambientais e para a saúde humana.  Assim, há uma crescente necessidade de desenvolver produtos químicos eficazes, não tóxicos para os seres humanos e para o meio ambiente. O direcionamento das pesquisas tem objetivado desenvolver produtos ambientalmente corretos e com viabilidade econômica, e uma alternativa é o uso do Crude Tall Oil (CTO, que é um resíduo no processamento de polpa de coníferas resinosas, para produção do papel Kraft. O tall oil, como agente de proteção, tem sido considerado promissor por reduzir significativamente a absorção de água capilar do alburno, removendo, assim um dos fatores que favorecem a madeira ser atacada por fungos e insetos: água, oxigênio e nutrientes. Pesquisas mostram que o tall oil pode ser utilizado puro, seja crude ou destilado, ou em combinação com biocidas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ricardo Marques Barreiros</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3792051&rendertype=abstract"> <span id="translatedtitle">Polyenylpyrrole Derivatives Inhibit NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and Inflammatory Mediator Expression by Reducing Reactive Oxygen Species <span class="hlt">Production</span> and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two polyenylpyrroles from a soil ascomycete Gymnoascus reessii were previously identified as hit compounds in screening for cytotoxicity against lung cancer cells. These compounds and various analogs, which have been previously synthesized and tested for anti-lung cancer cell activity, were tested for anti-inflammatory activity. After preliminary screening for cytotoxicity for RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells, the <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> compounds were tested for anti-inflammatory activity using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 cells. Compounds 1h, 1i, and 1n reduced LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) <span class="hlt">production</span>, with respective ED50 values of 15 ± 2, 16 ± 2, and 17 ± 2 µM. They also reduced expression of inducible NO synthase and interleukin-6 (IL-6) without affecting cyclooxygenase-2 expression. Compound 1h also reduced secretion of IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-? by LPS-activated J774A.1 murine macrophage cells, primary mice peritoneal macrophages, and JAWSII murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and reduced NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated interleukin-1? (IL-1?) secretion by LPS + adenosine triphosphate-activated J774A.1 and JAWSII cells. The underlying mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory activity of compound 1h were found to be a decrease in LPS-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) <span class="hlt">production</span>, mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, and NF-?B activation and a decrease in ATP-induced ROS <span class="hlt">production</span> and PKC-? phosphorylation. These results provide promising insights into the anti-inflammatory activity of these conjugated polyenes and a molecular rationale for future therapeutic intervention in inflammation-related diseases. They also show how compound 1h regulates inflammation and suggest it may be a new source for the development of anti-inflammatory agents to ameliorate inflammation- and NLRP3 inflammasome-related diseases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hua, Kuo-Feng; Chou, Ju-Ching; Lam, Yulin; Tasi, Yu-Ling; Chen, Ann; Ka, Shuk-Man; Fang, Zhanxiong; Liu, May-Lan; Yang, Feng-Ling; Yang, Yu-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chich; Wu, Shih-Hsiung</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24116148"> <span id="translatedtitle">Polyenylpyrrole derivatives inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation and inflammatory mediator expression by reducing reactive oxygen species <span class="hlt">production</span> and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two polyenylpyrroles from a soil ascomycete Gymnoascus reessii were previously identified as hit compounds in screening for cytotoxicity against lung cancer cells. These compounds and various analogs, which have been previously synthesized and tested for anti-lung cancer cell activity, were tested for anti-inflammatory activity. After preliminary screening for cytotoxicity for RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells, the <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> compounds were tested for anti-inflammatory activity using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 cells. Compounds 1h, 1i, and 1n reduced LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) <span class="hlt">production</span>, with respective ED50 values of 15 ± 2, 16 ± 2, and 17 ± 2 µM. They also reduced expression of inducible NO synthase and interleukin-6 (IL-6) without affecting cyclooxygenase-2 expression. Compound 1h also reduced secretion of IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-? by LPS-activated J774A.1 murine macrophage cells, primary mice peritoneal macrophages, and JAWSII murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and reduced NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated interleukin-1? (IL-1?) secretion by LPS + adenosine triphosphate-activated J774A.1 and JAWSII cells. The underlying mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory activity of compound 1h were found to be a decrease in LPS-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) <span class="hlt">production</span>, mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, and NF-?B activation and a decrease in ATP-induced ROS <span class="hlt">production</span> and PKC-? phosphorylation. These results provide promising insights into the anti-inflammatory activity of these conjugated polyenes and a molecular rationale for future therapeutic intervention in inflammation-related diseases. They also show how compound 1h regulates inflammation and suggest it may be a new source for the development of anti-inflammatory agents to ameliorate inflammation- and NLRP3 inflammasome-related diseases. PMID:24116148</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hua, Kuo-Feng; Chou, Ju-Ching; Lam, Yulin; Tasi, Yu-Ling; Chen, Ann; Ka, Shuk-Man; Fang, Zhanxiong; Liu, May-Lan; Yang, Feng-Ling; Yang, Yu-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chich; Wu, Shih-Hsiung</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.environdec.com/es/The-International-EPD-System/Member-Organisations/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Miembros - Environmental <span class="hlt">Product</span> Declarations - <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Miembros - Environmental <span class="hlt">Product</span> Declarations - <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules Miembros - Environmental <span class="hlt">Product</span> Declarations - <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules Log on to environdec Remember ...EPD® Declaración climática Contacto Search Uso de EPDs El Sistema Internacional EPD® Miembros Organizaciones de todo el mundo participan en el Sistema Internacional EPD&174...; Miembros en el Sistema Internacional EPD Es posible que las organizaciones o asociaciones que estén interesados ó tengan un valioso y profundo conocimiento de ...PCR y ACV participen como miembros y formen parte del futuro desarrollo del Sistema Internacional de EPD®. Los miembros están invitados a ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.forskningsdatabasen.dk/Search.external?operation=search&search-query=ti:PDT+%28Product+Data+Technology%29%2C+Production+and+Society"> <span id="translatedtitle">PDT (<span class="hlt">Product</span> Data Technology), <span class="hlt">Production</span> and Society</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://forskningsbasen.deff.dk/?lang=eng">DEFF Research Database (Denmark)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Information and communication technology (ICT) constitute a genuine technical revolution by enabling a dynamic and flexible support or automation of knowledge and information work. Bearing in mind that <span class="hlt">products</span> are frozen knowledge, ICT as known will change the way we produce <span class="hlt">products</span> dramatically. The use of ICT in engineering of <span class="hlt">products</span> constitutes <span class="hlt">product</span> data technology (PDT).This paper presents a a basic platform for an understanding the ongoing revolution with focus on the PDT-area taking outset in the fundamental elements of knowledge and information work: creation, transformation, transmission, storing, and retrieval of knowledge and information.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vesterager, Johan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:41014624"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Product</span> variety and reliability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Murthy et al. [Murthy DNP, Rausand M, Virtanen S. Investment in new <span class="hlt">product</span> reliability, Reliability Engineering and System Safety (accepted for publication)] proposed an approach to decide on <span class="hlt">product</span> reliability in the context of new <span class="hlt">product</span> development and identified two tasks for execution as part of the overall process. In this paper, we focus on the first task-determining the <span class="hlt">product</span> reliability requirements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:90%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> <div id="refine_search_form_div" style="right:140px"> <form id="simple_search_form" method="post" action="http://worldwidescience.org/cgi-bin/wwsproxy.pl" onsubmit="return ValidationUtils.validateSimpleSearch('refine_search_terms');"> <input name="viewId" value="view0" type="hidden" /><input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /> <input id="search_terms" name="expression" value="non-toxic non-hazardous product" class="TextInput" type="text" style="width:250; 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height:17pt"/> <input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /><button type="submit" class="search_submit" id="search_submit" title="New Search">Search</button> </form>  <br>  </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=research_asb::623b61965c656eaee9a01de02ec2909b"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermophilic Biohydrogen <span class="hlt">Production</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dark fermentative hydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> at thermophilic conditions is attractive process for biofuel <span class="hlt">production</span>. From thermodynamic point of view, higher temperatures favor biohydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span>. Highest hydrogen yields are always associated with acetate, or with mixed acetate- butyrate type fermentation. On the contrary the hydrogen yield decreases, with increasing concentrations of lactate, ethanol or propionate. Major factors affecting dark fermentative biohydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> are organic lo...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/AEC/AEF/1994/milani_rain.php"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rain Forest <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Students move from lab station to lab station observing samples of <span class="hlt">products</span> from the Rain Forest. At each station they record the name of the <span class="hlt">product</span>, write a description and sketch a diagram of the <span class="hlt">product</span>. For homework, students prepare an advertisement for the Rain Forest and its <span class="hlt">products</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Meg Milani (South San Francisco High School REV)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-07-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=21265224"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Product</span> variety and reliability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Murthy et al. [Murthy DNP, Rausand M, Virtanen S. Investment in new <span class="hlt">product</span> reliability, Reliability Engineering and System Safety (accepted for publication)] proposed an approach to decide on <span class="hlt">product</span> reliability in the context of new <span class="hlt">product</span> development and identified two tasks for execution as part of the overall process. In this paper, we focus on the first task-determining the <span class="hlt">product</span> reliability requirements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Murthy, D.N.P. [Division of Mechanical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)], E-mail: p.murthy@uq.edu.au; Hagmark, P.-E.; Virtanen, S. [Institute of Machine Design and Operation, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995emp..rept..127P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Successful <span class="hlt">product</span> realization strategies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Product</span> realization is the process of defining, designing, developing, and delivering <span class="hlt">products</span> to the market. While the main thrust of this JTEC panel was to conduct a complete investigation of the state of Japanese low-cost electronic packaging technologies, it is very difficult to totally separate the development of technology and <span class="hlt">products</span> from the <span class="hlt">product</span> realization process. Japan's electronics firms adhere to a <span class="hlt">product</span> realization strategy based on a strong customer focus, a consistent commitment to excellence in design, and a cost-effective approach to technology commercialization. The Japanese <span class="hlt">product</span>-pull strategy has been a successful driver and influencing factor in every aspect of the <span class="hlt">product</span> development cycle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peeples, John; Boulton, William R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hrcak.srce.hr/index.php?show=clanak&id_clanak_jezik=4012"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probiotic fermented dairy <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=searchArticles">Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available Fermented dairy <span class="hlt">products</span> are the most popular vehicle used in theindustry for the implantation of the probiotic microflora in humans. Therefore this paper provides an overview of new knowledge on probiotic fermented dairy <span class="hlt">products</span>. It involves historical developments, commercial probiotic microorganisms and <span class="hlt">products</span>, and their therapeutic properties, possibilities of quality improvement of different types of newly developed fermented dairy <span class="hlt">products</span> together with fermented goat’s milk <span class="hlt">products</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adnan Tamime</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=doajarticles::60e619558c798e84cec9f6e2635e783e"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probiotic fermented dairy <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fermented dairy <span class="hlt">products</span> are the most popular vehicle used in theindustry for the implantation of the probiotic microflora in humans. Therefore this paper provides an overview of new knowledge on probiotic fermented dairy <span class="hlt">products</span>. It involves historical developments, commercial probiotic microorganisms and <span class="hlt">products</span>, and their therapeutic properties, possibilities of quality improvement of different types of newly developed fermented dairy <span class="hlt">products</span> together with fermented goat’s milk <span class="hlt">products</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.madehow.com/"> <span id="translatedtitle">How <span class="hlt">Products</span> Are Made</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">How <span class="hlt">Products</span> Are Made explains and details the manufacturing process of a wide variety of <span class="hlt">products</span>, from daily household items to complicated electronic equipment and heavy machinery. The site provides descriptions of the step-by-step assembly and manufacturing process (complemented with illustrations and diagrams). Background information is also provided, such as how the item works, who invented the <span class="hlt">product</span>, raw materials used, <span class="hlt">product</span> applications, by-<span class="hlt">products</span>, possible future developments, quality-control procedures, etc.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______571::74df83c10f19c9a67aa745786e80e38e"> <span id="translatedtitle">Framework of <span class="hlt">product</span> experience:</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we introduce a general framework for <span class="hlt">product</span> experience that applies to all affective responses that can be experienced in human-<span class="hlt">product</span> interaction. Three distinct components or levels of <span class="hlt">product</span> experiences are discussed: aesthetic experience, experience of meaning, and emotional experience. All three components are distinguished in having their own lawful underlying process. The aesthetic level involves a <span class="hlt">product’s</span> capacity to delight one or more of our sensory modalities....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Desmet, P.; Hekkert, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cscanada.net/index.php/est/article/view/2103"> <span id="translatedtitle">Replacing an Existing <span class="hlt">Product</span>'s <span class="hlt">Production</span> Within a Similar <span class="hlt">Product</span> <span class="hlt">Production</span> by Using a Replacement Technique</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=searchArticles">Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available <p>Existing processes for specific <span class="hlt">products</span> cannot sustain operational profitably over a long period. The <span class="hlt">product’s</span> price is not much higher than the raw material costs and it is necessary to make certain modifications by using savings or replacements during <span class="hlt">product</span> <span class="hlt">production</span>. In our case, the <span class="hlt">production</span> of methanol having a low market value would be replaced by the <span class="hlt">production</span> of dimethyl ether (DME. This would create greater demand, especially from the environmental perspective, and can be achieved by using replacement technique. We want to keep and transfer as many of the existing units from the previous <span class="hlt">production</span> to the new <span class="hlt">production</span>. Dimethyl ether is an organic compound with the formula CH<sub>3</sub>OCH<sub>3</sub>.  It is a colourless gas that is a useful precursor to other organic compounds, and an aerosol propellant. DME can act as a clean fuel when burned in engines properly optimized for DME. The direct <span class="hlt">production</span> of DME would be cheaper than indirect when applied for new buildings. The same applies for retrofits, or the replacing of existing methanol - specific <span class="hlt">production</span> – a similar DME <span class="hlt">product</span> plant would be more rational for the direct <span class="hlt">production</span> of DME, because of greater efficiency, <span class="hlt">productivity</span> of DME <span class="hlt">production</span>, profit, and for 20 % more electricity generation.</p><p><strong>Key</strong><strong> </strong><strong>words:</strong> Dimetyl ether; Replacement; Methanol process; Indirect method; Direct method; Retrofit</p></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anita Kova? Kralj</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=21368864"> <span id="translatedtitle">Green fracing : as the U.S. frac debate rolls on, service firms are developing cleaner fracing <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Apache Corporation fracing operations in British Columbia's Horn River Basin have involved 274 frac stimulations in 16 shale gas wells. The multi-stage horizontal well completions in the Horn River Basin are massive operations. The American Petroleum Institute has stated that hydraulic fracturing is so important that without it, the industry would lose 45 percent of domestic natural gas <span class="hlt">production</span> and 17 percent of oil <span class="hlt">production</span> within five years. The Marcellus fairway which covers parts of Pennsylvania, New York, Ohio, West Virginia and Maryland, covers about 10 times the area of the core Barnett shale play. <span class="hlt">Production</span> from the Marcellus may reach 489 trillion cubic feet of natural gas over a 50-year period. However, the amount of hydraulic fracing required for Marcellus <span class="hlt">production</span> has raised concerns about potential harm to underground aquifers. Green Century Capital Management and New York State Common Retirement Fund are among the investor groups that are asking for greater transparency about the business and environmental risks associated with fracturing. Schlumberger has developed OpenFRAC, a new group of fracturing fluid additives that are all water-based. In order to eliminate contamination risks to formations, aquifers and <span class="hlt">product</span> handlers, Trican unveiled its EcoClean-GSW slickwater system, which includes <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span>, biodegradable and non-bioaccumulating additives. Sanjel Corporation in Canada also plans to unveil a new friction reducer as an alternative to polyacrylamides. However, in the short term, there may be higher costs and lower efficiency with the new enviro-friendly fracing fluids and additives. Water issues must also be addressed. Since slickwater fracing uses a lot of water, most companies are looking at the recycling and re-use of water. The B.C. Oil and Gas Commission is seeking to establish some ground rules to avoid conflict. A new Oil and Gas Activities Act will expand the commission's power to manage water withdrawals and provide for monitoring, water testing and reporting of drilling and fracing programs. 4 refs., 4 figs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Budd, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:39083363"> <span id="translatedtitle">The transformation sequence of cement-asbestos slates up to 1200 deg. C and safe recycling of the reaction <span class="hlt">product</span> in stoneware tile mixtures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cement-asbestos is the main asbestos containing material still found in most of the European countries such as Italy. Man- and weathering-induced degradation of the cement-asbestos slates makes them a source of dispersion of asbestos fibres and represents a priority cause of concern. This concern is the main prompt for the actual policy of abatement and disposal of asbestos containing materials in controlled wastes. An alternative solution to the disposal in dumping sites is the direct temperature-induced transformation of the cement-asbestos slates into <span class="hlt">non-hazardous</span> mineral phases. This patented process avoids the stage of mechanical milling of the material before the treatment, which improves the reactivity of the materials but may be critical for the dispersion of asbestos fibres in working and life environment. For the first time, this paper reports the description of the reaction path taking place during the firing of cement-asbestos slates up to the complete transformation temperature, 1200 deg. C. The reaction sequence was investigated using different experimental techniques such as optical and electron microscopy, in situ and ex situ quali-quantitative X-ray powder diffraction. The understanding of the complex reaction path is of basic importance for the optimization of industrial heating processes leading to a safe recycling of the transformed <span class="hlt">product</span>. For the recycling of asbestos containing materials, the Italian laws require that the <span class="hlt">product</span> of the crystal chemical transformation of asbestos containing materials must be entirely asbestos-free, and should not contain more than 0.1 wt% fraction of the carcinogenic substances such as cristobalite. Moreover, if fibrous phases other than asbestos (with length to diameter ratio >3) are found, they must have a geometrical diameter larger than 3 ?m. We have demonstrated that using an interplay of different experimental techniques, it is possible to safely verify the complete transformation of asbestos minerals in this temperature-induced process. The <span class="hlt">product</span> of transformation of cement-asbestos (CATP) has a phase composition similar to that of a natural or a low temperature clinker with the exception of having a larger content of aluminium, iron and magnesium. This <span class="hlt">product</span> can be safely recycled for the <span class="hlt">production</span> of stoneware tile mixtures. The addition of 3-5 mass% of CATP does not bear significant variations to the standard parameters of white porcelain tile mixtures</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3417558"> <span id="translatedtitle">Boholmycin, a new aminoglycoside antibiotic. I. <span class="hlt">Production</span>, isolation and properties.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A novel aminoglycoside antibiotic, boholmycin, was produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus H617-25 isolated from a soil sample collected in Bohol Island, the Philippines. It has a pseudotetrasaccharide structure composed of a heptose, two aminosugars and dicarbamoyl-scyllo-inositol. Intrinsic antibacterial activity of boholmycin is weak but it exhibits broad spectrum activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria including aminoglycoside-resistant strains. Boholmycin is <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> in mice at 1,000 mg/kg intravenously. PMID:3417558</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saitoh, K; Tsunakawa, M; Tomita, K; Miyaki, T; Konishi, M; Kawaguchi, H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.forskningsdatabasen.dk/Search.external?operation=search&search-query=ti:Making+Product+Customization+Profitable"> <span id="translatedtitle">Making <span class="hlt">Product</span> Customization Profitable</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://forskningsbasen.deff.dk/?lang=eng">DEFF Research Database (Denmark)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The main result presented in this paper is the Framework for <span class="hlt">Product</span> Family Master Plan. This framework supports the identification of a <span class="hlt">product</span> architecture for companies that customize <span class="hlt">products</span> and services. The framework has five coherent aspects, the market, <span class="hlt">product</span> assortment, supply-<span class="hlt">production</span>, organization and work processes. One of the unique results is that these aspects are linked, which make it possible to make explicit recommendations for an architecture (the way a <span class="hlt">product</span> family should be structured with clear interfaces), architecture elements and consequences. By means of a case study it is shown that the potential EBIT (Earning Before Interests and Taxes) improvement of the case company is 10%.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Hvam, Lars</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.euractiv.com/print/sustainability/integrated-product-policy-ipp/article-117512"> <span id="translatedtitle">Integrated <span class="hlt">Product</span> Policy (IPP)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Integrated <span class="hlt">Product</span> Policy (IPP) Published on EurActiv (http://www.euractiv.com) Source URL: http://www.euractiv....com/ sustainability/integrated-<span class="hlt">product</span>-policy-ipp/article-117512 Integrated <span class="hlt">Product</span> Policy (IPP) Published: 21 September 2006 | Updated: 07 November 2012 On ...June 2003, the Commission finally adopted its long-awaited Communication on Integrated <span class="hlt">Product</span> Policy (IPP) opting for a more voluntary approach to greener <span class="hlt">products</span>. ... IPP seeks to minimise environmental degradation caused by <span class="hlt">products</span> throughout their whole life-cycle. Milestones In its Communication, the Commission presented the following ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=5384998"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Productivity</span> Management Program: Manual</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Department of Energy (DOE) has an ongoing effort to maximize <span class="hlt">productivity</span>, including its <span class="hlt">Productivity</span> Management Program (PMP), Manpower Management Survey Program (MMSP) and the Manpower utilization Reporting System (MURS). The <span class="hlt">productivity</span> effort has three major goals: to develop quantitative and qualitative measures against which the <span class="hlt">productivity</span> of individual organizations and functions can be measured; to provide a systematic process by which managers can measure their <span class="hlt">productivity</span> and incorporate the results in formal reporting systems to Departmental management, the Office of Management and Budget, Congress and other appropriate bodies; and to promote <span class="hlt">productivity</span> improvement.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=22063421"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of pine bark and compost on the biological denitrification process of <span class="hlt">non-hazardous</span> landfill leachate: Focus on the microbiology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In an attempt to optimize the cost-efficiency of landfill leachate treatment by biological denitrification process, our study focused on finding low-cost alternatives to traditional expensive chemicals such as composted garden refuse and pine bark, which are both available in large amount in South African landfill sites. The overall objective was to assess the behaviour of the bacterial community in relation to each substrate while treating high strength landfill leachates. Denitrification processes in fixed bed reactors were simulated at laboratory scale using anaerobic batch tests with immature compost and pine bark. High strength leachate was simulated using a solution of water and nitrate at a concentration of 500 mg l{sup -1}. Results suggest that pine bark released large amounts of phenolic compounds and hydroxylated benzene rings, which both can delay the acclimatization time and inhibit the biological denitrification (only 30% efficiency). Furthermore, presence of potential pathogens like Enterobacter and Pantoea agglomerans prevents the applicability of the pine bark in full-scale operations. On the other hand, lightly composted garden refuse (CGR) offered an adequate substrate for the formation of a biofilm necessary to complete the denitrification process (total nitrate removal observed within 7 days). CGR further contributed to a rapid establishment of an active consortium of denitrifiers including Acinetobacter, Rhizobium, Thermomonas, Rheinheimera, Phaeospirillum and Flavobacterium. Clearly the original composition, nature, carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) and degree of maturity and stability of the substrates play a key role in the denitrification process, impacting directly on the development of the bacterial population and, therefore, on the long-term removal efficiency.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trois, Cristina, E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Coulon, Frederic; Polge de Combret, Cecile [Centre for Resource Management and Efficiency, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Martins, Jean M.F.; Oxarango, Laurent [Laboratoire d' etude de Transferts en Hydrologie et Environnement, UMR 5564 (CNRS/INPG/IRD/UJF), Universite de Grenoble, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:43130226"> <span id="translatedtitle">Real-time, digital pulse-shape discrimination in <span class="hlt">non-hazardous</span> fast liquid scintillation detectors: Prospects for safety and security</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) in fast, organic scintillation detectors is a long-established technique used to separate neutrons and ? rays in mixed radiation fields. In the analogue domain the method can achieve separation in real time, but all knowledge of the pulses themselves is lost thereby preventing the possibility of any post- or repeated analysis. Also, it is typically reliant on electronic systems that are largely obsolete and which require significant experience to set up. In the digital domain, PSD is often more flexible but significant post-processing has usually been necessary to obtain neutron/?-ray separation. Moreover, the scintillation media on which the technique relies usually have a low flash point and are thus deemed hazardous. This complicates the ease with which they are used in industrial applications. In this paper, results obtained with a new portable digital pulse-shape discrimination instrument are described. This instrument provides real-time, digital neutron/? separation whilst preserving the synchronization with the time-of-arrival for each event, and realizing throughputs of 3 x 106 events per second. Furthermore, this system has been tested with a scintillation medium that is non-flammable and not hazardous. (authors)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:7263681"> <span id="translatedtitle">Methode of preparation on mainly organic waste liquids containing radioactive or toxic materials for <span class="hlt">non-hazardeous</span> and safe handling, transport and disposal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Liquid waste containing organic radioactive or toxic material is solidified in blocks; the activity of the liquids may amount to 0-5 curies/l per solid block. Solidification is achieved by mixing with one or several monomeric monovinyl or polyvinyl compounds and polymerisation catalizers and by subsequent polymerisation. This occurs at temperatures in the range between 15 and 150"0C. The liquid waste is charged in the range between 20 and 75 wt.%. With reference only to the polymerization mixture the monovinyl compounds are charged between 30 and 98%, the polyvinyl compounds between 2 and 30% and the catalizers between 0.01 and 10%. As to waste, all organic substances or adducts of extraction solvents with inorganic acids or salts are suited. As monovinyl compounds, styrene, vinyl toluene or methyl acrylate, as polyvinyl compounds, divinyl benzene and trivinyl benzene, and as catalizers, acetyl peroxide are used. Swelling as well as neutralizing agents may be added to the mixtures. The solidification is especially suited for tri-n-butyl-phosphate. (DG/PB)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cds.cern.ch/record/1461300/files/BOivzSJJcqhDA.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Standard Specification for ESD Controlled Garments Required in Cleanrooms and Controlled Environments for Spacecraft for <span class="hlt">Non-Hazardous</span> and Hazardous Operations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://cdsweb.cern.ch/">CERN Document Server</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1.1 This test method covers the measurement of the heat-transfer rate or the heat flux to the surface of a solid body (test sample) using the measured transient temperature rise of a thermocouple located at the null point of a calorimeter that is installed in the body and is configured to simulate a semi-infinite solid. By definition the null point is a unique position on the axial centerline of a disturbed body which experiences the same transient temperature history as that on the surface of a solid body in the absence of the physical disturbance (hole) for the same heat-flux input. 1.2 Null-point calorimeters have been used to measure high convective or radiant heat-transfer rates to bodies immersed in both flowing and static environments of air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen, and mixtures of these and other gases. Flow velocities have ranged from zero (static) through subsonic to hypersonic, total flow enthalpies from 1.16 to greater than 4.65 × 101 MJ/kg (5 × 102 to greater than 2 × 104 ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20554377"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of pine bark and compost on the biological denitrification process of <span class="hlt">non-hazardous</span> landfill leachate: focus on the microbiology.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In an attempt to optimize the cost-efficiency of landfill leachate treatment by biological denitrification process, our study focused on finding low-cost alternatives to traditional expensive chemicals such as composted garden refuse and pine bark, which are both available in large amount in South African landfill sites. The overall objective was to assess the behaviour of the bacterial community in relation to each substrate while treating high strength landfill leachates. Denitrification processes in fixed bed reactors were simulated at laboratory scale using anaerobic batch tests with immature compost and pine bark. High strength leachate was simulated using a solution of water and nitrate at a concentration of 500 mg l(-1). Results suggest that pine bark released large amounts of phenolic compounds and hydroxylated benzene rings, which both can delay the acclimatization time and inhibit the biological denitrification (only 30% efficiency). Furthermore, presence of potential pathogens like Enterobacter and Pantoea agglomerans prevents the applicability of the pine bark in full-scale operations. On the other hand, lightly composted garden refuse (CGR) offered an adequate substrate for the formation of a biofilm necessary to complete the denitrification process (total nitrate removal observed within 7 days). CGR further contributed to a rapid establishment of an active consortium of denitrifiers including Acinetobacter, Rhizobium, Thermomonas, Rheinheimera, Phaeospirillum and Flavobacterium. Clearly the original composition, nature, carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) and degree of maturity and stability of the substrates play a key role in the denitrification process, impacting directly on the development of the bacterial population and, therefore, on the long-term removal efficiency. PMID:20554377</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trois, Cristina; Coulon, Frédéric; de Combret, Cécile Polge; Martins, Jean M F; Oxarango, Laurent</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:90%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> <div id="refine_search_form_div" style="right:140px"> <form id="simple_search_form" method="post" action="http://worldwidescience.org/cgi-bin/wwsproxy.pl" onsubmit="return ValidationUtils.validateSimpleSearch('refine_search_terms');"> <input name="viewId" value="view0" type="hidden" /><input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /> <input id="search_terms" name="expression" value="non-toxic non-hazardous product" class="TextInput" type="text" style="width:250; 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height:17pt"/> <input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /><button type="submit" class="search_submit" id="search_submit" title="New Search">Search</button> </form>  <br>  </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od________70::fd953a8d9d86dd6d9f375e407db798ad"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of pine bark and compost on the biological denitrification process of <span class="hlt">non-hazardous</span> landfill leachate: Focus on the microbiology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In an attempt to optimize the cost-efficiency of landfill leachate treatment by biological denitrification process, our study focused on finding low-cost alternatives to traditional expensive chemicals such as composted garden refuse and pine bark, which are both available in large amount in South African landfill sites. The overall objective was to assess the behaviour of the bacterial community in relation to each substrate while treating high strength landfill leachates. Denitrification pr...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Troisa, Cristina; Coulon, Frederic; Polge Combret, Ce?cile; Martins, Jean M. F.; Oxarango, Laurent</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_GttGAG&server=pvlbsrch14&v%3astate=root%7croot-10-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm248864.htm&rid=Ndoc17&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=efecfe7683356c55d68e7579d7655147&"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identifying Recalled <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Section Contents Menu Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_GttGAG&server=pvlbsrch14&v%3astate=root%7croot-10-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm182929.htm&rid=Ndoc15&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=f2236d5542a58b736925fab611783b4b&"> <span id="translatedtitle">FDA 101: <span class="hlt">Product</span> Recalls</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... 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Consumers Consumer Updates Section Contents Menu Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_NqvuEu&server=pvlbsrch11&v%3astate=root%7croot-10-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm182929.htm&rid=Ndoc19&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=f2236d5542a58b736925fab611783b4b&"> <span id="translatedtitle">FDA 101: <span class="hlt">Product</span> Recalls</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... Administration A to Z Index Follow FDA En Español Enter Search terms Home Food Drugs Medical Devices ... <span class="hlt">Products</span> Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol ? - Resources for You Sign up for Consumer Updates ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://archive.defra.gov.uk/environment/business/products/roadmaps/motors.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electric motor <span class="hlt">product</span> roadmaps</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">Oct 15, 2009 ... heating and lighting <span class="hlt">products</span>; electric motors; domestic and office appliances ... \\with motors include resource depletion (including precious metals in ... the metal \\<span class="hlt">products</span> machinery & equipment sector, the chemicals sector, ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_H7KJRh&server=pvlbsrch10&v%3astate=root%7croot-90-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm248864.htm&rid=Ndoc91&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=efecfe7683356c55d68e7579d7655147&"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identifying Recalled <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... may have a recalled <span class="hlt">product</span>. 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FoodSafety.gov: Your Gateway to Federal Food Safety Information - Page Last Updated: 12/07/2013 Note: If ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_PPKdU6&server=pvlbsrch12&v%3astate=root%7croot&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm248864.htm&rid=Ndoc9&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=efecfe7683356c55d68e7579d7655147&"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identifying Recalled <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... Recall Information for Consumers Recalls, Market Withdrawals, & Safety Alerts Recalled <span class="hlt">Product</span> Photos on Flickr - - Related Consumer Updates FDA 101: <span class="hlt">Product</span> Recalls - From First Alert to Effectiveness Checks [ARCHIVED] Start at the Store: ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://archive.defra.gov.uk/rural/documents/policy/dso/annex2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Annex 1: <span class="hlt">Productivity</span> measure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">This measure of rural <span class="hlt">productivity</span> has been developed in conjunction with the \\Office for National Statistics' ... Government-supported trainees (from DfES and \\DWP) and ... <span class="hlt">Productivity</span> in R80, compared to regional; performance = 100. 80. \\80. ×.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/lpsc10.sci.life.lp_product/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Product</span> Life Cycle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this media-rich lesson featuring LOOP SCOOPS videos, students think about where materials in everyday <span class="hlt">products</span> come from, and learn that knowing about <span class="hlt">product</span> life cycles can help us make decisions that reduce waste and pollution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Foundation, Wgbh E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od______2198::278469b779351e7e06aaa11132782938"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PRODUCTION</span> SYSTEM ORGANIZATION OF THE WOOD <span class="hlt">PRODUCT</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the chapter the basic information about the company producing wooden <span class="hlt">product</span> for home, garden, as well as windows, doors and floors, was presented. The object of the research is the sandbox with a fixed roof, which is produced by this company. <span class="hlt">Production</span> process depicted technologically was presented. In the research the BOST survey – Toyota management principles in questions was used, E4 area, connected with the 3rd Toyota management principle and characteristics of respo...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Borkowski, Stanis?aw; Ingaldi, Manuela; Jagusiak-kocik, Marta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______258::c225d3a3163847f602b3e8e580c00bdc"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corporate Greening : <span class="hlt">Product</span> and <span class="hlt">Production</span> Perspectives</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This thesis describes corporate greening in general, and specifically the environmental technology (ET) sector as a green sector. The thesis has also particular focus on <span class="hlt">production</span> and <span class="hlt">products</span> related aspects and the influence of the environmental profile of the ET sector on the environmental engagement of companies in the sector. The study is based on a questionnaire-based survey, online surveys and on semi-structured open-ended interviews. The organizations within the ET sector were identi...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Guziana, Bozena</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=doajarticles::af9d2dc6c426e80e000f890258ab3386"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dry alcohol <span class="hlt">production</span> plant</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for dry alcohol <span class="hlt">production</span> plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects a <span class="hlt">production</span> plant with a capacity of 40 m3/y was manufactured, at "Zorka Pharma", Šabac in 1995-1996. The <span class="hlt">product</span> meets all quality demands, as well as environmental regulations. The dry alcohol <span class="hlt">production</span> process is fully automatiz...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______185::6a4f566cbb6fd50a4ea3c287d2811aef"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed multiattribute <span class="hlt">product</span> differentiation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We develop a two-stage model for versioning <span class="hlt">products</span> with respect to both vertical and horizontal attributes. At first, a firm positions its top-quality “flagship” <span class="hlt">product</span> in a market with an imperfectly known distribution of tastes and reservation prices. In the second stage, the firm learns these consumer characteristics and has the option of extending its <span class="hlt">product</span> line by versioning the flagship <span class="hlt">product</span> using pure horizontal differentiation, quality degrading, or both. The firm's noncon...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weber, Thomas A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=doajarticles::7a266d36fc3bf18f7fe3f4f22fbf67c7"> <span id="translatedtitle">Procyclical <span class="hlt">Productivity</span> in Manufacturing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the cyclical behavior of labor <span class="hlt">productivity</span> in eighty industries of the Chilean manufacturing sector in the 1979-2001 period. We find that labor <span class="hlt">productivity</span> at the sector-level is procyclical but it is a-cyclical when using aggregate data. We provide an analytical and empirical explanation for this divergence. We also use an econometric model to quantify the determinants of <span class="hlt">productivity</span>. The results indicate that technology shocks account for one half of <span class="hlt">productivity</span> growth, thus su...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LUCAS NAVARRO; RAIMUNDO SOTO</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______206::d3f61de6047b51f88b112cd4995c3903"> <span id="translatedtitle">Growth, <span class="hlt">productivity</span> and employment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Productivity</span> comparisons need to be based on a careful definition of the objectives. Labour <span class="hlt">productivity</span> per hour worked is the best measure of prosperity per effort at any time, but can sometimes be achieved at the expense of unemployment or low capital <span class="hlt">productivity</span>. Total factory <span class="hlt">productivity</span> is the nearest measure we have to absolute efficiency, but that does not mean that it is an appropriate policy maximand. Performance can, therefore only be compared by looking at several different meas...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Turner, Adair</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cds.cern.ch/record/910311/files/0511191.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Production</span> Function</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://cdsweb.cern.ch/">CERN Document Server</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Productions</span> functions map the inputs of a firm or a <span class="hlt">productive</span> system onto its outputs. This article expounds generalizations of the <span class="hlt">production</span> function that include state variables, organizational structures and increasing returns to scale. These extensions are needed in order to explain the regularities of the empirical distributions of some economic variables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fioretti, G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=5458399"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radionuclides <span class="hlt">Production</span>, vol. I</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Twelve specialists present a comprehensive and integrated guide on the theory and practical aspects of radionuclide <span class="hlt">production</span>. Vol. I: The following areas are covered: activation techniques with sort descriptions on irradiation sources, accelerators and nuclear reactors, and targetry and radiochemical processing of the activated target. Different methods of radionuclide <span class="hlt">production</span>, including basic theory essential to the particular <span class="hlt">production</span> procedure, are described.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Helus, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:27017205"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quarkonia <span class="hlt">production</span> at Fermilab</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent data on J/?, ?(2S), ?c and ? <span class="hlt">production</span> has unraveled unexpected features of Q bar Q bound states <span class="hlt">production</span> in high energy hadronic collisions. In the 1992-1995 runs CDF has collected large samples of J/?, ?(2S) and ? identified through their muonic decay. In the charmonium system all <span class="hlt">production</span> sources have been separately measured and compared with the theoretical predictions. A large excess of direct <span class="hlt">production</span> has been observed for both ?(2S) and J/?. The relative <span class="hlt">production</span> rate for the ?c1 and ?c2 has also been measured. Results on J/?, ?(2S) and ?c <span class="hlt">production</span> from the fixed target experiments E789,E705 and E672/706 are also presented. Important features of the <span class="hlt">production</span> of charmonium states are shared by fixed target and collider data</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-06-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-08/pdf/2010-7931.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 18015 - Credit for Renewable Electricity <span class="hlt">Production</span>, Refined Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>, and Indian Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Credit for Renewable Electricity <span class="hlt">Production</span>, Refined Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>, and Indian Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>...determining the availability of the credit for renewable electricity <span class="hlt">production</span>, refined coal <span class="hlt">production</span>, and Indian coal...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:90%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> <div id="refine_search_form_div" style="right:140px"> <form id="simple_search_form" method="post" action="http://worldwidescience.org/cgi-bin/wwsproxy.pl" onsubmit="return ValidationUtils.validateSimpleSearch('refine_search_terms');"> <input name="viewId" value="view0" type="hidden" /><input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /> <input id="search_terms" name="expression" value="non-toxic non-hazardous product" class="TextInput" type="text" style="width:250; height:17pt"/> <input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /><button type="submit" class="search_submit" id="search_submit" title="New Search">Search</button> </form>  <br>  </div> </div> </div><!-- page_14 div --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:90%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> <div id="refine_search_form_div" style="right:140px"> <form id="simple_search_form" method="post" action="http://worldwidescience.org/cgi-bin/wwsproxy.pl" onsubmit="return ValidationUtils.validateSimpleSearch('refine_search_terms');"> <input name="viewId" value="view0" type="hidden" /><input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /> <input id="search_terms" name="expression" value="non-toxic non-hazardous product" class="TextInput" type="text" style="width:250; height:17pt"/> <input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /><button type="submit" class="search_submit" id="search_submit" title="New Search">Search</button> </form>  <br>  </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:44027850"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Productivity</span> analysis of sunflower <span class="hlt">production</span> in Turkey</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In Turkey, which ranks the tenth country worldwide in the sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) <span class="hlt">production</span>, 55% of the <span class="hlt">production</span> is carried out in Thrace Region. Therefore, agricultural enterprises in Thrace Region, situated in the European part of Turkey have specialized in producing sunflower, and have become the centre of vegetable oil industry in the region in terms of produced raw material. This research was conducted in 182 agricultural enterprises in 3 provinces of Thrace Region in Turkey and its objective was to determine input/output relations in sunflower <span class="hlt">production</span>. The study indicates that the determination coefficient (r/sup 2/) derived from Cobb-Douglas <span class="hlt">production</span> function was significant at 0.01 level and the elasticity coefficients of the variables (except chemical fertilizer) were found beta i positive in derived equation. It was determined that the variable of herbicide cost had the highest value of the marginal effectiveness coefficients and none of the variables was used at economically optimal level in the study area. When the Marginal Technical Substitution and the Price Rates were taken into consideration, it was noted that only the seed cost/hoeing cost was closest to economically optimum level (1.10). According to stepwise analysis the Land Renting Value was determined as the most important variable in sunflower <span class="hlt">production</span>. (author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______307::87959b5d6d8ae7157977b651ae1eaefc"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biodiesel <span class="hlt">production</span> by microalgae and macroalgae from north littoral portuguese coast</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Biodiesel, as an alternative fuel, has many benefits. It is biodegradable, <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> and compared to petroleum-based diesel, has a more favorable combustion emission profile, such as low emissions of carbon monoxide, particulate matter and unburned hydrocarbons. In brief, these merits make biodiesel a good alternative to petroleum based fuel. Biodiesel feedstocks derived from microalgae and macroalgae have emerged as one of the most promising alternative sources of lipid for use in biodiesel ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carvalho, Joana; Ribeiro, Andre?; Castro, Joana Daniela Fernandes; Vilarinho, Ca?ndida; Castro, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od______1399::aa1f4ff0fe1e136f741a23ecf67d4e58"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biodiesel <span class="hlt">production</span> from sunflower oil using microwave assisted transesterification / by Nokuthula E. Magida</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Biofuels are becoming more attractive worldwide because of the high energy demands and the fossil fuel resources that are being depleted. Biodiesel is one of the most attractive alternative energy sources to petroleum diesel fuel and it is renewable, <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">toxic</span>, biodegradable, has low sulphur content and has a high flash point. Biodiesel can be generated from domestic natural resources such as coconuts, rapeseeds, soybeans, sunflower, and waste cooking o...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Magida, Nokuthula Ethel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cds.cern.ch/record/1703010/files/ATL-PHYS-SLIDE-2014-222.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Charmonium <span class="hlt">production</span> at ATLAS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://cdsweb.cern.ch/collection/Multimedia%20%26%20Outreach?ln=en">CERN Multimedia</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Understanding of the <span class="hlt">production</span> of P-wave charmonium states is a significant bottleneck in the understanding of charmonium <span class="hlt">production</span> as a whole. Current theoretical calculations are limited in their ability to model the <span class="hlt">production</span> and decay of these states. We present new measurements of the differential <span class="hlt">production</span> cross-sections of the chi_c1 and chi_c2 spin charmonium states, extending upon previous measurements in precision, kinematic reach, and number of measurements. The relative <span class="hlt">production</span> cross-sections of the chi_c states through prompt and non-prompt <span class="hlt">production</span> modes are explored as a function of transverse momentum, as well as the fraction of the total J/psi <span class="hlt">production</span> which occurs via chi_c feed-down. Prompt and non-prompt <span class="hlt">production</span> cross-sections for psi(2S) are presented, in the decay mode J/psi pi pi, to help provide an accurate picture of charmonium <span class="hlt">production</span>. A competitive measurement of the <span class="hlt">production</span> cross-section of prompt J/psi mesons in association with a W boson is also presented. Thi...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cheatham, S; The ATLAS collaboration</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cds.cern.ch/record/1708917/files/ATL-COM-PHYS-2014-586.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Charmonium <span class="hlt">Production</span> at ATLAS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://cdsweb.cern.ch/">CERN Document Server</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Understanding of the <span class="hlt">production</span> of P-wave charmonium states is a significant bottleneck in the understanding of charmonium <span class="hlt">production</span> as a whole. Current theoretical calculations are limited in their ability to model the <span class="hlt">production</span> and decay of these states. We present new measurements of the differential <span class="hlt">production</span> cross-sections of the chi_c1 and chi_c2 spin charmonium states, extending upon previous measurements in precision, kinematic reach, and number of measurements. The relative <span class="hlt">production</span> cross-sections of the chi_c states through prompt and non-prompt <span class="hlt">production</span> modes are explored as a function of transverse momentum, as well as the fraction of the total J/psi <span class="hlt">production</span> which occurs via chi_c feed-down. Prompt and non-prompt <span class="hlt">production</span> cross-sections for psi(2S) are presented, in the decay mode J/psi pi pi, to help provide an accurate picture of charmonium <span class="hlt">production</span>. A competitive measurement of the <span class="hlt">production</span> cross-section of prompt J/psi mesons in association with a W boson is also presented. Thi...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cheatham, S; The ATLAS collaboration</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.scielo.org.mx/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1665-27382010000100003&lang=en"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proteínas PEGiladas: producción, purificación y aplicaciones / PEGylated proteins: <span class="hlt">production</span>, purification, and applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.scielo.org/php/index.php?lang=en">Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available SciELO Mexico | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish La PEGilación es la conjugación de una proteína y/o péptido con una o más moléculas de poli(etilen glicol). El poli(etilen glicol) es un polímero no toxico, no inmunogénico y esto aprobado por la FDA (Food and Drug Administration, USA). En los últimos años, la PEGilación ha sido utilizada para mejor [...] ar las propiedades fisicoquímicas de proteínas y drogas terapéuticas, por lo que esta tecnología ha impactado fuertemente a la industria bio-farmacéutica. La PEGilación permite prolongar el tiempo de residencia en el cuerpo, mejorar la estabilidad, aumentar la solubilidad, disminuir la proteólisis y excreción renal. Desde el surgimiento de esta tecnología, diferentes proteínas han sido PEGiladas para el tratamiento de enfermedades como: hepatitis C, leucemia, artritis reumatoide, etc. Este artículo de revisión presenta una descripción del desarrollo de la PEGilación en los últimos años, así como de los procedimientos usados para la producción de bio-conjugados. Además, se revisan las estrategias de purificación utilizadas para la recuperación de proteínas PEGiladas, siendo este uno de los grandes retos en el proceso debido a que la reacción de PEGilación puede generar bio-conjugados con diferentes grados de PEGilación. Por último, se presentan las aplicaciones de dichos bio-conjugados y los retos futuros que se identifican para su aplicación genérica. Abstract in english PEGylation is the covalent attachment of protein and/or peptide to poly(ethylene glycol). The poly(ethylene glycol) is a polymer, <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">toxic</span>, non immunogenic, and FDA (Food and Drug Administration, USA) approved. In the last years, PEGylation has been used to improve the physicochemical properties of [...] some proteins and therapeutic drugs; this technology has impacted heavily on the bio-pharmaceutical industry. PEGylation prolongs the body-residence time and stability, decreases the proteolysis and renal excretion. Since the emergence of this technology, some proteins have been PEGylated for the treatment of diseases including hepatitis C, leukemia, rheumatoid arthritis, etc. This review presents a description of the PEGylation development in the last years and the chemical procedures used to obtain some bio-conjugated <span class="hlt">products</span>. Strategies of purification used to obtain PEGylated proteins are reviewed; purification is one of the major problems to establish suitable processes due to the fact that the reaction can generate bio-conjugates with different degree of PEGylation. Finally the applications of PEGylated proteins and the future challenges that are identified for generic application are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mayolo-Deloisa, K. P.; Rito-Palomares, M..</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=20714496"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biodiesel <span class="hlt">production</span> from vegetable oils via catalytic and non-catalytic supercritical methanol transesterification methods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper reviews the <span class="hlt">production</span> and characterization of biodiesel (BD or B) as well as the experimental work carried out by many researchers in this field. BD fuel is a renewable substitute fuel for petroleum diesel or petrodiesel (PD) fuel made from vegetable or animal fats. BD fuel can be used in any mixture with PD fuel as it has very similar characteristics but it has lower exhaust emissions. BD fuel has better properties than that of PD fuel such as renewable, biodegradable, <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span>, and essentially free of sulfur and aromatics. There are more than 350 oil bearing crops identified, among which only sunflower, safflower, soybean, cottonseed, rapeseed and peanut oils are considered as potential alternative fuels for diesel engines. The major problem associated with the use of pure vegetable oils as fuels, for Diesel engines are caused by high fuel viscosity in compression ignition. Dilution, micro-emulsification, pyrolysis and transesterification are the four techniques applied to solve the problems encountered with the high fuel viscosity. Dilution of oils with solvents and microemulsions of vegetable oils lowers the viscosity, some engine performance problems still exist. The viscosity values of vegetable oils vary between 27.2 and 53.6mm{sup 2}/s whereas those of vegetable oil methyl esters between 3.59 and 4.63mm{sup 2}/s. The viscosity values of vegetable oil methyl esters highly decreases after transesterification process. Compared to no. 2 diesel fuel, all of the vegetable oil methyl esters were slightly viscous. The flash point values of vegetable oil methyl esters are highly lower than those of vegetable oils. An increase in density from 860 to 885kg/m{sup 3} for vegetable oil methyl esters or biodiesels increases the viscosity from 3.59 to 4.63mm{sup 2}/s and the increases are highly regular. The purpose of the transesterification process is to lower the viscosity of the oil. The transesterfication of triglycerides by methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol, has proved to be the most promising process. Methanol is the commonly used alcohol in this process, due in part to its low cost. Methyl esters of vegetable oils have several outstanding advantages among other new-renewable and clean engine fuel alternatives. The most important variables affecting the methyl ester yield during the transesterification reaction are molar ratio of alcohol to vegetable oil and reaction temperature. Biodiesel has become more attractive recently because of its environmental benefits. Biodiesel is an environmentally friendly fuel that can be used in any diesel engine without modification. (author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Demirbas, Ayhan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Selcuk University, Campus, 42031 Konya (Turkey)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:35016854"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radiation chemical technology for <span class="hlt">production</span> of polymeric hydrogels for medical purposes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full text: Polymeric hydrogels are water-swelling cross-linked hydrophilic polymers with ability to store reversibly great amount of water (more than 1000 g of water per 1 g of dry polymer). At present they found a lot of different applications in highly developed countries in science and industry. The set of unique physicochemical and biomedical properties (regulated sorption ability in respect to water and biological liquids, biocompatibility, soft tissue state, permeability in respect to small and big molecules, <span class="hlt">non-toxicity</span>, etc.) allows their application in medicine. According to the clinical data there are no materials that can compete with hydrogels in development of endo-prostheses of soft-tissues in surgery, contact lenses for eyesight correction, hemo-compatible materials, novel for treatment of wounds and burns, targeted drug delivery systems. Polymeric hydrogels today practically substitute the traditional hydrophobic bases (Vaseline, lanolin) in technology of drug forms for development of ointments and dressings, containing natural and synthetic physiologically active substances. The advantages of hydrogels in comparison with hydrophobic analogues are obvious due to the drainage effect, homogenous distribution of drugs, better contact with wound, painless removing by water washing. The polymeric hydrogels are not produced in Kazakhstan in spite of the big source of raw materials. The aim of the present work is the development of radiation-chemical technology and development of polymeric biomedical hydrogels <span class="hlt">production</span> based on raw materials of Kazakhstan. The novel types of polymeric hydrogel materials are developed by the authors of the report based on vinyl ethers of glycols, which produced in 'Alash Ltd.' (Temirtau). The great fundamental information content has been obtained about these monomers and polymers including direct quantitative data of their structure formation mechanism and physicochemical properties. These data served as a basis for design of novel polymeric hydrogels of different type including so-called 'intelligent' materials, which are able to respond on small changes of environmental parameters (temperature, pH, electric field). According the biomedical tests the availability and competitive ability of these biomaterials is due to their unique stability to bio-destruction in aggressive infection media unlike of known hydrogels based on polyacrylamide, hydroxyalkyl acrylates, etc. This is connected with the absence of hydrolyzable bonds (ester, amide, etc.) in the structure of vinyl ethers. As the result of many years collaboration with a number of leading medical centers of Kazakhstan and Russia the possibility of wide and effective application of these hydrogel materials in different areas of medicine has bee found (contact hydrogel for ultrasonic diagnostics; hydrogel basis for medicinal and cosmetic ointments; hydrogel implant material)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.scielo.cl/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0717-68212006000100007&lang=en"> <span id="translatedtitle">Procyclical <span class="hlt">Productivity</span> in Manufacturing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.scielo.org/php/index.php?lang=en">Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in english We study the cyclical behavior of labor <span class="hlt">productivity</span> in eighty industries of the Chilean manufacturing sector in the 1979-2001 period. We find that labor <span class="hlt">productivity</span> at the sector-level is procyclical but it is a-cyclical when using aggregate data. We provide an analytical and empirical explanation [...] for this divergence. We also use an econometric model to quantify the determinants of <span class="hlt">productivity</span>. The results indicate that technology shocks account for one half of <span class="hlt">productivity</span> growth, thus supporting the supply shocks hypothesis as the main source of business cycles in Chile. The other 50% of the <span class="hlt">productivity</span> changes is explained by reallocation of resources from less to more <span class="hlt">productive</span> sectors as well as the presence of increasing returns. Variations in factor utilization were insignificant</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NAVARRO, LUCAS; SOTO, RAIMUNDO.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agr.hr/smotra/pdf_68/acs68_36.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Milk <span class="hlt">Production</span> in Croatia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=searchArticles">Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available In the last few years Croatian economy is restructuring through the processes of market liberalization and closing to EU, which is demanding some significant changes. Agriculture is in the process of reforms on the basis of CAP (Common Agricultural Policy policies of the EU, and those changes are producing different effects in each agricultural sector. The most sensitive area is livestock <span class="hlt">production</span>, especially cattle and milking cows (<span class="hlt">production</span> of meat and milk. This sector has insufficient <span class="hlt">production</span>. More precise, domestic <span class="hlt">production</span> in Croatia can satisfy around 80% of one-year consumption. This study shows economic position of <span class="hlt">production</span> and processing of milk with the emphasis on primary milk <span class="hlt">production</span>, processing of milk, domestic market and export-import situation. The goal is to consider the situation, position and possibilities for development of this sector.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Petar Bosni?</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/servlets/purl/10133218/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span> 1992</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span> 1992 provides comprehensive information about US coal <span class="hlt">production</span>, the number of mines, prices, <span class="hlt">productivity</span>, employment, <span class="hlt">productive</span> capacity, and recoverable reserves to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In 1992, there were 3,439 active coal mining operations made up of all mines, preparation plants, and refuse operations. The data in Table 1 cover the 2,746 mines that produced coal, regardless of the amount of <span class="hlt">production</span>, except for bituminous refuse mines. Tables 2 through 33 include data from the 2,852 mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10 thousand or more short tons of coal during the period, except for bituminous refuse, and includes preparation plants with 5 thousand or more employee hours. These mining operations accounted for over 99 percent of total US coal <span class="hlt">production</span> and represented 83 percent of all US coal mining operations in 1992.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-10-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21076215"> <span id="translatedtitle">Valuable <span class="hlt">product</span> <span class="hlt">production</span> from wood mill effluents.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fibreboard <span class="hlt">production</span> is one of the most important industrial activities in Galicia (Spain). Great amounts of wastewater are generated, with properties depending on the type of wood, treatment process, final <span class="hlt">product</span> and water reusing, among others. These effluents are characterized by a high chemical oxygen demand (COD), low pH and nutrients limitation. Aerobic and anaerobic processes have been used for their treatment. Presently, bioplastics <span class="hlt">production</span> (mainly polyhydroxyalkanoates or PHA) from wastewaters with mixed cultures is being studied. Substrate requirements for these processes are a high organic matter content and low nutrient concentration. Therefore, wood mill effluents could be a suitable feedstock. PHA <span class="hlt">production</span> from wastewaters is carried out in three steps. First, complex organic matter is converted into volatile fatty acids (VFA) through acidogenic fermentation. Then, VFA are used as substrate in an aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR), in which the enrichement of PHA producing bacteria from a mixed culture is favoured. Finally, the sludge from the SBR is fed with a pulse containing high VFA concentrations, resulting in PHA accumulation inside the cells. In this work, the possibility of applying this process to wood mill effluents is proposed. An acidification percentage of 37% and a storage yield (Y(STO)) of 0.23 Cmmol/Cmmol were obtained. PMID:21076215</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mato, T; Ben, M; Kennes, C; Veiga, M C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______908::4cb2ba2d1401652a1b88387839198638"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recombinant organisms for <span class="hlt">production</span> of industrial <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A revolution in industrial microbiology was sparked by the discoveries of ther double-stranded structure of DNA and the development of recombinant DNA technology. Traditional industrial microbiology was merged with molecular biology to yield improved recombinant processes for the industrial <span class="hlt">production</span> of primary and secondary metabolites, protein biopharmaceuticals and industrial enzymes. Novel genetic techniques such as metabolic engineering, combinatorial biosynthesis and molecular breeding...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adrio, Jose-luis; Demain, Arnold L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______550::ff7110c7083aa6a4354d831c189b42ab"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contracting <span class="hlt">Productivity</span> Growth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we analyze the interactions between growth and the contracting environment in the <span class="hlt">production</span> sector.Allowing incompleteness in contracting implies that viable <span class="hlt">production</span> relationships for firms and workers, and therefore the profitability of industries, depend on the rates of innovation and growth.The speed at which new innovations arrive in turn depends on the profitability of <span class="hlt">production</span>, for the usual reasons examined in the endogenous growth literature.We show that these int...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Francois, P.; Roberts, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______908::b336c6aa0fe98bed03a8d94016f2f6d2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Material and Energy <span class="hlt">Productivity</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Resource <span class="hlt">productivity</span>, measured as GDP output per resource input, is a widespread sustainability indicator combining economic and environmental information. Resource <span class="hlt">productivity</span> is ubiquitous, from the IPAT identity to the analysis of dematerialization trends and policy goals. High resource <span class="hlt">productivity</span> is interpreted as the sign of a resource-efficient, and hence more sustainable, economy. Its inverse, resource intensity (resource per GDP) has the reverse behavior, with higher values indica...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:23047891"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ionization of food <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">After general remarks on foods preservation, on international works and on ionization future prospects, main irradiation sources are described. Recalls on radioactivity, on radiation-matter interaction, on toxicology of ionized foods and on ionized foods detection are given. Ionization applications to various <span class="hlt">products</span> are reviewed, especially in: - Poultry meat - Fishing <span class="hlt">products</span> - Fresh fruits and vegetables - Dry fruits and vegetables - spices, tea, infusion - prepacked <span class="hlt">products</span>... An evaluation of economics and sociocultural impacts is presented in connection with recent experiments</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______550::4bc2ab643fba4424b6ea73c2c4aa7573"> <span id="translatedtitle">Green <span class="hlt">Product</span> Innovation Strategy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over the last decades, companies have started to incorporate green issues in <span class="hlt">product</span> innovation strategies. This dissertation studies green <span class="hlt">product</span> innovation strategy, its antecedents and its outcomes. A three-stage approach is followed. In the first stage, the topic is explored and a preliminary research framework is identified. The second stage involves theory-building, using case studies and literature interactively. This stage leads to the identification of elelments of <span class="hlt">product</span> innovatio...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Driessen, P. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______571::778ed5a2c77d2631575a779d0a2ac113"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fermentative <span class="hlt">production</span> of isobutene:</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Isobutene (2-methylpropene) is one of those chemicals for which bio-based <span class="hlt">production</span> might replace the petrochemical <span class="hlt">production</span> in the future. Currently, more than 10 million metric tons of isobutene are produced on a yearly basis. Even though bio-based <span class="hlt">production</span> might also be achieved through chemocatalytic or thermochemical methods, this review focuses on fermentative routes from sugars. Although biological isobutene formation is known since the 1970s, extensive metabolic engineering is re...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leeuwen, B. N. M.; Wulp, A. M.; Duijnstee, I.; Maris, A. J. A.; Straathof, A. J. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______260::ce46cc0271cfca030c51cb88c7ea89e0"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Productivity</span> : -measurement and improvement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objective of this paper is to analyze methods of measurement of labor <span class="hlt">productivity</span> and introduce them to real business. The object of this paper is to investigate methods of measuring performance. The subject of this paper is the process of implementing methods to increase <span class="hlt">productivity</span>. Methods (procedures) of the study. Pattern during the writing of this work was used by scientists articles information about the measurement and implementation of systems <span class="hlt">productivity</span>. Recommendations for ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Myronenko, Yana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=doajarticles::f3e15d3124e8573f93419b8e90c554d7"> <span id="translatedtitle">FORECASTING NEW <span class="hlt">PRODUCT</span> SALES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><p>ENGLISH ABSTRACT: This paper tests the accuracy of using Linear regression, Logistics regression, and Bass curves in selected new <span class="hlt">product</span> rollouts, based on sales data. The selected new <span class="hlt">products</span> come from the electronics and electrical engineering and information and communications technology industries. The eight selected <span class="hlt">products</span> are: electronic switchgear, electric motors, supervisory control and data acquisition systems, programmable logic controllers, cell phones, wireless modul...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:90%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> <div id="refine_search_form_div" style="right:140px"> <form id="simple_search_form" method="post" action="http://worldwidescience.org/cgi-bin/wwsproxy.pl" onsubmit="return ValidationUtils.validateSimpleSearch('refine_search_terms');"> <input name="viewId" value="view0" type="hidden" /><input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /> <input id="search_terms" name="expression" value="non-toxic non-hazardous product" class="TextInput" type="text" style="width:250; 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height:17pt"/> <input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /><button type="submit" class="search_submit" id="search_submit" title="New Search">Search</button> </form>  <br>  </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od________18::460f7ed72cf0ff33354692483e94c066"> <span id="translatedtitle">Matrix <span class="hlt">product</span> operator representations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show how to construct relevant families of matrix <span class="hlt">product</span> operators in one and higher dimensions. Those form the building blocks for the numerical simulation methods based on matrix <span class="hlt">product</span> states and projected entangled pair states. In particular, we construct translational invariant matrix <span class="hlt">product</span> operators suitable for time evolution, and show how such descriptions are possible for Hamiltonians with long-range interactions. We illustrate how those tools can be exploite...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Murg, V.; Cirac, J. I.; Pirvu, B.; Verstraete, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=5216909"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coal <span class="hlt">production</span> in Thailand</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The first coal mine in Thailand was opened in 1955, and coal <span class="hlt">production</span> has increased steadily since then. The coal, from brown coal to anthracite, is used mainly for electricity generation. Thailand is thought to have at least 1660 million tonnes of coal reserves, mainly of low rank coal. <span class="hlt">Production</span> is currently underway in 7 coal basins. Figures for <span class="hlt">production</span> and consumption of coal from 1955 are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Supurtipanish, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od______1061::91bc5544441f87594df057964bffdfeb"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computers, obsolescence, and <span class="hlt">productivity</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper develops a new technique for measuring the effect of computer usage on U.S. <span class="hlt">productivity</span> growth. Standard National Income and <span class="hlt">Product</span> Accounts (NIPA) measures of the computer capital stock, which are constructed by weighting past investments according to a schedule for economic depreciation (the rate at which capital loses value as it ages), are shown to be inappropriate for growth accounting because they do not capture the effect of a unit of computer capital on <span class="hlt">productivity</span>. This...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whelan, Karl</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od______2018::e22d8ad89409a5a4c979b36db842a74b"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Productivity</span> from within</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The influence of personal and environmental psychosocial variables on workers’ individual <span class="hlt">productivity</span> was investigated in a large company using the company’s own index of individual <span class="hlt">productivity</span>. <span class="hlt">Productivity</span> depended on age, use of anxiolitics, the WES variables control, clarity and innovation (Moos et al., 1984) and the MAE variable ambition (Pelechano, 1975). ------ RESUMO ------ Neste artigo foi analisada a influhcia das varihveis pessoais e da envolvente psic...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Farin?a, Francisca; Arce, Ramon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______661::61eb9af13ee994cf900e5b101940e91c"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modular <span class="hlt">product</span> platform design</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Modular <span class="hlt">product</span> platforms, sets of common modules that are shared among a <span class="hlt">product</span> family, can bring cost savings and enable introduction of multiple <span class="hlt">product</span> variants quicker than without platforms. This thesis describes the current state of modular platform design and identifies gaps in the current state. The gaps were identified through application of three existing methods and by testing their usability and reliability on engineers and engineering students. Existing platform or modular desi...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ho?ltta?-otto, Katja</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od______1687::1d5c930c9b0550f882f12a9b472a2e60"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reputation in team <span class="hlt">production</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Consider team <span class="hlt">production</span> with two people. Each is characterized by a prior distribution that he will do Right or Wrong. After the outcome of the project is observed, these probabilities are updated. When output depends on the weakest link in <span class="hlt">production</span>, following project failure the posterior probability that a person did Right declines with the probability that the other worker did Right. The same holds when output depends on the best shot in <span class="hlt">production</span> and the team effort succeeded. A leade...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Glazer, Amihai; Segendorff, Bjo?rn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs076-01/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coal combustion <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coal-burning powerplants, which supply more than half of U.S. electricity, also generate coal combustion <span class="hlt">products</span>, which can be both a resource and a disposal problem. The U.S. Geological Survey collaborates with the American Coal Ash Association in preparing its annual report on coal combustion <span class="hlt">products</span>. This Fact Sheet answers questions about present and potential uses of coal combustion <span class="hlt">products</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kalyoncu, R. S.; Olson, D. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://jrnl.nau.edu.ua/index.php/visnik/article/view/1135"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PRODUCT</span> STRUCTURE DIGITAL MODEL ??????????? ?????? ????????? ??????? ?????????? ?????? ????????? ??????</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=searchArticles">Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available  Research results of representation of <span class="hlt">product</span> structure made by means of CADDS5 computer-aided design (CAD system, <span class="hlt">Product</span> Data Management Optegra (PDM system and <span class="hlt">Product</span> Life Cycle Management Wind-chill system (PLM, are examined in this work. Analysis of structure component development and its storage in various systems is carried out. Algorithms of structure transformation required for correct representation of the structure are considered. Management analysis of electronic mockup presentation of the <span class="hlt">product</span> structure is carried out for Windchill system. ?????o????? ?????????? ???????????? ????????????? ????????? ??????? (????????? ?????? ? ??????? ????(CAD CADDS5, ??????? ?????????? ?????????? ??????? (PDM Optegra, ??????? ????????????? ?????????? ????? ??????? (PLM Windchill. ???????? ?????? ???????? ? ???????? ??????????? ???????? ? ????????? ????????. ????????? ????????? ?????????????? ???????? ??? ?? ??????????? ?????????????. ??? ?????? ?????????? ?????????????? ??????????? ?????? ????????? ??????? ? ??????? Windchill. ?????????? ?????????? ??????????? ??????? ????????? ?????? (??????????? ??????? ? ??????? ???? (CAD CADDS5, ??????? ????????? ?????????? ?????? (PDM Optegra, ??????? ????????? ????????? ????? ??????? (PLM Windchill. ????????? ?????? ????????? ? ?????????? ??????????? ???????? ? ?????? ????????. ???????? ????????? ???????????? ???????? ??? ???????  ??????????? ???????. ???? ?????? ????????? ???????? ?????-?????? ?????? ????????? ?????? ? ??????? Windchill.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">V.M. Sineglazov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0711.3274.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microsystem <span class="hlt">Product</span> Development</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://cdsweb.cern.ch/">CERN Document Server</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over the last decade the successful design and fabrication of complex MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), optical circuits and ASICs have been demonstrated. Packaging and integration processes have lagged behind MEMS research but are rapidly maturing. As packaging processes evolve, a new challenge presents itself, microsystem <span class="hlt">product</span> development. <span class="hlt">Product</span> development entails the maturation of the design and all the processes needed to successfully produce a <span class="hlt">product</span>. Elements such as tooling design, fixtures, gages, testers, inspection, work instructions, process planning, etc., are often overlooked as MEMS engineers concentrate on design, fabrication and packaging processes. Thorough, up-front planning of <span class="hlt">product</span> development efforts is crucial to the success of any project.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Polosky, M -A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1701368"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonhomogeneous matrix <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://cdsweb.cern.ch/collection/Multimedia%20%26%20Outreach?ln=en">CERN Multimedia</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Infinite <span class="hlt">products</span> of matrices are used in nonhomogeneous Markov chains, Markov set-chains, demographics, probabilistic automata, <span class="hlt">production</span> and manpower systems, tomography, and fractals. More recent results have been obtained in computer design of curves and surfaces. This book puts together much of the basic work on infinite <span class="hlt">products</span> of matrices, providing a primary source for such work. This will eliminate the rediscovery of known results in the area, and thus save considerable time for researchers who work with infinite <span class="hlt">products</span> of matrices. In addition, two chapters are included to show h</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hartfiel, Darald J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nanotechproject.org/inventories/consumer/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nanotechnology Consumer <span class="hlt">Product</span> Inventory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An inventory of nanotechnology-based consumer <span class="hlt">products</span> currently on the market. After more than twenty years of basic and applied research, nanotechnologies are gaining in commercial use. Nanoscale materials now are in electronic, cosmetics, automotive and medical <span class="hlt">products</span>. But it has been difficult to find out how many "nano" consumer <span class="hlt">products</span> are on the market and which merchandise could be called "nano." While not comprehensive, this inventory gives the public the best available look at the 800+ manufacturer-identified nanotechnology-based consumer <span class="hlt">products</span> currently on the market.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od______1687::03e2bb1578bf5fb291a241df8a01dc15"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wages, <span class="hlt">productivity</span> and aging</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this article, we estimate age based wage and <span class="hlt">productivity</span> differentials using linked employer-employee Canadian data from the Workplace and Employee Survey 1999-2003. Data on the firm side is used to estimate <span class="hlt">production</span> functions taking into account the age profile of the firm’s workforce. Data on the workers’ side is used to estimate wage equations that also depend on age. Results show concave age-wage and age-<span class="hlt">productivity</span> profiles. Wage-<span class="hlt">productivity</span> comparisons show that the producti...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=5294160"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improving longwall <span class="hlt">productivity</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Improved <span class="hlt">productivity</span> in the longwall mining industry will result, by and large, only from improvements in technology. The longwall method of mining is potentially the most <span class="hlt">productive</span> and safest system available, but further advancements can and must be made to improve <span class="hlt">productivity</span> to meet the inevitable increased demands of the future. The Kloswall concept is one radical approach which appears to have numerous advantages: more coal produced per foot of longwall face per cut; fewer turnarounds; more space in which to put machinery; simpler and more powerful machinery and roof supports; and less dust <span class="hlt">production</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peake, C.V.; Goode, C.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.environdec.com/en/PCR/Detail/?Pcr=9754"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fabricated steel <span class="hlt">products</span>, except construction <span class="hlt">products</span>, machinery and equipment (under development) - Environmental <span class="hlt">Product</span> Declarations - <span class="hlt">Product</span> C</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">...01 (2013) Based on: Basic Module: Fabricated metal <span class="hlt">products</span>, except machinery and equipment Related PCR(s): Fabricated steel construction <span class="hlt">products</span> (under development) Contributor(s): CO2 Consulting (original PCR) Prepared by: IK Ingenieria PCR moderator(s): Gorka Benito Alonso Share Print Pcr documents Template for providing comments on PCR Final draft PCR Fabricated steel <span class="hlt">products</span>, except construction <span class="hlt">products</span>, machinery and equipment Login required Comments on this PCR Be the first discussing this PCR Start a discussion Using EPDs EPD Search What is an EPD®? The International EPD® System Climate Declarations ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=5051390"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ethanol <span class="hlt">production</span> with bacteria</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new process for the <span class="hlt">production</span> of the important industrial chemical ethanol has been developed. Instead of being produced biologically with the help of the yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae, the bacterium zymomonas mobilis is used. This makes it possible to produce ethanol more quickly and more effectively, and in a simpler <span class="hlt">production</span> as against the static culture of yeasts, thus enabling <span class="hlt">productivity</span> to be increased. Furthermore, sugar can be replaced as fermentation agent by glucose syrup gained with enzymes from starch waste, which lowers the <span class="hlt">production</span> costs. Gene technology should bring improvements in this field in the future.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bringer, S.; Sahm, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.environdec.com/it/PCR/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules - Environdec</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">...vegetables, pulses and potatoes 2012-08-28 Fruits and nuts, except kiwi fruit 2012-08-24 Bakery <span class="hlt">products</span> 2012-04-17 Wood particle and fibreboards 2012-03-09 On-line text based information, on-line books ... 2012-01-09 Books, in print 2011-12-22 Builders' joinery and carpentry of wood 2011-12-19 Electricity, steam and hot/cold water generation and distrib... ...stones and minerals Textile and leather <span class="hlt">products</span>Furniture and other transportable goods Forestry, wood and paper <span class="hlt">products</span>Plastic, glass and chemical <span class="hlt">products</span> Metals and metal ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______165::72007aa30f1420dfc9f1d812c489f985"> <span id="translatedtitle">Holomorphic Cliffordian <span class="hlt">Product</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Let R_{0,n} be the Clifford algebra of the antieuclidean vector space of dimension n. The aim is to built a function theory analogous to the one in the C case. In the latter case, the <span class="hlt">product</span> of two holomorphic functions is holomorphic, this fact is, of course, of paramount importance. Then it is necessary to define a <span class="hlt">product</span> for functions in the Clifford context. But, non-commutativity is inconciliable with <span class="hlt">product</span> of functions. Here we introduce a <span class="hlt">product</span> which is commutative and we compute...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_eA4Y0H&server=pvlbsrch10&v%3astate=root%7croot-10-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm248864.htm&rid=Ndoc15&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=efecfe7683356c55d68e7579d7655147&"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identifying Recalled <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... For Government For Press Combination <span class="hlt">Products</span> Advisory Committees Science & Research Regulatory Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_eA4Y0H&server=pvlbsrch10&v%3astate=root%7croot-10-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm182929.htm&rid=Ndoc13&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=f2236d5542a58b736925fab611783b4b&"> <span id="translatedtitle">FDA 101: <span class="hlt">Product</span> Recalls</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... For Government For Press Combination <span class="hlt">Products</span> Advisory Committees Science & Research Regulatory Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=20746684"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> by low-temperature reforming of bioethanol over ZnO-supported Co-Ni and Co-Cu catalysts</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of a renewable, <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> biomass-derived source, like bioethanol, to produce hydrogen is actually very attractive. In such domain, the search of a catalytic system highly effective for the selective steam-reforming process is of current research interest, CH3CH2OH+3H2O.6H2+2CO2. The steam-reforming of ethanol involves numerous steps and usually competes with several parallel reactions that originate undesired <span class="hlt">products</span> like CO and CH4, resulting in lower hydrogen yields and difficult practical application. Copper- and nickel-based catalysts, including catalysts containing both metals, have been extensively studied in the steam-reforming of ethanol [1-3]. It has been well established that copper favours the dehydrogenation reaction and nickel the breaking of C-C bonds. Moreover, the presence of basic supports and Cu-Ni alloys prevent the formation of carbon deposits [1-3]. On the other hand, we have shown that ZnO-supported cobalt catalysts are very selective to hydrogen and CO2 from the steam reforming of bioethanol mixtures below 673 K [4]. In addition, sodium addition to ZnO-supported cobalt catalysts results in a major stability by suppressing the deposition of carbon [5]. Here we present the catalytic behaviour at low temperature of sodium-promoted, bimetallic cobalt-nickel and cobalt copper catalysts supported on ZnO and compare their performance with mono metallic ZnO-supported Ni and Cu samples. Catalysts have been tested in the steam-reforming reaction of bioethanol at atmospheric pressure (C2H5OH:H2O1:4 v/v) and characterised by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy techniques (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after reaction. The effect of introduction of copper or nickel on cobalt-based catalysts is discussed in relation to their catalytic performances. (Author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Llorca, J.; Homs, N.; Ramirez de la Piscina, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:90%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> <div id="refine_search_form_div" style="right:140px"> <form id="simple_search_form" method="post" action="http://worldwidescience.org/cgi-bin/wwsproxy.pl" onsubmit="return ValidationUtils.validateSimpleSearch('refine_search_terms');"> <input name="viewId" value="view0" type="hidden" /><input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /> <input id="search_terms" name="expression" value="non-toxic non-hazardous product" class="TextInput" type="text" style="width:250; 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height:17pt"/> <input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /><button type="submit" class="search_submit" id="search_submit" title="New Search">Search</button> </form>  <br>  </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23578882"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cytotoxicity evaluation and antioxidant enzyme expression related to heavy metals found in tuna by-<span class="hlt">products</span> meal: An in vitro study in human and rat liver cell lines.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Heavy metals can accumulate in organisms via various pathways, including respiration, adsorption and ingestion. They are known to generate free radicals and induce oxidative and/or nitrosative stress with depletion of anti-oxidants. Tuna by-<span class="hlt">product</span> meal (TBM) is rich in proteins and can, therefore, offer an attractive protein source for animals. This study was undertaken to assess the effects of metals present in TBM, namely cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg), separately or in combination with oxidative stress, on cell viability. Three cell models: rat liver FTO2B, human hepatoma HepG2, and human hepatic WRL-68, were used. Cell viability was determined following exposure to various concentrations of the metals. Two antioxidant genes, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), were measured to obtain a better understanding of oxidative stress-associated gene expression. Among the metals present in TBM, only Cd at a concentration of 30?M was noted to exhibit cytotoxic effects. This cytotoxicity was even more pronounced after co-stimulation with H2O2, used to mimic systemic oxidative stress. At <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> concentrations, Hg and Pb were noted to aggravate oxidative stress toxicity. The results further revealed that exposure to Cd, Pb, and a co-stimulation of H2O2 with Hg resulted in the increased expression of antioxidant gene SOD. A risk assessment of toxic contaminants in TBM indicated that food safety objectives should consider the human health impacts of foods derived from animals fed on contaminated meal and that much care should be taken when TBM is used in animal diet. PMID:23578882</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saïdi, Saber Abdelkader; Azaza, Mohamed Salah; Windmolders, Petra; van Pelt, Jos; El-Feki, Abdelfattah</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_5x53uj&server=pvlbsrch12&v%3astate=root%7croot-30-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm190842.htm&rid=Ndoc38&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=8a54df3c0ba21d6950b934ea543d3825&"> <span id="translatedtitle">Warning on Body Building <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Archived ... Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol ? - Resources for You ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_kn0Mmx&server=pvlbsrch10&v%3astate=root%7croot-20-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm190842.htm&rid=Ndoc25&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=8a54df3c0ba21d6950b934ea543d3825&"> <span id="translatedtitle">Warning on Body Building <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Archived Content The content on this page ... Drugs Food Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol ? - Resources ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.mivlgu.ru/site_arch/educational_activities/journal_ec/journal_arch/N7/Myakishev,%20Tenjaeva.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Building Information <span class="hlt">production</span> Management</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=searchArticles">Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available The paper discusses the development of information technologies in the field of financial and economic activity of the enterprise. The analysis used computer aided <span class="hlt">production</span> management. Evaluate the appropriateness and effectiveness of the implementation of the software in an organization with a long <span class="hlt">production</span> cycle. Proposed to forecast the expected economic effects of automation planning and consideration of the project.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Myakishev Yuri Dmitrievich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22labor+productivity%22&pg=2&id=ED454391"> <span id="translatedtitle">Training for <span class="hlt">Productivity</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An exploratory study was conducted to evaluate the utility of a method to demonstrate that Australian enterprises that invest in the training of their employees gain a return from that investment through an increase in employee <span class="hlt">productivity</span>. The method, which compares enterprise expenditure on training of personnel with labor <span class="hlt">productivity</span> across a…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maglen, Leo; Hopkins, Sonnie; Burke, Gerald</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:37108852"> <span id="translatedtitle">Antihydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> temperature dependence</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cold antihydrogen atoms were produced by mixing cold samples of antiprotons and positrons. The temperature of the positron plasma was increased by controlled radio-frequency (RF) heating, and the antihydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> was measured. Formation is observed to decrease with increased temperature but a simple power law scaling is not observed. Significant <span class="hlt">production</span> is still present at room temperature</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-03-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=20807371"> <span id="translatedtitle">Antihydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> temperature dependence</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cold antihydrogen atoms were produced by mixing cold samples of antiprotons and positrons. The temperature of the positron plasma was increased by controlled radio-frequency (RF) heating, and the antihydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> was measured. Formation is observed to decrease with increased temperature but a simple power law scaling is not observed. Significant <span class="hlt">production</span> is still present at room temperature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Amoretti, M.; Amsler, C.; Bazzano, G.; Bonomi, G.; Bouchta, A.; Bowe, P.D.; Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Doser, M.; Fontana, A.; Fujiwara, M.C.; Funakoshi, R.; Genova, P.; Hangst, J.S.; Hayano, R.S.; Johnson, I.; Joergensen, L.V.; Kellerbauer, A.; Lagomarsino, V.; Landua, R.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Macri, M.; Madsen, N.; Manuzio, G.; Marchesotti, M.; Mitchard, D.; Ottone, F.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Riedler, P.; Rotondi, A.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Venturelli, L.; Yamazaki, Y.; Werf, D.P. van der; Zurlo, N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-03-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhLB..583...59A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Antihydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> temperature dependence</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cold antihydrogen atoms were produced by mixing cold samples of antiprotons and positrons. The temperature of the positron plasma was increased by controlled radio-frequency (RF) heating, and the antihydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> was measured. Formation is observed to decrease with increased temperature but a simple power law scaling is not observed. Significant <span class="hlt">production</span> is still present at room temperature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Amoretti, M.; Amsler, C.; Bazzano, G.; Bonomi, G.; Bouchta, A.; Bowe, P. D.; Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Doser, M.; Fontana, A.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Genova, P.; Hangst, J. S.; Hayano, R. S.; Johnson, I.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kellerbauer, A.; Lagomarsino, V.; Landua, R.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Macrí, M.; Madsen, N.; Manuzio, G.; Marchesotti, M.; Mitchard, D.; Ottone, F.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Riedler, P.; Rotondi, A.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Venturelli, L.; Yamazaki, Y.; van der Werf, D. P.; Zurlo, N.; Athena Collaboration</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.forskningsdatabasen.dk/Search.external?operation=search&search-query=ti:Improved+wound+care+product"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improved wound care <span class="hlt">product</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://forskningsbasen.deff.dk/?lang=eng">DEFF Research Database (Denmark)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present invention pertains to use of sodium diacetate (NaHAc 2) as an antimicrobial agent against bacteria growing in biofilms. The aspects of the invention include a wound care <span class="hlt">product</span> comprising sodium diacetate, a kit comprising a wound care <span class="hlt">product</span>,and a methodof treating an infected wound.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Givskov, Michael Christian Technical University of Denmark,</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=7797429"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Production</span> based taxation. Bruttoskatt</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is shown in this report that <span class="hlt">production</span> based taxation of the petroleum activity may have negative incentive effects with regard to ranking of exploration alternatives, exploration effort, choice of development solution, utilization of the resources as well as point of time for shutdown of the <span class="hlt">production</span>. 13 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sunnevaag, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:16053160"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Production</span> by chemonuclear methods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this section, the ozone synthesis by chemonuclear methods is discussed in the light of two different ozone generating systems that work with fission <span class="hlt">products</span>. A brief description of the basic stages of the process is offered: <span class="hlt">production</span> of oxygen, ozone formation from oxygen and the purification and concentration of ozone. (G.J.P.)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=290536"> <span id="translatedtitle">Phenomenology of `onium` <span class="hlt">production</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The phenomenology of heavy quarkonia <span class="hlt">production</span> in hadron collisions is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared to data. Commonly used <span class="hlt">production</span> models are shown to fail in explaining all the experimental findings. The shortcomings of these models are analysed and possible improvements are discussed. (author) 12 refs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cacciari, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati (Italy). Lab. Nazionale di Frascati]|[Pavia Univ. (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=6130913"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Productive</span> efficiency and region</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Based on estimates of Cobb-Douglas <span class="hlt">production</span> function, this study has found that significant spatial variation in labor <span class="hlt">productivity</span> exists even after adjusting for capital intensity. The adjustment for capital intensity reduces the regional variation by 38 to 69% and the ciy-size variation by 75%. The results reveal a 6 to 8% producitivity advantage for non-South Census Regions relative to the South and <span class="hlt">productivity</span> increases of 1.5% with each doubling of SMSA population. Nevertheless, lower wages in the South (and in smaller cities) make it (and them) an attractive location for manufacturing firms. The study has also found that the Sveikauskas conjecture that labor <span class="hlt">productivity</span> can be substituted for Hicks-neutral <span class="hlt">productivity</span> in an analysis of the latter is false, if metropolitan data are used. By so doing, capital intensity effects and total factor <span class="hlt">productivity</span> effects are confounded. To study spatial variations in total factor <span class="hlt">productivity</span> (<span class="hlt">productive</span> efficiency) it is necessary to control for spatial variations in captial intensity. The results of this study indicate that absent better data on capital, the approach offered by Aberg yields satisfactory results. 14 references, 2 tables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moomaw, R.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ann.ugal.ro/eco/Doc%202006/13.%20OK%20Adi%20Micu_2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">COMPETITIVE <span class="hlt">PRODUCT</span> ADVANTAGES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=searchArticles">Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available Cost advantages may be either internal or external. Internal economics of scope, scale, or experience, and external economies of focus or logistical integration, enable a company to produce some <span class="hlt">products</span> at a lower cost than the competition. The coordination of pricing with suppliers, although not actually economizing resources, can improve the efficiency of pricing by avoiding the incrementalization of a supplier's nonincremental fixed costs and profit. Any of these strategies can generate cost advantages that are, at least in the short run, sustainable. Even cost advantages that are not sustainable, however, can generate temporary savings that are often the key to building more sustainable cost or <span class="hlt">product</span> advantages later.. Even when a <span class="hlt">product</span>'s physical attributes are not readily differentiable, opportunities to develop <span class="hlt">product</span> advantages remain. The augmented <span class="hlt">product</span> that customers buy is more than the particular <span class="hlt">product</span> or service exchanged. It includes all sorts of ancillary services and intangible relationships that make buying thesame <span class="hlt">product</span> from one company less difficult, less risky, or more pleasant than buying from a competitor. Superior augmentation of the same basic <span class="hlt">product</span> can add substantial value in the eyes of consumers, leading them to pay willingly what are often considerable price premiums.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adrian MICU</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=156349"> <span id="translatedtitle">MICROBIAL RESISTANT GYPSUM <span class="hlt">PRODUCTS</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gypsum building materials often become wet, resulting in mold growth that leads to health and <span class="hlt">productivity</span> impacts. A major source of mold growth is gypsum wallboard since nearly 90% of the interior finished surfaces of buildings are covered with gypsum <span class="hlt">products</span>. It has been est...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JGP....58..670C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bohr Sommerfeld star <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We relate the Bohr-Sommerfeld conditions to formal deformation quantization of symplectic manifolds by classifying star <span class="hlt">products</span> adapted to some Lagrangian submanifold L, i.e. <span class="hlt">products</span> preserving the classical vanishing ideal IL of L up to IL-preserving equivalences.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carl, Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1253601"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Productive</span> Programmer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://cdsweb.cern.ch/">CERN Document Server</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anyone who develops software for a living needs a proven way to produce it better, faster, and cheaper. The <span class="hlt">Productive</span> Programmer offers critical timesaving and <span class="hlt">productivity</span> tools that you can adopt right away, no matter what platform you use. Master developer Neal Ford details ten valuable practices that will help you elude common traps, improve your code, and become more valuable to your team.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ford, Neal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750016041&hterms=hydrogen+production&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dhydrogen%2Bproduction"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> from coal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The gasification reactions necessary for the <span class="hlt">production</span> of hydrogen from montana subbituminous coal are presented. The coal composition is given. The gasifier types mentioned include: suspension (entrained) combustion; fluidized bed; and moving bed. Each gasification process is described. The steam-iron process, raw and <span class="hlt">product</span> gas compositions, gasifier feed quantities, and process efficiency evaluations are also included.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.doiserbia.nb.rs/img/doi/0367-598X/2003/0367-598X0302083S.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dry alcohol <span class="hlt">production</span> plant</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=searchArticles">Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for dry alcohol <span class="hlt">production</span> plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects a <span class="hlt">production</span> plant with a capacity of 40 m3/y was manufactured, at "Zorka Pharma", Šabac in 1995-1996. The <span class="hlt">product</span> meets all quality demands, as well as environmental regulations. The dry alcohol <span class="hlt">production</span> process is fully automatized. There is no waste in the process, neither gaseous, nor liquid. The chosen process provides safe operation according to temperature regime and resistance in the pipes, air purification columns and filters. Working at increased pressure is suitable for evaporation and condensation at increased temperatures. The <span class="hlt">production</span> process can be controlled manually, which is necessary during start-up, and repairs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stankovi? Mirjana S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:30056579"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exposure from consumer <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Consumer <span class="hlt">products</span> containing radioactive material, are available in the market place to any member of public as off the shelf item and are intended for unrestricted use by them at home or for their personal use. Radioactivity may be involved in the <span class="hlt">product</span> for several reasons: 1. ionising radiation from the radioactive material forms the basis of the particular functioning of the <span class="hlt">product</span> like radioisotopes in smoke detectors, radio-luminous dials, etc.; 2. chemical/spectroscopic characteristics of the radioactive material and not its radioactivity is the basis for the functional property of the <span class="hlt">product</span> like thoriated gas mantles, uranium in glass enamels, etc. and 3. radioactive materials could be naturally occurring in consumer <span class="hlt">products</span>, but could increase in concentration after processing like increased uranium or thorium concentrations after the processing of rare earth oxides</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:90%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> <div id="refine_search_form_div" style="right:140px"> <form id="simple_search_form" method="post" action="http://worldwidescience.org/cgi-bin/wwsproxy.pl" onsubmit="return ValidationUtils.validateSimpleSearch('refine_search_terms');"> <input name="viewId" value="view0" type="hidden" /><input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /> <input id="search_terms" name="expression" value="non-toxic non-hazardous product" class="TextInput" type="text" style="width:250; height:17pt"/> <input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /><button type="submit" class="search_submit" id="search_submit" title="New Search">Search</button> </form>  <br>  </div> </div> </div><!-- page_17 div --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:90%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> <div id="refine_search_form_div" style="right:140px"> <form id="simple_search_form" method="post" action="http://worldwidescience.org/cgi-bin/wwsproxy.pl" onsubmit="return ValidationUtils.validateSimpleSearch('refine_search_terms');"> <input name="viewId" value="view0" type="hidden" /><input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /> <input id="search_terms" name="expression" value="non-toxic non-hazardous product" class="TextInput" type="text" style="width:250; height:17pt"/> <input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /><button type="submit" class="search_submit" id="search_submit" title="New Search">Search</button> </form>  <br>  </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22445787"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Production</span> of shikimic acid.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Shikimic acid is a key intermediate for the synthesis of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu®). Shikimic acid can be produced via chemical synthesis, microbial fermentation and extraction from certain plants. An alternative <span class="hlt">production</span> route is via biotransformation of the more readily available quinic acid. Much of the current supply of shikimic acid is sourced from the seeds of Chinese star anise (Illicium verum). Supply from star anise seeds has experienced difficulties and is susceptible to vagaries of weather. Star anise tree takes around six-years from planting to bear fruit, but remains <span class="hlt">productive</span> for long. Extraction and purification from seeds are expensive. <span class="hlt">Production</span> via fermentation is increasing. Other <span class="hlt">production</span> methods are too expensive, or insufficiently developed. In the future, <span class="hlt">production</span> in recombinant microorganisms via fermentation may become established as the preferred route. Methods for producing shikimic acid are reviewed. PMID:22445787</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ghosh, Saptarshi; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, Uttam C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/servlets/purl/6741198/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Product</span> identification file</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">product</span> identification file was compiled as an aid to the industrial hygienist who may encounter the <span class="hlt">products</span> listed in surveys for and studies of occupational health hazards. It is pointed out that the chemical composition of a <span class="hlt">product</span> may vary from year to year and some components may be added or deleted without an indication on the label. Some of the data in this file may not be complete depending on the analysis requested. For example, a solvent may be the only component for which the <span class="hlt">product</span> was analyzed. The file is arranged by listing the chemical manufacturer, followed by the trade name. In cases where no manufacturer is known, the trade name appears in alphabetical order. The log number and the chemist who analyzed the <span class="hlt">product</span> are listed for reference.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gray, C.E. (ed.)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=nora_uio__no::eb61ce0591cf7948adbc0d5151343a6c"> <span id="translatedtitle">Public goods <span class="hlt">production</span> and private sector <span class="hlt">productivity</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we study how the use of resources in the public sector affects industrial structure, the size and the <span class="hlt">productivity</span> in knowledge-intensive clusters in local communities. We also discuss how these considerations should be implemented in costbenefit assessments of local public goods supply. The topics are studied in a setting where there are gains from agglomeration in knowledge-intensive industries, creating clusters of firms in such industries. We find that the primary effect is ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:45038520"> <span id="translatedtitle">Betulin and betulinic acid attenuate ethanol-induced liver stellate cell activation by inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS), cytokine (TNF-?, TGF-?) <span class="hlt">production</span> and by influencing intracellular signaling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background/aims: Liver fibrosis has been reported to be inhibited in vivo by oleanolic and ursolic acids. However, the mechanisms of the action of those triterpenoids are poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to determine the antifibrotic potential of other triterpenes, betulin and betulinic acid, and to characterize their influence on the signal transduction pathways involved in ethanol-activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Methods: Investigated was the influence of preincubation of rat HSCs with betulin and betulinic acid, at <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> concentrations, on ethanol-induced toxicity, migration, and several markers of HSC activation such as smooth muscle ?-actin (?-SMA) and procollagen I expression, release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytokines: tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and tumor growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1), and <span class="hlt">production</span> of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2). To assess the mechanism of the action of those triterpenes, intracellular signals such as nuclear factor-?B (NF?B), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) induced by ethanol were examined. Results: In vitro, betulin, but not betulinic acid, protected HSCs against ethanol toxicity. However, both betulin and betulinic acid inhibited the <span class="hlt">production</span> of ROS by HSCs treated with ethanol and inhibited their migration as well as ethanol-induced TNF-?, and TGF-?1, <span class="hlt">production</span>. Betulin and betulinic acid down-regulated ethanol-induced <span class="hlt">production</span> of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. Betulin and betulinic acid, also decreased ethanol-induced activity of MMP-2. In ethanol-induced HSCs, betulin inhibited the activation of the p38 MAPK and the JNK transduction pathways, while betulinic acid inhibited the JNK transduction pathway only. They also significantly inhibited phosphorylation of I?B and Smad 3 and attenuated the activation of TGF-?1 and NF?B/I?B transduction signaling. Conclusion: The results indicated that betulin and betulinic acid inhibited ethanol-induced activation of HSCs on different levels, acting as antioxidants, inhibitors of cytokine <span class="hlt">production</span>, and inhibitors of TGF-?, and NF?B/I?B transduction signaling. Betulin was also inhibitor of both JNK and p38 MAPK signal transduction, while betulinic acid inhibited only JNK. The remarkable inhibition of several markers of HCS activation makes triterpenes, especially betulin, promising agents for anti-fibrotic combination therapies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:43010255"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ozone safety assurance during operation of 10 MeV RF electron linac by developing an air flow sensor and using ozone level monitor and interlock</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A lot of ozone gas is produced due to breaking of air particles present in between the beam exit window of Linac and <span class="hlt">products</span> to be irradiated. Though the ozone gas is non-poisonous, <span class="hlt">non-hazardous</span> and <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span>, being much heavier than oxygen, it creates a depletion of oxygen near the scan horn area of LINAC. The allowable level of ozone is 100 ppb for the human occupancy. There is a 2.6 meter thick mild steel mobile shield for entering the operating personnel after irradiation near the scan horn area of LINAC. Two 20 HP ozone removal pumps are in operation to remove the ozone produced due to Linac operation, via 12 earth pits made in the irradiation area of LINAC. The human safety is ensured by continuously monitoring the ozone level (analog signal), the ozone removal speed by measuring air flow signals (analog signal) at different pits, the ON/OFF status (DI) of two pumps and interlocking the mobile shield opening with the 100 ppb level of ozone level. A potential free contact is generated against the 100 ppb level in the ozone monitor. An Air flow sensor with two analog inputs and two alarm outputs have been developed to ensure the ozone removal at various pits. A light transmitter-receiver is mounted at the two ends of the rotating fan, which rotates due to air flow. The count of light pulses is calibrated with the air flow speed. This paper discusses the details of the measures taken to ensure human safety against ozone produced during operation of LINAC. (author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:37043933"> <span id="translatedtitle">Petroleum <span class="hlt">product</span> market outlook</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The influence of petroleum market disturbances on price increases was discussed with particular reference to Hurricane Katrina and the loss of refinery <span class="hlt">production</span> and damage to oil infrastructure in the United States. The supply of petroleum <span class="hlt">products</span> in Canada will be very tight heading into the winter of 2006, despite the fact that Canadian refineries are operating at full capacity to ensure an adequate supply of gasoline and diesel fuel for consumers. In addition to refinery <span class="hlt">production</span>, petroleum supplies are also determined by the adequacy of inventories and the efficiency of the infrastructure in place to deliver <span class="hlt">products</span> to where they are needed. The lack of spare capacity has reduced the flexibility of the North American refining system to respond to further disruptions. Refiners were asked to provide information on 4 areas of their operations in order for Natural Resources Canada to analyze the short-term outlook for petroleum <span class="hlt">products</span> markets. The 4 areas included refinery utilization rates and capability to increase <span class="hlt">production</span>; any planned refinery turnaround that would affect petroleum <span class="hlt">product</span> supplies; inventory levels compared to levels in previous years; and, any logistical problems that could affect <span class="hlt">product</span> distribution. A graph depicting the relationship between Canadian <span class="hlt">production</span> of gasoline and domestic sales clearly illustrated the seasonal nature of gasoline consumption and that <span class="hlt">production</span> in Canada is much higher than consumption. Canada exports large volumes of gasoline, primarily to the United States eastern seabord from refineries in Atlantic Canada. The trend is similar for diesel fuel. Demand for both gasoline and diesel is expected to continue to grow in 2005 as high prices have had a limited impact on demand growth. In general, the Ontario/Quebec region is short of gasoline and must import gasoline during the summer months to cover the shortfall. It was noted that motorists and homeowners who heat with oil will bear the burden of higher consumer prices in the 2005-2006 winter season. 2 tabs., 8 figs</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-04-19/pdf/2011-9471.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 21947 - Credit for Renewable Electricity <span class="hlt">Production</span>, Refined Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>, and Indian Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Revenue Service Credit for Renewable Electricity <span class="hlt">Production</span>, Refined Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>...availability of the credit for renewable electricity <span class="hlt">production</span>, refined coal <span class="hlt">production</span>...year 2011 sales of kilowatt hours of electricity produced in the United States or a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-01/pdf/2010-7263.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 16576 - Credit for Renewable Electricity <span class="hlt">Production</span>, Refined Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>, and Indian Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Revenue Service Credit for Renewable Electricity <span class="hlt">Production</span>, Refined Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>...availability of the credit for renewable electricity <span class="hlt">production</span>, refined coal <span class="hlt">production</span>...year 2010 sales of kilowatt hours of electricity produced in the United States or a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-30/pdf/2012-10275.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 25538 - Credit for Renewable Electricity <span class="hlt">Production</span>, Refined Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>, and Indian Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Credit for Renewable Electricity <span class="hlt">Production</span>, Refined Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>, and Indian Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>...determining the availability of the credit for renewable electricity <span class="hlt">production</span>. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Philip...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-11/pdf/2012-8675.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 21835 - Credit for Renewable Electricity <span class="hlt">Production</span>, Refined Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>, and Indian Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Revenue Service Credit for Renewable Electricity <span class="hlt">Production</span>, Refined Coal <span class="hlt">Production</span>...availability of the credit for renewable electricity <span class="hlt">production</span>, refined coal <span class="hlt">production</span>...year 2012 sales of kilowatt hours of electricity produced in the United States or a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=988467"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> by bio-ethanol reforming for small-scale fuel cell applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The depletion of fossil fuels in the future and availability of crude oil are serious concerns around the globe. Moreover, the green house gas (GHG) emissions, which have influence on the climate change and environmental problems on the earth, have to be reduced. In order to have a CO2 neutral energy <span class="hlt">production</span>, renewable energy sources will be one of the solutions to cut-off GHG emissions and to gain energy security. Various biofuels, which can be produced sustainably from renewable raw materials, can be used and they are benign renewable energy carriers. Bio-ethanol as a raw material for H{sub 2} generation is a good alternative because of its <span class="hlt">non-toxicity</span>, high energy density and easy delivery. Bio-ethanol can be produced from biomass like cellulosic materials, e.g. lignin or hemicelluloses, wood residuals, food industry side streams, etc., for example via fermentation. <span class="hlt">Production</span> of bio-ethanol from these resources is in focus in research and the most sustainable way to produce it is studied widely. Bio-ethanol produced from sugar or corn based raw materials are of less interest due to the need of plants suitable for food <span class="hlt">production</span>. The hydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> via bio-ethanol reforming for fuel cell applications has attracted significant interest both in academic and industrial research. Bio-ethanol reforming process can be done by three alternative ways as follows: (1) Steam reforming using water (SR) (Endothermic) (2) Dry reforming using CO{sub 2} (DR) (Endothermic) (3) Autothermal steam reforming using partial oxidation (OSR{sub +}POX) (Exothermic). Steam reforming and autothermal reforming are reported to be effective routes for producing hydrogen from ethanol. The catalyst plays a crucial role for the <span class="hlt">production</span> of hydrogen through ethanol reforming. In the present study, several catalytic materials, mainly CNT (carbon nanotube) support based catalysts but also conventional reforming catalysts were tested and reported. In this study, the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT) based catalyst materials are investigated in ethanol reforming. Catalysts for the bio-ethanol reformer operating at low temperatures, i.e. below 400 degC, are needed. The research is focused on developing new and sustainable ways to produce hydrogen by ethanol reforming for e.g. small-scale fuel cell systems having electric output power below 10 kW. The technologies will cover low temperature bio-ethanol reforming, study of hydrogen selective membranes for produced gas stream purification as well as the combinations of these two; catalytic membrane reactors to produce pure hydrogen streams suitable for fuel cells. Pd based hydrogen selective catalytic membranes were studied to obtain high hydrogen gas selectivity and purity with good hydrogen permeability. Further, theoretical and experimental research works were done to find and optimise appropriate operating pressures and temperatures for a micro-reactor performance to achieve a good hydrogen gas yield in reforming. CFD will be used as one of the tools when designing an optimal micro reactor structure for reforming. This project is in cooperation with COST Action 543 'Research and Development of Bio-ethanol Processing for Fuel Cells, BIOETHANOL' (2006-2010)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huuhtanen, M.; Seelam, P. K.; Turpeinen, E., Keiski, R. L. (Univ. of Oulu, Dept. of Process and Environmental Engineering (Finland)). email: mika.huuhtanen@oulu.fi; Kordas, K. (Univ. of Oulu, Dept. of Electrical and Information Engineering (Finland))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cscanada.net/index.php/ibm/article/view/1851"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Product</span> Development Risk Management in <span class="hlt">Product</span> Development Process</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=searchArticles">Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available <p>It is necessary to manage <span class="hlt">product</span> development risk in new <span class="hlt">product</span> development process. This paper puts forward a risk management frame combined the traditional risk management framework and establishes a <span class="hlt">product</span> development risk system in new <span class="hlt">product</span> development, which provides new patterns for practice. It is helpful to raising the possibility of new <span class="hlt">product</span> development success.</p><p><strong>Key words: </strong><span class="hlt">Product</span> development risk management; <span class="hlt">Product</span> development Process</p></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hanpeng ZHANG</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.environdec.com/PCR/Pcr-Search/?Category=6194"> <span id="translatedtitle">PCR Search - Environmental <span class="hlt">Product</span> Declarations - <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">...minerals Electricity, fuels and water Food <span class="hlt">products</span> Textiles and leather <span class="hlt">products</span> Forestry, wood and paper <span class="hlt">products</span> Plastics, glass and chemical <span class="hlt">products</span> Metals and ...and other transportable goods Constructions and infrastructure Found 16 PCR's CPC Name Forestry, wood and paper <span class="hlt">products</span> 03 Basic module: Forestry and logging <span class="hlt">products</span> ...Basic module: <span class="hlt">Products</span> of wood, cork, straw and plaiting material 3143 Wood particle and fibreboards 31600 Builders' joinery and carpentry of wood ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=doajarticles::382a81d27ef4d320ce85c90aed1e35c2"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Product</span> Development Risk Management in <span class="hlt">Product</span> Development Process</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><p>It is necessary to manage <span class="hlt">product</span> development risk in new <span class="hlt">product</span> development process. This paper puts forward a risk management frame combined the traditional risk management framework and establishes a <span class="hlt">product</span> development risk system in new <span class="hlt">product</span> development, which provides new patterns for practice. It is helpful to raising the possibility of new <span class="hlt">product</span> development success.</p><p><strong>Key words: </strong><span class="hlt">Product</span> development risk management; <span class="hlt">Product</span> de...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Hanpeng; Ma, Yongbo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:34065216"> <span id="translatedtitle">Manual of radioisotope <span class="hlt">production</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Manual of Radioisotope <span class="hlt">Production</span> has been compiled primarily to help small reactor establishments which need a modest programme of radioisotope <span class="hlt">production</span> for local requirements. It is not comprehensive, but gives guidance on essential preliminary considerations and problems that may be met in the early stages of <span class="hlt">production</span>. References are included as an aid to the reader who wishes to seek further in the extensive literature on the subject. In preparing the Manual, which is in two parts, the Agency consulted several Member States which already have long experience in radioisotope <span class="hlt">production</span>. An attempt has been made to condense this experience, firstly, by setting out the technical and economic considerations which govern the planning and execution of an isotope programme and, secondly, by providing experimental details of isotope <span class="hlt">production</span> processes. Part I covers topics common to all radioisotope processing, namely, laboratory design, handling and dispensing of radioactive solutions, quality control, measurement and radiological safety. Part II contains information on the fifteen radioisotopes in most common use. These are bromine-82, cobalt-58, chromium-51, copper-64, fluorine-18, gold-198, iodine-131, iron-59, magnesium-28, potassium-42, sodium-24, phosphorus-32, sulphur-35, yttrium-90 and zinc-65. Their nuclear properties are described, references to typical applications are given and published methods of <span class="hlt">production</span> are reviewed; also included are descriptions in detail of the <span class="hlt">production</span> processes used at several national atomic energy organizations. No attempt has been made to distinguish the best values for nuclear data or to comment on the relative merits of <span class="hlt">production</span> processes. Each process is presented essentially as it was described by the contributor on the understanding that critical comparisons are not necessary for processes which have been well tried in practical <span class="hlt">production</span> for many years. The information is presented as a guide to enable the reader to select processes most suitable to his local conditions</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1966-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:39065056"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radiation processed polysaccharide <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radiation crosslinking, degradation and grafting techniques for modification of polymeric materials including natural polysaccharides have been providing many unique <span class="hlt">products</span>. In this communication, typical <span class="hlt">products</span> from radiation processed polysaccharides particularly plant growth promoter from alginate, plant protector and elicitor from chitosan, super water absorbent containing starch, hydrogel sheet containing carrageenan/CM-chitosan as burn wound dressing, metal ion adsorbent from partially deacetylated chitin were described. The procedures for producing those above <span class="hlt">products</span> were also outlined. Future development works on radiation processing of polysaccharides were briefly presented. (author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od______1061::2e9642340f75ed977c294e40e9f986db"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computers, obsolescence, and <span class="hlt">productivity</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper examines the role that computers have played in boosting U.S. economic growth in recent years. The paper focuses on two effects - the effect of increased <span class="hlt">productivity</span> in the computer-producing sector and the effect of investments in computing equipment on the <span class="hlt">productivity</span> of those who use them - and concludes that together they account for almost all of the recent acceleration in U.S. labor <span class="hlt">productivity</span>. In calculating the computer-usage effect, standard NIPA measures of the capita...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whelan, Karl</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.thescipub.com/pdf/10.3844/ajabssp.2011.332.338"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wheat <span class="hlt">Production</span> and Economics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=searchArticles">Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available Problem statement: The crop in the irrigated scheme has faced by manifold problems contributed to low level of <span class="hlt">productivity</span> and high cost of <span class="hlt">production</span> of wheat. The crop is commonly produced under pump irrigation from the River Nile. In River Nile State (RNS, wheat is grown under the irrigated sector, the State is considered as a suitable environment for producing this crop. The study was conducted at Elzeidab irrigated scheme of RNS which is regarded as the oldest and biggest scheme belonging to the Ministry of Agriculture of RNS. Approach: Primary data was collected by using structured questionnaire for (70 randomly selected respondents. More than one technique used to assess economic aspects of the crop. Cobb-Douglas <span class="hlt">production</span> function, descriptive statistics and partial budgeting have been employed to analyze the primary data. The study detected that the major socioeconomic characteristics of Elzeidab farmers were educated, the scheme tenants have had a cumulative experience in agriculture and average farm size is found to be small and the majority 50% of surveyed tenants in Elzeidab scheme were rented. The farming system of Elzeidab scheme is dominated by wheat <span class="hlt">production</span> which counts to 25% of the farm land. The yield gab with the potential yield obtained by Agricultural Research Corporation (ARC in the State amounts 66%. The microfinance market in Elzeidab scheme is not well developed. Water charges in the scheme were high. About 53% of the annual running expenses were allocated for fuel that made irrigation costs to be the highest single component of <span class="hlt">production</span> costs of the crop, while irrigation water cost was considered as the most agricultural constraint, this item was found to be as 19% of the total cost of <span class="hlt">production</span> as the highest percentage overall the variable cost items. Results: The regression analysis revealed that the most factors affecting wheat <span class="hlt">productivity</span> under the study were: the average of tenants age, family labor, distance from home to field, hired labor, distance of farm to source of irrigation, number of irrigation, term of irrigation. Furthermore, the weakness of wheat <span class="hlt">production</span> normally regards as a cost issue and lack of awareness wheat grower especially about wheat technical package. Conclusion: The study concluded that wheat <span class="hlt">production</span> contribute significantly to farm sustainability and contribute to alleviation of malnutrition in the State. The actual <span class="hlt">production</span> constraints restrict the sustainability of this important crop. The cooperation between international organizations and governmental institutions should tackle the hindrances of wheat <span class="hlt">production</span> and achieve stability of wheat. There is a great potential for improvement the yield of the crop and an intervention of the State is needed to ease having the inputs of <span class="hlt">production</span> especially irrigation water inputs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Elgilany Ahmed</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=6524756"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simplified subsea <span class="hlt">production</span> wellhead</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A simplified subsea <span class="hlt">production</span> wellhead which permits (1) pumpdown tool operations for routine well maintenance and (2) vertical entry to the wellbore for major workover operations. The wellhead can be lowered by the <span class="hlt">production</span> pipeline to a wellhead site on the sea floor. The <span class="hlt">production</span> wellhead includes a diverter spool for releasably attaching to a subsea well. Pumpdown tools can be used with the diverter spool. If vertical entry of the subsea well is required, the diverter spool can be released, raised and moved horizontally to one side of the subsea well, giving vertical entry. After workover operations, the diverter spool is again moved over the subsea well and reattached.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lewis, H.R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-10-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=20674535"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dragline <span class="hlt">production</span> record</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In part eight of his series on dragline <span class="hlt">productivity</span>, Graham Lumley considers the lessons of a dragline that achieved the ultimate in <span class="hlt">production</span> - an M8050 moved 20.0 million BCMs in 2004. Others in the 'best practice' group of draglines include the BE1260W, BE1370W, BE1570W, M8200 and M8750. Factors impacting on dragline <span class="hlt">productivity</span> include management, mine planning, blasting, maintenance, and scheduling. The author believes that the average Australian dragline could achieve an extra 20% improvement by following best practice. 2 figs., 1 tab.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lumley, G. [GBI Consulting, Qld. (Australia)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:90%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> <div id="refine_search_form_div" style="right:140px"> <form id="simple_search_form" method="post" action="http://worldwidescience.org/cgi-bin/wwsproxy.pl" onsubmit="return ValidationUtils.validateSimpleSearch('refine_search_terms');"> <input name="viewId" value="view0" type="hidden" /><input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /> <input id="search_terms" name="expression" value="non-toxic non-hazardous product" class="TextInput" type="text" style="width:250; 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height:17pt"/> <input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /><button type="submit" class="search_submit" id="search_submit" title="New Search">Search</button> </form>  <br>  </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=21555478"> <span id="translatedtitle">Screening of additives for the <span class="hlt">production</span> of ice pulp for application in normal cooling and freezing; Screening von Zusatzstoffen zur Herstellung von Eisbrei fuer die NK-/TK-Anwendung</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The project investigated <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> additives for <span class="hlt">production</span> of ice slurry. Ice slurry is an environment-friendly refrigerant that is increasingly used as a substitute for conventional refrigerants. In view of rising energy prices and an impending tax on climate-relevant refrigerants, ice slurry may soon be used for chilling of food in supermarkets. For this, ice slurry of about 0 C is required for normal cooling and of about -25 C for deep freezing. A very fine-grained, pumpable ice slurry is obtained with glucose as an additive, or with sodium chloride in eutectic concentration with small amounts of ethanol for deep freezing. Ethanol will refine the coarse crystal structure of the eutectic sodium chloride / water mixture and will also reduce the freezing point. Further, the method of primary crystallisation on a crystallised additive was developed. An industrial plant working by this principle will have less disturbances and wear during ice slurry <span class="hlt">production</span>. [German] Die Projektarbeit befasste sich mit der Untersuchung lebensmittelvertraeglicher Additive zur Herstellung von Eisbrei. Eisbrei gilt als umweltfreundlicher Kaeltetraeger, der zunehmend in verschiedenen Bereichen zur Anwendung kommt und herkoemmliche Kaeltemittel ersetzen kann. Aufgrund steigender Energiekosten sowie einer eventuell anstehenden Besteuerung treibhauswirksamer Kaeltemittel, kann Eisbrei zukuenftig zur Kuehlung von Lebensmitteln in Supermaerkten verwendet werden. Dazu wird Eisbrei mit ca. 0 C fuer die Normalkuehlung, beziehungsweise mit ca. -25 C fuer die Tiefkuehlung benoetigt. Mit Glucose als Zusatzstoff laesst sich ein sehr feinkoerniger und damit pumpbarer Eisbrei fuer die Normalkuehlung erzeugen. Bei der Tiefkuehlung ist Natriumchlorid in einer eutektischen Konzentration mit geringen Mengen Ethanol empfehlenswert. Ethanol verfeinert die grobe Kristallstruktur des reinen eutektischen Natriumchlorid-Wasser-Gemisches und senkt den Gefrierpunkt. Des Weiteren wurde das Verfahren der Primaerkristallisation an einem auskristallisierten Additiv erarbeitet. Bei einer industriellen Anlage nach diesem Verfahrensschema duerfte es im Vergleich zu den herkoemmlichen Eisbreiherstellungsverfahren zu weniger Stoerungen und Verschleiss kommen.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruebeling, Jascha; Eiseler, Jens [Hochschule Karlsruhe - Technik und Wirtschaft (Germany). Inst. fuer Kaelte-, Klima- und Umwelttechnik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB89105696"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quality Seed <span class="hlt">Production</span>,</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In many arid and semiarid regions, seed <span class="hlt">production</span> has not kept pace with the development of new varieties. To remedy the situation, the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) is working closely with national programs and...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. J. G. van Gastel J. Kerley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/servlets/purl/5673643/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radioactivity in consumer <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various <span class="hlt">products</span> containing radioactive sources.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.istc.ru/istc/db/projects.nsf/All/727DC25EA72180FAC325699100412855?OpenDocument&search=1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Boron Materials <span class="hlt">Production</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.istc.ru/istc/db/projects.nsf/projectsSearchByKeywords?OpenForm&type=All&lang=Eng">International Science & Technology Center (ISTC)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Investigation of the <span class="hlt">Production</span> Processes of Highly Pure Boric Acid and Elemental Boron Labeled with Boron-10 or Boron-11 Isotopes and of the Gain in Efficiency of the Boron Isotope Concentrating Process</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA599065"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plankton <span class="hlt">Production</span> Biology.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">I continue to investigate geographic and seasonal distributions of hydrography and nutrients in respect to plankton <span class="hlt">production</span> in the central and eastern Arabian Sea including the continental shelf of India west coast. This year I have added the central B...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Banse</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://betobaccofree.hhs.gov/about-tobacco/Smoked-Tobacco-Products/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Smoked Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Smoked Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> Cigarettes Light Cigarettes Menthol cigarettes Cigars and pipes Bidis and Kreteks (Clove Cigarettes) Hookahs Cigarettes A cigarette is any roll of tobacco wrapped in paper or in any substance not ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_dG7loa&server=pvlbsrch13&v%3astate=root%7croot-80-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm182929.htm&rid=Ndoc87&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=f2236d5542a58b736925fab611783b4b&"> <span id="translatedtitle">FDA 101: <span class="hlt">Product</span> Recalls</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... Consumer Updates RSS Feed FDA 101: <span class="hlt">Product</span> Recalls (video) Search the Consumer Updates Section Read the Consumer ... market may be necessary. In this Consumer Update video, FDA Recall Operations Team Leader Armando Zamora, explains ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=20274246"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> and infrastructure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The following topics were dealt with: hydrogen market, hydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span> (steam reforming, partial oxidation, electrolysis); liquid hydrogen (transport with trailers, liquefaction); infrastructure requirements for mobile applications (filling station of LH{sub 2} at Munich airport)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bracha, M. [Linde Gas AG, Muenchen (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_KDT7bE&server=pvlbsrch14&v%3astate=root%7croot-10-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm248864.htm&rid=Ndoc15&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=efecfe7683356c55d68e7579d7655147&"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identifying Recalled <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco <span class="hlt">Products</span> ... Get Consumer Updates by E-mail | Consumer Updates RSS Feed FDA Consumer Safety Officer Armando Zamora explains what to do if ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0710.3423.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quasidiagonality of crossed <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://cdsweb.cern.ch/collection/Multimedia%20%26%20Outreach?ln=en">CERN Multimedia</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We prove that the crossed <span class="hlt">product</span> A x G of a separable, unital, quasidiagonal C*- algebra A by a discrete, countable, amenable, maximally almost periodic group G is quasidiagonal, provided that the action is almost periodic.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Orfanos, Stefanos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0231764"> <span id="translatedtitle">Minimum entropy <span class="hlt">production</span> principle.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.library.sk/i2/i2.entry.cls?ictx=cav&op=advsrch&qt=3">Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database</a></p> <p class="result-summary">. Ro?. 8, ?. 7 (2013), s. 9664-9677. ISSN 1941-6016Institucionální podpora: RVO:68378271Klí?ová slova: MINEPKód oboru RIV: BE - Teoretická fyzikahttp://www.scholarpedia.org/article/Minimum_entropy_<span class="hlt">production</span>_principle</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maes, C.; Neto?ný, Karel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/factsheets/antimic.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Antimicrobial Pesticide <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... as of: December 1, 2004 Resources Questions On Pesticides? National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) 1-800-858-7378 On ... Types of Antimicrobial <span class="hlt">Products</span> For More Information Antimicrobial pesticides are substances or mixtures of substances used to ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/health/illegalproducts/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Illegal Pesticide <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Illegal Pesticide <span class="hlt">Products</span> Esta página Web está disponible en español Quick Resources Protect your Business Counterfeit Flea and Tick ... Center (NPIC) 1-800-858-7378 Questions on Pesticides? National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) 1-800-858- ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_FH1tea&server=pvlbsrch13&v%3astate=root%7croot-40-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm248864.htm&rid=Ndoc40&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=efecfe7683356c55d68e7579d7655147&"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identifying Recalled <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available U.S. Food & Drug Administration A to Z Index Follow FDA FDA Voice Blog Enter Search terms Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting <span class="hlt">Products</span> Vaccines, Blood & Biologics ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=5338111"> <span id="translatedtitle">Forest <span class="hlt">products</span> - world situation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">World consumption and <span class="hlt">production</span> of forest <span class="hlt">products</span> continues to increase. This is especially the case for newsprint, writing and printing paper and other paper <span class="hlt">products</span>.. Consumption increase in sawnwood has almost stagnated and consumption increase in wood-based panels is much lower than previously. Lower rates of growth are forecasted for Europe than for the world as a whole. Supplies of roundwood and the available forest resources seem to be adequate enough to cover the world demand for forest <span class="hlt">products</span>, at least up to the year 2000. The decrease in forests in large areas of the developing world is leading to a serious shortage of fuelwood and to the degradation of soils due to erosion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kuusela, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB82188681"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dairy Handbook (<span class="hlt">Production</span>).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The handbook provides information concerned with milk <span class="hlt">production</span>, including breeding, calf rearing, feeding, health care, and equipment practices used in raising cattle, buffaloes, and goats. The handbook gives the workers and dairy farmers a basic unders...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.forskningsdatabasen.dk/Search.external?operation=search&search-query=ti:Products+in+fusion+systems"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Products</span> in fusion systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://forskningsbasen.deff.dk/?lang=eng">DEFF Research Database (Denmark)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We revisit the notion of a <span class="hlt">product</span> of a normal subsystem with a p-subgroup as defined by Aschbacher (2011) [Asc11, Chapter 8]. In particular, we give a previously unknown, more transparent construction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Henke, Ellen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od______2294::a3bfe22b9b7154bc0e552e4e70f58f73"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biomimetic hydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen with outstanding efficiency. An electrode surface which is covered with active hydrogenase molecules becomes a promising alternative to platinum for electrochemical hydrogen <span class="hlt">production</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=7049015"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wind turbines. <span class="hlt">Product</span> guide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Product</span> guide presented gives names and addresses of Canadian, USA, EEC, Swiss, Scandinavian and Japanese vertical and horizontal turbine manufacturers, with names of rotor, blade, tower and gear manufacturers included. Technical specifications for each item of equipment are tabulated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=20489835"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dragline <span class="hlt">productivity</span>: the operator</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Technical developments such as universal dig and dump (UDD) have reignited interest in dragline <span class="hlt">productivity</span>. Australian mines realise that millions of dollars can be saved through technological and operational changes. In a series of articles the dragine <span class="hlt">productivity</span> issue is considered. This article looks at the human factors involved - how the operators are selected, trained, and supported so that maximum <span class="hlt">productivity</span> can be achieved. It describes the Vienna Test System (VTS) that can quantify the concentration, hand-eye co-ordination, visual tracking and movement anticipation of the operator. In subsequent columns the author will consider what is dragline's best practice? Why is payload so important to dragline <span class="hlt">productivity</span>? Are US draglines really better than Australian draglines? 2 figs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lumley, G. [GBI Consulting (Australia)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:90%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> <div id="refine_search_form_div" style="right:140px"> <form id="simple_search_form" method="post" action="http://worldwidescience.org/cgi-bin/wwsproxy.pl" onsubmit="return ValidationUtils.validateSimpleSearch('refine_search_terms');"> <input name="viewId" value="view0" type="hidden" /><input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /> <input id="search_terms" name="expression" value="non-toxic non-hazardous product" class="TextInput" type="text" style="width:250; 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height:17pt"/> <input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /><button type="submit" class="search_submit" id="search_submit" title="New Search">Search</button> </form>  <br>  </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:43058449"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regional electricity <span class="hlt">production</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While France's final energy consumption remained stable between 2000 and 2010, this was not the case for its consumption of electricity, which increased by 13% over 10 years, and by 4.5% over five years. <span class="hlt">Production</span> of electricity is concentrated into a few areas within the national territory, essentially as a result of geographical factors. Due, notably, to the presence of hydro generating, some regions produce a large proportion of the renewable electricity. Viewed at the level of the entire territory, <span class="hlt">production</span> is not linked to local consumption. Some regions have high surpluses whereas others show important deficits, while overall <span class="hlt">production</span> covers, on average, 114% of national needs. However, at the local level, measures by local authorities to control energy consumption and the development of renewables are beginning to show results. <span class="hlt">Production</span> of renewable electricity, not including hydro, has grown greatly over a few years and still has a high potential. (authors)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/food-labeling/food-product-dating/food-product-dating"> <span id="translatedtitle">Food <span class="hlt">Product</span> Dating</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Forms FSIS Forms Administrative Forms Standard Forms FSIS Food Safety and Inspection Service United States Department of ... Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Food <span class="hlt">Product</span> Dating "Sell by Feb 14" is a ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______571::a9be5998db238852cc86e30a9f1ada54"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Product</span> sounds: fundamentals and application:</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Products</span> are ubiquitous, so are the sounds emitted by <span class="hlt">products</span>. <span class="hlt">Product</span> sounds influence our reasoning, emotional state, purchase decisions, preference, and expectations regarding the <span class="hlt">product</span> and the <span class="hlt">product</span>'s performance. Thus, auditory experience elicited by <span class="hlt">product</span> sounds may not be just about the act of hearing or a sensory response to an acoustical stimulus (e.g., this is a loud and sharp sound). A complimentary and meaningful relationship exists between a <span class="hlt">product</span> and its sounds. The bas...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=143772"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetite and its <span class="hlt">production</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The supply of high quality magnetite for the cleaning of coal using dense medium cyclones and vessels is of concern to all coal preparation operations. This paper describes the <span class="hlt">production</span> of high purity magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) from a domestic underground mining operation in Missouri, Pea Ridge Iron Ore Company. Emphasis will be placed on the mining and processing of the magnetite ore into the various magnetite <span class="hlt">products</span> required by coal preparation plants.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Koebbe, E.R. [Pea Ridge Iron Ore Co., Sullivan, MO (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=6439017"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radioactive consumer <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Present situation of utilizing the radioactive consumer <span class="hlt">products</span> and exposure dose were reviewed with published data. Practically, consumer <span class="hlt">products</span> are divided into three categories, (1) radioactive nuclides intentionally incorporated into radioluminous dye, ionization chambers for smoke detector, eliminator of static electricity, and glow lamp (2) natural radioactive nuclides contained in false teeth, porcelain, glass, and gas mantle (3) natural radioactive nuclides accumulated as industrial waste at the consumption of coal, petroleum, and natural gas or in fertilizer and materials for construction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sato, O. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Industrial Science)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:14750384"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radioactive consumer <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Present situation of utilizing the radioactive consumer <span class="hlt">products</span> and exposure dose were reviewed with published data. Practically, consumer <span class="hlt">products</span> are divided into three categories, (1) radioactive nuclides intentionally incorporated into radioluminous dye, ionization chambers for smoke detector, eliminator of static electricity, and glow lamp (2) natural radioactive nuclides contained in false teeth, porcelain, glass, and gas mantle (3) natural radioactive nuclides accumulated as industrial waste at the consumption of coal, petroleum, and natural gas or in fertilizer and materials for construction. (Nakanishi, T.)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/servlets/purl/1128522/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pretreated densified biomass <span class="hlt">products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">product</span> comprising at least one densified biomass particulate of a given mass having no added binder and comprised of a plurality of lignin-coated plant biomass fibers is provided, wherein the at least one densified biomass particulate has an intrinsic density substantially equivalent to a binder-containing densified biomass particulate of the same given mass and h a substantially smooth, non-flakey outer surface. Methods for using and making the <span class="hlt">product</span> are also described.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dale, Bruce E; Ritchie, Bryan; Marshall, Derek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:11526764"> <span id="translatedtitle">Massive lepton pair <span class="hlt">production</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this review of massive lepton pair <span class="hlt">production</span> the Drell-Yan mechanism is defined in terms of the parton model, and the modifications expected from Quantum Chromodynamics description of the process are described. The problems of the phenomenology of the data are described. Included in addition are particle-type dependence, mass spectra, momentum spectra of lepton pairs, Quantum Chromodynamics phenomenology of lepton pair <span class="hlt">production</span>, angular distributions, structure functions and quark distributions, and the future outlook. 40 references</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-07-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=doajarticles::a07ef8b08cfab0828fa36073b3951cc2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wheat <span class="hlt">Production</span> and Economics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Problem statement: The crop in the irrigated scheme has faced by manifold problems contributed to low level of <span class="hlt">productivity</span> and high cost of <span class="hlt">production</span> of wheat. The crop is commonly produced under pump irrigation from the River Nile. In River Nile State (RNS), wheat is grown under the irrigated sector, the State is considered as a suitable environment for producing this crop. The study was conducted at Elzeidab irrigated scheme of RNS which is regarded as the oldest and biggest scheme...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Elgilany Ahmed; Jamalludin Sulaiman; Saidatulakmal Mohd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:37065167"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gas reserves, discoveries, <span class="hlt">production</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The new 2000-2004 natural gas discoveries have permitted the replacement of existing reserves up to 71%. They are particularly concentrated in the Asia-Oceania area. The Middle-East and the offshore represent an increasing share in the world gas <span class="hlt">production</span>. Non-conventional gas resources are important too but they remain poorly exploited, except in the US where they represent 30% of the domestic gas <span class="hlt">production</span>. (J.S.)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od_______260::674e147909e85bde786767327a7f546d"> <span id="translatedtitle">Turbomachinery in Biofuel <span class="hlt">Production</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim for this study has been to evaluate the integration potential of turbo-machinery into the <span class="hlt">production</span> processes of biofuels. The focus has been on bio-fuel produced via biomass gasification; mainly methanol and synthetic natural gas. The research has been divided into two parts; gas and steam turbine applications. Steam power generation has a given role within the fuel <span class="hlt">production</span> process due to the large amounts of excess chemical reaction heat. However, large amounts of the steam prod...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Go?rling, Martin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=doajarticles::75973d6f9d07927b7ab599131b80d225"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Production</span> VS. Reception</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">TV newscasts are the <span class="hlt">product</span> of information with major impact on contemporary society. The objective of this study is to investigate the relationships between <span class="hlt">production</span> and audience through a quantitative and qualitative comparative analysis, especially observing the communicatory strategies used by newscasters to engage their viewers, and how diverse, socially active individuals are represented in local TV newscasts in the State of Rio de Janeiro. The study also re? ects upon the viabilit...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=doajarticles::264af1b51ff6cf529e18e1c901e8c69a"> <span id="translatedtitle">Powder detergents <span class="hlt">production</span> plant</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for powder detergent <span class="hlt">production</span> plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories, in 1998. - 2000. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a <span class="hlt">production</span> plant with a capacity of 25,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Delta In", Zrenjanin, in 2000.This technology was an innovation, because new approach in mixing a powder materials was used, as well as introducing ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stankovi? Mirjana S.; Pezo Lato L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:44056158"> <span id="translatedtitle">Excellent <span class="hlt">Production</span> Performance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Operation of 2010 at Cierny Vah hydro-centre can be assessed as peaceful, in spite of the weather changes in the fi rst half of the year. April was uncommonly dry, while in May we had the most rains in the history of measurements. Thanks to the sufficiency of rain we were able to achieve 176% performance against the <span class="hlt">production</span> plan. The main contribution came from the pumped-storage power plant of Cierny Vah with the <span class="hlt">production</span> above 233%. (author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=od______1687::242c8d3c3cc80b371b80813c437d683f"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ageing and <span class="hlt">productivity</span>: Introduction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Population ageing will be the dominant feature of the world's demographic landscape in the coming decades, raising concerns about labor <span class="hlt">productivity</span> and about economic outcomes at both the individual, enterprise, and macro levels. The articles in this special issue of Labour Economics define and address key issues with respect to the interplay of ageing, workforce <span class="hlt">productivity</span>, and economic performance. Taken as a whole, the articles dispel some of the concerns, sharpen our understanding of o...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bloom, David E.; Sousa-poza, Alfonso</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=dedup_wf_001::69c5c3e638c90081bc7b11e333ba4022"> <span id="translatedtitle">Human capital and <span class="hlt">productivity</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper surveys the empirical literature on human capital and <span class="hlt">productivity</span> and summarizes the results of my own work on the subject. On balance, the available evidence suggests that investment in education has a positive, significant and sizable effect on <span class="hlt">productivity</span> growth. According to my estimates, moreover, the social returns to investment in human capital are higher than those on physical capital in most EU countries and in many regions of Spain.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fuente, A?ngel La</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:11526828"> <span id="translatedtitle">Particle <span class="hlt">production</span> by neutrinos</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A review is given of particle <span class="hlt">production</span> by neutrinos in charged-current inclusive and exclusive channels. The <span class="hlt">production</span> rates for various particles in neutrino-nucleon interactions at a beam energy of 25 GeV are compared. The mesons are, of course, dominated by pion <span class="hlt">production</span>. The p"0(760) rate is an order of magnitude smaller. Strange and charm pseudoscalar mesons are a further factor of two down in rate. The strange vector mesons are suppressed by more than an order of magnitude relative to K"0 <span class="hlt">production</span>; however, the charmed D*"+(2010) is only a factor of two smaller in rate than the D"0(1860). With regards to the baryons, most of them are, of course, nucleons. The ?"0 and Y*(1385) rates are down by one and two orders of magnitudes, respectively. The lower limit on the charmed ?/sub c/"+"+ baryon rate is similar to the Y*(1385) rate. Finally, the quasielastic and one-pion <span class="hlt">production</span> exclusive channels have about the same cross section as that of the D*"+; associated <span class="hlt">production</span> of strange particles in the ?n ? ?"-K"+? channel and the ?S = +?? process ?p ? ?"-pK"+ are down by factors of five and twenty, respectively, compared to the quasielastic cross section</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-08-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:24027652"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coal <span class="hlt">production</span>, 1991</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coal <span class="hlt">production</span> in the United States in 1991 declined to a total of 996 million short tons, ending the 6-year upward trend in coal <span class="hlt">production</span> that began in 1985. The 1991 figure is 33 million short tons below the record level of 1.029 billion short tons produced in 1990 (Table 1). Tables 2 through 33 in this report include data from mining operations that produced, prepared, and processed 10,000 or more short tons during the year. These mines yielded 993 million short tons, or 99.7 percent of the total coal <span class="hlt">production</span> in 1991, and their summary statistics are discussed below. The majority of US coal (587 million short tons) was produced by surface mining (Table 2). Over half of all US surface mine <span class="hlt">production</span> occurred in the Western Region, though the 60 surface mines in this area accounted for only 5 percent of the total US surface mines. The high share of <span class="hlt">production</span> was due to the very large surface mines in Wyoming, Texas and Montana. Nearly three quarters of underground <span class="hlt">production</span> was in the Appalachian Region, which accounted for 92 percent of underground mines. Continuous mining methods produced the most coal among those underground operations that responded. Of the 406 million short tons, 59 percent (239 million short tons) was produced by continuous mining methods, followed by longwall (29 percent, or 119 million short tons), and conventional methods (11 percent, or 46 million short tons)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=6508548"> <span id="translatedtitle">Parallelism in <span class="hlt">production</span> systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Production</span> systems (or rule-based systems) are widely used in Artificial Intelligence for modeling intelligent behavior and building expert systems. Most <span class="hlt">production</span> system programs, however, are extremely computation intensive and run quite slowly. The slow speed of execution has prohibited the use of <span class="hlt">production</span> systems in domains requiring high performance and real-time response. This thesis explores the role of parallelism in the high-speed execution of <span class="hlt">production</span> systems. The thesis presents simulation results for a large set of <span class="hlt">production</span> systems exploiting different sources of parallelism. The thesis points out the features of existing programs that limit the speed-up obtainable from parallelism and suggests solutions for some of the bottlenecks. The simulation results show that using the suggested multiprocessor architecture (with individual processors performing at 2 MIPS), it is possible to obtain execution speeds of about 12000 working-memory element changes per second. This corresponds to a speed-up of 10-fold over the best known sequential implementation using a 2 MIPS processor. This performance is significantly higher than that obtained by other proposed parallel implementations of <span class="hlt">production</span> systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gupta, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.jmbfs.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/JMBFS_0006_Ka?ániová-and-Juhaniaková-2011.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">MICROORGANISMS IN CONFECTIONERY <span class="hlt">PRODUCTS</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=searchArticles">Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine microbiological quality of confectionery <span class="hlt">products</span>. In confectionery <span class="hlt">products</span> microbiological parameters: coliforms bacteria, microscopic filamentous fungi and yeasts, Salmonella sp. and staphylococci were observed. The confectionery <span class="hlt">products</span> were evaluated: Kremes - honey cube, roll Arabica, roll Rona, roll stuffed with apricot cream, honey cube, pinwheel caramel, Sachovnica cut, Zora cut and curd cake. For microbiological tests 18 samples of confectionery <span class="hlt">products</span> were used. Numbers of coliforms bacteria in confectionery <span class="hlt">products</span> ranged from <1x101 to 4x102 cfu.g-1, the number of microscopic fungi ranged from 0 to <1x101 cfu.g-1, the number of yeasts from <1x101 to 5.5x102 cfu.g-1, cells of Salmonella sp. were not detected and the number of staphylococci was from 0 to <1x101 cfu.g-1. All investigated samples of confectionary <span class="hlt">products</span> were in accordance with the Codex Alimentarius of the Slovak Republic.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">?ubomíra Juhaniaková</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:90%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> <div id="refine_search_form_div" style="right:140px"> <form id="simple_search_form" method="post" action="http://worldwidescience.org/cgi-bin/wwsproxy.pl" onsubmit="return ValidationUtils.validateSimpleSearch('refine_search_terms');"> <input name="viewId" value="view0" type="hidden" /><input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /> <input id="search_terms" name="expression" value="non-toxic non-hazardous product" class="TextInput" type="text" style="width:250; 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height:17pt"/> <input name="ssid" value="" type="hidden" /><button type="submit" class="search_submit" id="search_submit" title="New Search">Search</button> </form>  <br>  </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:33055374"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bituminized <span class="hlt">products</span> data book</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Low radioactive liquid wastes (LLW) from Tokai Reprocessing Plant were mixed and solidified with bitumen in the Bituminization Demonstration Facility (BDF). In the facility, the treatment operation was started from 1982, and it had been continued until the fire and explosion incident occurred on March 11, 1997. The LLW of 7,438 m3 were processed and the bituminized <span class="hlt">products</span> of 29,967 drums were manufactured in the BDF for about 15 years. The process information of the bituminized <span class="hlt">products</span> is important for fixing the technology indicator of bituminized <span class="hlt">products</span> in the disposal. The bituminized <span class="hlt">products</span> data, that is the inventory of the bitumen quantity, the salt quantity, the radionuclide concentration and so on in the drum, are saved in the main computer of O-arai Engineering Center and the personal computer of the Waste Condition Section. This report summarize the bituminized <span class="hlt">product</span> data in the list. In addition, if you want to know the manufacture review in the BDF, please refer to 'Manufacture Review of the Bituminized <span class="hlt">Products</span> for Research and Development Program'. (author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:12609690"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Production</span> of uranium dioxide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A continuous, four stage fluidized bed process for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF_6) to ceramic-grade uranium dioxide (UO_2) powder suitable for use in the manufacture of fuel pellets for nuclear reactors is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of first reacting UF_6 with steam in a first fluidized bed to form solid intermediate reaction <span class="hlt">products</span> UO_2F_2, U_3O_8 and off-gas including hydrogen fluoride (HF). The solid intermediate reaction <span class="hlt">products</span> are conveyed to a second fluidized bed reactor in which the mol fraction of HF is controlled at low levels in order to prevent the formation of uranium tetrafluoride (UF_4). The first intermediate reaction <span class="hlt">products</span> are reacted in the second fluidized bed with steam and hydrogen at 630"0C. The second intermediate reaction <span class="hlt">product</span> including uranium dioxide (UO_2) is conveyed to a third fluidized bed reactor and reacted with additional steam and hydrogen at 650"0C producing a reaction <span class="hlt">product</span> consisting essentially of uranium dioxide having an oxygen-uranium ratio of about 2 and a low residual fluoride content. This <span class="hlt">product</span> is then conveyed to a fourth fluidized bed wherein a mixture of air and preheated nitrogen is introduced in order to futher reduce the fluoride content of the UO_2 and increase the oxygen-uranium ratio to about 2.25. (auth)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1517-83822007000100010"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of fractional factorial design to levan <span class="hlt">production</span> by Zymomonas mobilis Aplicação do planejamento fatorial fracionário para a produção de levana por Zymomonas mobilis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=searchArticles">Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available Levan is a <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span>, biologically active, extra cellular polysaccharide composed solely by fructose units. Optimization of levan <span class="hlt">production</span> by Zymomonas mobilis strain ZAG-12 employing a 2(4-1 fractional factorial design was performed to analyze the influence of the temperature (20, 25 e 30ºC agitation (50, 75 e 100 rpm, and the initial concentrations of both sucrose (150, 200 e 250 g.L-1 and yeast extract (2.0, 3.5 e 5.0g.L-1 on final levan concentration. Aerobic fermentation was performed batchwise in 500mL Pyrex flasks for 72 hours. Biomass, ethanol, levan and sucrose were determined at beginning and also at end of the fermentations. The experiments showed that the final levan concentration depended on initial sucrose concentration, temperature and agitation velocity and that the initial concentration of yeast extract did not influence levan <span class="hlt">production</span>. However, when the <span class="hlt">production</span> of ethanol and biomass were considered, it became evident that yeast extract was a significant variable. The best conditions for levan <span class="hlt">production</span> occurred at 100 rpm agitation, 20ºC and 250g.L-1 of initial sucrose resulting in 14.67g.L-1 of levan.Levana é um polissacarídeo extracelular, biologicamente ativo, não tóxico, contendo em sua estrutura apenas frutose. A maximização da produção de levana, por via fermentativa, pela linhagem de Zymomonas mobilis ZAG-12, foi estudada utilizando-se um planejamento fatorial de dois níveis 2(4-1, variando-se as concentrações iniciais de sacarose (150, 200 e 250 g.L-1 , extrato de levedura (2.0, 3.5 e 5.0 g.L-1, temperatura (20, 25 e 30ºC e agitação (50, 75 e 100 rpm. As fermentações foram desenvolvidas por processos descontínuos em frascos Pyrex roscados, de 500 mL, contendo 300 mL de meio a base de sacarose, por 72 horas. No início e ao final do processo, foram dosados: biomassa, etanol, levana e sacarose como açúcares redutores totais. A análise dos dados mostra que o aumento da produção de levana depende tanto dos efeitos da concentração inicial de sacarose, temperatura e agitação, isoladamente, quanto da interação entre agitação e temperatura na faixa experimental estudada. O extrato de levedura não afeta a produção de levana, entretanto, quando a resposta é produção de etanol e biomassa, fica evidente que essa variável é significativa. Os resultados demonstraram que as melhores condições para a produção em batelada ocorreram com 250g/L de sacarose inicial, 100 rpm de agitação, a 20ºC.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">I.R. Melo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.switch-asia.eu/fileadmin/content/PSC/SCP_Handbooks_Icons/Opportunities_cleaner_production_web.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">6Cleaner and Safer <span class="hlt">Production</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">There is a need to enhance cleaner <span class="hlt">production</span> (CP) policies for all enterprises, including SMEs.... • CP policies can address issues in sustainable <span class="hlt">production</span>. ...Eco-efficiency and green <span class="hlt">productivity</span> both express clear messages of CP. Cleaner <span class="hlt">Production</span> The term Cleaner <span class="hlt">Production</span> was defined</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.environdec.com/Epd-Search/?Category=6195"> <span id="translatedtitle">EPD Search - Environmental <span class="hlt">Product</span> Declarations - <span class="hlt">Product</span> Category Rules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">...and chemical <span class="hlt">products</span> Metals and metal <span class="hlt">products</span> Machinery, appliances and equipment Transport vehicles and equipment Services Construction <span class="hlt">products</span> and construction services Beverages Furniture and other transportable goods Constructions and infrastructure Found 68 EPD's <span class="hlt">Product</span>/Service Company Category Sodium chlorate Akzo Nobel Pulp and Performance Chemicals AB Plastics, glass and chemical <span class="hlt">products</span> Hydrogen peroxide Akzo Nobel Pulp and Performance Chemicals AB Plastics, glass and chemical <span class="hlt">products</span> Concentrated pigment dispersion Eurocolori Srl Plastics,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=doajarticles::116ab89162bbd39bb3e997f5007701ca"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two <span class="hlt">Products</span> Manufacturer’s <span class="hlt">Production</span> Decisions with Carbon Constraint</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we consider a manufacture which produces both ordinary <span class="hlt">products</span> and green <span class="hlt">products</span> in a monopoly market, and investigate his <span class="hlt">production</span> decisions with carbon constraint. Firstly, we derive the manufacturer’s optimal <span class="hlt">production</span> and maximum profit without carbon constraint. Then, we discuss the optimal <span class="hlt">production</span> and maximum profit with carbon constraint in different situation. The results indicate that manufacturer’s optimal <span class="hlt">production</span> and maximum profit with carbon constrai...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lu, Li; Chen, Xu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.etde.org/etdeweb/details.jsp?query_id=1&page=0&osti_id=5180638"> <span id="translatedtitle">Parallelism in <span class="hlt">production</span> systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="https://www.etde.org/etdeweb/fieldedsearch.jsp">Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Production</span>-system programs, on the surface, appear to be capable of using large amounts of parallelism - it is possible to match each <span class="hlt">production</span> in a program to the data memory in parallel. This thesis shows that in practice, however, the speed up obtainable from parallelism is quite limited, around 15-fold as compared to initial expectations of 100- to 1000-fold. The main reasons for the limited speed-up from parallelism are: (1) there are only a small number of <span class="hlt">productions</span> that require significant processing as a result of a change to working memory; and (2) there is a large variation in the processing requirement of these <span class="hlt">productions</span>. To obtain a large fraction of the limited speed up available, the thesis proposes a parallel version of the Rete match algorithm that exploits parallelism at a very fine grain. It further suggests that a suitable architecture to exploit the fine-grained parallelism is a shared-memory multiprocessor, with 32-64 high-performance processors. For scheduling the fine grained tasks (consisting of about 50-100 instruction), a hardware task scheduler is proposed. This thesis presents a large set of simulation results for <span class="hlt">production</span> systems exploiting different sources of parallelism; it points out the features of existing programs that limit the speed up obtainable from a parallelism and suggest solution for some of the bottlenecks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gupta, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20975146"> <span id="translatedtitle">Visualization of graph <span class="hlt">products</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.science.gov/">Science.gov (United States)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Graphs are a versatile structure and abstraction for binary relationships between objects. To gain insight into such relationships, their corresponding graph can be visualized. In the past, many classes of graphs have been defined, e.g. trees, planar graphs, directed acyclic graphs, and visualization algorithms were proposed for these classes. Although many graphs may only be classified as "general" graphs, they can contain substructures that belong to a certain class. Archambault proposed the TopoLayout framework: rather than draw any arbitrary graph using one method, split the graph into components that are homogeneous with respect to one graph class and then draw each component with an algorithm best suited for this class. Graph <span class="hlt">products</span> constitute a class that arises frequently in graph theory, but for which no visualization algorithm has been proposed until now. In this paper, we present an algorithm for drawing graph <span class="hlt">products</span> and the aesthetic criterion graph <span class="hlt">product</span>'s drawings are subject to. We show that the popular High-Dimensional Embedder approach applied to cartesian <span class="hlt">products</span> already respects this aestetic criterion, but has disadvantages. We also present how our method is integrated as a new component into the TopoLayout framework. Our implementation is used for further research of graph <span class="hlt">products</span> in a biological context. PMID:20975146</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jänicke, Stefan; Heine, Christian; Hellmuth, Marc; Stadler, Peter F; Scheuermann, Gerik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:40020654"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Production</span> of titanium dioxide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://inis.iaea.org/search/">International Nuclear Information System (INIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Titanium dioxide pigments provide whiteness and opacity to a vast range of everyday <span class="hlt">products</span> from coatings and plastics to inks and even cosmetics and food. Manufacturing takes place using two different processes - the so called 'sulphate' and 'chloride' routes - to produce more than 4.5 million t per year worldwide. Both routes start from impure TiO2 based feedstocks containing moderately enhanced concentrations of radionuclides of natural origin. Experts from the TiO2 <span class="hlt">production</span> industry and feedstock suppliers are assisting the IAEA in the development of a Safety Report concerning exposure to NORM within the TiO2 industry. The data assessment shows that, for both process routes, most of the radioactivity reports to the solid process wastes and there are no areas of concern related to <span class="hlt">products</span>, co-<span class="hlt">products</span> or liquid or gaseous effluents for <span class="hlt">production</span> units operating to current environmental standards. Risk assessments for the landfill disposal of solid process waste similarly did not indicate any areas of concern where current waste management practices were followed. Process deposits, typically scale material, can exhibit enhanced activity concentrations of radium. Specific management practices such as controlled vessel entry to restrict worker exposure to these materials may be necessary. With such measures, it is considered unlikely that a worker would receive an annual effective dose exceeding 1 mSv. (author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://beta.openaire.eu/index.php?option=com_openaire&view=article&Itemid=114&articleId=doajarticles::f75bd2835cd00c0c8272f6b512fae2a9"> <span id="translatedtitle">Differences in gene expression and cytokine <span class="hlt">production</span> by crystalline vs. amorphous silica in human lung epithelial cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search1.driver.research-infrastructures.eu/webInterface/simpleSearch.do?action=load">Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract Background Exposure to respirable crystalline silica particles, as opposed to amorphous silica, is associated with lung inflammation, pulmonary fibrosis (silicosis), and potentially with lung cancer. We used Affymetrix/GeneSifter microarray analysis to determine whether gene expression profiles differed in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS 2B) exposed to cristobalite vs. amorphous silica particles at <span class="hlt">non-toxic</span> and equal surface areas (75 and 150 × 10...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://worldwidescience.org/wws/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3afile=viv_5QjXTl&server=pvlbsrch13&v%3astate=root%7croot-60-10%7c0&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.fda.gov%2fForConsumers%2fConsumerUpdates%2fucm190842.htm&rid=Ndoc64&v%3aframe=redirect&v%3aredirect-hash=8a54df3c0ba21d6950b934ea543d3825&"> <span id="translatedtitle">Warning on Body Building <span class="hlt">Products</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">Medline Plus</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Full Text Available ... 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