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Sample records for nocturnal melatonin elevation

  1. Nocturnal melatonin secretion in multiple sclerosis patients with affective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandyk, R; Awerbuch, G I

    1993-02-01

    The pineal gland has been implicated recently in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic demyelinating disease of CNS. Since nocturnal melatonin secretion is low in some groups of patients with mental depression, we predicted lower melatonin secretion in MS patients with history of affective illness compared to those without psychiatric disorders. To test this hypothesis, we studied single nocturnal plasma melatonin levels and the incidence of pineal calcification (PC) on CT scan in a cohort of 25 MS patients (4 men, 21 women; mean age = 39.4 years, SD = 9.3), 15 of whom had a history of coexisting psychiatric disorders with predominant affective symptomatology. Other factors that may be related to depression such as vitamin B12, folic acid, zinc, magnesium, and homocysteine, were also included in the analysis. Neither any of the metabolic factors surveyed nor the incidence of PC distinguished the psychiatric from the control group. However, the mean melatonin level in the psychiatric patients was significantly lower than in the control group. Since low melatonin secretion in patients with depression may be related to a phase-advance of the circadian oscillator regulating the offset of melatonin secretion, we propose that the depression of MS likewise may reflect the presence of dampened circadian oscillators. Furthermore, since exacerbation of motor symptoms in MS patients may be temporally related to worsening of depression, we propose that circadian phase lability may also underlie the relapsing-remitting course of the disease. Consequently, pharmacological agents such as lithium or bright light therapy, which have been shown to phase-delay circadian rhythms, might be effective in the treatment of affective symptoms in MS as well as preventing motor exacerbation and hastening a remission from an acute attack. PMID:8063528

  2. Nocturnal melatonin secretion in suicidal patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandyk, R; Awerbuch, G I

    1993-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterised by the occurrence of patchy CNS demyelinating lesions, leading to various degrees of motor, sensory, affective, and cognitive deficits. MS is associated also with an increased risk of suicide accounting for a substantial rate of death among these patients. Post-mortem studies in suicide victims with various psychiatric disorders demonstrate a decreased concentration of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolites in the brain. Since 5-HT is a precursor in the synthesis of melatonin and as pineal melatonin content was found to be low in suicide victims, we predicted lower melatonin secretion in suicidal versus non-suicidal MS patients during an acute exacerbation of symptoms. To test this hypothesis, we investigated nocturnal plasma melatonin levels in a cohort of 28 relapsing patients who were admitted consecutively to an inpatient Neurology service, 6 of whom had a history of suicide attempts and were having suicidal ideation at the time of admission. While both cohorts of patients were not distinguishable on any of the demographic data including use of psychotrophic drugs on the day of admission to hospital, the mean melatonin level in the suicidal group was significantly lower than in the control group (19.0 pg/ml +/- 11.9 versus 45.5 pg/ml +/- 27.1; p suicidality in MS and reinforce the concept that a biological rather than a reactive etiology underlies the development of psychiatric symptoms in MS. PMID:8407143

  3. Nocturnal Melatonin Profiles in Patients with Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder and Control Sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micic, Gorica; Lovato, Nicole; Gradisar, Michael; Burgess, Helen J; Ferguson, Sally A; Kennaway, David J; Lack, Leon

    2015-10-01

    A significant delay in the timing of endogenous circadian rhythms has been associated with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). More recently, other mechanisms have also been proposed to account for this disorder. To further explore the etiology of DSPD, the present study compared nocturnal melatonin profiles of 26 DSPD patients (18 males, 8 females; age, 21.73 ± 4.98 years) and 17 normally timed good sleepers (10 males, 7 females; age, 23.82 ± 5.23 years) in a time-free, dim-light (sleep opportunities and 40 min of enforced wakefulness was used to measure the endogenous melatonin circadian rhythm. Salivary melatonin was sampled half-hourly from 1820 h to 0020 h and then hourly from 0120 h to 1620 h. DSPD patients had significantly later timed melatonin profiles that were delayed by approximately 3 h compared to normal sleepers, and there were no notable differences in the relative duration of secretion between groups. However, melatonin secretion between dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) and acrophase was less prominent in DSPD patients compared to good sleepers, who showed a more acute initial surge of melatonin following the DLMO. Although the regulatory role of melatonin is unknown, abnormal melatonin profiles have been linked to psychiatric and neurological disorders (e.g., major depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, Parkinson disease). These results therefore suggest that in addition to a delayed endogenous circadian rhythm, a diminished initial surge of melatonin secretion following DLMO may contribute to the etiology of DSPD. PMID:26149168

  4. Melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood levels of melatonin.Vitex agnus-castusTaking vitex agnus-castus increases melatonin levels in the body. In theory, taking vitex agnus-castus with melatonin might increase both the effects and ...

  5. Alteraciones de la secreción nocturna de melatonina y neuropatías ópticas / Alterations in nocturnal melatonin levels in patients with optic neuropathies

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    C., Pérez-Rico; P., De la Villa; R., Blanco; F., Germain; J., Paz-Moreno; I., Arribas-Gómez.

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar la supresión de la secreción nocturna de melatonina inducida por exposición a la luz en pacientes con neuropatías ópticas bilaterales. Métodos: Estudio clínico de casos controles, observacional y prospectivo. Tamaño muestral de 20 pacientes distribuidos en 3 grupos: Grupo A (n=5, S [...] ujetos Sanos Controles), Grupo B (n=10, Pacientes Experimentales) y Grupo C (n=5, Sujetos Controles Ciegos). Se analiza la mejor agudeza visual corregida LogMAR, la desviación media en perimetría estática automatizada, el espesor medio de la capa de fibras nerviosas retinianas mediante Tomografía de Coherencia Óptica y los registros de electrorretinografía multifocal (mfERG). Se realizan determinaciones de melatonina en saliva por radioinmunoensayo tras exposición a una luz de 600 lux durante 1 hora (Test de supresión nocturna de melatonina). Resultados: Se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre los grupos. No se observaron cambios en los registros de mf ERG. El test de supresión nocturna de melatonina fue positivo en todos los casos del Grupo A, en el 50% de los casos del Grupo B y en todos los casos del Grupo C fue negativo. Conclusiones: El 50% de los pacientes con neuropatías ópticas y pérdida visual severa exhiben alteraciones significativas en la secreción nocturna de melatonina, probablemente debido a una disfunción de las células ganglionares de la retina intrínsecamente fotosensibles (ipCGR). Abstract in english Objective: To study nocturnal melatonin suppression induced by exposure to light in patients with bilateral optic neuropathies. Methods: Observational, prospective case control study. Twenty patients were included in this study and distributed in 3 groups: Group A (n=5, Healthy Control Subjects), Gr [...] oup B (n=10, Experimental Patients) and Group C (n=5, Blind Control Subjects). LogMAR best-corrected visual acuity, standard automated perimetry mean deviation, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness by Optical Coherence Tomography and multifocal electroretinograpy (mfERG) were used to evaluate the changes. Melatonin was analysed in the saliva by radioimmunoassay after exposure to light (600 lux for 1 hour) (nocturnal melatonin suppression test). Results: Statistically significant differences between the groups were found. No changes in the mfERG results were detected. The nocturnal melatonin suppression test was positive in all cases in Group A, 50 % in Group B and none in Group C. Conclusions: Half of the patients with optic neuropathies and severe visual loss were shown to suffer significant melatonin regulation anomalies, probably due to the dysfunction of the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC).

  6. Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manchester, Lucien C; Coto-Montes, Ana; Boga, Jose Antonio; Andersen, Lars Peter H; Zhou, Zhou; Galano, Annia; Vriend, Jerry; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin is remarkably functionally diverse with actions as a free radical scavenger and antioxidant, circadian rhythm regulator, anti-inflammatory and immunoregulating molecule, and as an oncostatic agent. We hypothesize that the initial and primary function of melatonin in photosynthetic cyano...

  7. Melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be more effective. Stomach ulcers caused by H. pylori infection. Evidence suggests that taking melatonin together with ... improves healing in people with ulcers caused by H. pylori infection. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Early research suggests ...

  8. Variations in the light-induced suppression of nocturnal melatonin with special reference to variations in the pupillary light reflex in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukouchi, Akira; Hazama, Tadaaki; Kozaki, Tomoaki

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the existence of individual differences of pupil response to light stimulation, and to confirm the reproducibility of this phenomenon. Furthermore, the relationship between the individual differences in nocturnal melatonin suppression induced by lighting and the individual differences of pupillary light response (PLR) was examined. The pupil diameter and salivary melatonin content of 20 male students were measured at the same period of time (00:00-02:30 hr) on different days, accordingly. Illumination (530 nm) produced by a monochromatic light-emitting diode (LED) was employed as the light stimulation: pupil diameter was measured with 4 different levels of illuminance of 1, 3, 30 and 600 lux and melatonin levels were measured at 30 and 600 lux (respective controls were taken at 0 lux). Oral temperature, blood pressure and subjective index of sleepiness were taken in experiments where melatonin levels were measured. Changes of the pupil diameter in response to light were expressed as PLR and light-induced melatonin suppression was expressed as a control-adjusted melatonin suppression score (control-adjusted MSS), which was compared to the melatonin level measured at 0 lux. In the PLR, the coefficients of variation obtained at 30 lux or less were large (51.5, 45.0, 28.4 and 6.2% at 1, 3, 30 and 600 lux, respectively). Correlations of illuminance of any combination at 30 lux or less were statistically significant at less than 1% level (1 vs. 3 lux: r=0.68; 1 vs. 30 lux: r=0.64; 3 vs. 30 lux: r=0.73), which showed the reproducibility of individual differences. The control-adjusted MSS at 600 lux (-1.14+/-1.16) was significantly (p<0.05) lower than that registered at 30 lux (-0.22+/-2.12). PLR values measured at 30 and 600 lux were then correlated with control-adjusted MSS; neither indicated a significant linear relationship. However, the control-adjusted MSS showed around 0 under any of the illuminance conditions in subjects with high PLR. In control-adjusted MSS of low values (i.e., melatonin secretions were easily suppressed), subjects indicated typically low PLR. In subjects with low control-adjusted MSS (n=3), characteristic changes in the autonomic nervous system, such as body temperature and blood pressure, were noted in subjects exposed to low illuminance of 30 lux. The fact that the relationship between PLR and control-adjusted MSS portray a similar pattern even under different luminance conditions suggests that MSS may not be affected in those with high PLR at low illuminance, regardless of the illuminance condition. PMID:17435353

  9. URINARY MELATONIN IN DEPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, A. Venkoba; Devi, S. Parvathi; Srinivasan, V

    1983-01-01

    This report is based on a study of 12 cases of depression (8 endogenous, 4 neurotic) with a view to explore the possible association between urinary melatonin and the illness prior to and following treatment. While cases of endogenous depression had low 24 hour as well as nocturnal urinary melatonin levels, the neurotic depressives showed higher than normal levels. A rise in the 24 hour melatonin levels occurred in all cases of endogenous depression though this did not apply, to the nocturnal...

  10. Melatonin rhythms in women with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortola, J F; Laughlin, G A; Yen, S S

    1993-12-01

    To discern whether the multiple neuroendocrine-metabolic dysfunctions observed in women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are associated with altered diurnal variations in serum melatonin profiles, we compared cycling and amenorrheic women with normal weight BN (n = 8) and AN (n = 7) to 21 normal cycling controls. Endogenous depression, which has confounded prior studies of melatonin profiles in women with eating disorders, was excluded in all subjects. Serum samples for melatonin measurements were obtained at frequent intervals (every 20 min) in a controlled light-dark environment, and cycling women were studied in the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Mean (+/- SE) peak melatonin levels were similar in AN, BN, and controls (325 +/- 43, 310 +/- 33, and 334 +/- 30 pmol/L, respectively). The time of melatonin peak, the time of onset and offset of the nocturnal serum melatonin excursion, and the duration of the nocturnal elevation were also similar in the three groups. Analysis of covariance revealed no independent effects of age or time of year on the data. Moreover, when subjects were separated into those with and without menstrual cyclicity, no significant differences in any parameter of melatonin diurnal variation were observed. Taken together, these data suggest that pineal melatonin secretion is unaltered in women with eating disorders, in whom depression is excluded, and that the frequent occurrence of amenorrhea in this population is not mediated by melatonin. PMID:8263138

  11. Urinary melatonin in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, A V; Devi, S P; Srinivasan, V

    1983-07-01

    This report is based on a study of 12 cases of depression (8 endogenous, 4 neurotic) with a view to explore the possible association between urinary melatonin and the illness prior to and following treatment. While cases of endogenous depression had low 24 hour as well as nocturnal urinary melatonin levels, the neurotic depressives showed higher than normal levels. A rise in the 24 hour melatonin levels occurred in all cases of endogenous depression though this did not apply, to the nocturnal levels. An association between melatonin levels with suicide behaviour, insomnia, psychomotor retardation and diurnal variation is discussed. PMID:21847281

  12. Occurrence, diel patterns, and the influence of melatonin on the photosynthetic performance of cultured Symbiodinium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopin, Modi; Yacobi, Yosef Z; Levy, Oren

    2013-08-01

    Dinoflagellata is the earliest phylum in which true circadian regulation of melatonin rhythms has been convincingly demonstrated. Here, diel profiling of melatonin in a cultured member of this phylum belonging to the genus Symbiodinium indicated that melatonin levels oscillate with significant nocturnal peaks. However, unlike in other previously studied dinoflagellate species, the diel rhythmicity of melatonin in Symbiodinium did not persist under constant dark conditions. Thus, the oscillating pattern of melatonin in Symbiodinium is presumed not to be driven by endogenous circadian control of melatonin production, but rather by changes in the daily photocycle, most likely through a mechanism involving the enhanced photo-consumption of melatonin by free radicals. Although direct interactions of melatonin with detrimental radicals have been previously studied in several basal species, including dinoflagellates, none of these investigations addressed the effects that this molecule may have on photosynthesis, a major source of radical species in unicellular algae. In the present work, real-time monitoring of oxygen evolution in Symbiodinium cultures indicated a significant decrease in photosynthesis rates upon treatment with various doses of melatonin. Analyses of chlorophyll a fluorescence and xanthophyll cycle activity confirmed this effect and further revealed that this slowdown may occur through an enhanced engagement of photoprotective mechanisms in melatonin-treated cells. These findings are of great importance as they demonstrate that in certain photoautotroph species, the interactions of elevated melatonin levels with photosynthesis may extend beyond the general purpose of antioxidant protection. PMID:23496383

  13. Morning and nocturnal serum melatonin rhythm levels in patients with major depressive disorder: an analytical cross-sectional study / Medir los niveles del ritmo de melatonina día-noche entre los pacientes con trastorno depresivo mayor: un estudio analítico transversal

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Shahnaz, Khaleghipour; Mohsen, Masjedi; Hassan, Ahade; Meersalahodin, Enayate; Gholamreza, Pasha; Farah, Nadery; Gholamhossein, Ahmadzade.

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO Y OBJETIVO: La glándula pineal actúa precisamente regulando los ritmos biológicos de melatonina de hemostasia cerebral, como un órgano adaptativo. La modificación del ritmo de melatonina puede ser el motivo probable del trastorno depresivo. Este estudio se realizó con el objetivo de medir l [...] os niveles de melatonina entre los pacientes con trastorno depresivo mayor y los sanos. DISEÑO Y ESPACIO: Estudio analítico transversal-la unidad medicina laboral de empresa de Zob Ahan de Isfahán-Irán. MÉTODO: Los niveles de melatonina en suero día-noche se midó entre dos grupos (pacientes y sanos) utilizando el método de ELISA (Ensayo por inmunoabsorción ligado a enzimas). Todos los datos se hizo utilizando el análisis de la varianza. RESULTADOS: El nivel de melatonina en suero día-noche era distinto entre los deprimidos y los saludables (P Abstract in english CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The pineal gland is an adaptive organ that precisely regulates the biological rhythms of melatonin brain hemostasis. Variation in the regulation of melatonin rhythms is a likely cause of depressive disorder. The purpose of this study was to measure serum melatonin levels in pa [...] tients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and normal control subjects. DESIGN AND SETTING: Analytical cross-sectional study at the industrial medical unit of the Iron Smelting Company of Isfahan, Iran. METHODS: The morning and nocturnal serum melatonin levels of patients and controls were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. All data were assessed using variance analysis. RESULTS: The morning and nocturnal serum melatonin levels of depressed and healthy subjects differed (P

  14. Added impact of obesity and insulin resistance in nocturnal blood pressure elevation in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurbe, Empar; Torro, Isabel; Aguilar, Francisco; Alvarez, Julio; Alcon, Jose; Pascual, Jose Maria; Redon, Josep

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between insulin resistance and the ambulatory blood pressure components in obese children and adolescents. Eighty-seven overweight and obese white children and adolescents of both sexes, of European origin from 6 to 18 years of age (mean age: 10.9+/-2.7 years), were selected. Obesity was defined on the basis of a threshold body mass index z score >2 (Cole's least mean square method) and overweight with a body mass index from the 85th to 97th percentile. A validated oscillometric method was used to measure ambulatory BP (Spacelabs 90207) during 24 hours. Fasting glucose and insulin were measured, and the homeostasis model assessment index was calculated. Subjects were grouped into tertiles of homeostasis model assessment index. No significant differences in terms of age, sex, and body mass index z score distribution were observed among groups. When adjusted by age, sex, and height, nocturnal systolic blood pressure and heart rate were significantly higher in subjects in the highest homeostasis model assessment index tertile (>4.7) as compared with those of the other groups, whereas no differences were observed for awake systolic blood pressure or heart rate. Whereas body mass index z score was more closely related with blood pressure and heart rate values, waist circumference was strongly related with insulin resistance. Moreover, both waist circumference and insulin resistance were mainly associated with higher nocturnal but not with awake blood pressure. The early increment of nocturnal blood pressure and heart rate associated with hyperinsulinemia may be a harbinger of hypertension-related insulin resistance and may contribute to heightened cardiovascular risk associated with this condition. PMID:18195166

  15. Nocturnal plasma levels of melatonin in quails (Coturnix japonica) injected with l-5-hydroxy-tryptophan / Níveis plasmáticos noturnos de melatonina em codornas (Coturnix japonica) injetadas com l-5-hidroxi-triptofano

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    LC., Reis; AC., Almeida; MC., Ribeiro; PA., Polo; EL., Olivares; MA., Medeiros; KO., Nonaka; LR., Castilhos.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou demonstrar a influência da administração sistêmica de l-5-hidroxi-triptofano (L-HTP) sobre os níveis plasmáticos de melatonina durante o período noturno em codornas. Ao longo do período claro, os níveis plasmáticos de melatonina não diferiram significativamente, oscilando ent [...] re 110,2 ± 15,8 pg.mL-1 e 157,4 ± 34,8 pg.mL-1, de 8 às 16 horas. L-HTP (25 mg.kg-1, via intracelomática), administrado às 18 horas atenuou significativamente a elevação noturna dos níveis plasmáticos de melatonina (controles, 327,3 ± 20,1 e 315,8 ± 20,9 pg.mL-1 vs. 242,1 ± 24,8 e 217,5 ± 21 pg.mL-1, respectivamente, às 20 e 24 horas, P Abstract in english This study aimed to demonstrate the influence of the systemic administration of l-5-hydroxy-tryptophan (L-HTP) on the plasma levels of melatonin during the dark period in quails. Throughout daylight, the plasma levels of melatonin did not differ significantly, oscillating between 110.2 ± 15.8 pg.mL- [...] 1 and 157.4 ± 34.8 pg.mL-1, from 8 to 16 hours. L-HTP (25 mg.kg-1, through the intracelomic route) administered at 18 hours lessened significantly the nocturnal increase of the plasma levels of melatonin (controls, 327.3 ± 20.1 and 315.8 ± 20.9 pg.mL-1 vs. 242.1 ± 24.8 and 217.5 ± 21 pg.mL-1, respectively, at 20 and 24 hours, P

  16. Antioxidative protection in a high-melatonin organism: the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax polyedra is rescued from lethal oxidative stress by strongly elevated, but physiologically possible concentrations of melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolín, I; Obst, B; Burkhardt, S; Hardeland, R

    1997-11-01

    Lethal oxidative stress was investigated in the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax polyedra by measuring the dying-peak of bioluminescence during circadian phases of low physiological light emission, low bioluminescence capacity, and low sensitivity to stimulatory agents. Measurements were carried out in constant darkness after transfer of cells from light at CT 6 (circadian time, 0600 hr). H2O2 (0.08 mM), when administered 1 hr after transfer of cells, led to a multifold, long-lasting enhancement of light emission, which is typical for lethal cell damage. At the circadian phases of investigation, melatonin did not substantially stimulate bioluminescence up to concentrations of 0.5 mM. At this concentration, addition of melatonin prevented the dying-peak and reduced bioluminescence to almost basal values. The high concentration of melatonin applied is not unphysiological in Gonyaulax, because the indoleamine can increase to levels of several millimolar, e.g., in response to temperature signals. These protective effects of melatonin seem to be caused mainly by the direct action of melatonin as an antioxidant, because the major enzymes of antioxidative protection were not stimulated by melatonin, although some of them responded to H2O2. The activities of neither superoxide dismutase, hemoperoxidase/catalase, glutathione peroxidase, nor haloperoxidase were enhanced under the influence of melatonin; glutathione S-transferase activity increased only slightly. PMID:9462850

  17. Melatonin Induces Follicle Maturation in Danio rerio

    OpenAIRE

    Carnevali, Oliana; Gioacchini, Giorgia; Maradonna, Francesca; Olivotto, Ike; Migliarini, Beatrice

    2011-01-01

    Most organisms modulate their reproductive activity responding to day length by the nocturnal release of melatonin by the pineal gland. This hormone is also responsible for synchronizing reproduction with specific external environment stimuli in order to optimize reproductive success.

  18. Doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer is driven by light at night-induced disruption of the circadian melatonin signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Shulin; Dauchy, Robert T; Hauch, Adam; Mao, Lulu; Yuan, Lin; Wren, Melissa A; Belancio, Victoria P; Mondal, Debasis; Frasch, Tripp; Blask, David E; Hill, Steven M

    2015-08-01

    Chemotherapeutic resistance, particularly to doxorubicin (Dox), represents a major impediment to successfully treating breast cancer and is linked to elevated tumor metabolism and tumor over-expression and/or activation of various families of receptor- and non-receptor-associated tyrosine kinases. Disruption of circadian time structure and suppression of nocturnal melatonin production by dim light exposure at night (dLEN), as occurs with shift work, and/or disturbed sleep-wake cycles, is associated with a significantly increased risk of an array of diseases, including breast cancer. Melatonin inhibits human breast cancer growth via mechanisms that include the suppression of tumor metabolism and inhibition of expression or phospho-activation of the receptor kinases AKT and ERK1/2 and various other kinases and transcription factors. We demonstrate in tissue-isolated estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ER?+) MCF-7 human breast cancer xenografts, grown in nude rats maintained on a light/dark cycle of LD 12:12 in which dLEN is present during the dark phase (suppressed endogenous nocturnal melatonin), a significant shortening of tumor latency-to-onset, increased tumor metabolism and growth, and complete intrinsic resistance to Dox therapy. Conversely, a LD 12:12 dLEN environment incorporating nocturnal melatonin replacement resulted in significantly lengthened tumor latency-to-onset, tumor regression, suppression of nighttime tumor metabolism, and kinase and transcription factor phosphorylation, while Dox sensitivity was completely restored. Melatonin acts as both a tumor metabolic inhibitor and circadian-regulated kinase inhibitor to reestablish the sensitivity of breast tumors to Dox and drive tumor regression, indicating that dLEN-induced circadian disruption of nocturnal melatonin production contributes to a complete loss of tumor sensitivity to Dox chemotherapy. PMID:25857269

  19. Nocturnal plasma levels of melatonin in quails (Coturnix japonica injected with l-5-hydroxy-tryptophan Níveis plasmáticos noturnos de melatonina em codornas (Coturnix japonica injetadas com l-5-hidroxi-triptofano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LC. Reis

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to demonstrate the influence of the systemic administration of l-5-hydroxy-tryptophan (L-HTP on the plasma levels of melatonin during the dark period in quails. Throughout daylight, the plasma levels of melatonin did not differ significantly, oscillating between 110.2 ± 15.8 pg.mL-1 and 157.4 ± 34.8 pg.mL-1, from 8 to 16 hours. L-HTP (25 mg.kg-1, through the intracelomic route administered at 18 hours lessened significantly the nocturnal increase of the plasma levels of melatonin (controls, 327.3 ± 20.1 and 315.8 ± 20.9 pg.mL-1 vs. 242.1 ± 24.8 and 217.5 ± 21 pg.mL-1, respectively, at 20 and 24 hours, P Este trabalho objetivou demonstrar a influência da administração sistêmica de l-5-hidroxi-triptofano (L-HTP sobre os níveis plasmáticos de melatonina durante o período noturno em codornas. Ao longo do período claro, os níveis plasmáticos de melatonina não diferiram significativamente, oscilando entre 110,2 ± 15,8 pg.mL-1 e 157,4 ± 34,8 pg.mL-1, de 8 às 16 horas. L-HTP (25 mg.kg-1, via intracelomática, administrado às 18 horas atenuou significativamente a elevação noturna dos níveis plasmáticos de melatonina (controles, 327,3 ± 20,1 e 315,8 ± 20,9 pg.mL-1 vs. 242,1 ± 24,8 e 217,5 ± 21 pg.mL-1, respectivamente, às 20 e 24 horas, P < 0,05. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que a administração de L-HTP reduziu a liberação noturna de melatonina, possivelmente por suscitar um aumento da síntese e liberação sináptica de serotonina na pineal. Portanto, a transmissão serotoninérgica da rafe para a pineal constituiria um mecanismo de modulação da síntese e/ou liberação de melatonina em codornas.

  20. Nocturnal Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Director, Health Initiatives View full profile Nocturnal Asthma Worsening of asthma at night, or nocturnal asthma, ... With Us View Events Calendar Read the News Asthma Treatment Program At National Jewish Health, we offer ...

  1. Melatonin: Physiological effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claustrat, B; Leston, J

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin is a methoxyindole synthesized and secreted principally by the pineal gland at night under normal light/dark conditions. The endogenous rhythm of secretion is generated by the suprachiasmatic nuclei and entrained to the light/dark cycle. Light is able to either suppress or synchronize melatonin production according to the light schedule. The nycthohemeral rhythm of this hormone can be evaluated by repeated measurement of plasma or saliva melatonin or urine sulfatoxymelatonin, the main hepatic metabolite. The primary physiological function of melatonin, whose secretion adjusts to night length, is to convey information concerning the daily cycle of light and darkness to body structures. This information is used for the organisation of functions, which respond to changes in the photoperiod such as the seasonal rhythms. Seasonal rhythmicity of physiological functions in humans related to possible alteration of the melatonin message remains, however, of limited evidence in temperate areas under field conditions. Also, the daily melatonin secretion, which is a very robust biochemical signal of night, can be used for the organisation of circadian rhythms. Although functions of this hormone in humans are mainly based on correlations between clinical observations and melatonin secretion, there is some evidence that melatonin stabilises and strengthens coupling of circadian rhythms, especially of core temperature and sleep-wake rhythms. The circadian organisation of other physiological functions depend also on the melatonin signal, for instance immune, antioxidant defences, haemostasis and glucose regulation. The difference between physiological and pharmacological effects of melatonin is not always clear but is based upon consideration of dose and not of duration of the hormone message. It is admitted that a "physiological" dose provides plasma melatonin levels in the same order of magnitude as a nocturnal peak. Since the regulating system of melatonin secretion is complex, following central and autonomic pathways, there are many pathophysiological situations where melatonin secretion can be disturbed. The resulting alteration could increase the predisposition to disease, add to the severity of symptoms or modify the course and outcome of the disorder. Since melatonin receptors display a very wide distribution in the body, putative therapeutic indications of this compound are multiple. Great advances in this field could be achieved by developing multicentre trials in a large series of patients, in order to establish efficacy of melatonin and absence of long-term toxicity. PMID:25908646

  2. Non-vertebrate melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Rüdiger; Poeggeler, Burkhard

    2003-05-01

    Melatonin has been detected in bacteria, eukaryotic unicells, macroalgae, plants, fungi and various taxa of invertebrates. Although precise determinations are missing in many of these organisms and the roles of melatonin are still unknown, investigations in some species allow more detailed conclusions. Non-vertebrate melatonin is not necessarily circadian, and if so, not always peaking at night, although nocturnal maxima are frequently found. In the cases under study, the major biosynthetic pathway is identical with that of vertebrates. Mimicking of photoperiodic responses and concentration changes upon temperature decreases have been studied in more detail only in dinoflagellates. In plants, an involvement in photoperiodism seems conceivable but requires further support. No stimulation of flowering has been demonstrated to date. A participation in antioxidative protection might be possible in many aerobic non-vertebrates, although evidence for a contribution at physiological levels is mostly missing. Protection from stress by oxidotoxins or/and extensions of lifespan have been shown in very different organisms, such as the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium, the ciliate Paramecium, the rotifer Philodina and Drosophila. Melatonin can be taken up from the food, findings with possible implications in ecophysiology as well as for human nutrition and, with regard to high levels in medicinal plants, also in pharmacology. PMID:12662344

  3. Melatonin in treatment of chronic sleep disorders in adults with autism: a retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Galli-Carminati, Giuliana Mariangela; Deriaz, Nicolas; Bertschy, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Melatonin may be used to treat sleep disorders in both children and adults with intellectual disability. The evidence for its efficacy, potential adverse effects and drug interactions are reviewed in the context of prescription of melatonin to patients with autism. METHODS: This study presents the use of melatonin to treat severe circadian sleep-wake disturbances in 6 adults with autism. Melatonin was initiated at a daily dose of 3 mg at nocturnal bedtime. If this proved ineffecti...

  4. Homeobox genes and melatonin synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based induction of Aanat transcription. However, additional transcriptional control mechanisms exist. Homeobox genes, which are generally known to encode transcription factors controlling developmental processes, ...

  5. Seasonal Patterns of Melatonin, Cortisol, and Progesterone Secretion in Female Lambs Raised Beneath a 500-kV Transmission Line.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jack M.

    1992-06-01

    Although several kinds of biological effects of electric and magnetic fields have been reported from laboratory studies, few have been independently replicated. When this study was being planned, the suppression of nighttime melatonin in rodents was thought to represent one of the strongest known effects of these fields. The effect had been replicated by a single laboratory for 60-Hz electric fields, and by multiple laboratories for d-c magnetic fields. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the effect of electric and magnetic fields on melatonin would also occur in sheep exposed to a high voltage transmission line. The specific hypothesis tested by this experiment was as follows: The electrical environment produced by a 60-Hz, 500-kV transmission line causes a depression in nocturnal melatonin in chronically exposed female lambs. This may mimic effects of pinealectomy or constant long-day photoperiods, thus delaying the onset of reproductive cycles. Results of the study do not provide evidence to support the hypothesis. Melatonin concentrations in the sheep exposed to the transmission line showed the normal pattern of low daytime and high nighttime serum levels. As compared to the control group, there were no statistically significant group differences in the mean amplitude, phase, or duration of the nighttime melatonin elevation.

  6. Melatonin and LH secretion patterns in pubertal boys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma melatonin and LH were measured at 20 minute intervals for 24 hours in four normal pubertal boys. All four subjects showed a significant augmentation of LH and melatonin during nocturnal sleep. There was also a significant correlation between the LH and melatonin levels (p<0.001). There were periods of episodic secretion of melanin during the diurnal waking period which seemed related to 'stress'. These data indicate that the peripheral concentrations of melatonin which occur during sleep are insufficient to prevent spontaneous LH secretion during puberty

  7. Putting cancer to sleep at night: the neuroendocrine/circadian melatonin signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blask, David E; Dauchy, Robert T; Sauer, Leonard A

    2005-07-01

    Physiological and pharmacological blood concentrations of melatonin inhibit tumorigenesis in a variety of in vivo and in vitro experimental models of neoplasia. Evidence indicates that melatonin's anticancer effects are exerted via inhibition of cell proliferation and a stimulation of differentiation and apoptosis. A new mechanism by which physiological and pharmacological blood levels of melatonin inhibit cancer growth in vivois via a melatonin-induced suppression of tumor linoleic acid (LA) uptake and its metabolism to the important mitogenic signaling molecule 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE). Melatonin suppresses cAMP formation and inhibits tumor uptake of LA and its metabolism to 13-HODE via a melatonin receptor-mediated mechanism in both tissue-isolated rat hepatoma 7288 CTC and human breast cancer xenografts. It has been postulated that in industrialized societies, light at night, by suppressing melatonin production, poses a new risk for the development of breast cancer and, perhaps, other cancers as well. In support of this hypothesis, light during darkness suppresses nocturnal melatonin production and stimulates the LA metabolism and growth of rat hepatoma and human breast cancer xenografts. Nocturnal dietary supplementation with melatonin, at levels contained in a melatonin-rich diet, inhibits rat hepatoma growth via the mechanisms described above. The nocturnal melatonin signal organizes tumor metabolism and growth within circadian time structure that can be further reinforced by appropriately timed melatonin supplementation. Dietary melatonin supplementation working in concert with the endogenous melatonin signal has the potential to be a new preventive/therapeutic strategy to optimize the host/cancer balance in favor of host survival and quality of life. PMID:16217131

  8. Intake of melatonin increases tryptophan hydroxylase type 1 activity in aged rats: Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moranta, D; Barceló, P; Aparicio, S; Garau, C; Sarubbo, F; Ramis, M; Nicolau, C; Esteban, S

    2014-01-01

    Pineal melatonin is important not only for synchronization of biological rhythms, but also in the ageing process as a potential drug to relieve oxidative damage. During ageing, the nocturnal melatonin production decreases resulting in an increased incidence of disorders. Present in vivo experiments were performed to study the effects of exogenous melatonin chronically administered to old rats on the pineal biosynthesis of melatonin and the precursor serotonin (5-HT) mediated by tryptophan hydroxylase type 1 (TPH-1). Accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) after decarboxylase inhibition was used as a measure of the TPH-1 activity. 5-HT and its metabolite 5-HIAA were also quantified by HPLC-ED. As expected, ageing resulted in worsening of different neurochemical parameters. However, chronic intake of melatonin (1mg/kg/day, diluted in drinking water, 4 weeks) increased TPH-1 activity and significantly improved the age-induced deficits in nocturnal melatonin content in the pineal gland. Results suggest that melatonin intake (or melatonin rich foods) may contribute to recover the pineal function preventing the nocturnal descent of 5-HT and melatonin biosynthesis that normally occur in pineal gland as a consequence of ageing. PMID:24189046

  9. MELATONIN: POTENTIAL UTILITY FOR IMPROVING PUBLIC HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russel J REITER; Fatih GULTEKIN; Luis J FLORES; Ma Pilar TERRON; Dun-Xian TAN

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the beneficial actions of melatonin in various experimental conditions/diseases and identifies where the use of melatonin may be helpful in improving public health. The nightly use of melatonin supplements by humans often improves their sleep and helps correct the circadian dyssynchronization associated with “jet lag”. Additionally, melatonin has been found effective in curtailing the growth of a variety of experimental cancers. Mechanistically, this is achieved by melatonin’s ability to limit fatty acid uptake, especially linoleic acid, by tumor cells. Fatty acids are growth factors for many tumors. Additionally, melatonin inhibits the elevated telomerase activity of tumor cells thus making them more fragile and vulnerable to chemotherapies. Melatonin also may inhibit angiogenesis in tumors by suppressing endothelin-1 production and the indole interferes with the stimulatory action of steroids on hormone-responsive tumors. As an ubiquitously-acting antioxidant, melatonin reduces cardiac damage during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury (heart attack and during I/R to the brain (stroke. Melatonin also limits the toxicity of amyloid  peptide and of neurofibrillary tangles, two of the cardinal signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Collectively, these data suggest supplementation with melatonin, whose endogenous levels decrease with age, may improve the quality of life in the aged and, as a consequence, be beneficial for public health generally. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(2.000: 131-158

  10. Advances in the Research of Melatonin in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Literature Review and New Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordjman, Sylvie; Najjar, Imen; Bellissant, Eric; Anderson, George M.; Barburoth, Marianne; Cohen, David; Jaafari, Nemat; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Fagard, Rémi; Lagdas, Enas; Kermarrec, Solenn; Ribardiere, Sophie; Botbol, Michel; Fougerou, Claire; Bronsard, Guillaume; Vernay-Leconte, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Abnormalities in melatonin physiology may be involved or closely linked to the pathophysiology and behavioral expression of autistic disorder, given its role in neurodevelopment and reports of sleep-wake rhythm disturbances, decreased nocturnal melatonin production, and beneficial therapeutic effects of melatonin in individuals with autism. In addition, melatonin, as a pineal gland hormone produced from serotonin, is of special interest in autistic disorder given reported alterations in central and peripheral serotonin neurobiology. More specifically, the role of melatonin in the ontogenetic establishment of circadian rhythms and the synchronization of peripheral oscillators opens interesting perspectives to ascertain better the mechanisms underlying the significant relationship found between lower nocturnal melatonin excretion and increased severity of autistic social communication impairments, especially for verbal communication and social imitative play. In this article, first we review the studies on melatonin levels and the treatment studies of melatonin in autistic disorder. Then, we discuss the relationships between melatonin and autistic behavioral impairments with regard to social communication (verbal and non-verbal communication, social interaction), and repetitive behaviors or interests with difficulties adapting to change. In conclusion, we emphasize that randomized clinical trials in autism spectrum disorders are warranted to establish potential therapeutic efficacy of melatonin for social communication impairments and stereotyped behaviors or interests. PMID:24129182

  11. Homeobox genes and melatonin synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based indu......Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a c......AMP-based induction of Aanat transcription. However, additional transcriptional control mechanisms exist. Homeobox genes, which are generally known to encode transcription factors controlling developmental processes, are also expressed in the mature rodent pineal gland. Among these, the cone-rod homeobox (CRX......) transcription factor is believed to control pineal-specific Aanat expression. Based on recent advances in our understanding of Crx in the rodent pineal gland, we here suggest that homeobox genes play a role in adult pineal physiology both by ensuring pineal-specific Aanat expression and by facilitating c...

  12. Nocturnal continuous glucose monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Christiane; Kristensen, Peter Lommer; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Tarnow, Lise; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: A reliable method to detect biochemical nocturnal hypoglycemia is highly needed, especially in patients with recurrent severe hypoglycemia. We evaluated reliability of nocturnal continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in patients with type 1 diabetes at high risk of severe...

  13. Adrenaline and nocturnal asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, J. F.; Teale, C.; Pearson, S B; Marshall, P.; Dwyer, N M; Jones, S.; Dean, H G

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether the nocturnal fall in plasma adrenaline is a cause of nocturnal asthma. DESIGN--Double blind placebo controlled cross-over study. In the first experiment the nocturnal fall in plasma adrenaline at 4 am was corrected in 10 asthmatic subjects with an infusion of adrenaline after parasympathetic blockade with 30 micrograms/kg intravenous atropine. In the second experiment 11 asthmatic subjects showing similar variations in peak expiratory flow rate had the nocturn...

  14. New developments in the treatment of primary insomnia in elderly patients: focus on prolonged-release melatonin

    OpenAIRE

    Vigo; MF Vidal; Cardinali DP

    2012-01-01

    Daniel P Cardinali, María F Vidal, Daniel E VigoDepartment of Teaching and Research, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaAbstract: A temporal relationship between the nocturnal rise in melatonin secretion and the increase in sleep propensity at the beginning of the night, coupled with the sleep-promoting effects of exogenous melatonin, indicate that melatonin is involved in the regulation of sleep. This action is...

  15. Melatonin’s Effect in Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl MAHYAR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE FA How to Cite This Article: Mahyar A, Ayazi P, Dalirani R, Gholami N, Daneshi-Kohan MM, Mohammadi N, Ahmadi MM, Sahmani AA. Melatonin’s Effect in Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Summer;8(3: 24-29. AbstractObjectiveRecognition of risk factors for febrile seizures (FS and epilepsy is essential. Studies regarding the role of melatonin in these convulsive disorders are limited.This study determines the relationship between serum melatonin levels and FS and epilepsy in children.Materials & MethodsA population of 111 children with simple FS, complex FS, and epilepsy (37 children per group, respectively were included as case groups. In addition, 37 febrile children without seizures comprised the control group. Serum melatonin levels were measured and compared between all groups.ResultsThe serum melatonin levels in the simple, complex FSs, and epilepsy groups were 2, 2.4, and 2 pg/ml, respectively. The serum melatonin level in the control group was 2.1pg/ml.Moreover, there were no significant differences observed while comparing the case groups.ConclusionThe present study reveals that there is no association between serum melatonin level and simple or complex FS and epilepsy. It appears that melatonin plays no significant role in these convulsive disorders. ReferencesBanerjee TK, Hazra A, Biswas A, Ray Jet al. Neurological disorders in children and adolescents. Indian J Pediatr2009; 76:139-46.Salehi Omran MR, Khalilian E, Mehdipour E, Ghabeli JA. Febrile seizures in North Iranian children: Epidemiology and clinical feature, Journal of Pediatric Neurology2008, 6: 39-43.Shinnar S, O’Dell C. Febrile Seizures, Pediatr Ann 2004, 33: 394-402.Millar JS. The child with febrile seizure, Pediatrics for parents 2006.24:12-14.Fetvei A. Assessment of febrile seizures in children, Eur J Pediatr2008, 167:17-27.Mikati MA. Seizures in Childhood In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, Schor NF, St. Geme III JW, Behrman RE. Nelson textbook of pediatrics. 19th ed. Phila: Saunders, 2011:2013-2039.Camfield PR, Canfield CS. Epilepsy. In: Swaiman KF, Ashwal S, Ferriero DM, editors. Pediatric neurology: principles and practice. 4th ed. Philadelphia: Mosby, 2006:981-8.Chang BS, Lowenstein DH. Epilepsy, N Eng J Med 2003, 13:1257-1266.Aydin A, Ergor A, Ergor G, Dirik E. The prevalence of epilepsy amongst school children in Izmir, Turkey, Seizure 2002; 11: 392–396.10.Jan MM, Girvin JP. Febrile seizures. Update and controversies. Neurosciences (Riyadh 2004; 9:235-42.French JA. Febrile seizures: possible outcomes. Neurology2012; 28; 79:e80-2.Guo JF,Yao JF. Serum melatonin levels in children with epilepsy or FS, Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi2009, 11:288-90 (Medline.Reiter RJ. Melatonin: clinical relevance, Best Pract. Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2003, 17: 273-285.Seithikurippu R, Perumal P, Trakh I, Srinivasan V, Spence DW, Maestroni GJM, Zisapel N, Cardinali DP. Physiological effects of melatonin Role of melatonin receptors and signal transduction pathways, Prog Neurobiol 85, 2008: 335-353.Ardura J, Andres J, Garmendia JR, Ardura F. Melatonin in epilepsy and FS.J Child Neurol 2010; 25:888-91.Ganesh R, Janakiraman L, Meenakshi B. Serum zinc levels are low in children with simple FS compared with those in children with epileptic seizures and controls.Ann Trop Paediatr 2011; 31:345-9.Bazil CW, Short D, Crispin D, Zheng W. Patients with intractable epilepsy have low melatonin, which increases following seizures. Neurology 2000; 55:1746-8.Yalyn O, Arman F, Erdogan F, Kula M. A comparison of the circadian rhythmsand the levels of melatonin in patients with diurnal and nocturnal complexpartial seizures. Epilepsy Behav 2006;8:542-6.Schapel GJ, Beran RG, Kennaway DL, McLoughney J, Matthews CD. Melatonin response in active epilepsy. Epilepsia 1995; 36:75-8.Ekmekcioglu C. Melatonin receptors in humans: biological role and clinical relevance,Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy 2006,60: 97-108.Tan DX, Manchester LC, Hardeland R, Lopez-Burillo S, et al. Melatonin: a hormone, a tissue fa

  16. Seasonal Patterns of Melatonin, Cortisol, and Progesterone Secretion in Female Lambs Raised Beneath a 500-KV Transmission Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jack Monroe, Jr.

    There is ongoing controversy about the possibility of adverse biological effects from environmental exposures to electric and magnetic fields. These fields are produced by all electrical equipment and appliances including electrical transmission lines. The objective of this environmental science study was to investigate the possible effects of a high voltage transmission line on domestic sheep (Ovis aries L.), a species that can often be found near such lines. The study was primarily designed to determine whether a specific effect of electric and magnetic fields found in laboratory animals also occurs in livestock under natural environmental conditions. The effect is the ability of fields, at levels found in the environment, to significantly depress the normally high nocturnal concentrations of the pineal hormone-melatonin. Ten female Suffolk lambs were penned for 10 months directly beneath a 500-kV transmission line near Estacada, Oregon. Ten other lambs of the same type were penned in a control area away from the transmission line where electric and magnetic fields were at ambient levels. Serum melatonin was analyzed by radioimmunoassay (RIA) from 6618 blood samples collected at 0.5 to 3-hour intervals over eight 48-hour periods. Serum progesterone was analyzed by RIA from blood samples collected twice weekly. Serum cortisol was also assayed by RIA from the blood samples collected during the 48-hour samples. Results showed that lambs in both the control and line groups had the typical pattern of melatonin secretion consisting of low daytime and high nighttime serum concentrations. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in melatonin levels, or in the phase or duration of the nighttime melatonin elevation. Age at puberty and number of reproductive cycles also did not differ between groups. Serum cortisol showed a circadian rhythm with highest concentrations during the day. There were, however, no differences in cortisol concentrations between groups. Statistical analyses on other biological parameters revealed no differences between groups for body weight gain, wool growth, or behavior.

  17. Melatonin and melatonergic drugs on sleep: possible mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Venkataramanujan; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Trahkt, Ilya; Spence, D Warren; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Hardeland, Ruediger; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2009-01-01

    Pineal melatonin is synthesized and secreted in close association with the light/dark cycle. The temporal relationship between the nocturnal rise in melatonin secretion and the "opening of the sleep gate" (i.e., the increase in sleep propensity at the beginning of the night), coupled with the sleep-promoting effects of exogenous melatonin, suggest that melatonin is involved in the regulation of sleep. The sleep-promoting and sleep/wake rhythm regulating effects of melatonin are attributed to its action on MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors present in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Animal experiments carried out in rats, cats, and monkeys have revealed that melatonin has the ability to reduce sleep onset time and increase sleep duration. However, clinical studies reveal inconsistent findings, with some of them reporting beneficial effects of melatonin on sleep, whereas in others only marginal effects are documented. Recently a prolonged-release 2-mg melatonin preparation (Circadin(TM)) was approved by the European Medicines Agency as a monotherapy for the short-term treatment of primary insomnia in patients who are aged 55 or above. Several melatonin derivatives have been shown to increase nonrapid eye movement (NREM) in rats and are of potential pharmacological importance. So far only one of these melatonin derivatives, ramelteon, has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to be used as a sleep promoter. Ramelteon is a novel MT(1) and MT(2) melatonergic agonist that has specific effects on melatonin receptors in the SCN and is effective in promoting sleep in experimental animals such as cats and monkeys. In clinical trials, ramelteon reduced sleep onset latency and promoted sleep in patients with chronic insomnia, including an older adult population. Both melatonin and ramelteon promote sleep by regulating the sleep/wake rhythm through their actions on melatonin receptors in the SCN, a unique mechanism of action not shared by any other hypnotics. Moreover, unlike benzodiazepines, ramelteon causes neither withdrawal effects nor dependence. Agomelatine, another novel melatonergic antidepressant in its final phase of approval for clinical use, has been shown to improve sleep in depressed patients and to have an antidepressant efficacy that is partially attributed to its effects on sleep-regulating mechanisms. PMID:19326288

  18. The benefits of four weeks of melatonin treatment on circadian patterns in resistance-trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardo-Mendonça, Roberto C; Martinez-Nicolas, Antonio; de Teresa Galván, Carlos; Ocaña-Wilhelmi, Javier; Rusanova, Iryna; Guerra-Hernández, Eduardo; Escames, Germaine; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío

    2015-10-01

    Exercise can induce circadian phase shifts depending on the duration, intensity and frequency. These modifications are of special meaning in athletes during training and competition. Melatonin, which is produced by the pineal gland in a circadian manner, behaves as an endogenous rhythms synchronizer, and it is used as a supplement to promote resynchronization of altered circadian rhythms. In this study, we tested the effect of melatonin administration on the circadian system in athletes. Two groups of athletes were treated with 100?mg?day(-1) of melatonin or placebo 30?min before bed for four weeks. Daily rhythm of salivary melatonin was measured before and after melatonin administration. Moreover, circadian variables, including wrist temperature (WT), motor activity and body position rhythmicity, were recorded during seven days before and seven days after melatonin or placebo treatment with the aid of specific sensors placed in the wrist and arm of each athlete. Before treatment, the athletes showed a phase-shift delay of the melatonin circadian rhythm, with an acrophase at 05:00?h. Exercise induced a phase advance of the melatonin rhythm, restoring its acrophase accordingly to the chronotype of the athletes. Melatonin, but not placebo treatment, changed daily waveforms of WT, activity and position. These changes included a one-hour phase advance in the WT rhythm before bedtime, with a longer nocturnal steady state and a smaller reduction when arising at morning than the placebo group. Melatonin, but not placebo, also reduced the nocturnal activity and the activity and position during lunch/nap time. Together, these data reflect the beneficial effect of melatonin to modulate the circadian components of the sleep-wake cycle, improving sleep efficiency. PMID:26361788

  19. Melatonin and the skeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstrup, A K; Sikjaer, T; Mosekilde, L; Rejnmark, L; Rejnmark, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin may affect bone metabolism through bone anabolic as well as antiresorptive effects. An age-related decrease in peak melatonin levels at nighttime is well documented, which may increase bone resorption and bone loss in the elderly. In vitro, melatonin reduces oxidative stress on bone cells by acting as an antioxidant. Furthermore, melatonin improves bone formation by promoting differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) into the osteoblastic cell linage. Bone resorption is red...

  20. Melatonin and the skeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstrup, A K; Sikjaer, T

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin may affect bone metabolism through bone anabolic as well as antiresorptive effects. An age-related decrease in peak melatonin levels at nighttime is well documented, which may increase bone resorption and bone loss in the elderly. In vitro, melatonin reduces oxidative stress on bone cells by acting as an antioxidant. Furthermore, melatonin improves bone formation by promoting differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) into the osteoblastic cell linage. Bone resorption is reduced by increased synthesis of osteoprogeterin (OPG), a decoy receptor that prevents receptor activator of NK-?B ligand (RANKL) in binding to its receptor. Moreover, melatonin is believed to reduce the synthesis of RANKL preventing further bone resorption. In ovariectomized as well as nonovariectomized rodents, melatonin has shown beneficial effects on bone as assessed by biochemical bone turnover markers, DXA, and ?CT scans. Furthermore, in pinealectomized animals, bone mineral density (BMD) is significantly decreasedcompared to controls, supporting the importance of sufficient melatonin levels. In humans, dysfunction of the melatonin signaling pathway may be involved in idiopathic scoliosis, and the increased fracture risk in nighttime workers may be related to changes in the circadian rhythm of melatonin. In the so-far only randomized study on melatonin treatment, no effects were, however, found on bone turnover markers. In conclusion, melatonin may have beneficial effects on the skeleton, but more studies on humans are warranted in order to find out whether supplementation with melatonin at bedtime may preserve bone mass and improve bone biomechanical competence.

  1. Nocturnal light pollution and underexposure to daytime sunlight: Complementary mechanisms of circadian disruption and related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolensky, Michael H; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda L; Portaluppi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Routine exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) in work, home, and community settings is linked with increased risk of breast and prostate cancer (BC, PC) in normally sighted women and men, the hypothesized biological rhythm mechanisms being frequent nocturnal melatonin synthesis suppression, circadian time structure (CTS) desynchronization, and sleep/wake cycle disruption with sleep deprivation. ALAN-induced perturbation of the CTS melatonin synchronizer signal is communicated maternally at the very onset of life and after birth via breast or artificial formula feedings. Nighttime use of personal computers, mobile phones, electronic tablets, televisions, and the like--now epidemic in adolescents and adults and highly prevalent in pre-school and school-aged children--is a new source of ALAN. However, ALAN exposure occurs concomitantly with almost complete absence of daytime sunlight, whose blue-violet (446-484 nm ?) spectrum synchronizes the CTS and whose UV-B (290-315 nm ?) spectrum stimulates vitamin D synthesis. Under natural conditions and clear skies, day/night and annual cycles of UV-B irradiation drive corresponding periodicities in vitamin D synthesis and numerous bioprocesses regulated by active metabolites augment and strengthen the biological time structure. Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency are widespread in children and adults in developed and developing countries as a consequence of inadequate sunlight exposure. Past epidemiologic studies have focused either on exposure to too little daytime UV-B or too much ALAN, respectively, on vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency or melatonin suppression in relation to risk of cancer and other, e.g., psychiatric, hypertensive, cardiac, and vascular, so-called, diseases of civilization. The observed elevated incidence of medical conditions the two are alleged to influence through many complementary bioprocesses of cells, tissues, and organs led us to examine effects of the totality of the artificial light environment in which humans reside today. Never have chronobiologic or epidemiologic investigations comprehensively researched the potentially deleterious consequences of the combination of suppressed vitamin D plus melatonin synthesis due to life in today's man-made artificial light environment, which in our opinion is long overdue. PMID:26374931

  2. Nocturnal leg cramps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Richard E; Kirby, Karl A

    2012-08-15

    Up to 60 percent of adults report that they have had nocturnal leg cramps. The recurrent, painful tightening usually occurs in the calf muscles and can cause severe insomnia. The exact mechanism is unknown, but the cramps are probably caused by muscle fatigue and nerve dysfunction rather than electrolyte or other abnormalities. Nocturnal leg cramps are associated with vascular disease, lumbar canal stenosis, cirrhosis, hemodialysis, pregnancy, and other medical conditions. Medications that are strongly associated with leg cramps include intravenous iron sucrose, conjugated estrogens, raloxifene, naproxen, and teriparatide. A history and physical examination are usually sufficient to differentiate nocturnal leg cramps from other conditions, such as restless legs syndrome, claudication, myositis, and peripheral neuropathy. Laboratory evaluation and specialized testing usually are unnecessary to confirm the diagnosis. Limited evidence supports treating nocturnal leg cramps with exercise and stretching, or with medications such as magnesium, calcium channel blockers, carisoprodol, or vitamin B(12). Quinine is no longer recommended to treat leg cramps. PMID:22963024

  3. Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Special Issues Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) What is MDS? iPad App Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Types Treatment Wait and Watch Blood ... and Bone Marrow Basics Aplastic Anemia Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH) ... Trials Special Issues Living ...

  4. Nocturnal panic attacks

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes Fabiana L; Nardi Antonio E.; Nascimento Isabella; Valença Alexandre M.; Zin Walter A

    2002-01-01

    The panic-respiration connection has been presented with increasing evidences in the literature. We report three panic disorder patients with nocturnal panic attacks with prominent respiratory symptoms, the overlapping of the symptoms with the sleep apnea syndrome and a change of the diurnal panic attacks, from spontaneous to situational pattern. The implication of these findings and awareness to the distinct core of the nocturnal panic attacks symptoms may help to differentiate them from sle...

  5. New developments in the treatment of primary insomnia in elderly patients: focus on prolonged-release melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vigo DE

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel P Cardinali, María F Vidal, Daniel E VigoDepartment of Teaching and Research, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaAbstract: A temporal relationship between the nocturnal rise in melatonin secretion and the increase in sleep propensity at the beginning of the night, coupled with the sleep-promoting effects of exogenous melatonin, indicate that melatonin is involved in the regulation of sleep. This action is attributed to the MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors present in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and other brain areas. The sleep-promoting actions of melatonin, which are demonstrable in healthy humans, have been found to be useful in subjects suffering from circadian rhythm sleep disorders and in elderly patients, who had low nocturnal melatonin production and secretion. The effectiveness of melatonin in treating sleep disturbances in these patients is relevant because the sleep-promoting compounds that are usually prescribed, such as benzodiazepines and related drugs, have many adverse effects, such as next-day hangover, dependence, and impairment of memory. Melatonin has been used for improving sleep in patients with insomnia mainly because it does not cause any hangover or show any addictive potential. However, there is a lack of consistency concerning its therapeutic value (partly because of its short half-life and the small quantities of melatonin used. Thus, attention has been focused either on the development of more potent melatonin analogs with prolonged effects or on the design of slow-release melatonin preparations. A prolonged-release preparation of melatonin 2 mg (Circadin® has been approved for the treatment of primary insomnia in patients aged ?55 years in the European Union. This prolonged-release preparation of melatonin had no effect on psychomotor functions, memory recall, or driving skills during the night or the next morning relative to placebo, and was associated with significantly less impairment on many of these tasks relative to zolpidem alone or in combination with prolonged-release melatonin. In 3-week and 6-month randomized, double-blind, clinical trials in patients with primary insomnia aged ?55 years, prolonged-release melatonin was associated with improvements relative to placebo in many sleep and daytime parameters, including sleep quality and latency, morning alertness, and quality of life. Prolonged-release melatonin was very well tolerated in clinical trials in older patients, with a tolerability profile similar to that of placebo. Short-term or longer-term treatment with prolonged-release melatonin was not associated with dependence, tolerance, rebound insomnia, or withdrawal symptoms.Keywords: insomnia, melatonin, Circadin®, clinical trials

  6. Anti-glucocorticoid effects of melatonin on adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, H; Mori, N; Mori, W

    1987-07-01

    To extend our previous experiment on anti-glucocorticoid effects of melatonin which was performed under a very special condition using young rats, we have carried out another experiment of long term administration of pineal hormone melatonin to adult female rats which were conditioned by overdose glucocorticoid. The results clearly demonstrated significant protection, by melatonin, from the injurious effects of a glucocorticoid, dexamethasone: decrease of body weight gain, atrophy of the thymus and adrenals, and elevation of the level of total cholesterol in blood. Thus, it has been clarified that anti-glucocorticoid effects of melatonin could be shown experimentally not only in young rats but also in adults, and also, could be really seen not only in short term experiment but also in longer ones. Anti-glucocorticoid effects of melatonin seem to be of considerably wide range, not being limited to occur under a special condition, including the age of animals, in experiments. PMID:3661196

  7. Effect of melatonin on circadian rhythm, locomotor activity and body temperature in the intact house sparrow, Japanese quail and owl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, N; Kawano, T; Nakahara, K; Nasu, T; Shiota, K

    2001-01-19

    We compared the effect of melatonin on circadian rhythm, body temperature, and locomotion in the intact house sparrow, Japanese quail and owl. Daily treatment with melatonin at a fixed time did not entrain the free-running rhythm of locomotor activity in the house sparrow and the disrupted rhythm in Japanese quail under constant dim light. However, melatonin clearly inhibited movement for several hours after treatment. The duration of resting after injection of melatonin was dose-dependent. Body temperature was significantly decreased after melatonin treatment, the effect being more potent during the active phase than in the resting phase. Although this effect of melatonin on body temperature was also dose-dependent, the magnitude of the decrease in body temperature after injection of melatonin was greater in the house sparrow than in the Japanese quail. On the other hand, melatonin induced a further large decrease of body temperature in a nocturnal bird, the owl, whose pineal gland is degenerate. The decrease of body temperature was larger in the active phase than in the resting phase, and melatonin did not prevent movement in spite of the decrease in body temperature. These results suggest that the effects of melatonin on circadian rhythm, locomotor activity and body temperature differ among avian species, and that these mechanisms may not be linked to each other. PMID:11166707

  8. Methylphenidate Ameliorates Depressive Comorbidity in ADHD Children without any Modification on Differences in Serum Melatonin Concentration between ADHD Subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Cubero-Millán; Antonio Molina-Carballo; Irene Machado-Casas; Luisa Fernández-López; Sylvia Martínez-Serrano; Pilar Tortosa-Pinto; Aida Ruiz-López; Juan-de-Dios Luna-del-Castillo; José Uberos; Antonio Muñoz-Hoyos

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients have other associated pathologies, with depressive symptoms as one of the most prevalent. Among the mediators that may participate in ADHD, melatonin is thought to regulate circadian rhythms, neurological function and stress response. To determine (1) the serum baseline daily variations and nocturnal excretion of melatonin in ADHD subtypes and (2) the effect of chronic administration of methylphenidate, as well as ...

  9. Melatonin Promotes Superovulation in Sika Deer (Cervus nippon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of melatonin (MT on superovulation and reproductive hormones (melatonin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH and PRL were investigated in female sika deer. Different doses (40 or 80 mg/animal of melatonin were subcutaneously implanted into deer before the breeding season. Exogenous melatonin administration significantly elevated the serum FSH levels at the time of insemination compared with levels in control animals. During superovulation, the serum LH levels in donor sika deer reached their highest values (7.1 ± 2.04 ng/mL at the point of insemination, compared with the baseline levels (4.98 ± 0.07 ng/mL in control animals. This high level of LH was sustained until the day of embryo recovery. In contrast, the serum levels of PRL in the 80 mg of melatonin-treated group were significantly lower than those of control deer. The average number of corpora lutea in melatonin-treated deer was significantly higher than that of the control (p < 0.05. The average number of embryos in the deer treated with 40 mg of melatonin was higher than that of the control; however, this increase did not reach significant difference (p > 0.05, which may be related to the relatively small sample size. In addition, embryonic development in melatonin-treated groups was delayed.

  10. Nocturnality and species survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, G C; Ehrlich, P R

    1996-10-15

    Surveys of butterfly and moth diversity in tropical forest fragments suggest that nocturnality confers a dispersal, and possibly a survival, advantage. The butterfly faunas of smaller fragments were depauperate; in contrast, the species richness of nocturnal moths was similar in all fragments and even in pasture. The lack of correlation between butterfly and moth species richness among fragments (r2 = 0.005) is best explained by movements of moths at night when ambient conditions in forest and pasture are most similar; butterflies face substantial daytime temperature, humidity, and solar radiation barriers. This interpretation is supported by information on birds, beetles, and bats. PMID:8876201

  11. Nocturnal panic attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Fabiana L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The panic-respiration connection has been presented with increasing evidences in the literature. We report three panic disorder patients with nocturnal panic attacks with prominent respiratory symptoms, the overlapping of the symptoms with the sleep apnea syndrome and a change of the diurnal panic attacks, from spontaneous to situational pattern. The implication of these findings and awareness to the distinct core of the nocturnal panic attacks symptoms may help to differentiate them from sleep disorders and the search for specific treatment.

  12. Blood glucose and nocturnal blood pressure in African and caucasian men: the SABPA study

    OpenAIRE

    Lammertyn, Leandi; Schutte, Aletta Elisabeth; Schutte, Rudolph, et al.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between nocturnal blood pressure and chronically elevated blood glucose to determine if these elevated blood glucose concentrations contribute to a non-dipping blood pressure, especially in high-risk groups such as Africans.

  13. Melatonin: a multitasking molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Russel J; Tan, Dun-Xian; Fuentes-Broto, Lorena

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) has revealed itself as an ubiquitously distributed and functionally diverse molecule. The mechanisms that control its synthesis within the pineal gland have been well characterized and the retinal and biological clock processes that modulate the circadian production of melatonin in the pineal gland are rapidly being unravelled. A feature that characterizes melatonin is the variety of mechanisms it employs to modulate the physiology and molecular biology of cells. While many of these actions are mediated by well-characterized, G-protein coupled melatonin receptors in cellular membranes, other actions of the indole seem to involve its interaction with orphan nuclear receptors and with molecules, for example calmodulin, in the cytosol. Additionally, by virtue of its ability to detoxify free radicals and related oxygen derivatives, melatonin influences the molecular physiology of cells via receptor-independent means. These uncommonly complex processes often make it difficult to determine specifically how melatonin functions to exert its obvious actions. What is apparent, however, is that the actions of melatonin contribute to improved cellular and organismal physiology. In view of this and its virtual absence of toxicity, melatonin may well find applications in both human and veterinary medicine. PMID:20478436

  14. Melatonin: the dark force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, W H; Hakanson, D O

    1998-01-01

    Although the pineal gland was described 2,300 years ago, its functions remained obscure and productive research was limited until 1958, when Lerner and associates defined melatonin. In 1965 Wurtman and Axelrod advanced the "melatonin hypothesis," according to which the pineal gland acts as a transducer responding to changes in circumambient light by changing its rates of melatonin output. Sites and mechanisms of melatonin action are still poorly understood. Two consistent effects are the induction of sleep and an antigonadotropic influence on reproductive structure and behavior. The former is demonstrable and clinically useful in human subjects; the latter has been shown in birds, rodents, and sheep. Alteration of skin color by the contraction of melanophores was effected by pineal extracts before the discovery of melatonin. This phenomenon, seen in reptiles, amphibians, and fish, has received little recent attention. Areas of greater interest and potential importance include the antimitotic effects of melatonin on some types of tumor cells in culture and the apparent in vivo protection of immunocompetent lymphocytes during chronic stress, which reduces the functional capacity of lymphocytes in control rodents. Clinical application of the antimitotic and immunosupportive properties of melatonin seems likely in the near future. Unfortunately, this innocent molecule has been touted in two recent books and many advertisements as an aphrodisiac, rejuvenator, protector against disease, and general wonder-worker. Because interest in melatonin is high, all physicians can expect questions and may have use for the information provided in this review. PMID:9742299

  15. Nocturnal intermittent hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumfart, Julia; Müller, Dominik

    2015-05-01

    Preemptive renal transplantation is the method of choice for end stage renal disease in childhood and adolescence. However, without preemptive transplantation, waiting time for kidney transplantation might exceed several years. The poor quality of life and the extremely high morbidity and mortality rates of dialysis patients have led to the development of intensified hemodialysis programs in which the modes of dialysis (short daily, nocturnal intermittent or daily nocturnal) are different. Such programs have been shown to significantly improve several uremia-associated parameters, such as blood pressure, phosphate control, anemia and growth retardation, in both adult and pediatric (children and adolescents) patients and lead to a reduction in medications, including phosphate binders, erythropoietin and antihypertensive agents. Fluid limitations and dietary restrictions can also be lifted. With respect to psychosocial rehabilitation and quality of life, nocturnal intermittent dialysis programs provide a reasonable compromise of all forms of intensified programs. Experiences and practical approaches of our own in-center nocturnal intermittent hemodialysis program in the light of the recent publications are described in this review. PMID:25103600

  16. Nocturn and Aubade

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Dehghani

    2012-01-01

    Nocturne After such a meandering historyOf ramblingAlong water and up the stepsAnd steps and down the treesAnd trees and across the waterAnd round and round the waterfall and fountainAnd kaleidoscopic...

  17. Utility of melatonin to treat surgical stress after major vascular surgery - a safety study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükakin, Bülent; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Reiter, Russel J.; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenür, Ismayil

    2008-01-01

    Surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm is associated with elevated oxidative stress. As an antioxidant in animal and human studies, melatonin has the potential of ameliorating some of this oxidative stress, but melatonin has never been administered to adults during surgery for the purpose of reducing oxidative damage. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety of various doses of melatonin administered during or after surgery and to monitor the changes in biomarkers of oxidative stres...

  18. Utility of melatonin to treat surgical stress after major vascular surgery--a safety study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükakin, Bülent; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Reiter, Russel J; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm is associated with elevated oxidative stress. As an antioxidant in animal and human studies, melatonin has the potential of ameliorating some of this oxidative stress, but melatonin has never been administered to adults during surgery for the purpose of reducing oxidative damage. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety of various doses of melatonin administered during or after surgery and to monitor the changes in biomarkers of oxidative stres...

  19. Melatonin in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Huang, Qiong-Xia; Yang, Shu-Sheng; Chu, Jiang; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Tian, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), an age-related neurodegenerative disorder with progressive cognition deficit, is characterized by extracellular senile plaques (SP) of aggregated ?-amyloid (A?) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, mainly containing the hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau. Multiple factors contribute to the etiology of AD in terms of initiation and progression. Melatonin is an endogenously produced hormone in the brain and decreases during aging and in patients with AD. Data from clinical trials indicate that melatonin supplementation improves sleep, ameliorates sundowning and slows down the progression of cognitive impairment in AD patients. Melatonin efficiently protects neuronal cells from A?-mediated toxicity via antioxidant and anti-amyloid properties. It not only inhibits A? generation, but also arrests the formation of amyloid fibrils by a structure-dependent interaction with A?. Our studies have demonstrated that melatonin efficiently attenuates Alzheimer-like tau hyperphosphorylation. Although the exact mechanism is still not fully understood, a direct regulatory influence of melatonin on the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases is proposed. Additionally, melatonin also plays a role in protecting the cholinergic system and in anti-inflammation. The aim of this review is to stimulate interest in melatonin as a potentially useful agent in the prevention and treatment of AD. PMID:23857055

  20. Melatonin for primary insomnia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Melatonin, a hormone produced by the pineal gland, has a key role in regulating circadian rhythms, most importantly, the sleep-wake cycle. Melatonin's action has led to its being tried as a treatment for a wide range of sleep disorders, such as jet lag, primary insomnia, sleep-wake cycle disruption and sleep problems in children with neuro-developmental disorders. Until recently, it had not been licensed in the UK for any indication. Prolonged-release melatonin (Circadin - Lundbeck) has now been licensed as a treatment for primary insomnia. Here we consider whether this product has a place in the management of people with this condition. PMID:19567841

  1. Pathophysiology of nocturnal enuresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittig, Søren; Kamperis, Konstantinos

    important part of enuresis pathogenesis is reduced bladder capacity, either during night-time only or present during daytime also (i.e. reduced MVV on a FV chart). The background behind the reduced nocturnal reservoir function is not fully clarified but may involve CNS regulatory centers, detrusor...... overactivity, or a defect intrinsic circadian control of bladder function. The role of sleep is currently under scrutiny as recent evidence point towards poor sleep with increased sleep fragmentation, arousal index, and periodic limb movements as important factors. One unifying pathophysiologic theory suggests...... that dysfunction of the intrinsic circadian regulation located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus results in dysfunction of one or more of the brainstem centers involved in AVP secretion, arousal function, bladder control, and blood pressure regulation. Furthermore, nocturnal enuresis has a strong genetic...

  2. Melatonin for the newborn

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia Marseglia; Sara Manti; Gabriella D'Angelo; Eloisa Gitto; Ignazio Barberi

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species play an important role in the pathogenesis of several diseases during the perinatal and neonatal period. Melatonin, an effective direct free-radical scavenger and indirect antioxidant agent, diffuses through biological membranes easily and exerts pleiotropic actions on every cell. Several studies have tested the efficacy of melatonin to counteract oxidative damage in diseases of newborn such as chronic lung disease, perinatal brain injury, necrotizing enterocolitis and...

  3. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is presented in which MR imaging and CT findings were characteristic. The signal intensity of renal cortex was lower than that of medulla on both T1- and T2-weighted imaging. On CT without contrast enhancement the attenuation of renal cortex was higher than that of renal medulla. These findings at MR imaging and CT were the results of a deposition of hemosiderin in the cells of proximal convoluted tubules, and were helpful for diagnosis of PNH. (orig.)

  4. Behavioral Treatment for Nocturnal Enuresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friman, Patrick C.; Jones, Kevin M.

    2005-01-01

    Nocturnal enuresis is one of the most prevalent and distressing of all childhood problems. The treatment of nocturnal enuresis has shifted in the past few decades from a strictly psychopathological perspective to a biobehavioral perspective. Although the primary clinical features of this disorder are medical/organic, there is currently strong…

  5. Melatonin und das kardiovaskuläre System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakotnik A

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, das physiologisch bedeutendste Hormon der Epiphyse, zog nicht zuletzt aufgrund zahlreicher populärer Bücher über seine "wundersamen Effekte" die Aufmerksamkeit auf sich. Synthese und Sekretion von Melatonin werden wesentlich durch den Hell/Dunkel-Zyklus beeinflußt: Trifft Licht auf die Retina, so wird die Melatoninsekretion supprimiert. Melatonin beeinflußt endogene zirkadiane Rhythmen sowie Köpertemperatur und Stimmungslage. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird das derzeitige Wissen um Interaktionen von Melatonin und dem kardiovaskulären System kritisch beleuchtet. Zusammenfassend muß die Rolle von Melatonin im menschlichen Organismus äußerst kontroversiell betrachtet werden.

  6. Role of Melatonin in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando L. Morera-Fumero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a chronic mental disease that disturbs several cognitive functions, such as memory, thought, perception and volition. Schizophrenia’s biological etiology is multifactorial and is still under investigation. Melatonin has been involved in schizophrenia since the first decades of the twentieth century. Research into melatonin regarding schizophrenia has followed two different approaches. The first approach is related to the use of melatonin as a biological marker. The second approach deals with the clinical applications of melatonin as a drug treatment. In this paper, both aspects of melatonin application are reviewed. Its clinical use in schizophrenia is emphasized.

  7. Melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been made of isotope exchange between melatonin and deuterium (D2O) or tritium (HTO) oxide under different conditions. The ease of isotope exchange for the indole ring hydrogens of melatonin in an acidic medium decreases over the series H4 > H2 H6 >> H7, enabling the authors to process a route for production of melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes at positions 4,6, and 2 of the indole ring. A method has been suggested for producing melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes at position 2 by desulfurization of 2-(2,4-dinitro-phenylsulfenyl)melatonin at Ni(Re) (D)

  8. Role of Melatonin in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera-Fumero, Armando L.; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic mental disease that disturbs several cognitive functions, such as memory, thought, perception and volition. Schizophrenia’s biological etiology is multifactorial and is still under investigation. Melatonin has been involved in schizophrenia since the first decades of the twentieth century. Research into melatonin regarding schizophrenia has followed two different approaches. The first approach is related to the use of melatonin as a biological marker. The second approach deals with the clinical applications of melatonin as a drug treatment. In this paper, both aspects of melatonin application are reviewed. Its clinical use in schizophrenia is emphasized. PMID:23698762

  9. Evaluation And Comparison Of Serum Melatonin Determination In Normal Individuals And Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fooladsaz K

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is a chronic hereditary and relapsing headache. With regard to the prevalence of this ancient disease and its economic complications in country, in this study , nocturnal serum melatonin of migraine patients and control subjects have been evaluated and compared by ELISA kit. Materials and Methods: Fifty migraine patients (mostly women were compared to a control group (mostly men matched according to age. Results: Statistical analysis revealed a decrease in nocturnal serum melatonin levels for migraine patients (32.9 28.4 compared to the control one (75.6 56.8. With using of t-test by ELISA kit showed significant difference (p=0.0064. Conclusion: With regard to this, the pineal gland has the main role in the synchronization of the organism with the environmental conditions and migrainous headaches.

  10. MT1 and MT2 Melatonin Receptors: A Therapeutic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiabei; Clough, Shannon J; Hutchinson, Anthony J; Adamah-Biassi, Ekue B; Popovska-Gorevski, Marina; Dubocovich, Margarita L

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, or 5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine, is synthesized and released by the pineal gland and locally in the retina following a circadian rhythm, with low levels during the day and elevated levels at night. Melatonin activates two high-affinity G protein-coupled receptors, termed MT1 and MT2, to exert beneficial actions in sleep and circadian abnormality, mood disorders, learning and memory, neuroprotection, drug abuse, and cancer. Progress in understanding the role of melatonin receptors in the modulation of sleep and circadian rhythms has led to the discovery of a novel class of melatonin agonists for treating insomnia, circadian rhythms, mood disorders, and cancer. This review describes the pharmacological properties of a slow-release melatonin preparation (i.e., Circadin®) and synthetic ligands (i.e., agomelatine, ramelteon, tasimelteon), with emphasis on identifying specific therapeutic effects mediated through MT1 and MT2 receptor activation. Discovery of selective ligands targeting the MT1 or the MT2 melatonin receptors may promote the development of novel and more efficacious therapeutic agents. PMID:26514204

  11. Experience with sustained-release melatonin for the treatment of sleep disorders in depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Vladimirovna Prokhorova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The data available in the literature on the role of melatonin in the regulation of circadian rhythms and sleep disorders in the population and in patients with mental diseases are analyzed. The cause of insomnia may be circadian rhythm disorders due to the age-related decline in the elaboration of the endogenous hormones that are responsible for the quality and duration of sleep, one of which is melatonin.Sustained-release melatonin is a synthetic analogue of the endogenous human pineal hormone melatonin. According to clinical findings, the main proven clinical effects of sustained-release melatonin 2 mg are a reduction in the latency of sleep, improvement of its quality, and lack of daytime sleepiness. The drug causes no dependence on its long use and rebound symptoms (increased insomnia symptoms, positively affects cognitive functions, and lowers nocturnal blood pressure in hypertensive patients.The paper describes a clinical case of a female patient with recurrent depressive disorder, in whom sustained-release melatonin 2 mg has demonstrated high efficacy and good tolerability in the combination therapy of sleep disorders in the pattern of depression.

  12. Seasonality, suicidality and melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havaki-Kontaxaki, B J; Papalias, E; Kontaxaki, M-E V; Papadimitriou, G N

    2010-01-01

    Seasonality of suicidal behavior has been investigated regarding both neurobiological and climatic factors, as well as psychopathological and social aspects. Most of the studies detectedpeaks in late spring and troughs in the winter. Several lines of evidence evaluated the role of extended periods of light associated with probability of suicides whereas others summarize the alterations of melatonin excretion and its seasonal variation along with seasonaldistribution of psychiatric disorders. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of studies attempted to reach an explanatory model of underlying pathophysiology of melatonin in thepathogenesis of seasonal variation in suicidality. There is argument on the interconnection between suicide rates and weather factors. However, an inverse pattern of melatonin levels and the seasonalpeak in suicides was observed. These findings suggest that sunlight exposure along with a wide spectrum of other factors may explain the aetiopathogenesis of suicidal behavior. PMID:21914615

  13. Melatonin improves oxidative stress parameters measured in the blood of elderly type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Szewczyk-Golec, Karolina; Kozakiewicz, Mariusz; Pawluk, Hanna; Czuczejko, Jolanta; Kornatowski, Tomasz; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Kedziora, Józef

    2009-04-01

    An elevated oxidative status in the aging organism may be involved in the development of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Melatonin, a potent antioxidant agent, is essential for glucose homeostasis and regulation. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of melatonin supplementation on the oxidative stress parameters in elderly NIDDM patients. The malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) activity in erythrocytes, the level of nitrate/nitrite in plasma and morning melatonin concentration and oxidase activity of ceruloplasmin (Cp) in serum in 15 elderly NIDDM patients at baseline and after the 30 days of melatonin supplementation (5 mg daily) in comparison with levels in 15 healthy elderly volunteers were determined. A significant increase of MDA level and decrease of SOD-1 activity and melatonin concentration were observed in NIDDM patients. Cp oxidase activity and nitrate/nitrite level were similar in both examined groups. Melatonin administration in NIDDM patients resulted in a significant increase in the morning melatonin concentration and SOD-1 activity, and a reduction in the MDA level and Cp oxidase activity. Statistically significant alterations in nitrate/nitrite levels were not observed. These results indicate an improvement of antioxidative defense after melatonin supplementation in the NIDDM individuals and suggest melatonin supplementation as an additional treatment for the control of diabetic complications. PMID:19317795

  14. The effect of acute exogenous melatonin on P50 suppression in healthy male volunteers stratified for low and high gating levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ucar, Ebru; Lehtinen, Emilia

    2012-01-01

    Sensory gating is frequently found to be disturbed in patients with schizophrenia. In addition, a disruption of the circadian rhythm together with a low nocturnal melatonin output is regularly found in these patients. Since there is some evidence that a brief period of sleep normalizes sensory gating in schizophrenia patients, it is conceivable that their disrupted melatonin level may contribute to the deficits in P50 suppression. In this initial study, the effects of acutely administered melatonin on sensory gating in healthy subjects were investigated. In a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design, 21 healthy male volunteers were administered melatonin (4 mg) or placebo, after which they were tested in a P50 suppression paradigm. In the group as a whole, melatonin did not affect P50 suppression. However, melatonin increased the P50 ratio in the individuals with high baseline suppression. In contrast to what was expected, melatonin reduced P50 suppression, albeit only in those individuals with high baseline suppression. The current study does not support a beneficial effect of acute exposure to exogenous melatonin on sensory gating. Future research should focus on melatonin's ability to restore basic sleep rhythms and its subsequent effects on sensory gating, in both healthy volunteers and patients with schizophrenia.

  15. [Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Jun-ichi; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2008-03-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is an acquired hematopoietic stem cell disorder. The most common clinical manifestations of PNH include intravascular hemolysis, venous thrombosis, and bone marrow failure. Hematopoietic stems cells with mutant PIG-A are present in normal marrow, but they are not noticed because they have no advantage under normal circumstances. In the setting of immune-mediated bone marrow injury, such as that seen in aplastic anemia, PIG-A mutant cells are selected because they have a survival advantage based on deficiency of one or more GPI-anchored proteins. Expansion of the PIG-A-mutant clones occurs when other events that enhance the growth properties of the cells work together with the effects of the PIG-A mutation to enhance further the growth properties of the mutant cells. PMID:18330025

  16. Clinical pharmacokinetics of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Nathja Groth; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the review was to provide an overview of studies investigating the pharmacokinetics of exogenous melatonin in humans and if possible, to provide recommendations for clinical use. METHODS: The review was conducted in accordance to PRISMA guidelines. A systematic literature search...

  17. Melatonin Anticancer Effects: Review

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Di Bella; Luciano Gualano; Fabrizio Mascia; Giuseppe Di Bella

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, MLT), the main hormone produced by the pineal gland, not only regulates circadian rhythm, but also has antioxidant, anti-ageing and immunomodulatory properties. MLT plays an important role in blood composition, medullary dynamics, platelet genesis, vessel endothelia, and in platelet aggregation, leukocyte formula regulation and hemoglobin synthesis. Its significant atoxic, apoptotic, oncostatic, angiogenetic, differentiating and antiproliferative prope...

  18. Effect of melatonin administration on subjective sleep quality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    D.M., Nunes; R.M.S., Mota; M.O., Machado; E.D.B., Pereira; V.M.S., de Bruin; P.F.C., de Bruin.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Disturbed sleep is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Conventional hypnotics worsen nocturnal hypoxemia and, in severe cases, can lead to respiratory failure. Exogenous melatonin has somnogenic properties in normal subjects and can improve sleep in several clinical conditions. T [...] his randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out to determine the effects of melatonin on sleep in COPD. Thirty consecutive patients with moderate to very severe COPD were initially recruited for the study. None of the participants had a history of disease exacerbation 4 weeks prior to the study, obstructive sleep apnea, mental disorders, current use of oral steroids, methylxanthines or hypnotic-sedative medication, nocturnal oxygen therapy, and shift work. Patients received 3 mg melatonin (N = 12) or placebo (N = 13), orally in a single dose, 1 h before bedtime for 21 consecutive days. Sleep quality was assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and daytime sleepiness was measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Pulmonary function and functional exercise level were assessed by spirometry and the 6-min walk test, respectively. Twenty-five patients completed the study protocol and were included in the final analysis. Melatonin treatment significantly improved global PSQI scores (P = 0.012), particularly sleep latency (P = 0.008) and sleep duration (P = 0.046). No differences in daytime sleepiness, lung function and functional exercise level were observed. We conclude that melatonin can improve sleep in COPD. Further long-term studies involving larger number of patients are needed before melatonin can be safely recommended for the management of sleep disturbances in these patients.

  19. Morning and evening physical exercise differentially regulate the autonomic nervous system during nocturnal sleep in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yujiro; Hashimoto, Satoko; Takasu, Nana N; Tanahashi, Yusuke; Nishide, Shin-Ya; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-Ichi

    2015-11-01

    Effects of daily physical exercise in the morning or in the evening were examined on circadian rhythms in plasma melatonin and core body temperature of healthy young males who stayed in an experimental facility for 7 days under dim light conditions (plasma melatonin rhythm was delayed by 1.1 h without exercise. Phase-delay shifts of a similar extent were detected by morning and evening exercise. But the falling phase shifted only after evening exercise by 1.0 h. The sleep PSG did not change after morning exercise, while Stage 1+2 sleep significantly decreased by 13.0% without exercise, and RE sleep decreased by 10.5% after evening exercise. The nocturnal decline of rectal temperature was attenuated by evening exercise, but not by morning exercise. HRV during sleep changed differentially. Very low frequency (VLF) waves increased without exercise. VLF, low frequency (LF), and high frequency (HF) waves increased after morning exercise, whereas HR increased after evening exercise. Morning exercise eventually enhanced the parasympathetic activity, as indicated by HRV, while evening exercise activated the sympathetic activity, as indicated by increase in heart rate in the following nocturnal sleep. These findings indicated differential effects of morning and evening exercise on the circadian melatonin rhythm, PSG, and HRV. PMID:26333783

  20. Myocardial infarction and nocturnal hypoxaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pen?i? Biljana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with nocturnal intermittent hypoxaemia. Objecive. The aim of this study was to evalute the influence of nocturnal hypoxaemia on ventricular arrhythmias and myocardial ischaemia in patients with myocardial infarction (MI. Method. We studied 77 patients (55.8±7.9 years with MI free of complications, chronic pulmonary diseases, abnormal awake blood gases tension. All patients underwent overnight pulse oximetry and 24-hour electrocardiography. Patients were divided into two groups according to nocturnal hypoxaemia. Total number of ventricular premature complex (VPC; maximal VPC/h; incidence of VPC Lown class>2 and occurrence of ST-segment depression were analyzed for nocturnal (10 PM to 6 AM, daytime (6 AM to 22 PM periods and for the entire 24 hours. Results. Both groups were similar in age, gender, standard risk factors, myocardial infarction size and did not differ in VPC during the analyzed periods. The number of nocturnal maximal VPC/h was insignificantly greater in group 1 (with hypoxaemia compared to group 2 (without hypoxaemia, (p=0.084. Maximal VPC/h did not differ significantly either for daytime or for 24 hours among the groups. Nocturnal VPC Lown>2 were significantly more frequent in group 1 (25% vs 0%, p=0.002. The incidence of VPC Lown>2 was similar during the daytime, and during 24 hrs in both groups. Occurrence of ST-segment depression did not differ between groups 1 and 2. Conclusion. Nocturnal hypoxaemia was associated with complex nocturnal ventricular arrhythmias in patients with MI. .

  1. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

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    Juan M. Guerrero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed.

  2. Endogenous melatonin and oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulsen Henrik E

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant body of literature indicates that melatonin, a hormone primarily produced nocturnally by the pineal gland, is an important scavenger of hydroxyl radicals and other reactive oxygen species. Melatonin may also lower the rate of DNA base damage resulting from hydroxyl radical attack and increase the rate of repair of that damage. This paper reports the results of a study relating the level of overnight melatonin production to the overnight excretion of the two primary urinary metabolites of the repair of oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA. Methods Mother-father-daughter(s families (n = 55 were recruited and provided complete overnight urine samples. Total overnight creatinine-adjusted 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s/Cr has been shown to be highly correlated with total overnight melatonin production. Urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine (8-oxoGua results from the repair of DNA or RNA guanine via the nucleobase excision repair pathway, while urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG may possibly result from the repair of DNA guanine via the nucleotide excision repair pathway. Total overnight urinary levels of 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua are therefore a measure of total overnight guanine DNA damage. 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua were measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry assay. The mother, father, and oldest sampled daughter were used for these analyses. Comparisons between the mothers, fathers, and daughters were calculated for aMT6s/Cr, 8-oxodG, and 8-oxoGua. Regression analyses of 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua on aMT6s/Cr were conducted for mothers, fathers, and daughters separately, adjusting for age and BMI (or weight. Results Among the mothers, age range 42-80, lower melatonin production (as measured by aMT6s/CR was associated with significantly higher levels of 8-oxodG (p Conclusion Low levels of endogenous melatonin production among older individuals may lead to higher levels of oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA, thereby possibly increasing the risk of developing cancer. The possible different effects of melatonin in the rates of utilization of pathways for repair of oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA identified between older women and older men are intriguing.

  3. Melatonin Poisoning: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Gül

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, also known chemically as N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, is produced in the pineal gland from the precursor tryptophan and secreted into the blood. Its exogenous forms are used for the treatment of sleep disorders and jet lag. Melatonin is sold as a sleep drug at pharmacies in Turkey and throughout the world. In this study, we present a case of attempted suicide by the ingestion of melatonin.

  4. Role of Melatonin in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Morera-Fumero, Armando L.; Pedro Abreu-Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic mental disease that disturbs several cognitive functions, such as memory, thought, perception and volition. Schizophrenia’s biological etiology is multifactorial and is still under investigation. Melatonin has been involved in schizophrenia since the first decades of the twentieth century. Research into melatonin regarding schizophrenia has followed two different approaches. The first approach is related to the use of melatonin as a biological marker. The second app...

  5. Protecting the melatonin rhythm through circadian healthy light exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonmati-Carrion, Maria Angeles; Arguelles-Prieto, Raquel; Martinez-Madrid, Maria Jose; Reiter, Russel; Hardeland, Ruediger; Rol, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Currently, in developed countries, nights are excessively illuminated (light at night), whereas daytime is mainly spent indoors, and thus people are exposed to much lower light intensities than under natural conditions. In spite of the positive impact of artificial light, we pay a price for the easy access to light during the night: disorganization of our circadian system or chronodisruption (CD), including perturbations in melatonin rhythm. Epidemiological studies show that CD is associated with an increased incidence of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, cognitive and affective impairment, premature aging and some types of cancer. Knowledge of retinal photoreceptors and the discovery of melanopsin in some ganglion cells demonstrate that light intensity, timing and spectrum must be considered to keep the biological clock properly entrained. Importantly, not all wavelengths of light are equally chronodisrupting. Blue light, which is particularly beneficial during the daytime, seems to be more disruptive at night, and induces the strongest melatonin inhibition. Nocturnal blue light exposure is currently increasing, due to the proliferation of energy-efficient lighting (LEDs) and electronic devices. Thus, the development of lighting systems that preserve the melatonin rhythm could reduce the health risks induced by chronodisruption. This review addresses the state of the art regarding the crosstalk between light and the circadian system. PMID:25526564

  6. Protecting the Melatonin Rhythm through Circadian Healthy Light Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angeles Bonmati-Carrion

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, in developed countries, nights are excessively illuminated (light at night, whereas daytime is mainly spent indoors, and thus people are exposed to much lower light intensities than under natural conditions. In spite of the positive impact of artificial light, we pay a price for the easy access to light during the night: disorganization of our circadian system or chronodisruption (CD, including perturbations in melatonin rhythm. Epidemiological studies show that CD is associated with an increased incidence of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, cognitive and affective impairment, premature aging and some types of cancer. Knowledge of retinal photoreceptors and the discovery of melanopsin in some ganglion cells demonstrate that light intensity, timing and spectrum must be considered to keep the biological clock properly entrained. Importantly, not all wavelengths of light are equally chronodisrupting. Blue light, which is particularly beneficial during the daytime, seems to be more disruptive at night, and induces the strongest melatonin inhibition. Nocturnal blue light exposure is currently increasing, due to the proliferation of energy-efficient lighting (LEDs and electronic devices. Thus, the development of lighting systems that preserve the melatonin rhythm could reduce the health risks induced by chronodisruption. This review addresses the state of the art regarding the crosstalk between light and the circadian system.

  7. Protecting the Melatonin Rhythm through Circadian Healthy Light Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonmati-Carrion, Maria Angeles; Arguelles-Prieto, Raquel; Martinez-Madrid, Maria Jose; Reiter, Russel; Hardeland, Ruediger; Rol, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Currently, in developed countries, nights are excessively illuminated (light at night), whereas daytime is mainly spent indoors, and thus people are exposed to much lower light intensities than under natural conditions. In spite of the positive impact of artificial light, we pay a price for the easy access to light during the night: disorganization of our circadian system or chronodisruption (CD), including perturbations in melatonin rhythm. Epidemiological studies show that CD is associated with an increased incidence of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, cognitive and affective impairment, premature aging and some types of cancer. Knowledge of retinal photoreceptors and the discovery of melanopsin in some ganglion cells demonstrate that light intensity, timing and spectrum must be considered to keep the biological clock properly entrained. Importantly, not all wavelengths of light are equally chronodisrupting. Blue light, which is particularly beneficial during the daytime, seems to be more disruptive at night, and induces the strongest melatonin inhibition. Nocturnal blue light exposure is currently increasing, due to the proliferation of energy-efficient lighting (LEDs) and electronic devices. Thus, the development of lighting systems that preserve the melatonin rhythm could reduce the health risks induced by chronodisruption. This review addresses the state of the art regarding the crosstalk between light and the circadian system. PMID:25526564

  8. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  9. [Monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, R de P

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MNE) plays a very important role in the practice of pediatrics due to its high prevalence, its psychosocial impact, and its controversial etiology and treatment. Our objective was to show that MNE can be a well-defined clinical entity (monosymptomatic), but it can also be a symptom of urinary disorder, thus requiring a completely different therapeutic approach. METHODS: The literature presents numerous publications related to the matter of MNE, thus we tried to select, for this review, the classical and the most recent publications from internationally recognized authors; in addition, we also have a 13-year work experience at the Unit for Urinary Disorders of the Pediatric Nephrology Center of the state of Paraná (Unidade de Distúrbios Miccionais - Centro de Nefrologia Pediatrica do Paraná). RESULTS: The lack of a well-defined, international consensus on the concept, terminology, and classification of MNE is an obstacle for the assessment of the numerous studies found in the literature. The individualization of the MNE clinical entity is the fundamental starting point for providing appropriate guidance for patients. Enuresis can be found in most societies and, thus, it gives way to several interpretations and forms of treatment. There is a consensus, however, on the damage to the self-esteem of enuretic children, and consequently, on the advantage of proper treatment. CONCLUSIONS: In most cases, MNE is kept as a family secret while children remain without proper guidance and treatment and suffering with the lack of understanding and damage to their self-esteem. Doctors should survey patients extensively for MNE during pediatric appointments. It is possible to discard other diagnoses with a detailed survey of habits, quality of the urination, and history of urinary infection and a meticulous physical examination. MNE should be faced as a medical problem worthy of the attention of professionals and patient? families. PMID:14647579

  10. Hepatoprotective actions of melatonin: Possible mediation by melatonin receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M Mathes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, the hormone of darkness and messenger of the photoperiod, is also well known to exhibit strong direct and indirect antioxidant properties. Melatonin has previously been demonstrated to be a powerful organ protective substance in numerous models of injury; these beneficial effects have been attributed to the hormone’s intense radical scavenging capacity. The present report reviews the hepatoprotective potential of the pineal hormone in various models of oxidative stress in vivo, and summarizes the extensive literature showing that melatonin may be a suitable experimental substance to reduce liver damage after sepsis, hemorrhagic shock, ischemia/reperfusion, and in numerous models of toxic liver injury. Melatonin’s influence on hepatic antioxidant enzymes and other potentially relevant pathways, such as nitric oxide signaling, hepatic cytokine and heat shock protein expression, are evaluated. Based on recent literature demonstrating the functional relevance of melatonin receptor activation for hepatic organ protection, this article finally suggests that melatonin receptors could mediate the hepatoprotective actions of melatonin therapy.

  11. Serum melatonin in relation to clinical variables in patients with major depressive disorder and a hypothesis of a low melatonin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Friis, J; Kjellman, B F; Aperia, B; Undén, F; von Rosen, D; Ljunggren, J G; Wetterberg, L

    1985-04-01

    Maximum nocturnal serum melatonin level (MTmax) in relation to some clinical variables was studied in 32 patients with a major depressive episode and in 33 healthy subjects with reference to the outcome of the dexamethasone suppression test (DST). Significant regressions were found between MTmax levels and clinical rating scores in CPRS, interpreted as retardation symptoms. Four healthy subjects with disposition for dysthymic reactions had subnormal MTmax levels, which differed from MTmax levels in subjects without such disposition. Patients but not the healthy subjects, who reported parental loss before 17 years of age, had subnormal MTmax levels and differed from patients with no reported parental loss. Patients with no reported suicidal behaviour in clinical history had significantly lower MTmax levels than patients with reported suicide attempts. No relations were found between low MTmax levels and diagnoses, duration of illness, reported inheritance for depressive illness or sleep disturbances. A hypothetical low melatonin syndrome in depression is proposed: low nocturnal melatonin, abnormal dexamethasone suppression test, disturbed 24-h rhythm of cortisol, less pronounced daily and annual cyclic variation in depressive symptomatology. PMID:4039876

  12. Clinical pharmacokinetics of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Nathja Groth; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the review was to provide an overview of studies investigating the pharmacokinetics of exogenous melatonin in humans and if possible, to provide recommendations for clinical use. METHODS: The review was conducted in accordance to PRISMA guidelines. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed and Embase databases. The pharmacokinetic variables included maximal plasma/serum concentration (Cmax), time to maximal plasma/serum concentration (Tmax), elimination half-life...

  13. Nocturnal polyuria in monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis refractory to desmopressin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamperis, Konstantinos; Rittig, Søren; Jørgensen, Kaj Anker; Djurhuus, Jens Christian

    2006-01-01

    The transition from day to night is associated with a pronounced decline in diuresis with reductions in the amount of excreted water, electrolytes, and other end products of our metabolism. Failure to do so leads to a large urine output at night, a condition known as nocturnal polyuria, encounter...

  14. The serotonin-N-acetylserotonin–melatonin pathway as a biomarker for autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Pagan, C; Delorme, R.; Callebert, J.; Goubran-Botros, H; Amsellem, F; Drouot, X; Boudebesse, C; Le Dudal, K; Ngo-Nguyen, N; Laouamri, H; Gillberg, C; Leboyer, M.; Bourgeron, T.; Launay, J-M

    2014-01-01

    Elevated whole-blood serotonin and decreased plasma melatonin (a circadian synchronizer hormone that derives from serotonin) have been reported independently in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Here, we explored, in parallel, serotonin, melatonin and the intermediate N-acetylserotonin (NAS) in a large cohort of patients with ASD and their relatives. We then investigated the clinical correlates of these biochemical parameters. Whole-blood serotonin, platelet NAS and plasma melat...

  15. Nocturnal Lagrangian Transport of Industrial Plumes from a US Megacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R.; Fortner, E.; Zheng, J.; Zaveri, R.; Berkowitz, C.; Voss, P.; Valente, R.; Culis, A.; Olaguer, J.

    2007-05-01

    A Twin Otter research aircraft equipped with a suite of instruments measuring O3, NOx, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in conjunction with an altitude controlled balloon (tetroon) was used to investigate nocturnal transport of industrial plumes from the Houston metropolitan area during the 2005 Southeast Texas Tetroon Study (SETTS). Polluted air masses with elevated O3, CO, and NOx along with elevated mass peaks characteristic of industrial VOCs detected by a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) were tracked from the Houston metropolitan area to remote locations over distances as far as 200 miles. In addition, high levels of biogenic isoprene and its oxidation products such methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein were detected outside of the polluted plumes. The measurements revealed efficient nocturnal transport of highly reactive VOCs, particularly light alkenes and their oxidation products from the industrial sources, which needs to be considered when assessing the regional effects of a major metropolitan/industrial urban center.

  16. In the Heat of the Night: Thermo-TRPV Channels in the Salmonid Pineal Photoreceptors and Modulation of Melatonin Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisembaum, Laura Gabriela; Besseau, Laurence; Paulin, Charles-Hubert; Charpantier, Alice; Martin, Patrick; Magnanou, Elodie; Fuentès, Michael; Delgado, Maria-Jesus; Falcón, Jack

    2015-12-01

    Photoperiod plays an essential role in the synchronization of metabolism, physiology, and behavior to the cyclic variations of the environment. In vertebrates, information is relayed by the pineal cells and translated into the nocturnal production of melatonin. The duration of this signal corresponds to the duration of the night. In fish, the pinealocytes are true photoreceptors in which the amplitude of the nocturnal surge is modulated by temperature in a species-dependent manner. Thus, the daily and annual variations in the amplitude and duration of the nocturnal melatonin signal provide information on daily and calendar time. Both light and temperature act on the activity of the penultimate enzyme in the melatonin biosynthesis pathway, the arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (serotonin ? N-acetylserotonin). Although the mechanisms of the light/dark regulation of melatonin secretion are quite well understood, those of temperature remain unelucidated. More generally, the mechanisms of thermoreception are unknown in ectotherms. Here we provide the first evidence that two thermotransient receptor potential (TRP) channels, TRPV1 and TRPV4, are expressed in the pineal photoreceptor cells of a teleost fish, in which they modulate melatonin secretion in vitro. The effects are temperature dependent, at least for TRPV1. Our data support the idea that the pineal of fish is involved in thermoregulation and that the pineal photoreceptors are also thermoreceptors. In other nervous and nonnervous tissues, TRPV1 and TRPV4 display a ubiquitous but quantitatively variable distribution. These results are a fundamental step in the elucidation of the mechanisms of temperature transduction in fish. PMID:26389691

  17. Nocturnal 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate excretion in female workers exposed to magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juutilainen, J (Kuopio, University of); Stevens, Richard G.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Anderson, Larry E.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Hansen, Norman H.(WAVEID); Kilpelainen, M (Kuopio, University of); Kumlin, T (Kuopio, University of); Laitinen, J T.(Kuopio, University of); Sobell, Eugene (Southern California, Univ Of); Wilson, Bary W.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2000-03-15

    The objective of this study was to determine whether daytime occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (MFs) suppresses nocturnal melatonin production. Sixty female volunteers were recruited. Thirty-nine worked in a garment factory, and 21 office workers served as a reference group. Exposure assessment was based on the type of sewing machine used and MF measurements around each type of machine. Eye-level MF flux density was used to classify the operators to higher (> 1 microT) and lower (0.3-1 microT) exposure categories. A third group of factory workers had diverse MF exposures from other sources. The reference group had average exposure of about 0.15 microT. Urine samples were collected on Friday and Monday for three consecutive weeks. Melatonin production was assessed as urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate (6-OHMS) excretion. The ratio of Friday morning/Monday morning 6-OHMS was used to test the hypothesis that melatonin production is suppressed after 4 days of occupational MF exposure with significant recovery during the weekend. Possible chronic suppression of melatonin production was evaluated by studying exposure-related differences in the Friday values by multivariate regression analysis. The Monday/Friday ratios were close to 1.0, suggesting that there is no increase in melatonin production over the weekend. The average 6-OHMS excretion on Friday was lower among the factory workers than in the reference group, but no monotonous dose-response was observed. Multivariate regression analysis identified MF exposure, smoking, and age as significant explanatory variables associated with decreased 6-OHMS excretion.

  18. Melatonin in Plants – Diversity of Levels and Multiplicity of Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has been detected in numerous plant species. A particularly surprising finding concerns the highly divergent levels of melatonin that vary between species, organs and environmental conditions, from a few pg/g to over 20 μg/g, reportedly up to 200 μg/g. Highest values have been determined in oily seeds and in plant organs exposed to high UV radiation. The divergency of melatonin concentrations is discussed under various functional aspects and focused on several open questions. This comprises differences in precursor availability, catabolism, the relative contribution of isoenzymes of the melatonin biosynthetic pathway, and differences in rate limitation by either serotonin N-acetyltransferase or N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase. Other differences are related to the remarkable pleiotropy of melatonin, which exhibits properties as a growth regulator and morphogenetic factor, actually debated in terms of auxin-like effects, and as a signaling molecule that modulates pathways of ethylene, abscisic, jasmonic and salicylic acids and is involved in stress tolerance, pathogen defense and delay of senescence. In the context of high light/UV intensities, elevated melatonin levels exceed those required for signaling via stress-related phytohormones and may comprise direct antioxidant and photoprotectant properties, perhaps with a contribution of its oxidatively formed metabolites, such as N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine and its secondary products. High melatonin levels in seeds may also serve antioxidative protection and have been shown to promote seed viability and germination capacity. PMID:26925091

  19. The organization of melatonin in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dies, Hannah; Cheung, Bonnie; Tang, Jennifer; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-04-01

    Melatonin is a hormone that has been shown to have protective effects in several diseases that are associated with cholesterol dysregulation, including cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and certain types of cancers. We studied the interaction of melatonin with model membranes made of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) at melatonin concentrations ranging from 0.5mol% to 30mol%. From 2-dimensional X-ray diffraction measurements, we find that melatonin induces a re-ordering of the lipid membrane that is strongly dependent on the melatonin concentration. At low melatonin concentrations, we observe the presence of melatonin-enriched patches in the membrane, which are significantly thinner than the lipid bilayer. The melatonin molecules were found to align parallel to the lipid tails in these patches. At high melatonin concentrations of 30mol%, we observe a highly ordered melatonin structure that is uniform throughout the membrane, where the melatonin molecules align parallel to the bilayers and one melatonin molecule associates with 2 lipid molecules. Understanding the organization and interactions of melatonin in membranes, and how these are dependent on the concentration, may shed light into its anti-amyloidogenic, antioxidative and photoprotective properties and help develop a structural basis for these properties. PMID:25602914

  20. HEME OXYGENASE-1 UPREGULATED BY MELATONIN: POTENTIAL PROTECTION AGAINST BURN-INDUCED OXIDATIVE GASTRIC MUCOSAL INJURY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minka Hristova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is indoleamine hormone derived from L-tryptophan. Due to its lipophilic nature, it is accessible to every cell. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities thus protecting tissue injury. Heat shock proteins such as HSP32 known as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilatory properties and plays an important role in the protecting of tissues from several stresses. The aim of study is to investigate the expression of HO-1 in gastric mucosa and its connection with oxidative stress and melatonin mediated protection after thermal injury. On rats back, under anesthesia, third degree burn was applied involving 30% of total body surface area (TBSA. Melatonin (10 mg per kg body mass was injected i.p. immediately and 12 hours after thermal skin injury. We used tissue malondialdehyde (MDA, lipid peroxidation product, as a marker of oxidative stress. Gastric mucosa histopathology were observed on light microscopy and light immunohistochemistry investigating the HO-1 too. Results: The levels of MDA in gastric mucosa were elevated (p< 0.05. The HO-1 expression was significantly increased in rats with trauma. Melatonin inhibited elevation in lipid peroxidation product and augmented the increase in expression of HO-1 in the gastric mucosa. In conclusion, our data suggest that HO-1 induction following burn injury is an adaptive response protecting gastric mucosal against further oxidative damage. Melatonin increased the antioxidant capacity and restricted burn-induced oxidative damage in gastric mucosa and thus could be used therapeutically in organ protection.

  1. The potential physiological crosstalk and interrelationship between two sovereign endogenous amines, melatonin and homocysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rajib; Borah, Anupom

    2015-10-15

    The antioxidant melatonin and the non-proteinogenic excitotoxic amino acid homocysteine (Hcy) are very distinct but related reciprocally to each other in their mode of action. The elevated Hcy level has been implicated in several disease pathologies ranging from cardio- and cerebro-vascular diseases to neurodegeneration owing largely to its free radical generating potency. Interestingly, melatonin administration potentially normalizes the elevated Hcy level, thereby protecting the cells from the undesired Hcy-induced excitotoxicity and cell death. However, the exact mechanism and between them remain obscure. Through literature survey we have found an indistinct but a vital link between melatonin and Hcy i.e., the existence of reciprocal regulation between them, and this aspect has been thoroughly described herein. In this review, we focus on all the possibilities of co-regulation of melatonin and Hcy at the level of their production and metabolism both in basal and in pathological conditions, and appraised the potential of melatonin in ameliorating homocysteinemia-induced cellular stresses. Also, we have summarized the differential mode of action of melatonin and Hcy on health and disease states. PMID:26281918

  2. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350...ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1350 Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications . The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7 milligrams of...

  3. Melatonin, melatonin receptors and melanophores: a moving story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, David; Davidson, Kathryn; Hough, Kate A; Teh, Muy-Teck

    2004-10-01

    Melatonin (5-methoxy N-acetyltryptamine) is a hormone synthesized and released from the pineal gland at night, which acts on specific high affinity G-protein coupled receptors to regulate various aspects of physiology and behaviour, including circadian and seasonal responses, and some retinal, cardiovascular and immunological functions. In amphibians, such as Xenopus laevis, another role of melatonin is in the control of skin coloration through an action on melanin-containing pigment granules (melanosomes) in melanophores. In these cells, very low concentrations of melatonin activate the Mel(1c) receptor subtype triggering movement of granules toward the cell centre thus lightening skin colour. Mel(1c) receptor activation reduces intracellular cAMP via a pertussis toxin-sensitive inhibitory G-protein (Gi), but how this and other intracellular signals regulate pigment movement is not yet fully understood. However, melanophores have proven an excellent model for the study of the molecular mechanisms which coordinate intracellular transport. Melanosome transport is reversible and involves both actin- (myosin V) and microtubule-dependent (kinesin II and dynein) motors. Melanosomes retain both kinesin and dynein during anterograde and retrograde transport, but the myosin V motor seems to be recruited to melanosomes during dispersion, where it assists kinesin II in dominating dynein thus driving net dispersion. Recent work suggests an important role for dynactin in coordinating the activity of the opposing microtubule motors. The melanophore pigment aggregation response has also played a vital role in the ongoing effort to devise specific melatonin receptor antagonists. Much of what has been learnt about the parts of the melatonin molecule required for receptor binding and activation has come from detailed structure-activity data using novel melatonin ligands. Work aiming to devise ligands specific for the distinct melatonin receptor subtypes stands poised to deliver selective agonists and antagonists which will be valuable tools in understanding the role of this enigmatic hormone in health and disease. PMID:15357831

  4. Melatonin, immune function and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perumal SR Pandi

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aging is associated with a decline in immune function (immunosenescence, a situation known to correlate with increased incidence of cancer, infectious and degenerative diseases. Innate, cellular and humoral immunity all exhibit increased deterioration with age. A decrease in functional competence of individual natural killer (NK cells is found with advancing age. Macrophages and granulocytes show functional decline in aging as evidenced by their diminished phagocytic activity and impairment of superoxide generation. There is also marked shift in cytokine profile as age advances, e.g., CD3+ and CD4+ cells decline in number whereas CD8+ cells increase in elderly individuals. A decline in organ specific antibodies occurs causing reduced humoral responsiveness. Circulating melatonin decreases with age and in recent years much interest has been focused on its immunomodulatory effect. Melatonin stimulates the production of progenitor cells for granulocytes-macrophages. It also stimulates the production of NK cells and CD4+ cells and inhibits CD8+ cells. The production and release of various cytokines from NK cells and T-helper lymphocytes also are enhanced by melatonin. Melatonin presumably regulates immune function by acting on the immune-opioid network, by affecting G protein-cAMP signal pathway and by regulating intracellular glutathione levels. Melatonin has the potential therapeutic value to enhance immune function in aged individuals and in patients in an immunocompromised state.

  5. Impact of different colours of artificial light at night on melatonin rhythm and gene expression of gonadotropins in European perch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, Anika; Hölker, Franz; Franke, Steffen; Kleiner, Wibke; Kloas, Werner

    2016-02-01

    The distribution and intensity of artificial light at night, commonly referred to as light pollution, is consequently rising and progressively also ecological implications come to light. Low intensity light is known to suppress nocturnal melatonin production in several fish species. This study aims to examine the least suppressive light colour for melatonin excreted into the holding water and the influence of different light qualities and quantities in the night on gene expression of gonadotropins in fish. European perch (Perca fluviatilis) were exposed to light of different wavelengths during the night (blue, green, and red). Melatonin concentrations were measured from water samples every 3h during a 24h period. Gene expression of gonadotropins was measured in perch exposed to different light colours and was additionally examined for perch subjected to different intensities of white light (0lx, 1lx, 10lx, 100lx) during the night. All different light colours caused a significant drop of melatonin concentration; however, blue light was least suppressive. Gene expression of gonadotropins was not influenced by nocturnal light of different light colours, but in female perch gonadotropin expression was significantly reduced by white light already at the lowest level (1lx). We conclude that artificial light with shorter wavelengths at night is less effective in disturbing biological rhythms of perch than longer wavelengths, coinciding with the light situation in freshwater habitats inhabited by perch. Different light colours in the night showed no significant effect on gonadotropin expression, but white light in the night can disturb reproductive traits already at very low light intensities. These findings indicate that light pollution has not only the potential to disturb the melatonin cycle but also the reproductive rhythm and may therefore have implications on whole species communities. PMID:26584071

  6. Protective effects of thymoquinone and melatonin on intestinal ischemia–reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Tas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: In the present study, we aimed to compare the potential protective effects of thymoquinone and melatonin by using equivalent dose, on oxidative stress-induced ischemia–reperfusion (IR injury in the intestinal tissue of rats. Materials and Methods: The study was performed using 32 male Wistar–Albino rats (weighing 180–200 g randomly divided into four groups: Group I, sham group; Group II, IR group; Group III, IR with melatonin group; and Group IV, IR with thymoquinone group. After laparotomy, ischemia and reperfusion were performed for 60 and 120 min, respectively, on all the groups. Intestinal tissue sections were stained using routine histological methods and examined under the light microscope. In addition, the sections were immunohistochemically stained using the TUNEL method for determination of apoptosis. Superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA levels in the intestinal tissue were also measured. Results: The IR group had significantly elevated tissue SOD activity, GSH-Px activity, and MDA levels compared with the sham group. Administration of thymoquinone and melatonin efficiently reduced these increases. Statistically significant number of apoptotic cells was observed in the intestinal tissue of IR group rats compared with the sham group. Treatment with thymoquinone and melatonin markedly reduced the number of apoptotic cells. Conclusion: The effects of melatonin and thymoquinone on IR-induced oxidative stress in rat intestines were similar. Our findings suggest that melatonin and thymoquinone protect against IR-induced injury to intestinal tissues.

  7. Protective Effects of Thymoquinone and Melatonin on Intestinal Ischemia–reperfusion Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Ufuk; Ayan, Murat; Sogut, Erkan; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Uysal, Murat; Tanriverdi, Halil I.; Senel, Ufuk; Ozyurt, Birsen; Sarsilmaz, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim: In the present study, we aimed to compare the potential protective effects of thymoquinone and melatonin by using equivalent dose, on oxidative stress-induced ischemia–reperfusion (IR) injury in the intestinal tissue of rats. Materials and Methods: The study was performed using 32 male Wistar–Albino rats (weighing 180–200 g) randomly divided into four groups: Group I, sham group; Group II, IR group; Group III, IR with melatonin group; and Group IV, IR with thymoquinone group. After laparotomy, ischemia and reperfusion were performed for 60 and 120 min, respectively, on all the groups. Intestinal tissue sections were stained using routine histological methods and examined under the light microscope. In addition, the sections were immunohistochemically stained using the TUNEL method for determination of apoptosis. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the intestinal tissue were also measured. Results: The IR group had significantly elevated tissue SOD activity, GSH-Px activity, and MDA levels compared with the sham group. Administration of thymoquinone and melatonin efficiently reduced these increases. Statistically significant number of apoptotic cells was observed in the intestinal tissue of IR group rats compared with the sham group. Treatment with thymoquinone and melatonin markedly reduced the number of apoptotic cells. Conclusion The effects of melatonin and thymoquinone on IR-induced oxidative stress in rat intestines were similar. Our findings suggest that melatonin and thymoquinone protect against IR-induced injury to intestinal tissues. PMID:26458854

  8. Intracoronary and systemic melatonin to patients with acute myocardial infarction : protocol for the IMPACT trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halladin, Natalie L; Busch, Sarah EkelØf

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ischaemia-reperfusion injury following acute myocardial infarctions (AMI) is an unavoidable consequence of the primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) procedure. A pivotal mechanism in ischaemia-reperfusion injury is the production of reactive oxygen species following reperfusion. The endogenous hormone, melatonin, works as an antioxidant and could potentially minimise the ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Given intracoronarily, it enables melatonin to work directly at the site of reperfusion. We wish to test if melatonin, as an antioxidant, can minimise the reperfusion injury following pPCI in patients with AMI. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The IMPACT trial is a multicentre, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. We wish to include 2 × 20 patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarctions undergoing pPCI within six hours from symptom onset. The primary end-point is the Myocardial Salvage Index assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging on day 4 (± 1) after pPCI. The secondary end-points are high-sensitivity troponin, creatinekinase myocardial band and clinical events. CONCLUSION: The aim of the IMPACT trial is to evaluate the effect of melatonin on reperfusion injuries following pPCI. Owing to its relatively non-toxic profile, melatonin is an easily implementable drug in the clinical setting, and melatonin has the potential to reduce morbidity in patients with AMI. FUNDING: This study received no financial support from the industry. TRIAL REGISTRATION: www.clinicaltrials.gov, clinical trials identifier: NCT01172171.

  9. Melatonin Inhibits GnRH-1, GnRH-3 and GnRH Receptor Expression in the Brain of the European Sea Bass, Dicentrarchus labrax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Muñoz-Cueto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Several evidences supported the existence of melatonin effects on reproductive system in fish. In order to investigate whether melatonin is involved in the modulation of GnRH systems in the European sea bass, we have injected melatonin (0.5 µg/g body mass in male specimens. The brain mRNA transcript levels of the three GnRH forms and the five GnRH receptors present in this species were determined by real time quantitative PCR. Our findings revealed day–night variations in the brain expression of GnRH-1, GnRH-3 and several GnRH receptors (dlGnRHR-II-1c, -2a, which exhibited higher transcript levels at mid-light compared to mid-dark phase of the photocycle. Moreover, an inhibitory effect of melatonin on the nocturnal expression of GnRH-1, GnRH-3, and GnRH receptors subtypes 1c, 2a and 2b was also demonstrated. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of melatonin affected the expression of hypophysiotrophic GnRH forms and GnRH receptors that exhibit day–night fluctuations, suggesting that exogenous melatonin reinforce physiological mechanisms already established. These interactions between melatoninergic and GnRH systems could be mediating photoperiod effects on reproductive and other rhythmic physiological events in the European sea bass.

  10. Importance of light and of the serotonin-melatonin-system on neurophysiology of milk synthesis and ejection in dairy cows

    OpenAIRE

    Kollmann, Maria Theresia

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to influence the serotonin-melatonin-system and thus to investigate its effect to milk synthesis and ejection in dairy cows. Melatonin concentration of heifers but not of lactating cows could be influenced after elevating plasma tryptophan concentration by oral administration of rumen protected tryptophan. A variation of the daily photoperiod affected prolactin , but not oxytocin concentration. Via directed use of artificial sunlight during milking oxytocin, but not p...

  11. Sleep and psychological disturbance in nocturnal asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Stores, G.; Ellis, A; Wiggs, L.; Crawford, C; Thomson, A.

    1998-01-01

    Subjective and objective sleep disturbance was studied in children with nocturnal asthma. Relations between such disturbance and daytime psychological function were also explored, including possible changes in learning and behaviour associated with improvements in nocturnal asthma and sleep. Assessments included home polysomnography, parental questionnaires concerning sleep disturbance, behaviour, and mood and cognitive testing. Compared with matched controls, children with ...

  12. Sertraline and venlafaxine-induced nocturnal enuresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    inci meltem atay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal enuresis is defined as the involuntary discharge of urine after the age of expected continence that occurs during sleep at night. Although there are a few reports in adults for nocturnal enuresis associated with serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs, the mechanism or frequency of this side effect have not been identified yet. We report here a case of nocturnal enuresis associated with both sertraline and venlafaxine in different major depressive episodes in an adult patient that resolves after the discontinuation of the medications and continuation with escitalopram. To our knowledge, in literature there have been no reports about nocturnal enuresis caused by those two agents in the same patient. This case is discussed in detail for the recurrence of nocturnal enuresis, the importance of detailed assessment of even rare side effects and for their possible mechanisms.

  13. Melatonin Anticancer Effects: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Di Bella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, MLT, the main hormone produced by the pineal gland, not only regulates circadian rhythm, but also has antioxidant, anti-ageing and immunomodulatory properties. MLT plays an important role in blood composition, medullary dynamics, platelet genesis, vessel endothelia, and in platelet aggregation, leukocyte formula regulation and hemoglobin synthesis. Its significant atoxic, apoptotic, oncostatic, angiogenetic, differentiating and antiproliferative properties against all solid and liquid tumors have also been documented. Thanks, in fact, to its considerable functional versatility, MLT can exert both direct and indirect anticancer effects in factorial synergy with other differentiating, antiproliferative, immunomodulating and trophic molecules that form part of the anticancer treatment formulated by Luigi Di Bella (Di Bella Method, DBM: somatostatin, retinoids, ascorbic acid, vitamin D3, prolactin inhibitors, chondroitin-sulfate. The interaction between MLT and the DBM molecules counters the multiple processes that characterize the neoplastic phenotype (induction, promotion, progression and/or dissemination, tumoral mutation. All these particular characteristics suggest the use of MLT in oncological diseases.

  14. Melatonin Anticancer Effects: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, Giuseppe; Mascia, Fabrizio; Gualano, Luciano; Di Bella, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, MLT), the main hormone produced by the pineal gland, not only regulates circadian rhythm, but also has antioxidant, anti-ageing and immunomodulatory properties. MLT plays an important role in blood composition, medullary dynamics, platelet genesis, vessel endothelia, and in platelet aggregation, leukocyte formula regulation and hemoglobin synthesis. Its significant atoxic, apoptotic, oncostatic, angiogenetic, differentiating and antiproliferative properties against all solid and liquid tumors have also been documented. Thanks, in fact, to its considerable functional versatility, MLT can exert both direct and indirect anticancer effects in factorial synergy with other differentiating, antiproliferative, immunomodulating and trophic molecules that form part of the anticancer treatment formulated by Luigi Di Bella (Di Bella Method, DBM: somatostatin, retinoids, ascorbic acid, vitamin D3, prolactin inhibitors, chondroitin-sulfate). The interaction between MLT and the DBM molecules counters the multiple processes that characterize the neoplastic phenotype (induction, promotion, progression and/or dissemination, tumoral mutation). All these particular characteristics suggest the use of MLT in oncological diseases. PMID:23348932

  15. Nocturnal drainage wind characteristics in two converging air sheds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the short experimental period in the Grants Basin of Northeastern New Mexico a survey was conducted on the complex meteorology of this area. Emphasis was placed on the nocturnal drainage flow because of the potential hazards to the populated areas of Milan and Grants from the effluents of the uranium mining and milling operation in this area. This investigation has shown that the nocturnal drainage flow patterns agree with the winds predicted on the basis of the complex terrain of the area. Because of the surface cooling at night (over 250C during summer and about 200C during winter), air from elevated surrounding areas flows to the low lying regions consequently setting up a nocturnal drainage flow. This regime exists over 60% of the time during summer months and over 65% of the time during winter months with a depth generally less than 200 m. In the San Mateo air shed the drainage flow is east northeast, and in the Ambrosia Lake air shed it is from northwest. The confluence of these two air flows contributes mainly to the drainage flow through the channel formed by La Ja Mesa and Mesa Montanosa. The analysis of data collected by the recording Flats Station confirms the prediction that although the area south of the channel region broadens considerably causing a reduction in flow speed, contributions from the southside of La Jara Mesa and Mesa Montanosa partly compensate for this reduction. The position of this recording station is 15 to 20 km from the populated towns of Milan and Grants. A drainage flow speed of approximately 2.2 m s-1 and the duration of over 11 hours as recorded by this station indicates that air from the San Mateo and Ambrosia Lake regions may be transported southwards to these population centers during a nocturnal period. In order to test this prediction, a series of multi-atmospheric tracer experiments were conducted in the Grants Basin

  16. 'Melatonin isomer' in wine is not an isomer of the melatonin but tryptophan-ethylester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardana, Claudio; Iriti, Marcello; Stuknyt?, Milda; De Noni, Ivano; Simonetti, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone, chronobiotic, and antioxidant compound found in wine and deriving directly from grapes and/or synthesized by yeast during alcoholic fermentation. In addition, a melatonin isomer has been detected in different foods, wine among them. The special interest for melatonin isomer related to the fact that it was found in greater quantities than melatonin and probably shares some of its biological properties. Despite this, its chemical structure has not yet been defined; although some researchers hypothesize, it could be melatonin with the ethylacetamide group shifted into position N1. Thus, the aim of our study was to identify the structures of the melatonin isomer. For this purpose, melatonin and melatonin isomer in Syrah wine were separated chromatographically by a sub-2 ?m particle column and detected by tandem mass spectrometry. The sample was then purified and concentrated by solid-phase extraction, hydrolyzed with alkali or esterase, and substrates and products quantified by UPLC-MS/MS. Moreover, melatonin, melatonin isomer, and their product ions were evaluated by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The amount of melatonin isomer and melatonin in the wine was 84 ± 4 and 3 ± 0 ng/mL, respectively. In the solutions, containing diluted alkali or esterase, melatonin isomer was hydrolyzed in about 8 min. Correspondingly, tryptophan was detected, and its amount increased and reached the maximum concentration in about 8 min. Melatonin concentration was not affected by diluted alkali or esterase. The fragmentation pattern of melatonin isomer was different from that of melatonin but comparable to that of tryptophan-ethylester. Finally, the so-called melatonin isomer identity was verified by cochromatography with authentic standard of tryptophan-ethylester. PMID:25251161

  17. Melatonin and Pancreatic Islets: Interrelationships between Melatonin, Insulin and Glucagon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckhard Mühlbauer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The pineal hormone melatonin exerts its influence in the periphery through activation of two specific trans-membrane receptors: MT1 and MT2. Both isoforms are expressed in the islet of Langerhans and are involved in the modulation of insulin secretion from ?-cells and in glucagon secretion from ?-cells. De-synchrony of receptor signaling may lead to the development of type 2 diabetes. This notion has recently been supported by genome-wide association studies identifying particularly the MT2 as a risk factor for this rapidly spreading metabolic disturbance. Since melatonin is secreted in a clearly diurnal fashion, it is safe to assume that it also has a diurnal impact on the blood-glucose-regulating function of the islet. This factor has hitherto been underestimated; the disruption of diurnal signaling within the islet may be one of the most important mechanisms leading to metabolic disturbances. The study of melatonin–insulin interactions in diabetic rat models has revealed an inverse relationship: an increase in melatonin levels leads to a down-regulation of insulin secretion and vice versa. Elucidation of the possible inverse interrelationship in man may open new avenues in the therapy of diabetes.

  18. Pharmacology and function of melatonin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily from the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone, through an action in the brain, appears to be involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes that are cued by the daily change in photoperiod. This article reviews the pharmacological characteristics and function of melatonin receptors in the central nervous system, and the role of melatonin in mediating physiological functions in mammals. Melatonin and melatonin agonists, at picomolar concentrations, inhibit the release of dopamine from retina through activation of a site that is pharmacologically different from a serotonin receptor. These inhibitory effects are antagonized by the novel melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole (N-0774), which suggests that melatonin activates a presynaptic melatonin receptor. In chicken and rabbit retina, the pharmacological characteristics of the presynaptic melatonin receptor and the site labeled by 2-[125I]iodomelatonin are identical. It is proposed that 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding sites (e.g., chicken brain) that possess the pharmacological characteristics of the retinal melatonin receptor site (order of affinities: 2-iodomelatonin greater than 6-chloromelatonin greater than or equal to melatonin greater than or equal to 6,7-di-chloro-2-methylmelatonin greater than 6-hydroxymelatonin greater than or equal to 6-methoxymelatonin greater than N-acetyltryptamine greater than or equal to luzindole greater than N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine greater than 5-methoxytryptamine much greater than 5-hydroxytryptamine) be classified as ML-1 (melatonin 1). The 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding site of hamster brain membranes possesses different binding and pharmacological characteristics from the retinal melatonin receptor site and should be classified as ML-2. 64 references

  19. Pharmacology and function of melatonin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubocovich, M.L.

    1988-09-01

    The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily from the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone, through an action in the brain, appears to be involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes that are cued by the daily change in photoperiod. This article reviews the pharmacological characteristics and function of melatonin receptors in the central nervous system, and the role of melatonin in mediating physiological functions in mammals. Melatonin and melatonin agonists, at picomolar concentrations, inhibit the release of dopamine from retina through activation of a site that is pharmacologically different from a serotonin receptor. These inhibitory effects are antagonized by the novel melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole (N-0774), which suggests that melatonin activates a presynaptic melatonin receptor. In chicken and rabbit retina, the pharmacological characteristics of the presynaptic melatonin receptor and the site labeled by 2-(125I)iodomelatonin are identical. It is proposed that 2-(125I)iodomelatonin binding sites (e.g., chicken brain) that possess the pharmacological characteristics of the retinal melatonin receptor site (order of affinities: 2-iodomelatonin greater than 6-chloromelatonin greater than or equal to melatonin greater than or equal to 6,7-di-chloro-2-methylmelatonin greater than 6-hydroxymelatonin greater than or equal to 6-methoxymelatonin greater than N-acetyltryptamine greater than or equal to luzindole greater than N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine greater than 5-methoxytryptamine much greater than 5-hydroxytryptamine) be classified as ML-1 (melatonin 1). The 2-(125I)iodomelatonin binding site of hamster brain membranes possesses different binding and pharmacological characteristics from the retinal melatonin receptor site and should be classified as ML-2. 64 references.

  20. Melatonin use in sleep disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, KF

    1997-01-01

    Melatonin is a widely publicized 'magical drug'. Claims of its use include regulation of sleep, circadian rhythm, mood, immune system and reproduction, anti-aging, protection against cancer, and treatment of AIDS. This article reviews the evidence of its use in sleep disorders. Its possible indications and adverse effects are discussed.

  1. Treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Lisukov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare, life?threatening clonal hematological disorder caused by an acquired mutation in the phosphatidylinositol glucan (PIG-A gene. PNH is characterized by chronic intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, thrombophilia and other severe clinical syndromes. Until recently, the treatment of PNH has been symptomatic with blood transfusions, anticoagulation and supplementation with folic acid or iron. The only potentially curative treatment is allogeneic stem cell transplantation, but this has severe complications with high mortality rates. A new targeted treatment strategy is the inhibition of the terminal complement cascade with anti?C5 monoclonal antibody (eculizumab. Eculizumab has shown significant efficacy in controlling of intravascular hemolysis resulting in improving quality of life and survival.

  2. Iatrogenic nocturnal eneuresis- an overlooked side effect of anti histamines?

    OpenAIRE

    D Italiano; F Italiano; Genovese, C.; R S Calabro

    2015-01-01

    Nocturnal enuresis is a common disorder in childhood, but its pathophysiological mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Iatrogenic nocturnal enuresis has been described following treatment with several psychotropic medications. Herein, we describe a 6-year-old child who experienced nocturnal enuresis during treatment with the antihistamine cetirizine. Drug rechallenge was positive. Several neurotransmitters are implicated in the pathogenesis of nocturnal enuresis, including noradrenaline,...

  3. Chronobiology of Melatonin beyond the Feedback to the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus—Consequences to Melatonin Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Hardeland

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian system is composed of numerous oscillators, which gradually differ with regard to their dependence on the pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. Actions of melatonin on extra-SCN oscillators represent an emerging field. Melatonin receptors are widely expressed in numerous peripheral and central nervous tissues. Therefore, the circadian rhythm of circulating, pineal-derived melatonin can have profound consequences for the temporal organization of almost all organs, without necessarily involving the melatonin feedback to the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Experiments with melatonin-deficient mouse strains, pinealectomized animals and melatonin receptor knockouts, as well as phase-shifting experiments with explants, reveal a chronobiological role of melatonin in various tissues. In addition to directly steering melatonin-regulated gene expression, the pineal hormone is required for the rhythmic expression of circadian oscillator genes in peripheral organs and to enhance the coupling of parallel oscillators within the same tissue. It exerts additional effects by modulating the secretion of other hormones. The importance of melatonin for numerous organs is underlined by the association of various diseases with gene polymorphisms concerning melatonin receptors and the melatonin biosynthetic pathway. The possibilities and limits of melatonergic treatment are discussed with regard to reductions of melatonin during aging and in various diseases.

  4. Problems in assessment of acute melatonin overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliman, B J; Chyka, P A

    1997-04-01

    Melatonin is sold in the United States as a dietary supplement and is promoted primarily as an aid for insomnia, stress, jet lag, and aging. Cases of acute poisoning have not been reported, partially because of problems in assessment of toxicity. We report the case of a 66-year-old man who became lethargic and disoriented after taking 24 mg melatonin to aid relaxation and sleep the evening before prostate surgery. He recovered uneventfully, and after the scheduled surgery he resumed his regular practice of taking 6 mg melatonin with prescription sedative drugs. Although melatonin is not regulated as a drug, it may interact with benzodiazepines, be antagonized by naloxone and flumazenil, and interact with melatonin receptors in the central nervous system and elsewhere in the body. Melatonin appears to be pharmacologically active and should not be considered a benign agent on overdose. PMID:9114843

  5. Melatonin modulation of presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors located on short noradrenergic neurons of the rat vas deferens: a pharmacological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, the pineal hormone produced during the dark phase of the light-dark cycle, modulates neuronal acetylcholine receptors located presynaptically on nerve terminals of the rat vas deferens. Recently we showed the presence of high affinity nicotine-binding sites during the light phase, and low and high affinity binding sites during the dark phase. The appearance of the low affinity binding sites was due to the nocturnal melatonin surge and could be mimicked by exposure to melatonin in vitro. The aim of the present research was to identify the receptor subtypes responsible for the functional response during the light and the dark phase. The rank order of potency of agonists was dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP = cytisine > nicotine > carbachol and DMPP = nicotine = cytisine > carbachol, during the light and dark phase, respectively, due to an increase in apparent affinity for nicotine. Mecamylamine similarly blocked the DMPP response during the light and the dark phase, while the response to nicotine was more efficiently blocked during the light phase. In contrast, methyllycaconitine inhibited the nicotine-induced response only at 21:00 h. Since a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs have low affinity for nicotine in binding assays, we suggest that a mixed population composed of a3ß4 - plus a7-bearing nAChR subtypes is present at night. This plasticity in receptor subtypes is probably driven by melatonin since nicotine-induced contraction in organs from animals sacrificed at 15:00 h and incubated with melatonin (100 pg/ml, 4 h is not totally blocked by mecamylamine. Thus melatonin, by acting directly on the short adrenergic neurons that innervate the rat vas deferens, induces the appearance of the low affinity binding site, probably an a7 nAChR subtype.

  6. Melatonin modulation of presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors located on short noradrenergic neurons of the rat vas deferens: a pharmacological characterization

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    W.M., Zago; R.P., Markus.

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, the pineal hormone produced during the dark phase of the light-dark cycle, modulates neuronal acetylcholine receptors located presynaptically on nerve terminals of the rat vas deferens. Recently we showed the presence of high affinity nicotine-binding sites during the light phase, and low [...] and high affinity binding sites during the dark phase. The appearance of the low affinity binding sites was due to the nocturnal melatonin surge and could be mimicked by exposure to melatonin in vitro. The aim of the present research was to identify the receptor subtypes responsible for the functional response during the light and the dark phase. The rank order of potency of agonists was dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) = cytisine > nicotine > carbachol and DMPP = nicotine = cytisine > carbachol, during the light and dark phase, respectively, due to an increase in apparent affinity for nicotine. Mecamylamine similarly blocked the DMPP response during the light and the dark phase, while the response to nicotine was more efficiently blocked during the light phase. In contrast, methyllycaconitine inhibited the nicotine-induced response only at 21:00 h. Since a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have low affinity for nicotine in binding assays, we suggest that a mixed population composed of a3ß4 - plus a7-bearing nAChR subtypes is present at night. This plasticity in receptor subtypes is probably driven by melatonin since nicotine-induced contraction in organs from animals sacrificed at 15:00 h and incubated with melatonin (100 pg/ml, 4 h) is not totally blocked by mecamylamine. Thus melatonin, by acting directly on the short adrenergic neurons that innervate the rat vas deferens, induces the appearance of the low affinity binding site, probably an a7 nAChR subtype.

  7. The role of melatonin in radiation induced biochemical disturbances in brain and thyroid gland in adult male albino rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced changes in adult male albino male rats before and after melatonin administration were monitored to detect some biochemical changes in brain and thyroid gland. The parameters monitored were dopamine (DA), norepinephdne (NE) and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) in brain and triiodothyronine (T3) thyroxine (T4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in serum of irradiated adult male albino rats before and after intraperitoneal injection of melatonin. Results indicated that 6.0 Gy whole body ?-irradiated rats showed gradual and significant decrease in DA, NE and GABA contents in different brain areas under investigation (cerebellum, pons+medulla oblongata, corpus striatum, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and hippocampus). The maximum effect of whole body ?-irradiation was observed after 21 days. Moreover, gradual and significant decrease in serum T3 and T4 levels were recorded after ?-irradiation. However, TSH level showed significant elevation throughout the experimental period. Melatonin at a dose level of 15 mg/kg b.wt. was intraperitoneally injected daily 30 minutes after 6.0 Gy whole body ?-irradiation, ameliorated DA, NE and GABA contents in different brain areas compared to those measured in irradiated rats. Moreover, melatonin gradually attenuated the effect of ?-irradiation on serum T3 and T4 levels to reach nearly the control level at day 21 after melatonin injection. However, melatonin ameliorated the elevated TSH level induced by ?-irradiation to reach its corresponding control value at day 21

  8. Effectiveness of Melatonin, as a Radiation Damage-Mitigating Drug in Modulating Liver Biochemical disorders in ?-Irradiated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melatonin has an anti per oxidative effect on several tissues as well as a scavenger effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS). Whilst radiation-hazards due to free radical generation, present enormous challenges for biological and medical safety. Therefore, rats were classified into four groups; control (n= 8), (received 0.5 ml of alcoholic saline as a vehicle for 5 days). Melatonin-treated rats received 10 mg/ kg body wt, for 5 days (given to the animals in the morning via stomach tube). gamma-irradiated rats received 0.5 ml of the melatonin vehicle followed by one shot dose of 3 Gy gamma-rays. Each of these groups was compared with a further group, which-received melatonin for 5 days after 3 Gy gamma-irradiation exposure. The results revealed that all considered biochemical parameters were not changed significantly in melatonin-treated group as compared with control one. In the liver tissue of the gamma-irradiated animals (3 Gy), the oxidative stress markers malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl (PC) were significantly increased, while a marked decrease occurred in the contents of deoxy- and ribo-nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and glutathione (GSH) as well as activity of glutathione-S-transferase (GST). In addition, catalase (CAT) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities were increased. Activities of aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) were significantly increased in sera of the irradiated rats. Treatment with melatonin for 5 days after gamma-rays exposure significantly modulated the radiation-induced elevations in MDA and PC levels in the liver tissue and significantly restored hepatic GSH content, GST, CAT and MPO activities. Post-irradiation treatment with melatonin showed significant higher hepatic DNA and RNA contents than irradiated rats. The activities of AST, ALP, and GGT in serum were significantly ameliorated when melatonin was administrated after irradiation. Conclusion: Melatonin has effective mitigating effects against gamma- radiation induced oxidative stress and liver injury.

  9. Inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis by sleep deprivation is independent of circadian disruption and melatonin suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, A D; Mear, R J; Mistlberger, R E

    2011-10-13

    Procedures that restrict or fragment sleep can inhibit neurogenesis in the hippocampus of adult rodents, although the underlying mechanism is unknown. We showed that rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation (RSD) by the platform-over-water method inhibits hippocampal cell proliferation in adrenalectomized rats with low-dose corticosterone clamp. This procedure also greatly disrupts daily behavioral rhythms. Given recent evidence for circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, we asked whether disruption of circadian rhythms might play a role in the anti-neurogenic effects of sleep loss. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a 4-day RSD procedure or were exposed to constant bright light (LL) for 4 days or 10 weeks, a non-invasive procedure for eliminating circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology in this species. Proliferating cells in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus were identified by immunolabeling for the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine. Consistent with our previous results, the RSD procedure suppressed cell proliferation by ?50%. By contrast, although LL attenuated or eliminated daily rhythms of activity and sleep-wake without affecting daily amounts of REM sleep, cell proliferation was not affected. Melatonin, a nocturnally secreted neurohormone that is inhibited by light, has been shown to promote survival of new neurons. We found that 3-weeks of LL eliminated daily rhythms and decreased plasma melatonin by 88% but did not significantly affect either total cell survival or survival of new neurons (doublecortin+). Finally, we measured cell proliferation rates at the beginning and near the end of the daily light period in rats entrained to a 12:12 light/lark (LD) cycle, but did not detect a daily rhythm. These results indicate that the antineurogenic effect of RSD is not secondary to disruption of circadian rhythms, and provide no evidence that hippocampal cell proliferation and survival are regulated by the circadian system or by nocturnal secretion of pineal melatonin. PMID:21771640

  10. Green Light for Nocturnally Migrating Birds

    OpenAIRE

    Wernand, Marcel R.; Maurice A. H. Donners; Han de Vries; Bruno J. Ens; Hanneke Poot; Joop M. Marquenie

    2008-01-01

    The nighttime sky is increasingly illuminated by artificial light sources. Although this ecological light pollution is damaging ecosystems throughout the world, the topic has received relatively little attention. Many nocturnally migrating birds die or lose a large amount of their energy reserves during migration as a result of encountering artificial light sources. This happens, for instance, in the North Sea, where large numbers of nocturnally migrating birds are attracted to the many offsh...

  11. Nocturnal panic attacks Ataques de pânico noturno

    OpenAIRE

    FABIANA L. LOPES; Nardi, Antonio E; Isabella Nascimento; Valença, Alexandre M.; Walter A Zin

    2002-01-01

    The panic-respiration connection has been presented with increasing evidences in the literature. We report three panic disorder patients with nocturnal panic attacks with prominent respiratory symptoms, the overlapping of the symptoms with the sleep apnea syndrome and a change of the diurnal panic attacks, from spontaneous to situational pattern. The implication of these findings and awareness to the distinct core of the nocturnal panic attacks symptoms may help to differentiate them from sle...

  12. Effect of Light and Melatonin and Other Melatonin Receptor Agonists on Human Circadian Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emens, Jonathan S; Burgess, Helen J

    2015-12-01

    Circadian (body clock) timing has a profound influence on mental health, physical health, and health behaviors. This review focuses on how light, melatonin, and other melatonin receptor agonist drugs can be used to shift circadian timing in patients with misaligned circadian rhythms. A brief overview of the human circadian system is provided, followed by a discussion of patient characteristics and safety considerations that can influence the treatment of choice. The important features of light treatment, light avoidance, exogenous melatonin, and other melatonin receptor agonists are reviewed, along with some of the practical aspects of light and melatonin treatment. PMID:26568121

  13. Some implications of melatonin use in chronopharmacology of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, Diego A; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Brown, Gregory M; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2015-09-01

    The last decade has witnessed the emergence of new chronopharmacological perspectives. In the case of sleep disorders, the accumulating evidence suggests that even a minor dysfunction in the biological clock can impact broadly upon body physiology causing increases in sleep onset latency, phase delays or advances in sleep initiation, frequent nocturnal awakenings, reduced sleep efficiency, delayed and shortened rapid eye movement sleep and increased periodic leg movements, among others. Thus, restoration of the adequate circadian pattern of proper sleep hygiene, targeted exposure to light and the use of chronobiotic drugs, such as melatonin, which affect the output phase of clock-controlled circadian rhythms, can help to recover the sleep-wake cycle. The optimization of drug effects and/or minimization of toxicity by timing medications with regard to biological rhythms is known as chronotherapeutics. While chronotherapeutical approaches have been particularly successful in the treatment of hypertension, allergies and some forms of cancer, a time-dependent pharmacological approach can be also effective when dealing with sleep disruptions like insomnia. A large proportion of patients under benzodiazepine (BZD)/Z drug treatment fail to achieve a complete and sustained recovery and are left with residual symptoms, like tolerance or dependency, that make relapse or recurrence more likely, and poorer quality of life a reality. Thus the chronic and extensive use of BZD/Z drugs has become a public health issue and has led to multiple campaigns to reduce both prescription and consumption of BZD/Z-drugs. This short review discusses available data on the efficacy of melatonin to reduce chronic BZD use in insomnia patients. PMID:26004526

  14. Concentração plasmática de melatonina em novilhas bubalinas (Bubalus bubalis) ao longo do ano / Plasma melatonin in bufallo heifers (Bubalus bubalis) during a year

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    P.S.R., Mattos; R., Franzolin; K.O., Nonaka.

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Coletaram-se nove amostras de sangue ao longo do dia, mês-a-mês durante um ano, de seis novilhas bubalinas da raça Mediterrâneo, para determinação da melatonina plasmática dos animais mantidos na latitude 22° Sul. A concentração plasmática de melatonina se elevou lentamente até atingir o pico entre [...] 21 e 23 horas, permanecendo elevada até as 3-5 horas. A seguir, a concentração diminuiu para valores baixos antes do nascer do sol. A duração da elevação noturna de melatonina plasmática não acompanhou a duração do período noturno ao longo do ano e a diminuição da concentração diurna de melatonina plasmática ocorreu na época de maior atividade reprodutiva estimada do rebanho. Abstract in english Nine blood samples were taken to determine plasma melatonin in a 24h-period/month for a year. The six buffalo heifers used were kept at latitude 22° South. Plasma melatonin rose slowly, peaking at night (between 9 and 11pm) and maintained until 3 to 5am. Melatonin concentration decreased day-time to [...] lower levels until sunrise. Nocturnal higher plasmatic melatonin did not vary with night length over the year. Diurnal melatonin concentrations were lower when estimated reproductive rate was the highest for the herd.

  15. Melatonin and cortisol profiles in late midlife and their association with age-related changes in cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waller KL

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Katja Linda Waller,1,2 Erik Lykke Mortensen,2,3 Kirsten Avlund,2,3,†, Merete Osler,3,4 Birgitte Fagerlund,5 Martin Lauritzen,2,6 Steen Gammeltoft,7 Poul Jennum1,2 1Danish Center for Sleep Medicine, Clinic of Clinical Neurophysiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 2Center for Healthy Aging, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 4Research Center for Prevention and Health, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Denmark; 5Center for Neuropsychiatric Schizophrenia Research (CNSR, Lundbeck Foundation Center for Clinical Intervention and Neuropsychiatric Schizophrenia Research (CINS, Mental Health Center Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark; 6Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Denmark; 7Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Denmark †Kirsten Avlund passed away on June 15, 2012 Abstract: Previous studies have reported an association between circadian disturbances and age-related cognitive impairment. The aim was to study the 24-hour profiles of melatonin and cortisol in relation to cognitive function in middle-aged male subjects. Fifty healthy middle-aged males born in 1953 were recruited from a population-based cohort based on previous cognitive assessments in young adulthood and late midlife. The sample included 24 cognitively high-functioning and 26 cognitively impaired participants. Saliva samples were collected every 4 hours over a 24-hour period and analyzed for cortisol and melatonin levels by immunoassay. All participants exhibited clear circadian rhythms of salivary melatonin and cortisol. Salivary melatonin concentrations had a nocturnal peak at approximately 4 am. The median nocturnal melatonin response at 4 am was significantly lower in the cognitively impaired group than in the high-functioning group (?4.6 pg/mL, 95% CI: ?7.84, ?1.36, P=0.006. The 24-hour mean melatonin concentration (high-functioning group: 4.80±0.70 pg/mL, vs cognitively impaired group: 4.81±0.76 pg/mL; P>0.05 (or the area under the curve, AUC was not significantly different between the two groups. Cortisol levels were low during the night, and peaked at approximately 8 am. Median cortisol concentrations were similar at all times, as were the 24-hour mean cortisol concentrations and AUC. To the best of our knowledge, ours is the first study to assess circadian measures (ie, melatonin and cortisol in healthy middle-aged men with different cognitive trajectories in midlife. We found evidence of altered circadian rhythms with a reduced nocturnal melatonin response at 4 am in men with cognitive impairment. The 24-hour concentration and AUC of melatonin and cortisol were similar in the cognitively high-functioning group and in the cognitively impaired. Keywords: diurnal variation, middle-aged males, minimal cognitive impairment

  16. Melatonin-Based Therapeutics for Neuroprotection in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar V. Borlongan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present review paper supports the approach to deliver melatonin and to target melatonin receptors for neuroprotection in stroke. We discuss laboratory evidence demonstrating neuroprotective effects of exogenous melatonin treatment and transplantation of melatonin-secreting cells in stroke. In addition, we describe a novel mechanism of action underlying the therapeutic benefits of stem cell therapy in stroke, implicating the role of melatonin receptors. As we envision the clinical entry of melatonin-based therapeutics, we discuss translational experiments that warrant consideration to reveal an optimal melatonin treatment strategy that is safe and effective for human application.

  17. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7...—(1) Amount. One implant per mink. (2) Indications for use. For use in healthy male and female kit...

  18. Seasonal differences in melatonin concentrations and heart rates during sleep in obese subjects in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Maki; Kanikowska, Dominika; Iwase, Satoshi; Shimizu, Yuuki; Nishimura, Naoki; Inukai, Yoko; Sato, Motohiko; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2013-09-01

    During the past several decades, obesity has been increasing globally. In Japan, obesity is defined by a BMI of 25 kg/m2 or over; 28.6 % of men and 20.6 % of women are obese. Obese people have an increased incidence of developing cardiovascular, renal, and hormonal diseases and sleep disorders. Obese people also have shortened sleep durations. We investigated seasonal differences in melatonin concentrations, heart rates, and heart rate variability during sleep in obese subjects in Japan. Five obese (BMI, 32.0 ± 4.9 kg/m2) and five non-obese (BMI, 23.2 ± 2.9 kg/m2) men participated in this study in the summer and winter. Electrocardiograms were measured continuously overnight in a climatic chamber at 26 °C with a relative humidity of 50 %. Saliva samples for melatonin were collected at 2300 hours, 0200 hours, and 0600 hours. We found that melatonin concentrations during sleep in obese subjects were significantly lower than those in non-obese subjects in the winter. Heart rate during sleep in winter was significantly higher than that in summer in both obese and non-obese subjects. Heart rate variability was not significantly different in the summer and winter in both obese and non-obese subjects. Our results show that decreased nocturnal melatonin concentrations during winter in obese men may be related to higher heart rates, and this may suggest that obese men are at an increased risk of a cardiovascular incident during sleep, especially in the winter.

  19. Circadian rhythms in glucose and lipid metabolism in nocturnal and diurnal mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Jha, Pawan; Challet, Etienne; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2015-12-15

    Most aspects of energy metabolism display clear variations during day and night. This daily rhythmicity of metabolic functions, including hormone release, is governed by a circadian system that consists of the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus (SCN) and many secondary clocks in the brain and peripheral organs. The SCN control peripheral timing via the autonomic and neuroendocrine system, as well as via behavioral outputs. The sleep-wake cycle, the feeding/fasting rhythm and most hormonal rhythms, including that of leptin, ghrelin and glucocorticoids, usually show an opposite phase (relative to the light-dark cycle) in diurnal and nocturnal species. By contrast, the SCN clock is most active at the same astronomical times in these two categories of mammals. Moreover, in both species, pineal melatonin is secreted only at night. In this review we describe the current knowledge on the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism by central and peripheral clock mechanisms. Most experimental knowledge comes from studies in nocturnal laboratory rodents. Nevertheless, we will also mention some relevant findings in diurnal mammals, including humans. It will become clear that as a consequence of the tight connections between the circadian clock system and energy metabolism, circadian clock impairments (e.g., mutations or knock-out of clock genes) and circadian clock misalignments (such as during shift work and chronic jet-lag) have an adverse effect on energy metabolism, that may trigger or enhancing obese and diabetic symptoms. PMID:25662277

  20. Melatonin in experimental seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach, Monika; Gurdziel, Elwira; J?drych, Marian; Borowicz, Kinga K

    2011-01-01

    Although melatonin is approved only for the treatment of jet-lag syndrome and some types of insomnia, clinical data suggest that it is effective in the adjunctive therapy of osteoporosis, cataract, sepsis, neurodegenerative diseases, hypertension, and even cancer. Melatonin also modulates the electrical activity of neurons by reducing glutamatergic and enhancing GABA-ergic neurotransmission. The indoleamine may also be metabolized to kynurenic acid, an endogenous anticonvulsant. Finally, the hormone and its metabolites act as free radical scavengers and antioxidants. The vast majority of experimental data indicates anticonvulsant properties of the hormone. Melatonin inhibited audiogenic and electrical seizures, as well as reduced convulsions induced by pentetrazole, pilocarpine, L-cysteine and kainate. Only a few studies have shown direct or indirect proconvulsant effects of melatonin. For instance, melatonin enhanced low Mg2+-induced epileptiform activity in the hippocampus, whereas melatonin antagonists delayed the onset of pilocarpine-induced seizures. However, the relatively high doses of melatonin required to inhibit experimental seizures can induce some undesired effects (e.g., cognitive and motor impairment and decreased body temperature). In humans, melatonin may attenuate seizures, and it is most effective in the treatment of juvenile intractable epilepsy. Its additional benefits include improved physical, emotional, cognitive, and social functions. On the other hand, melatonin has been shown to induce electroencephalographic abnormalities in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and increase seizure activity in neurologically disabled children. The hormone showed very low toxicity in clinical practice. The reported adverse effects (nightmares, hypotension, and sleep disorders) were rare and mild. However, more placebo-controlled, double-blind randomized clinical trials are needed to establish the usefulness of melatonin in the adjunctive treatment of epilepsy. PMID:21441606

  1. Differential regulation of kiss1 expression by melatonin and gonadal hormones in male and female Syrian hamsters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansel, L; Bolborea, M

    2010-01-01

    In seasonal breeders, reproduction is synchronized to seasons by day length via the pineal hormone melatonin. Recently, we have demonstrated that Kiss1, a key activator of the reproductive function, is down-regulated in sexually inactive hamsters maintained in inhibitory short days (SDs). In rodents, Kiss1 is expressed in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and in the arcuate nucleus (ARC). Because both the duration of the nocturnal peak of melatonin and circulating sex steroid levels vary with photoperiod, the aim of this study was to determine whether melatonin and sex steroids differentially regulate Kiss1 expression in the ARC and the AVPV. Kiss1 expression was examined by in situ hybridization in both male and female hamsters kept in various experimental conditions, and we observed that 1) SD exposure markedly reduced Kiss1 expression in the ARC and AVPV of male and female hamsters as compared to LD animals, 2) sex steroid treatment in SD-adapted male and female hamsters increased the numberof Kiss1 neurons in the AVPV but decreased it in the ARC, 3) melatonin administration to LD-adapted hamsters decreased Kiss1 mRNA level in both the AVPV and the ARC in intact animals, whereas in castrated hamsters, melatonin rapidly inhibited Kiss1 expression in the ARC but not in the AVPV, and 4) pinealectomy of male or female SD-adapted hamsters increased the number of Kiss1 neurons in the ARC but not in the AVPV. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that Kiss1 expression in the Syrian hamster hypothalamus is down-regulated in SD via different mechanisms. In the ARC, melatonin inhibits Kiss1 via a direct effect on the hypothalamus, and this effect is probably sex steroid dependent, whereas in the AVPV, the decrease in Kiss1 expression appears to be secondary to the melatonin-driven reduction of sex steroid levels. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that ARC Kiss1 neurons mediate melatonin effects on the gonadotropic axis of the Syrian hamster.

  2. Can nocturnal hypertension predict cardiovascular risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oded Friedman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Oded Friedman1, Alexander G Logan21Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Division of Nephrology, Mount Sinai Hospital, 2Mount Sinai Hospital and University Health Network and Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, CanadaAbstract: Nocturnal hypertension and non-dipping of blood pressure during sleep are distinct entities that often occur together and are regarded as important harbingers of poor cardiovascular prognosis. This review addresses several aspects related to these blood pressure abnormalities including definitions, diagnostic limitations, pathogenesis and associated patient profiles, prognostic significance, and therapeutic strategies. Taken together, persistent nocturnal hypertension and non-dipping blood pressure pattern, perhaps secondary to abnormal renal sodium handling and/or altered nocturnal sympathovagal balance, are strongly associated with deaths, cardiovascular events, and progressive loss of renal function, independent of daytime and 24-hour blood pressure. Several pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches may restore nocturnal blood pressure and circadian blood pressure rhythm to normal; however, whether this translates to a clinically meaningful reduction in unfavorable cardiovascular and renal consequences remains to be seen.Keywords: blood pressure, sleep, nocturnal hypertension

  3. Melatonin attenuates hypoxic pulmonary hypertension by inhibiting the inflammation and the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haifeng; Wang, Yueyue; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Lu; Zhang, Peng; Deng, Wuguo; Yuan, Yuhui

    2014-11-01

    Hypoxia-induced inflammation and excessive proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) play important roles in the pathological process of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH). Melatonin possesses anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative properties. However, the effect of melatonin on HPH remains unclear. In this study, adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to intermittent chronic hypoxia for 4 wk to mimic a severe HPH condition. Hemodynamic and pulmonary pathomorphology data showed that chronic hypoxia significantly increased right ventricular systolic pressures (RVSP), weight of the right ventricle/left ventricle plus septum (RV/LV+S) ratio, and median width of pulmonary arterioles. Melatonin attenuated the elevation of RVSP, RV/LV+S, and mitigated the pulmonary vascular structure remodeling. Melatonin also suppressed the hypoxia-induced high expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), hypoxia-inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?), and nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B). In vitro, melatonin concentration-dependently inhibited the proliferation of PASMCs and the levels of phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinases1/2 (ERK1/2) caused by hypoxia. These results suggested that melatonin might potentially prevent HPH via anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative mechanisms. PMID:25251287

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder catalog Conditions > Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (often shortened to ADNFLE ) On this page: Description ... What is ADNFLE? Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is an uncommon form of epilepsy that ...

  5. Effects of exposure to intermittent versus continuous red light on human circadian rhythms, melatonin suppression, and pupillary constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Mien, Ivan; Chua, Eric Chern-Pin; Lau, Pauline; Tan, Luuan-Chin; Lee, Ivan Tian-Guang; Yeo, Sing-Chen; Tan, Sara Shuhui; Gooley, Joshua J

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to light is a major determinant of sleep timing and hormonal rhythms. The role of retinal cones in regulating circadian physiology remains unclear, however, as most studies have used light exposures that also activate the photopigment melanopsin. Here, we tested the hypothesis that exposure to alternating red light and darkness can enhance circadian resetting responses in humans by repeatedly activating cone photoreceptors. In a between-subjects study, healthy volunteers (n?=?24, 21-28 yr) lived individually in a laboratory for 6 consecutive days. Circadian rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, body temperature, and heart rate were assessed before and after exposure to 6 h of continuous red light (631 nm, 13 log photons cm(-2) s(-1)), intermittent red light (1 min on/off), or bright white light (2,500 lux) near the onset of nocturnal melatonin secretion (n?=?8 in each group). Melatonin suppression and pupillary constriction were also assessed during light exposure. We found that circadian resetting responses were similar for exposure to continuous versus intermittent red light (P?=?0.69), with an average phase delay shift of almost an hour. Surprisingly, 2 subjects who were exposed to red light exhibited circadian responses similar in magnitude to those who were exposed to bright white light. Red light also elicited prolonged pupillary constriction, but did not suppress melatonin levels. These findings suggest that, for red light stimuli outside the range of sensitivity for melanopsin, cone photoreceptors can mediate circadian phase resetting of physiologic rhythms in some individuals. Our results also show that sensitivity thresholds differ across non-visual light responses, suggesting that cones may contribute differentially to circadian resetting, melatonin suppression, and the pupillary light reflex during exposure to continuous light. PMID:24797245

  6. Functions of melatonin in plants: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnao, Marino B; Hernández-Ruiz, Josefa

    2015-09-01

    The number of studies on melatonin in plants has increased significantly in recent years. This molecule, with a large set of functions in animals, has also shown great potential in plant physiology. This review outlines the main functions of melatonin in the physiology of higher plants. Its role as antistress agent against abiotic stressors, such as drought, salinity, low and high ambient temperatures, UV radiation and toxic chemicals, is analyzed. The latest data on their role in plant-pathogen interactions are also discussed. Both abiotic and biotic stresses produce a significant increase in endogenous melatonin levels, indicating its possible role as effector in these situations. The existence of endogenous circadian rhythms in melatonin levels has been demonstrated in some species, and the data, although limited, suggest a central role of this molecule in the day/night cycles in plants. Finally, another aspect that has led to a large volume of research is the involvement of melatonin in aspects of plant development regulation. Although its role as a plant hormone is still far of from being fully established, its involvement in processes such as growth, rhizogenesis, and photosynthesis seems evident. The multiple changes in gene expression caused by melatonin point to its role as a multiregulatory molecule capable of coordinating many aspects of plant development. This last aspect, together with its role as an alleviating-stressor agent, suggests that melatonin is an excellent prospect for crop improvement. PMID:26094813

  7. Chapter 16: Melatonin and nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaci, Ersan; Kaplan, Suleyman

    2009-01-01

    Melatonin is a widely distributed and important signal molecule that occurs in unicellular organisms, plants, and fungi in addition to animals and humans. It is the main hormone of the pineal gland and its synthesis occurs mainly in this gland. It has free radical scavenging and antioxidative properties and shows clinical antibacterial and analgesic effects. By means of these properties, it is able to protect cells, tissues, and organs against oxidative damage from free radicals. Recently, widespread interest has grown among researchers regarding the apparent protective effects of melatonin following traumatic events to peripheral nerves, especially the sciatic nerve and its pathological conditions, as melatonin administration could be beneficial following surgery. Although there are great numbers of studies that have mentioned protective effects of melatonin on peripheral nerve pathologies, there are also some studies that report toxic effects of melatonin on peripheral nerves. This paper reviews the available literature in terms of both the beneficial and the toxic effects of melatonin on peripheral nerves. Short descriptions of the structure of pineal gland and synthesis and secretion of melatonin are also given. PMID:19682645

  8. Melatonin in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Zhi Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, an age-related neurodegenerative disorder with progressive cognition deficit, is characterized by extracellular senile plaques (SP of aggregated ?-amyloid (A? and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, mainly containing the hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau. Multiple factors contribute to the etiology of AD in terms of initiation and progression. Melatonin is an endogenously produced hormone in the brain and decreases during aging and in patients with AD. Data from clinical trials indicate that melatonin supplementation improves sleep, ameliorates sundowning and slows down the progression of cognitive impairment in AD patients. Melatonin efficiently protects neuronal cells from A?-mediated toxicity via antioxidant and anti-amyloid properties. It not only inhibits A? generation, but also arrests the formation of amyloid fibrils by a structure-dependent interaction with A?. Our studies have demonstrated that melatonin efficiently attenuates Alzheimer-like tau hyperphosphorylation. Although the exact mechanism is still not fully understood, a direct regulatory influence of melatonin on the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases is proposed. Additionally, melatonin also plays a role in protecting the cholinergic system and in anti-inflammation. The aim of this review is to stimulate interest in melatonin as a potentially useful agent in the prevention and treatment of AD.

  9. Iatrogenic nocturnal eneuresis- an overlooked side effect of anti histamines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Italiano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal enuresis is a common disorder in childhood, but its pathophysiological mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Iatrogenic nocturnal enuresis has been described following treatment with several psychotropic medications. Herein, we describe a 6-year-old child who experienced nocturnal enuresis during treatment with the antihistamine cetirizine. Drug rechallenge was positive. Several neurotransmitters are implicated in the pathogenesis of nocturnal enuresis, including noradrenaline, serotonin and dopamine. Antihistamine treatment may provoke functional imbalance of these pathways resulting in incontinence.

  10. Melatonin as a radioprotective agent: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), the chief secretory product of the pineal gland in the brain, is well known for its functional versatility. In hundreds of investigations, melatonin has been documented as a direct free radical scavenger and an indirect antioxidant, as well as an important immunomodulatory agent. The radical scavenging ability of melatonin is believed to work via electron donation to detoxify a variety of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, including the highly toxic hydroxyl radical. It has long been recognized that the damaging effects of ionizing radiation are brought about by both direct and indirect mechanisms. The direct action produces disruption of sensitive molecules in the cells, whereas the indirect effects (?70%) result from its interaction with water molecules, which results in the production of highly reactive free radicals such as ·OH, ·H, and eaq- and their subsequent action on subcellular structures. The hydroxyl radical scavenging ability of melatonin was used as a rationale to determine its radioprotective efficiency. Indeed, the results from many in vitro and in vivo investigations have confirmed that melatonin protects mammalian cells from the toxic effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, several clinical reports indicate that melatonin administration, either alone or in combination with traditional radiotherapy, results in a favorable efficacy:toxicity ratio during the treatment of human cancers. This article reviews the literature from laboratory investigations that document the ability of melatonin to scavenge a variety of free radicals (including the hydroxyl radical induced by ionizing radiation) and summarizes the evidence that should be used to design larger translational research-based clinical trials using melatonin as a radioprotector and also in cancer radiotherapy. The potential use of melatonin for protecting individuals from radiation terrorism is also considered

  11. Melatonin: General Features and its Role in Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Erdem

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there is a growing interest in melatonin all over the world. The main task of protecting the body's biological clock, which set the rhythm of melatonin, involves many biological and physiological processes of the body. Cell renewal, strengthening of the immune system and body temperature regulation are other tasks of melatonin. Melatonin, with its lipophilic property, is the most powerful antioxidant as it can reach all body areas and can easily pass the blood-brain barrier. The fact that individuals with low levels of melatonin have sleep problems lead to the consideration of melatonin as a therapeutic medicine in this field. The detailed researches have shown that melatonin can improve sleep quality without changing the total duration of sleep. Nevertheless, despite high number of researches done, the functions of melatonin have not yet fully understood. Therefore, review of the available information related to melatonin will be guide for researchers in the field.

  12. Alpha-2 adrenergic activity of bromocriptine and quinpirole in chicken pineal gland. Effects on melatonin synthesis and [3H]rauwolscine binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the pineal gland and retina of chickens, serotonin N-acetyl-transferase (NAT) activity and melatonin content are modulated by different receptors, alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in pineal gland and D2-dopamine receptors in retina. The effect of two D2-dopamine receptor agonists, bromocriptine and quinpirole (LY 171555), on melatonin synthesis in these tissues was investigated. Systemic administrations of bromocriptine and quinpirole decreased nocturnal NAT activity and melatonin content of both pineal gland and retina. Bromocriptine was equipotent in the two tissues, whereas quinpirole was approximately 100-fold more potent in retina than in pineal gland. In pineal gland, the suppressive effects of bromocriptine and quinpirole on NAT activity were blocked by yohimbine, a selective alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, but not by spiperone, a D2-dopamine receptor antagonist. In contrast, bromocriptine- and quinpirole-induced decreases of the enzyme activity in retina were antagonized by spiperone, and not affected by yohimbine. The nocturnal increase of NAT activity of pineal glands in vitro was inhibited with an order of potency clonidine greater than bromocriptine greater than quinpirole. Additionally, bromocriptine and quinpirole displaced the specific binding of [3H]rauwolscine, an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, to membranes from chicken pineal gland, with potencies comparable to those observed for inhibition of NAT activity in vitro. It is suggested that bromocriptine and quinpirole, in addition to their D2-dopaminergic activity, can stimulate alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in pineal gland of chicken

  13. Alpha-2 adrenergic activity of bromocriptine and quinpirole in chicken pineal gland. Effects on melatonin synthesis and ( sup 3 H)rauwolscine binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawilska, J.; Iuvone, P.M. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-12-01

    In the pineal gland and retina of chickens, serotonin N-acetyl-transferase (NAT) activity and melatonin content are modulated by different receptors, alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in pineal gland and D2-dopamine receptors in retina. The effect of two D2-dopamine receptor agonists, bromocriptine and quinpirole (LY 171555), on melatonin synthesis in these tissues was investigated. Systemic administrations of bromocriptine and quinpirole decreased nocturnal NAT activity and melatonin content of both pineal gland and retina. Bromocriptine was equipotent in the two tissues, whereas quinpirole was approximately 100-fold more potent in retina than in pineal gland. In pineal gland, the suppressive effects of bromocriptine and quinpirole on NAT activity were blocked by yohimbine, a selective alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, but not by spiperone, a D2-dopamine receptor antagonist. In contrast, bromocriptine- and quinpirole-induced decreases of the enzyme activity in retina were antagonized by spiperone, and not affected by yohimbine. The nocturnal increase of NAT activity of pineal glands in vitro was inhibited with an order of potency clonidine greater than bromocriptine greater than quinpirole. Additionally, bromocriptine and quinpirole displaced the specific binding of (3H)rauwolscine, an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, to membranes from chicken pineal gland, with potencies comparable to those observed for inhibition of NAT activity in vitro. It is suggested that bromocriptine and quinpirole, in addition to their D2-dopaminergic activity, can stimulate alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in pineal gland of chicken.

  14. MT1 melatonin receptors and their role in the oncostatic action of melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Danielczyk

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, the main hormone produced by the pineal gland, strongly inhibits the growth of cancer cells [i]in vitro[/i] and [i]in vivo[/i]. Some publications indicate that the addition of melatonin to culture medium slows the proliferation of some cancer cell lines. It is also suggested that melatonin used as an adjuvant benefits the effectiveness and tolerance of chemotherapy. The mechanisms of this are not fully understood, but melatonin receptors might be one of the most important elements. Two distinct types of membrane-bound melatonin receptors have been identified in humans: MT1 (Mel1a and MT2 (Mel1b receptors. These subtypes are 60�0homologous at the amino-acid level. MT1 receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors. Through the α subunit of G protein, melatonin receptors stimulate an adenylate cyclase and decrease the level of cAMP. This has a significant influence on cell proliferation and has been confirmed in many tests on different cell lines, such as S-19, B-16 murine melanoma cells, and breast cancer cells. It seems that expression of the MT1 melatonin receptors benefits the efficacy of melatonin treatment. Melatonin and its receptors may provide a promising way to establish new alternative therapeutic approaches in human cancer prevention.

  15. Immunoregulatory actions of melatonin and zinc during chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazão, Vânia; Santello, Fabricia Helena; Filipin, Marina Del Vecchio; Azevedo, Angela Palamin; Toldo, Míriam Paula Alonso; de Morais, Fabiana Rossetto; do Prado, José Clóvis

    2015-03-01

    After one century of the discovery of Chagas' disease and the development of an efficient drug with amplitude of actions both in the acute and chronic phase is still a challenge. Alternative immune modulators have been exhaustively used. For that purpose, melatonin and zinc were administered during chronic Trypanosoma cruzi-infected Wistar rats and several endpoints were assessed. Melatonin has a remarkable functional versatility, being associated with important antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic effects. The cross-talk between zinc and the immune system includes its ability to influence the production and signaling of numerous inflammatory cytokines in a variety of cell types. Our study showed that zinc triggered a decrease in the generation of IFN-? for TCD4(+) cells. Reduced percentage of CD4(+) T cells producing TNF-? was observed in control melatonin or zinc-and-melatonin-treated animals as compared with untreated rats. On the other hand, a significant increase in the percentage of IL-4 from CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes producers was observed 60 days after infection, for all zinc-treated animals, whether infected or not. Melatonin and zinc therapies increased the percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes IL-10 producers. CD4(+) CD25(high) Foxp3(+) T cells were also elevated in zinc- and melatonin-treated animals. The modulation of the immune system influenced by these molecules affected cytokine production and the inflammatory process during chronic T. cruzi infection. Elucidation of the interplay between cytokine balance and the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease is extremely relevant not only for the comprehension of the immune mechanisms and clinical forms but, most importantly, also for the implementation of efficient and adequate therapies. PMID:25611919

  16. Nocturnal antihypertensive treatment in patients with type 1 diabetes with autonomic neuropathy and non-dipping of blood pressure during night time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkær, Henrik; Jensen, Tonny; Kofoed, Klaus; Mogensen, Ulrik; Køber, Lars; Hilsted, Karen Lisa; Corinth, Helle; Theilade, Simone; Hilsted, Jannik

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) and elevated nocturnal blood pressure are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Previously, associations between CAN, non-dipping of nocturnal blood pressure and coronary artery calcification have been demonstrated. The present protocol describes a trial to test the efficacy of bedtime dosing of the ACE inhibitor enalapril on night time blood pressure and left ventricular mass in patients with type 1 diabet...

  17. Melatonin in perioperative medicine: Current perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Maitra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, a new addition to the armamentarium of anesthesiologist, has some unique properties that are highly desirable in routine peri-operative care. Available clinical data show that preoperative melatonin is as effective as benzodiazepines in reducing preoperative anxiety with minimal action on psychomotor performance and sleep wake cycle. It may be considered as a safe and effective alternative of benzodiazepines as preoperative anxiolytic. It may have opioid sparing effect, may reduce intraocular pressure, and have role in prevention of postoperative delirium. The short-term administration of melatonin is free from significant adverse effects also.

  18. Abnormal melatonin synthesis in autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Melke, Jonas; Goubran-Botros, Hany; Chaste, Pauline; Betancur, Catalina; Nygren, Gudrun; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Rastam, Maria; Ståhlberg, Ola; Gillberg, I. Carina; Delorme, Richard; Chabane, Nadia; Mouren-Simeoni, Marie-Christine; Fauchereau, Fabien; Durand, Christelle; Chevalier, Fabien

    2007-01-01

    Melatonin is produced in the dark by the pineal gland and is a key regulator of circadian and seasonal rhythms. A low melatonin level has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but the underlying cause of this deficit was unknown. The ASMT gene, encoding the last enzyme of melatonin synthesis, is located on the pseudo-autosomal region 1 of the sex chromosomes, deleted in several individuals with ASD. In this study, we sequenced all ASMT exons and promoters in indiv...

  19. Nocturnal petal movements in the Asteraceae

    OpenAIRE

    C. H. Stirton

    1983-01-01

    Nocturnal petal movements were recorded from 48 genera and 106 species growing in cultivation at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and in the wild in Canada, Great Britain, France, Italy, Greece, Canary Islands and South Africa. Seven different night positions of petals, as distinct from day positions, are recognized and discussed.

  20. Melatonin: a "Higgs boson" in human reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragojevic Dikic, Svetlana; Jovanovic, Ana Mitrovic; Dikic, Srdjan; Jovanovic, Tomislav; Jurisic, Aleksandar; Dobrosavljevic, Aleksandar

    2015-02-01

    As the Higgs boson could be a key to unlocking mysteries regarding our Universe, melatonin, a somewhat mysterious substance secreted by the pineal gland primarily at night, might be a crucial factor in regulating numerous processes in human reproduction. Melatonin is a powerful antioxidant which has an essential role in controlling several physiological reactions, as well as biological rhythms throughout human reproductive life. Melatonin, which is referred to as a hormone, but also as an autocoid, a chronobiotic, a hypnotic, an immunomodulator and a biological modifier, plays a crucial part in establishing homeostatic, neurohumoral balance and circadian rhythm in the body through synergic actions with other hormones and neuropeptides. This paper aims to analyze the effects of melatonin on the reproductive function, as well as to shed light on immunological and oncostatic properties of one of the most powerful hormones. PMID:25377724

  1. Melatonin Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongprayoon, Pawaris; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an illegal psycho-stimulant, is widely known as a recreational drug. In addition to its addictive effect, METH induces neurotoxicity via multiple mechanisms. The major contributors to METH-induced neurotoxicity are reactive oxygen species, which lead to cell death through apoptotic pathway and disturbances in mitochondria, the generation of neuroinflammation, and autophagy. Melatonin, a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland, is a potent antioxidant compound that plays a beneficial role by protecting against the oxidative stress caused by METH. Melatonin also plays a role in maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis. Nanomolar concentrations of melatonin have been shown to protect against the inflammation caused by METH and to prevent the decrease in neurogenesis caused by METH in progenitor cells obtained from adult rat hippocampal tissue. The intent of this review is to describe the underlying mechanisms involving melatonin that protect against the neurodegeneration caused by METH. PMID:25248807

  2. Antioxidant activity of melatonin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrefiche, G; Topall, G; Courboin, G; Henriet, I; Laborit, H

    1993-05-01

    Melatonin (in gum tragacanth as solvent) was administered to mice in the dose range of 100 to 450 mg/kg intraperitoneally. It prevented the increase in plasma glucose resulting from pancreatic toxicity caused by the intravenous administration of alloxan at 40 mg/kg. This action of melatonin was significant and dose-dependent. In parallel work using mouse brain homogenates, melatonin and more so its principal hepatic metabolite, 6-hydroxymelatonin, inhibited the formation of colored products reacting with thiobarbituric acid. Again, this inhibition was significant and dose-dependent. Alloxan-induced diabetes and lipoperoxidation induced by thiobarbituric acid are imputed to the production of oxygen free radicals. The consistent results obtained using these two experimental models show the antioxidant activity of melatonin, both in vivo and in vitro. This effect may be reasonably attributed to the indole structure of the molecule. PMID:8321921

  3. Melatonin in psychiatric disorders - subtyping affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlund, B

    1999-01-01

    Altered diurnal secretory patterns, i.e. altered phase and/or amplitude of melatonin have been reported in sleep and affective disorders. The alteration may depend on environmental factors which in vulnerable individuals may cause sleep and/or affective disorders. Early stress in conjunction with development of resistance to corticotropin-releasing hormone may be linked to the low melatonin syndrome in subgroups of depressed patients. Also the seasonal variation in melatonin as well as serotonin may be linked to the seasonal pattern seen in subgroups of affective disorders. Melatonin may be used as a combined marker for proneness to develop affective disorders especially in latent carriers of bipolar disorders. PMID:10085473

  4. Melatonin reduces the expression of chemokines in rat with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to investigate the effect of melatonin on the colon inflammatory injury of rats with colitis and determine whether this effect is associated with inhibition of chemoattractant molecules interleukins (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1.The study was designed and implemented in JingMen No.1 People's Hospital, HuBei Province, from May 2006 to April 2007. It involved 72 animals divided into 6 groups of 12 each: normal group, model group, 5-aminosalisalicylic acid group, and melatonin group (dose of 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0mg/kg). Rat colitis model was established by 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) enema. Interleukin-8 and MCP-1 proteins in colon tissue were examined by immunohistochemistry and western blot. The messenger-RNA expressions of chemokines were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid enema resulted in pronounced pathological changes of colonic mucosa in model rats, which were in accordance with the significantly elevated Myeloperoxidase activity. Expressions of chemokines were up-regulated in colitis. Melatonin treatment reduced colonic lesions and improved colitis symptom, and decreased the protein and mRNA expressions of IL-8 and MCP-1 significantly in colon tissues of rats with colitis. Chemokines IL-8 and MCP-1 are elevated in mucosal tissues in colitis and play an important role in the perpetuation of tissue destructive inflammatory process; melatonin reduces colonic inflammatory injury of rats colitis through down-regulating the expressions of chemokines. Melatonin can be considered as a novel therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. (author)

  5. Topical Melatonin for Treatment of Androgenetic Alopecia

    OpenAIRE

    Tobias W. Fischer; Trüeb, Ralph M.; Hänggi, Gabriella; Innocenti, Marcello; Elsner, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the search for alternative agents to oral finasteride and topical minoxidil for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA), melatonin, a potent antioxidant and growth modulator, was identified as a promising candidate based on in vitro and in vivo studies. Materials and Methods: One pharmacodynamic study on topical application of melatonin and four clinical pre-post studies were performed in patients with androgenetic alopecia or general hair loss and evaluated by standardise...

  6. Melatonin in perioperative medicine: Current perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Maitra, Souvik; Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Khanna, Puneet

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin, a new addition to the armamentarium of anesthesiologist, has some unique properties that are highly desirable in routine peri-operative care. Available clinical data show that preoperative melatonin is as effective as benzodiazepines in reducing preoperative anxiety with minimal action on psychomotor performance and sleep wake cycle. It may be considered as a safe and effective alternative of benzodiazepines as preoperative anxiolytic. It may have opioid sparing effect, may reduce ...

  7. Putative melatonin receptors in a human biological clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reppert, S.M.; Weaver, D.R.; Rivkees, S.A.; Stopa, E.G.

    1988-10-07

    In vitro autoradiography with /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin was used to examine melatonin binding sites in human hypothalamus. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was localized to the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of a putative biological clock, and was not apparent in other hypothalamic regions. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was consistently found in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalami from adults and fetuses. Densitometric analysis of competition experiments with varying concentrations of melatonin showed monophasic competition curves, with comparable half-maximal inhibition values for the suprachiasmatic nuclei of adults (150 picomolar) and fetuses (110 picomolar). Micromolar concentrations of the melatonin agonist 6-chloromelatonin completely inhibited specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding, whereas the same concentrations of serotonin and norepinephrine caused only a partial reduction in specific binding. The results suggest that putative melatonin receptors are located in a human biological clock.

  8. Putative melatonin receptors in a human biological clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro autoradiography with 125I-labeled melatonin was used to examine melatonin binding sites in human hypothalamus. Specific 125I-labeled melatonin binding was localized to the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of a putative biological clock, and was not apparent in other hypothalamic regions. Specific 125I-labeled melatonin binding was consistently found in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalami from adults and fetuses. Densitometric analysis of competition experiments with varying concentrations of melatonin showed monophasic competition curves, with comparable half-maximal inhibition values for the suprachiasmatic nuclei of adults (150 picomolar) and fetuses (110 picomolar). Micromolar concentrations of the melatonin agonist 6-chloromelatonin completely inhibited specific 125I-labeled melatonin binding, whereas the same concentrations of serotonin and norepinephrine caused only a partial reduction in specific binding. The results suggest that putative melatonin receptors are located in a human biological clock

  9. Pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous melatonin in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Lars P. H.; Werner, Mads U.; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Harpsøe, Nathja G.; Fuglsang, Hanne; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of oral and iv melatonin in healthy volunteers. Methods The study was performed as a cohort crossover study. The volunteers received either 10 mg oral melatonin or 10 mg intravenous melatonin on two separate study days. Blood samples were collected at different time points following oral administration and short iv infusion, respectively. Plasma melatonin concentrations were determined by RIA technique. Pharmacokinetic analyses were p...

  10. Melatonin improves spermatogonial stem cells transplantation efficiency in azoospermic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadreza Gholami; Ghasem Saki; Masoud Hemadi; Ali Khodadadi; Javad Mohammadi-asl

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s):Transplantation quality improvement and reduction of cellular damage are important goals that are now considered by researchers. Melatonin is secreted from the pineal gland and some organs such as testes. According to beneficial effects of melatonin (such as its antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties), researchers have proposed that the use of melatonin may improve transplantation quality. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on the spermatogonial s...

  11. Nocturnal Hypertension and Attenuated Nocturnal Blood Pressure Dipping is Common in Pediatric Lupus [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fallon Campbell

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is an important manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE but reports of prevalence vary between 20-70% in published reports of adult and pediatric patients. For both children and adults with SLE, the clinical diagnosis and management of hypertension has traditionally been based on guidelines developed for the general population. In clinical trials, the criteria used for defining participants with hypertension are mostly undefined. As a first step towards formally assessing the blood pressure (BP patterns of children diagnosed with SLE, 24-hr ambulatory BP monitoring data was analyzed on clinic patients who presented with prehypertension or stage I hypertension. In this pediatric SLE cohort (n=10, 20% met daytime criteria for a diagnosis of hypertension. Patterns of BP elevation varied widely with white coat, masked, isolated systolic, and diastolic nocturnal hypertension all identified. Nocturnal hypertension was detected in 60% and attenuated nocturnal BP dipping in 90% of both hypertensive and normotensive SLE patients. In SLE patients, the median nighttime systolic and diastolic loads were 25% and 15.5% compared with median daily loads of 12.5% and 11.5%. Daytime and nighttime systolic and diastolic BP load and nocturnal dipping was compared to a control population consisting of 85 non-SLE patients under 21 years old with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension presenting to hypertension clinic. Median systolic BP dipped 5.3 mmHg in SLE patients compared to 11.9 mmHg in non-lupus (p-value = 0.001. Median diastolic BP dipped 12.9 mmHg versus 18.5 mmHg in non-lupus (p-value = 0.003. Patterns of BP dysregulation in pediatric SLE merit further exploration. Children with or without SLE displaying prehypertensive or stage 1 casual BP measurements had similar rates of hypertension by ambulatory BP monitoring. However, regardless of BP diagnosis, and independent of kidney involvement, there was an increased proportion with attenuated nocturnal dipping and nocturnal hypertension in SLE patients.

  12. Body position and late postoperative nocturnal hypoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg-Adamsen, S; Stausholm, K; Edvardsen, L; Zwarts, M; Kehlet, H; Rosenberg, J

    1997-01-01

    Thirteen patients were monitored for nocturnal body position (supine vs. side) and arterial oxygen saturation pre-operatively and on the second postoperative night after major abdominal surgery. The number of positional changes were significantly decreased after operation (p < 0.05) with a trend towards more time spent in the supine position (p = 0.1). Individual mean arterial oxygen saturation decreased postoperatively (p < 0.05) but without a difference between the supine and side positions (p...

  13. Bat predation on nocturnally migrating birds

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, Carlos; Juste, Javier; García-Mudarra, Juan L.; Agirre-Mendi, Pablo T.

    2001-01-01

    Bat predation on birds is a very rare phenomenon in nature. Most documented reports of bird-eating bats refer to tropical bats that occasionally capture resting birds. Millions of small birds concentrate and cross over the world's temperate regions during migration, mainly at night, but no nocturnal predators are known to benefit from this enormous food resource. An analysis of 14,000 fecal pellets of the greater noctule bat (Nyctalus lasiopterus) reveals that this...

  14. Nocturnal enuresis in sickle cell haemoglobinopathies.

    OpenAIRE

    Readett, D R; Morris, J.S.; Serjeant, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of nocturnal enuresis (wet at least two nights a week) was investigated in children, aged 8, who were being followed up as part of a prospective cohort study. There were 175 children with homozygous sickle cell disease, 106 with sickle cell haemoglobin C disease, and 150 controls with a normal haemoglobin genotype. In homozygous sickle cell disease, 48 boys (52%) and 31 girls (38%) were enuretic, a significantly higher prevalence than in those with sickle cell haemoglobin C dis...

  15. Folic acid and melatonin ameliorate carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic injury, oxidative stress and inflammation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebaid Hossam

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study investigated the protective effects of melatonin and folic acid against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced hepatic injury in rats. Oxidative stress, liver function, liver histopathology and serum lipid levels were evaluated. The levels of protein kinase B (Akt1, interferon gamma (IFN-?, programmed cell death-receptor (Fas and Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-? mRNA expression were analyzed. CCl4 significantly elevated the levels of lipid peroxidation (MDA, cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides, bilirubin and urea. In addition, CCl4 was found to significantly suppress the activity of both catalase and glutathione (GSH and decrease the levels of serum total protein and HDL-cholesterol. All of these parameters were restored to their normal levels by treatment with melatonin, folic acid or their combination. An improvement of the general hepatic architecture was observed in rats that were treated with the combination of melatonin and folic acid along with CCl4. Furthermore, the CCl4-induced upregulation of TNF-? and Fas mRNA expression was significantly restored by the three treatments. Melatonin, folic acid or their combination also restored the baseline levels of IFN-? and Akt1 mRNA expression. The combination of melatonin and folic acid exhibited ability to reduce the markers of liver injury induced by CCl4 and restore the oxidative stability, the level of inflammatory cytokines, the lipid profile and the cell survival Akt1 signals.

  16. Efficacy and safety of prolonged-release melatonin for insomnia in middle-aged and elderly patients with hypertension: a combined analysis of controlled clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Lemoine P; Wade AG; Katz A; Nir T; Zisapel N

    2012-01-01

    Patrick Lemoine1, Alan G Wade2, Amnon Katz3, Tali Nir3, Nava Zisapel3,41The Clinique Lyon-Lumière, Meyzieu, France; 2CPS Research, 3 Todd Campus, Glasgow, UK; 3Neurim Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Tel-Aviv, Israel; 4Department of Neurobiology Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, IsraelBackground: Add-on prolonged-release melatonin (PRM) in antihypertensive therapy has been shown to ameliorate nocturnal hypertension. Hypertension is a major comorbidity among insomnia pati...

  17. Consequences of nocturnal water loss: a synthesis of regulating factors and implications for capacitance, embolism and use in models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeppel, M J B; Lewis, J D; Phillips, N G; Tissue, D T

    2014-10-01

    Total daily water use is a key factor influencing the growth of many terrestrial plants, and reflects both day-time and nocturnal water fluxes. However, while nocturnal sap flow (En) and stomatal conductance (gs,n) have been reported across a range of species, ecosystems and microclimatic conditions, the regulation of these fluxes remains poorly understood. Here, we present a framework describing the role of abiotic and biotic factors in regulating En and gs,n highlighting recent developments in this field. Across ecosystems, En and gs,n generally increased with increasing soil water content and vapor pressure deficit, but the interactive effects of these factors and the potential roles of wind speed and other abiotic factors remain unclear. On average, gs,n and En are higher in broad-leaved compared with needle-leaved plants, in C3 compared with C4 plants, and in tropical compared with temperate species. We discuss the impacts of leaf age, elevated [CO2] and refilling of capacitance on night-time water loss, and how nocturnal gs,n may be included in vegetation models. Younger leaves may have higher gs,n than older leaves. Embolism refilling and recharge of capacitance may affect sap flow such that total plant water loss at night may be less than estimated solely from En measurements. Our estimates of gs,n for typical plant functional types, based on the published literature, suggest that nocturnal water loss may be a significant fraction (10-25%) of total daily water loss. Counter-intuitively, elevated [CO2] may increase nocturnal water loss. Assumptions in process-based ecophysiological models and dynamic global vegetation models that gs is zero when solar radiation is zero are likely to be incorrect. Consequently, failure to adequately consider nocturnal water loss may lead to substantial under-estimation of total plant water use and inaccurate estimation of ecosystem level water balance. PMID:25413023

  18. Melatonin in Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Related Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujam; Spence, D. Warren; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R.; Brown, Gregory M.; Cardinali, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered one of the major causative factors in the aging process, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), septic shock, and neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Huntington's disease (HD). Increased free radical generation, enhanced mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity, enhanced NO production, decreased respiratory complex activity, impaired electron transport system, and opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore all have been suggested as factors responsible for impaired mitochondrial function. Melatonin, the major hormone of the pineal gland, also acts as an antioxidant and as a regulator of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Both in vitro and in vivo, melatonin was effective for preventing oxidative stress/nitrosative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction seen in experimental models of PD, AD, and HD. In addition, melatonin is known to retard aging and to inhibit the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R lesions by maintaining respiratory complex activities, electron transport chain, and ATP production in mitochondria. Melatonin is selectively taken up by mitochondrial membranes, a function not shared by other antioxidants. Melatonin has thus emerged as a major potential therapeutic tool for treating neurodegenerative disorders such as PD or AD, and for preventing the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R. PMID:21629741

  19. Evaluation of nocturnal bronchoconstriction by all night tracheal sound monitoring.

    OpenAIRE

    Lenclud, C; Cuttitta, G.; Van Gansbeke, D.; Visconti, A.; Van Muylem, A.; Bellia, V.; Yernault, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A study was undertaken to evaluate the reliability of a digital tracheal sound analyser (ELENS-DSA) in predicting nocturnal changes in airways resistance in asthmatic patients. This device allows continuous measurement of the proportion of the time occupied by wheezing (Wh%). METHODS: Nocturnal polygraphic studies with simultaneous continuous monitoring of tracheal sounds and airways resistance were performed in seven patients with nocturnal asthma. In order to evaluate the possib...

  20. Shedding light on light: benefits of anthropogenic illumination to a nocturnally foraging shorebird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Ross G; Bearhop, Stuart; Campbell, Hamish A; Bryant, David M

    2013-03-01

    Intertidal habitats provide important feeding areas for migratory shorebirds. Anthropogenic developments along coasts can increase ambient light levels at night across adjacent inter-tidal zones. Here, we report the effects of elevated nocturnal light levels upon the foraging strategy of a migratory shorebird (common redshank Tringa totanus) overwintering on an industrialised estuary in Northern Europe. To monitor behaviour across the full intertidal area, individuals were located by day and night using VHF transmitters, and foraging behaviour was inferred from inbuilt posture sensors. Natural light was scored using moon-phase and cloud cover information and nocturnal artificial light levels were obtained using geo-referenced DMSP/OLS night-time satellite imagery at a 1-km resolution. Under high illumination levels, the commonest and apparently preferred foraging behaviour was sight-based. Conversely, birds feeding in areas with low levels of artificial light had an elevated foraging time and fed by touch, but switched to visual rather than tactile foraging behaviour on bright moonlit nights in the absence of cloud cover. Individuals occupying areas which were illuminated continuously by lighting from a large petrochemical complex invariably exhibited a visually based foraging behaviour independently of lunar phase and cloud cover. We show that ambient light levels affect the timing and distribution of foraging opportunities for redshank. We argue that light emitted from an industrial complex improved nocturnal visibility. This allowed sight-based foraging in place of tactile foraging, implying both a preference for sight-feeding and enhanced night-time foraging opportunities under these conditions. The study highlights the value of integrating remotely sensed data and telemetry techniques to assess the effect of anthropogenic change upon nocturnal behaviour and habitat use. PMID:23190422

  1. The role of melatonin as an antioxidant in the follicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamura Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine is secreted during the dark hours at night by pineal gland, and it regulates a variety of important central and peripheral actions related to circadian rhythms and reproduction. It has been believed that melatonin regulates ovarian function by the regulation of gonadotropin release in the hypothalamus-pituitary gland axis via its specific receptors. In addition to the receptor mediated action, the discovery of melatonin as a direct free radical scavenger has greatly broadened the understanding of melatonin's mechanisms which benefit reproductive physiology. Higher concentrations of melatonin have been found in human preovulatory follicular fluid compared to serum, and there is growing evidence of the direct effects of melatonin on ovarian function especially oocyte maturation and embryo development. Many scientists have focused on the direct role of melatonin on oocyte maturation and embryo development as an anti-oxidant to reduce oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species, which are produced during ovulation process. The beneficial effects of melatonin administration on oocyte maturation and embryo development have been confirmed by in vitro and in vivo experiments in animals. This review also discusses the first application of melatonin to the clinical treatment of infertile women and confirms that melatonin administration reduces intrafollicular oxidative damage and increase fertilization rates. This review summarizes our recent works and new findings related to the reported beneficial effects of melatonin on reproductive physiology in its role as a reducer of oxidative stress, especially on oocyte maturation and embryo development.

  2. Expression of melatonin receptors in arteries involved in thermoregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melatonin binding sites were localized and characterized in the vasculature of the rat by using the melatonin analogue 2-[125I]iodomelatonin (125I-melatonin) and quantitative in vitro autoradiography. The expression of these sites was restricted to the caudal artery and to the arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. The arterial 125I-melatonin binding was stable, saturable, and reversible. Saturation studies revealed that the binding represented a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 3.4 x 10(-11) M in the anterior cerebral artery and 1.05 x 10(-10) M in the caudal artery. The binding capacities (Bmax) in these arteries were 19 and 15 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. The relative order of potency of indoles for inhibition of 125I-melatonin binding at these sites was typical of a melatonin receptor: 2-iodomelatonin greater than melatonin greater than N-acetylserotonin much much greater than 5-hydroxytryptamine. Norepinephrine-induced contraction of the caudal artery in vitro was significantly prolonged and potentiated by melatonin in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that these arterial binding sites are functional melatonin receptors. Neither primary steps in smooth muscle contraction (inositol phospholipid hydrolysis) nor relaxation (adenylate cyclase activation) were affected by melatonin. Melatonin, through its action on the tone of these arteries, may cause circulatory adjustments in these arteries, which are believed to be involved in thermoregulation

  3. Unlike the synchronous Plasmodium falciparum and P. chabaudi infection, the P. berghei and P. yoelii asynchronous infections are not affected by melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Bagnaresi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Piero Bagnaresi1, Eduardo Alves1, Henrique Borges da Silva1, Sabrina Epiphanio2, Maria M Mota2, Célia RS Garcia11Departamento de Fisiologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Unidade de Malária, Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, PortugalAbstract: We have previously reported that Plasmodium chabaudi and P. falciparum sense the hormone melatonin and this could be responsible for the synchrony of malaria infection. In P. chabaudi and P. falciparum, melatonin induces calcium release from internal stores, and this response is abolished by U73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, and luzindole, a melatoninreceptor competitive antagonist. Here we show that, in vitro, melatonin is not able to modulate cell cycle, nor to elicit an elevation in intracellular calcium concentration of the intraerythrocytic forms of P. berghei or P. yoelii, two rodent parasites that show an asynchrononous development in vivo. Interestingly, melatonin and its receptor do not seem to play a role during hepatic infection by P. berghei sporozoites either. These data strengthen the hypothesis that hostderived melatonin does not synchronize malaria infection caused by P. berghei and P. yoelii. Moreover, these data explain why infections by these parasites are asynchronous, contrary to what is observed in P. falciparum and P. chabaudi infections.Keywords: malaria, calcium, melatonin, cell cycle, rhythm, sporozoite

  4. Unlike the synchronous Plasmodium falciparum and P. chabaudi infection, the P. berghei and P. yoelii asynchronous infections are not affected by melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnaresi, Piero; Alves, Eduardo; da Silva, Henrique Borges; Epiphanio, Sabrina; Mota, Maria M; Garcia, Célia Rs

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that Plasmodium chabaudi and P. falciparum sense the hormone melatonin and this could be responsible for the synchrony of malaria infection. In P. chabaudi and P. falciparum, melatonin induces calcium release from internal stores, and this response is abolished by U73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, and luzindole, a melatonin-receptor competitive antagonist. Here we show that, in vitro, melatonin is not able to modulate cell cycle, nor to elicit an elevation in intracellular calcium concentration of the intraerythrocytic forms of P. berghei or P. yoelii, two rodent parasites that show an asynchrononous development in vivo. Interestingly, melatonin and its receptor do not seem to play a role during hepatic infection by P. berghei sporozoites either. These data strengthen the hypothesis that host-derived melatonin does not synchronize malaria infection caused by P. berghei and P. yoelii. Moreover, these data explain why infections by these parasites are asynchronous, contrary to what is observed in P. falciparum and P. chabaudi infections. PMID:20360886

  5. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopic studies of melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Abbas, J. M.; Dogra, Sukh Dev; Sachdeva, Ritika; Rai, Bimal; Tripathi, S. K.; Prakash, Satya; Sathe, Vasant; Saini, G. S. S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the infrared absorption and Raman spectra of melatonin recorded with 488 and 632.8 nm excitations in 3600-2700 and 1700-70 cm-1 regions. Further, we optimized molecular structure of the three conformers of melatonin within density functional theory calculations. Vibrational frequencies of all three conformers have also been calculated. Observed vibrational bands have been assigned to different vibrational motions of the molecules on the basis of potential energy distribution calculations and calculated vibrational frequencies. Observed band positions match well with the calculated values after scaling except Nsbnd H stretching mode frequencies. It is found that the observed and calculated frequencies mismatch of Nsbnd H stretching is due to intermolecular interactions between melatonin molecules.

  6. Melatonin and its precursors scavenge nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Y.; Mori, A.; Liburdy, R.; Packer, L.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of melatonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan and L-tryptophan was examined by the Griess reaction using flow injection analysis. 1-Hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene(NOC-7) was used as NO generator. The Griess reagent stoichiometrically reacts with NO2-, which was converted by a cadmium-copper reduction column from the stable end products of NO oxidation. Except for tryptophan, all the compounds examined scavenged NO in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin, which has a methoxy group in the 5-position and an acetyl side chain, exhibited the most potent scavenging activity among the compounds tested. Serotonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively, showed moderate scavenging activity compared to melatonin. Tryptophan, which has neither a methoxy nor a hydroxyl group in the 5-position, exhibited the least NO scavenging activity.

  7. Prolactin response in Border-Leicester x merino ewes to administration of melatonin, melatonin analogues, a melatonin metabolite and 6-methoxybenzoxazolinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennaway, D J; Royles, P; Dunstan, E A; Hugel, H M

    1986-01-01

    The effect of structural modifications of the melatonin molecule on plasma half-life of the analogues and basal prolactin secretion was studied in Border-Leicester x Merino ewes. Halogenation at position 6 and/or unsaturation of the 2,3-double bond of the melatonin molecule slightly lengthened the half-life of the analogues. Melatonin, 6-chloromelatonin, 2,3-dihydromelatonin and 6-chloro-2,3-dihydromelatonin decreased plasma prolactin to 31, 45, 54 and 48% of control levels respectively when administered daily (100 micrograms at 1600 h) for 21 days. The brain metabolite of melatonin, N-acetyl-N'-formyl-5-methoxykynurenamine, and the putative natural melatonin analogue, 6-methoxybenzoxazolinone, failed to affect prolactin levels when administered in a similar manner. These results indicate that certain structural modifications to the melatonin molecule can be tolerated biologically; however, the modifications reported here still did not prevent rapid clearance from the circulation. PMID:3593120

  8. Role of Carnosine and Melatonin in Ameliorating Cardiotoxicity of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in the Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouf Al-Rasheed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the possible cardiotoxicity of two different doses of 50 nm nano titanium dioxide (n-TiO2 and the possible modulating effects of the use of two natural antioxidants carnosine and melatonin. The results showed that TiO2- NPs produced deleterious effects on rat cardiac tissue as confirmed by the increased levels of serum myoglobin, troponin-T and CK-MB. Increased levels of serum Inflammatory markers represented by the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and Interleukin-6 (IL-6 was also noticed. Caspase3 and IGg were elevated compared to the control group in a dose dependant manner. treatment of the rats with Carnosine or melatonin. along with TiO2- NPs administration significantly improved most of the elevated biochemical markers. It was concluded that the use of Carnosine or melatonin could play a beneficial role against deleterious effects of TiO2- NPs

  9. Short-term air temperature on a regional scale and its estimation with a nocturnal cooling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accuracy of spatial estimation of air temperatures can be very poor for a short term temperature. The objective of this paper is to study feasibility of the regional estimation of air temperatures with a nocturnal cooling model, which was proposed by Kondo & Mori (1982) to describe nocturnal cooling rate with wind speed and site-specific parameters. First, relationships between elevation and air temperatures within diurnal cycles were addressed at 27 monitoring points across a region of 110km×100km in central Japan. The weather data were obtained from the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System. The results showed that air temperature in the evenings was linearly related to the elevation above sea level with little perturbations from the weather, wind speed and topography. In contrast, minimum air temperature in the mornings and nocturnal cooling rate were greatly influenced by the above factors. Furthermore, in a complex terrain, the morning air temperature and cooling rate were unrelated to those at nearby points. Therefore, the two temperature traits may not be accurately estimated by using spatial interpolation. Second, two parameters (a & b) of the nocturnal cooling model were determined for each of the 27 monitoring points, and were related to topographical features of the points. Indexes of surface flatness (Sidx), cubical measure by a concavo-convex space (Cidx) and steepness (Ridx) on the level surface at observation were defined and calculated for each point using elevations of the grid points of the Digital National Land Information. The parameter b, which represents thermal conditions and accumulation of cold air, was related to Sidx and Cidx. The parameter a, which represents the extent of air mixing, was related to Ridx. The short-term air temperatures could therefore be estimated on a regional basis with the nocturnal cooling model, whose parameters are determined with the topographical indexes. (author)

  10. Melatonin administration reduces inflammatory pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laste G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gabriela Laste,1–3 Isabel Cristina de Macedo,1,3 Joanna Ripoll Rozisky,1–3 Fernanda Ribeiro da Silva,1,3 Wolnei Caumo,1,2 Iraci LS Torres1–31Laboratório de Farmacologia da Dor, Departamento de Farmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, 2Programa de Pós-Graduação em Medicina, Ciências Médicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 3Unidade de Experimentação Animal e Grupo de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, BrazilAbstract: In view of the broad range of effects attributed to melatonin, this study evaluated its analgesic effect on inflammatory pain induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA in Wistar rats. Inflammation was induced by intradermal CFA injection in the hind paw of all animals, which were then divided into two groups that received either 60 mg/kg of melatonin or vehicle (1% alcohol in saline, intraperitoneally, for three days. The analgesic effect of melatonin was assessed by the hot-plate test, immediately and thereafter at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after the first administration and 24 hours after once-daily administration for 2 more days. After CFA injection, melatonin administration increased withdrawal latency at 60 minutes after the first dose. After the end of treatment, melatonin showed a significant analgesic effect on inflammatory pain. This study paves the way for exploration of how brief courses of treatment could improve this analgesic effect in the late phases of inflammatory pain.Keywords: analgesic response, complete Freund's adjuvant, hot-plate test, inflammation, melatonin, nociception

  11. Structural requirements at the melatonin receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugden, D; Chong, N W; D. F. Lewis

    1995-01-01

    1. High affinity, specific binding sites for the pineal hormone, melatonin (5-methoxy N-acetyltryptamine) can be detected in chick brain membranes by use of the radiolabelled agonist, 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin (2-[125I]-aMT). 2. The affinity of a number of analogues of melatonin at the 2-[125I]-aMT binding site was determined and compared with an analysis of their electronic structure and significant quantitative relationships obtained. 3. The best correlations indicated that binding affinity wa...

  12. Effect of laser acupuncture for monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis on bladder reservoir function and nocturnal urine output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radvanska, E; Kamperis, Konstantinos; Kleif, A; Kovács, L; Rittig, S

    2011-01-01

    The alternative treatments for enuresis have been reported with high efficacy but in noncontrolled studies. Therefore, using a prospective, single-blind, randomized, placebo controlled design we evaluated the effect of laser acupuncture on bladder reservoir function and enuresis frequency in cases of monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis with reduced maximal voided volume.

  13. Green Light for Nocturnally Migrating Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel R. Wernand

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The nighttime sky is increasingly illuminated by artificial light sources. Although this ecological light pollution is damaging ecosystems throughout the world, the topic has received relatively little attention. Many nocturnally migrating birds die or lose a large amount of their energy reserves during migration as a result of encountering artificial light sources. This happens, for instance, in the North Sea, where large numbers of nocturnally migrating birds are attracted to the many offshore platforms. Our aim is to develop bird-friendly artificial lighting that meets human demands for safety but does not attract and disorient birds. Our current working hypothesis is that artificial light interferes with the magnetic compass of the birds, one of several orientation mechanisms and especially important during overcast nights. Laboratory experiments have shown the magnetic compass to be wavelength dependent: migratory birds require light from the blue-green part of the spectrum for magnetic compass orientation, whereas red light (visible long-wavelength disrupts magnetic orientation. We designed a field study to test if and how changing light color influenced migrating birds under field conditions. We found that nocturnally migrating birds were disoriented and attracted by red and white light (containing visible long-wavelength radiation, whereas they were clearly less disoriented by blue and green light (containing less or no visible long-wavelength radiation. This was especially the case on overcast nights. Our results clearly open perspective for the development of bird-friendly artificial lighting by manipulating wavelength characteristics. Preliminary results with an experimentally developed bird-friendly light source on an offshore platform are promising. What needs to be investigated is the impact of bird-friendly light on other organisms than birds.

  14. Extended Driving Impairs Nocturnal Driving Performances

    OpenAIRE

    Sagaspe, Patricia; Taillard, Jacques; Åkerstedt, Torbjorn; Bayon, Virginie; Espié, Stéphane; Chaumet, Guillaume; Bioulac, Bernard; Philip, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Though fatigue and sleepiness at the wheel are well-known risk factors for traffic accidents, many drivers combine extended driving and sleep deprivation. Fatigue-related accidents occur mainly at night but there is no experimental data available to determine if the duration of prior driving affects driving performance at night. Participants drove in 3 nocturnal driving sessions (3–5am, 1–5am and 9pm–5am) on open highway. Fourteen young healthy men (mean age [±SD]?=?23.4 [±1.7] years) partici...

  15. Early dinner reduces nocturnal gastric acidity.

    OpenAIRE

    Duroux, P.; Bauerfeind, P.; Emde, C; Koelz, H R; Blum, A L

    1989-01-01

    This study examines whether eating food at different times has differential effects on intragastric pH. Experiments were done in 23 healthy volunteers (12 men). Intragastric acidity was monitored by ambulatory 22 hour pH-metry. Composition of meals was standardised: breakfast and lunch at 7 am and 12 noon respectively, and dinner at 6 or 9 pm, in random order. The time of going to bed and getting up was also standardised. With early dinner nocturnal pH was higher, than with late dinner (pH me...

  16. Melatonin as a possible antidote to UV radiation induced cutaneous damages and immune-suppression: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Soumik; Haldar, Chandana

    2015-12-01

    The sun rays brings along the ultraviolet radiations (UVRs) which prove deleterious for living organisms. The UVR is a known mutagen and is the prime cause of skin carcinomas. UVR causes acute oxidative stress and this in turn deteriorates other physiological functions. Inflammatory conditions and elevation of pro-inflammatory molecules are also associated with UVR mediated cellular damages. The inflammatory conditions can secondarily trigger the generation of free radicals and this act cumulatively in further deterioration of tissue homeostasis. Photoimmunologists have also related UVR to the suppression of not only cutaneous but also systemic immunity by different mechanisms. Some researchers have proposed the use of various plant products as antioxidants against UVR induced oxidative imbalances but Melatonin is gaining rapid interest as a product that can be utilized to delineate the pathological effects of UVR since it is an established antioxidant. Besides the antioxidative nature, the capacity of melatonin to attenuate apoptosis and more importantly the efficacy of its metabolites to further aid in the detoxification of free radicals have made it a key player to be utilized against UVR mediated aggravated conditions. However, there is need for further extensive investigation to speculate melatonin as an antidote to UVR. Although too early to prescribe melatonin as a clinical remedy, the hormone can be integrated into dermal formulations or oral supplements to prevent the ever increasing incidences of skin cancers due to the prevalence of the UVR on the surface of the earth. The present review focuses and substantiates the work by different photo-biologists demonstrating the protective effects of melatonin and its metabolites against solar UVR - Melatonin as a possible antidote to UV radiation induced cutaneous damages and immune-suppression: an overview. J Photochem Photobiol B. PMID:26496791

  17. Deficient nocturnal surge of thyrotropin in central hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, P J; Nieman, L K; Rose, S R; Nisula, B C

    1986-05-01

    In normal individuals, serum TSH concentrations have a circadian pattern characterized by a nocturnal surge which begins in the late afternoon and reaches its peak after midnight. We assessed the nocturnal surge of TSH in 16 patients with pituitary and/or hypothalamic diseases, 6 of whom were judged to be hypothyroid. To assess the magnitude of the nocturnal surge in individual patients, TSH was measured in 5 serum samples obtained during the normal time of the TSH nadir in the late afternoon and in 5 samples obtained during the normal time of the peak of serum TSH after midnight. A significant nocturnal surge of TSH was defined as a significantly greater mean nighttime TSH level than the mean daytime TSH concentration. The nocturnal TSH surge was absent in the 6 patients with central hypothyroidism, while it was present in the 10 euthyroid patients with central lesions. In 6 hypothyroid patients who did not have pituitary or hypothalamic lesions, the nocturnal TSH surge was intact, indicating that hypothyroidism per se does not account for the deficient nocturnal TSH surge in central hypothyroidism. We conclude that central hypothyroidism is characterized by a deficient nocturnal surge of TSH, and accordingly, we suggest that evaluation of the circadian pattern of TSH may be a useful adjunct in making the diagnosis of hypothyroidism in patients with diseases involving the pituitary or hypothalamus. PMID:3958131

  18. Dietary melatonin alters uterine artery hemodynamics in pregnant Holstein heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockus, K E; Hart, C G; Gilfeather, C L; Fleming, B O; Lemley, C O

    2016-04-01

    The objective was to examine uterine artery hemodynamics and maternal serum profiles in pregnant heifers supplemented with dietary melatonin (MEL) or no supplementation (CON). In addition, melatonin receptor-mediated responses in steroid metabolism were examined using a bovine endometrial epithelial culture system. Twenty singleton pregnant Holstein heifers were supplemented with 20 mg of melatonin (n = 10) or no melatonin supplementation (control; n = 10) from days 190 to 262 of gestation. Maternal measurements were recorded on days 180 (baseline), 210, 240, and 262 of gestation. Total uterine blood flow was increased by 25% in the MEL-treated heifers compared with the CON. Concentrations of progesterone were decreased in MEL vs CON heifers. Total serum antioxidant capacity was increased by 43% in MEL-treated heifers when compared with CON. Activity of cytochrome P450 1A, 2C, and superoxide dismutase was increased in bovine endometrial epithelial cells treated with melatonin, whereas the melatonin receptor antagonist, luzindole, negated the increase in cytochrome P450 2C activity. Moreover, estradiol or progesterone treatment altered bovine uterine melatonin receptor expression, which could potentiate the melatonin-mediated responses during late gestation. The observed increase in total uterine blood flow during melatonin supplementation could be related to its antioxidant properties. Compromised pregnancies are typically accompanied by increased oxidative stress; therefore, melatonin could serve as a therapeutic supplementation strategy. This could lead to further fetal programming implications in conjunction with offspring growth and development postnatally. PMID:26641925

  19. Nocturnal panic attacks / Ataques de pânico noturno

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Fabiana L., Lopes; Antonio E., Nardi; Isabella, Nascimento; Alexandre M., Valença; Walter A, Zin.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A conexão pânico-respiração vem apresentando evidências crescentes na literatura. Nós relatamos três pacientes com transtorno de pânico com ataques de pânico no sono com sintomas respiratórios proeminentes, a sobreposição de sintomas com a síndrome de apnéia do sono e a mudança dos ataques de pânico [...] em vigília, de um padrão espontâneo a situacional. A implicação destes achados e a necessidade de maior atenção para o conjunto distinto de sintomas dos ataques de pânico no sono poderá ser útil para o diagnóstico diferencial e na busca por tratamento específico. Abstract in english The panic-respiration connection has been presented with increasing evidences in the literature. We report three panic disorder patients with nocturnal panic attacks with prominent respiratory symptoms, the overlapping of the symptoms with the sleep apnea syndrome and a change of the diurnal panic a [...] ttacks, from spontaneous to situational pattern. The implication of these findings and awareness to the distinct core of the nocturnal panic attacks symptoms may help to differentiate them from sleep disorders and the search for specific treatment.

  20. Therapeutic implications of melatonin in cerebral edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnasamy, Gurugirijha; Ling, Eng-Ang; Kaur, Charanjit

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral edema/brain edema refers to the accumulation of fluid in the brain and is one of the fatal conditions that require immediate medical attention. Cerebral edema develops as a consequence of cerebral trauma, cerebral infarction, hemorrhages, abscess, tumor, hypoxia, and other toxic or metabolic factors. Based on the causative factors cerebral edema is differentiated into cytotoxic cerebral edema, vasogenic cerebral edema, osmotic and interstitial cerebral edema. Treatment of cerebral edema depends on timely diagnosis and medical assistance. Pragmatic treatment strategies such as antihypertensive medications, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, barbiturates, steroids, glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and trometamol are used in clinical practice. Although the above mentioned treatment approaches are being used, owing to the complexity of the mechanisms involved in cerebral edema, a single therapeutic strategy which could ameliorate cerebral edema is yet to be identified. However, recent experimental studies have suggested that melatonin, a neurohormone produced by the pineal gland, could be an effective alternative for treating cerebral edema. In animal models of stroke, melatonin was not only shown to reduce cerebral edema but also preserved the blood brain barrier. Melatonin's beneficial effects were attributed to its properties, such as being a potent anti-oxidant, and its ability to cross the blood brain barrier within minutes after its administration. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of melatonin when used for treating cerebral edema. PMID:24876075

  1. The Impact of Melatonin in Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Maria Varoni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Citation indexes represent helpful tools for evaluating the impact of articles on research. The aim of this study was to obtain the top-100 ranking of the most cited papers on melatonin, a relevant neurohormone mainly involved in phase-adjusting the biological clock and with certain sleep-promoting capability. An article search was carried out on the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI Web of Science platform. Numbers of citations, names of authors, journals and their 2014-impact factor, year of publication, and experimental designs of studies were recorded. The ranking of the 100-most cited articles on melatonin research (up to February 2016 revealed a citation range from 1623 to 310. Narrative reviews/expert opinions were the most frequently cited articles, while the main research topics were oxidative stress, sleep physiology, reproduction, circadian rhythms and melatonin receptors. This study represents the first detailed analysis of the 100 top-cited articles published in the field of melatonin research, showing its impact and relevance in the biomedical field.

  2. Melatonin decreases the expression of inflammation and apoptosis markers in the lung of a senescence-accelerated mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Ángela; Rancan, Lisa; Paredes, Sergio D; Carrasco, Adrián; Escames, Germaine; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2016-03-01

    Aging is associated with an increase in oxidative stress and inflammation. The aging lung is particularly affected since it is continuously exposed to environmental oxidants while antioxidant machinery weakens with age. Melatonin, a free radical scavenger, counteracts inflammation and apoptosis in healthy cells from several tissues. Its effects on the aging lung are, however, not yet fully understood. This study aimed to investigate the effect of chronic administration of melatonin on the expression of inflammation markers (TNF-?, IL-1?, NF?B2, HO-1) and apoptosis parameters (BAD, BAX, AIF) in the lung tissue of male senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP8). In addition, RNA oxidative damage, as the formation of 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-OHG), was also evaluated. Young and old animals, aged 2 and 10months respectively, were divided into 4 groups: untreated young, untreated old, old mice treated with 1mg/kg/day melatonin, and old animals treated with 10mg/kg/day melatonin. Untreated young and old male senescence accelerated resistant mice (SAMR1) were used as controls. After 30days of treatment, animals were sacrificed. Lungs were collected and immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen. mRNA and protein expressions were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Levels of 8-OHG were quantified by ELISA. Mean values were analyzed using ANOVA. Old nontreated SAMP8 animals showed increased (p<0.05) mRNA and protein levels of TNF-?, IL-1?, NF?B2, and HO-1 compared to young mice and SAMR1 mice. Melatonin treatment with either dose reversed the aging-derived inflammation (p<0.05). BAD, BAX and AIF expressions also rose with aging, the effect being counteracted with melatonin (p<0.05). Aging also caused a significant elevation (p<0.05) in SAMP8 8-OHG values. This increase was not observed in animals treated with melatonin (p<0.05). In conclusion, melatonin treatment was able to modulate the inflammatory and apoptosis status of the aging lungs, exerting a protective effect on age-induced damage. PMID:26656745

  3. Raconter Accident nocturne de Patrick Modiano Raconter Accident nocturne de Patrick Modiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurate Kaminskas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Modiano affirme que chaque roman marque un pas en avant dans la réalisation de son oeuvre. « J’ai l’impression qu’à chaque livre je me suis débarrassé d’un truc pour essayer d’accéder à d'autres choses », explique-t-il dans un entretien avec Laurence Liban. Qu’en est-il donc pour Accident nocturne ?Modiano affirme que chaque roman marque un pas en avant dans la réalisation de son oeuvre. « J’ai l’impression qu’à chaque livre je me suis débarrassé d’un truc pour essayer d’accéder à autre chose », explique-t-il dans un entretien avec Laurence Liban. Qu’en est-il donc pour Accident nocturne ?

  4. On the Role of Melatonin in Skin Physiology and Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Slominski, A; Fischer, T. W.; Zmijewski, M. A.; Wortsman, J.; Semak, I.; ZBYTEK, B.; Slominski, R.M.; Tobin, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    Melatonin has been experimentally implicated in skin functions such as hair growth cycling, fur pigmentation, and melanoma control, and melatonin receptors are expressed in several skin cells including normal and malignant keratinocytes, melanocytes, and fibroblasts. Melatonin is also able to suppress ultraviolet (UV)-induced damage to skin cells and shows strong antioxidant activity in UV exposed cells. Moreover, we recently uncovered expression in the skin of the biochemical machinery invol...

  5. Melatonin in sleepless children : everything has a rhythm?

    OpenAIRE

    van Geijlswijk, I.M.

    2011-01-01

    Every living organism has an biological clock regulating endogenous melatonin production, synchronized by exogenous impulses like daylight, temperature and feeding. Inappropriately applied bright light disturbs this melatonin rhythm. Some large swine producers apply artificial light three times a day for three hours; we compared the 24 hour melatonin rhythm of pigs in a large swine production unit with pigs in a farm with natural light schemes (chapter two). No significant differences were fo...

  6. Measurement of melatonin in body fluids: Standards, protocols and procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Eduardo; Mascio, Paolo; Harumi, Tatsuo; D Warren Spence; Moscovitch, Adam; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Cardinali, Daniel; Brown, Gregory M.; S.R.Pandi-Perumal

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The circadian rhythm of melatonin in saliva or plasma, or of the melatonin metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (a6MTs) in urine, is a defining feature of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) function, the body’s endogenous oscillatory pacemaker. The primary objective of this review is to ascertain the clinical benefits and limitations of current methodologies employed for detection and quantification of melatonin in biological fluids and tissues. Data Identification A search of th...

  7. ARE THE MELATONIN SUPPLEMENTS POTENTIAL TREATMENT OPTIONS? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Subhranil Saha*, Munmun Koley and Sandip Patra

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Melatonin is a neuro-hormone secreted from the pineal gland and involved in various regulatory activities in body. Ever-increasing use of melatonin supplements and enlarging research evidences make the authors undertook the review to arrive at a qualitative conclusion whether melatonin supplements can act as potential treatment options or not.Methodology: A comprehensive search was undertaken in different electronic databases using various search terms. A total of 225 studies we...

  8. RESPONSE OF COMMIPHORA MUKUL (GUGGULU) ON MELATONIN INDUCED HYPOTHYROIDISM

    OpenAIRE

    A.K.Singh; Tripathi, S. N.; Prasad, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    The results of this study indicate that melatonin induces hypothyroidism in mice within eight days. Simultaneous administration of melatonin and petroleum ether extract of Commiphora mukul brings about a significant improvement in thyroid structure and function. Further, melatonin induced hypothyroidism is although a little reversible yet it is normalized quickly after C. mukul treatment. These data suggest that C. mukul directly stimulates thyroid function probably through some enzymatic mec...

  9. Melatonin Supplementation in Patients with Complete Tetraplegia and Poor Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Jo Spong; Kennedy, Gerard A.; Brown, Douglas J.; Armstrong, Stuart M.; David J. Berlowitz

    2013-01-01

    People with complete tetraplegia have interrupted melatonin production and commonly report poor sleep. Whether the two are related is unclear. This pilot study investigated whether nightly supplementation of 3?mg melatonin would improve objective and subjective sleep in tetraplegia. Five participants with motor and sensory complete tetraplegia ingested 3?mg melatonin (capsule) two hours prior to usual sleep time for two weeks. Full portable sleep studies were conducted in participants' homes ...

  10. Nocturnal panic attack: is it an another subtype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezgin Erdiman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate if the nocturnal panic attack has different features and might be considered as a subtype or not. Methods: Sociodemographic data form, SCID-I, SCID-II, Panic and Agoraphobia Scale (PAS, Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D, Beck Anxiety Scale, and Bak?rköy Panic Disorder Behavioral Changes Form are applied to the participants. 51 of the 98 patients were suffering from Nocturnal Panic Attacks according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Results: It was revealed that 47.9% of the panic disorder patients were suffering from nocturnal panic attacks. The most frequent symptoms in nocturnal panic disorder cases were experiences of feelings like drowning, lethargy, palpitation, vertigo, fear of death, and anxiety. The existence of nocturnal panic attacks is found to be related with severity of the disorder and comorbid depression. Moreover, comorbid sleep disturbances characterized with troubles in falling asleep, difficulty in sustaining sleep, feeling tired in the morning, were observed. There were sleep related avoidances and behavioral changes. Panic disorder patients with nocturnal panic attacks were found to avoid sleeping, or going to bed alone. Conclusions: Panic disorder cases with nocturnal panic attacks had more severe symptoms. From here, it can be concluded that it might be a subtype of panic disorder.

  11. Melatonin improves spatial navigation memory in male diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Farrin Babaei-Balderlou; Samad Zare

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin as an antioxidant on spatial navigation memory in male diabetic rats. Thirty-two male white Wistar rats weighing 200 ± 20 g were divided into four groups, randomly: control, melatonin, diabetic and melatonin-treated diabetic. Experimental diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg kg-1 streptozotocin. Melatonin was injected (10 mg kg-1 day-1, ip) for 2 weeks after 21 days of diabetes induction. At the end of ...

  12. Melatonin Effects on Hard Tissues: Bone and Tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Wen He

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is an endogenous hormone rhythmically produced in the pineal gland under the control of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and the light/dark cycle. This indole plays an important role in many physiological processes including circadian entrainment, blood pressure regulation, seasonal reproduction, ovarian physiology, immune function, etc. Recently, the investigation and applications of melatonin in the hard tissues bone and tooth have received great attention. Melatonin has been investigated relative to bone remolding, osteoporosis, osseointegration of dental implants and dentine formation. In the present review, we discuss the large body of published evidence and review data of melatonin effects on hard tissues, specifically, bone and tooth.

  13. Peripheral reproductive organ health and melatonin: ready for prime time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Russel J; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A; Manchester, Lucien C; Tan, Dun-Xian

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin has a wide variety of beneficial actions at the level of the gonads and their adnexa. Some actions are mediated via its classic membrane melatonin receptors while others seem to be receptor-independent. This review summarizes many of the published reports which confirm that melatonin, which is produced in the ovary, aids in advancing follicular maturation and preserving the integrity of the ovum prior to and at the time of ovulation. Likewise, when ova are collected for in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer, treating them with melatonin improves implantation and pregnancy rates. Melatonin synthesis as well as its receptors have also been identified in the placenta. In this organ, melatonin seems to be of particular importance for the maintenance of the optimal turnover of cells in the villous trophoblast via its ability to regulate apoptosis. For male gametes, melatonin has also proven useful in protecting them from oxidative damage and preserving their viability. Incubation of ejaculated animal sperm improves their motility and prolongs their viability. For human sperm as well, melatonin is also a valuable agent for protecting them from free radical damage. In general, the direct actions of melatonin on the gonads and adnexa of mammals indicate it is an important agent for maintaining optimal reproductive physiology. PMID:23549263

  14. Peripheral Reproductive Organ Health and Melatonin: Ready for Prime Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russel J. Reiter

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin has a wide variety of beneficial actions at the level of the gonads and their adnexa. Some actions are mediated via its classic membrane melatonin receptors while others seem to be receptor-independent. This review summarizes many of the published reports which confirm that melatonin, which is produced in the ovary, aids in advancing follicular maturation and preserving the integrity of the ovum prior to and at the time of ovulation. Likewise, when ova are collected for in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer, treating them with melatonin improves implantation and pregnancy rates. Melatonin synthesis as well as its receptors have also been identified in the placenta. In this organ, melatonin seems to be of particular importance for the maintenance of the optimal turnover of cells in the villous trophoblast via its ability to regulate apoptosis. For male gametes, melatonin has also proven useful in protecting them from oxidative damage and preserving their viability. Incubation of ejaculated animal sperm improves their motility and prolongs their viability. For human sperm as well, melatonin is also a valuable agent for protecting them from free radical damage. In general, the direct actions of melatonin on the gonads and adnexa of mammals indicate it is an important agent for maintaining optimal reproductive physiology.

  15. Melatonin regulates proteomic changes during leaf senescence in Malus hupehensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Sun, Xun; Xie, Yinpeng; Li, Mingjun; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Sheng; Liang, Dong; Ma, Fengwang

    2014-10-01

    Despite the relationship between melatonin and aging, the overall changes and regulation of proteome profiling by long-term melatonin exposure during leaf senescence is not well understood. In this study, leaf senescence in Malus hupehensis plants was delayed when exogenous melatonin was regularly applied to the roots for 2 months compared with natural leaf senescence. Proteins of samples 0 and 50 day for both treatments were extracted and labeled with TMT regents before being examined via NanoLC-MS/MS. The proteomics data showed that 622 and 309 proteins were altered by senescence and melatonin, respectively. Our GO analysis by Blast2GO revealed that most of the altered proteins that are involved in major metabolic processes exhibited hydrolase activity and were mainly located in the plastids. These proteins were classified into several senescence-related functional categories, including degradation of macromolecules, redox and stress responses, transport, photosynthesis, development, and other regulatory proteins. We found that melatonin treatment led to the downregulation of proteins that are normally upregulated during senescence. The melatonin-related delay in senescence might have occurred due to the altering of proteins involved in processes associated with senescence. And as well, there are many unknown regulatory proteins possibly being involved in the melatonin's function. This study is the first to demonstrate changes at the proteome level in response to exogenous melatonin in plants. Our findings provide a set of informative and fundamental data about the role of melatonin in apple leaf senescence. PMID:25146528

  16. Melatonin: An Underappreciated Player in Retinal Physiology and Pathophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    Tosini, Gianluca; Baba, Kenkichi; Hwang, Christopher K.; Iuvone, P Michael

    2012-01-01

    In the vertebrate retina, melatonin is synthesized by the photoreceptors with high levels of melatonin at night and lower levels during the day. Melatonin exerts its influence by interacting with a family of G-protein-coupled receptors that are negatively coupled with adenylyl cyclase. Melatonin receptors belonging to the subtypes MT1 and MT2 have been identified in the mammalian retina. MT1 and MT2 receptors are found in all layers of the neural retina and in the retinal pigmented epithelium...

  17. Nocturnal flow on a western Colorado slope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy sponsored Atomspheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program has conducted a research program designed to increase our knowledge and understanding of terrain-dominated flows with specific emphasis on nocturnal flows within mountain valleys. ASCOT has sponsored both field studies and numerical modeling efforts to improve our understanding of the wind, temperature and turbulence structure of nocturnal drainage flows. One of the most recent ASCOT sponsored field studies involves a study within the Mesa Creek Basin in western Colorado to investigate the seasonal frequency of occurrence of drainage flows along the sloped surfaces and within the basin, and to evaluate the effect of the ambient meteorology on their development. The Mesa Creek Basin, situated on the north slope of the Grand Mesa, encompasses a roughly 10 x 20 km area that is approximately 30 km east of Grand Junction. The observational segment of the study was undertaken jointly by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory, and involved the operation of network of eight meteorological towers and a monostatic sodar within the Mesa Creek study area over a period of one year that extended from December 1988 through November 1989. These measurements were augmented by tethersonde observations to define the vertical wind and temperature structure during a few nights. The modeling portion of the study is being undertaken by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory using a three-dimensional prognostic boundary layer model to gain further insight into the dynamics of the seasonal variations and the effect of cloud cover on the development of the drainage flows. It is the purpose of this paper to present preliminary results form a numerical simulation done as part of this study. 4 refs., 7 figs

  18. Melatonina y deficiencia de hormona de crecimiento: contribucin a la evaluacin de los desrdenes neuroendocrinos Melatonin and growth hormone deficiency: a contribution to the evaluation of neuroendocrine disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Fideleff

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available La melatonina constituye un integrante fundamental del denominado "reloj biolgico" y las alteraciones hormonales sueo-dependientes. Siendo la secrecin fisiolgica de GH, predominantemente nocturna, evaluamos en un grupo de nios y adultos deficitarios de GH (GHD sin y con tratamiento sustitutivo, la secrecin nocturna de melatonina. Estudiamos 44 pacientes GHD: Grupo a (Ga: Nios sin tratamiento; Grupo b (Gb: Nios con tratamiento con GH (0.16 mg/Kg/semana, dosis estable por mnimo de 6 meses; Grupo c (Gc: Adultos sin tratamiento y Grupo d (Gd: Adultos con tratamiento con GH (0.1- 0.8 mg/da, para mantener IGF1 entre 0 y +2 SDS, dosis estable por mnimo de 6 meses. Todos los pacientes con dficits hormonales asociados estaban adecuadamente sustituidos. La produccin de melatonina fue evaluada a travs de la medicin de su principal metabolito urinario: 6-Sulfatoximelatonina (6-SM, dosado por radioinmunoensayo, en muestras nocturnas (6PM a 8AM. Los niveles de 6-SM nocturna expresados como μg/unidad de tiempo fueron (media SEM para el grupo peditrico: Ga = 6.50 ( 5.10 y Gb = 8.21 ( 5.31 (Test de Mann-Whitney, p = 0.82. Para los adultos fueron: Gc = 2.99 ( 1.17 y Gd = 6.60 ( 2.00 (Test de Mann-Whitney, p = 0.35. En algunas alteraciones hipotlamo-hipofisarias han sido descriptas modificaciones del patrn secretorio de melatonina, pero no se han caracterizado en forma completa an, las posibles variaciones en pacientes con GHD. Si bien en las condiciones de este estudio, no hallamos diferencias en la excrecin nocturna de 6-SM entre los GHD no tratados y los tratados en ambos grupos, ello no invalida la existencia de posibles diferencias que podran detectarse estudiando la secrecin diurna de melatonina y su diferencia con la secrecin nocturna. Todo ello podr contribuir al conocimiento de los posibles desrdenes cronobiolgicos involucrados en la deficiencia de GH.Melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, constitutes a landmark in neuroendocrine integration. The relationship between melatonin and different pituitary hormones and sex steroids has been studied; however, the relationship between growth hormone (GH and melatonin remains unclear. Considering that melatonin is an essential component of the so-called "biological clock", related to circadian rhythm, day-night cycle, and sleep-dependent hormonal alterations, and knowing that physiological GH secretion occurs predominantly at night, we decided to evaluate nocturnal melatonin secretion in a group of GH-deficient children and adults on and off replacement therapy. Patients and Methods: We studied 44 patients with GH deficiency (GHD, duly confirmed by pharmacological tests, divided into 4 groups: Group a (Ga : untreated GHD children; Group b (Gb: GHD children on GH replacement therapy (0.16 mg/Kg/week, stable dose for at least 6 months; Group c (Gc: untreated GHD adults and Group d (Gd: GHD adults on GH replacement therapy (0.1- 0.8 mg/day, to maintain IGF1 between 0 and +2 SDS, stable dose for at least 6 months. All associated hormonal deficits were adequately replaced. Melatonin production was evaluated by measuring the excretion of its major urinary metabolite: 6-Sulphatoxymelatonin (6-SM. Urinary 6-SM was measured (radioimmunoassay, Stockgrand Ltd, Guildford, UK in nocturnal samples (6PM to 8AM in all patients. Results: Nocturnal 6-SM levels expressed as μg/unit of time were (mean SEM for the pediatric group: Ga = 6.50 ( 5.10 and Gb = 8.21 ( 5.31 (Mann Whitney test, p = 0.82. For adults: Gc = 2.99 ( 1.17 and Gd = 6.60 ( 2.00 (Mann Whitney test, p = 0.35. Discussion and Conclusions: It is difficult to characterize the relationship between melatonin and GH in healthy individuals; however, the administration of intravenous melatonin stimulates GH secretion in normal adults. In some hypothalamic-pituitary alterations, changes in the secretory pattern of melatonin have been reported, but possible variations in GHD patients have not been thoroughly characterized yet. This led us to evaluate 6-SM concentrations in GH deficient children and adults on and off adequate replacement therapy. One of the major aspects of this study has been the evaluation of baseline 6-SM concentrations, with no physiological or pharmacological stimulation. Even if under the conditions of this study we found no differences in nocturnal excretion of 6-SM between untreated and treated GHD individuals in both groups, this does not rule out the potential existence of differences that might be detected by studying diurnal melatonin secretion and its difference with nocturnal secretion. Such studies may contribute to an understanding of potential chronobiological disorders involved in GH deficiency.

  19. Melatonin in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poeggeler B

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been identified as common pathophysiological phenomena associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD and Huntington's disease (HD. As the age-related decline in the production of melatonin may contribute to increased levels of oxidative stress in the elderly, the role of this neuroprotective agent is attracting increasing attention. Melatonin has multiple actions as a regulator of antioxidant and prooxidant enzymes, radical scavenger and antagonist of mitochondrial radical formation. The ability of melatonin and its kynuramine metabolites to interact directly with the electron transport chain by increasing the electron flow and reducing electron leakage are unique features by which melatonin is able to increase the survival of neurons under enhanced oxidative stress. Moreover, antifibrillogenic actions have been demonstrated in vitro, also in the presence of profibrillogenic apoE4 or apoE3, and in vivo, in a transgenic mouse model. Amyloid-? toxicity is antagonized by melatonin and one of its kynuramine metabolites. Cytoskeletal disorganization and protein hyperphosphorylation, as induced in several cell-line models, have been attenuated by melatonin, effects comprising stress kinase downregulation and extending to neurotrophin expression. Various experimental models of AD, PD and HD indicate the usefulness of melatonin in antagonizing disease progression and/or mitigating some of the symptoms. Melatonin secretion has been found to be altered in AD and PD. Attempts to compensate for age- and disease-dependent melatonin deficiency have shown that administration of this compound can improve sleep efficiency in AD and PD and, to some extent, cognitive function in AD patients. Exogenous melatonin has also been reported to alleviate behavioral symptoms such as sundowning. Taken together, these findings suggest that melatonin, its analogues and kynuric metabolites may have potential value in prevention and treatment of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Evidence of a role for melatonin in fetal sheep physiology: direct actions of melatonin on fetal cerebral artery, brown adipose tissue and adrenal gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Farfan, Claudia; Valenzuela, Francisco J; Mondaca, Mauricio; Valenzuela, Guillermo J; Krause, Bernardo; Herrera, Emilio A; Riquelme, Raquel; Llanos, Anibal J; Seron-Ferre, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Although the fetal pineal gland does not secrete melatonin, the fetus is exposed to melatonin of maternal origin. In the non-human primate fetus, melatonin acts as a trophic hormone for the adrenal gland, stimulating growth while restraining cortisol production. This latter physiological activity led us to hypothesize that melatonin may influence some fetal functions critical for neonatal adaptation to extrauterine life. To test this hypothesis we explored (i) the presence of G-protein-coupled melatonin binding sites and (ii) the direct modulatory effects of melatonin on noradrenaline (norepinephrine)-induced middle cerebral artery (MCA) contraction, brown adipose tissue (BAT) lypolysis and ACTH-induced adrenal cortisol production in fetal sheep. We found that melatonin directly inhibits the response to noradrenaline in the MCA and BAT, and also inhibits the response to ACTH in the adrenal gland. Melatonin inhibition was reversed by the melatonin antagonist luzindole only in the fetal adrenal. MCA, BAT and adrenal tissue displayed specific high-affinity melatonin binding sites coupled to G-protein (Kd values: MCA 64 ± 1 pm, BAT 98.44 ± 2.12 pm and adrenal 4.123 ± 3.22 pm). Melatonin binding was displaced by luzindole only in the adrenal gland, supporting the idea that action in the MCA and BAT is mediated by different melatonin receptors. These direct inhibitory responses to melatonin support a role for melatonin in fetal physiology, which we propose prevents major contraction of cerebral vessels, restrains cortisol release and restricts BAT lypolysis during fetal life. PMID:18599539

  1. Melatonin in Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jian-Zhi Wang; Qing Tian; Jiang Chu; Shu-Sheng Yang; Qiong-Xia Huang; Li Lin

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), an age-related neurodegenerative disorder with progressive cognition deficit, is characterized by extracellular senile plaques (SP) of aggregated ?-amyloid (A?) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, mainly containing the hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau. Multiple factors contribute to the etiology of AD in terms of initiation and progression. Melatonin is an endogenously produced hormone in the brain and decreases during aging and in patien...

  2. Visual cues and parental favouritism in a nocturnal bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parejo, Deseada; Avilés, Jesús M; Rodríguez, Juan

    2010-04-23

    Visual signals are crucial for parent-offspring communication, although their functioning has been neglected for nocturnal birds. Here, we investigated parental preference for nestling coloration in nocturnal conditions--a question hitherto unexplored--in a nocturnal raptor, the scops owl (Otus scops). We assessed how parents allocated food during the night in relation to a manipulation of ultraviolet (UV) reflectance of the cere (skin above the beak) of their offspring. Reflectance of the cere shows a marked peak in the UV part of the spectrum, and location of the UV peak is related to nestling body mass (i.e. heavier nestlings have a UV peak at lower wavelengths). We found evidence of parental bias in favour of lighter offspring: UV-reduced nestlings gained more weight during the night than their control siblings. This study provides the first experimental evidence of the use of visual cues for parent-offspring communication in a nocturnal bird. PMID:19864276

  3. Exogenous Melatonin for Sleep Problems in Individuals with Intellectual Disability: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braam, Wiebe; Smits, Marcel G.; Didden, Robert; Korzilius, Hubert; van Geijlswijk, Ingeborg M.; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses on melatonin has raised doubts as to whether melatonin is effective in treating sleep problems in people without intellectual disabilities. This is in contrast to results of several trials on melatonin in treating sleep problems in individuals with intellectual disabilities. To investigate the efficacy of melatonin in treating…

  4. Eye shape and the nocturnal bottleneck of mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Margaret I.; Kamilar, Jason M.; Kirk, E. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Most vertebrate groups exhibit eye shapes that vary predictably with activity pattern. Nocturnal vertebrates typically have large corneas relative to eye size as an adaptation for increased visual sensitivity. Conversely, diurnal vertebrates generally demonstrate smaller corneas relative to eye size as an adaptation for increased visual acuity. By contrast, several studies have concluded that many mammals exhibit typical nocturnal eye shapes, regardless of activity pattern. However, a recent ...

  5. The effect of sleep on nocturnal urine output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamperis, Konstantinos; Hagstrøm, Søren; Rittig, Søren; Radvanska, Eva; Djurhuus, Jens Christian

    2005-01-01

      Hypothesis / aims of studyAim of this study was to elucidate the impact of sleep on the quantity and quality of the nocturnal urine production in healthy individuals.Our hypothesis was that sleep deprivation is related to excess nocturnal urine production.Study design, materials and methodsThe study protocol was approved by the local Ethics Committee.Twenty healthy volunteers with no history of enuresis, incontinence or nocturia were investigated in the present study. The participants were adm...

  6. Kiwi genome provides insights into evolution of a nocturnal lifestyle

    OpenAIRE

    Le Duc, Diana; Renaud, Gabriel; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Almén, Markus Sällman; Huynen, Leon; Prohaska, Sonja J.; Ongyerth, Matthias; Bitarello, Barbara D.; Schiöth, Helgi B.; Hofreiter, Michael; Stadler, Peter F.; Pruefer, Kay; Lambert, David; Kelso, Janet; Schoeneberg, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Background: Kiwi, comprising five species from the genus Apteryx, are endangered, ground-dwelling bird species endemic to New Zealand. They are the smallest and only nocturnal representatives of the ratites. The timing of kiwi adaptation to a nocturnal niche and the genomic innovations, which shaped sensory systems and morphology to allow this adaptation, are not yet fully understood. Results: We sequenced and assembled the brown kiwi genome to 150-fold coverage and annotated the genome using...

  7. Fundamental Issues Related to the Origin of Melatonin and Melatonin Isomers during Evolution: Relation to Their Biological Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dun-Xian Tan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin and melatonin isomers exist and/or coexist in living organisms including yeasts, bacteria and plants. The levels of melatonin isomers are significantly higher than that of melatonin in some plants and in several fermented products such as in wine and bread. Currently, there are no reports documenting the presence of melatonin isomers in vertebrates. From an evolutionary point of view, it is unlikely that melatonin isomers do not exist in vertebrates. On the other hand, large quantities of the microbial flora exist in the gut of the vertebrates. These microorganisms frequently exchange materials with the host. Melatonin isomers, which are produced by these organisms inevitably enter the host’s system. The origins of melatonin and its isomers can be traced back to photosynthetic bacteria and other primitive unicellular organisms. Since some of these bacteria are believed to be the precursors of mitochondria and chloroplasts these cellular organelles may be the primary sites of melatonin production in animals or in plants, respectively. Phylogenic analysis based on its rate-limiting synthetic enzyme, serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT, indicates its multiple origins during evolution. Therefore, it is likely that melatonin and its isomer are also present in the domain of archaea, which perhaps require these molecules to protect them against hostile environments including extremely high or low temperature. Evidence indicates that the initial and primary function of melatonin and its isomers was to serve as the first-line of defence against oxidative stress and all other functions were acquired during evolution either by the process of adoption or by the extension of its antioxidative capacity.

  8. Melatonin improves spatial navigation memory in male diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrin Babaei-Balderlou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin as an antioxidant on spatial navigation memory in male diabetic rats. Thirty-two male white Wistar rats weighing 200 ± 20 g were divided into four groups, randomly: control, melatonin, diabetic and melatonin-treated diabetic. Experimental diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg kg-1 streptozotocin. Melatonin was injected (10 mg kg-1 day-1, ip for 2 weeks after 21 days of diabetes induction. At the end of administration period, the spatial navigation memory of rats was evaluated by cross-arm maze. In this study lipid peroxidation levels, glutathione-peroxidase and catalase activities were measured in hippocampus. Diabetes caused to significant decrease in alternation percent in the cross-arm maze, as a spatial memory index, compared to the control group (p < 0.05, whereas administration of melatonin prevented the spatial memory deficit in diabetic rats. Also melatonin injection significantly increased the spatial memory in intact animals compared to the control group (p < 0.05. Assessment of hippocampus homogenates indicated an increase in lipid peroxidation levels and a decrease in GSH-Px and CAT activities in the diabetic group compared to the control animals, while melatonin administration ameliorated these indices in diabetic rats. In conclusion, diabetes induction leads to debilitation of spatial navigation memory in rats, and the melatonin treatment improves the memory presumably through the reduction of oxidative stress in hippocampus of diabetic rats.

  9. Promising Role of Melatonin as Neuroprotectant in Neurodegenerative Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Neeraj; Biswas, Joyshree; Nath, C; Singh, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    Melatonin treatment showed a potent neuroprotective action in experimental models and in clinical studies. However, the entire disease prevention is not observed with melatonin treatment. Therefore, findings have suggested its future use in combination therapies for neurological diseases. Several studies have showed its free radical scavenging, antioxidant property, antiapoptotic activity, and its action towards enhanced mitochondrial function. It has direct and indirect effects on mitochondrial functions. Neurodegenerative disease pathology includes the impaired mitochondrial functions and apoptotic death of neurons due to energy crisis which could be prevented with antiapoptotic activity of melatonin. However, for the therapeutic use of melatonin, researchers also need to pay attention towards the various intermediary events taking place in apoptotic death of neurons during disease pathology. Age-related neurological diseases include the decreased level of melatonin in neuronal death. Therefore, it is worthwhile to discuss about the different functions of melatonin in aspect of its antioxidative property, its role in the enhancement of mitochondrial function, and its antiapoptotic attributes. This review summarizes the reports to date showing the potent role of melatonin in experimental models and clinical trials and discussing the employment of melatonin as future potent neuroprotective agent. PMID:25159482

  10. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:25908097

  11. No effect of melatonin on oxidative stress after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükakin, B.; Klein, M.; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Reiter, R.J.; Rosenberg, J.; Gögenür, I.

    2010-01-01

    melatonin and 21 patients received placebo during surgery. No significant differences were observed between the groups in the oxidative stress variables MDA, TAA, AA and DHA or in the inflammatory variable CRP (repeated-measures ANOVA, P > 0.05 for all variables). Conclusions Administration of 10 mg...... melatonin did not reduce variables of oxidative stress in patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy...

  12. Relation of Melatonin to Sleep Architecture in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Roberta M.; Beyderman, Liya; Botzolakis, Emmanuel J.; Surdyka, Kyla; Wang, Lily; Malow, Beth A.

    2011-01-01

    Children with autism often suffer from sleep disturbances, and compared to age-matched controls, have decreased melatonin levels, as indicated by urine levels of the primary melatonin metabolite, 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (6-SM). We therefore investigated the relationship between 6-SM levels and sleep architecture in children with autism spectrum…

  13. Melatonin Therapy in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Daniel P.; Vigo, Daniel E.; Olivar, Natividad; Vidal, María F.; Brusco, Luis I.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a major health problem and a growing recognition exists that efforts to prevent it must be undertaken by both governmental and non-governmental organizations. In this context, the pineal product, melatonin, has a promising significance because of its chronobiotic/cytoprotective properties potentially useful for a number of aspects of AD. One of the features of advancing age is the gradual decrease in circulating melatonin levels. A limited number of therapeutic trials have indicated that melatonin has a therapeutic value as a neuroprotective drug in the treatment of AD and minimal cognitive impairment (which may evolve to AD). Both in vitro and in vivo, melatonin prevented the neurodegeneration seen in experimental models of AD. For these effects to occur, doses of melatonin about two orders of magnitude higher than those required to affect sleep and circadian rhythmicity are needed. More recently, attention has been focused on the development of potent melatonin analogs with prolonged effects, which were employed in clinical trials in sleep-disturbed or depressed patients in doses considerably higher than those employed for melatonin. In view that the relative potencies of the analogs are higher than that of the natural compound, clinical trials employing melatonin in the range of 50–100 mg/day are urgently needed to assess its therapeutic validity in neurodegenerative disorders such as AD. PMID:26784870

  14. Melatonin-mediated effects on killifish reproductive axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Francesco; Gioacchini, Giorgia; Fabbrocini, Adele; Candelma, Michela; D'Adamo, Raffaele; Giorgini, Elisabetta; Carnevali, Oliana

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the melatonin-mediated effects upon the neuroendocrine axis of the brackish killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus), a suitable experimental model to study reproductive events. The ability of melatonin to enhance reproductive capacity (fecundity, embryo survival and hatching rate) inducing the transcriptional activity of gonadotropin releasing hormone (gnrh), luteinizing hormone receptor (lhr) and melatonin receptor (mtnr) was investigated in adult females. Moreover, the melatonin-mediated enhancement of killifish sperm motility and velocity was found consistent with higher fecundity of melatonin-exposed fishes. As a further extent, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy evidenced a reduction of lipid unsaturation level on isolated spermatozoa from treated males. Moreover, the reduction of mtnr gene expression during embryo development and lower biometric parameters documented in the larvae from melatonin-exposed parents suggest that melatonin acts as a hormonal mediator able to transfer the environmental signal to oocytes and then to embryos as inheritance of adaptive environmental changes. These results support the positive role of melatonin on killifish reproduction and its role as a maternal factor on embryo and larval development. PMID:24548909

  15. High levels of melatonin generated during the brewing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Moreno, H; Calvo, J R; Maldonado, M D

    2013-08-01

    Beer is a beverage consumed worldwide. It is produced from cereals (barley or wheat) and contains a wide array of bioactive phytochemicals and nutraceutical compounds. Specifically, high melatonin concentrations have been found in beer. Beers with high alcohol content are those that present the greatest concentrations of melatonin and vice versa. In this study, gel filtration chromatography and ELISA were combined for melatonin determination. We brewed beer to determine, for the first time, the beer production steps in which melatonin appears. We conclude that the barley, which is malted and ground in the early process, and the yeast, during the second fermentation, are the largest contributors to the enrichment of the beer with melatonin. PMID:23607887

  16. Melatonin in the skin: synthesis, metabolism and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Andrzej; Tobin, Desmond J; Zmijewski, Michal A; Wortsman, Jacobo; Paus, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Melatonin, a ubiquitous methoxyindole, is produced by and metabolized in the skin. Melatonin affects skin functions and structures through actions mediated by cell-surface and putative-nuclear receptors expressed in skin cells. Melatonin has both receptor-dependent and receptor-independent effects that protect against oxidative stress and can attenuate ultraviolet radiation-induced damage. The widespread expression and pleiotropic activity of the cutaneous melatoninergic system provides for a high level of cell-specific selectivity. Moreover, intra-, auto- and para-crine mechanisms equip this system with exquisite functional selectivity. The properties of endogenous melatonin suggest that this molecule is an important effector of stress responses in the skin. In this way, melatonin actions may counteract or buffer both environmental and endogenous stressors to maintain skin integrity. PMID:18155917

  17. The role of melatonin in mood disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Berardis D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Domenico De Berardis,1–3 Laura Orsolini,3–5 Nicola Serroni,1 Gabriella Girinelli,1–3 Felice Iasevoli,3–6 Carmine Tomasetti,3–6 Monica Mazza,3–7 Alessandro Valchera,3–8 Michele Fornaro,9 Giampaolo Perna,10–12 Monica Piersanti,13Marco Di Nicola,14 Marilde Cavuto,15 Giovanni Martinotti,2 Massimo Di Giannantonio21NHS, Department of Mental Health, Psychiatric Service of Diagnosis and Treatment, Hospital "G Mazzini", Teramo, Italy; 2Department of Neuroscience, Imaging and Clinical Science, Chair of Psychiatry, University G d'Annunzio, Chieti, Italy; 3Polyedra, Teramo, Italy; 4United Hospitals, Academic Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy; 5School of Life and Medical Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, UK; 6Laboratory of Molecular Psychiatry and Psychopharmacotherapeutics, Section of Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, University School of Medicine Federico II, Naples, Italy; 7Department of Health Sciences, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy; 8Villa S Giuseppe Hospital, Hermanas Hospitalarias, Ascoli Piceno, Italy; 9Department of Scienze della Formazione, University of Catania, Catania, Italy; 10Hermanas Hospitalarias, FoRiPsi, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Villa San Benedetto Menni, Albese con Cassano, Como, Italy; 11Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, the Netherlands; 12Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Leonard Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 13Hospital Pharmacy, Hospital G Mazzini, ASL 4 Teramo, Italy; 14Institute of Psychiatry and Psychology, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy; 15IASM, L'Aquila, ItalyAbstract: Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine has been discovered as a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, even though it is also synthetized in various other organs, tissues, and cells. The circadian rhythm of melatonin is often used as an indicator phase position since it is a well-defined, high-amplitude rhythm controlled by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei. Melatonin production is controlled by this endogenous circadian timing system. It peaks during the night and is suppressed by daylight. Mood spectrum disorders, including bipolar disorder (BD, major depressive disorder (MDD, and seasonal affective disorder (SAD, have been observed to be accompanied by circadian dysregulation as well as dysregulation in melatonin secretion. Simultaneously, it has also been documented that disruptions in circadian rhythms, including the sleep/wake cycle, though environmental means can produce mood-related problems in vulnerable individuals. These findings suggested that altered circadian rhythms might be biological markers of these disorders. As melatonin is considered a chronobiotic factor, ie, able to entrain the circadian rhythms of several biological functions (eg, activity/rest, sleep/wake, body temperature, endocrine rhythms, etc, its use may provide a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of affective disorders. However, the available evidence is controversial. This review summarizes the data published so far about reliable evidence on the role of melatonin in affective disorders.Keywords: melatonin, melatonergic system, mood disorders, depression, seasonal affective disorder, bipolar disorder 

  18. Myocardial infarction:aspects relating to endogenous and exogenous melatonin and cardiac contractility

    OpenAIRE

    Sallinen, P.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Melatonin is an important modulator of several physiological and behavioural processes, and it influences the function of many different tissues. Melatonin has effective antioxidative properties, but some of its actions in mammals are also mediated through the MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors. Antioxidative properties are seen especially when the melatonin concentration is high (? nM), and melatonin's affinity for its receptors appears at lower concentrations (pM). Recently, ...

  19. Circulating Melatonin And The Risk Of Breast And Endometrial Cancer In Women

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Schernhammer, Eva S.

    2008-01-01

    Several decades of observational data have accumulated to implicate a potential role for melatonin in cancer prevention. Experimental studies suggest that the antineoplastic action of melatonin arises through many different mechanisms, including melatonin’s antioxidant, antimitotic, and antiangiogenic activity, as well as its ability to modulate the immune system and alter fat metabolism. Melatonin interacts with membrane and nuclear receptors, and may be linked to the regulation of tumor gro...

  20. Necrotizing Fasciitis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patir, Pusem; Isik, Yakup; Turk, Yigit; Ugur, Mehmet Can; Ceylan, Cengiz; Gorgun, Gulnur; Mete Gokmen, Nihal; Saydam, Guray; Sahin, Fahri

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, progressive, and life-threatening hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis and a prothrombotic state. Patients with PNH might have slightly increased risk of infections due to complement-associated defects subsequent to CD59 deficiency. Here, we report a rare case of a 65-year-old male patient with necrotic ulcers on both legs, where the recognition of pancytopenia and microthrombi led to the diagnosis of PNH based on FLAER (FLuorescent AERolysin) flow cytometric analysis. He was subsequently started on eculizumab therapy, with starting and maintenance doses set as per drug labelling. Progression of the patient's leg ulcers during follow-up, with fulminant tissue destruction, purulent discharge, and necrotic patches, led to a later diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics, surgical debridement, and superficial skin grafting were applied with successful effect during ongoing eculizumab therapy. This case highlights the point that it is important to maintain treatment of underlying disorders such as PNH in the presence of life-threatening infections like NF. PMID:26347833

  1. Radioprotective effects of melatonin on radiation-induced cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the mechanisms proposed to explain lens opacification is the oxidation of crystallins, either by radiation or reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been shown that melatonin has both an anti-peroxidative effect on several tissues and a scavenger effect on ROS. The purpose of this study was to determine the antioxidant role of melatonin (5 mg/kg/day) against radiation-induced cataract in the lens after total-cranium irradiation of rats with a single dose of 5 Gy. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Control group received neither melatonin nor irradiation. Irradiated rats (IR) and melatonin+irradiated rats (IR+Mel) groups were exposed to total cranium irradiation of 5 Gy in a single dose by using a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. IR+Mel and melatonin (Mel) groups were administered 5 mg/kg melatonin daily by intraperitoneal injections during ten days. Chylack's cataract classification was used in this study. At the end of the 10th day, the rats were killed and their eyes were enucleated to measure the antioxidant enzymes i.e. the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and lipid peroxidation level (malondialdehyde (MDA)). Irradiation significantly increased the MDA level, as an end product of lipid peroxidation, and also significantly decreased SOD and GSH-Px activity, emphasizing the generation of increased oxidative stress. Rats injected with melatonin only did not cause cataract formation. Melatonin supplementation with irradiation significantly increased the activity of SOD and GSH-Px enzymes and significantly decreased the MDA level. Total cranium irradiation of 5 Gy in a single dose enhanced cataract formation, and melatonin supplementation protected the lenses from radiation-induced cataract formation. Our results suggest that supplementing cancer patients with adjuvant therapy of melatonin may reduce patients suffering from toxic therapeutic regimens such as chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and may provide an alleviation of the symptoms due to radiation-induced organ injuries. (author)

  2. Melatonin prevents neonatal dexamethasone induced programmed hypertension: histone deacetylase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting-Hsin; Kuo, Hsuan-Chang; Lin, I-Chun; Chien, Shao-Ju; Huang, Li-Tung; Tain, You-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Adulthood hypertension can be programmed by corticosteroid exposure in early life. Oxidative stress, epigenetic regulation by histone deacetylases (HDACs), and alterations of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are involved in the developmental programming of hypertension. We examined whether melatonin prevented neonatal dexamethasone (DEX)-induced programmed hypertension and how melatonin prevented these processes. We also examined whether HDAC inhibition by trichostatin A (TSA, a HDAC inhibitor) had similar effects. Male offspring were assigned to 5 groups (n=6/group): control, DEX, melatonin, DEX+melatonin, and DEX+TSA. Male rat pups were injected i.p. with DEX on day 1 (0.5mg/kg BW), day 2 (0.3mg/kg BW), and day 3 (0.1mg/kg BW) after birth. Melatonin was administered in drinking water at the dose of 0.01% during the lactation period. The DEX+TSA group received DEX and 0.5mg/kg TSA subcutaneous injection once daily for 1 week. All rats were killed at 16 weeks of age. Neonatal DEX exposure induced hypertension in male offspring at 16 weeks of age, which melatonin prevented. Neonatal DEX exposure decreased gene expression related to apoptosis, nephrogenesis, RAS, and sodium transporters. Yet DEX treatment increased protein levels of HDAC-1, -2, and -3 in the kidney. Melatonin therapy preserved the decreases of gene expression and decreased HDACs. Similarly, HDAC inhibition prevented DEX-induced programmed hypertension. In conclusion, melatonin therapy exerts a long-term protection against neonatal DEX-induced programmed hypertension. Its beneficial effects include alterations of RAS components and inhibition of class I HDACs. Given that the similar protective effects of melatonin and TSA, melatonin might inhibit HDACs to epigenetic regulation of hypertension-related genes to prevent programmed hypertension. PMID:25090636

  3. Role of melatonin in mitigating chemotherapy-induced testicular dysfunction in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, P; Reddy, K Pratap; Reddy, P Sreenivasula

    2016-04-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer affecting men of reproductive age, and its incidence is increasing steadily. A regimen of cisplatin (P), vinblastin (V) and bleomycin (B) (PVB) is the standard chemotherapy for testicular cancer. Though PVB-based chemotherapy has been widely used against germ cell tumors, it is associated with induction of oxidative toxicity and a transient or permanent loss of fertility. However, the mechanism of action of PVB on the testis is not thoroughly elucidated. Using a rat model, we investigated the persistence of the effects of PVB on steroidogenesis, spermatogenesis and testicular oxidative status and architecture. Further, we have also studied whether administration of melatonin has any protective effect on testicular physiology in the PVB-treated rats, since melatonin exerts influence on the antioxidant defense system. The body weight of the PVB-treated rats did not show significant change as compared with the control group. Significant decrease in the weight of the testis was observed with a reduction in volume in the PVB-treated rats. Administration of PVB caused a reduction in the testicular steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis. The circulatory levels of testosterone were also significantly reduced with an elevation of FSH and LH in the PVB-treated rats. Testicular architecture was severely affected with a reduction in seminiferous tubule diameter and epithelial height. The activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were decreased while the levels of lipid peroxidation increased significantly in the testis of the PVB-treated rats indicating depletion of antioxidant defence system and elevation of oxidative stress. Co-administration of melatonin mitigated these changes in the PVB-treated rats. PMID:26072956

  4. Melatonin for pre- and postoperative anxiety in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Melissa V; Halladin, Natalie L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety in relation to surgery is a well-known problem. Melatonin offers an atoxic alternative to benzodiazepines in ameliorating this condition in the pre- and postoperative period. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of melatonin on pre- and postoperative anxiety in adults when comparing melatonin with placebo or when comparing melatonin with benzodiazepines. SEARCH METHODS: The following databases were searched on 19 April 2013: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Web of Science. For ongoing trials and protocols we searched clinicaltrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We reran the search in October 2014. We will deal with any studies of interest when we update the review. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized, placebo-controlled or standard treatment-controlled, or both, studies that evaluated the effect of preoperatively administered melatonin on preoperative or postoperative anxiety. We included adult patientsof both genders (15 to 90 years of age) undergoing any kind of surgical procedure in which it was necessary to use general, regional or topical anaesthesia. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Data were extracted independently by two review authors. Data extracted included information about study design, country of origin, number of participants and demographic details, type of surgery, type of anaesthesia, intervention and dosing regimen, preoperative anxiety outcome measures and postoperative anxiety outcome measures. MAIN RESULTS: This systematic review identified 12 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including 774 patients that assessed melatonin for treating preoperative anxiety, postoperative anxiety or both. Four of the 12 studies compared melatonin, placebo and midazolam, whereas the remaining eight studies compared melatonin and placebo only.The quality of the evidence for our primary outcome (melatonin versus placebo for preoperative anxiety) was high. More than half of the included studies had a low risk of selection bias and at least 75% of the included studies had a low risk of attrition, performance and detection bias. Most of the included studies had an unclear risk of reporting bias.Eight out the 10 studies that assessed the effect of melatonin on preoperative anxiety using a visual analogue scale (VAS) (ranging from 0 to 100 mm, higher scores indicate greater anxiety) showed a reduction compared to placebo. The reported estimate of effect (relative effect -13.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) -16.13 to -10.58; high quality evidence) was based on a meta-analysis of seven studies. Two studies did not show any difference between melatonin and placebo. Two studies comparing melatonin with midazolam using a VAS found no evidence of a difference in preoperative anxiety between the two groups (relative effect -1.18, 95% CI -2.59 to 0.23; low quality evidence).Eight studies assessed the effect of melatonin on postoperative anxiety. Four of these studies measuring postoperative anxiety 90 minutes postoperatively using a VAS did not find any evidence of a difference between melatonin and placebo (relative effect -3.71, 95% CI -9.26 to 1.84). Conversely, two studies showed a reduction of postoperative anxiety measured six hours after surgery using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) when comparing melatonin with placebo (relative effect -5.31, 95% CI -8.78 to -1.84; moderate quality evidence). Two studies comparing melatonin with midazolam using a VAS did not find any evidence of a difference between the two groups in postoperative anxiety (relative effect -2.02, 95% CI -5.82 to 1.78). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: When compared to placebo, melatonin given as premedication (tablets or sublingually) can reduce preoperative anxiety in adults (measured 50 to 100 minutes after administration). Melatonin may be equally as effective as standard treatment with midazolam in reducing preoperative anxiety in adults (measured 50 to 100 minutes after administration). The effect of melatonin on postoperative anxiety (measured 90minutes

  5. Relationship between Aldose reductase and superoxide dismutase inhibition capacities of indole-based analogs of melatonin derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da?-Evcimen N.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldose reductase (AR has been implicated in the etiology of diabetic complications. Under diabetic conditions, the elevated vascular glucose level causes an increased flux through the polyol pathway, which induces functional and morphological changes associated with secondary diabetic complications such as cataract, neuropathy, and nephrop­athy. Oxidative stress, antioxidants, and the polyol pathway have recently been found to be linked in pathological states. A large number of structurally different compounds have been studied as potent in vitro AR inhibitors (ARIs. However, with few exceptions, these compounds did not show clinical benefit, and some even produced serious side effects. In view of the ARI activity of certain indole derivative compounds and antioxidant properties of melatonin, we investigated some indole-based analogs of melatonin derivatives. Antioxidant and ARI activity tests were applied to nine indole derivatives that are substituted at the third and fifth positions. Also, the relationship between ARI and antioxidant enzyme activity is discussed.

  6. Concentração plasmática de melatonina em novilhas bubalinas (Bubalus bubalis ao longo do ano Plasma melatonin in bufallo heifers (Bubalus bubalis during a year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S.R. Mattos

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Coletaram-se nove amostras de sangue ao longo do dia, mês-a-mês durante um ano, de seis novilhas bubalinas da raça Mediterrâneo, para determinação da melatonina plasmática dos animais mantidos na latitude 22° Sul. A concentração plasmática de melatonina se elevou lentamente até atingir o pico entre 21 e 23 horas, permanecendo elevada até as 3-5 horas. A seguir, a concentração diminuiu para valores baixos antes do nascer do sol. A duração da elevação noturna de melatonina plasmática não acompanhou a duração do período noturno ao longo do ano e a diminuição da concentração diurna de melatonina plasmática ocorreu na época de maior atividade reprodutiva estimada do rebanho.Nine blood samples were taken to determine plasma melatonin in a 24h-period/month for a year. The six buffalo heifers used were kept at latitude 22° South. Plasma melatonin rose slowly, peaking at night (between 9 and 11pm and maintained until 3 to 5am. Melatonin concentration decreased day-time to lower levels until sunrise. Nocturnal higher plasmatic melatonin did not vary with night length over the year. Diurnal melatonin concentrations were lower when estimated reproductive rate was the highest for the herd.

  7. Prolonged-release melatonin for insomnia – an open-label long-term study of efficacy, safety, and withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemoine P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Lemoine1, Doron Garfinkel2, Moshe Laudon3, Tali Nir3, Nava Zisapel3,41The Clinique Lyon-Lumière, Meyzieu, France; 2Geriatric-Palliative Department, Shoham Geriatric Medical Center, Pardes Hanna, Israel; 3Neurim Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Tel-Aviv, Israel; 4Department of Neurobiology Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, IsraelBackground: Prolonged-release melatonin (PRM 2 mg is indicated for insomnia in patients aged 55 years and older. A recent double-blind placebo-controlled study demonstrated 6-month efficacy and safety of PRM in insomnia patients aged 18–80 and lack of withdrawal and rebound symptoms upon discontinuation.Objective: To investigate the efficacy, safety, and withdrawal phenomena associated with 6–12 months PRM treatment.Methods: Data from a prospective 6–12-month open-label study of 244 community dwelling adults with primary insomnia, who had participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind dose-ranging trial of PRM. Patients received PRM nightly, followed by a 2-week withdrawal period. Main outcome measures were patient-reported sleep quality ratings (diary, adverse events, vital signs, and laboratory tests recorded at each visit, and withdrawal symptoms (CHESS-84 [Check-list Evaluation of Somatic Symptoms]. Nocturnal urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin excretion, a measure of the endogenous melatonin production, was assessed upon discontinuing long-term PRM.Results: Of the 244 patients, 36 dropped out, 112 completed 6 months of treatment, and the other 96 completed 12 months of treatment. The mean number of nights by which patients reported sleep quality as "good" or "very good" was significantly higher during PRM than before treatment. There was no evidence of tolerance to PRM. Discontinuation of PRM was not associated with rebound insomnia or withdrawal symptoms; on the contrary, residual benefit was observed. PRM was well tolerated, and there was no suppression of endogenous melatonin production.Conclusion: Results support the efficacy and safety of PRM in primary insomnia patients aged 20–80 throughout 6–12 months of continuous therapy. PRM discontinuation even after 12 months was not associated with adverse events, withdrawal symptoms, or suppression of endogenous melatonin production.Keywords: PRM, adverse events, sleep, insomnia, patients

  8. The effect of the melatonin on cryopreserved mouse testicular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Saki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: After improvements in various cancer treatments, life expectancy has been raised, but success in treatment causes loss of fertility in many of the survived young men. Cryopreservation of immature testicular tissues or cells introduced as the only way to preserve fertility. However, freezing has some harmful effects. Melatonin, a pineal gland hormone, has receptors in reproductive systems of different species. It is assumed that melatonin has free radical scavenger properties. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of melatonin on the cryopreserved testicular cells in mouse. Materials and Methods: Cells from 7- 10 days old NMRI mice testes were isolated using two step enzymatic digestion. The testicular cells were divided into two groups randomly and cryopreserved in two different freezing media with and without the addition of 100 μm melatonin. Finally, apoptosis of the cells was assayed by flow cytometry. Also, lactate dehydrogenase activity test was performed to assess the cytotoxicity. Results: The results of lactate dehydrogenase showed the nearly cytotoxic effect of melatonin. The results of flow cytometry showed increase in apoptosis in the cryopreserved cells in the media containing melatonin compared to the control group. Conclusion: The present study shows that melatonin has an apoptotic effect on cryopreserved mouse testicular cells.

  9. Melatonin affects the temporal pattern of vocal signatures in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derégnaucourt, Sébastien; Saar, Sigal; Gahr, Manfred

    2012-10-01

    In humans and other animals, melatonin is involved in the control of circadian biological rhythms. Here, we show that melatonin affects the temporal pattern of behavioral sequences in a noncircadian manner. The zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) song and the crow of the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) are courtship vocalizations composed of a stereotyped sequence of syllables. The zebra finch song is learned from conspecifics during infancy, whereas the Japanese quail crow develops normally without auditory input. We recorded and analyzed the complete vocal activity of adult birds of both species kept in social isolation for several weeks. In both species, we observed a shortening of signal duration following the transfer from a light-dark (LD) cycle to constant light (LL), a condition known to abolish melatonin production and to disrupt circadian rhythmicity. This effect was reversible because signal duration increased when the photoperiod was returned to the previous LD schedule. We then tested whether this effect was directly related to melatonin by removal of the pineal gland, which is the main production site of circulating melatonin. A shortening of the song duration was observed following pinealectomy in LD. Likewise, melatonin treatment induced changes in the temporal structure of the song. In a song learning experiment, young pinealectomized finches and young finches raised in LL failed to copy the temporal pattern of their tutor's song. Taken together, these results suggest that melatonin is involved in the control of motor timing of noncircadian behavioral sequences through an evolutionary conserved neuroendocrine pathway. PMID:22506964

  10. The central role of melatonin in Danio rerio appetite regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliana Carnevali

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is the hormonal mediator of photoperiodic information to the central nervous system in vertebrates and allows the regulation of energy homeostasis through the establishment of a proper balance between energy intake and energy expenditure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of melatonin in the regulation of feeding behavior in the zebrafish Danio rerio. For this purpose, the effect of two different melatonin doses (100 nM and 1µM administered for ten days via water to zebrafish adults was evaluated at both physiological and molecular level and the effect of melatonin was considered in relation to the most prominent systems involved in appetite regulation. The melatonin control of food intake by the modulation of leptin, MC4R, ghrelin, NPY and CB1 gene expression was evaluated. The results obtained indicate that melatonin significantly reduces food intake and the reduction is in agreement with the changes observed at the molecular level. A significant increase in genes codifying for molecules involved in feeding inhibition, such as leptin and MC4R, and a significant reduction in the major orexigenic signals including ghrelin, NPY and CB1 was demonstrated. These results support the idea that melatonin falls fully into the complex network of signals that regulate food intake and therefore this hormone plays a key role in central appetite regulation.

  11. Melatonin and Atopy: Role in Atopic Dermatitis and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Marseglia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin may have important immunostimulatory actions in allergic diseases, in addition to its well-known antioxidant and cytoprotective effects in several inflammatory conditions. The activation of the immune system leads to free radical production associated with decreased melatonin levels and depressed antioxidant enzyme activities in several inflammatory diseases. Many skin disorders, including atopic dermatitis, are accompanied by infiltration and activation of mast cells, which release vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators. Experimental data suggest that melatonin inhibits development of atopic eczema and reduces serum total IgE and IL-4. Allergic asthma is a condition characterized by bronchial hyperresponsiveness and the presence of IgE antibodies in response to inhaled allergens; often there is also enhanced total serum IgE levels. Melatonin regulates smooth muscle tone and influences the immune response. Melatonin may, however, act as a pro-inflammatory agent in asthma leading to bronchial constriction. The safety of melatonin as a sleep-inducing agent has been confirmed in asthmatic subjects, but its routine use is not recommended in bronchial asthma. This review summarizes what is known about the role of melatonin as an immunomodulatory agent in asthma and atopic eczema.

  12. Melatonin and atopy: role in atopic dermatitis and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marseglia, Lucia; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Manti, Sara; Salpietro, Carmelo; Arrigo, Teresa; Barberi, Ignazio; Reiter, Russel J; Gitto, Eloisa

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin may have important immunostimulatory actions in allergic diseases, in addition to its well-known antioxidant and cytoprotective effects in several inflammatory conditions. The activation of the immune system leads to free radical production associated with decreased melatonin levels and depressed antioxidant enzyme activities in several inflammatory diseases. Many skin disorders, including atopic dermatitis, are accompanied by infiltration and activation of mast cells, which release vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators. Experimental data suggest that melatonin inhibits development of atopic eczema and reduces serum total IgE and IL-4. Allergic asthma is a condition characterized by bronchial hyperresponsiveness and the presence of IgE antibodies in response to inhaled allergens; often there is also enhanced total serum IgE levels. Melatonin regulates smooth muscle tone and influences the immune response. Melatonin may, however, act as a pro-inflammatory agent in asthma leading to bronchial constriction. The safety of melatonin as a sleep-inducing agent has been confirmed in asthmatic subjects, but its routine use is not recommended in bronchial asthma. This review summarizes what is known about the role of melatonin as an immunomodulatory agent in asthma and atopic eczema. PMID:25093714

  13. Effect of Melatonin on Human Dental Papilla Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryusuke Tachibana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin regulates a variety of biological processes, which are the control of circadian rhythms, regulation of seasonal reproductive function and body temperature, free radical scavenging and so on. Our previous studies have shown that various cells exist in human and mouse tooth germs that express the melatonin 1a receptor (Mel1aR. However, little is known about the effects of melatonin on tooth development and growth. The present study was performed to examine the possibility that melatonin might exert its influence on tooth development. DP-805 cells, a human dental papilla cell line, were shown to express Mel1aR. Expression levels of mRNA for Mel1aR in DP-805 cells increased until 3 days after reaching confluence and decreased thereafter. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that melatonin increased the expression of mRNAs for osteopontin (OPN, osteocalcin (OCN, bone sialoprotein (BSP, dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1 and dentin sialophosphoprotin (DSPP. Melatonin also enhanced the mineralized matrix formation in DP-805 cell cultures in a dose-dependent manner. These results strongly suggest that melatonin may play a physiological role in tooth development/growth by regulating the cellular function of odontogenic cells in tooth germs.

  14. Nocturnal asthma in school children of south punjab, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time, the epidemiology of the childhood asthma is of considerable interest. There is an understandable concern that changes in the geographical area, lifestyle, and environment. This study was conducted to find the prevalence of nocturnal asthma, in school children of south Punjab, Pakistan. It was a cross sectional, questionnaire based, descriptive survey of the children aged 3-18 years, in randomly selected primary and secondary schools, from October 2002 to March 2003. The data was analysed with Statistical Analysis System (SAS). Of 6120 questionnaire sent to the parents/guardians, we received 3180 back (52%). Of the 3180 respondents, 1767 (56%) were for boys and 1413 (44%) were for girls. The median age was 8.25 years. Around 71% of children were between 4 to 11 years of age. The parents reported nocturnal asthma in 177 (6%) of their children with an equal prevalence in boys and girls, i.e., (3% each, rounded off to nearest whole number). Of these 177 children with nocturnal asthma, 99 (56%) were boys and 78 (44%) were girls. Of the 1767 boys and 1413 girls, the nocturnal asthma reported by parents was 6% each (99 and 78 respectively). The nocturnal asthma was not reported in 14-18 years age group of females. The asthma is taken as a stigma in our society and as such is not reported or disclosed rather denied. An extensive educational media campaign is required for awareness of the masses. (author)

  15. Melatonin Attenuates Colistin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats?

    OpenAIRE

    Yousef, Jumana M.; Chen, Gong; Hill, Prue A.; Nation, Roger L; Li, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Colistin-induced nephrotoxicity is a dose-limiting adverse effect when colistin is used against Gram-negative pathogens. This study examined the nephroprotective effect of melatonin against colistin in rats. Rats (n = 7 per group) were treated intravenously twice daily with saline, colistin (at increasing doses from 0.5 to 4.0 mg/kg), melatonin (5 mg/kg), or both melatonin and colistin for 7 days. The severity of renal alteration was examined both biochemically and histologically. The effect ...

  16. Melatonin for sleep problems in children with neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Children with neurodevelopmental disorders are at risk of sleep problems, typically difficulty getting to sleep, sleep/wake rhythm disturbances and reduced duration of sleep (insomnia).(1,2) This may be associated with abnormally timed or inadequate secretion of melatonin, a naturally-occurring hormone involved in coordinating the body's sleep-wake cycle.(1,3) Previously, we reviewed the use of a melatonin product licensed for primary insomnia in adults aged over 55 years.(4) Here we review off-label and unlicensed use of melatonin in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder or related neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26471270

  17. Role of melatonin, melatonin receptors and STAT3 in the cardioprotective effect of chronic and moderate consumption of red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Kim; Nduhirabandi, Frederic; Adam, Tasneem; Thomas, D Paul; Opie, Lionel H; Lecour, Sandrine

    2015-10-01

    We have recently discovered that melatonin, given acutely and directly to the isolated heart at the concentration found in wine, confers cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). However, whether the presence of melatonin in wine contributes to the cardioprotective effect of chronic and moderate consumption of wine and its signalling mechanisms of protection are unknown. We therefore used both in vivo and in vitro models of I/R to investigate whether the presence of melatonin in red wine may contribute to the cardioprotective effect of chronic and moderate consumption of red wine. Wistar rats and C57black6 mice (WT) received drinking water supplemented daily with a moderate amount of red wine or melatonin given at the concentration found in the red wine. Rats were also pretreated with luzindole, a specific inhibitor of melatonin receptors 1 and 2 (2.3 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally) or prazosin, a specific inhibitor of melatonin receptor type 3 (2.5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). After 14 days, hearts were subjected to I/R in vivo or ex vivo. Red wine reduced the infarct size in both rats and WT mice (p < 0.001). Luzindole did not affect wine-induced cardioprotection, while prazosin reduced the infarct sparing effect of red wine (p < 0.05). Furthermore, red wine or melatonin failed to protect tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) receptor 2 knockout or cardiomyocyte specific signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) deficient mice (n.s. vs. control). Our novel findings suggest that the presence of melatonin in red wine contributes to the cardioprotective effect of chronic and moderate consumption of red wine against lethal I/R injuries. This effect is most likely mediated, at least in part, via melatonin receptor 3 and the activation of TNF and STAT3, both key players of the prosurvival and well described SAFE pathway. PMID:26296463

  18. [Treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrobák, L; Dulícek, P; Zák, P

    2001-12-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is an acquired clonal disorder of the hematopoietic stem cell in which intravascular hemolysis is due to an intrinsic defect in the membrane of red cells that makes them increasingly susceptible to lysis by complement. The phenotypic hallmark of PNH cells is an absence or marked deficiency of GPI-anchored proteins such as CD 59+, CD 55+ and others which normally protect cells from the action of complement. PHN is closely associated with aplastic anemia. Some degree of bone marrow failure is always present. Management of PNH is complicated by a highly variable clinical picture and course. Some patients have severe anemia aggravated by hemolytic crises and associated thromboses. Bone marrow failure is accompanied with frequent infections and hemorrhagic manifestations due to thrombocytopenia. With the exception of marrow transplantation, no definite therapy is available. In the exceptional circumstance in which the patient has a syngeneic twin, bone marrow transplantation is the most appropriate therapy for severe PNH because of absence of graft-versus-host disease. In general syngeneic transplantation without preconditioning has been unsuccessful because abnormal hematopoiesis returns. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation has been used, but the transplant-associated morbidity and mortality are high due mainly to the fatal graft-versus-host disease and severe posttransplant marrow failure. Use of an unrelated donor transplant has to be considered as contraindicated. PNH is associated with striking predisposition to intravascular thrombosis which often involves the portal system or the brain. Fatal thromboses account for about 40-50% of all deaths in patients with PNH. The etiology of the thrombophilia in PNH is not fully clarified. Anticoagulation or thrombolytic therapy is required for treatment of venous thrombosis, the latter vena cava. Prophylactic anticoagulation in patients without contraindications such as severe thrombocytopenia seems to be justified. However, whether such therapy may be efficacious in reducing the incidence of thromboses or affect survival is conjectural. PNH patients have varying degree of platelet activation and some authors suggest that antiplatelet therapy might be efficacious in reducing the incidence and severity of venous thrombosis in PNH. Pregnancy is hazardous. Female patients should avoid the use of oral contraceptives. Pregnant patients require combined care of an experienced hematologist and obstetrician specialized in the management of high-risk pregnancies. PMID:11826554

  19. Increases in nocturnal bruxism among college students implicate stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, R A; Conti, P A; Bragg, H R

    1990-12-01

    While the etiology of nocturnal bruxism is unknown, three major categories of theories have been advanced to explain its cause(s), i.e., local-mechanical theories, psychological theories and systemic/neurophysiological theories. The recent report of a four-fold increase in the incidence of self-reported nocturnal bruxism in college students over the last 23-year period emphasizes the role that psychological variables may play in the development of this disorder and it is suggested that the personality traits which contribute to stress management are primary among these. PMID:2090924

  20. Melatonin in higher plants: occurrence and possible functions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolá?, Jan; Machá?ková, Ivana

    2005-01-01

    Ro?. 39, - (2005), s. 333-341. ISSN 0742-3098 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Melatonin * Lingulodinium * auxin-like effects Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 5.025, year: 2005

  1. New actions of melatonin and their relevance to biometeorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    Melatonin is not only produced by the pineal gland, retina and parietal but also by various other tissues and cells from vertebrates, invertebrates, fungi, plants, multicellular algae and by unicells. In plants, many invertebrates and unicells, its concentration often exceeds that found in vertebrate blood by several orders of magnitude. The action of melatonin is highly pleiotropic. It involves firstly, direct effects, via specific binding sites in various peripheral tissues and cells of vertebrates, including immunomodulation; secondly, systemic influences on the cytoskeleton and nitric oxide formation, mediated by calmodulin; and thirdly, antioxidative protection, perhaps also in the context of photoprotection in plants and unicells. In some dinoflagellates, melatonin conveys temperature signals. On the basis of these comparisons, melatonin appears to mediate and modulate influences from several major environmental factors, such as the photoperiod, radiation intensity and temperature.

  2. Melatonin improves spermatogonial stem cells transplantation efficiency in azoospermic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Gholami

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: Administration of melatonin (20 mg/kg simultaneously with transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells in azoospermia mouse testis increases the efficiency of transplantation and improves structural properties of the testes tissue.

  3. The effect of melatonin on bovine in vitro embryo development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gasparrini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin supplementation during in vitro maturation on fertilization and embryo development in cattle. Bovine cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COC, recovered from abattoir ovaries, were matured in vitro in the absence (control and in the presence of 10 ?M, 100 ?M and 1 mM of melatonin. Matured oocytes were fertilized in vitro with frozen-thawed sperm and cultured up to the blastocyst stage. The results of this work demonstrated that melatonin enrichment of the in vitro maturation (IVM medium does not affect both cleavage (71.0, 72.8, 72.5 and 72.7 % in the control group and in the groups supplemented with 10 ?M, 100 ?M and 1 mM of melatonin respectively and blastocyst rates (41.3, 33.8, 39.4 and 38.3 % respectively in cattle.

  4. Melatonin for pre- and postoperative anxiety in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Melissa V; Halladin, Natalie L; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail; Møller, Ann Merete

    2015-01-01

    effect of preoperatively administered melatonin on preoperative or postoperative anxiety. We included adult patients of both genders (15 to 90 years of age) undergoing any kind of surgical procedure in which it was necessary to use general, regional or topical anaesthesia. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS......, whereas the remaining eight studies compared melatonin and placebo only.The quality of the evidence for our primary outcome (melatonin versus placebo for preoperative anxiety) was high. More than half of the included studies had a low risk of selection bias and at least 75% of the included studies had a...... low risk of attrition, performance and detection bias. Most of the included studies had an unclear risk of reporting bias.Eight out the 10 studies that assessed the effect of melatonin on preoperative anxiety using a visual analogue scale (VAS) (ranging from 0 to 100 mm, higher scores indicate greater...

  5. Nocturnal cooling in a very shallow cold air pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakovec, Jože; Skok, Gregor; Žabkar, Rahela; Žagar, Nedjeljka

    2015-04-01

    Cold air pools (CAPs) may develop during nights in very shallow depressions. The depth of the stagnant air within a CAP influences the process of the cooling of nocturnal air and the resulting minimum temperature. A seven-month long field experiment was performed during winter 2013/2014 in an orchard near Kr\\vsko, Slovenia, located inside a very shallow basin only a few meters deep and approximately 500 m wide. Two locations at different elevations inside the basin were selected for measurement. The results showed that the nights (in terms of cooling) can be classified into three main categories; nights with overcast skies and weak cooling, windy nights with clear sky and strong cooling but with no difference in temperatures between locations inside the basin, and calm nights with even stronger cooling and significant temperature differences between locations inside the basin. On calm nights with clear skies, the difference at two measuring sites inside the basin can be up to 5 °C but the presence of even weak winds can cause sufficient turbulent mixing to negate any difference in temperature. To better understand the cooling process on calm, clear nights, we developed a simple 1-D thermodynamic conceptual model focusing on a very shallow CAP. The model has 5-layers (including two air layers representing air inside the CAP), and an analytical solution was obtained for the equilibrium temperatures. Sensitivity analysis of the model was performed. As expected, a larger soil heat conductivity or higher temperature in the ground increases the morning minimum temperatures. An increase in temperature of the atmosphere also increases the simulated minimum temperatures, while the temperature difference between the higher and lower locations remains almost the same. An increase in atmosphere humidity also increases the modelled equilibrium temperatures, while an increase of the humidity of the air inside the CAP results in lower equilibrium temperatures. The humidity of the air within the CAP and that of the free atmosphere strongly influence the differences in equilibrium temperatures at higher and lower locations. The more humid the air, the stronger the cooling at the lower location compared to the higher location.

  6. Melatonin for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Siah, Kewin Tien Ho; Wong, Reuben Kong Min; Ho, Khek Yu

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort, in combination with disturbed bowel habits in the absence of identifiable organic cause. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a hormone produced by the pineal gland and also large number by enterochromaffin cells of the digestive mucosa. Melatonin plays an important part in gastrointestinal physiology which includes regulation of gastrointestinal motility, local anti-inflammator...

  7. Exogenous melatonin affects photosynthesis in characeae Chara australis

    OpenAIRE

    Lazár, Dušan; Murch, Susan J; Beilby, Mary J.; Al Khazaaly, Sabah

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin was found in the fresh water characeae Chara australis. The concentrations (~4 ?g/g of tissue) were similar in photosynthesizing cells, independent of their position on the plant and rhizoids (roots) without chloroplasts. Exogenous melatonin, added at 10 ?M to the artificial pond water, increased quantum yield of photochemistry of photosystem II by 34%. The increased efficiency appears to be due to the amount of open reaction centers of photosystem II, rather than increased efficien...

  8. Homology Models of Melatonin Receptors: Challenges and Recent Advances

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Rivara; Gilberto Spadoni; Annalida Bedini; Alessio Lodola; Daniele Pala

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin exerts many of its actions through the activation of two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), named MT1 and MT2. So far, a number of different MT1 and MT2 receptor homology models, built either from the prototypic structure of rhodopsin or from recently solved X-ray structures of druggable GPCRs, have been proposed. These receptor models differ in the binding modes hypothesized for melatonin and melatonergic ligands, with distinct patterns of ligand-receptor interactions and putativ...

  9. Melatonin and Atopy: Role in Atopic Dermatitis and Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia Marseglia; Gabriella D'Angelo; Sara Manti; Carmelo Salpietro; Teresa Arrigo; Ignazio Barberi; Reiter, Russel J.; Eloisa Gitto

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin may have important immunostimulatory actions in allergic diseases, in addition to its well-known antioxidant and cytoprotective effects in several inflammatory conditions. The activation of the immune system leads to free radical production associated with decreased melatonin levels and depressed antioxidant enzyme activities in several inflammatory diseases. Many skin disorders, including atopic dermatitis, are accompanied by infiltration and activation of mast cells, which release...

  10. Relation of Melatonin to Sleep Architecture in Children with Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Leu, Roberta M.; Beyderman, Liya; Botzolakis, Emmanuel J; Surdyka, Kyla; Wang, Lily; Malow, Beth A

    2011-01-01

    Children with autism often suffer from sleep disturbances, and compared to age-matched controls, have decreased melatonin levels, as indicated by urine levels of the primary melatonin metabolite, 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (6-SM). We therefore investigated the relationship between 6-SM levels and sleep architecture in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Twenty-three children, aged 4–10 years, completed two nights of polysomnography and one overnight urine collection for measurement of ur...

  11. Melatonin agonists for treatment of sleep and depressive disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Gregory M. Brown; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Venkataramanujan Srinivasan

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin the hormone secreted by the pineal gland has been effective in improving sleep both in normal sleepers and insomniacs and has been used successfully in treating sleep and circadian rhythm sleep disorders. The lack of consistency in the reports published by the authors is attributed to the differential bioavailabilty and short half-life of melatonin. Sleep disturbances are also prominent features of depressive disorders. To overcome this problem, melatonergic agonists with sleep prom...

  12. Melatonin and mitochondrial dysfunction in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Daniel P; Pagano, Eleonora S; Scacchi Bernasconi, Pablo A; Reynoso, Roxana; Scacchi, Pablo

    2013-02-01

    Cell death and survival are critical events for neurodegeneration, mitochondria being increasingly seen as important determinants of both. Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered a major causative factor in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). Increased free radical generation, enhanced mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity and NO production, and disrupted electron transport system and mitochondrial permeability transition, have all been involved in impaired mitochondrial function. Melatonin, the major secretory product of the pineal gland, is an antioxidant and an effective protector of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Both in vitro and in vivo, melatonin was effective to prevent oxidative stress/nitrosative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction seen in experimental models of AD, PD and HD. These effects are seen at doses 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than those required to affect sleep and circadian rhythms, both conspicuous targets of melatonin action. Melatonin is selectively taken up by mitochondria, a function not shared by other antioxidants. A limited number of clinical studies indicate that melatonin can improve sleep and circadian rhythm disruption in PD and AD patients. More recently, attention has been focused on the development of potent melatonin analogs with prolonged effects which were employed in clinical trials in sleep-disturbed or depressed patients in doses considerably higher than those employed for melatonin. In view that the relative potencies of the analogs are higher than that of the natural compound, clinical trials employing melatonin in the range of 50-100mg/day are needed to assess its therapeutic validity in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22391273

  13. Melatonin, cardiolipin and mitochondrial bioenergetics in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradies, Giuseppe; Petrosillo, Giuseppe; Paradies, Valeria; Reiter, Russel J; Ruggiero, Francesca M

    2010-05-01

    Melatonin is a natural occurring compound with well-known antioxidant properties. Melatonin is ubiquitously distributed and because of its small size and amphiphilic nature, it is able to reach easily all cellular and subcellular compartments. The highest intracellular melatonin concentrations are found in mitochondria, raising the possibility of functional significance for this targeting with involvement in situ in mitochondrial activities. Mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, are considered to be the most important cellular organelles to contribute to degenerative processes mainly through respiratory chain dysfunction and formation of reactive oxygen species, leading to damage to mitochondrial proteins, lipids and DNA. Therefore, protecting mitochondria from oxidative damage could be an effective therapeutic strategy against cellular degenerative processes. Many of the beneficial effects of melatonin administration may depend on its effect on mitochondrial physiology. Cardiolipin, a phospholipid located at the level of inner mitochondrial membrane is known to be intimately involved in several mitochondrial bioenergetic processes as well as in mitochondrial-dependent steps of apoptosis. Alterations to cardiolipin structure, content and acyl chain composition have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in multiple tissues in several physiopathological situations and aging. Recently, melatonin was reported to protect the mitochondria from oxidative damage by preventing cardiolipin oxidation and this may explain, at least in part, the beneficial effect of this molecule in mitochondrial physiopathology. In this review, we discuss the role of melatonin in preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and disease. PMID:20433638

  14. [MORPHOFUNCTIONAL STATE OF THE THYROID GLAND AFTER EXPOSURE TO MELATONIN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanko, R V

    2015-01-01

    Morphofunctional state of the thyroid gland (TG) of young rats after exposure of exogenous melatonin in the spring and autumn periods was investigated. Exogenous melatonin (Unipharm Inc., USA) was administered to experimental group of animals daily at a dose 5 mg/kg. The duration of the experiment was 28 days. It was shown an increase of the cross-section area of follicles by 31% and colloid by 30% (in spring), reduction of the area of follicle epithelium by 12% (in autumn), an increase in the follicle internal diameter and a decline in the thyroid epithelium height by 12% (in autumn) in TG of experimental groups rats. Also it was shown a decline of follicle-colloid index and growth of colloid accumulation index, reduction amount of interfollicular islets. The introduction of melatonin in the spring period brought down the amount of connecting tissue elements. Melatonin introduction in the autumn period reduced the thickness of connective tissue trabecules in TG. The introduction of melatonin in the spring period resulted in more substantial changes in the structure of TG, as compared to an autumn experiment. Thus, melatonin administered both in the spring and in the autumn periods reduces the functional activity and physiological regeneration of TG. PMID:26845843

  15. Serum levels of melatonin and cytokines in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Farhadi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are important factors of the immune system in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS in which damage caused by oxidants plays a major role in the pathology. Melatonin secreted by the pineal gland has recently been considered as an antioxidant. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between melatonin and cytokines in patients with MS. Thirty patients with MS and 30 healthy controls were selected. Serum levels of melatonin and cytokines, including interleukin-4, interferon-?, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?, were detected in all participants by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. There was a significant difference between patient and control groups in the levels of melatonin and TNF-?. Also, no significant correlation between the serum levels of melatonin and cytokines in both patient and control groups was seen. We concluded that decrease of melatonin and subsequent increase of pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-?, could be a factor in the inflammatory reactions in the pathologic process of MS.

  16. Peripheral and Central Effects of Melatonin on Blood Pressure Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Pechanova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The pineal hormone, melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, shows potent receptor-dependent and -independent actions, which participate in blood pressure regulation. The antihypertensive effect of melatonin was demonstrated in experimental and clinical hypertension. Receptor-dependent effects are mediated predominantly through MT1 and MT2 G-protein coupled receptors. The pleiotropic receptor-independent effects of melatonin with a possible impact on blood pressure involve the reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging nature, activation and over-expression of several antioxidant enzymes or their protection from oxidative damage and the ability to increase the efficiency of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Besides the interaction with the vascular system, this indolamine may exert part of its antihypertensive action through its interaction with the central nervous system (CNS. The imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic vegetative system is an important pathophysiological disorder and therapeutic target in hypertension. Melatonin is protective in CNS on several different levels: It reduces free radical burden, improves endothelial dysfunction, reduces inflammation and shifts the balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic system in favor of the parasympathetic system. The increased level of serum melatonin observed in some types of hypertension may be a counter-regulatory adaptive mechanism against the sympathetic overstimulation. Since melatonin acts favorably on different levels of hypertension, including organ protection and with minimal side effects, it could become regularly involved in the struggle against this widespread cardiovascular pathology.

  17. Gut melatonin response to microbial infection in carp Catla catla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Palash Kumar; Hasan, Kazi Nurul; Maitra, Saumen Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of present study was to demonstrate the response of gut melatoninergic system to Aeromonas hydrophila infection for 3 or 6 days and search for its correlation with the activity of different antioxidative and digestive enzymes to focus their interplay under pathophysiological conditions in carp (Catla catla). Microscopic study of gut in infected fish revealed degenerative changes in the tunica mucosa and lamina propria layers with sloughed off epithelial cells in the lumen. The activity of each digestive enzyme was reduced, but the levels of melatonin, arylalkylamine-N-acetyl transferase protein, the key regulator of melatonin biosynthesis, and different enzymatic antioxidants in gut were gradually and significantly increased with the progress of infection. Gut melatonin concentrations in A. hydrophila challenged carp by showing a positive correlation with the activity of each antioxidative enzyme, and a negative correlation with different digestive enzymes argued in favor of their functional relation, at least, during pathological stress. Moreover, parallel changes in the gut and serum melatonin titers indicated possible contribution of gut to circulating melatonin. Collectively, present carp study provided the first data to suggest that endogenous gut melatonin may be implicated to the mechanism of response to microbial infections in any fish species. PMID:26563281

  18. Hemoglobinuria paroxística nocturna: Actualización / Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    María Teresa, Milanés Roldán; Norma, Fernández Delgado; Teresa, Fundora Sarraff; Juan Carlos, Jaime Facundo; Porfirio, Hernández Ramírez.

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available La hemoglobinuria paroxística nocturna (HPN) es una enfermedad clonal y adquirida causada por una mutación somática en el gen PIG-A que se encuentra en el cromosoma X y codifica una proteina involucrada en la síntesis del glicosilfosfatidilinositol (GPI), el cual le sirve como anclaje a muchas prote [...] ínas de la membrana celular. La mutación ocurre en el stem cell hematopoyético y da lugar a una deficiencia parcial o total de la proteína PIG-A con la consecuente alteración en la síntesis del GPI de anclaje; como resultado, una parte de las células sanguíneas serán deficientes de todas las proteínas ligadas al GPI. La ausencia de estas proteinas en la HPN explica algunos de los síntomas clínicos de la enfermedad, como la hemólisis intravascular mediada por el complemento, la trombosis venosa, el déficit de la hematopoyesis, etc; pero no el mecanismo mediante el cual el clon HPN se expande en la médula ósea. Varios estudios han demostrado que la inactivación del gen PIG- A por sí sola, no confiere una ventaja proliferativa al stem cell mutado, uno o más factores ambientales externos son necesarios para la expansión de este clon mutado, los cuales ejercen una presión selectiva a favor del clon HPN. La causa por el cual el clon HPN se estimula a proliferar podría ser un daño selectivo a la hematopoyesis normal. En el tratamiento de esta enfermedad se han utilizado varios agentes terapéuticos, pero el único tratamiento curativo es el trasplante de progenitores hematopoyéticos Abstract in english The paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is a clonal acquired disease caused by a somatic mutation in the PIG-A gene that is located in the chromosome X and codifies a protein involved in the synthesis of glycosil phosphatidylinositol (GPI), which serves as an anchor for many proetins of the c [...] ellular membrane. The mutations occurs in the hematopoietic stem cell and gives rise to a partial or total deficiency of the protein PIG-A with the subsequent alteration in the synthesis of the anchored GPI. As a result, a part of the blood cells will be lacking all the proteins bound to the GPI. The absence of these proteins in the NPH explains some of the clinical symptoms of the disease, such as the intravascular hemolysis mediated by the complement, the venous thrombosis, the deficit of hematopoiesis, etc., but not the mechanism by which the NPH clone expands into the bone marrow. Some studies have proved that the inactivation of the GPI-A gene does not confer a proliferative advantage to the mutated stem cell. One or more external environmental factors are needed for the expansion of this mutated clone. These factors exert a selective pressure in favor of the NPH clone. The cause for which the NPH clone is estimulated to proliferate may be a selective damage to the normal hematopoiesis. Several therapeutic agents have been used in the treatment of this disease, but the only curative treatment is the transplantation of hematopoietic progenitors

  19. Enurese noturna monossintomática Monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane de P. Meneses

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: a enurese noturna monossintomática (ENM ocupa papel de destaque na prática pediátrica, pela alta freqüência, pelo impacto psicossocial e por ser assunto controverso em relação à etiologia e ao tratamento. O principal interesse deste trabalho é mostrar que a ENM é uma entidade clínica bem individualizada. A enurese noturna pode ser sintoma de distúrbio miccional cuja abordagem terapêutica é completamente diferente. MÉTODOS: Encontramos na literatura uma enorme quantidade de publicações, mas procuramos selecionar, para esta revisão, as publicações clássicas e as mais recentes, de autores internacionalmente reconhecidos como estudiosos neste tema; além disso, trazemos a experiência acumulada ao longo de 13 anos no Centro de Nefrologia Pediátrica do Paraná - Unidade de Distúrbios Miccionais. RESULTADOS: A falta de consenso internacional bem definido quanto a conceituação, terminologia e classificação dificulta a avaliação dos inúmeros estudos publicados na literatura. A individualização da entidade clínica ENM é o ponto de partida fundamental para uma orientação adequada do paciente. A enurese não é um mal da civilização moderna e encontra-se presente na maioria das sociedades, dando oportunidade às mais diversas interpretações e propostas de tratamento (1. Há consenso em relação ao prejuízo da auto-estima em crianças enuréticas e, portanto, em relação ao benefício de seu tratamento. CONCLUSÕES: A enurese noturna continua sendo um grande segredo de família, e muitas crianças permanecem sem orientação e tratamento, sofrendo por falta de compreensão e tendo sua auto-estima atingida. A ENM deve ser ativamente pesquisada na ocasião da consulta pediátrica. Um interrogatório detalhado sobre hábitos e qualidade da micção, antecedentes de infecção urinária e exame físico minucioso, permite descartar outros diagnósticos. A ENM é um problema médico, merecedor de atenção dos profissionais e familiares.OBJECTIVES: Monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MNE plays a very important role in the practice of pediatrics due to its high prevalence, its psychosocial impact, and its controversial etiology and treatment. Our objective was to show that MNE can be a well-defined clinical entity (monosymptomatic, but it can also be a symptom of urinary disorder, thus requiring a completely different therapeutic approach. METHODS: The literature presents numerous publications related to the matter of MNE, thus we tried to select, for this review, the classical and the most recent publications from internationally recognized authors; in addition, we also have a 13-year work experience at the Unit for Urinary Disorders of the Pediatric Nephrology Center of the state of Paraná (Unidade de Distúrbios Miccionais - Centro de Nefrologia Pediatrica do Paraná. RESULTS: The lack of a well-defined, international consensus on the concept, terminology, and classification of MNE is an obstacle for the assessment of the numerous studies found in the literature. The individualization of the MNE clinical entity is the fundamental starting point for providing appropriate guidance for patients. Enuresis can be found in most societies and, thus, it gives way to several interpretations and forms of treatment. There is a consensus, however, on the damage to the self-esteem of enuretic children, and consequently, on the advantage of proper treatment. CONCLUSIONS: In most cases, MNE is kept as a family secret while children remain without proper guidance and treatment and suffering with the lack of understanding and damage to their self-esteem. Doctors should survey patients extensively for MNE during pediatric appointments. It is possible to discard other diagnoses with a detailed survey of habits, quality of the urination, and history of urinary infection and a meticulous physical examination. MNE should be faced as a medical problem worthy of the attention of professionals and patients' families.

  20. Hemoglobinuria paroxística nocturna: Actualización Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Milanés Roldán

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available La hemoglobinuria paroxística nocturna (HPN es una enfermedad clonal y adquirida causada por una mutación somática en el gen PIG-A que se encuentra en el cromosoma X y codifica una proteina involucrada en la síntesis del glicosilfosfatidilinositol (GPI, el cual le sirve como anclaje a muchas proteínas de la membrana celular. La mutación ocurre en el stem cell hematopoyético y da lugar a una deficiencia parcial o total de la proteína PIG-A con la consecuente alteración en la síntesis del GPI de anclaje; como resultado, una parte de las células sanguíneas serán deficientes de todas las proteínas ligadas al GPI. La ausencia de estas proteinas en la HPN explica algunos de los síntomas clínicos de la enfermedad, como la hemólisis intravascular mediada por el complemento, la trombosis venosa, el déficit de la hematopoyesis, etc; pero no el mecanismo mediante el cual el clon HPN se expande en la médula ósea. Varios estudios han demostrado que la inactivación del gen PIG- A por sí sola, no confiere una ventaja proliferativa al stem cell mutado, uno o más factores ambientales externos son necesarios para la expansión de este clon mutado, los cuales ejercen una presión selectiva a favor del clon HPN. La causa por el cual el clon HPN se estimula a proliferar podría ser un daño selectivo a la hematopoyesis normal. En el tratamiento de esta enfermedad se han utilizado varios agentes terapéuticos, pero el único tratamiento curativo es el trasplante de progenitores hematopoyéticosThe paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH is a clonal acquired disease caused by a somatic mutation in the PIG-A gene that is located in the chromosome X and codifies a protein involved in the synthesis of glycosil phosphatidylinositol (GPI, which serves as an anchor for many proetins of the cellular membrane. The mutations occurs in the hematopoietic stem cell and gives rise to a partial or total deficiency of the protein PIG-A with the subsequent alteration in the synthesis of the anchored GPI. As a result, a part of the blood cells will be lacking all the proteins bound to the GPI. The absence of these proteins in the NPH explains some of the clinical symptoms of the disease, such as the intravascular hemolysis mediated by the complement, the venous thrombosis, the deficit of hematopoiesis, etc., but not the mechanism by which the NPH clone expands into the bone marrow. Some studies have proved that the inactivation of the GPI-A gene does not confer a proliferative advantage to the mutated stem cell. One or more external environmental factors are needed for the expansion of this mutated clone. These factors exert a selective pressure in favor of the NPH clone. The cause for which the NPH clone is estimulated to proliferate may be a selective damage to the normal hematopoiesis. Several therapeutic agents have been used in the treatment of this disease, but the only curative treatment is the transplantation of hematopoietic progenitors

  1. Efectos de la melatonina sobre la macro-arquitectura del sueño en pacientes con demencia tipo Alzheimer / Melatonin effects on macro arquitecture sleep in Alzheimer's disease patients

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Manuel Alejandro, Cruz-Aguilar; Ignacio, Ramírez-Salado; Carlos, Cruz-Ulloa; Gloria, Benítez-King.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente estudio fue determinar los efectos de 5 mg. de melatonina de liberación inmediata sobre la macro-arquitectura del sueño en ocho pacientes con diagnóstico de Demencia Tipo Alzheimer (DTA) de media a moderada. Utilizando la técnica polisomnográfica (PSG) se realizó un estudio [...] simple ciego, no aleatorio, controlado con placebo. Los registros PSG se llevaron a cabo de la siguiente manera: Noche 1: administración de placebo; noche 2 y 3: administración continua de melatonina (5 mg). Observamos que el tratamiento con melatonina durante la primera noche de administración disminuyó significativamente la latencia de la fase 2, del sueño de ondas delta y el sueño de MOR al ser comparadas con el placebo (P ?.05). No se observaron diferencias significativas en el tiempo total de cada fase de sueño; tampoco se observaron diferencias en la eficiencia del sueño en presencia de la melatonina. Sin embargo se observó una tendencia a la disminución del tiempo total de vigilia y un aumento del tiempo total de sueño, principalmente durante la segunda noche de tratamiento. Concluimos que la melatonina puede mejorar el sueño en pacientes con DTA de media a moderada. Abstract in english The objective of the present study was to evaluate the 5 mg. melatonin effects on the sleep macro-architecture in eight patients with middle to moderate Alzheimer's disease (DTA). Using the polysomnography technique (PSG), we made a simple-blind, non-randomized, controlled with placebo study. The PS [...] G was carried out according to the following order: night 1: placebo administration; night 2 and 3: continues melatonin administration. In the first night with melatonin treatment, the sleep latency to the first episode of Stage 2, Delta and REM sleep, was significantly diminished as compared with placebo (?.05). No significant difference in total time of each sleep stage and sleep efficiency was observed. Nevertheless, a tendency to diminish the total time of nocturnal wake and increase of the total sleep time in the second night with melatonin treatment was observed. We conclude that melatonin can improve sleep in patients with middle to moderate DTA.

  2. Renal and hepatic scintigraphy in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintigraphic findings in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) have been presented. To summarize, a focal hot spot on liver imaging was better seen on the IDA scan, showing resolution following a satisfactory portacaval anastomosis. PNH is another cause of hot kidneys on bone imaging

  3. Sleep board review question: nocturnal hypoxemia in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Poongkunran C; Budhiraja R

    2013-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated at end of question. Question: Which of the following is the strongest predictor of nocturnal hypoxemia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)?1.Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)2.Age3.Daytime Oxygen Saturation4.Radiological severity of COPD…

  4. Sleep board review question: nocturnal hypoxemia in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poongkunran C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at end of question. Question: Which of the following is the strongest predictor of nocturnal hypoxemia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD?1.Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV12.Age3.Daytime Oxygen Saturation4.Radiological severity of COPD…

  5. Does petroleum development affect burrowing owl nocturnal space-use?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scobie, Corey; Wellicome, Troy; Bayne, Erin [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta (Canada)], email: cscobie@ualberta.ca, email: tiw@ualberta.ca, email: bayne@ualberta.ca

    2011-07-01

    Decline all over Canada in the population of burrowing owls, a federally listed endangered species, has raised concerns about the possible influence of petroleum infrastructure development on owl nocturnal space-use while foraging. Roads, wells, pipelines and sound-producing facilities related to petroleum development change the landscape and can influence the owls' mortality risk. For 3 years, 27 breeding adult male burrowing owls with nests close to different petroleum infrastructures were captured and fitted with a miniature GPS datalogger in order to track their nocturnal foraging. Data from these GPS devices were fed into a geographical information system and showed that pipelines and wells did not alter the foraging habits of the owls. Dirt and gravel roads, with little traffic, were preferentially selected by the owls, conceivably because of higher owl mortality risk along paved roads. Sound-producing facilities did not change owls' foraging behaviour, implying that sound may not affect their nocturnal space-use. Traffic data and sound power measurements will be used in further studies in an effort to better understand burrowing owls' nocturnal foraging habits.

  6. Wild Chimpanzees on the Edge: Nocturnal Activities in Croplands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krief, Sabrina; Cibot, Marie; Bortolamiol, Sarah; Seguya, Andrew; Krief, Jean-Michel; Masi, Shelly

    2014-01-01

    In a rapidly changing landscape highly impacted by anthropogenic activities, the great apes are facing new challenges to coexist with humans. For chimpanzee communities inhabiting encroached territories, not bordered by rival conspecifics but by human agricultural fields, such boundaries are risky areas. To investigate the hypothesis that they use specific strategies for incursions out of the forest into maize fields to prevent the risk of detection by humans guarding their field, we carried out video recordings of chimpanzees at the edge of the forest bordered by a maize plantation in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Contrary to our expectations, large parties are engaged in crop-raids, including vulnerable individuals such as females with clinging infants. More surprisingly chimpanzees were crop-raiding during the night. They also stayed longer in the maize field and presented few signs of vigilance and anxiety during these nocturnal crop-raids. While nocturnal activities of chimpanzees have been reported during full moon periods, this is the first record of frequent and repeated nocturnal activities after twilight, in darkness. Habitat destruction may have promoted behavioural adjustments such as nocturnal exploitation of open croplands. PMID:25338066

  7. Transient pancytopenia associated with parvovirus infection in paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria.

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhani, A. K.; Malkovska, V.; Bevan, D H; Anderson, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    A 25 year old woman with a 15-year history of paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria developed transient pancytopenia following infection with human parvovirus B19. This is the first report of transient pancytopenia in a patient with an acquired haemolytic anaemia due to parvovirus. The possible mechanism of pancytopenia in such a case is discussed.

  8. Melatonin in edible plants identified by radioimmunoassay and by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melatonin, the chief hormone of the pineal gland in vertebrates, is widely distributed in the animal kingdom. Among many functions, melatonin synchronizes circadian and circannual rhythms, stimulates immune function, may increase life span, inhibits growth of cancer cells in vitro and cancer progression and promotion in vivo, and was recently shown to be a potent hydroxyl radical scavenger and antioxidant. Hydroxyl radicals are highly toxic by-products of oxygen metabolism that damage cellular DNA and other macromolecules. Herein we report that melatonin, in varying concentrations, is also found in a variety of plants. Melatonin concentrations, measured in nine different plants by radioimmunoassay, ranged from 0 to 862 pg melatonin/mg protein. The presence of melatonin was verified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Our findings suggest that the consumption of plant materials that contain high levels of melatonin could alter blood melatonin levels of the indole as well as provide protection of macromolecules against oxidative damage. (au) 30 refs

  9. Melatonin suppresses markers of inflammation and oxidative damage in a human daytime endotoxemia model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, Mahdi; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin used as an exogenous drug has been documented to have potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in animal model. We aimed to examine the effect of melatonin in an experimental human sepsis model.

  10. Melatonin in edible plants identified by radioimmunoassay and by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubbels, R.; Klenke, E.; Schnakenberg, E.; Ehlers, C.; Schloot, W. [Univ. of Bremen, Center of Human Genetics and Genetic Counselling, Bremen (Germany); Reiter, R.J. [The Univ. of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Dept. of Cellular and Structural Biology, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Goebel, A.; Schiware, H.W. [Gemeinschaftslabor Dr. Schiwara et al., Breman (Germany)

    1995-01-01

    Melatonin, the chief hormone of the pineal gland in vertebrates, is widely distributed in the animal kingdom. Among many functions, melatonin synchronizes circadian and circannual rhythms, stimulates immune function, may increase life span, inhibits growth of cancer cells in vitro and cancer progression and promotion in vivo, and was recently shown to be a potent hydroxyl radical scavenger and antioxidant. Hydroxyl radicals are highly toxic by-products of oxygen metabolism that damage cellular DNA and other macromolecules. Herein we report that melatonin, in varying concentrations, is also found in a variety of plants. Melatonin concentrations, measured in nine different plants by radioimmunoassay, ranged from 0 to 862 pg melatonin/mg protein. The presence of melatonin was verified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Our findings suggest that the consumption of plant materials that contain high levels of melatonin could alter blood melatonin levels of the indole as well as provide protection of macromolecules against oxidative damage. (au) 30 refs.

  11. Melatonin's effect on inflammatory cytokines in oxidative stress induced PC12 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yap??lar, Hande; Özda?, ?ule; Ak?n, Demet; Ersöz, Melike

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Melatonin is primarily synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland. Melatonin participate in many physiological and biochemical functions. The etiology of neurodegenerative diseases has not been well understood.

  12. Rat liver mitochondrial damage under acute or chronic carbon tetrachloride-induced intoxication: Protection by melatonin and cranberry flavonoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In current societies, the risk of toxic liver damage has markedly increased. The aim of the present work was to carry out further research into the mechanism(s) of liver mitochondrial damage induced by acute (0.8 g/kg body weight, single injection) or chronic (1.6 g/ kg body weight, 30 days, biweekly injections) carbon tetrachloride – induced intoxication and to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of the antioxidant, melatonin, as well as succinate and cranberry flavonoids in rats. Acute intoxication resulted in considerable impairment of mitochondrial respiratory parameters in the liver. The activity of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (complex II) decreased (by 25%, p 4 displayed obvious irreversible impairments. Long-term melatonin administration (10 mg/kg, 30 days, daily) to chronically intoxicated rats diminished the toxic effects of CCl4, reducing elevated plasma activities of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and bilirubin concentration, prevented accumulation of membrane lipid peroxidation products in rat liver and resulted in apparent preservation of the mitochondrial ultrastructure. The treatment of the animals by the complex of melatonin (10 mg/kg) plus succinate (50 mg/kg) plus cranberry flavonoids (7 mg/kg) was even more effective in prevention of toxic liver injury and liver mitochondria damage. Highlights: ► After 30-day chronic CCl4 intoxication mitochondria displayed considerable changes. ► The functional parameters of mitochondria were similar to the control values. ► Melatonin + succinate + flavonoids prevented mitochondrial ultrastructure damage. ► The above complex enhanced regenerative processes in the liver.

  13. Sleep Apnea and Nocturnal Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Populational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Dumas Cintra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanisms associated with the cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea include abrupt changes in autonomic tone, which can trigger cardiac arrhythmias. The authors hypothesized that nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Objective: To analyze the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and abnormal heart rhythm during sleep in a population sample. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 1,101 volunteers, who form a representative sample of the city of São Paulo. The overnight polysomnography was performed using an EMBLA® S7000 digital system during the regular sleep schedule of the individual. The electrocardiogram channel was extracted, duplicated, and then analyzed using a Holter (Cardio Smart® system. Results: A total of 767 participants (461 men with a mean age of 42.00 ± 0.53 years, were included in the analysis. At least one type of nocturnal cardiac rhythm disturbance (atrial/ventricular arrhythmia or beat was observed in 62.7% of the sample. The occurrence of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias was more frequent with increased disease severity. Rhythm disturbance was observed in 53.3% of the sample without breathing sleep disorders, whereas 92.3% of patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea showed cardiac arrhythmia. Isolated atrial and ventricular ectopy was more frequent in patients with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea when compared to controls (p < 0.001. After controlling for potential confounding factors, age, sex and apnea-hypopnea index were associated with nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia. Conclusion: Nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and the prevalence increases with disease severity. Age, sex, and the Apnea-hypopnea index were predictors of arrhythmia in this sample.

  14. Scientific Basis for the Potential Use of Melatonin in Bone Diseases: Osteoporosis and Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    R. J. Reiter; D. X. Tan; Mediavilla, M. D.; E. J. Sánchez-Barceló

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to analyze the data supporting the possible role of melatonin on bone metabolism and its repercussion in the etiology and treatment of bone pathologies such as the osteoporosis and the adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Melatonin may prevent bone degradation and promote bone formation through mechanisms involving both melatonin receptor-mediated and receptor-independent actions. The three principal mechanisms of melatonin effects on bone function could be: ...

  15. Effects of electromagnetic fields on photophasic circulating melatonin levels in American kestrels.

    OpenAIRE

    Fernie, K.J.; Bird, D.M.; PETITCLERC, D.

    1999-01-01

    Birds reproduce within electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from transmission lines. Melatonin influences physiologic and behavioral processes that are critical to survival, and melatonin has been equivocally suppressed by EMFs in mammalian species. We examined whether EMFs affect photophasic plasma melatonin in reproducing adult and fledgling American kestrels (Falco sparverius), and whether melatonin was correlated with body mass to explain previously reported results. Captive kestrel pairs were b...

  16. Electron Microscopic Study on the Effects of Melatonin on Early Spermatids in the Rat Testis

    OpenAIRE

    Sherif H. El-Alfy; Rashed-Morad A. Rashed; Ihab K. Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin is a neuroendocrine hormone secreted principally at night by pineal gland and regulates biological rhythms. Exogenous melatonin is used as a potential treatment for insomnia, sleep disorders and depression. The present investigation was undertaken to characterize the morphological defects in spermatids during early phases of spermiogenesis in melatonin-treated rats using electron microscopy. A single melatonin dose of either 0.05 or 0.1 mg kg-1 body weight was orally administrated t...

  17. [Melatonin and oxidative stress in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczyk, Daria; Rybka, Joanna; Kedziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Kedziora, Józef

    2010-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disease, which frequency increases substantially with age. Oxidative stress as a result of production and deactivation of free radicals unbalance, may play an important role in a complex pathogenesis of disease. Free radicals are by-products of metabolism, which in regard to their chemical structure, readily react with DNA, lipids, proteins and carbohydrates and cause changes in their structure and function. Antioxidant enzyme system and small molecule antioxidants protect organism against harmful effect of free radicals. In accordance to free radical theory of aging, antioxidant enzymes and molecules activity decrease with age. At the same time, quantity of disadvantageous changes caused by reactive oxygen species (RFT) increase. Disturbance in the prooxidant-antioxidant balance causes organism senescence and development of age-related diseases including diabetes mellitus. Hyperglycemia is an additional factor which can escalate systemic oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus. Elevated concentration of glucose increases generation of reactive oxygen species and accumulation of oxidative modified macromolecules as a result of accelerated activation of a few independent molecular pathways such as autooxidation of monosacharides, non-enzymatic glycosylation, activation of protein kinase C, phospholipase A2 and polyol pathway. Moreover aging is associated with decrease of melatonin concentration, which leads to physiological dysfunctions including depressed antioxidant defense mechanisms. Antioxidant properties of melatonin, which protects macromolecules, especially DNA, from harmful effects of RFT, are particularly important in aspect of free radical theory of aging. PMID:20568408

  18. Melatonin and its correlation with testosterone in polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS is considered to be the most common endocrine disorder affecting women. Melatonin, a small lipophilic indoleamine, and reproductive hormones may be interrelated. Melatonin influences sex steroid production at different stages of ovarian follicular maturation as melatonin receptors have been demonstrated at multiple sites in ovary and in intrafollicular fluid. It plays role as an antioxidant and free radical scavanger which protects follicles from oxidative stress, rescuing them from atresia, leading to complete follicular maturation and ovulation. Aims: To study the role of melatonin in PCOS and to investigate its correlation with testosterone in patients suffering from PCOS. Settings and Design: A total of 50 women with PCOS (Rotterdam criteria, 2003 and 50 age and weight matched healthy controls were selected and serum melatonin estimation was done in both the groups and correlated with serum total testosterone levels. Materials and Methods: In a case-control study, detailed history, clinical examination and hormonal evaluation [basal levels of leutinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, insulin, total testosterone, progesterone and melatonin] were carried out in all the participants including both cases and controls. For melatonin estimation, blood samples were collected between 12:00 am and 04:00 am on day 2 nd of menstrual cycle and analyzed by using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Statistical Analysis: Student?s t-test was used to compare the significant difference in mean values between cases and control groups. Chi-square test was used to test the significant association between the qualitative variables. Linear correlation coefficient and regression analysis were done to see the amount and direction of relationship between quantitative variables. Results: The mean melatonin level was observed to be significantly increased in patients (63.27 ? 10.97 pg/mL than in controls (32.51 ? 7.55 pg/mL. Melatonin was found to be raised in all the cases of PCOS (above cut-off value of ?45 pg/mL, P < 0.001. Total testosterone level was also raised in 72% of patients. Melatonin levels were found to be positively associated with increased testosterone (P < 0.001. In regression analysis using melatonin as dependent variable and testosterone as an independent variable, the value of R2 ? 100 (percent variation was found to be 72.1%. Conclusions: Women with PCOS have significantly raised serum melatonin levels and hyperandrogenemia along with increased number of atretic follicles. Further studies are required to establish a definite role of melatonin in PCOS cases with disturbed hormonal milieu. This could open up the way for therapeutic role of melatonin in treatment of patients suffering from PCOS.

  19. Melatonin receptor and KATP channel modulation in experimental vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhat; Gupta, Surbhi; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-04-01

    Cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases are stated as important risk factors of vascular dementia (VaD) and other cognitive disorders. In the central nervous system, melatonin (MT1/MT2) as well as serotonin subtype 2C (5-HT2C) receptors is pharmacologically associated with various neurological disorders. Brain mitochondrial potassium channels have been reported for their role in neuroprotection. This study has been structured to investigate the role of agomelatine, a melatonergic MT1/MT2 agonist and nicorandil, a selective ATP sensitive potassium (KATP) channel opener in renal artery ligation (two-kidney-one-clip: 2K1C) hypertension induced endothelial dysfunction, brain damage and VaD. 2K1C-renovascular hypertension has increased mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), impaired memory (elevated plus maze and Morris water maze), endothelial function, reduced serum nitrite/nitrate and increased brain damage (TTC staining of brain sections). Furthermore, 2K1C animals have shown high levels of oxidative stress in serum (increased thiobarbituric acid reactive species-TBARS with decreased levels of glutathione-GSH, superoxide dismutase-SOD and catalase-CAT), in the aorta (increased aortic superoxide anion) and in the brain (increased TBARS with decreased GSH, SOD and CAT). 2K1C has also induced a significant increase in brain inflammation (myeloperoxidase-MPO levels), acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE) and calcium levels. Impairment in mitochondrial complexes like NADH dehydrogenase (complex-I), succinate dehydrogenase (complex-II) and cytochrome oxidase (complex-IV) was also noted in 2K1C animals. Administration of agomelatine, nicorandil and donepezil significantly attenuated 2K1C-hypertension induced impairments in memory, endothelial function, nitrosative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and brain damage. Therefore, modulators of MT1/MT2 receptors and KATP channels may be considered as potential agents for the management of renovascular hypertension induced VaD. PMID:25659733

  20. Alternative Radioligands for Investigating the Molecular Pharmacology of Melatonin Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legros, Céline; Brasseur, Chantal; Delagrange, Philippe; Ducrot, Pierre; Nosjean, Olivier; Boutin, Jean A

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin exerts a variety of physiologic activities that are mainly relayed through the melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2 Low expressions of these receptors in tissues have led to widespread experimental use of the agonist 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin as a substitute for melatonin. We describe three iodinated ligands: 2-(2-[(2-iodo-4,5-dimethoxyphenyl)methyl]-4,5-dimethoxy phenyl) (DIV880) and (2-iodo-N-2-[5-methoxy-2-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridine-3-yl])acetamide (S70254), which are specific ligands at MT2 receptors, and N-[2-(5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl]iodoacetamide (SD6), an analog of 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin with slightly different characteristics. Here, we further characterized these new ligands with regards to their molecular pharmacology. We performed binding experiments, saturation assays, association/dissociation rate measurements, and autoradiography using sheep and rat tissues and recombinant cell lines. Our results showed that [(125)I]-S70254 is receptor, and can be used with both cells and tissue. This radioligand can be used in autoradiography. Similarly, DIV880, a partial agonist [43% of melatonin on guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding assay], selective for MT2, can be used as a tool to selectively describe the pharmacology of this receptor in tissue samples. The molecular pharmacology of both human melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2, using a series of 24 ligands at these receptors and the new radioligands, did not lead to noticeable variations in the profiles. For the first time, we described radiolabeled tools that are specific for one of the melatonin receptors (MT2). These tools are amenable to binding experiments and to autoradiography using sheep or rat tissues. These specific tools will permit better understanding of the role and implication in physiopathologic processes of the melatonin receptors. PMID:26759496

  1. Melatonina y deficiencia de hormona de crecimiento: contribucin a la evaluacin de los desrdenes neuroendocrinos / Melatonin and growth hormone deficiency: a contribution to the evaluation of neuroendocrine disorders

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    G, Fideleff; M, Surez; HR, Boquete; M, Azaretzky; P, Sobrado; O, Brunetto; HL, Fideleff.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available La melatonina constituye un integrante fundamental del denominado "reloj biolgico" y las alteraciones hormonales sueo-dependientes. Siendo la secrecin fisiolgica de GH, predominantemente nocturna, evaluamos en un grupo de nios y adultos deficitarios de GH (GHD) sin y con tratamiento sustitutivo, la [...] secrecin nocturna de melatonina. Estudiamos 44 pacientes GHD: Grupo a (Ga): Nios sin tratamiento; Grupo b (Gb): Nios con tratamiento con GH (0.16 mg/Kg/semana, dosis estable por mnimo de 6 meses); Grupo c (Gc): Adultos sin tratamiento y Grupo d (Gd): Adultos con tratamiento con GH (0.1- 0.8 mg/da, para mantener IGF1 entre 0 y +2 SDS, dosis estable por mnimo de 6 meses). Todos los pacientes con dficits hormonales asociados estaban adecuadamente sustituidos. La produccin de melatonina fue evaluada a travs de la medicin de su principal metabolito urinario: 6-Sulfatoximelatonina (6-SM), dosado por radioinmunoensayo, en muestras nocturnas (6PM a 8AM). Los niveles de 6-SM nocturna expresados como ?g/unidad de tiempo fueron (media SEM) para el grupo peditrico: Ga = 6.50 ( 5.10) y Gb = 8.21 ( 5.31) (Test de Mann-Whitney, p = 0.82). Para los adultos fueron: Gc = 2.99 ( 1.17) y Gd = 6.60 ( 2.00) (Test de Mann-Whitney, p = 0.35). En algunas alteraciones hipotlamo-hipofisarias han sido descriptas modificaciones del patrn secretorio de melatonina, pero no se han caracterizado en forma completa an, las posibles variaciones en pacientes con GHD. Si bien en las condiciones de este estudio, no hallamos diferencias en la excrecin nocturna de 6-SM entre los GHD no tratados y los tratados en ambos grupos, ello no invalida la existencia de posibles diferencias que podran detectarse estudiando la secrecin diurna de melatonina y su diferencia con la secrecin nocturna. Todo ello podr contribuir al conocimiento de los posibles desrdenes cronobiolgicos involucrados en la deficiencia de GH. Abstract in english Melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, constitutes a landmark in neuroendocrine integration. The relationship between melatonin and different pituitary hormones and sex steroids has been studied; however, the relationship between growth hormone (GH) and melatonin remains unclear. Conside [...] ring that melatonin is an essential component of the so-called "biological clock", related to circadian rhythm, day-night cycle, and sleep-dependent hormonal alterations, and knowing that physiological GH secretion occurs predominantly at night, we decided to evaluate nocturnal melatonin secretion in a group of GH-deficient children and adults on and off replacement therapy. Patients and Methods: We studied 44 patients with GH deficiency (GHD), duly confirmed by pharmacological tests, divided into 4 groups: Group a (Ga ): untreated GHD children; Group b (Gb): GHD children on GH replacement therapy (0.16 mg/Kg/week, stable dose for at least 6 months); Group c (Gc): untreated GHD adults and Group d (Gd): GHD adults on GH replacement therapy (0.1- 0.8 mg/day, to maintain IGF1 between 0 and +2 SDS, stable dose for at least 6 months). All associated hormonal deficits were adequately replaced. Melatonin production was evaluated by measuring the excretion of its major urinary metabolite: 6-Sulphatoxymelatonin (6-SM). Urinary 6-SM was measured (radioimmunoassay, Stockgrand Ltd, Guildford, UK) in nocturnal samples (6PM to 8AM) in all patients. Results: Nocturnal 6-SM levels expressed as ?g/unit of time were (mean SEM) for the pediatric group: Ga = 6.50 ( 5.10) and Gb = 8.21 ( 5.31) (Mann Whitney test, p = 0.82). For adults: Gc = 2.99 ( 1.17) and Gd = 6.60 ( 2.00) (Mann Whitney test, p = 0.35). Discussion and Conclusions: It is difficult to characterize the relationship between melatonin and GH in healthy individuals; however, the administration of intravenous melatonin stimulates GH secretion in normal adults. In some hypothalamic-pituitary alterations, changes in the secretory pattern of melatonin have been reported, but possible variations in GHD patients have not been thoroughly characterized yet. This led us to evaluate 6-S

  2. Diurnal Profiles of Melatonin Synthesis-Related Indoles, Catecholamines and Their Metabolites in the Duck Pineal Organ

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    Bogdan Lewczuk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study characterizes the diurnal profiles of ten melatonin synthesis-related indoles, the quantitative relations between these compounds, and daily variations in the contents of catecholamines and their metabolites in the domestic duck pineal organ. Fourteen-week-old birds, which were reared under a 12L:12D cycle, were killed at two-hour intervals. The indole contents were measured using HPLC with fluorescence detection, whereas the levels of catecholamines and their metabolites were measured using HPLC with electrochemical detection. All indole contents, except for tryptophan, showed significant diurnal variations. The 5-hydroxytryptophan level was approximately two-fold higher during the scotophase than during the photophase. The serotonin content increased during the first half of the photophase, remained elevated for approximately 10 h and then rapidly decreased in the middle of the scotophase. N-acetylserotonin showed the most prominent changes, with a more than 15-fold increase at night. The melatonin cycle demonstrated only an approximately 5-fold difference between the peak and nadir. The 5-methoxytryptamine content was markedly elevated during the scotophase. The 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, 5-hydroxytryptophol, 5-methoxyindole acetic acid and 5-methoxytryptophol profiles were analogous to the serotonin rhythm. The norepinephrine and dopamine contents showed no significant changes. The DOPA, DOPAC and homovanillic acid levels were higher during the scotophase than during the photophase. Vanillylmandelic acid showed the opposite rhythm, with an elevated level during the daytime.

  3. Circadian clock regulation of melatonin MTNR1B receptor expression in human myometrial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesley, Stephen; Lee, Justin; Olcese, James

    2015-08-01

    Circadian genes are expressed in virtually all cells and tissues, and circadian rhythms influence many bodily processes, including reproductive physiology. The expression of hMTNR1B is suppressed during pregnancy until late in term (much like the oxytocin receptor), at which time it is up-regulated to allow for the nocturnal melatonin/oxytocin synergy, which promotes strong nocturnal contractions. Little is currently known about the regulation of hMNTR1b, nor about its functional significance in the myometrium. We, therefore, aimed to elucidate some of the transcription factors that regulate hMNTR1b gene expression in the human myometrium and to determine if hMNTR1b is under circadian control. In this study, we used immortalized and primary myometrial cells that were assessed for circadian gene expression rhythms using real-time bioluminometry and quantitative PCR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation examined the binding of the clock gene product brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)-like protein 1 (BMAL1) to the promoter of the hMTNR1B gene. Overexpression studies tested the role of circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) and its partner BMAL1 in regulating hMTNR1B expression. We confirmed circadian clock gene expression in both immortalized human myometrial cells and primary myometrial cell cultures. We further showed that the hBMAL1 protein binds to an E-box motif in the proximal promoter of the hMTNR1B gene. Overexpression studies demonstrated that the BMAL1/CLOCK complex activates expression of hMTNR1B leading to a circadian rhythm in phase with the E-box driven clock gene hPER2 (Period 2). These results indicate, for the first time, the presence of a functional circadian clock in the human myometrium with the hMTNR1B gene as a clock controlled target. Further investigations could open new vistas for understanding the regulation of uterine contractions and the timing of human labor. PMID:25939854

  4. A train of blue light pulses delivered through closed eyelids suppresses melatonin and phase shifts the human circadian system

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    Figueiro MG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mariana G Figueiro, Andrew Bierman, Mark S ReaLighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USAAbstract: A model of circadian phototransduction was published in 2005 to predict the spectral sensitivity of the human circadian system to narrow-band and polychromatic light sources by combining responses to light from the spectral-opponent “blue” versus “yellow” cone bipolar pathway with direct responses to light by the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. In the model, depolarizing “blue” responses, but not hyperpolarizing “yellow” responses, from the “blue” versus “yellow” pathway are combined with the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell responses. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell neurons are known to be much slower to respond to light than the cone pathway, so an implication of the model is that periodic flashes of “blue” light, but not “yellow” light, would be effective for stimulating the circadian system. A within-subjects study was designed to test the implications of the model regarding retinal exposures to brief flashes of light. The study was also aimed at broadening the foundation for clinical treatment of circadian sleep disorders by delivering flashing light through closed eyelids while people were asleep. In addition to a dark control night, the eyelids of 16 subjects were exposed to three light-stimulus conditions in the phase delay portion of the phase response curve while they were asleep: (1 2-second flashes of 111 W/m2 of blue (?max ? 480 nm light once every minute for 1 hour, (2 131 W/m2 of green (?max ? 527 nm light, continuously on for 1 hour, and (3 2-second flashes of the same green light once every minute for 1 hour. Inferential statistics showed that the blue flash light-stimulus condition significantly delayed circadian phase and significantly suppressed nocturnal melatonin. The results of this study further our basic understanding of circadian phototransduction and broaden the technical foundations for delivering light through closed eyelids during sleep for treating circadian sleep disorders.Keywords: melatonin, dim light melatonin onset, eyelids, flashing blue light, circadian rhythms, sleep

  5. Melatonin: Current Status and Future Perspectives in Plant Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Muhammad A.; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong; Ahmed, Waqar; Reiter, Russel J.; Niu, Mengliang; Hameed, Saba

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a ubiquitous molecule with pleiotropic actions in different organisms. It performs many important functions in human, animals, and plants; these range from regulating circadian rhythms in animals to controlling senescence in plants. In this review, we summarize the available information regarding the presence of melatonin in different plant species, along with highlighting its biosynthesis and mechanisms of action. We also collected the available information on the effects of melatonin application on commercially important crops to improve their growth and development. Additionally, we have identified many new aspects where melatonin may have possible roles in plants, for example, its function in improving the storage life and quality of fruits and vegetables, its role in vascular reconnection during the grafting process and nutrient uptake from roots by modifying root architecture. Another potentially important aspect is the production of melatonin-rich food crops (cereals, fruits, and vegetables) through combination of conventional and modern breeding approaches, to increase plant resistance against biotic and abiotic stress, leading to improved crop yields, and the nutraceutical value of produce to solve food security issues. PMID:26793210

  6. Melatonin regulates the rhythmic migration of neutrophils in live zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Da-long; Li, Ya-juan; Hu, Bing-bing; Wang, Han; Hu, Bing

    2015-05-01

    The circadian clock plays a vital role in physiology and behavior such as the sleep-wake cycle and blood pressure and hormone levels. Immune responses also display circadian rhythmicity and particularly pineal melatonin contributes to immunological processes. Little attention, however, is given to mechanisms underlying rhythmic neutrophil responses to the injury. Here, we used a transgenic Tg(lyz:EGFP) zebrafish tail fin transection model to investigate whether the recruitment of neutrophils toward the injured site is regulated by the circadian clock. We found that migrating neutrophils display robust rhythmicity, peaking at darkness. Melatonin positively regulates rhythmic neutrophil migration, as evidenced that treatment with melatonin at low dosage can significantly enhance neutrophil recruitment toward the injured site, which is attenuated by luzindole treatment and in pinealectomized fish. Furthermore, using a transgenic zebrafish eyeball model, we observed that melatonin enhances secretion of two cytokines, TNF-? and IL-8, both of which markedly enhance neutrophil migration. Taken together, these results highlight a positive role of melatonin in rhythmic neutrophil migration and help obtain a better understanding of circadian regulation in immunology. PMID:25763660

  7. PACAP – Melatonin Interaction in Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Slice Cultures

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    Ehab TOUSSON

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The pineal indoleamine-hormone melatonin elicits a wide variety of physiological actions across vertebrate species. Mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN has high density of melatonin receptors that plays important role in the entrainment of the circadian pacemaker. SCN of the mammalian hypothalamus serves as the central biological clock, controlling circadian rhythms that are synchronized with the external light/dark cycle by retinal photoreception and transmission of light information via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT. RHT has recently been shown to contain pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP as neurotransmitter/neuromodulator. In the present study we cultured hypothalamic brain slices that included the region of the SCN on multi-microelectrode arrays to study in long-duration recordings simultaneously the electrical activity of SCN neurons and their possible target neurons in the hypothalamus. The extracellular recordings from the acute and ? or organotypic hypothalamic slices mainly exhibited multi-unit activity often without the possibility to discriminate single unit activity. Application of melatonin (1nM for 50 min at CT 10 shifted served the circadian rhythm in the firing rate and caused a phase-advance of 4 hours. Application of PACAP (100nM for 25 min at CT6 evoked phase-advance of 2-3 hours while application of PACAP at CT10 had no effect on the circadian rhythm. Co-application of PACAP together with melatonin at CT 10 completely blocked the phase-advance normally induced by melatonin.

  8. Melatonin, a possible promising panacea for premature ovarian failure

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    Ting Guo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF is characterized by impairment of ovarian function unrelated to elevatedfollicle-stimulating hormone (FSH before the age of 40. The consequence of POF is severe and distinctive, presentingfrom infertility to symptoms caused by hormone deprivation. The mechanism of POF remains unclearand current treatments are therefore ineffective. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine is a neuroendocrinalhormone chiefly secreted by the pineal body. Melatonin exerts extensive physiological and pharmacologicaleffects on the biological rhythm, oxidative stress, reproduction, autoimmune and tumourigenesis. However,current researches have not yet brought melatonin into the study of POF. In the present review, we have involvedstate-of-the-art research progress of melatonin in ovary with regard to oxidation, follicle formation and function,and ovarian autoimmune disorders since these aspects mainly dispose to POF development. The features thatmelatonin scavenges reactive oxygen species (ROS, directly and indirectly induces follicle maturation, ovulationand inhibits apoptosis, and modulates autoimmune derangements in the ovaries are highly indicative that melatonincan effect in combating POF. Also, in this respect we have discussed the possibility of applying melatoninin the treatment of POF and have listed evidence of studies in vitro and in vivo. Vacant research directions aresubsequently suggested and the future application of melatonin in POF treatment is prospected.

  9. Prolonged-release melatonin for children with neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leersnyder, Hélène; Zisapel, Nava; Laudon, Moshe

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies demonstrated the efficacy and safety of prolonged-release melatonin in children and adolescents with neurodevelopmental and behavioral disorders. The long-term effectiveness and safety of prolonged-release melatonin treatment were assessed in 88 children (42 girls and 46 boys) with neurodevelopmental disorders. These patients participated in a compassionate-use program with the drug Circadin (2 mg; Neurim Pharmaceuticals, Tel Aviv, Israel) in France, and received treatment in the context of regular care by a specialized physician. The study involved a structured questionnaire for the parents, comprising a combination of multiple-choice and numeric questions addressing sleep onset/offset, sleep quality problems, and mood. The dose of melatonin ranged from 4-6 mg, and treatment duration ranged from 6-72 months. Within 3 months, sleep latency with prolonged-release melatonin decreased by 44.0% (P < 0.001), sleep duration increased by 10.1% (P < 0.001), the number of awakenings decreased by 75% (P < 0.001), and sleep quality improved by 75%, compared with baseline (P < 0.001). No serious adverse events or treatment-related comorbidities were reported. Prolonged-release melatonin remains a safe, effective therapy for the long-term treatment of sleep disorders in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:21723455

  10. Melatonin and serotonin profiles in beans of Coffea species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Akula; Giridhar, Parvatam; Sankar, Kadimi Udaya; Ravishankar, Gokare Aswathanarayana

    2012-05-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) methods were applied to quantify the profiles of melatonin and serotonin (5-HT) in green and roasted beans of Coffea canephora (robusta) and Coffea arabica (arabica). Both melatonin and 5-HT were detected in green coffee beans (5.8±0.8?g/g dry weight (DW), 10.5±0.6?g/g DW) and also in roasted beans of C. canephora (8.0±0.9?g/g DW, 7.3±0.5?g/g DW). Melatonin (3.0±0.6?g/50mL) and 5-HT (4.0±0.7?g/50mL) were detected in coffee brew. In C. arabica, 5-HT was high in green beans (12.5±0.8?g/g DW) compared with roasted beans (8.7±0.4). The levels of melatonin were higher (9.6±0.8?g/g DW) in roasted beans compared with green beans (6.8±0.4?g/g DW). Both melatonin (3.9±0.2?g/50mL) and 5-HT (7.3±0.6?g/50mL) were detected in coffee brew. Because of the relevance of indoleamines as bioactive molecules with implications for food, nutritional sciences and human health, it was of interest to explore their levels in coffee, an important universal beverage. PMID:22017393

  11. ARE THE MELATONIN SUPPLEMENTS POTENTIAL TREATMENT OPTIONS? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

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    Subhranil Saha*, Munmun Koley and Sandip Patra

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Melatonin is a neuro-hormone secreted from the pineal gland and involved in various regulatory activities in body. Ever-increasing use of melatonin supplements and enlarging research evidences make the authors undertook the review to arrive at a qualitative conclusion whether melatonin supplements can act as potential treatment options or not.Methodology: A comprehensive search was undertaken in different electronic databases using various search terms. A total of 225 studies were identified including clinical research studies and basic experiments. Data were extracted individually from the studies and compiled in the end.Results: Melatonin has been used successfully in chronic insomnia and as an anti-oxidant in cancer and other age-related neuro-degenerative disorders, especially Alzheimer’s disease and Autistic disorders. Its evidences of use in other conditions remained insufficient and inconclusive.Conclusion: Melatonin therapy may be considered as efficacious and safe in insomnia and as an anti-oxidant; however, other roles needs to be evaluated in further studies.

  12. Melatonin protects uterus and oviduct exposed to nicotine in mice

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    Seyed Saadat Seyedeh Nazanin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Smoking is associated with higher infertility risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate protective effects of melatonin on the uterus and oviduct in mice exposed to nicotine. Adult female mice (n=32 were divided into four groups. Group A: control animals received normal saline, Group B: injected with nicotine 40 ?g/kg, Group C: injected with melatonin 10 ?g, Group D: injected with nicotine 40 ?g/kg and melatonin 10 ?g. All animals were treated over 15 days intraperitoneally. On the 16th day, animals in the estrus phase were dissected and their uterus and oviducts were removed. Immunohistochemistry was recruited for studying apoptosis and for detection of estrogen receptor (ER alpha in luminal epithelium of the uterus and oviduct. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used for serum estradiol level determination. Nicotine in group B decreased estradiol level and ERalpha numbers both in the uterus and oviduct (p<0.05. Co-administration of melatonin-nicotine in Group D ameliorated the histology of the uterus and oviduct, increased ERalpha numbers and reduced apoptosis in the uterus and oviduct compared with the nicotine Group B (p<0.05. This study indicates that nicotine impairs the histology of the uterus and oviduct and co-administration of melatonin-nicotine ameliorates these findings, partly through alteration in ERalpha numbers and reduction of apoptosis

  13. Effects of melatonin on liver of rats with experimental hyperthyroid

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    Oner J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the structural changes that occurred in the liver of rats with experimental hyperthyroidism and the possible effects of melatonin on these changes. The animals were designated as control group (group I, 3,3', 5-Triiodo-I-Thyronine (T3 injected group (group II and T3+ melatonin injected group (group III. At the end of study, tissue specimens were examined for changes in structure. In the T3 injected group dilatation in sinusoids and pale cytoplasm were observed, as well as an increased number of the Kupffer cells and an increased amount of glycogen. In T3 + melatonin injected group, the amount of glycogen was similar to the T3 injected groups while the number of Kupffer cells increased but sinusoid largeness and hepatocyte structure were similar to the control. On electron microscopic examination the mitochondria of T3 injected group were slightly larger than those of the control group. In T3 + melatonin injected group enlargement in the spaces of Disse, increased number of lipid vacuoles of Ito cells and increased number of microvilli of hepatocytes were observed. Kupffer cells were more active in this group. The results of this study indicate that T3 injection causes structural changes in the liver, and melatonin hormone has a small, if any, protective effect on the liver of rats with hyperthyroid.

  14. Melatonin prevents hyperglycemia in a model of sleep apnea

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Renata Schenkel Rivera, Kaminski; Denis, Martinez; Micheli, Fagundes; Emerson Ferreira, Martins; Carolina Caruccio, Montanari; Darlan Pase, Rosa; Cintia Zappe, Fiori; Norma Possa, Marroni.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder associated with aging and obesity. Apneas cause repeated arousals, intermittent hypoxia, and oxidative stress. Changes in glucolipidic profile occur in apnea patients, independently of obesity. Animal models of sleep apnea induce hyperglycemia. [...] This study aims to evaluate the effect of the antioxidants melatonin and N-acetylcysteine on glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol levels in animals exposed to intermittent hypoxia. Materials and methods Two groups of Balb/c mice were exposed to intermittent hypoxia (n = 36) or sham intermittent hypoxia (n = 36) for 35 days. The intermittent hypoxia group underwent a total of 480 cycles of 30 seconds reducing the inspired oxygen fraction from 21% to 7 ± 1% followed by 30 seconds of normoxia, during 8 hours daily. Melatonin or N-acetylcysteine were injected intraperitonially daily from day 21 on. Results At day 35, glucose levels were significantly higher in the intermittent hypoxia group than in the control group. The intermittent hypoxia groups receiving N-acetylcysteine and vehicle showed higher glucose levels than the group receiving melatonin. The lipid profile was not affected by intermittent hypoxia or antioxidant administration. Conclusions The present results suggest that melatonin prevents the well-recognized increase in glucose levels that usually follows exposure to intermittent hypoxia. Further exploration of the role of melatonin in sleep apnea is warranted. Arch Endocrinol Metab. 2015;59(1):66-70

  15. Presence of melatonin in various cat brainstem nuclei determined by radioimmunoassay

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    Sallanon, M.; Touret, M. (Lyon-1 Univ., 69 (France)); Claustrat, B. (Service de Radiopharmacie et Radioanalyse, Lyon, France)

    1982-01-01

    Microdissected samples of juvenile cat brain tissue were assayed for melatonin content using a double antibody radioimmunoassay. Immunoreactive melatonin was consistently detected, albeit in variable amounts, in pineal, habenula, the region of the nucleus gracilis, gigantocellular reticular formation of the pons and medulla oblongata. Among the negative areas were raphe nuclei, substantia nigra and locus caeruleus. These findings suggest that melatonin may play a role in some structures of the central nervous system outside the pineal-hypothalamo-pituitary axis. This immunoreactive melatonin could reflect a local synthesis, or a tissular uptake of melatonin from blood or cerebrospinal fluid.

  16. Presence of melatonin in various cat brainstem nuclei determined by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microdissected samples of juvenile cat brain tissue were assayed for melatonin content using a double antibody radioimmunoassay. Immunoreactive melatonin was consistently detected, albeit in variable amounts, in pineal, habenula, the region of the nucleus gracilis, gigantocellular reticular formation of the pons and medulla oblongata. Among the negative areas were raphe nuclei, substantia nigra dn locus caeruleus. These findings suggest that melatonin may play a role in some structures of the central nervous system outside the pineal-hypothalamo-pituitary axis. This immunoreactive melatonin could reflect a local synthesis, or a tissular uptake of melatonin from blood or cerebrospinal fluid. (author)

  17. Melatonin mitigates cadmium phytotoxicity through modulation of phytochelatins biosynthesis, vacuolar sequestration, and antioxidant potential in Solanum lycopersicum L

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Md Kamrul; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Yin, Lingling; Shi, Kai; Xia, Xiaojian; ZHOU, YANHONG; Yu, Jingquan; Zhou, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin is a ubiquitous signal molecule, playing crucial roles in plant growth and stress tolerance. Recently, toxic metal cadmium (Cd) has been reported to regulate melatonin content in rice; however, the function of melatonin under Cd stress, particularly in higher plants, still remains elusive. Here, we show that optimal dose of melatonin could effectively ameliorate Cd-induced phytotoxicity in tomato. The contents of Cd and melatonin were gradually increased over time under Cd stress. H...

  18. [Effective melatonin therapy in a case of Machado-Joseph disease with insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, A; Okawa, M; Sasaki, H; Hamada, T; Tashiro, K

    2000-07-01

    The effects of melatonin (MLT) therapy on insomnia and serum MLT concentration were studied in a 44-year-old man with Machado-Joseph disease. He suffered from insomia since age 41, and could not sleep well, despite that he was given many kinds of hypnotics. He showed neither noctural central apnea, inspirative stridor, restless leg syndrome, REM without atonia, nor noctural polyuria, all of which are known to cause insomnia in spinocerebellar degeneration. The peak serum level of MLT was low, 9.2 pg/ml. He was administered 9 mg of MLT p.o. at 8 p.m., and it's peak noctural level elevated to 7,000 pg/ml, and this alleviated his intractable insomnia. Our experience indicate that the MLT could be effective for insomnia in MJD which relates to low MLT concentration. PMID:11186915

  19. DNA protective effects of melatonin on oxidative stress in streptozotocin - induced diabetic rats.

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    Selim Sekkin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease characterized by elevated blood sugar levels resulting from either a lack of insulin production or resistance to insulin. As the prevalence of diabetes has risen to epidemic proportions worldwide, complications of diabetes have now become one of the most challenging health problems. Radicals derived from oxygen (ROS and nitrogen (RNS are the largest class of radical species generated in living systems. ROS and RNS are products of normal cell metabolism and have either beneficial or deleterious effects, depending on the concentration reached in the tissues (1. In diabetic patients, oxidative stress induced by the presence of excessive ROS and RNS is closely associated with chronic inflammation leading to potential tissue damage. The role of oxidative stress in the development of diabetic endothelial dysfunction is underlined by a number of studies. The development of inhibitors against the main sources of ROS generation could be an alternative approach to conventional antioxidant therapies. One of the main challenges of research in recent years has been finding ways to attenuate oxidative stress in order to improve diabetes. Therefore, it seems reasonable that antioxidants can play an important role in the improvement of diabetes. There are many reports on effects of antioxidants in the management of diabetes. Melatonin (MEL (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine is a compound synthesized by the pineal gland in the human brain. MEL is also produced in the retina, thymus, bone marrow, respiratory epithelium, skin, lens, intestine and in other sites. MEL has been characterized as an effective synchronizing agent in several physiological and pathological conditions. MEL is a major scavenger of both ROS and RNS reactive molecules. MEL provokes this effect at both physiological and pharmacological concentrations. Several of its metabolites can also detoxify free radicals and derivatives. With regards to the enzymes of the antioxidant system, MEL regulates the expression of several genes such as those of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (2-4. The aim of this study was to research the effects of MEL on oxidative stress and DNA protective effects in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. A total of 32 rats were equally divided into 4 experimental groups as Control, Melatonin, Diabetic, and Diabetic + Melatonin. A pancreatic beta-cell cytotoxic agent, single dose streptozotocin (60 mg/kg was given by intraperitoneal route to induce experimental diabetes in rats. Rats with ≥200mg/dL blood glucose level were established as Diabetic and Diabetic + Melatonin groups. MEL (10 mg/kg per day and sodium citrate solution were administrated to rats by intraperitoneal route for 6 weeks. With the termination of the experiment, tissue and blood samples were obtained for further analysis. SOD, catalase (CAT, reduced glutathione (GSH and malondialdehyde (MDA were evaluated in rat liver, renal, brain and pancreas tissues. Body weight, plasma glucose, and %HbA1c levels were studied. DNA damage was analyzed with the comet assay in rat lymphocytes; %Tail DNA and Mean Tail Moment parameters were evaluated (5. Antioxidant and oxidant enzyme levels were similar in the Control and Melatonin groups, although there were significant differences between the Diabetic and Diabetic + Melatonin groups. SOD levels in brain and liver tissues were higher (P<0,001, and CAT activities in renal tissue (P<0,001, GSH levels in pancreas tissue (P<0,01 as well as MDA levels in liver (P<0,001, renal (P<0,001 and brain (P<0,01 tissues were higher in the Diabetic + Melatonin group compared with the Diabetic group. Body weight changes and blood glucose levels of the rats were evaluated during the 6 weeks. The effect of MEL on the body weights of Control and Melatonin as well as Diabetic and Diabetic + Melatonin group rats were similar. MEL had no effect on body weight and the diabetic rats were lighter (P<0,001. Also, MEL did not affect blood glucose level and the diabetic rats glucose levels were higher (P<0,001. Blood %HbA1c level was also higher in the diabetic rats (P<0,001 and MEL had no effect on %HbA1c levels. DNA damage was higher in Diabetic group rats (P<0,001, although %Tail DNA and Mean Tail Moment parameters were better in the MEL administered groups than the Diabetic group rats (P<0,001. These results indicate that administration of 10 mg/kg intraperitoneal MEL for 6 weeks may cause amelioration in oxidative stress parameters associated with diabetes, with beneficial effects seen on %Tail DNA and Mean Tail Moment parameters in rat lymphocytes.

  20. Neuroethology of ultrasonic hearing in nocturnal butterflies (Hedyloidea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yack, Jayne E.; Kalko, Elisabeth K.V.; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2007-01-01

    Nocturnal Hedyloidea butterflies possess ultrasound-sensitive ears that mediate evasive flight maneuvers. Tympanal ear morphology, auditory physiology and behavioural responses to ultrasound are described for Macrosoma heliconiaria, and evidence for hearing is described for eight other hedylid species. The ear is formed by modifications of the cubital and subcostal veins at the forewing base, where the thin (1-3 m), ovoid (520 £ 220 )mpanal membrane occurs in a cavity. The ear is innervated by n...

  1. Epidemiology and exogenous factors in nocturnal airflow limitation in children

    OpenAIRE

    Rosman-Meijer, Geertruida Gerarda,

    1996-01-01

    The studies in this thesis add new insights to the concept on the pathophysiology of nocturnal airflow limitation in asthmatic children. Exogenous factors such as environmental tobacco smoke, the presence of pets, and high HDMA levels all independently contribute to the circadian PEF amplitude in allergic asthmatic children. Parents should not only be stressed to stop smoking during pregnancy, but also any time thereafter to improve the stability and the prognosis of their childs asthma...

  2. Vision in the nocturnal wandering spider Leucorchestris arenicola (Araneae: Sparassidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Thomas; Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Henschel, Joh R; Garm, Anders; Wehner, Rüdiger

    2008-01-01

    At night the Namib Desert spider Leucorchestris arenicola performs long-distance homing across its sand dune habitat. By disabling all or pairs of the spiders' eight eyes we found that homing ability was severely reduced when vision was fully abolished. Vision, therefore, seems to play a key role in the nocturnal navigational performances of L. arenicola. After excluding two or three pairs of eyes, the spiders were found to be able to navigate successfully using only their lateral eyes or only t...

  3. Nocturnal Homing: Learning Walks in a Wandering Spider?

    OpenAIRE

    Nørgaard, Thomas; Gagnon, Yakir L.; Warrant, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Homing by the nocturnal Namib Desert spider Leucorchestris arenicola (Araneae: Sparassidae) is comparable to homing in diurnal bees, wasps and ants in terms of path length and layout. The spiders' homing is based on vision but their basic navigational strategy is unclear. Diurnal homing insects use memorised views of their home in snapshot matching strategies. The insects learn the visual scenery identifying their nest location during learning flights (e.g. bees and wasps) or walks (ants). Th...

  4. Golden hamsters are nocturnal in captivity but diurnal in nature

    OpenAIRE

    GATTERMANN, Rolf; Johnston, Robert E; Yigit, Nuri; Fritzsche, Peter; Larimer, Samantha; Özkurt, Sakir; Neumann, Karsten; Song, Zhimin; Colak, Ercüment; Johnston, Joan; McPhee, M. Elsbeth

    2008-01-01

    Daily activity rhythms are nearly universal among animals and their specific pattern is an adaptation of each species to its ecological niche. Owing to the extremely consistent nocturnal patterns of activity shown by golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) in the laboratory, this species is a prime model for studying the mechanisms controlling circadian rhythms. In contrast to laboratory data, we discovered that female hamsters in the wild were almost exclusively diurnal. These results raise m...

  5. Reduced nocturnal ACTH-driven cortisol secretion during critical illness

    OpenAIRE

    Boonen E; Meersseman P; Vervenne H; Meyfroidt G; Gu\\xefza F; Wouters PJ; VeldhuisJD; Van den Berghe G

    2014-01-01

    Recently, during critical illness, cortisol metabolism was found to be reduced. We hypothesize that such reduced cortisol breakdown may suppress pulsatile ACTH and cortisol secretion via feedback inhibition. To test this hypothesis, nocturnal ACTH and cortisol secretory profiles were constructed by deconvolution analysis from plasma concentration time series in 40 matched critically ill patients and eight healthy controls, excluding diseases or drugs that affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-adr...

  6. A Climatology of Nocturnal Low-Level Jets at Cabauw

    OpenAIRE

    Baas, P.; Bosveld, F. C.; Baltink, H.K.; Holtslag, A. A. M.

    2009-01-01

    A climatology of nocturnal low-level jets (LLJs) is presented for the topographically flat measurement site at Cabauw, the Netherlands. LLJ characteristics are derived from a 7-yr half-hourly database of wind speed profiles, obtained from the 200-m mast and a wind profiler. Many LLJs at Cabauw originate from an inertial oscillation, which develops after sunset in a layer decoupled from the surface by stable stratification. The data are classified to different types of stable boundary layers b...

  7. Targeting nocturnal hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossen, Niklas Blach; Knudsen, SØren Tang

    2014-01-01

    Several studies in different populations have suggested that nighttime blood pressure (BP) is a stronger predictor of cardiovascular events than daytime BP. Consequently, treatment strategies to target nighttime BP have come into focus. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of change of administration time of antihypertensive drugs. We included 41 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nocturnal hypertension (nighttime systolic BP >120 mm Hg) in an open-label, crossover study. Patients were randomized to 8 weeks of either morning or bedtime administration of all of the individual's once-daily antihypertensive drugs, followed by 8 weeks of switched dosing regimen. Bedtime administration of antihypertensive drugs resulted in a significant reduction in nighttime (7.5 mm Hg; P<0.001) and 24-hour (3.1 mm Hg; P=0.014) systolic BP, with a nonsignificant reduction in daytime (1.3 mm Hg; P=0.336) systolic BP. We did not find morning BP surge to be different between dosing regimens. Levels of C-reactive protein were significantly lower with bedtime administration, which may indicate an effect on low-grade inflammation. We found no difference in urinary albumin excretion, regardless of albuminuria status. Urinary sodium/creatinine was significantly increased and urinary osmolality significantly reduced with bedtime administration, which can be interpreted as increased nocturnal natriuresis. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nocturnal hypertension, administration of once-daily antihypertensive drugs at bedtime may be favorable. The increased nocturnal natriuresis may reflect increased effect of bedtime-administered thiazides and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, suggesting a potential mechanism of the observed effects on BP with chronotherapeutic intervention.

  8. Processes driving nocturnal transpiration and implications for estimating land evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Víctor Resco; Roy, Jacques; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Alday, Josu G.; Landais, Damien; Milcu, Alexandru; Gessler, Arthur

    2015-06-01

    Evapotranspiration is a major component of the water cycle, yet only daytime transpiration is currently considered in Earth system and agricultural sciences. This contrasts with physiological studies where 25% or more of water losses have been reported to occur occurring overnight at leaf and plant scales. This gap probably arose from limitations in techniques to measure nocturnal water fluxes at ecosystem scales, a gap we bridge here by using lysimeters under controlled environmental conditions. The magnitude of the nocturnal water losses (12-23% of daytime water losses) in row-crop monocultures of bean (annual herb) and cotton (woody shrub) would be globally an order of magnitude higher than documented responses of global evapotranspiration to climate change (51-98 vs. 7-8?mm yr-1). Contrary to daytime responses and to conventional wisdom, nocturnal transpiration was not affected by previous radiation loads or carbon uptake, and showed a temporal pattern independent of vapour pressure deficit or temperature, because of endogenous controls on stomatal conductance via circadian regulation. Our results have important implications from large-scale ecosystem modelling to crop production: homeostatic water losses justify simple empirical predictive functions, and circadian controls show a fine-tune control that minimizes water loss while potentially increasing posterior carbon uptake.

  9. Sound imaging of nocturnal animal calls in their natural habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, Takeshi; Aihara, Ikkyu; Otsuka, Takuma; Takeda, Ryu; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Hiroshi G

    2011-09-01

    We present a novel method for imaging acoustic communication between nocturnal animals. Investigating the spatio-temporal calling behavior of nocturnal animals, e.g., frogs and crickets, has been difficult because of the need to distinguish many animals' calls in noisy environments without being able to see them. Our method visualizes the spatial and temporal dynamics using dozens of sound-to-light conversion devices (called "Firefly") and an off-the-shelf video camera. The Firefly, which consists of a microphone and a light emitting diode, emits light when it captures nearby sound. Deploying dozens of Fireflies in a target area, we record calls of multiple individuals through the video camera. We conduct two experiments, one indoors and the other in the field, using Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica). The indoor experiment demonstrates that our method correctly visualizes Japanese tree frogs' calling behavior. It has confirmed the known behavior; two frogs call synchronously or in anti-phase synchronization. The field experiment (in a rice paddy where Japanese tree frogs live) also visualizes the same calling behavior to confirm anti-phase synchronization in the field. Experimental results confirm that our method can visualize the calling behavior of nocturnal animals in their natural habitat. PMID:21584762

  10. Determination of melatonin in Acyrthosiphon pisum aphids by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrivá, Laura; Manyes, Lara; Barberà, Miquel; Martínez-Torres, David; Meca, Guiseppe

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin is a hormone mainly involved in the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Despite the identification of melatonin in many insects, its involvement in the insect seasonal response remains unclear. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed for melatonin analysis in aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) for the first time. After comparing two different procedures and five extraction solvents, a sample preparation procedure with a mixture of methanol/water (50:50) was selected for melatonin extraction. The method was validated by analyzing melatonin recovery at three spiked concentrations (5, 50 and 100pg/mg) and showed satisfactory recoveries (75-110%), and good repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation (aphid samples demonstrating its usefulness for melatonin determination in insects. This is -to our knowledge- the first identification of melatonin in aphids by LC-MS/MS. PMID:26778054

  11. Nightly treatment of primary insomnia with prolonged release melatonin for 6 months: a randomized placebo controlled trial on age and endogenous melatonin as predictors of efficacy and safety

    OpenAIRE

    Wade Alan G; Ford Ian; Crawford Gordon; McConnachie Alex; Nir Tali; Laudon Moshe; Zisapel Nava

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Melatonin is extensively used in the USA in a non-regulated manner for sleep disorders. Prolonged release melatonin (PRM) is licensed in Europe and other countries for the short term treatment of primary insomnia in patients aged 55 years and over. However, a clear definition of the target patient population and well-controlled studies of long-term efficacy and safety are lacking. It is known that melatonin production declines with age. Some young insomnia patients also ma...

  12. The role of melatonin in anaesthesia and critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri S Kurdi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland. It is widely present in both plant and animal sources. In several countries, it is sold over the counter as tablets and as food supplement or additive. Currently, it is most often used to prevent jet lag and to induce sleep. It has been and is being used in several clinical trials with different therapeutic approaches. It has sedative, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and chronobiotic effects. In the present review, the potential therapeutic benefits of melatonin in anaesthesia and critical care are presented. This article aims to review the physiological properties of melatonin and how these could prove useful for several clinical applications in perioperative management, critical care and pain medicine. The topic was handsearched from textbooks and journals and electronically from PubMed, and Google scholar using text words.

  13. Conformational complexity of melatonin in water and methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillady, Donald D; Castevens, Charles M; Trindle, Carl; Sulik, Jeffrey; Klonowski, Paula

    2003-09-01

    The magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of melatonin in water and methanol solutions is compared to the MCD spectra of indole and five melatonin conformations observed in low temperature jet spectroscopy. Based on a survey of indole compounds using Slater type orbitals-6G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-31G(d) energies, and CNDO/S-D calculations of MCD spectral bands, a dominant structure with a water molecule bridging the amide-keto oxygen and indole Nz-H atoms is proposed as the best fit for the MCD of aqueous melatonin. In methanol an additional band appears at 310 nm which is supported only by solvated structures in which the alkyl-amide arm is extended away from the indole moiety. PMID:14499912

  14. The pineal neurohormone melatonin and its physiologic opiatergic immunoregulatory role

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Georges J. M., Maestroni; Ario, Conti; Walter, Pierpaoli.

    Full Text Available The pineal gland functions as a neuroendocrine transducer that coordinate the organism response to changing environmental stimuli such as light and temperature. The main and best known pineal neurohormone is melatonin that is synthesized and released in a circadian fashion with a peak during the nig [...] ht darkness hours. We have recently reported that melatonin exerts important immuno regulatory functions. Here we describe the astonishing property of exogenous melatonin which is able to counteract completely the depressive effect of anxiety-restraint stress and/or of corticosterone on thymus weight, andibody production and antiviral responses. This effect seems to be mediated by antigen-activated T cells via an opiatergic mechanism.

  15. Hormone melatonin influence on cell to cell information transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation-induced bystander effect is a phenomenon whereby cellular damage is expressed in unirradiated neighboring cells, connected or not to an irradiated cell or cells. The influence of melatonin on bystander effect has been studied, using the colony-forming and micronuclei assay in cultured human cells. It was shown that donor medium transfer to unirradiated cells caused bystander effect. Irradiated culture medium itself (without cells) does not able to induce bystander effect. Melatonin increased the colony-forming ability of bystander recipient cells and reduced micronucleus rate, when it was added into culture medium after irradiation of donor cells. The received results indicate that melatonin reduces transfer of bystander signals from irradiated cells to unirradiated ones. It's important for bystander mechanism study as well as for radiation risk assessment and cancer radiotherapy. (authors)

  16. The pineal neurohormone melatonin and its physiologic opiatergic immunoregulatory role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges J. M. Maestroni

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available The pineal gland functions as a neuroendocrine transducer that coordinate the organism response to changing environmental stimuli such as light and temperature. The main and best known pineal neurohormone is melatonin that is synthesized and released in a circadian fashion with a peak during the night darkness hours. We have recently reported that melatonin exerts important immuno regulatory functions. Here we describe the astonishing property of exogenous melatonin which is able to counteract completely the depressive effect of anxiety-restraint stress and/or of corticosterone on thymus weight, andibody production and antiviral responses. This effect seems to be mediated by antigen-activated T cells via an opiatergic mechanism.

  17. A systematic review of peri-operative melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L P H; Werner, M U

    2014-01-01

    We systematically reviewed randomised controlled trials of peri-operative melatonin. We included 24 studies of 1794 participants that reported eight peri-operative outcomes: anxiety; analgesia; sleep quality; oxidative stress; emergence behaviour; anaesthetic requirements; steal induction; and safety. Compared with placebo, melatonin reduced the standardised mean difference (95% CI) pre-operative anxiety score by 0.88 (0.44-1.33) and postoperative pain score by 1.06 (0.23-1.88). The magnitude of effect was unreliable due to substantial statistical heterogeneity, with I(2) 87% and 94%, respectively. Qualitative reviews suggested the melatonin improved sleep quality and emergence behaviour, and might be capable of reducing oxidative stress and anaesthetic requirements.

  18. Rat liver mitochondrial damage under acute or chronic carbon tetrachloride-induced intoxication: Protection by melatonin and cranberry flavonoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheshchevik, V.T. [Institute for Pharmacology and Biochemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Len. Kom. Blvd. - 50, 230017 Grodno (Belarus); Department of Biochemistry, Yanka Kupala Grodno State University, Len. Kom. Blvd. - 50, 230017 Grodno (Belarus); Lapshina, E.A.; Dremza, I.K.; Zabrodskaya, S.V. [Institute for Pharmacology and Biochemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Len. Kom. Blvd. - 50, 230017 Grodno (Belarus); Reiter, R.J. [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229–3900 (United States); Prokopchik, N.I. [Grodno State Medical University, Gorkogo - 80, 230015 Grodno (Belarus); Zavodnik, I.B., E-mail: zavodnik_il@mail.ru [Institute for Pharmacology and Biochemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Len. Kom. Blvd. - 50, 230017 Grodno (Belarus); Department of Biochemistry, Yanka Kupala Grodno State University, Len. Kom. Blvd. - 50, 230017 Grodno (Belarus)

    2012-06-15

    In current societies, the risk of toxic liver damage has markedly increased. The aim of the present work was to carry out further research into the mechanism(s) of liver mitochondrial damage induced by acute (0.8 g/kg body weight, single injection) or chronic (1.6 g/ kg body weight, 30 days, biweekly injections) carbon tetrachloride – induced intoxication and to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of the antioxidant, melatonin, as well as succinate and cranberry flavonoids in rats. Acute intoxication resulted in considerable impairment of mitochondrial respiratory parameters in the liver. The activity of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (complex II) decreased (by 25%, p < 0.05). Short-term melatonin treatment (10 mg/kg, three times) of rats did not reduce the degree of toxic mitochondrial dysfunction but decreased the enhanced NO production. After 30-day chronic intoxication, no significant change in the respiratory activity of liver mitochondria was observed, despite marked changes in the redox-balance of mitochondria. The activities of the mitochondrial enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase, as well as that of cytoplasmic catalase in liver cells were inhibited significantly. Mitochondria isolated from the livers of the rats chronically treated with CCl{sub 4} displayed obvious irreversible impairments. Long-term melatonin administration (10 mg/kg, 30 days, daily) to chronically intoxicated rats diminished the toxic effects of CCl{sub 4}, reducing elevated plasma activities of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and bilirubin concentration, prevented accumulation of membrane lipid peroxidation products in rat liver and resulted in apparent preservation of the mitochondrial ultrastructure. The treatment of the animals by the complex of melatonin (10 mg/kg) plus succinate (50 mg/kg) plus cranberry flavonoids (7 mg/kg) was even more effective in prevention of toxic liver injury and liver mitochondria damage. Highlights: ► After 30-day chronic CCl{sub 4} intoxication mitochondria displayed considerable changes. ► The functional parameters of mitochondria were similar to the control values. ► Melatonin + succinate + flavonoids prevented mitochondrial ultrastructure damage. ► The above complex enhanced regenerative processes in the liver.

  19. Yeast contribution to melatonin, melatonin isomers and tryptophan ethyl ester during alcoholic fermentation of grape musts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigentini, Ileana; Gardana, Claudio; Fracassetti, Daniela; Gabrielli, Mario; Foschino, Roberto; Simonetti, Paolo; Tirelli, Antonio; Iriti, Marcello

    2015-05-01

    Melatonin (MEL) has been found in some medicinal and food plants, including grapevine, a commodity of particular interest for the production of wine, a beverage of economic relevance. It has also been suggested that MEL in wine may, at least in part, contribute to the health-promoting properties attributed to this beverage and, possibly, to other traditional Mediterranean foodstuffs. After a preliminary screening of 9 yeast strains in laboratory medium, three selected strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118, Torulaspora delbrueckii CBS1146(T) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii ATCC36947(T) ) were inoculated in experimental musts obtained from 2 white (Moscato and Chardonnay) and 2 red (Croatina and Merlot) grape varieties. The production of MEL, melatonin isomers (MIs) and tryptophan ethyl ester (TEE) was monitored during the alcoholic fermentation. The screening showed that the three investigated strains produced the highest concentrations of MEL and two MIs in optimal growth conditions. However, MEL and MIs were not produced in oenological conditions, but the three strains synthesized high concentrations of a new MI and TEE in musts. PMID:25726850

  20. Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Experiment Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Parsons, D [NCAR; Geerts, B [Department of Atmospheric Science, University of Wyoming

    2015-03-01

    The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment is a large field campaign that is being supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with contributions from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Atmospheric and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The overarching goal of the PECAN experiment is to improve the understanding and simulation of the processes that initiate and maintain convection and convective precipitation at night over the central portion of the Great Plains region of the United States (Parsons et al. 2013). These goals are important because (1) a large fraction of the yearly precipitation in the Great Plains comes from nocturnal convection, (2) nocturnal convection in the Great Plains is most often decoupled from the ground and, thus, is forced by other phenomena aloft (e.g., propagating bores, frontal boundaries, low-level jets [LLJ], etc.), (3) there is a relative lack of understanding how these disturbances initiate and maintain nocturnal convection, and (4) this lack of understanding greatly hampers the ability of numerical weather and climate models to simulate nocturnal convection well. This leads to significant uncertainties in predicting the onset, location, frequency, and intensity of convective cloud systems and associated weather hazards over the Great Plains.

  1. Acute myeloblastic leukemia in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Evidence of evolution from the abnormal paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clone.

    OpenAIRE

    Devine, D V; Gluck, W L; Rosse, W F; Weinberg, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired hematopoietic stem cell disorder in which the blood cells demonstrate aberrant interactions with serum complement. In part, this is due to the absence of the complement regulatory protein, decay accelerating factor (DAF). A small number of patients with PNH have gone on to develop acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, which is thought to arise from the injured marrow as a second hematopoietic disorder. We have studied a patient with PNH who de...

  2. Patterns of GPS Tracks Suggest Nocturnal Foraging by Incubating Peruvian Pelicans (Pelecanus thagus)

    OpenAIRE

    Zavalaga, Carlos B.; Dell'Omo, Giacomo; Becciu, Paolo; Yoda, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Most seabirds are diurnal foragers, but some species may also feed at night. In Peruvian pelicans (Pelecanus thagus), the evidence for nocturnal foraging is sparse and anecdotal. We used GPS-dataloggers on five incubating Peruvian pelicans from Isla Lobos de Tierra, Perú, to examine their nocturnality, foraging movements and activities patterns at sea. All instrumented pelicans undertook nocturnal trips during a 5–7 day tracking period. Eighty-seven percent of these trips (n?=?13) were strict...

  3. Anatomical Specializations for Nocturnality in a Critically Endangered Parrot, the Kakapo (Strigops habroptilus)

    OpenAIRE

    Corfield, Jeremy R.; Gsell, Anna C.; Brunton, Dianne; Heesy, Christopher P.; Hall, Margaret I.; Acosta, Monica L.; Iwaniuk, Andrew N.

    2011-01-01

    The shift from a diurnal to nocturnal lifestyle in vertebrates is generally associated with either enhanced visual sensitivity or a decreased reliance on vision. Within birds, most studies have focused on differences in the visual system across all birds with respect to nocturnality-diurnality. The critically endangered Kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), a parrot endemic to New Zealand, is an example of a species that has evolved a nocturnal lifestyle in an otherwise diurnal lineage, but nothing ...

  4. LBA-ECO CD-03 Nocturnal Meteorological Data, Forest and Pasture Sites, Para, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains measurements of nocturnal meteorological profiles collected from tethered balloon platforms during July 2001, October 2001, and...

  5. LBA-ECO CD-03 Nocturnal Meteorological Data, Forest and Pasture Sites, Para, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains measurements of nocturnal meteorological profiles collected from tethered balloon platforms during July 2001, October 2001, and November...

  6. A physiologically based pharmacokinetics model for melatonin--effects of light and routes of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Henry T; Bouak, Fethi; Vartanian, Oshin; Cheung, Bob

    2013-12-15

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models were developed using MATLAB Simulink(®) to predict diurnal variations of endogenous melatonin with light as well as pharmacokinetics of exogenous melatonin via different routes of administration. The model was structured using whole body, including pineal and saliva compartments, and parameterized based on the literature values for endogenous melatonin. It was then optimized by including various intensities of light and various dosage and formulation of melatonin. The model predictions generally have a good fit with available experimental data as evaluated by mean squared errors and ratios between model-predicted and observed values considering large variations in melatonin secretion and pharmacokinetics as reported in the literature. It also demonstrates the capability and usefulness in simulating plasma and salivary concentrations of melatonin under different light conditions and the interaction of endogenous melatonin with the pharmacokinetics of exogenous melatonin. Given the mechanistic approach and programming flexibility of MATLAB Simulink(®), the PBPK model could provide predictions of endogenous melatonin rhythms and pharmacokinetic changes in response to environmental (light) and experimental (dosage and route of administration) conditions. Furthermore, the model may be used to optimize the combined treatment using light exposure and exogenous melatonin for maximal phase advances or delays. PMID:24120727

  7. Detection and quantification of the antioxidant melatonin in Montmorency and Balaton tart cherries (Prunus cerasus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, S; Tan, D X; Manchester, L C; Hardeland, R; Reiter, R J

    2001-10-01

    The antioxidant melatonin was recently identified in a variety of edible plants and seeds in high concentrations. In plants, as in animals, melatonin is believed to function as a free radical scavenger and possibly in photoperiodism. In this study, melatonin was detected and quantified in fresh-frozen Balaton and Montmorency tart cherries (Prunus cerasus) using high-performance liquid chromatography. Both cherry species contain high levels of melatonin compared to the melatonin concentrations in the blood of mammals. Montmorency cherries (13.46 +/- 1.10 ng/g) contain approximately 6 times more melatonin than do Balaton cherries (2.06 +/- 0.17 ng/g). Neither the orchard of origin nor the time of harvest influenced the amount of melatonin in fresh cherries. The implication of the current findings is that consuming cherries could be an important source of dietary melatonin inasmuch as melatonin is readily absorbed when taken orally. Also, previously published data and the results presented here show that melatonin is not only endogenously produced but also present in the diet. PMID:11600041

  8. Melatonin directly interacts with cholesterol and alleviates cholesterol effects in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngjik; Attwood, Simon J; Hoopes, Matthew I; Drolle, Elizabeth; Karttunen, Mikko; Leonenko, Zoya

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is a pineal hormone that has been shown to have protective effects in several diseases that are associated with cholesterol dysregulation, including cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and certain types of cancers. Cholesterol is a major membrane constituent with both a structural and functional influence. It is also known that melatonin readily partitions into cellular membranes. We investigated the effects of melatonin and cholesterol on the structure and physical properties of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) monolayer as a simple membrane model using the Langmuir-Blodgett (L-B) monolayer technique and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We report that melatonin increases the area per lipid and elastic compressibility of the DPPC monolayer in a concentration dependent manner, while cholesterol has the opposite effect. When both melatonin and cholesterol were present in the monolayer, the compression isotherms showed normalization of the area per molecule towards that of the pure DPPC monolayer, thus indicating that melatonin counteracts and alleviates cholesterol's effects. Atomistic MD simulations of melatonin enriched DPPC systems correlate with our experimental findings and illustrate the structural effects of both cholesterol and melatonin. Our results suggest that melatonin is able to lessen the influence of cholesterol through two different mechanisms. Firstly, we have shown that melatonin has a fluidizing effect on monolayers comprising only lipid molecules. Secondly, we also observe that melatonin interacts directly with cholesterol. Our findings suggest a direct nonspecific interaction of melatonin may be a mechanism involved in reducing cholesterol associated membrane effects, thus suggesting the existence of a new mechanism of melatonin's action. This may have important biological relevance in addition to the well-known anti-oxidative and receptor binding effects. PMID:24651707

  9. Circadian rhythm in salivary melatonin in narcoleptic patiens.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blažejová, K.; Illnerová, Helena; Hájek, Ivan; Nevšímalová, S.

    2008-01-01

    Ro?. 437, ?. 2 (2008), s. 162-164. ISSN 0304-3940 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : narcolepsy * circadian system * melatonin Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.200, year: 2008

  10. Effects of melatonin and its analogues on neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jiaqi; Tu, Yalin; Chen, Jingkao; Tan, Dunxian; Liu, Xingguo; Pi, Rongbiao

    2016-01-15

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent cells which are capable of self-replication and differentiation into neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). NSCs are found in two main regions in the adult brain: the subgranular zone (SGZ) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ). The recent discovery of NSCs in the adult mammalian brain has fostered a plethora of translational and preclinical studies to investigate novel approaches for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Melatonin is the major secretory product synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland and shows both a wide distribution within phylogenetically distant organisms from bacteria to humans and a great functional versatility. Recently, accumulated experimental evidence showed that melatonin plays an important role in NSCs, including its proliferation, differentiation and survival, which are modulated by many factors including MAPK/ERK signaling pathway, histone acetylation, neurotrophic factors, transcription factors, and apoptotic genes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the beneficial effects of melatonin on NSCs and further to discuss the potential usage of melatonin and its derivatives or analogues in the treatment of CNS neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26499395

  11. Melatonin in Chagas´ disease: Possible therapeutic value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Cardinali

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease is a severe health problem in Latin America, causing approximately 50 000 deaths a year, with approximately 18 million infected people. About 25-30% of the patients infected with Trypanosoma cruzi develop the chronic form of the disease. The protective response against T. cruzi depends on both innate and acquired immunity involving macrophages, natural killer cells, T and B lymphocytes, and the production of proinflammatory Th-1 cytokines. In addition, an increased nitric oxide (NO production in macrophages leading to effective microbicidal action is needed to control parasitemia. Melatonin is detectable in T. cruzi and may play a role in promoting infection whereas, when administered in high doses during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection, it can decrease parasitemia while reducing NO production. During chronic disease progression, the sustained oxidative stress concomitant to myocardial damage could be reduced by administering melatonin. It is hypothesized that the coordinated administration of a melatonin agonist like the MT1/MT2 agonist ramelteon, that lacks antioxidant activity and may not affect NO production during the acute phase, and of melatonin in doses high enough to decrease oxidative damage, to preserve mitochondrial and to prevent cardiomyopathy during the chronic phase, could be a novel add-on treatment of Chagas´ disease.

  12. Production and purification of polyclonal antibody against melatonin hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fooladsaz K

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays immunochemical techniques have played a very important and valuable role in quantitative and qualitative assays of liquid compounds of the body. Producing antibody against immunogenes is the first step to make immunochemical kits. In this study production and purification of polyclonal antibody against melatonin has been considered. This hormone which has several important functions in physiological conditions such as migraine, cirrhosis, mammary gland cancer and other diseases, is the most important pineal gland secretion. This gland is a circumventricular organ of brain and according to histological and anatomical studies, it is a high secretory organ, that secretes active biological substances like melatonin, oxytocin, serotonin and ect. In this study, melatonin has been considered as hapten and has become an immunogen by being linked to the bovine serum Albumin. Then, by the immunization of three white New Zeland rabbits that had the booster injections in regular intervals, the antibody titer was detected to be 1/2000, by using checkboard curves, and with the use of melatonin linked to penicillinase as a labeled antigen, the titer was detected 1/200. Finally an antibody with high purification rate has been obtained, which can be used in immunochemical assays like RIA, ELISA, and EIA.

  13. Melatonin as a hormone in humans: a history.

    OpenAIRE

    Wurtman, R J

    1985-01-01

    This article describes the history of melatonin's transformation, in the perception of the biomedical community, from a skin-lightening agent in amphibians to a hormone in mammals, which may also exert important behavioral--and physiological--effects in humans.

  14. Nocturnal leg cramps. Clinically mysterious and painful--but manageable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaan, N; Sawaya, R

    2001-06-01

    Nocturnal leg cramps are common occurrences among older, generally healthy adults. Although there are many known causes--endocrinologic, neurologic, and vascular disorders, treatment with certain drugs, and occupational factors--a significant portion of cases are idiopathic. History, physical exam, and laboratory testing can provide clues for distinguishing between cramps with identifiable causes and idiopathic cases. For nonidiopathic cases, management consists of treating the underlying cause whenever possible. A nonpharmacologic approach (massaging and stretching) is the recommended first-line treatment for idiopathic cases. Quinine sulfate also appears to offer safe and effective symptom management of idiopathic cases, although its efficacy has not been definitively established in clinical trials. PMID:11417373

  15. Melatonin protects against ischemic heart failure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ?ehirli, Ahmet Özer; Koyun, Derya; Tetik, ?ermin; Özsavc?, Derya; Yi?iner, Ömer; Çetinel, ?ule; Tok, Olgu Enis; Kaya, Zehra; Akkiprik, Mustafa; K?l?ç, Ertugrul; ?ener, Göksel

    2013-09-01

    Ischemic injury, which occurs as a result of sympathetic hyperactivity, plays an important role in heart failure. Melatonin is thought to have antiatherogenic, antioxidant, and vasodilatory effects. In this study, we investigated whether melatonin protects against ischemic heart failure (HF). In Wistar albino rats, HF was induced by left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery ligation and rats were treated with either vehicle or melatonin (10 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. At the end of this period, echocardiographic measurements were recorded and the rats were decapitated to obtain plasma and cardiac tissue samples. Lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lysosomal enzymes (?-D-glucuronidase, ?-galactosidase, ?-D-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, acid phosphatase, and cathepsin-D) were studied in plasma samples, while malondialdehyde and glutathione levels and Na+, K+-ATPase, caspase-3 and myeloperoxidase activities were determined in the cardiac samples. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) and caveolin-3 levels in cardiac tissues were evaluated using Western blot analyses. Furthermore, caveolin-3 levels were also determined by histological analyses. In the vehicle-treated HF group, cardiotoxicity resulted in decreased cardiac Na+, K+-ATPase and SERCA activities, GSH contents and caveolin-3 levels, while plasma LDH, CK, and lysosomal enzyme activities and cardiac MDA and Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities were found to be increased. On the other hand, melatonin treatment reversed all the functional and biochemical changes. The present results demonstrate that Mel ameliorates ischemic heart failure in rats. These observations highlight that melatonin is a promising supplement for improving defense mechanisms in the heart against oxidative stress caused by heart failure. PMID:23551402

  16. Sleep-wake and melatonin pattern in craniopharyngioma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickering, Line; Jennum, Poul

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of craniopharyngioma or consequent surgery on melatonin secretion, and the association with fatigue, sleepiness, sleep pattern and sleep quality. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: A total of 15 craniopharyngioma patients were individually matched to healthy controls. In this study, 24-h salivary melatonin and cortisol were measured. Sleep-wake patterns were characterised by actigraphy and sleep diaries recorded for 2 weeks. Sleepiness, fatigue, sleep quality and general health were assessed by Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Short-Form 36. RESULTS: Patients had increased mental fatigue, daytime dysfunction, sleep latency and lower general health (all, P?0.05), and they tended to have increased daytime sleepiness, general fatigue and impaired sleep quality compared with controls. The degree of hypothalamic injury was associated with an increased BMI and lower mental health (P=0.01). High BMI was associated with increased daytime sleepiness, daytime dysfunction, mental fatigue and lower mental health (all, P?0.01). Low midnight melatonin was associated with reduced sleep time and efficiency (P?0.03) and a tendency for increased sleepiness, impaired sleep quality and physical health. Midnight melatonin remained independently related to sleep time after adjustment for cortisol. Three different patterns of melatonin profiles were observed; normal (n=6), absent midnight peak (n=6) and phase-shifted peak (n=2). Only patients with absent midnight peak had impaired sleep quality, increased daytime sleepiness and general and mental fatigue. CONCLUSION: Craniopharyngioma patients present with changes in circadian pattern and daytime symptoms, which may be due to the influence of the craniopharyngioma or its treatment on the hypothalamic circadian and sleep regulatory nuclei.

  17. Anxiolytic effects of the melatonin MT(2) receptor partial agonist UCM765: comparison with melatonin and diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Sanchez, Rafael; Rainer, Quentin; Comai, Stefano; Spadoni, Gilberto; Bedini, Annalida; Rivara, Silvia; Fraschini, Franco; Mor, Marco; Tarzia, Giorgio; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2012-12-01

    Melatonin (MLT) is a neurohormone known to be involved in the regulation of anxiety. Most of the physiological actions of MLT in the brain are mediated by two high-affinity G-protein-coupled receptors, denoted MT(1) and MT(2). However, the particular role of these receptors in anxiety remains to be defined. Here we used a novel MT(2)-selective partial agonist, UCM765 to evaluate the involvement of MT(2) receptors in anxiety. Adult male rats were acutely injected with UCM765 (5-10-20mg/kg), MLT (20mg/kg) or diazepam (DZ, 1mg/kg). Anxiety-related behaviors were assessed in the elevated plus maze test (EPMT), novelty suppressed feeding test (NSFT) and open field test (OFT). UCM765 at the dose of 10mg/kg showed anxiolytic-like properties by increasing the time spent in the open arm of the EPMT, and by reducing the latency to eat in a novel environment in the NSFT. In the EPMT, animals treated with UCM765 (10mg/kg) or MLT (20mg/kg) spent more time in the open arms compared to vehicle-treated animals, but to a lesser extent compared to DZ (1mg/kg). In the NSFT, all treatments similarly decreased the latency to eat in a novel environment compared to vehicle. UCM765 and MLT did not affect the total time and the number of entries into the central area of the OFT, but unlike DZ, did not impair locomotion. The anxiolytic effects of UCM765 and MLT in the EPMT and the NSFT were blocked using a pre-treatment with the MT(1)/MT(2) antagonist luzindole (10mg/kg) or the MT(2) antagonist 4P-PDOT (10mg/kg). These results demonstrated, for the first time, the anxiolytic properties of UCM765 and suggest that MT(2)-receptors may be considered a novel target for the development of anxiolytic drugs. PMID:22789661

  18. Melatonin mitigate cerebral vasospasm after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage: a study of synchrotron radiation angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, J.; He, C.; Chen, L.; Han, T.; Huang, S.; Huang, Y.; Bai, Y.; Bao, Y.; Zhang, H.; Ling, F.

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating and unsolved clinical issue. In this study, the rat models, which had been induced SAH by prechiasmatic cistern injection, were treated with melatonin. Synchrotron radiation angiography (SRA) was employed to detect and evaluate CV of animal models. Neurological scoring and histological examinations were used to assess the neurological deficits and CV as well. Using SRA techniques and histological analyses, the anterior cerebral artery diameters of SAH rats with melatonin administration were larger than those without melatonin treatment (p < 0.05). The neurological deficits of SAH rats treated with melatonin were less than those without melatonin treatment (p < 0.05). We concluded that SRA was a precise and in vivo tool to observe and evaluate CV of SAH rats; intraperitoneally administration of melatonin could mitigate CV after experimental SAH.

  19. The effect of melatonin on mouse jejunal crypt cell survival and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jin Oh; Ha, Eun Young; Baik, Hyung Hwan; Cho, Yong Ho; Hong, Seong Eon [College of Medicine, Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate protective mechanism of melatonin against radiation damage and its relationship with apoptosis in mouse jejunum. 168 mice were divided into 28 groups according to radiation dose and melatonin treatment. To analysis crypt survival, microcolony survival assay was done according to Withers and Elkind's method. To analysis apoptosis, TUNEL assay was done according to Labet-Moleur's method. Radiation protection effect of melatonin was demonstrated by crypt survival assay and its effect was stronger in high radiation dose area. Apoptosis index with 8 Gy irradiation was 18.4% in control group and 16.5% in melatonin treated group. After 18 Gy, apoptosis index was 17.2%in control group and 15.4% in melatonin treated group. Apoptosis index did not show statistically significant difference between melatonin shows clear protective effect in mouse jejunum against radiation damage but its protective effect seems not to be related with apoptosis protection effect.

  20. Determination Melatonin in Serum of Kurdish Horses by HPLC in Kermanshah Region at Breeding Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Arabi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in serum concentration of melatonin of Kurdish horses Kermanshah region at breeding season (February to June of 2010. Blood samples from jugular vein of 40 Kurdish horses were collected. Serum was harvested from these blood samples by centrifugation. After preparation and derivation of serums for HPLC assay, samples were injected to HPLC column and melatonin was measured by area under curve based on standard curve of melatonin. The mean (±S.E of serum melatonin was determined 63.23±9.51 pg/mL. The concentration of serum melatonin of mares was nearly 2 times than stallions and significantly differed (p = 0.01. Thus serum melatonin related to breed of horses and may affect reproductive activity in different breed and geographical region.

  1. Development of nanocapsule suspensions and nanocapsule spray-dried powders containing melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaffazick Scheila R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocapsule suspensions containing melatonin were prepared by interfacial deposition method and characterized (size, morphological aspect and encapsulation efficiency. The formulation parameters studied were the oil nature, the type of surfactants and the type of polymer. The melatonin-encapsulation efficiency ranged between 30% and 56% and polymer nature was the parameter that more influenced the characteristics of suspensions. According to the highest encapsulation efficiency, the nanocapsules prepared with Eudragit S100® were selected to be spray-dried in order to improve the physical stability of suspension and to control the release of melatonin. The melatonin-loaded nanocapsule spray-dried powder presented encapsulation efficiency of the 93% and no morphological alterations were observed after 12 months of storage. This system showed a controlled release profile in comparison to the dissolution of the pure melatonin. The release profile was fitted to monoexponential model and the melatonin release mechanism was based on swelling and dissolution of the polymer.

  2. Melatonin mitigate cerebral vasospasm after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage: a study of synchrotron radiation angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating and unsolved clinical issue. In this study, the rat models, which had been induced SAH by prechiasmatic cistern injection, were treated with melatonin. Synchrotron radiation angiography (SRA) was employed to detect and evaluate CV of animal models. Neurological scoring and histological examinations were used to assess the neurological deficits and CV as well. Using SRA techniques and histological analyses, the anterior cerebral artery diameters of SAH rats with melatonin administration were larger than those without melatonin treatment (p < 0.05). The neurological deficits of SAH rats treated with melatonin were less than those without melatonin treatment (p < 0.05). We concluded that SRA was a precise and in vivo tool to observe and evaluate CV of SAH rats; intraperitoneally administration of melatonin could mitigate CV after experimental SAH.

  3. Protective effect of maternal prenatal melatonin administration on rat pups born to mothers submitted to constant light during gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.D. Cisternas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effects of adverse conditions such as constant light (LL on the circadian rhythm of malate (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37 and lactate (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27 dehydrogenase activities of the testes of male Wistar rats on postnatal day 28 (PN28, anxiety-like behavior (elevated plus-maze test at PN60 and sexual behavior at PN120. The rats were assigned to mother groups on day 10 of pregnancy: control (12-h light/dark, LL (light from day 10 to 21 of pregnancy, and LL+Mel (LL and sc injection to the mothers of a daily dose of melatonin, 1 mg/kg body weight at circadian time 12, from day 17 to 21 of pregnancy. LL offspring did not show circadian rhythms of MDH (N = 62 and LDH (N = 63 activities (cosinor and ANOVA-LSD Fisher. They presented a 44.7% decrease in open-arm entries and a 67.9% decrease in time (plus-maze test, N = 15, P < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis test, an increase in mounting (94.4%, intromission (94.5% and ejaculation (56.6% latencies (N = 12, P < 0.01, Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis test and lower numbers of these events (61, 59 and 73%, respectively; P < 0.01, N = 12 compared to controls. The offspring of the LL+Mel group presented MDH and LDH circadian rhythms (P < 0.05, N = 50, cosinor and ANOVA-LSD Fisher, anxiety-like and sexual behaviors similar to control. These findings supported the importance of the melatonin signal and provide evidence for the protective effects of hormones on maternal programming during gestation. This protective action of melatonin is probably related to its entrainment capacity, favoring internal coupling of the fetal multioscillatory system.

  4. Beneficial Effects of Melatonin Combined with Exercise on Endogenous Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Proliferation after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjeon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (eNSPCs proliferate and differentiate into neurons and glial cells after spinal cord injury (SCI. We have previously shown that melatonin (MT plus exercise (Ex had a synergistic effect on functional recovery after SCI. Thus, we hypothesized that combined therapy including melatonin and exercise might exert a beneficial effect on eNSPCs after SCI. Melatonin was administered twice a day and exercise was performed on a treadmill for 15 min, six days per week for 3 weeks after SCI. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analysis were used to determine cell population for late response, in conjunction with histological examination and motor function test. There was marked improvement in hindlimb function in SCI+MT+Ex group at day 14 and 21 after injury, as documented by the reduced size of the spinal lesion and a higher density of dendritic spines and axons; such functional improvements were associated with increased numbers of BrdU-positive cells. Furthermore, MAP2 was increased in the injured thoracic segment, while GFAP was increased in the cervical segment, along with elevated numbers of BrdU-positive nestin-expressing eNSPCs in the SCI+MT+Ex group. The dendritic spine density was augmented markedly in SCI+MT and SCI+MT+Ex groups.These results suggest a synergistic effect of SCI+MT+Ex might create a microenvironment to facilitate proliferation of eNSPCs to effectively replace injured cells and to improve regeneration in SCI.

  5. Modelling chemistry in the nocturnal boundary layer above tropical rainforest and a generalised effective nocturnal ozone deposition velocity for sub-ppbv NOx conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Pugh, Thomas A. M.; Ryder, James; MacKenzie, A. Robert; Moller, Sarah J.; Lee, James D.; Helfter, Carol; Nemitz, Eiko; Lowe, Douglas; Hewitt, C. Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric composition have been made over a remote rainforest landscape. A box model has previously been demonstrated to model the observed daytime chemistry well. However the box model is unable to explain the nocturnal measurements of relatively high [NO] and [O3], but relatively low observed [NO2]. It is shown that a one-dimensional (1-D) column model with simple O3 -NOx chemistry and a simple representation of vertical transport is able to explain the observed nocturnal ...

  6. Effects of melatonin and ethanol on the heart rate of Daphnia magna

    OpenAIRE

    Rebecca Kohn; Larissa Stuckey; Elizabeth Marion; Krithika Krishnarao; Bonnie Kaas

    2009-01-01

    Melatonin, an endogenous hormone that may regulate circadian rhythms by modulating cholinergic activity, is increasing in popular use as a natural treatment for sleep disorders. However, the effects of melatonin on the human heart are not well characterized, and the consequences of combining alcohol with melatonin are unknown. The myogenic heart of the water flea Daphnia magna (D. magna) is regulated by inhibitory cholinergic neurons that modulate cardiac function, including heart rate. D. ma...

  7. Effect of melatonin on depressive symptoms and anxiety in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Melissa V; Andersen, Lærke T; Madsen, Michael T; Hageman, Ida; Rasmussen, Lars S; Bokmand, Susanne; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenür, Ismayil

    2014-01-01

    Depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances are known problems in patients with breast cancer. The effect of melatonin as an antidepressant in humans with cancer has not been investigated. We investigated whether melatonin could lower the risk of depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer in a three-month period after surgery and assessed the effect of melatonin on subjective parameters: anxiety, sleep, general well-being, fatigue, pain and sleepiness. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-contr...

  8. Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases.

  9. MILK WITH INCREASED CONCENTRATION OF MELATONIN PACKAGING FACTORS ON CONSUMER PURCHASE INTENTION

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Patricia Milagres; Valéria Paula Rodrigues Minim; Andréa Alves Simiqueli; Ana Cristina Rocha Espeschit; Luis Antonio Minim

    2014-01-01

    The conjoint analysis of factors was used employed to develop a label for the packaging of milk with increased concentration of melatonin. Three factors were selected with three or two levels for the assembly of packaging: packaging design (“blue design with stars and pouring milk”, “white without drawing” and “blue stars with and without drawing”), name (“milk night “and” melatonin “) and informative text about getting natural melatonin by night milking, and the benefits of this compound (“w...

  10. Preliminary study: Evaluation of melatonin secretion in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz Kor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Melatonin is an indolamine hormone, synthesized from tryptophan in the pineal gland primarily. Melatonin exerts both antioxidative and immunoregulatory roles but little is known about melatonin secretion in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. The aim of this study was to measure serum melatonin levels in patients with T1DM and investigates their relationship with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: Forty children and adolescents with T1DM (18 boys and 22 girls and 30 healthy control subjects (17 boys and 13 girls participated in the study. All patients followed in Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism Unit of Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine and also control subjects had no hypertension, obesity, hyperlipidemia, anemia, and infection. Blood samples were collected during routine analysis, after overnight fasting. Serum melatonin levels were analyzed with ELISA. Results: There were no statistically significant differences related with age, sex, BMI distribution between diabetic group and control group. Mean diabetic duration was 2.89 ± 2.69 years. The variables were in the equation. Mean melatonin level in diabetic group was 6.75 ± 3.52 pg/ml and mean melatonin level in control group was 11.51 ± 4.74 pg/ml. Melatonin levels were significantly lower in diabetic group compared to controls (P < 0.01. Conclusions: Melatonin was associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus significantly. Because of the varied roles of melatonin in human metabolic rhythms, these results suggest a role of melatonin in maintaining normal rhythmicity. Melatonin may play role in preventing process of inflammation and oxidative stress.

  11. Nocturnal enuresis and nocturia, differences and similarities - lessons to learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessaert, A-S; Everaert, K; Hoebeke, P; Kapila, A; Walle, J Vande

    2015-04-01

    This review highlights the current views on and differences and similarities between nocturnal enuresis (NE) in children and nocturia in adults, which might be a guidance to elucidate the missing links in our knowledge. In both conditions, a genetic factor is suspected. Reduced bladder capacity and nocturnal polyuria are the main underlying lower urinary tract-related conditions. There is a link with sleep disorders, although it is not clear whether this is a cause or consequence. Physical and mental health are comprised in both conditions, however, in different ways. In NE, constipation and attention deficit disorder are the most important comorbidities and the effect on mental health and quality of life is mainly through the negative impact on self-esteem. In nocturia, cardiovascular disease and fall injuries are important comorbidities, mainly affecting the older nocturia population; personal distress and depression are consequences of the related poor sleep quality. For both conditions, treatment is often inadequate and a more individualized approach seems to be necessary. The main difference between NE and nocturia seems to be the difference in arousal to bladder stimuli, suggesting that sleep characteristics might be a key factor in these conditions. PMID:25379877

  12. Monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis caused by seasonal temperature changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Tuncay; Cakiroglu, Basri; Hazar, Aydin Ismet; Balci, Mustafa Bahadir Can; Sinanoglu, Orhun; Nas, Yunus; Yilmazer, Fazli

    2014-01-01

    Background: Primary nocturnal enuresis is the most frequent urologic complaint among pediatric patients. Enuresis is believed to have a complex etiology involving genetic, somatic, and behavioral factors. We study the relationship between seasonal temperature changes effect and monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MNE). Methods: Between 2011 and 2012, a total of 75 children with primary MNE selected from urology and pediatry clinics were included in this study. All of the children underwent physical examinations, urine analyses, urinary ultrasounds, and direct urinary graphs. We evaluated the enuresis ratio for the summer (the hot season from June to September) and winter (the cold season from December to March) months in nightly, weekly, and monthly intervals via prepared questionnaires. Results: Of the 75 study participants, 45 were boys (60%) and 30 were girls (40%). The age range was 6-16 years (mean 10.3±2.0 years). We observed a difference in the ratio of enuresis data between the summer and winter months in 29 males and 19 females, which totals 48 of the 75 MNE patients evaluated in this study. There was a statistically significant difference noted in monthly enuresis ratio in the summer and winter (p<0.0001). We observed a significant difference in quality of life, and this difference caused considerable emotional discomfort for the patients. Conclusion: In the winter months, the nightly, weekly, and monthly ratios are higher in children with MNE. This increase causes a decrease in the quality of life of these children. PMID:24955178

  13. Effects of artificial illumination on the nocturnal foraging of waders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Carlos D.; Miranda, Ana C.; Granadeiro, José P.; Lourenço, Pedro M.; Saraiva, Sara; Palmeirim, Jorge M.

    2010-03-01

    Large areas of natural and semi-natural habitats are exposed to artificial illumination from adjacent urban areas and roads. Estuarine and coastal wetlands are particularly exposed to such illumination because shorelines often are heavily utilized by man. However, the impact of artificial illumination on the waders that forage in these highly productive habitats is virtually unknown. We evaluated the effects of artificial illumination on the nocturnal habitat selection and foraging behaviour of six wader species with different feeding strategies: three visual foragers, two species that alternate visual and tactile strategies (mixed foragers), and one tactile forager. We quantified the number of birds and their foraging behaviour at sites affected and not affected by streetlights, and also before and after illuminating experimental sites. Areas illuminated by streetlights were used more during the night by visual foragers, and to a lesser extent by mixed foragers, than non-illuminated areas. Visual foragers increased their foraging effort in illuminated areas, and mixed foragers changed to more efficient visual foraging strategies. These behavioural shifts improved prey intake rate by an average of 83% in visual and mixed foragers. We have showed that artificial illumination has a positive effect on the nocturnal foraging of waders, but on the other hand may draw them to degraded areas close to urban centres, and potentially raises their exposure to predators. Our findings suggest that artificial illumination is worth investigation as a tool in the management of intertidal habitats for waders.

  14. Effect of domperidone therapy on nocturnal dyspeptic symptoms of functional dyspepsia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Liang Chen, Jie-Ru Ji, Ping Xu, Zhi-Jun Cao, Jian-Zhong Mo, Jing-Yuan Fang, Shu-Dong Xiao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the incidence of nocturnal dyspeptic symptoms in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD and whether prokinetic drugs can alleviate them.METHODS: Eighty-five consecutive Chinese patients with FD were included in this study. One week after single-blinded placebo run-in treatment, baseline nocturnal intragastric pH, bile reflux and nocturnal dyspeptic symptoms of eligible patients, including epigastric pain or discomfort, abdominal distention and belching, were investigated with questionnaires. Patients exhibiting nocturnal dyspeptic symptoms were randomly and double-blindly assigned to domperidone group or placebo group. Nocturnal intragastric pH and percentage of duodenogastric bile reflux time were determined after treatment.RESULTS: Of the 85 FD patients, 2 females without nocturnal symptoms, who responded to placebo run-in treatment, were excluded from the study, 30 (36.1% exhibited nocturnal dyspeptic symptoms with increased duodenogastric bile reflux time (intragastric bilirubin absorbance > 0.14 and mean gastric pH (confirming the existence of bile reflux (P = 0.021, 0.023 at night were included in the study. Of these 30 patients, 21 (70% had overt nocturnal duodenogastric bile reflux, which was significantly higher than that of those without nocturnal symptoms (P = 0.026. The 30 patients were allocated to domperidone group or placebo group (n = 15. The nocturnal duodenogastric bile reflux and gastric pH were significantly decreased after domperidone treatment (P = 0.015, 0.021. The severity score of nocturnal dyspeptic symptoms was also significantly decreased after domperidone treatment (P = 0.010, 0.015, 0.026, which was positively correlated with the reduced nocturnal bile reflux or gastric pH (r = 0.736, 0.784, 0.753 or r = 0.679, 0.715, 0.697, P = 0.039, 0.036, 0.037 or P = 0.043, 0.039, 0.040.CONCLUSION: A subgroup of Chinese FD patients show overt nocturnal dyspeptic symptoms, which may be correlated with the excessive nocturnal duodenogastric bile reflux. Domperidone therapy can alleviate these symptoms.

  15. Using Nocturnal Flight Calls to Assess the Fall Migration of Warblers and Sparrows along a Coastal Ecological Barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Adam D.; Paton, Peter W. C.; McWilliams, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions fundamentally influence the timing, intensity, energetics, and geography of avian migration. While radar is typically used to infer the influence of weather on the magnitude and spatiotemporal patterns of nocturnal bird migration, monitoring the flight calls produced by many bird species during nocturnal migration represents an alternative methodology and provides information regarding the species composition of nocturnal migration. We used nocturnal flight call (NFC) r...

  16. Antioxidant capacity of the neurohormone melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofic, E; Rimpapa, Z; Kundurovic, Z; Sapcanin, A; Tahirovic, I; Rustembegovic, A; Cao, G

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the antioxidant behaviour of melatonin (M) and determine its activity-structure relationship. M or 5-metoxy-N acetyltriptamine is a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland, which plays a proven role in maintaining sleep-wake rhythms. The antioxidant capacity of M was analysed using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. Furthermore, spectral measurements for aerobic photolytic reaction of neutral red (NR) and degree of inhibition of photolysis with M, glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid (AA) and vitamin E analogue Trolox were studied at room temperature 25 degrees C, using visible (VIS) and ultra-violet (UV) radiations. In the ORAC assay 2,2-azobis (2-amidino-propane)dihydrochloride (AAPH) a peroxyl radical generator, ROO degrees ; H2O2-Cu2+, mainly a hydroxyl radical generator, degrees OH; and Cu2+ a transition metal were used. Although some studies indicated that M is a powerful antioxidant, no one has compared its antioxidant capacities with GSH, E-vitamin and AA, using three free radical (FR) generators in an assay which utilizes an area-under curve technique and thus combines both inhibition time and inhibition degree of FR action by an antioxidant into a single quantity. In the current study, we used ORAC assay with three FR generators. The assay is based on propensity of the fluorescence emitted by the protein beta-phycoerythrin (beta-PE) from porphyridium cruentum to be quenched when exposed to FR action. M in our experiments acted as a universal antioxidant against ROO degrees and degrees OH radicals. Also, M served as an antioxidant in the presence of Cu2+. M, which is a lipid-soluble compound, was a twice more powerful antioxidant than vitamin E, and four times than AA or GSH. Furthermore, M inhibited aerobic photolysis of NR photoinduced with VIS and UV rays faster and more effectively, than AA, GSH or vitamin E. AA with NR, under aerobic conditions during irradiation with VIS and UV acted as a pro-oxidant. M may be the premier molecule to protect the cells from oxidative stress. PMID:15666035

  17. Transcutaneous Noninvasive Device for the Responsive Delivery of Melatonin in Microgravity. Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our goal is develop a smart, transcutaneous device for individualized circadian (sleep) therapy by responsive release of melatonin, in microgravity. Additionally,...

  18. Melatonin protects mast cells against cytotoxicity mediated by chemical stimuli PMACI: possible clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, M D; Garcia-Moreno, H; Calvo, J R

    2013-09-15

    Melatonin has documented cytoprotective effects on a wide variety of immune cells. The mechanism of action on mast cells (RBL-2H3) still remains in the dark. We found that melatonin significantly attenuated phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-induced cytotoxicity in a concentration and time-dependent manner. It appears that the effect of melatonin on mast cells is two-fold: dependent (MT1 and MT2) and independent membrane receptors. In conclusion, melatonin treatment reduced the cytotoxicity, mediated by PMACI, and could provide a useful therapeutic option in processes where an excessive activation of mast cells occurs. PMID:23870536

  19. Functional roles of melatonin in plants, and perspectives in nutritional and agricultural science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Hardeland, Rudiger; Manchester, Lucien C; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Ma, Shuran; Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Reiter, Russel J

    2012-01-01

    The presence of melatonin in plants is universal. Evidence has confirmed that a major portion of the melatonin is synthesized by plants themselves even though a homologue of the classic arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) has not been identified as yet in plants. Thus, the serotonin N-acetylating enzyme in plants may differ greatly from the animal AANAT with regard to sequence and structure. This would imply multiple evolutionary origins of enzymes with these catalytic properties. A primary function of melatonin in plants is to serve as the first line of defence against internal and environmental oxidative stressors. The much higher melatonin levels in plants compared with those found in animals are thought to be a compensatory response by plants which lack means of mobility, unlike animals, as a means of coping with harsh environments. Importantly, remarkably high melatonin concentrations have been measured in popular beverages (coffee, tea, wine, and beer) and crops (corn, rice, wheat, barley, and oats). Billions of people worldwide consume these products daily. The beneficial effects of melatonin on human health derived from the consumption of these products must be considered. Evidence also indicates that melatonin has an ability to increase the production of crops. The mechanisms may involve the roles of melatonin in preservation of chlorophyll, promotion of photosynthesis, and stimulation of root development. Transgenic plants with enhanced melatonin content could probably lead to breakthroughs to increase crop production in agriculture and to improve the general health of humans. PMID:22016420

  20. Melatonin Supplementation During In Vitro Maturation and Development Supports the Development of Porcine Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Ltk; Shibata, Y; Taniguchi, M; Nii, M; Nguyen, T V; Tanihara, F; Takagi, M; Otoi, T

    2015-12-01

    Melatonin has been reported to improve the in vitro development of embryos in some species. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of melatonin supplementation during in vitro maturation (IVM) and development culture on the development and quality of porcine embryos. In the first experiment, when the in vitro fertilized embryos were cultured with different concentrations of melatonin (0, 10, 25 and 50 ng/ml) for 8 days, the blastocyst formation rate of embryos cultured with 25 ng/ml melatonin (10.7%) was significantly increased (p IVM and development has beneficial effects on the developmental competence and quality of porcine embryos. PMID:26392209

  1. Determination of melatonin content in traditional Thai herbal remedies used as sleeping aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Melatonin content was screened in leaves of seven edible herbs used as sleeping aids in Thai traditional medicine. These plants are Piper nigrum L, Sesbania glandiflora (L.) Desv., Sesbania sesban (L.) Merr., Senna tora (L.) Roxb., Moringa oleifera Lam., Momordica charantia L. and Baccaurea ramiflora Lour. Dried leaves were extracted by sonication in methanol for six hours at room temperature, and then melatonin was purified by C18 solid phase extraction (SPE). Melatonin was then quantified by a validated RP-C18 HPLC method with fluorescent detection. Findings Melatonin contents in extracts of B. ramiflora,?S. glandiflora,?M. charantia,?S. tora and S. sesban were 43.2, 26.3, 21.4, 10.5 and 8.7 ng/g of dry sample weight, respectively. The highest melatonin content was from P. nigrum extract (1092.7 ng/g of dry sample weight). Melatonin was not detected in the extract of M. oleifera. Melatonin identification was confirmed by ELISA. Conclusions Melatonin was found in six of the seven herbs in the traditional Thai sleeping recipe. One of these, P. nigrum, exhibited an encouragingly high amount of melatonin. PMID:24393215

  2. Analgesic effects of melatonin : a review of current evidence from experimental and clinical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous indoleamine, produced mainly by the pineal gland. Melatonin has been proven to have chronobiotic, antioxidant, antihypertensive, anxiolytic and sedative properties. There are also experimental and clinical data supporting an analgesic role of melatonin. In experimental studies, melatonin shows potent analgesic effects in a dose-dependent manner. In clinical studies, melatonin has been shown to have analgesic benefits in patients with chronic pain (fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine). The physiologic mechanism underlying the analgesic actions of melatonin has not been clarified. The effects may be linked to G(i) -coupled melatonin receptors, to G(i) -coupled opioid µ-receptors or GABA-B receptors with unknown downstream changes with a consequential reduction in anxiety and pain. Also, the repeated administration of melatonin improves sleep and thereby may reduce anxiety, which leads to lower levels of pain. In this paper, we review the current evidence regarding the analgesic properties of melatonin in animals and humans with chronic pain.

  3. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways are required for melatonin-mediated defense responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoung Yool; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2016-04-01

    Melatonin enhances pathogen resistance by inducing the expression of a number of plant defense-related genes. To examine whether the melatonin-mediated pathogen resistance is associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, Arabidopsis and tobacco leaves were treated with melatonin and investigated for MAPK activation using an antiphospho-p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) monoclonal antibody. Two MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, were activated rapidly and transiently by 1 μm melatonin treatment in Arabidopsis. Its tobacco ortholog MAPKs were also activated. The activation of MPK3 and MPK6 by 2-hydroxymelatonin and N-acetylserotonin was also observed, albeit to a lesser degree than that by melatonin. Furthermore, MAPK activation by melatonin was uncoupled from G-protein signaling, because melatonin efficiently activated two MAPKs in a G-protein β knockout mutant (agb1). Suppression of both MPK3 and MPK6 in transgenic Arabidopsis exhibited significant decreases in the induction of defense-related gene expression and pathogen resistance relative to wild-type plants. Using an array of MAP kinase kinase (MKK) knockout mutants, we found that four MKKs, namely MKK4, MKK5, MKK7, and MKK9, are responsible for the activation of MPK3 and MPK6 by melatonin, indicating that melatonin-mediated innate immunity is triggered by MAPK signaling through MKK4/5/7/9-MPK3/6 cascades. PMID:26927635

  4. Melatonin and its metabolites as anti-nitrosating and anti-nitrating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudiger Hardeland

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Although basal and moderately elevated levels of nitric oxide are physiologically necessary and beneficial, excessive upregulations of this signaling molecule can be a cause of damage and cellular dysfunctions. In the presence of increased amounts of superoxide anions (•O2– and carbon dioxide, peroxynitrite (ONOO– and the peroxynitrite-CO2 adduct (ONOOCO2– generate hydroxyl (•OH, nitrogen dioxide (•NO2 and carbonate (•CO3– radicals, which damage biomolecules by oxidation/peroxidation, nitration and nitrosation reactions. Nitrosation also occurs with all three NO congeners (NO+, •NO, and HNO = protonated NO–, with •NO especially in combination with electron/hydrogen-abstracting compounds, or with N2O3. 3-Nitrotyrosine, found in low-density lipoprotein particles (LDL, atherosclerotic plaques, ion channels, receptors, transporters, enzymes and respirasomal subunits, is associated with numerous dysfunctions. Damage to the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC is of particular significance and involves nitration, nitrosation and oxidation of proteins, cardiolipin peroxidation, and binding of •NO to ETC irons. Resulting bottlenecks of electron flux cause enhanced electron leakage which leads to elevated •O2–. In combination with high •NO, •O2– initiates a vicious cycle by generating more peroxynitrite that leads to further blockades and electron dissipation. Mitochondrial dysfunction, as induced via the •NO/peroxynitrite pathway, is of utmost importance in inflammatory diseases, especially sepsis, but also relevant to neurodegenerative and various other disorders. It may contribute to processes of aging. Melatonin, hormone of the pineal gland and product of other organs, interacts directly with reactive nitrogen species, but, more importantly, has antiinflammatory properties and downregulates inducible and neuronal NO synthases (iNOS, nNOS. It does not block moderately elevated •NO formation, but rather blunts excessive rises as occurring in sepsis and breaks the vicious cycle of mitochondrial electron leakage. The melatonin metabolite N1-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AMK forms stable nitrosation products and efficiently inhibits iNOS and nNOS, in conjunction with other antiinflammatory properties. [J Exp Integr Med 2011; 1(2.000: 67-81

  5. Hypothyroidism and deficiency of the nocturnal thyrotropin surge in children with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, S R; Manasco, P K; Pearce, S; Nisula, B C

    1990-06-01

    The circadian pattern of serum TSH in normal children, aged 5-18 yr, is characterized by a nocturnal surge and is presumably related in some way to a biological clock within the central nervous system. To look for patients deficient in the nocturnal TSH surge, we studied 52 children with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders. Thirteen of the children were hypothyroid, as judged by subnormal serum free T4 (FT4). The hypothyroid patients had a mean nocturnal TSH surge of 22% (range, -30% to +114%), significantly less than that of normal controls (mean, 124%; 95% confidence limits, 47-300%; n = 96; P less than 0.01). Only 1 of the hypothyroid children had a value for the nocturnal TSH surge (114%) that was within the normal range. Nineteen of the 52 patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders had subnormal nocturnal TSH surges; their mean iodothyronine values were significantly less than those of the 33 patients with normal surges [total T4, 73 +/- 4 (mean +/- SE) vs. 109 +/- 3 nmol/L (P less than 0.01); FT4, 13 +/- 1.0 vs. 19 +/- 0.5 pmol/L (P less than 0.01)]. These data demonstrate a clear association of a deficient nocturnal TSH surge and low iodothyronine concentration in children with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders. We performed both TRH tests and nocturnal TSH surge tests in 11 of the children with central hypothyroidism; TRH was abnormal in only 2, while the nocturnal surge test was abnormal in 10 of the 11. We suggest that the nocturnal surge of TSH is important for maintenance of thyroid function and conclude that the nocturnal TSH surge is a much more sensitive test than the TSH response to TRH for the diagnosis of central hypothyroidism. PMID:2112153

  6. Oxidative stress in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and other conditions of complement-mediated hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibach, Eitan; Dana, Mutaz

    2015-11-01

    The complement (C') system and redox status play important roles in the physiological functioning of the body, such as the defense system, but they are also involved in various pathological conditions, including hemolytic anemia. Herein, we review the interaction between the C' and the redox systems in C'-mediated hemolytic anemias, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and autoimmune hemolytic anemia, including acute hemolytic transfusion reaction. Blood cells in these diseases have been shown to have increased oxidative status, which was further elevated by interaction with activated C'. The results suggest that oxidative stress, in conjunction with activated C', may cause the underlying symptoms of these diseases, such as intra- and extravascular hemolysis and thrombotic complications. Antioxidants ameliorate oxidative stress by preventing generation of free radicals, by scavenging and preventing their accumulation, and by correcting their cellular damage. Antioxidants have been shown to reduce the oxidative stress and inhibit hemolysis as well as platelet activation mediated by activated C'. This raises the possibility that treatment with antioxidants might be considered as a potential therapeutic modality for C'-mediated hemolytic anemias. Currently, eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that specifically targets the C' protein C5, is the main treatment modality for PNH. However, because antioxidants are well tolerated and relatively inexpensive, they might be considered as potential adjuvants or an alternative therapeutic modality for PNH and other C'-mediated hemolytic anemias. PMID:25937178

  7. Melatonin improve the sperm quality in forced swimming test induced oxidative stress in nandrolone treated Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaii, Bagher; Moayeri, Ardeshir; Shokri, Saeed; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar; Golmohammadi, Taghi; Malek, Fatemeh; Barbarestani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of melatonin on the sperm quality and testis weight after the combination of swimming exercise and nandrolone decanoate (DECA). Two groups of male Wistar rats were treated for eight weeks as follows; group A consist of CO (control), Sham, N (DECA), S (swimming) and NS (DECA plus swimming); and group B: Sham M (sham melatonin), M (melatonin), MN (melatonin plus DECA), MS (melatonin plus swimming), MNS (melatonin, DECA plus swimming). The motility of sperm was significantly improved in melatonin groups in comparison to N, S and NS groups (P?0.05).  The left testes weight was decreased in N, NS and MNS groups, and the right testes weight was decreased in N,S,NS, MS and MNS groups in compare with the control group. This study concluded that melatonin probably could improve the sperm motility and sex organs weight after the combination of DECA and exercise. PMID:25135257

  8. Melatonin improve the sperm quality in forced swimming test induced oxidative stress in nandrolone treated Wistar rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagher Minaii

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of melatonin on the sperm quality and testis weight after the combination of swimming exercise and nandrolone decanoate (DECA. Two groups of male Wistar rats were treated for eight weeks as follows; group A consist of CO (control, Sham, N (DECA, S (swimming and NS (DECA plus swimming; and group B: Sham M (sham melatonin, M (melatonin, MN (melatonin plus DECA, MS (melatonin plus swimming, MNS (melatonin, DECA plus swimming. The motility of sperm was significantly improved in melatonin groups in comparison to N, S and NS groups (P?0.05.  The left testes weight was decreased in N, NS and MNS groups, and the right testes weight was decreased in N,S,NS, MS and MNS groups in compare with the control group. This study concluded that melatonin probably could improve the sperm motility and sex organs weight after the combination of DECA and exercise.

  9. Plasma Melatonin Levels in Relation to the Light-Dark Cycle and Parental Background in Domestic Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson H

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available To study porcine melatonin secretion in a stable environment 3 daytime (10.00 – 15.00 and 3 nighttime (22.00 – 03.00 plasma samples were collected by jugular venipuncture from 15 gilts, 16 sows, 3 boars and 48 piglets (24 females and 24 males from 8 litters and analysed for melatonin content. Nighttime melatonin concentrations were higher than daytime melatonin concentrations (p

  10. Identification of Pathway-Biased and Deleterious Melatonin Receptor Mutants in Autism Spectrum Disorders and in the General Population

    OpenAIRE

    Chaste, Pauline; Clement, Nathalie; Mercati, Oriane; Guillaume, Jean-Luc; Delorme, Richard; Botros, Hany Goubran; Pagan, Cécile; Périvier, Samuel; Scheid, Isabelle; Nygren, Gudrun; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Rastam, Maria; Ståhlberg, Ola; Gillberg, Carina; Serrano, Emilie

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin is a powerful antioxidant and a synchronizer of many physiological processes. Alteration of the melatonin pathway has been reported in circadian disorders, diabetes and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, very little is known about the genetic variability of melatonin receptors in humans. Here, we sequenced the melatonin receptor MTNR1A and MTNR1B, genes coding for MT1 and MT2 receptors, respectively, in a large panel of 941 individuals including 295 patients with ASD, 362 con...

  11. Melatonin: Action as antioxidant and potential applications in human disease and aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review aims at describing the beneficial properties of melatonin related to its antioxidant effects. Oxidative stress, i.e., an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant defences, is involved in several pathological conditions such as cardiovascular or neurological disease, and in aging. Therefore, research for antioxidants has developed. However, classical antioxidants often failed to exhibit beneficial effects, especially in metabolic diseases. Melatonin has been shown as a specific antioxidant due to its amphiphilic feature that allows it to cross physiological barriers, thereby reducing oxidative damage in both lipid and aqueous cell environments. Studies on the antioxidant action of melatonin are reported, with a special mention to water gamma radiolysis as a method to produce oxygen-derived free radicals, and on structure-activity relationships of melatonin derivatives. Mass spectrometry-based techniques have been developed to identify melatonin oxidation products. Besides its ability to scavenge several radical species, melatonin regulates the activity of antioxidant enzymes (indirect antioxidant properties). Efficient detection methods confirmed the presence of melatonin in several plant products. Therapeutic potential of melatonin relies either on increasing melatonin dietary intake or on supplementation with supraphysiological dosages. Clinical trials showed that melatonin could be efficient in preventing cell damage, as well under acute (sepsis, asphyxia in newborns) as under chronic (metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, inflammation, aging). Its global action on oxidative stress, together with its rhythmicity that plays a role in several metabolic functions, lead melatonin to be of great interest for future clinical research in order to improve public health.

  12. Melatonin administration enhances the reproductive capacity of young rams under a southern Mediterranean environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekik, Mourad; Taboubi, Rahma; Ben Salem, Imene; Fehri, Younes; Sakly, Cyrine; Lassoued, Narjess; Hilali, Muhi Eddine

    2015-07-01

    This study tested the effect of melatonin treatment, initiated in late February on reproductive traits of young rams. A total of 14 young Barbarine rams were used. Seven animals were treated with three melatonin subcutaneous implants (Melatonin) on 28 February while the remaining rams remained untreated (Control). After 60 days of melatonin administration, scrotal circumference reached average values of 32.1 ± 1.54 and 29.5 ± 1.0 cm for Melatonin and Control animals, respectively (P < 0.05). Semen characteristics did not differ between groups; melatonin treatment tended (P = 0.091) to increase sperm concentration 60 days after implantation when means reached 5.87 ± 0.703 and 4.61 ± 0.654 × 10(9) spermatozoa/mL for Melatonin and Control rams, respectively. Melatonin treatment significantly affected total activity time, number of lateral approaches and mount attempts in comparison to controls. During a 6-h sampling period, mean plasma testosterone concentrations increased as a result of melatonin treatment (P < 0.001) and testosterone pulse frequency averaged 3.45 ± 2.24 and 1.25 ± 1.0 (P = 0.086) for Melatonin and Control rams. Data clearly suggest that abrupt treatment of young rams with melatonin implants in winter is sufficient to improve reproductive traits. PMID:25689168

  13. Alleviation of cold damage to photosystem II and metabolisms by melatonin in Bermudagrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jibiao; Hu, Zhengrong; Xie, Yan; Chan, Zhulong; Chen, Ke; Amombo, Erick; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2015-01-01

    As a typical warm-season grass, Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L).Pers.] is widely applied in turf systems and animal husbandry. However, cold temperature is a key factor limiting resource utilization for Bermudagrass. Therefore, it is relevant to study the mechanisms by which Burmudagrass responds to cold. Melatonin is a crucial animal and plant hormone that is responsible for plant abiotic stress responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of melatonin in cold stress response of Bermudagrass. Wild Bermudagrass pre-treated with 100 ?M melatonin was subjected to different cold stress treatments (?5°C for 8 h with or without cold acclimation). The results showed lower malondialdehyde (MDA) and electrolyte leakage (EL) values, higher levels of chlorophyll, and greater superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities after melatonin treatment than those in non-melatonin treatment under cold stress. Analysis of chlorophyll a revealed that the chlorophyll fluorescence transient (OJIP) curves were higher after treatment with melatonin than that of non-melatonin treated plants under cold stress. The values of photosynthetic fluorescence parameters increased after treatment with melatonin under cold stress. The analysis of metabolism showed alterations in 46 metabolites in cold-stressed plants after melatonin treatment. Among the measured metabolites, five sugars (arabinose, mannose, glucopyranose, maltose, and turanose) and one organic acid (propanoic acid) were significantly increased. However, valine and threonic acid contents were reduced in melatonin-treated plants. In summary, melatonin maintained cell membrane stability, increased antioxidant enzymes activities, improved the process of photosystem II, and induced alterations in Bermudagrass metabolism under cold stress. PMID:26579171

  14. Alleviation of cold damage to photosystem II and metabolisms by melatonin in Bermudagrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jibiao; Hu, Zhengrong; Xie, Yan; Chan, Zhulong; Chen, Ke; Amombo, Erick; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2015-01-01

    As a typical warm-season grass, Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L).Pers.] is widely applied in turf systems and animal husbandry. However, cold temperature is a key factor limiting resource utilization for Bermudagrass. Therefore, it is relevant to study the mechanisms by which Burmudagrass responds to cold. Melatonin is a crucial animal and plant hormone that is responsible for plant abiotic stress responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of melatonin in cold stress response of Bermudagrass. Wild Bermudagrass pre-treated with 100 ?M melatonin was subjected to different cold stress treatments (-5°C for 8 h with or without cold acclimation). The results showed lower malondialdehyde (MDA) and electrolyte leakage (EL) values, higher levels of chlorophyll, and greater superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities after melatonin treatment than those in non-melatonin treatment under cold stress. Analysis of chlorophyll a revealed that the chlorophyll fluorescence transient (OJIP) curves were higher after treatment with melatonin than that of non-melatonin treated plants under cold stress. The values of photosynthetic fluorescence parameters increased after treatment with melatonin under cold stress. The analysis of metabolism showed alterations in 46 metabolites in cold-stressed plants after melatonin treatment. Among the measured metabolites, five sugars (arabinose, mannose, glucopyranose, maltose, and turanose) and one organic acid (propanoic acid) were significantly increased. However, valine and threonic acid contents were reduced in melatonin-treated plants. In summary, melatonin maintained cell membrane stability, increased antioxidant enzymes activities, improved the process of photosystem II, and induced alterations in Bermudagrass metabolism under cold stress. PMID:26579171

  15. Placental melatonin system is present throughout pregnancy and regulates villous trophoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ahmed; Lacasse, Andrée-Anne; Lanoix, Dave; Sagrillo-Fagundes, Lucas; Boulard, Véronique; Vaillancourt, Cathy

    2015-08-01

    Melatonin is highly produced in the placenta where it protects against molecular damage and cellular dysfunction arising from hypoxia/re-oxygenation-induced oxidative stress as observed in primary cultures of syncytiotrophoblast. However, little is known about melatonin and its receptors in the human placenta throughout pregnancy and their role in villous trophoblast development. The purpose of this study was to determine melatonin-synthesizing enzymes, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) and hydroxyindole O-methyltransferase (HIOMT), and melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) expression throughout pregnancy as well as the role of melatonin and its receptors in villous trophoblast syncytialization. Our data show that the melatonin generating system is expressed throughout pregnancy (from week 7 to term) in placental tissues. AANAT and HIOMT show maximal expression at the 3rd trimester of pregnancy. MT1 receptor expression is maximal at the 1st trimester compared to the 2nd and 3rd trimesters, while MT2 receptor expression does not change significantly during pregnancy. Moreover, during primary villous cytotrophoblast syncytialization, MT1 receptor expression increases, while MT2 receptor expression decreases. Treatment of primary villous cytotrophoblast with an increasing concentration of melatonin (10 pM-1 mM) increases the fusion index (syncytium formation; 21% augmentation at 1 mM melatonin vs. vehicle) and ?-hCG secretion (121% augmentation at 1 mM melatonin vs. vehicle). This effect of melatonin appears to be mediated via its MT1 and MT2 receptors. In sum, melatonin machinery (synthetizing enzymes and receptors) is expressed in human placenta throughout pregnancy and promotes syncytium formation, suggesting an essential role of this indolamine in placental function and pregnancy well-being. PMID:25833399

  16. Homology Models of Melatonin Receptors: Challenges and Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Rivara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin exerts many of its actions through the activation of two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, named MT1 and MT2. So far, a number of different MT1 and MT2 receptor homology models, built either from the prototypic structure of rhodopsin or from recently solved X-ray structures of druggable GPCRs, have been proposed. These receptor models differ in the binding modes hypothesized for melatonin and melatonergic ligands, with distinct patterns of ligand-receptor interactions and putative bioactive conformations of ligands. The receptor models will be described, and they will be discussed in light of the available information from mutagenesis experiments and ligand-based pharmacophore models. The ability of these ligand-receptor complexes to rationalize structure-activity relationships of known series of melatonergic compounds will be commented upon.

  17. Homology models of melatonin receptors: challenges and recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Daniele; Lodola, Alessio; Bedini, Annalida; Spadoni, Gilberto; Rivara, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin exerts many of its actions through the activation of two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), named MT1 and MT2. So far, a number of different MT1 and MT2 receptor homology models, built either from the prototypic structure of rhodopsin or from recently solved X-ray structures of druggable GPCRs, have been proposed. These receptor models differ in the binding modes hypothesized for melatonin and melatonergic ligands, with distinct patterns of ligand-receptor interactions and putative bioactive conformations of ligands. The receptor models will be described, and they will be discussed in light of the available information from mutagenesis experiments and ligand-based pharmacophore models. The ability of these ligand-receptor complexes to rationalize structure-activity relationships of known series of melatonergic compounds will be commented upon. PMID:23584026

  18. Efficacy and safety of prolonged-release melatonin for insomnia in middle-aged and elderly patients with hypertension: a combined analysis of controlled clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemoine P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Lemoine1, Alan G Wade2, Amnon Katz3, Tali Nir3, Nava Zisapel3,41The Clinique Lyon-Lumière, Meyzieu, France; 2CPS Research, 3 Todd Campus, Glasgow, UK; 3Neurim Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Tel-Aviv, Israel; 4Department of Neurobiology Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, IsraelBackground: Add-on prolonged-release melatonin (PRM in antihypertensive therapy has been shown to ameliorate nocturnal hypertension. Hypertension is a major comorbidity among insomnia patients. The efficacy and safety of PRM for primary insomnia in patients aged 55 years and older who are treated with antihypertensive drugs were evaluated.Methods: Post hoc analysis of pooled antihypertensive drug-treated subpopulations from four randomized, double-blind trials of PRM and placebo for 3 weeks (N[PRM] = 195; N[placebo] = 197 or 28 weeks (N[PRM] = 157; N[placebo] = 40. Efficacy measurements included Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire scores of quality of sleep and alertness and behavioral integrity the following morning after 3 weeks, and sleep latency (daily sleep diary and Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I after 6 months of treatment. Safety measures included antihypertensive drug-treated subpopulations from these four and three additional single-blind and open-label PRM studies of up to 1 year (N[PRM] = 650; N[placebo] = 632.Results: Quality of sleep and behavior following wakening improved significantly with PRM compared with placebo (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0008, respectively. Sleep latency (P = 0.02 and CGI-I (P = 0.0003 also improved significantly. No differences were observed between PRM and placebo groups in vital signs, including daytime blood pressure at baseline and treatment phases. The rate of adverse events normalized per 100 patient-weeks was lower for PRM (3.66 than for placebo (8.53.Conclusions: The findings demonstrate substantive and sustained efficacy of PRM in primary insomnia patients treated with antihypertensive drugs. PRM appears to be safe for insomnia in patients with cardiovascular comorbidity.Keywords: prolonged-release melatonin, hypertension, nocturnal blood pressure, insomnia, cardiovascular disease, sleep quality

  19. Protecting the Melatonin Rhythm through Circadian Healthy Light Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Bonmati-Carrion, Maria Angeles; Arguelles-Prieto, Raquel; Martinez-Madrid, Maria Jose; Reiter, Russel; Hardeland, Ruediger; Rol, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Currently, in developed countries, nights are excessively illuminated (light at night), whereas daytime is mainly spent indoors, and thus people are exposed to much lower light intensities than under natural conditions. In spite of the positive impact of artificial light, we pay a price for the easy access to light during the night: disorganization of our circadian system or chronodisruption (CD), including perturbations in melatonin rhythm. Epidemiological studies show that CD is associated ...

  20. Antinociceptive properties of selective MT(2) melatonin receptor partial agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Canul, Martha; Comai, Stefano; Domínguez-López, Sergio; Granados-Soto, Vinicio; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone involved in the regulation of both acute and chronic pain whose mechanism is still not completely understood. We have recently demonstrated that selective MT2 melatonin receptor partial agonists have antiallodynic properties in animal models of chronic neuropathic pain by modulating ON/OFF cells of the descending antinociceptive system. Here, we examined the antinociceptive properties of the selective MT2 melatonin receptor partial agonists N-{2-[(3-methoxyphenyl)phenylamino]ethyl}acetamide (UCM765) and N-{2-[(3-bromophenyl)-(4-fluorophenyl)amino]ethyl}acetamide (UCM924) in two animal models of acute and inflammatory pain: the hot-plate and formalin tests. UCM765 and UCM924 (5-40 mg/kg, s.c.) dose-dependently increased the temperature of the first hind paw lick in the hot-plate test, and decreased the total time spent licking the injected hind paw in the formalin test. Antinociceptive effects of UCM765 and UCM924 were maximal at the dose of 20mg/kg. At this dose, the effects of UCM765 and UCM924 were similar to those produced by 200 mg/kg acetaminophen in the hot-plate test, and by 3 mg/kg ketorolac or 150 mg/kg MLT in the formalin test. Notably, antinociceptive effects of the two MT2 partial agonists were blocked by the pre-treatment with the MT2 antagonist 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetralin (4P-PDOT, 10 mg/kg) in both paradigms. These results demonstrate the antinociceptive properties of UCM765 and UCM924 in acute and inflammatory pain models and corroborate the concept that MT2 melatonin receptor may be a novel target for analgesic drug development. PMID:26162699

  1. Melatonin and Ischemic Stroke: Mechanistic Roles and Action

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Suhail Andrabi; Suhel Parvez; Heena Tabassum

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating neurological disabilities and brain's vulnerability towards it proves to be fatal and socio-economic loss of millions of people worldwide. Ischemic stroke remains at the center stage of it, because of its prevalence amongst the several other types attacking the brain. The various cascades of events that have been associated with stroke involve oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, upregulation of Ca2+ level, and so forth. Melatonin ...

  2. Light and melatonin schedule neuronal differentiation in the habenular nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    de Borsetti, Nancy Hernandez; Dean, Benjamin J; Bain, Emily J.; Clanton, Joshua A.; Robert W. Taylor; Gamse, Joshua T

    2011-01-01

    The formation of the embryonic brain requires the production, migration, and differentiation of neurons to be timely and coordinated. Coupling to the photoperiod could synchronize the development of neurons in the embryo. Here, we consider the effect of light and melatonin on the differentiation of embryonic neurons in zebrafish. We examine the formation of neurons in the habenular nuclei, a paired structure found near the dorsal surface of the brain adjacent to the pineal organ. Keeping embr...

  3. The reno-pineal axis: A novel role for melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pineal gland is a tiny endocrine gland whose physiologic role has been the focus of much research and much more speculation over the past century. This mini-review discusses recent findings which correlate melatonin and renal physiology, and postulates the presence of a "reno-pineal axis." Drawing lessons from comparative endocrinology, while quoting human data, it advocates the need to study the "reno-pineal axis" in greater detail.

  4. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: a case report of MR, CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, acquired disease involving multiple hematopoietic cell lines. Characteristics of PNH are intrinsic hemolytic anemia, iron deficiency anemia and venous thrombosis. We report a case of PNH with characterostoc MR and CT findings. The signal intensity of renal cortex was lower than that of medulla on both T1-and T2-weighted MR imaging. On T2 weighted MR images, the liver showed very low signal intensity but the signal intensity of the spleen was normal. On precontrast CT the attenuation of renal cortex was higher than that of renal medulla and the attenuation of liver was higher than that of the spleen. These findings of MR imaging and CT were the result from the deposition of hemosiderin in the cells of proximal convoluted tubules and transfusional hemosiderosis of liver

  5. Differential approach to treatment of primary nocturnal enuresis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesterenko O.V.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is to develop an algorithm of differentiated therapy in children with PNE. 234 children aged 5-15 years were studied. Results of treatment of children with primary nocturnal enuresis using the traditional therapeutic scheme and the algorithm of differential therapy based on identification of individual pathology were analyzed. The best clinical effect (recovery— in 73,1%, improvement— in 19,4% of cases was obtained in children undergone the complex of recommended measures: psychological consultation, rational and family psychotherapy, medication correction, physical and physiotherapy, alarm-monitoring; the complex was used differentially, i.e. depending on the identified pathology. In conclusion the article stated that individual treatment program with the obligatory inclusion of alarm-control for child with PNE should be selected after performing the recommended set of diagnostic measures

  6. Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devalet, Bérangère; Mullier, François; Chatelain, Bernard; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Chatelain, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired disorder of the hematopoietic stem cell that makes blood cells more sensitive to the action of complement. Patients experience intravascular hemolysis, smooth muscle dystonia, renal failure, arterial and pulmonary hypertension, recurrent infectious diseases and an increased risk of notably dreadful thrombotic complications. The diagnosis is made by flow cytometry. Efforts have been recently performed to improve the sensitivity and the standardization of this technique. PNH is frequently associated with aplastic anemia or low-risk myelodysplasia and may be asymptomatic. Management of the classical form of PNH has been dramatically revolutionized by the development of eculizumab, which brings benefits in terms of hemolysis, quality of life, renal function, thrombotic risk, and life expectancy. Prophylaxis and treatment of arterial and venous thrombosis currently remain a challenge in PNH. PMID:25753400

  7. Decomposition of Spatial Structure of Nocturnal Flow over Gentle Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, Andrew; Mahrt, Larry

    2015-09-01

    A network of sonic anemometers was deployed over gentle terrain in north-eastern Colorado, USA to observe and characterize local nocturnal circulations. Our study focuses on a small valley about 270 m wide and 12 m deep with a down-valley slope of 2-3 %. The measurements include 19 stations with sonic anemometers at 1 m and a 20-m tower that includes six sonic anemometers in the lowest 5 m. Shallow cold pools and drainage down the valley develop for weak ambient flow and relatively clear skies. However, transient modes constantly modulate or intermittently eliminate the cold pool, which makes extraction and analysis of the horizontal structure of the cold pool difficult with traditional analysis methods. Singular value decomposition successfully isolates the effects of large-scale flow from local down-valley cold-air drainage within the cold pool in spite of the intermittent nature of this local flow. Shortcomings of the method are noted.

  8. Vision in the nocturnal wandering spider Leucorchestris arenicola (Araneae: Sparassidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Thomas; Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Henschel, Joh R; Garm, Anders; Wehner, Rüdiger

    At night the Namib Desert spider Leucorchestris arenicola performs long-distance homing across its sand dune habitat. By disabling all or pairs of the spiders' eight eyes we found that homing ability was severely reduced when vision was fully abolished. Vision, therefore, seems to play a key role...... in the nocturnal navigational performances of L. arenicola. After excluding two or three pairs of eyes, the spiders were found to be able to navigate successfully using only their lateral eyes or only their anterior median eyes. Measurement of the eyes' visual fields showed that the secondary eyes...... and temporal resolution of the eyes is insufficient for detecting any visual information on structures in the landscape, and bright stars would be the only objects visible to the spiders. However, by summation in space and time, the spiders can rescue enough vision to detect coarse landscape...

  9. Autism in siblings with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Tomoko; Kumada, Tomohiro; Saito, Keiko; Fujii, Tatsuya

    2013-02-01

    In 1999, Hirose et al. reported a Japanese family with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) associated with a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ?4 subunit mutation (S252L). We followed the siblings of this family, and found that the elder brother had Asperger's disorder without mental retardation (MR) and the younger brother had autistic disorder with profound MR. The clinical epileptic features of the siblings were very similar, and both had deficits in socialization, but their cognitive development differed markedly. It thus seems that epilepsy is the direct phenotype of the S252L mutation, whereas other various factors modulate the cognitive and social development. No patients with ADNFLE have previously been reported to have autism spectrum disorder or profound MR. PMID:22883468

  10. Simvastatin-induced nocturnal leg pain disappears with pravastatin substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojakovi? Nataša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Statins have similar side effects that do not always occur at the same rate among the various statins. We present a case of simvastatin-induced muscle toxicity that disappeared when pravastatin was substituted for the original drug. Case Outline. A 74-year-old male, a nonsmoker, complained of severe nocturnal leg cramps. The patient also complained that similar painful cramping occurred when he walked rapidly or jogged. Because some components of his lipid panel exceeded the ‘desirable’ range, and as he had a history of myocardial infarction, his family physician prescribed simvastatin (40 mg/day. The patient had taken this medication for the past eight years. The painful nocturnal episodes started two years ago and affected either one or the other leg. Four months ago we discontinued his simvastatin and prescribed pravastatin (80 mg/day. At a follow-up visit six weeks later, the patient reported that his leg pains at night and the pain experienced after brisk walking had disappeared. Four months after the substitution of pravastatin for simvastatin, the patient reported that his complete lack of symptoms had continued. Conclusion. These painful muscle cramps were probably caused by an inadequate vascular supply to the calf and foot muscles. Perhaps a combination of advanced age and atherosclerotic changes created a predisposition for the simvastatin-induced leg cramps. Pravastatin differs from simvastatin in several ways. It is not metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4 oxidases, and thus is not influenced by CYP 3A4 inhibitors like simvastatin. Also, simvastatin is associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms located within the SLCO1B1 gene on the chromosome 12 and established myopathy, while pravastatin lacks this association. These differences may contribute to increased tolerance to pravastatin in this particular case.

  11. Nocturnal thyrotropin surge in growth hormone-deficient children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Municchi, G; Malozowski, S; Nisula, B C; Cristiano, A; Rose, S R

    1992-08-01

    Because some patients with growth hormone (GH) deficiency are found to be hypothyroid after initiation of treatment with GH, we assessed the predictive value of the nocturnal thyrotropin surge (a sensitive test for central hypothyroidism) in 56 untreated GH-deficient children and adolescents. Eighteen patients had a subnormal thyrotropin surge (mean 18% (range -30% to 46%)), significantly less than that of 96 normal control subjects (mean 124%; 95% confidence limits, 47% to 300%; p less than 0.01); 13 of the 18 had a subnormal total thyroxine (T4) level or a subnormal free T4 level, or both. These 18 patients were given thyroid hormone replacement therapy; GH deficiency was confirmed during treatment with thyroxine. Of the remaining 38 patients, who had no initial evidence of dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, 23 were re-examined while they were receiving GH treatment. Hypothyroidism developed in none of those 23 children during GH therapy. The nocturnal thyrotropin surge test and determination of iodothyronine levels were repeated in 14 of these euthyroid patients. There was no significant change in mean thyrotropin surge (129% (range +49% to +300) vs 125% (range +51% to +222%)), mean serum level of total T4 (111 +/- 4 vs 103 +/- 3 nmol/L), mean serum level of free T4 (19 +/- 0.7 vs 18 +/- 0.8 pmol/L), mean serum level of triiodothyronine (2.5 +/- 0.1 vs 2.5 +/- 0.1 nmol/L), or mean serum level of thyrotropin (2.9 +/- 0.3 vs 2.9 +/- 0.5 mU/L (mean +/- SEM)). We conclude that GH treatment does not appreciably alter thyroid function in GH-deficient patients who have no evidence of thyroid axis dysfunction before GH treatment. PMID:1640286

  12. Melatonin agonists for treatment of sleep and depressive disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seithikurippu R. Pandi-Perumal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin the hormone secreted by the pineal gland has been effective in improving sleep both in normal sleepers and insomniacs and has been used successfully in treating sleep and circadian rhythm sleep disorders. The lack of consistency in the reports published by the authors is attributed to the differential bioavailabilty and short half-life of melatonin. Sleep disturbances are also prominent features of depressive disorders. To overcome this problem, melatonergic agonists with sleep promoting properties have been introduced in clinical practice. Ramelteon, the MT1/ MT2 melatonergic agonist, has been used in a large number of clinical trials involving chronic insomniacs and has been found effective in improving the total sleep time and sleep efficiency of insomniacs and has not manifested serious adverse effects. The development of another MT1/MT2 melatonergic agonist agomelatine with antagonsim to 5-HT2c serotonin receptors has been found useful not only in treating sleep problems of patients but also as a first line antidepressant with earlier onset of actions in patients with major depressive disorder. An agonist for MT3 melatonin receptor has also been found effective in animal models of depression. [J Exp Integr Med 2011; 1(3.000: 149-158

  13. Melatonin improves bone mineral density at the femoral neck in postmenopausal women with osteopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstrup, Anne Kristine; Sikjaer, Tanja; Heickendorff, Lene; Mosekilde, Leif; Rejnmark, Lars

    2015-01-01

    melatonin could improve bone mass and integrity in humans. In a double-blind RCT, we randomized 81 postmenopausal osteopenic women to 1-yr nightly treatment with melatonin 1 mg (N = 20), 3 mg (N = 20), or placebo (N = 41). At baseline and after 1-yr treatment, we measured bone mineral density (BMD) by dual...

  14. Complex effects of melatonin on human circadian rhythms in constant dim light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, B; Arendt, J; Stone, B M

    1997-10-01

    In humans, the pineal hormone melatonin can phase shift a number of circadian rhythms (e.g., "fatigue", endogenous melatonin, core body temperature) together with the timing of prolactin secretion. It is uncertain, however, whether melatonin can fully entrain all human circadian rhythms. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of daily melatonin administration on sighted individuals kept in continuous very dim light. A total of 10 normal, healthy males were maintained in two separate groups in partial temporal isolation under constant dim light (actigraphy and logs). In the experiment, 9 of the 10 subjects free ran with Placebo 1st, whereas Melatonin 1st stabilized the sleep-wake cycle to 24 h in 8 of 10 individuals. In addition, 2 individuals showed irregular sleep with this treatment. In some subjects, there was a shortening of the period of the temperature rhythm without synchronization. Melatonin 2nd induced phase advances (5 of 9 subjects), phase delays (2 of 9 subjects), and stabilization (2 of 9 subjects) of the sleep-wake cycle with subsequent synchronization to 24 h in the majority of individuals (7 of 9). Temperature continued to free run in 4 subjects. Maximum phase advances in core temperature were seen when the first melatonin treatment was given approximately 2 h after the temperature acrophase. These results indicate that melatonin was able to phase shift sleep and core temperature but was unable to synchronize core temperature consistently. In the majority of subjects, the sleep-wake cycle could be synchronized. PMID:9376645

  15. Ultrastructural evidence of a secretory role for melatonin in the human parotid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, F; Isola, M; Isola, R; Solinas, P; Lilliu, M A; Puxeddu, R; Ekstrom, J

    2015-12-01

    In vivo animal studies show that pentagastrin, cholecystokinin and melatonin cause the secretion and synthesis of salivary proteins. Melatonin occurs in large amounts in the gut and is released into the blood on food intake. In vitro experiments suggest that pentagastrin exerts secretory activity in human salivary glands, as judged by ultrastructural changes, reflecting secretion, and an actual protein output. Currently, it is hypothesised that melatonin induces secretory exocytotic events in the human parotid gland. Human parotid tissues were exposed to a high single concentration of melatonin in vitro, processed for high resolution scanning electron microscopy and then assessed morphometrically with the emphasis on the membrane of the intercellular canaliculi, a site of protein secretion. Compared with controls and in terms of density, the melatonin-exposed parotid tissues displayed increases in protrusions (signalling anchored granules) and microbuds (signalling membrane recycling and/or vesicle secretion) and decreases in microvilli (signalling cytoskeletal re-arrangement related to exocytosis), phenomena abolished or very largely reduced by the melatonin receptor blocker, luzindole. In conclusion, acinar serous cells of parotid tissue displayed in vitro exocytotic activity to melatonin, signalling protein secretion. Whether, under physiological conditions, melatonin influences the secretion of human parotid glands remains to be explored, however. PMID:26769834

  16. Rapid and transient stimulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by melatonin in normal and tumor leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melatonin is a modified tryptophan with potent biological activity, exerted by stimulation of specific plasma membrane (MT1/MT2) receptors, by lower affinity intracellular enzymatic targets (quinone reductase, calmodulin), or through its strong anti-oxidant ability. Scattered studies also report a perplexing pro-oxidant activity, showing that melatonin is able to stimulate production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we show that on U937 human monocytes melatonin promotes intracellular ROS in a fast (< 1 min) and transient (up to 5-6 h) way. Melatonin equally elicits its pro-radical effect on a set of normal or tumor leukocytes; intriguingly, ROS production does not lead to oxidative stress, as shown by absence of protein carbonylation, maintenance of free thiols, preservation of viability and regular proliferation rate. ROS production is independent from MT1/MT2 receptor interaction, since a) requires micromolar (as opposed to nanomolar) doses of melatonin; b) is not contrasted by the specific MT1/MT2 antagonist luzindole; c) is not mimicked by a set of MT1/MT2 high affinity melatonin analogues. Instead, chlorpromazine, the calmodulin inhibitor shown to prevent melatonin-calmodulin interaction, also prevents melatonin pro-radical effect, suggesting that the low affinity binding to calmodulin (in the micromolar range) may promote ROS production.

  17. Melatonin Decreases Daytime Challenging Behaviour in Persons with Intellectual Disability and Chronic Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braam, W.; Didden, R.; Maas, A. P. H. M.; Korzilius, H.; Smits, M. G.; Curfs, L. M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Persons with intellectual disability (ID) and sleep problems exhibit more daytime challenging behaviours than persons with ID without sleep problems. Several anecdotal reports suggest that melatonin is not only effective in the treatment of insomnia, but also decreases daytime challenging behaviour. However, the effect of melatonin…

  18. Antioxidative effects of melatonin administration in elderly primary essential hypertension patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Szewczyk-Golec, Karolina; Czuczejko, Jolanta; Pawluk, Hanna; van Marke de Lumen, Katarzyna; Kozakiewicz, Mariusz; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Kedziora, Józef

    2008-10-01

    The imbalance of the redox state of the aging organism may be involved in the development of primary essential hypertension. Melatonin, a potent antioxidant agent, was found to exert a hypotensive effect and improve the function of the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of melatonin supplementation on oxidative stress parameters in elderly primary essential hypertensive (EH) patients, controlled by a diuretic (indapamide) monotherapy. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH), activities of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in erythrocytes, the plasma level of nitrate/nitrite, the content of carbonyl groups of plasma proteins and morning melatonin levels in the serum of 17 elderly EH patients were determined at the baseline and after the 15th and 30th days of melatonin supplementation (5 mg daily). Melatonin administration resulted in a significant increase in the morning melatonin concentration, SOD-1 and CAT activities, and a reduction in the MDA level. Statistically significant alterations in the levels of GSH, nitrate/nitrite and carbonyl groups and the activity of GSH-Px were not observed. These results indicate an improvement in the antioxidative defense of the organism by melatonin supplementation in the examined group and may suggest melatonin supplementation as an additional treatment supporting hypotensive therapy in elderly EH patients. PMID:18363674

  19. Oxidative stress in relation to surgery: is there a role for the antioxidant melatonin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükakin, Bülent; Gögenur, Ismail; Reiter, Russel J; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    antioxidant and in many studies melatonin has been shown to be more effective than some "classical" antioxidants (e.g., vitamins E and C) in protecting against oxidative/nitrosative stress. There are numerous experimental studies in which the antioxidant properties of melatonin have been proven. In...

  20. Effects of melatonin and ethanol on the heart rate of Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Kohn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, an endogenous hormone that may regulate circadian rhythms by modulating cholinergic activity, is increasing in popular use as a natural treatment for sleep disorders. However, the effects of melatonin on the human heart are not well characterized, and the consequences of combining alcohol with melatonin are unknown. The myogenic heart of the water flea Daphnia magna (D. magna is regulated by inhibitory cholinergic neurons that modulate cardiac function, including heart rate. D. magna is a useful model organism for cardiovascular function, due to its physical transparency and susceptibility to cardioactive drugs known to affect the human heart. In this study, the effects of immersion in 10 mg/L melatonin and 5% ethanol on the heart rate of D. magna were quantified. Two-hour exposure to melatonin caused a significant decrease in heart rate, from 228 ± 2 bpm to 167 ± 8 bpm. Six-minute immersion in ethanol also significantly depressed the heart rate to 176 ± 10 bpm. Pretreatment with melatonin prior to the addition of ethanol resulted in a greater decrease in heart rate (89 ± 7 bpm than ethanol or melatonin alone. These findings indicate that melatonin and alcohol may combine to cause a greater depressive effect on cardiac function.

  1. Effect of melatonin and time of administration on irradiation-induced damage to rat testes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Take

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ionizing irradiation on testes and the protective effects of melatonin were investigated by immunohistochemical and electron microscopic methods. Eighty-two adult male Wistar rats were divided into 10 groups. The rats in the irradiated groups were exposed to a sublethal irradiation dose of 8 Gy, either to the total body or abdominopelvic region using a 60Co source at a focus of 80 cm away from the skin in the morning or evening together with vehicle (20% ethanol or melatonin administered 24 h before (10 mg/kg, immediately before (20 mg/kg and 24 h after irradiation (10 mg/kg, all ip. Caspace-3 immunoreactivity was increased in the irradiated group compared to control (P < 0.05. Melatonin-treated groups showed less apoptosis as indicated by a considerable decrease in caspace-3 immunoreactivity (P < 0.05. Electron microscopic examination showed that all spermatogenic cells, especially primary spermatocytes, displayed prominent degeneration in the groups submitted to total body and abdominopelvic irradiation. However, melatonin administration considerably inhibited these degenerative changes, especially in rats who received abdominopelvic irradiation. Total body and abdominopelvic irradiation induced identical apoptosis and testicular damage. Chronobiological assessment revealed that biologic rhythm does not alter the inductive effect of irradiation. These data indicate that melatonin protects against total body and abdominopelvic irradiation. Melatonin was more effective in the evening abdominopelvic irradiation and melatonin-treated group than in the total body irradiation and melatonin-treated group.

  2. Effect of mobile usage on serum melatonin levels among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Abha; Saxena, Yogesh

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic radiations from mobile phones may affect the circadian rhythm of melatonin in mobile users. The study was designed with objective to evaluate the influence of mobile phone on circadian rhythm of melatonin and to find the association if any between the hours of mobile usage with serum melatonin levels. All the volunteers medical students using mobiles for > 2 hrs/day were included in high users group and volunteers who used mobile for ? 2 hrs where included in low users group. Both high and low users volunteers were sampled three times in the same day (Morning-3-4 am, Noon 1-2 pm, Evening-5-6 pm) for estimation of serum melatonin levels: Comparsion of sernum melatonin levels in high users and low users were done by Mann Whitney "U" Test. Reduced morning melatonin levels (3-4 am) was observed in high users (> 2 hrs/day) i.e high users had a disturbed melatonin circadian rhythm.There was a negative correlation between melatonin secretion and hours of mobile usages. PMID:26215007

  3. Melatonin modulates visual function and cell viability in the mouse retina via the MT1 melatonin receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Baba, Kenkichi; Pozdeyev, Nikita; Mazzoni, Francesca; Contreras-Alcantara, Susana; Liu, Cuimei; Kasamatsu, Manami; Martinez-Merlos, Theresa; Strettoi, Enrica; Iuvone, P Michael; Tosini, Gianluca

    2009-01-01

    A clear demonstration of the role of melatonin and its receptors in specific retinal functions is lacking. The present study investigated the distribution of MT1 receptors within the retina, and the scotopic and photopic electroretinograms (ERG) and retinal morphology in wild-type (WT) and MT1 receptor-deficient mice. MT1 receptor transcripts were localized in photoreceptor cells and in some inner retinal neurons. A diurnal rhythm in the dark-adapted ERG responses was observed in WT mice, wit...

  4. No effect of melatonin on oxidative stress after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucukakin, B.; Klein, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Melatonin, an endogenous circadian regulator, also has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidative effect of melatonin in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods Patients were randomized to receive 10 mg melatonin or placebo during surgery. Blood samples for analysis of malondialdehyde (MDA), ascorbic acid (AA), total ascorbic acid (TAA) dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were collected pre-operatively and at 5 min, 6 h and 24 h after operation. Results Twenty patients received melatonin and 21 patients received placebo during surgery. No significant differences were observed between the groups in the oxidative stress variables MDA, TAA, AA and DHA or in the inflammatory variable CRP (repeated-measures ANOVA, P > 0.05 for all variables). Conclusions Administration of 10 mg melatonin did not reduce variables of oxidative stress in patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  5. The hormonal Zeitgeber melatonin: Role as a circadian modulator in memory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Rawashdeh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The neuroendocrine substance melatonin is a hormone synthesized rhythmically by the pineal gland under the influence of the circadian system and alternating light/dark cycles. Melatonin has been shown to have broad applications, and consequently becoming a molecule of great controversy. Undoubtedly, however, melatonin plays an important role as a time cue for the endogenous circadian system. This review focuses on melatonin as a regulator in the circadian modulation of memory processing. Memory processes (acquisition, consolidation and retrieval are modulated by the circadian system. However, the mechanism by which the biological clock is rhythmically influencing cognitive processes remains unknown. We also discuss, how the circadian system by generating cycling melatonin levels can implant information about daytime into memory processing, depicted as day and nighttime differences in acquisition, memory consolidation and/or retrieval.

  6. Effect of Using Melatonin Implants on Postpartum Reproductive Indices in Tigaia Sheep Breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Padeanu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were carried out in a commercial farm from Turnu, Arad County, on a number of 110 indigenous adultewes from the Tigaia breed. It is estimated by some authors that administration of subcutaneous melatonin implantsduring a period of 30 days, in lactating or dry ewes, would improve the reproductive performances in some sheepbreeds. Subcutaneous melatonin implants (Melovin were inserted to the ewes in doses of 18 mg. Current research,emphasized treated that from indigenous Tigaia breed, can be obtained superior reproduction indexes if the animalsare treated with melatonin implants with 35 days before the mating season, differences from the untreated groupbeing significantly (p<0.001. However, in sheep treated used melatonin implants, the lambing interval were reducedwith 40 to 50%. It seems that use of melatonin implants Melovin type near the beginning of normal breeding season,increases the reproductive performance of adult ewes from the Tigaia breed.

  7. Melatonin Regulates Oxidative Stress Initiated by Freund’s Complete Adjuvant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Pohanka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a hormone with strong antioxidant properties. In this experiment, Freund’s complete adjuvant was used as a stressogenic substance given to laboratory outbred mice, whereas melatonin was investigated as a protectant against the stressogenic effect. Levels of low molecular weight antioxidants, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and tumor necrosis factor ? and activity of glutathione reductase were determined in blood from the animals. Surprisingly, melatonin was not involved in direct regulation of antioxidants, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and tumor necrosis factor ?. On the other hand, melatonin regulated glutathione reductase activity. We can conclude on regulation of metabolism caused by melatonin in the model. The effect was more important than the expected regulation of immunity and basal oxidative homeostasis.

  8. Melatonin reduces bacterial translocation and apoptosis in trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Akcan, Can Kucuk, Erdogan Sozuer, Duygu Esel, Hizir Akyildiz, Hulya Akgun, Sabahattin Muhtaroglu, Yucel Aritas

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the effects of exogenous melatonin on bacterial translocation and apoptosis in a rat ulcerative colitis model.METHODS: Rats were randomly assigned to three groups: groupI: control, group II: experimental colitis, group III: colitis plus melatonin treatment. On d 11 after colitis, plasma tumor necrosis factor-?, portal blood endotoxin levels, colon tissue myeloperoxidase and caspase-3 activity were measured. Bacterial translocation was quantified by blood, lymph node, liver and spleen culture.RESULTS: We observed a significantly reduced incidence of bacterial translocation to the liver, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, portal and systemic blood in animals treated with melatonin. Treatment with melatonin significantly decreased the caspase-3 activity in colonic tissues compared to that in trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid- treated rats (16.11 ± 2.46 vs 32.97 ± 3.91, P < 0.01.CONCLUSION: Melatonin has a protective effect on bacterial translocation and apoptosis.

  9. Can Fasting Glucose Levels or Post-Breakfast Glucose Fluctuations Predict the Occurrence of Nocturnal Asymptomatic Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetic Patients Receiving Basal-Bolus Insulin Therapy with Long-Acting Insulin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Sumie; Nishimura, Rimei; Ando, Kiyotaka; Tsujino, Daisuke; Utsunomiya, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the occurrence of nocturnal asymptomatic hypoglycemia may be predicted based on fasting glucose levels and post-breakfast glucose fluctuations. Patients and Methods The study subjects comprised type 1 diabetic patients who underwent CGM assessments and received basal-bolus insulin therapy with long-acting insulin. The subjects were evaluated for I) fasting glucose levels and II) the range of post-breakfast glucose elevation (from fasting glucose levels to postprandial 1- and 2-hour glucose levels). The patients were divided into those with asymptomatic hypoglycemia during nighttime and those without for comparison. Optimal cut-off values were also determined for relevant parameters that could predict nighttime hypoglycemia by using ROC analysis. Results 64 patients (mean HbA1c 8.7 ± 1.8%) were available for analysis. Nocturnal asymptomatic hypoglycemia occurred in 23 patients (35.9%). Fasting glucose levels (I) were significantly lower in those with hypoglycemia than those without (118 ± 35 mg/dL vs. 179 ± 65 mg/dL; P 54 mg/dL (0.65/0.61/0.71, P = 0.006), 2-h postprandial elevation > 78 mg/dL (0.65/0.73/0.71, P = 0.005). Conclusions Nocturnal asymptomatic hypoglycemia was associated with increases in post-breakfast glucose levels in type 1 diabetes. Study findings also suggest that fasting glucose levels and the range of post-breakfast glucose elevation could help predict the occurrence of nocturnal asymptomatic hypoglycemia. PMID:26625003

  10. Melatonin attenuates sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction via a PI3K/Akt-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Rui; Zhao, Lei; Xi, Cong; Li, Haixun; Shen, Guohong; Liu, Haixiao; Zhang, Shumiao; Sun, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is an important manifestation of sepsis. Previous studies suggest that melatonin is protective against sepsis. In addition, activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway has been reported to be beneficial in sepsis. However, the role of PI3K/Akt signaling in the protective effect of melatonin against sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction remains unclear. Here, LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, was used to investigate the role of PI3K/Akt signaling in mediating the effects of melatonin on sepsis-induced myocardial injury. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery was used to establish a rat model of sepsis. Melatonin was administrated to rats intraperitoneally (30 mg/kg). The survival rate, measures of myocardial injury and cardiac performance, serum lactate dehydrogenase level, inflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative stress level, and the extent of myocardial apoptosis were assessed. The results suggest that melatonin administration after CLP surgery improved survival rates and cardiac function, attenuated myocardial injury and apoptosis, and decreased the serum lactate dehydrogenase level. Melatonin decreased the production of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-?, IL-1?, and HMGB1, increased anti-oxidant enzyme activity, and decreased the expression of markers of oxidative damage. Levels of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), unphosphorylated Akt (Akt), Bcl-2, and Bax were measured by Western blot. Melatonin increased p-Akt levels, which suggests Akt pathway activation. Melatonin induced higher Bcl-2 expression and lower Bax expression, suggesting inhibition of apoptosis. All protective effects of melatonin were abolished by LY294002, the PI3K inhibitor. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that melatonin mitigates myocardial injury in sepsis via PI3K/Akt signaling activation. PMID:26671026

  11. Protective effects of melatonin against thioacetamide-induced liver fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowska, G; Celinski, K; Korolczuk, A; Wojcicka, G; Dudka, J; Bojarska, A; Reiter, R J

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of melatonin on thioacetamide (TAA) induced liver fibrosis in rats. The antifibrotic effects of melatonin were assessed by determining activity indirect markers of fibrosis: aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (AP), and proinflammatory cytokines: interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Parameters of oxidative stress: oxidised glutathione (GSSG), reduced glutathione (GSH) and presaged activity of paraoxonase 1 (PON-1), an antioxidative enzyme were determined. Inflammatory changes and fibrosis extent were evaluated histologically. Experiments were carried out in Wistar rats. Animals were divided into 4 groups: I - controls, water ad libitum for 12 weeks, group II - TAA, 300 mg/L ad libitum for 12 weeks, III - melatonin, 10 mg/kg b.w. intraperitoneally (i.p.) daily for 4 weeks, IV - TAA, 300 mg/L ad libitum for 12 weeks followed by melatonin, 10 mg/kg/b.w. i.p. daily for 4 weeks. Results of serum determinations demonstrated significantly lower activity of AST, ALT and AP in the group receiving TAA followed by melatonin compared to the group receiving only TAA. Immunoenzymatic findings on effect of melatonin on concentration of proinflammatory cytokines confirmed these data. Biochemical examinations in liver homogenates revealed statistically significant improvement (concentration of GSH increases and concentration of GSSG decreases) in animals with TAA-induced liver damage receiving melatonin. Moreover, the activity of PON-1 toward phenyl acetate and paraoxon was increased in liver homogenates and serum in the group receiving TAA followed by melatonin compared to the TAA group without melatonin treatment. Microscopic evaluation disclosed inhibitory effects of melatonin on inflammatory changes and extent of liver fibrosis. PMID:26348081

  12. Alteration of melatonin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes and proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikichi T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Taiichi Hikichi1, Naohiro Tateda2, Toshiaki Miura31Department of Ophthalmology, Ohtsuka Eye Hospital, Sapporo; 2Asahikawa National College of Technology, Asahikawa; 3Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dynamics of plasma melatonin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy.Methods: Plasma melatonin levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in 56 patients. Patients were divided into a diabetic group (30 patients and a nondiabetic group (26 patients. The diabetic group was divided further into a proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR group (n = 14 and a nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR group (n = 16. Plasma melatonin levels obtained at midnight and 3 am were compared between the groups.Results: Nighttime melatonin levels were significantly lower in the diabetic group than in the nondiabetic group (P < 0.03 and lower in the PDR group than in the nondiabetic and NPDR groups (P < 0.01 and P < 0.03, respectively, but no significant difference was found between the nondiabetic and NPDR groups. The daytime melatonin level did not significantly differ between the nondiabetic and diabetic groups or between the nondiabetic, NPDR, and PDR groups.Conclusion: The nighttime melatonin level is altered in patients with diabetes and PDR but not in diabetic patients without PDR. Although patients with PDR may have various dysfunctions that affect melatonin secretion more severely, advanced dysfunction of retinal light perception may cause altered melatonin secretion. Alteration of melatonin secretion may accelerate further occurrence of complications in diabetic patients.Keywords: circadian rhythm, diabetes, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, melatonin

  13. Facilitation and inhibition of G-protein regulated protein secretion by melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubis, M; Zisapel, N

    1995-08-01

    Melatonin has been found to inhibit or enhance the constitutive secretion of proteins from the cultured melanoma cells at nanomolar concentrations (0.5-10 nM), in a dose dependent manner. The amplitude and direction of the response were found to depend on cell density: melatonin inhibited the release early after plating or at low cell density, but facilitated the release later on, or at high cell density. To elucidate the involvement of G-proteins in these responses, the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP tau S; which was introduced into the cells during the process of permeabilization and resealing with ATP), aluminum fluoride, pertussis and cholera toxins on protein secretion from the cells were assessed in the absence and presence of melatonin. At low cell density, melatonin inhibited release, but paradoxically enhanced it when GTP hydrolysis was blocked (by GTP tau S or cholera toxin treatment). Aluminum fluoride and melatonin inhibited protein release in the absence or presence of GTP tau S. At high cell density, melatonin facilitated the release and so did GTP tau S, aluminum fluoride, their combination, and cholera toxin treatment. However, in the presence of the combination of GTP tau S, aluminium fluoride and melatonin, protein release was paradoxically inhibited. Similar treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin, did not affect the melatonin-mediated inhibition or facilitation. These results indicate that the effects of melatonin on protein secretion are mediated by at least one heterotrimeric G protein which belongs to the Gs class. In addition, melatonin can facilitate secretion via a cholera and pertussis toxins-insensitive mechanism which can be inhibited by aluminum fluoride. This effect is manifested when Gs is permanently activated (by GTP tau S or cholera toxin). PMID:7580873

  14. Melatonin in the thyroid gland: regulation by thyroid-stimulating hormone and role in thyroglobulin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Marin, R; Fernandez-Santos, J M; Morillo-Bernal, J; Gordillo-Martinez, F; Vazquez-Roman, V; Utrilla, J C; Carrillo-Vico, A; Guerrero, J M; Martin-Lacave, I

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin is an indoleamine with multiple functions in both plant and animal species. In addition to data in literature describing many other important roles for melatonin, such as antioxidant, circadian rhythm controlling, anti-aging, antiproliferative or immunomodulatory activities, our group recently reported that thyroid C-cells synthesize melatonin and suggested a paracrine role for this molecule in the regulation of thyroid activity. To discern the role played by melatonin at thyroid level and its involvement in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, in the present study we have analyzed the effect of thyrotropin in the regulation of the enzymatic machinery for melatonin biosynthesis in C cells as well as the effect of melatonin in the regulation of thyroid hormone biosynthesis in thyrocytes. Our results show that the key enzymes for melatonin biosynthesis (AANAT and ASMT) are regulated by thyroid-stimulating hormone. Furthermore, exogenous melatonin increases thyroglobulin expression at mRNA and protein levels on cultured thyrocytes and this effect is not strictly mediated by the upregulation of TTF1 or, noteworthy, PAX8 transcription factors. The present data show that thyroid C-cells synthesize melatonin under thyroid-stimulating hormone control and, consistently with previous data, support the hypothesis of a paracrine role for C-cell-synthesised melatonin within the thyroid gland. Additionally, in the present study we show evidence for the involvement of melatonin in thyroid function by directly-regulating thyroglobulin gene expression in follicular cells. PMID:26579570

  15. Melatonin ineffective in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis patients with fragmented or normal motor activity rhythms recorded by wrist actigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hätönen, T; Kirveskari, E; Heiskala, H; Sainio, K; Laakso, M L; Santavuori, P

    1999-04-01

    Melatonin was tested as a sleeping pill in five patients with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. The single-blind, placebo-controlled study consisted of motor activity recordings, sleep logs, and administration of placebo or melatonin (2.5 or 5 mg). Daily motor activity rhythms were measured by wrist actigraphy during four 7-day periods (baseline, placebo, melatonin 2.5 mg, and melatonin 5 mg). The placebo or melatonin was administered in the evenings for 3 weeks, and the recordings were made during the last week of the 3-week treatment. Sleep logs were kept by the caregivers during the recordings. Based on period analyses, the activity recordings were evaluated to display a normal (24-h) or fragmented rhythm. Three patients had normal motor activity patterns during the baseline recordings, and administration of placebo or melatonin did not affect their rest/activity rhythms. Two patients had abnormally fragmented activity rhythms during the baseline periods, and administration of placebo or melatonin did not induce synchronization. According to the actigraphic data, there were no changes in activity rhythms resulting from administration of melatonin. However, based on the observations, three families reported that melatonin slightly improved the sleep quality of the patients. These controversial findings show the difficulties involved in specifying the role of melatonin in modulating sleep. Thus, we conclude that more evidence is required before the significance of melatonin as a sleeping pill is defined. PMID:10191137

  16. Melatonin membrane receptor (MT1R) expression and nitro-oxidative stress in testis of golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus: An age-dependent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arun; Haldar, Chandana

    2015-09-01

    Age-dependent decline in melatonin level induces nitro-oxidative stress that compromises physiological homeostasis including reproduction. However, less information exist regarding the age-dependent variation in local melatonin (lMel) concentration and MT1R expression in testis and its interaction with testicular steroidogenesis and nitro-oxidative stress in golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus. Therefore, we evaluated lMel level along with MT1R expression and its possible interaction with steroidogenesis and nitro-oxidative stress in testes of young (6weeks), adult (15weeks) and old (2years) aged hamsters. Further, we injected the old hamsters with melatonin to address whether age-related decline in lMel and MT1R is responsible for the reduction in testicular steroidogenesis and antioxidant status. Increased expression of steroidogenic markers suggests increased testicular steroidogenesis in adult hamsters that declined in old hamsters. An age-dependent elevation in the level of NOX, TBARS, corticosterone and the expression of iNOS and GR with a concomitant decrease in enzyme activities for SOD, CAT, GSH-PX indicate increased nitro-oxidative stress in testes. Data suggest that reproductive senescence in male hamsters might be a consequence of declined lMel concentration with MT1R expression inducing nitro-oxidative stress resulting in diminished testicular steroidogenesis. However, administration of Mel in old-aged hamsters significantly increased steroidogenesis and antioxidant status without a significant variation in lMel concentration and MT1R expression in testes. Therefore, decreased lMel and MT1R might not be the causative factor underlying the age-associated decrease in antioxidant defence and steroidogenesis in testes. In conclusion, Mel induced amelioration of testicular oxidative insult and elevation of steroidogenic activity suggests a potential role of increased nitro-oxidative stress underlying the age-dependent decrease in steroidogenesis. PMID:26151342

  17. Light Pollution Modifies the Expression of Daily Rhythms and Behavior Patterns in a Nocturnal Primate

    OpenAIRE

    Le Tallec, Thomas; Perret, Martine; Théry, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Among anthropogenic pressures, light pollution altering light/dark cycles and changing the nocturnal component of the environment constitutes a threat for biodiversity. Light pollution is widely spread across the world and continuously growing. However, despite the efforts realized to describe and understand the effects of artificial lighting on fauna, few studies have documented its consequences on biological rhythms, behavioral and physiological functions in nocturnal mammals. To determine ...

  18. The importance of visual cues for nocturnal species: Eagle owls signal by badge brightness

    OpenAIRE

    Penteriani, Vincenzo; Delgado, María del Mar; Alonso-Álvarez, Carlos; Sergio, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    Nocturnal species may communicate by visual signals more frequently than previously thought. In fact, such species are habitually active around sunset and sunrise, when light conditions are still suitable for visual communication. We investigated the communication function of a visual cue in the eagle owl Bubo bubo, a nocturnal predator. In this species, territorial and courtship displays peak during the sunset and sunrise periods and involve the display of a white badge located on the throat...

  19. Changes in nocturnal and peak acid outputs after duodenal ulcer healing with sucralfate or ranitidine.

    OpenAIRE

    Kummer, A F; Johnston, D.A.; Marks, I. N.; Young, G O; Tigler-Wybrandi, N A; Bridger, S A

    1992-01-01

    Changes in basal and stimulated acid secretion after duodenal ulcer healing have been previously shown to be influenced by the nature of the treatment. This study aimed to determine possible changes in nocturnal acid secretion on duodenal ulcer healing in patients treated with sucralfate or ranitidine. Nocturnal acid output and peak acid output in response to pentagastrin stimulation were studied in 20 patients before and after duodenal ulcer healing with sucralfate (n = 9) or ranitidine (n =...

  20. Epidemiology of nocturnal enuresis in basic schoolchildren in Aden Governorate, Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalida Anwer Yousef

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal enuresis is a common problem among children and adolescents. Data regarding this problem in schoolchildren in Yemen are scarce. This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of nocturnal incontinence in Aden school going children, describe its severity and identify the relation between nocturnal enuresis with personal and family characteristics. The study was a cross-sectional survey conducted on the public basic schoolchildren in Aden, Yemen, in the period November 2007-April 2009. A random, multistage sample of 890 students was taken from four districts in eight schools and divided into two strata: males and females. Data were obtained by using pre-recoded questionnaire, which was completed by parents. The response rate was 73.7% (656 students; 113 (17.2% cases of nocturnal enuresis were encountered. Nocturnal enuresis de-creased by age from 31.5% at 6-8 years to 8.7% at 15+ years (P < 0.05. Primary nocturnal enuresis affected 76.1%, of which the majority of children were bedwetting every night. Positive family history of nocturnal enuresis, deeper sleep, daytime enuresis, tea drinking, being non working father or with less education showed significant association with the occurrence of enuresis in the students. Stressful events in the previous 6 months of the study were twice more frequently noted. The study concluded that the prevalence of nocturnal enuresis in Aden public school children and its associated factors are almost comparable with that reported in epidemiological studies from various countries. Health education will encourage the parents to be aware, cope with this problem and seek appropriate medical advice.

  1. Diurnal and Nocturnal Pollination of Marginatocereus marginatus (Pachycereeae: Cactaceae) in Central Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    DAR, SALEEM; ARIZMENDI, Ma. del CORO; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Chiropterophillous and ornithophillous characteristics can form part of a single reproductive strategy in plants that have flowers with diurnal and nocturnal anthesis. This broader pollination strategy can ensure seed set when pollinators are scarce or unpredictable. This appears to be true of hummingbirds, which presumably pollinate Marginatocereus marginatus, a columnar cactus with red nocturnal and diurnal flowers growing as part of dense bat-pollinated columnar cacti...

  2. Nocturnal oxygen desaturation and spirometric parameters in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Pond, M. N.; Conway, S P

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Correction of nocturnal hypoxaemia in patients with cystic fibrosis may delay the development of pulmonary hypertension. Descriptive statistics used for nocturnal arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) lack uniformity. The relationship between SpO2 and spirometric parameters has not previously been explored in a large number of exacerbations in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. METHODS--Over a 21 month period overnight SpO2, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and forced ...

  3. Melatonin - a key to the evaluation of the effects of electric; Melatonin - Schluessel fuer die Bewertung der Wirkung elektrischer und magnetischer Felder?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunstorf, B.; Lichtenberg, W. [Fachhochschule Hamburg (Germany). Fachbereich Oekotrophologie; Boikat, U. [BAGS, Amt fuer Gesundheit, Hamburg (Germany)

    2000-09-01

    The human pineal gland produces melatonin in a circadian rhythm. The substance has different functions - as a hormone, as an antioxidant and as a neurotransmitter. The secretion of melatonin and its tumor inhibition function can be influenced by electric and magnetic fields. Investigations have been carried out with rodents which have a melatonin rhythm similar to humans; nevertheless, they show a high variability between the species. The present state of knowledge only allows limited use of melatonin as an indicator for the impact of electric and magnetic fields. (orig.) [German] In der Epiphyse des Menschen wird in circadianem Rhythmus Melatonin produziert und ausgeschuettet. Die Substanz hat unterschiedliche Funktionen - als Hormon, Antioxidans und Neurotransmitter. Seine Ausschuettung und seine tumorhemmende Funktion koennen durch elektrische und magnetische Felder beeinflusst werden. Anhand von Nagern, die einen dem Menschen aehnlichen Melatoninrhythmus haben, allerdings eine hohe Speziesvarianz aufweisen, wurden diese Funktionen untersucht. Nach dem jetzigen Kenntnisstand eignet sich Melatonin nur bedingt als Indikator fuer die Wirkungen elektrischer und magnetischer Felder. (orig.)

  4. Effect of oral melatonin on the date of the first ovulation after ovarian inactivity in mares under artificial photoperiod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, D; Palmer, E

    1991-01-01

    Two experiments tested the hypothesis that exogenous melatonin (12 mg) given 4 h before dusk (evening melatonin), or near dawn (morning melatonin), would mimic a prolongation of the night and suppress stimulation of the ovaries induced by long days. Experiment 1 consisted of a non-stimulated control group, a control group stimulated by 14.5 h of light, a treated group stimulated with 14.5 h of light plus evening melatonin, a control group given 17.5 h of light and a treatment group given 17.5 h of light plus morning melatonin. The mean (+/- s.e.m.) intervals from the start of treatment to the first ovulation were 135 +/- 26, 68 +/- 4, 147 +/- 11, 94 +/- 6 and 107 +/- 13 days, respectively. Experiment 2 consisted of 3 groups exposed to 14.5 h of light, a control group and a morning and an evening melatonin group. The mean (+/- s.e.m.) intervals from treatment to first ovulation were 53 +/- 12, 62 +/- 8 and 101 +/- 5 days, respectively. Thus, evening melatonin suppressed the stimulatory effect of the applied light, but morning melatonin did not (P greater than 0.05). In non-treated mares, peripheral blood melatonin levels were higher at night than during the day. In the treated mares, very high plasma melatonin concentrations occurred 10-20 min after treatment and levels began to fall again immediately after this peak was reached. This decline was steeper after morning than the evening treatments. Conversely, the endogenous night-time plasma melatonin concentrations before the morning treatment were lower than the night-time levels measured in the treated animals. Two hypotheses are proposed: (a) exogenous treatment with melatonin in the morning is perceived as dusk and is followed by only approximately 5 h of high melatonin concentrations in the blood and (b) in the morning the mare is sensitive to light regardless of the presence of high levels of melatonin in her blood. PMID:1795267

  5. Melatonin stimulates the nonamyloidogenic processing of ?APP through the positive transcriptional regulation of ADAM10 and ADAM17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Mayuri; Htoo, Htut Htut; Wintachai, Phitchayapak; Hernandez, Jean-Francois; Dubois, Claire; Postina, Rolf; Xu, Huaxi; Checler, Frédéric; Smith, Duncan R; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Vincent, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Melatonin controls many physiological functions including regulation of the circadian rhythm and clearance of free radicals and neuroprotection. Importantly, melatonin levels strongly decrease as we age and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) display lower melatonin than age-matched controls. Several studies have reported that melatonin can reduce aggregation and toxicity of amyloid-? peptides that are produced from the ?-amyloid precursor protein (?APP). However, whether melatonin can directly regulate the ?APP-cleaving proteases ('secretases') has not been investigated so far. In this study, we establish that melatonin stimulates the ?-secretase cleavage of ?APP in cultured neuronal and non-neuronal cells. This effect is fully reversed by ADAM10- and ADAM17-specific inhibitors and requires both plasma membrane-located melatonin receptor activation, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, we demonstrate that melatonin upregulates both ADAM10 and ADAM17 catalytic activities and endogenous protein levels. Importantly, genetic depletion of one or the other protease in mouse embryonic fibroblasts prevents melatonin stimulating constitutive and PKC-regulated sAPP? secretion and ADAM10/ADAM17 catalytic activities. Furthermore, we show that melatonin induces ADAM10 and ADAM17 promoter transactivation, and we identify the targeted promoter regions. Finally, we correlate melatonin-dependent sAPP? production with a protection against staurosporine-induced apoptosis. Altogether, our results provide the first demonstration that melatonin upregulates the nonamyloidogenic ADAM10 and ADAM17 proteases through melatonin receptor activation, ERK phosphorylation and the transactivation of some specific regions of their promoters and further underline the preventive rather than curative nature of melatonin regarding AD treatment. PMID:25491598

  6. Nocturnal eating predicts tooth loss among adults: results from the Danish MONICA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jennifer D; Williams, Karen B

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between nocturnal eating, such as that associated with night eating syndrome (NES), and oral health is unknown. This study sought to determine if nocturnal eating is related to tooth loss in a large, epidemiologic sample. Danes (N=2217; age range 30-60 years, M BMI [kg/m(2)]=25.9, % Male=50.1) enrolled in the Danish MONICA (MONItoring trends and determinants of CArdiovascular disease) were assessed on oral health, eating behavior, anthropometrics, general health, and demographic characteristics in both 1987/88 and 1993/94. We hypothesized that nocturnal eating at time one (1987/88) predicts number of missing teeth at time two (1993/94), when controlling for age, education, smoking status, body mass, carbohydrate intake, binge eating behavior, and diabetes diagnosis. A negative binomial model predicting number of missing teeth from nocturnal eating while controlling for covariates was conducted. Expected change in log count of missing teeth was significantly less for non-night eaters (p=.009),non-smokers (p=.001), non-diabetics (p=.001) and for each successive younger age group (p=.0001). Additionally, expected increase in log count of missing teeth was significantly greater for individuals with less than "high school diploma" education compared to those with the highest level of education (p=.0001). In sum, nocturnal eating contributes to tooth loss. Treatment providers should encourage good oral health care practices to reduce the risk of tooth loss associated with nocturnal eating.

  7. Nocturnal secondary ozone concentration maxima analysed by sodar observations and surface measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitebuch, Oliver; Strassburger, Anja; Emeis, Stefan; Kuttler, Wilhelm

    The occurrence of nocturnal secondary ozone maxima was investigated by ground-level meteorological and air quality measurements in an urban park in Essen, Germany, during 29 individual summer measurement campaigns between May 1995 and September 1997. In addition, during an intensive measurement campaign in May 1997, SODAR measurements of wind and turbulence were made. The spatial and temporal distribution of nocturnal ozone maxima within the measurement network of the Environmental Protection Office of North Rhine-Westphalia was also analysed. Two case studies of nocturnal secondary ozone maxima are discussed in more detail. They represent two different types of this phenomenon, associated with a nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) and the passage of a front, respectively. In both cases, the nocturnal increase in ozone concentration was accompanied by a significant increase in the standard deviation of the vertical wind speed ?w across the lower stable boundary layer, indicating enhanced vertical mixing. During the LLJ case, ozone maxima were observed at 33% of the stations of the Environmental Protection Office network at approximately the same time. In the case of the front, the time of the ozone concentration rise could be allocated to the time of the passage of the front, moving from northwest to southeast across the study area. For the first time, the measurements presented here document turbulent mixing induced by shear forces in the whole layer between the core of the LLJ and the ground surface during secondary nocturnal ozone maxima.

  8. Evaluation of hemostasis and endothelial function in patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria receiving eculizumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helley, Dominique; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Porcher, Raphaël; Rodrigues, Celso Arrais; Galy-Fauroux, Isabelle; Matheron, Jeanne; Duval, Arnaud; Schved, Jean-François; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Socié, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    Background Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis through unknown mechanisms. Design and Methods We studied 23 patients with PNH, before and after five and 11 weeks of treatment with eculizumab. We examined markers of thrombin generation and reactional fibrinolysis (prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2), D-dimers, and plasmin antiplasmin complexes (P-AP), and endothelial dysfunction tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), soluble thrombomodulin (sTM), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM-1), endothelial microparticles (EMPs), and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). Results At baseline, vWF, sVCAM-1, the EMP count, and F1+2 and D-dimer levels were significantly elevated in the patients, including those with no history of clinical thrombosis. Treatment with eculizumab was associated with significant decreases in plasma markers of coagulation activation (F1+2, P=0.012, and D-dimers, P=0.01), and reactional fibrinolysis (P-AP, P=0.0002). Eculizumab treatment also significantly reduced plasma markers of endothelial cell activation (t-PA, P=0.0005, sVCAM-1, P<0.0001, and vWF, P=0.0047) and total (P=0.0008) and free (P=0.0013) TFPI plasma levels. Conclusions Our results suggest a new understanding of the contribution of endothelial cell activation to the pathogenesis of thrombosis in PNH. The terminal complement inhibitor, eculizumab, induced a significant and sustained decrease in the activation of both the plasma hemostatic system and the vascular endothelium, likely contributing to the protective effect of eculizumab on thrombosis in this setting. PMID:20081060

  9. Late postoperative nocturnal episodic hypoxaemia and associated sleep pattern.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; WildschiØdtz, G

    1994-01-01

    Ten patients undergoing major abdominal surgery under general anaesthesia were monitored with a pulse oximeter, electroencephalogram, electromyogram, electrocardiogram and eye and hand movement sensors two nights before and three nights after surgery. Episodic hypoxaemic events were increased significantly after surgery (P < 0.05). Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep decreased significantly on the first night after operation (P < 0.05). Seven patients had increased amounts of REM sleep (rebound) on the second, third or both nights after operation compared with the preoperative night. Slow wave sleep was depressed significantly on the first two nights after operation (P < 0.05). REM sleep-associated hypoxaemic episodes for individual patients increased about three-fold on the second and third nights after operation compared with the night before operation (P < 0.05). We conclude that postoperative sleep pattern is disturbed severely with early depression of REM and slow wave sleep and with rebound of REM sleep on the second and third nights. Postoperative rebound of REM sleep may contribute to the development of sleep disordered breathing and nocturnal episodic hypoxaemia.

  10. A Moessbauer study of hemoglobin in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 57Fe Moessbauer spectra of concentrated hemoglobin (Hb) of normal subjects and six patients with Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH) were studied at 300deg K and 77 K. PNH is a very rate autoimmune hematological disease. The possibility of structural alterations of Hb induced by, or as part of the altered PNH-red cell membrane was the objective of this study. The Moessbauer parameters of the Hb of the normal subjects, both at 300 K and at 77 K, are identical to values previously reported. The PNH-Hb spectra show clear differences. They are wider and more asymmetric. At 77 K, an extra doublet grows in with an isomer shift of 0.425 mm/sec. and a quadrupolar splitting of 1.951 mm/sec. The other two doublets have ?'s and ?Q's slightly, but significantly, different from the corresponding values for normal Hb. These results are rationalized in terms of a population of Hb molecules with structures varying very slightly in a narrow range. The spread in structures manifests itself in a wider and more asymmetric Moessbauer spectrum. (orig.)

  11. [Investigation on apoptosis in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) granulocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichishima, T

    2001-10-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired hematologic disordr characterized by increased susceptibility of erythrocytes to complement-mediated hemolysis. Recently, PNH is a stem cell disorder with all hematopoietic lineages affected, which have deficiencies of glycosylphosphtidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins due to the phosphatidylinositol glycan-class A (PIG-A) gene abnormalities. However, it is unknown how PNH clones with PIG-A gene abnormalities increase in bone marrow. The possibility has been suggested that resistance of PNH cells to apoptosis causes the increase. We studied two-color or single-color flow cytometric analysis using Annexin V and propidium iodide or 7-amino actinomycin D for evaluation of spontaneous apoptosis in peripheral blood granulocytes from PNH patient (n = 5) and healthy volunteers (n = 5), respectively. Apoptotic granulocytes were evaluated before and after 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-hour cultures without serum. Flow cytometric analyses showed that there were no significant differences of the number of proportion of apoptotic cells between them. This fact reveals that the sensitivity of PNH cells to apoptosis is similar to that of normal cells, suggesting that PNH clones should not be increased according to resistance to apoptosis as an intrinsic characteristic. PMID:11769477

  12. [Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). Pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röth, A; Dührsen, U; Schrezenmeier, H; Schubert, J

    2009-02-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is characterized by the classic clinical triad of corpuscular hemolytic anemia, thrombophilia and cytopenia. This is caused by an acquired mutation of the PIG(phosphatidylinositol glycan)-A gene of the pluripotent hematopoetic stem cell. This results in a deficiency of GPI(glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-anchors and GPI-anchored proteins on the surface of affected blood cells. Flow cytometry is the standard for diagnosis and measurement of type and size of the PNH clone. Treatment of PNH is mainly symptomatic. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is the only curative option in case of severe complications during the course of the diseases. A new targeted treatment strategy is the inhibition of the terminal complement cascade with a monoclonal antibody (eculizumab). As shown in clinical studies this is efficient to reduce complement mediated intravascular hemolysis, reduce the need for transfusions, improve the quality of life in patients with PNH and reduce the risk for thromboembolic complications, which are the main cause of mortality in PNH. PMID:19224425

  13. Brainstem evaluation in children with primary nocturnal enuresis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unal M

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the brainstem integrity in children with primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE using auditory brainstem responses (ABR, blink reflex and exteroceptive suppression of the masseter muscle. We examined 23 children with PNE (16 male, 7 female; mean age: 10.4 years and 19 control subjects (11 male, 8 female; mean age: 11.8 years. ABR parameters such as wave latencies, amplitudes and interpeak latencies and blink reflex parameters such as R1 and R2 amplitude and latencies were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Although S2 parameters of the exteroceptive suppression of the masseter muscle were easily and completely obtained from the control subjects, in the PNE group S2 onset latency and duration were not recorded in 26% of the study children (n = 6 (P = 0.01. S2 duration time was significantly lowered in the enuretic group (left side: P = 0.001 and right side: P = 0.003. S2 duration time changes in the enuretic group supports a possible brainstem dysfunction in children with PNE.

  14. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplant in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hong; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jia; Xu, Yang; Jin, Zhengming; Miao, Miao; Fu, Zhengzheng; Qiu, Huiying; Sun, Aining; Wu, Depei

    2016-04-01

    Eighteen patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT), either from HLA-haploidentical donors (HRD; n = 10) or HLA-matched donors (n = 5 from siblings and n = 3 from unrelated donors), were retrospectively evaluated. One showed primary graft failure following unrelated-donor HSCT. He was given a second HRD-HSCT, but died from cytomegalovirus pneumonia after achieving hematopoietic recovery. The other 17 patients achieved sustained engraftment and full-donor chimerism. Four in the HRD-HSCT group experienced grade II/III acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), and five in the HLA-matched HSCT group developed grade II aGVHD. Among all 18 patients, 10 developed chronic GVHD (cGVHD), only one patient receiving HRD-HSCT developed extensive cGVHD. Nine in the HRD-HSCT group and all those in the HLA-matched HSCT group were alive and transfusion-independent at last follow-up. Our findings suggest that allo-HSCT is a promising treatment for PNH, and HRD-HSCT is a viable option for patients with PNH who lack HLA-matched donors. PMID:26911378

  15. Ghost protein damage by peroxynitrite and its protection by melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Mascio P.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the effect of peroxynitrite (ONOO- on the membrane cytoskeleton of red blood cells and its protection by melatonin. Analysis of the protein fraction of the preparation by SDS-PAGE revealed a dose-dependent (0-600 µM ONOO- disappearance at pH 7.4 of the main proteins: spectrin, band 3, and actin, with the concomitant formation of high-molecular weight aggregates resistant to reduction by ß-mercaptoethanol (2% at room temperature for 20 min. These aggregates were not solubilized by 8 M urea. Incubation of the membrane cytoskeleton with ONOO- was characterized by a marked depletion of free sulfhydryl groups (50% at 250 µM ONOO-. However, a lack of effect of ß-mercaptoethanol suggests that, under our conditions, aggregate formation is not mediated only by sulfhydryl oxidation. The lack of a protective effect of the metal chelator diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid confirmed that ONOO--induced oxidative damage does not occur only by a transition metal-dependent mechanism. However, we demonstrated a strong protection against cytoskeletal alterations by desferrioxamine, which has been described as a direct scavenger of the protonated form of peroxynitrite. Desferrioxamine (0.5 mM also inhibited the loss of tryptophan fluorescence observed when the ghosts were treated with ONOO-. Glutathione, cysteine, and Troloxregistered (1 mM, but not mannitol (100 mM, were able to protect the proteins against the effect of ONOO- in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin (0-1 mM was especially efficient in reducing the loss of spectrin proteins when treated with ONOO- (90% at 500 µM melatonin. Our findings show that the cytoskeleton, and in particular spectrin, is a sensitive target for ONOO-. Specific antioxidants can protect against such alterations, which could seriously impair cell dynamics and generate morphological changes.

  16. Ghost protein damage by peroxynitrite and its protection by melatonin

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    P., Di Mascio; B., Dewez; C.R.S., Garcia.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the effect of peroxynitrite (ONOO-) on the membrane cytoskeleton of red blood cells and its protection by melatonin. Analysis of the protein fraction of the preparation by SDS-PAGE revealed a dose-dependent (0-600 µM ONOO-) disappearance at pH 7.4 of the main proteins: spectrin, band [...] 3, and actin, with the concomitant formation of high-molecular weight aggregates resistant to reduction by ß-mercaptoethanol (2%) at room temperature for 20 min. These aggregates were not solubilized by 8 M urea. Incubation of the membrane cytoskeleton with ONOO- was characterized by a marked depletion of free sulfhydryl groups (50% at 250 µM ONOO-). However, a lack of effect of ß-mercaptoethanol suggests that, under our conditions, aggregate formation is not mediated only by sulfhydryl oxidation. The lack of a protective effect of the metal chelator diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid confirmed that ONOO--induced oxidative damage does not occur only by a transition metal-dependent mechanism. However, we demonstrated a strong protection against cytoskeletal alterations by desferrioxamine, which has been described as a direct scavenger of the protonated form of peroxynitrite. Desferrioxamine (0.5 mM) also inhibited the loss of tryptophan fluorescence observed when the ghosts were treated with ONOO-. Glutathione, cysteine, and Trolox® (1 mM), but not mannitol (100 mM), were able to protect the proteins against the effect of ONOO- in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin (0-1 mM) was especially efficient in reducing the loss of spectrin proteins when treated with ONOO- (90% at 500 µM melatonin). Our findings show that the cytoskeleton, and in particular spectrin, is a sensitive target for ONOO-. Specific antioxidants can protect against such alterations, which could seriously impair cell dynamics and generate morphological changes.

  17. Melatonin replacement restores the circadian behavior in adult rat Leydig cells after pinealectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Janjic, Marija M; Stojkov-Mimic, Natasa J; Bjelic, Maja M; Andric, Silvana A; Kostic, Tatjana S

    2015-09-15

    Melatonin actions on oscillators in reproductive organs are poorly understood. Here we analyzed melatonin effects on rhythmic expression of clock and steroidogenesis-related genes in adult rat Leydig cells (LCs). The effect of melatonin was tested both in vivo using pinealectomized and melatonin-substituted rats and in vitro on isolated LCs. Data revealed 24-h-rhythmic expression of clock genes (Bmal1, Per1,2,3, Rev-erba,b, Rorb), steroidogenic genes (Star, Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1), and genes of steroidogenic regulators (positive-Nur77, negative-Arr19). Pinealectomy increased 24-h-oscillations of serum testosterone and LC's cAMP levels, expression of Insl3, Per1, Star/StAR, Hsd3b1/2, Nur77, decreased Arr19 and canceled Per2 oscillatory expression pattern. At hypothalamic-pituitary level, pinealectomy increased mesor of Gnrh, Lhb and rhythm robustness of Mntr1a expression. All parameters disturbed were restored by melatonin-replacement. In vitro studies did not confirm direct melatonin effects on neither clock nor steroidogenic genes. Accordingly, melatonin influence 24-h-rhythmic LC-function likely through hypothalamic-pituitary axis and consequently cAMP-signaling in LCs. PMID:26116827

  18. Dissolution of Intact, Divided and Crushed Circadin Tablets: Prolonged vs. Immediate Release of Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ming Chua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadin 2 mg prolonged-release tablet is the only licensed melatonin product available in the UK. Circadin is indicated for patients with primary insomnia aged 55 and over, but is more widely used “off-label” to treat sleep disorders especially in the paediatric population. Children and older people often have difficulty swallowing tablets and dividing the tablet is sometimes required to ease administration. The aim of this study was to measure the release profile of melatonin from Circadin tablets when divided or crushed, and compare this with release from intact tablets. Dissolution testing was also performed for unlicensed melatonin products for comparison. Dissolution tests were performed using the pharmacopoeial paddle apparatus, with melatonin release analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Melatonin content, hardness, friability, and disintegration of the products were also evaluated. The prolonged release of melatonin from Circadin tablets was unlike that of any other product tested. When divided into halves, Circadin preserved most of the prolonged-release characteristic (f2 = 58, whereas quarter-cut and crushed tablet had a more immediate melatonin release profile. Circadin is significantly less expensive and should be preferred to unlicensed medicines which are not pharmaceutically equivalent and offer less quality assurance.

  19. Dissolution of Intact, Divided and Crushed Circadin Tablets: Prolonged vs. Immediate Release of Melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Hui Ming; Hauet Richer, Nathalie; Swedrowska, Magda; Ingham, Stephen; Tomlin, Stephen; Forbes, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Circadin 2 mg prolonged-release tablet is the only licensed melatonin product available in the UK. Circadin is indicated for patients with primary insomnia aged 55 and over, but is more widely used "off-label" to treat sleep disorders especially in the paediatric population. Children and older people often have difficulty swallowing tablets and dividing the tablet is sometimes required to ease administration. The aim of this study was to measure the release profile of melatonin from Circadin tablets when divided or crushed, and compare this with release from intact tablets. Dissolution testing was also performed for unlicensed melatonin products for comparison. Dissolution tests were performed using the pharmacopoeial paddle apparatus, with melatonin release analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Melatonin content, hardness, friability, and disintegration of the products were also evaluated. The prolonged release of melatonin from Circadin tablets was unlike that of any other product tested. When divided into halves, Circadin preserved most of the prolonged-release characteristic (f2 = 58), whereas quarter-cut and crushed tablet had a more immediate melatonin release profile. Circadin is significantly less expensive and should be preferred to unlicensed medicines which are not pharmaceutically equivalent and offer less quality assurance. PMID:26751472

  20. Melatonin ameliorates oxidative stress and reproductive toxicity induced by cyclophosphamide in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabra, A; Shokrzadeh, M; Naghshvar, F; Salehi, F; Ahmadi, A

    2014-02-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of melatonin in cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced testicular injury, lipid peroxidative damage, and antioxidant enzymes status of the mice testis on the basis of biochemical and histological studies. Mice were pretreated with four different doses of melatonin (2.5, 5, 10, and, 20 mg/kg by body weight (b.w.)) via intraperitoneal injection for five consecutive days followed by injection with CP (200 mg/kg b.w.) 1 h after the last injection of melatonin on the 5th day. After 24 h, mice were euthanized, testes were immediately removed, and biochemical and histological studies were conducted. Treatment with melatonin significantly mitigates lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activity and the level of reduced glutathione content abnormality induced by CP in mice testis. Histological examination clearly demonstrates that pretreatment of melatonin prevented CP-induced spermatogenesis toxicity and spermatogenic cells reduction in mice testis. The protective effect of melatonin is likely due to the antioxidative properties of the indolamine existed in the chemical structure. Because melatonin is a safe, natural compound, it could be used concomitantly as a supplement to protect people undergoing chemotherapy against reproductive toxicity. PMID:23703819

  1. The protective effect of melatonin on neural stem cell against LPS-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juhyun; Kang, So Mang; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Jong Eun

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy for tissue regeneration has several limitations in the fact that transplanted cells could not survive for a long time. For solving these limitations, many studies have focused on the antioxidants to increase survival rate of neural stem cells (NSCs). Melatonin, an antioxidant synthesized in the pineal gland, plays multiple roles in various physiological mechanisms. Melatonin exerts neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system. To determine the effect of melatonin on NSCs which is in LPS-induced inflammatory stress state, we first investigated nitric oxide (NO) production and cytotoxicity using Griess reagent assays, LDH assay, and neurosphere counting. Also, we investigated the effect of melatonin on NSCs by measuring the mRNA levels of SOX2, TLX, and FGFR-2. In addition, western blot analyses were performed to examine the activation of PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling in LPS-treated NSCs. In the present study, we suggested that melatonin inhibits NO production and protects NSCs against LPS-induced inflammatory stress. In addition, melatonin promoted the expression of SOX2 and activated the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling under LPS-induced inflammation condition. Based on our results, we conclude that melatonin may be an important factor for the survival and proliferation of NSCs in neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:25705693

  2. Lipoxygenase-mediated pro-radical effect of melatonin via stimulation of arachidonic acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have shown that melatonin immediately and transiently stimulates intracellular free radical production on a set of leukocytes, possibly as a consequence of calmodulin binding. We show here that melatonin-induced ROS are produced by lipoxygenase (LOX), since they are prevented by a set of LOX inhibitors, and are accompanied by increase of the 5-LOX product 5-HETE. LOX activation is accompanied by strong liberation of AA; inhibition of Ca2+-independent, but not Ca2+-dependent, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), prevents both melatonin-induced arachidonic acid and ROS production, whereas LOX inhibition only prevents ROS, indicating that PLA2 is upstream with respect to LOX, as occurs in many signaling pathways. Chlorpromazine, an inhibitor of melatonin-calmodulin interaction, inhibits both ROS and arachidonic acid production, thus possibly placing calmodulin at the origin of a melatonin-induced pro-radical pathway. Interestingly, it is known that Ca2+-independent PLA2 binds to calmodulin: our results are compatible with PLA2 being liberated by melatonin from a steady-state calmodulin sequestration, thus initiating an arachidonate signal transduction. These results delineate a novel molecular pathway through which melatonin may participate to the inflammatory response.

  3. Sleep–wake and melatonin pattern in craniopharyngioma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickering, Line; Jennum, Poul; Gammeltoft, Steen; Poulsgaard, Lars; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Klose, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    controls. In this study, 24-h salivary melatonin and cortisol were measured. Sleep-wake patterns were characterised by actigraphy and sleep diaries recorded for 2 weeks. Sleepiness, fatigue, sleep quality and general health were assessed by Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index......, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Short-Form 36. RESULTS: Patients had increased mental fatigue, daytime dysfunction, sleep latency and lower general health (all, P?0.05), and they tended to have increased daytime sleepiness, general fatigue and impaired sleep quality compared with controls. The degree of...

  4. Analgesic effects of melatonin on post-herpetic neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Yun-Kun; Ding, Ji-Fei; Liu, Jin; Yong-yao YANG

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the analgesic effects of melatonin on post-herpetic neuralgia and its possible mechanism. Methods: A total of 48 PHN Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups randomly: Normal, PHN, PHN+MT and naloxone, 4P-PDOT or L-arginine+120 mg/kg MT (C). Heat pain latency was determined after MT injection for 20 min, 40 min, 80 min and 120 min respectively. The expression levels of ? receptor and MT2 receptor in different tissues of rats were detected by RT-PCR method. ...

  5. Prospective Study on Salivary Evening Melatonin and Sleep before and after Pinealectomy in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawik, Helen; Stoffel, Michael; Riedl, Lina; Veselý, Zdenko; Behr, Michael; Lehmberg, Jens; Pohl, Corina; Meyer, Bernhard; Wiegand, Michael; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-02-01

    Melatonin is secreted systemically from the pineal gland maximally at night but is also produced locally in many tissues. Its chronobiological function is mainly exerted by pineal melatonin. It is a feedback regulator of the main circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei and of many peripheral oscillators. Although exogenous melatonin is approved for circadian rhythm sleep disorders and old-age insomnia, research on endogenous melatonin in humans is hindered by the great interindividual variability of its amount and circadian rhythm. Single case studies on pinealectomized patients report on disrupted but also hypersomnic sleep. This is the first systematic prospective report on sleep with respect to pinealectomy due to pinealocytoma World Health Organization grade I without chemo- or radiotherapy. Before and after pinealectomy, 8 patients completed questionnaires on sleep quality and circadian rhythm (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire), 2 nights of polysomnography, salivary evening melatonin profiles, and qualitative assessment of 2 weeks of actigraphy and sleep logs. Six patients were assessed retrospectively up to 4 years after pinealectomy. Before pinealectomy, all but 1 patient showed an evening melatonin rise typical for indifferent chronotypes. After pinealectomy, evening saliva melatonin was markedly diminished, mostly below the detection limit of the assay (0.09 pg/mL). No systematic change in subjective sleep quality or standard measures of polysomnography was found. Mean pre- and postoperative sleep efficiency was 94% and 95%, and mean sleep-onset latency was 21 and 17 min, respectively. Sleep-wake rhythm during normal daily life did not change. Retrospective patients had a reduced sleep efficiency (90%) and more stage changes, although this was not significantly different from prospective patients. In conclusion, melatonin does seem to have a modulatory, not a regulatory, effect on standard measures of sleep. Study output is limited by small sample size and because only evening melatonin profiles were assessed. PMID:26647380

  6. Evaluation of Melatonin for Prevention of Radiation Myelopathy in Irradiated Cervical Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Shirazi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Radiation myelopathy (RM is known as a serious complication of head andneck radiation therapy. Furthermore, the radioprotective roles of melatonin have beeninvestigated on different tissues. The aim of this study was to assess the radio protectiveeffects of melatonin on biochemical, histopathological and clinical manifestations of RMin the rat cervical spinal cord.Materials and Methods: Four groups of rats were investigated as follows: The controlgroup was treated with vehicle. The second group (melatonin only was intraperitoneallyinjected with 100 mg/kg melatonin. The third group's (radiation cervical spinal cord areawas irradiated with 22 Gy cobalt-60 gamma-rays. The fourth group (melatonin plus irradiationreceived 100 mg/kg melatonin intraperitoneally, and after 30 minutes their spinalcord area was irradiated with 22 Gy gamma radiation. Five animals from each group wererandomly selected. 72 hours, 8 and 22 weeks after irradiation for analysis of malondialdehyde(MDA and glutathione (GSH levels, and underwent histopathological studies.Results: The MDA levels in the irradiation group were significantly higher than in the controlgroup (p<0.001. Furthermore, the GSH levels in this group were significantly lowerthan that of those in the control group (p<0.001. Administration of melatonin markedlyreduced MDA (p<0.001 and increased GSH (p<0.05 levels in this group. Demyelinationand clinical signs of myelopathy were decreased in the melatonin plus irradiation group incomparison to the irradiated group.Conclusion: Our study confirms the radioprotective effects of melatonin at early stagesof biochemical, as well as late histological and clinical changes in the spinal cord.

  7. Melatonin applied to cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seeds improves germination during chilling stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posmyk, Ma?gorzata M; Ba?abusta, M; Wieczorek, M; Sliwinska, E; Janas, K M

    2009-03-01

    The relationship between germination and melatonin applied during osmo- and hydropriming was studied in cucumber seeds. The proportion of nuclei with different DNA contents, the mean ploidy and the (2C + 4C = 8C)/2C ratio in unprimed and primed, dry and imbibed at 10 degrees C seeds were established by flow cytometry. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and protein oxidation were also estimated. Melatonin and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) concentrations in the seeds were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Being sensitive to chilling stress, seeds that germinated well (99%) at 25 degrees C showed only 30% germination at 15 degrees C, and almost no germination (4%) at 10 degrees C. Hydropriming in water improved seed germination to 50-60% at 15 degrees C and the addition of melatonin (25-100 M) also increased the rate of germination. Osmopriming in polyethylene glycol increased germination at 15 degrees C to 78%, and 98% when combined with 50 M melatonin. Osmoprimed seeds germinated even at 10 degrees C and reached 43%, and 83% when 50 M melatonin was applied. None of the treatments induced DNA synthesis, although during the first 24 hr of imbibition at 10 degrees C the mean ploidy and the (2C + 4C = 8C)/2C ratio increased, which is indicative of the advanced Phase II of germination. Hydro- and osmopriming slightly decreased IAA content in the seeds in most of the cases; only hydropriming with 100 and 500 M melatonin increased it. Melatonin protected membrane structure against peroxidation during chilling, but excessive melatonin levels in cucumber seeds (approximately 4 microg/g fresh weight) provoked oxidative changes in proteins. There is still lack of information explained clearly the role of melatonin in plant physiology. This molecule acts multidirectionally and usually is alliged to other compounds. PMID:19141087

  8. Melatonin controls experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by altering the T effector/regulatory balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Cruz-Chamorro, Ivan; López-González, Antonio; Utrilla, José C; Fernández-Santos, José M; Martínez-López, Alicia; Lardone, Patricia J; Guerrero, Juan M; Carrillo-Vico, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the experimental model for multiple sclerosis (MS), is triggered by myelin-specific Th1 and Th17 cells. The immunomodulatory activities of melatonin have been shown to be beneficial under several conditions in which the immune system is exacerbated. Here, we sought to elucidate the basis of the melatonin protective effect on EAE by characterizing the T effector/regulatory responses, particularly those of the memory cell subsets. Melatonin was tested for its effect on Th1, Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) cells in the lymph nodes and CNS of immunodominant peptide of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (pMOG)-immunized and EAE mice, respectively. The capacity of melatonin to ameliorate EAE as well as modifying both T cell response and effector/regulatory balance was surveyed. T cell memory subsets and CD44, a key activation marker involved in the EAE pathogenesis, were also examined. Melatonin protected from EAE by decreasing peripheral and central Th1/Th17 responses and enhancing both the Treg frequency and IL-10 synthesis in the CNS. Melatonin reduced the T effector memory population and its pro-inflammatory response and regulated CD44 expression, which was decreased in T effector cells and increased in Tregs. The alterations in the T cell subpopulations were associated with a reduced mononuclear infiltration (CD4 and CD11b cells) of the melatonin-treated mice CNS. For the first time, we report that melatonin protects against EAE by controlling peripheral and central T effector/regulatory responses, effects that might be partially mediated by CD44. This immunomodulatory effect on EAE suggests that melatonin may represent an effective treatment option for MS. PMID:26130320

  9. Age-related changes in melatonin synthesis in rat extrapineal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Hidalgo, M; de la Lastra, C Alarcon; Carrascosa-Salmoral, M P; Naranjo, M C; Gomez-Corvera, A; Caballero, B; Guerrero, J M

    2009-05-01

    In the search of new therapeutic targets improving the quality of life of elderly, melatonin, "the chemical expression of darkness", seems to play a remarkable role in aging process possibly due to its antioxidant, immunoenhancer and anti-aging properties. The present study was designed to elucidate effects of aging in melatonin extrapineal synthesis and investigate evident age-related alterations in the action mechanisms involved. The presence of the two key enzymes involved in melatonin synthesis, arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT) was analyzed in thymus, spleen, liver, kidney and heart of 3- and 12month-old rats using real time PCR as well as its functionality by enzymatic activity assays. In addition, extrapineal melatonin content was measured by a competitive enzyme immunoassay (ELISA). The results of this study reveal that all rat tissues studied including thymus, and for the first time, spleen, liver, kidney and heart have the necessary machinery to synthesize melatonin. Moreover, we report an age-related decline in rat extrapineal melatonin synthesis with a consequent HIOMT functionality decrease in spleen, liver and heart during physiological aging. On the contrary, NAT enzymatic activity maintains unchanged without evident alterations with advancing age. Moreover, diminished melatonin concentrations were measured in these tissues cited above during aging except in the thymus, where, surprisingly, melatonin content, NAT/HIOMT expression, and enzymatic functionality assays revealed no significant alterations with age. As a conclusion, we report evident age-related changes in melatonin synthesis in some rat peripheral organs. We suggest that thymus may develop compensatory mechanisms to counteract the loss of immune activity and consequently, the loss of this potent antioxidant, during physiological aging. PMID:19233254

  10. Evaluation of melatonin treatment in primary culture of canine mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Juliana Ramos; Maschio, Larissa Bazela; Jardim-Perassi, Bruna Victorasso; Moschetta, Marina Gobbe; Ferreira, Lívia Carvalho; Martins, Gustavo Rodrigues; Gelaleti, Gabriela Bottaro; De Campos Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires

    2015-01-01

    Mammary neoplasias are the most common tumors observed in female dogs. Identification of these tumors is valuable in order to identify beneficial therapeutic agents as alternative treatments for this tumor type. Oral administration of melatonin appears to exert an oncostatic effect on mammary neoplasia and may have a possible mechanism of action through its interaction with estrogen receptors on epithelial cells. Hence, we analyzed the potential therapeutic value of melatonin in tumors that are estrogen-dependent or -independent, and established a relationship of its action with the expression of the melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2. Furthermore, we analyzed the rate of cell proliferation and apoptosis after treatment with melatonin. Cell cultures were performed using 10 canine mammary tumor fragments and were divided into estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and ER-negative tumors. The results showed that both ER-positive and ER-negative tumors had decreased cell viability and proliferation after treatment with melatonin (ptreatment was more effective in the ER-positive tumors. Analysis of the relative expression of the MT1 and MT2 genes by quantitative PCR was performed and the data were compared with the expression of ER in 24 canine mammary tumors and the cellular response to melatonin in 10 samples. MT1 was overexpressed in ER-positive tumors (ptreatment in ER-positive tumors showed an efficient oncostatic effect by inhibiting cell viability and proliferation and inducing apoptosis. These results suggest that melatonin decreased neoplastic mammary cell proliferation and viability and induced apoptosis, with greater efficacy in ER-positive tumors that have a high expression of melatonin receptor MT1. This is a strong evidence for the use of melatonin as a therapeutic agent for estrogen-dependent canine mammary tumors. PMID:25384569

  11. Subjective pseudocyesis (false pregnancy) and elevated temporal lobe signs: an implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, M A

    1991-04-01

    Twenty-two percent of 106 undergraduate university women reported symptoms of pseudocyesis: cessation of menstruation, abdominal enlargement, morning sickness, and breast changes. These women also displayed significant elevations in temporal lobe signs with particular involvement of putative right hemispheric processes. Women prone to pseudocyesis displayed more memory blanks, nocturnal akinesia, awareness of abdominal sensations, and exotic beliefs such as alien intelligence; the phenomenon was 10 times more frequent in Roman Catholic women than in Protestant women. PMID:1852557

  12. Melatonin ameliorates experimental hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ru-Tao Hong, Jian-Ming Xu, Qiao Mei

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protective effects of melatonin on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic fibrosis in experimental rats.METHODS: All rats were randomly divided into normal control group, model control group treated with CCl4 for 12 wk, CCl4 + NAC group treated with CCl4 + NAC (100 mg/kg, i.p.) for 12 wk, CCl4 + MEL-1 group treated with CCl4 + melatonin (2.5 mg/kg) for 12 wk, CCl4 + MEL-2 group treated with CCl4 + melatonin (5.0 mg/kg) for 12 wk, and CCl4 + MEL-3 group treated wit...

  13. Effect of Melatonin on Cognitive Function and Sleep in relation to Breast Cancer Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Melissa Voigt; Madsen, Michael Tvilling; Andersen, Lærke Toftegård; Hageman, Ida; Rasmussen, Lars Simon; Bokmand, Susanne; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Background. Sleep disturbances and cognitive dysfunction are common in patients with breast cancer. Disturbed sleep leads to poor cognitive performance and exogenous melatonin may improve sleep and attenuate cognitive dysfunction. We hypothesized that melatonin would improve sleep and cognitive...... function after surgery. Methods. This study reports secondary endpoints from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Women, 30-75 years, were randomized to 6mg oral melatonin/placebo for 3 months. We assessed postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) with a neuropsychological test battery...

  14. No effect of melatonin on oxidative stress after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucukakin, B.; Klein, M.; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Reiter, R.J.; Rosenberg, J.; Gögenür, Ismayil

    2010-01-01

    Background Melatonin, an endogenous circadian regulator, also has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidative effect of melatonin in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods Patients were randomized to receive 10 mg...... melatonin or placebo during surgery. Blood samples for analysis of malondialdehyde (MDA), ascorbic acid (AA), total ascorbic acid (TAA) dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were collected pre-operatively and at 5 min, 6 h and 24 h after operation. Results Twenty patients received...

  15. Melatonin protects against apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-dependent cell death during acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Tao, Li; Zhang, Ye-Fa; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure and is primarily caused by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1-driven conversion of APAP into hepatotoxic metabolites. Several reports showed that melatonin attenuated APAP-induced acute liver failure. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism remains obscure. In the present study, we investigated the effects of melatonin on apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-dependent cell death in APAP-induced acute liver failure. Mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with different doses of melatonin (1.25, 5, 20 mg/kg) 30 min before APAP (300 mg/kg, i.p.). As expected, melatonin significantly alleviated APAP-induced cell death, as determined by TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Further analysis showed that melatonin significantly attenuated APAP-induced activation of the serine/threonine kinase receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1). In addition, melatonin inhibited APAP-induced hepatic c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and mitochondrial Bax translocation. Correspondingly, melatonin inhibited APAP-induced translocation of AIF from mitochondria to nuclei. Interestingly, no changes were induced by melatonin on hepatic CYP2E1 expression. In addition, melatonin had little effect on APAP-induced hepatic glutathione (GSH) depletion. In conclusion, melatonin protects against AIF-dependent cell death during APAP-induced acute liver failure through its direct inhibition of hepatic RIP1 and subsequent JNK phosphorylation and mitochondrial Bax translocation. PMID:23272189

  16. Pulsing blue light through closed eyelids: effects on acute melatonin suppression and phase shifting of dim light melatonin onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiro MG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mariana G Figueiro, Barbara Plitnick, Mark S Rea Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA Abstract: Circadian rhythm disturbances parallel the increased prevalence of sleep disorders in older adults. Light therapies that specifically target regulation of the circadian system in principle could be used to treat sleep disorders in this population. Current recommendations for light treatment require the patients to sit in front of a bright light box for at least 1 hour daily, perhaps limiting their willingness to comply. Light applied through closed eyelids during sleep might not only be efficacious for changing circadian phase but also lead to better compliance because patients would receive light treatment while sleeping. Reported here are the results of two studies investigating the impact of a train of 480 nm (blue light pulses presented to the retina through closed eyelids on melatonin suppression (laboratory study and on delaying circadian phase (field study. Both studies employed a sleep mask that provided narrowband blue light pulses of 2-second duration every 30 seconds from arrays of light-emitting diodes. The results of the laboratory study demonstrated that the blue light pulses significantly suppressed melatonin by an amount similar to that previously shown in the same protocol at half the frequency (ie, one 2-second pulse every minute for 1 hour. The results of the field study demonstrated that blue light pulses given early in the sleep episode significantly delayed circadian phase in older adults; these results are the first to demonstrate the efficacy and practicality of light treatment by a sleep mask aimed at adjusting circadian phase in a home setting. Keywords: circadian phase, dim light melatonin onset, light through closed eyelids, blue light, sleep

  17. Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jochen Stutz

    2005-05-24

    Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude dependent. Measurements at one altitude, for example at the ground, where most air quality monitoring stations are located, are not representative for the rest of the NBL. Our model also revealed that radical chemistry is, in general, altitude dependent at night. We distinguish three regions: an unreactive, NO rich, ground layer; an upper, O3 and NO3 dominated layer, and a reactive mixing layer, where RO2 radicals are mixed from aloft with NO from the ground. In this reactive layer an active radical chemistry and elevated OH radical levels can be found. The downward transport of N2O5 and HO2NO2, followed by their thermal decay, was also identified as a radical source in this layer. Our observations also gave insight into the formation of HONO in the NBL. Based on our field experiments we were able to show that the NO2 to HONO conversion was relative humidity dependent. While this fact was well known, we found that it is most likely the uptake of HONO onto surfaces which is R.H. dependent, rather than the NO2 to HONO conversion. This finding led to the proposal of a new NO2 to HONO conversion mechanism, which is based on solid physical chemical principles. Noteworthy is also the observation of enhanced NO2 to HONO conversion during a dust storm event in Phoenix. The final activity in our project investigated the influence of the urban canopy, i.e. building walls and surfaces, on nocturnal chemistry. For the first time the surface area of a city was determined based on a Geographical Information System database of the city of Santa Monica. The surface to volume areas found in this study showed that, in the 2 lower part of the NBL, buildings provide a much larger surface area than the aerosol. In addition, buildings take up a considerable amount of the volume near the ground. The expansion of our model and sensitivity studies based on the Santa Monica data revealed that the surface area of buildings considerably influences HONO levels in urban areas. The volume reduction leads to a decrease of O3 and an increase of NO2 near the ground due to the stronger impact o

  18. Anatomical specializations for nocturnality in a critically endangered parrot, the Kakapo (Strigops habroptilus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Gsell, Anna C; Brunton, Dianne; Heesy, Christopher P; Hall, Margaret I; Acosta, Monica L; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2011-01-01

    The shift from a diurnal to nocturnal lifestyle in vertebrates is generally associated with either enhanced visual sensitivity or a decreased reliance on vision. Within birds, most studies have focused on differences in the visual system across all birds with respect to nocturnality-diurnality. The critically endangered Kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), a parrot endemic to New Zealand, is an example of a species that has evolved a nocturnal lifestyle in an otherwise diurnal lineage, but nothing is known about its' visual system. Here, we provide a detailed morphological analysis of the orbits, brain, eye, and retina of the Kakapo and comparisons with other birds. Morphometric analyses revealed that the Kakapo's orbits are significantly more convergent than other parrots, suggesting an increased binocular overlap in the visual field. The Kakapo exhibits an eye shape that is consistent with other nocturnal birds, including owls and nightjars, but is also within the range of the diurnal parrots. With respect to the brain, the Kakapo has a significantly smaller optic nerve and tectofugal visual pathway. Specifically, the optic tectum, nucleus rotundus and entopallium were significantly reduced in relative size compared to other parrots. There was no apparent reduction to the thalamofugal visual pathway. Finally, the retinal morphology of the Kakapo is similar to that of both diurnal and nocturnal birds, suggesting a retina that is specialised for a crepuscular niche. Overall, this suggests that the Kakapo has enhanced light sensitivity, poor visual acuity and a larger binocular field than other parrots. We conclude that the Kakapo possesses a visual system unlike that of either strictly nocturnal or diurnal birds and therefore does not adhere to the traditional view of the evolution of nocturnality in birds. PMID:21860663

  19. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and telomere length predicts response to immunosuppressive therapy in pediatric aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Hideki; Sekiya, Yuko; Okuno, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Hirotoshi; Nishio, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Nao; Wang, Xinan; Xu, Yinyan; Kawashima, Nozomu; Doisaki, Sayoko; Hama, Asahito; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kudo, Kazuko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Ito, Etsuro; Yabe, Hiromasa; Ohga, Shouichi; Ohara, Akira; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an immune-mediated disease characterized by severe defects in stem cell number resulting in hypocellular marrow and peripheral blood cytopenias. Minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria populations and a short telomere length were identified as predictive biomarkers of immunosuppressive therapy responsiveness in aplastic anemia. We enrolled 113 aplastic anemia patients (63 boys and 50 girls) in this study to evaluate their response to immunosuppressive therapy. The paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria populations and telomere length were detected by flow cytometry. Forty-seven patients (42%) carried a minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population. The median telomere length of aplastic anemia patients was -0.99 standard deviation (SD) (range -4.01-+3.01 SD). Overall, 60 patients (53%) responded to immunosuppressive therapy after six months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the absence of a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population and a shorter telomere length as independent unfavorable predictors of immunosuppressive therapy response at six months. The cohort was stratified into a group of poor prognosis (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria negative and shorter telomere length; 37 patients) and good prognosis (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria positive and/or longer telomere length; 76 patients), respectively. The response rates of the poor prognosis and good prognosis groups at six months were 19% and 70%, respectively (P<0.001). The combined absence of a minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population and a short telomere length is an efficient predictor of poor immunosuppressive therapy response, which should be considered while deciding treatment options: immunosuppressive therapy or first-line hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The trial was registered in www.umin.ac.jp with number UMIN000017972. PMID:26315930

  20. Prevalence of nocturnal enuresis and its associated factors in primary school and preschool children of khorramabad in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Katayoun; Pournia, Yadollah; Ebrahimzadeh, Farzad; Farhadi, Ali; Shafizadeh, Fathollah; Hosseinabadi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background. Nocturnal enuresis refers to an inability to control urination during sleep. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of nocturnal enuresis and its associated factors in children in the city of Khorramabad. Materials and Methods. In this descriptive-analytic, cross-sectional study, 710 male and female children were divided into two groups with equal numbers. The samples were selected from the schools of Khorramabad using the multistage cluster and stratified random sampling methods based on the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV. The data was analyzed using the logistic regression. Results. The results showed that 8% of the children had nocturnal enuresis, including 5.2% of primary nocturnal enuresis and 2.8% of secondary nocturnal enuresis. The prevalence of nocturnal enuresis in the boys (10.7%) was higher compared with that in the girls (5.4%) (P = 0.009). There were statistically significant relationships between nocturnal enuresis and history of nocturnal enuresis in siblings (P = 0.023), respiratory infections (P = 0.036), deep sleep (P = 0.007), corporal punishment at school (P = 0.036), anal itching (P = 0.043), and history of seizures (P = 0.043). Conclusion. This study showed that the prevalence of nocturnal enuresis in the boys was higher compared with that in the girls. PMID:25374608

  1. Type 2 diabetes mellitus: Role of melatonin and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zephy, Doddigarla; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus caused by transfer of susceptible immortal gene from parent to progeny in individuals prone, and/or in contribution of factors such as obesity and physical inactivity results in chronic extracellular hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance or impaired glucose tolerance. Hyperglycemia leads to increased production of superoxide radical in mitochondrial electron transport chain, consequently, inhibit glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, increase the flux of substrates that direct the expression of genes responsible for activation of polyol, hexosamine, advanced glycation end products and protein kinase-C pathways enzymes. Simultaneously, these pathways add-up free radicals in the body, hamper cell redox state, alter genes of insulin sensitivity and are responsible for the diabetic complications like retinopathy, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy and neuropathy. Experimental evidence suggests that the indoleamine hormone melatonin is capable of influencing in development of diabetic complications by neutralizing the unnecessary production of ROS, protection of beta cells, as they possess low antioxidant potential and normalize redox state in the cell. However, studies reported the beneficial effects of pharmacological supplementation of melatonin in humans but it has not been extensively studied in a multicountric, multicentric which should include all ethnic population. PMID:25450812

  2. Nightly treatment of primary insomnia with prolonged release melatonin for 6 months: a randomized placebo controlled trial on age and endogenous melatonin as predictors of efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade Alan G

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melatonin is extensively used in the USA in a non-regulated manner for sleep disorders. Prolonged release melatonin (PRM is licensed in Europe and other countries for the short term treatment of primary insomnia in patients aged 55 years and over. However, a clear definition of the target patient population and well-controlled studies of long-term efficacy and safety are lacking. It is known that melatonin production declines with age. Some young insomnia patients also may have low melatonin levels. The study investigated whether older age or low melatonin excretion is a better predictor of response to PRM, whether the efficacy observed in short-term studies is sustained during continued treatment and the long term safety of such treatment. Methods Adult outpatients (791, aged 18-80 years with primary insomnia, were treated with placebo (2 weeks and then randomized, double-blind to 3 weeks with PRM or placebo nightly. PRM patients continued whereas placebo completers were re-randomized 1:1 to PRM or placebo for 26 weeks with 2 weeks of single-blind placebo run-out. Main outcome measures were sleep latency derived from a sleep diary, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Quality of Life (World Health Organzaton-5 Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I and adverse effects and vital signs recorded at each visit. Results On the primary efficacy variable, sleep latency, the effects of PRM (3 weeks in patients with low endogenous melatonin (6-sulphatoxymelatonin [6-SMT] ?8 ?g/night regardless of age did not differ from the placebo, whereas PRM significantly reduced sleep latency compared to the placebo in elderly patients regardless of melatonin levels (-19.1 versus -1.7 min; P = 0.002. The effects on sleep latency and additional sleep and daytime parameters that improved with PRM were maintained or enhanced over the 6-month period with no signs of tolerance. Most adverse events were mild in severity with no clinically relevant differences between PRM and placebo for any safety outcome. Conclusions The results demonstrate short- and long-term efficacy and safety of PRM in elderly insomnia patients. Low melatonin production regardless of age is not useful in predicting responses to melatonin therapy in insomnia. The age cut-off for response warrants further investigation.

  3. From dusk till dawn: nocturnal and diurnal pollination in the epiphyte Tillandsia heterophylla (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Rodríguez, P A; Krömer, T; García-Franco, J G; MacSwiney G, M C

    2016-01-01

    In order to compare the effectiveness of diurnal and nocturnal pollinators, we studied the reproductive biology and pollinators of Tillandsia heterophylla E. Morren, an epiphytic tank bromeliad endemic to southeastern Mexico. Since anthesis in T. heterophylla is predominantly nocturnal but lasts until the following day, we hypothesised that this bromeliad would receive visits from both diurnal and nocturnal visitors, but that nocturnal visitors would be the most effective pollinators, since they arrive first to the receptive flower, and that bats would be the most frequent nocturnal visitors, given the characteristics of the nectar. Flowering of T. heterophylla began in May and lasted until July. The species is fully self-compatible, with an anthesis that lasts for ca. 15-16 h. Mean volume of nectar produced per flower was 82.21 ?l, with a mean sugar concentration of 6.33%. The highest volume and concentration of nectar were found at 20:00 h, with a subsequent decline in both to almost zero over the following 12-h period. T. heterophylla has a generalist pollination system, since at least four different morphospecies of visitors pollinate its flowers: bats, moths, hummingbirds and bees. Most of the pollinating visits corresponded to bats and took place in the early evening, when stigma receptivity had already begun; making bats the probable pollinator on most occasions. However, diurnal pollinators may be important as a 'fail-safe' system by which to guarantee the pollination of T. heterophylla. PMID:25683682

  4. Microalbuminuria in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus relates to nocturnal systolic blood pressure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mitchell, T H

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: Microalbuminuria predicts early mortality in non-insulin-dependent-diabetes mellitus patients (NIDDM). Our objective in the present study was to compare and assess the relationship between 24-hour, day and nocturnal ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and urinary albumin excretion rate (UAE) in microalbuminuric and normoalbuminuric NIDDM and in normal control subjects. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In the present cross-sectional study, 24 hour ambulatory BP (daytime BP and nocturnal BP) and HbA1c were compared in microalbuminuric (n = 10) and nonmicroalbuminuric NIDDM patients (n = 10) and in nondiabetic controls (n = 9). None of the patients were taking antihypertensive agents. RESULTS: In the microlbuminuric group, whereas 24 hour and daytime systolic BP differed significantly from control values (P < 0.025 and P < 0.05 respectively), there was no difference between diabetic groups. However, nocturnal systolic BP in the microalbuminuric group was significantly higher than in the normoalbuminuric diabetic patients (139 vs. 125) (P < 0.05) and a significant difference was also found between the NIDDM patients and the control group (139, 125 vs. 114) (P < 0.025). In multiple regression analysis, only nocturnal systolic BP showed a significant relationship with UAE (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that the higher nocturnal systolic blood pressure seen in our microalbuminuric NIDDM patients may contribute to the increased morbidity in this group.

  5. Frequency of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in patients attended in Belém, Pará, Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Lacy Cardoso de, Brito Junior; Maria do Socorro de Oliveira, Cardoso; Euzamar Gaby, Rocha; Herika, Anijar; Mariana, Cunha; João Carlos Pina, Saraiva.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is a hematological disease with complex physiopathology. It is genetically characterized by a somatic mutation in the PIG-A gene (phosphatidylinositol glycan anchor biosynthesis, class A), in which the best known antigens are DAF (decay accelerating fa [...] ctor or CD55) and MIRL (membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis or CD59). OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in patients attended at the HEMOPA foundation from November 2008 to July 2009. METHOD: Thirty patients, with ages ranging from two to 79 years old and suspected of having paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria were examined. All patients were immunophenotyped by flow cytometry for the CD5, CD59, CD16 and CD45 antigens. RESULTS: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria was identified in nine of the thirty patients investigated. Another 3 cases had inconclusive results with CD59-negative labeling only for neutrophils. The highest frequency of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria patients (7/9) and inconclusive cases (2/3) were between 19 years old and 48 years old, with a median of 28 years. CONCLUSION: These results show the importance of flow cytometry to identify cases in which patients are deficient in only one antigen (CD59).

  6. Circadian Variation in the Response to Experimental Endotoxemia and Modulatory Effects of Exogenous Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, Mahdi; Klein, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Disturbances in circadian rhythms are commonly observed in the development of several medical conditions and may also be involved in the pathophysiology of sepsis. Melatonin, with its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, is known to modulate the response to endotoxemia. In this paper, we investigated the circadian variation with or without melatonin administration in an experimental endotoxemia model based on lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to six groups receiving an intraperitoneal injection of either LPS (5?mg/kg), LPS?+?melatonin (1?mg/kg), or LPS?+?melatonin (10?mg/kg) at either daytime or nighttime. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) was analyzed in liver samples collected after decapitation. Furthermore, inflammatory plasma markers (cytokines interleukin [IL]-6, IL-10) and oxidative plasma markers (ascorbic acid [AA], dehydroascorbic acid [DHA], and malondialdehyde [MDA]) were analyzed before and 5?h after the onset of endotoxemia. There were significant higher levels of SOD (p?

  7. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, [125I]iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30 degree C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing [125I]iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus

  8. PATHOGENETIC JUSTIFICATION AND EFFICIENCY OF MELATONIN APPLICATION IN PATIENTS WITH BRONCHIAL ASTHMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Litvinenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Present study dealt with efficiency of melatonin implementation in a combination therapeutic schedule of bronchial asthma (BA. A group of 248 patients with atopic, or mixed clinical forms of BA being in exacerbation, or medication remission state, and 36 healthy donors were included into the study. Melatonin (Melaxen, Unifarm, USA was administered as a single daily dose of 0.003 g, at 21.00, accompanied by a standard therapy in twenty BA patients for 21 days. We determined contents and functional properties of ?- and B-lymphocytes, mononuclear phagocytes, IgE, IL-4, IFN? levels, as well as melatonin concentrations in blood serum in the morning and evening time. When included into BA treatment protocol, melatonin proved to cause partial restoration of circadian rhythm for Tand B cell subpopulations, mononuclear phagocytes, cytokine production, due to its chronotropic and immunomodulating activity. This effect is associated with a more pronounced clinical effect, thus presuming reversibility of desynchronosis state.

  9. Oxidative Stress Induced by Epileptic Seizure and Its Attenuation by Melatonin.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, J.; Stopka, Pavel; Nohejlová, K.; Rokyta, R.

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 62, Suppl.1 (2013), S67-S74. ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : free radicals * seizure * melatonin * EPR Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  10. Seasonal pattern of melatonin excretion in humans: relationship to daylength variation rate and geomagnetic field fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergiannaki Joff; Paparrigopoulos, T J; Stefanis, C N

    1996-03-15

    In order to investigate the influence of various environmental parameters on melatonin excretion, the night-time urinary melatonin excretion of 16 healthy volunteers was measured in samples collected monthly over a period of one year. No significant interindividual differences were detected in the monthly rate of change of melatonin excretion. A seasonal bimodal pattern did, however, emerge. Peak values were observed in June and November. In these months a combination of high daylength stability and low values of the vertical component of the geomagnetic field was recorded. Trough values were found in April and August-October when low daylength stability was combined with high values of the vertical component of the geomagnetic field. We propose that the daylength variation rate, and the fluctuations of the vertical component of the geomagnetic field, interact to induce the changes in melatonin secretion which signalize the different seasons in humans. PMID:8631397

  11. Melatonin suppresses cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via activation of Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilic Ulkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin, one of the most effective and potent anticancer drugs, is used in the treatment of a wide variety of both pediatric and adult malignancies. However, the chemotherapeutic use of cisplatin is limited by its serious side-effects such as nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Cisplatin chemotherapy induces a reduction in the antioxidant status, leading to a failure of the antioxidant defense against free-radical damage generated by antitumor drugs. Cisplatin-induced oxidative stress in the kidney was partially prevented by antioxidant treatments using superoxide dismutase, glutathione, selenium and flavonoids. Melatonin and its metabolites possess free-radical scavenging activity and it has been shown that they protect against cisplatin toxicity. However, the mechanism of the protective effects of melatonin against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is still essentially unknown. We therefore designed this study to investigate the underlying mechanism of the protective effect of melatonin against cisplatin-induced renal damage in a rat nephrotoxicity model in vivo. Methods Twenty eight 8-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into four groups of control, melatonin treatment (4?mg/kg b.w i.p. for 10?days, cisplatin treatment (7?mg/kg b.w., i.p. and melatonin and cisplatin combination treatment. Serum urea nitrogen (urea-N and creatinine levels were measured. Histopathological changes were evaluated. In addition, we analyzed the expression levels of HO-1, Nrf2, NF-?B and AP-1 in Western blot analysis. Results Both serum creatinine and urea nitrogen increased significantly following cisplatin administration alone; these values decreased significantly with melatonin co-treatment of cisplatin-treated rats. Histological analysis showed that cisplatin caused damage in the proximal tubular cells in the kidneys of cisplatin-treated rats; these changes were reversed by melatonin co-treatment. Upon Western blot analysis, melatonin treatment increased Nrf2 accumulation in the nuclear fraction, and increased the expression of HO-1 in the cytosolic fraction as compared to the cisplatin-treated rats. Expressions of NF-?B p65 and AP-1 were increased significantly in the kidneys of rats treated with cisplatin compared with the expression in the kidneys from the control, melatonin-only-treated and melatonin co-treated rats. Conclusion Our present data suggest that melatonin attenuates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity possibly by modulating Nrf2/HO-1 signaling.

  12. Melatonin and tadalafil treatment improves erectile dysfunction after spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavukçu, Hasan Hüseyin; Sener, Tarik Emre; Tinay, Ilker; Akbal, Cem; Er?ahin, Mehmet; Cevik, Ozge; Cadirci, Selin; Reiter, Russel J; Sener, Göksel

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role both in spinal cord injury (SCI) and erectile dysfunction (ED). The present study investigated the effects of melatonin and tadalafil treatment alone or in combination on SCI-induced ED. Male Wistar albino rats (n = 40) were divided into five groups: sham-operated control and SCI-injured rats given either vehicle, melatonin (10 mg/kg, i.p.), tadalafil (10 mg/kg, p.o.) or a combination of melatonin and tadalafil. Spinal cord injury was induced using a standard weight-drop method. On Day 7 after SCI, intracavernosal pressure (ICP) was measured and all rats were decapitated. Cavernosal tissues were obtained to examine caspase 3, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, as well as cGMP, nerve growth factor (NGF), malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels. Spinal cord injury caused oxidative damage, as evidenced by increases in MDA and cGMP levels. In addition, MPO and caspase 3 activites were increased after SCI, whereas GSH and NGF levels and SOD activity were reduced. Melatonin effectively reversed these oxidative changes. Furthermore, in rats treated with both melatonin and tadalafil, the recoveries were more pronounced than in rats given either melatonin or tadalafil alone. The ICP/mean arterial pressure value in vehicle-treated SCI rats was significantly higher than in the control group, whereas in the tadalafil- and tadalafil + melatonin-treated groups have returned this value had returned to control levels. As an individual treatment, and especially when combined with tadalafil, a well-known agent in the treatment of ED, melatonin prevented SCI-induced oxidative damage to cavernosal tissues and restored ED, most likely due to its anti-oxidant effects. PMID:24552354

  13. Melatonin Ameliorates Injury and Specific Responses of Ischemic Striatal Neurons in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Yuxin; FENG Qiqi; Ma, Jing; Feng, Zhibo; Zhan, Mali; OuYang, Lisi; Mu, Shuhua; Liu, Bingbing; Jiang, Zhuyi; Jia, Yu; Li, Youlan; Lei, Wanlong

    2013-01-01

    Studies have confirmed that middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) causes striatal injury in which oxidative stress is involved in the pathological mechanism. Increasing evidence suggests that melatonin may have a neuroprotective effect on cerebral ischemic damage. This study aimed to examine the morphological changes of different striatal neuron types and the effect of melatonin on striatal injury by MCAO. The results showed that MCAO induced striatum-related dysfunctions of locomotion, coo...

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of New Bivalent Agents as Melatonin- and Histamine H3-Ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Daniele Pala; Laura Scalvini; Alessio Lodola; Marco Mor; Lisa Flammini; Elisabetta Barocelli; Valeria Lucini; Francesco Scaglione; Silvia Bartolucci; Annalida Bedini; Silvia Rivara; Gilberto Spadoni

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous molecule involved in many pathophysiological processes. In addition to the control of circadian rhythms, its antioxidant and neuroprotective properties have been widely described. Thus far, different bivalent compounds composed by a melatonin molecule linked to another neuroprotective agent were synthesized and tested for their ability to block neurodegenerative processes in vitro and in vivo. To identify a novel class of potential neuroprotective compounds, we pr...

  15. Differential effect of melatonin on {gamma}-irradiated ovarian follicles in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.K.; Lee, C.J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    The present study was performed to obtain evidence of the radioprotective function of melatonin on the ovarian follicles in {gamma}-irradiated immature mice. Three weeks old immature mice were i.p. injected with 10 {mu}g and 100 {mu}g of melatonin dissolved in 100 {mu}l of alcoholic saline. Two hours after the treatments, they were whole-body irradiated with a dose of LD{sub 80(30)} (8.3 Gy). The ovaries were dissected out of the animals at -2, 2, 8, and 14 h after the onset of irradiation and prepared for the histological observation using glutaraldehyde fixation. In terms of morphometry, it was observed that the number of primordial follicles of the irradiation group or the melatonin-treated group was less than that of the control. However, the number of primary, preantral, and early antral follicles was not different from that of the control group. In the group pretreated with 100 {mu}g of melatonin before irradiation, the percentage of normal primordial follicles was significantly higher than that of the irradiation group at any time after irradiation. The high concentration of melatonin also reduced radiation-induced degeneration of the primary follicles at 14 h after irradiation. The pretreatment of 10 {mu}g of melatonin had little of no effect on radiation-induced degeneration of the primordial follicles and of the primary follicles. However it gave a protective effect on the radiation-induced degeneration in the preantral and early antral follicles. From the above results, it is concluded that the exogenous melatonin has different functions depending on the follicular stages, and that the radioprotective effect of exogenous melatonin on follicular degeneration is related to its concentration. (author)

  16. Dissolution of Intact, Divided and Crushed Circadin Tablets: Prolonged vs. Immediate Release of Melatonin

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Ming Chua; Nathalie Hauet Richer; Magda Swedrowska; Stephen Ingham; Stephen Tomlin; Ben Forbes

    2016-01-01

    Circadin 2 mg prolonged-release tablet is the only licensed melatonin product available in the UK. Circadin is indicated for patients with primary insomnia aged 55 and over, but is more widely used “off-label” to treat sleep disorders especially in the paediatric population. Children and older people often have difficulty swallowing tablets and dividing the tablet is sometimes required to ease administration. The aim of this study was to measure the release profile of melatonin from Circadin ...

  17. Age, alcoholism and depression are associated with low levels of urinary melatonin.

    OpenAIRE

    Wetterberg, L.; Aperia, B; Gorelick, D A; Gwirtzman, H E; McGuire, M T; Serafetinides, E A; Yuwiler, A

    1992-01-01

    Two normal control populations, separated by 8,000 miles and 24 degrees of latitude, had similar six-month mean values for overnight urinary melatonin concentrations. These values were significantly higher than six-month values for depressed subjects and abstinent alcoholic subjects, while the means for the two clinical populations were similar. Age and urinary melatonin concentration in the control and clinical populations were inversely related, but the slopes of the linear regression equat...

  18. Transcutaneous Auricular Vagus Nerve Stimulation Triggers Melatonin Secretion and Is Antidepressive in Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shaoyuan; Zhai, Xu; Rong, Peijing; McCabe, Michael F; Zhao, Jingjun; Ben, Hui; Wang,Xing; Wang, Shuxing

    2014-01-01

    Decreased circulating melatonin is implicated in depression. We recently found that Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF, fa/fa) develop depression-like behaviors and that transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (taVNS) is antidepressive in ZDF rats. Here we studied whether the ZDF rats could be used as a depression rodent model and whether the antidepressive effect of taVNS is mediated through modulation of melatonin secretion. Adult male ZDF and Zucker lean (ZL, fa/+) littermates were u...

  19. Effects of melatonin on the proliferation and differentiation of rat adipose-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaminy Arash

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteogenesis driven by adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs is regulated by physiological and pathological factors. Accumulating evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments suggests that melatonin may have an influence on bone formation. However, little is known about the effects of melatonin on osteogenesis, which thus remains to be elucidated. This study was performed to determine whether melatonin at physiological concentrations (0.01-10 nM could affect the in vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rat ADSCs. Materials and Methods: ADSCs were isolated from the fat of adult rats. After cell expansion in culture media and through three passages, osteogenesis was induced in a monolayer culture using osteogenic medium with or without melatonin at physiological concentrations (0.01-10 nM. After four weeks, the cultures were examined for mineralization by Alizarin Red S and von Kossa staining and for alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity using an ALP kit. Cell viability and apoptosis were also assayed by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Results: The results indicated that at physiological concentrations, melatonin suppressed proliferation and differentiation of ADSCs. These data indicate that ADSCs exposed to melatonin, had a lower ALP activity in contrast to the cells exposed to osteogenic medium alone. Similarly, mineral deposition (calcium level also decreased in the presence of melatonin. Flow cytometry confirmed that cell growth had decreased and that the numbers of apoptotic cells had increased. Conclusion: These results suggest that the physiological concentration of melatonin has a negative effect on ADSC osteogenesis.

  20. Protective Effect of Melatonin against Inequality-Induced Damages on Testicular Tissue and Sperm Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Shiva Nasiraei-Moghadam; Kazem Parivar,; Abolhasan Ahmadiani; Mansoureh Movahhedin; Mohammad Reza Vaez Mahdavi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The goals of the study are evaluation the effects of food deprivation and isolation situation as a social stress on fertility; and in the following, investigation of the improving effect of melatonin as an antioxidant component. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, We investigated histopathological and serological effects of melatonin and social stress (food deprivation and isolation) on different features of sperm and testicular tissue among 42 male r...