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Sample records for nagasaki city japan

  1. The risk of ovarian cancer in atomic bomb survivors, Nagasaki city, Japan 1973-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A population based study was conducted to evaluate the risk of ovarian cancer among female atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors in Nagasaki City by using data from 1973 to 1987 of the Nagasaki Tumor Resistry. The incidence rate of ovarian cancer in the total female population in Nagasaki City decreased at ages 50-59, 60-69, and 70-79 with advancing the periods investigated (1973-1977, 1978-1982, and 1983-1987). A similar trend in the incidence rate was also observed in A-bomb survivors. The summarized risk ratio (SRR) of ovarian cancer was not significantly higher in A-bomb survivors; SRR: 1.30 (95% confidence interval of SRR: 0.64-2.68) in the survivors exposed to the A-bomb radiation within 2 km of the hypocenter, and 1.07 (0.78-1.46) in the total population of A-bomb survivors. There was also no difference in histologic type of ovarian cancer between A-bomb survivors and non-exposed persons. It should be noted, however, that the incidence rate at age 40-49 was higher in A-bomb survivors than in non-exposed persons during the all periods investigated. A follow-up study is, therefore, still necessary to evaluate the risk of ovarian cancer in A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki city. (author)

  2. Incidence of multiple myeloma in Nagasaki City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to observe the incidence of multiple myeloma in the population of Nagasaki City from 1973 to 1982, and to assess any influence caused by A-bomb exposure, 85 cases of myeloma have been collected and analysed. Informatively, 48 cases of this number were A-bomb survivors. Among the middle-aged cases, the crude incidence rates of myeloma in the exposed group were found to be higher than those in the non-exposed group. Further, the relative risk of myeloma was higher in A-bomb survivors and this tendency become more pronounced in the those who were within 2 km of the epicenter of the blast. The age-adjusted relative risk in male and female A-bomb survivors was 1.59 and 1.68 respectively, but no significant differences were noted. (author)

  3. Plutonium isotopes derived from Nagasaki atomic bomb in the sediment of Nishiyama reservoir at Nagasaki, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito-Kokubu, Y. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)]. E-mail: kokubu.yoko@jaea.go.jp; Esaka, F. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yasuda, K. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Magara, M. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Miyamoto, Y. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sakurai, S. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Usuda, S. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yamazaki, H. [School of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yoshikawa, S. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Nagaoka, S. [Faculty of Education, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    The source of plutonium in sediments deposited at Nishiyama reservoir at Nagasaki was characterized by their {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio. The average ratio was approximately 0.03, except in two layers. The main source of the plutonium was the Nagasaki atomic bomb. The plutonium continues to flow into the reservoir even now. The {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in two layers were higher than the average, which showed that plutonium in these layers were made of those of nuclear tests added to those of the atomic bomb.

  4. The cancer registry in Nagasaki City, with atomic bomb survivors data, 1973-1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tumor registry program in Nagasaki City was conceived as a contribution to knowledge concerning possible radiation induced carcinogenesis among a human population and a tumor registry was established in 1957 and a tissue registry in 1974. According to the chronological changes in adjusted incidence rates for Nagasaki City, an increasing trend was shown in males for cancer of the colon, rectum, lung, urinary bladder, and for all sites combined, and, in females for cancer of the colon, pancreas, and breast. No decreasing trend was observed for any site in males, while a decreasing trend was indicated in females for cancer of the uterus. In comparison with age-adjusted incidence rates for all cancer sites combined in other prefectures and cities in 1979, the rates in Nagasaki City are high for both males and females. Sites with a tendency for high rates, in Nagasaki City, are, for males, stomach, colon, rectum, liver, and lymphoid tissue, and for females, colon, rectum, liver, gallbladder, lung, breast, and lymphoid tissue. From these data, it is necessary to ascertain whether or not the incidence of malignant tumors is higher among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors than in nonexposed persons. According to the Nagasaki City tumor and tissue registry data for 1973 - 77, the crude incidence rate and relative risk for several cancers were higher in A-bomb survivors and well correlated with the radiation dose. However, the adjusted relative risk showed a higher trend only frelative risk showed a higher trend only for thyroid cancer in females and in double cancers for both sexes. Histopathological difference between cancer tissue of A-bomb survivors and nonexposed persons was not detected. In general, it is premature to determine the qualitative and quantitative differences of malignancy between A-bomb survivors and nonexposed persons, although an increase in cancer incidence and mortality is a recognized late effect of exposure to A-bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. (author)

  5. Epidemiology and Clinical Features of Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacteriosis in Nagasaki, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Shotaro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Kohno, Yoshihisa; Fukuda, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hideki; Sasaki, Eisuke; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Higashiyama, Yasuhito; Hashiguchi, Kohji; Futsuki, Yoji; Inoue, Yuichi; Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Suyama, Naofumi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Recent reports indicate that the incidence of nontuberculous mycobacterial-lung disease (NTM-LD) is increasing. This study aimed to investigate the epidemiology and clinical features of NTM-LD patients in Nagasaki prefecture, Japan to identify the negative prognostic factors for NTM-LD in Japan. Methods The medical records of patients newly diagnosed with NTM-LD in eleven hospitals in Nagasaki prefecture between January 2001 and February 2010 were reviewed. Data regarding the annual population of each region and the incidence of all forms of tuberculosis were collected to assess geographic variations in NTM-LD incidence, isolates, and radiological features. Results A total 975 patients were diagnosed with NTM-LD. The incidence increased over the study period and reached 11.0 and 10.1 per 100,000 population in 2008 and 2009, respectively. M. intracellulare was the most common pathogen in the southern region, and M. avium most common in other regions. The most common radiographic pattern was the nodular-bronchiectatic pattern. Age >60 years, body mass index <18.5 kg/m2, underlying lung disease, and cavitary pattern were the negative prognostic factors at the 1-year follow-up. Conclusions The incidence of NTM-LD has been increasing in Nagasaki prefecture. The isolates and radiographic features of patients vary markedly by region. PMID:26020948

  6. The cancer registry in Nagasaki city with atomic bomb survivor data, 1973-1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the establishment of the tumor registry program in Nagasaki City; it was conceived as a contribution to knowledge concerning possible radiation induced carcinogenesis among a human population. The tumor registry was established in 1957 and a tissue registry in 1974. Chronological changes in adjusted incidence rates for Nagasaki City are examined for various cancers in males; a decreasing trend was indicated in females for cancer of the uterus. From these data, the authors ascertain whether or not the incidence of malignant tumors is higher among atomic bomb survivors than in nonexposed persons. The adjusted relative risk showed a higher trend only for thyroid cancer in females and in double cancers for both sexes of the A-bomb survivors

  7. The current mortality rates of A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki-city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the paper is to describe and investigate the death rate of about 110,000 A-Bomb survivors who have been registered in Nagasaki-city since 1957. There were 7,780 deaths among the A-Bomb survivors during 1970 -- 76 from which the age-specific death rates are calculated and compared with those of non-exposed controls in Nagasaki-city. The results are as follows: (1) The age-specific death rates by all causes of A-Bomb survivors are lower than those of the controls. (2) The age-specific death rates by the cerebrovascular disease (ICD 430 - 438) are also lower in A-Bomb survivors than in others. (3) The age-specific death rates by all malignant neoplasms are nearly the same between A-Bomb survivors and the controls. It is strongly suggested from these results that, although there may still exist a number of A-Bomb survivors having been suffered from the late effects of radiation, financial or medical aid supplied by the ministry and other organizations have done good work in advancing the health care of A-Bomb survivors. (author)

  8. Statistical investigation of a-bomb survivors health examinations in Nagasaki City, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical investigation was made as to results of hematological examinations in male A-bomb survivors picked out from 60,000 A-bomb survivors (the total cases, 600,000) in Nagasaki city who received general health examinations from 1965 to 1979. With respect to the exposed who were young at the time of exposure (their age; under 12 years, the mean age at the time of exposure; 6.4 years, and the mean age at the time of examinations; 33.7 years), there was a significant difference in hemoglobin concentration and systolic blood pressure between a short-distance group exposed within 1.8 km from the center of explosion and a long-distance group exposed over 2.4 km between the age 30 and 35 years. Systematic changes in erythrocyte count and white cell count were not found. With respect to the exposed who had grown up at the time of exposure (the age at the time of exposure; over 13 years, the mean age at the time of exposure; 29.7 years, and the mean age at the time of examinations; 57.0 years), erythrocyte count, hemoglobin concentration, and white cell count in both a short-distance group and a long-distance group tended to decrease in accordance with aging. Systolic blood pressure elevated in accordance with aging, but there was not a significant difference between both groups. (Tsunoda, M.)

  9. Correlation between fatty liver and coronary risk factors: a population study of elderly men and women in Nagasaki, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahoshi, M; Amasaki, Y; Soda, M; Tominaga, T; Ichimaru, S; Nakashima, E; Seto, S; Yano, K

    2001-07-01

    The relation between fatty liver, detected by ultrasonography as a marker of visceral fat accumulation, and coronary risk factors was studied in 810 elderly men and 1,273 elderly women in Nagasaki, Japan from 1990 to 1992. The prevalence of fatty liver was 3.3% in the male and 3.8% in the female non-obese participants (BMI, body mass index diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance (DM+IGT) in the women independent of age, obesity, smoking and drinking. Non-obesity with fatty liver, rather than obesity with or without fatty liver, had the highest odds ratio for hypertension and low-HDL cholesterol in the men and for hypercholesterolemia, low-HDL cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia and DM+IGT in the women. The prevalence of fatty liver is the same in elderly men and women, and fatty liver is an independent correlate of coronary risk factors in the elderly. PMID:11510744

  10. [WHO Healthy City Initiative in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Kazuko

    2013-01-01

    City environmental conditions are associated with health outcomes in people living there. World Health Organization (WHO) initiated Healthy City in 1986. To promote the networking, Alliance for Healthy Cities (AFHC) was launched in 2003 with local offices including AFHC Japan. As of 2010, 26 cities are members of AFHC Japan. A questionnaire was sent to those member cities. It includes questions on why they became an AFHC member, which section is in charge of the initiatives, what factors are important for promotion, and others. Out of the 26 cities, 13 cities returned the completed questionnaire. As for factors important for promoting the initiatives, 10 (77%) out of the 13 cities answered "consciousness of residents", while five (38%) chose "budget". This result suggests that community participation is a more important factor than budget for promoting and succeeding in the initiatives. Aging is a problem in any of the member cities, and six cities out the 13 falls under the category of superaged society, which is defined as a society with the proportion of aged people cities (85%) agreed that bicycles are an alternative means of transportation to cars; however, infrastructure for ensuring safety needs further improvement. In the promotion of Healthy City, networking among the member cities in Japan and worldwide should be promoted. Community participation with empowerment from the planning stage should lead to sustainable initiatives. The function of AFHC in collaboration among the members should be strengthened to cope with the rapidly changing city environment. PMID:23718975

  11. Studies on the growth of the middle school children, whose parents were exposed to the atom bomb in Nagasaki City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki junior high school students were divided into Group E (children of the exposed) and Group O (children of the non-exposed). Their growth was compared according to the degree of exposure received by their parents. An interim result was reported. There was a big difference between the height and body weight of students who lived in the center of the city and those who lived in the suburbs. These values also differed greatly according to family occupations. When the difference in physique between Group E and Group O was considered, districts and occupations were restricted. A tendency of O>E only was observed in an investigation of all subjects in all districts. A significant difference between the groups was observed in regard to some grades when districts and occupations were restricted. A scattering analysis of physique values, regarded as independent variables, of the same students according to grade revealed a difference in O>E in height, especially in boys. (Tsunoda, M.)

  12. Japan's Four Major Smart Cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-15

    A brief overview is given of initiatives, developments, projects, investment, incentives and business opportunities for Dutch companies in Japan with regard to smart cities. The four major smart cities are Yokohama City, Toyota City, Keihanna City (Kyoto Prefecture's Kansai Science Park), and Kitakyushu City.

  13. Atomic bombs and the long-run effect on trust: Experiences in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamura, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan are the only cities in the world that have experienced an atomic bomb attack. This paper explores how this devastating experience affected victims’ tendency to trust others. Individual-level data were used to examine the long-term influence of experiencing an atomic bomb on individuals’ trust. After controlling for individual characteristics, I obtained the following key findings. Individuals who experienced the attack were more likely to trust others. Furt...

  14. Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    Japan consists of 3900 islands and lies off the east coast of Asia. Even though Japan is one of the most densely populated nations in the world, its growth rate has stabilized at .5%. 94% of all children go to senior high school and almost 90% finish. Responsibility for the sick, aged, and infirmed is changing from the family and private sector to government. Japan was founded in 600 BC and its 1st capital was in Nara (710-1867). The Portuguese, the 1st Westerners to make contact with Japan in 1542, opened trade which lasted until the mid 17th century. US Navy Commodore Matthew Perry forced Japan to reopen in 1854. Following wars with China and Russia in the late 1800s and early 1900s respectively, Japan took part in World Wars I and II. In between these wars Japan invaded Manchuria and China. The US dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the Japanese surrendered in September, 1945 ending World War II (WWII). Following, WWII, the Allied Powers guided Japan's establishment as a nonthreatening nation and a democratic parliamentary government (a constitutional monarchy) with a limited defense force. Japan remains one of the most politically stable of all postwar democracies. The Liberal Democratic Party's Noboru Takeshita became prime minister in 1987. Japan has limited natural resources and only 19% of the land is arable. Japanese ingenuity and skill combine to produce one of the highest per hectare crop yields in the world. Japan is a major economic power, and its and the US economies are becoming more interdependent. Its exports, making up only 13% of the gross national product, mainly go to Canada and the US. Many in the US are concerned, however, with the trade deficit with Japan and are seeking ways to make trade more equitable. Japan wishes to maintain good relations with its Asian neighbors and other nations. The US and Japan enjoy a strong, productive relationship. PMID:12178004

  15. Depositional records of plutonium and {sup 137}Cs released from Nagasaki atomic bomb in sediment of Nishiyama reservoir at Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito-Kokubu, Y. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: kokubu.yoko@jaea.go.jp; Yasuda, K.; Magara, M.; Miyamoto, Y.; Sakurai, S.; Usuda, S. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yamazaki, H. [School of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yoshikawa, S. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Nagaoka, S. [Faculty of Education, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Mitamura, M.; Inoue, J.; Murakami, A. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    In a sediment core of Nishiyama reservoir at Nagasaki city, depth profiles of {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu isotopic ratio, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 137}Cs activities were determined. Sediments containing plutonium and {sup 137}Cs, which were deposited immediately after a detonation of Nagasaki atomic bomb, were identified in the core. Observed below the sediments were macroscopic charcoals, providing evidence for initial deposit of the fallout of the Nagasaki atomic bomb. This is the first entire depositional records of plutonium and {sup 137}Cs released from the Nagasaki atomic bomb together with those from atmospheric nuclear tests.

  16. Imported dengue fever/dengue hemorrhagic fever cases in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2011-01-01

    Several dengue outbreaks occurred in Japan from 1942 to 1945. Dengue fever emerged in Nagasaki in August 1942 and soon spread to other cities such as Sasebo, Hiroshima, Kobe and Osaka, recurring every summer until 1945 and constituting the greatest outbreak in the temperate zone. Domestic outbreaks have not been reported in Japan since then. However, the number of imported dengue cases has increased year by year: 868 imported cases were reported in Japan between 1999 and 2010 according to the...

  17. Future population of atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Kenichi; Mine, Mariko; Shibata, Yoshisada

    2013-01-01

    The Nagasaki University Atomic Bomb Survivor Database, which was established in 1978 for elucidating the long-term health effects of the atomic bombing, has registered since 1970 about 120,000 atomic bomb survivors with a history of residence in Nagasaki city. Since the number of atomic bomb survivors has steadily been decreasing, prediction of future population is important for planning future epidemiologic studies, and we tried to predict the population of atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki city from 2008 to 2030. In addition, we evaluated our estimated population comparing with the actual number from 2008 to 2011. PMID:23920726

  18. Statistical studies on cause of death among a-bomb survivors from 1970 to 1976 in Nagasaki City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The death rate from malignant neoplasms in a-bomb survivors was higher than that in Japan through the whole period from 1970 to 1976. The death rate from malignant neoplasms was also high in a-bomb survivors in their thirties and fortieth exposed to a-bomb near the hypocenter. Seven thousand, five hundred and twenty-eight a-bomb survivors investigated this time were quivalent to 90% of all 8,334 a-bomb survivors who died during the period from 1970 to 1976. Therefore, the result obtained from this investigation seemed to indicate the cause of death correctly. Remaining 10% are now under investigation. (Tsunoda, M.)

  19. Experiences and extrapolations from Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the events following the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 and extrapolates from these experiences to further understand the possible consequences of detonations on a local area from weapons in the current world nuclear arsenal. The first section deals with a report of the events that occurred in Hiroshima and Nagasaki just after the 1945 bombings with respect to the physical conditions of the affected areas, the immediate effects on humans, the psychological response of the victims, and the nature of outside assistance. Because there can be no experimental data to validate the effects on cities and their populations of detonations from current weapons, the data from the actual explosions on Hiroshima and Nagasaki provide a point of departure. The second section examines possible extrapolations from and comparisons with the Hiroshima and Nagasaki experiences. The limitations of drawing upon the Hiroshima and Nagasaki experiences are discussed. A comparison is made of the scale of effects from other major disasters for urban systems, such as damages from the conventional bombings of cities during World War II, the consequences of major earthquakes, the historical effects of the Black Plague and widespread famines, and other extreme natural events. The potential effects of detonating a modern 1 MT warhead on the city of Hiroshima as it exists today are simulated. This is extended to the local effects on a targeted city from a global neffects on a targeted city from a global nuclear war, and attention is directed to problems of estimating the societal effects from such a war

  20. Radon measurements in some houses of Tsukuba Science City, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements concerning radon and its daughter products' concentration levels have been performed in 42 selective houses of the Tsukuba Science City (Japan) using CR-39 and LR-115 nuclear track detectors. These included both single story houses and flats in multi-storied buildings. Four CR-39 and four LR-115 detectors were put into a zippable polyethylene bag and a number of such bags were prepared. These detector loaded bags were then installed in two bedrooms of each of the houses/flats and were exposed for a period of three months during the winter season (i.e. from December to February). These radon exposed samples were then processed, analyzed and related to the Bq/m3. These studies indicated that the radon levels are very low in the houses surveyed and do not pose any serious threat to the occupants. (author)

  1. Skin cancer of Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We already reported that there was a high correlation between the exposure dose and the incidence of skin cancer in A-bomb survivors using the data of the Nagasaki Life Span Study of Radiation Effects Research Foundation and Nagasaki Tumor Registry. In Report 3 of this series, we confirmed that the correlation between the exposure distance and the incidence of skin cancer was statistically significant. In Report 4, we clarified that the incidence of skin cancer in proximally exposed Nagasaki A-bomb survivors when compared to distally exposed victims appears to be increasing since 1975. In this final report of the series, we examined the characteristics of skin cancer in Nagasaki A-bomb survivors using 140 skin cancer cases collected from 31 hospitals in Nagasaki City and adjacent districts on the basis of the data of a total of 66,276 A-bomb survivors recorded in the Scientific Data Center of Atomic Bomb Disaster, Nagasaki University School of Medicine. Among the various items examined, the only item that showed a statistical significance was the age at exposure in the cases of squamous cell carcinoma, i.e., those exposed within 2.5 km from the hypocenter were significantly younger than those exposed at 3.0 km or more. (author)

  2. Los Alamos, Hiroshima, Nagasaki - a personal recollection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author, a physicist participating in the Manhattan Project, recalls his experiences and work in the laboratories at the time which marked the onset of the nuclear era, the construction of the first uranium and plutonium bombs in Los Alamos, and the hidious effects shown to the world by the nuclear bombing of Japan. His thoughts and memories presented 50 years after the nuclear destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and now that the Cold War has ended, call for a global ban of nuclear weapons. (orig.)

  3. A Methodological Study of the Citizen's Learning Network in a Small-size City in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Seiichiro

    This guide presents a description of a typical citizens' learning network in a small-sized city in Japan, guidelines for establishing and administering a similar network, and a copy of the regulations of the citizens' learning network in Munakata, Japan. Addressed in the first part of the volume are the following topics: the nature and scope of a…

  4. Mental health status of A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most survivors of disaster usually recover with few or no lasting effects on their mental health. However, in some portions of survivors, distress lasts long. The atomic bomb detonated to Nagasaki in August 1945 instantaneously destroyed almost all areas of the city, resulting in a total of ca. 73,884 deaths by the end of 1945 and about 74,909 injured people. Since the A-bomb survivors reached over 60 years of age, their mental health as well as physical health has become of great concern. Some studies on their mental health conditions have been carried out in Japan. I give an outline about a precedent study on mental health of the A-bomb survivors in this report. The mental health studies of the A-bomb survivors who paid attention to a being bombed experience, stigmatization, long-term outcome, recovery are necessary. The improvement of wide appropriate support system for the A-bomb survivors is expected in future. (author)

  5. Delayed damage from fallout and activated radiation of A-bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with an alternative approach to assess the risk of delayed damage from fallout and activated radiation of the A-bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the total doses absorbed were determined separately for the '0-9 rad T65D' and 'NIC' (Not In City) groups of individuals. The risk of organ damage from loosely ionising radiation in the low dose range was calculated on the basis of quantitative observations for mammary carcinomas and leukemia. Account was further taken of predictions about the dose-response relationship, including theories supporting the likelihood of linear and quadratic curves for the two organ lesions under investigation. The incidence of these diseases as indicated by the overall cancer index for Japan was taken as a control value. (ECB)

  6. Radon concentrations in residential housing in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A measurement of indoor radon (222Rn) concentrations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was carried out to examine an effect of the exposure on atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. Two hundred dwellings (100 from each city), chiefly of members of the Life Span Study population which is a fixed cohort studied by Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), were selected for this survey. We used two types of alpha-track detector: a Terradex detector type SF and a bare-track detector improved by Yonehara et al. Comparative measurements showed that although there was an adequate correlation between the values obtained using the two detectors, the geometric mean value for the bare-track detector was 45% of that for the Terradex detector. This difference was considered to be due to differences in the calibration methods and sensitivities of the detectors to thoron (220Rn). The arithmetic mean values of the radon concentrations for 193 locations in Hiroshima and 192 locations in Nagasaki measured by Terradex SF detector were 103 Bq m-3 and 40.6 Bq m-3, respectively. The values at 100 locations in Hiroshima and at 93 locations in Nagasaki measured by the bare detector were 43.1. Bq m-3 and 13.6 Bq m-3, respectively. The significant difference between the geometric mean values of the concentration in Hiroshima and Nagasaki measured by both methods was observed. The difference might be attributable to the different geological environments of the two cities. The difference between the estimated dose equivalents for exposure to radon daughters in dwellings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki over the last 30 years might amount to 0.4 or 0.8 Sv; however, no statistically significant difference was observed in lung cancer mortality in the low-dose range in either city. Nevertheless, the indoor-radon concentrations estimated in this survey could significantly influence the dose-response relationships for A-bomb exposure. (author)

  7. Investigation of radiation effects in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using a general Monte Carlo-discrete ordinates coupling scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general adjoint Monte Carlo-forward discrete ordinates radiation transport calculational scheme has been created to study the effects of the radiation environment in Hiroshima and Nagasaki due to the bombing of these two cities. Various such studies for comparison with physical data have progressed since the end of World War II with advancements in computing machinery and computational methods. These efforts have intensified in the last several years with the U.S.-Japan joint reassessment of nuclear weapons dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Three principal areas of investigation are: (1) to determine by experiment and calculation the neutron and gamma-ray energy and angular spectra and total yield of the two weapons; (2) using these weapons descriptions as source terms, to compute radiation effects at several locations in the two cities for comparison with experimental data collected at various times after the bombings and thus validate the source terms; and (3) to compute radiation fields at the known locations of fatalities and surviving individuals at the time of the bombings and thus establish an absolute cause-and-effect relationship between the radiation received and the resulting injuries to these individuals and any of their descendants as indicated by their medical records. It is in connection with the second and third items, the determination of the radiation effects and the dose received by individuals, that the current study is concernede current study is concerned

  8. Study on Comparison of Citizens’ Environmental Awareness Among Four Cities in China and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng WANG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to compare governmental activities and citizens’ consciousness in environmental protection in China and Japan. The citizens’ environmental awareness and the relevant acts were examined by designing and distributing questionnaires to citizens in urban and rural cities in China and Japan. The results demonstrate that there are more differences between the two countries than between urban and rural cities inside the same country. Chinese people pay more attention to local severe problems, and require more garbage classification while Japanese people are relatively satisfied with the current environmental situations. Past trends of the accessible environment could positively affect citizens’ perspectives for the environment in the future.
    Key words: Environmental awareness; Citizen; China; Japan; Social survey

  9. FURTHER MAPPING OF THE NATALITY CHRONOME IN TODA CITY (JAPAN) MATERNITY HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    T. Yamanaka(International Center for Elementary Particle Physics and Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan); Cornélissen, G.; KAZUMA, M.; KAZUMA, N.; S. Murakami; Otsuka, K; SIEGELOVÁ, J.; DUŠEK, J.; SOSÍKOVÁ, M.; Halberg, F.

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate any circannual and/or circaseptan variations in birth incidence and birth weight in Toda City (Japan), data on 4,411 consecutive births were obtained from the city’s Maternity Hospital between 1 Jan 1999 and 31 Dec 2001. Data were analysed by cosinor separately for babies with birth weights in given ranges, and separately for boys and girls born at different gestational ages. A circannual rhythm was detected with statistical significance (P=0.047) for birth incidence...

  10. Dental radiography exposure of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dental radiography doses in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were estimated using doses measured by a thermoluminescent dosimeter and a phantom, and survey data from dental hospitals and clinics in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Doses to organs, including the lens, pituitary fossa, thyroid gland, and skin were calculated. Average doses per examination to these body sites were calculated using data obtained during a two-week survey in both cities. The mean caput doses were calculated from the data indicating frequency per year, and were tabulated by organ, age, teeth examined, type of examination, population, sex, and city. No significant difference was observed by age, population, sex, or city. Currently, the doses incurred during dental radiography may not be sufficiently high to cause bias in the assessments for late radiation effects among atomic bomb survivors. However, the mean caput thyroid doses of 62 mrad and 67 mrad in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively, cannot be ignored from the standpoint of their potential in contributing to radiation-induced carcinogenesis. (author)

  11. Survey of dental radiology among RERF, Hiroshima and Nagasaki populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dental hospitals and clinics in Hiroshima and Nagasaki cities were surveyed to assess the frequency and type of dental radiography performed during 2-week periods from March through June 1976. Patients radiographed were categorized as members of the Adult Health Study (AHS), non-AHS (Extended Life Span Study other than AHS) sample and general populations, and also categorized as Atomic Bomb Survivors Health Handbook holders (the A-bomb exposed) and nonholders of the handbook (the nonexposed). All of these groups were variously compared. They were mainly exposed to conventional oral radiography, and to a much lesser extent(3%-5%) to orthopantomography. The exposure frequencies for oral radiography per caput per year in Hiroshima were 1.2 for AHS, 0.9 for non-AHS, and 0.9 for the general population. In Nagasaki, these were 0.9, 1.1, and 0.6, respectively. The oral radiography exposure rates for the A-bomb exposed were 0.6 in Hiroshima and 0.5 in Nagasaki. For the nonexposed, these were 1.0 and 0.8, respectively. Thus, the exposure rates were about 1.5 times greater among the nonexposed than the exposed in both cities. The analysis of technical factors used revealed that, compared to a previous survey (1970), many dental radiographic machines were fitted with open-end cylindrical cones. Because of this a reduction in exposure dose can be inferred. Data obtained in the present investigation are essential for subsequent estimations of exposure doses of the populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki cities. (author)

  12. Hiroshima and Nagasaki at 65 – A Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimatsu Satoko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available On countless occasions this year, sixty-five years after the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, I have heard and read that hibakusha (atomic-bomb survivors are dying away, and that we need to eliminate nuclear weapons from the face of the earth, for the future of humanity, to be sure, but also so that their dying wishes are fulfilled. Indeed, hibakusha are not getting any younger. The average age of the 227,565 hibakusha who hold atomic-bomb health books as of March 2010 is 76.73. On August 6 this year, the names of 5,501 hibakusha who had died during the past year were added to the Hiroshima Cenotaph, making the total number of deaths of Hiroshima's hibakusha 269,446. In Nagasaki on August 9, 3,114 names were added to make a total of 152,276. Adding the death tolls from both cities, the total of Hiroshima/Nagasaki deaths as of August, 2010 was 421,722. The total number of hibakusha, including the living and dead, is at least 649,287, and keeping in mind those unaccounted for, it is probably more. Simply put, approximately, one third of hibakusha survive, speaking and living on behalf of all.No matter how many years go by, the number of people who were in or under the fiery clouds from the explosion of the two atomic-bombs, the first to be used against people, will always be the same, whether alive or dead. It includes those who perished instantly at and near the hypocentres, as Maruki Iri and Maruki Toshi described above,4 without ever being able to speak or even comprehend their own experience. It is for those dead and living people that we younger generations are acting and speaking on behalf of, and from whom we learn. And having fewer, or even none, of those surviving people will in no way diminish the significance of our actions, our shared memories, and our knowledge, to be inherited by future generations, so that never again will nuclear weapons be used, in combat or in experiments.

  13. Testimonies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki [videorecording] : women speak out for peace.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    "The harrowing experiences of [eight] women who experienced the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 make tangible the deadly legacy of nuclear weapons. Since 1979, the Soka Gakkai Women's Peace Committee (WPC) in Japan has been collecting women's war testimonies in order to help create a global culture of peace."

  14. Nagasaki symposium on Chernobyl: Update and future. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication contains valuable, up-to-date scientific information on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident, obtained from almost all the leading international and national organizations. The purpose of the Nagasaki symposium on Chernobyl was to present and discuss the available data from all over the world independent of psychological, social, economic, and political bias, and thus to make conclusions that would further medical science. To this end, the symposium consisted of two sessions, 'Chernobyl update' and 'Chernobyl in the future'. Along with the proceedings of these two sessions, the proceedings of the Japan-NIS Chernobyl thyroid symposium, held in December 1993 are included in this book. (orig.)

  15. Fifty years after Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial radiation was composed primarily of gamma rays and neutrons. Several estimates have in the past been advanced for the initial dose of radiation. The tentative T65D dose estimates (established in 1965) were revised in July 1987 by the US-Japan Committee for Reassessment of Atomic Bomb Radiation Dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the new DS86 dosimetry system was adopted. However, there may still be various uncertainties involved. The uncertainties under emergency conditions, in particular, the uncertainties in estimating dose-effect, relationships in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been repeatedly discussed by professor Nishiwaki since the first meeting on the medical and pathological effects of atomic bombings held at the Department of Pathology of the late Professor Ryojun Kinoshita, the then Professor of pathology, Faculty of Medicine of Osaka University in 1945. The survivors and those who visited Hiroshima immediately after the atomic bombing could have been subjected in a number of other possible noxious effects in addition to atomic radiation. Hospitals, laboratories, drugstores, chemists, pharmaceutical works, storehouses of chemicals, factories, etc. that were situated close to the hypocenter were all completely destroyed and various mutagenic, carcinogenic or teratogenic substances must have been released. There was no medical care and no food in the region of high dose exposure and the drinking water was contaminated. There would have been various possibilities of infection. Mental stress would also have been much higher in the survivors closer to the hypocenter. It is confusing which factor played a dominant role. In addition, there would be problems in accurately recording the position of the exposed persons at the time of the atomic bombing and also in estimating the shielding factors. There may be considerable uncertainty in human memory under such conditions. It is also possible that there could have been a large storage of gasoline to be used for transportation of the army corps in Hiroshima. Therefore there is a possibility that various toxic substances, mutagenic or carcinogenic agents such as benzopyrene and other radiomimetic substances could have been released from various facilities which were destroyed at the time of the atomic bombing. The enormous difference in dose rates between the atomic bombings and the radiation sources used for calibration experiments may also have some effect on some dosimetric systems or on some biological systems. Although it may be difficult to quantify some of these uncertainties, it is extremely important to keep all these uncertain factors in mind when analysing the atomic bomb effects of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In Japan, medical X-ray examination is compulsory in schools, factories and companies. With certain diseases such as tuberculosis and some diseases of the lung and digestive systems extensive X-ray examinations may be conducted and periodically repeated. Survivors with a relatively low dose of high dose rate atomic bomb radiation must also have received some relatively low dose of low dose rate medical X-ray radiation. In other words, they must have received both high dose rate radiation and low dose rate radiation. There is a possibility of non-probabilistic uncertainties involved in estimation of the relative proportion of the two types of radiation and even greater uncertainties would be involved in the estimation of the organ doses. In these uncertainties both randomness and fuzziness may be involved.Under such situation it may be important to consider application of fuzzy theory for the analysis of cause-effect relationships. In exploding an atomic bomb, in addition to ionizing radiation, strong non-ionizing radiations, such as infrared, ultraviolet light, visible light, electromagnetic pulse radiation, as well as heat and shock waves are produced. Therefore, the possibility of the combined effects of all these direct factors and the indirect factors such as those mentioned above must be considered in interpreting the effect of the atomic b

  16. Investigation of circular asymmetry in cancer mortality of Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors are used to investigate, for each city, possible circular asymmetry in cancer mortality around the hypocenter. Using the Cox regression method and controlling for age ATB, sex, followup year, distance from the hypocenter, and type of shielding, it is found that in Hiroshima cancer mortality was significantly higher in the westerly direction from the hypocenter. Mortality from stomach cancer, leukemia, and colon cancer were higher in the westerly direction. In Nagasaki, only lung cancer exhibited circular asymmetry, and was significantly higher in the westerly direction. For various reasons, the results tend to support the possibility of an asymmetry in radiation dose in Hiroshima, but not in Nagasaki. Also, possible asymmetry in nondose variables associated with cancer is suggested in both cities, particularly in variables associated with lung cancer. Indications for future work and implications for future dose-mortality investigations are discussed

  17. Radon concentrations in residential housing in hiroshima and nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of indoor radon (222Rn) concentrations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was carried out to assess the range of exposures expected among atomic-bomb survivors. Two hundred dwellings (100 from each city), chiefly of members of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Life Span Study, were selected for this survey. We used two types of etched-track alpha-particle detectors: a Terradex detector (type SF) and an improved bare-track detector. Comparative measurements showed that although there was an adequate correlation between the values obtained using the two detectors, the geometric mean value for the bare-track detector was 45% lower than that for the Terradex detector. This difference was considered to be due to differences in the calibration methods and in the sensitivities of the detectors to thoron (220Rn). The geometric mean values of the radon concentrations for 193 locations in Hiroshima and 192 locations in Nagasaki measured by Terradex SF detectors were 51.8 Bq/m3 and 26.5 Bq/m3, respectively. The large difference is attributable to the different geological environments of the two cities. Factors correlating with the indoor radon concentrations were also studied. The geometric mean concentration was significantly higher in wooden houses with clay walls than in other types of house. This tendency was especially strong in Hiroshima. The difference between the estimated dose equivalents for exposure to radon decay products in dwellings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki during the last 30 years might amount to 0.8 Sv; however, no statistically significant difference was observed in lung-cancer mortality in the low-dose range in either city. Nevertheless, the indoor radon concentrations estimated in this survey could have a significant influence on the dose-response relationship for atomic-bomb exposure. (author)

  18. Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    Japan is composed of 4 main islands and more than 3900 smaller islands and has 317.7 persons/square kilometer. This makes it one of the most densely populated nations in the world. Religion is an important force in the life of the Japanese and most consider themselves Buddhists. Schooling is free through junior high but 90% of Japanese students complete high school. In fact, Japan enjoys one of the highest literacy rates in the world. There are over 178 newspapers and 3500 magazines published in Japan and the number of new book titles issued each year is greater than that in the US. Since WW1, Japan expanded its influence in Asia and its holdings in the Pacific. However, as a direct result of WW2, Japan lost all of its overseas possessions and was able to retain only its own islands. Since 1952, Japan has been ruled by conservative governments which cooperate closely with the West. Great economic growth has come since the post-treaty period. Japan as a constitutional monarchy operates within the framework of a constitution which became effective in May 1947. Executive power is vested in a cabinet which includes the prime minister and the ministers of state. Japan is one of the most politically stable of the postwar democracies and the Liberal Democratic Party is representative of Japanese moderate conservatism. The economy of Japan is strong and growing. With few resources, there is only 19% of Japanese land suitable for cultivation. Its exports earn only about 19% of the country's gross national product. More than 59 million workers comprise Japan's labor force, 40% of whom are women. Japan and the US are strongly linked trading partners and after Canada, Japan is the largest trading partner of the US. Foreign policy since 1952 has fostered close cooperation with the West and Japan is vitally interested in good relations with its neighbors. Relations with the Soviet Union are not close although Japan is attempting to improve the situation. US policy is based on the following 3 principles: 1) the US views Japan as an equal trade partner, 2) that the relationship is global in scope, and 3) that Japan has become increasingly assertive in world matters and plays a greater international role. The combined efforts of the US and Japan will be utilized to promote world peace. PMID:12177912

  19. Hiroshima-Nagasaki exhibition towards a world of peace opens September 5 at the Vienna International Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document gives information about the Hiroshima-Nagasaki exhibition organized by the two cities together with IAEA, CTBTO and UN Office in Vienna in September 2000 at the Vienna International Centre, with the occasion of the fifty-fifth anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bombs on these cities

  20. Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan occupies a central position in the issue of climatic change. The nation still depends on imported energy for more than 90 percent of its energy supply. This dependency prompted substantial efforts to save energy through the application of advanced technologies. Japan uses only about half as much energy per unit of economic output as the United States. Japan thus represents a special case - a wealthy, low-energy nation with aspirations for greater energy services but a compelling need to conserve. Japan's high efficiency and low rate of services in some sectors make further gains difficult. but if Japan can hold constant or even cut emissions of carbon, there is considerable hope that other, more energy-intensive nations may do more. Total carbon dioxide emissions in Japan were almost constant between 1973 and 1987, averaging about 250 million tons per year. Emissions from oil declined over this period while releases from coal and liquefied natural gas (LNG) increased. Similarly, emissions from buildings and transportation rose. A significant increase of carbon dioxide emissions in 1988, however, indicates that the period of stable carbon dioxide emissions is ending and is expected to be replaced by steady increases. Both energy efficiency improvements, defined as reduced energy requirements per unit of GNP, and a shift to low - or noncarbon fuels appear to be waning

  1. Ophthalmologic changes related to radiation exposure and age in the adult health study sample, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-year ophthalmologic study of age- and radiation-related ophthalmologic lesions among the Adult Health Study (AHS) population of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was conducted at RERF in 1978-80. The study population in both cities was composed of all persons exposed to 100+ rad in the AHS, their controls, and all other persons in the AHS sample with a previous record of axial opacities or posterior subcapsular changes, and the in utero clinical sample. The ophthalmologic examination was conducted on 1,582 persons in Hiroshima and 719 persons in Nagasaki belonging to the AHS sample, and 67 persons in Hiroshima and 17 persons in Nagasaki belonging to the in utero clinical sample. Participation in the study was 42% of the eligible AHS sample in Hiroshima and 21% in Nagasaki, and 24% of the eligible in utero sample in Hiroshima and 26% in Nagasaki. Increased lenticular opacities, other lens changes, and loss of visual acuity and accommodation occurred with increasing age in both exposed and control subjects as manifestations of the normal aging process. A highly significant excess risk for all ages in the 300+ rad group in comparison to those in the control group was observed for both axial opacities and posterior subcapsular changes in Hiroshima, but not in Nagasaki. (J.P.N.)

  2. JAPAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mr. Hughes

    2006-03-04

    DESK Standard: Know the physical, political, and economic features of Japan. . DATES: You can begin this activity on April 16. You should complete it by April 20. OBJECTIVE: During fourth grade, we have learned about the history and physical features of Utah. This activity will allow you to compare what you\\'ve learned about the state of Utah with ...

  3. Late health effects among Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hiroshima-Nagasaki inter city differences in the dose-response are smaller for ORNL than that for T65D, but the risk is still higher for Hiroshima than for Nagasaki. The estimated risk coefficients for gamma rays based on a linear model for both gamma rays and neutrons are larger for ORNL than for T65D for each effect, and the ratios of coefficients (ORNL vs T65D) are in the range of 1.2 to 1.7. As the ORNL neutron dose becomes very small even in Hiroshima, estimates of risk coefficients for ORNL neutrons may not be warranted. However, similar estimates as for gamma rays suggest that the risk coefficients are larger for ORNL than for T65D and ORNL-T65D ratios are in the range of 4 to 6. The estimated relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for neutrons using ORNL dose and the linear model indicate that the RBE values for neutrons are larger for the ORNL dose than that for the T65D dose. (orig./HP)

  4. Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear research in Japan was restarted in 1952 after World War II. The legislation of the Atomic Energy Act in 1955 provided the basis nuclear development of the country. The nuclear engineering course was inaugurated in the Department of Applied Physics of Tokai University in 1956 as the first nuclear engineering department in Japanese Universities. Major organizations like the Science and Technology Agency (STA), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and others started around 1955. The first reactor, JRR-1 went critical in 1957 at JAERI. Since then, various research reactors including general research reactors, educational or training reactors, and test reactors have been constructed. Japan is the only country who has faced the devastating effects of nuclear weapons in World War II. Despite this terrible situation, Japan has embraced the peaceful use of nuclear technology to provide a substantial portion of its electricity. In 1966, its first commercial reactor started operation. Today, the country has 55 power reactors in operation, generating about 30% of the country's total electricity production. Japan plans to increase this to 41% in 2014. Needs for nuclear scientists and engineers are closely related to the national nuclear programmes. The current status of nuclear power generation in Japan has been given above. Following are the main nuclear activities that need a nuclear technical work force in the country: - Safe operation of current nuclear power - Safe operation of current nuclear power plants; - Development of new power and research reactors; - Activities related to front end and back end sectors of fuel cycle; - Nuclear related activities as fusion power development. The public perception plays an important role in attracting talent towards this particular discipline of education. Unfortunately, since the Chernobyl incident, the nuclear community is facing negative public perception regarding the risks of a nuclear accident. Specifically, in Japan, a series of local incidents have been reported in mass media such as; the sodium leak in Monju in December 1995, fire at the asphalt solidification plant in March 1996, invention of inspection data of spent fuel transportation casks in October 1997, criticality accident at JCO in Tokaimura in September 1999. The latest one, the JCO accident, is extremely serious because it seems to suggest at present a deteriorating situation of Japanese technologies. These accidents affected the public perception of nuclear education which reinforced the decreasing trends of nuclear engineering in the universities. According to a CECD report in 2002, in Japan, there has been an imbalance between graduated students and recruitment i.e. the number of students graduated from a nuclear related master's course were almost 300 while the recruitment by nuclear engineering was about 70 every year. In order to prevent nuclear education from a serious downturn, during the 1990s, the government changed its policy for national universities having nuclear engineering departments and restructured nuclear education. Major changes are to emphasize education on a graduate school level. The department for undergraduate education has been renamed at most of the universities. Nuclear engineering departments have disappeared from national universities except for Hokkaido University. Instead, the key words for the new department names are energy, quantum system and science. The key words, nuclear or nuclear energy are retained in the names of the graduate courses. Engineering fundamentals have been emphasized in undergraduate education. Moreover, nuclear engineering was projected as a study to utilize nuclear reactions for the welfare of mankind. Major nuclear reactions are fission and fusion, but dealing with other nuclear reactions is within the category of nuclear engineering. Since April 2004, all national universities have been reformed

  5. Unnecessary Dieting Intention and Behavior among Female Students in Naha City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Khin Zay Yar; Nonaka, Daisuke; Jimba, Masamine; Nanishi, Keiko; Poudel, Krishna Chandra; Yasuoka, Junko; Miyagi, Masaya; Shinjo, Masaki; Kobayashi, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Weight concerns and dieting are prevalent among female adolescents both in Western and Asian countries. They can result in negative psychological and physiological consequences. This study aimed to examine the relative importance of social and personal factors in the decision to diet among female adolescent students in Japan, applying the Theory of Planned Behavior. Data were collected from five junior high schools and three high schools in Naha City, Okinawa Prefecture, in 2010, through self-administered questionnaires. The data of 756 female students were assessed. The independent variables included social factor variables (norms) and personal factor variables (attitude to dieting, perceived behavior control, body esteem, body-figure discrepancy and past dieting). The dependent variables were dieting intention and behavior. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were performed to examine three models: model 1 (age and obesity index), model 2 (social factor variables with age and obesity index) and model 3 (all variables). Although model 2 failed to explain a substantial proportion of the variance, model 3 explained approximately a half of the variance for intention (R(2) = 0.507) and more than one third of the variance for behavior (R(2) = 0.376). Past experience of dieting was the best predictor of both dieting intention and behavior. Body esteem was the second best predictor for dieting behavior. In conclusion, personal factors are more likely than social factors to drive the dieting decision. Diet education programs should consider targeting frequent dieters and those with poor body esteem. PMID:26161031

  6. Sampling of atomic bomb survivors and method of cancer detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of acute deaths in both cities which occurred due to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 until the end of December 1945 is estimated to be between 150,000 - 200,000 and the number of survivors identified by the supplementary schedule of the 1950 National Census is 284,000. From among these survivors, a fixed population, the Life Span Study (LSS) sample, was established and has been followed by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission-the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (ABCC-RERF). In this paper the sampling methods of the fixed population are explained. Also described is the utilization of the tumor and tissue registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the LSS and the Adult Health Study (AHS) for cancer detection among the fixed population. (author)

  7. Sampling of atomic bomb survivors and method of cancer detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of acute deaths in both cities which occurred due to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 until the end of December 1945 is estimated to be between 150,000-200,000 and the number of survivors identified by the supplementary schedule of the 1950 National Census is 284,000. From among these survivors, a fixed population, the Life Span Study (LSS) sample, was established and has been followed by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission-the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (ABCC-RERF). In this paper the sampling methods of the fixed population are explained. Also described is the utilization of the tumor and tissue registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the LSS and the Adult Health Study (AHS) for cancer detection among the fixed population

  8. Circular asymmetry of cancer mortality in Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors are used to investigate, for each city, possible circular asymmetry of cancer mortality around the hypocenter. Using the Cox regression method, and controlling for age at the time of the bomb, sex, follow-up year, distance from hypocenter, and type of shielding, it is found that cancer mortality in Hiroshima was significantly higher in the westerly direction from the hypocenter. Mortality from stomach cancer, leukemia, and colon cancer was higher in the westerly direction. In Nagasaki also cancer mortality, notably lung cancer mortality, was significantly higher in the westerly direction. Discussed are possible sources of the asymmetry, particularly the possibilities of asymmetry of epidemiologic variables and of radiation exposure, and indications for future work. (author)

  9. Out-of hospital cardiac arrest in Okayama city (Japan: outcome report according to the "Utsutein Style".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi,Hoei

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in the city of Okayama, Japan, during a 1-year period after the reorganization of defibrillation by Emergency Life-Saving Technicians (ELSTs with standing orders of CPR. The data were collected prospectively according to an Utstein style between June 1, 2003 and May 31, 2004; OHCA was confirmed in 363 patients. Cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac etiology (179 was witnessed by a bystander in 62 (34.6% cases. Of this group, ventricular fibrillation (VF was documented in 20 cases (32.3%, and 1 patient (5% was discharged alive without severe neurological disability. This outcome is average in Japan, but it is quite low level compared with Western countries because there is less VF in Japan. The Utstein style revealed that we must try to detect VF before the rhythm changes and to provide defibrillation as soon as possible in order to improve outcomes. Further research will be required to accurately evaluate OHCA in Okayama city.

  10. Scholastic intercourse between Shogunal Astronomer Shibukawa Kagesuke and Nagasaki-based astronomer Mine Gensuke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Setsuko

    2004-04-01

    It is important to know how scholastic tradition of Tenmon-kata (Shogunal Astronomical Office) was transferred to local astronomers over the 19th century, since it is likely that modernization of Japan in science and technology after the Meiji-restoration (1868) has its root in the pre-Meiji period. In this report, as a case-study of such line-of-thoughts, I took up a local astronomer Mine Gensuke, from Omura-han (clan) of Nagasaki. Mine, at his age of 25 (1850), came to Edo and learned astronomy for six years under the supervision of Shibukawa Kagesuke, the top-ranking Shogunal astronomer at that time. After returning to Nagasaki, Mine was assigned to be the land-surveyer of Omura-han. In Mine's book-collection preserved at the Nagasaki Municipal Museum, I found several books and notebooks copied and annotated by Mine, whose original author was Shibukawa. Through a research to those materials, I discuss what and how Mine learned from Shibukawa.

  11. Primary liver carcinoma and liver cirrhosis in atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1961-75, with special reference to hepatitis B surface antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1961-75, 128 cases of primary liver carcinoma (PLC) in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation life-span study extended sample and 301 cases of liver cirrhosis in the pathology study sample were observed. The presence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was assessed in all of the cases with the use of orcein and aldehyde fuchsin stains and was confirmed by the immunofluorescence technique. The incidence of PLC was two times higher in Nagasaki than in Hiroshima, which was statistically significant, but little difference was noted in the prevalence of cirrhosis in the two cities. Findings that might possibly explain the higher PLC incidence in Nagasaki were 1) the 2.3 times higher presence in Nagasaki than in Hiroshima of HBsAg in the livers of subjects without liver disease and 2) the two times higher prevalence in Nagasaki than in Hiroshima of cirrhosis with PLC. We believe that the higher incidence of PLC in Nagasaki is attributable to hepatitis B virus infection, although other factors (e.g., immunologic competence affected by radiation) cannot be excluded. In both cities, a suggestive relationship of radiation dose to cirrhosis prevalence, but not to PCL prevalence, was noted. To clarify possible radiation effects on cirrhosis prevalence, further follow-up of the populations of these two cities is necessary

  12. Implications of new Hiroshima and Nagasaki dose estimates: cancer risks and neutron RBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) estimates of the neutron and gamma doses at Hiroshima and Nagasaki were applied to available biomedical data from A-bomb survivors. Dose-response relations for four major endpoints were re-analyzed: radiation-induced leukaemia, breast cancer, total malignancies and chromosome aberrations. The new LLNL doses fitted well with epidemiological observations in Japan, and dose-response relations derived from them gave improved consistency between A-bomb and other radiobiological data. From the results, inferences were drawn regarding risk coefficients for radiation-induced malignancies and, where possible, regarding neutron RBE. (U.K.)

  13. Initial field survey report of the 2011 East Japan Tsunami in Sendai, Natori and Iwanuma Cities

    OpenAIRE

    Sugawara, Daisuke; Goto, Kazuhisa; Chagué-Goff, Catherine; Fujino, Shigehiro; Goff, James; Jaffe, Bruce; Nishimura, Yuichi; Richmond, Bruce; Szczuci?ski, Witold; David R. Tappin; Witter, Rob; Yulianto, Eko

    2011-01-01

    The East Japan Earthquake (Mw 9.0) and associated tsunami struck the Pacific coast of eastern Japan on March 11th, 2011 at 2:46 p.m. (Japan Standard Time). Maximum run-up heights reached about 40 m along the Sanriku region’s coast and around 10 m on the Sendai coastline. The coasts of Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima Prefectures in particular were badly damaged, and a considerable amount of time and money will be required to restore these areas. Tsunami inundation up to 5 km inlan...

  14. Hiroshima and Nagasaki at 65 – A Reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Norimatsu Satoko

    2010-01-01

    On countless occasions this year, sixty-five years after the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, I have heard and read that hibakusha (atomic-bomb survivors) are dying away, and that we need to eliminate nuclear weapons from the face of the earth, for the future of humanity, to be sure, but also so that their dying wishes are fulfilled. Indeed, hibakusha are not getting any younger. The average age of the 227,565 hibakusha who hold atomic-bomb health books as of March 2010 is 76.73. On August 6 ...

  15. Isotope dilution sector-field ICPMS combined with extraction chromatography for rapid determination of Am-241 in soils derived from Nagasaki atomic bomb in 1945

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: On August 9, 1945, a Pu atomic bomb was exploded over Nagasaki, Japan. In contrast to the comprehensive studies on Pu, a great knowledge gap exists on the concentration variation and the mobility of 241Am. We investigated the current status of 241Am and Pu isotope concentrations in surface soils of Nagasaki using isotope dilution sector-field ICPMS. We reconstructed the variation of 241Am in the past 6 decades. We found that 241Am has reached maximum activity in 2008, and 241Am/239+240Pu activity ratio, similar to 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio, was a useful fingerprint for environmental radioactivity study. (author)

  16. Primary liver carcinoma and liver cirrhosis in atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1961-75, with special reference to HBs antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1961-75, 128 cases of primary liver carcinoma (PLC) in the RERF Life Span Study extended sample and 301 cases of liver cirrhosis in the RERF Pathology Study sample were observed. All cases were assessed for hepatitis B surface antigen (HB sub(s) Ag) using orcein and aldehyde fuchsin staining. The incidence of PLC was 2.0 times higher in Nagasaki than in Hiroshima which was statistically significant, but the prevalence of liver cirrhosis showed hardly any difference between the two cities. Meaningful findings that may possibly explain the higher incidence of PLC in Nagasaki were that the presence of HB sub(s) Ag in the liver of patients without overt liver disease was 2.3 times higher in Nagasaki than in Hiroshima, and the prevalence of liver cirrhosis associated with PLC, especially that of posthepatitic cirrhosis with PLC, was almost 2.0 times higher in Nagasaki than in Hiroshima. In both cities a suggestive relationship of radiation dose with the prevalence of liver cirrhosis was noted but not with PLC. We believe that the higher incidence of PLC in Nagasaki is attributable to HB virus infection, though other factors, such as immunological competence affected by radiation, cannot be excluded. (author)

  17. Reevaluation of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dosimetry system currently used in analyzing the Hiroshima-Nagasaki data was developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their T65 system was called into question following a new study of the incidence of leukemia in the two cities. H.H. Rossi and C.W. Mays concluded that a worker continually exposed to neutrons at the maximum permissible level recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) stood a chance of developing leukemia that was several times higher than for the average unexposed person. Rossi and Mays recommended the NCRP reduce its permissible doses for neutrons by an order of magnitude. One of the reponses of the NCRP to this recommendation was to set up a Task Group on Atomic-Bomb Dosimetry, under the chairmanship of H.O. Wyckoff, to review the dosimetry for the data that had led to the Rossi-Mays conclusion. This paper reviews the work of this task group which has been divided into 5 areas: bomb spectra, fireball gamma rays, radiation transport, buildings, and depth dose

  18. Imported dengue fever/dengue hemorrhagic fever cases in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2011-01-01

    Several dengue outbreaks occurred in Japan from 1942 to 1945. Dengue fever emerged in Nagasaki in August 1942 and soon spread to other cities such as Sasebo, Hiroshima, Kobe and Osaka, recurring every summer until 1945 and constituting the greatest outbreak in the temperate zone. Domestic outbreaks have not been reported in Japan since then. However, the number of imported dengue cases has increased year by year: 868 imported cases were reported in Japan between 1999 and 2010 according to the Infectious Diseases Control Law. Moreover, 406 imported cases were confirmed to be dengue virus infection among 768 dengue suspected cases received at NIID from 2003 to 2010. A total of 142 cases (35.6%), 103 cases (25.8%) and 62 cases (15.5%) were noted in the 20–29, 30–39 and 40–49 age groups, respectively. Infecting dengue virus serotypes were determined for 280 of the 406 cases. The number of cases infected with each of the 4 serotypes was 98 (35%) with type 1, 78 (28%) with type 3, 72 (26%) with type 2, and 32 (11%) with type 4. Sixty percent of dengue cases were imported from July to October, the summer vacation season in Japan. PMID:22500132

  19. Whole-blood phagocytic and bactericidal activities of atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This in vitro study evaluated the phagocytic and bactericidal activities of leukocytes in aliquots of whole blood from Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors for Staphylococcus aureus. The data were analyzed by multiple linear regression. Any significant effects of exposure to A-bomb radiation could not be detected for both phagocytic and bactericidal activities of whole blood from A-bomb survivors. In addition, there were no significant effects of age categories, sex or city, except in neutrophil counts. (J.P.N.)

  20. The Japan Conference on English for Specific Purposes Proceedings (Aizuwakamatsu City, Fukushima, November 8, 1997).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Thomas, Ed.

    The 13 papers archived here represent a sampling of the 23 presentations approved for the Japan Conference on English for Specific Purposes (ESP): "An Overview of ESP in the 1990s" (Tony Dudley-Evans); "'Easifying' ESP Texts for EFL Science Majors" (Judy Noguchi); "From Non-Communicative Exercises to Technical Writing: Profile of a Two-Semester…

  1. Mortality of atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed the risk in 2,743 atomic bomb survivors by using a new dosimetry system. From the database, we selected 2,743 exposed persons and a total of three times 2,743 age-matched controls who were living far from the center of the A-bomb radiation in Nagasaki at the time of the explosion and who were still alive in 1971. The mortalities from all causes for male subjects exposed were slightly lower than, or almost equal to, those of unexposed persons. Death from cancer, however, increased in both sexes after all levels of irradiation except in males exposed to 0.01-0.49 Gy. In males, the risk was showed significant reduction in death from all diseases other than cancer classified according to 0.31-0.40 Gy. (author)

  2. Mortality of atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mine, Mariko; Honda, Sumihisa; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yokota, Kenichi; Tomonaga, Masao; Okumura, Yutaka [Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    We analyzed the risk in 2,743 atomic bomb survivors by using a new dosimetry system. From the database, we selected 2,743 exposed persons and a total of three times 2,743 age-matched controls who were living far from the center of the A-bomb radiation in Nagasaki at the time of the explosion and who were still alive in 1971. The mortalities from all causes for male subjects exposed were slightly lower than, or almost equal to, those of unexposed persons. Death from cancer, however, increased in both sexes after all levels of irradiation except in males exposed to 0.01-0.49 Gy. In males, the risk was showed significant reduction in death from all diseases other than cancer classified according to 0.31-0.40 Gy. (author)

  3. Distribution of 90Sr in the tree rings of a Japanese cedar exposed to the black rain from the Nagasaki atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cedar sample was collected at the black rain area in Nagasaki city. A clear peak of 90Sr/Sr was observed in the 1924-1925 rings. To investigate the mobility of Sr in a cedar tree stem, strontium chloride solution was injected into a living tree, and the distribution profiles of Sr in the stem at 8 months later were determined. The strontium moves radially through the sapwood of a cedar stem but that it almost stops at the heartwood. It was concluded that the peak in the 1924-1925 rings was due to the black rain from the Nagasaki atomic bomb. (author)

  4. The Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki Historical Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Griffith

    Documents about the atomic boming of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. There are two sets of documents and reports. The first covers before the bombing and includes the scienctists petitions to prevent the bombing, the bombing order, and the Potsdam Declaration. The second covers the aftermath of the bombings. These documents include: White House Press Release on Hiroshima, Eyewitness Account of Atomic Bomb Over Nagasaki, Eyewitness Account of Hiroshima By Father John A. Siemes, and Truman's Reflections on the Atomic Bombings.

  5. [Development of modern medical doctors in Japan from late Edo to early Meiji].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, OckJoo; Takuya, Miyagawa

    2011-12-31

    Western medicine began to be introduced to Japan since late 16th century. Japanese encounter with Western medicine centered on Dejima in Nagasaki in the seventeenth and eighteenth century and the initial process of introduction was gradual and slow. In the mid-nineteenth century, facing threats from Western countries, Tokugawa bakufu asked Dutch naval surgeon, J. L. C. Pompe van Meerdervoort to teach western medicine at the Kaigun Denshujo naval academy in Nagasaki. The government also supported the western medical school in Edo. This paper deals with how modern western medical doctors were developed in Japan from late Edo to early Meiji. The publication of the New Text on Anatomy in 1774 translated by Sugita Genpaku and his colleagues stimulated Japanese doctors and scholars to study western medicine, called Rangaku. During the Edo period, western medicine spread into major cities and countryside in Japan through Rangaku doctors. In 1838, for example, Dr. Ogata Koan established the Rangaku school named Tekijuku and educated many people with western medicine. When smallpox vaccination was introduced in Japan in 1849, Rangaku doctors played an important role in practiving the vaccination in cities and in countryside. After the Edo bakufu and the feudal lords of han(han) actively pursued to introduce western medicine to their hans by sending their Samurai to Edo or Nagasaki or abroad and by establishing medical schools and hospitals until their abolition in 1871. In late Edo and early Meiii military doctors were the main focus of training to meet the urgent need of military doctors in the battle fields of civil wars. The new Meiji government initiated a series of top-down reformations concerning army recruitment, national school system, public health and medical system. In 1874, the government introduced a law on medicine to adopt western medicine only and to launch a national licence system for medical doctors. Issuing supplementary regulations in the following years, the Meiji government settled down a dual-track medical licensing system: one for the graduates from medical schools with certain quality and the other for the graduate from less qualified schools who should take the licensing examination. PMID:22343704

  6. Medical and dental radiological trends in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yearly trends in radiologic practice in Japan were estimated on the basis of annual dampling surveys of medical and dental examinations and treatments covered by Government-Managed Health Insurance, modified by (1) the ratio of all insurance-covered medical care to that covered by this insurance, and (2) the ratio of insured plus privately purchased medical care to insured medical care alone. All radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations, x-ray films consumed, radiation treatments, and dental x-ray examinations, increased during the 10 years prior to this study. In 1970, numbers of examinations or treatments per capita were 1.2 for radiography, 0.1 for fluoroscopy, 0.06 for radiation treatments, and 0.3 for dental radiography, respectively. The dental radiography data were interpolated to Hiroshima and Nagasaki Cities and compared with those submitted by institutions in both cities in October 1970. The Reports of Annual Medical Care Survey, the Fund Office's Annual Reports, and the Annual Reports of the National Health Insurance were main sources for this estimate and provided more than 90% of the necessary information. (auth.)

  7. Hospital and clinic survey estimates of medical x-ray exposures in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All large hospitals and 40% of the small hospitals and clinics in Hiroshima and Nagasaki cities were surveyed for the X-ray examinations they performed during a 2-week period in 1974. The frequency and type of X-ray examinations received by members of the RERF Adult Health Study (AHS) and the RERF Life Span Study (LSS) extended, excluding AHS (Non-AHS), were compared with the general population in each city. Radiologic exposures of patients at hospitals and clinics were most frequent among the general populations. The number of patients, examinations, and exposures per caput per year in each population were estimated. Since the age distribution differed among the three populations, comparisons were made only after correcting for age. On a per caput per year basis exposure frequency was relatively high in the AHS and low in the general populations, a reflection of the greater number of patients in the AHS than in the general populations. Non-AHS males in Nagasaki had a higher X-ray examination rate than did the AHS subjects. The others in the Non-AHS did not differ appreciably from the general populations. There was no difference among these groups according to body sites examined. (author)

  8. Neutrons confirmed in Nagasaki and at the Army pulsed radiation Facility: Implications for Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent reports have clearly demonstrated that large discrepancies exist between neutron activation measured in Hiroshima and activation calculated using the current dosimetry system DS86. The reports confirmed previous results for cobalt activation in Hiroshoma that suggested problems, and this has spurred a joint U.S.-Japan effort to identify the source(s) of this discrepancy. Here, new results are presented that appear to eliminate both the measurements of neutron activation and the DS86 air-transport calculations are potential sources of the discrepancy in Hiroshima. Computer transport of DS86 fission neutrons through large distances of air was validated using concrete samples from Nagasaki and chloride detectors placed at selected distances from a bare uranium reactor. In both cases accelerator mass spectrometry was used to measure thermal neutron activation via the reaction. 35Cl(n, ?)36Cl (half-life, 301,000 years). Good agreement was observed between measurements of neutron activation and DS86 calculations for Nagasaki, as well as for the reactor experiment. Thus the large discrepancy observed in Hiroshima appears not to be due to uncertainties in air-transport calculations or in the activation measurements; rather, the discrepancy appears to be due to uncertainties associated with the Hiroshima bomb itself. 15 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs

  9. Medical response to the Great East Japan Earthquake in Ishinomaki City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Ishii

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Problem: The Ishinomaki Red Cross Hospital is the only designated disaster hospital in the Ishinomaki Medical Zone, Japan that was undamaged from the Great East Japan Earthquake in March 2011. The tsunami completely destroyed a large part of the Ishinomaki Medical Zone.Context: The Ishinomaki Red Cross Hospital was designed with the capability to respond to disasters. An instruction manual for responding to disasters had been developed and was exercised through drills. Action: In accordance with the manual, the hospital disaster task force was established. The Ishinomaki Zone Joint Relief Team coordinated medical support from organizations such as physicians associations, dental associations, self-defence forces medical teams, pharmacists associations, the Japanese Red Cross and relief teams from hospitals all over the country. In three days, the joint relief team directly visited all emergency shelters to make an initial assessment and to collect information about the number and state of health of evacuees, provision of food and drinking water and the availability of electricity, water and sewerage. Outcome: Initial assessment revealed that 35 emergency shelters lacked a sufficient food supply and that 100 shelters had unsanitary conditions. The joint relief team provided the Miyagi Prefecture government and the Ishinomaki municipal government with information about emergency shelters that did not have a sufficient food supply. As of 30 September, the activities of the joint relief teams were completed, and there was no outbreak of communicable diseases in the Ishinomaki Medical Zone. A total of 328 shelters with 46 480 evacuees were managed by the Ishinomaki Zone Joint Relief Team.Discussion: Advanced preparation to quickly establish an initial response system, expertise, and decision-making ability and the ability to get things done are required for disaster response management.

  10. Kioto, la antigua capital del Japón y el modelo chino de la ciudad ideal / Kyoto, the ancient capital of Japan and the Chinese model of the ideal city

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Olimpia, Niglio.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available La ciudad de Kioto fue fundada en el año 794 cuando el emperador Kanmu decidió construir la nueva capital del Japón y abandonar la ciudad de Nara. Esta contribución recorre la historia de la fundación de Kioto en relación con los principios ideales de la ciudad china. Este modelo de cuadricula const [...] ituyó por algunos siglos una referencia cultural importante para la construcción de nuevas ciudades en Japón. Hoy la ciudad de Kioto conserva la antigua estructura urbana reticular y esta contribución tiene como finalidad proponer una reflexión sobre la influencia de la cultura china en Japón desde el 550 d.C. (período Kofun) y evaluar el desarollo de esta cultura en el tiempo y su presencia actual en la forma urbana y en su arquitectura, sobre todo religiosa. El modelo ideal de la ciudad china después de 1200 años desde la fundación de Kioto se conserva y constituye una referencia fundamental para el desarrollo de la ciudad contemporánea en estrecha relación con el paisaje. Abstract in english The city of Kyoto was founded in 794 when Emperor Kanmu decided to build a new capital of Japan and to leave the city of Nara. This paper traces the history of the foundation of Kyoto in relation to the normative principles of the Chinese city. For centuries, this urban model, with orthogonal axes, [...] had constituted a major cultural reference for the construction of new cities in Japan. Today, the city of Kyoto preserves the old urban orthogonal structure and this contribution aims to propose a reflection on the influence of Chinese culture in Japan since 550 AD (Kofun period) and to consider the development of this culture over time and its current presence in urban form; especially religious architecture. The ideal model of the Chinese city, after 1200 years since the foundation of Kyoto, is preserved and constitutes a fundamental reference for the development of the contemporary city in strict relationship with the landscape.

  11. Hiroshima-Remembered.com: Documents about the Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Griffith

    Documents about the atomic boming of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These include: Potsdam Declaration, White House Press Release on Hiroshima, an Eyewitness Account of Atomic Bomb Over Nagasaki, Eyewitness Account of Hiroshima By Father John A. Siemes, The Voice of Hibakusha, The Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by The Manhattan Engineer District, The Yields of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Nuclear Explosions , On My Participation In The Atom Bomb Project - Albert Einstein, and Truman's Reflections on the Atomic Bombings.

  12. Histological review of breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A group of pathologists from the United States and Japan reviewed breast cancer material of women exposed to the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and controls. The purpose of the review was to verify the diagnoses, establish a base of confirmed cases for epidemiologic study, and provide a reference for other pathology review. Compared to the control group, matched through the Life Span Study extended sample, there were no differences in distribution of tumor type and tumor size. There were also no differences in histological type by age or radiation dose. The peak age for cancer to develop was the same in the exposed and control groups. The type of radiation had no effect on histological type. Atypical changes or residual proliferative lesions were not found in women exposed to radiation but free from cancer. On the basis of this study, it was concluded that radiogenic breast cancer does not differ histologically from spontaneously occurring cancer in Japanese women. (author)

  13. Tables of standardized mortality ratio for cancer in cities, towns and villages in Japan (1973-1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains tables of standardized mortality ratio(SMR) for cancer in cities, towns and villages in Japan. A survey is made only on several kinds of cancer which has (or possibly has) a relation to radiation, such as all malignant neoplasms, leukemia, acute non-lymphocytic leukemia, malignant lymphoma, non-hodgkin lymphoma(NHL), multiple myeloma, and malignant neoplasms of the lung and the thyroid. It is conducted by sex and by time period not only on all age group but also on age group from 0 to 24 (except malignant neoplasms of the lung and the thyroid) because raise of leukemia onset rate of the younger generation in peripheral area of reprocessing facilities becomes a problem. The term of survey is from 1973 to 1987 and divided into the whole term and every five years on available statistical data of dynamic population. SMR is calculated on each term by sex and municipalities. The results are shown on the tables. This report consists of 7 volumes. The volume No. 1 contains tables of SMR for all malignant neoplasms. (J.P.N.)

  14. Tables of standardized mortality ratio for cancer in cities, towns and villages in Japan (1973-1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains tables of standardized mortality ratio(SMR) for cancer in cities, towns and villages in Japan. A survey is made only on several kinds of cancer which has (or possibly has) a relation to radiation, such as all malignant neoplasms, leukemia, acute non-lymphocytic leukemia, malignant lymphoma, non-hodgkin lymphoma(NHL), multiple myeloma, and malignant neoplasms of the lung and the thyroid. It is conducted by sex and by time period not only on all age group but also on age group from 0 to 24 (except malignant neoplasms of the lung and the thyroid) because raise of leukemia onset rate of the younger generation in peripheral area of reprocessing facilities becomes a problem. The term of survey is from 1973 to 1987 and divided into the whole term and every five years on available statistical data of dynamic population. SMR is calculated on each term by sex and municipalities. The results are shown on the tables. This report consists of 7 volumes. The volume No.2 contains tables of SMR for leukemia. (J.P.N.)

  15. Tables of standardized mortality ratio for cancer in cities, towns and villages in Japan (1973-1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains tables of standardized mortality ratio(SMR) for cancer in cities, towns and villages in Japan. A survey is made only on several kinds of cancer which has (or possibly has) a relation to radiation, such as all malignant neoplasms, leukemia, acute non-lymphocytic leukemia, malignant lymphoma, non-hodgkin lymphoma(NHL), multiple myeloma, and malignant neoplasms of the lung and the thyroid. It is conducted by sex and by time period not only on all age group but also on age group from 0 to 24 (except malignant neoplasms of the lung and the thyroid) because raise of leukemia onset rate of the younger generation in peripheral area of reprocessing facilities becomes a problem. The term of survey is from 1973 to 1987 and divided into the whole term and every five years on available statistical data of dynamic population. SMR is calculated on each term by sex and municipalities. The results are shown on the tables. This report consists of 7 volumes. The volume No.7 contains tables of SMR for malignant neoplasms of the lung and the thyroid. (J.P.N.)

  16. Effect Analysis on the Radiation Dose Rate of Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Survivors by Atmospheric Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02) had been established to evaluate the radiation doses for the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The radiation effects of neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from the atomic bombs detonated at both cities were analyzed, and two types of radiation transport codes (i.e., MCNP4C and DORT) were employed in their studies. It was specifically investigated for contribution of each type of radiations to total dose. However, it is insufficient to examine the effects by various environmental factors such as weather conditions, because their calculations were only performed under certain condition at the times of the bombings. In addition, the scope of them does not include acute radiation injury of the atomic bomb survivors in spite of important information for investigating hazard of unexpected radiation accident. Therefore, this study analyzed the contribution of primary and secondary effects (i.e., skyshine and groundshine) of neutrons emitted from the Nagasaki atomic bomb. These analyses were performed through a series of radiation transport calculations by using MCNPX 2.6.0 code with variations of atmospheric density. The acute radiation injury by prompt neutrons was also evaluated as a function of distance from the hypocenter, where hypocenter is the point on the ground directly beneath the epicenter which is the burst point of the bomb in air

  17. Estimation of neutron fluence of Nagasaki atomic bomb by 152Eu activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity of 152Eu in stones and rocks around the hypocenter in Nagasaki city was counted, and influences of atomic bomb neutrons were estimated. Stones and rocks were gathered in the area within 790 m in radius from the hypocenter. As the amount of generated 152Eu depends on the existence rate of Eu in rocks and stones, the amount of Eu was determined. Stones were cut in 5 cm in thickness from the surface, and the distribution of 152Eu at 30 cm in depth of stones was also investigated. The amount of Eu contained in 26 stones was 1.06 ppm on an average, and the standard deviation was 0.48 ppm. Radioactivity of 152Eu in stones was calculated into specific radioactivity of Eu/mg. The result showed that the distribution of specific radioactivity of 152Eu in exposed stones was the maximum around the surface of stones, and it decreased according to the depth from the surface of stones. Specific radioactivity of 152Eu decreased according to the distance from the hypocenter. Relaxation length where specific radioactivity of 152Eu decreased to 1/e was 239 m, and it was consistent in the range in errors with the reported value of relaxation length where absorbed dose of neutrons of atomic bomb in Nagasaki decreased to 1/e. (Tsunoda, M.)

  18. Effect Analysis on the Radiation Dose Rate of Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Survivors by Atmospheric Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ji Sun; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Chang Ho [Innovative Technology Center for Radiation Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Heon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02) had been established to evaluate the radiation doses for the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The radiation effects of neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from the atomic bombs detonated at both cities were analyzed, and two types of radiation transport codes (i.e., MCNP4C and DORT) were employed in their studies. It was specifically investigated for contribution of each type of radiations to total dose. However, it is insufficient to examine the effects by various environmental factors such as weather conditions, because their calculations were only performed under certain condition at the times of the bombings. In addition, the scope of them does not include acute radiation injury of the atomic bomb survivors in spite of important information for investigating hazard of unexpected radiation accident. Therefore, this study analyzed the contribution of primary and secondary effects (i.e., skyshine and groundshine) of neutrons emitted from the Nagasaki atomic bomb. These analyses were performed through a series of radiation transport calculations by using MCNPX 2.6.0 code with variations of atmospheric density. The acute radiation injury by prompt neutrons was also evaluated as a function of distance from the hypocenter, where hypocenter is the point on the ground directly beneath the epicenter which is the burst point of the bomb in air

  19. The delayed effects of radiation exposure among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1945-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important radiation-induced late medical effect in the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been the increased occurrence of certain neoplasms, specifically, leukemia and cancers of the thyroid, lung, and breast. Other definite radiation-related effects include an increase in posterior lenticular opacities, chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes, and some abnormalities of growth and development following irradiation while in utero or during childhood. Moderate to fairly strong associations between A-bomb exposure and the increased occurrence of stomach cancer, multiple myeloma, and several other types of cancer have been observed. Radiation relationships also are suggestive for alterations of certain aspects of immune mechanisms and the increased occurrence of myelofibrosis. No increase in genetic effects has been demonstrated in the children born of exposed parents, and studies to data have been negative for evidence of increased infertility, accelerated aging, or increased mortality from diseases other than cancer. In general, the radiation dose-response relationships for most positive effects have been higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki, and the shape of the dose-response curves for certain effects is different in the two cities. These differences may be related to differences in the quality of the radiation from the two A-bombs. For several radiation-related effects the latent period following exposure is shorter and the incidence rate is higher in personse exposed when young as compared to exposure later in life. (author)

  20. Radiation-Driven Migration: The Case of Minamisoma City, Fukushima, Japan, after the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The emigration of residents following the Fukushima nuclear accident has resulted in aging and depopulation problems in radiation-contaminated areas. The recovery of affected areas, and even those areas with low radioactive pollution levels, is still heavily affected by this problem. This slow recovery consequently affects immigration patterns. This review aims to present possible factors that have contributed to this dilemma. We first present an overview of the evacuation protocol that was administered in the study area following the Fukushima accident. We then analyze characteristics of the subsequent exodus by comparing population data for both before and after the accident. Based on the findings of existing literature, we identify three causes of emigration: (1 The health risks of living in a low radiation zone are still unknown; (2 The post-disaster psychological disturbance and distrust of government information promotes the emigration of evacuees; (3 an absence of economic vitality and of a leading industry renders the area less attractive to individuals residing outside of the city. Further research is needed on this issue, especially with respect to countermeasures for addressing this problem.

  1. Radiation-driven migration: the case of Minamisoma City, Fukushima, Japan, after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Yan, Wanglin; Oba, Akihiro; Zhang, Wei

    2014-09-01

    The emigration of residents following the Fukushima nuclear accident has resulted in aging and depopulation problems in radiation-contaminated areas. The recovery of affected areas, and even those areas with low radioactive pollution levels, is still heavily affected by this problem. This slow recovery consequently affects immigration patterns. This review aims to present possible factors that have contributed to this dilemma. We first present an overview of the evacuation protocol that was administered in the study area following the Fukushima accident. We then analyze characteristics of the subsequent exodus by comparing population data for both before and after the accident. Based on the findings of existing literature, we identify three causes of emigration: (1) The health risks of living in a low radiation zone are still unknown; (2) The post-disaster psychological disturbance and distrust of government information promotes the emigration of evacuees; (3) an absence of economic vitality and of a leading industry renders the area less attractive to individuals residing outside of the city. Further research is needed on this issue, especially with respect to countermeasures for addressing this problem. PMID:25207491

  2. Inventory of ABCC-RERF autopsies Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1948-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the fourth inventory of ABCC-RERF autopsies which covers those performed from 1948-80 (the other three inventories). For general information the introduction of the third inventory (1948-70) is included with some modification, and deaths and autopsy rates for 1971-80 are added. ABCC-RERF performed 10,096 autopsies (6,555 in Hiroshima and 3,541 in Nagasaki) from 1948 to 1980. Protocols, tissues, sections, smears, etc., assembled by the collaborating institutions were examined by members of the ABCC Department of Pathology who completed ABCC records for each case. Copies of all protocols, gross tissues, and histological sections were placed in a designated repository in the Medical School of each city where they are available to all qualified and interested investigators. (J.P.N.)

  3. Breast cancer among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-69

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pathological features of 161 cases of breast cancer --7% noninfiltrating carcinoma, 47% nonspecific infiltrating duct carcinoma, 21% nonfiltrating papillary duct carcinoma, 7% comedo carcinoma, 6% medullary carcinoma, 6% colloid carcinoma, 4% lobular carcinoma, and 2% sarcoma-- were investigated and their relation to irradiation dosage due to the atomic bomb was studied. Irradiation dosage was estimated from T65 dosage, the total dosage of ?-rays and neutrons in unshielded tissue. However, there was no relation between the dosage and any specific tissue type. Breast cancers were classified as either type I, type II, or type III according to the histological grade, and each grade was divided according to the degree of differentiation, multiplicity, and mitiotic activity. The pathological characteristics, lymphatic infiltration, fibrosis, necrosis, localization, calcification, and vascular, perineurial, muscular, and dermal invasion were investigated in each case. The histological grade and the incidence of localized invasion, necrosis, localization, and calcification were lower in the patients who were irradiated with more than 50 rad than in those who were not irradiated. The absolute risk rate for breast cancer was estimated to increase by 1.9 cases/100,000 rad from 1950 to 1969. This increase was much smaller than that estimated from x-ray irradiation during medical treatment in North America. The dose response curves at Hiroshima and Nagasaki were similar and Hiroshima and Nagasaki were similar and fitted well with a linear model, suggesting that the effect of ?-rays was analogous to that of neutrons in inducing cancer. The problems involved in the histological classification of breast cancer and the histological differences between cancer patients in Japan and in the U.S.A. were discussed. (Nakanishi, T.)

  4. Prevalence and Genetic Properties of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Definitive Phage Type 104 Isolated from Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus House Rats in Yokohama City, Japan? †

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Eiji; Maruyama, Soichi; Kabeya, Hidenori; Hara, Siro; Sata, Shin; Kuroki, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2007-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was isolated from the intestinal contents of Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus house rats captured at two buildings, designated buildings J and YS, in Yokohama City, Japan. From October 1997 to September 1998, 52 of 339 (15.3%) house rats were found to carry Salmonella serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 (DT104). In building J, 26 of 161 (16.1%) house rats carried DT104 over the 1-year study period, compared to 26 of 178 (14.6%) rats in buil...

  5. Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part I: Use of the tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for incidence studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 30 years ago, population-based tumor registries were established in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This report, the first of a series of papers on cancer incidence, describes methodological aspects of the tumor registries and discusses issues of data quality in the context of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, the major atomic bomb survivor population. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are characterized by active case ascertainment based on abstraction of medical records at area hospitals, augmented by tissue registries operational in the area and a number of clinical and pathological programs undertaken over the years among the atomic bomb survivors. Using conventional measures of quality, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries have a death certificate-only (DCO) rate of less than 9%, a mortality/incidence (M/I) ratio of about 50%, and a histological verification (HV) rate in excess of 70%, which place these registries among the best in Japan and comparable to many established registries worldwide. All tumor registry data pertaining to the LSS population were assembled, reviewed and handled with special attention given to the quality and uniformity of data based on standardized procedures. Special studies and monitoring programs were also introduced to evaluate the quality of the tumor incidence data in the LSS. Analyses were performed to examine the quality of incidence data overall and across various substrata used for risk assessment such as agstrata used for risk assessment such as age, time and radiation dose groups. No significant associations were found between radiation dose and data quality as measured by various indices. These findings warrant the use of the present tumor registry-based data for studies of cancer incidence in the atomic bomb survivors. 41 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs

  6. Mosquito biosurveillance on Kyushu Island, Japan, with emphasis on Anopheles Hyrcanus Group and related species (Diptera: culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Leopoldo M; Pagac, Benedict; Iwakami, Masashiro; Spring, Alexandra R; Motoki, Mayasa T; Pecor, James E; Higa, Yukiko; Futami, Kyoko; Imanishi, Nozomi; Long, Lewis S; Debboun, Mustapha

    2014-01-01

    This report includes the distribution records of the Anopheles (Anopheles) Hyrcanus Group and associated species in Kyushu Island, Japan, based on our field collections from various localities of 4 prefectures (Fukuoka, Kumamoto, Nagasaki, Saga), primarily from 2002-2013. The status of common and potential mosquito vectors, particularly Anopheles species, in Japan are noted. PMID:25074597

  7. Japan Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Japan Society was founded in New York City in 1907 by a group of businesspeople who were intimately interested in promoting relations between the United States and Japan. While the Society experienced a downturn in activities during World War II, the postwar period saw the Society come under the direction of John D. Rockefeller III, who was able to vastly expand its programs. Currently, the Society offers a number of programs, including programs for K-12 educators, a language center, a global affairs lecture and seminar series, and exhibitions in its gallery. One particularly nice resource is the mini-site, "Journey Through Japan", which may be found in the education section. This part of the site is designed specifically for educators, and includes background readings, lesson plans, maps, an interactive timeline and a photo gallery. Additionally, visitors can sign up to receive a number of specialized electronic newsletters sent out by the Society.

  8. Multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-76: relationship to radiation dose absorbed by marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between atomic bomb exposure and the incidence of multiple myeloma has been examined in a fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors and controls in the life-span study sample for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. From October 1950 to December 1976, 29 cases of multiple myeloma were confirmed in this sample. Our analysis shows that the standardized relative risk (RR) adjusted for city, sex, and age at the time of bombings (ATB) increased with marrow-absorbed radiation dose. The increased RR does not appear to differ between cities or sexes and is demonstrable only for those survivors whose age ATB was between 20 and 59 years. The estimated risk in these individuals is approximately 0.48 cases/million person-years/rad for bone marrow total dose. This excess risk did not become apparent in individuals receiving 50 rad or more in marrow total dose until 20 years or more after exposure

  9. Multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-76: relationship to radiation dose absorbed by marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between atomic bomb exposure and the incidence of multiple myeloma has been examined in a fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors and controls in the life-span study sample for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. From October 1950 to December 1976, 29 cases of multiple myeloma were confirmed in this sample. Our analysis shows that the standardized relative risk (RR) adjusted for city, sex, and age at the time of bombings (ATB) increased with marrow-absorbed radiation dose. The increased RR does not appear to differ between cities or sexes and is demonstrable only for those survivors whose age ATB was between 20 and 59 years. The estimaged risk in these individuals is approximately 0.48 cases/million person-years/rad for bone marrow total dose. This excess risk did not become apparent in individuals receiving 50 rad or more in marrow total dose until 20 years or more after exposure

  10. Sensitivity/uncertainty analysis for free-in-air tissue kerma due to initial radiation at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncertainty estimates and cross correlations by range/survivor have been calculated for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki free-in-air (FIA) tissue kerma obtained from two-dimensional air/ground transport calculations. The uncertainties due to modeling parameter and basic nuclear transport data uncertainties were calculated for 700-, 1000-, and 1500-m ground ranges. Only the FIA tissue kerma due to initial radiation was treated in the analysis; the uncertainties associated with terrain and building shielding and phantom attenuation were not considered in this study. Uncertainties of --20% were obtained for the prompt neutron and secondary gamma kerma and 30% for the prompt gamma kerma at both cities. The uncertainties on the total prompt kerma at Hiroshima and Nagasaki are --18 and 15%, respectively. The estimated uncertainties vary only slightly by ground range and are fairly highly correlated. The total prompt kerma uncertainties are dominated by the secondary gamma uncertainties, which in turn are dominated by the modeling parameter uncertainties, particularly those associated with the weapon yield and radiation sources

  11. Pu isotopes, 241Am and 137Cs in soils from the atomic bombed areas in Nagasaki and Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium Isotopes, 241Am and 137Cs in soil samples collected from Nagasaki and Hiroshima were measured to evaluate the contribution of residual radioactivity derived from the atomic bombs dropped in 1945. In the soils from Nishiyama area of Nagasaki City, activity ratios different from those of global fallout were found for the 238Pu/sup(239, 240)Pu (0.05-0.06), sup(239, 240)Pu/137Cs (0.2-0.3), 241Am/sup(239, 240)Pu (0.04-0.05) and 240Pu/239Pu (0.08-0.13), activity ratios indicating that a fair amount of plutonium derived from the atomic bomb had accumulated in this area. On the other hand, in the soils from the ''Black-rain'' area of Hiroshima, no significant difference from the global fallout was found for the activity ratios among the Pu isotopes, 241Am and 137Cs except for the soils collected at 10 km and 12 km in the NNW direction from the epicenter, where a factor 2 to 3 lower 241Am/sup(239, 240)Pu activity ratio was observed. However, no evidence of the contribution of the atomic bomb was found by the measurement of 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratio. (author)

  12. Cancer risks and neutron RBE's from Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new radiation dose estimates for Hiroshima and Nagasaki are here combined with epidemiologic data from the A-bomb survivors and examined radiobiologically for compatability with other human and experimental data. The new doses show certain improvements over the original T65 doses. However, they suggest for chronic granulocytic leukemia, total malignancies, and chromosome aberrations, at neutron doses of 1 rad, RBEs in excess of 100, higher than expected from other findings. This and other indications suggest that either there are unrecognized systematic problems with the various radiobiological data, or the new doses are deficient in neutrons for Hiroshima, by a factor of about five. If in fact there were actually some 5-fold more dose from neutrons at Hiroshima than estimated by the new calculations, the RBEs would agree well with laboratory results, and other inconsistencies would largely disappear. Cancer risks are estimated for neutrons from the new doses and are compared with those estimated from radiobiologically reconciled doses (the new doses adjusted by adding approximately 5-fold more neutrons). The latter estimates appear more reasonable. For low-LET radiation, cancer risk estimates are altered very little by the new dose estimates for Nagasaki

  13. Radiation therapy among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the continuing evaluations of atomic bomb survivors for late radiation effects, not only doses from the A-bombs but those from other radiation sources must be considered, for the latter may be concomitantly acting factors causing bias among these investigations. In the present study, among 73 Hiroshima and 22 Nagasaki Adult Health Study (AHS) subjects who reported receiving radiation therapy, from 1970 through 1979, the medical records of 72 and 20, respectively, were reviewed, and 41 Hiroshima and 14 Nagasaki subjects were confirmed to have received radiation therapy. The data obtained in the present study were pooled with those of the previous investigation on radiation therapy exposures of AHS subjects prior to 1970. A total of 190 subjects have been documented as receiving radiation therapy and their doses were estimated. Energies used in treatments and diseases treated are discussed. Malignancies developed subsequent to radiation therapy in seven cases; five after treatment for malignancies and two after treatment for benign diseases. Neoplasms of 12 AHS subjects may have been induced by earlier radiation therapy; 5 in the earlier study and 7 in the present one. These investigations underscore the need for continued documentation of exposures to ionizing radiation for medical reasons, especially from sources incurring relatively high doses. Bias in assessments of late radiation effects among A-bomb survivors can thus be avoided. (author)

  14. Measurement of Nagasaki Pu global transport rates, comparing with SO2 from historic volcanic eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An artificial single dose contaminant was released at Nagasaki, Japan on August 9, 1945, detonating plutonium (10-15 kg) atomic bomb. A portion, 1,2 kg of 239Pu was fissioned releasing 21 kt TNT energy along with various fission products. The rest of the unexpended fissile material, 239+240Pu, 13.8 kg (3.49 x 1013 Bq), was dispersed into the atmosphere along with a fission product, 137Cs, 23.4 g (7.44 x 1013 Bq). The fate of 239+240Pu and 137Cs was investigated by analysing both local and global fallout. The highest concentration of 239+240Pu was 64.5 mBq/g (181 mBq/cm2) while it was 188 mBq/g (526 mBq/cm2) for 137Cs both at 2.8 km east from the hypocentre. The total amount of deposition in the local fallout region of 264 km2 was 37.5 g (9.48 x 1010Bq) for 239+240Pu and 3.14 mg (5.88 x 1010Bq) for 137Cs. The ratio of the local fallout against the total amount of the radionuclides released was 0.27 % for 239+240Pu and 0.134% for 137Cs. Recent advancements in analytical technology made it possible for artificial radionuclides released from the Nagasaki explosion to be detected in the Arctic ice core layer of 1945. The 239+240Pu and the 137Cs, were measured by collecting 10 ice cores on the Agassiz ice cap, Ellesmere Island, Canada. The deposition was 0.1ere Island, Canada. The deposition was 0.16 ?Bq/cm2 for 239+240Pu and 20 ?Bq/cm2 for 137Cs. During the atmospheric testing, the deposition of 239+240Pu and 137Cs varied more than 100 times with the highest peaks of over 50 ?Bq/cm2 for 239+240Pu and over 800 ?Bq/cm2 for 137Cs both occurred in 1962. Analyzing Arctic data, there are many new information for long global transport, the history of nuclear weapons development etc. (author)

  15. Dosimetry study and its meanings - Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Chernobyl, Semipalatinsk and Silchar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We have been studied radiation doses for the world-wide exposed people. Here I would like to explain the recent dosimetry studies, which have been performed by our laboratory as collaborations. The Dosimetry System 1896 (DS86) have been discussed and reevaluated by US-Japan joint study for almost 10 years. Combining with the epidemiological study in Radiation Effects Research Foundation and our institution, people; radiation risks were determined and limitations of the radiation for workers and for general people were determined in each country. The new dosimetry system is called as DS02 and determines new and accurate radiation risks. DS02 have been decided in 2003 and that preparing publication for this study. The actual study was to measure small amount of radioactivity such as 152Eu, 60Co, 36Cl, 63Ni, and etc.), which was induced by neutrons. These were used for neutron dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Also tiles, roof tiles and bricks were used for the gamma-ray dose evaluation. US scientists calculated emission of neutrons and gamma rays from the bombs and performed neutron and gamma ray transport calculations. The data were compared and agreed with calculation based on DS02. Thus new dosimetry system was determined. I would like to explain this system and results. I would like to explain briefly Semipalatinsk, Chernobyl and Shilchar study. The Semipalatinsk study was begun since it is a long-term radiaty was begun since it is a long-term radiation not like instantaneous exposure like atomic bomb radiation. It may change radiation risks from Hiroshima and Nagasaki results. Recently we calculated thyroid dose in Blest oblast in Belarus, where there were no such study before. Two types of rock, 10 spices and cyger samples, which are taken by the people as a habit in the Shilchar area were brought back last year and measured gamma-rays by using a Ge detector. Except for one rock sample, the measured gamma-ray spectra are same as background. It was found U-series gamma-rays from remaining rock sample. However the values are not so much high comparing with usual rock samples

  16. Uncertainties under emergency conditions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 and Bikini accident in 1954

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In exploding an atomic bomb, in addition to ionizing radiation, strong non-ionizing radiation, such as infrared, ultraviolet light, visible light, electromagnetic pulse radiation, as well as heat and shock waves are produced. The survivors and those who visited Hiroshima immediately after the atomic bombing could have been subjected to a number of other possible noxious effects in addition to atomic radiation. Hospitals, laboratories, drugstores, pharmaceutical works, storehouses of chemicals, factories, etc. that were situated close to the hypocenter were all completely destroyed and various mutagenic, carcinogenic or teratogenic substances must have been released, many doctors, nurses and chemists were killed. There was no medical care and no food in the region of high dose exposure and the drinking water was contaminated. There would have been various possibilities of infection. Mental stress would also have been much higher in the survivors closer to the hypocenter. It is confusing which factor played a dominant role. In addition, there would be problems in accurately identifying the position of the exposed persons at the time of the atomic bombing and also in estimating the shielding factors. There may be considerable uncertainty in human memory under such conditions. It is also possible that there could have been a large storage of gasoline to be used for transportation of the army corps in Hiroshima. Therefore there is a possibility that various toxic substancea possibility that various toxic substances, mutagenic or carcinogenic agents such as benzopyrene and other radiomimetic substances, chemical weapons (Yperit, Lewisite, etc.) could have been released from various facilities which were destroyed at the time of the atomic bombing. After the German surrender, in May 1945, it was reported in June, in Japan, that the USA might attempt landing on Japan mainland, and that they might be planning massive use of chemical weapons all over Japan on that occasion. Preparing for such case chemical officers who were trained at Narashino Chemical School were assigned, at least one, to each unit (brigade and higher) of the Japanese Army. Chemical Weapons Control unit was organised at the headquarters in the centre of Hiroshima. After atomic bombing some vessels of mustard gas stored underground were found cracked and leaked. Judging from these findings it may be possible that some chemical weapons were released to the environment from the military facilities on ground at the time they were destroyed by the atomic bombing and the survivors were exposed to poison gases to a smaller or larger extent. There was no drinking water and they had to drink rain water which fell heavily soon after the atomic bombing. It is highly possible that the rainwater was also contaminated by various toxic substances including chemical weapons. These effects combined with the irradiation by atomic radiation are difficult to quantify accurately at present, many years after atomic bombings. But if all these adverse effects were ascribed solely to the ionizing radiation, the effects of radiation may be overestimated in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In using the Hiroshima and Nagasaki data for establishing radiation safety standard in peaceful uses of atomic energy, we should keep these possibilities of overestimation in mind. At the Bikini accident, where Japanese fishing boat was showered by strongly radioactive ash due to thermonuclear test on March 1, 1954 in the Pacific, some crew tested the ash to see what it is. The amount of intake is uncertain. Depending on the assumption, a widely different result would be obtained. (author)

  17. A legacy of Hiroshima and Nagasaki : risk estimates for radiation induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki fifty years ago ended the war in the Pacific and set the world agog at the prospect of new and frightening weapons for the future. Many residents of these cities, exposed to lesser than lethal amounts of radiation, survived to constitute the most remarkable radioepidemiological study of late radiation effects any of us could have imagined. These survivors and those relatively few among them who died of cancers attributable to radiation, provide us with our primary source of risk estimates for radiation induced cancer. As cancer is the principal low dose radiation effect these estimates are today at the core of our radiation protection system for workers and the public. In 1977 it was the risk estimates mainly from the LSS (Lifespan Study of the A-bomb survivors) estimated at about 1%/Sv that enabled ICRP to confirm the existing worker limit of 50mSv/y. In 1987, NCRP introduced a new and more restrictive occupational guideline because risk estimates from the LSS were known to be 'going up'. Continued surveillance of radioepidemiological studies and especially the LSS is a vital part of the scientific background of radiation protection. (author)

  18. Incidence of thoracic vertebral fractures among adult health study participants, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1958-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of thoracic vertebral fractures (TVF) in a fixed Hiroshima and Nagasaki population of 16,027 was determined by sex, age, and atomic bomb ionizing radiation exposure. Diagnosis was based on lateral chest radiographs made from 1 July 1958 to 28 February 1986. Born between 1880 and 1940, the subjects were categorized by sex into 10-year birth cohorts. When examined by birth cohort and age at onset, the age dependency of TVF incidence showed a good fit to a log-linear regression model. In females, TVF incidence tended to be lower in the younger birth cohorts and tended to increase with age in all birth cohorts. With each 10-year increase in age, the incidence among females increased by a factor of 1.7. In males, the incidence was significantly lower in the younger birth cohorts, but did not increase with age. The incidence decreased by a factor of 0.5 in males and 0.6 in females as the birth cohort age became younger. TVF incidence was greater in males until the age of 50, was equal by sex in the sixth decade, and was greater among females, who were 60 years of age or older. TVF incidence did not differ by city, and no correlation with A-bomb radiation exposure was demonstrated. (author)

  19. Long-term effects of the rain exposure shortly after the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Ritsu; Grant, Eric J; Furukawa, Kyoji; Misumi, Munechika; Cullings, Harry; Ozasa, Kotaro; Shore, Roy E

    2014-12-01

    The "black rain" that fell after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been generally believed to contain radioactive materials. During 1949-1961 the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission conducted surveys that included a query about exposure to the rain that fell a short time after the bombings. This article presents the first report of those data in relation to possible adverse health outcomes. This study looked at Life Span Study subjects who were in either city at the time of bombing and had an estimated direct radiation dose from the bombs (n = 86,609). The mortality data from 1950-2005 and cancer incidence data from 1958-2005 were used. Excess relative risks (ERRs) of subjects who were exposed to rain compared to those who reported no rain exposure were calculated using a Poisson regression model. In Hiroshima 11,661 subjects (20%) reported that they were exposed to rain, while in Nagasaki only 733 subjects (2.6%) reported rain exposure. To avoid outcome dependent biases (i.e., recall of exposure after a health outcome has already occurred), the primary analyses were based on events that occurred during 1962-2005. No significant risks due to rain exposure were observed for death due to all causes, all solid cancer or leukemia in Hiroshima. In Nagasaki there was no significantly elevated rain exposure-associated risks for 1962-2005, however, for 1950-2005 there was a weak association for all-cause mortality (ERR = 0.08; 95% confidence interval 0.00006, 0.17; P = 0.05). For incidence of solid cancer and leukemia, no significantly elevated rain exposure risks were observed in either city. These results failed to show deleterious health effects from rain exposure. While these data represent the most extensive set of systematically collected data on rain exposure of the atomic bomb survivors, they are limited by substantial uncertainties regarding exposures and missing individual data, so cautious interpretation is advised. PMID:25402555

  20. Physical destruction in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic bombs, for the first time in human history, were dropped on Hiroshima in August 6, and on Nagasaki on August 9, 1945. Though the powers of these bombs were far small as compared with those of present day nuclear weapons, the atomic bombs claimed many lives instantaneously, damaged human bodies, and destroyed all objects, annihilating the urban areas. Even today, the dreadful consequences of the bombings still remain in both body and mind of the victims. Meanwhile, the experiences of atomic bomb disasters are fading constantly. In order to maintain the vivid information, in Part 1 ''physical destruction'', the following matters are described: dropping of the atomic bombs, atomic bombs and heat rays, blast due to atomic bombing, damages due to heat rays, blast and fire, radiation from the atomic bombings, and weather on the days of atomic bombings. (J.P.N.)

  1. A 3D analysis of spatial relationship between geological structure and groundwater profile around Kobe City, Japan: based on ARCGIS 3D Analyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, A.; Tsukamoto, H.; Kazahaya, K.; Morikawa, N.; Takahashi, M.; Takahashi, H.; Yasuhara, M.; Ohwada, M.; Oyama, Y.; Inamura, A.; Handa, H.; Nakama, J.

    2008-12-01

    Kobe city is located on the northern side of Osaka sedimentary basin, Japan, containing 1,000-2,000 m thick Quaternary sediments. After the Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake (January 17, 1995), a number of geological and geophysical surveys were conducted in this region. Then high-temperature anomaly of groundwater accompanied with high Cl concentration was detected along fault systems in this area. In addition, dissolved He in groundwater showed nearly upper mantle-like 3He/4He ratio, although there were no Quaternary volcanic activities in this region. Some recent studies have assumed that these groundwater profiles are related with geological structure because some faults and joints can function as pathways for groundwater flow, and mantle-derived water can upwell through the fault system to the ground surface. To verify these hypotheses, we established 3D geological and hydrological model around Osaka sedimentary basin. Our primary goal is to analyze spatial relationship between geological structure and groundwater profile. In the study region, a number of geological and hydrological datasets, such as boring log data, seismic profiling data, groundwater chemical profile, were reported. We converted these datasets to meshed data on the GIS, and plotted in the three dimensional space to visualize spatial distribution. Furthermore, we projected seismic profiling data into three dimensional space and calculated distance between faults and sampling points, using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) scripts. All 3D models are converted into VRML format, and can be used as a versatile dataset on personal computer. This research project has been conducted under the research contract with the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES).

  2. Back pain in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis: epidemiological study for 43,630 pupils in Niigata City, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    SATO, TSUYOSHI; Hirano, Toru; Ito, Takui; Morita, Osamu; Kikuchi, Ren; Endo, Naoto; Tanabe, Naohito

    2010-01-01

    There have been a few studies regarding detail of back pain in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) as prevalence, location, and severity. The condition of back pain in adolescents with IS was clarified based on a cross-sectional study using a questionnaire survey, targeting a total of 43,630 pupils, including all elementary school pupils from the fourth to sixth grade (21,893 pupils) and all junior high pupils from the first to third year (21,737 pupils) in Niigata City (population of ...

  3. Hokkaido, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Cities mingle with rugged hills and a dormant volcano in this image of Hokkaido, Japan. This three-dimensional image comes from observations made by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite on July 23, 2006. The view is toward the north and slightly east. Green indicates vegetation; beige and gray indicate bare ground, paved surfaces, or buildings; and dark blue indicates water. The water body at the top of the image is the Pacific Ocean. Now dormant, Mount Yotei is a stratovolcano--a symmetrical cone composed of alternating layers of hardened lava, solidified ash, and volcanic rocks ejected in previous eruptions. It reaches a height of 1,898 meters (6,227 feet), and its summit sports a 700-meter- (2,297-foot-) wide crater. Snow often caps this volcano, but in this summertime shot, the volcano's summit is snow-free. The volcano is also known as Ezo-Fuji for its resemblance to Mount Fuji. As angular patches of gray and beige indicate, urban areas surround the volcano, most notably the city of Kutchan to the northwest. Even when volcanoes remain active, people often settle close to them, drawn by benefits of good soil and mild climates that appear to outweigh the risks. NASA image by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  4. Radiochemical estimation of neutron fluence of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To estimate neutron fluence of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs by radiochemical methods. Methods: Thermal neutron fluence at the time of explosion was estimated from the results of radiochemical analysis of residual 60Co in iron materials or iron products. Results: Materials were obtained through the kindness of Dr. Masanori Nakaidzum. The distribution of neutron fluence in Hiroshima and Nagasaki can be determined by measuring the residual radioactivity of many pieces of material by radiochemical methods presented in the paper

  5. The abnormal increase of the leukocyte number observed in the inhabitants of Nishiyama area, Nagasaki Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nishiyama area, Nagasaki Prefecture has been known by that the black rain fell after dropping atomic bomb. The abnormal increase of the leukocyte number was measured in the inhabitants of Nishiyama area, Nagasaki Prefecture after dropping atomic bomb. This phenomenon differs from the general knowledge that the leukocyte number decreases by the radiation exposure. This has been noticed as a rare record confirmed by the residual radiation effect to the human body using the group data. (M.H.)

  6. Evaluation of river pollution of neonicotinoids in Osaka City (Japan) by LC/MS with dopant-assisted photoionisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Terao, Tomoko; Hisatomi, Hirotaka; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2012-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure photoionisation (APPI) source for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was applied to determine neonicotinoid pesticides in the aquatic environment. Dopant-assisted APPI was very effective in the ionisation of neonicotinoids. Neonicotinoids generated protonated molecules in APPI with high sensitivity, while adduct ions, such as sodiated molecules, were predominantly generated in conventional electrospray ionisation. The ionisation of neonicotinoids was confirmed by ultra-high-resolution MS. An analytical method coupled with solid phase extraction was developed for acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, and thiamethoxam. Method detection limits were 0.47 to 2.1 ng L(-1) for six neonicotinoids. Dinotefuran was the most frequent and highest among the neonicotinoids examined in the aquatic environment in Osaka, Japan. The maximum concentration of dinotefuran was 220 ng L(-1). Given the toxicity of neonicotinoids for aquatic creatures, the concentrations observed here were substantially low. The change in concentrations was temporally coincident with the period of the neonicotinoid application. Although rapid photodegradation and some degradation products have been elucidated, the degradation products in the aquatic environment were not identified in the present study. PMID:22767100

  7. Influence of the 2009 financial crisis on detection of advanced pulmonary tuberculosis in Osaka city, Japan: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danno, Katsura; Komukai, Jun; Yoshida, Hideki; Matsumoto, Kenji; Koda, Shinichi; Terakawa, Kazuhiko; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between the economic recession and the detection of advanced cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in Osaka city from 2007 to 2009. Design A repeated cross-sectional study. Setting Osaka city has been the highest tuberculosis burden area in Japan. After the previous global financial crisis, the unemployment rate in Osaka prefecture has deteriorated from 5.3% in 2008 to 6.6% in 2009. Participants During the study period, 3406 pulmonary tuberculosis cases were enrolled: 2530 males and 876 females; 1546 elderly cases (65?years and above) and 1860 young cases (under 65?years); 417 homeless cases and 2989 non-homeless cases. Outcome measures Patients’ information included the sex, age, registry, health insurances, places of detection, sputum smear test results, patients’ delay, doctors’ delay and the grade of chest x-ray findings. They were statistically analysed between 2007 and 2008, two years before and just before the financial crisis, and between 2008 and 2009, just before and after the financial crisis. Results The total numbers of pulmonary tuberculosis cases were 1172 in 2007, 1083 in 2008 and 1151 in 2009. In health examinations for non-homeless people, higher number of cases in 2009 were sputum smear positive, had respiratory symptoms and showed advanced disease in chest x-rays than those in 2008, with a longer patients’ delay. On the contrary, in health examination for homeless people, fewer cases of advanced pulmonary tuberculosis were found in 2009 than in 2008, with a shorter patients’ delay. In clinical examinations, there was no trend towards a difference between non-homeless and homeless people. Conclusions Although homeless people might be protected by public assistance, tuberculosis prevention and control need to be reinforced for the non-homeless population after the financial crisis. PMID:23558729

  8. Radiation exposure inside reinforced concrete buildings at Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effects on the residents of Hiroshima and Nagasaki due to initial-irradiation exposure during the nuclear attacks of World War II was recognized immediately as an important source of information. After the war, an extensive effort gathered data concerning the locations of individuals at the time of the attack and their subsequent medical histories. The data from personnel located in reinforced concrete buildings are particularly significant, since large groups of occupants received radiation injury without complications due to blast and thermal effects. In order to correlate the radiation dose with physiological effects, the dose to each individual must be calculated. Enough information about the construction of the buildings was available after the war to allow a radiation transport model to be constructed, but the accurate calculation of penetration into such large, thick-walled three dimensional structures was beyond the scope of computing technology until recently. Now, the availability of Cray vector computers and the development of a specially-constructed discrete ordinates transport code, TORT, have combined to allow the successful completion of such a study. This document describes the radiation transport calculations and tabulates the resulting doses by source component and individual case location. An extensive uncertainty analysis is also included. These data are to be used in another study as input to a formal statistical analysis, resulting in a new value for the LD50 dose, i.e., the dose at which the mortality risk is 50%. 55 refs., 67 figs., 70 tabs

  9. Axial length of atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakiyama, Harumi; Kishikawa, Yasuhiro; Imamura, Naoki [Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Hospital (Japan); Amemiya, Tsugio [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    We reviewed a series of 778 patients who had cataract surgery during the past 4 years at the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Memorial Hospital. We evaluated the history of exposure to radiation by atomic bomb in 1945, axial length and state of refraction. All were born before 1945. The series comprised 263 males and 515 females. Their ages averaged 76.5{+-}8.6 years. History of exposure to radiation was present in 356 patients. The remaining 422 patients served as control. There was no difference in the type of cataract between the two groups. High myopia was present in 11 irradiated patients (3.2%) and in 24 patients in the control group (6.0%). The difference was not significant (p=0.083). There was no high myopia among 24 patients who were aged 18 years or less at the time of radiation and who were within 2 km from the epicenter. No difference was present regarding the axial length between the two groups or between both sexes. The present result is not definitive because ''irradiated group'' would include those with little or no exposure and because precise data has not been available about the dosis of radiation. (author)

  10. Tumor and tissue registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continued monitoring of tumor incidence is an important part of the surveillance of health effects of atomic bomb (A-bomb) radiation. The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF)(formerly Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC)) has been engaged in the operation of tumor and tissue registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These registries have been instrumental in studying risk of various specific cancer sites (thyroid, breast, lung, stomach, colorectal, and salivary gland) in a defined sample of A-bomb survivors. A recent analysis of registry data revealed little basis for suspecting systematic biases of registry data (e.g., hospital-related, or diagnostic biases related to radiation dose) which may confound observed association of cancer and radiation. The analysis also showed similarities in relative risk of cancer based on incidence and mortality data. However, absolute risks estimated from mortality data may underestimate the true magnitude for certain cancer sites (including breast, stomach, lung, and uterus). The registry data are also useful in assessing secular trends of radiation-induced cancer incidence which are essential in determining the latency of cancer. (author)

  11. Activation Measurements for Thermal Neutrons, Part D. U.S. Measurements of 36Cl in Mineral Samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper presents the 36Cl measurement effort in the US. A large number of 36Cl measurements have been made in both granite and concrete samples obtained from various locations and distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These measurements employed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the number of atoms of 36Cl per atom of total Cl in the sample. Results from these measurements are presented here and discussed in the context of the DS02 dosimetry reevaluation effort for Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bomb survivors. The production of 36Cl by bomb neutrons in mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki was primarily via the reaction 35Cl(n,?)36Cl. This reaction has a substantial thermal neutron cross-section (43.6 b at 0.025 eV) and the product has a long half-life (301,000 y). hence, it is well suited for neutron-activation detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using AMS more than 50 years after the bombings. A less important reaction for bomb neutrons, 39K(n,?)36Cl, typically produces less than 10% of the 36Cl in mineral samples such as granite and concrete, which contain ? 2% potassium. In 1988, only a year after the publication of the DS86 final report (Roesch 1987), it was demonstrated experimentally that 36Cl measured using AMS should be able to detect the thermal neutron fluences at the large distances most relevant to the A-bomb survivor dosimetry. Subsequent measurements in mineral samples from both Hiroshima and Nagasaki validated the experimental findings. The potential utility of 36Cl as a thermal neutron detector in Hiroshima was first presented by Haberstock et al. who employed the Munich AMS facility to measure 36Cl/Cl ratios in a gravestone from near the hypocenter. That work subsequently resulted in an expanded 36Cl effort in Germany that paralleled the US work. More recently, there have also been 36Cl measurements made by a Japanese group. The impetus for the extensive 36Cl and other neutron activation measurements was the recognized need to validate the neutron component of the dose in Hiroshima. Although this was suggested at the time of the DS86 Final Report, where it was stated that the calculated neutron doses for survivors could possibly be wrong, the paucity of neutron validation measurements available at that time prevented adequate resolution of this matter. It was not until additional measurements and data evaluations were made that it became clear that more work was required to better understand the discrepancies observed for thermal neutrons in Hiroshima. This resulted in a large number of additional neutron activation measurements in Hiroshima and Nagasaki by scientists in the US, Japan, and Germany. The results presented here for 36Cl, together with measurements made by other scientists and for other isotopes, now provide a much improved measurement basis for the validation of neutrons in Hiroshima

  12. Concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and polychlorinated biphenyls in blood and breast milk collected from pregnant women in Sapporo City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaka, Takashi; Hirakawa, Hironori; Kajiwara, Jumboku; Onozuka, Daisuke; Sasaki, Seiko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Yoshioka, Eiji; Yuasa, Motoyuki; Kishi, Reiko; Iida, Takao; Uchi, Hiroshi; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-12-01

    We measured the concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and non-dioxin-like PCBs in paired samples of blood and breast milk collected from 67 secundiparas in Sapporo City, Japan, and combined this data with those of the 30 secundiparas previously measured. The arithmetic mean total toxic equivalents (TEQ-WHO) concentrations of PCDDs, PCDFs, non-ortho PCBs, and mono-ortho PCBs in blood and breast milk of the 97 secundiparous subjects were 3.0-23 (mean: 13, median: 14) and 2.7-20 (mean: 8.6, median: 8.5) pg TEQ g(-1) lipid, respectively. The sums of the concentrations of 56 non-dioxin-like PCB congeners that were measured in the subjects' blood and breast milk were 16-326 (mean: 107, median: 100) and 12-252 (mean: 73, median: 67) ng g(-1) lipid, respectively. The partitioning ratios of individual congeners of PCDDs, PCDFs, dioxin-like PCBs, and non-dioxin-like PCBs from blood to breast milk in secundiparas were almost the same as those of primiparas that have been recently reported, suggesting that the partitioning ratios of these compounds from maternal blood to breast milk in women is little affected by delivery. Furthermore, the partition of PCB congeners with chlorine at the 2-, 3-, 4'-, and 5-positions or the 2-, 4-, 4'-, and 5-positions of the biphenyl ring from the blood to the breast milk tended to occur at a higher level than that of other congeners. In particular, the levels of tetraCB-74 and hexaCB-146 in the breast milk for both primiparous and secundiparous mothers were slightly higher than those in the blood. PMID:22004731

  13. Characterization of soluble and insoluble components in PM 2.5 and PM 10 fractions of airborne particulate matter in Kofu city, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyotani, Tomohiro; Iwatsuki, Masaaki

    A systematic method combining water and diluted-acid extractions has been developed for the manifold evaluation of soluble and insoluble fractions in ambient aerosol. The pre-washed regenerated cellulose membrane filter was used as a collection medium of a low-volume air sampler. The collection time of 7-14 days was required to obtain the sample amounts enough for the systematic analysis. Simple and efficient extraction procedures using the filtration of water and 0.1 M hydrochloric acid were recommended in order to obtain the information about the dissolution behaviors of various elements in the aerosol. Soluble components in both the extracts were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and ion chromatography (IC). These extraction procedures were also preferred to prepare thin-layer specimens suitable to the succeeding X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) for insoluble components. Elemental compositions of the extraction residues were conveniently determined by the XRF calibrated with thin-layer standard specimens prepared with activated carbon. The determination of the 17 representative elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Pb) in these three fractions from an aerosol sample was performed rapidly within 4 h. The proposed systematic method was applied to PM 2.5 and PM 10 aerosol samples collected in Kofu City, Central Japan, and the enrichment behaviors of various elements and their source apportionment such as soil, anthropogenic substances and vehicle exhaust particulates could be demonstrated by the present method.

  14. Review of the radiological significance of revised dose estimates for the Hiroshima-Nagasaki bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has indicated that new dosimetric and epidemiological data on Japanese bomb survivors will 'raise the risk estimate (for fatal cancers) for the exposed population by a total factor of the order of 2. This change is for a population of all ages, whereas for a worker population of ages 18-65 the changes will be small'. The present report has reviewed the available scientific literature that is relevant to this statement. The topics reviewed in this report include: a) the methods used in previous reports by scientific committees to calculate estimated lifetime risks of radiation-induced fatal cancers; b) recent revisions of the dosimetry for Hiroshima-Nagasaki survivors; c) updates on the epidemiological data on the Hiroshima-Nagasaki survivors; and d) revised estimates of fatal cancer risk from the Hiroshima-Nagasaki data

  15. Urban and spatial planning in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Marin Tominaga

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to introduce the urban and spatial planning inJapan. According to the national planning system of Japan, chapter 2, the planning system has 3 administrative levels and each territorial region has its own regulation. This paper introduces especially about planning and regulation system in city region in Japan.

  16. Urban and spatial planning in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Tominaga

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to introduce the urban and spatial planning inJapan. According to the national planning system of Japan, chapter 2, the planning system has 3 administrative levels and each territorial region has its own regulation. This paper introduces especially about planning and regulation system in city region in Japan.

  17. Epicenter of the Nagasaki weapon: a reanalysis of available data with recommended values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant source of uncertainty in estimates of radiation dose for atomic-bomb survivors of Nagasaki and in correlations of radiation dose with medical effects observed in these survivors is due to unresolved discrepancies in the literature with respect to the location of the epicenter or burst point of the weapon. Available data on the epicenter of the weapon have been reanalyzed in this report using several different approaches. These appear to have resolved some of the major discrepancies found in the literature and to justify a recalculation of radiation doses for the atomic bomb survivors of Nagasaki. A recommended epicenter for recalculating the radiation doses is given in the report

  18. Exposure to Volcanic Hazards, and Influence on Perception: A Case Study in Japan, Ten Years After the Unzen Fugendake Eruption

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    This study aims at understanding the perception of volcanic hazards that adults and pupils have in the province of Nagasaki Kyushu, ten years after the volcanic eruption of the Unzen Fugendake. The Unzen Fugendake started to erupt in 1991 and produced several pyroclastic flows lahars and ashes rains. Shimabara city, located on the foot of the volcano was severely stroke by the eruption. Ten years after this eruption, a study was carried on in Shimabara city and in Saikai city - away from any ...

  19.  Smart Shrinking Sado: Development Strategies in Shrinking Cities

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Ryo

    2009-01-01

    Rapid urbanisation has resulted in shrinking cities around the world, and Japan is no exception. This thesis endeavours to understand the causes and consequences of, and prospects for, shrinking cities in Japan through a case study: the city of Sado. Sado faces the shrinking city phenomenon following deindustrialisation, deagriculturalisation and Japan‘s structure of high concentration. Within Sado, suburbanisation and peripherization is observed, draining the younger generation from the ce...

  20. Characterization of atmospheric total suspended particulate (TSP) in a midsize city in Northern Japan: non-snow-clad period to snow-clad period comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total suspended particulate (TSP) samples were collected from three areas (commercial, residential and agricultural) in and near Akita City in northern Japan, from May - June 1996 (non-snow-clad period) and January - February 1997 (snow-clad period), over three days with a one-hour sampling interval for each area. The elemental composition and particle shape of TSP samples were determined and/or observed by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) combined with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. In the hourly TSP samples collected during the non-snow-clad period, 23 elements were determined for each area, and Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca and Fe were the major components. On the other hand, 25 elements, excluding As and Rb, were found in the snow-clad period samples, and P, Ga, Nb and Mo were only found in the snow-clad-period samples. Dominant elements, i.e., major components, of the snow-clad period were the same as the non-snow-clad period. Comparing the arithmetic means of elemental concentrations in TSP for the non-snow-clad and snow-clad periods, in the commercial area the elemental concentrations in the snow-clad period were the same or lower than those in the non-snow-clad period, with the concentrations of Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti and Fe in particular being markedly lower. In the residential area the concentrations of Na, Mg and Cl were markedly higher in the snow-clad period than in the non-snow-clad period, whiriod than in the non-snow-clad period, while the concentrations of the other elements were the same or only slightly lower. In the agricultural area, the concentrations of Na and Cl were markedly higher in the snow-clad period relative to the non-snow-clad period, and the concentrations of the other elements, except for P, were low. The concentrations of the major elements and Pb were particularly low. Thus, in the residential and agricultural areas the effect of northwesterly winter wind on TSP can be observed by Cl, and it is conjectured that soil particles rising up into the air is inhibited by snow accumulation. Soil particles rising up into the air seems to be inhibited by snow accumulation in the commercial area as well. With the aid of SEM and EDX analysis, aggregates of diesel exhaust particles (DEP), soil particles and small silicon-rich spherical particles were observed in the non-snow-clad period samples for each area. In addition, small aluminum-rich and iron-rich spheres were observed during the non-snow-clad period in the commercial area. Zinc-rich fiber was observed during the non-snow-clad period in the residential area. (author)

  1. Medical irradiation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, the radiological examinations, particularly X-ray diagnostic examinations go on increasing in frequency. The aim of medical and dental radiology being to provide maximum benefit to the population served, any increase in frequency of radiological examinations must be justified. With increasing emphasis in recent year on the somatic effects of radiations, somatic risks to an individual and the population from medical irradiations were estimated using risk factors determined from the data on excess deaths due to leukemia and malignant diseases for atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki, leukemia and malignancy significant factors determined taking into consideration the latent periods of these diseases after radiation exposures and the life expectancies of persons received medical irradiations, and organ or tissue doses related to the diseases. On the other hand, the benefits to the population were defined as life-saving rates of patients expected from X-ray diagnoses. As an example of results of risk-benefit assessments for X-ray diagnoses, it was recognized that both chest and stomach mass screenings cannot be justified for persons less than 30 years old. The stochastic risks to the whole population of Japaneses were estimated using the population doses such as the genetically significant dose and risks from radiological procedures. The results showed that about 340 persons for genetic effects, about 300 persons for leukemia and about 1,260 persons for malignant dia and about 1,260 persons for malignant diseases will annually receive some fatal risks from diagnostic X-ray examinations, respectively. In order to reduce patient exposures as low as reasonably achievable, the physical and biological studies were made on the possibility of dose reduction in the specific X-ray diagnoses. (J.P.N.)

  2. Status of Los Alamos efforts related to Hiroshima and Nagasaki dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos efforts related to resolution of the Hiroshima, Nagasaki doses are described as follows: (1) Using recently located replicas of the Hiroshima bomb, measurements will be made which will define the upper limit of the Hiroshima yield. (2) Two-dimensional calculations of the neutron and gamma-ray outputs of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki weapons are in progress. Neutron and gamma-ray leakage spectra measurements will be made. Similar measurements on the Mark 9 weapon and on the Ichiban assembly are proposed. These measurements will provide a check for present day cross sections and calculations. (3) Calculations of several air transport experiments are in progress. A comparison of calculated results with experimental results is given. (4) The neutron and gamma-ray output spectra of several devices tested in the atmosphere at the Nevada Test Site are being calculated. The results of these calculations will allow models of the debris cloud contribution to the total dose to be tested

  3. Investigation for effects of the atomic bomb on Nagasaki. {gamma}-ray measurements by Neher electrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Ryohei [Nishina Memorial Foundation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Neher electrometer, invented as an equipment to investigate the relationship of cosmic ray and terrestrial magnetism in 1930s, had excellent properties as an equipment to measure {gamma}-ray outdoor and thus was used for measurement of radiation exposure after A-bomb explosion in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In Nagasaki, measurement with this equipment enabled to locate the bombing center where the monument is standing now in the A-bomb Park. Measurement also revealed that the circular earth surface of 2000 m diameter had the induced radioactivity by neutron and that outside the area, the {gamma}-ray intensity was virtually similar to the background level. Ash composing of Pu and other fission products moved over Konpira-san on the west wind, most of which came down with rainfall onto around Nishiyama reservoir. In the A-bomb movies, there is a scene that Neher electrometer was working for {gamma}-ray measurement. (K.H.)

  4. Radiation exposure and thyroid cancer incidence among Hiroshima and Nagasaki residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependence of thyroid cancer incidence on radiation exposure level is examined with the use of tumor registry follow-up data on a life-span cohort of 98,610 Hiroshima and Nagasaki residents. The sample includes 112 clinically evident thyroid cancer cases: 62 in Hiroshima and 50 in Nagasaki. A clear, predominantly linear, increase in thyroid cancer incidence corresponds to increasing levels of gamma radiation to the thyroid gland, whereas neutron exposure could not be shown to contribute further to thyroid cancer risk. The relative risk associated with gamma ray exposure is particularly high among persons who were less than 30 years old at the time of radiation exposure. Limitations on the incidence and dosimetry data are discussed, as well as the ability of the Cox regression method to accommodate some of these limitations

  5. Investigation for effects of the atomic bomb on Nagasaki. ?-ray measurements by Neher electrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neher electrometer, invented as an equipment to investigate the relationship of cosmic ray and terrestrial magnetism in 1930s, had excellent properties as an equipment to measure ?-ray outdoor and thus was used for measurement of radiation exposure after A-bomb explosion in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In Nagasaki, measurement with this equipment enabled to locate the bombing center where the monument is standing now in the A-bomb Park. Measurement also revealed that the circular earth surface of 2000 m diameter had the induced radioactivity by neutron and that outside the area, the ?-ray intensity was virtually similar to the background level. Ash composing of Pu and other fission products moved over Konpira-san on the west wind, most of which came down with rainfall onto around Nishiyama reservoir. In the A-bomb movies, there is a scene that Neher electrometer was working for ?-ray measurement. (K.H.)

  6. The Influence of the Climate Change on Landslide Disasters in Western Japan -Hiroshima's case-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tetsuya; Aditian, Aril

    2015-04-01

    In last year 2014 and 2012, tremendous landslides due to heavy rainfalls occurred in western Japan. Especially in August 2014, serious landslide disasters induced by the extremely heavy rainfall caused over 70 people's death in Hiroshima. Most of them were caused by debris flows from shallow landslides on granite forest slopes on August 20. In Hiroshima, long-term increase in rainfalls was not obvious, while this trend was found in other area such as Kyushu district. However, in western Japan, the influence of climate change emerged in the increase of vapor concentration caused by rising water surface temperature in East China Sea and that brought the extreme rainfall. The landslide (debris flow) disasters in Hiroshima have distinctive characteristics in terms of followings: (1) the source of debris flows (directly flowing down from mostly shallow landslides), (2) their usual equivalent friction coefficient "Mf" i.e. relative travel distance for Granite (values between 0.174 and 0.554). (3) the peculiar meteorological condition of frontogenesis with vapor convergence on the stationary front and around the Pacific high pressure that can generate the heavy precipitation (above 101 mm/hr, total 256 mm). (4) Contrary to Mf values above, they caused heavy disaster at downstream area with the urban development on hillside slopes. We found that the Mf becomes bigger (relatively short travel distance) as the return period of disasters"Tr"becomes shorter as evaluating in the next formula: Mf = 0.278 Tr^(-3.32). If the return period becomes shorter due to climate change (it is possible), Mf may become bigger. However, the cities such as Hiroshima, Kobe or Nagasaki in western Japan which have the urban area at hillside will be more prone to severe debris flow disasters. (5) Also, theoretically, we may have more slope failures and debris flows per area "N/A" if the rainfall increment "dR" increases. The "increasing ratio in N/A" is given by next equation: (N/A)/(N0/A)=((R0 + dR) / R0)^(7.58). N0: landslide or debris flow frequency (event number) before the rainfall increased. Considering "the increasing rate of effective maximum rainfall"in western Japan (in Kyushu: 7.28 mm/day/year), landslide or debris flow frequency may increase at most 6.67 times than present situation, after a decade, in Hiroshima. In this perspective, we should prepare against the sediment related disasters or landslide disasters cautiously, especially in the area such as Hiroshima.

  7. Cytogenetic study of the offspring of atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the results of a cytogenetic study on 8,322 children born to atomic bomb survivors (4,716 in Hiroshima and 3,606 in Nagasaki) and 7,976 controls (5,112 in Hiroshima and 2,864 in Nagasaki). Because no child was examined before age 12, the data may not be considered valid for the occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities that impose a high risk of early death. Thus, we will restrict our comparison to the sex-chromosome aneuploids and autosomal structural rearrangements of the balanced type, although other abnormalities encountered in this survey will be enumerated. Among the children born to exposed parents, 19 individuals (0.23 %) exhibited sex chromosome abnormalities and 23 (0.28 %) exhibited autosomal structural rearrangements, whereas among children born to unexposed parents, 24 (0.30 %) and 27 (0.34 %), respectively, were observed to exhibit these abnormalities. Only one child with a karyotype of 47,XY,+21 was found in the Hiroshima exposed group. Thus, there was no statistically significant difference in the overall frequencies of cytogenetically abnormal cases between the exposed (0.52 %) and control (0.64 %) populations. In Hiroshima, frequencies of chromosome abnormalities were similar between exposed and control groups (0.64 % vs 0.65 %). However, the value observed in the exposed group in Nagasaki was slightly lower (0.36 %) - though not statistically significant - than the value observed in the control group (0.63 %). This value of the Nagasaki control group was similar to that in Hiroshima. Family studies on probands with chromosome abnormalities revealed that the majority of cases (about 90 %) with autosomal structural rearrangements of the balanced type were inherited from one or the other parent. The mutation rates for these reaarangements were similar between the exposed and control groups, being 0.98 x 10-4 per gamete per generation. (author)

  8. The new radiation dosimetry for the A-bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive work has been conducted over the past few years to reassess all aspects of the radiation dosimetry for the A-bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This work has included reviews of the bomb yields, source terms, air transport of neutrons and gamma rays, neutron-induced radioactivity and thermoluminescence in exposed materials, shielding of individuals by buildings, and calculations of organ doses. The results of these theoretical and experimental activities have led to the development of a new dosimetry system which is designated as the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86). New DS86 estimates of tissue kerma in air and absorbed dose to fifteen organs are available for 94,787 survivors who were either outside and unshielded, outside and shielded by houses, or inside and shielded by houses (64,408 in Hiroshima and 30,379 in Nagasaki). The organ doses are calculated on an age-dependent basis as follows: infants (less than 3 years old at the time of bombing, ATB), children (3 to 12 years old ATB), and adults (more than 12 years old ATB). Work in progress includes the extension of the DS86 system to Nagasaki survivors who were shielded either by terrain or by factory buildings

  9. 1995 Hanshin-Awaji (Kobe), Japan Images

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — On the morning of January 17, 1995 (January 16 at 20:46 GMT), a major earthquake occurred near the City of Kobe, Japan. The greatest intensity of shaking for the...

  10. Update Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, Aaron

    This book is a guide intended for persons planning on relocating to Japan. Following a chapter on background information, 13 additional chapters lead the reader step-by-step through the relocation process. These chapters include: before leaving, on arrival, language, culture, doing business in Japan, household pointers and everyday life, schools…

  11. Open Source Introducing Policy and Promotion of Regional Industries in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Noda, Tetsuo; Tansho, Terutaka

    2010-01-01

    The development style of open source has a possibility to create new business markets for Regional IT industries. Some local governments are trying to promote their regional IT industries by adopting an open source in their electronic government systems. In this paper, we analyze the data of open source application policy of the Japanese government and case studies of promotion policy of local industries by local governments; for example, Nagasaki Prefecture and Matsue City. And it aims to ex...

  12. Fuel combustion in thermal power plants in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.

    1983-11-01

    The position of black coal in the energy balance of Japan is discussed. About 75% of electric energy is produced by thermal power plants. Eighty-five per cent of electricity is produced by power plants fired with liquid fuels and 3% by coal fired plants. Coal production in Japan, the forecast coal import to the country by 1990 (132 Mt/year), proportion of coal imported from various countries, chemical and physical properties of coal from Australia, China and Japan are discussed. Coal classification used in Japan is evaluated. The following topics associated with coal combustion in fossil-fuel power plants in Japan are discussed: coal grindability, types of pulverizing systems, slagging properties of boiler fuel in Japan, systems for slag removal, main types of steam boilers and coal fired furnaces, burner arrangement and design, air pollution control from fly ash, sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides, utilization of fly ash for cement production, methods for removal of nitrogen oxides from flue gas using ammonia and catalysts or ammonia without catalysts, efficiency of nitrogen oxide control, abatement of nitrogen oxide emission from boilers by flue gas recirculation and reducing combustion temperatures. The results of research into air pollution control carried out by the Nagasaki Technical Institute are reviewed.

  13. Japan’s Economic Recession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalim Siddiqui

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Japan, the world’s second largest economy, is experiencing the worst economic crisis since the Second World War and the government is attempting to avoid a return to the “lost decade” of the 1990s when it was stuck in a deflationary spiral. To fight back recession, the Bank of Japan has kept the interest rate to 0.1 %, even lower than Bank of England’s 0.5 %. Japan’s economy has grown only at an average of 1% annually since 1992. Equally, the country’s recovery of 2003-07 did not have any long term effect on the growth.In many respects Japan remains very unique among the developed countries. The country’s economic miracle of the 1950s and 1960s has encouraged debate among the scholars to the significance of Japan’s economic past. It is widely seen as due to different model of development in areas such as industrial organisation, the role of the state, social institutions and history. Her appeal lies in the dramatic growth rates and economic transformation. Japan was first Asian country to break the western monopoly of modern industrialisation. Less than a generation ago, Japan was viewed an exemplary success story in terms of rapid economic growth and a model to be emulated by other developed and developing countries. Here I will argue that the Japanese economy suffers from severe problems that are not cyclical but structural in nature. Such structural problems are the most serious impediments to economic dynamism and the future long-run economic success of the country.

  14. Aging effect of 137Cs obtained from 137Cs in the Kanto loam layer from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident and in the Nishiyama loam layer from the Nagasaki A-bomb explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured 134Cs and 137Cs in the surface soil of the Kanto loam in the eastern Tokyo metropolitan area and the Nishiyama loam in Nagasaki, Japan. The observed 137Cs deposition in the Kanto loam from the Fukushima nuclear power plant (NPP) accident ranged from 4.0 to 77 kBq m-2, which corresponds to 0.3 - 5 times of that in the Nishiyama loam. The 137Cs retardation factor in the Kanto loam obtained seven months after the Fukushima NPP accident and in the Nishiyama loam after 36 and 38 years from the detonation of the Pu atomic bomb (A-bomb) ranged from 180 to 260 and 2000 to 10000, respectively. This difference in the retardation factors is attributed to an aging effect that corresponds to seven months and 36 to 38 years after the deposition of 137Cs occurred on the soil minerals. (author)

  15. Geographical distribution of plutonium derived from the atomic bomb in the eastern area of Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detonation of Nagasaki atomic bomb occurred on August 9, 1945. A large amount of unfissioned plutonium was dispersed into Nagasaki area. In our previous study, we measured 240Pu/239Pu ratios as well as 239+240Pu concentrations in sediment collected at Nishiyama reservoir in the center of Nishiyama area, where 'lack rain' was precipitated, and found that trace amount of the atomic-bomb plutonium has flown into the reservoir even now. A further study on soil samples collected within 10 km from the hypocenter including the basin of the reservoir elucidated the geological distribution of the atomic-bomb plutonium, which was locally deposited at Nishiyama area. In addition, the ratios of 0.13±0.01, which was lower than the value (0.176) of global fallout, were found in samples taken about 8 km east from the hypocenter, while the concentrations were comparable with back ground level. This means a possibility that the plutonium was deposited farther in eastern area. For this reason, we expanded the search area to the eastern area of Nagasaki for determining the deposition of the atomic-bomb plutonium from view point of 240Pu/239Pu ratio. Until now, we collected eight soil samples within 100 km north eastward of the hypocenter. As preliminary results of 2 samples collected at about 25 km east and 45 km from the hypocenter, the 240Pu/239Pu ratios were 0.154±0.017 and 0.111±0.004, which were low4±0.017 and 0.111±0.004, which were lower than the value of global fallout indicating the existence of the atomic-bomb plutonium. In the presentation, we will report the details and other results in soils collected in farther area and discuss about deposit area of the atomic-bomb plutonium.

  16. Prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance in Asia: a viewpoint from nagasaki atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Masako; Tomonaga, Masao

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is a known environmental risk factor for a variety of cancers including hematological malignancies, such as leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and multiple myeloma. Therefore, for Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors (surviving victims who were exposed to ionizing radiation emitted from the nuclear weapons), several cancer-screening tests have been provided annually, with government support, to detect the early stage of malignancies. An M-protein screening test has been used to detect multiple myeloma at an early stage among atomic bomb survivors. In the screening process, a number of patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), in addition to multiple myeloma, have been identified. In 2009 and 2011, we reported the age- and sex-specific prevalence of MGUS between 1988 and 2004 and the possible role of radiation exposure in the development of MGUS using the screening data of more than 1000 patients with MGUS among approximately 52,000 Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The findings included: (1) a significant lower overall prevalence (2.1%) than that observed in Caucasian or African-origin populations; (2) a significantly higher prevalence in men than in women; (3) an age-related increase in the prevalence; (4) a significantly higher prevalence in people exposed to higher radiation doses only among those exposed at age 20 years or younger; and (5) a lower frequency of immunoglobulin M MGUS in Japanese patients than in patients in Western countries. The large study of MGUS among Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors has provided important findings for the etiology of MGUS, including a possible role of radiation exposure on the cause of MGUS and an ethnicity-related difference in the characteristics of MGUS. PMID:24461807

  17. Occurrence of breast cancer, renal cancer and multiple myeloma in a Nagasaki atomic bomb survivor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 60-year-old female, who was exposed to the Nagasaki atomic bomb at 18 years old, had renal cancer and subsequently was found to have multiple myeloma (IgGk). She underwent the left mastectomy for breast cancer at 43 years old but was not given chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The karyotype of bone marrow cells was 46, XX. The estimated radiation dose was under 10 rads. While the effect of such a low-dose of radiation is considered to be almost negligible, there would be a possibility that in this case the risk of carcinogenesis was enhanced as her age advanced. (author)

  18. Nagasaki and radiation. Health effects of radiation: atomic bomb, Chernobyl and JCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the title of Nagasaki and Radiation, this presentation will include the significance of the investigation of health of radiation on A-bomb survivors, dissociation between the scientific results and the public impression at the Chernobyl accident and problems in health control of the people in the regions surrounding JCO, Tokaimura. It is proposed that in the area of the low-dose radiation, economic, ethical, psychological, environmental, and scientific factors are all essential in the policy and regulatory decision-making process to assure public health and well-being. (author)

  19. Change of blood pressure and systolic/diastolic hypertension in Nagasaki A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in blood pressure and systolic/diastolic hypertension in Nagasaki A-bomb survivors were surveyed from 1973 to 1982. Systolic hypertension tended to decrease, while diastolic hypertension tended to increase in younger male survivors. The incidence of hypertension tended to decrease or be constant. According to the WHO classification of hypertension, the type of H, in which both diastolic and systolic blood pressures were high, and the type of SH, in which only systolic blood pressure was high, tended to decrease, while the type of DH, in which only diastolic blood pressure was high, tended to increase. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Low-level cadmium exposure in Toyama City and its surroundings in Toyama prefecture, Japan, with references to possible contribution of shellfish intake to increase urinary cadmium levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagami, T. [Hokuriku Health Service Association, Toyama 930-0177 (Japan); Ezaki, T. [Kyoto Industrial Health Association, 67 Nishinokyo-Kitatsuboicho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8472 (Japan); Moriguchi, J. [Kyoto Industrial Health Association, 67 Nishinokyo-Kitatsuboicho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8472 (Japan); Fukui, Y. [Kyoto Industrial Health Association, 67 Nishinokyo-Kitatsuboicho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8472 (Japan); Okamoto, S. [Kyoto Industrial Health Association, 67 Nishinokyo-Kitatsuboicho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8472 (Japan); Ukai, H. [Kyoto Industrial Health Association, 67 Nishinokyo-Kitatsuboicho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8472 (Japan); Sakurai, H. [Occupational Health Research and Development Center, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0014 (Japan); Aoshima, K. [Hagino Hospital, Fuchu-machi, Toyama 939-2723 (Japan); Ikeda, M. [Kyoto Industrial Health Association, 67 Nishinokyo-Kitatsuboicho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8472 (Japan)]. E-mail: ikeda@kyotokojohokenkai.or.jp

    2006-06-01

    Objectives: This study was initiated to examine if exposure to cadmium (Cd) was high also outside of the previously identified Itai-itai disease endemic region in the Jinzu River basin in Toyama prefecture in Japan. Methods: Morning spot urine samples were collected in June-August 2004 from 651 adult women (including 535 never-smokers) in various regions in Toyama prefecture, and subjected to urinalyses for cadmium (Cd), {alpha}{sub 1}-microglobulin ({alpha}{sub 1}-MG), {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}-MG), N-acetyl-{beta}-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), specific gravity (SG or sg) and creatinine (CR or cr). Three months later, the second urine samples were collected from those with elevated Cd in urine (e.g., {>=} 4 {mu}g/g cr), together with answers to questionnaires on shellfish consumption. Results: The geometric mean (GM) Cd, {alpha}{sub 1}-MG, {beta}{sub 2}-MG and NAG (after correction for CR) for the total participants were 2.0 {mu}g/g cr, 2.4 mg/g cr, 104 {mu}g/g cr and 2.8 units/g cr, respectively; further analysis with never-smoking cases only did not induce significant changes in these parameters. Analyses of the second urine samples from the high Cd subjects showed that there was substantial decrease (to about a half) in Cd in the 3-month period, and that the decrease was accompanied by reduction in {alpha}{sub 1}-MG and NAG ({beta}{sub 2}-MG did not show elevation even in the first samples). The urinalysis results in combination with the results of the questionnaire survey suggest that the high urinary Cd was temporary and might be induced by intake of shellfish that is edible whole. Conclusions: The overall findings appear to suggest that Cd exposure in Toyama populations (outside of the Itai-itai disease endemic region) was at the levels commonly observed on the coast of the Sea of Japan, and that the Cd level in urine might be modified by the intake of some types of seafood. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the relation of urinary Cd with seafood intake.

  1. Diuron, Irgarol 1051 and Fenitrothion contamination for a river passing through an agricultural and urban area in Higashi Hiroshima City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaonga, Chikumbusko Chiziwa; Takeda, Kazuhiko; Sakugawa, Hiroshi

    2015-06-15

    A study was conducted on the pesticides Diuron, Irgarol 1051 and Fenitrothion in Kurose River water, Higashi Hiroshima, Japan for a period of one year to assess the contribution of agriculture and urban activities on pesticide pollution of the river. Samples were analysed by a reverse phase HPLC system. The maximum pesticide concentrations were; 4620ng/L, 50ng/L and 370ng/L for Diuron, Irgarol 1051 and Fenitrothion, respectively. While Diuron and Fenitrothion were detected at all sites, Irgarol 1051 was only present at Izumi, a high density urban and industrial area which also registered the highest concentrations of the pesticides. The pattern showed by Diuron and Fenitrothion was linked to farming activities. Also, Diuron and Fenitrothion concentration correlated with pesticide utilization data for Hiroshima Prefecture. Irgarol 1051 showed a different pattern to that of Diuron and Fenitrothion and its source was attributed to paint. It was noted that 78% and 42% of water samples at Izumi sampling site exceeded the European Union (EU) guidelines for Diuron and Fenitrothion, respectively. PMID:25777951

  2. The new radiation dose estimation for people exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABS93D (Atomic Bomb Survivor 1993 Dose) which being a method established in Atomic Bomb-Radiation Medical Institute of Hiroshima University for estimating the atomic-bomb radiation dose based on DS86 (Dosimetry System 1986), was applied for people exposed to Nagasaki atomic bomb radiation who had been registered in the Database Center for Atomic Bomb Radiation, School of Medicine, Nagasaki University. It was possible to estimate the dose for 10,022 people who had been present at the known distance from the explosion site and had been either exposed ''unshielded'' in the open-air or exposed ''shielded'' outdoors by a wooden construction or trees and indoors in a wooden construction. The population exposed at <0.005 Gy was calculated to be 19.1%, 0.005-1 Gy, 71.4%, and ?1 Gy, 9.5%. Comparison of this ABS93D dose with the dose on T65D (Tentative 1965 Dose) in the same individuals revealed that the dose on ABS93D was lower than T65D dose. The method and parameters to calculate the free-air kerma, shield kerma and organ kerma based on ABS93D were presented in the appendix. (K.H.)

  3. Atomic bomb dosimetry for epidemiological studies of survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Better atomic bomb (A-bomb) radiation dose estimates with a higher accuracy are required for the epidemiological studies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Several scientists have tried to evaluate the free-in-air gamma ray and neutron dose and some weighting factors such as house shielding and body shielding. Since 1965, the tentative 1965 dose (T65D) had been widely used as the basic data for the dose determination of A-bomb survivors in epidemiological studies. In 1976, however, the reevaluation of the T65D dose was proposed by an American scientist who calculated the A-bomb doses on the basis of declassified data on the radiation spectra of the A-bomb. The development of computer technology made it possible to perform complicated dosecalculations for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs. This paper describes the history of A-bomb dosimetry, reviews some issues in the determination of T65D, and discusses the necessity of reassessment of A-bomb dose and the expected values for survivors

  4. Effects of radiation on the incidence of prostate cancer among Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Hisayoshi; Soda, Midori; Mine, Mariko; Yokota, Kenichi

    2013-10-01

    Atomic bomb survivors have been reported to have an increased risk of some cancers, especially leukemia. However, the risk of prostate cancer in atomic bomb survivors is not known to have been examined previously. This study examined the association between atomic bomb radiation and the incidence of prostate cancer among male Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The subjects were classified by distance from the hypocenter into a proximal group (<2 km), a distal group (?2 km), and an early entrance group (those who entered the region <2 km from the hypocenter within 2 weeks after the explosion). Between 1996 and 2009, 631 new cases of prostate cancer were identified among approximately 18 400 male Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors who were alive in 1996. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate the risk of prostate cancer development, with adjustment for age at atomic bomb explosion, attained age, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. Compared with the distal group, the proximal group had significant increased risks of total, localized, and high-grade prostate cancer (relative risk and 95% confidence interval: 1.51 [1.21-1.89]; 1.80 [1.26-2.57]; and 1.88 [1.20-2.94], respectively). This report is the first known to reveal a significant relationship between atomic bomb radiation and prostate cancer. PMID:23859763

  5. Hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage in isolated islands in Nagasaki prefecture. A remote teleradiology and helicopter transportation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (HICH) causes significant morbidity and mortality. The time required to transport the patients to a specialized hospital can influence the prognosis. In the isolated islands in Nagasaki prefecture, there is no medical institution which can offer emergent neurosurgical intervention. We reviewed the cases of HICH in this region from January 2006 to September 2010, who were transferred to Nagasaki Medical Center by a helicopter after consultation via teleradiology. Eighty four cases (23%) were transferred via helicopter to our institution from isolated islands. In three of them (4%), re-hemorrhage was demonstrated on computed tomography after helicopter transportation, and one of three had been administered an anti-coagulant agent. Only one case (1%) has deteriorated during helicopter transportation because of acute obstructive hydrocephalus. The outcome at discharge was as follows: modified Rankin Scale (mRS) I: 3 cases (4%), II: 5 cases (6%), III: 3 cases (4%), IV: 30 cases (36%), V: 31 cases (37%), VI: 12 cases (14%), 43 cases (51%) showed poor outcome (mRS V, VI). For medical management in isolated islands, a remote teleradiology system is indispensable to decide a strategy of treatment rapidly, and a helicopter transportation system is very useful in cases requiring emergent neurosurgical intervention, particular in cases of impending cerebral herniation or acute hydrocephalus. However, we may need to expand logistical supportinwe may need to expand logistical supporting hospitals or secure other transportation facilities because many of the patients with poor outcome can not return to their home islands. (author)

  6. Analysis of the standardization and centralization for cancer treatment in Nagasaki prefecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utada, Mai; Ohno, Yuko; Hori, Megumi; Soda, Midori; Suyama, Akihiko

    2010-01-01

    In medical care systems for cancer, it is important to consider the issues of standardization and centralization. In this study, we employed the Nagasaki Cancer Registry, which has a high registry rate, to investigate standardization and centralization for five major cancers, in addition to childhood malignancies (which are often rare types). Subjects were patients diagnosed with cancer and registered in the Nagasaki Cancer Registry between 1985 and 2004. For standardization, we calculated a Preference Index and five-year survival rate, and for centralization we investigated Pareto curves and Gini coefficients as well as the annual average number of cases per hospital. Results suggested that patients migrate to medical service areas different from where they reside in order to receive treatment at facilities thought to have a better record of treatment. In addition, while the number of patients and treatment facilities for childhood cancer was decreasing due to a decline in the number of children, the centralized tendency differed for the 12 diagnoses assessed. By conducting analyses based on population-based cancer registries using the evaluation methods employed in this study, it should be possible to investigate patients' migrant patterns, as well as to develop systems for providing medical care in secondary medical service areas. PMID:20843125

  7. Initial activities of a radiation emergency medical assistance team to Fukushima from Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an urgent response to serious radiological accidents in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the radiation emergency medical assistance team (REMAT) from Nagasaki University landed at Fukushima on March 14, 2011, two days after the initiation of radiation crisis by the hydrogen explosion at Unit-1 reactor. During a succession of unexpected disasters, REMAT members were involved in various activities for six days, such as setting the base for radiological triage at the Fukushima Medical University, considerations for administration of stable iodine, and risk communication with health care workers. This report briefly describes what happened around REMAT members and radiation doses measured during their activities. -- Highlights: ? The radiation emergency medical assistance team from Nagasaki was sent to Fukushima. ? The practical action level for body surface contamination was 100 kcpm. ? The ambient radiation dose in Fukushima drastically elevated on March 15, 2011. ? Higher than 10 kBq of I-131, Cs-134, and Cs-137 were detected in soil samples. ? The effective dose of the team members ranged between 51.7 and 127.8 ?Sv in 6 days

  8. Thermo-chronological study of hydrothermal systems and magma intrusion. ; Example from Goto-Fukue island, Nagasaki, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, K. (Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1992-08-31

    The geothermal history of altered granite porphyry in the Goto-Fukue Island was studied by fission track length analysis and K-Ar dating of hydrothermal minerals. The sample A not hydrothermally altered, the sample B greatly altered to form chlorite and the altered rock sample C composed of sericite were collected, and zircon separated from them were used for the fission track length analysis. The same samples were also dated by conventional K-Ar method. As a result, the date of 11.3 Ma for the sample A showed the timing of cooling down to 200[degree]C in the western part of the island after magma intrusion at nearly 15 Ma. The date of 6.6 Ma for the sample B suggested the reset by subsequent thermal events. The date of 14.5 Ma for sericite from the sample C indicated that sericite minerals were formed at nearly the same time as high temperature alteration. Therefore, in the eastern part of the island, although high level alteration occurred just after intrusion of granite porphyry, no subsequent thermal events could be detected. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  9. Historical review of radiation research in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outline of the history of radiation research in Japan is written in connection with the names of researchers. Yoshio Nishina was a pioneer, who derived the Klein-Nishina formula for the scattering of hard X-ray by free electrons. In 1935, the first nuclear experiment laboratory was constructed in the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research. Two cyclotrons, 26 in and 60 in pole face diameter, and a high voltage Cockcroft-Walton type ion accelerator were installed. Irradiation of insects and plants with fast neutrons was attempted to examine the biological effect. In August, 1945, atomic bombs exploded in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In 1950, radioisotopes were available. In early March, 1954, Bikini accident occurred. One fishing vessel was contaminated by radioactive fallout, and to investigate the effect of radioactivity, a committee consisted of investigators of physics, chemistry, medicine, biology, fisheries and geophysics was organized. The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute was established in June, 1956. Several institutions for the peaceful use of atomic energy were established. The hybrid spark chamber to image the distribution of ?-emitting isotopes on a plane surface was constructed in Nagoya University. As for the national project on food irradiation, one laboratory has played the role in irradiation techniques. Researches on radiation chemistry in universities, governmental and commercial organizations have been progressing steadily, and the machinbeen progressing steadily, and the machines for nanosecond to picosecond pulse radiolysis are working. (Yamashita, S.)

  10. Assessment of environmental radiation based on the geographical distributions of background ?-ray intensity and soil-type in Tokai-mura village and Hitachinaka City, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The background ?-ray intensity and chemical composition of soil was determined in the Naka terrace of Tokai-mura Village and Hitachinaka City, where many nuclear facilities are located. The aim of the sampling was to assess environmental radiation within the Naka terrace and the sites of nuclear facilities. The study was initiated following the JCO Criticality Accident on September 30th, 1999. ?-ray measurement and soil sampling were conducted at the nodes of a 500 m grid. The ?-ray intensity recorded at all sample points is less than the average radiation of Japanese granites and less than the typical radiation of humans as assessed by UNSCREA. The chemical characteristics of the soil are divided into 3 types. The distribution of both the soil types and background ?-ray intensity is controlled by geographical and geological factors. K2O and Rb concentrations within the soil show a good correlation with background ?-ray intensity. Our observations indicate that environmental radiation within the study area is derived principally from natural radioisotope radiation. (author)

  11. A review of 40 years studies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The late health effects of ionizing radiation have been studied by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) based on a fixed population of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki which had been established in 1950. The results thus far obtained up to the present can be classified into the following three categories: (1) The effects for which a strong association with atomic bomb radiation has been found include malignant neoplasms, cataracts, chromosomal aberrations, small head size and mental retardation among the in utero exposed. (2) A weak association has been found in the several sites of cancers, some non-cancer mortalities and immunological abnormalities. (3) No association has been observed in some types of leukemia, osteosarcoma, accelerated aging, sterility and hereditary effects

  12. Hospital and clinic survey estimates of medical X-ray exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical factors used during radiological examinations performed in Hiroshima and Nagasaki medical institutions were analyzed. The most frequently performed examination was chest radiography, followed by upper GI series. More than half the radiographic exposures were from upper GI series due to the many spot films made during fluoroscopy. Comparison of the present survey results with those of a previous one showed that relatively high kVp, low mAs and mA, and smaller field sizes are now more widely used. Though there have been decreased in fluoroscopy times and tube currents over the past 10 years, the numbers of spot films used have increased. Based on these technical factors, tables of organ doses from fluoroscopic examinations were compiled. (author)

  13. Recent re-assessments of the doses to survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to recalculations of the neutron output of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs, re-assessments of the doses to survivors are under review. The details of the sources of radiation, bombs and detonations are given. This is followed by a discussion of the doses received by the survivors due to the immediate photon and neutron emission from the bomb and subsequent fireball, and the interactions of these radiations with air, ground and other shielding material. There remains considerable uncertainty in the results of these new calculations. The re-assessment is still in progress and will need to include recalculations of shielding factors from the effects of terrain and buildings, and a consideration of kerma to organ dose conversion factors. (U.K.)

  14. Une catastrophe glorieuse : le martyre des premiers chrétiens du Japon, Nagasaki, 1597

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clotilde Jacquelard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Le naufrage du galion San Felipe dans le port de Urado (Shikoku, Japon en octobre 1596 fut le déclencheur d’un désastre missionnaire : le martyre de vingt-six chrétiens, franciscains espagnols et chrétiens japonais, à Nagasaki, le 5 février 1597. Cet article s’attache à examiner la relation dialectique entre les deux événements par l’étude de deux discours missionnaires franciscains hagiographiques. Il s’agit tout d’abord de rappeler la lecture providentialiste du temps à travers la perception de présages matériels et spirituels de la part des acteurs, puis de montrer que ces évènements paroxystiques révèlent en même temps qu’ils résolvent – temporairement – des tensions et des crises latentes, résultat de la confrontation entre plusieurs communautés culturelles comme la japonaise, l’espagnole et la portugaise, autour de prétentions géopolitiques, commerciales et religieuses dans cette zone de frontière de l’antiméridien du Pacifique nord.El naufragio del galeón San Felipe en el puerto de Urado (Shikoku, Japón en octubre de 1596 desembocó en un desastre misionero : el martirio de veintiséis cristianos, franciscanos españoles y cristianos japoneses, en Nagasaki, el 5 de febrero de 1597. Este artículo quiere examinar la relación dialéctica entre ambos acontecimientos, mediante el estudio de dos discursos misioneros franciscanos hagiográficos. Se trata de recordar primero la lectura providencialista de la época a través de la percepción de presagios tanto materiales como espirituales por parte de los actores, y mostrar luego que estos acontecimientos paroxísticos revelan, al mismo tiempo que resuelven –temporalmente– tensiones y crisis latentes, resultados de la confrontación de varias comunidades culturales como la japonesa, la española y la portuguesa, en torno a pretensiones geopolíticas, comerciales y religiosas en la zona fronteriza del antimeridiano del Pacífico norte.

  15. Effect on intelligence test score of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyses of intelligence test scores (Koga) at 10-11 years of age of individuals exposed prenatally to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki using estimates of the uterine absorbed dose based on the recently introduced system of dosimetry, the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86), reveal the following: 1) there is no evidence of a radiation-related effect on intelligence among those individuals exposed within 0-7 weeks after fertilization or in the 26th or subsequent weeks; 2) for individuals exposed at 8-15 weeks after fertilization, and to a lesser extent those exposed at 16-25 weeks, the mean tests scores but not the variances are significantly heterogeneous among exposure categories; 3) the cumulative distribution of test scores suggests a progressive shift downwards in individual scores with increasing exposure; and 4) within the group most sensitive to the occurrence of clinically recognizable severe mental retardation, individuals exposed 8 through 15 weeks after fertilization, the regression of intelligence score on estimated DS86 uterine absorbed dose is more linear than with T65DR fetal dose, the diminution in intelligence score under the linear model is 21-29 points at 1Gy. The effect is somewhat greater when the controls receiving less than 0.01 Gy are excluded, 24-33 points at 1 Gy. These findings are discussed in the light of the earlier analysis of the frequency of occurrence of mental retardation among the prenatally exposed survivors of the A-bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It is suggested that both are the consequences of the same underlying biological process or processes. (author)

  16. Study of skin cancer incidence in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors, 1958-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on skin cancer incidence in a cohort of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors in the Nagasaki Extended Life Span Study (LSS-E85) sample have been investigated. Among 25,942 exposed survivors at risk whose DS86 dose estimates were available, 47 cases of skin cancer including malignant melanoma were confirmed in the Nagasaki Tumor Registry during the period from 1 April 1958 to 31 December 1985. The dose-response relationship of skin cancer based on an additive relative risk model showed linearity without threshold, not a linear-quadratic curve. The excess relative risk (ERR) of 2.2 per gray in the LSS-E85 sample was highly significant (95% confidence limits: 0.5 to 5.0). In addition, the ERR of 3.1 per gray in the Adult Health Study (AHS) sample was also significant (95% confidence limits: 0.6 to 20.3). When dose equivalents based on a relative biological effectiveness of neutrons of 10 were used, the ERR in the former sample decreased to 2.0 per sievert (95% confidence limits: 0.7-4.5), and the risk in the latter group also declined, to 2.7 per sievert (95% confidence limits: 0.6-17.8). The ERRs did not differ significantly between males and females in the LSS-E85 and AHS samples, but a highly significant increase was observed for the ERR of age at exposure and time trend since exposure. The ERR of skin cancer cases including and excluding 4 malignant melanoma cases for the LSS-E85 sample (there were no malignant melanoma cases in the AHS sample) showed almost the same linear dose response. This is the first report to demonstrate a highly significant dose-response relationship between A-bomb exposure and skin cancer incidence. (author)

  17. Cytogenetic study of the offspring of atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the present study is to evaluate the radiation sensitivity of human germ-cell chromosomes by measuring the frequency of children with chromosome changes in structure or number induced by radiation in the germ cells of exposed parents. It is expected that stable chromosome aberrations, if induced in the germ cells, would be mot likely transmitted to the offspring. Although there is no evidence of chromosome aneuploidy being induced by radiation exposure in humans, it is difficult to exclude the possibility that abnormalities, such as XYY and XXX, would be induced in the offspring. The present chapter describes the results of somatic chromosome analysis of 8,322 children born to A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Hagasaki and 7,976 children born to parents who had received less than 1 rad (distally exposed) or were not in the cities (NIC) at the time of the bomb (ATB). Chromosome analyses were based mostly on nonbanded preparations throughout the study. Because of the recent, extensive reassessment of A-bomb dosimetry by a US-Japan team of experts, the present study samples have been divided into exposed and control groups based on the T65DR system that has been routinely used until recently at RERF. The data base for the new DS86 dose system has been entered into the RERF computer; however, calculations of the individual dose estimates for each survivor are now in progress, but are not available at this time. For this reason, no attempt has been mae. For this reason, no attempt has been made to analyze the present data in terms of parental radiation doses

  18. A survey of dietary intake of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and dioxin-like coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls from food during 2000-2002 in Osaka City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Ogaki, Sumiko

    2011-04-01

    Studies of the dietary intake of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and dioxin-like coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (dioxin-like PCBs), collectively referred as dioxins, were conducted using the total diet study (TDS) method with food purchased in Osaka City, Japan during 2000-2002. The daily intake of dioxin-TEQ (toxic equivalent) from food per adult person was estimated respectively as 104.24 pg TEQ/person/day in 2000, 72.73 pg TEQ/person/day in 2001, and 87.28 pg TEQ/person/day in 2002, corresponding to 2.08, 1.45, and 1.74 pg TEQ/kg body weight (bw)/day for an adult weighing 50 kg. The highest contribution ratio to the total intake of dioxin-TEQ was from fish and shellfish (group 10) in each year, accounting for 77-92%. The next highest contributor was meat and eggs (groups 11-A and 11-B). An annual decrease of the intake of dioxin-TEQ was not observed clearly. Otherwise, the dietary intake of non-2,3,7,8-substituted PCDDs/PCDFs were estimated together. The intake of 1,3,6,8-TeCDD came mostly from intake of fish and shellfish (group 10), green vegetable (group 7), and the other vegetables, including mushrooms and seaweed (group 8). In addition, the intake of 1,3,6,8-TeCDF, which reportedly antagonizes 2,3,7,8-TeCDD-mediated aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) induction activities, was an insufficient amount to suppress 2,3,7,8-TeCDD-mediated activities. Furthermore, we discussed different TEQ compositions of PCDDs/PCDFs to dioxin-like PCBs from food intake and in human samples and inferred that the difference was caused by low bioaccumulation properties of 3,3',4,4',5-PeCB (PCB 126). PMID:20589371

  19. Japan earthquake: Footage of moment tsunami hit

    Science.gov (United States)

    BBC

    This video footage shows the force at which the tsunami struck Japan's coast. In the fishing port of Miyako, in Iwate prefecture, boats were overturned, while video from Kamaishi city shows cars being dragged down city streets by the water. The tsunami that followed the 8.9-magnitude earthquake wreaked havoc along a huge stretch of Japan's north-east coast, sweeping far inland and devastating a number of towns and villages. Powerful aftershocks are continuing to hit the region. Footage courtesy of TV Asahi and TBS

  20. Biomarkers of Radiosensitivity in A-Bomb Survivors Pregnant at the Time of Bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    OpenAIRE

    Masazumi Akahoshi; Saeko Fujiwara; Kei Nakachi; Yoichiro Kusonoki; Thomas Seed; Yoshiaki Kodama; Eiji Nakashima; Naoko Kamada; Sachiyo Funamoto; Yoshimi Tatsukawa; Miles, Edward F.; Kazuo Neriishi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. There is evidence in the literature of increased maternal radiosensitivity during pregnancy. Materials and Methods. We tested this hypothesis using information from the atomic-bomb survivor cohort, that is, the Adult Health Study database at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, which contains data from a cohort of women who were pregnant at the time of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Previous evaluation has demonstrated long-term radiation dose-response effects. Result...

  1. Wind Energy Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsubara, Kazuyo [Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    An overview is given of wind energy in Japan: Background; Wind Energy in Japan; Japanese Wind Energy Industry; Government Supports; Useful Links; Major Japanese Companies; Profiles of Major Japanese Companies; Major Wind Energy Projects in Japan.

  2. The earliest telescope preserved in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tsuko

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes the antique telescope owned by one of Japan's major feudal warlords, Tokugawa Yoshinao. As he died in 1650, this means that this telescope was produced in or before that year. Our recent investigation of the telescope revealed that it is of Schyrlean type, consisting of four convex lenses, so that it gives erect images with a measured magnifying power of 3.9 (± 0.2-0.3). This also implies that Yoshinao's telescope could be one of the earliest Schyrlean telescopes ever. The design, fabrication technique, and the surface decoration of the telescopic tube and caps all suggest that it is not a Western make at all, but was produced probably under the guidance of a Chinese Jesuit missionary or by the Chinese, in Suzhou or Hangzhou in Zhejiang province, China, or in Nagasaki. Following descriptions in the Japanese and Chinese historical literature, we also discuss the possibility that production of Schyrlean-type telescopes started independently in the Far East nearly simultaneously with the publication of Oculus Enoch et Eliae by Anton Maria Schyrle in 1645.

  3. Autopsy studies of Hashimoto's thyroiditis in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (1954-1974)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors examined 155 autopsy cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis in the Life Span Study sample including both A-bomb survivors and controls in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (1954 to 1974). Hashimoto's thyroiditis was classified into lymphoid, diffuse and fibrous types and the following results were obtained. No difference existed in the effects of A-bomb radiation in the incidence and ATB (At the time of the A-bomb). The ration of males to females did not reveal statistical significance, even though reversed ratio was noted in the high dose group. The variation of thyroid gland weight in T65 dose or by variant showed no significant pattern, even though the smallest average weight was found in the highest radiation exposure group. The complication in the patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis were noted to have high prevalance of ovarian cancer and low prevalence of stomach cancer and total cancer. Only two patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis were found to be complicated with thyroid carcinoma. Among collagen diseases, the prevalence of rheumatic fever and rheumatoid arthritis was high as complication. And the prevance of combined diseases suggested that no late effect of A-bomb radiation existed. (author)

  4. Myelodysplastic syndromes in atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki. A preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogenous hematological group characterized by an ineffective hematopoiesis resulting in a variety of cytopenias, morphological abnormalities of blood cells, chromosomal aberrations, and an increases risk of transformation into acute myeloid leukemia. Despite of its nature of close relation to leukemia, MDS has been not well investigated in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. We conducted a retrospective cohort study with over 80,000 A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki to assess the incidence of MDS and its relation with A-bomb exposure status. In a preliminary analysis, we confirmed 162 MDS cases during 1980 to 2004. The median age at diagnosis was 71 years old. The incidence rate was higher in men than women, and an inverse relationship was observed between incidence of MDS and the distance from the hypocenter. We suggest that A-bomb radiation may affect the occurrence of MDS in A-bomb survivors even more than 50 years passed after the explosion. Further detail analyses are necessary to confirm these results. (author)

  5. Cigarette smoking and radiation exposure in relation to cancer mortality, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer mortality among 40,498 Hiroshima and Nagasaki residents was examined in relation to cigarette smoking habits and estimated atomic bomb radiation exposure. Relative risk models that are either multiplicative or additive in the two exposures (smoking radiation) were emphasized. Most analyses were directed toward all nonhematologic cancer, stomach cancer, lung cancer, or digestive cancer other than stomach, for which there were, respectively, 1,725, 658, 281, and 338 deaths in the follow-up period of this study. Persons heavily exposed to both cigarette smoke and radiation were found to have significantly lower cancer mortality than multiplcative relative risk models would suggest for all nonhematologic cancer, stomach cancer, and digestive cancer other than stomach. Surprisingly, the relative risk function appeared not only to be submultiplicative for these cancer sites, but to be subadditive as well. The lung cancer relative risk function could not be distinguished from either a multiplicative or an additive form. The number of deaths was sufficient to permit some more detailed study of all nonhematologic cancer mortality: Relative risk functions appeared to be consistent between males and females though a paucity of heavy smoking females limits the precision of this comparison. (author)

  6. Cancer of the head and neck in atomic bomb survivors: Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1957-1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A search was conducted in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for all cases of cancer of the lip, nose and nasal cavity, accessory sinuses, larynx, and the oral cavity and pharynx with their subdivisions occurring during the period 1957-1976 among a large, fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors. A total of 232 cases were identified, of which 154 (66.4%) were histologically confirmed (definite cases). Among definite cases, cancer of the epiglottis and larynx predominated (31.2%), followed by accessory sinus (24.7%) and tongue (18.8%). Of the 154 definite cases, 141 (91.6%) were squamous-cell carcinomas. Only two sarcomas were identified, neither of which was attributable to radiation exposure. Analysis of both total and definite cases, by both total group and major anatomic site, failed to reveal definite evidence of a radiation relationship. Although a suggestive relationship to radiation dose was found for accessory sinus cancers (P . 0.06) among the definite cases, inconsistencies in the data do not permit the conclusion that the incidence of tumors in this group increased as a result of atomic bomb radiation exposure. The medical literature concerning post-irradiation head and neck tumors is briefly reviewed

  7. Specific radioactivity of europium-152 in roof tiles exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Takashi; Miwa, Kentaroh; Ohki, Rika [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1998-12-01

    Specific radioactivities of residual europium (Eu)-152 were measured in six roof tile samples exposed to the Nagasaki atomic bomb at two locations. The ground distances of the two locations from the hypocenter are 1020 m and 1060 m. In order to obtain reliable data, Eu-enriched samples (from 207 to 855 mg) were prepared by separating Eu from each roof tile sample (from 1 to 2 kg). For the major aliquot of the Eu-enriched sample, residual radioactivity of {sup 152}Eu was measured using a low-energy photon spectrometer. For the minor aliquot of the Eu-enriched sample, Eu content was determined by neutron activation analysis. Results of the specific radioactivity ({sup 152}Eu/Eu, Bq mg{sup -1}) corrected to the time of bombing were in a range from 0.080 to 0.446. Although the measured values showed some scattering, they are moderately consistent with the calculated values by the DS86 methodology, i.e. the average ratio of the calculated to measured values is 1.3{+-}0.8. (author)

  8. Improved Accuracy in the Measurement of {sup 152}Eu Induced by Atomic Bomb Neutrons in Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iimoto, T.; Kosako, T.; Shida, K.; Eguchi, H

    1999-07-01

    {sup 152}Eu activities induced by the atomic explosion in Nagasaki, have been experimentally estimated in two roof tiles in order to improve the accuracy of the former data about positions distant from the epicentre (at 1100 m) as the slant distance. Several aspects causing estimation errors have been discussed in more detail: i.e. influence of the natural background nuclides such as {sup 210}Bi, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 212}Bi and {sup 138}La, and half-life selection of {sup 152}Eu. As a result, the value of {sup 152}Eu/Eu (i.e. ratio of the {sup 152}Eu activity to total Eu) has been estimated to be 0.336 {+-} 0.032 (Sample A) and 0.491 {+-} 0.040 (Sample B) Bq.mg{sup -1} as the values at the time of the bombing. In a comparison between the experimental values and the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) calculation, the ratio between DS86 calculations and the present work is estimated to be 0.40-0.58. More detailed discussion on the dose estimation of thermal neutrons might be needed for the improvement of the DS86 system. (author)

  9. Outline on populations of Nagasaki A-bomb survivors and sex ratio in their children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of file delivered together with A-bomb surrivor's health Cards in Nagasaki, statistical management was performed on a mass of A-bomb survivors. The number of A-bomb survivors in a mass was 97,032. A family investigation by census registration was performed on 2,547 of A-bomb survivor group (the distance from the center of explosion recorded on cards was within 1.5 km) and 2,791 of its control group. As to 2,547 of A-bomb survivor group, each exposure place was determined, the distance from the center of explosion was measured again, and exposure dose was presumed. The mean exposure dose of A-bomb survivor group was 577 rad in male, and 681 rad in female. By adding A-bomb survivor group to the control group, 4,452 pairs of marriage were confirmed by census registration, and the number of their children was 10,073. With respect to changes of sex ratio, in case of exposed mother, it was expected theoretically that the number of male would decrease together with an decrease of dose, but an opposite change was recognized in a result of the investigation. A result in case of exposed father showed an increase of the male number although not significantly and a change towards the expected direction. (Tsunoda, M.)

  10. Reassessment of radiation dosimetry for the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new dosimetry system DS 86 for the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings differs considerably from the former T 65 D dosimetry system in the following items: 1) Improved simulation of the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima has corrected the neutron dose contribution to much lower values, and the free-field gamma radiation dose to higher values. 2) The gamma radiation shielding effect by buildings has been much stronger, and was assessed so far to be weaker, as the old system estimated the shielding factors for a neutron and gamma radiation field in which the neutron contribution was relatively high. 3) Organ doses per kerma in free air are clearly higher, presumably because earlier calculations have been based on a different energy spectrum. Assuming a quality factor Q = 10 for neutrons, especially for distances around 1000 m from the Hiroshima explosion calculations have revealed lower dose equivalents for the red bone marrow, the thyroid, the lungs, and the breast. There is difference calculated by the new system with regard to more deeper lying body organs such as the gastrointestinal tract. (orig.)

  11. Determinations of organ or tissue doses to survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of risk estimates from radiation carcinogenesis including leukemogenesis and radiation genetic effects, the biological significant dose is not the tissue kerma in air but the absorbed dose in organ or tissue with respect to carcinogenic and leukemogenic effects or genetic effects. In order to estimate organ or tissue dose from the tissue kerma in air, a ratio of the organ or tissue dose to the tissue kerma in air for survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was calculated with the aid of the Snyder's mathematical phantoms constructed so as to simulate the body shape of survivors aged 5, 10 years old and adult at the time of atomic bomb detonations. The ratios were corrected for the angular distribution of atomic bomb radiations, assuming an anisotropic angular distribution for the survivors exposed to the atomic bombs in open air and the isotropic distribution for the survivors incide a Japanese house or other structures. The resultant ratios are tabulated as a function of incident angles on survivors for gamma-rays and neutrons. The ratios for neutrons were categorized according to the type of interaction of neutrons with tissue elements. It is noted that the ratios for survivors exposed as children and juveniles were significantly higher than those for survivors exposed as adults. (author)

  12. Earthquake Early Warning Starts Nationwide in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshiba, Mitsuyuki; Kamigaichi, Osamu; Saito, Makoto; Tsukada, Shin'ya; Hamada, Nobuo

    2008-02-01

    When an earthquake occurs, a certain amount of time elapses before destructive seismic energy hits nearby population centers. Though this time is measured on the order of seconds, depending on the proximity of the rupture to a given city or town, a new public safety program in Japan is taking advantage of the fact that seismic energy travels slower than electronic communication.

  13. Evolutionary pattern of the hemagglutinin gene of influenza B viruses isolated in Japan: cocirculating lineages in the same epidemic season.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanegae, Y; Sugita, S.; Endo, A.; Ishida, M.; Senya, S; Osako, K; Nerome, K.; A. Oya

    1990-01-01

    The unexpectedly low efficacy of influenza vaccine during school outbreaks of influenza B virus in the spring of 1987 in Japan was probably attributable to a poor antibody response of vaccinees to the epidemic viruses. An antigenic analysis of the causative B viruses isolated in 1987 and 1988 showed much variation in hemagglutination inhibition patterns. The nucleotide sequences that code for the HA1 domain of B/Fukuoka/c-27/81, B/Ibaraki/2/85, B/Nagasaki/1/87, and B/Yamagata/16/88 viruses we...

  14. The observed relationship between the occurrence of acute radiation sickness and subsequent cancer mortality among A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an analysis of data obtained from the Life Span Study, a follow-up study of a fixed population of 73,330 atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the slope of a linear dose response between the estimated dose of ionizing radiation and leukemia mortality was found to be steeper (p 0.2) by the presence of epilation. The results for leukemia were not modified by age or sex and were consistent in both cities. These observations suggest that those individuals who experienced early effects of radiation were more likely to die of leukemia during the follow-up period than individuals who were exposed to the same level of A-bomb radiation but did not develop epilation. The robustness of this finding on the interaction of two difficult but important problems was investigated. These were the validity of a linear dose-response model for leukemia, and the level of assumed precision of the radiation dosimetry system used for assignment of dose estimates to individual survivors. Assuming 35 % random dose errors and a dose-response function cubic in dose, the excess relative risk for leukemia was still estimated to be 1.89 times higher for the group with epilation, and the p-value for a test of association between leukemia and epilation remained significant at the 0.10 level. If 50 % random dosimetry errors are assumed using the same cubic model, the dose response in the epilation group is estimated to be 1.58 times higher than the others, but is not significant (p < 0.3). (author)

  15. A study of plutonium fallout in japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monthly fall rate of 239+240Pu in Tokyo and Tsukuba Science City during January 1974 through December 1980 is given. The cumulative amount of plutonium fallout in Tokyo from the beginning of nuclear detonations to the end of 1980 is estimated to be about 1.2 m Ci/km2. The ratio of 239+240Pu to 90Sr deposition during the same period was about 1.6 %. Samples collected at Akita, the Japan Sea side of Honshu Island, Japan, during 1963 to 1964 indicate that the fall rate of plutonium isotopes is about 2 times higher than that in Tokyo. After the removal of our Institution to Tsukuba Science City, about 60 km north of Tokyo, the sampling and analysis of plutonium isotopes were continued and it was confirmed that the amount of plutonium deposition in both cities are in good agreement with each other. (author)

  16. Statement by IAEA Director General on the 60th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: No one who has seen the victims, the film footage or photographs of the aftermath of the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the end of World War II can fail to be horrified by the devastation that was wrought by the use of nuclear weapons. To date, Hiroshima and Nagasaki thankfully remain the only instances in which nuclear weapons have been used, and while it is difficult to speak of any good coming out of such ruin, it has always been hoped that the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki stand as constant reminders of why preventing the further use and proliferation of such weapons - and why nuclear disarmament leading to a nuclear-weapon-free world - is of utmost importance for the survival of humankind and planet Earth. The International Atomic Energy Agency born out of President Eisenhower's 'Atoms for Peace' vision, came at a time when the horrifying consequences and images of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were still fresh. Through its safeguards and verification system in support of the 1968 Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and other similar non-proliferation agreements, the IAEA has done a great deal of work to help stem the tide of nuclear proliferation, while ensuring that the benefits of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy are made available to all those who want them. While the Agency can effectively verify compliance with non-proliferation undertakings, the value of these efforts can be better realized if they are reinforced by all other components of the nuclear non-proliferation and arms control regime, and accompanied by the political will and dialogue among concerned States to address underlying issues of security and confidence building with a view to achieving a system of collective security that no longer relies on nuclear weapons. A world without nuclear weapons remains a far-off goal and the world continues to be burdened with nearly thirty thousand nuclear warheads. The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty has not entered into force and the negotiation of a global treaty on the verified production ban on fissile material for nuclear weapons has not started. Despite these continuing challenges, there are symbols of hope and indicators of the path to follow - the NPT is almost universal, and nuclear-weapon-free zones cover all of the landmass of the southern hemisphere. We should remain humbled by what we have learned from the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We cannot allow sixty years to soften our memories of how devastating such weapons are. Let us instead ensure that the memories of what happened sixty years ago are once again a catalyst for a new way of thinking. The best protection against nuclear weapons, and the only way to prevent future Hiroshimas and Nagasakis, is to bring about an end to all nuclear weapons. Let us renew today - on the 60th anniversary of the first use of nuclear weapons - the promise to the peoples of the world to spare no effort to work collectively to reduce and eliminate nuclear weapons. (IAEA)

  17. Late radiation responses in man: Current evaluation from results from Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schull, William J.

    Among the late effects of exposure to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, none looms larger than radiation related malignancies. Indeed, the late effects of A-bomb radiation on mortality appear to be limited to an increase in malignant tumors. At present, it can be shown that cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, lungs, stomach, thyroid, and urinary tract as well as leukemia and multiple myeloma increase in frequency with an increase in exposure. No significant relationship to radiation can as yet be established for malignant lymphoma, nor cancers of the rectum, pancreas or uterus. Radiation induced malignancies other than leukemia seem to develop proportionally to the natural cancer rate for the attained age. For specific age-at-death intervals, both relative and absolute risks tend to be higher for those of younger age at the time of bombing. Other late effects include radiation-related lenticular opacities, disturbances of growth among those survivors still growing at the time of exposure, and mental retardation and small head sizes among the in utero exposed. Chromosomal abnormalities too are more frequently encountered in the peripheral leucocytes of survivors, and this increase is functionally related to their exposure. Some uncertainty continues to surround both the quantity and quality of the radiation released by these two nuclear devices, particularly the Hiroshima bomb. A recent reassessment suggests that the gamma radiation estimates which have been used in the past may be too low at some distances and the neutron radiation estimates too high at all distances; moreover, the energies of the neutrons released now appear ``softer'' than previously conjectured. These uncertainties not sufficiently large, however, to compromise the reality of the increased frequency of malignancy, but make estimates of the dose response, particularly in terms of gamma and neutron exposures, tentative.

  18. Severe mental retardation among the prenatally exposed survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In March 1986, as a result of a comprehensive reevaluatioin of the exposures of the survivors of the A-bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a new method for the estimation of individual doses was introduced, termed the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86). In the new system they are computed individually without the use generally of explicit, average correction factors and thus allow better for the scattering of radiant energy that occurs within tissues. The comparisons described here rest on the computed dose to the mother's uterus. The DS86 sample itself consists of 1,544 individuals (96.6 %) of the 1,598 belonging to the clinical sample on whom T65DR doses are available. A variety of models with and without a threshold have been fitted to the individual as well as grouped dose data to ascertain the most suitable dose-response relationship. Briefly the findings of this comparison are as follows: The risk of severe mental retardation due to radiation exposure changes little from one dosimetric system to the other. The highest risk of radiation damage to the embryonic and fetal brain occurs 8 - 15 weeks after fertilization under both the T65DR and DS86 systems. Somewhat more evidence exists under the DS86 system of a threshold to the dose-response relationship in the 8 - 15 week interval than existed with the T65DR doses. However, the location and reality of the threshold are difficult to assess. Damage to the fetus 16 - 25 weeks after fertilization seems linear-quadratically or quadratically related to dose, especially in the DS86 sample, and suggests a threshold in the neighborhood of 0.70 Gy (DS86 dose), under a linear model using the individual dose data, with a lower 95 % confidence bound of 0.21 Gy. Grouped dose data give the same lower bound, but an estimate of the threshold of 0.64 Gy. (author)

  19. Primary intracranial tumors among atomic bomb survivors and controls, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1961-75

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis was made of the relationship of radiation dose to the occurrence of primary intracranial tumors among atomic bomb survivors and nonexposed controls, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in the fixed cohort of the Life Span Study (LSS) extended sample during the period 1961-75, or 16 to 30 years after the A-bombs. Based on various medical sources, 104 cases of primary intracranial tumors were identified among approximately 99,000 LSS extended sample members who were alive as of 1 January 1961. Of these 104 cases, 45 had manifested clinical signs of brain tumors, but, 59 cases were identified incidentally at postmortem examination. The distributions of morphologic type, age, and size of tumor were quite different for those primary intracranial tumors with and without a clinical sign of brain tumor. Glioma was the most frequent type of tumor with a clinical sign and meningioma was the most frequent type without. In relation to radiation dose the incidence rate of primary intracranial tumors with a clinical sign showed a significant excess risk for males in the high dose group who received 100 rad or more after adjustment for age at the time of the bomb (ATB). The standardized relative risk is around 5 in this group. The data also suggest that the crude relative risk of glioma is greater in the high dose group for younger ages ATB. However, there is no increased risk in females. Among the 5,012 autopsy subjects in the LSS extended sample during 1961-75, there is no relationship between radiation dose and the prevalence rate of primary intracranial tumors in those identified incidentally by autopsy. The relative risk of subclinical adenoma of the pituitary gland between high dose subjects and controls was also examined for a sample of 95 sex- and age-matched pairs using Hiroshima autopsy materials for 1961-74, but no relationship to dose was observed. (author)

  20. Relationship of cigarette smoking and radiation exposure to cancer mortality in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer mortality among 40,498 Hiroshima and Nagasaki residents was examined in relation to cigarette smoking habits and estimated atomic bomb radiation exposure level. Relative risk (RR) models that are either multiplicative or additive in the two exposures were emphasized. Most analyses were directed toward all nonhematologic (ANH) cancer, stomach cancer, lung cancer, or digestive tract cancer other than stomach cancer, for which there were, respectively, 1,725, 658, 281, and 338 deaths in the follow-up period for this study. Persons heavily exposed to both cigarette smoke and radiation were found to have significantly lower cancer mortality than multiplicative RR models would suggest for ANH cancer, stomach cancer, and digestive tract cancer other than stomach cancer. Surprisingly, the RR function appeared not only to be submultiplicative for some of these cancer site categories but also may be subadditive. The lung cancer RR function could not be distinguished from either a multiplicative or an additive form. The number of deaths was sufficient to permit some more detailed study of ANH cancer mortality: RR functions appeared to be consistent between males and females, though a paucity of heavy smoking females limits the precision of this comparison. The submultiplicative nature of the RR function mentioned above was particularly pronounced among persons who were relatively young (less than or equal to 30 yr of age) at the time of radiation exposure. The RR functionime of radiation exposure. The RR function for these younger subjects depends strongly on both radiation and cigarette smoke exposure levels. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to human carcinogenesis models. As a byproduct, cancer mortality of several sites is significantly related to radiation exposure in this population, after accommodation for the possible confounding effects of cigarette smoking

  1. Landslides in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    This internet site, published by The Japan Landslide Society, focues on the current understanding of landslide origin, and discusses some of the problems concerning landslide investigations and research in Japan.

  2. Reclassification of leukemia among A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki using French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concordance rate for diagnoses of atomic bomb-related cases of leukemia in Nagasaki was determined using the French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Two Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) hematologists and one of the members (JMB) of the FAB cooperative group reviewed independently the peripheral blood and/or bone marrow smears from 193 people with leukemia or a related disorder. There was 85 % agreement in the identification of types and subtypes of acute leukemia. There was almost complete agreement for the diagnoses of non-FAB disorders (chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and others) resulting in overall concordance of 88.2 %. The present study suggest that the previously established leukemia types for about a quarter of the cases of acute leukemia and related disorders except CML should be changed. Considerable numbers of cases of ATL and MDS were involved in this series. The frequency of the former disease was not high in the high-dose irradiated group, but that of the latter was considerably high. All subtypes of AML except M3 and M6 were present in the high-dose group. The striking difference in CML incidence between Nagasaki and Hiroshima may continue to be a problem in relation to biological response to radiation exposure. (author)

  3. Tissue kerma vs distance relationships for initial nuclear radiation from the atomic devices detonated over Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial nuclear radiation is comprised of prompt neutrons and prompt primary gammas from an exploding nuclear device, prompt secondary gammas produced by neutron interactions in the environment, and delayed neutrons and delayed fission-product gammas from the fireball formed after the nuclear device explodes. These various components must all be considered in establishing tissue kerma vs distance relationships which describe the decrease of initial nuclear radiation with distance in Hiroshima and in Nagasaki. The tissue kerma at ground evel from delayed fission-product gammas and delayed neutrons was investigated using the NUIDEA code developed by Science Applications, Inc. This code incorporates very detailed models which can take into account such features as the rise of the fireball, the rapid radioactive decay of fission products in it, and the perturbation of the atmosphere by the explosion. Tissue kerma vs distance relationships obtained by summing results of these current state-of-the-art calculations will be discussed. Our results clearly show that the prompt secondary gammas and delayed fission-product gammas are the dominant components of total tissue kerma from initial nuclear radiation in the cases of the atomic (or pure-fission) devices detonated over Hiroshima and Nagasaki

  4. Academic Libraries in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Rowena; Nagata, Haruki

    2008-01-01

    Academic libraries in Japan are well resourced by international standards, and support Japan's internationally recognized research capability well, but there are also ways in which they reflect Japan's strong bureaucratic culture. Recent changes to the status of national university libraries have seen a new interest in customer service, and…

  5. Bank of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Bank of Japan serves as Japan's central bank. The web site contains publications such as Quarterly Economic Outlook, Balance of Payments Monthly, and Economic Statistics Monthly. Visitors can also find press releases, Governor's speeches and statistics on prices, money, interest rates, exchange rates, and the Bank of Japan accounts.

  6. RBE of neutrons in cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-78

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons in cancer mortality in the period 1950-78 in a fixed cohort of 109,000 individuals is reported. The RBE of neutrons has been estimated by fitting several models to the dose-response curves in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for leukemia, lung, breast, and stomach cancers where the dose-response relationship has been confirmed and for cancers of all sites other than leukemia. A simple additive model was used because two other models where mortality is assumed to level off in the high dose group due to cell killing fit closely resembling the simple additive model. Thus, primarily, the L-L model where mortality is assumed to increase linearly with gamma and neutron doses and the Q-L model where mortality increases proportionally to the square of the gamma dose and linearly with the neutron dose were used. Since the observations on cancers of all sites fit both the L-L and Q-L models, the RBE was estimated for both. The RBE based on the kerma dose (and tissue dose) is leukemia 7.3 (14.7), stomach cancer 3.0 (7.4), lung cancer 2.2 (4.7), and breast cancer 4.6 (6.5) using the L-L model. Under the Q-L model, the RBE is dose dependent and decreases with increasing dose. At 100 rad it is 5.1 (5.5), 3.1 (3.4), 8.3 (9.2), and 11.6 (12.7), respectively. The L-Q-L model where mortality increases with the gamma dose and its square, and linearly with the neutron dose, fits better than either the L-L model or the Q-L model for the data on cancer other than leukemia. However, one or the other of the two estimated coefficients associated with the gamma dose are negative. (author)

  7. Neurological deficit among the survivors exposed in utero to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: A reassessment and new directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive epidemiological and experimental literature records the deleterious effects on the embryonic and fetal central nervous system of exposure to ionizing radiation; much of the human evidence stems from studies of the in utero exposed survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. (orig./MG)

  8. City age and city size

    OpenAIRE

    Giesen, Kristian; Suedekum, Jens

    2013-01-01

    There has been vast interest in the distribution of city sizes in an economy, but this research has largely neglected that cities also diff er along another fundamental dimension: age. Using novel data on the foundation dates of almost 8,000 American cities, we fi nd that older cities in the US tend to be larger than younger ones. To take this nexus between city age and city size into account, we introduce endogenous city creation into a dynamic economic model of an urban system. The city siz...

  9. Education Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaked, Haim

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several cities in Israel have labeled themselves "Education Cities," concentrating on education as their central theme. Employing qualitative techniques, this article aims to describe, define, and conceptualize this phenomenon as it is being realized in three such cities. Findings show that Education Cities differ from…

  10. Kids Web Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managed by the Japan Center for Intercultural Communications, the Kids Web Japan site introduces schoolchildren aged between 10 and 14 to the country of Japan. The main page offers links to information about the physical and cultural aspects of the country, including its nature and climate, history, traditions, daily life, and more. Each subject contains a description, beautiful photographs, and questions that kids can answer. Other features include several maps, games, a cookbook for kids, language lab, and much more.

  11. Survival experience of atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1951 - 76

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a review of the experience of persons in the Life Span Study sample exposed to the atomic bombs in 1945 as reflected by survival rates for the period 1951-76. The greatest effect is on the population less than 10 years of age at the time of the bombs (ATB) exposed to 100 rad or more. The survival rates for both sexes in the two cities declined significantly below those for the controls. This change occurred after a latent period. There has been an unusual acceleration in the decline in survival rates for the group aged 25 - 44 years ATB but this does not appear to be raidation related inasmuch as both the exposed and nonexposed populations in the two cities are similarly affected. (author)

  12. Depleted uranium in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, depleted uranium ammunition is regarded as nuclear weapons and meets with fierce opposition. The fact that US Marines mistakenly fired bullets containing depleted uranium on an island off Okinawa during training exercises in December 1995 and January 1996, also contributes. The overall situation in this area in Japan is outlined. (P.A.)

  13. Japan and LPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 20 million metric tonnes of Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG) are consumed each year in Japan, of which 14,5 million metric tonnes are imported from Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates. This paper presents LPG industry in Japan and gives informations on the present status: supply and demand, imports, market, distribution

  14. Japan's plutonium glut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear plans in Japan, France and Britain are set to produce large quantities of plutonium in the 1990s. It is argued that this plutonium will be surplus to requirements, and very difficult to use. It will pose political and security problems, particularly for Japan. (author)

  15. Energy education in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, there is a substantial lack of systematic and continuing education regarding energy issues in schools. Energy education based on a systematic curriculum from a global point of view should be planned and realized. The present status of nuclear power education in Japan is surveyed. The organization and activities of an experimental training session on nuclear reactors are presented. (R.P.)

  16. Analysis of tooth decay data in Japan using asymmetric statistical models

    OpenAIRE

    Tomizawa S; Yamamoto K

    2012-01-01

    Kouji Yamamoto,1 Sadao Tomizawa21Department of Medical Innovation, Osaka University Hospital, Osaka, 2Department of Information Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Noda City, Chiba, JapanBackground: The aim of the present paper was to develop two new asymmetry probability models to analyze data for tooth decay from 363 women and 349 men aged 18–39 years who visited a dental clinic in Sapporo City, Japan, from 2001 to 2005.Methods: We analyzed th...

  17. Long-term Radiation-Related Health Effects in a Unique Human Population: Lessons Learned from the Atomic Bomb Survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    OpenAIRE

    Douple, Evan B.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Cullings, Harry M.; Preston, Dale L.; Kodama, Kazunori; Shimizu, Yukiko; Fujiwara, Saeko; Shore, Roy E.

    2011-01-01

    For 63 years scientists in the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, have been assessing the long-term health effects in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and in their children. The identification and follow-up of a large population (approximately a total of 200 000, of whom more than 40% are alive today) that includes a broad range of ages and radiation exposure doses, and healthy representatives of both sex...

  18. Energy policy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the seventies, Japan could reduce its general dependence on imports of crude oil for the entire power supply in the country. Simultaneously, Japan could diversify the imports of energy from the Middle East to a certain extent and concerning to new sources of energy. The regional dependence on imported resources of energy was regionally concentrated to a substantial extent. Important changes of the regional dependence of imports were observed in certain periods of time. Under this aspect, the author of the contribution under consideration reports on the energy policy of Japan. Especially, the author reports on the following aspects: (a) Challenges in the 21st century concerning to the national energy security; (b) Uncertainties with the future nuclear energy option and the regional distrust into of Japan civilian nuclear activities; (c) Japan's oil diplomacy and gas diplomacy. Despite the decrease of the dependence on crude oil by diversification into other sources of energy, the energy security of Japan is still threatened. So the dependence on imports of crude oil from the Middle East is still raised and could rise between the years 2010 and 2020. However, the greatest uncertainties exist in connection with the future of the own nuclear industry. Over the medium-term, Japan depends on the development of the nuclear energy if a stable power supply should be ensured

  19. Studies of the mortality of A-bomb survivors, report 7. Part III. incidence of cancer in 1959-1978, based on the tumor registry, Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of malignant tumors in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Life Span Study (LSS) sample in Nagasaki as revealed by the Nagasaki Tumor Registry was investigated for the period 1959-1978. (1) No bias in exposure status in data collection was revealed. Neither method of diagnosis nor reporting hospitals nor the frequency of doubtful cases differ by exposure dose. (2) The risk of radiogenic cancer definitely increases with radiation dose for leukemia, cancers of the breast, lung, stomach, and thyroid, and suggestively so for cancers of the colon and urinary tract and multiple myeloma. However, no increase is seen for cancer of the esophagus, liver, gall bladder, uterus, ovary, or salivary gland or for malignant lymphoma. (3) In general, the relative risks based on incidence, that is, on the tumor registry data, are either the same or somewhat higher than those based on mortality in the same years; however, the absolute risk estimates [excess cancer per 10(6) Person Year Rad (PYR)] are far higher. (4) Since A-bomb radiation in Nagasaki consisted essentially of gamma rays, the present report provides a good opportunity to examine the shape of the dose-response curve for gamma exposures. Unfortunately, statistically one cannot actually distinguish one model from another among a simple linear, a quadratic, or a linear quadratic response. Further data are obviously necessary

  20. Urinary bladder tumors among atomic bomb survivors Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1961-1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the relationship of radiation dose to the incidence of urinary bladder tumors among atomic bomb survivors and controls in the RERF Life Span Study extended sample. A total of 112 cases of urinary bladder tumors was identified among approximately 99,000 subjects in this fixed cohort during 1961-72. Morphologic diagnoses were available for 86 cases (76.8%), cystoscopy alone for 21 cases (18.7%), and only the cause of death recorded on death certificates for 5 cases (4.5%). Urothelial carcinoma (transitional cell carcinoma) is the most common type of urinary bladder tumor for which morphologic diagnoses are available. The 1961-72 incidence rate was calculated using 106 cases identified as urinary bladder tumors. Although the crude annual incidence rate in the high dose group (100 rad or more) is elevated in both cities and both sexes, all nine cases with this dose were aged 40 years or more at the time of the bomb (ATB). The standardized relative risk adjusted for city and sex for those of age 40 or more ATB in the high dose group is 1.8 in comparison with the control group and this is a suggestive statistical difference. A statistically significant elevation of risk occurs in the high dose group for urothelial carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder among those aged 40 or more ATB. (author)

  1. The application of artificial radionuclides from Nagasaki A-bomb as a global transport tracer at Canadian arctic ice caps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten ice cores, at 8.7 cm in diameter and 14 m in length, were collected on the Agassiz ice cap (80.8degN and 71.9degW), Ellesmere Island, Canada, covering a total area of 580 cm2, in 1994. More than 100 ice core samples were chronologically produced from the ice cores collected. The ice core samples were each 10 cm in thickness, which represents about six months of precipitation on the ice cap. The samples were evaporated and the gamma radioactivity of 137Cs and alpha radioactivity of 239+240Pu were determined from 1935 to 1986. A total of 49.5 mBq/cm2 of 137Cs and 0.552 mBq/cm2 of 239+240Pu was deposited during the 35-year period of atmospheric nuclear explosions, i.e., 1945-80. There were more than a dozen distinct signals for both 137Cs and 239+240Pu during this period, including the largest and most outstanding peak corresponding to the 1962 explosions. From the ice layer depth of 11.3-11.5 m for 137Cs and 11.4-11.7 m for 239+340Pu, the peaks of the depositions from the 1945 explosions were 0.055 mBq/cm2 for 137Cs and 0.00032 mBq/cm2, respectively. The estimated average deposition rates for the northern hemisphere were 0.030 mBq/cm2 for 137Cs and 0.014 mBq/cm2 for 239+240Pu, from Nagasaki A-bomb. While the deposition of 137Cs at Ellesmere Island is 67% of NagCs at Ellesmere Island is 67% of Nagasaki estimates, the deposition of 239+240Pu was only 1.1% of the estimate (for a 15 kg Pu bomb). The large discrepancy in deposition rates between 137Cs and 239+240Pu suggests that 137Cs can be transported for long distances (in this case more than 10,000 km), while 239+240Pu is easily deposited during its transport. Another interesting point is that 137Cs arrived at the Arctic about six months later than 239+240Pu. (J.P.N.)

  2. FAQs: Japan Nuclear Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... centre Global network Global Health Cluster FAQs: Japan nuclear concerns September 2011 Current risk What is the ... radiation emitted into the atmosphere from damaged Japanese nuclear power plants? Thus far, there are no health ...

  3. Japan's plutonium policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan is trying to match its economic power with political influence. Current Japanese nuclear policy is committed to expansion not only in fuel facilities but in electric power generation, from about 25% from nuclear now to 40% by the year 2000. Japan is building its own reprocessing plant, a uranium enrichment facility and a low level waste shallow burial facility. It also has nuclear exports in Indonesia, Taiwan and Thailand. The purpose of Japan's stockpile of plutonium is not clear. Although officially the stocks will only be maintained at levels necessary for the future reactor programme, it is suggested that if North and South Korea join China as nuclear weapon states Japan would want to develop her own nuclear weapon capability. (UK)

  4. null Kirishima, Japan Images

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The shield volcano consists of more than 20 eruptive centers over a 20 x 30 km area that also includes Japan's first national park. Sixty-nine eruptions have been...

  5. Identification of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis as vanC-type Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) from sewage and river water in the provincial city of Miyazaki, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Masateru; Iguchi, Atsushi; Suzuki, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    As a first step for assessing the risk to human health posed by vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in the aquatic environment, we screened sewage and urban river water samples from Miyazaki, Japan for VRE. Because vancomycin-resistant organisms are not as prevalent in sewage and river water as vancomycin-susceptible organisms, the samples were screened by minimum inhibitory concentration test using the vancomycin-supplemented membrane-Enterococcus indoxyl-?-d-glucoside (mEI) agar. The isolates, presumed to be enterococci, were identified using 16S rRNA sequencing analysis. The percentages of VRE isolates screened using 4 ?g mL(-1) vancomycin-supplemented mEI agar from sewage and urban river water samples were 12% and 24%, respectively. The vancomycin-resistant genes vanC1 and vanC2/3 were detected in the isolates from both samples by PCR analysis. All enterococci isolates containing vanC1, which is a specific gene for vanC-type of VRE, were identified as Enterococcus casseliflavus/gallinarum. Further, 92% enterococci isolates containing vanC2/3 were identified as E. casseliflavus/gallinarum, the remaining isolates containing vanC2/3 were E. faecium (4%) and E. faecalis (4%). Thereafter, the distribution of E. faecium and E. faecalis, which are the major types of enterococci in humans containing vanC2/3, was observed in the water samples collected. PMID:25438128

  6. State of research and perspective on adaptive response to low doses of ionizing radiation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a review article entitled ''Physical Benefits from Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation,'' published in Health Physics in December of 1982, Professor T.D. Luckey of the University of Missouri, asserted the ''radiation hormesis'' with 200 references. This resulted in the first International Symposium on Radiation Hormesis in Oakland, California (August 1985). CRIEPI consulted many specialists about Luckey's paper and studied many other papers such as Lorenz, 1954; Luckey, 1980, Liu et al., 1985. Radiation hormesis research in Japan has been based on the rationale that if Luckey's claim were to be true, radiation management in Japan has been extremely erroneous. CRIEPI organized a Hormesis Research Steering Committee composed of leading specialists in the field concerned, and began research in cooperation with a number of universities, as well as the National Cancer Research Institute, and the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. After obtaining interesting results in various experiments on the health effects of exposure to low doses of radiation, we have proceeded on an expanded program, which involves fourteen universities and two research institutes throughout Japan. The interesting results we obtained can be categorized in five groups. 1. Enhancement of immune systems such as lymphocytes and suppression of cancer, 2. Radio-adaptive response relating to the activation of DNA repair and adoptosis, 3. Rejuvenation of cells such as increase of SOD and cell membrane permeability, 4. Radiation effect on neuro-transmitting system through increase of key enzymes, 5. Others, including the therapy of adult-disease such as diabetes and hypertension. We are now carrying out experimental activities on the effects of low-dose radiation on mammals. After several years of research activities, we are recognizing Luckey's claim. Some basic surveys including Hiroshima Nagasaki and animal experiments in Japan have brought us valuable informations on the health effects of low-dose radiation. The followings are some topical research informations obtained across Japan. (author)

  7. Autopsy studies of Hashimoto's thyroiditis in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (1954-1974): relation to atomic bomb radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, M. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan); Norman, J.E. Jr.; Kato, H.; Yagawa, K.

    1978-01-01

    The authors examined 155 autopsy cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis in the Life Span Study sample including both A-bomb survivors and controls in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (1954 to 1974). Hashimoto's thyroiditis was classified into lymphoid, diffuse and fibrous types and the following results were obtained. No difference existed in the effects of A-bomb radiation in the incidence and ATB. The ratio of males to females did not reveal statistical significance, even though reversed ratio was noted in the high dose group. The variation of thyroid gland weight in T65 dose or by variant showed no significant pattern, even though the smallest average weight was found in the highest radiation exposure group. The complications in the patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis were noted to have high prevalance of ovarian cancer and low prevalence of stomach cancer and total cancer. Only two patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis were found to be complicated with thyroid carcinoma. Among collagen diseases, the prevalence of rheumatic fever and rheumatoid arthritis was high as complication. And the prevalence of combined diseases suggested that no late effect of A-bomb radiation existed.

  8. Historic Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jointly sponsored by the Historic Cities Center within the Department of Geography at Hebrew University and the Jewish National and University Library, the Historic Cities Web site is intended to contain maps, literature, documents, books, and other relevant material concerning the past, present, and future of historic cities While some of these documents and ephemera are still forthcoming to the site, visitors will find a wide array of historic city maps and views dating from 1486 to 1720. The scanned maps are searchable alphabetically, by date, and by individual cartographer. Additionally, a bit of information is provided about each cartographer. Overall, the site contains close to two hundred individual city maps and renderings, ranging from medieval Heidelberg to Casablanca. For persons with an interest in urban morphology and the history of cartography, the Historic Cities site will be a good place to start.

  9. King City

    OpenAIRE

    Stålhandske, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    King City is a new citycenter in the expanding Kungens Kurva area in the southern part of Stockholm that combines shopping, service, dwellings and workplaces into a coherent urban environment. The project deals with the expanding city of Stockholm, where areas that before where seen as external, now form the basis of a polycentric city where the divide between innercity and suburbia is disolving.The Kungens Kurva area is today the result of “laissez-faire” planing principles that have allowed...

  10. Incidence of female breast cancer among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascertainment of breast cancer incidence among the cohort of the RERF Life Span Study extended sample identified 574 breast cancers among 564 cases diagnosed during 1950 - 80, of which 412 cancers were reviewed microscopically. There were no dose-dependent differences with respect to diagnostic certainty or histological type. As in previous studies, the dose response appeared to be roughly linear, and did not differe between the two cities. The most remarkable new finding was the emergence of a radiation-related excess among women aged under 10 at exposure. The risk of radiogenic breast cancer appears to decrease with increasing age at exposure, whether expressed in relative or absolute terms. These results suggest that exposure of female breast tissue to ionizing radiation at any age, even during the premature stage, can cause breast cancer later in life, and that the length of time that tumor promoters such as endogenous hormones operate following exposure has an important influence on the development of radiation-induced breast cancer. (author)

  11. Multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950 - 76

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between atomic bomb exposure and the occurrence of multiple myeloma has been evaluated in a fixed cohort of approximately 100,000 A-bomb survivors and nonexposed controls during the period from October 1950 to December 1976. Analysis of these data revealed the standardized relative risk adjusted for city, sex, and age at the time of the bombs (ATB) to be significantly greater in the group of individuals who received 100 rad or more of radiation than in their controls. An excess risk became apparent in the high dose group about 20 years after exposure. The excess risk of multiple myeloma in those persons aged 20 - 59 ATB is estimated to be approximately 0.24 per million person-years per rad (PYR) in kerma dose and approximately 0.48 per million PYR in bone marrow dose. The interval between radiation exposure and the occurrence of an excess risk for multiple myeloma in the high dose population is considerably longer than that for leukemia. The cases of multiple myeloma observed in the high dose group showed no unusual clinical features. (author)

  12. A study to assess COPD Symptom-based Management and to Optimise treatment Strategy in Japan (COSMOS-J) based on GOLD 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Betsuyaku T; Kato M; Fujimoto K.; Hagan G; Kobayashi A; Hitosugi H; James M; Jones PW

    2013-01-01

    Tomoko Betsuyaku,1 Motokazu Kato,2 Keisaku Fujimoto,3 Gerry Hagan,4 Akihiro Kobayashi,5 Hideki Hitosugi,5 Mark James,5 Paul W Jones61Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Respiratory Disease, Kishiwada City Hospital, Osaka, Japan; 3Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Shinshu University, Nagano, Japan; 4Private Practice, Marbella, Spain; 5GlaxoSmithKline KK, Tokyo, Japan; 6Division of Clinical Science, St George’s, U...

  13. Japan Nuclear Fuel, Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just over a month ago, on July 1, Japan Nuclear Fuel Industries (JNFI) and Japan Nuclear Fuel Services (JNFS) merged to form the integrated nuclear fuel cycle company, Japan Nuclear Fuel, Ltd. (JNFL). The announcement in mid-January that the country's two major fuel cycle firms intended to merge had long been anticipated and represents one of the most significant restructuring events in Japan's nuclear industry. The merger forming JNFL was a logical progression in the evolution of Japan's fuel cycle, bringing complementary technologies together to encourage synergism, increased efficiency, and improved community relations. The main production facilities of both JNFI and JNFS were located near the village of Rokkashomura, on the northern end of the main island of Honshu, and their headquarters were in Tokyo. The former JNFS was responsible for spent fuel reprocessing and also was building a high-level waste (HLW) management facility. The former JNFI focused on uranium enrichment and low-level waste (LLW) disposal. It was operating the first stage of a centrifuge enrichment plant and continuing to construct additional capacity. These responsibilities and activities will be assumed by JNFL, which now will be responsible for all JNFI and JNFS operations, including those at Rokkashomura

  14. Japan steel mill perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, K. [Kobe Steel Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    The international and Japan's steel industry, the coking coal market, and Japan's expectations from Canada's coal industry are discussed. Japan's steel mills are operating at full capacity. Crude steel production for the first half of 2004 was 55.8 million tons. The steel mills are profitable, but costs are high, and there are difficulties with procuring raw materials. Japan is trying to enhance the quality of coke, in order to achieve higher productivity in the production of pig iron. Economic growth is rising disproportionately in the BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India, and China), with a large increase in coking coal demand from China. On the supply side, there are several projects underway in Australia and Canada to increase production. These include new developments by Elk Valley Coal Corporation, Grande Cache Coal, Western Canadian Coal, and Northern Energy and Mining in Canada. The Elga Mine in the far eastern part of Russia is under development. But the market is expected to remain tight for some time. Japan envisions Canadian coal producers will provide a stable coal supply, expansion of production and infrastructure capabilities, and stabilization of price. 16 slides/overheads are included.

  15. Cultural Astronomy in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Steven L.

    While Japan is known more for its contributions to modern astronomy than its archaeoastronomical sites, there is still much about the culture's heritage that is of interest in the study of cultural astronomy. This case study provides an overview of historical considerations necessary to understand the place of astronomy in Japanese society as well as methodological considerations that highlight traditional approaches that have at times been a barrier to interdisciplinary research. Some specific areas of study in the cultural astronomy of Japan are discussed including examples of contemporary research based on interdisciplinary approaches. Japan provides a fascinating background for scholars who are willing to go beyond their curiosity for sites of alignment and approach the culture with a desire to place astronomical iconography in social context.

  16. Japan's nuclear juggernaut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of nuclear energy in Japan is presented. Nuclear energy provides 17% of Japan's electricity but could provide much more. 25 more reactors (to add to the existing 27) are planned by 1995. The cooperation between Japanese government and industry and the economic assistance in building new plants means that these are not likely to be cancelled. Public acceptance of new plants has often been obtained by large cash employment inducements. Now, however, there is growing disillusionment when short-term well paid employment building the reactors is followed by unemployment when the reactor is in operation. Also there is a growing opposition to the storage of the nuclear waste. To maintain the growth of its nuclear industry Japan needs to export to provide a steady flow of big orders. (U.K.)

  17. Megaloblastic anemia in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taguchi,Hirokuni

    1978-08-01

    Full Text Available Since 1903, 744 cases of megaloblastic anemia have been reported in Japan: 490 cases of pernicious anemia; 95 cases associated with pregnancy; 66 cases after gastrectomy; 22 cases of megaloblastic anemia of infants; 21 cases of folic acid deficiency other than pregnancy and 19 cases of vitamin B12 malabsorption after ileal resection. It is generally agreed among hematologists in Japan that pernicious anemia is relatively rare, as in other Asian countries. The diagnosis of pernicious anemia in Japan is usually made by stained marrow films, radioisotopic assay of serum vitamin B12, Schilling test and good response to vitamin B12 therapy. Serum folate level, intrinsic factor or its antibody, methylmalonic acid excretion, formiminoglutamic acid excretion and deoxyuridine suppression test are performed only at a small number of laboratories. The drugs of choice are hydroxocobalamin, deoxyadenosylcobalamin and methylcobalamin. Cyanocobalamin has nearly disappeared from commercial sources in Japan. Vitamin B12 administration is common in patients with neurological disorders. Megaloblastic anemia due to folic acid deficiency is extremely rare in Japan. Low serum folate levels are frequently observed among patients receiving anticonvulsants or in pregnant women, but in such samples megaloblastic anemia is almost never detected. The folic acid content of hospital diets indicates that satisfactory amounts of folate are taken in Japan. The intake of folic acid from rice is well over the minimum daily requirement of folate. Other factors in folic acid deficiency, such as food taboos, severe alcoholism and malabsorption syndrome are not frequently found in Japanese. The inadequate intake of folate was the critical factor in most reported cases.

  18. Disaster in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrs. Wheeler

    2011-03-28

    What happened in Japan? Navigate the photos and websites below to grasp the extent of the damage caused by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Part I: Summarize the event Read the article, Death Toll Estimate in Japan Soars as Relief Efforts Intensify , to better understand the basics of the event. On your own piece of paper, answer the 6 Q s About the News. You may type them on the computer and print them out. Be sure to write complete sentences. Part II: The One-Pager Now that you have summarized the ...

  19. Japan's nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is becoming more than ever unavoidable that the nuclear power program in Japan must be pursued. The program described is based on the LWR and FBR. Present projections are for about 20 FBR units by 2010 and for the LWRs to reach a peak in 2010 with 110 units. Current and proposed developments are outlined. Figures based on program estimates are given for requirements for uranium as well as enrichment, reprocessing and waste disposal. It is established policy that Japan will develop a completely closed fuel cycle

  20. Tokyo and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokyo and Japan should be interesting and educational for people from junior-high students to adults. It provides an interactive experience as a virtual tourist on a trip to Tokyo. You can also 'Ask the Old Japan Hand' questions about Tokyo and what it's like to live there. There are also links to many Japanese sites that publish in English. The site is young, but growing. It's direction and speed of growth will be determined by the reactions of the visitors. Your input is encouraged.

  1. The internationalization of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are growing tensions and frictions between the U.S. and Japan. Among them are science and technology issues that relate to the development of superconductor technology, as well as economic, trade and agricultural issues. The structure of this friction is very complex. There are many interconnected issues that cannot be resolved one by one. This article focuses on the relationship between the U.S. and Japan. Some of the complexities behind the issues are discussed by defining different notions of internationalization and by presenting the positive and negative aspects of the Japanese approach that affects the future cooperation and competition between our nations in the area of superconductivity

  2. Cerebrovascular diseases in a fixed population Hiroshima and Nagasaki with special reference to relationship between type and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases, their chronological trend, and relationship between the disease types and risk factors on 16,491 subjects of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who underwent medical examination at least once between 1958 - 74, and who were free of cerebrovascular disease at the initial examination. During the 16-year period, 1,162 cases of cerebrovascular disease developed in this study population with the diagnosis definite in 621, and the annual incidence was 3.2 per 1,000 population. By type, there were 108 cases of cerebral hemorrhage, 469 cases of cerebral infarction, 33 cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage, and 11 cases of other unclassifiable types, with cerebral infarction occurring more frequently than cerebral hemorrhage at the ratio of 4.5 : 1. The incidence of cerebrovascular diseases increased with age in both types, but the proportion of younger subjects in cerebral hemorrhage was greater than that in cerebral infarction. A secular trend of declining incidence was noted for both cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction. As a risk factor of cerebral hemorrhage, elevation of systolic and diastolic blood pressure was the most closely related to onset, and left ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiogram (ECG) and proteinuria were also related. However, a tendency was seen for the risk to be somewhat higher the lower the levels of serum cholesterol. In cerebral infarction, aging, like systolic blood pressure, was a most important risk factor. Left ventricular hypertrophy on ECG, proteinuria, and diabetes could also be risk factors. However, the relation to blood pressure, especially diastolic blood pressure, was not so great as in the case of cerebral hemorrhage. (author)

  3. Japan and Zhongdong Railway Incident

    OpenAIRE

    Hongjun Zhang

    2009-01-01

    It has been for quite some time the conspiracy that Japan invaded China and seized the Northeast. In the process of its implementation of the conspiracy, there had a vehement interest conflict between Japan and Soviet Russia. After the Japan-Russia War, Northeast China became a sphere of influence between Russia and Japan, but they fought against each other continually for Zhongdong Railway issue. After the September 18 Incident, situation of Zhongdong Railway was in depression, together with...

  4. Sapovirus in Water, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Hansman, Grant S; Sano, Daisuke; Ueki, You; Imai, Takahiro; Oka, Tomoichiro; KATAYAMA, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Naokazu; Omura, Tatsuo

    2007-01-01

    Sapoviruses are etiologic agents of human gastroenteritis. We detected sapovirus in untreated wastewater, treated wastewater, and a river in Japan. A total of 7 of 69 water samples were positive by reverse transcription–PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral capsid gene grouped these strains into 4 genetic clusters.

  5. Advanced composites in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefendorf, R. Judd; Hillig, William G.; Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Pipes, R. Byron; Perepezko, John H.; Sheehan, James E.

    1994-01-01

    The JTEC Panel on Advanced Composites surveyed the status and future directions of Japanese high-performance ceramic and carbon fibers and their composites in metal, intermetallic, ceramic, and carbon matrices. Because of a strong carbon and fiber industry, Japan is the leader in carbon fiber technology. Japan has initiated an oxidation-resistant carbon/carbon composite program. With its outstanding technical base in carbon technology, Japan should be able to match present technology in the U.S. and introduce lower-cost manufacturing methods. However, the panel did not see any innovative approaches to oxidation protection. Ceramic and especially intermetallic matrix composites were not yet receiving much attention at the time of the panel's visit. There was a high level of monolithic ceramic research and development activity. High temperature monolithic intermetallic research was just starting, but notable products in titanium aluminides had already appeared. Matrixless ceramic composites was one novel approach noted. Technologies for high temperature composites fabrication existed, but large numbers of panels or parts had not been produced. The Japanese have selected aerospace as an important future industry. Because materials are an enabling technology for a strong aerospace industry, Japan initiated an ambitious long-term program to develop high temperature composites. Although just starting, its progress should be closely monitored in the U.S.

  6. Japan Hadron Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S

    1999-01-01

    Japan Hadron Facility (JHF) is a high-intensity proton accelerator complex consisting of a 200 MeV linac, a 3 GeV booster and a 50 GeV main ring. Its status and future possibilities of realizing a versatile antiproton facility at JHF are presented.

  7. 1993 Hokkaido, Japan Images

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — On July 12, 1993, a magnitude 7.6 Ms (7.7 Mw) (HRV) earthquake at 13:17 UT in the Sea of Japan near Hokkaido caused a back-arc tsunami that caused damage in all of...

  8. Japan's nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a nation almost completely dependent upon outside energy supplies, Japan is looking increasingly to the nuclear power option. This paper reviews the past performance of Japanese pwrs and bwrs, looks at prospects for nuclear exports to China, and surveys the existing research programs including work on fast breeder reactors and fusion reactors

  9. Globalization and Education in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Kentaro; Shibata, Masako

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the authors contend that globalization in Japan is the gradual process in which Japan's positioning of "self" within international relations, which had formerly been dominated by the West, has changed. Accordingly, Japan's relationships with the West and the rest of the world, for example, Asia, have also been reviewed and modified.…

  10. Sin City?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarer, Michael; Gautier, Pieter A.

    2007-01-01

    s moving to the countryside a credible commitment device for couples? We investigate whether lowering the arrival rate of potential alternative partners by moving to a less populated area lowers the dissolution risk for a sample of Danish couples. We find that of the couples who married in the city, the ones who stay in the city have significant higher divorce rates. Similarly, for the couples who married outside the city, the ones who move to the city are more likely to divorce. This correlation can be explained by both a causal and a sorting effect. We disentangle them by using the timing-of-events approach. In addition we use information on father's location as an instrument. We find that the sorting effect dominates. Moving to the countryside is therefore not a cheap way to prolong relationships.

  11. City beautiful

    OpenAIRE

    Carlino, Gerald A.; Saiz, Albert

    2008-01-01

    The city beautiful movement, which in the early 20th Century advocated city beautification as a way to improve the living conditions and civic virtues of the urban dweller, had languished by the Great Depression. Today, new urban economic theory and policymakers are coming to see the provision of consumer leisure amenities as a way to attract population, especially the highly skilled and their employers. However, past studies have only provided indirect evidence of the importance of leisure a...

  12. Invincible Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Camilo J.

    2006-01-01

    Throughout history, cities have risen and fallen from prominence, and in recent times more attention has been paid to why this ebb and flow persists across the centuries. Documenting this process has increasingly been the province of historians, archaeologists, city planners, sociologists, and of course, photographers. Many photographers have been very interested in the world of post-industrial urban decay, and Camilo Jose Vergara is one of the best. With financial support from the Ford Foundation, this website brings together Vergaraâ??s photographic record of the cities of Camden, New Jersey and Richmond, California in exquisite geographic and visual detail. First-time visitors will want to read through the introduction to the project offered by Vergara, and then perhaps click on the question mark on the homepage for a brief primer on how to use the user interface for each city. At that point, visitors shouldnâ??t be afraid to look over both cities, as they can zoom in and out around a number of interesting locales, including abandoned factories, old piers, and gated communities. Short of wandering through these cities in a peripatetic fashion, this website serves as an interesting introduction to some overlooked aspects of urbanity.

  13. Sustainable cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sustainable City Project, a collaboration among the cities of Portland, Oregon, and San Francisco and San Jose, California, aims at developing and implementing sustainable energy planning methods and programs for cites. For a period of two years (1989-90), the three project cities worked in parallel, yet pursued independent courses to develop appropriate sustainable urban energy practices to meet local needs and aspirations. Central to the Sustainable City Project was finding ways to manage today's urban energy needs without jeopardizing the needs of future generations. Sustainability implies that nothing should go to waste, but rather should contribute to the proper balance between the natural environment and the built environment Sustainable urban energy systems encompass more than energy efficiency and energy conservation measures: they must be diverse, flexible, self-reliant, renewable, and integrated. Since local governments make decisions affecting land use, building codes, transportation systems, waste disposal, and power plants--all of which impact energy resource use--local jurisdictions can do much to ensure their own sustainable future. This paper will present an accounting of the specific steps that each city took to determine and begin implementation of their respective approaches to sustainable energy planning, with a specific focus on the City of San Jose activities. Useful tools for facilitating community process, program planning and implementatiorocess, program planning and implementation, and quantitative analysis will also be discussed

  14. [Tuberculosis control of urban areas in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    The rates of tuberculosis remain high in urban areas. The declining speed of tuberculosis incidence rate in urban areas has been slower than other areas. Efforts and resources to tuberculosis control must be concentrated on urban locations to eradicate tuberculosis in Japan. 1. Tuberculosis control in a public health center of urban area: Teru OGURA and Chiyo INOGUCHI (Toshima City, Ikebukuro Public Health Center, Tokyo Metropolitan) A wide range of TB control measures is implemented by public health centers, such as a patient registration, home-visit guidance, contact examination in urban areas. Directors of every health center have the direct responsibility for tuberculosis control measures in their jurisdiction. Ikebukuro is urban areas where there are many offices, shopping and amusement facilities. Urban people is often on the move looking for job, so public health centers are often not easy to carry out contact examinations as planned. In recent years, homelessness has been recognized as a growing urban social problem. Their incidence of tuberculosis is high. Special TB control program must be carried out in urban areas. 2. Tuberculosis Control in Tokyo Metropolitan: Kazumasa MATSUKI (Department of Infectious Diseases and Tuberculosis, Bureau of Public Health, Tokyo Metropolitan) There has been a steady decline in the TB wards. The beds for TB patients are running short and even smear positive TB cases cannot be put in a hospital without waiting several days. Staffs of an urban emergency department must protect tuberculosis infection by environmental controls of emergency room. Tokyo Metropolitan government supports the engineering improvements of emergency room to hospitals. Directly observed therapy for tuberculosis patients at a district has been implemented to complete their therapy. On DOT, a trained health worker observes the patient take anti-TB medication. 3. Usefulness of Molecular Epidemiologic approach on Tuberculosis Control: Atsushi HASE (Osaka City Institute Laboratory of Health and Environment) DNA fingerprinting establishes the genetic relatedness of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates and has become a powerful tool in tuberculosis epidemiology. To use DNA fingerprinting to assess the efficacy of current tuberculosis infection-control practices. Combining conventional epidemiologic techniques with DNA fingerprinting of M. tuberculosis can improve the understanding of how tuberculosis is transmitted. Patients were assigned to clusters based on mycobacterial isolates with identical DNA fingerprints. Clusters were assumed to have arisen from recent transmission. We analyzed M. tuberculosis isolates from patients reported to the tuberculosis registry by RFLP techniques. These results were interpreted along with demographic data. Patients infected with the same strains were identified according to their RFLP patterns, and patients with identical patterns were grouped in clusters. RFLP patterns of high incidence districts have more variations than other areas. This suggests that the source of tuberculosis infection are quite diverse and complicated. Tuberculosis patients may accumulate to high incidence districts from other places after infection. 4. Structure of High Incidence of Tuberculosis and Control Plan in Osaka City: Yoichi TATSUMI (Bureau of Infection Control, Osaka City Office) The case notification rate in Osaka City is the highest in Japan. That of all TB cases and smear positive TB cases was 1573 and 216 per 100,000 population in 1997 at Airin District in Osaka City. The main reason for this highest incidence rate is that there are many homeless people and it is a mobile population. Most of residents are daily laborers. They come from all over Japan and stay there, mainly in rented rooms, to look for jobs. Thousands of homeless people also live in tents on streets or in parks. We are making to new strategic plan to intensify tuberculosis control measures throughout the city. Osaka city government h PMID:11109777

  15. Spent fuel management strategy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan has consistently based its policy on its nuclear fuel cycle option with only peaceful purposes, in order to ensure a stable and reliable energy supply and to minimize environmental loads. Since the start of operation of the first commercial nuclear power plant in 1966, nuclear power generation in Japan has steadily increased. At present, 52 commercial nuclear power plants are in operation. Nearly 1,000 tU of spent fuel is discharged annually by these plants. JNFL is constructing the RRP, planned to be commissioned in July 2005. The reprocessing capacity is 800 tU/year. Therefore, more than 200 tU of surplus spent fuel will accumulate every year. Building up the interim storage capability outside of nuclear plant sites is now a focal point for the flexible, practical, and safe management of the surplus amount of spent fuel predicted to arise over the next several decades. In February 1997, a Cabinet decision on 'Policy to Promote Nuclear Fuel Cycle' was made and the need to build more AFR interim storage capacity was acknowledged. A law concerning interim storage was enacted in 1999. Thus, the spent fuel storage business has legally become possible in Japan. Since then, the utilities have been endeavouring to site ARF storage facilities, with the goal of commencing operation around 2010. TEPCO is now preparing for the first AFR in Japan, Mutsu Recycle Fuel Storage Center, located at Sekinehama in Mutsu City. In April 2003, TEPCO released a report on the site feas, TEPCO released a report on the site feasibility investigation, which verified the suitability of the site for the AFR storage facility and also announced the framework of this project. (author)

  16. Japan and Zhongdong Railway Incident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Zhang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been for quite some time the conspiracy that Japan invaded China and seized the Northeast. In the process of its implementation of the conspiracy, there had a vehement interest conflict between Japan and Soviet Russia. After the Japan-Russia War, Northeast China became a sphere of influence between Russia and Japan, but they fought against each other continually for Zhongdong Railway issue. After the September 18 Incident, situation of Zhongdong Railway was in depression, together with threat of Puppet Manchu, so in 1933, Soviet Union government transferred all its authority in Zhongdong Railway to “Manchuria Government” in a paid form. Japan eventually achieved its purpose.

  17. Summary of the studies at ABCC-RERF concerning the late hematologic effects of atomic bomb exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most significant late hematologic effect of atomic bomb radiation exposure in the populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been the increased occurrence of leukemia. The radiation effect for leukemia has disappeared in Nagasaki but slightly elevated rates still exist in Hiroshima. Multiple myeloma also is radiation-related, but there is only a suggestive relationship for malignant lymphoma. No evidence exists of a late radiation effect for primary disturbances of hematopoiesis in the absence of malignant disease. Somatic hematopoietic markers of previous radiation exposure include lymphocyte chromosomal aberrations and an increased frequency of mutant T-lymphocytes deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase. A radiation effect also has been observed for the frequency of mutant erythrocytes lacking expression of glycophorin-A protein on the membrane. There is no evidence for radiation-induced disturbance of granulocyte function, but age-related accelerated decline in the immunological functions of T lymphocytes and age-related alteration in the number of certain subsets of circulating T and B lymphocytes appears to be radiation-related. A number of radiation-related hematology research proposals which might be considered for the future are included in this report. (author) 92 refs

  18. Relationship of stature to gamma and neutron exposure among atomic bomb survivors aged less than 10 at the time of the bomb, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reanalysis has been undertaken of the relationship of attained adult height of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors aged less than 10 at the time of the bomb (ATB) to radiation dose based upon new dosimetry data. The present analysis aims to examine the relationship of stature to radiation dose in terms of gamma rays and neutrons, separately. The 628 individuals were selected from Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors, aged less than 10 ATB, whose doses were available, and whose statures were recorded at the Adult Health Study (AHS) biennial health examination during 1970-72. To ascertain the relationship of attained adult stature to gamma and neutron doses three doseresponse models were applied to the data. The analysis revealed that the attained height is a separate function of exposure to gamma rays and neutrons. The model assuming a squared term dependence on gamma rays and a linear dependence on neutrons provides a better explanation of the data. The regression coefficient associated with the squared gamma dose is -0.00000927 and the coefficient associated with neutron dose is -0.0172. The relative biological effectiveness of neutrons in relation to gamma radiation with respect to the effect for diminished development of stature is estimated as 43.1 / ?Dn in kerma (Dn=neutron dose). The 95% confidence limits are 19.3 / ?Dn--96.5 / ?Dn. (author)

  19. DPAL activities in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Masamori; Wani, Fumio

    2015-02-01

    Activities on diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) in Japan is reviewed. We have started alkali laser works in 2011, and currently, we are the only players in Japan. Our interests are application oriented, and it is not only defense but also industrial. DPAL is a good candidate as a source of remote laser machining, thanks to its scalability and extremely good beam quality. We are studying on scientific and engineering problems of Cs DPAL with a small-scale apparatus. A commercial diode laser with volume Bragg grating outcoupler is used to pump the gain cell longitudinally. A 6.5 W continuous-wave output with optical to optical efficiency of 56% (based on the absorbed power) has been achieved. Numerical simulation codes are developed to understand the physics of DPAL and to help future developments.

  20. Piping research in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various kinds of material research works have been conducted for the evaluation and improvement of integrity of nuclear piping system in Japan. The researches on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the remedies for it have been intensively made since the appearance of IGSCC in BWR type piping. Now that it is widely recognized that this problem was solved by thorough implementation of several effective remedies, people's concern is moving towards the possibility of simplification of the piping system based on the acceptance of the leak-before-break (LBB) concept in nuclear piping system. This paper presents the summary on the piping researches which were or are being conducted in Japan, including the researches on IGSCC, feedwater line cracking in PWR, ductile fracture of piping, and the development of fracture analysis method

  1. Nuclear situation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis takes stock on the nuclear situation in Japan. It discusses the ambitious equipment program in collaboration with the France, the destabilization of the japanese nuclear industry following the accidents and the energy policy evolutions. It presents the projects of the japanese nuclear industry: the Monju reactor restart, the Pluthermal project, the reprocessing power plant of Rokkasho Mura, the new reactors, the russian weapons dismantling, the ITER site selection and the buy out of Westinghouse by Toshiba. (A.L.B.)

  2. Emergency preparedness in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the countermeasures implemented in Japan in case of a nuclear accident. Various aspects of the subject are tackled such as the regulatory system for the nuclear reactor or the preparedness arrangements (responsibilities of the various government and public organizations, nuclear emergency action plans including the emergency planning zones, the emergency environmental monitoring and the emergency medical treatment). It should be noted that training exercises for the population is already implemented. (TEC). 3 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Radioactive iodine (131I) therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer in Japan. Current issues with historical review and future perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive iodine (RAI, 131I) has been used as a therapeutic agent for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) with over 50 years of history. Recently, it is now attracting attention in medical fields as one of the molecular targeting therapies, which is known as targeted radionuclide therapy. Radioactive iodine therapy (RIT) for DTC, however, is now at stake in Japan, because Japan is confronting several problems, including the recent occurrence of the Great East Japan Disaster (GEJD) in March 2011. RIT for DTC is strictly limited in Japan and requires hospitalization. Because of strict regulations, severe lack of medical facilities for RIT has become one of the most important medical problems, which results in prolonged waiting time for Japanese patients with DTC, including those with distant metastasis, who wish to receive RIT immediately. This situation is also due to various other factors, such as prolonged economic recession, super-aging society, and subsequent rapidly changing medical environment. In addition, due to the experience of atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japanese people have strong feeling of ''radiophobia ''. There is fear that GEJD and related radiation contamination may worsen this feeling, which might be reflected in more severe regulation of RIT. To overcome these difficulties, it is essential to collect and disclose all information about the circumstances around this therapy in Japan. In this review, we would like to look at. In this review, we would like to look at this therapy through several lenses, including historical, cultural, medical, and socio-economic points of view. We believe that clarifying the problems is sure to lead to the resolution of this complicated situation. We have also included several recommendations for future improvements. (author)

  4. Thorotrast injury in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorotrast injuries in Japan were discovered after 1945, and 94 autopsy cases were examined up to 1970. These autopsy cases included 60 cases of malignant tumor of the liver and 9 cases of blood disease. Examination of thorotrast-administered autopsy cases in Japan has revealed, among other things, that about one-half of all thorotrast-administered cases were war-wounded ex-servicemen and that the dates of injection in these cases were concentrated between 1932 and 1945. Based on this preliminary findings, a follow-up study was made on 147 thorotrast-administered war-wounded ex-serviceman after a lapse of 31 to 36 years from injection, and 6 cases of malignant tumor of the liver, 1 case of leukemia, 1 case of thrombocytopenic purpura, and 5 cases of liver cirrhosis were found among the samples. The incidence of these diseases in the samples was significantly higher than in the controls. The total number of thorotrast-administered persons living in Japan as of 1973 was roughly estimated at 5,000. (auth.)

  5. FUN CITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Once the blues guitarist B.B. King sang that when he "didn't wanna live no more", he would go shopping instead. Now, however, shopping has become a lifestyle... The city of today has become "Disneyfied" and "Tivolized". It has become a scene for events. The aim of the book is to encircle and pin down the consquences of these developments, to elocidate the interplay between funscapes and fear culture, and to account for the meaning of new concepts and new phenomena such as "event culture", "urban scenography", "experience economy","city branding" and "cultural planning".

  6. City 2020+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, C.; Buttstädt, M.; Merbitz, H.; Sachsen, T.; Ketzler, G.; Michael, S.; Klemme, M.; Dott, W.; Selle, K.; Hofmeister, H.

    2010-09-01

    This research initiative CITY 2020+ assesses the risks and opportunities for residents in urban built environments under projected demographic and climate change for the year 2020 and beyond, using the City of Aachen as a case study. CITY 2020+ develops scenarios, options and tools for planning and developing sustainable future city structures. We investigate how urban environment, political structure and residential behavior can best be adapted, with attention to the interactions among structural, political, and sociological configurations and with their consequences on human health. Demographers project that in the EU-25-States by 2050, approximately 30% of the population will be over age 65. Also by 2050, average tem¬peratures are projected to rise by 1 to 2 K. Combined, Europe can expect enhanced thermal stress and higher levels of particulate matter. CITY 2020+ amongst other sub-projects includes research project dealing with (1) a micro-scale assessment of blockages to low-level cold-air drainage flow into the city centre by vegetation and building structures, (2) a detailed analysis of the change of probability density functions related to the occurrence of heat waves during summer and the spatial and temporal structure of the urban heat island (UHI) (3) a meso-scale analysis of particulate matter (PM) concentrations depending on topography, local meteorological conditions and synoptic-scale weather patterns. First results will be presented specifically from sub-projects related to vegetation barriers within cold air drainage, the assessment of the UHI and the temporal and spatial pattern of PM loadings in the city centre. The analysis of the cold air drainage flow is investigated in two consecutive years with a clearing of vegetation stands in the beginning of the second year early in 2010. The spatial pattern of the UHI and its possible enhancement by climate change is addressed employing a unique setup using GPS devices and temperature probes fixed to several public transport units running all across the city. This is accompanied by an analysis of probability density functions (PDF) for heat waves based on recent climate data and climate projections. A dense net of 40 PM measurement sites is operated in order to obtain the spatial pattern of PM concentration as depending on meteorological condition and location. It is lined out how this climate related sub-projects interact with investigations on social networks, governance issues, buildings structure development and health outcome. Related to the later the chemical composition of PM is analyzed in more detail and related to the spatial patterns of health deficiencies. At a later stage City2020+ will propose new strategies based on cooperation from the fields of medicine, geography, sociology, history, civil engineering, and architecture for adapting the city for future needs. The Project CITY 2020+ is part of the interdisciplinary Project House HumTec (Human Sciences and Technology) at RWTH Aachen University funded by the Excellence Initiative of the German federal and state governments through the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation, DFG).

  7. Chronic heart failure in Japan: Implications of the CHART studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Shiba

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Nobuyuki Shiba, Hiroaki ShimokawaDepartment of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Evidence-Based Cardiovascular Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai City, JapanAbstract: The prognosis of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF still remains poor, despite the recent advances in medical and surgical treatment. Furthermore, CHF is a major public health problem in most industrialized countries where the elderly population is rapidly increasing. Although the prevalence and mortality of CHF used to be relatively low in Japan, the disorder has been markedly increasing due to the rapid aging of the society and the Westernization of lifestyle that facilitates the development of coronary artery disease. The Chronic Heart Failure Analysis and Registry in the Tohoku District (CHART-1 study was one of the largest cohorts in Japan. The study has clarified the characteristics and prognosis of Japanese patients with CHF, demonstrating that their prognosis was similarly poor compared with those in Western countries. However, we still need evidence for the prevention and treatment of CHF based on the large cohort studies or randomized treatment trials in the Japanese population. Since the strategy for CHF management is now changing from treatment to prevention, a larger-size prospective cohort, called the CHART-2 study, has been initiated to evaluate the risk factors of CHF in Japan. This review summarizes the current status of CHF studies in Japan and discusses their future perspectives.Keywords: heart failure, aging, Japanese

  8. Low-dose computed tomography screening in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Tohru; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Endo, Katsuyuki

    2015-03-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in both male and female individuals in Japan. The effect of screening using chest radiography is assumed to be limited. In Japan, screening using low-dose computed tomography (CT) was initiated in 1993, and its dissemination has progressed with studies evaluating its efficacy, although it is not officially recommended. In addition to the academic activities of the Japanese Society of CT Screening, certification of physicians and radiologic technologists by the Japan Accreditation Council for CT Screening has been progressing. Currently, several hundred thousand low-dose CT screenings are performed annually in Japan. In Hitachi City, Ibaraki Prefecture, low-dose CT screening among employees and in communities started in 2001, and it was estimated that 40% of 50- to 69-year-old citizens had undergone screening at least once by March 2009. The lung cancer mortality rate in citizens in this age group decreased by 24% in 2005 to 2009 compared with the national statistics. Low-dose CT screening targeting the general population may be effective, but it is necessary to consider the target and interval of screening separately from those for the high-risk group. Observational study may play a role in evaluating the efficacy of screening in Japan. PMID:25658475

  9. Total-factor energy efficiency of regions in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study computes the regional total-factor energy efficiency (TFEE) in Japan by employing the data envelopment analysis (DEA). A dataset of 47 prefectures in Japan for the period 1993-2003 is constructed. There are 14 inputs, including three production factors (labor employment, private, and public capital stocks) and 11 energy sources (electric power for commercial and industrial use, electric power for residential use, gasoline, kerosene, heavy oil, light oil, city gas, butane gas, propane gas, coal, and coke). GDP is the sole output. Following Fukao and Yue [2000. Regional factor inputs and convergence in Japan-how much can we apply closed economy neoclassical growth models? Economic Review 51, 136-151 (in Japanese)], data on private and public capital stocks are extended. All the nominal variables are transformed into real variables, taking into consideration the 1995 price level. For kerosene, gas oil, heavy oil, butane gas, coal, and coke, there are a few prefectures with TFEEs less than 0.7. The five most inefficient prefectures are Niigata, Wakayama, Hyogo, Chiba, and Yamaguchi. Inland regions and most regions along the Sea of Japan are efficient in energy use. Most of the inefficient prefectures that are developing mainly upon energy-intensive industries are located along the Pacific Belt Zone. A U-shaped relation similar to the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) is discovered between energy efficiency and per capita income for the regions in Japana income for the regions in Japan

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Shiota, Seiji; Murakawi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Rumiko; Fujioka, Toshio; YAMAOKA, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is gradually decreasing in Japan. On the main island of Japan, nearly all H. pylori isolates possess cagA and vacA with strong virulence. However, less virulent H. pylori strains are frequently found in Okinawa where cases of gastric cancer are the lowest in Japan. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and early gastric cancer after endoscopic resection has b...

  11. Japan country report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Nuclear 2007 highlights: - A magnitude 6.8 earthquake occurred in Niigata on July 16 2007. Owing to this earthquake, 3 units operating and 1 unit during start-up were shutdown automatically at TEPCO's Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPS. Now, all 7 units of the NPS are in an outage for investigation. This influenced the capacity factor of Japanese NPPs in FY 2007, which stood at just 60.7%. - Debate on global warming is more and more active in Japan, as it is the host country of the G8 Hokkaido Toyako Summit in July. The Japan Atomic Energy Commission released 'White Paper on Nuclear Energy 2007' in March 2008. In the paper, they first expressed the view that the expansion of the peaceful use of nuclear energy is indispensable. 2. Nuclear overview: a. Energy policy: Electricity share: 25.4% of nuclear. The energy policy of Japan aims at nuclear power generation being maintained at the current level (30 to 40% of the total electricity generation) or increasing even after 2030, for stable energy supply and as a countermeasure against global warming. - Nuclear Fuel Cycle: The active tests at the JNFL reprocessing plant in Rokkasho-mura are in the final phase for commercial operation in 2008. By FY 2010 Plutonium utilization in LWRs in 16 to 18 NPP units. Around FY 2010 Installment of new centrifuges at the uranium enrichment plant at Rokkasho-mura. In FY 2012 Start of commercial operation of MOX fuel fabrication plant. Fast-breeder reactor cycle: Operation of the prototype reactor cycle: Operation of the prototype reactor 'MONJU' has been suspended since a secondary sodium leak in 1995. JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) completed full-scale remodeling work and is implementing various tests to confirm the capabilities and soundness of MONJU. They aim to start its operation within FY 2008. Around 2025 Building a demonstration FBR. Before 2050 Development of a commercial FBR. - Electricity production (Operating): BWR: 32 units (including 4 units of APWR), PWR: 23 units. - Electricity production (Under construction): BWR: 1 unit, PWR: 1 unit. - Electricity production (Preparing for construction): BWR: 9 units, PWR: 2 units. - Research: FBR: 1 unit. Nuclear waste management: NUMO (Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan) was established as the implementing organization for a high-level waste disposal project in October 2000. Operations are slated to start in the 2030's. NUMO will select the site through the following three-step process. 1- Selection of preliminary investigation areas by documentary studies; 2- Selection of areas for detailed investigation by borehole programs, etc.; 3- Selection of the site for repository construction by test programs in underground exploration facilities. NUMO is recruiting voluntary candidates for documentary studies. Some municipalities have interested in the project, however, they have not let NUMO to do documentary studies. The mayor of the town of Toyo in Kochi prefecture applied for a documentary study in January 2007. It was the first application in Japan, and NUMO was authorized to implement a documentary study there by the national government in March 2007. But NUMO withdrew its application in April 2007 because of opposition from prefecture governors, stakeholders and general public in the town. To improve this situation, the government strengthened its efforts to start documentary studies. For example, they changed the rule so that the government could propose some suitable towns as candidates for documentary studies, in addition to accepting voluntary applications. Other nuclear activities: Implementation of a new inspection system (after FY 2008) instead of the current uniform inspection, change to a plant-by-plant approach. Inspection also during operation. Analyzing the root causes of abnormal occurrences and accidents. This new system improves not only measures against aging facilities but also the reliability of inspection activities by individual plants and the quality of work by equalizing the volume of work. Nuclear competencies (Needs, education and training): It's serious sub

  12. Population doses from beam-therapy in Japan, 1978, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a series of estimations of population doses and of risk estimates from medical exposures in Japan, the malignancy significant dose (MSD) and the fatal malignant risk from beam therapy were estimated based on a nationwide survey of radiotherapeutic treatments, using a malignancy significant factor and a weighting factor determined from the data on the cancer mortality among the atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki. The effective dose was defined as a sum of the product of the weighting factor and the organ or tissue doses with respect to the malignant diseases. The organ or tissue doses were determined with ionization chambers placed at the positions of their center in a MixDp-phantom simulated lung tissues by a block of cork, using a telecobalt unit, a conventional X-ray unit and a medical linear accelerator. The organ or tissue doses were categorized into three dose components; namely 1) dose from useful beams; 2) scattered radiation dose from irradiated materials and 3) leakage radiation dose through structures of the units. The effective doses were separately determined for the organs or tissues in the useful beams and out of the beams. The resultant MSD was 1 mrad (0.01 mGy)p-1y-6 (p: person; y: year) for male and 3.3 mrad (0.033 mGy)p-1y-1 for female, with a total 4.3 mrad (0.043 mGy)p-1y-1. The malignant risk from the beam therapy was estimated to be 0.53 x 10-6 y-1p-1-6 y-1p-1 for the organs or tissues irradiated with the useful beams and 0.17 x 10-6 p-1y-1 for the organs or tissues out of the beams, with a total of 0.70 x 10-6 p-1y-1. Consequently, the population fatal malignant risk were estimated to be about 82 persons per year for the whole population in Japan. (author)

  13. Diffusion of microcystins (cyanobacteria hepatotoxins) from the reservoir of Isahaya Bay, Japan, into the marine and surrounding ecosystems as a result of large-scale drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tohru; Umehara, Akira; Tsutsumi, Hiroaki

    2014-12-15

    In the artificial reservoir of the Isahaya reclaimed land, Nagasaki, Japan, algal blooms have become an annual event, dominated primarily by the microcystin (MC) producing cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa. Although the majority of MCs are either degraded by bacteria or washed out to sea, some remain in the sediment of the reservoir and bay throughout the year. As a result, they also accumulate in aquatic organisms (mullet, oyster, etc.) that inhabit the reservoir and surrounding areas, as well as midge flies that spend their larval period in the bottom of the reservoir. Accordingly, MCs also accumulate in the predators of these organisms, allowing the toxin to spread from the hydrosphere to terrestrial ecosystems. The most effective method for resolving this potentially dangerous condition is to introduce seawater into the reservoir by opening the drainage gates at high tide. PMID:25444624

  14. Fuel recycle in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been the policy of the Japanese Atomic Energy Commission that all spent fuel from the Japanese nuclear power program should be recycled in order to make effective use of limited uranium resources. Japan can carry on most of the steps of the nuclear fuel cycle: uranium enrichment, reactor fuel element fabrication, reprocessing, and MOX fuel element fabrication. This paper reviews some problems to be solved in regard to the development of advanced power reactors, plutonium MOX fuel development, plutonium recycling, and the fate of depleted uranium recovered from reprocessing

  15. Gems of Japanized English

    CERN Document Server

    Kenrick, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Japanese do things better, this book may be the ideal antidote. Even the Japanese are quick to admit that despite their enthusiasm for learning it, they still have a certain amount of difficulty with the English language. This is no new phenomenon. Shortly after Japan opened her ports to foreign traders, one doctor advertised himself as "a Specialist in the Decease of Children"; eggs were sold as "extract of fowl" ; and a notice advised that "Tomorrow, from midnight to 12 noon, you will receive dirty water. " Fortunately, things are improving, but very slowly. A m

  16. Food Irradiation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1967 research activities on food irradiation in Japan have been carried out under the National Food Irradiation Programme by the Japanese Atomic Energy Commission. The programme has been concentrated on the technological and economical feasibility and wholesomeness testings of seven irradiated food items of economic importance to the country, i.e. potatoes, onions, wheat, rice, “kamaboko” (fish-paste products), “Vienna” sausages and mandarin oranges. By now most studies, including wholesomeness testings of these irradiated food items, have been completed. In Japan, all foods or food additives for sale are regulated by the Food Sanitation Law enforced in 1947. Based on studies made by the national programme, irradiated potatoes were given “unconditional acceptance” for human consumption in 1972. At present, irradiated potatoes are the only food item which has so far been approved by the Minister of Health and Welfare. Unless the Minister of Health and Welfare has declared that items are not harmful to human health on obtaining comments from the Food Sanitation Investigation Council, no irradiated food can be processed or sold. In addition, the import of irradiated foodstuffs other than potatoes from foreign countries is prohibited by law.

  17. Nuclear industry in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Station with 6 BWRs totaling 4,696 MW has attained the total generated electric power of 200 million MWh, the largest power generation in a single nuclear power station in the world. The plutonium reprocessed in France was unloaded in Tokyo Port, and transported to the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. These two events were the prominence in papers in the past three months. This shining operation performance and the heavy dependence of Japanese nuclear fuel cycle on foreign countries indicate the state of nuclear power and the present state of nuclear industry in Japan. The industry has grown up regarding the construction and operation of nuclear power plants, and laid a firm foundation in the Japanese industrial structure with the annual sales exceeding one billion yen. ''Atoms in Japan'' plans to review the present state of the nuclear industry in a series of articles, and in this first installment, the characteristics of the nuclear industry, the progress of the nuclear industry, the framework of the nuclear industry, the activity in a field of nuclear fuel cycle, and the utilization of radioisotopes and radiation are reported. (Kako, I.)

  18. Perry Visits Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upon opening this website, visitors will be treated to an image from an anonymous Japanese scroll which depicts a steam locomotive and several Japanese onlookers. It's an excellent way to start a digital collection dedicated to Commodore Matthew Perry's visit to Japan in 1854. The collection is part of Brown University's Center for Digital Initiatives, and it was created as part of a project by Professor Susan Smulyan and her students. On the site, visitors can peruse three different sets of images, including those created by the American artist William Heine and a set of broadsides by anonymous Japanese creators. The subject matter is the same for all of these works (Commodore Perry's visit to Japan), and visitors can take a close look at each image, and also read accompanying essays by students. That's far from all, as visitors can also read accounts of the expeditions written by Commodore Perry and William Heine. The site is rounded out by a detailed bibliography containing scholarly works, journal articles, and web sources.

  19. Measurement of residual {sup 60}Co activity induced by atomic-bomb neutrons in Nagasaki and background contribution by environmental neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Endo, Satoru [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Hoshi, Masaharu [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine] [and others

    2002-12-01

    Residual {sup 60}Co activity in five steel samples induced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb has been measured within about 1000 m from the hypocenter. The chemical separation of cobalt and nickel from steel samples was performed, and cobalt-enriched samples were prepared for all samples. Gamma-ray measurements were carried out with a low-background well-type germanium detector. The gamma-ray spectra for five samples were compared with the spectrum of a control sample to ensure that the observed {sup 60}Co was actually induced by A-bomb neutrons. The activation of cobalt by environmental neutrons was also investigated. It has been shown that the present {sup 60}Co data are consistent with earlier Hashizume's data. (author)

  20. Curious City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicago, what are you curious about? That might serve as the tagline for the WBEZ radio program "Curious City," as it's an inquisitive program that asks its listeners that exact question. The public submits queries about Chicago here on the show's site, visitors vote for the questions they like the best, and then the crack team at Curious City investigates and reports back, complete with help from locals who want to be part of the whole recursive process. On the site, visitors can look over the Up For Voting area, which includes questions that cover everything from Cook County Hospital to the design of Wrigley Field. For complete audio and written answers to questions that are wrapped up, click on over to the Answered & Investigating area. Here visitors can look over questions such as "Will the Pullman neighborhood ever be revitalized?" and "What is the origin of Chicago's distinctive wooden fire escapes?"

  1. Decision-making tools and procedures for City Logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Mun?uzuri, Jesus; Gonzalez-feliu, Jesus

    2013-01-01

    Urban logistics research set off in Europe some fifteen years ago, supported by the funding efforts of the European Commission. The special morphology of European cities, with narrow streets and historical centres which had to be preserved in many cases as world heritage sites, contributed to this interest. However, the problems of urban deliveries also had to be faced in other lively and congested cities around the globe, from Japan to America or Australia. Therefore, several researchers and...

  2. Continuing Engineering Education in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Keichi; Yamada, Keiichi

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (1) the current status of continuing engineering education (CEE) in Japan; (2) characteristics of CEE in enterprises; and (3) future issues of CEE in Japan. Indicates that ways of improving CEE include increasing the role of universities, promoting creativity and education of elites, and re-education of middle- and advanced-aged…

  3. Higher Education Studies in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Motohisa

    2010-01-01

    The rapid development of higher education in the postwar period has given rise to various problems, and higher education studies in Japan have developed in response to them. What have been the major issues, and how did academic research respond to them, in postwar Japan? This article delineates an outline of higher education studies in general,…

  4. Solar cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade, climate change has moved from being the concern of few to a widely recognized threat to humanity itself and the natural environment. The 1990s were the warmest decade on record, and ever-increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/), could, if left unchecked lead to serious consequences globally, including increased risks of droughts, floods and storms, disruption to agriculture, rising sea levels and the spread of disease. The contribution of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide has been recognized as the principal cause of the atmospheric changes that drive these climate trends. Globally, buildings are the largest source of indirect carbon emissions. In 2000, the UK Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution estimated that in order to stabilise carbon emissions at levels, which avoid catastrophic alterations in the climate, we would have to reduce emissions from the built environment by at least 60% by 2050 and 80% by 2100 relative to 1997 levels. Studies of the Oxford Ecohouse have demonstrated that it is not difficult to reduce carbon emissions from houses by 60% or more through energy efficiency measures, but it is only possible to reach the 90% level of reductions required by using renewable energy technologies. Solar energy technologies have been the most successfully applied of all renewable to date largely because they are the only systems that can be incorporated easily into the urban fabric.incorporated easily into the urban fabric. In addition, the short fossil fuel horizons that are predicted (c. 40 years left for oil and 65 years for gas) will drive the markets for solar technologies. For these reasons, the cities of the future will be powered by solar energy, to a greater or lesser extent, depending on the city form and location. In recognition of the need to move rapidly towards a renewable energy future, a group of international cities, including Oxford, have started the Solar City Network. In this paper we outline the programmes and strategies of the Oxford Solar Initiative developed to meet the three aims of reducing CO/sub 2/ emissions from the buildings of the city, to stimulate local industry and to ensure that the citizens of Oxford are future-proofed, in safe and comfortable homes, against the risks posed by both climate change and increasingly expensive fossil fuels. (author)

  5. Generic antibiotics in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Shigeru; Watanabe, Akira

    2012-08-01

    Generic drugs have been used extensively in many developed countries, although their use in Japan has been limited. Generic drugs reduce drug expenses and thereby national medical expenditure. Because generic drugs provide advantages for both public administration and consumers, it is expected that they will be more widely used in the future. However, the diffusion rate of generic drugs in Japan is quite low compared with that of other developed countries. An investigation on generic drugs conducted by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan revealed that 17.2 % of doctors and 37.2 % of patients had not used generic drugs. The major reasons for this low use rate included distrust of off-patent products and lower drug price margin compared with the brand name drug. The generic drugs available in the market include external drugs such as wet packs, antihypertensive agents, analgesics, anticancer drugs, and antibiotics. Among them, antibiotics are frequently used in cases of acute infectious diseases. When the treatment of these infections is delayed, the infection might be aggravated rapidly. The pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics (PK-PD) theory has been adopted in recent chemotherapy, and in many cases, the most appropriate dosage and administration of antibiotics are determined for individual patients considering renal function; high-dosage antibiotics are used preferably for a short duration. Therefore, a highly detailed antimicrobial agent is necessary. However, some of the generic antibiotics have less antibacterial potency or solubility than the brand name products. We showed that the potency of the generic products of vancomycin and teicoplanin is lower than that of the branded drugs by 14.6 % and 17.3 %, respectively. Furthermore, we confirmed that a generic meropenem drug for injection required about 82 s to solubilize in saline, whereas the brand product required only about 21 s. It was thought that the cause may be the difference in size of bulk particle and amount of solubilizer. The Japanese government hopes to increase the diffusion rate of generic drugs (in terms of quantity) from 20.2 % in 2010 to 30 % or more in 2012, and therefore it will be necessary to clarify the advantages of generic antibiotics in terms of expenditure and equivalency with the branded drugs. PMID:22684334

  6. Japan and the global environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many areas, the word most often used to describe Japanese policy is open-quotes enigma.close quotes In some ways, Japan's record on environmental policy also has elements of mystery and contradiction. On the one hand, Japan's history and culture often are associated with a reverence for nature. Indeed, Japan does lead the world in certain environmental areas, such as reduction of conventional air pollutants and compensation of air pollution victims. On the other hand, Japan has been widely criticized for its poor record in preserving its domestic environment, contribution to tropical deforestation, and unwillingness to protect endangered species. Today, the international community clamors for Japan to take its share of responsibility, as an economic superpower, for the global environment. To secure its place in world affairs, Japan slowly has begun to respond to this pressure on issues ranging from ivory importation to reduction of CFC emissions. There is some hope that the government's particular willingness to address global warming may be a sign of significant changes to come in Japanese environmental policy. However, international pressure remains on the many environmental issues Japan has yet to resolve, including tropical deforestation and financing of Third World development projects that harm the environment. Japan's environmental policy is most effective when government and industry cooperate to find technical solutions to environmental problems. Although tions to environmental problems. Although in recent years Japan's energy consumption has risen sharply, the Japanese have developed numerous technologies to reduce pollution and increase economic growth by improving energy efficiency. It is in these technologies that Japan has made the greatest strides and has the most to offer the global environment

  7. Economic Crisis in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Megan.

    This week's In the News examines Japan's struggle against economic recession. The nine resources discussed provide an overview on various aspects of the topic. Due to economic crisis throughout Asia, the Japanese economy was severely strained this week as the yen continued to fall against the dollar in Tokyo trading. A "weak domestic financial sector" and shrinking private-sector investments and exports also contributed to Japanese economic woes, according to Economic Planning Minister Shimpei Nukaya. Although many top Japanese governmental officials believe their nation's economy can be revived through financial reform and international monetary support, some United States analysts remain uncertain. With a weak GDP, a weak yen, and ownership of over half the world's savings, international concern for Japanese impact on other economies is growing. To alleviate these fears, President Clinton bolstered the yen with US dollar sales on June 17, 1998. The long-term effects of this intervention remain to be seen.

  8. Safety regulations in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, it is provided in the Law for Regulations of Nuclear Source Material, Nuclear Fuel Material and Reactors (referred as LRNR) that the licensee shall establish the safety regulations for individual plant by themselves regarding the operating management of nuclear reactor facility to secure the concrete safety of the nuclear power plant, that he shall receive an authorization of responsible government agencies (Minister of International Trade and Industry for commercial power station) and that this regulation shall be kept by the licensee and its employees. Furthermore, it is also provided in the same law that the licensee shall voluntarily nominate a chief reactor engineer to supervise the safety of reactor operation and that those who are engaged to the reactor operation shall obey the chief reactor engineer's instruction for the safety of reactor operation. These two factors are the base of the voluntary security system for reactor safety

  9. Radiation processing in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic scale of radiation application in the field of industry, agriculture and medicine in Japan in 1997 was investigated to compare its economic impacts with that of nuclear energy industry. Total production value of radiation application accounted for 54% of nuclear industry including nuclear energy industry and radiation applications in three fields above. Industrial radiation applications were further divided into five groups, namely nondestructive test, RI instruments, radiation facilities, radiation processing and ion beam processing. More than 70% of the total production value was brought about by ion beam processing for use with IC and semiconductors. Future economic prospect of radiation processing of polymers, for example cross-linking, EB curing, graft polymerization and degradation, is reviewed. Particular attention was paid to radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex and also to degradation of natural polymers. (S. Ohno)

  10. Japan: Ingestion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan is a developed country in the Asian region with very little or no population below the poverty line. The food intake pattern of the Japanese population is believed to be quite uniform and hence it was possible to use duplicate diets to study dietary intakes of trace elements by country's adult population. Duplicate diet samples were collected from nine different regions spread over the entire country considering the comparatively homogeneous socio-economic status of the Japanese population. These samples covered diets consumed on three consecutive days from nine subjects in the age range of 20-50 a. In addition, food materials were also collected to develop the Typical Japanese Diet RM (see section 6 on QA/QC)

  11. Tappi Wind Park, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since April 1992, Tohoku Electric Power Co has been operating a demonstration wind power station at Tappi-saki where the annual mean wind speed is 10.1 m/s. The station, ''Tappi WinPark'' , is the largest in Japan and was commissioned with a total rated power output of 1.375 kW. Its five wind turbines, each of 275 kW, generated 2.3 GWh and 2.9 GWh of electricity in 1992/93 and in 1993/94 respectively. The expansion of the station to a total capacity of 2,875 kW, by adding 5 turbines each of 300 kW turbines, was completed in September 1995. (Author)

  12. Transboundary Secondary Organic Aerosol in Western Japan: An Observed Limitation of the f44 Oxidation Indicator

    CERN Document Server

    Irei, Satoshi; Sadanaga, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Takao; Arakaki, Tekemitsu; Sato, Kei; Kaneyasu, Naoki; Bandow, Hiroshi; Hatakeyama, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    To obtain evidence for secondary organic aerosol formation during the long range transport of air masses over the East China Sea, we conducted field measurements in March 2012 at the Fukue atmospheric monitoring station, Nagasaki, in western Japan. The relative abundance of m/z 44 in fine organic aerosol mass spectra (f44) was measured by an Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitor. The stable carbon isotope ratio (d13C) of low volatile water soluble organic carbon (LV-WSOC) in the daily filter samples of total suspended particulate matter was also analyzed using an elemental analyzer coupled with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Additionally, in situ measurements of NOx and NOy were performed using NOx and NOy analyzers. The measurements showed that, unlike the systematic trends observed in a previous field study, a scatter plot for d13C of LV-WSOC versus f44 indicated a random variation. Comparison of f44 with the photochemical age estimated by the NOx to NOy ratio revealed that the f44 values distri...

  13. History of R and D on environmental radioactivity measurement techniques and present status of monitoring for tokai reprocessing facility in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan's basic policy of utilization of atomic energy is strongly limited only for the peaceful use under the statutory control, reflecting the catastrophic experience of twice atomic bomb detonation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. To attain a sustainable prosperous happy life of people, the energy resource is one of indispensable factor which ranks with foods and environment. Japan has started peaceful atomic energy development program since 1955, the program contained power reactor, uranium exploration, plutonium utilization including reprocessing of spent fuel and MOX fuel and so on. Tokai Reprocessing plant for spent fuel was constructed from 1970 and has been operated since 1977. At the start of the operation, to protect the vicinity people and the environment from radiation hazard which might be occurred by the discharged radioactivity from the plant a total environmental monitoring program was set by the implementing organization. Prior to the operation, environmental monitoring technique had to be developed. This presentation will introduce the history of R and D on low level environmental radioactivity measurement techniques and present status of monitoring for Tokai Reprocessing Facility in Japan. (authors)

  14. Worldwide cryogenics - Japan. Research and development at the Japanese National Research Institute for Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities at the National Research Institute for Metals on high-field superconducting materials and the structure materials for cryogenic use are described. The superconducting materials research building equipped with a 17.5 T superconducting magnet, was recently constructed in Tsukuba New Science City of Japan to further progress in superconducting and cryogenic engineering. (author)

  15. The Japan’s Award for PPIM UIN Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idris Thaha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PPIM UIN Jakarta acted as an advisor for the Visiting Program for Pesantren Leaders held by the government of Japan. PPIM UIN Jakarta has a network with many pesantrens in Indonesia. Since 2002, PPIM is deliberately asked by the government of Japan's to select about 12 to15 kyais, nyais, religious teacher (ustad from various modern, traditional, and salafi pesantrens in Indonesia to be sent to Japan. Until now, at least there are 90 kyais, nyais, and religious leaders who have been participated in the program. This year, PPIM recommends 17 names of pesantren leaders and religious teachers to the Embassy of Japan in Jakarta to be selected to participate in the program.Copyright (c 2014 by SDI. All right reserved.DOI: 10.15408/sdi.v18i3.431

  16. Multiple personality disorder in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Y; Suzuki, K; Sato, T; Murakami, Y; Takahashi, T

    1998-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the features of multiple personality disorder (MPD) in Japan are similar to those in North America, although a wide disparity exists in the prevalence of MPD between the two areas. In order to describe the features of MPD in Japan, we obtained clinical data from MPD case reports, including two of our own cases, published in Japanese academic journals and compared it with the data from other countries. The cases in Japan differed significantly from those in North America in the mean number of personalities and prevalence of sexual and/or physical abuse. PMID:9681581

  17. National gas transmission pipelines - vital for greater gas use in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, unlike Europe and U.S.A., high-pressure transmission pipelines are confined to areas around the cities of Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya, because they primarily connect LNG receiving terminals with city pipelines. Building longer pipelines has been hampered by the difficulty of determining the routes and the high construction cost due to topographical complexity, concentrated population in the limited non-mountainous areas, and no established concept of right-of-way as in Europe and U.S.A., owing to a complicated pattern of land ownership. This underdeveloped transmission pipeline network has been a bottleneck for promoting natural gas distribution on a nation-wide basis, and construction of a national transmission pipeline running through the Japanese archipelagos is essential for natural gas to play an important role in the future primary energy supply in Japan. As major gas distribution companies, we wish to describe in this report the concept of national gas transmission pipelines in Japan

  18. Branding Cities, Changing Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2010-01-01

    Societal changes are seldom discussed in the literature on city branding. The time element is important because it highlights the fluctuating reality of society. The city brand message freezes the place but in fact, the city branding exercise is a continuous process. Society emerges too. City brands are supposed to accentuate the uniqueness of the city, be built from the bottom-up and reflect the city's identity. This paper highlights three paradoxes, pointing out that city branding processes can also make cities more alike, bring about societal changes and forge new city identities. A city branding campaign does not just present the city, it may change the city. The relationships between the branding exercise and the city are intertwined in the evolution of the place.

  19. Learning Cities as Healthy Green Cities: Building Sustainable Opportunity Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a new generation of learning cities we have called EcCoWell cities (Economy, Community, Well-being). The paper was prepared for the PASCAL International Exchanges (PIE) and is based on international experiences with PIE and developments in some cities. The paper argues for more holistic and integrated development so that…

  20. Purification of europium for the determination of the specific radioactivity of ultra low-level Eu-152 in a sample exposed to atomic-bomb neutrons in Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the specific radioactivity of residual neutron-induced radionuclides such as 152Eu and 60Co have been carried out to assess the validity of a series of computer calculations employed for atomic-bomb neutron dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. However, the use of these nuclides for atomic-bomb neutron dosimetry has been limited by the following difficulties: (1) today, these radionuclides are found only at extremely low concentrations in materials exposed to the atomic bombs and (2) the neutrons that induced these radionuclides were thermal and epithermal, while the neutron dose received in Hiroshima and Nagasaki is attributable to fast neutrons. In order to overcome the first difficulty, we established a chemical procedure to extract Eu and Co from materials exposed to the atomic bomb. This chemical procedure has been successful for materials exposed to the atomic bomb within a 1400 m slant distance from the explosion point over Hiroshima. At Nagasaki, materials exposed at distances greater than 1200 m have never been subjected to the measurement of residual neutron-induced radionuclides. In this work, we have undertaken the determination of the specific radioactivity of 152Eu (half-life: 13.542 y) in a sample exposed to the Nagasaki atomic bomb at a place distant from the explosion point. However, because of radioactive decay during the ?60 years since 1945 and the great distance from the explosion point, the currennce from the explosion point, the current specific radioactivity of 152Eu in the sample is extremely low (estimated to be ?2x10-4 Bq-152Eu/mg-Eu), and a serious problem in the measurement of ultra low-level 152Eu radioactivity arises due to interference from daughters of 227Ac (half-life: 21.8 y). Hence, our chemical procedure for preparing a Eu-enriched counting source must be improved, and much attention must be given to the removal of Ac from the sample. An approximately 19 kg concrete sample was obtained from the outer surface of a building exposed to the Nagasaki atomic bomb at a distance of 1596 m from the explosion point. From the concrete sample, approximately 9.6 kg of andesite (used as osteodentin) and approximately 7.7 kg of mortar were separated. Because preliminary neutron activation analysis demonstrated that the Eu concentration in the andesite fraction (0.96 ppm) was higher than the concentration in the mortar fraction (0.41 ppm), approximately 7.8 kg aliquots of andesite were subjected to a chemical procedure to separate rare-earth elements (REEs) including Eu. After total decomposition of the pulverized andesite by fusion with sodium hydroxide, removal of major elements (such as Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Na, K, and Mg) was carried out by precipitation, solvent extraction, and ion-exchange column methods. A crude specimen obtained in this manner was subjected to preliminary measurement of Eu and radionuclides. The crude specimen, which was enriched in REEs, was then subjected to total decomposition and chemical procedures to obtain a purified specimen, which was virtually free of major elements and Ac. To remove Ac from the REEs, the major elements were first removed, then solvent extraction with 1M HDEHP-benzene was applied to the REE fraction in dilute nitric acid medium. Preliminary measurements of Eu and radionuclides in the crude specimen revealed that the content of 227Ac daughters in the specimen was too high to determine the low-level 152Eu radioactivity. A series of tracer experiments using 152Eu and 228Ac demonstrated that solvent extraction in a 1M HDEHP-benzene/dilute HNO3 system is an efficient method to remove Ac from Eu (Figs. 1 and 2). In the case of the actual crude specimen enriched in REEs, Eu and Ac were first extracted into 300 mL of 1M HDEHP-benzene from 300 mL of 0.1 M HNO3 solution. The organic phase was then washed with five 300 mL portions of 0.2 M HNO3. Some results of the enrichment and purification of Eu from the sample exposed to the atomic bomb are given in Table 1. Although the overall recovery of Eu in the purified specimen is only ?26%, the remov

  1. Biosimilar development and regulation in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GaBI Journal Editor

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Japan, biosimilars guidelines following the principles of the EU framework were established by Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in March 2009. The guidelines cover the manufacturing process, characterization of quality attributes, and clinical and non-clinical studies for biosimilars. In this paper, the requirements for regulatory approval of biosimilars in Japan are outlined.

  2. Biosimilar development and regulation in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    GaBI Journal Editor

    2013-01-01

    In Japan, biosimilars guidelines following the principles of the EU framework were established by Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in March 2009. The guidelines cover the manufacturing process, characterization of quality attributes, and clinical and non-clinical studies for biosimilars. In this paper, the requirements for regulatory approval of biosimilars in Japan are outlined.

  3. Nuclear fission industry in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of the nuclear fission industry in Japan is described. Japanese nuclear policy, vision, goals, and supporting organizational structures are reviewed. The facilities of the Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel development Corporation (PNC), and the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPCO) are illustrated and described. Nuclear power statistics and power generation costs by power source are shown for Japan. Photographic details and technical descriptions are presented for Japan's: nuclear fuel cycle (NFC), light water reactor (LWR), advanced thermal reactor (ATR), fast breeder reactor (FBR), gas centrifuge uranium enrichment, LWR spent fuel reprocessing, ATR and FBR spent fuel uranium/plutonium mixed oxide fuel (MOX) co-conversion process, high level nuclear waste management (NWM) policy, reactor operation safety, newly developed decommissioning and dismantling policy for obsolete nuclear facilities, and new future technology

  4. Radioactivity survey data in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strontium-90 and cesium-137 in Japan were determined in rain and dry fallout, airborne dust, service water, total diet, rice, milk, vegetables, sea fish, shellfish, and seaweeds. The results were shown in tables. (J.P.N.)

  5. Nuclear power development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy situation in Japan is briefly outlined. Vulnerability in energy structure of the country is shown by a comparison of primary energy supply patterns of Japan and Western countries. Japan's energy policy consists in reducing dependence on oil, promoting efficient use of energy and increasing use of non-fossil fuels. Nuclear power is a core of alternative energy for petroleum because of stable supply of nuclear fuel, low detrimental emissions and less dependence on the fuel. A short historical review of nuclear power development in Japan is presented. Some future issues as development of entire nuclear fuel cycle, social acceptance, reactor safety and nuclear power economics are also discussed. 6 figs. (R.T.)

  6. 1983 Akita, Honshu, Japan Images

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The tsunami generated by a magnitude 7.9 (Mw) earthquake destroyed 700 boats and 59 houses for a total of $800 million in property damage in Japan (1983 dollars)....

  7. Nuclear power controversy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arguments for and against nuclear energy in Japan date back to the 1950's, when the research and development of the peaceful uses of atomic energy were resumed after the World War 2. In the history of the controversy over this question, anti-nuclear power movement became active in 1970's, and has continued as the mainstream of the nuclear controversy. A review is made on the nuclear controversy, which is composed of the opposition movement supported by the Japan socialist party, with the Japan Congress against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs as the main body, and citizen groups, labor unions, environmentalist groups, etc., and the movement supported by the Japan Scientist Congress, and carried on by fishery associations and local residents. (J.P.N.)

  8. Whistleblowing in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anne J; Konishi, Emiko

    2007-03-01

    This article, written from research data, focuses on the possible meaning of the data rather than on detailed statistical reporting. It defines whistleblowing as an act of the international nursing ethical ideal of advocacy, and places it in the larger context of professional responsibility. The experiences, actions, and ethical positions of 24 Japanese nurses regarding whistleblowing or reporting a colleague for wrongdoing provide the data. Of these respondents, similar in age, educational level and clinical experience, 10 had previously reported another nurse and 12 had reported a physician for a wrongful act. These data raise questions about overt actions to expose a colleague in a culture that values group loyalty and saving face. Additional research is needed for an in-depth understanding of whistleblowing, patient advocacy and professional responsibility across cultures, especially those that value group loyalty, saving face and similar concepts to the Japanese Ishin Denshin, where the value is on implicit understanding requiring indirect communication. Usually, being direct and openly discussing sensitive topics is not valued in Japan because such behavior disrupts the most fundamental value, harmony (wa). PMID:17425148

  9. The photovoltaic energy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today the Japan is the leader of the photovoltaic energy. The first reason of this success is an action of the government integrating subventions for the installation of photovoltaic systems and a support of the scientific research. To explain this success, the author presents the energy situation in Japan, details the national programs, the industrial sector (market, silicon needs, recycling, manufacturers, building industry) and presents the main actors. (A.L.B.)

  10. City Car = The City Car / Andres Sevtshuk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sevtshuk, Andres, 1981-

    2008-01-01

    Massachusettsi Tehnoloogiainstituudi (MIT) meedialaboratooriumi juures tegutseva Targa Linna Grupi (Smart City Group) ja General Motorsi koostööna sündinud kaheistmelisest linnasõbralikust elektriautost City Car. Nimetatud töögrupi liikmed (juht William J. Mitchell, töögruppi kuulus A. Sevtshuk Eestist)

  11. Radioactivity survey data in Japan. Pt. 2. Dietary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides radioactivity survey data in dietary materials, which were collected from January through September 1992. The samples were sent to the Japan Chemical Analysis Center from 46 contracted prefectures. The samples were prepared for radiochemical analysis. The concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs in samples are tabulated. The maximum concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs were 0.19±0.011 Bq/p·d from Kamisaibara-mura (Okayama) and 0.34±0.021 Bq/p·d from Nagano, respectively, for total diet; 0.021±0.011 Bq/kgwet from Chiba and 0.048±0.0076 Bq/kgwet from Kanazawa for rice (producing districts); 0.18±0.013 Bq/l and 0.16±0.010 Bq/l from Aomori for milk (producing districts for domestic program); 0.14±0.012 Bq/l from Kochi and 0.12±0.009 Bq/l from Hikawa-machi (Shimane) for milk (producing districts for WHO program); 0.057±0.0068 Bq/l from Sapporo and 0.15±0.014 Bq/l from Nagasaki for milk (consuming districts); 0.76±0.029 Bq/l and 2.0±0.04 Bq/l from Sample C for powdered milk; 0.50±0.015 Bq/kgwet and 2.6±0.04 Bq/kgwet from Oota (Shimane) for vegetables (producing districts); 0.37±0.019 Bq/kgwet and 0.098±0.011 Bq/kgwet from Sendai for vegetables (consuming districts); 1.9±0.09 Bq/kg from Ue-mura (Kumamoto) and 3.1±0.14 Bq/kg from Kawaminami-machi (Miyazaki) for Japanese tea; 0.035±0.0063 Bq/kgwet in Scorpion-fish collected from Hamada (Shimane) and 0.42±0.024 Bq/kgwet in Skipjack from Tosa (Kochi) for sea fish; 0.95±0.033 Bq/kgwet from Akita and 0.38±0.025 Bq/kgwet from Kasumigaura (Ibaraki) for freshwater fish; 0.010±0.011 Bq/kgwet from Sakata (Yamagata) and 0.054±0.013 Bq/kgwet from Minamichita-machi (Aichi) for shellfish; 0.049±0.012 Bq/kgwet from Sakata (Yamagata) and 0.036±0.0095 Bq/kgwet from Muta (Aomori) for seaweeds. (N.K.)

  12. Intraoperative radiotherapy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IOR) which have been obtained in Japan were reviewed. In IOR of gastric cancer, a single dose of 2800-4000 rad was delivered. The 5-year survival rates of the patients treated by operation alone were 93.0% for Stage I, 54.5% for Stage II, 36.8% for Stage III and 0% for Stage IV, while those of patients treated by IOR were 88.1% for Stage I, 77.6% for Stage II, 44.6% for Stage III and 19.5% for Stage IV. In pancreatic cancer, long-term survivors could hardly be obtained because of the advanced stage of the disease. However about 80% who complained of severe abdominal pain experienced relief within a week after irradiation with more than 2000 rad. In colon cancer, a cancerocidal dose can be delivered safely, since normal intestine is shifted from the field. Five of 14 patients treated by IOR are alive and 2 of the five patients have survived more than 5 years. In patients with glioblastoma, it was demonstrated that those having received external irradiation, followed by a second craniotomy combined with necrotomy and IOR to the residual tumors, yield significantly better results than those having received conventional treatment. In prostatic cancer, satisfactory local control could be obtained by IOR with a single dose of more than 3300 rad without complications of rectovesical function. In mediastinal tumors, two of the 9 patients treated by IOR have survived more than 5 years with no sign of pulmonary fibrosis. In soft th no sign of pulmonary fibrosis. In soft tissue sarcomas IOR has yielded a local control rate of 73.3% without affecting the skin overlying the tumor. (author)

  13. Mutation breeding in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The achievements made in mutation breeding in Japan over the past 40 years are outlined from the viewpoint of practical breeding. Fifty-four varieties of 23 crops were obtained by direct use of induced mutants. These include 12 cereal mutant varieties, five food legumes, nine industrial crops, seven vegetables and 18 ornamentals. Ten varieties were obtained by national breeding institutes, 14 by prefectural stations and 30 by universities or private firms. The varieties produced by the national breeding programme were registered and released with Norin numbers. In most cases, ionizing radiation was used. Forty additional mutant varieties were developed through cross-breeding using induced mutants as the gene sources. Of the 33 rice varieties in this category, 21, including six national varieties, resulted from crosses involving Reimei, a semi-dwarf mutant variety. Another semi-dwarf mutant parent was used to breed two more national varieties. Three early heading mutants were also integrated into cross-breeding programmes and produced three national and two prefectural varieties. A large grain mutant produced three varieties for sake brewing. A new recessive resistant mutant allele to the soil borne virus (BaYMV) was induced in barley. One variety was bred using this mutant as a parent. Another promising disease resistant clone was induced by chronic irradiation in a gamma field in the leading Japanese pear variety Nijisseiki, which is susceptible to black spot diseasewhich is susceptible to black spot disease caused by Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler. This mutant clone maintained all the superior qualities of the original variety. The significant role of the Institute of Radiation Breeding as a core in mutation breeding is mentioned briefly. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs, 6 tabs

  14. \\(Nakano Seig\\bar{o}\\) and the Politics of Democracy, Empire and Fascism in Prewar and Wartime Japan

    OpenAIRE

    von Loë, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The subject of this dissertation is the life and career of \\(Nakano Seig\\bar{o}\\), a Japanese journalist and politician born in Fukuoka-city on the southwestern island of \\(Ky\\bar{u}sh\\bar{u}\\) in 1886. Initially a liberal and a democrat, Nakano became enamored with European-style fascist movements in the 1930s and tried to start a similar political mass movement in Japan. Advocating a hard-line \\(vis-\\grave{a}-vis\\) America and England, Nakano supported Japan’s entry into WW2. As early as ...

  15. Worker’s city: hostel city

    OpenAIRE

    Massalha, Manal

    2014-01-01

    “Umm-el-Fahem is not fit to be a city at all. It does not have the basic ingredients of a modern city because of racist planning policies. Where are the facilities in the city?! It may tick some of the cities’ criteria, such as population size, but where are the facilities?! The streets?!... It is one big refugee camp. It does not provide work for the bulk of its work force. Workers still have to leave the city at the crack of dawn to travel 80km and sometimes 300km each way to go to wor...

  16. Action taken by three humans, an American physicist in the bomber, two Japanese with radiation poisoning in Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the atomic bombs were exploded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luis W. Alvarez of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), University of California, USA, won the Nobel Prize for physics of elementary particle in 1968. He was very famous physicist and concerned the World War II in some ways. He joined the radar research development at MIT Radiation Lab. in 1940, then he developed the magnetron and the ground-controlled approach (GCA) for blind landing of planes. Afterwards he joined the Manhattan Project to fabricate the atomic bombs. His career connecting to those is introduced partly based on his autobiography. In addition, introduced are two reports by two Japanese, the personal experience of Yoko Ota with radiation poisoning in Hiroshima, and the action of Takashi Nagai who assisted the victims of radiation poisoning in Nagasaki even if he had radiation poisoning himself, as well as a letter from Luis W. Alvarez to Ryokichi Sagane, which was put in the tube of atomic bomb energy measuring instruments. Nightmares of the Hiroshima view are also introduced. (S.Y.)

  17. Long-term epidemiological studies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Study populations, dosimetry and summary of health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation succeeded 28 years' worth of activities of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission on long-term epidemiological studies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It has three major cohorts of atomic bomb survivors, i.e. the Life Span Study (LSS) of 120.000 people, the In Utero Cohort of 3600 and the Second Generation Study (F1) of 77 000. The LSS and F1 studies include a periodic health examination for each sub-cohort, i.e. the Adult Health Study and the F1 Clinical Study, respectively. An extensive individual dose estimation was conducted and the system was published as the Dosimetry System established in 2002 (DS02). As results of these studies, increases of cancers in relation to dose were clearly shown. Increases of other mortality causes were also observed, including heart and respiratory diseases. There has been no evidence of genetic effects in the survivors' children, including cancer and other multi-factorial diseases. The increase in the expected mortality number in the next 10 y would allow the analyses of further details of the observed effects related to atomic bomb exposures. (authors)

  18. Long-term radiation-related health effects in a unique human population: lessons learned from the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douple, Evan B; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Cullings, Harry M; Preston, Dale L; Kodama, Kazunori; Shimizu, Yukiko; Fujiwara, Saeko; Shore, Roy E

    2011-03-01

    For 63 years scientists in the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, have been assessing the long-term health effects in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and in their children. The identification and follow-up of a large population (approximately a total of 200,000, of whom more than 40% are alive today) that includes a broad range of ages and radiation exposure doses, and healthy representatives of both sexes; establishment of well-defined cohorts whose members have been studied longitudinally, including some with biennial health examinations and a high survivor-participation rate; and careful reconstructions of individual radiation doses have resulted in reliable excess relative risk estimates for radiation-related health effects, including cancer and noncancer effects in humans, for the benefit of the survivors and for all humankind. This article reviews those risk estimates and summarizes what has been learned from this historic and unique study. PMID:21402804

  19. Long-term epidemiological studies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: study populations, dosimetry and summary of health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Toshiteru

    2012-10-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation succeeded 28 years' worth of activities of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission on long-term epidemiological studies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It has three major cohorts of atomic bomb survivors, i.e. the Life Span Study (LSS) of 120,000 people, the In Utero Cohort of 3600 and the Second Generation Study (F(1)) of 77,000. The LSS and F(1) studies include a periodic health examination for each sub-cohort, i.e. the Adult Health Study and the F(1) Clinical Study, respectively. An extensive individual dose estimation was conducted and the system was published as the Dosimetry System established in 2002 (DS02). As results of these studies, increases of cancers in relation to dose were clearly shown. Increases of other mortality causes were also observed, including heart and respiratory diseases. There has been no evidence of genetic effects in the survivors' children, including cancer and other multi-factorial diseases. The increase in the expected mortality number in the next 10 y would allow the analyses of further details of the observed effects related to atomic bomb exposures. PMID:22908354

  20. Urgent Safety Measures in Japan after Great East Japan Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to tsunami triggered by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, the operating and refueling reactor facilities at Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni Nuclear Power Plants of Tokyo Electric Power Co. caused a nuclear hazard. Japanese electric power companies voluntarily began to compile various urgent measures against tsunami within the week the hazard was caused. As for the urgent safety measures of each licensee, it is clarified that effective measures have been appropriately implemented as a result of the inspection of the national government, the verification based on the guideline of the Japan Society of Maintenology and the stress test. (author)

  1. Datafile: [nuclear power in] Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan is third after the USA and France in terms of the Western World's installed nuclear capacity, but it has by far the largest forward programme. Great effort is also being put into the fuel cycle and advanced reactors. There is close co-operation between the government, utilities and manufacturers, but Japan has not sought to export reactors. The government has responded to the growing public opposition to nuclear power with a massive increase in its budget for public relations. Details of the nuclear power programme are given. (author)

  2. Study of applicability of a small modular type FBR in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applicability of a small modular type FBR (SMFR) in Japan has been studied. The SMFR has merits and demerits from various points of view. Evaluation factors for applicability are discussed and evaluated under the circumstances in Japan. Based on the above evaluations, an appropriate reactor power is evaluated and 300 MWe per module is proposed. SMFR has a potential to be an alternative future FBR system. By enhancement of inherent and passive safety features it may be possibly located near a city or for the replacement of fossil plants on small site area. (author)

  3. Incidence of osteoporotic fractures in Sado, Japan in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Mayumi; Endo, Naoto; Oinuma, Takeo; Miyasaka, Dai; Oguma, Yujiro; Imao, Kanta; Koga, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Naohito

    2014-03-01

    We conducted a survey of fracture incidences associated with senile osteoporosis in 2010 in Sado City, Niigata Prefecture, Japan, including compression vertebral fractures, hip fractures, distal radius fractures, and fractures of the proximal end of the humerus. We previously conducted a similar survey from 2004-2006 in Sado City. The purpose of the current study was to determine the incidence of osteoporotic fractures in Sado City in 2010 and to examine changes over time. We calculated the incidence of each fracture per 100,000 person-years based on the population of Sado City. Hip and vertebral fractures showed marked increases from 2004-2006, but a similar increase was not found from 2006-2010. The average age at injury increased in 2010 compared to 2004, except for fractures of the radius. Among the subjects with hip fractures, 14 % had a history of contralateral hip fracture. The percentage of patients taking medication for osteoporosis before injury was higher in 2010 compared with 2004, but these percentages were still only 7 and 13 % for those with subsequent hip and vertebral fractures, respectively. PMID:23818063

  4. 75 FR 57980 - Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ...AA1921-129 (Third Review)] Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION...the antidumping duty finding on polychloroprene rubber from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  5. Biophilic Cities Are Sustainable, Resilient Cities

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Newman; Timothy Beatley

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing recognition of the need for daily contact with nature, to live happy, productive, meaningful lives. Recent attention to biophilic design among architects and designers acknowledges this power of nature. However, in an increasingly urban planet, more attention needs to be aimed at the urban scales, at planning for and moving towards what the authors call “biophilic cities”. Biophilic cities are cities that provide close and daily contact with nature, nearby nature, but a...

  6. MEDICAL DEVICE APPROVAL PROCESS IN JAPAN

    OpenAIRE

    Devesh Sharma

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW or Koseirodosho in Japanese) is in charge of the pharmaceutical regulatory affairs in Japan. Formal approvals and licenses are required to marketing drugs in Japan which are obtained from the MHLW.  Japan’s Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) has set itself the challenging task of expediting patient access to novel therapies while ensuring these meet international standards of safety, efficacy and quality. One of the biggest hurd...

  7. MEDICAL DEVIC E APPROVAL PROCESS IN JAPAN

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma Devesh

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW or Koseirodosho in Japanese) is in charge of the pharmaceutical regulatory affairs in Japan. Formal approvals and licenses are required to marketing drugs in Japan which are obtained from the MHLW. Japan’s Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) has set itself the challenging task of expediting patient access to novel therapies while ensuring these meet international standards of safety, efficacy and quality. One of the biggest hurdl...

  8. Banking crises and "Japanization": Origins and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Kawai, Masahiro; Morgan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Japan's "two lost decades" perhaps represent an extreme example of a weak recovery from a financial crisis, and are now referred to as "Japanization." More recently, widespread stagnation in advanced economies in the wake of the global financial crisis led to fears that Japanization might spread to other countries. This study examines the dimensions of Japanization - including low trend growth, debt deleveraging, deflation, and massive increases in government debt - and analyzes their possibl...

  9. Japan and America: Culture Counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Barry D.

    1989-01-01

    Cultural distinctions in the approach to social relationships, access to information, personal motivation, and hierarchy make Japan an effective economic power. U.S. business can learn from the Japanese ways to create more information-based organizations, think in global terms, foster links between business and education, and develop internal…

  10. Light water reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economy shifted to a low growth rate, and energy conservation advanced, accordingly, the growth rate of electric power demand is expected to be 3 %. As the result, nuclear power must be more economical. From the perspective of the national security, the continuous development of nuclear power is essential for Japan, as nuclear power is a quasi-domestically produced energy source, and Japan must reduce the dependence on oil. The commercial power plants in Japan are a gas-cooled reactor plant of 166 MW capacity, 16 BWR plants of 12,917 MW total capacity and 15 PWR plants of 11,438 MW total capacity, totaling 32 plants of 24,521 MW. Those in the construction or planning stage are 8 BWR plants of 8,245 MW and 8 PWR plants of 7,928 MW, totaling 16 plants of 16,173 MW. As of the end of March, 1986, nuclear power generating facilities were 16 % of the total facilities in Japan, which generated 26 % of the total electric power generated in fiscal year 1985. The capacity factor exceeded 70 % since 1982. The improvement and standardization program of LWRs and its results, the effort to develop ALWRs, the further advance in LWRs, the use of plutonium and so on are discussed. The further improvement of the economy and reliability of nuclear power plants is urgently required. (Kako, I.)

  11. The March 2011 Japan tsunami

    OpenAIRE

    Tappin, Dave

    2011-01-01

    The March 11th 2011 Tohoku-iki earthquake was the fifth largest on Earth in the last 50 years, it created one of the most devastating tsunamis in history. Dave Tappin describes the background to the tsunami and its impact based on his research on tsunamis and visits to Japan over the past three months.

  12. Modernization of Education in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. for Educational Research, Tokyo (Japan).

    The document traces the development of education in Japan from the 17th century to the present. It is presented in four chapters. Chapter one discusses the Tokugawa Period (1603-1867). Principal forms of schooling were hanko for the Samurai class and terakoya for the commoners. The hanko were established for the benefit of the fiefs; objectives of…

  13. Japan tests Swiss top technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five Japanese energy supply utilities are working on a new generation of pressurized water reactors. The key components for the first power station of this type are being put through a particularly rigorous test program, which also takes into account Japan's heightened earthquake probability. A main steam isolating valve developed and produced in Switzerland has been included in this demanding program. (orig.)

  14. Organic photovoltaic energy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan finances research programs on photovoltaic conversion since 1974. Research in this domain is one of the 11 priorities of NEDO, the agency of means of the ministry of economy, trade and industry of Japan. The search for an abatement of production costs and of an increase of cells efficiency is mentioned in NEDO's programs as soon as the beginning of the 1990's. A road map has been defined which foresees photovoltaic energy production costs equivalent to the ones of thermal conversion by 2030, i.e. 7 yen/kWh (4.4 cents of euro/kWh). The use of new materials in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) or organic solar cells, and of new structures (multi-junctions) is explored to reach this objective. The organic photovoltaic technology is more particularly considered for small generation units in mobile or domestic technologies. Japan is particularly in advance in the improvement of DSSC cells efficiency, in particular in the domain of the research on solid electrolytes. Europe seems more in advance in the domain of the new generation of organic solar cells. Therefore, a complementarity may be found between Japan and French teams in the domain of organic solar cells improvement through collaboration programs. (J.S.)

  15. The US Occupation and Japan's New Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumano, Ruriko

    2007-01-01

    During the US Occupation of Japan (1945-1952), a victorious America attempted to reform Japanese education by replacing Japan's tradition system of values with one that promoted American democratic values. The United States had considered the source of Japan's militarism to lie in the selfless loyalty and love of country that many older Japanese…

  16. Indicators in the governance of sustainable transport policies in Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik; Fukuda, Daisuke

    The paper addresses the role of indicators to promote transitions towards a more sustainable transportation future in Japan. Existing international literature suggests a potential key role for performance measurement and indicator systems to strengthen such policies. The research explores to what extent governance frameworks associated with ‘new public management’ reforms in Japan also provide an enhanced basis to promote sustainability within transportation. A framework is derived based on the assumption that the effectiveness of such frameworks in this regard depends on the way sustainability is represented, as well as how the framework is integrated with decision making processes. Japan is used as a case, because Japanese transport seems to perform well in certain aspects of ‘sustainability’, while Japanese transportation policy also faces significant management challenges. A range of governance measures have been adopted to assist in managing transport policy challenges, including the application of experimentation, monitoring and evaluation of plans, policies and institutions. The paper looks at two cases of policy management within Japanese transportation: The first is the performance evaluation framework for the road sector used by the Japanese Ministry of Land Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT). The second is the so-called ‘Eco-model’ cities program, also undertaken by the MLIT, using the case of Toyama City for illustration. In each case the approach to performance measurement is outlined, the actual application is presented, and the results in terms of how the indicators contribute to promote sustainable transport will be reviewed. A finding is that indicators in both programs seem to have limited positive influence on sustainability, with the most and visible effects in the latter one. The institutional context seems important for the strength of influence.

  17. The City at Stake:

    OpenAIRE

    Sophie Esmann Andersen; Anne Ellerup Nielsen

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the city have been addressed from many different approaches such as law, political science, art history and public administration, in which the eco-nomic, political and legal status of the city have played a major role. However, a new agenda for conceptualizing the city has emerged, in which the city assumes new roles. By using stakeholder theory as a framework for conceptualizing the city, we argue that the city assumes a political-economic agenda-setting role as well as providing...

  18. Evidence of a neutron RBE of 70 for solid-tumor induction at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and its implications for assessing the effective neutron quality factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of the risk attendant to exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation have been primarily based on epidemiological data for relatively large doses and on extrapolation that is necessary because of statistical uncertainties of the data in the range of doses that are of principal concern in radiation protection. These estimates have been mostly for low-LET radiations (X and ? radiation) because of their greater practical importance and also because the recent revision of the dosimetry for Hiroshima and Nagasaki reduced the estimated neutron dose to the point where they could not be expected to contribute significantly to the effects observed. In order to describe the risks associated with ionizing radiation a number of studies have invoked one of the following simplified models representing the cancer mortality rate, ? (loosely referred to as risk in the literature): (1) ?r(t,D) = ?(t,0) [1 + ?r(t)·er(D)]·S0(D) or (2) ?a(t,D) = [?(t,0) + ?a(t)·ea(D)]·S0(D). These are termed, respectively, the relative-risk and the absolute-risk models. In these expressions ?(t,D) represents the mortality rate at time t after exposure to a dose D; ?(t,0) is the spontaneous mortality rate. The main reason for choosing the forms, Eqs (1,2) - computational convenience aside - is the fact that the notion of a dose-response function, e(D), whose functional form does not change with t form does not change with t is preserved. The authors shall restrict the discussion here to the relative-risk model and omit the subscript r. e(D) is a carcinogenesis term, S0(D) is a cell-killing term factor and ?(t) is a parameter which depends on the time post-exposure

  19. Radiation-related posterior lenticular opacities in Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors based on T65DR and DS86 dosimetry systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the quantitative relationship of ionizing radiation to the occurrence of posterior lenticular opacities among the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, as suggested by the DS86 dosimetry system. DS86 doses are available for 1,983 (93.4%) of the 2,124 A-bomb survivors analyzed in 1982. In the DS86 system, both gamma-ray and neutron regression coefficients for the best-fitting model are positive and highly significant for the estimated energy deposited in the eye, here termed the eye organ dose. The DS86 gamma regression coefficient is almost the same as that associated with the T65DR gamma kerma, the ratio of the two coefficients being 1.1 (95% confidence limits: 0.5 - 2.3) for D86 kerma in the individual data. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values based on the individual gamma and neutron components of the DS86 eye organ dose are estimated to be 32.4 + 0.73/(D? - 0.06)>0 with the 95% confidence limits ranging from 11.8 to 88.8 + 1.39/(D? - 0.06)>0, where D? is the neutron dose in gray. It is suggested that the neutron component could be more important for the eyes than for other sites of the body. Finally, it is interesting to observe that a linear-quadratic gamma and linear neutron model with two thresholds, which fits the data less well, produces very similar estimates of the two thresholds as the linear gamma-linear neutron-response model. In this model, however, the regression coefficient is not significantly associated with the quadratic gamma response. (J.P.N.)

  20. Scientists Examine Challenges and Lessons From Japan's Earthquake and Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-03-01

    A week after the magnitude 9.0 great Tohoku earthquake and the resulting tragic and damaging tsunami of 11 March struck Japan, the ramifications continued, with a series of major aftershocks (as Eos went to press, there had been about 4 dozen with magnitudes greater than 6); the grim search for missing people—the death toll was expected to approximate 10,000; the urgent assistance needed for the more than 400,000 homeless and the 1 million people without water; and the frantic efforts to avert an environmental catastrophe at Japan's damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, about 225 kilometers northeast of Tokyo, where radiation was leaking. The earthquake offshore of Honshu in northeastern Japan (see Figure 1) was a plate boundary rupture along the Japan Trench subduction zone, with the source area of the earthquake estimated at 400-500 kilometers long with a maximum slip of 20 meters, determined through various means including Global Positioning System (GPS) and seismographic data, according to Kenji Satake, professor at the Earthquake Research Institute of the University of Tokyo. In some places the tsunami may have topped 7 meters—the maximum instrumental measurement at many coastal tide gauges—and some parts of the coastline may have been inundated more than 5 kilometers inland, Satake indicated. The International Tsunami Information Center (ITIC) noted that eyewitnesses reported that the highest tsunami waves were 13 meters high. Satake also noted that continuous GPS stations indicate that the coast near Sendai—which is 130 kilometers west of the earthquake and is the largest city in the Tohoku region of Honshu—moved more than 4 meters horizontally and subsided about 0.8 meter.

  1. Jerusalem: City of Dreams, City of Sorrows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Jerusalem is more than an intriguing global historical city; it is a classroom for liberal learning and international understanding. It had never been a city of one language, one religion and one culture. Looking at the origins of Jerusalem's name indicates its international and multicultural nature. While Israelis designate Jerusalem as their…

  2. INSTANT CITY : PERFORMATIVE ARCHITECTURE AND CITY LIFE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marling, Gitte; Kiib, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This article analyses Roskilde Festival as an Instant City. For more than 40 years, Roskilde Festival has had many thousands participants for a weeklong festival on music, performances and cultural experiences in a layout designed as an urban environment. During the last ten years, in- creasing emphasis has been laid on creating a vivid, and engaging social environment in order to create a lab for social, and architectural experi- ments. These goals challenge the city planning as well as the urban sce- nography. The article addresses the research questions: What kind of city life and social experiments are taking place in ‘the instant city’, and how can it be characterized? It also emphasizes the relation between city life, urban design, and the aesthetics of architecture and urban spaces. The question here is, in what way architecture and urban scenography are used as tools to support the goal of an experimental and social en- gaged city environment? The analysis shows that the specific city life at the instant city, Roskilde Festival, can be characterized by being ‘open minded’, ‘playful’ and ‘inclusive’, but also by ‘a culture of laughter’ that penetrates the aesthetics and the urban scenography.

  3. Aging, saving, and public pensions in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Horioka, Charles Yuji; Suzuki, Wataru; Hatta, Tatsuo

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the impact of population aging on Japan's household saving rate and on its public pension system and the impact of that system on Japan's household saving rate and obtain the following results: first, the age structure of Japan's population can explain the level of, and past and future trends in, its household saving rate; second, the rapid aging of Japan's population is causing Japan's household saving rate to decline and this decline can be expected to continue; third, the pay-as...

  4. The nuclear fuel cycle business in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, the development and use of nuclear power are considered key building blocks of safe energy supply in the 21st century. Closing the nuclear fuel cycle so as to utilize uranium and plutonium from spent fuel elements is to establish nuclear power as a quasi-domestic energy source in Japan. Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. is the only private enterprise in Japan to offer nuclear fuel cycle services. At Rokkasho, the company operates plants for reprocessing (under construction), uranium enrichment, treatment of radioactive waste, and a repository for low level radioactive materials. Consequently, an important sector of Japan's future energy supply is ensured on this location. (orig.)

  5. Urgent Safety Measures in Japan after Great East Japan Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to tsunami triggered by the Great East Japan Earthquake, the operating and refueling reactor facilities at Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni Nuclear Power Plants caused a nuclear hazard. Given the fact, Japanese electric power companies voluntarily began to compile various urgent measures against tsunami. And then the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) ordered the licensees to put into practice the voluntarily compiled urgent safety measures, in order to ensure the effectiveness of the means for recovering cooling functions along with avoiding the release of radioactive substances to the possible minimum, even if a huge tsunami following a severe earthquake hits nuclear power plants. The following describes the state and the effect of the urgent safety measures implemented for 44 reactors (under operation) and 1 reactor (under construction) in Japan and also describes the measures to be implemented by the licensees of reactor operation in the future.

  6. Latin American immigrants have limited access to health insurance in Japan: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguimoto S Pilar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japan provides universal health insurance to all legal residents. Prior research has suggested that immigrants to Japan disproportionately lack health insurance coverage, but no prior study has used rigorous methodology to examine this issue among Latin American immigrants in Japan. The aim of our study, therefore, was to assess the pattern of health insurance coverage and predictors of uninsurance among documented Latin American immigrants in Japan. Methods We used a cross sectional, mixed method approach using a probability proportional to estimated size sampling procedure. Of 1052 eligible Latin American residents mapped through extensive fieldwork in selected clusters, 400 immigrant residents living in Nagahama City, Japan were randomly selected for our study. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire developed from qualitative interviews. Results Our response rate was 70.5% (n = 282. Respondents were mainly from Brazil (69.9%, under 40 years of age (64.5% and had lived in Japan for 9.45 years (SE 0.44; median, 8.00. We found a high prevalence of uninsurance (19.8% among our sample compared with the estimated national average of 1.3% in the general population. Among the insured full time workers (n = 209, 55.5% were not covered by the Employee's Health Insurance. Many immigrants cited financial trade-offs as the main reasons for uninsurance. Lacking of knowledge that health insurance is mandatory in Japan, not having a chronic disease, and having one or no children were strong predictors of uninsurance. Conclusions Lack of health insurance for immigrants in Japan is a serious concern for this population as well as for the Japanese health care system. Appropriate measures should be taken to facilitate access to health insurance for this vulnerable population.

  7. Removal of actinium from europium for the determination of specific radioactivity of ultra low-level Eu-152 in a sample exposed to atomic-bomb neutrons in Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosotani, R.; Izumi, H.; Nomura, T.; Yokoyama, A.; Nakanishi, T. [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology

    2004-07-01

    Measurements of specific radioactivities of residual neutron-induced radionuclides such as {sup 152}Eu and {sup 60}Co have been carried out to check the validity of a series of computer calculations employed for the atomic-bomb neutron dosimetry in Hiroshima (exposed to uranium bomb) and Nagasaki (exposed to plutonium bomb). The use of these nuclides for atomic-bomb neutron dosimetry, however, has been limited by the following difficulties: (1) today, these radionuclides are found only at extremely low concentrations in materials exposed to the atomic-bomb and (2) the neutrons that induced these radionuclides were thermal and epithermal, while the neutron dose received in Hiroshima and Nagasaki is attributable to fast neutrons. In order to overcome the first difficulty, we established a chemical procedure to extract Eu and Co from materials exposed to the atomic-bomb, and the chemical procedure has been successful for the materials exposed to atomic-bomb within 1400 m in slant distance from the explosion point. As for Nagasaki, materials exposed in the distances farther than 1200 m have never been subjected to the measurement of residual neutron-induced radionuclides. In this work, determination of specific radioactivity of {sup 152}Eu (half-life: 13.542 y) in a sample exposed to Nagasaki atomic-bomb at a distant place from the explosion point was undertaken. But, because of radioactive decay during this {proportional_to}60 years since 1945 and long distance from the explosion point, the present specific radioactivity of {sup 152}Eu in the sample is extremely low (estimated to be {proportional_to}3 x 10{sup -4} Bq-{sup 152}Eu/mg-Eu), and a serious problem is interferences from daughters of {sup 227}Ac (half-life: 21.8 y) in the measurement of ultra low-level radioactivity of {sup 152}Eu. Hence, our chemical procedure to obtain Eu-enriched counting source should be improved, and much attention is being denoted to removal of Ac from Eu. (orig.)

  8. Removal of actinium from europium for the determination of specific radioactivity of ultra low-level Eu-152 in a sample exposed to atomic-bomb neutrons in Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of specific radioactivities of residual neutron-induced radionuclides such as 152Eu and 60Co have been carried out to check the validity of a series of computer calculations employed for the atomic-bomb neutron dosimetry in Hiroshima (exposed to uranium bomb) and Nagasaki (exposed to plutonium bomb). The use of these nuclides for atomic-bomb neutron dosimetry, however, has been limited by the following difficulties: (1) today, these radionuclides are found only at extremely low concentrations in materials exposed to the atomic-bomb and (2) the neutrons that induced these radionuclides were thermal and epithermal, while the neutron dose received in Hiroshima and Nagasaki is attributable to fast neutrons. In order to overcome the first difficulty, we established a chemical procedure to extract Eu and Co from materials exposed to the atomic-bomb, and the chemical procedure has been successful for the materials exposed to atomic-bomb within 1400 m in slant distance from the explosion point. As for Nagasaki, materials exposed in the distances farther than 1200 m have never been subjected to the measurement of residual neutron-induced radionuclides. In this work, determination of specific radioactivity of 152Eu (half-life: 13.542 y) in a sample exposed to Nagasaki atomic-bomb at a distant place from the explosion point was undertaken. But, because of radioactive decay during this ?60 years since 1945 and long distance from thers since 1945 and long distance from the explosion point, the present specific radioactivity of 152Eu in the sample is extremely low (estimated to be ?3 x 10-4 Bq-152Eu/mg-Eu), and a serious problem is interferences from daughters of 227Ac (half-life: 21.8 y) in the measurement of ultra low-level radioactivity of 152Eu. Hence, our chemical procedure to obtain Eu-enriched counting source should be improved, and much attention is being denoted to removal of Ac from Eu. (orig.)

  9. Ülemiste City kutsub gümnasiste

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Ülemiste City pakutavast võimalusest gümnaasiuminoortele alates sügisest tulla linnakusse ekskursioonidele, et tutvuda kaasaegsete IT-ettevõtete töötingimustega. Sellega soovib Ülemiste City olla toeks Eesti Infotehnoloogia ja Telekommunikatsiooni Liidu IKT-sektori populariseerimise projektile

  10. Development of a biogas purifier for rural areas in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Y.; Hinata, T. [Hokkaido Central Agricultural Experiment Station, Hokkaido (Japan); Yasui, S. [Zukosha Co. Ltd., Obihiro, Hokkaido (Japan); Noguchi, N. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Tsukamoto, T. [IHI Shibaura. Co. Ltd., Obihiro, Hokkaido (Japan); Imai, T. [Green Plan Co. Ltd., Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Kanai, M. [Air Water Co. Ltd, Sakai, Osaka (Japan); Matsuda, Z. [Hokuren Agricultural Research Center, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Although the biogas that is currently produced for dairy farms in Japan is a carbon-neutral energy, its use is restricted to farming areas only because there is no effective method of transporting unused biogas. There is a need for establishing practical methods for biogas removal from operating systems. In this study, a gas separation membrane was used in order to modify biogas to city gas 12A specifications, and to develop a biogas purifier equipped with a device to fill high pressure purified gas into cylinders to be taken outside the farming area. The objective was to expand the use of biogas produced from stand-alone gas plants. The amount of purified gas produced at a newly created refining-compression-filling (RCF) facility was approximately 97.0 Nm{sup 3}/day, for a raw material amount of about 216.0 Nm{sup 3}/day. The heat quantity of the purified gas was 38.9 MJ/Nm{sup 3}, which was within city gas 12A specifications. A total of 14.3 cylinders were filled each day with the manufactured purified gas. Test calculations along with a simulation exercise revealed that it would be possible to provide purified gas to approximately 6 per cent of common residences in a town in northern Japan. It was concluded that the newly created RCF facility allowed the modification of carbon-neutral biogas to conform to city gas 12A specifications, and allowed the transport of this gas out of the farming area.

  11. Adaptation measures for climate change and the urban heat island in Japan's built environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change scenarios are discussed for Japan with clear implications drawn for the built environment in terms of increased temperatures of 4-5oC, rising sea levels and subterranean water tables. Research on the impacts and adaptation measures for global warming in Japan is reviewed. One of the most significant impacts of climate change in Japan will exacerbate the existing heat island phenomenon in cities by absorbing increased solar radiation. This will lead to further increases in temperatures in an urban microclimate with negative implications for energy and water consumption, human health and discomfort, and local ecosystems. The current urban heat island phenomenon and its impacts are described. The relationships between climate change and urban heat island impacts are discussed. Potential adaptation measures to those impacts are also discussed and proposed. (author)

  12. The japan a nuclear power?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work analyzes the Japan nuclear policy, in the frame of its foreign and safety policy in Pacific Asia, since the end of the cold war, especially the relations with the Usa and China. The Japan is a civil power because it has submitted the military institution to juridical restrictions and because it does not rely on the armed force to promote its national interests. The anti nuclear speech is joined with the acknowledgement of the dissuasion necessity, of the control of industrial processes and energy channels susceptible of military applications. Cultivating the ambiguity, the Japanese government can send a dissuasive message, perfectly legible, kind of communication of latent intimidation constituted by the virtual nuclear power of a state that takes part to the non proliferation treaty. (N.C.)

  13. Japan reforms its nuclear safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2013-11-15

    The Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident deeply questioned the bases of nuclear safety and nuclear safety regulation in Japan. It also resulted in a considerable loss of public confidence in the safety of nuclear power across the world. Although the accident was caused by natural phenomena, institutional and human factors also largely contributed to its devastating consequences, as shown by the Japanese Diet's and Government's investigation reports. 'Both regulators and licensees were held responsible and decided to fully reconsider the existing approaches to nuclear safety. Consequently, the regulatory system underwent extensive reform based on the lessons learned from the accident,' Yoshihiro Nakagome, the President of Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organisation, an ETSON member TSO, explains. (orig.)

  14. A Tourist's Album of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    If you are looking to explore Japan in the year 1909 via the eyes of an informed and thoughtful Western tourist, look no further. This engaging collection from the University of Vermont Libraries' Center for Digital Initiatives brings together the photo album compiled by Katherine Wolcott and her uncle, Robert Hull Fleming. Fleming was a graduate of the University of Vermont and as part of a larger Asian trip, the two of them stopped in Japan and collected photos, postcards, and other printed ephemera. This collection contains nearly 40 leaves of collected items which depict daily life, landscapes, and pictures of the countryside. Visitors can browse the materials here by genre, topic, creator, format, or place. A good place to start here is with the photos of Mount Fuji, which are a real treat.

  15. Reactor physics activities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the research activity in reactor physics field in Japan during June, 1991 - July, 1992. The review was performed in the following fields : nuclear data evaluation, calculational method development, fast reactor physics, thermal and intermediate reactor physics, advanced core design, fusion reactor neutronics, nuclear criticality safety, shielding, incineration of radioactive nuclear wastes and national programs. The main references were taken from journals published during this period. The research committee of reactor physics is responsible for the review work. (author)

  16. US-Japan Data Linkage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial testing of the US-Japan Data Link has proceeded and the entire system is approaching operational status. An overview of the technical structure of the linkage is given. The file transport and interactive terminal capabilities are discussed and specific example are included. Some considerations of the initial use and scope of allowed activities, and the management of the Linkage are also outlined. (author)

  17. Job displacement penalties in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Bognanno, Michael; Delgado, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    The costs of job displacement are examined on a sample of Japanese workers successfully provided job placement services from 2000 to 2003, a period of economic stagnation and structural change in Japan. We find that displaced workers suffer a loss of approximately $1,100 for each additional year of age. Workers also incur a large penalty when they change industries after being displaced. The age-earnings loss relationship is consistent with the operation of a delayed compensation scheme in la...

  18. Conceptions of CSR in Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to advance an analysis of different conceptions of CSR in Japan after the Fukushima accident. The literature on CSR suggests that CSR is a complex term that has been open to a variety of interpretations. Until recently, CSR was mainly incorporated into Japanese companies in terms of social employee issues and concerns. A strong relationship between companies and employees has always been an advantage of the Japanese economy, and this strength was developed further by the integration of CSR into management systems and strategies. But increasing environmental concerns have raised crucial questions about environmental issues with regards to CSR. How do Japanese companies incorporate environmental issues into their CSR aims and achievements? What is the next strategic challenge for CSR in Japan? This paper will analyze the conceptualization of CSR in TEPCO documents and the political discussions following the Fukushima accident. Drawing on rhetorical theory, especially on the importance of metaphors (Lakoff & Johnson, 1980; 1999) and how this applies to the field of strategic management (Audebrand, 2010), Thus, the paper interrogates CSR as a site of conceptual and metaphorical "struggle" regarding how to conceive the social responsibilities of companies. It identifies three main conceptions of CSR; a narrow economic conception, a broad economic conception and a systemic conception of CSR. They represent different taken-for-granted conceptual frameworks used to understand CSR and the strategic challenges for CSR in Japan. Such a conceptual analysis provides important insight into how Japanese companies conceive of environmental issues and incorporate these into their CSR aims and achievements. As such, this paper will argue, part of the next strategic challenge for CSR in Japan is to deal with the preconceptions about the nature of business activities amongst managers, politicians, and other CSR agents.

  19. Potato irradiation technology in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the National research program on potato irradiation, the public consumption of potatoes irradiated to a maximum of 15 krad was authorized by the Ministry of Welfare. Shihoro Agricultural Cooperative Association, one of the largest potato producers in Japan with an annual production of 200,000 tons, intended an application of the irradiation to their potato storage system. This paper describes the technological background of the potato irradiation facility and operational experience. (author)

  20. Biophilic Cities Are Sustainable, Resilient Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Newman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing recognition of the need for daily contact with nature, to live happy, productive, meaningful lives. Recent attention to biophilic design among architects and designers acknowledges this power of nature. However, in an increasingly urban planet, more attention needs to be aimed at the urban scales, at planning for and moving towards what the authors call “biophilic cities”. Biophilic cities are cities that provide close and daily contact with nature, nearby nature, but also seek to foster an awareness of and caring for this nature. Biophilic cities, it is argued here, are also sustainable and resilient cities. Achieving the conditions of a biophilic city will go far in helping to foster social and landscape resilience, in the face of climate change, natural disasters and economic uncertainty and various other shocks that cities will face in the future. The paper identifies key pathways by which biophilic urbanism enhances resilience, and while some are well-established relationships, others are more tentative and suggest future research and testing.

  1. Japan: desire for energy independence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of the art of nuclear power development in Japan is reviewed. Given is a list of operating, constructing and planning NPPs as well as prototype reactors. Problems of NPP components and parameters improvement are discussed. Problems of their seismic stability and problems related to fuel cycle are discussed as well. It is noted that the purpose of the Japan energy program emphasizing on NPP construction is decreasing the dependence of the country on the import of oil and other types of fuel. It is underlined that in the nearest future PWR and BWR reactors will be mainly used at NPPs. High priority in developing nuclear power is given to its safety. Besides application of different measures for controlling NPP safety created is a system for early detection of defects of operating components which permits to exclude accidents earlier occurring at NPPs. The work has been done an creating an information system for data processing with accounting for mechanical properties of materials, programming of possible sequences and taking measures to exclude accidents. Much attention is paid to the problem of thermal release of NPP and dissipation of this heat. Work is in progress on improvement of the domestic production process of isotope separation using centrifuges. At present spent fuel is regenerated at the Tokai facility as well as under contracts in Great Britain and France. Japan will be able to satisfy regeneration requirements by itself after 1990ements by itself after 1990

  2. Operation Strategy for a Power Grid Supplied by 100% Renewable Energy at a Cold Region in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Morel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an operation strategy for a power system supplied from 100% renewable energy generation in Kitami City, a cold region in Japan. The main goal of this work is the complete elimination of the CO2 emissions of the city while keeping the power frequency within prescribed limits. Currently, the main energy related issue in Japan is the reduction of CO2 emissions without depending on nuclear generation. Also, there is a need for the adoption of distributed generation architecture in order to permit local autonomous operation of the system by the local generation of power. As a solution, this paper proposes a strategy to eliminate CO2 emissions that considers digital simulations using past hourly meteorological data and demand for one year. Results shows that Kitami City can be supplied entirely by renewable generation, reducing its CO2 emission to zero while keeping the quality of its power grid frequency within permitted limits.

  3. Global transport rates of 137Cs and 239+240Pu originating from the Nagasaki A-bomb in 1945 as determined from analysis of Canadian Arctic ice cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advancements in analytical technology make it possible for artificial radionuclides released from nuclear explosions to be detected in Arctic ice core layers. The fission product, 137Cs, and the unexpended fission material, 239+240Pu, originating from the Nagasaki A-bomb of August 1945, were measured by collecting 10 ice cores on the Agassiz ice cap, Ellesmere Island, Canada. The deposition rates were 0·020 mBq cm-2 for 137Cs and 0·0016 mBq cm-2 for 239+240Pu, originating from Nagasaki. Assuming the radionuclides, excluding the amount fissioned from the explosion and deposited as local fallout, are deposited evenly throughout the Northern Hemisphere, 67% of the expected amount of 137Cs reached the Arctic while 1·1% of 239+240Pu reached the Arctic. The results suggest that different transport mechanisms exist for various contaminants in the global transport system. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Japan's hidden youths: mainstreaming the emotionally distressed in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovoy, Amy

    2008-12-01

    One of the most talked-about social issues in Japan in recent years has been the problem of the nation's purportedly one million "hidden" youths, known as hikikomori (literally, "the withdrawn"). Most observers agree that the category of hikikomori encompasses a wide range of problems and provocations. The fact that these various dilemmas lead to the shared outcome of shutting oneself away at home is the point of departure here. The article explores the spheres of mental health care, education and family, focusing on the reluctance to highlight underlying psychological dimensions of hikikomori and the desire on the part of schools and families to "mainstream" Japanese children, accommodating as many as possible within standardized public education. Hikikomori can perhaps be seen as a manifestation of Japanese democracy, in which the good society is imagined as cohesive, protective and secure, rather than one in which the individual can freely exercise the right to be different. Schools, families and the sphere of mental health care have focused on producing social inclusion but have discouraged citizens from being labeled as "different" -- even when such a distinction might help them. The dearth of facilities and discourse for caring for the mentally ill or learning disabled is, in many respects, the darker side of Japan's successes. Those who cannot adjust are cared for through the institutions of families, companies and various other spheres that offer spaces to rest and to temporarily "drop out"; however, the expectation is that rest will eventually lead to a re-entry into mainstream society. Often the psychological problem or disability that led to the problem goes unnamed and untreated (hikikomori, psychiatry, special education, youth, family, Japan). PMID:18818992

  5. Implementation of the Additional Protocol in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Additional Protocol between Japan and the IAEA entered into force in December 1999. To come into force a series of implementation trials of Additional Protocol was carried out at two Japanese representative nuclear research centers, i.e. Tokai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Oarai Engineering Center of Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute (JNC). These trials were proposed by Japan and were conducted in cooperation with the IAEA Secretariat. In addition, Japan amended 'the Law for the Regulation of Reactors etc.', to collect adequate information to submit to the IAEA, to arrange the surrounding for the complementary access, etc. In addition, Japan Submitted the Initial Declaration of the Additional Protocol within 180 days of the entry into force of the Protocol, in the middle of June, 2000

  6. Multipurpose soft contact lens care in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Toshida H; Kadota Y; Suto C; Ohta T; Murakami A

    2012-01-01

    Hiroshi Toshida1,2, Yoshiaki Kadota3, Chikako Suto2, Toshihiko Ohta1, Akira Murakami21Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, Shizuoka, 2Juntendo University School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo, 3Bausch & Lomb Japan Co, Ltd, Research and Development, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: To assess the use of multipurpose lens care products via an online survey conducted among soft contact lens (SCL) wearers in Japan.Methods: The subjects were 1000 men and ...

  7. Book review: Precarious Japan by Anne Allison

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan, Sneha

    2014-01-01

    "Precarious Japan." Anne Allison. Duke University Press. 2013. --- In an era of irregular labour, nagging recession, nuclear contamination, and a shrinking population, Japan is facing precarious times. How the Japanese experience insecurity in their daily and social lives is the subject of Precarious Japan. Moving between the structural conditions of socioeconomic life and the ways people are making do, or not, Anne Allison chronicles the loss of home affecting many Japanese, not only in the ...

  8. A perspective in epidemiology of suicide in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamura Takehiko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. According to the information about deaths from any causes, provided by the vital statistics based on the WHO Member Countries mortality and morbidity, suicide rate in Japan has been ranking high among the causes of death. The number of suicides goes on increasing every year in Japan. In fact, suicide rates per 100 000 population have already reached the sixth place among the leading causes of death. The aim of this study was to perform epidemiological surveys of suicide rates, obtained from the official vital statistics provided by the WHO on mortality and morbidity during several past decades in Japan. Methods. Completed suicide data were collected via the vital statistics by the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry (MHLW, Japan and the attempted suicide data were extracted from the Annual Report of the Ambulance and Rescue Activities by the Fire Prevention and Control Office (FPCO in Kobe City. The data were examined on the basis of social factors including economic trends, gender differences, modus operandi of suicide, age group, and physical and mental disorders in suicidal behavior and compared to international data. Results. Male suicide rates have gradually increased with the four temporal steep risings during the 20th century, while those of females have generally reached the stabilization with no fluctuations. Suicides are not always under the influence of economic trends in Japan. Suicide rate was the highest in the Akita and Iwate prefectures, known for the low population density. Suicide rate increases with aging, reaching a peak in the age of 80 and over. The trends of completed suicide rates are elevating by males about twice the suicide rate of females which keeps on stable. On the other hand, female attempted suicide rates greatly increase from two to five times more than those in males which are generally close to the constant. The majority of suicides are caused by their physical and/or mental disorders including typical depressive states. Suffocations/hangings are the most common methods used to commit suicide by both sexes. Utilities and interactions among these several components were considered, as well as a perspective of suicidal behavior. Conclusion. In order to prevent suicide and avoid the worst tragedy for a family, it is an essential requirement to collect and analyze any information concerning suicide victims.

  9. Japan's post-Fukushima reconstruction: A case study for implementation of sustainable energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following World War II, Japan miraculously developed into an economic powerhouse and a model of energy efficiency among developed countries. This lasted more than 65 years until the Northeastern Japan earthquake and tsunami induced nuclear crisis of March 2011 brought Japan to an existential crossroads. Instead of implementing its plans to increase nuclear power generation capacity from thirty percent to fifty percent, Japan shut-down all fifty-four nuclear reactors for safety checks and stress-checks (two have since been restarted), resulting in reduced power generation during the summer of 2012. The reconstruction of Northeastern Japan approaches at a time when the world is grappling with a transition to sustainable energy technologies—one that will require substantial investment but one that would result in fundamental changes in infrastructure and energy efficiency. Certain reconstruction methods can be inappropriate in the social, cultural and climatic context of disaster affected areas. Thus, how can practitioners employ sustainable reconstructions which better respond to local housing needs and availability of natural energy resources without a framework in place? This paper aims at sensitizing policy-makers and stakeholders involved in post disaster reconstruction by recognizing advantages of deploying sustainable energy technologies, to reduce dependence of vulnerable communities on external markets. - Highlights: • We examine the energy challenges faced by Japan in the aftermath of Fukushima. • We identify policy measures for the use of energy technologies applicable to disaster prone nations. • We evaluate the potential for renewable energy to support reduced reliance on nuclear energy in Japan. • We model scenarios for eco-towns and smart-cities in post-disaster reconstruction. • We assess the role of culture in formulating energy policy in post-disaster reconstruction

  10. Bone marrow transplantation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BMT in Japan was started in 1975. From 1981 Japan BMT study group was organized by the grant of ministry of health and welfare Japan. A rapid increase of number of BMT parallel to the improvement of results was observed in the 489 patients by the registry of this group. The major causes of failure of BMT were interstitial pneumonitis (IP), relapse of leukemia, infection, and graft versus host disease (GVHD). The incidence of IP decreased very rapidly by fractionation of total body irradiation and anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) antibody negative platelet transfusion. Prophylactic administration of anti-CMV immunoglobulin produced also significant reduction of IP. In the double blind controled study oral administration of aciclovir revealed significant reduction of herpes stomatitis, followed by the reduction of other infections including sepsis. For the decontamination of bioclean room we have developed ozone decontamination, which revealed to be very effective for fungus. Colony stimulating factor was found to shorten the period of granulocytopenia. The patients with GVHD showed lower incidence of relapse of leukemia than those without GVHD. In the patients who received BMT during their first remission of ALL. Long survival rate was 63 %, for ANLL in the first remission, 64 % and for CML in the chronic phase, 40 %. Out of the first 20 BMT patients of the center for adult diseases Osaka, only three are living now, while out of the next 25 patients 22 are living disease free. Major items of modification of BMT procedures between those two groups were cyclosporine A, colony stimulating factor, fractionated TBI, CMV-negative platelet donar, BMT in first remission for acute leukemia or chronic phase in CML. BMT seemed to be a very reliable and promising treatment of leukemia with a very high possibility of complete cure. (author)

  11. Public information activities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a slide presentation dealing with the public information (PI) activities in Japan. At present in Japan 51 nuclear power plants are in commercial operation contributing with a capacity of about 440 G We, i.e. 1/3 of the total electricity is produced by nuclear power. An investigation conducted by Advisory Committee for Energy resulted in the following guidelines in the advancing the Nuclear Power Policy: - maintain transparency in determining policy and reflect the voice of people, making information available to the public; - promote mutual understanding between areas that produce electricity by nuclear power and those that consume electricity; - cultivate an awareness of energy issues amongst the public to encourage them to take issues regarding Japan's energy policy to heart. Concerning the current PI, the following actions are undertaken at a nationwide scale: - for all people, supplying information by mass media, internet and holding lecture meetings and panel discussions etc; - for women, advertisements in journals; - for youth, educational materials, exhibition of energy etc; - for teachers, seminars; for opinion leaders, sending newsletters on nuclear energy. In areas for planned or constructed nuclear plants the PI actions are addressed to all people, women, fishermen, farmers and opinion leaders. There are given the responses to the following three questions addressed to the public concerning the nuclear power: - do you think whether we need nuclear p: - do you think whether we need nuclear power plants? - do you think whether nuclear power plants are safe? - what mechanism do you think generates energy during the production of nuclear power. A discussion of the results is presented. As future objectives of PI activities the following are in view: to cultivate reliability, to aware of information about nuclear power, to promote awareness of nuclear power, to promote mutual understanding of nuclear power. In conclusion, the need is stressed to make the PI activities more effective, to find new ways of increasing effectiveness and to examined carefully the proposals made at this conference

  12. Reactor physics activities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the research activity in reactor physics field in Japan during July, 1992 - July, 1993. The review was performed in the following fields : nuclear data evaluation, calculational method development, fast reactor physics, thermal reactor physics, advanced core design, fusion reactor neutronics, nuclear criticality safety, shielding, incineration of radioactive nuclear wastes, noise analysis and control and national programs. The main references were taken from journals and reports published during this period. The research committee of reactor physics is responsible for the review work. (author)

  13. Japanese History, Post-Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Lazopoulos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jason ?nanda Josephson, The Invention of Religion in Japan. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2012. 408 pp. $90 (cloth, $30 (paper. Hwansoo Ilmee Kim, Empire of the Dharma: Korean and Japanese Buddhism, 1877–1912. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2012. 444 pp. $50 (cloth. Jung-Sun N. Han, An Imperial Path to Modernity: Yoshino Sakuz? and a New Liberal Order in East Asia, 1905–1937. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2012. 244 pp. $40 (cloth.

  14. Japan nuclear ship sea trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sea trial of the first Japan nuclear Ship 'MUTSU' was conducted from the end of October to December in 1990. The purpose of the sea trial was to verify the nuclear propulsive performances and maneuverabilities. The present report describes the results of the sea trial. These results are classified into four items: 1. Speed test and engineering performance tests 2. Maneuvering performance tests 3. Vibration tests 4. Other tests. Acceptable performances were demonstrated, as expected in the original design. The experience of the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS), which were newly adopted for the sea trial, is also reported. (author)

  15. Cells and batteries in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, research programs are done jointly or independently by three organization types: private firms, universities and national institutes. This paper presents cells and batteries production in three chapters: the first one is dealing with the 'MOONLIGHT' project (advanced batteries, fuel cells and electric-powered vehicle), the second one with general purpose cells and batteries (Ni/Cd, Ni/Metal Hydride, Pb/PbO2 and lithium batteries), the last chapter gives a list and a precise description of the different organizations visited. (A.B.). refs., figs., tabs

  16. Photovoltaic electricity production in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author first recalls the early investment of Japan in the solar energy which gave a leadership position to this country. However, it has been recently over-taken by Germany and Spain in terms of installed power. The share of the different technologies for the manufacturing of photovoltaic panels (polycrystalline silicon, mono-crystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, copper-indium-selenium cells) of different sizes, is presented, together with the current measures which are aimed at giving a new boost to this sector. The author tries then to foresee the evolutions of this sector during the next years and in a longer term (market prospective evolutions, factory projects, power station projects)

  17. Japan's technology and manufacturing infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, William R.; Meieran, Eugene S.; Tummala, Rao R.

    1995-01-01

    The JTEC panel found that, after four decades of development in electronics and manufacturing technologies, Japanese electronics companies are leaders in the development, support, and management of complex, low-cost packaging and assembly technologies used in the production of a broad range of consumer electronics products. The electronics industry's suppliers provide basic materials and equipment required for electronic packaging applications. Panelists concluded that some Japanese firms could be leading U.S. competitors by as much as a decade in these areas. Japan's technology and manufacturing infrastructure is an integral part of its microelectronics industry's success.

  18. DNA Data Bank of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DNA Data Bank of Japan collects DNA sequence data and assigns internationally recognized accession numbers mainly from Japanese researchers. It is one of the International DNA Databases that shares data on a daily basis with the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL) and the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI); as a result, all three sources should provide the same information. Users can search for data in several different ways or use one of the various analysis tools. The site also provides information for researchers looking to submit data. Most information is presented in both English and Japanese.

  19. JapanBizTech: The Source for Technology Business in Japan and Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japan BizTech is a source for technology and business news from Japan and Asia developed by Nikkei Business Publications. It covers the latest news and research breakthroughs in the communications, electronics and computer industries in Japan and other Asian countries. An online directory for technology and business contacts throughout Asia in banking, communications, transport equipment and wholesale is available at the site.

  20. Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive animal studies are carried out at the national Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) to investigate biokinetics and biological effects of radionuclides, especially transuranic elements. The Institute has a staff of 90 plus 60 regular contractors who are allowed to work in the research facility. These people are counted twice a year. Another several dozen seasonal workers are counted at the beginning and the end of each contract. NIRS is also responsible for medical preparedness for radiation accident. If a patient seriously contaminated with plutonium is taken to NIRS, the lung monitor is used for the assessment of contamination level. Intercomparison Measurements: The measurements were conducted in the shielded whole body counter. The counting room is 2.3 m wide, 1.5 m deep and 1.6 m high. The shielding is provided by a graded liner of iron (200 mm), lead (3 mm), copper (1 mm) and plastic (3 mm). The room air is filtered with a high efficiency particulate (HEPA) air supply. Counting is performed using two sodium iodide, cesium iodide phoswich detectors, 125 mm in diameter. The entrance window is 75?m thick aluminum. Resolution in the plutonium L X ray region is 35% (Apparent), and 16% in the gamma-ray region of 241Am. The normal background is 0.10 counts per minute in the L X ray region and 0.13 counts per minute for ?-ray region of 241Am. The minimum detectable activity for 241Am is 30Bq. Data processing is conducted m is 30Bq. Data processing is conducted using a 16bit, 20MHz Personal Computer. Spectrum analysis software is used, and dose calculations are based on the ICRP 30 model. Results: The measured 238Pu (13.6 keV + 17.1 keV + 20.3 keV) counting efficiency for the Asian (JAERI) phantom is shown together with the measured efficiencies for the Western (Livermore) phantom. It shows close agreement between the Asian and Western phantoms with 100% muscle overlays. The comparison when the 50% adipose and 87% adipose overlays are used illustrates the effect of tissue composition at these low energies. The separate counting efficiencies for the right and left lungs indicate a significant difference in the relative contribution of the two sides for these phantoms. It is likely that this results in large part from shielding of the left lung in the Western phantom by the heart, which is acknowledged to be enlarged. There is a systematic difference of about 25%. Because the Western phantom has been used for some time and may be considered well characterized, this suggests that this difference may be due, in part, to an error in the assay of the 241Am content of this lung set

  1. Assimilation in multilingual cities

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega, Javier; Verdugo, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Using the Public Use Microdata Files of the 2001 and 2006 Canadian Censuses, we study the determinants of the assimilation of language minorities into the city majority language. We show that official minority members (i.e. francophones in English-speaking cities and anglophones in French-speaking cities) assimilate less than the allophones (the individuals with a mother tongue other than English or French), and that immigrants generally assimilate less than natives. In addition, the language...

  2. Chaos and the city

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Edel

    2012-01-01

    An endeavour to explore the relationship between order and chaos in the making of the city as a common place; a place to inhabit and engage, this satisfying a basic human requirement. Food, embodying both elements of order and chaos, is used as tool throughout the discourse, in which the city is dissected (in both the vertical and longitudinal section) to examine the production of space and role of processes in the city as an integral part of place making.

  3. Are sunnier cities denser?

    OpenAIRE

    Hartwick, John

    2007-01-01

    We set out an open, monocentric city with residential structures and reflect on how changes to an amenity index affects the city. On the production side, the shock is represented by a productivity improvement and a local wage increase and on the consumption side the shock is represented by an exogenous boost to the utility of a resident's current commodity bundle. In each case the city's population, land rent and footprint expand. In the second case there is an increase in density.

  4. CITY, SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    CAMELIA MARIN; ISABELLA SIMA; ALINA VOICULE?; MIHAELA RUXANDA

    2012-01-01

    The present research aims to establish and outline the involvement of local government and citizens in sustainable development. In other words, in this paper will highlight that good local government collaboration with citizens leads to support economic and sustainable city. The phrase "city motor development" is very common in the development strategies of each city, but we meet frequently and lips each represented locally. Importance of the work is given by observing citizen involvement in ...

  5. Bioaccumulation of nitroarenes in bivalves at Osaka Bay, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Seiichi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Miki, Shizuho; Kokushi, Emiko; Ito, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Masataka; Koyama, Jiro

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports for the first time the detection and occurrence of nitroarenes (NPAHs) in marine organisms. Mussels and oysters collected from Osaka Bay, Japan, had total NPAHs concentrations that ranged from 2380 to 24,688 pg/g dry and 2672 to 25,961 pg/g dry, respectively. Relatively higher concentrations were detected in sampling sites located near the central district and suburbs of Osaka City implying that the most probable sources of NPAHs in the two bivalves are exhaust gases and smokes emitted by automobiles and industrial plants. Bivalves had relatively higher residues of 1-nitronaphthalene, 2-nitronaphthalene, 3-nitrophenanthrene, and 9-nitrophenanthrenes. Residues of 2-nitrofluorene, 1-nitropyrene, 4-nitropyrenes, and 6-nitrochrysene were much lower compared to nitronaphthalenes and nitrophenanthrenes. Inter-species differences was only observed for 2-nitronaphthalene with oysters exhibiting significantly higher residues than mussels. PMID:21420130

  6. Postsovkhoz City & Postsovkhoz Person

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    Põlvamaal Moostes mõtte- ja keskkonnakunstitalgud "Postsovkhoz City" ja "Postsovkhoz Person". Näha saab endistesse tööstushoonetesse ülespandud näitusi ja installatsioone. 11. VIII esinejad, ettekanded.

  7. The electronuclear program of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan, depending on imports for 80% of its energy supply, introduced a nuclear power program, which now comprises 14 reactors in operation (8,000 MW., that is 8% of its electricity production), and 15 reactors (14,000MW) under construction or being investigated. The objective for 1985 is from 26,000 to 33,000 MW. Japanese industry committed the error of placing too much confidence in its American licensers and not undertaking enough of its own research. This resulted in having a too small number of nuclear stations available, approximately 50%. Japan secured its uranium supply (Niger), its enrichment facilities (U.S.A. and Eurodif), while studying the centrifugation process, and facilities for reprocessing irradiated fuels (France and U.K.) while, at the same time, seeking national independence regarding its entire fuel cycle. The siting of nuclear power stations comes up against local opposition, which is being overcome by a taxation on electricity used to subsidize local collectivities favorable to the construction of a power station, whether hydro-electric, thermal or nuclear

  8. Food Irradiation Development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, the first food irradiation research was carried out on the preservation of fish and fishery products. In 1966, the Atomic Energy Commission of the Japanese Government (JAEC) decided to promote the National Project on Food Irradiation and, in 1967, the Steering Committee on food irradiation research in the Atomic Energy Bureau, Science and Technology-Agency, selected the following food items as of economic importance to the country, i.e., potatoes, onions, rice, wheat, ''Vienna'' sausage, ''kamaboko'' (fish meat jelly products) and mandarin oranges. The National Project is expected, to finish at the end of the 1981 fiscal year. Based on the studies by the National Project, irradiated potatoes were given ''unconditional acceptance'' for human consumption in 1972. Already in 1973, a commercial potato irradiator was built at Shihoro, Hokkaido. In 1980, the Steering Committee submitted a final report on the effectiveness and wholesomeness studies on irradiated onions to the JAEC. This paper gives a brief explanation of the legal aspects of food irradiation in Japan, and the present status of wholesomeness studies on the seven items of irradiated foods. In addition, topics concerning food irradiation research on ''kamaboko'', especially on the effectiveness and a new detecting method for the irradiation treatment of these products, are outlined. (author)

  9. Food irradiation development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, the first food irradiation research was carried out on the preservation of fish and fishery products. In 1966, the Atomic Energy Commission of the Japanese Government (JAEC) decided to promote the National Project on Food Irradiation and, in 1967, the Steering Committee on food irradiation research in the Atomic Energy Bureau, Science and Technology Agency, selected the following food items as of economic importance to the country, i.e., potatoes, onions, rice, wheat, ''Vienna'' sausage, ''kamaboko'' (fish meat jelly products) and mandarin oranges. The National Project is expected to finish at the end of the 1981 fiscal year. Based on the studies by the National Project, irradiated potatoes were given ''unconditional acceptance'' for human consumption in 1972. Already in 1973, a commercial potato irradiator was built at Shihoro, Hokkaido. In 1980, the Steering Committee submitted a final report on the effectiveness and wholesomeness studies on irradiated onions to the JAEC. This paper gives a brief explanation of the legal aspects of food irradiation in Japan, and the present status of wholesomeness studies on the seven items of irradiated foods. In addition, topics concerning food irradiation research on ''kamaboko'', especially on the effectiveness and a new detecting method for the irradiation treatment of these products, are outlined. (author)

  10. Indoor radon survey in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arithmetic mean radon concentration was estimated to be 21.3 Bq/m3 (S.D. 18.8 Bq/m3) by a nation-wide survey in Japan. The geometric mean was found to be 17.3 Bq/m3. Ninety nine percent of the measured houses are less than 96 Bq/m3. No radon prone area was found, although a little elevation of radon concentration was found in the western part of Japan due to granite formation. Our detectors have a disadvantage of detection of thoron since the air filtration rate of the detector is very high. The estimated radon concentration based on the first survey of indoor radon might have been overestimated due to thoron contribution to the radon measurements. In the additional survey one prefecture showed no thoron contribution while the other two prefectures showed significant thoron contribution in the radon measurements. No clear-cut indication of high thoron houses has not been obtained. (author)

  11. Japan's nuclear fuel cycle policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japanese private companies are making progress with the plans to construct a commercial reprocessing plant, an enrichment plant and a radioactive waste management facility. As the site for the plants, the Federation of Electric Power Companies has selected the Shimokita Peninsula. The construction of these three nuclear fuel facilities at the same site will be the first such case worldwide. The Federation made its formal request to the local authorities in July, 1984, and Aomori Prefecture gave its approval in April, 1985. Capacity is scheduled to be 800 tU/year for the reprocessing plant and 1,500 ton SWU/year for the enrichment plant and 200 thousand cubic meters for the radioactive waste storage facility. The Japan Nuclear Fuel Service Co., Ltd, (JNFS, established in 1980) is responsible for the construction and operation of the commercial reprocessing plant and the Japan Nuclear Fuel Industries Co., Inc. (JNFI, established in 1985) will build and operate both enrichment plant and the radioactive waste management facility. Preparations for taking the necessary procedures for the licensing and construction of the facilities are now underway. Operations are scheduled to start in 1995 for reprocessing and 1991 for enrichment (starting capacity: 150 t SWU/year) and radioactive waste management. Plutonium recovered from spent fuel will be utilized in LWR, ATR and FBR. R and D activities on these technologies are in progress

  12. Transformer Efficiency Assessment - Okinawa, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas L. Baldwin; Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jake P. Gentle; Jason W. Bush

    2012-05-01

    The US Army Engineering & Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), and the US Marine Corps Base (MCB), Okinawa, Japan retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a Transformer Efficiency Assessment of “key” transformers located at multiple military bases in Okinawa, Japan. The purpose of this assessment is to support the Marine Corps Base, Okinawa in evaluating medium voltage distribution transformers for potential efficiency upgrades. The original scope of work included the MCB providing actual transformer nameplate data, manufacturer’s factory test sheets, electrical system data (kWh), demand data (kWd), power factor data, and electricity cost data. Unfortunately, the MCB’s actual data is not available and therefore making it necessary to de-scope the original assessment. Note: Any similar nameplate data, photos of similar transformer nameplates, and basic electrical details from one-line drawings (provided by MCB) are not a replacement for actual load loss test data. It is recommended that load measurements are performed on the high and low sides of transformers to better quantify actual load losses, demand data, and power factor data. We also recommend that actual data, when available, be inserted by MCB Okinawa where assumptions have been made and then the LCC analysis updated. This report covers a generalized assessment of modern U.S. transformers in a three level efficiency category, Low-Level efficiency, Medium-Level efficiency, and High-Level efficiency.

  13. Transformer Efficiency Assessment - Okinawa, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas L. Baldwin; Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jake P. Gentle; Jason W. Bush

    2012-08-01

    The US Army Engineering & Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), and the US Marine Corps Base (MCB), Okinawa, Japan retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a Transformer Efficiency Assessment of “key” transformers located at multiple military bases in Okinawa, Japan. The purpose of this assessment is to support the Marine Corps Base, Okinawa in evaluating medium voltage distribution transformers for potential efficiency upgrades. The original scope of work included the MCB providing actual transformer nameplate data, manufacturer’s factory test sheets, electrical system data (kWh), demand data (kWd), power factor data, and electricity cost data. Unfortunately, the MCB’s actual data is not available and therefore making it necessary to de-scope the original assessment. Note: Any similar nameplate data, photos of similar transformer nameplates, and basic electrical details from one-line drawings (provided by MCB) are not a replacement for actual load loss test data. It is recommended that load measurements are performed on the high and low sides of transformers to better quantify actual load losses, demand data, and power factor data. We also recommend that actual data, when available, be inserted by MCB Okinawa where assumptions have been made and then the LCC analysis updated. This report covers a generalized assessment of modern U.S. transformers in a three level efficiency category, Low-Level efficiency, Medium-Level efficiency, and High-Level efficiency.

  14. Laser precision microfabrication in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Isamu; Ooie, Toshihiko; Takeno, Shozui

    2000-11-01

    Electronic devices such as handy phones and micro computers have been rapidly expanding their market recent years due to their enhanced performance, down sizing and cost down. This has been realized by the innovation in the precision micro- fabrication technology of semiconductors and printed wiring circuit boards (PWB) where laser technologies such as lithography, drilling, trimming, welding and soldering play an important role. In phot lithography, for instance, KrF excimer lasers having a resolution of 0.18 micrometers has been used in production instead of mercury lamp. Laser drilling of PWB has been increased up to over 1000 holes per second, and approximately 800 laser drilling systems of PWB are expected to be delivered in the world market this year, and most of these laser processing systems are manufactured in Japan. Trend of laser micro-fabrication in Japanese industry is described along with recent topics of R&D, government supported project and future tasks of industrial laser precision micro-fabrication on the basis of the survey conducted by Japan laser Processing Society.

  15. Great East Japan Earthquake Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Y.; Minoura, K.; Hirano, S.; Yamada, T.

    2011-12-01

    The 11 March 2011, Mw 9.0 Great East Japan Earthquake, already among the most destructive earthquakes in modern history, emanated from a fault rupture that extended an estimated 500 km along the Pacific coast of Honshu. This earthquake is the fourth among five of the strongest temblors since AD 1900 and the largest in Japan since modern instrumental recordings began 130 years ago. The earthquake triggered a huge tsunami, which invaded the seaside areas of the Pacific coast of East Japan, causing devastating damages on the coast. Artificial structures were destroyed and planted forests were thoroughly eroded. Inrush of turbulent flows washed backshore areas and dunes. Coastal materials including beach sand were transported onto inland areas by going-up currents. Just after the occurrence of the tsunami, we started field investigation of measuring thickness and distribution of sediment layers by the tsunami and the inundation depth of water in Sendai plain. Ripple marks showing direction of sediment transport were the important object of observation. We used a soil auger for collecting sediments in the field, and sediment samples were submitted for analyzing grain size and interstitial water chemistry. Satellite images and aerial photographs are very useful for estimating the hydrogeological effects of tsunami inundation. We checked the correspondence of micro-topography, vegetation and sediment covering between before and after the tsunami. The most conspicuous phenomenon is the damage of pine forests planted in the purpose of preventing sand shifting. About ninety-five percent of vegetation coverage was lost during the period of rapid currents changed from first wave. The landward slopes of seawalls were mostly damaged and destroyed. Some aerial photographs leave detailed records of wave destruction just behind seawalls, which shows the occurrence of supercritical flows. The large-scale erosion of backshore behind seawalls is interpreted to have been caused by supercritical flows, resulting in the loss of landward seawall slopes. Such erosion was also observed at landward side of footpath between rice fields. The Sendai plain was subjected just after the main shock of the earthquake. Seawater inundation resulting from tsunami run-up lasted two months. The historical document Sandai-jitsuroku, which gives a detailed history of all of Japan, describes the Jogan earthquake and subsequent tsunami which have attacked Sendai plain in AD 869. The document describes the prolonged period of flooding, and it is suggested that co-seismic subsidence of the plain took place. The inundation area of the Jogan tsunami estimated by the distribution of tsunami deposit mostly overlaps with that of the 3.11 tsunami. Considering the very similarity of seismic shocks between the both, we interpreted the Great East Japan Earthquake Tsunami is the second coming of the Jogan Earthquake Tsunami.

  16. 67 FR 21731 - Gas Turbo-Compressor Systems From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    ...731-TA-748 (Review)] Gas Turbo-Compressor Systems From Japan AGENCY...antidumping duty order on gas turbo-compressor systems from Japan...antidumping duty order on gas turbo-compressor systems from Japan would...

  17. PREFACE: India-Japan Workshop on Biomolecular Electronics & Organic Nanotechnology for Environment Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Mitsuyoshi; Malhotra, Bansi D.

    2012-04-01

    The 'India-Japan Workshop on Biomolecular Electronics & Organic Nanotechnology for Environment Preservation' (IJWBME 2011) will be held on 7-10 December 2011 at EGRET Himeji, Himeji, Hyogo, Japan. This workshop was held for the first time on 17-19 December 2009 at NPL, New Delhi. Keeping in mind the importance of organic nanotechnology and biomolecular electronics for environmental preservation and their anticipated impact on the economics of both the developing and the developed world, IJWBME 2009 was jointly organized by the Department of Biological Functions, Graduate School of Life Sciences and Systems Engineering, the Kyushu Institute of Technology (KIT), Kitakyushu, Japan, and the Department of Science & Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics (DSTCBE), National Physical Laboratory (NPL). Much progress in the field of biomolecular electronics and organic nanotechnology for environmental preservation is expected for the 21st Century. Organic optoelectronic devices, such as organic electroluminescent devices, organic thin-film transistors, organic sensors, biological systems and so on have especially attracted much attention. The main purpose of this workshop is to provide an opportunity for researchers interested in biomolecular electronics and organic nanotechnology for environmental preservation, to come together in an informal and friendly atmosphere and exchange technical knowledge and experience. We are sure that this workshop will be very useful and fruitful for all participants in summarizing the recent progress in biomolecular electronics and organic nanotechnology for environmental preservation and preparing new ground for the next generation. Many papers have been submitted from India and Japan and more than 30 papers have been accepted for presentation. The main topics of interest are as follows: Bioelectronics Biomolecular Electronics Fabrication Techniques Self-assembled Monolayers Nano-sensors Environmental Monitoring Organic Devices Organic Functional Materials We would like to express our sincere thanks to the organizing committee members of this workshop and the many organizations such as the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), Japan, the Department of Science & Technology (DST), India, the Society of Organic Nanometric Interfacial Controlled Electronic (NICE) Devices, the Japan Society of Applied Physics, Himeji City, Himeji Convention & Visitors Bureau, Delhi Technological University, Delhi, India and the University of Hyogo for their financial support. Thanks are also given to The Japan Society of Applied Physics, Division of Molecular Electronics and Bioelectronics, The Japan Society of Applied Physics (M & BE), the Technical Committee on Dielectric and Electrical Insulation Materials of the Institute of Electrical Engineering in Japan (IEEJ), the Technical Group on Organic Molecular Electronics, Electronics Society of the Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers (IEICE), and the IEEE Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Society, Japan Chapter, for their cooperation. Finally, we hope that the many young and active researchers who are participating will enjoy stimulating discussions and exchange ideas with each other at IJWBME 2011, Himeji, Japan. 7 April 2011 IJWBME 2011 Chairs Mitsuyoshi Onoda Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Japan Bansi D Malhotra Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, Delhi, India Conference photograph Participants of the India-Japan Workshop on Biomolecular Electronics & Organic Nanotechnology for Environment Preservation 2011, December 7-10 2011, EGRET Himeji, Japan The PDF also contains a list of sponsors.

  18. Fukushima, Into the Forbidden Zone - A Trip through Hell and High Water in Post-earthquake Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just weeks after earthquake and tsunami struck Japan, the author ventured into the nuclear hot zone of the Fukushima Daiichi plant, outfitted only with rubber gloves, a cloth face-mask, and armed with a capricious dosimeter. He emerged with a haunting report on daily life in a now-ravaged Japan, a country he has known and loved for many years. He stopped to interview people in the cities and towns hit hardest by the earthquake, the tsunami, and the radioactive contamination. The answers he could get are sometimes surprising, in particular regarding the kindness and enduring spirit of the people he encountered and considering what was going on in their lives

  19. Japan, a journey in irradiated lands. Japan changes its fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first article describes the situation in terms of radioactivity, contamination and decontamination, of living conditions and of issues in the immediate surroundings of the Fukushima power station and in places located at different distances of the Fukushima power station: 10 km away, in a village 20 km away, in a farming and agriculture area 50 km away from the station, and in the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station (the greatest nuclear power station in the world, 220 km away from Fukushima). The article also evokes works performed in these places, sometimes with the help of French companies, to manage the wastes or decontamination purposes. The second article comments the perspectives of development of new energy sources, with a strong trend of investments in renewable energies. The author indicates that Japan not always possesses the required technologies. In this respect, the article outlines that there could be opportunities for French companies in the field of offshore wind energy

  20. Development of clean coal technologies in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M. [Electric Power Research Industry, Yokosuka (Japan). Central Research Inst.

    2013-07-01

    In Japan, we have to import almost of primary energy resources from all over the world. We depend on foreign countries for 96% of our primary energy supply. Following the two oil crises in the 1970s, Japan has diversified its energy resources through increased use of nuclear energy, natural gas and coal as well as the promotion of energy efficiency and conservation.

  1. Autochthonous Dengue Fever, Tokyo, Japan, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yasuyuki; Moi, Meng Ling; Kotaki, Akira; Ota, Masayuki; Shinohara, Koh; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Yamamoto, Kei; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Mawatari, Momoko; Sato, Tastuya; Kunimatsu, Junwa; Takeshita, Nozomi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Ohmagari, Norio

    2015-01-01

    After 70 years with no confirmed autochthonous cases of dengue fever in Japan, 19 cases were reported during August–September 2014. Dengue virus serotype 1 was detected in 18 patients. Phylogenetic analysis of the envelope protein genome sequence from 3 patients revealed 100% identity with the strain from the first patient (2014) in Japan. PMID:25695200

  2. Japan: Language Policy and Planning in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Nanette

    2008-01-01

    This monograph discusses the language situation in Japan, with an emphasis on language planning and policy. Japan has long considered itself to be a monoethnic and therefore monolingual society, despite the existence of substantial old-comer ethnic minorities, and this--with the instrumental exception of English--has been reflected in its language…

  3. Understanding earthquake design criteria used in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the current earthquake design criteria used in Japan for nuclear power plants. Information is presented on the codes and standards and seismic requirements for reactor buildings and containment structures. The most interesting features of the earthquake design criteria used in Japan, in the light of those used in the United States, are summarized

  4. Japan - ocean dumping of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early in 1980 Japan announced that it was proposing to conduct a trial dumping of low-level radioactive waste into a site in the North Pacific from mid-1981. Subsequent strong criticism of the proposed program by South Pacific countries has led Japan to review its plans

  5. The Role of German in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Juergen

    This historical overview of German studies in Japan, dating from the birth of modern Japan in the 1870's to the present time, includes commentary on the nature and scope of existing language programs. The importance of German idealism--reflected in the philosophy of Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Marx--on Japanese culture is noted.…

  6. The geomorphic history of the Ainoura plain, Kyushu, Japan, based on excavation of the Monzen ruins

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Hirotsugu, Mori; Shoichi, Shimoyama; Kazuaki, Soejima.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La compleja línea de costa en la región noroccidental de Kyushu, Japón, está compuesta por acantilados, ensenadas de laderas inclinadas y archipiélagos, y es producto de la subsidencia de un cinturón montañoso. Los valles aluviales y las estrechas llanuras de inundación de esta región se encuentran [...] densamente pobladas y están sujetas a continuos movimientos en masa. Ainoura es un ejemplo de esta llanura de inundación. La excavación de Monzen Ruin realizada por -Nagasaki Prefectural Board of Education- en la llanura de inundación Ainoura revela la historia geomorfológica; la depositación de gravas, arenas y lodos en los últimos milenios. En la sucesión aluvial, los primeros en llenar el canal fueron los depósitos de lodos y arenas, probablemente como resultado de la transgresión del óptimo climático que ocurrió durante el Holoceno. Consecutivamente, los depósitos de grava empezaron a reemplazar las capas de arena y lodo mediante la erosión y depositación sucesiva, elevando el lecho del río. Nosotros corroboramos que el conglomerado de la llanura de inundación Ainoura proviene del deslizamiento de tierras de la zona interior de Hokusho, ya que la Llanura de inundación Hino, ubicada al sureste de Ainoura, no contiene capas de conglomerados. El lecho del río Ainoura muestra que el Monzen Ruin se localiza en la abrupta reducción del gradiente, lo cual explica el material clástico grueso en esta área. Adicionalmente, nosotros reportamos la paleo-línea de costa de la llanura de inundación de Ainoura durante el optimo climático que ocurrió durante el Holoceno. La paleolínea de costa no se movió significativamente hasta que la población empezó a recuperar tierra. Por consiguiente, nosotros predecimos que el mismo proceso de depositación podría ocurrir en la llanura de inundación de Ainoura al interior de la línea de costa. Abstract in english The complex coastline of north-western Kyushu, Japan, consisting of cliffs, steep-sided inlets and archipelagos, has resulted from subsidence in mountainous terrain; the region’s populated river valleys, having narrow alluvial plains, often suffer rock avalanches. The Ainoura plain is one such alluv [...] ial plain. Excavation of the Monzen ruins on the Ainoura Plain by the Nagasaki Prefectural Board of Education has revealed the plain’s geomorphic history regarding how the gravels and associated muds and sands were deposited during the last several thousand years. Regarding alluvial succession, mud and sand first filled in the trough, possibly as part of the transgression caused by the Holocene climatic optimum, and gravel later began to replace parts of the sand and mud layers by successive erosion and sedimentation, thereby raising riverbed level. It was confirmed that such conglomerate from the Ainoura plain was derived from the Hokusho landslide area in the hinterland because there is no conglomerate layer in the Hino plain (a small plain southeast of the Ainoura plain). The Ainoura River’s thalweg shows that the Monzen ruins are located at a sudden reduction in its gradient, thereby accounting for the thickness of coarse clastic material in that area. The reconstructed Ainoura plain’s paleoshoreline during the Holocene climatic optimum is also reported. The paleoshoreline did not move much until people began to reclaim land; it would thus be expected that the similar deposition would happened on the Ainoura plain inside this paleoshoreline.

  7. Lost City News Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Legislative and Public Affairs

    This press release from the National Science Foundation provides an overview of the 2003 expedition to the Lost City Hydrothermal Field at the Atlantis Massif. It briefly describes the expedition, features of the Lost City, research results and implications for future discoveries. Photos and images accompany the text.

  8. 78 FR 78338 - Japan-U.S. Decommissioning and Remediation Fukushima Recovery Forum Tokyo, Japan February 18-19...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ...Japan-U.S. Decommissioning and Remediation Fukushima Recovery Forum Tokyo, Japan February 18-19...Japan-United States Decommissioning and Remediation Fukushima Recovery Forum (``Fukushima Recovery Forum'') on February 18-19...

  9. Marriage and the City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier, Pieter; Svarer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Do people move to cities because of marriage market considerations? In cities singles can meet more potential partners than in rural areas. Singles are therefore prepared to pay a premium in terms of higher housing prices. Once married, the marriage market benefits disappear while the housing premium remains. We extend the model of Burdett and Coles (1997) with a distinction between efficient (cities) and less efficient (non-cities) search markets. One implication of the model is that singles are more likely to move from rural areas to cities while married couples are more likely to make the reverse movement. A second prediction of the model is that attractive singles benefit most from a dense market (i.e. from being choosy). Those predictions are tested with a unique Danish dataset.

  10. Universities Scale Like Cities

    CERN Document Server

    van Raan, Anthony F J

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic city characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all cities, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the city, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of cities cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as cities in the distribution of the gross university income in terms of total number of citations over size in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its ...

  11. Cities, Towns and Villages, City Limits of City of Dubuque, IA, Published in 2007, City of Dubuque.

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cities, Towns and Villages dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It is described as 'City Limits of City of...

  12. Heading towards a solar city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelsenkirchen, a former city of the mining industry uses solar energy for a structural change. This results in a new image. The city of the thousand fires is heading towards the city of the thousand suns. (orig.)

  13. The gas industry in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though oil is the most widely used primary energy in Japan, its market share is decreasing steadily in favour of other energies such as natural gas. Around 80 % of the gas consumed in Japan is imported in the form of LNG, with locally produced natural gas accounting for 5 % and LPG 12%. Annual LNG supplies now total 48 million tons (720 TWh) and are forecast to rise to 57 million tons over the next ten years. However, only on third of the total volume of LNG, i.e., 242 TWh, is distributed to final consumers. The rest is imported directly by power companies to produce electricity. The 245 gas distribution companies, 70 in the public sector and 175 in the private sector (including three large firms: Tokyo Gas, Osaka Gas and Toho Gas) carry the gas through their own non-interconnected networks to around 25 million customers, though the gas supply area covers only 5 % of the country. This small percentage can be explained partly by Japan's topography: 80 % of the land is covered by mountains. This means that only 20 % of the country is suitable for industrial and residential development. Populations living outside the gas supply areas mainly use LPG. The number of LPG customers totals around 25 million, a similar number to those using mains gas. However, the share of mains gas is increasing each year due to the population increase in urban zones. Though gas represents only 11 % of the energy consumed in Japan, it is nevertheless present on practically all markets and holdresent on practically all markets and holds the leading position for domestic hot water and cooking in the residential sector. However, for heating, it lags well behind oil. In industry, mains gas covers only 5% of energy needs. However, with the expansion of the pipeline network and market liberalization, the share of gas is set to increase. The price of gas for the residential sector is 2 to 3 times higher than in western countries. This can be attributed to the following factors: most natural gas is imported LNG; unit consumption in the residential sector is only one-fifth to one-quarter that of western countries due to differences in climate, structure of dwellings and lifestyle; the cost of laying underground gas pipe is high. The japanese gas distribution law, revised in April 1999 and in force since October 1999, has introduced strong competition on the Japanese gas market, thereby opening up an unregulated market which represents a potential of 40% of sales and providing scope for the negotiation of sales and TPA (third party access) conditions. However, third-party access is unlikely to develop rapidly as there are practically no interconnected networks. In addition, the application since March 2000 of the law on the power industry will deregulate the power market, giving rise to stronger competition between gas and electricity, for cogeneration and air conditioning in particular. (authors)

  14. Application of EB in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation processing using electron beam (EB) facilities other than gamma-ray facilities in Japan is introduced. After briefly presented the features of EB compared with gamma ray, present status of EB application is described. Polymerized materials for use of wire, cable, radial tire, heat shrinkable tube, foam polyethylene, PTFE, battery separator, and adsorbent material are known to be resulting from cross-linking, decomposition, and graft polymerization reactions. Environmental preservation includes electron flue gas treatment in the coal- or oil-fired power plants, research for volatile organic compounds (VOC) and dioxins, as well as wastewater and sludge treatment. Finally activity of JAERI in the related fields is overviewed with the authors prospects for utilization of low energy EB with low cost for surface treatment and functional materials. (S. Ohno)

  15. Japan's National Security: Structures, norms, and policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan's national security policy has two distinctive aspects that deserve analysis. First, Japan's definition of national security goes far beyond traditional military notions. National security is viewed in comprehensive terms that also include economic and political dimensions. The second feature of Japan's security policy worth explanation is a distinctive mixture of flexibility and rigidity in the process of policy adaptation to change: flexibility on issues of economic security, rigidity on issues of military security, and flexibility combined with rigidity on issues of political security. With the end of the Cold War and changes in the structure of the international system, it is only natural that we ask whether and how Japan's national security policy will change as well. Optimists insist that the Asian balance of power and the US-Japan relationship will make Japan aspire to be a competitive, noninterventionist trading state that heeds the universal interest of peace and profit rather than narrow aspirations for national power. Pessimists warn us instead that the new international system will finally confirm Herman Kahn's prediction of 1970: Japan will quickly change to the status of a nuclear superpower, spurred perhaps by what some see as a dangerous rise of Japanese militarism in the 1970s and 1980s

  16. Sleep, serotonin, and suicide in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Jun

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews evidence supporting the hypothesis that suicide rates in Japan could be reduced by elevating serotonin levels via increasing the average duration of sleep. Seven major relevant findings were apparent in the literature: 1) Sleep loss is associated with suicide, but the direction of causality is equivocal. 2) Decreased serotonergic activity may be involved in suicidal behavior. 3) Sleep debt may decrease serotonergic activity. 4) The suicide rate in Japan has remained at a heightened level for the past 12 years. 5) The average sleep duration in Japan has decreased over the past 40 years. 6) The average sleep duration in Japan is among the lowest in the world. 7) The average sleep duration in Japan plateaued in 1995 and has been relatively stable since. From the research reviewed, two major problematic issues were apparent: 1) Most people in Japan receive inadequate sleep. 2) Individuals whose sleep is inadequate are unlikely to be sufficiently physically active to stimulate serotonergic systems to a desirable level. I propose that public health initiatives encouraging a longer duration of sleep may provide a relatively simple way of addressing the disturbing current trend in Japan. The combination of actigraph and brain serotonin level measurement could allow large population-based cohort studies to be designed, to elucidate the causal links between sleep duration, serotonin levels, and suicide rates. PMID:21307614

  17. MEDICAL DEVICE APPROVAL PROCESS IN JAPAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Sharma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW or Koseirodosho in Japanese is in charge of the pharmaceutical regulatory affairs in Japan. Formal approvals and licenses are required to marketing drugs in Japan which are obtained from the MHLW.  Japan’s Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA has set itself the challenging task of expediting patient access to novel therapies while ensuring these meet international standards of safety, efficacy and quality. One of the biggest hurdles for the government is the “drug lag” problem, whereby many new innovative medicinal drugs do not reach the Japanese market until several years after the United States (US and Europe (EU. This delay is caused due to the obligation to perform clinical bridging studies in Japan hand since clinical data obtained in non-Japanese trials such as EU and US studies cannot solely be used to obtain market approval in Japan. Japan provides a public medical insurance system, which is carried on as a social insurance system covering all citizens. Through this insurance system, about 30% of the nation’s medical expenses are covered by public funds, and all prices for medicine, including medical compensation for doctors and prices for new drugs are substantially controlled by the Japanese government.

  18. MEDICAL DEVIC E APPROVAL PROCESS IN JAPAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Devesh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW or Koseirodosho in Japanese is in charge of the pharmaceutical regulatory affairs in Japan. Formal approvals and licenses are required to marketing drugs in Japan which are obtained from the MHLW. Japan’s Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA has set itself the challenging task of expediting patient access to novel therapies while ensuring these meet international standards of safety, efficacy and quality. One of the biggest hurdles for the government is the “drug lag” problem, whereby many new innovative medicinal drugs do not reach the Japanese market until several years after the United States (US and Europe (EU. This delay is caused due to the obligation to perform clinical bridging studies in Japan hand since clinical data obtained in non-Japanese trials such as EU and US studies cannot solely be used to obtain market approval in Japan. Japan provides a public medical insurance system, which is carried on as a social insurance system covering all citizens. Through this insurance system, about 30% of the nation’s medical expenses are covered by public funds, and all prices for medicine, including medical compensation for doctors and prices for new drugs are substantially controlled by the Japanese government.

  19. Analysis of energy intensity in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study discusses the causes of the increase in Japan's energy intensity, defined as energy consumption divided by GDP, since the early 1990s. The significant reduction in Japan's energy intensity ceased in the early 1980s and has even slightly increased since the early 1990s, indicating that Japan seemingly stopped taking aggressive action to improve energy use. However, further analysis at prefecture level and sector level provides additional insight on energy intensity trends. To analyze the causes of the increase in Japan's energy intensity, energy intensity is decomposed into energy efficiency (improvements in energy efficiency) and energy activity (structural changes from the secondary sector to the tertiary sector of the economy). Our result indicates that the non-uniform energy intensity trends between prefectures are attributed to a high variability in energy efficiency. At sector level, we estimate the income elasticity of energy consumption in each sector and find that a structural change in energy consumption behaviors occurred in all sectors at different time points. The industrial sector and commercial sector became less energy efficient after 1981 and 1988, respectively, which is presumably responsible for the deterioration of Japan's energy intensity since the early 1990s. - Highlights: • We examine why the reduction in Japan's energy intensity increased in the early 1990s. • There is a high variability in energy intensity trends between regions. • The structural changes in energy consumption behaviors occurred in sector level. • These changes may be responsible for the deterioration of Japan's energy intensity

  20. @City: technologising Barcelona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas, Jesús

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is about the concept of the contemporary city - the influence that technology has when one thinks about, plans and lives in a city. The conjunction of technology and city reformulates customs and social practices; it can even determine the way one constitutes one's own identity. One can see how close the relation is between technology (specifically, TICS and the structures of the city in a wide variety of situations: in social interactions on the street, in transport, and in ways of buying, of working and entertainment. "@City" is a concept that very well reflects the emergent properties of a current city, that is, the coexistence of a physical and a virtual urban space. The "22@Barcelona" project attempts to bring together different types of spaces. By combining the physical with the virtual, 22@Barcelona, as a neighborhood of @City, creates an uncertain and blurred border between both spaces.The article also examines the impact that these spaces have on the psycho-social processes involved in the daily life of a traditionally working-class neighborhood, now strongly limited by technological boundaries.

  1. Computers in Education: An Outline of Country Experiences. Report of the Asian Seminar on Educational Technology (3rd, Tokyo, Japan, September 26-October 2, 1984).

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    Selected country papers included in this collection focus on applications of computers in the educational systems of Australia, China, India, Japan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. Information for the city of Singapore is also provided. The reports for each country and Singapore include: (1) background information on the development of…

  2. Optimisation of city size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurila, Hannu

    2011-01-01

    Club theoretical analysis of migration between asymmetrical cities shows that centralised policy intervention is necessary to ensure the efficient allocation of people between cities. Administrative and economic measures are compared as policy instruments of central government. These instruments are found to differ in their effects on residential allocation and welfare. In particular, a lump-sum tax-transfer programme pools the welfare-creating potentials of cities, thus affecting the efficiency condition. Therefore, lump-sum tax-transfers are superior to both quantity rationing and Pigouvian taxes, and they also activate, rather than stabilise, migration. PMID:21584984

  3. Thinking Cities Through Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Simon; Dodsworth, Francis; Ruppert, Evelyn; Watson, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Why study the city through objects? As we will argue below, material objects are analytically important but until recently they have largely been marginalised in urban studies. Thus, our aim here is to bring them to the centre of the analysis of the city. In Part I, after first reviewing how materiality has been taken up in the work of key urbanists, we propose a conceptual and methodological orientation that draws on these and sets out a way for following and analysing city objects. We then ...

  4. Fukushima accident: the consequences in Japan, France and in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document begins with a description of the Fukushima accident, the second article reviews the main consequences in Japan of the accident: setting of a forbidden zone around the plant, restriction of the exports of food products, or the shutdown of the Hamaoka plant. The third article is the reporting of an interview of L. Oursel, deputy general director of the Areva group, this interview deals mainly with the safety standard of the EPR and with the issue of passive safety systems. The last part of the document is dedicated to the consequences in France (null sanitary impact, cooperation between Areva, EdF, CEA and the Japanese plant operator Tepco...) and in the rest of the world: the organization of resistance tests in the nuclear power plants operating in the European Union, the decision about the agreement of EPR and AP1000 reactor has been delayed in United-Kingdom, acceleration of the German program for abandoning nuclear energy, Italy suspends its nuclear program, China orders a general overhaul of the safety standard of its nuclear power plants, Poland and Romania reaffirm their trust in nuclear energy, France wishes a 'mechanism' allowing a quick international intervention in case of major nuclear accident, Russia proposes measures to improve nuclear safety. (A.C.)

  5. Flux of perfluorinated chemicals through wet deposition in Japan, the United States, and several other countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Karen Y; Taniyasu, Sachi; Yeung, Leo W Y; Murphy, Margaret B; Lam, Paul K S; Horii, Yuichi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Petrick, Gert; Sinha, Ravindra K; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi

    2010-09-15

    The widespread distribution of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) in different environmental matrices has prompted concern about the sources, fate, and transport of these classes of chemicals. PFCs are present in the atmosphere, but only a few studies have investigated their occurrence in precipitation. In this study, concentrations of 20 PFCs, including C3-C5 short-chain PFCs, were quantified using HPLC-MS/MS in precipitation samples from Japan (n = 31), the United States (n = 12), China (n = 5), India (n = 2), and France (n = 2). Among the PFCs measured, perfluoropropanoic acid (PFPrA) was detected in all of the precipitation samples. Average total PFC concentrations ranged from 1.40 to 18.1 ng/L for the seven cities studied. The greatest total PFC concentrations were detected in Tsukuba, Japan, whereas the lowest concentrations were detected in Patna, India. PFPrA, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) were found to be the dominant PFCs in Japanese and U.S. precipitation samples. No observable seasonal trend was found in precipitation samples from two locations in Japan. Annual fluxes of PFCs were estimated for Japan and the U.S. and the evidence for precipitation as an effective scavenger of PFCs in the atmosphere is reported. PMID:20795671

  6. Deoxygenation of Lake Ikeda, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, R.; Hasegawa, N.

    2010-12-01

    Lake Ikeda (Kagoshima prefecture, Japan) is a deep lake with a maximum depth of 233 m. Monitoring data of lake Ikeda exist since 1975. We have analyzed the long-term variability in the water conditions of Lake Ikeda. Recently, Lake Ikeda has exhibited the phenomenon of incomplete overturning because of climate warming. The concentrations of DO (dissolved oxygen) in the deepest parts of the lake have reduced. This phenomenon was observed to have started in the 1980s, and gradually, the deepest parts of the lake became anoxic. Later, the anoxic layer became thicker. Currently, winter mixing in Lake Ikeda reaches to depths of only 100 m. According to our simple estimation, the total volume of oxygen in Lake Ikeda will reduce from approximately 70% in the mid-1980s to 40% by the end of 2010. In addition to this phenomenon, the oxygen concentration appears to vary with several years oscillations. The depths to which mixing occurs depends on the severity of the winter, such as the air temperature during the winter season. The mixing period generally occurs in February; hence, the limnological year is considered to start in February. During our analysis period, the total DO mass showed high values in 1996, 2001, and 2003. Air temperature data obtained for regions near Lake Ikeda (the station name is Ibusuki) are used to clarify the cause of the high DO mass values in the three abovementioned years. During the period prior to the occurrence of the high DO mass in February 1996, i.e., in December 1995 and January 1996, the air temperature was low. Similarly, in 2001 and 2003, the air temperature was low in January (one month before the high DO mass was observed). In January 2001 and 2003, the AO (Atlantic Oscillation) index was negative. When the AO index is negative, there tends to be a greater movement of cold polar air into mid-latitudinal regions including Japan (Yamakawa, 2005). This movement induced a low air temperature in Ibusuki, and consequently, a high DO mass was observed in Lake Ikeda. On the other hand, the AO index was negative in December 1995 and January 1996. In addition, the WP (Western Pacific) index was also negative in the winter of 1995/96. When the WP index is negative, Japan experiences a cold winter (Koide and Kodera, 1999; Yasunaka and Hanawa, 2008). Therefore, the combination of the negative phase of AO and the negative phase of WP led to the occurrence of cold surges near Lake Ikeda, which in turn resulted in the high DO mass in February 1996. When DO concentration in the deep layer of the lake becomes higher caused winter mixing, we observe also a reduction in the DO concentration in the surface layer. The DO concentration in the surface layer sometimes decreased to 70%. In future, once Lake Ikeda will deep mixing during very cold winters, the DO concentration in the surface water might reduce largely.

  7. University Teacher Training in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Kato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La formación del profesorado universitario en Japón ha sido promovida en el marco del “Desarrollo profesional docente (FD”. La formación del profesorado se convirtió en un "deber sustancial» para los profesores de los centros de pregrado por una orden ministerial en 2008 (en 2007 para los centros de posgrado. Sin embargo, el contenido de la Capacitación Docente queda a la discreción de cada organización, y el marco legal no impone como obligatoria la participación de todo el personal académico en la formación del profesorado. En la década de 2000, las universidades japonesas empezaron a moverse de acuerdo con presiones externas, como las inspecciones para garantizar la calidad, la obtención de fondos externos, y la publicación de datos acerca de sus estudiantes. Estas circunstancias han promovido los movimientos de la Capacitación Docente aplicada a las actividades de educación en las instituciones, y entendidas según el concepto del KAIZEN (proceso de mejora colectiva que sigue el ciclo planificación-acción-verificación. Sin embargo, la formación del profesorado basada en las habilidades de enseñanza todavía no es una prioridad en Japón.ABSTRACTUniversity teacher training in Japan has been promoted as a part of ‘Faculty Development (FD’. Teacher training became a ‘substantial duty’ to faculties for of undergraduate schools by a ministerial ordinance in 2008 (graduate schools in 2007. However, contents of the Faculty Development are left to each organisation’s discretion, and the ordinance does not have the legal right to mandate the participation of all academic staff in teacher training. In the 2000s, Japanese universities were under the external pressures such as quality assurance inspections, acquisition of external funds, and the exposure of data about their students. These circumstances have promoted the movements of the Faculty Development as KAIZEN (collective improvement by means of the plan-do-check-action cycle activities of education at institutions. However, a few institutions offer a systematised programme of teaching and learning for academic staff. The teacher training for enhancement of teaching skills is still not a priority in Japan.

  8. Ecological city planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Rueda

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A territory, a city, a neighbourhood are all ecosystems; a mixture of chemico-physical and organic elements related to each other. That which defines an ecological system is the set of rules and characteristics which condition its relationships, and its duration in time is guaranteed by its efficiency and internal organization which applied to the city is translated in the reduction of the use of natural resources and in the increase of social organization. To increase the efficiency of the urban systems is the necessary condition for the formulation of ecological city planning favouring the maximum liveability of sites. Liveability is directly correlated to the optimization of numerous elements (public space, equipment, services, building techniques, innovative technology, social cohesion, biodiversity. To carry out such objectives, ecological city planning proposes a new model of town planning on three levels (subsoil, ground level, and upper level.

  9. OpenCities Project

    US Agency for International Development — The Open Cities Project aims to catalyze the creation, management and use of open data to produce innovative solutions for urban planning and resilience challenges...

  10. City fiiling / Triin Ojari

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojari, Triin, 1974-

    2006-01-01

    Arhitektide Andres Alveri ja Tiit Trummali tähtsamatest töödest. Pikemalt Tallinna kesklinnas asuvatest majadest City Plaza ja Rävala Neli. Kommentaarid Rein Veidemannilt, Veljo Kaasikult, Hardo Aasmäelt, Toomas Tammiselt, Jaak Aaviksoolt ja Karin Pauluselt

  11. Design a Solar City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Students design and build a model city powered by the sun! They learn about the benefits of solar power, and how architectural and building engineers integrate photovoltaic panels into the design of buildings.

  12. Active City Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Sindhu, M. R.; Jamle, Viraj M.; Shelke, Pramod M.; Baheti, Shrikant G.

    2012-01-01

    The basic and universal corner stone of good governance are quality of service, quick response mechanisms and above all accountable and transparent process mechanism. The active city administration initiatives resulted in computerization of the legacy systems in government with limited ability to internalize the advances in information and communication technologies.By using active city administration services we able to know real time, quantitative and basic approach of the government servic...

  13. Creativity, cities and innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Neil; Rodri?guez-pose, Andre?s

    2013-01-01

    The creative industries have long been seen as an innovative sector. More recent research posits that creative occupations are also a fundamental, but overlooked, driver of innovation. Theory also suggests cities are important for both creative industries and occupations, with urban environments helping firms innovate. Yet little empirical work has considered the links between creative industries, occupations, cities and innovation at the firm level. This paper addresses this gap using a samp...

  14. Reflective cool cities:

    OpenAIRE

    Heidegger, V.

    2011-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Smart & Bioclimatic Design. Our globe is heating, and cities are heating up much more. At the same time, cities are growing and green spaces are substituted by buildings and streets. These man-made surfaces are dark and tend to heat up easily, contributing to the urban heat island effect. This manual gives an overview of the new approach to make these surfaces more reflective, reducing the heat gain.

  15. The Unsustainable City

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Berger

    2014-01-01

    “Make cities more sustainable” is an omnipresent slogan in architecture and urban planning. This article is a discussion on theoretical and practical boundaries of using the expression “sustainability” with respect to the scientific community, therefore avoiding sustainability becoming a euphemism for “doing good”. By definition, it can be concluded, cities developed as counterparts to the hinterland and, therefore, they axiomatically should be and are as a matter of fact unsustai...

  16. Improving the City environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All around the world cities are under severe environmental pressure. Water supplies, traffic congestion, air pollution, noise and waste disposal cause very similar problems in cities that are otherwise quite diverse. And attempts to improve conditions usually run into a range of difficulties. Indeed, environmental problems often persist for years before governments -national, regional and local- make any major effort to address them. 6 refs

  17. Japan Races to Avert Multiple Nuclear Meltdowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Associated Press

    Japan's nuclear crisis intensified Sunday as authorities raced to combat the threat of multiple reactor meltdowns and more than 170,000 people evacuated the northeastern coast where fears spread over possible radioactive contamination. (March 13, 2011)

  18. 1940 Japan-America Student Conference (JASC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsema, James A.

    The first release in a new electronic series published by the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Kansas, James J. Halsema's "Diary of the 1940 Japan America Student Conference" (ed. Grant Goodman) offers an interesting account of the last JASC conference before the Second World War. A student delegate to the conference (which was held in Japan), Halsema made a number of astute observations on Japan and its imperial state in Northeast Asia in his diary, which he fortunately kept and has now shared with readers. The diary is offered as a large single HTML document, accompanied by an introduction from the editor and an appendix. The new series, which the diary inaugurates, will publish primary documents, translations, and scholarly studies relating to China, Japan, and Korea.

  19. River and Wetland Restoration: Lessons from Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    KEIGO NAKAMURA, KLEMENT TOCKNER, and KUNIHIKO AMANO (; )

    2006-05-01

    This is a peer reviewed article from BioScience focuses on river and wetland restoration projects in Japan. River and wetland restoration has emerged as a worldwide phenomenon and is becoming a highly profitable business. Although researchers worldwide know a lot about restoration practices in Europe and the United States, we have only scant information about the activities in Japan, where more than 23,000 river restoration projects have been conducted during the past 15 years. In Japan, restoration is a daunting business because of the high human population density, urbanization, and harsh environmental conditions. Here we provide an overview of the various restoration activities in Japan and discuss the lessons that we can draw from them.

  20. Uranium enrichment by centrifuge in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The promotion of nuclear power generation is one of the most important tasks in Japan's energy policy. The uranium enrichment services necessary for the nation's nuclear power generation are at present located entirely overseas. In 1972, the Japan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) took up research and development of the centrifuge uranium enrichment process as a national project and decided seriously to promote it in order to start uranium enrichment in Japan. The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) took a leading part in the subsequent research and development work on centrifuge uranium enrichment technology. The resultant pilot plant entered into full-scale operation in March 1982. The paper summarizes the construction and operation of the pilot plant and outlines the steps involved in establishing a uranium enrichment enterprise in Japan. (author)

  1. History of Nuclear Fusion Research in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Harukazu; Matsuoka, Keisuke; Kimura, Kazue; Namba, Chusei; Matsuda, Shinzaburo

    In the late 1950s just after the atomic energy research was opened worldwide, there was a lively discussion among scientists on the strategy of nuclear fusion research in Japan. Finally, decision was made that fusion research should be started from the basic, namely, research on plasma physics and from cultivation of human resources at universities under the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture (MOE). However, an endorsement was given that construction of an experimental device for fusion research would be approved sooner or later. Studies on toroidal plasma confinement started at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) under the Science and Technology Agency (STA) in the mid-1960s. Dualistic fusion research framework in Japan was established. This structure has lasted until now. Fusion research activities over the last 50 years are described by the use of a flowchart, which is convenient to glance the historical development of fusion research in Japan.

  2. 226Ra in the Japan Sea and the residence time of the Japan Sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface water of the Japan Sea contained 226Ra of 70+-4 dpm m-3 which was nearly equal to that of the surface water in the North Pacific. The concentration of 226Ra in the Japan Sea deep water below 500 m was 151+-8 dpm m-3, showing a vertically and regionally small variation. This concentration of 226Ra in the deep water is unexpectedly high, because the Japan Sea deep water has a higher ?14C value by about 50per mille than the Atlantic deep water containing the same 226Ra. One of the causes to be considered is larger contribution of 226Ra from biogenic particles dissolving in the Japan Sea deep water, but the Japan Sea is not so fertile in comparison to the Bering Sea. The other more plausible cause is the internal ventilation of the Japan Sea water, which means that the residence time of the Japan Sea Proper water is considerably long although the water is vertically mixed fairly well especially in winter. The ventilation may supply some amounts of radiocarbon and oxygen but does not change the inventory of 226Ra. The residence times of the Japan Sea deep water and of water within the Japan Sea are calculated by solving simultaneous equations for 226Ra and 14C with a three-box model to be 300-400 years and 700-1000 years, respectively. (orig.)

  3. Art in Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The organizers of Art in Cities say, "Cities are like a huge art gallery with a permanently changing exhibition." Therefore, this web site exists to collect submissions of artwork from cities all over the world, and plot it on a map. To view the art, browse by selecting points on the map, or search by City, Submitter, or artist (Artwork by). There is also a quick link to the most recent uploads. On the day we visited, this link lead to stencil art and graffiti from several cities in the Netherlands, including Amsterdam, Rotterdam, and Eindhoven, as well as one from San Bernardino, CA. This was just the first page of 473 for this specific link, which is in turn only a fraction of the close to 6,000 pieces of art on view at the site. Submitting art is as easy as uploading an image from your computer, and filling out a few fields on a form thus encouraging anyone to walk the streets of their city looking for art to add the site.

  4. The Cities Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponsored by the World Bank and other organizations, the Cities Alliance is "a global coalition of cities and their development partners committed to scaling up successful approaches to poverty reduction." The "News" area is front and center on their homepage and it provides a fine overview of their work, which ranges from concerted efforts to upgrade slums in the developing world, developing strategies to help cities with their financial situation, and also working on cohesive and comprehensive development strategies. Visitors can click on the right-hand side of the page to learn more about each of these thematic areas in the "Cities Alliance Activities" section. Moving on, the "Publications" area with its annual reports, fact sheets, and archived e-newsletters is a place worth visiting as well. The site is rounded out by the "City Development Strategies" area, which offers a rigorous explanation of the ways in which cities can assess their existing strengths and what the key aspects of a meaningful development strategy might be.

  5. From the Jura to Japan...

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Fifty years ago, a week-long school for physicists took place in Saint Cergue, in the Jura mountains not far from CERN. Its focus was on using emulsion techniques, but its legacy was much more far reaching. Last week I was in Fukuoka, Japan, on the last day of a direct descendent – the first Asia–Europe–Pacific School of High-Energy Physics (AEPSHEP).   That first small school in 1962 was the precursor to the annual European Schools of High-Energy Physics, which are organised jointly by CERN and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in countries that are a member state of either (or both) of the organisations. They led in turn to the CERN–Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics, first held in Brazil in 2001. The aim of these schools is not only to give young particle physicists the opportunity to learn from leading experts in the field, but also to nurture from the start communication among researchers from different regions. CERN and JI...

  6. Spent fuel treatment in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, 52 nuclear power reactors are operating with a total power generation capacity of 45 GWe. The cumulative amount of spent fuel arising, as of March 1998, is about 14,700 W. Spent fuel is reprocessed and recovered nuclear materials are to be recycled in LWRs and FBRs. Pu utilization in LWRs will commence in 1999. In January 1997, short-term policy measures were announced by the Atomic Energy Commission, which addressed promotion of the reprocessing programme in Rokkasho, plutonium utilization in LWRs, spent fuel management, back-end measures and FBR development. With regard to the spent fuel management, the policy measures included expansion of spent fuel storage capacity at reactor sites and a study on spent fuel storage away-from-reactor sites, considering the increasing amount of spent fuel arising. Valuable experience was been accumulated at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP), from the start of hot operation in 1977 up to now. The role of the TRP will be changed from an operation-oriented to a more R and D oriented facility, when PNC is reorganized into the new organization JNC. The Rokkasho reprocessing plant is under construction and is expected to commence operation in 2003. R and D of future recycling technologies is also continued for the establishment of a nuclear fuel cycle based on FBRs and LWRs. (author)

  7. Geological disposal programme in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomio Kawata, Executive Director (NUMO) presented the geological disposal programme in Japan. NUMO was created in 2000 by the Radioactive Waste Final Disposal Act which describes the site selection process. The siting process is currently underway including a volunteer approach under NUMO's responsibility. The Final Disposal Act provides for a stepwise process of site investigation with a safety case including a demonstration of compliance with siting factors. The safety case will be refined step by step as the investigations proceed from one stage to the next. One of the key issues is the closure strategy, which is now a part of the overall safety strategy because it is closely linked to post-closure safety and to important issues such as monitoring and retrievability. T. Kawata insisted on the importance to share a common understanding of fundamental issues and a common safety philosophy among the countries involved with a view to successful implementation of the disposal programme in each country. In this regard, he declared that the role of the NEA/RWMC is indispensable

  8. Romanticising Shinsengumi in Contemporary Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Shinsengumi, a group of young men recruited by the Bakufu to protect Kyoto from radical Imperial House loyalists in the tumultuous Bakumatsu period, is romanticised and idolised in Japan despite its limited place in history. This article attempts to comprehend this phenomenon by locating the closest crystallisation of popularly imagined Shinsengumi in Moeyo ken, a popular historical fiction by Shiba Ry?tar?. Antonio Gramsci explains readers are attracted to popular literature because it reflects their ‘philosophies of the age’, which may be discovered by examining popular heroes with their subsequent replications.This article will identify why Shinsengumi is appealing by comparing Shiba’s hero in Moeyo ken with its twenty-first century reincarnation in Gintama, a popular manga series, and by discerning reader response to Moeyo ken from customer reviews on Amazon.co.jp. It will be demonstrated from these studies that a likely reason for the Japanese public’s romanticisation of Shinsengumi in recent years could be their attraction to autonomous, self-determining heroes who also appreciate the value of community.

  9. Nuclear energy in Japan today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants now supply over 30% of Japan's electricity. Of the 49 currently operating power reactors, 22 are PWRs, 25 are BWRs, one is the original 166MWe Magnox reactor and one a prototype advanced thermal reactor. The Onagawa-2 780MWe BWR and the 246MWe Monju prototype fast breeder reactor are expected to commence full operation in 1995. In response to the projected increase in electricity demand, by 2010, a planned expansion of nuclear power will require the construction of 30 new 1000MWe units. A long-term programme for nuclear power development was produced by the Atomic Energy Commission in 1956 and is revised approximately every five years with the goals of ensuring security of energy supply and improving the quality of life and social welfare both nationally and internationally. These goals are approached within the framework of the Japanese Atomic Energy Basic Law which states that nuclear energy will be for peaceful use only and that safety will be the foremost consideration in its development. Long term strategy also supports the development of a domestic nuclear infrastructure. To this end, waste management, enrichment and reprocessing facilities are all either operating or under construction at the Rokkasho-mura fuel cycle centre and the construction of a MOX fuel fabrication plant is foreseen. (UK)

  10. Internal Structure of the Sambongi Fan - Towada Volcano, Japan: Putting the Theory to the Test, using an Extensive GPR Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, Christopher; Kyoko, Kataoka

    2011-01-01

    The Towada Caldera Volcano is located in Aomori Prefecture - Northern Honshu Island, Japan. The caldera, today filled by a lake, has produced 15,000 years ago a complex eruption emplacing an Ignimbrite deposit topped by the lake outburst flood deposit, through which the present Oirase River cuts. This deposit has shaped the geomorphologic feature named Sambongi fan, on which Towada City extends. Based on outcrops, a few coring and radiocarbon dating, Kataoka (2011) has developed a theory tyin...

  11. The disappointments for nuclear energy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several dysfunctions are reported in this paper: A reactor (Onagawa) closed after a nitrogen leakage; a small leakage of radioactive water in the nuclear power plant of Mihama assessment raised to five deaths, the operator stops its nuclear power plants for inspection, the Japan face to its ageing nuclear power plants, the truth about the cost of M.O.X., the seven reactors of Japan closed for inspection after cracks and leaks hidden to authorities, Tokai MURA accident. (N.C.)

  12. Status of historical seismology in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, K.

    2004-01-01

    Japan's combination of high seismicity and a long history has produced copious written records of historical earthquakes. Systematic collection and investigation of such historical documents began late in the 19th century. Now, almost all of Japan's known historical materials on earthquakes have been transcribed into 25 printed volumes. The collections include records of about 400 destructive earthquakes from A.D. 599 to 1872. Epicentral coordinates and magnitudes have been estimated for abou...

  13. Revitalizing US electronics lessons from Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Sprague, John

    1993-01-01

    Written by one of the few executives who have extensive experience in the electronics industry in both the US and Japan, this book compares market research, design, and manufacturing techniques as used in both countries. Unlike other books on theJapanese business culture, Sprague gives specific advice and recommendations about what companies can do now to compete with Japan, clearly pointing out what is and what is not adaptable from the Japanese approach to business.

  14. Von Japan lernen? Wissensmanagement im Fernen Osten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parissa Haghirian

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Schon seit den 80-Jahren wird Japan als Vorreiter im Wissensmanagement gesehen. Japanische Unternehmen scheinen Wissen scheinbar mühelos zu managen, obwohl sie sich in hohem Ausmass auf implizites Wissen und nicht auf Datenbanken verlassen; der Wissensaustausch in japanischen Unternehmen funktioniert ohne Barrieren und neue und innovative Produktideen werden in der Gruppe entwickelt. Es stellt sich also die Frage, wie wird in Japan Wissen gemanagt und was können wir von japanischen Unternehmen lernen?

  15. On Chinese Trainees and Interns in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Jiaoyan Fan

    2012-01-01

    There are millions of Chinese workers in Japan, most as trainees and interns hired in small or medium sized industries. While they work hard and contribute great to the economic development of Japan, there also exist some problems arising from the mechanism which have to be faced by both Japanese and Chinese governments. On analyzing the status of the trainees and interns, the author exposed some problems in the system, and presents some suggestions from the legal view for the future at last.

  16. Immigrants’ Experiences of Maternity Care in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Igarashi, Yukari; Horiuchi, Shigeko; Porter, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    Language and cultural differences can negatively impact immigrant women’s birth experience. However, little is known about their experiences in Japan’s highly homogenous culture. This cross-sectional study used survey data from a purposive sampling of immigrant women from 16 hospitals in several Japanese prefectures. Meeting the criteria and recruited to this study were 804 participants consisting of 236 immigrant women: Chinese (n = 83), Brazilian (n = 62), Filipino (n = 43), South Korean (n...

  17. Mercury emission from crematories in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Takaoka, M.; Oshita, K.; TAKEDA, N; Morisawa, S

    2009-01-01

    Anthropogenic sources of mercury emissions have a significant impact on global pollution. Therefore, finding uncharacterised sources and assessing the emissions from these sources are important. However, limited data are available worldwide on mercury emissions from crematories. In Japan, 99.9% of dead bodies are cremated, which is the highest percentage in the world, and more than 1600 crematories are in operation. We thus focused on emissions from crematories in Japan. The number of targete...

  18. Kampo medicine for palliative care in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Okumi, Hirokuni; Koyama, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    Kampo medicines are currently manufactured under strict quality controls. The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan has approved 148 Kampo formulas. There is increasing evidence for the efficacy of Kampo medicines, and some are used clinically for palliative care in Japan. The specific aim of this review is to evaluate the clinical use of Kampo medicines in palliative care in the treatment of cancer. The conclusions are as follows: Juzentaihoto inhibits the progression of liver tumo...

  19. Plans for super-beams in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    HASEGAWA, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    In Japan, as the first experiment utilizes J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) neutrino facility, T2K (Tokai to Kamioka Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment) starts operation. T2K is supposed to give critical information, which guides the future direction of the neutrino physics. Possible new generation discovery experiment based on T2K outcome is discussed. Especially, description of J-PARC neutrino beam upgrade plan and discussion on far detector options to max...

  20. Current status of atopic dermatitis in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Furue, Masutaka; Chiba, Takahito; Takeuchi, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, chronic or chronically relapsing, severely pruritic, eczematous skin disease. AD is the second most frequently observed skin disease in dermatology clinics in Japan. Prevalence of childhood AD is 12-13% in mainland Japan; however, it is only half that (about 6%) in children from Ishigaki Island, Okinawa. Topical steroids and tacrolimus are the mainstay of treatment. However, the adverse effects and emotional fear of long-term use of topical steroids have in...

  1. Experimental DML over digital repositories in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Namiki, Takao; Kuroda, Hiraku; Naruse, Shunsuke

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the authors show an overview of Virtual Digital Mathematics Library in Japan (DML-JP), contents of which consist of metadata harvested from institutional repositories in Japan and digital repositories in the world. DML-JP is, in a sense, a subject specific repository which collaborate with various digital repositories. Beyond portal website, DML-JP provides subject-specific metadata through OAI-ORE. By the schema it is enabled that digital repositories can load...

  2. Legal intervention against medical accidents in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Hideo Yasunaga

    2008-01-01

    Hideo YasunagaDepartment of Health Management and Policy, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: The number of civil lawsuits in Japan concerning medical accidents has been increasing gradually. Emotional reports in the media about medical accidents have amplified people’s distrust of physicians. Since 2002, the police have been more actively involved, and the number of criminal prosecutions against physicians as a result of medical accidents has inc...

  3. The Firebombing of Tokyo: Views from the Ground

    OpenAIRE

    Cary Karacas; Bret Fisk

    2011-01-01

    More than sixty-five years after the Great Tokyo Air Raid of March 10, 1945, and the subsequent firebombing and destruction of Japan's cities by the United States Army Air Forces in World War II, the issues remain little known and less studied. In stark contrast to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, however, historians and other scholars working in the English language have paid little attention to the tremendous societal impact - both immediate and long-lasting - of the destructi...

  4. Sinking Coastal Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkens, G.; Stuurman, R.; De Lange, G.; Bucx, T.; Lambert, J.

    2014-12-01

    In many coastal cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will continue to sink, even below sea level. The ever increasing industrial and domestic demand for water in these cities results in excessive groundwater extraction, causing severe subsidence. In addition, coastal cities are often faced with larger natural subsidence, as they are built on thick sequences of soft soil. The impacts of subsidence are further exacerbated by climate-induced sea level rise. Land subsidence results in two types damage: foremost it increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. Secondly, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs of roads and transportation networks, sewage systems, buildings and foundations. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. To survey the extent of groundwater associated subsidence, we conducted a quick-assessment of subsidence in a series of mega-cities (Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Dhaka, New Orleans and Bangkok). For each city research questions included: what are the main causes, how much is the current subsidence rate and what are predictions, where are the vulnerable areas, what are the impacts and risks, how can adverse impacts can be mitigated or compensated for, and what governmental bodies are involved and responsible to act? Using the assessment, this paper discusses subsidence modelling and measurement results from the selected cities. The focus is on the importance of delayed settlement after increases in hydraulic heads, the role of the subsurface composition for subsidence rates and best practice solutions for subsiding cities. For the latter, urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management and related spatial planning strategies are just examples of the options available. The discussions in this paper form the building blocks for a much-needed research agenda that aims to deliver a strategy to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas.

  5. IAEA Remediation Mission to Japan Concludes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A team of international experts today completed a preliminary assessment of the strategy and plans being considered by the Japanese authorities to remediate the areas off-site the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant reported to have elevated levels of radiation. The IAEA dispatched the mission to Japan on 7 October following a request from the country's Government. The mission, comprising 12 international and IAEA experts from several countries, visited numerous locations in the Fukushima Prefecture and conducted meetings in Tokyo and Fukushima with Japanese officials from several Ministries and institutions. ''The meetings held and visits made by the team over the last eight days gave us a first-hand appreciation of the extraordinary efforts and dedication on the part of Japanese people in their effort to remediate the areas affected by elevated levels of radiation in the Fukushima Prefecture,'' says Mr. Juan Carlos Lentijo, Team Leader and General Director for Radiation Protection at Spain's nuclear regulatory authority. ''As Japan continues its current remediation efforts, it is our belief that this work will bring relief to the populations who are affected by the consequences of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.'' In a Preliminary Summary Report delivered to Japanese authorities today, the team prepared a set of conclusions including, though not limited to, the following: - Japan developed an efficient program for remediation - allocating the necessary legal, financial and technological resources to bring relief to the people affected by the accident, with priority being given to children. The Team was impressed with the strong commitment to the remediation effort from all institutions and parties involved, including the public; - Japan has also taken practical measures to inform the public and involve residents and local institutions in the process of defining its remediation strategy; - Japan is advised to avoid classifying removed materials that do not warrant special radiation protection measures as ''radioactive waste''; - Japan is advised to consider explaining to the public the importance of focusing on radiation doses that may actually be received by people rather than on data indicating contamination levels; and - Japan is encouraged to continue its remediation efforts. In doing so, Japan is encouraged to take into account the advice provided by the Mission. The IAEA stands ready to support Japan as it considers new and appropriate criteria for such activities. The authorities and local residents in Japan fully assisted the IAEA international team in its endeavor to conclude its mission successfully. ''The team also appreciates the openness with which our discussions were conducted and the high level of cooperation and access we were granted by Japan,'' says Mr. Lentijo. ''This was an invaluable opportunity for us to learn from this important decontamination initiative. We would like to continue our support to Japan in this very challenging task. We look forward to sharing our findings with the international community.'' The final report of the mission will be presented to the Government of Japan in the next month. Background. The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant has led to elevated levels of radiation over large areas. The Government of Japan has been formulating a strategy and plans to implement countermeasures to remediate these areas. The IAEA organized an International Fact Finding Expert Mission of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident Following The Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami, which took place between 24 May and 2 June 2011. The mission concluded today is a follow-up to the fact-finding mission held earlier in the year and an essential component of the IAEA's Nuclear Safety Action Plan, approved by the IAEA Board of Governors on 13 September and endorsed by all 151 Member States at the recent IAEA General Conference in September 2011. The Action Plan defines a programme of work to strengthen the global nucl

  6. Introduction of JNES in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES), an incorporated administrative agency, was established on October 1, 2003, as a technical support organization to the nuclear regulatory authority, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA), with the mission to ensure the safety of nuclear installations for energy use. JNES's activities include inspection of nuclear installations, safety analysis and evaluation, emergency preparedness support, technical survey, tests and research for ensuring nuclear safety, and information analysis, evaluation and transmission. The studies on new approaches to ensure nuclear safety on the basis of the latest technological knowledge are also within JNES's scope of responsibilities. The paper addresses the following issues: Outline of organization; - Major Tasks; - Organization Chart; - The number of management and staff; - Budget Scale; - Role and Mission; - Major Tasks; - Inspection Activities; - Activities concerning Analysis and Evaluation of the Safety of Nuclear Installations; - Supporting Activities for the Nuclear Disaster Preparedness; - Study, Test and Research to Ensure the Nuclear Safety; - Collection, arrangement and provision of information to ensure the safety. In conclusion, since activities in the nuclear safety area have become further specialized and gained international dimension, which reflects the latest technical progress, JNES, recognizing itself as a professional organization, is keenly aware of its extl organization, is keenly aware of its extremely large and important role in this area. With its foremost concern being to assure the public safety, JNES will respect transparency and give plain explanations based on scientific and rational judgments. The public expects from nuclear experts to show the true picture of the nuclear technology, and one believes that serious discussions and plain explanations by nuclear experts will surely gain the public confidence. Upon recognition of these facts, JNES staff will fulfill their jobs with all their strength to meet the public's expectations for ensuring nuclear safety

  7. Ocean Science Communication in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, H.

    2011-12-01

    Ocean literacy and education panel (OLEP) of the Oceanographic Society of Japan (JOS) has been established in 2003 for sharing the ocean literacy with the public and promoting the ocean science education in school and college. Its activities include publishing reference books and electronic teaching materials for primary school teachers and students, conducting surveys on the people's consciousness on the ocean, and supporting the events such as 'Ocean Science Cafe' for the public, oceanographer's talks in class room and sea side, and seminars on board of research vessel for high-school teachers and students. Its activities are announced to the public in its website and through Twitter. The records are available to the public in the websites. Some JOS members including me are telling the public the basic knowledge of ocean science, additional explanations to scientific topics in mass media, their thoughts on the ocean, the science, and STEM education, and their daily life such as travels, meetings and cruises through their own private websites, blogs, and accounts in Twitter and Facebook. In this presentation, as a coordinator of the 'Ocean Science Cafe', I will indicate how well it has worked as a good method for promoting mutual communication between non-professional citizens and oceanographers, and changed a scientist to a better citizen. Also, as an ocean science blogger, I will mention a good effect of the mutual communication with the public from my experience. It is concluded that the science communication by new media should not be one-way but really two-way to understand well what people wish to know and have difficulties to understand, and where they stop learning.

  8. LIDAR Investigation Of The 2004 Niigata Ken Chuetsu, Japan, Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayen, R.; Pack, R. T.; Sugimoto, S.; Tanaka, H.

    2005-12-01

    The 23 October 2004 Niigata Ken Chuetsu, Japan, Mw 6.6 earthquake was the most significant earthquake to affect Japan since the 1995 Kobe earthquake. Forty people were killed, almost 3,000 injured, and numerous landslides destroyed entire upland villages. Landslides and permanent ground deformation caused extensive damage to roads, rail lines and other lifelines, resulting in major economic disruption. The cities and towns most significantly affected by the earthquake were Nagaoka, Ojiya, and the mountainous rural areas of Yamakoshi village and Kawaguchi town. Our EERI team traveled with a tripod mounted LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) unit, a scanning-laser that creates ultra high-resolution 3-D digital terrain models of the earthquake damaged surfaces the ground, structures, and life-lines. This new technology allows for rapid and remote sensing of damaged terrain. Ground-based LIDAR has an accuracy range of 0.5-2.5 cm, and can illuminate targets up to 400m away from the sensor. During a single tripod-mounted LIDAR scan of 10 minutes, several million survey points are collected and processed into an ultra-high resolution terrain model of the damaged ground or structure. There are several benefits in acquiring these LIDAR data in the initial reconnaissance effort after the earthquake. First, we record the detailed failure morphologies of damaged ground and structures in order to make measurements that are either impractical or impossible by conventional survey means. The digital terrain models allow us to enlarge, enhance and rotate data in order to visualize damage in orientations and scales not previously possible. This ability to visualize damage allows us to better understand failure modes. Finally, LIDAR allows us to archive 3-D terrain models so that the engineering community can evaluate analytical and numerical models of deformation potential against detailed field measurements. Here, we discuss the findings of this 2004 Niigata Chuetsu Earthquake (M6.6) reconnaissance presented with LIDAR examples for damage-visualization.

  9. The Great East-Japan Earthquake and devastating tsunami. An update and lessons from the past great earthquakes in Japan since 1923

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan has a long history of fighting against great earthquakes that cause structural damage/collapses, fires and/or tsunami. On March 11, 2011 at 14:46 (Friday), the Great East-Japan Earthquake (magnitude 9.0) attacked the Tohoku region (northeastern Japan), which includes Sendai City. The earthquake generated a devastating tsunami, leading to unprecedented disasters (?18,500 victims) in coastal areas of Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures, despite the fact that people living in the Tohoku region are well trained for tsunami-evacuation procedures, with the mindset of ''Tsunami, ten-den-ko.'' This code means that each person should evacuate individually upon an earthquake. Sharing this rule, children and parents can escape separately from schools, houses or workplaces, without worrying about each other. The concept of ten-den-ko (individual evacuation) is helpful for people living in coastal areas of earthquake-prone zones around the world. It is also important to construct safe evacuation centers, because the March 11th tsunami killed people who had evacuated to evacuation sites. We summarize the current conditions of people living in the disaster-stricken areas, including the consequences of the Fukushima nuclear accident. We also describe the disaster responses as the publisher of the Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine (TJEM), located in Sendai, with online support from Tokyo. In 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake (magnitude 7.9) evoked a massivethquake (magnitude 7.9) evoked a massive fire that destroyed large areas of Tokyo (?105,000 victims), including the print company for TJEM, but the Wistar Institute printed three TJEM issues in 1923 in Philadelphia. Mutual aid relationships should be established between distant cities to survive future disasters. (author)

  10. Ultrafine particles in cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Morawska, Lidia; Birmili, Wolfram; Paasonen, Pauli; Hu, Min; Kulmala, Markku; Harrison, Roy M; Norford, Leslie; Britter, Rex

    2014-05-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs; diameter less than 100 nm) are ubiquitous in urban air, and an acknowledged risk to human health. Globally, the major source for urban outdoor UFP concentrations is motor traffic. Ongoing trends towards urbanisation and expansion of road traffic are anticipated to further increase population exposure to UFPs. Numerous experimental studies have characterised UFPs in individual cities, but an integrated evaluation of emissions and population exposure is still lacking. Our analysis suggests that the average exposure to outdoor UFPs in Asian cities is about four-times larger than that in European cities but impacts on human health are largely unknown. This article reviews some fundamental drivers of UFP emissions and dispersion, and highlights unresolved challenges, as well as recommendations to ensure sustainable urban development whilst minimising any possible adverse health impacts. PMID:24503484

  11. Why the USA dropped atomic bombs on Japanese cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Why did the USA use atomic bombs on Japanese cities? Because, by summer 1945, the earlier morality that said you should not kill non-combatants had been chipped away, then eroded, and ultimately destroyed by World War II. After Hitler's viciousness, after the Japanese rape of Nanjing, after the killings in Manila, after the savagery through Asia, after Dresden, after Hamburg, after Tokyo, Osaka, Kobe, Nagoya - over sixty Japanese cities had been bombed before Hiroshima, Hiroshima was inevitable, easy, comfortable, virtually automatic. The transformation was not the use of bomb, but the bombing of non-combatants - massively, intentionally. There was probably a desire to revenge, as well. In addition, there was an expectation that the bombs used on japan would also intimidate the Soviet Union but that was not crucial. Any nation that had the capacity would have used the bomb in righteousness and comfort, self-conceived dignity, amid popular applause from its electorate people

  12. A prospective earthquake forecast experiment for Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Sayoko; Nanjo, Kazuyoshi; Tsuruoka, Hiroshi; Hirata, Naoshi

    2013-04-01

    One major focus of the current Japanese earthquake prediction research program (2009-2013) is to move toward creating testable earthquake forecast models. For this purpose we started an experiment of forecasting earthquake activity in Japan under the framework of the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) through an international collaboration. We established the CSEP Testing Centre, an infrastructure to encourage researchers to develop testable models for Japan, and to conduct verifiable prospective tests of their model performance. On 1 November in 2009, we started the 1st earthquake forecast testing experiment for the Japan area. We use the unified JMA catalogue compiled by the Japan Meteorological Agency as authorized catalogue. The experiment consists of 12 categories, with 4 testing classes with different time spans (1 day, 3 months, 1 year, and 3 years) and 3 testing regions called All Japan, Mainland, and Kanto. A total of 91 models were submitted to CSEP-Japan, and are evaluated with the CSEP official suite of tests about forecast performance. In this presentation, we show the results of the experiment of the 3-month testing class for 5 rounds. HIST-ETAS7pa, MARFS and RI10K models corresponding to the All Japan, Mainland and Kanto regions showed the best score based on the total log-likelihood. It is also clarified that time dependency of model parameters is no effective factor to pass the CSEP consistency tests for the 3-month testing class in all regions. Especially, spatial distribution in the All Japan region was too difficult to pass consistency test due to multiple events at a bin. Number of target events for a round in the Mainland region tended to be smaller than model's expectation during all rounds, which resulted in rejections of consistency test because of overestimation. In the Kanto region, pass ratios of consistency tests in each model showed more than 80%, which was associated with good balanced forecasting of event number and spatial distribution. Due to the multiple rounds of the experiment, we are now understanding the stability of models, robustness of model selection and earthquake predictability in each region beyond stochastic fluctuations of seismicity. We plan to use the results for design of 3 dimensional earthquake forecasting model in Kanto region, which is supported by the special project for reducing vulnerability for urban mega earthquake disasters from Ministy of Education, Culture, Sports and Technology of Japan.

  13. Heavy metal pollution in Ancient Nara, Japan, during the eighth century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahata, Hodaka; Yamashita, Shusuke; Yamaoka, Kyoko; Okai, Takashi; Shimoda, Gen; Imai, Noboru

    2014-12-01

    We quantitatively investigated the eighth century heavy metal pollution in Heijo-kyo (Ancient Nara), the first large, international city of Japan. In this metropolis, mercury, copper, and lead levels in soil were increased by urban activity and by the construction of the Great Buddha statue, Nara Daibutsu. Mercury and copper pollution associated with the construction of the statue was particularly high in the immediate vicinity of the statue, but markedly lower in the wider city environment. We therefore reject the hypothesis that extensive mercury pollution associated with the construction of the Nara Daibutsu made it necessary to abandon Ancient Nara, even though severe lead pollution was detected at several sites. The isotopic composition of the lead indicated that it originated mainly from the Naganobori mine in Yamaguchi, which was a major source of the copper for the Nara Daibutsu.

  14. The City of Law

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, K.

    2013-01-01

    There is now a well-established ‘spatial turn in law’. However, it remains oriented towards notions of space rather than law. How, then, to capture both the spatiality of law and the legality of space? This article draws on Bruno Latour’s concept of the legal construction of the ‘social’ to explore the assemblage of the city of law. It shows how law functions as a particular form of association in urban life by tracing two key forms of urban legal association in London, the city of law. The f...

  15. Climate change and cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satterthwaite, David

    2006-10-15

    What is done, or not done, in cities in relation to climate change over the next 5-10 years will affect hundreds of millions of people, because their lives and livelihoods are at risk from global warming. What is done in cities will also have a major influence on whether the escalating risks for the whole planet will be reduced or eliminated. Climate change needs to be considered in all development plans and investments - local, regional, national and international. Urban growth must be made more climate-resilient and help reduce, rather than increase, greenhouse gas emissions. This will not be done by the market; it can only be done by governments.

  16. Prototyping a Smart City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Henrik; Brynskov, Martin

    In this paper, we argue that by approaching the so-called Smart City as a design challenge, and an interaction design perspective, it is possible to both uncover existing challenges in the interplay between people, technology and society, as well as prototype possible futures. We present a case in which we exposed data about the online communication between the citizens and the municipality on a highly visible media facade, while at the same time prototyped a tool that enabled citizens to report ‘bugs’ within the city.

  17. Middle term prospects for Japan's safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan has responded to IAEA requirements on reinforced safeguard regulations. The IAEA additional protocol entered in force in Japan on December 1999. Japan submitted a preliminary information report to IAEA on June 2000 after joint works with the Nuclear Material Control Center (NMCC) of Japan. The first annual report was submitted to IAEA on May 2001. Another activity for the additional protocol is complementary accesses. The total 36 accesses to facilities have been done from November 2000 to September 2001. Procedures of access to managements are under discussion. MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) has been constructing the Rokkasho Safeguards On-Site Laboratory from 1997, and the Rokkasho Safeguards Center from 2000. The Design Information Verification (DIV) is now ongoing. Much more personal resources will be needed for future inspections. Therefore, the budget for safeguards is increasing in contrast to the flat base budget for the total atomic energy. As for future activity, a MOX (Mixed Oxide Fuels) fuel processing plant is one of the issues for discussion. The construction of the MOX processing plant is supposed to begin on around 2004. The conclusion of additional protocol will be given by IAEA until end of 2002. Shift to integrated safeguards are under discussions by MEXT, NMCC and utilities of Japan parallel with IAEA. Key issues of discussion are cost saving for safeguards, development of personal resources for inspectolopment of personal resources for inspectors and the role of NMCC. (Y. Tanaka)

  18. Advanced USC technology in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Masafumi [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). High Temperature Materials Center

    2010-07-01

    The 600deg-C class Ultra Super-Critical(USC) steam condition technology was mainly developed through projects led by J-Power in the '80s and 90s'. In 2001, the project was successfully finished with newly developed 9-12% chromium steels. These materials were selected for the major parts of the USC power plants in Japan and almost half of the coal power plants have the USC steam condition today. However, aged plants, which were built in the '70s and early '80s will reach the point where they will need to be rebuilt or refurbished in the near future. The steam temperatures of the older plants are 538 deg-C or 566deg-C. We did a case study, retrofitting these plants with the USC and an advanced USC technology that takes a 700deg-C class steam temperature to increase thermal efficiency and to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. The study showed that the advanced USC Technology(A-USC) is suitable for the retrofitting of aged plants and can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by about 15%. The Japanese government launched the ''Cool Earth-Innovative Energy Technology Program'' in 2008 March to promote international cooperation and actively contribute to substantial global greenhouse gas emissions reductions. 21 technologies that will contribute to substantial reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions by efficiency improvement and low carbonization were selected. The A-USC that aims at 46% (net, HHV) thermal efficiency of coal power generation is included in the technologies. We started a large-scale development project of the A-USC technology in 2008 August. 700deg-C class boiler, turbine and valve technologies, which include high temperature material technology, will be developed. Some candidate materials for boilers are being tested. Turbine rotor and casing materials are being developed and tested, as well. Two years from the beginning of the project, we have obtained some useful test results regarding the candidate materials. (orig.)

  19. The great East Japan earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' More formally called the Tohoku-Chihou-Taiheiyo-Oki Earthquake of March 11, 2011, it was the ensuing tsunami that caused the most death and destruction to the north-east coastal region of Japan. It is also what caused the multiple meltdowns at Fukushima Dai-ichi. Reactor Unit 1, ironically, was scheduled to be permanently shut down for decommissioning just two weeks later. The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant has a tsunami protection barrier designed for the worst recorded tsunami in that area since 1896 - to a height of 5.7 m. The plant itself is on an elevated grade of about 10 m. The tsunami, reported to be 14-15 m, caused inundation of the entire site with at least four metres of seawater. The seawater flooded the turbine building and damaged electrical equipment including the emergency diesel generators, leaving the entire six-unit nuclear power plan without any source of AC power, known as the 'station blackout scenario'. There are numerous reports available on-line at various sites. The Japanese Government report is frank and forthcoming on the causes and the lessons learned, and the lAEA Mission report is in-depth and well presented, not only as a factual account of the events but as a unified source of the conclusions and lessons learned. Photos of the catastrophe are available at the TEPCO web site: http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/index-e.html. In this edition of the Bulletin there is a 'layman's' description of CANDU and BWR design in terms of the fundamental safety principles - Control, Cool and Contain as well as a description of how these principles were met, or not met at Fukushima Dai-ichi. Also, an excerpt from the IAEA Expert Mission is included. We 'technocrats' sometimes forget about the human aspects of a nuclear disaster. An essay by Dr. Michael Edwards is included entitled 'Psychology, Philosophy and Nuclear Science'. Other references to the events appear throughout this edition.(author)

  20. Need for Sustainability and Coexistence with Wildlife in a Compact City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukichika Kawata

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the underuse of wildlife and the increase in wildlife population due to decreased hunting have led to serious problems in both rural and urban areas. Traditional conservation methods are no longer applicable in such situations. The main purpose of this paper is, therefore, to explore ways to cope with increases in wildlife population and related issues, especially in urban areas. First, we present an overview of the current status of wildlife in urban areas, and examine why wildlife appears in cities. Then, after reviewing current expectations from compact cities through a comparison of Japan and western countries, we examine additional requirements for compact cities and depict possible future visions. Currently, the main objectives in establishing compact cities are sustainability and the prevention of population decline in local cities. We assert that when current cities are transformed into compact cities, consideration should be given to returning some space to wildlife whose habitats were altered when the cities were developed. We affirm that it is possible to ensure some space for wildlife. One possible use of reclaimed areas is as wildlife corridors, which should be distinguished from green space for residents. Former vegetation should be restored and continuous corridors secured, with recognition of the value of wildlife.

  1. Insights into software development in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Lorraine M.

    1992-01-01

    The interdependence of the U.S.-Japanese economies makes it imperative that we in the United States understand how business and technology developments take place in Japan. We can gain insight into these developments in software engineering by studying the context in which Japanese software is developed, the practices that are used, the problems encountered, the setting surrounding these problems, and the resolution of these problems. Context includes the technological and sociological characteristics of the software development environment, the software processes applied, personnel involved in the development process, and the corporate and social culture surrounding the development. Presented in this paper is a summary of results of a study that addresses these issues. Data for this study was collected during a three month visit to Japan where the author interviewed 20 software managers representing nine companies involved in developing software in Japan. These data are compared to similar data from the United States in which 12 managers from five companies were interviewed.

  2. Japan's Ambivalent Diplomacy on Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan often pictures itself as an environmental leader. While many examples of Japan's actions against climate change are in line with global climate change norms, others can be in opposition to them. This study, based on first hand interviews with Japanese policy makers and actors from the private and civil society sector, gives an informed perspective on the process through which Japan came to integrate and implement, at the domestic level, the international objective of climate change prevention, pointing out the discrepancies, tensions or synergies that emerged. As the current governance on climate change, and particularly after the Copenhagen conference, tends to reassert the importance of the national level against the global one, the Japanese case can serve as an example of tools and strategies that fully integrate the domestic level

  3. Magic Lantern Slides Collection from Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) has a collection of approximately 1,500 magic lantern slides in its Japan Collection, which it has digitized with the permission of the Japan Foundation. The magic lantern was the precursor to the modern slide projector, and was extremely popular in Europe and Asia in the 1800s, with people going from towns to villages doing public shows. The slides featured on the UHM website are those that were produced and distributed by KBS, a group that was the predecessor of the Japan Foundation. To view the collection, you can browse alphabetically by title, category (from alcohol to fan making to Western clothes), and by slides with recent comments made about them. Visitors to the website shouldn't leave the site without browsing under the "University" category. With few exceptions, all the buildings are Western in style, and reminiscent of many U.S. colleges with their columns, stone, and tendency to sprawl.

  4. Childbirth in aristocratic households of Heian Japan

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Anna, Andreeva.

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on childbirth in Japan's aristocratic households during the Heian period (794-1185). Drawing on various sources, including court diaries, visual sources, literary records, and Japan's first medical collection, with its assortment of gynaecological and obstetric prescriptions, as w [...] ell as Buddhist and other ritual texts, this short excursion into the cultural history of childbirth offers an insight into how childbirth was experienced and managed in Heian Japan. In particular, it addresses the variety of ideas, knowledge systems and professionals involved in framing and supporting the process of childbirth in elite households. In so doing, it casts light on the complex background of early Japanese medicine and healthcare for women.

  5. AMS {sup 14}C dating of wooden anchors and planks excavated from submerged wrecks located at Takashima in Imari Bay, Nagasaki prefecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Oda, Hirotaka; Niu, Etsuko; Ikeda, Akiko; Nakamura, Toshio [Nagoya Univ., Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Ogawa, Mitsuhiko [Ryukyus Univ., Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Course of Regional Cultural Studies, Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan); Matsuo, Akiko [Takashima-town Archeological Center, Takashima, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    According to folklore the fleet that was dispatched to Japan for the second Mongol invasion of 1281 encountered a fierce typhoon at Takashima. Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) ages of wooden anchors and planks excavated from the submerged site at Takashima were determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The {sup 14}C ages are 745{+-}20 BP for bamboo and 770{+-}20 BP for wood from the intact wooden anchor, and 840{+-}20 / 865{+-}20 BP for the planks, respectively. The calibrated bamboo age of 1268-1284 cal AD and the slightly older age of 1257-1279 cal AD for wood suggest that the wooden anchor was manufactured just before the invasion. The age range of planks (1191-1236 and 1163-1215 cal AD) is consistent with an idea that they are likely to be derived from contemporaneous ships. The high-precision AMS {sup 14}C dating confirms that the wooden anchors and planks are remains of wrecked Mongolian warships that were involved in the second Mongol invasion. (author)

  6. AMS 14C dating of wooden anchors and planks excavated from submerged wrecks located at Takashima in Imari Bay, Nagasaki prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to folklore the fleet that was dispatched to Japan for the second Mongol invasion of 1281 encountered a fierce typhoon at Takashima. Radiocarbon (14C) ages of wooden anchors and planks excavated from the submerged site at Takashima were determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The 14C ages are 745±20 BP for bamboo and 770±20 BP for wood from the intact wooden anchor, and 840±20 / 865±20 BP for the planks, respectively. The calibrated bamboo age of 1268-1284 cal AD and the slightly older age of 1257-1279 cal AD for wood suggest that the wooden anchor was manufactured just before the invasion. The age range of planks (1191-1236 and 1163-1215 cal AD) is consistent with an idea that they are likely to be derived from contemporaneous ships. The high-precision AMS 14C dating confirms that the wooden anchors and planks are remains of wrecked Mongolian warships that were involved in the second Mongol invasion. (author)

  7. Bug City: Bees [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography, fun…

  8. Olympic cities and communication

    OpenAIRE

    Moragas Spa?, Miquel

    2005-01-01

    Article published in Greek in the special issue "The Olympic Games: the mega sports and media event" of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens journal Communication Issues (2004, no.1), discussing the need for establishing a communication model for city-games relations.

  9. Making Cities Green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Neil B.; Engel, Jane

    1981-01-01

    Describes several examples of urban parks and the renewal of city open spaces. Community groups interested in getting funding from government or private sources must cope with budget restrictions by making effective, innovative use of available money. Government agencies with funds allocated for urban improvements are mentioned. (AM)

  10. Global / globalizing cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, B S

    1999-01-01

    Along with the rise in research on globalization, the concept of globalization has become a subject to a more critical scrutiny. While majority agree that it represents a serious challenge to the state-centrist assumptions of most previous social science, doubts about its newness, inevitability and epoch-making qualities are also being raised. Others argue that the globalization literature neglects issues of social regulation by the nation-state, while some critics view it as a discourse drawn upon to legitimize particular political and economic agendas. Debates focus on metropolitan manifestations and impacts. Moving from this background, the paper presents three sociospatial urban configurations that have emerged in the literature. Alongside attempts at identifying globalizing cities and transnational urban networks as new theoretical subjects, another significant vein in the literature focuses on the complex forces of globalization and the production of new urban spaces in these cities. In addition, economic conceptions of globalization is now being pushed beyond adding sociocultural or sociopolitical dimensions and argue instead for the need to theorize globalization as a discursive formation. The global city as a discursive category conjures up imaginary concepts of high modernity, megadevelopment, 21st century urbanity. However, it is noted that the way forward is to focus on the distinctive ways in which urban actors engage in specific processes of economic and social reflexivity. There exists an urgent task for theorizations of the global city, which weave together historical, economic, cultural, sociopolitical and discursive dimensions. PMID:12296126

  11. Scarcity Makes the City

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The first talk in the series, Scarcity Makes the City, features Vancouver-based economic geographer Geoff Mann. Looking at how modern political economy affects social relations and our experience of everyday life, Mann will discuss how contemporary capitalist dynamics shape Vancouver’s urban context, and the pasts, presents, and futures that weave it together.

  12. Bug City: Ants [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children (grades 1-6) learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic…

  13. Sinking coastal cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkens, Gilles; Bucx, Tom; Dam, Rien; De Lange, Ger; Lambert, John

    2014-05-01

    In many coastal and delta cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will sink below sea level. Land subsidence increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. In addition, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs. This effects roads and transportation networks, hydraulic infrastructure - such as river embankments, sluice gates, flood barriers and pumping stations -, sewage systems, buildings and foundations. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. Excessive groundwater extraction after rapid urbanization and population growth is the main cause of severe land subsidence. In addition, coastal cities are often faced with larger natural subsidence, as they are built on thick sequences of soft soil. Because of ongoing urbanization and population growth in delta areas, in particular in coastal megacities, there is, and will be, more economic development in subsidence-prone areas. The impacts of subsidence are further exacerbated by extreme weather events (short term) and rising sea levels (long term).Consequently, detrimental impacts will increase in the near future, making it necessary to address subsidence related problems now. Subsidence is an issue that involves many policy fields, complex technical aspects and governance embedment. There is a need for an integrated approach in order to manage subsidence and to develop appropriate strategies and measures that are effective and efficient on both the short and long term. Urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management and related spatial planning strategies are just examples of the options available. A major rethink is needed to deal with the 'hidden' but urgent threat of subsidence. As subsidence is spatially different and can be caused by multi processes, an assessment of subsidence in delta cities needs to answer questions such as: what are the main causes, how much is the current subsidence rate and what are future scenarios (and interaction with other major environmental issues), where are the vulnerable areas, what are the impacts and risks, how can adverse impacts can be mitigated or compensated for, and who is involved and responsible to act? In this study a quick-assessment of subsidence is performed on the following mega-cities: Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Dhaka, New Orleans and Bangkok. Results of these case studies will be presented and compared, and a (generic) approach how to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas is provided.

  14. Clean Cities National Partner Awards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-05-01

    U. S. DOE Clean Cities Program has awarded its National Partner awards for 2002, and the awards will be presented at the Clean Cities Conference in May 2002. This fact sheets describe the winners and their contributions.

  15. Bushehr as an Energic City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Sabatsani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bushehr city is one of the famous city in the south of Iran which is situated in the coastal part of Persian Gulf. This paper try to discuss one of the most important theme which threat the sustainability and comfortability of tomorrow’s life. Changing Bushehr into an Energic city is one of the effective ways to solve the cities problem. For this purpose, we try to answer these questions: what is called as an energic city?; What are its main characteristics?; What are the aims of changing a city into an energic city? And what should be done to obtain the aims? For these purposes we offer a model which responds to the sustainability of Bushehr. This model uses 3 levels of activity that each level should respond to 5 significant characteristics of an energic city. For this purpose we present some applied ways in each category to obtain those characteristics.

  16. City project and public space

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The book aims at nurturing theoretic reflection on the city and the territory and working out and applying methods and techniques for improving our physical and social landscapes. The main issue is developed around the projectual dimension, with the objective of visualising both the city and the territory from a particular viewpoint, which singles out the territorial dimension as the city’s space of communication and negotiation. Issues that characterise the dynamics of city development will be faced, such as the new, fresh relations between urban societies and physical space, the right to the city, urban equity, the project for the physical city as a means to reveal civitas, signs of new social cohesiveness, the sense of contemporary public space and the sustainability of urban development. Authors have been invited to explore topics that feature a pluralism of disciplinary contributions studying formal and informal practices on the project for the city and seeking conceptual and operative categories capab...

  17. Control of radiation sources in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report refers to the regulations for radioactive material in force in Japan, and to the organizations with responsibilities for regulating radiation sources. An outline of the law regulating the use of radiation sources and radioactive materials is provided, including its scope, types of radiation sources under control, exemptions and the system of notification, authorization and inspection. The experience of Japan with orphan sources is presented in three different cases, and the measures carried out to store the orphan sources in safe conditions. (author)

  18. On Chinese Trainees and Interns in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoyan Fan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There are millions of Chinese workers in Japan, most as trainees and interns hired in small or medium sized industries. While they work hard and contribute great to the economic development of Japan, there also exist some problems arising from the mechanism which have to be faced by both Japanese and Chinese governments. On analyzing the status of the trainees and interns, the author exposed some problems in the system, and presents some suggestions from the legal view for the future at last.

  19. LNG trade developments reflect Japan's energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the first LNG deliveries were 30 years ago from North Africa to Europe, the trade is now dominated by demand for LNG in the Far East. In 1994, 76 per cent of LNG deliveries worldwide were to the Far East compared with 22 per cent to Europe. Japan requires clean energy more than most other countries and gas is a prime fuel. The way the LNG trade will expand is with movement of LNG from Abu Dhabi and from Qatar to Japan dominating the new business. (author)

  20. Status of research reactor decommissioning in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 27 research reactors and critical facilities have been built or are in the construction or operating phase today throughout the Japan. Of these, more than seven have already been shut down. Three research reactors have already been decommissioned to different levels. Several research reactors operated today, will have reached 30 years of age and become likely candidates for decommissioning as well. This paper described the current of Japan research reactors and critical facilities which have been decommissioned and the experiences gained from these activities. 2 refs

  1. Experimental DML over digital repositories in Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Namiki, Takao; Naruse, Shunsuke

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the authors show an overview of Virtual Digital Mathematics Library in Japan (DML-JP), contents of which consist of metadata harvested from institutional repositories in Japan and digital repositories in the world. DML-JP is, in a sense, a subject specific repository which collaborate with various digital repositories. Beyond portal website, DML-JP provides subject-specific metadata through OAI-ORE. By the schema it is enabled that digital repositories can load the rich metadata which were added by mathematicians.

  2. Pawaa Appu! Women Only Unions in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BROADBENT, Kaye

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Women-only unions in Japan organise women workers in a variety of ways, including across enterprises and employment status boundaries. As their appearance is recent an analysis of their development is also a new area of research. The formation of autonomous women-only unions in Japan continues a tradition of women's activism which has challenged both management and the male domination of the union movement. This article argues that the formation of women-only unions is a positive development for women workers and the broader workers' movement.

  3. Fuel cells and the city of the future — a Japanese view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomi, Tomohide

    The development and practical application of fuel cells have been promoted aggressively in Japan, and the on-site phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) has been attained with the prospect for practical market enery in commercial buildings by the middle of the 1990s. Fuel cells have features of less environmental impact and high energy efficiency which meet the requirements of the utility system for the future city. In Japan, the recent concentration of social functions and population to the city have begun to cause many serious problems. To resolve these environmental and resource related problems and to move towards developing and constructing a new city, one answer offered is the concept of CAN (community amenity network). CAN is a sophisticated utility system which integrates fuel cells as well as a system for effective use of unused energy and recycling of waste disposal and water. For solving the housing shortage problem in the next century, the concept of skyscraper building cities is currently proposed. Fuel cell systems can also be applied to these cities as a major element of the integrated zone energy supply network facility.

  4. Smart city: fact and fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Santis, Roberta; Fasano, Alessandra; Mignolli, Nadia; Villa, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Transforming a city into a Smart City is a complex and multidimensional process which changes over time since all the involved stakeholders work to achieve more and better results. “To be smart” affects many aspects of a city including economics, government, people, living, mobility, environment, energy and services. This paper aims at critically analysing the main features related to smart cities such as terminological issues, the heterogeneous theoretical background and the methodo...

  5. City College Report to FIPSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartter, Vivien C.

    In each of 3 years, 20 City College of New York undergraduates from New York City public inner city school backgrounds read to and mentored individual second graders in a Harlem public school in a program supported by the Department of Education's Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE). Supporting academic experience aimed to…

  6. 67 FR 42057 - Gas Turbo-Compressor Systems From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-20

    ...Investigation No. 731-TA-748 (Review)] Gas Turbo-Compressor Systems From Japan AGENCY: International Trade...whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on gas turbo-compressor systems from Japan would be likely to lead to...

  7. 76 FR 8774 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ...731-TA-386 (Third Review)] Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission...the antidumping duty order on granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or...

  8. 76 FR 8773 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ...731-TA-1090 (Review)] Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION...antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  9. 'My city of ruins': A city to come

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Johann-Albrecht, Meylahn.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available 'My city of ruins' is the title of a song by Bruce Springsteen and will accompany a public theological reflection of imagining alternative cities. A city of ruins is either a city of ruins in the sense that it is a city in ruins. Alternatively it is a city of ruins in the sense that it is a city tha [...] t is built from ruins, like a phoenix rising from the ashes. The article will reflect on the second alternative namely the poiesis of a habitable, sustainable and political space (polis) in a time when all the meta-discourses of constructing and social engineering lie in ruins (have been deconstructed). The article will focus on Derrida's ideas of deconstruction and the hope and prayer of perhaps. Springsteen's song includes the prayer: 'come on, come on, rise up!' A city of ruins prayed into existence, rising up by the call (prayer) of those longing for a liveable, sustainable city to rise up from the ruins of too many empty promises of the various political agendas. Creating and imagining a city of prayer, which involves the prayers for justice incarnate in the broken language (ruined language) of revolutions, and transformations and political construction, thus calls a city of promise into existence.

  10. Present state of Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency held the annual report meeting on April 8, 1981. The main contents were the plan of research and development of nuclear ships hereafter, the present state of the repair works for the nuclear ship ''Mutsu'', the progress of the selection of the new home port and others. In the last year, the function of research was given to the Agency by the revision of the related law. The full-scale repair works for Mutsu were started in August, 1980, and various equipments and shields in the containment vessel and the upper shields of the containment vessel have been removed. Subsequently, new shields are being installed. According to the report by the committee of nuclear ship research and development, the development of Mutsu, which is valuable as the experimental ship, is continued. Moreover, it is proposed to do the research and development of an improved marine nuclear plant for the purposes of securing the economic efficiency, the proving of the reliability of nuclear merchant ships, and the establishment of safety. As the home port for Mutsu, the new port will be constructed on the open sea side in Aomori Prefecture, and as a candidate, Sekine beach in Mutsu City was named. Till the completion of the new home port, Mutsu will be berthed in Ominato home port. The conditions for entering and berthing in Ominato port will be decided later. (Kako, I.)

  11. Tracing airborne particles after Japan's nuclear plant explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Hisashi; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2011-11-01

    The powerful Tohoku earthquake and consequent tsunami that occurred off the east coast of Japan on 11 March 2011 devastated dozens of coastal cities and towns, causing the loss of more than 15,000 lives and leaving close to 4000 people still missing. Although nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, located on the Pacific coast, stopped their operation automatically upon the occurrence of the Mw 9.0 quake [Showstack, 2011], the cooling system for nuclear fuel broke down. From 12 to 16 March, vapor and hydrogen blasts destroyed the buildings that had contained the reactors, resulting in the release into the atmosphere of radioactive materials such as sulfur-35, iodine-131, cesium-134, and cesium-137, which collectively can cause harmful health effects such as tissue damage and increased risk of cancer (particularly in children), depending on dose. Most of those materials emitted from the power plant rained out onto the grounds within its vicinity and forced tens of thousands within a 20-kilometer radius to evacuate (residents to the northwest of the site within about 40 kilometers also were moved from their homes). Some of the radioactive materials were transported and then detected at such distant locations as North America and Europe, although the level of radiation dose was sufficiently low not to affect human health in any significant manner.

  12. Preserving city color plan, surveying Iranian submontane cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preserving city color plan, surveying Iranian submontane cities

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available No Considering color pallet of the buildings of every city, arouse a debate related to identity and aesthetics of urban environment. This debate is succeeded by researches about the color of cities, from limited hues of traditional city to numerous colors of modern city. The French Lenclos was the first one who after dedicating many years to the color subject, innovated a method of surveying color of cities; which is used by anyone who is researching in this field. This article after mentioning Lenclos’ method of surveying color plan of cities, represents author’s case study in color pallet of Fuman. Author’s method in this case study is a combination of digital photography and photo shop software along with Lenclos’ method. Results (shown in a bar chart confirm that although traditional color pallet of the city is still dominant, but it has some differences with citizens’ opinion achieved by interviews and questionnaires.

  13. Contribution of soil sciences for recovering from damages by the Great East Japan Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This symposium was held in September 2013, under the joint hosting of Science Council of Japan, Agricultural Academy of Japan, and Japanese Society of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, as one of the programs of the Nagoya convention of Japanese Society of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition. The theme was the contribution of soil science to the restoration from the Great East Japan Earthquake and the issues involved in this. As the restoration from the tsunami, the following two topics were presented: 'Situation of Miyagi Prefecture and challenge of soil science', and 'Technological measures for the resumption of farming in tsunami-hit areas in Soma City, Fukushima Prefecture.' As the restoration from the radiation damage caused by Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident, the following four topics were presented: 'Cooperation between villagers and scholars at Iitate Village; efforts for survey and decontamination with the hands of villagers,' 'Cesium fixation related to on-site soil,' 'Concentration and separation of cesium,' and 'Volume reduction of contaminated soil.' This paper summarizes these six topics of lectures, keynote comments by other specialists and relevant persons, and the atmosphere of the convention on the day. (A.O)

  14. Analysis of tooth decay data in Japan using asymmetric statistical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomizawa S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kouji Yamamoto,1 Sadao Tomizawa21Department of Medical Innovation, Osaka University Hospital, Osaka, 2Department of Information Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Noda City, Chiba, JapanBackground: The aim of the present paper was to develop two new asymmetry probability models to analyze data for tooth decay from 363 women and 349 men aged 18–39 years who visited a dental clinic in Sapporo City, Japan, from 2001 to 2005.Methods: We analyzed the probability relationship between grade of upper and lower tooth decay for men and women using the two new models, and tested goodness-of-fit for the models.Results: The probability that a woman's (man's grade of lower tooth decay is i (i = 1,2 and her (his grade of upper tooth decay is j(>i, (j = 2,3 is estimated to be at most 13.52 (10.23 times higher than the probability that the woman's (man's grade of upper tooth decay is i and grade of lower tooth decay is j.Conclusion: From the data on tooth decay, decay of the upper teeth is worse than of the lower teeth in women and men, and the tendency becomes stronger as the numbers of decayed upper and lower teeth increase.Keywords: distance-proportional symmetry, asymmetry, square contingency table, teeth

  15. The Relationship between Entrepreneurship and Unemployment in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Stel, A.J. van; Thurik, A.R.; Verheul, I.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between entrepreneurship (as measured by fluctuations in the business ownership rate) and unemployment in Japan for the period between 1972 and 2002. We find that, although Japan’s unemployment rate has been influenced by specific exogenous shocks, the effects of entrepreneurship on unemployment are not different when compared to other OECD countries. In the past, small firms in Japan benefited from the protective environment of the keiretsu structure. Thi...

  16. Capacity Limitations of Medical Services Provided by Pediatricians in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Kohyama

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of pediatricians has been identified as one of the largest social problems in Japan. This study aimed to compare the assumed ideal nighttime working conditions of pediatric hospitalists in Japan with the actual current situation. By using available data on the age-related numbers of pediatricians in Japan, we described the ideal working conditions for pediatric hospitalists in Japan. The ideal situation was then compared with the existing actual working ...

  17. Bank recapitalization in the U.S. - lessons from Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Heather; Takahashi, Yuki

    2011-01-01

    This study empirically investigates the effectiveness of the Capital Purchase Program (CPP), the centerpiece of the United States 700 billion dollar policy response to the global financial crisis of 2008. We frame our analysis of the United States policy response against the backdrop of Japan’s banking crisis and policy response in the late 1990s. As one of the only advanced economies with a large global presence in international finance, Japan’s banking crisis of 1997 and the effectivene...

  18. Images of Japan and its people in Australian media

    OpenAIRE

    Windsor, Adam

    2012-01-01

    In the popular Australian imagination, Japan is often considered a mysterious, distant land beyond our ability to easily comprehend. Despite remaining a popular tourist destination for Australians (until 2011’s earthquake & tsunami disaster), the ‘far East’ image of Japan prevents Australians from meaningfully engaging with Japan and its culture. This paper examines the construction of the ‘far East’ image of Japan in Australian media since the beginnings of Australian contact with ...

  19. Living in Japan. Intercultural Exchange Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkinson, Annie

    The guide provides a brief introduction to the culture and language of Japan, and is designed for visitors, students, and business travelers. It offers practical information on various aspects of daily living, including: money; banks; food; restaurants; hotels; tipping; postal and telecommunications services; transportation; shopping; health and…

  20. Deepening Democracy in Japan: Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Makoto

    1993-01-01

    Adult education can play a role in alleviating sex, social, and racial discrimination in Japanese society by preparing citizens for participation and paying attention to the needs of special groups: women, Baraku people, dropouts, people with disabilities, the Ainu (indigenous Caucasians), Koreans living in Japan, and refugees. (SK)