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Sample records for n-6 fatty acids

  1. DIETARY N-6 POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACID DEPRIVATION INCREASES DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID METABOLISM IN RAT BRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Igarashi, Miki; Kim, Hyung-wook; Chang, Lisa; Ma, Kaizong; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2012-01-01

    Dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) deprivation in rodents reduces brain arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) concentration and 20:4n-6-preferring cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2-IVA) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression, while increasing brain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) concentration and DHA-selective Ca2+-independent iPLA2-VIA expression. We hypothesized that these changes are accompanied by upregulated brain DHA metabolic rates. Using a fatty acid model, brain DHA concentration...

  2. Docosahexaenoic acid and n-6 docosapentaenoic acid supplementation alter rat skeletal muscle fatty acid composition

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    Lim Sun-Young

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA and n-6 docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6, DPAn-6 are highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA, ? 20 carbons, ? 3 double bonds that differ by a single carbon-carbon double bond at the ?19 position. Membrane 22:6n-3 may support skeletal muscle function through optimal ion pump activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum and electron transport in the mitochondria. Typically n-3 fatty acid deficient feeding trials utilize linoleic acid (18:2n-6, LA as a comparison group, possibly introducing a lower level of HUFA in addition to n-3 fatty acid deficiency. The use of 22:5n-6 as a dietary control is ideal for determining specific requirements for 22:6n-3 in various physiological processes. The incorporation of dietary 22:5n-6 into rat skeletal muscles has not been demonstrated previously. A one generation, artificial rearing model was utilized to supply 22:6n-3 and/or 22:5n-6 to rats from d2 after birth to adulthood. An n-3 fatty acid deficient, artificial milk with 18:2n-6 was supplemented with 22:6n-3 and/or 22:5n-6 resulting in four artificially reared (AR dietary groups; AR-LA, AR-DHA, AR-DPAn-6, AR-DHA+DPAn-6. A dam reared group (DAM was included as an additional control. Animals were sacrificed at 15 wks and soleus, white gastrocnemius and red gastrocnemius muscles were collected for fatty acid analyses. Results In all muscles of the DAM group, the concentration of 22:5n-6 was significantly lower than 22:6n-3 concentrations. While 22:5n-6 was elevated in the AR-LA group and the AR-DPAn-6 group, 20:4n-6 tended to be higher in the AR-LA muscles and not in the AR-DPAn-6 muscles. The AR-DHA+DPAn-6 had a slight, but non-significant increase in 22:5n-6 content. In the red gastrocnemius of the AR-DPAn-6 group, 22:5n-6 levels (8.1 ± 2.8 wt. % did not reciprocally replace the 22:6n-3 levels observed in AR-DHA reared rats (12.2 ± 2.3 wt. % suggesting a specific preference/requirement for 22:6n-3 in red gastrocnemius. Conclusion Dietary 22:5n-6 is incorporated into skeletal muscles and appears to largely compete with 22:6n-3 for incorporation into lipids. In contrast, 18:2n-6 feeding tends to result in elevations of 20:4n-6 and restrained increases of 22:5n-6. As such, 22:5n-6 dietary comparison groups may be useful in elucidating specific requirements for 22:6n-3 to support optimal health and disease prevention.

  3. Searching for health beneficial n-3 and n-6 fatty acids in plant seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhnt, Katrin; Degen, Christian; Jaudszus, Anke; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Various plant seeds have received little attention in fatty acid research. Seeds from 30 species mainly of Boraginaceae and Primulaceae were analysed in order to identify potential new sources of the n-3 PUFA ?-linolenic acid (ALA) and stearidonic acid (SDA) and of the n-6 PUFA ?-linolenic acid (GLA). The fatty acid distribution differed enormously between genera of the same family. Echium species (Boraginaceae) contained the highest amount of total n-3 PUFA (47.1%), predominantly ALA (36.6...

  4. Plasma and erythrocyte fatty acids reflect intakes of saturated and n-6 PUFA within a similar time frame.

    OpenAIRE

    Hodson, L.; Eyles, Hc; Mclachlan, Kj; Bell, Ml; Green, Tj; Skeaff, Cm

    2014-01-01

    Erythrocytes, compared with plasma, are considered more robust markers of n-3 (?-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake, because dietary-induced change in fatty acid (FA) composition takes longer to complete. The extent to which this applies to intakes of saturated fatty acid (SFA) or n-6 PUFA is unclear. We compared the pattern of change over time in the fatty acid composition of plasma, erythrocyte, buccal cell, and adipose tissue lipids when changing between diets high in SFA or n-6 ...

  5. MOLECULAR SWITCH THAT CONTROLS THE FLUX OF LINOLEIC ACID INTO N-6 OR N-3 POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS IN MICROORGANISMS

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    Mingxuan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA of the n-6 and n-3 series play important roles in nutrition. Microorganisms are important sources of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids; however, most produce either n-6 or n-3 fatty acids as the major PUFAs and very few produce both. This differential production suggests that PUFAs metabolic pathway is strictly controlled in microorganisms. The major pathway of n-6/n-3 faty acids biosynthesis in lower eukaryotes is composed of ?12 Desaturase (Des, ?3 Des (?15, ?17, ?6 Des, ?6 Elongase (Elo, ?5 Des, ?5 Elo and ?4 Des, among which ?6 Des and ?15 (?3 Des, located at the branch point of PUFAs metabolic pathways, are key regulators of the flux of linoleic acid (18:2 n-6 into either n-6 or n-3 fatty acid metabolic pathways. These latter two enzymes work together as a molecular switch that control the production of n-6/n-3 fatty acids. However the mechanism of the molecular switch is, so far, not clear. This review summarizes the recent advancement of the molecular base of the differentail production of n-6 or n-3 PUFAs in microorganisms.

  6. cAMP-depending signaling regulates the adipogenic effect of N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone MØller

    2008-01-01

    The effect of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6 PUFAs) on adipogenesis and obesity is controversial as fundamentally opposing results both in vivo and in vitro have been reported. Using in vitro cell culture models we show that the adipogenic action of the n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid was dependent on the intracellular levels of cAMP. In conditions with baseline intracellular levels of cAMP, n-6 PUFAs acted pro-adipogenic, whereas n-6 PUFAs acted anti-adipogenic when the intracellular levels of cAMP were elevated. The anti-adipogenic action of n-6 PUFAs was dependent on a PKA-mediated induction of cyclooxygenase (COX) expression and activity. In vivo the intracellular levels of cAMP are modulated in response to dietary intake of different classes of macronutrients. Accordingly, we show that n-6 PUFAs were pro-adipogenic when combined with a high carbohydrate diet, but non-adipogenic when combined with a high protein diet in mice. The high protein diet increased the glucagon/insulin ratio, leading to elevated cAMP-dependent signaling and induction of COX-mediated prostaglandin synthesis. Mice fed the high protein diet had a markedly lower feed efficiency than mice fed the high carbohydrate diet. Yet, oxygen consumption and apparent heat production were similar. Mice on a high protein diet had increased hepatic expression of PGC-1a and genes involved in energy demanding processes like urea synthesis and gluconeogenesis. We conclude that cAMP signaling is pivotal in regulating the adipogenic effect of n-6 PUFAs, and that diet-induced differences in cAMP levels can explain the ability of n-6 PUFAs to either enhance or counteract adipogenesis and obesity.

  7. Effects of dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids levels on egg and larval quality of Eurasian perch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrotte, E.; Overton, Julia Lynne

    2008-01-01

    Three groups of 40 perch breeders were reared in order to study the effects of 3 different levels of dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids on egg quality. Two experimental diets, R1 and R2 (n-3/n-6 = 0.13 and 35.54, respectively), were compared to one commercial food, R3 (n-3/n-6 = 3.48.). Spawning and fertilization rates were high for diets R I and R3, which displayed a n-3/n-6 ratio of 0.77 and 2.34 in the eggs, respectively, by comparison with R2 (n-3/n-6 = 4.87), which produced low reproductive performances. We can conclude that dietary n-3 and n-6 FA levels influence egg and larval quality of Eurasian perch.

  8. Searching for health beneficial n-3 and n-6 fatty acids in plant seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnt, Katrin; Degen, Christian; Jaudszus, Anke; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2012-02-01

    Various plant seeds have received little attention in fatty acid research. Seeds from 30 species mainly of Boraginaceae and Primulaceae were analysed in order to identify potential new sources of the n-3 PUFA ?-linolenic acid (ALA) and stearidonic acid (SDA) and of the n-6 PUFA ?-linolenic acid (GLA). The fatty acid distribution differed enormously between genera of the same family. Echium species (Boraginaceae) contained the highest amount of total n-3 PUFA (47.1%), predominantly ALA (36.6%) and SDA (10.5%) combined with high GLA (10.2%). Further species of Boraginaceae rich in both SDA and GLA were Omphalodes linifolia (8.4, 17.2%, resp.), Cerinthe minor (7.5, 9.9%, resp.) and Buglossoides purpureocaerulea (6.1, 16.6%, resp.). Alkanna species belonging to Boraginaceae had comparable amounts of ALA (37.3%) and GLA (11.4%) like Echium but lower SDA contents (3.7%). Different genera of Primulaceae (Dodecatheon and Primula) had varying ALA (14.8, 28.8%, resp.) and GLA portions (4.1, 1.5%, resp.), but similar amounts of SDA (4.9, 4.5%, resp.). Cannabis sativa cultivars (Cannabaceae) were rich in linoleic acid (57.1%), but poor in SDA and GLA (0.8, 2.7%, resp.). In conclusion, several of the presented plant seeds contain considerable amounts of n-3 PUFA and GLA, which could be relevant for nutritional purposes due to their biological function as precursors for eicosanoid synthesis. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS: N-3 PUFA are important for human health and nutrition. Unfortunately, due to the increasing world population, overfishing of the seas and generally low amounts of n-3 PUFA in major oil crops, there is a demand for new sources of n-3 PUFA. One approach involves searching for potential vegetable sources of n-3 PUFA; especially those rich in ALA and SDA. The conversion of ALA to SDA in humans is dependent on the rate-limiting ?6-desaturation. Plant-derived SDA is therefore a promising precursor regarding the endogenous synthesis of n-3 long-chain PUFA in humans. The present study shows that, in addition to seed oil of Echium, other species of Boraginaceae (Cerinthe, Omphalodes, Lithospermum, Buglossoides) and Primulaceae (Dodecatheon, Primula), generally high in n-3 PUFA (30-50%), contain considerable amounts of SDA (5-10%). Therefore, these seed oils could be important for nutrition. PMID:22745569

  9. Effect of Different Dietary n-6 to n-3 Fatty Acid Ratios on the Performance and Fatty Acid Composition in Muscles of Broiler Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, G P; Ghosh, T K; Patra, A K

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the different dietary ratios of n-6 to n-3 (n-6/n-3) fatty acid (FA) on performance and n-6/n-3 FA in muscles of broiler chickens. A total of 300 one-day-old Cobb chicks were randomly assigned to 3 treatments of 10 replicates in each (10 birds/replicate). Birds were fed on a corn-soybean meal-based diet containing 1% oil during starter (day 1 to 21) and 2% oil during finisher (day 22 to 39) phases, respectively. Treatments of high, medium and low dietary n-6/n-3 FA were formulated by replacing rice bran oil with linseed oil to achieve n-6/n-3 FA close to >20:1, 10:1 and 5:1, respectively. Average daily gain, average daily feed intake, and feed conversion ratio were similar (p>0.05) among the treatments. Serum glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides concentrations were not affected (p>0.05) by dietary treatments. In breast, concentration of C18:3n-3 was significantly greater (p = 0.001) for medium and low vs high n-6/n-3 FA, while concentrations of C20:5n-3, C22:6n-3, total n-3 FA, and n-6/n-3 FA were significantly higher for low vs medium, and medium vs high dietary n-6/n-3 FA. In contrast, concentrations of C18:2 and mono-unsaturated FA (MUFA) were lower for low vs high dietary n-6/n-3 FA. In thigh muscles, concentrations of C20:5n-3 were higher (p<0.05) for medium and low vs high dietary n-6/n-3 FA, and concentrations of C18:3n-3, C22:6, and n-3 FA were greater (p<0.05) for medium vs high, low vs medium dietary n-6/n-3 FA. However, concentrations of C18:1, MUFA, n-6/n-3 were lower (p<0.05) for low and medium vs high dietary n-6/n-3 FA. In conclusion, lowering the dietary n-6/n-3 FA did not affect the performance of chickens, but enhanced beneficial long-chain n-3 FA and decreased n-6/n-3 FA in chicken breast and thigh, which could be advantageous for obtaining healthy chicken products. PMID:25358321

  10. Quantitation of alpha-linolenic acid elongation to eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid as affected by the ratio of n6/n3 fatty acids

    OpenAIRE

    Somoza Veronika; Andersen Gaby; Harnack Kerstin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Conversion of linoleic acid (LA) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) to their higher chain homologues in humans depends on the ratio of ingested n6 and n3 fatty acids. Design and methods In order to determine the most effective ratio with regard to the conversion of ALA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), human hepatoma cells were incubated with varying ratios of [13C] labeled linoleic acid ([13C]LA)- and alpha-linolenic acid ([13C]ALA)-methylesters. ...

  11. Associations of the Ratios of n-3 to n-6 Dietary Fatty Acids With Longitudinal Changes in Depressive Symptoms Among US Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydoun, May A; Fanelli Kuczmarski, Marie T; Beydoun, Hind A; Rostant, Ola S; Evans, Michele K; Zonderman, Alan B

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, we examined longitudinal changes in self-reported depressive symptoms (and related domains) in relation to baseline intakes of n-3 fatty acids (absolute and relative to n-6 fatty acids). Sex-specific associations were evaluated in a prospective cohort of adults (n = 2,053) from Baltimore, Maryland, who were 30-64 years of age at baseline and were followed for a mean of 4.65 (standard deviation, 0.93) years (2004-2013). Using mean intakes of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids reported on two 24-hour dietary recalls, we estimated the ratios of n-3 to n-6 fatty acids for both highly unsaturated fatty acids (?20 carbon atoms) (HUFAs) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (?18 carbon atoms) (PUFAs). Outcomes included total and domain-specific scores on the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale. Based on mixed-effects regression models, among women, both higher n-3 HUFA:n-6 PUFA and n-3 PUFA:n-6 PUFA ratios were associated with a slower rate of increase in total Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scores over time. Higher n-3 HUFA:n-6 HUFA ratios were associated with slower increases in somatic complaints in men, whereas among women, higher n-3 HUFA:n-6 PUFA and n-3 PUFA:n-6 PUFA ratios were both linked to putative longitudinal improvement in positive affect over time. Among US adults, n-3:n-6 dietary fatty acid ratio was associated with longitudinal changes in depressive symptoms, with a higher ratio linked to a slower increase in depressive symptoms over time, particularly among women. PMID:25855645

  12. Seasonal Variations of n-6: n-3 Ratios and Fatty Acid Compositions in Foot and Tissue of Chiton lamyi in a High Primary Productivity Area

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    Nooshin Sajjadi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Fatty acid content and composition in mollusks is a function of their feeding diversity. Chabahar bay located in the northern part of Oman sea in Indian ocean provides high rates of primary productivity and a diverse food source for mollusks in this area. Identification of fatty acid compositions of Chiton lamyi and study their seasonal changes in the intertidal zone of Chabahar bay. Study the meat quality by n-6: n-3 ratios calculation throughout the year. Approach: Chiton lamyi species analyzed seasonally for its fatty acid compositions in foot and internal tissue separately by GC/MS chromatography. Temperature and nutrients measured monthly for evaluating their effects on investigated seasonal variations of fatty acids. Pearson analysis showed effects of measured environmental factors on studied fatty acids composition. n-6: n-3 ratio calculated seasonally in order to study meat quality. Results: Thirteen fatty acids identified in foot and internal tissue of Chiton lamyi. The major Saturated Fatty Acids (SFAs were myristic, palmitic and stearic acids. The major Mono-Unsaturated Fatty Acids (MUFAs were palmitoleic, oleic and 11-eicosenoic acids and Poly-Unsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs were linoleic, eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acids. Palmitic acid was the most abundant in this species. Fatty acid contents of foot and internal tissue of Chiton lamyi were similar but their seasonal variations were different. Pearson analysis showed correlation among palmitic and oleic acids with silicate; oleic acid with phosphate; Linoleic and arachidonic acids with nitrate in Chiton lamyi internal tissues, but no correlation observed in foot. Although temperature showed correlation with heptadecanoic and methyl-heptadecanoic acids in Chiton lamyi foot, no correlation found in internal tissues. Also, n-6: n-3 ratio calculations showed domination of n-3 fatty acid over n-6 only in spring. Conclusion: Fatty acid variations were not same at different organs and environmental factors could have opposite effects on them in this species. Also, n-6: n-3 ratio showed the lack of food loads throughout the year except in spring for this species. These findings can lead the best exploitation periods for such marine mollusks.

  13. Quantitation of alpha-linolenic acid elongation to eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid as affected by the ratio of n6/n3 fatty acids

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    Somoza Veronika

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conversion of linoleic acid (LA and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA to their higher chain homologues in humans depends on the ratio of ingested n6 and n3 fatty acids. Design and methods In order to determine the most effective ratio with regard to the conversion of ALA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, human hepatoma cells were incubated with varying ratios of [13C] labeled linoleic acid ([13C]LA- and alpha-linolenic acid ([13C]ALA-methylesters. Regulative cellular signal transduction pathways involved were studied by determinations of transcript levels of the genes encoding delta-5 desaturase (D5D and delta-6 desaturase (D6D, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR? and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1 were also examined. Results Maximum conversion was observed in cells incubated with the mixture of [13C]LA/[13C]ALA at a ratio of 1:1, where 0.7% and 17% of the recovered [13C]ALA was converted to DHA and EPA, respectively. Furthermore, differential regulation of enzymes involved in the conversion at the transcript level, dependent on the ratio of administered n6 to n3 fatty acids in human hepatocytes was demonstrated. Conclusion Formation of EPA and DHA was highest at an administered LA/ALA ratio of 1:1, although gene expression of PPAR?, SREBP-1c and D5D involved in ALA elongation were higher in the presence of ALA solely. Also, our findings suggest that a diet-induced enhancement of the cell membrane content of highly unsaturated fatty acids is only possible up to a certain level.

  14. Survey of n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish and fish products

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    Strobel Claudia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The imbalance of the n-3/n-6 ratio in the Western diet is characterised by a low intake of n-3 long-chain (LC PUFA and a concurrent high intake of n-6 PUFA. Fish, in particular marine fish, is a unique source of n-3 LC PUFA. However, FA composition of consumed fish changed, due to the increasing usage of n-6 PUFA-rich vegetable oils in aquaculture feed and in fish processing (frying which both lead to a further shift in n-6 PUFA to the detriment of n-3 LC PUFA. The aim of this study was to determine the ratio of n-3/n-6 including the contents of EPA and DHA in fish fillets and fish products from the German market (n=123. Furthermore, the study focussed on the FA content in farmed salmon compared to wild salmon as well as in processed Alaska pollock fillet, e.g., fish fingers. Results Total fat and FA content in fish products varied considerably depending on fish species, feed management, and food processing. Mackerel, herring and trout fillets characteristically contained adequate dietary amounts of absolute EPA and DHA, due to their high fat contents. However, despite a lower fat content, tuna, pollock, and Alaska pollock can contribute considerable amounts of EPA and DHA to the human supply. Farmed salmon are an appropriate source of EPA and DHA owing to their higher fat content compared to wild salmon (12.3 vs. 2.1 wt %, however with elevated SFA, n-9 and n-6 FA contents representing the use of vegetable oils and oilseeds in aquaculture feed. The n-3/n-6 ratio was deteriorated (2.9 vs. 12.4 but still acceptable. Compared to pure fish fillets, breaded and pre-fried Alaska pollock fillet contained extraordinarily high fat and n-6 PUFA levels. Conclusions Since fish species vary with respect to their n-3 LC PUFA contents, eating a variety of fish is advisable. High n-6 PUFA containing pre-fried fish support the imbalance of n-3/n-6 ratio in the Western diet. Thus, consumption of pure fish fillets is to be favoured. The lower n-3 PUFA portion in farmed fish can be offset by the higher fat content, however, with an unfavourable FA distribution compared to wild fellows.

  15. Effects of dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids on clinical outcome in a porcine model on postoperative infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langerhuus, Sine Nygaard; TØnnesen, Else Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the effects of dietary n-3 and n-6 long-chain PUFA (LC-PUFA) on clinical outcome in a porcine model on early aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection (AVPGI). A total of eighty-four pigs were randomised to a 35 d dietary treatment with 10 % (w/w) fish oil (rich in n-3 LC-PUFA), sunflower oil (rich in n-6 LC-PUFA) or animal fat. After 3 weeks of dietary treatment, the pigs had an aortic vascular prosthetic graft inserted, and it was inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus (106 colony-forming units). Changes in selected plasma and erythrocyte n-3 and n-6 LC-PUFA concentrations and in plasma PGE2 metabolite concentration were determined in the 3-week preoperative period. Clinical signs of infection, i.e. rectal temperature, hindquarter function, general appearance and feed intake, were monitored daily in the 14 d post-operative period, and, finally, daily body-weight gain was determined in both periods. The preoperative changes in plasma and erythrocyte n-3 and n-6 LC-PUFA concentrations reflected the fatty acid compositions of the dietary treatments given, and plasma PGE2 metabolite concentration decreased in the fish oil treatment (P < 0·001). In the post-operative period, feed intake (P = 0·004) and body-weight gain (P = 0·038) were higher in the fish oil treatment compared with the sunflower oil treatment. The dietary treatments did not affect the number of days pigs were showing fever, weakness in the hindquarters or impaired general appearance. In conclusion, preoperative treatment with dietary fish oil compared with sunflower oil improved clinical outcome in pigs with AVPGI by improving feed intake and body-weight gain post-operatively.

  16. n-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Enhance the Activities of Ceftazidime and Amikacin in Experimental Sepsis Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelos J. Giamarellos-Bourboulis; Mouktaroudi, Maria; Adamis, Theodoros; Koussoulas, Vassilios; Baziaka, Fotini; Perrea, Despina; Karayannacos, Panayotis E.; Giamarellou, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Recent in vitro and ex vivo studies disclosed an enhancement of the activity of antimicrobials on multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa by n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAS); therefore their effect was evaluated in experimental sepsis in 60 rabbits. Solutions of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and arachidonic acid (AA) were administered intravenously with ceftazidime and amikacin in rabbits with sepsis caused by one multidrug-resistant isolate. Therapy was started after bacterial challen...

  17. Effect of heat treatment on the n-3/n-6 ratio and content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneedorferová, Ivana; Tom?ala, Aleš; Valterová, Irena

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different heat treatments (pan-frying, oven-baking, and grilling) on the contents of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in fish tissue. Four fish species were examined: pike, carp, cod, and herring. High performance liquid chromatography, coupled with electrospray ionization and mass spectrometric detection (HPLC/ESI/MS), was employed for determination of intact lipid molecules containing n-3 and n-6 PUFAs. Although mostly non-polar lipids (triacylglycerols, TGs) were present in the fish tissue, the PUFAs were present preferentially in the phospholipid fraction. Omnivorous fish species (carp, herring) contained more TGs than did predatory ones (pike, cod). Higher amounts of PUFAs were detected in the marine species than in the freshwater ones. The impact of heat treatments on the lipid composition in the fish tissue seems to be species-specific, as indicated by multivariate data analysis. Herring tissue is most heat-stable, and the mildest heat treatment for PUFA preservation was oven-baking. PMID:25624225

  18. Heterologous expression of C. elegans fat-1 decreases the n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio and inhibits adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? Expression of C. elegans fat-1 reduces the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio in 3T3-L1 cells. ? fat-1 inhibits the proliferation and differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. ? fat-1 reduces lipid deposition in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ? The lower n-6/n-3 ratio induces apoptosis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. -- Abstract: In general, a diet enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) inhibits the development of obesity and decreases adipose tissue. The specific impacts of n-3 and n-6 PUFAs on adipogenesis, however, have not been definitively determined. Traditional in vivo and in vitro supplementation studies have yielded inconsistent or even contradictory results, which likely reflect insufficiently controlled experimental systems. Caenorhabditiselegans fat-1 gene encodes an n-3 fatty acid desaturase, and its heterologous expression represents an effective method both for altering the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio and for evaluating the biological effects of n-3 and n-6 PUFAs. We sought to determine whether a reduced n-6/n-3 ratio could influence adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Lentivirus-mediated introduction of the fat-1 gene into 3T3-L1 preadipocytes significantly reduced the n-6/n-3 ratio and inhibited preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. In mature adipocytes, fat-1 expression reduced lipid deposition, as measured by Oil Red O staining, and induced apoptosis. Our results indicate that a reduced n-6/n-3 ratio inhibits adipogenesis through several mechanisms and that n-3 PUFAs more effectively inhibit adipogenesis (but not lipogenesis) than do n-6 PUFAs.

  19. Heterologous expression of C. elegans fat-1 decreases the n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio and inhibits adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells

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    An, Lei, E-mail: anleim@yahoo.com.cn [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Pang, Yun-Wei, E-mail: yunweipang@126.com [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Gao, Hong-Mei, E-mail: Gaohongmei_123@yahoo.cn [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Research Unit for Animal Life Sciences, Animal Resource Science Center, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Ibaraki-Iwama 319-0206 (Japan); Tao, Li, E-mail: Eunice8023@yahoo.cn [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); College of Animal Science and Technology, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun, Jilin 130118 (China); Miao, Kai, E-mail: miaokai7@163.com [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Wu, Zhong-Hong, E-mail: wuzhh@cau.edu.cn [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); and others

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of C. elegans fat-1 reduces the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio in 3T3-L1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer fat-1 inhibits the proliferation and differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer fat-1 reduces lipid deposition in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lower n-6/n-3 ratio induces apoptosis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. -- Abstract: In general, a diet enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) inhibits the development of obesity and decreases adipose tissue. The specific impacts of n-3 and n-6 PUFAs on adipogenesis, however, have not been definitively determined. Traditional in vivo and in vitro supplementation studies have yielded inconsistent or even contradictory results, which likely reflect insufficiently controlled experimental systems. Caenorhabditiselegans fat-1 gene encodes an n-3 fatty acid desaturase, and its heterologous expression represents an effective method both for altering the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio and for evaluating the biological effects of n-3 and n-6 PUFAs. We sought to determine whether a reduced n-6/n-3 ratio could influence adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Lentivirus-mediated introduction of the fat-1 gene into 3T3-L1 preadipocytes significantly reduced the n-6/n-3 ratio and inhibited preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. In mature adipocytes, fat-1 expression reduced lipid deposition, as measured by Oil Red O staining, and induced apoptosis. Our results indicate that a reduced n-6/n-3 ratio inhibits adipogenesis through several mechanisms and that n-3 PUFAs more effectively inhibit adipogenesis (but not lipogenesis) than do n-6 PUFAs.

  20. Association of n3 and n6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in red blood cell membrane and plasma with severity of normal tension glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Yu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To determine whether red blood cell (RBC membrane and plasma lipids, particularly long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, arachidonic acid (AA are significantly correlated with severity of normal tension glaucoma (NTG.METHODS:This study included 35 patients with NTG and 12 healthy normal control subjects, matched for age and sex with the study group. The stage of glaucoma was determined according to the Hodapp-Parrish-Anderson classification. Lipids were extracted from RBC membranes and plasma, and fatty acid methyl esters prepared and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS.RESULTS:When RBC lipids were analyzed, the levels of EPA, the levels of DHA and the ratio of n3 to n6 were positively associated with the Humphrey Perimetry mean deviation (MD score (r=0.617, P<0.001; r=0.727, P<0.001 and r=0.720, P<0.001, respectively, while the level of AA was negatively associated with the MD score (r=-0.427, P=0.001. When plasma lipids were analyzed, there was a significant positive relationship between the levels of EPA and the MD score (r=0.648, P<0.001, and the levels of AA were inversely correlated with the MD score (r=-0.638, P<0.001.CONCLUSION:The levels of n3 and n6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in RBC membrane and plasma lipids were associated with severity of NTG.

  1. Dietary n-3:n-6 fatty acid ratios differentially influence hormonal signature in a rodent model of metabolic syndrome relative to healthy controls

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    Koch Lauren G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dietary ratios of omega-3 (n-3 to omega-6 (n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs have been implicated in controlling markers of the metabolic syndrome, including insulin sensitivity, inflammation, lipid profiles and adiposity. However, the role of dietary PUFAs in regulating energy systems in healthy relative to metabolic diseased backgrounds has not been systematically addressed. We used dietary manipulation of n-3 to n-6 PUFA ratios in an animal model of metabolic syndrome and a related healthy line to assay feeding behavior and endocrine markers of feeding drive and energy regulation. Two related lines of rodents with a healthy and a metabolic syndrome phenotype were fed one of two isocaloric diets, comprised of either a 1:1 or a 1:30 n-3 to n-6 ratio, for 30 days. Food intake and weight gain were monitored; and leptin, ghrelin, adiponectin and a suite of hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in energy regulation were assayed following the dietary manipulation period. There was no difference in caloric intake or weight gain between diet groups, however there was a significant interaction between diet and phenotypic line on central and peripheral markers of energy homeostasis. Thus serum levels of leptin, acylated-ghrelin and adiponectin, and mRNA levels of the anorexigenic hypothalamic neuropeptide, cocaine-amphetamine related transcript (CART, showed differential, dietary responses with HCR rats showing an increase in anorexigenic signals in response to unbalanced n-3:6 ratios, while LCR did not. These data are the first to demonstrate that a rodent line with a metabolic syndrome-like phenotype responds differentially to dietary manipulation of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids relative to a related healthy line with regard to endocrine markers of energy homeostasis. The dietary n-3:n-6 ratios used in this experiment represent extreme points of natural human diets, however the data suggest that optimal recommendations regarding omega-3 and omega-6 intake may have differing effects in healthy subjects relative to metabolic syndrome patients. Further research is necessary to establish these responses in human populations.

  2. Endogenous conversion of n-6 to n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids attenuates K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis in fat-1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seong Ji; Lim, Kyu; Park, Su Yeon; Jung, Mun Yhung; Lim, Hye Song; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Lee, Sang-Il; Park, Byung-Hyun

    2015-07-01

    It is suggested that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) can be used in the preventive or therapeutic management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, controversial results have been reported. Here, we examined the effects of a decrease in the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio on RA using fat-1 transgenic mice. First, we tested whether fat-1 expression modulated signaling pathways in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) stimulated with tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?). TNF-? activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and increased phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in wild type (WT) FLSs but not in fat-1 FLSs. Arthritis was induced by injection of K/BxN serum. Based on clinical scores, ankle thickness and pathological severity, we showed that WT mice developed clinically overt arthritis, whereas fat-1 mice showed attenuated arthritis. Moreover, fat-1 mice exhibited down-regulated local and systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines. Lastly, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) of WT mice differentiated into tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated osteoclasts, whereas the osteoclastogenenic process was suppressed in BMMs of fat-1 mice. The endogenous conversion of n-6 to n-3 PUFAs via fat-1 plays a key role in attenuation of RA; therefore, dietary supplementation of n-3 PUFAs may have therapeutic potential for the management of RA. PMID:25910895

  3. Kinetics of chronic inflammation in Nile tilapia fed n?3 and n?6 essential fatty acids / Cinética da inflamação crônica em tilápia?do?nilo alimentada com ácidos graxos essenciais n?3 e n?6

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Róberson, Sakabe; Flávio Ruas de, Moraes; Marco Antonio de Andrade, Belo; Fabiana, Pilarski; Julieta Rodini Engrácia de, Moraes.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar o efeito da suplementação alimentar com ácidos graxos essenciais sobre a cinética do acúmulo de macrófagos e a formação de células gigantes em tilápia?do?nilo (Oreochromis niloticus). As fontes de suplementação foram óleo de soja (OS, fonte de ômega 6, n?6) e [...] óleo de linhaça (OL, fonte de ômega 3, n?3), nas seguintes proporções: 100% OS; 75% OS + 25% OL; 50% OS + 50% OL; 25% OS + 75% OL; e 100% OL (quatro repetições por tratamento). Após período de alimentação de três meses, foi avaliado o desempenho produtivo, e lamínulas de vidro foram implantadas no tecido subcutâneo dos peixes, as quais foram removidas para exame aos 2, 4, 6 e 8 dias após o implante. O desempenho produtivo não diferiu entre os tratamentos. Os peixes alimentados com 100% de óleo de linhaça tiveram maior acúmulo de macrófagos e formação mais rápida de células de Langhans, no sexto dia. No oitavo dia, as células de Langhans foram predominantes nas lamínulas implantadas nos peixes alimentados com 75 e 100% de óleo de linhaça. Os ácidos graxos n?3 podem contribuir para o recrutamento de macrófagos e a formação de células gigantes, na resposta inflamatória crônica a corpo estranho em peixes. Abstract in english The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation with essential fatty acids on the kinetics of macrophage accumulation and giant cell formation in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The supplementation sources were soybean oil (SO, source of omega 6, n?6) and li [...] nseed oil (LO, source of omega 3, n?3), in the following proportions: 100% SO; 75% SO + 25% LO; 50% SO + 50% LO; 25% SO + 75% LO; and 100% LO (four replicates per treatment). After a feeding period of three months, growth performance was evaluated, and glass coverslips were implanted into the subcutaneous connective tissue of fish, being removed for examination at 2, 4, 6, and 8 days after implantation. Growth performance did not differ between treatments. Fish fed 100% linseed oil diet had the greatest macrophage accumulation and the fastest Langhans cell formation on the sixth day. On the eighth day, Langhans cells were predominant on the coverslips implanted in the fish feed 75 and 100% linseed oil. n?3 fatty acids may contribute to macrophage recruitment and giant cell formation in fish chronic inflammatory response to foreign body.

  4. Kinetics of chronic inflammation in Nile tilapia fed n?3 and n?6 essential fatty acids Cinética da inflamação crônica em tilápia?do?nilo alimentada com ácidos graxos essenciais n?3 e n?6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róberson Sakabe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation with essential fatty acids on the kinetics of macrophage accumulation and giant cell formation in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus. The supplementation sources were soybean oil (SO, source of omega 6, n?6 and linseed oil (LO, source of omega 3, n?3, in the following proportions: 100% SO; 75% SO + 25% LO; 50% SO + 50% LO; 25% SO + 75% LO; and 100% LO (four replicates per treatment. After a feeding period of three months, growth performance was evaluated, and glass coverslips were implanted into the subcutaneous connective tissue of fish, being removed for examination at 2, 4, 6, and 8 days after implantation. Growth performance did not differ between treatments. Fish fed 100% linseed oil diet had the greatest macrophage accumulation and the fastest Langhans cell formation on the sixth day. On the eighth day, Langhans cells were predominant on the coverslips implanted in the fish feed 75 and 100% linseed oil. n?3 fatty acids may contribute to macrophage recruitment and giant cell formation in fish chronic inflammatory response to foreign body.O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar o efeito da suplementação alimentar com ácidos graxos essenciais sobre a cinética do acúmulo de macrófagos e a formação de células gigantes em tilápia?do?nilo (Oreochromis niloticus. As fontes de suplementação foram óleo de soja (OS, fonte de ômega 6, n?6 e óleo de linhaça (OL, fonte de ômega 3, n?3, nas seguintes proporções: 100% OS; 75% OS + 25% OL; 50% OS + 50% OL; 25% OS + 75% OL; e 100% OL (quatro repetições por tratamento. Após período de alimentação de três meses, foi avaliado o desempenho produtivo, e lamínulas de vidro foram implantadas no tecido subcutâneo dos peixes, as quais foram removidas para exame aos 2, 4, 6 e 8 dias após o implante. O desempenho produtivo não diferiu entre os tratamentos. Os peixes alimentados com 100% de óleo de linhaça tiveram maior acúmulo de macrófagos e formação mais rápida de células de Langhans, no sexto dia. No oitavo dia, as células de Langhans foram predominantes nas lamínulas implantadas nos peixes alimentados com 75 e 100% de óleo de linhaça. Os ácidos graxos n?3 podem contribuir para o recrutamento de macrófagos e a formação de células gigantes, na resposta inflamatória crônica a corpo estranho em peixes.

  5. Randomized Controlled Trial Examining the Effects of Fish Oil and Multivitamin Supplementation on the Incorporation of n-3 and n-6 Fatty Acids into Red Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Pipingas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-groups clinical trial examined the effects of fish oil and multivitamin supplementation on the incorporation of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids into red blood cells. Healthy adult humans (n = 160 were randomized to receive 6 g of fish oil, 6 g of fish oil plus a multivitamin, 3 g of fish oil plus a multivitamin or a placebo daily for 16 weeks. Treatment with 6 g of fish oil, with or without a daily multivitamin, led to higher eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA composition at endpoint. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA composition was unchanged following treatment. The long chain LC n-3 PUFA index was only higher, compared to placebo, in the group receiving the combination of 6 g of fish oil and the multivitamin. Analysis by gender revealed that all treatments increased EPA incorporation in females while, in males, EPA was only significantly increased by the 6 g fish oil multivitamin combination. There was considerable individual variability in the red blood cell incorporation of EPA and DHA at endpoint. Gender contributed to a large proportion of this variability with females generally showing higher LC n-3 PUFA composition at endpoint. In conclusion, the incorporation of LC n-3 PUFA into red blood cells was influenced by dosage, the concurrent intake of vitamin/minerals and gender.

  6. Associations between dietary n-6 and n-3 fatty acids and arachidonic acid compositions in plasma and erythrocytes in young and elderly Japanese volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawabata Terue

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We reported that the compositions of arachidonic acid (ARA in erythrocytes and plasma phospholipids (PL in the elderly were lower than those in the young, though the ARA intake was nearly identical. Objective We further analyzed data in four study groups with different ages and sexes, and determined that the blood ARA levels were affected by the kinds of dietary fatty acids ingested. Methods One hundred and four healthy young and elderly volunteers were recruited. Dietary records together with photographic records from 28 consecutive days were reviewed and the fatty acid composition in plasma lipid fractions and erythrocyte PL was analyzed. Results No correlations for ARA between dietary fatty acids and blood lipid fractions were observed. A significant negative correlation between eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA intake and ARA composition in erythrocyte PL was observed. ARA composition in erythrocyte PL was significantly lower in elderly subjects than in young subjects, because EPA and DHA intake in elderly subjects was higher than in young subjects. However, after removing the effect of dietary EPA+DHA intake, the ARA composition in erythrocyte PL in elderly subjects was significantly lower than that in young subjects. Conclusions Changes in physical conditions with aging influenced the low ARA composition of erythrocyte in elderly subjects in addition to the effects of dietary EPA and DHA.

  7. Levels of Soybean Oil and Time of Treatment for Nile Tilapia: a Factorial Design for Total n-3 Fatty Acids, n-6/n-3 and PUFA/SFA Ratios

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ana P., Lopes; Vanessa V. A., Schneider; Paula F., Montanher; Ingrid L., Figueiredo; Hevelyse M. C., Santos; Swami A., Maruyama; Angela M. M., Araújo; Jesuí V., Visentainer.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A 22 factorial design (two factors with two levels, in triplicate) was performed to investigate the influence of factors A (soybean oil content in supplemented diet, at 2.1 and 4.2%) and B (time of treatment, 15 and 30 days) in three responses [(a) total n-3 fatty acids; (b) n-6/n-3 ratio; and (c) p [...] olyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)/saturated fatty acids (SFA) ratio] from lipids of Nile tilapia submitted to experimental treatment. Normality of residuals was assessed through statistical tests. Factors A and B were significant in all obtained regression models, while AB interaction was not a significant contributor for PUFA/SFA response. ANOVA and response surfaces obtained from factorial design indicated best results in tilapia that received the diet containing 4.2% of soybean oil during 30 days.

  8. The effect of dietary n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio on salmonid alphavirus subtype 1 (SAV-1) replication in tissues of experimentally infected rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Jimena, Benjamin; Lyons, Philip; Herath, Tharangani; Richards, Randolph H; Leaver, Michael; Bell, J Gordon; Adams, Alexandra; Thompson, Kim D

    2015-07-01

    Salmon pancreas disease (SPD) is one of the most commercially significant viral diseases of farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Europe. In this study, the potential for dietary mitigation of the disease using different polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) profiles was assessed in rainbow trout. We experimentally infected fish with salmonid alphavirus subtype 1 (SAV-1), the causative agent of SPD. These fish were fed two diets with different n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio (high omega 3, 3.08, and high omega 6, 0.87). We assessed the influence of the diets on the fatty acid composition of the heart at 0 days post infection (d.p.i.) (after 4 weeks of feeding the experimental diets prior to SAV-1 infection), and sampled infected and control fish at 5, 15 and 30d.p.i. Viral E1 and E2 glycoprotein genes were quantified by two absolute real-time PCRs in all the organs sampled, and significantly lower levels of the virus were evident in the organs of fish fed with high omega 6. Characteristic pathological lesions were identified in infected fish as early as 5d.p.i., with no significant differences in the pathology lesion scores between the two dietary regimes. This study shows that decreasing the n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio in experimental diets of rainbow trout changes the fatty acid content of the fish, and is associated with reduced SAV-1 replication in rainbow trout. PMID:25935121

  9. Ácidos graxos poli-insaturados n-3 e n-6: metabolismo em mamíferos e resposta imune / Omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids: metabolism in mammals and immune response

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    João Ângelo De Lima, Perini; Flávia Braidotti, Stevanato; Sheisa Cyléia, Sargi; Jeane Eliete Laguila, Visentainer; Márcia Machado De Oliveira, Dalalio; Makoto, Matshushita; Nilson Evelázio De, Souza; Jesuí Vergílio, Visentainer.

    1075-10-01

    Full Text Available A experimentação animal apresenta uma grande importância para o desenvolvimento da ciência. O uso de camundongos em experimentos ocorre devido à semelhança destes animais com os seres humanos, fácil criação e manutenção e resposta experimental bastante rápida. Esses animais possuem as mesmas enzimas [...] dessaturases e elongases que os humanos, por isso são usados em pesquisas envolvendo incorporação e síntese de ácidos graxos em tecidos. Os ácidos graxos da família ômega-3 e ômega-6 são de suma importância na dieta humana, pois estes não são sintetizados pela síntese de novo e são precursores dos ácidos graxos poli-insaturados de cadeia muito longa, como os ácidos eicosapentaenóico, docosahexaenóico e araquidônico. Estes desempenham funções importantes no organismo, como a síntese de eicosanóides que estão envolvidos diretamente no sistema imune e nas respostas inflamatórias. A razão entre o consumo de ácidos graxos n-6 e n-3 na dieta é um importante fator para determinar a ingestão adequada de ácidos graxos bem como prevenir o aparecimento de doenças. Este artigo tem como objetivo avaliar a incorporação de ácidos graxos em tecidos de animais e discutir a importância dos ácidos da família n-3 e seus metabólitos no sistema imunológico. Abstract in english Experiments with animals are very important for the improvement of science. The use of mice in experiments is due to their similarity with humans, the easy of raising and maintaining them and their very fast response. These animals have the same desaturase and elongase enzymes as humans and so they [...] are used in research involving the incorporation and synthesis of fatty acids in tissues. The fatty acids omega-3 and omega-6 are extremely important in the human diet because they are not synthesized de novo and are precursors of very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as the eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids. These acids play important roles in animals, such as precursors of eicosanoids, which are directly involved in the immune system and inflammatory response. The dietary n-3:n-6 intake ratio is important for assessing proper fatty acid intake and for preventing the development of diseases. Thus, this article assessed the incorporation of fatty acids in animal tissues and discussed the importance of n-3 fatty acids and its metabolites for the immune system.

  10. Trabajos de Investigación Increase of plasma fatty acids without changes in n-6/n-3-PUFA ratio in asymptomatic obese subjects

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Jerusa, Brignardello; Pamela, Morales; Erik, Diaz; Oscar, Brunser; Martin, Gotteland.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available La obesidad está asociada con una inflamación de bajo grado que contribuye al desarrollo de la insulino-resistencia y de la diabetes. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar las concentraciones plasmáticas de ácidos grasos saturados (AGS), monoinsaturados (AGMI) y poliinsaturados (AGPI) en sujetos o [...] besos asintomáticos y determinar el ratio ácido araquidónico/ácido eicosapentanoico [ARA/EPA] como un posible marcador de inflamación, con su eventual asociación con los niveles de proteína C reactiva ultrasensible (PCRus). Se reclutaron 14 sujetos obesos (34,4 ± 11.1 años; índice de masa corporal: 36,0 ± 4,5 kg/m2) y 12 normopeso (30,6 ± 7.8 años; índice de masa corporal: 23,6 ± 2,4 kg/m2); las concentraciones plasmáticas de ácidos grasos fueron determinados por cromatografía de gases. Los niveles de PCRus fueron más elevadas en los sujetos obesos (p=0,01) y correlacionaron con el contenido de grasa corporal. Los porcentajes relativos de AGS, AGMI, AGPI no se vieron afectados en los sujetos obesos, pero sus concentraciones plasmáticas se incrementaron en comparación con el grupo control. Sin embargo, no se observaron diferencias en las concentraciones de PUFAs de cadena larga (DHA, EPA y ARA) ni en el ratio ARA/EPA en los sujetos obesos. Estas observaciones no apoyan el uso del ratio ARA/EPA como un marcador de inflamación de bajo grado evaluada por PCRus en este grupo de sujetos obesos asintomáticos. Abstract in english Obesity is associated with a low grade inflammation which contributes to the development of insulin resistance and diabetes. The aim of this study was to assess the total saturated (SFAs), monounsaturated (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in plasma from asymptomatic obese subjects and [...] to determine the arachidonic/eicosapentanoic acid ratio [ARA/EPA] as a marker of inflammation, and its eventual association with ultrasensitive CRP. Fourteen obese (34.4 ± 11.1y.; BMI: 36.0 ± 4,5 kg/m2) and 12 normal-weight (30.6 ± 7.8y.; BMI: 23,6± 2,4 kg/m2) subjects were recruited and their plasma fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography. usCRP was higher in the obese subjects (p=0,01) and correlates with their body fat content. The percentages of SFAs, MUFAs, PUFAs were not affected in the obese subjects but their concentrations were increased, compared with the control group. However, no differences in the long chain PUFAs (DHA and EPA) concentrations or in the plasmatic ARA/EPA ratio were observed in these subjects. These observations do not support a relation between the ARA/EPA ratio and the presence of low grade inflammation evaluated by plasma usCRP in this group of asymptomatic obese subjects.

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Inflammatory Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Calder, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids influence inflammation through a variety of mechanisms; many of these are mediated by, or at least associated with, changes in fatty acid composition of cell membranes. Changes in these compositions can modify membrane fluidity, cell signaling leading to altered gene expression, and the pattern of lipid mediator production. Cell involved in the inflammatory response are typically rich in the n-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid, but the contents of arachidonic acid and of th...

  12. Proteomic changes induced by effective chemopreventive ratios of n-3:n-6 fatty acids and tamoxifen against MNU-induced mammary cancer in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibinski, Christine G; Thompson, Henry J; Das, Arunangshu; Manni, Andrea; Bortner, James D; Stanley, Anne; Stanley, Bruce A; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2013-09-01

    We used a proteomic approach to gain insights into the mechanisms of protection at the protein level by a high n-3:n-6 ratio in the absence and presence of Tamoxifen. Four groups were treated with 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (MNU) and fed the following diets with varied n-3:n-6 ratios; group 1 = 1:1; groups 2 and 3 = 10:1 and 25:1, respectively; group 4: (25:1) plus Tamoxifen (1 mg/kg diet). The plasma from six rats/group was pooled and analyzed with the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation method; 148 proteins were identified with 95% confidence by ProteinPilot 4.0. In plasma of rats fed 10:1, 25:1 n-3:n-6, and 25:1 plus Tamoxifen, the number of proteins that met our criteria (P ? 0.05, error factor ? 2) were 10, 14, and 19 proteins, respectively. Selected proteins were further validated by Western blotting. Compared to 1:1, both 10:1 and 25:1 diets upregulated vitamin D binding protein, gelsolin, and 14-3-3 sigma, reported to have tumor suppressive effects, whereas alpha-1B-glycoprotein, which has been reported to be elevated in the serum of breast cancer patients was decreased. Compared to 25:1, the 25:1 plus Tamoxifen diet downregulated apolipoprotein E, haptoglobin, and inter-?-inhibitor H4 heavy chain. Ingenuity pathway analysis determined that the trends of specific proteins were related to lipid metabolism in the 25:1 n-3:n-6 group, whereas the 25:1 n-3:n-6 plus Tamoxifen group included proteins involved in cancer and inflammation. Our results show that several proteins were altered in a manner consistent with chemoprevention. Such proteins may serve as biomarkers to monitor efficacy of n-3 and Tamoxifen in future clinical chemoprevention trials. PMID:23880232

  13. Metabolic responses to high-fat diets rich in n-3 or n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in mice selected for either high body weight or leanness explain different health outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuernberg Karin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing evidence suggests that diets high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA confer health benefits by improving insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism in liver, muscle and adipose tissue. Methods The present study investigates metabolic responses in two different lines of mice either selected for high body weight (DU6 leading to rapid obesity development, or selected for high treadmill performance (DUhTP leading to a lean phenotype. At 29 days of age the mice were fed standard chow (7.2% fat, 25.7% protein, or a high-fat diet rich in n-3 PUFA (n-3 HFD, 27.7% fat, 19% protein or a high-fat diet rich in n-6 PUFA (n-6 HFD, 27.7% fat, 18.6% protein for 8 weeks. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of these PUFA-rich high-fat diets on the fatty acid profile and on the protein expression of key components of insulin signalling pathways. Results Plasma concentrations of leptin and insulin were higher in DU6 in comparison with DUhTP mice. The high-fat diets stimulated a strong increase in leptin levels and body fat only in DU6 mice. Muscle and liver fatty acid composition were clearly changed by dietary lipid composition. In both lines of mice n-3 HFD feeding significantly reduced the hepatic insulin receptor ? protein concentration which may explain decreased insulin action in liver. In contrast, protein kinase C ? expression increased strongly in abdominal fat of n-3 HFD fed DUhTP mice, indicating enhanced insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue. Conclusions A diet high in n-3 PUFA may facilitate a shift from fuel deposition in liver to fuel storage as fat in adipose tissue in mice. Tissue specific changes in insulin sensitivity may describe, at least in part, the health improving properties of dietary n-3 PUFA. However, important genotype-diet interactions may explain why such diets have little effect in some population groups.

  14. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Risti?-Medi? Danijela; Vu?i? Vesna; Taki? Marija; Karadži? Ivana; Glibeti? Marija

    2013-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are necessary for overall health. The two PUFAs families, n-6 and n-3 fatty acid are physiologically and metabolically distinct. Proportion of PUFAs in serum and erythrocyte phospholipids is an important determinant of both health and disease, and depends on endogenous metabolism controlled by genetic polymorphisms and dietary intake. Both n-3 and n-6 PUFAs are processed to powerful promoters of eicosanoids synthesis at the cyclooxygenase and lipoxyge...

  15. Efeito dos ácidos graxos n-3 e n-6 na expressão de genes do metabolismo de lipídeos e risco de aterosclerose / Effects of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids on the expression of genes involved in the lipid metabolism and risk of atherosclerosis

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Helena Fonseca, Raposo.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A aterosclerose, principal responsável pela patogênese do infarto miocárdico e cerebral, bem como pela gangrena e por outras doenças vasculares periféricas, permanece como principal causa de morbidade e mortalidade nas populações "ocidentalizadas". Estima-se que 17,5 milhões de pessoas morreram por [...] doenças cardiovasculares em 2005, o que representou 30% das causas de morte nesse ano, e que, em 2015, 20 milhões de pessoas morrerão por doenças cardiovasculares no mundo. Os ácidos graxos n-3, principalmente os de cadeia longa, encontrados nos peixes, têm-se mostrado particularmente úteis na prevenção e tratamento de doenças como dislipidemias, diabetes mellitus e obesidade, apresentando importante efeito cardioprotetor. Nesse contexto, pesquisas têm evidenciado que ao menos parte dos benefícios dos ácidos graxos eicosapentaenóico e docosahexaenóico sobre o risco de doenças cardiovasculares é decorrente da modulação de genes responsivos aos receptores ativados por proliferadores de peroxissomos e envolvidos no metabolismo lipídico. Nesta revisão, pretende-se expor alguns mecanismos de ação dos ácidos graxos n-3 e n-6 sobre o metabolismo de lipídeos e de lipoproteínas. Conclui-se que muitos aspectos que contribuem para o risco de doenças cardiovasculares são afetados pela ingestão de n-3. Além da redução de triglicérides, fatores como o aumento de adiponectina, a redução da concentração de colesterol plasmático e a melhora do transporte reverso de colesterol também são responsáveis pela redução do risco de aterosclerose promovida pelos ácidos graxos n-3. No entanto, ainda são necessários estudos adicionais para definir mais claramente os mecanismos celulares e moleculares responsáveis pelo efeito cardioprotetor dos ácidos graxos n-3. Abstract in english Atherosclerosis, the main cause of myocardial infarction, stroke, gangrene and other peripheral vascular diseases, also persists as the main cause of morbidity and mortality in Western populations. Roughly 17.5 million people died from cardiovascular diseases in 2005, representing 30% of the causes [...] of death in that year, and in 2015, another 20 million people will die of cardiovascular diseases around the world. The n-3 fatty acids, especially the long-chain n-3 found in fish, have been shown to be particularly effective in the prevention and treatment of diseases such as dyslipidemias, diabetes mellitus and obesity, presenting an important cardioprotective effect. In this context, studies have found that at least some of the cardiovascular benefits associated with eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic fatty acids regard the modulation of genes that respond to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors involved in lipid metabolism. This review will discuss some of the mechanisms of action of some n-3 and n-6 fatty acids on the metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins. In conclusion, many aspects that contribute to the risk of cardiovascular diseases are affected by n-3 intake. N-3 fatty acids not only reduce triglycerides, but also promote factors that increase adiponectin, reduce blood cholesterol levels and improve the reverse cholesterol transport, and all of these contribute to reducing the risk of atherosclerosis. However, additional studies are still necessary to elucidate all the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the cardioprotective effect of n-3 fatty acids.

  16. Efeito dos ácidos graxos n-3 e n-6 na expressão de genes do metabolismo de lipídeos e risco de aterosclerose Effects of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids on the expression of genes involved in the lipid metabolism and risk of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Fonseca Raposo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A aterosclerose, principal responsável pela patogênese do infarto miocárdico e cerebral, bem como pela gangrena e por outras doenças vasculares periféricas, permanece como principal causa de morbidade e mortalidade nas populações "ocidentalizadas". Estima-se que 17,5 milhões de pessoas morreram por doenças cardiovasculares em 2005, o que representou 30% das causas de morte nesse ano, e que, em 2015, 20 milhões de pessoas morrerão por doenças cardiovasculares no mundo. Os ácidos graxos n-3, principalmente os de cadeia longa, encontrados nos peixes, têm-se mostrado particularmente úteis na prevenção e tratamento de doenças como dislipidemias, diabetes mellitus e obesidade, apresentando importante efeito cardioprotetor. Nesse contexto, pesquisas têm evidenciado que ao menos parte dos benefícios dos ácidos graxos eicosapentaenóico e docosahexaenóico sobre o risco de doenças cardiovasculares é decorrente da modulação de genes responsivos aos receptores ativados por proliferadores de peroxissomos e envolvidos no metabolismo lipídico. Nesta revisão, pretende-se expor alguns mecanismos de ação dos ácidos graxos n-3 e n-6 sobre o metabolismo de lipídeos e de lipoproteínas. Conclui-se que muitos aspectos que contribuem para o risco de doenças cardiovasculares são afetados pela ingestão de n-3. Além da redução de triglicérides, fatores como o aumento de adiponectina, a redução da concentração de colesterol plasmático e a melhora do transporte reverso de colesterol também são responsáveis pela redução do risco de aterosclerose promovida pelos ácidos graxos n-3. No entanto, ainda são necessários estudos adicionais para definir mais claramente os mecanismos celulares e moleculares responsáveis pelo efeito cardioprotetor dos ácidos graxos n-3.Atherosclerosis, the main cause of myocardial infarction, stroke, gangrene and other peripheral vascular diseases, also persists as the main cause of morbidity and mortality in Western populations. Roughly 17.5 million people died from cardiovascular diseases in 2005, representing 30% of the causes of death in that year, and in 2015, another 20 million people will die of cardiovascular diseases around the world. The n-3 fatty acids, especially the long-chain n-3 found in fish, have been shown to be particularly effective in the prevention and treatment of diseases such as dyslipidemias, diabetes mellitus and obesity, presenting an important cardioprotective effect. In this context, studies have found that at least some of the cardiovascular benefits associated with eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic fatty acids regard the modulation of genes that respond to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors involved in lipid metabolism. This review will discuss some of the mechanisms of action of some n-3 and n-6 fatty acids on the metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins. In conclusion, many aspects that contribute to the risk of cardiovascular diseases are affected by n-3 intake. N-3 fatty acids not only reduce triglycerides, but also promote factors that increase adiponectin, reduce blood cholesterol levels and improve the reverse cholesterol transport, and all of these contribute to reducing the risk of atherosclerosis. However, additional studies are still necessary to elucidate all the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the cardioprotective effect of n-3 fatty acids.

  17. Hepatic fatty acid partitioning

    OpenAIRE

    Hodson, L.; Frayn, KN

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of Review: A net retention of triacylglycerol within the liver is a prerequisite for the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The accumulation of liver fat reflects an imbalance between fatty acid input and disposal. Here we summarize recent research into understanding the fate of fatty acids within the hepatocyte. Recent Findings: Several recent studies have elucidated the contribution of different sources of fatty acids to liver fat and to plasma triacylglycerol. Some re...

  18. Hepatic fatty acid partitioning.

    OpenAIRE

    Hodson, L.; Frayn, KN

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: A net retention of triacylglycerol within the liver is a prerequisite for the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The accumulation of liver fat reflects an imbalance between fatty acid input and disposal. Here we summarize recent research into understanding the fate of fatty acids within the hepatocyte. RECENT FINDINGS: Several recent studies have elucidated the contribution of different sources of fatty acids to liver fat and to plasma triacylglycerol. Some re...

  19. Consequences of Essential Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Lands

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential fatty acids (EFA are nutrients that form an amazingly large array of bioactive mediators that act on a large family of selective receptors. Nearly every cell and tissue in the human body expresses at least one of these receptors, allowing EFA-based signaling to influence nearly every aspect of human physiology. In this way, the health consequences of specific gene-environment interactions with these nutrients are more extensive than often recognized. The metabolic transformations have similar competitive dynamics for the n-3 and n-6 homologs when converting dietary EFA from the external environment of foods into the highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA esters that accumulate in the internal environment of cells and tissues. In contrast, the formation and action of bioactive mediators during tissue responses to stimuli tend to selectively create more intense consequences for n-6 than n-3 homologs. Both n-3 and n-6 nutrients have beneficial actions, but many common health disorders are undesired consequences of excessive actions of tissue n-6 HUFA which are preventable. This review considers the possibility of preventing imbalances in dietary n-3 and n-6 nutrients with informed voluntary food choices. That action may prevent the unintended consequences that come from eating imbalanced diets which support excessive chronic actions of n-6 mediators that harm human health. The consequences from preventing n-3 and n-6 nutrient imbalances on a nationwide scale may be very large, and they need careful evaluation and implementation to avoid further harmful consequences for the national economy.

  20. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat- ... in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  1. Trans Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Inflammatory Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip C. Calder

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Long chain fatty acids influence inflammation through a variety of mechanisms; many of these are mediated by, or at least associated with, changes in fatty acid composition of cell membranes. Changes in these compositions can modify membrane fluidity, cell signaling leading to altered gene expression, and the pattern of lipid mediator production. Cell involved in the inflammatory response are typically rich in the n-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid, but the contents of arachidonic acid and of the n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA can be altered through oral administration of EPA and DHA. Eicosanoids produced from arachidonic acid have roles in inflammation. EPA also gives rise to eicosanoids and these often have differing properties from those of arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids. EPA and DHA give rise to newly discovered resolvins which are anti-inflammatory and inflammation resolving. Increased membrane content of EPA and DHA (and decreased arachidonic acid content results in a changed pattern of production of eicosanoids and resolvins. Changing the fatty acid composition of cells involved in the inflammatory response also affects production of peptide mediators of inflammation (adhesion molecules, cytokines etc.. Thus, the fatty acid composition of cells involved in the inflammatory response influences their function; the contents of arachidonic acid, EPA and DHA appear to be especially important. The anti-inflammatory effects of marine n-3 PUFAs suggest that they may be useful as therapeutic agents in disorders with an inflammatory component.

  3. Fatty acids profiles of some Spanish wild vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Patricia; Ferreira, Isabel C. F. R.; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Sa?nchez Mata, Mari?a Corte?s; Ca?mara Hurtado, Montan?a; Tardi?o, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids play an important role in human nutrition, being associated with several health benefits. The analyzed vegetables, in spite of his low fat content, lower than 2 %, presents a high proportion of PUFA of n-3, n-6 and n-9 series, such as ?-linolenic, linoleic, and oleic acids, respectively. Wild edible plants contain in general a good balance of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids. The present study tries to contribute to the preservation and valorization of tradi...

  4. Adipose tissue fatty acid patterns and changes in anthropometry : a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahm, Christina Catherine; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Diets rich in n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA), but low in n-6 LC-PUFA and 18:1 trans-fatty acids (TFA), may lower the risk of overweight and obesity. These fatty acids have often been investigated individually. We explored associations between global patterns in adipose tissue fatty acids and changes in anthropometry.

  5. Desaturation of fatty acids in Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uptake and metabolism of saturated (16:0, 18:0) and unsaturated [18:1(n-9), 18:2(n-6), 18:3(n-3)] fatty acids by cultured epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi were studied. Between 17.5 and 33.5% of the total radioactivity of [1-14C]labeled fatty acids initially added to the culture medium was incorporated into the lipids of T. cruzi and mostly choline and ethanolamine phospholipids. As demonstrated by argentation thin layer chromatography, gas liquid chromatography and ozonolysis of the fatty acids synthesized, exogenous palmitic acid was elongated to stearic acid, and the latter was desaturated to oleic acid and 18:2 fatty acid. The 18:2 fatty acid was tentatively identified as linoleic acid with the first bond in the delta 9 position and the second bond toward the terminal methyl end. Exogenous stearic acid was also desaturated to oleic and 18:2 fatty acid, while oleic acid was only converted into 18:2. All of the saturated and unsaturated fatty acids investigated were also converted to a small extent (2-4%) into polyunsaturated fatty acids. No radioactive aldehyde methyl ester fragments of less than nine carbon atoms were detected after ozonolysis of any of the fatty acids studied. These results demonstrate the existence of delta 9 and either delta 12 or delta 15 desaturases, or both, in T. cruzi and suggest that delta 6 desaturase or other desaturases of the animal type are likely absent in cultured forms of this organism

  6. Trans Fatty Acids and Memory

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Video player keyboard shortcuts Transcript Eating too much food containing trans fatty acids may lead to poorer ... Trans fatty acids are commonly used in processed foods. The Food and Drug Administration recently ordered manufacturers ...

  7. Trans Fatty Acids and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/videos/news/Memory_061815.html Trans Fatty Acids and Memory HealthDay News Video - June ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Play video: Trans Fatty Acids and Memory For closed captioning, click ...

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. ...

  9. Fatty acid composition of human milk and infant formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan?ica Delaš

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate fatty acid composition of membrane lipids is necessary for structure and function of the developing nervous system. Rapid synthesis of brain tissue occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy and the early postnatal weeks. This synthesis of brain structure involves the formation of complex lipids, many of which contain significant quantities of essential fatty acids and their higher homologs. This study was undertaken to elucidate how fatty acid compositions of available diets for infants meet the requirements for essential fatty acids. Samples of infant formulas, present on the market, as well as milk samples obtained from breast feeding mothers, were extracted by chloroform : methanol mixtures in order to obtain total lipids. Fatty acid methyl esters were prepared and fatty acid composition was revealed by gas chromatography. Special interest was directed to the content of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The results have shown that infant formulas, designed to substitute mothers’ breast milk, contain medium chain fatty acids (C 10:0, C 12:0, along with the other saturated fatty acids, in the amounts acceptable for infants’ energy consumption. Although linoleic acid (C18:2, n-6 was present at the level expected to cover needs for essential fatty acids, most of the tested products did not contain sufficient amounts of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, despite the fact that these fatty acids are necessary for undisturbed brain development, ignoring the strong recommendations that they should be used as a supplement in infants’ food.

  10. Generation of novel metabolites of dietary linoleic acid (18:2n6) by guinea pig epidermis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the authors have demonstrated the inability of rat and guinea pig (GP) skin enzyme preparations to desaturate 18:2n6 into gammalinolenic acid (18:3n6) using an in vitro microsomal system, the fate of this dietary essential fatty acid in the GP epidermis is unknown. To explore the fate of 18:2n6, intact tissue slices from GP epidermis were incubated with [1-14C]18:2n6. After incubation, the extracted lipids were transesterified using methanolic-HCL. The fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed using a combination of (i) argentation TLC, scanned using a proportional TLC radioscanner, and (ii) reverse phase HPLC, equipped with a flow through radioscanner. The results indicate that the intact epidermis metabolized 14C-18:2n6 to a group of novel products more polar than 18:2n6. In subsequent experiments, 14C-18:2n6 was either incubated with the 800 xg supernatant, the 105,000 xg pellet or supernatant from GP epidermis. Metabolism of 18:2n6 by the high speed supernatant resulted in the generation of polar products with chromatographic properties of not greater than 2 double bonds. These results indicate that although the GP epidermis lacks the capacity to desaturate 18:2n6 to 18:3n6, it can convert dietary 18:2n6 into a group of novel polar metabolites via a cytosolic mediated process. The function of these metabolites in the GP integumentary system remains to be determined

  11. Fatty acids profiles of some Spanish wild vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, P; Ferreira, I C F R; Carvalho, A M; Sánchez-Mata, M C; Cámara, M; Tardío, J

    2012-06-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids play an important role in human nutrition, being associated with several health benefits. The analyzed vegetables, in spite of its low fat content, lower than 2%, present a high proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids of n-3, n-6 and n-9 series, such as ?-linolenic, linoleic and oleic acids, respectively. Wild edible plants contain in general a good balance of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids. The present study tries to contribute to the preservation and valorization of traditional food resources, studying the fatty acids profile of 20 wild vegetables by gas-liquid chromatography with flame ionization detection. Results show that species in which leaves are predominant in their edible parts have in general the highest polyunsaturated fatty acid/saturated fatty acid ratios: Rumex pulcher (5.44), Cichorium intybus (5.14) and Papaver rhoeas (5.00). Due to the low n-6/n-3 ratios of the majority of the samples, they can be considered interesting sources of n-3 fatty acids, especially those with higher total fat amount, such as Bryonia dioica, Chondrilla juncea or Montia fontana, with the highest contents of ?-linolenic acid (67.78, 56.27 and 47.65%, respectively). The wild asparaguses of Asparagus acutifolius and Tamus communis stand out for their linoleic acid content (42.29 and 42.45%, respectively). All these features reinforce the interest of including wild plants in diet, as an alternative to the variety of vegetables normally used. PMID:22701061

  12. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in chronic childhood disorders: panacea, promising, or placebo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA, or LCP) include the essential fatty acids alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3 n-3) and linoleic acid (LA, 18:2 n-6) as well as a number of metabolites of both, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), and arachid...

  13. Fatty acid composition of Swedish bakery products, with emphasis on trans-fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattner, Sofia; Becker, Wulf; Wretling, Sören; Öhrvik, Veronica; Mattisson, Irene

    2015-05-15

    Trans-fatty acids (TFA) have been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease, by affecting blood lipids and inflammation factors. Current nutrition recommendations emphasise a limitation of dietary TFA intake. The aim of this study was to investigate fatty acid composition in sweet bakery products, with emphasis on TFA, on the Swedish market and compare fatty acid composition over time. Products were sampled in 2001, 2006 and 2007 and analysed for fatty acid composition by using GC. Mean TFA levels were 0.7% in 2007 and 5.9% in 2001 of total fatty acids. In 1995-97, mean TFA level was 14.3%. In 2007, 3 of 41 products had TFA levels above 2% of total fatty acids. TFA content had decreased in this product category, while the proportion of saturated (SFA) and polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids had increased, mostly through increased levels of 16:0 and 18:2 n-6, respectively. The total fat content remained largely unchanged. PMID:25577101

  14. Origin of fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The appearance of fatty acids and membranes is one of the most important events of the prebiotic world because genesis of life required the compartmentalization of molecules. Membranes allowed cells to become enriched with molecules relevant for their evolution and gave rise to gradients convertible into energy. By virtue of their hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface, membranes developed certain enzymatic activities impossible in the aqueous phase. A prebiotic cell is an energy unit but it is also an information unit. It has a past, a present and a future. The biochemistry of fatty acids involves acetylCoA, malonylCoA and an enzyme, acyl synthetase, which joins both molecules. After substitution of the acetyl group in place of the carboxyl group of malonyl derivatives, the chain is reduced and dehydrated to crotonyl derivatives. These molecules can again react with malonylCoA to form unsaturated chain; they can also undergo a new reduction step to form butyryl derivatives which can react with malonylCoA to form a longer aliphatic chain. The formation of malonylCoA consumes ATP. The reduction step needs NADPH and proton. Dehydration requires structural information because the reduction product is chiral (D configuration). It is unlikely that these steps were possible in a prebiotic environment. Thus we have to understand how fatty acids could appear in the prebiotic era. This hypothesis about the origin of fatty acids is based on the chemistry of sulfonium ylides and sulfthe chemistry of sulfonium ylides and sulfonium salts. The most well-known among these molecules are S-melthyl-methionine and S-adenosyl methionine. The simplest sulfonium cation is the trimethylsulfonium cation. Chemists have evidence that these products can produce olefin when they are heated or flashed with UV light in some conditions. I suggest that these volatile products can allow the formation of fatty acids chains in atmospheric phase with UV and temperature using methanol as starting material. Different synthetic pathways will be studied. (author). Abstract only

  15. Depression and long chain n-3 fatty acids in adipose tissue in adults from Crete

    OpenAIRE

    Mamalakis, G; Kalogeropoulos, N.; Andrikopoulos, N.; Hatzis, C.; Kromhout, D; Moschandreas, J.; KAFATOS, A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Only one study has investigated the relationship of essential fatty acids in the adipose tissue with depression in adults and suggested an inverse relationship between docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3) (DHA) and depression. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation between adipose tissue polyunsaturated fatty acids especially n-3 and n-6 fatty acids, an index of long-term or habitual fatty acid intake, and depression in adults. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of healthy adults from the islan...

  16. Fatty acid composition of ostrich (Struthio camelus abdominal adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Belichovska

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid composition of foods has a great impact on nutrition and health. Therefore, th? determination and knowledge of the fatty acid composition of food is very important for nutrition. Due to the high nutritional characteristics of ostrich meat and its products, the research determining their quality is of topical interest. The aim of the present investigation was the determination of fatty acid composition of ostrich adipose tissue. The content of fatty acids was determined according to AOAC Official Methods of Analysis and determination was performed using a gas chromatograph with a flame-ionization detector (GC-FID. The results are expressed as a percentage of the total content of fatty acids. The method was validated and whereupon the following parameters were determined: linearity, precision, recovery, limit of detection and limit of quantification. The repeatability was within of 0.99 to 2.15%, reproducibility from 2.01 to 4.57%, while recovery ranged from 94.89 to 101.03%. According to these results, this method is accurate and precise and can be used for analysis of fatty acids in foods. It was concluded that the content of saturated fatty acids (SFA accounted 34.75%, of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA 38.37%, of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA 26.88%, of total unsaturated fatty acids (UFA 65.25% and of desirable fatty acids (DFA (total unsaturated + stearic acid 70.37% of the analysed samples. The ratio polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids accounted 0.77. The most present fatty acid is the oleic (C18:1n9c with 28.31%, followed by palmitic (C16:0 with 27.12% and linoleic (C18:2n6c acid with 25.08%. Other fatty acids are contained in significantly lower quantities.

  17. Human requirement for N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, A P

    2000-07-01

    The diet of our ancestors was less dense in calories, being higher in fiber, rich in fruits, vegetables, lean meat, and fish. As a result, the diet was lower in total fat and saturated fat, but contained equal amounts of n-6 and n-3 essential fatty acids. Linoleic acid (LA) is the major n-6 fatty acid, and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is the major n-3 fatty acid. In the body, LA is metabolized to arachidonic acid (AA), and ALA is metabolized to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The ratio of n-6 to n-3 essential fatty acids was 1 to 2:1 with higher levels of the longer-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), such as EPA, DHA, and AA, than today's diet. Today this ratio is about 10 to 1:20 to 25 to 1, indicating that Western diets are deficient in n-3 fatty acids compared with the diet on which humans evolved and their genetic patterns were established. The n-3 and n-6 EPA are not interconvertible in the human body and are important components of practically all cell membranes. The N-6 and n-3 fatty acids influence eicosanoid metabolism, gene expression, and intercellular cell-to-cell communication. The PUFA composition of cell membranes is, to a great extent, dependent on dietary intake. Therefore, appropriate amounts of dietary n-6 and n-3 fatty acids need to be considered in making dietary recommendations. These two classes of PUFA should be distinguished because they are metabolically and functionally distinct and have opposing physiological functions; their balance is important for homeostasis and normal development. Studies with nonhuman primates and human newborns indicate that DHA is essential for the normal functional development of the retina and brain, particularly in premature infants. A balanced n-6/n-3 ratio in the diet is essential for normal growth and development and should lead to decreases in cardiovascular disease and other chronic diseases and improve mental health. Although a recommended dietary allowance for essential fatty acids does not exist, an adequate intake (AI) has been estimated for n-6 and n-3 essential fatty acids by an international scientific working group. For Western societies, it will be necessary to decrease the intake of n-6 fatty acids and increase the intake of n-3 fatty acids. The food industry is already taking steps to return n-3 essential fatty acids to the food supply by enriching various foods with n-3 fatty acids. To obtain the recommended AI, it will be necessary to consider the issues involved in enriching the food supply with n-3 PUFA in terms of dosage, safety, and sources of n-3 fatty acids. PMID:10901194

  18. Effects of Parental Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake on Offspring Microbiome and Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Myles, Ian A.; Pincus, Nathan B.; Fontecilla, Natalia M.; Datta, Sandip K.

    2014-01-01

    The “Western diet” is characterized by increased intake of saturated and omega-6 (n?6) fatty acids with a relative reduction in omega-3 (n?3) consumption. These fatty acids can directly and indirectly modulate the gut microbiome, resulting in altered host immunity. Omega-3 fatty acids can also directly modulate immunity through alterations in the phospholipid membranes of immune cells, inhibition of n?6 induced inflammation, down-regulation of inflammatory transcription factors, and...

  19. Essential fatty acids and radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presenting a short review of published literature and some experimental results, the authors exemplified possible relationships between radioprotection and the essential fatty acid status underlying eicosanoid generation capacity

  20. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  1. Impact of omega-6 fatty acids on cardiovascular outcomes: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Khandelwal, Shweta; Kelly, Laura; Malik, Richa; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Reddy, Srinath

    2012-01-01

    Poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have usually been associated with beneficial health effects on early life and later life disease such as cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Emerging evidence, however, suggests that PUFA species (n-3, n-6) have differential health effects. N-6 PUFAs, in particular, have sparked a scientific debate regarding their role in human physiological processes. Current dietary recommendations for n-6 fatty acids have been based on animal studies, insufficient epidemiolo...

  2. Trans Fatty Acids and Memory

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nih.gov/medlineplus/videos/news/Memory_061815.html Trans Fatty Acids and Memory HealthDay News Video - June ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Play video: Trans Fatty Acids and Memory For closed captioning, click ...

  3. Fatty Acid Composition of Rickettsiae

    OpenAIRE

    Tzianabos, Theodore; Moss, C. Wayne; McDade, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    The fatty acid compositions of selected strains of rickettsiae were studied by gas-liquid chromatography. The profiles of all the rickettsiae except Coxiella burnetii were qualitatively similar. The fatty acid composition of C. burnetii was similar to that of certain Legionella species.

  4. Fatty acids composition of 10 microalgal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thidarat Noiraksar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids composition of 10 species of microalgae was determined at the exponential phase and the stationary phase. The microalgae consist of two species of diatoms, Bacillariophyceae, (Nitzschia cf. ovalis, Thalassiosira sp. five species of green microalgae, Prasinophyceae (Tetraselmis sp. and Chlorophyceae, (Dictyosphaerium pulchellum, Stichococcus sp., Chlorella sp., Scenedesmus falcatus and three species of blue green microalgae, Cyanophyceae (Anacystis sp., Synechococcus sp., Synechocystis sp..Medium for culture diatoms and green microalgae was F/2, and BG-11 media was used for Cyanophyceae. The microalgae were cultured beneath light intensity 143 ?Em-2s-1, light: dark illustration 12:12 hrs., temperature 28ºC, and salinities 8-30 psu. The microalgae were harvested for analyzing fatty acid by centrivugal machine at 3500 rpm. for 5 min. at temperature 20ºC and stored at -80ºC prior to analysis.Fatty acids composition of microalgae differed from species to species. The majority fatty acids composition of diatoms at the exponential phase and the stationary phase were C16:1n-7 (17.12-31.47% and 28.22-42.02%, C16:0 (13.25-19.61% and 18.83-20.67%, C20:5 n-3 (16.65-26.67% and 11.32-23.68% respectively. The principle fatty acids composition of green microalgae, Prasinophyceae, Tetraselmis sp. were C18:3n-3 (16.17-16.67%, C16:0 (15.33-17.45%, C18:1n-9 (12.25-15.43%, C18:2n-6 (9.66-19.97%. The fatty acids composition of green microalgae, Chlorophyceae, were C18:3 n-3 (20.02-26.49% and 15.35- 30.63%, C16:0 (5.76-17.61% and 11.41-20.03%, C18:2n-6 (4.67-17.54% and 7.48-20.61% respectively. The major amounts of fatty acids content of blue green microalgae were C16:1n-7 (9.28-34.91% and 34.48- 35.04%, C14:0 (13.34-25.96% and 26.69-28.24%, C16:0 (5.89-29.15% and 5.70-16.81% except for Anacystis sp.which had a high amount of C18:3 n-3 (23.18-27.98% but low amount of C14:0 (3.66-4.98%.Bacillariophyceae contained the highest amount of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs at both growth phases. Prasinophyceae had a small amount while in Chlorophyceae and Cyanophyceae they were not detected. Nitzschia cf. ovalis and Thalassiosira sp. had amount of C20:4n-6 (0.08-4.40%,C20:5 n-3 (11.32- 26.67% and C22:6 n-3 (0.80-4.20% respectively. Tetraselmis sp. had amounts of C20:4n-6 and C20:5 n-3 ranging from 0.99-1.13% and 4.18-4.70% respectively. In conclusion, Nitzschia cf. ovalis and Thalassiosira sp. would serve as good nutritional sources of HUFAs for aquaculture animals.

  5. 21 CFR 172.860 - Fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...acids and their associated fatty acids manufactured from fats and oils derived from edible sources: Capric acid, caprylic acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, oleic acid, palmitic acid, and stearic acid. (b) The food additive meets the...

  6. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for fats, including saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, trans fatty acids, and cholesterol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2010-01-01

    This Opinion of the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA) deals with the setting of Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for fats. A lower bound of the reference intake range for total fat of 20 energy % (E%) and an upper bound of 35 E% are proposed. Fat intake in infants can gradually be reduced from 40 E% in the 6-12 month period to 35-40 E% in the 2nd and 3rd year of life. For specific fatty acids the following is proposed: saturated fatty acid (SFA) and trans fatty acid intake should be as low as possible; not to set any DRV for cis-monounsaturated fatty acids; not to formulate a DRV for the intake of total cis-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA); not to set specific values for the n-3/n-6 ratio; to set an Adequate Intake (AI) of 4 E% for linoleic acid (LA); not to set any DRV for arachidonic acid; not to set an UL for total or any of the n-6 PUFA; to set an AI for alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) of 0.5 E%; not to set an UL for ALA; to set an AI of 250 mg for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for adults; to set an AI of 100 mg DHA for infants (>6 months) and young children

  7. Survey on the fatty acids profile of fluid goat milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pittau

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluid goat milk submitted to thermal treatment has interesting nutritional properties and a potential expanding market. The present study was aimed to conduct fatty acids profile characterisation of goat milk placed on market. Forty-nine fluid milk samples were collected: 12 pasteurised, 12 pasteurised at high temperature, 11 ultrahigh temperature (UHT whole milk and 14 UHT semi-skimmed milk. Milk samples were collected at retail level from 7 different companies and from different production batches. After extraction and methilation, fatty acids (FAs profile was determined on each sample using a gas chromatograph with flame ionisation detector (GC-FID with high-polarity capillary column. The concentration (g/100mL of saturated fatty acids (SFAs, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, trans fatty acids (t-FAs, and isomers of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA was determined. N-6/n-3 ratio, atherogenic index (AI and thrombogenic index (TI were also assessed. Fluid goat milk lipid profile was characterised by SFAs (68.4% of total FAs, PUFAs (5.3%, MUFAs (21.3%, t-FAs (3.6% and CLA (0.8%. The most represented fatty acids were: 16:0 (24.5%, 9cis-18:1 (18.2%, 18:0 (9.6%, 14:0 (9.5%, 10:0 (9.3% and 12:0 (4.5%. Nutritional indices were 2.8-6.8 for n-6/n-3 ratio; 2.3-2.9 for AI; and 2.7-3.2 for TI. Milk produced by small scale plants, with no milk fat standardisation, showed greater differences in fatty acid profile as compared to industrial plants milk. Large scale production is characterised by commingled bulk tank milk of different origins and then is more homogeneous. The whole goat milk supply chain should be controlled to obtain milk with fatty acids of high nutritional value.

  8. Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Synthesis and Elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatty acid synthesis and fatty acid elongation are two parts of a critically important pathway in plants. The endproducts are essential components of cell membranes, waxes, and suberin. Two chemical families of herbicide (groups that share similar chemical structures) inhibit fatty acid synthesis, while fatty acid elongation is inhibited by two other families. This lesson will provide an overview of fatty acid synthesis and elongation, and explain where herbicides inhibit the pathway. Mechanisms of resistance to these herbicides will be described.

  9. Breast milk: Fatty acid composition and maternal diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihela Dujmovi?

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast milk from healthy and well-nourished mothers is the preferred form of infants´ feeding in the first six months after parturition, and breastfeeding in this period supports the normal growth and development of new-born infants. During the first month postpartum, breast milk changes through three stages: colostrum, transitional milk and mature milk. Mature milk, which is excreted after the 16th day postpartum, contains on average 3.4-4.5 % lipids. Breast milk lipids fulfill 40-55 % of an infant´s daily energy needs and provide a supply of fat-soluble vitamins and fatty acids. The characteristics of milk lipids are largely determined by their fatty acid composition. In this work the general characteristics of breast milk and milk lipids, as well as the influence of maternal diet on composition of fatty acids in breast milk, are discussed. Breast milk provides all dietary essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (C18:2n-6 and ?-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3, as well as their longer-chain more-unsaturated metabolites, including arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6 and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6n-3. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are of particular importance in visual and neural development, and their content in milk is a reflection of the mother´s current and long-term dietary intake. A positive association has been established between the maternal intake of fish and seafood and the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (especially docosahexaenoic acid in milk. Numerous researches have been shown that supplementation with docosahexaenoic acids during the last trimester of pregnancy and during lactation significantly increases the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in breast milk.

  10. A Chemotaxonomic Approach to the Fatty Acid and Tocochromanol Content of Cannabis sativa L. (Cannabaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Bag?ci, Eyu?p

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the fatty acid, tocopherol and tocotrienol composition in the seed oil of Cannabis sativa L., which is traded under the common name hemp seed oil, were determined by using GLC and HPLC techniques. While a- linolenic, linoleic, oleic and palmitic acid were the main fatty acid components, g - linolenic (18:3 n-6) and stearidonic acid (18:4 n-3) were found as unusual minor fatty acids in the seed oil. g - linolenic acid is an important fatty acid used both as a healthy nutrient an...

  11. Thiamine and fatty acid content of Lake Michigan Chinook salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Peters, A.K.; Jones, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional status of Lake Michigan Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is inadequately documented. An investigation was conducted to determine muscle and liver thiamine content and whole body fatty acid composition in small, medium and large Chinook salmon. Muscle and liver thiamine concentrations were highest in small salmon, and tended to decrease with increasing fish size. Muscle thiamine was higher in fall than spring in large salmon. The high percentage of Chinook salmon (24-32% in fall and 58-71% in spring) with muscle thiamine concentration below 500 pmol/g, which has been associated with loss of equilibrium and death in other Great Lake salmonines, suggest that Chinook appear to rely less on thiamine than other Great Lakes species for which such low concentrations would be associated with thiamine deficiency (Brown et al. 2005b). A positive correlation was observed between liver total thiamine and percent liver lipids (r = 0.53, P fatty acids declined between fall and spring. Essential omega-3 fatty acids appear to be conserved as lipid content declined. Arachidonic acid (C20:4n6), an essential omega-6 fatty acid was not different between fall and spring, although the sum of omega-6 (Sw6) fatty acids declined over winter. Elevated concentrations of saturated fatty acids (sum) were observed in whole body tissue lipid. In summary, thiamine, a dietary essential vitamin, and individual fatty acids were found to vary in Lake Michigan Chinook salmon by fish size and season of the year.

  12. Gene transfer of Chlorella vulgaris n-3 fatty acid desaturase optimizes the fatty acid composition of human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meilan Xue

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella vulgaris has the gene of n-3 fatty acid desaturase (CvFad3, which can synthesize the precursor of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs or convert n-6 to n-3 PUFAs. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the CvFad3 gene from C. vulgaris can be functionally and efficiently expressed in human breast cancer cells and whether its expression can exert a significant effect on cell fatty acid composition. We inserted the CvFad3 gene into the plasmid pEGFP-C3 to construct the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-C3-n-3 and to express the n-3 Fad gene in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells. Transfection of MCF-7 cells with the recombinant vector resulted in a high expression of n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Lipid analysis indicated that the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs was decreased from 6:1 in the control cells to about 1:1 in the cells expressing the n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Accordingly, the CvFad3 gene significantly decreased the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs of the MCF-7 cell membrane. The expression of the CvFad3 gene can decrease cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that the CvFad3 gene can dramatically balance the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs and may provide an effective approach to the modification of the fatty acid composition of mammalian cells, also providing a basis for potential applications of its transfer in experimental and clinical settings.

  13. Gene transfer of Chlorella vulgaris n-3 fatty acid desaturase optimizes the fatty acid composition of human breast cancer cells

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Meilan, Xue; Yinlin, Ge; Jinyu, Zhang; Qing, Wang; Lin, Hou.

    1141-11-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella vulgaris has the gene of n-3 fatty acid desaturase (CvFad3), which can synthesize the precursor of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) or convert n-6 to n-3 PUFAs. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the CvFad3 gene from C. vulgaris can be functionally and efficie [...] ntly expressed in human breast cancer cells and whether its expression can exert a significant effect on cell fatty acid composition. We inserted the CvFad3 gene into the plasmid pEGFP-C3 to construct the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-C3-n-3 and to express the n-3 Fad gene in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells). Transfection of MCF-7 cells with the recombinant vector resulted in a high expression of n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Lipid analysis indicated that the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs was decreased from 6:1 in the control cells to about 1:1 in the cells expressing the n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Accordingly, the CvFad3 gene significantly decreased the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs of the MCF-7 cell membrane. The expression of the CvFad3 gene can decrease cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that the CvFad3 gene can dramatically balance the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs and may provide an effective approach to the modification of the fatty acid composition of mammalian cells, also providing a basis for potential applications of its transfer in experimental and clinical settings.

  14. Cellular fatty acid composition of marine-derived fungi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi; Shridhar, M.P.D.; DeSouza, L.; Naik, C.G.

    2006-01-01

    in certain species of green algae 20 . In conclusion, high concentrations of C18 PUFAs (18:2 n-6 and 18:1 n-9) together with relatively high concentrations of saturated fatty acids like palmitic (16:0) and stearic acids (18:0) accompanied by minor... contribution no. 4140. References 1 Pupin, A.M., Messias, C.L., Piedrabuena, A.E. & Roberts, D.W., Total lipids and fatty acids of strains of Metarhizium Anisopliae, Braz J Microbiol., 31(2000) 121-128. 2 Weete, J.D., Lipids in fungal growth...

  15. Fatty acids for myocardial imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, J R

    1999-07-01

    Radioiodinated free fatty acids are tracers that can be used to assess both myocardial perfusion and metabolism. There have been several fatty acids and structurally modified fatty acids studied since Evans' initial report of radiolabeled I-123 oleic acid in 1965. The radiolabeling of a phenyl group added to the long chain fatty acids in the omega-terminal position opposite the carboxyl terminal group prevents nonspecific deiodination and the rapid release of free iodine as the tracer undergoes beta-oxidation. The additional inclusion of a methyl or dimethyl group to the chain slows oxidation resulting in prolonged myocardial retention. The longer retention of the radiolabel permits longer image acquisitions more compatible with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging, especially with single-detector imaging systems. Several protocols have been implemented using these compounds, particularly 15-(para-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methyl pentadecanoic BMIPP, to detect abnormal fatty acid metabolism in ischemic heart disease as well as in nonischemic and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. Successful management of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathies depends on the accurate identification of hibernating myocardium. The studies covered in this review suggest that both IPPA and BMIPP, especially when combined with markers of myocardial perfusion, may be excellent tracers of viable and potentially functional myocardium. Future studies with larger numbers of patients are needed to confirm the results of these studies and to compare their efficacy with that of other available imaging modalities. Cost and distribution issues will have to be resolved for these metabolic tracers to compete in the commercial marketplace. Otherwise they will likely be available only on a limited basis for research use. As progress is made with these issues and with the development of newer imaging systems, the use of radioiodinated and fluorinated fatty acids is likely to be increasingly attractive. PMID:10433339

  16. Dietary lipids and forages interactions on cow and goat milk fatty acid composition and sensory properties

    OpenAIRE

    Chilliard, Yves; Ferlay, Anne

    2004-01-01

    This review summarises the known effects of dietary factors on bovine and caprine milk fatty acid composition, as well as the regulation of cow and goat mammary lipid secretion. Special attention is given to fatty acids that could play a role for human health, such as saturated fatty acids, oleic acid, n-6- or n-3-C18 to C22 polyunsaturated fatty acids, trans isomers of C18:1 and C18:2, and isomers of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). The main dietary factors taken into account are the nature o...

  17. Comparing the fatty acid composition of organic and conventional milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, K A; Innocent, G; Grove-White, D; Cripps, P; McLean, W G; Howard, C V; Mihm, M

    2006-06-01

    During a 12-mo longitudinal study, bulk-tank milk was collected each month from organic (n = 17) and conventional (n = 19) dairy farms in the United Kingdom. All milk samples were analyzed for fatty acid (FA) content, with the farming system type, herd production level, and nutritional factors affecting the FA composition investigated by use of mixed model analyses. Models were constructed for saturated fatty acids, the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) to monounsaturated fatty acids, total n-3 FA, total n-6 FA, conjugated linoleic acid, and vaccenic acid. The ratio of n-6:n-3 FA in both organic and conventional milk was also compared. Organic milk had a higher proportion of PUFA to monounsaturated fatty acids and of n-3 FA than conventional milk, and contained a consistently lower n-6:n-3 FA ratio (which is considered beneficial) compared with conventional milk. There was no difference between organic and conventional milk with respect to the proportion of conjugated linoleic acid or vaccenic acid. A number of factors other than farming system were identified which affected milk FA content including month of year, herd average milk yield, breed type, use of a total mixed ration, and access to fresh grazing. Thus, organic dairy farms in the United Kingdom produce milk with a higher PUFA content, particularly n-3 FA, throughout the year. However, knowledge of the effects of season, access to fresh grazing, or use of specific silage types could be used by producers to enhance the content of beneficial FA in milk. PMID:16702257

  18. Thai jute seed oil: a potential polyunsaturated fatty acid source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitree Suttajit

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined lipid and fatty acid compositions of different varieties of jute (Po-kra-jao, Corchorus olitorius L. seed grown in Thailand. Four different jute seeds (Nonn-Soong, Keaw-Yai, Cuba and Khonkaen harvested from northeastern Thailand were ground, their lipid was extracted with chloroform: methanol (2:1, v/v, and lipid composition was determined by Iatroscan (TLC/FID. Fatty acid composition was analyzed using GLC with standard methods. Triacylglycerol was a predominant lipid in jute seed oil, ranging from 70% to 74%, and other two minor components were phytosterol (12% to 28% and diacylglycerol (0% to 9%. The ratio of saturates: monounsaturates: polyunsaturates, was approximately 2: 3: 4. Most predominant polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA was linoleic acid (18:2n-6, accounting for 40-67% of total fatty acid. Nonn-Soong had the highest amount of PUFA (67.7%, followed by Khonkaen (44.53%, Keaw-Yai (41.14%, and Cuba (40.19%. Another PUFA found was ?-linolenic acid (18:3n-3, accounting for about 1% of total fatty acid. The results indicated that jute seed oil was a potential edible PUFA source. The oils obtained from different kinds of jute seeds had significantly different lipid and fatty acid compositions.

  19. Simulation of Palm based Fatty Acids Distillation

    OpenAIRE

    Chin Peng Jiun; Oh Pin Pin; Awang Bono

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acids have long been recognized for their commercial value in the absence of glycerol. Chemicals derived from fatty acids are widely used in the formulation of detergents, lubricant, surfactants and in pharmaceutical industries. In addition, fatty acids also play a vital role in human metabolism and are widely used as catalyst in some chemical reactions. Commercially produced fatty acids are derived from naturally occurring fats and oils through the process of hydrolysis. Most of these ...

  20. Erythrocyte fatty acid status in a convenience sample of residents of the Guatemalan Pacific coastal plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Noel W; Bailey, Eileen; Soto Méndéz, María José; Campos, Raquel; Kraemer, Klaus; Salem, Norman

    2015-07-01

    We report the fatty acid composition, and in particular, the n-3 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA), in erythrocytes from a convenience sample of 158 women and 135 schoolchildren residing in the southern Pacific Coast of Guatemala. Erythrocyte fatty acids were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography with flame ionization detection and the profiles were expressed as a weight percent; the Omega-3 Index values were also determined. Schoolchildren had significantly higher mean ARA and total n-6 fatty acid levels than the women. Women had significantly higher EPA fatty acid levels than schoolchildren, but the reverse was true for DHA. For mean total n-3 fatty acid concentration, women and schoolchildren had similar values. The red cell weight percentages of selected fatty acids were also similar in women and schoolchildren. As compared with erythrocyte fatty acid data from developed countries, Guatemalan women and schoolchildren had consistently lower LCPUFA values. The traditional diet of Guatemalans living in the Pacific coastal region provided a worse erythrocyte fatty acid profile than that typically obtained from a Western diet. Additional fatty acid composition studies with associated dietary intake data in other inland locations may be useful for the interpretation of the nutritional status of Guatemalan children and adults. PMID:25979321

  1. The role of essential fatty acids in the control of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedtofte, Mia Sadowa; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from various research paradigms supports the cardiovascular benefits of a high intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially the long-chain, marine-derived n-3 PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acids and docosahexaenoic acids. The effect of the plant-derived alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is, however, not clear. Concerns about a high n-6 PUFA intake has been raised, because n-6 PUFA may weaken the effects of n-3 PUFA.

  2. Trans Fatty Acids and Memory

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home ? Latest Health News ? Trans Fatty Acids and Memory URL of this page: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videos/news/ ...

  3. Fatty acid composition of intramuscular fat from pastoral yak and Tibetan sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatty acid (FA) composition of intramuscular fat from mature male yak (n=6) and mature Tibetan sheep (n=6) grazed on the same pasture in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau was analyzed by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer to characterize fat composition of these species and to evaluate possible differenc...

  4. Essential fatty acid intake and serum fatty acid composition among adolescent girls in central Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Riitta; Korkalo, Liisa; Vessby, Bengt; Tengblad, Siv; Vaara, Elina M; Hauta-Alus, Helena; Selvester, Kerry; Mutanen, Marja

    2015-04-01

    Many African diets are low in fat but are currently changing because of nutrition transition. We studied fat and fatty acid (FA) intake and the essential fatty acid (EFA) status of adolescent girls (aged 14-19 years, n 262) in Zambezia Province, central Mozambique. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a city as well as in the towns and rural villages of a coastal and an inland district. Dietary intake and FA sources were studied in a 24 h dietary recall. FA compositions of cholesteryl esters and phospholipids of non-fasting serum samples were analysed by GLC. Fat intake was low (13-18 % of energy) in all areas. Coconut and palm oil were the main sources of fat, and soyabean oil and maize were the main sources of PUFA. Compared to Food and Agriculture Organization/WHO 2010 recommendations, intake of linoleic acid (LA, 18 : 2n-6) was inadequate in the coastal district, and intakes of n-3 PUFA were inadequate in all areas. FA compositions of serum lipids differed between areas. The proportions of LA tended to be highest in the city and lowest in the rural areas. The phospholipid mead (20 : 3n-9):arachidonic acid (20 : 4n-6) ratio did not indicate EFA insufficiency. LA proportions in phospholipids were low, but those of long-chain n-6 and n-3 PUFA were high in comparison with Western adolescents. To conclude, fat sources, FA intake and EFA status differed between adolescent girls living in different types of communities. Fat intake was low, but EFA insufficiency was not indicated. PMID:25772191

  5. Abnormalities in the serum phospholipids fatty acid profile in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis - a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Ristic?-medic?, Danijela; Takic?, Marija; Vuc?ic?, Vesna; Kandic?, Dragoslav; Kostic?, Nada; Glibetic?, Marija

    2013-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of serum phospholipids were analyzed in 20 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis (11 with malnutrition and 9 with acceptable nutritional status); 25 healthy age and sex-matched adults were used as controls. Cirrhotic patients showed higher levels of palmitic acid and total saturated fatty acids than healthy subjects. Total n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and levels of linoleic, dihomo-gama linolenic, arachidonic, and docosahexaenoic acid were signi...

  6. Synthesis and diagnostic use of ?-substituted fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application, evaluation and synthesis are discussed of the radioiodinated ?-substituted fatty acids used as myocardial imaging agents. The possibilities of the synthesis of all modifications of the radiolabelled fatty acids - ?-halogen acids, ?(p-iodophenyl) acids, ?-5-iodothienyl acids, ?-substituted ?- and ?-methyl-branched fatty acids, ?-iodoalkenyl fatty acids and ?-substituted tellurium fatty acids are demonstrated. The iodination methods are also included. (author)

  7. Long?chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and the pathophysiology of myalgic encephalomyelitis (chronic fatigue syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Puri, B. K.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence is put forward to suggest that myalgic encephalomyelitis, also known as chronic fatigue syndrome, may be associated with persistent viral infection. In turn, such infections are likely to impair the ability of the body to biosynthesise n?3 and n?6 long?chain polyunsaturated fatty acids by inhibiting the ??6 desaturation of the precursor essential fatty acids—namely, ??linolenic acid and linoleic acid. This would, in turn, impair the proper functioning of cell membranes,...

  8. Analysis of Fatty Acids from Gentiana olivieri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsala Mansoor

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The plants of Gentiana olivieri collected from Hazar Ganji, Quetta, were analysed for their fatty acid composition. The acids were converted into methyl esters and identified by Gas liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, which revealed the presence of pentadecanoic, hexadecanoic, heptadecanoic, octadecenoic and nonadecanoic acid. The only unsaturated fatty acid found was heptadecatrienoic acid.

  9. Proximate Composition and Fatty Acids Profile in Oleaginous Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Claudia Rodrigues

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids were quantified in oleaginous seeds: pistachio, almonds, European nuts, cashew nuts, hazelnuts, Brazil nuts, pecan nuts, and macadamia nuts. Three brands of each sample were purchased in three lots (n = 9. The proximate composition, energetic value, and fatty acids (FA were determined by gas chromatography. All seeds had large amounts of total lipids and the highest contents (ca. 70% were found in macadamia, pecan, and European nuts. The samples had significant amounts of crude protein. Pistachio and cashew nuts had the greatest amount (ca. 20%, as well as the largest carbohydrate contents (32%. All seeds were rather energetic, ranging from 600 to 760 Kcal.g-1. From seven to nine FA were identified and quantified, oleic (n-9 and linoleic (n-6 acids were the major acids. Essential fatty acid a-linolenic (n-3 was found in European nuts (except pistachio with an n-6/n-3 ratio (4:1 that is very beneficial to health. Trans FA were also observed in salted roasted cashew nuts. The major saturated FA (SFA was palmitic, stearic, and arachidonic acids, however, their amounts were much lower than those of polyunsaturated acids (PUFA and monounsaturated acids (MUFA. European nuts had the greatest PUFA/SFA ratio (9, followed by almonds (3.6.

  10. Transgenic mice rich in endogenous omega-3 fatty acids are protected from colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hudert, Christian A.; Weylandt, Karsten H.; Lu, Yan; Wang, Jingdong; Hong, Song; Dignass, Axel; Serhan, Charles N.; Kang, Jing X.

    2006-01-01

    Omega-6 (n-6) and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are the precursors of potent lipid mediators and play an important role in regulation of inflammation. Generally, n-6 PUFA promote inflammation whereas n-3 PUFA have antiinflammatory properties, traditionally attributed to their ability to inhibit the formation of n-6 PUFA-derived proinflammatory eicosanoids. Newly discovered resolvins and protectins are potent antiinflammatory lipid mediators derived directly from n-3 PUFA wi...

  11. Fatty Acid Profiles of the Seed Oils in Two Groups of Anchusa officinalis L.

    OpenAIRE

    O?zcan, Tamer

    2010-01-01

     Total seed oil and fatty acid compositions of two informal groups of Anchusa officinalis L. were studied in order to provide additional information for the delineation of the groups. Major fatty acids were linoleic (C18:2n6), oleic (C18:1n9), ?-linolenic (C18:3n3), ?-linolenic (C18:3n6), palmitic (C16:0) and stearidonic acid (C18:4n3) respectively. The lower levels were observed in stearic (C18:0), eicosenoic (C20:1n9) and erucic acids (C22:1n9). Linoleic (24,4 to 25,8%) and...

  12. Lipid content and fatty acid composition in foods commonly consumed by nursing Congolese women: incidences on their essential fatty acid intakes and breast milk fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocquelin, G; Tapsoba, S; Mbemba, F; Gallon, G; Picq, C

    1998-09-01

    The fat content and fatty acid (FA) composition of nearly 40 foods, currently consumed by 102 nursing Congolese mothers living in Brazzaville, were determined to assess their impact on mothers' essential fatty acid (EFA) intakes and breast milk FA. Data on mothers' milk FA and dietary habits which allowed food selection were recently published (Rocquelin et al., 1998). Most foods were locally produced. Food samples were collected at local markets, bleached if necessary to avoid microbial degradation, and stored at +4 degrees C or -20 degrees C. They were lyophilized upon their arrival in the laboratory before lipid analyses. FA composition of food lipids was determined by capillary gas chromatography. Staple diets included low-fat, high-carbohydrate foods (processed cassava roots, wheat bread) and high-polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) foods: soybean oil (high in 18 : 2 n-6 and alpha-18 : 3 n-3), bushbutter (dacryodes edulis), peanuts, avocado (high in fat and 18 : 2 n-6), freshwater and salt-water fish (high in LC n-3 and/or n-6 PUFA), and leafy green vegetables (low in fat but very high in alpha-18 : 3 n-3). Their frequent consumption by nursing mothers provided enough EFA to meet requirements due to lactation. It also explains why mothers' breast milk was rich in C8-C14 saturated FA (26% of total FA) and in n-6, n-3 PUFA (respectively 15.0% and 2.4% of total FA) highly profitable for breastfed infants' development. From this point of view, dietary habits of Congolese mothers have to be sustained for they are more adequate than most Western-type diets. PMID:10367004

  13. Selective incorporation of various C-22 polyunsaturated fatty acids in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three 14C-labeled 22-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids, 7,10,13,16-[14C]docosatetraenoic acid (22:4(n-6)), 7,10,13,16,19-[14C]docosapentaenoic acid (22:5(n-3)), and 4,7,10,13,16,19-[14C]docosahexaenoic acid (22:6(n-3)), were compared with [3H]arachidonic acid (20:4(n-6] and [14C]linoleic acid (18:2(n-6)) to characterize their incorporation into the lipids of Ehrlich ascites cells. The relatively rapid incorporation of the labeled 22-carbon acids into phosphatidic acid indicated that substantial amounts of these acids may be incorporated through the de novo pathway of phospholipid synthesis. In marked contrast to 20:4(n-6), the 22-carbon acids were incorporated much less into choline glycerophospholipids (CGP) and inositol glycerophospholipids (IGP). No selective preference was apparent for the (n-3) or (n-6) type of fatty acids. The amounts of the acids incorporated into diacylglycerophosphoethanolamine were in the order of: 22:6(n-3) greater than 20:4(n-6) much greater than 22:5(n-3) greater than or equal to 22:4(n-6) greater than 18:2(n-6), whereas for alkylacylglycerophosphoethanolamine they were in the order of: 22:4(n-6) greater than 22:6(n-3) greater than 22:5(n-3) much greater than 20:4(n-6) greater than 18:2(n-6). Of the mechanisms possibly responsible for the selective entry of 22-carbon acids into ethanolamine glycerophospholipids, the most reasonable explanation was that the cytidine-mediated ethanolamn was that the cytidine-mediated ethanolamine phosphotransferase may have a unique double selectivity: for hexaenoic species of diacylglycerol and for 22-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing species of alkylacylglycerol. The relative distribution of fatty acids between newly incorporated and already maintained lipid classes suggested that IGP may function in Ehrlich cells as an intermediate pool for the retention of polyunsaturated fatty acids in glycerolipids

  14. Sex differences in the relationship of dietary fatty acids to cognitive measures in American children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WillLassek

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Because the first neurons evolved in an environment high in the n-3 (omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, this fatty acid became a major component of neural structure and function and makes up 10% of the dry weight of the human brain. Since n-3 fatty acids must come from the diet, this suggests a possible positive role for dietary n-3 fatty acids in cognition and a possible negative role for n-6 fatty acids, which compete with n-3 for access to critical enzymes. Because human females must provide DHA for the growth of the unusually large brains of their offspring from maternal fat stored during childhood, their need for DHA is especially great. We used stepwise regression to determine whether particular dietary fatty acids and other nutrients were related to cognitive performance in over 4000 American children aged 6 to 16 from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III; a variety of possible biological, social and environmental risk factors were statistically controlled. In this context the only dietary factors related to cognitive performance were n-3 and n-6 fatty acids. Dietary n-3 fatty acids were positively related to cognitive test scores in male and female children, while n-6 showed the reverse relationship, significantly so in females. In female children the positive effects of n-3 intake were twice as strong as in males and exceeded the negative effects of lead exposure. This suggests that increasing dietary intake of n-3 and decreasing n-6 fatty acids may have cognitive benefits in children, especially in females.

  15. Plasma Fatty Acid Profile of Gestating Ewes Supplemented with Fishmeal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamun M. Or-Rashid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The very long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (>18C cannot be adequately synthesized by ruminant tissues to meet their requirements; therefore, their concentration in body depends on the supply through feed. It may be possible to improve the essential fatty acid status of ruminant animals, during gestation by manipulating the maternal diet with Fishmeal (FM. The objectives of this research were to (1 determine the effect of fishmeal supplementation on the plasma fatty acid profile of ewes during late gestation and (2 determine the status of the plasma docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n3 of lambs born to these ewes. Approach: Eight gestating ewes [Rideau-Arcott, 97±5 kg initial body weight, 100 days of gestation] were used in a completely randomized design. Ewes were individually-housed and fed either a control diet (supplemented with soybean meal or a fishmeal supplemented diet. Blood samples were collected via jugular venipuncture for plasma fatty acids analysis on 100, 114, 128 and 142 days of â??gestationâ?. Blood samples from the lambs were also collected via jugular venipuncture immediately after birth and before receiving their mothersâ?? colostrum. Plasma fatty acids were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. Results: The ewes from both groups, i.e., control and fishmeal supplemented, had a similar fatty acid profile prior to supplementation (at 100 days, p>0.05. Thereafter, there was an increase in eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n3, docosahexaenoic acid, total n3-PUFA and total very long chain n3-PUFA (>C18 contents in plasma for the fishmeal supplemented ewes compared to the control (p0.05 in total saturated fatty acids, total monounsaturated fatty acids, total conjugated linoleic acid, total trans-18:1, total cis-18:1, or total n6-PUFA contents in ewe plasma between control and fishmeal supplemented groups. Lambs born to ewes fed the fishmeal supplemented diet had greater (pConclusion: The ewes supplemented with fishmeal supplementation showed a positive response with the enrichment of docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and total very long chain n3-PUFA in plasma during gestation and these fatty acids were transferred to the fetus as well.

  16. Botanical oils enriched in n-6 and n-3 FADS2 products are equally effective in preventing atherosclerosis and fatty liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewale, Swapnil V; Boudyguina, Elena; Zhu, Xuewei; Shen, Lulu; Hutchins, Patrick M; Barkley, Robert M; Murphy, Robert C; Parks, John S

    2015-06-01

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in 18:4 n-3, the immediate product of fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) desaturation of 18:3 n-3, is as atheroprotective as fish oil (FO). The objective of this study was to determine whether botanical oils enriched in the FADS2 products 18:3 n-6 versus 18:4 n-3 are equally atheroprotective. LDL receptor KO mice were fed one of four atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and 10% calories as palm oil (PO) plus 10% calories as: 1) PO; 2) borage oil (BO; 18:3 n-6 enriched); 3) EO (18:4 n-3 enriched); or 4) FO for 16 weeks. Mice fed BO, EO, and FO versus PO had significantly lower plasma total and VLDL cholesterol concentrations; hepatic neutral lipid content and inflammation, aortic CE content, aortic root intimal area and macrophage content; and peritoneal macrophage inflammation, CE content, and ex vivo chemotaxis. Atheromas lacked oxidized CEs despite abundant generation of macrophage 12/15 lipooxygenase-derived metabolites. We conclude that botanical oils enriched in 18:3 n-6 and 18:4 n-3 PUFAs beyond the rate-limiting FADS2 enzyme are equally effective in preventing atherosclerosis and hepatosteatosis compared with saturated/monounsaturated fat due to cellular enrichment of ?20 PUFAs, reduced plasma VLDL, and attenuated macrophage inflammation. PMID:25921305

  17. Effects of dietary butter enrichment on the fatty acid distribution of phospholipid fractions isolated from rat platelets and aortae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, J M; Sinclair, A J; O'Dea, K; Steel, M S

    1988-09-23

    Rats were maintained for 2 weeks on a low-fat basal diet (5% energy) and a diet from which 50% of the energy was derived from butter. Lipids were extracted from aortae and platelets and the fatty acid profiles of individual phospholipids were examined. Similar responses to dietary butter enrichment occurred in PI, PS, PE and PC fractions from either tissue: 20:4(n - 6) and all other n - 6 series longer-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids except 20:3(n - 6) decreased in percentage; all n - 3 series polyunsaturated fatty acids increased, including 20:5(n - 3) and 22:6(n - 3); n - 9 series polyunsaturated fatty acids, derived from 18:1(n - 9), increased. Despite the considerable redistribution of polyunsaturated fatty acids, the percentages of total polyunsaturated fatty acids in each phospholipid were, in every case, independent of diet. None of the changes were localized in a particular phospholipid fraction. Quantitation of fatty acids using heptadecanoic acid as an internal standard revealed that the concentrations of 20:4(n - 6) in platelet and aortic PE and PC was higher than in PI fractions. Therefore, in terms of substrate amount, it appears that PC and PE as well as PI have the potential to provide endogenous 20:4(n - 6) for oxygenation to the prostanoids thromboxane A2 and prostacyclin I2. PMID:3139039

  18. Intramuscular fatty acid composition in beef from Aosta cattle breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Barge

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to compare fat quality of three categories of the Aosta cattle breeds by fatty acid composition. Samples of longissimus thoracis et lumborum from 12 calves, 11 young bulls and 11 cows of Aosta Red Pied and Black Pied were bought at retail. Fatty acids content showed in most cases, except for C18:1, significant differences between the three categories. Veal calves had the lowest proportion of SFA and highest of PUFA, therefore they had the best PUFA/SFA ratio but the worst n-6/n-3 ratio due to the highest proportion of C18:2n-6. Besides veal calves was healthier by having best atherogenicity and thrombogenicity indices. Black Pied young bulls, in comparison to Red Pied young bulls, showed a significant lower proportion of C10:0, C18:1, and a significant higher proportion of C18:2n-6, C18:3n-3 and C20:4n-6. Consequently they had a significant lower MUFA content but a higher PUFA content therefore a significant better PUFA/SFA ratio.

  19. PPARs : fatty acid sensors controlling metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars la Cour; Siersbæk, Majken

    2012-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors that play key roles in the regulation of lipid metabolism, inflammation, cellular growth, and differentiation. The receptors bind and are activated by a broad range of fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives and they thereby serve as major transcriptional sensors of fatty acids. Here we review the function, regulation, and mechanism of the different PPAR subtypes with special emphasis on their role in the regulation of lipid metabolism.

  20. Simulation of Palm based Fatty Acids Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Peng Jiun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids have long been recognized for their commercial value in the absence of glycerol. Chemicals derived from fatty acids are widely used in the formulation of detergents, lubricant, surfactants and in pharmaceutical industries. In addition, fatty acids also play a vital role in human metabolism and are widely used as catalyst in some chemical reactions. Commercially produced fatty acids are derived from naturally occurring fats and oils through the process of hydrolysis. Most of these raw materials result in nature as complex mixtures of triglycerides, alcohols and other esters. Alternatively, common edible oils used are sunflower oil, corn oil, soybean oil, palm and palm kernel oil. Crude fatty acids can be obtained from the process of hydrolysis and will be purified through total distillation. Due to fatty acid market demand, the purity requirement of distillated fatty acid products is increasing greatly. Since desired purity of fatty acid is achievable through the most common and most efficient means of fractionation distillation process, study on simulation of fatty acids distillation has a significant contribution to the oleo chemical industry. In this simulation study, the optimization of the tray specification, feed stream pressure and temperature on the purity performance of the fatty acid composition are investigated. In South East Asia, palm tree fruit ripen continuously and can be harvested all year round. Therefore, palm based fatty acids are selected to be used as the feed components. In the present study, binary and multi-component distillations of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids are studied. This simulation model is developed by using HYSYS simulator with suitable thermodynamic package chosen. A shortcut simulation method is built in advanced for preliminary estimations and for determining rigorous operating limits. Eventually, parametric optimization is performed to obtain the optimum operating conditions of the rigorous distillation column.

  1. Interaction of Fatty Acid with Myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Renuka; Kreutzer, Ulrike; Shih, Lifan; Jue, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Upon titration with palmitate, the 1H NMR spectra of metmyoglobin cyanide (MbCN) reveal a selective perturbation of the 8 heme methyl, consistent with a specific interaction of myoglobin (Mb) with fatty acid. Other detectable hyperfine shifted resonances of the heme group remain unchanged. Mb also enhances fatty acid solubility, as reflected in a more intense methylene peak of palmitate in Mb than in Tris buffer. Ligand binding analysis indicates an apparent palmitate dissociation constant (Kd) of 43 ?M. These results suggest that Mb can bind fatty acid and may have a role in facilitating fatty acid transport in the cell. PMID:18840435

  2. Essential fatty acid deficiency in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition 1,2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, P. B.; HØy, Carl-Erik

    1998-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN), initiated in patients with severe malabsorption or decreased oral intake, may exhaust stores of essential fatty acids and cause clinical manifestations, mainly dermatitis. Plasma fatty acid profiles were measured by gas-liquid chromatography in 37 healthy control subjects and 56 patients receiving HPN. The concentration (% by wt of total fatty acids) of 18:2n-6 was 22.8% and 11.4% (P 200 cm of remaining small intestine, those receiving parenteral lipids had only minor changes in the fatty acids of plasma phospholipids compared with patients not receiving parenteral lipids. In patients with < 100 cm of remaining small intestine, those receiving parenteral lipids had increased concentrations of total n-6 fatty acids; however, these did not reach the concentrations in control subjects. No differences were seen in n-3 fatty acids. Twenty-five of the 56 patients receiving HPN reported skin problems. No differences were found in plasma phospholipid fatty acids, Holman index, or the supply of parenteral lipids between patients with and without skin problems. Patients receiving HPN had biochemical signs of EFAD. Parenteral lipids did not increase the concentration of essential fatty acids to values comparable with those of control subjects, but 500 mt 20% Intralipid once a week was sufficient to prevent an increase in the Holman index above 0.2.

  3. Fatty-Acid composition of free-choice starter broiler diets

    OpenAIRE

    Kessler AM; DS Lubisco; MM Vieira; AML Ribeiro; Penz Jr AM

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to evaluate the inclusion of vegetable oils with different fatty acid content in starter and pre-starter broiler diets. In Experiment I 480 1- to 9-day-old male Ross 308 broilers were fed diets containing corn oil (CO), acid corn oil (ACO), linseed oil (LO) or coconut fat (CoF). Chicks were distributed according to a factorial 2x2x2arrangement (2 free fatty acids - FFA ) x (2 n6:n3 ratios) x (2 medium-chain fatty acids levels - AGMC). Performance responses and...

  4. Fatty Acid Composition of Agaricus bisporus (Lange) Sing.

    OpenAIRE

    Aktümsek, Abdurrahman; ÖZTÜRK, Celâleddin; KA?IK, Giyasettin

    1998-01-01

    Fatty acid compositions of fruit body, stem, lamellae and total of Agaricus bisporus were seperately analysed by GLC. In the all fatty acid compositions of A. bisporus, linoleic acid were predominant. Percentages of linoleic acid were varied between 53.45 - 68.78%. It was showed that the other major fatty acids were palmitic, oleic and stearic acid in the fatty acid compositions.

  5. Centesimal composition and fatty acids of meat from lambs fed diets containing soybean hulls

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Lívia Santos, Costa; Robério Rodrigues, Silva; Fabiano Ferreira da, Silva; Gleidson Giordano Pinto de, Carvalho; Julliana Izabelle, Simionato; Jair de Araújo, Marques; Vinícius Lopes da, Silva; Cláudia Batista, Sampaio.

    1720-17-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the centesimal composition and fatty acids in meat from animals fed diets containing levels of soybean hulls. The experiment was conducted at UESB in Itapetinga-BA, Brazil. Twenty-five confined Santa Inês rams were used. Treatments consisted of different l [...] evels of substitution of corn by soybean hulls (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100%) and elephant grass silage as forage. The design was completely randomized. Samples of concentrate and silage were collected to evaluate the fatty acid composition. The experimental period lasted 110 days. After this period, the animals were slaughtered and samples of the longissimus muscle were collected and vacuum-packed for further analysis. The levels of total lipid and protein showed quadratic effect with the increase of soybean hulls in the diet, as the moisture increased linearly with inclusion. There was no effect of treatments on the percentage of ash. The composition of saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), PUFA/SFA and omega 6 (n-6) did not change, but increases in n-3 and reduction in the n-6:n-3 ratio were observed when the the amount of soybean hulls in the diet increased. The content of fatty acid conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) ranged from 3.0 to 4.0 g/kg at levels of substitution. The inclusion of soybean hulls in the diet increased CLA, the n-3 and decreased the n-6:n-3 ratio.

  6. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis IX. : Fatty Acid Synthesis from Enzymically and Chemically Acetylated Rabbit Mammary Gland Fatty Acid Synthetase.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, E. M.; Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max

    1972-01-01

    # 1. I. [I-14C]Acetate was covalently bound to rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase by enzymic transacylation from [I-14C]acetyl-CoA. Per mole of enzyme 2 moles of acetate were bound to thiol groups and up to I mole of acetate was bound to non-thiol groups. # 2. 2. The acetyl-fatty acid synthetase complex was isolated free from acetyl-CoA. It was rapidly hydrolysed at 30°C, but hydrolysis was greatly diminished at o°C and triacetic lactone synthesis occurred. In the presence of malonyl-CoA and NADPH, all the acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase was incorporated into long-chain fatty acids. Hydrolysis of bound acetate and incorporation of bound acetate into fatty acids were inhibited to the same extent by guanidine hydrochloride. # 3. 3. Acetate was also covalently bound to fatty acid synthetase by chemical acetylation with [I-14C]acetic anhydride in the absence of CoASH. A total of 60 moles of acetate were bound per mole of fatty acid synthetase, with 20–25 moles being bound to thiol groups per mole of enzyme. Acylation did not inhibit enzyme activity. The majority of the bound acetate was stable to hydrolysis at o °C. Out of the 60 moles of acetate bound per mole of acetylated enzyme, up to 20 moles were incorporated into fatty acids in the presence of malonyl-CoA and NADPH. # 4. 4. Due to the rapid hydrolysis of acetyl-fatty acid synthetase prepared from both acetyl-CoA and acetic anhydride, direct carboxylation of acetyl-fatty acid synthetase to form malonyl-fatty acid synthetase could not be demonstrated by CO2 fixation under the experimental conditions used. With acetic anhydride as acetyl donor, there was a low rate of incorporation of acetate into fatty acids in the presence of NADPH but absence of added malonyl-CoA. This could be due to direct carboxylation of the acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase or, if any CoA were associated with the fatty acid synthetase, to carboxylation of acetyl-CoA formed by chemical acetylation of this CoA.

  7. Effect of fatty acids on leukocyte function

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    C., Pompéia; L.R., Lopes; C.K., Miyasaka; J., Procópio; P., Sannomiya; R., Curi.

    1255-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids have various effects on immune and inflammatory responses, acting as intracellular and intercellular mediators. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of the omega-3 family have overall suppressive effects, inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation, antibody and cytokine production, adhesion mole [...] cule expression, natural killer cell activity and triggering cell death. The omega-6 PUFAs have both inhibitory and stimulatory effects. The most studied of these is arachidonic acid that can be oxidized to eicosanoids, such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes and thromboxanes, all of which are potent mediators of inflammation. Nevertheless, it has been found that many of the effects of PUFA on immune and inflammatory responses are not dependent on eicosanoid generation. Fatty acids have also been found to modulate phagocytosis, reactive oxygen species production, cytokine production and leukocyte migration, also interfering with antigen presentation by macrophages. The importance of fatty acids in immune function has been corroborated by many clinical trials in which patients show improvement when submitted to fatty acid supplementation. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain fatty acid modulation of immune response, such as changes in membrane fluidity and signal transduction pathways, regulation of gene transcription, protein acylation, and calcium release. In this review, evidence is presented to support the proposition that changes in cell metabolism also play an important role in the effect of fatty acids on leukocyte functioning, as fatty acids regulate glucose and glutamine metabolism and mitochondrial depolarization.

  8. Effect of ?-3 Fatty Acid on Gastrointestinal Motility after Abdominal Operation in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Guang-Jin Zhu; Qun Zhang; Wei-Ming Kang; Jian-Chun Yu

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether ?-3 fatty acid could stimulate gastrointestinal motility after abdominal operation. Method. Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 group (normal saline group, intralipid group, and ?-3 fatty acid group, n = 18/group) after partial caecectomy and gastrostomosis, each group was divided into 3 groups (POD1, POD3, and POD6, n = 6/group). Serum gastrin (GAS), motilin (MTL), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tissue necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), cyclooxygen...

  9. 40 CFR 721.3627 - Branched synthetic fatty acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Branched synthetic fatty acid. 721.3627 Section 721.3627...721.3627 Branched synthetic fatty acid. (a) Chemical substance and...generically as a branched synthetic fatty acid (PMN P-94-422) is...

  10. The effect of docosahexaenoic acid on t10, c12-conjugated linoleic acid-induced changes in fatty acid composition of mouse liver, adipose and muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Concomitant supplementation of 1.5% docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3; DHA) with 0.5% t10, c12- conjugated linoleic acid (18:2 n-6; CLA) prevented the CLA-induced increase in expression of hepatic genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and the decrease in expression of genes involved in fat...

  11. Four types of fatty acids exert differential impact on pancreatic cancer growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming; Liu, Hongyi; Duan, Yijie; Zhang, Dapeng; Li, Shasha; Wang, Feng

    2015-05-01

    Increased fatty acids (FAs) regulate pancreatic cancer progression, however, the detailed mechanism is not clear, and different forms of FAs may play diversified roles in pancreatic cancer. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we compared the effects of four major types of FAs on pancreatic cancer growth both in cell culture and in a mouse model. HPAF pancreatic cancer cells were implanted in nude mice for 14 weeks, and the mice were fed with four different high-fat/high-energy diets (15% fat, 4?kcal/g), an iso-caloric diet (5% fat, 4?kcal/g) and a normal diet (4% fat, 3?kcal/g). The high fat diets were rich in saturated fatty acids (SFAs), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), and n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n6- and n3PUFAs), respectively. While n3PUFA diet decreased tumor viability, the other high fat diets stimulated tumor viability by apparently different mechanisms. For instance, xenografts whose carriers were fed with SFA diet had marked expression of cancer-related proteins and lipid droplets. Although mice that were fed with MUFA- and n6PUFA diets had pancreatic tumors of similar size, liver metastasis occurred more frequently in those with the n6PUFA diet. In experiments in vitro, the HPAF-cell population was increased by SFAs and MUFAs, decreased by n3PUFAs and not changed by n6PUFAs. In conclusion, different fatty acids have different impact on pancreatic cancer cells. The effects of fatty acids on pancreatic cancer cells were consistent in vivo and in vitro except that n6PUFAs only had regulatory effects in vivo. PMID:25676690

  12. 40 CFR 721.3620 - Fatty acid amine condensate, polycarboxylic acid salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty acid amine condensate, polycarboxylic acid salts...Substances § 721.3620 Fatty acid amine condensate, polycarboxylic acid salts...chemical substance identified as a fatty acid amine condensate, polycarboxylic acid...

  13. 21 CFR 172.862 - Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. 172.862 Section 172.862...Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. The food additive oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids may be safely used in food...

  14. Polyunsaturated fatty acids for multiple sclerosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monserrat Kong-González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Fatty acids have an important role in structure and function of the nervous system. Recently, epidemiologic studies on neurodegenerative disorders have evaluated the usefulness of polyunsaturated fatty acids on multiple sclerosis. OBJECTIVE To examine recent studies, clinical trials, and reviews on the therapeutic effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids in multiple sclerosis. METHODS We conducted a search in MEDLINE/PubMed and Cochrane Library with the terms "fatty acids", "omega-3" and "omega-6" in combination with "multiple sclerosis". Articles were selected according to their relevance on the topic. RESULTS Epidemiologic studies have shown benefits of dietary supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids -especially omega-3- in relation to inflammatory, autoimmune and neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast, the studies do not show a beneficial effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids in multiple sclerosis. However, there are limitations related to design and sample issues in these studies CONCLUSIONS There is some evidence of a protective effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids on the risk of multiple sclerosis. Despite this, to date controlled trials have not produced definite results on the benefits of supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids in patients with multiple sclerosis. Any potential benefit will have to be confirmed in the long term.

  15. Omega-3 Fatty Acids during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHARE WITH WOMEN OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS DURING PREGNANCY During pregnancy, your baby gets most of his or her food from the foods you eat and vitamins you take. Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3s) are an important family of building ...

  16. Fatty acid profile, volatiles and antibacterial screening of lipids of the sponge Fasciospongia cavernosa (Schmidt collected from the Bay of Bengal (Orissa Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRAVAT MANJARI MISHRA

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid composition as well as the volatiles of a lipophilic extract from the marine sponge Fasciospongia cavernosa (Schmidt was analysed. The fatty acids (FA were characterized by linear saturated fatty acids (33.05 %, branched saturated fatty acids (9.30 % and mono-unsaturated fatty acids (18.07 %. A significant amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA (30.79 % was found in the total lipid, which included linoleic acid (18:2 n–6, 11.14 %, 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid/?-linolenic acid (18:3 n–3, 1.99 %, dihomo-g-linolenic acid (20:3 n–6, 2.03 % and arachidonic acid (20:4 n–3, 0.5 %. An antibacterial assay of the lipid extract of F. cavernosa showed broad-spectrum activity against different human and fish pathogens.

  17. Radioiodinated fatty acid analogs for myocardial imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruyan, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    Fatty acids are the preferred substrate for the normoxic heart. About sixty percent of the energy required by the myocardium is provided by fatty acid [beta]-oxidation. Many scientists have focused on the alterations in fatty acid metabolism in the ischemic heart for the development of radiolabelled fatty acids for functional imaging of the heart. Three main categories of compounds were synthesized: tetrazoles (1 and 2), glycidic and [alpha]-methylene acids (3-5), and analogs of oleic acid (6,7 and 7A). The tetrazole group has a similar pKa and size to that of a carboxyl group; however, such fatty acid analogs cannot undergo normal fatty acid metabolism. Glycidic and [alpha]-methylene analogs are potential irreversible inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism. Oleic acid analogs were investigated to assess the affect of stereochemical consequences on biodistribution. The key intermediates in the synthesis of the target compounds were [omega]-nitrophenyl alkylcarboxylic acids and alcohols, which were made using a variety of cross-coupling reactions. The Wittig reaction, which was used in the synthesis of tetrazole 1 and glycidic acid 3, gave low yields of the cross-coupled products. The remaining target compounds were synthesized by condensation of appropriate RCu (CN) ZnI and substituted benzyl bromides or by Pd[sup II] catalyzed cross-coupling of substituted arylhalides with suitable alkynes. The latter two reactions produced much higher yields of the desired products. All of the target compounds were radiolabeled with [sup 125]I by various Cu(I) catalyzed radioiodine exchange procedures and were then subjected to tissue biodistribution (TD) studies in rats. Except for the 15-(4-iodophenyl)-2-methylene-pentadecanoic acid (5), all of the fatty acid analogs failed to surpass clinically-used 15-(4-iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) in their ability to be taken up and retained by the rat myocardium.

  18. Product Fat-1 Transgenic Simmental Crossbred Cattle Endogenously Synthesizing Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Using OSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Jia Lai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Meat products normally contain low omega-3 fatty acids and high ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids may contribute to the prevalence of many diseases. In order to obtained in such beef with high levels of omega-3 fatty acids will be more healthy to meet people’s diet, researchers generated the fat-1 transgenic simmental crossbred cattle expressing the Caenorhabditis elegans c fat-1 gene encoding an omega-3 fatty acid desaturase that converts omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids and the gene is absent in mammals. In this study, researchers successful product the embryo of fat-1 transgenic simmental crossbred cattle using OSM. The results of Western Blotting and fluoroscopic examination have proved that the fat-1 gene has been into genome of clone embryo and translated into proteins which could be used to embryo transfer.

  19. Fatty acid contents of Brazilian soybean oils with emphasis on trans fatty acids

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Clayton Antunes, Martin; Jesuí Vergílio, Visentainer; Adriana Nery de, Oliveira; Claudio Celestino de, Oliveira; Makoto, Matsushita; Nilson Evelázio de, Souza.

    Full Text Available As composições em ácidos graxos das principais marcas de óleo de soja consumidas pelos brasileiros foram determinadas. Em média os níveis de ácidos graxos trans (TFA) variaram entre 0,8 e 2,6% do total de ácidos graxos e compreendem os isômeros 18:1, 18:2, e 18:3. Os níveis de TFA 18:1 foram menores [...] que 0,1% em todas as marcas estudadas. Entre os TFA poliinsaturados, 18:3 foi o predominante, com níveis variando de 0,5 a 1,4%. Este grupo compreende ácidos graxos mono e di-trans e o principal foi o 18:3 9c, 12c, 15t. As quantidades de TFA 18:2 variaram de 0,3 a 1,1% com predominância do ácido 18:2 9c, 12t. Teores do ácido alfa-linolênico variaram de 3,5 a 5,4%, com um valor médio de 4,1%. O grau de isomerização dos ácidos linoléico e alfa-linolênico variaram de 0,5 a 2,1% e de 9,1 a 27,2%, respectivamente. Este estudo indica que provavelmente o tratamento térmico aplicado durante o passo de desodorização dos óleos nos últimos anos foi intenso, resultando em uma diminuição significativa do teor de ácido alfa-linolênico no óleo e, em um aumento na razão n-6/n-3 da dieta dos brasileiros. Abstract in english The fatty acid composition of the main soybean oil brands consumed by the Brazilian has been determined. The mean trans fatty acids (TFA) levels ranged between 0.8 and 2.6% of the total fatty acids and comprised 18:1, 18:2, and 18:3 isomers. 18:1 TFA levels were lower than 0.1% in all the studied br [...] ands. Among the polyunsaturated TFA, 18:3 predominated, with levels ranging from 0.5 to 1.4%. This group comprised mono and di-trans fatty acids and the main acid was 18:3 9c,12c,15t. The amounts of 18:2 TFA ranged from 0.3 to 1.1% with a predominance of acid 18:2 9c,12t . Alpha-linolenic acid contents ranged from 3.5 to 5.4%, with a mean value of 4.1%. The degree of isomerization of linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids ranged from 0.5 to 2.1% and from 9.1 to 27.2%, respectively. This study probably indicates that the thermal treatment applied to soybean oil during the deodorization step in the last years is too intense and that it results in a significant decrease in oil alpha-linolenic acid content and an increase in the n-6/n-3 ratio in the Brazilian diet.

  20. Radioiodinated fatty acids for cardiological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of fatty acids labelled with iodine-123 is reviewed. The variety of methods for producing 123I and introducing radioiodine into the molecule is discussed and the important points of the biochemical background are recalled with the aim of finding a broad application for 123I-labelled fatty acids. The results of the pharmacokinetic studies and biochemical analysis are presented as they prove that both 17-123I-heptadecanoic acid (IHA) and 15-(rho-123I-phenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) exhibit analogous behaviour to that of the naturally occurring fatty acids. Clinical applications demonstrated two fields of importance: (i) applications solely for imaging the heart and (ii) assessment of myocardial turnover rates of fatty acids for functional diagnosis. Moreover, very recent studies show that the provision of information about prognosis of myocardial diseases and the applied cardiological therapy appear to be possible. (author)

  1. Forage breeding and management to increase the beneficial fatty acid content of ruminant products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, R J; Scollan, N D; Lee, M R F; Ougham, H J; Humphreys, M O

    2003-05-01

    The declining consumption of ruminant products has been partly associated with their high proportion (but not necessarily content) of saturated fatty acids. Recent studies have focused on the less prominent fact that they are also important sources of beneficial fatty acids, including n-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acids. alpha-Linolenic acid (18 : 3n-3) is of particular interest because it also contributes to improved flavour of beef and lamb. Many recent studies showed large effects of special concentrates on levels of fatty acids in milk and meat. However, the 'rumen protection' treatments, needed to ensure a worthwhile level of fatty acid in products, are expensive. Herbage lipids are the cheapest and safest source of these fatty acids and so breeding to increase delivery of fatty acids from plants into ruminant products is an important long-term strategy. Plant lipids usually contain high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly 18 : 2n-6 and 18 : 3n-3 which are the precursors of beneficial fatty acids. Whilst some plants are particularly rich in individual fatty acids (e.g. 18 : 3n-3 in linseed), there are also useful levels in grass and clover (Trifolium Spp.). Levels of fatty acids in forages in relation to species and varieties are considered, as well as management and conservation methods. Relationships between levels of fatty acids and existing traits and genetic markers are identified. The effects of forage treatments on the fatty acid content of ruminant products are reviewed. The higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk from cows fed clover silages show that the level of fatty acids in herbage is not the only factor affecting levels of fatty acids in ruminant products. Further effort is needed to characterise susceptibility of unsaturated fatty acids to oxidative loss during field wilting and biohydrogenation losses in the rumen, and the relative importance of plant and microbial processes in these losses. The pathways of lipolysis and lipid oxidation are reviewed and other plant factors which offer potential to breed for reduced losses are considered. PMID:14506880

  2. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A P; Aggarwal, K K; Zhang, P-Y

    2015-01-01

    Cardioceuticals are nutritional supplements that contain all the essential nutrients including vitamins, minerals, omega-3-fatty acids and other antioxidants like a-lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 in the right proportion that provide all round protection to the heart by reducing the most common risks associated with the cardiovascular disease including high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels and factors that contribute to coagulation of blood. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to significantly reduce the risk for sudden death caused by cardiac arrhythmias and all-cause mortality in patients with known coronary heart disease. Omega-3 fatty acids are also used to treat hyperlipidemia and hypertension. There are no significant drug interactions with omega-3 fatty acids. The American Heart Association recommends consumption of two servings of fish per week for persons with no history of coronary heart disease and at least one serving of fish daily for those with known coronary heart disease. Approximately 1 g/day of eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid is recommended for cardio protection. Higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids are required to reduce elevated triglyceride levels (2-4 g/day). Modest decreases in blood pressure occur with significantly higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids. PMID:25720716

  3. Myristoylation as a target for inhibiting HIV assembly: Unsaturated fatty acids block viral budding

    OpenAIRE

    Lindwasser, O. Wolf; Resh, Marilyn D.

    2002-01-01

    Modification of HIV-1 Gag with myristic acid, a saturated 14-carbon fatty acid (14:0), is essential for HIV-1 assembly. We recently showed that exogenous treatment of cells with unsaturated 14-carbon fatty acids, 5-cis-tetradecenoic acid (14:1n-9) and 5-cis,8-cis-tetradecadienoic acid (14:2n-6), reduces the affinity of some myristoylated proteins for plasma membrane rafts, membrane subdomains that have been shown to be required for efficient assembly of HIV. Here we demonstrate that treatment...

  4. Fatty acid profiles in tissues of mice fed conjugated linoleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    GØttsche, Jesper; Straarup, Ellen Marie

    2006-01-01

    The incorporation of vaccenic acid (VA, 0.5 and 1.2%), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, mixture of primarily c9,t11- and t10,c12-CLA, 1.2%), linoleic acid (LA, 1.2%) and oleic acid (OA, 1.2%) into different tissues of mice was examined. The effects on the fatty acid composition of triacylglycerols (TAG) and phospholipids (PL) in kidney, spleen, liver and adipose tissue were investigated. VA and CLA (c9,t11- and t10,c12-CLA) were primarily found in TAG, especially in kidney and adipose tissue, respectively. Conversion of VA to c9,t11-CLA was indicated by our results, as both fatty acids were incorporated into all the analyzed tissues when a diet containing VA but not c9,t11-CLA was fed. Most of the observed effects on the fatty acid profiles were seen in the CLA group, whereas only minor effects were observed in the VA groups compared with the CA group. Thus, CLA increased n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in PL from kidney and spleen and lowered the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFA in these tissues. Furthermore, CLA increased C-22 PUFA in the PL fraction of kidney, spleen and liver, but reduced the level of arachiclonic acid in PL of liver and spleen and lowered the Delta(9)-desaturation indexes in all analyzed tissue TAG.

  5. Fatty acyl specificity of the receptor-mediated release of polyunsaturated fatty acids from vascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histamine and bradykinin appear to exhibit the same fatty acid specificity as thrombin. Incubation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 10 ?M histamine for 10 min in buffered saline containing 50 ?M fat-free albumin stimulates the release of previously incorporated [14C]arachidonate but not [14C]22:4(n-6) or [14C]20:3(n-6). Similarly calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells release [14C]arachidonate but not [14C]22:4(n-6) in response to either bradykinin (1 +g/ml) or histamine (10?M). In both types of endothelial cells, the calcium ionophore A23187 (10 ?M) exhibits the same pattern of fatty acyl specificity as the receptor-mediated agonists. By contrast, mellitin (2-4 ?g/ml) stimulates the release of free 22:4(n-6) and oleate in addition to arachidonate; release of 22:4(n-6) is 30-70% that of arachidonate. These results suggest that histamine, bradykinin and thrombin stimulate a common calcium-dependent fatty acyl-specific phospholipase activity

  6. Effect of Dietary Fatty Acids on Human Lipoprotein Metabolism: A Comprehensive Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Esther M.M.; Watts, Gerald F.; Ng, Theodore W.K.; Barrett, P. Hugh R.

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Dietary fatty-acid composition regulates lipids and lipoprotein metabolism and may confer CVD benefit. This review updates understanding of the effect of dietary fatty-acids on human lipoprotein metabolism. In elderly participants with hyperlipidemia, high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty-acids (PUFA) consumption diminished hepatic triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) secretion and enhanced TRL to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) conversion. n-3 PUFA also decreased TRL-apoB-48 concentration by decreasing TRL-apoB-48 secretion. High n-6 PUFA intake decreased very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations by up-regulating VLDL lipolysis and uptake. In a study of healthy subjects, the intake of saturated fatty-acids with increased palmitic acid at the sn-2 position was associated with decreased postprandial lipemia. Low medium-chain triglyceride may not appreciably alter TRL metabolism. Replacing carbohydrate with monounsaturated fatty-acids increased TRL catabolism. Trans-fatty-acid decreased LDL and enhanced high-density lipoprotein catabolism. Interactions between APOE genotype and n-3 PUFA in regulating lipid responses were also described. The major advances in understanding the effect of dietary fatty-acids on lipoprotein metabolism has centered on n-3 PUFA. This knowledge emphasizes the importance of regulating lipoprotein metabolism as a mode to improve plasma lipids and potentially CVD risk. Additional studies are required to better characterize the cardiometabolic effects of other dietary fatty-acids. PMID:26043038

  7. Milk in human nutrition: Comparison of fatty acid profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsi? Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Milk and milk products are very important in human nutrition. Fatty acids (FA, which are the major component of milk lipids, have different effects on human health. The aim of this study was to determine and compare fatty acid composition of human milk, infant formula and cow's milk most often consumed in Serbian population. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography. Our results showed that saturated FA were predominant in all types of milk, particularly in cow's milk with more than 70%. Monounsaturated oleic acid was significantly higher in human milk (36% than in infants formula (30% and cow's milk (26%. Although polyunsaturated FA content of cow's milk was very low (3.6% compared with infant formula (15% and human milk (19%, cow's milk had the most desirable n6/n3 ratio, and content of n-3 precursor ?-linolenic acid. Low content of n-3 FA may be due to a relatively low consumption of marine foods in Serbian population. Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are important in infant development and maintenance of overall human health, were detected only in human milk. These results suggest that human milk is the most desirable food in infants' nutrition, but low content of n-3 FA indicates that supplementation of lactating women with n-3 FA is highly recommendable.

  8. Polyunsaturated fatty acid saturation by gut lactic acid bacteria affecting host lipid composition

    OpenAIRE

    Kishino, Shigenobu; Takeuchi, Michiki; Park, Si-Bum; Hirata, Akiko; Kitamura, Nahoko; Kunisawa, Jun; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Ryo; Isobe, Yosuke; Arita, Makoto; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Shima, Jun; Takahashi, Satomi; Yokozeki, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract interact with their host in many ways. Lipid metabolism by gastrointestinal microbes generates multiple fatty acid species that can affect host health. In the representative gut bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum, we revealed a fatty acid metabolism, saturation metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acid, that generates hydroxy fatty acids, oxo fatty acids, conjugated fatty acids, and partially saturated trans-fatty acids as intermediates. Furthermore,...

  9. Fatty acid, cholesterol and fat-soluble vitamin composition of wild and captive freshwater crayfish (Astacus leptodactylus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlioglu, A Gül; Aydin, S; Yilmaz, O

    2012-02-01

    The proximate analysis (dry matter, protein, fat and ash), cholesterol, fatty acid and fat-soluble vitamin compositions of the tail muscle of wild caught and captive crayfish (Astacus leptodactylus) were investigated. Captive crayfish contained higher moisture and fat content than wild crayfish. In contrast, wild crayfish contained a higher level of crude protein, ash and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), particularly eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) than captive crayfish. Arachidonic acid (C20:4 n-6) was the major n-6 PUFA in wild A. leptodactylus, and linoleic acid (C18:2 n-6) was the major n-6 PUFA in captive A. leptodactylus. The percentages of total saturated fatty acids (SFA), PUFA, and n-3/n-6 ratio were higher in wild crayfish and total monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) were lower. Although differences existed between wild and captive crayfish in vitamins A (p??0.05). The differences may be originated from the diet provided to captive crayfish. Since wild A. leptodactylus contained higher n-3/n-6 ratio than captive A. leptodactylus, crayfish farms can potentially produce a better quality of crayfish meat by increasing the PUFA n-3 (especially DHA and EPA) in the diets of A. leptodactylus. PMID:22328124

  10. Fatty acid composition of Mediterranean buffalo milk fat

    OpenAIRE

    Proto, V.; F. Masucci; R. Romano; A. Di Francia; M.L. Varricchio

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the variation in fatty acid composition of milk fat from four buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) herds under different feeding management and ration composition. Changes in milk fatty acid composition were monitored on a weekly basis. Saturated fatty acids (65.5%) predominated in buffalo milk fat; monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids were 27.0% and 4.5%, respectively. Of saturated fatty acids, the content of palmitic acid was the highest (30.6...

  11. Lymphatic Fatty Acid Absorption Profile During 24 Hours After Administration of Triglycerides to Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsgaard, Trine Charlotte; Straarup, Ellen Marie

    1999-01-01

    In this study we determined in rats the complete 24-h lymphatic fatty acid profile after administration of either rapeseedoil (RO) or rapeseed oil interesterified with 10:0 (RO/C10) with special emphasis on the transition from absorptive topostabsorptive phase. Rats were subjected to cannulation of the main mesenteric lymph duct and the next day oils wereadministered through a gastric feeding tube. Lymph was collected in 1-h fractions for the following 24 h. The time formaximum lymphatic transport of fatty acids was at 4 h with fast changes in fatty acid composition from the fatty acids ofendogenous origin to those of the administered oils. Seven to eight hours after administration the transport wassignificantly lower than maximum, indicating the change from absorptive to postabsorptive phase. At 24 h afteradministration of either oil the transport of total fatty acids, palmitic acid (16:0), and linoleic acid (18:2n-6) together witholeic acid (18:1 n-9) after RO had not returned to the transport at baseline. In contrast, the transport of decanoic acid(10:0) and alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) returned to baseline values between 12 and 15 h. This indicated that theabsorption of purely exogenous fatty acids (illustrated by 10:0 and 18:3n-3) was complete at 15 h and that the fatty acidstransported between 15 and 24 h were derived mostly from endogenous stores.

  12. Role and significance of polyunsaturated fatty acids in nutrition in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risti? Vanja I.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hyperlipoproteinemia is a key factor in development of atherosclerosis, whereas regression of atherosclerosis mostly depends on decreasing the plasma level of total and LDL-cholesterol. Many studies have reported the hypocholesterolemic effect of linolenic acid. Types of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA Linoleic and ?-linolenic acids are essential fatty acids. The main sources of linoleic acid are vegetable seeds and of ?-linolenic acid - green parts of plants. ?-linolenic acid is converted to eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. Linoleic acid is converted into arachidonic acid competing with eicosapentaenoic acid in the starting point for synthesis of eicosanoids, which are strong regulators of cell functions and as such, very important in physiology and pathophysiology of cardiovascular system. Eicosanoids derived from eicosapentaenoic acid have different biological properties in regard to those derived from arachidonic acid, i.e. their global effects result in decreased vasoconstriction platelet aggregation and leukocyte toxicity. Role and significant of PUFA The n-6 to n-3 ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the food is very important, and an optimal ratio 4 to 1 in diet is a major issue. Traditional western diets present absolute or relative deficiency of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and a ratio 15-20 to 1. In our diet fish and fish oil are sources of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. Refined and processed vegetable oils change the nature of polyunsaturated fatty acids and obtained derivates have atherogenic properties.

  13. Evaluation of the impact of dietary petroselinic acid on the growth performance, fatty acid composition, and efficacy of long chain-polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis of farmed Nile tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Chaiw-Yee; Ng, Wing-Keong

    2013-06-26

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential role of dietary petroselinic acid (PSA) in enhancing the n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) content in fish tissues. Three isolipidic casein-based diets were formulated to comprise graded levels of PSA (0, 10, or 20% of total fatty acid) with the incremented inclusion of coriander seed oil. Fish growth and nutrient digestibility were not significantly (P > 0.05) influenced by dietary PSA level. In general, dietary PSA affected the fatty acid composition of tilapia tissues and whole-body, which reflected dietary fatty acid ratios. Dietary PSA significantly (P < 0.05) increased ?-oxidation, particularly on ?-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) and linoleic acid (18:2n-6). This study provided evidence that PSA, a pseudoproduct mimicking the structure of 18:3n-6, did reduce ?-6 desaturation on 18:2n-6 but, contrary to popular speculation, did not stimulate more ?-6 desaturase activity on 18:3n-3. The overall ?-6 desaturase enzyme activity may be suppressed at high dietary levels of PSA. Nevertheless, the n-3 and n-6 LC-PUFA biosynthesis was not significantly inhibited by dietary PSA, indicating that the bioconversion efficiency is not modulated only by ?-6 desaturase. The deposition of n-3 LC-PUFA in liver and fillet lipids was higher in fish fed PSA-supplemented diets. PMID:23718861

  14. Synthesis of new fatty acids amides from aminolysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent biochemical and pharmacological studies have led to the characterization of different fatty acid amides as a new family of biologically active lipids. Here, we describe the synthesis of new amides from C16:0, 18:0, 18:1 and 18:1, OH fatty acids (FFA) families with cyclic and acyclic amines and demonstrate for the first time that these compounds produce cytotoxic effects. Application of this method to the synthesis of fatty acid amides was performed using the esters aminolysis as a key step and various carboxylic amides were prepared in good yield from fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). (author)

  15. [Composition and stability of fatty acids from deboned cachama and sardine meat during freezer storage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortíz, H; Bello, R

    1992-12-01

    Free fatty acids from total lipids and phospholipids in minced fish flesh from three sizes of Cachama (Colossoma macropomum) and Sardine (Sardinella anchovia) were evaluated. Cachama's most abundant unsaturated fatty acids from the total lipid fraction were: C18:1 (31-38%); C18:2, n-6 (13-15%); and C20:4, n-6 (3-5%), while in sardine were the follows: C18:1; C20:5 n-3 (12-24%) and C22: 6,n-3 (7-24%). C20:5, n-3 increased with the size and C22:6,n-3 decreased. The variance analysis indicated that percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids of n-6 series in the total lipids of cachama and n-3 series in sardine were affected by the storage temperature from -10C to -20 degrees C (p < 0.01). Storage time had effect on the stability of sardine fatty acids (p-0.01) and cachama (p < 0.05). Sardine minced flesh presented the highest value of free fatty acids at-10 degrees C during the second month of storage (620 mg%) while cachama at the fourth month (230 mg%). TBA- value in sardine increased at -10 degrees C from 5.5 to 23 mg of malonaldehyde in fourth months while in cachama these value were almost the same (2-6 mg-kg) during the storage period at -10 degrees C and -20 degrees C. PMID:1342185

  16. Omega-3 fatty acids for bipolar disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, P.; Richardson, AJ

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bipolar disorder is a complex psychiatric disorder and is amongst the top thirty causes of worldwide disability. Mood stabilisers are the primary pharmacological intervention, both in the treatment of acute episodes and in prophylaxis. There is, however, mounting evidence that dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids may be beneficial in psychiatric conditions, particularly those involving disturbances of mood. OBJECTIVES: To review the efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids as e...

  17. Interaction of Fatty Acid with Myoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Sriram, Renuka; Kreutzer, Ulrike; Shih, Lifan; Jue, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Upon titration with palmitate, the 1H NMR spectra of metmyoglobin cyanide (MbCN) reveal a selective perturbation of the 8 heme methyl, consistent with a specific interaction of myoglobin (Mb) with fatty acid. Other detectable hyperfine shifted resonances of the heme group remain unchanged. Mb also enhances fatty acid solubility, as reflected in a more intense methylene peak of palmitate in Mb than in Tris buffer. Ligand binding analysis indicates an apparent palmitate dissociation constant (K...

  18. Endocytosis is required for fatty acid uptake in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquier, Nicolas; Reiner, Sonja; Schneiter, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Fatty acids can either be synthesized or taken up from the environment. The mechanisms by which fatty acids translocate across the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, however, are still poorly understood. Two related hypotheses are currently being discussed to explain fatty acid uptake. The first states that free fatty acids passively penetrate the plasma membrane, whereas the second links this passive penetration to rapid acylation of the fatty acid ones it has reached t...

  19. Maternal Plasma Phosphatidylcholine Fatty Acids and Atopy and Wheeze in the Offspring at Age of 6 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Katharine C.; Calder, Philip C.; Inskip, Hazel M.; Robinson, Sian M.; Roberts, Graham C.; Cooper, Cyrus; Godfrey, Keith M.; Lucas, Jane S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Variation in exposure to polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) might influence the development of atopy, asthma, and wheeze. This study aimed to determine whether differences in PUFA concentrations in maternal plasma phosphatidylcholine are associated with the risk of childhood wheeze or atopy. For 865 term-born children, we measured phosphatidylcholine fatty acid composition in maternal plasma collected at 34 weeks' gestation. Wheezing was classified using questionnaires at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months and 6 years. At age of 6 years, the children underwent skin prick testing, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) measurement, and spirometry. Maternal n-6 fatty acids and the ratio of n-3 to n-6 fatty acids were not associated with childhood wheeze. However, higher maternal eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and total n-3 fatty acids were associated with reduced risk of non-atopic persistent/late wheeze (RR 0.57, 0.67 and 0.69, resp. P = 0.01, 0.015, and 0.021, resp.). Maternal arachidonic acid was positively associated with FENO (P = 0.024). A higher ratio of linoleic acid to its unsaturated metabolic products was associated with reduced risk of skin sensitisation (RR 0.82, P = 0.013). These associations provide some support for the hypothesis that variation in exposure to n-6 and n-3 fatty acids during pregnancy influences the risk of childhood wheeze and atopy. PMID:23049600

  20. Fatty Acid Composition of Meat from Ruminants, with Special Emphasis on trans Fatty Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Torben; Ovesen, L.

    1998-01-01

    The fatty acid composition was determined in 39 samples of beef, 20 samples of veal, and 34 samples of lamb, representative of the supply of ruminant meat in Denmark. Five cuts of beef and veal and three cuts of lamb with increasing fat content were selected, and analysis of the fatty acid methyl esters was performed by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) on a polar 50-m capillary column CP Sil 88 with flame-ionization detection. Lamb had the highest content of saturated fatty acids (52.8 +/- 1.8 g/100 g fatty acids), higher than beef and veal (45.3 +/- 3.1 and 45.4 +/- 0.8 g/100 g fatty acids, respectively). Cis monounsaturated fatty acids were 49.2 +/- 3.1, 44.9 +/- 1.8, and 37.7 +/- 1.7, and polyunsaturated fatty acids were 3.3 +/- 0.7, 5.8 +/- 2.0, and 5.0 +/- 0.1 g/100 g fatty acids in beef, veal, and lamb, respectively. Beef contained 2.1 +/- 0.8 g trans C-18:1 per 100 g fatty acids, about half that found in veal (4.0 +/- 1.2 g/100 g fatty acids) and lamb (4.5 +/- 0.6 g/100 g fatty acids). Trans C-16:1 was 0.24 +/- 0.01, 0.14 +/- 0.02, and 0.79 +/- 0.02 g/100 g fatty acids in beef, veal, and lamb, respectively. Only small variations in trans and other fatty acids could be demonstrated between cuts. The overlap between cis and trans C-18:1 by capillary GLC was verified by argentation-thin-layer chromatography followed by GLC, on three samples of veal and three samples of lamb. In veal 1.0 g, and in lamb 1.4 g trans C-18:1 per 100 g fatty acids were hidden under the cis C-18:1 peak. The mean intake of trans fatty acids from ruminant meat is estimated at 0.2 g/d.

  1. Circulating B-Vitamins and Smoking Habits Are Associated with Serum Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Patients with Suspected Coronary Heart Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeie, Eli; Strand, Elin; Pedersen, Eva R.; Bjørndal, Bodil; Bohov, Pavol; Berge, Rolf K.; Svingen, Gard F. T.; Seifert, Reinhard; Ueland, Per M.; Midttun, Øivind; Ulvik, Arve; Hustad, Steinar; Drevon, Christian A.; Gregory, Jesse F.; Nygård, Ottar

    2015-01-01

    The long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are considered to be of major health importance, and recent studies indicate that their endogenous metabolism is influenced by B-vitamin status and smoking habits. We investigated the associations of circulating B-vitamins and smoking habits with serum polyunsaturated fatty acids among 1,366 patients who underwent coronary angiography due to suspected coronary heart disease at Haukeland University Hospital, Norway. Of these, 52% provided information on dietary habits by a food frequency questionnaire. Associations were assessed using partial correlation (Spearman’s rho). In the total population, the concentrations of most circulating B-vitamins were positively associated with serum n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, but negatively with serum n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. However, the associations between B-vitamins and polyunsaturated fatty acids tended to be weaker in smokers. This could not be solely explained by differences in dietary intake. Furthermore, plasma cotinine, a marker of recent nicotine exposure, showed a negative relationship with serum n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, but a positive relationship with serum n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. In conclusion, circulating B-vitamins are, in contrast to plasma cotinine, generally positively associated with serum n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and negatively with serum n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in patients with suspected coronary heart disease. Further studies should investigate whether B-vitamin status and smoking habits may modify the clinical effects of polyunsaturated fatty acid intake. PMID:26039046

  2. n-3 fatty acids and the immune system in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergas, David; Eilat, Eran; Mendlovic, Shlomo; Sthoeger, Zeev M

    2002-01-01

    In short-term studies, both in animals and in humans, fish oil seems to exert anti-inflammatory effects. However, these effects may vanish during long-term treatment. There is a possibility that in autoimmune diseases, supplementation of dietary n-3 fatty acids might lead to a decrease in the number of autoreactive T cells via apoptosis, as demonstrated in (NZBXNZW) F1 lupus mice [40]. Thus, the "fade away" effect might be due to regrowth of pathogenic autoreactive cells. In animal models of autoimmune diseases, diets high in n-3 fatty acids from fish oil increase survival and reduce disease severity in spontaneous autoantibody-mediated disease, while n-6 linoleic acid-rich diets appear to increase disease severity. The situation in human disease is probably more complex. Some of the discrepancy between studies can be attributed to methodologic problems. The effect of fish oil is dose, time and disease-dependent. Since the anti-inflammatory effects depend on the balance between n-3 and n-6 fatty acids, the relative proportion of EPA and DHA and possibly co-treatment with dietary vitamin E, the dose/effect ratio may vary between individuals. Furthermore, some animal studies demonstrating efficacy used very high doses that may be incompatible with human consumption. It seems that fish oil is only mildly effective in acute inflammation. In those chronic inflammatory disorders where it was found to be effective, several weeks are necessary to exhibit results. Yet, this mild anti-inflammatory effect, possibly through downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production, leads to striking therapeutic improvement in critically ill patients. Fish oil supplementation seems advantageous especially in acute and chronic disorders where inappropriate activation of the immune system occurs. Fish oil has only a mild effect on active inflammation of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, SLE and Crohn's disease, but it could prevent relapse (in some of the studies). In diseases where the inflammation is mild, such as IgA nephropathy, fish oil may slow or even prevent disease progression. The above could explain the observation in some populations of a decreased incidence of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases [3], since the constant consumption of n-3 fatty acids could suppress any autoreactive (or hyper-reactive) T cells. However, if there is already an existing disease, increased consumption might not be beneficial over a long period. Therefore, the use of n-3 fatty acids can be recommended to the general healthy population, not only to prevent atherosclerosis but possibly also to reduce the risk of autoimmunity. PMID:11802309

  3. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids and inflammation: potential application in surgical and trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calder P.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipids used in nutritional support of surgical or critically ill patients have been based on soybean oil, which is rich in the n-6 fatty acid linoleic acid (18:2n-6. Linoleic acid is the precursor of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6. In turn, arachidonic acid in cell membrane phospholipids is the substrate for the synthesis of a range of biologically active compounds (eicosanoids including prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes. These compounds can act as mediators in their own right and can also act as regulators of other processes, such as platelet aggregation, blood clotting, smooth muscle contraction, leukocyte chemotaxis, inflammatory cytokine production, and immune function. There is a view that an excess of n-6 fatty acids should be avoided since this could contribute to a state where physiological processes become dysregulated. One alternative is the use of fish oil. The rationale of this latter approach is that fish oil contains long chain n-3 fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid. When fish oil is provided, eicosapentaenoic acid is incorporated into cell membrane phospholipids, partly at the expense of arachidonic acid. Thus, there is less arachidonic acid available for eicosanoid synthesis. Hence, fish oil decreases production of prostaglandins like PGE2 and of leukotrienes like LTB4. Thus, n-3 fatty acids can potentially reduce platelet aggregation, blood clotting, smooth muscle contraction, and leukocyte chemotaxis, and can modulate inflammatory cytokine production and immune function. These effects have been demonstrated in cell culture, animal feeding and healthy volunteer studies. Fish oil decreases the host metabolic response and improves survival to endotoxin in laboratory animals. Recently clinical studies performed in various patient groups have indicated benefit from this approach.

  4. Polyunsaturated fatty acid content of mother's milk is associated with childhood body composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Louise; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2012-01-01

    Background:Polyunsaturated fatty acid consumption has changed, and the prevalence of adiposity has increased over the last thirty years. A decrease of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid content in breast-milk has been suggested a contributing factor. The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between docosahexaenoic acid content and n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio in breast-milk, body composition and timing of adiposity rebound in children.Methods:In the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood birth cohort, breast-milk fatty acid profile was determined in 281 mothers and body mass index (BMI) development prospectively followed to the age of seven years in 222 children. Age and BMI at adiposity rebound was identified. Furthermore, fat mass determination by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed in 207 children at six to nine years of age.Results:There was a significant association between breast-milk docosahexaenoic acid and BMI from two to seven years, fat mass and, for the girls, age at adiposity rebound. No associations were observed between the breast-milk n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid-ratio and body composition.Conclusion:Early intake of docosahexaenoic acid may have an impact on body composition. Dietary habits of lactating mothers could contribute to the increased prevalence of obesity in western societies.Pediatric Research (2012); doi:10.1038/pr.2012.127.

  5. Control of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatty acid oxidation by bovine liver slices and mitochondria was examined to determine potential regulatory sites of fatty acid oxidation. Conversion of 1-[14C]palmitate to 14CO2 and total [14C]acid-soluble metabolites was used to measure fatty acid oxidation. Oxidation of palmitate (1 mM) was linear in both liver slice weight and incubation time. Carnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation; 2 mM dl-carnitine produced maximal stimulation of palmitate oxidation to both CO2 and acid-soluble metabolites. Propionate (10 mM) inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. Propionate (.5 to 10 mM) had no effect on palmitate oxidation by mitochondria, but malonyl Coenzyme A, the first committed intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, inhibited mitochondrial palmitate oxidation (inhibition constant = .3 ?M). Liver mitochonndrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase exhibited Michaelis constants for palmitoyl Coenzyme A and l-carnitine of 11.5 ?M and .59 mM, respectively. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver is regulated by mechanisms similar to those in rats but adapted to the unique digestive physiology of the bovine

  6. Control of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesse, B.W.; Emery, R.S.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-09-01

    Fatty acid oxidation by bovine liver slices and mitochondria was examined to determine potential regulatory sites of fatty acid oxidation. Conversion of 1-(/sup 14/C)palmitate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and total (/sup 14/C)acid-soluble metabolites was used to measure fatty acid oxidation. Oxidation of palmitate (1 mM) was linear in both liver slice weight and incubation time. Carnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation; 2 mM dl-carnitine produced maximal stimulation of palmitate oxidation to both CO/sup 2/ and acid-soluble metabolites. Propionate (10 mM) inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. Propionate (.5 to 10 mM) had no effect on palmitate oxidation by mitochondria, but malonyl Coenzyme A, the first committed intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, inhibited mitochondrial palmitate oxidation (inhibition constant = .3 ..mu..M). Liver mitochonndrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase exhibited Michaelis constants for palmitoyl Coenzyme A and l-carnitine of 11.5 ..mu..M and .59 mM, respectively. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver is regulated by mechanisms similar to those in rats but adapted to the unique digestive physiology of the bovine.

  7. Scintigraphy with radioiodinated free fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis several clinical and animal experimental studies of free fatty acids labeled with radioiodine are discussed. These radiolabeled fatty acids are used for cardiac imaging. Besides, the elimination rate of the radioactivity from the myocardium, as observed during a scintigraphic study, is correlated with fatty acid metabolism. Uptake and distribution of I-heptadecanoic acid (I-HDA) and I-phenylpentadecanoic acid (I-PPA) are compared with those of thallium-201 (Tl-201) in the normal and ischemic canine myocardium. For determination of the elimination rate (expressed in terms of halftime values) of the radioactivity from the myocardium, regions of interest have to be drawn over a scintigram. A method is described resulting in more reliable demarcation of normal and abnormal regions within the scintigram. (Auth.)

  8. Unusual fatty acid substitution in lipids and lipopolysaccharides of Helicobacter pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Geis, G; Leying, H; Suerbaum, S.; Opferkuch, W

    1990-01-01

    Cellular fatty acids, phospholipid fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharide fatty acids of four strains of Helicobacter pylori were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The presence of myristic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, 19-carbon cyclopropane fatty acid, beta-hydroxypalmitic acid, and beta-hydroxystearic acid was confirmed. In phospholipids, myristic acid and 19-carbon cyclopropane fatty acid were the major fatty acids. Hydroxy fatty acids and unsaturated fatt...

  9. Synthesis and utilization of fatty acids by wild-type and fatty acid auxotrophs of Caulobacter crescentus.

    OpenAIRE

    Letts, V; Shaw, P; Shapiro, L; Henry, S

    1982-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of the dimorphic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was found to consist primarily of 16- and 18-carbon fatty acids, both saturated and monounsaturated, in agreement with the findings of Chow and Schmidt (J. Gen. Microbiol. 83:359-373, 1974). In addition, two minor but as yet unidentified fatty acids were detected. Chromatographic mobilities suggested that these fatty acids may be a cyclopropane and a branched-chain fatty acid. In addition, we demonstrated that the fa...

  10. Characterization and analysis of the cotton cyclopropane fatty acid synthase family and their contribution to cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Rawat Richa; Yu Xiao-Hong; Shanklin John

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cyclopropane fatty acids (CPA) have been found in certain gymnosperms, Malvales, Litchi and other Sapindales. The presence of their unique strained ring structures confers physical and chemical properties characteristic of unsaturated fatty acids with the oxidative stability displayed by saturated fatty acids making them of considerable industrial interest. While cyclopropenoid fatty acids (CPE) are well-known inhibitors of fatty acid desaturation in animals, CPE can also ...

  11. Variation of lipid and fatty acid compositions in Thai Perilla seeds grown at different locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitree Suttajit

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Perilla or Nga-Kee-Mon (Perilla frutescens seed has long been known as a rich source of ?-linolenic acid (18:3, n-3. It is widely cultivated throughout Thailand. However, there are no data on the variation of lipid and fatty acid compositions among crops from different regions. The aim of this study was to examine the compositions of lipids and fatty acids in Thai perilla seed grown at different locations. Two different perilla seeds were harvested from Maehongsorn and Chiang Mai districts, and one commercial perilla was purchased from local market. Seeds were ground, lipid was extracted with chloroform: methanol (2:1, v/v and its composition determined by Iatroscan (TLC/FID. Fatty acid composition was analyzed with GLC using standard methods. Lipid content was between 34-36% (w/w. Triacylglycerol was a predominant lipid in perilla seed (97% of total lipids, and a minor component was phytosterol (3% of total lipids. The ratio of saturates: monounsaturates: polyunsaturates was approximately 1: 1: 8. Most predominant fatty acid was ?-linolenic acid (18:3, n-3 (55-60% of total fatty acid. Seeds from Maehongsorn district had the highest concentration of ?-linolenic acid, and commercial perilla had the lowest (P<0.05. Other two predominant fatty acids were linoleic acid (18:2, n-6 (18-22% of total fatty acid and oleic acid (18:1 (11-13% of total fatty acid. The results showed that the compositions of lipids and fatty acids in Thai perilla seeds varied significantly among samples from different locations.

  12. Cellular Fatty Acid Composition of Legionella longbeachae sp. nov. †

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, C. Wayne; Karr, D. E.; Dees, S B

    1981-01-01

    The cellular fatty acid composition of Legionella longbeachae was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. As in other Legionella species, the fatty acids of this new species are characterized by relatively large amounts of branched-chain acids.

  13. Effect of intravenous omega-3 fatty acid infusion and hemodialysis on fatty acid composition of free fatty acids and phospholipids in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Christensen, Jeppe Hagstrup

    2011-01-01

    Patients treated with hemodialysis (HD) have been reported to have decreased levels of ?-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in plasma and cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ?-3 PUFAs administered intravenously during HD, as well as the effect of HD treatment, on the fatty acid composition of plasma free fatty acids (FFAs), plasma phospholipids, and platelet phospholipids.

  14. Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Total Fatty Acids in Cider

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-gomis, Domingo; Mangas, J. J.; Margolles, Inmaculada; Arias, Pilar

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the composition of total fatty acids in an apple beverage, cider. Fatty acids are present in the free or esterified form and contribute to both the flavor and foam properties of cider. Fatty acids were separated and identified as methyl esters by GC-MS, and 12 of these were subsequently determined by GC-FID. The major fatty acids found in cider were caproic, caprylic, capric, and palmitic acid, the saturated acids predominating over the unsaturated ones. The pro...

  15. Features of fatty acid synthesis in higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the biosynthesis of fatty acid in the presence of 3H2O, 3H is incorporated into the hydrocarbon chain of the fatty acid. The features in the fatty acid synthesis of higher plants were investigated by applying 3H2O method to the measurement of the ability of spinach leaves synthesizing fatty acid. Sucrose, acetate, pyruvate, PGA, PEP, OAA, citrate, etc. were employed as the substrates of fatty acid synthesis to trace the process of synthesis of each fatty acid. The demand of various cofactors related to the ability of spinach chloroplast fatty acid synthesizing was also examined. Light dependence of the fatty acid synthesis of chloroplast as well as the influences of N,N'-dicyclohexyl carbodiimide, carbonylcyanide-4-trifluoromethoxy phenyl hydrazone and NH4Cl were discussed. The results were compared with the reports on the fatty acid synthesis of avocado pear, castor bean, etc. (Kobatake, H.)

  16. 40 CFR 721.6200 - Fatty acid polyamine condensate, phosphoric acid ester salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty acid polyamine condensate, phosphoric...Chemical Substances § 721.6200 Fatty acid polyamine condensate, phosphoric...chemical substances identified as fatty acid polyamine condensate,...

  17. Distinct fatty acid profile of ten brown macroalgae

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Graça, Silva; Renato B., Pereira; Patrícia, Valentão; Paula B., Andrade; Carla, Sousa.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that the consumption of ?-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids has beneficial effects on human health. In this work, ten brown macroalgae species collected along the Portuguese west coast were studied for their fatty acids composition by GC-MS after alkaline hydrolysis and derivatizat [...] ion. The results of this survey showed that different macroalgae from the same region display distinct fatty acids profile. Concerning ?-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid was found in all but one species. Additionally, some species contained docosahexaenoic acid. Linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid of the ?-6 series, was present in all studied macroalgae. Fucus spiralis L. exhibited the highest amounts of monounsaturated fatty acids and of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ?-3 and ?-6 series. The ?-6/?-3 ratio in half of the studied species was lower than 1. This information reinforces the potential application of some brown macroalgae as dietary sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  18. The fatty acid composition of muscles and fat depots of ostriches as influenced by genotype

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    L.C., Hoffman; M.M., Brand; S.W.P., Cloete; M., Muller.

    Full Text Available Three genotypes of ostrich (South African Black, Zimbabwean Blue Necks and crosses between Zimbabwean Blue Neck males x South African Black females) were used to investigate the influence of genotype on the fatty acid composition of the musculus gastrocnemius and musculus iliofibularis, and abdomina [...] l and breast fat depots. Total saturated fatty acids in both the m. gastrocnemius and m. iliofibularis were higher in crosses (36.4% and 35.9%) than in South African Black ostriches (32.9% and 30.4%), whereas mono-unsaturated fatty acids were highest in South African Black ostriches. Total polyunsaturated fatty acids in the m. gastrocnemius were lowest in South African Black ostriches (26.5%) compared with the Zimbabwean Blue Necks (33.2%). Neither the ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated (0.73 to 0.99) nor n-6 to n-3 (1.6 to 2.2) fatty acids were influenced by genotype, although the ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids in Zimbabwean Blue Necks was higher in the m. gastrocnemius (0.99) than in the m. iliofibularis (0.73). Differences in individual fatty acids were prominent in the breast fat, and total saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids differed between genotypes in both breast and abdominal fat. Only the ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids in the fat depots differed between South African Black (0.48) and Zimbabwean Blue Neck ostriches (0.42). The latter ratio was higher in the breast (0.50) than abdominal (0.42) fat in Zimbabwean Blue Necks. These results indicate that crossbreeding of different genotypes of ostriches reared under similar conditions does influence the overall fatty acid profiles of meat and fat.

  19. Molar extinction coefficients of some fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The attenuation of gamma rays in some fatty acids, viz. formic acid (CH2O2), acetic acid (C2H4O2), propionic acid (C3H6O2), butyric acid (C4H8O2), n-hexanoic acid (C6H12O2), n-caprylic acid (C8H16O2), lauric acid (C12H24O2), myristic acid (C14H28O2), palmitic acid (C16H32O2), oleic acid (C18H34O2) and stearic acid (C18H36O2), has been measured at the photon energies 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. Experimental values for the molar extinction coefficient, the effective atomic number and the electron density have been derived and compared with theoretical calculations. There is good agreement between experiment and theory

  20. Molar extinction coefficients of some fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, G.K.; Singh, K.

    2002-01-01

    The attenuation of gamma rays in some fatty acids, viz. formic acid (CH2O2), acetic acid (C2H4O2), propionic acid (C3H6O2), butyric acid (C4H8O2), n-hexanoic acid (C6H12O2), n-caprylic acid (C8H16O2), lauric acid (C12H24O2), myristic acid (C14H28O2), palmitic acid (C16H32O2), oleic acid (C18H34O2) and stearic acid (C18H36O2), has been measured at the photon energies 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. Experimental values for the molar extinction coefficient, the effective atomic number and the electron density have been derived and compared with theoretical calculations. There is good agreement between experiment and theory.

  1. Molar extinction coefficients of some fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, G. K.; Singh, Kulwant; Lark, B. S.; Gerward, L.

    2002-10-01

    The attenuation of gamma rays in some fatty acids, viz. formic acid (CH 2O 2), acetic acid (C 2H 4O 2), propionic acid (C 3H 6O 2), butyric acid (C 4H 8O 2), n-hexanoic acid (C 6H 12O 2), n-caprylic acid (C 8H 16O 2), lauric acid (C 12H 24O 2), myristic acid (C 14H 28O 2), palmitic acid (C 16H 32O 2), oleic acid (C 18H 34O 2) and stearic acid (C 18H 36O 2), has been measured at the photon energies 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. Experimental values for the molar extinction coefficient, the effective atomic number and the electron density have been derived and compared with theoretical calculations. There is good agreement between experiment and theory.

  2. Serum Phospholipid Fatty Acids, Genetic Variation in Myeloperoxidase, and Prostate Cancer Risk in Heavy Smokers: A Gene-Nutrient Interaction in the Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Ting-yuan David; King, Irena B.; Barnett, Matt J.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Thornquist, Mark D.; Goodman, Gary E.; Neuhouser, Marian L.

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated associations of serum phospholipid n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and trans-fatty acids with prostate cancer risk, and whether myeloperoxidase G-463A (rs2333227) modified the associations in the Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET) (Seattle, Washington; Irvine, California; New Haven, Connecticut; San Francisco, California; Baltimore, Maryland; and Portland, Oregon, 1985–2003). Prerandomization sera were assayed for fatty acids among 641 men w...

  3. Effects of n3 Intake on Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids and Sex Hormone Profiles in Postmenopausal Women: Potential for Breast Cancer Risk Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer risk is associated with dietary fat intake. Omega-6 fatty acids (n6) promote while omega-3 fatty acids (n3) inhibit tumorigenesis. Increased sex hormone (SH) concentrations are associated with risk of breast cancer. The effects of total fat and n3 on SH and PLFA were assessed in a f...

  4. Chain-modified radioiodinated fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several carbon chain manipulations have been studied in terms of their effects on myocardial activity levels and residence time. The manipulations examined included: chain length, chain branching, chain unsaturation, and carbon-iodine bond stabilization. It was found that chain length affects myocardial activity levels for both straight-chain alkyl acids and branched chain alkyl and aryl acids. Similar results have been reported for the straight-chain aryl acids. Generally, the longer chain lengths correlated with higher myocardial activity levels and longer residence times. This behavior is attributed to storage as triglycerides. Branched chain acids are designed to be anti-metabolites but only the aryl ?-methyl acids possessed the expected time course of constant or very slowly decreasing activity levels. The alkyl ?-methyl acids underwent rapid deiodination - a process apparently independent of ?-oxidation. Inhibition of ?-oxidation by incorporation of carbon-carbon double and triple bonds was studied. Deiodination of ?-iodo alkyl fatty acids prevented an assessment of suicide inhibition using an unsaturated alkynoic acid. Stabilization of the carbon-iodine bond by attachment of iodine to a vinylic or aryl carbon was studied. The low myocardial values and high blood values observed for an eleven carbon ?-iodo vinylic fatty acid were not encouraging but ?-iodo aryl fatty acids appear to avoid the problems of rapid deiodination. (Auth.)on. (Auth.)

  5. Bioactive fatty acids and coronary heart disease. Mechanisms and clinical effects of dietary fatty acids

    OpenAIRE

    Strand, Elin

    2013-01-01

    Background: A high intake of omega-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), which are potential peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists, has been associated with proposed favourable effects related to prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease. The n-3 LCPUFAs eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are poorly oxidizable and resemble the effects of the modified fatty acid and pan-PPAR agonist tetradecylthi...

  6. Fatty Acid Induced Remodeling within the Human Liver Fatty Acid-binding Protein*

    OpenAIRE

    SHARMA Ashwani; Sharma, Amit

    2011-01-01

    We crystallized human liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) in apo, holo, and intermediate states of palmitic acid engagement. Structural snapshots of fatty acid recognition, entry, and docking within LFABP support a heads-in mechanism for ligand entry. Apo-LFABP undergoes structural remodeling, where the first palmitate ingress creates the atomic environment for placement of the second palmitate. These new mechanistic insights will facilitate development of pharmacological agents against ...

  7. Involvement of N6 and N3 polyunsaturated faty acids on the lipidic profile in central nervous system of the animals of experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Iamandei1, Veronica Mocanu1, T. Oboroceanu2, Veronica Luca1

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: N-3 and N-6polyunsaturated fatty acids has manyinvolvements in activities within orentering in regulating various physiologicalprocesses and in certain pathologies.Among systemic physiological effects inwhich they are involved we mention thecentral nervous system development andrecall of the retina, regulating plasma lipidlevels, cardiovascular and immune systemfunctions, regulating the activity of insulin.Material and methods: The experimentthere were used 60 male Wistar rats , weight180 ± 20 grams, procured from the animalfarm of the Department ofPathophysiology, University of Medicineand Pharmacy “Gr.T. Popa”, Ia?i.Male Wistar rats were divided into twostudy groups: normal control animals (Mand test animals.Test group was further divided intothree groups - each group being composedof 15 animals.Administration of the substances wasmade for 36 weeks (nine months, afterwhich the animals were evaluated andsubsequently sacrificed.Results: Following statistical analysis, wedetermined the following:• Averages of AGP n3 were significantlyhigher in groups 2 (p <0.001 and 3 (p<0.001 compared with group 4• Averages ratio n6: n3 in nerve cellmembrane were significantly lower ingroups 2 (p <0.001 and 3 (p <0.001compared with group 4Discussions: Our experimentdemonstrates that increased amounts ofpolyunsaturated fatty acids in themembranes of nerve cells which can justifythe positive evolution of animals inassessing the performance of concomitantbehavioral tests.Conclusions: This study brings new lighton the importance of the existence of abalance between PUFA intake and dailydiet.

  8. Free polyunsaturated fatty acids cause taste deterioration of salmon during frozen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refsgaard, H H; Brockhoff, P M; Jensen, B

    2000-08-01

    Increased intensity of train oil taste, bitterness, and metal taste are the most pronounced sensory changes during frozen storage of salmon (Refsgaard, H. H. F.; Brockhoff, P. B.; Jensen, B. Sensory and Chemical Changes in Farmed Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) during Frozen Storage. J. Agric. Food Chem. 1998a, 46, 3473-3479). Addition of each of the unsaturated fatty acids: palmitoleic acid (16:1, n - 7), linoleic acid (C18:2, n - 6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; C20:5, n - 3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6, n - 3) to fresh minced salmon changed the sensory perception and increased the intensity of train oil taste, bitterness, and metal taste. The added level of each fatty acid ( approximately 1 mg/g salmon meat) was equivalent to the concentration of the fatty acids determined in salmon stored as fillet at -10 degrees C for 6 months. The effect of addition of the fatty acids on the intensity of train oil taste, bitterness and metal taste was in the order: DHA > palmitoleic acid > linoleic acid > EPA. Formation of free fatty acids was inhibited by cooking the salmon meat before storage. Furthermore, no changes in phospholipid level were observed during frozen storage. The results suggest that enzymatic hydrolysis of neutral lipids plays a major role in the sensory deterioration of salmon during frozen storage. PMID:10956102

  9. Fatty acids and terpenoids from Trigonia fasciculata

    OpenAIRE

    Mafezoli Jair; Santos Regina Helena A.; Gambardela Maria Teresa P.; Silveira Edilberto R

    2003-01-01

    The fatty portion of the hexane extract from roots of Trigonia fasciculata has been determined by GC/MS analysis of the methyl ester mixture. Seventeen fatty acids were identified and oleic acid (38.8%) was the major component. The GC/MS analysis of the less polar fraction of the non-saponifiable part of the root hexane extract allowed the identification of fifteen sesquiterpenes and alpha-santalene (28.4%) was the major component. Chromatography over silica gel of the more polar fraction all...

  10. Fatty acid composition of Piedmont "Ossolano" cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Zeppa, Giuseppe; Giordano, Manuela; Gerbi, Vincenzo; Arlorio, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Fatty acid composition of 66 samples of "Ossolano", a typical semi-hard cheese produced from raw cow milk in the Ossola valley (North Piedmont, West Italy) was determined. The survey was carried out on 24 summer cheeses produced in mountain farms (1500-2200 m) with milk from pasture-fed cows and 42 winter cheeses produced in valley farms (500-800 m) with milk from hay- and concentrate-fed cows. Seasonal variation in feeding condition was responsible for the observed variations in fatty acid c...

  11. Fatty acids in an estuarine mangrove ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel M Alikunhi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Los ácidos grasos se han utilizado con éxito para estudiar la transferencia de materia orgánica en las redes alimentarias costeras y estuarinas. Para delinear las interacciones tróficas en las redes, se analizaron perfiles de ácidos grasos en las especies de microbios (Azotobacter vinelandii y Lactobacillus xylosus, camarones (Metapenaeus monoceros y Macrobrachium rosenbergii y peces (Mugil cephalus, que están asociadas con la descomposición de las hojas de dos especies de mangle, Rhizophora apiculata y Avicennia marina. Los ácidos grasos, con excepción de los de cadena larga, exhiben cambios durante la descomposición de las hojas de mangle, con una reducción de los ácidos grasos saturados y un aumento de los monoinsaturados. Los ácidos grasos ramificados están ausentes en las hojas de mangle sin descomponer, pero presentes de manera significativa en las hojas descompuestas, en camarones y peces, representando una fuente importante para ellos. Esto revela que los microbios son productores dominantes que contribuyen significativamente con los peces y camarones en el ecosistema de manglar. Este trabajo demuestra que los marcadores biológicos de los ácidos grasos son una herramienta eficaz para la identificación de las interacciones tróficas entre los productores dominantes y consumidores en este manglar.Fatty acids have been successfully used to trace the transfer of organic matter in coastal and estuarine food webs. To delineate these web connections, fatty acid profiles were analyzed in species of microbes (Azotobacter vinelandii, and Lactobacillus xylosus, prawns (Metapenaeus monoceros and Macrobrachium rosenbergii and finfish (Mugil cephalus, that are associated with decomposing leaves of two mangrove species, Rhizophora apiculata and Avicennia marina. The fatty acids, except long chain fatty acids, exhibit changes during decomposition of mangrove leaves with a reduction of saturated fatty acids and an increase of monounsaturated fatty acids. The branched fatty acids are absent in undecomposed mangrove leaves, but present significantly in the decomposed leaves and in prawns and finfish, representing an important source for them. This revealed that the microbes are dominant producers that contribute significantly to the fishes and prawns in the mangrove ecosystem. This work has proved the fatty acid biomarkers as an effective tool for identifying the trophic interactions among dominant producers and consumers in this mangrove. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (2: 577-587. Epub 2010 June 02.

  12. Fatty acid composition of forage herb species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warner, D.; Jensen, SØren Krogh

    2010-01-01

    The use of alternative forage species in grasslands for intensive livestock production is receiving renewed attention. Data on fatty acid composition of herbs are scarce, so four herbs (Plantago lanceolata, Achillea millefolium, Cichorium intybus, Pastinaca sativa) and one grass species (timothy, Phleum pratense) were sown in a cutting trial. The chemical composition and concentration of fatty acids (FA) of individual species were determined during the growing season. Concentrations of crude protein and FA were generally higher in the herbs than in timothy. C. intybus had the highest nutritive value and FA concentrations. FA concentrations were generally lower in June after a heavy cut than in May and August.

  13. / Fatty acids in an estuarine mangrove ecosystem

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Nabeel M, Alikunhi; Rajendran, Narayanasamy; Kathiresan, Kandasamy.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Los ácidos grasos se han utilizado con éxito para estudiar la transferencia de materia orgánica en las redes alimentarias costeras y estuarinas. Para delinear las interacciones tróficas en las redes, se analizaron perfiles de ácidos grasos en las especies de microbios (Azotobacter vinelandii y Lacto [...] bacillus xylosus), camarones (Metapenaeus monoceros y Macrobrachium rosenbergii) y peces (Mugil cephalus), que están asociadas con la descomposición de las hojas de dos especies de mangle, Rhizophora apiculata y Avicennia marina. Los ácidos grasos, con excepción de los de cadena larga, exhiben cambios durante la descomposición de las hojas de mangle, con una reducción de los ácidos grasos saturados y un aumento de los monoinsaturados. Los ácidos grasos ramificados están ausentes en las hojas de mangle sin descomponer, pero presentes de manera significativa en las hojas descompuestas, en camarones y peces, representando una fuente importante para ellos. Esto revela que los microbios son productores dominantes que contribuyen significativamente con los peces y camarones en el ecosistema de manglar. Este trabajo demuestra que los marcadores biológicos de los ácidos grasos son una herramienta eficaz para la identificación de las interacciones tróficas entre los productores dominantes y consumidores en este manglar. Abstract in english Fatty acids have been successfully used to trace the transfer of organic matter in coastal and estuarine food webs. To delineate these web connections, fatty acid profiles were analyzed in species of microbes (Azotobacter vinelandii, and Lactobacillus xylosus), prawns (Metapenaeus monoceros and Macr [...] obrachium rosenbergii) and finfish (Mugil cephalus), that are associated with decomposing leaves of two mangrove species, Rhizophora apiculata and Avicennia marina. The fatty acids, except long chain fatty acids, exhibit changes during decomposition of mangrove leaves with a reduction of saturated fatty acids and an increase of monounsaturated fatty acids. The branched fatty acids are absent in undecomposed mangrove leaves, but present significantly in the decomposed leaves and in prawns and finfish, representing an important source for them. This revealed that the microbes are dominant producers that contribute significantly to the fishes and prawns in the mangrove ecosystem. This work has proved the fatty acid biomarkers as an effective tool for identifying the trophic interactions among dominant producers and consumers in this mangrove. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (2): 577-587. Epub 2010 June 02.

  14. Fatty acid content and lipid fractions in herbs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Majbritt Bonefeld; SØegaard, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Experiments have shown a higher transfer efficiency of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids (FA) to milk when feeding herbs compared to feeding grass-clover. With the aim to gain more knowledge for this, the FA profile of ten single plant species and the incorporation of FA in lipid fractions were analysed. The ten species were: chicory (Cichorium intybus), ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata), salad burnet (Sanguisorba minor), birds-foot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus), white meliot (Melilotus officinalis), caraway (Carum carvi), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium), white clover (Trifolium repens) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne). FA content in single species deviated considerably, although the main FA were C18:3n-3 and C18:2n-6, with chervil being the exception with C18:1n-9 as main FA. The majority of FA were found in the phospholipid and sterol fraction, with C18:3n-3 and C18:2n-6 as the dominating FA.

  15. Effects of parental omega-3 fatty acid intake on offspring microbiome and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, Ian A; Pincus, Nathan B; Fontecilla, Natalia M; Datta, Sandip K

    2014-01-01

    The "Western diet" is characterized by increased intake of saturated and omega-6 (n-6) fatty acids with a relative reduction in omega-3 (n-3) consumption. These fatty acids can directly and indirectly modulate the gut microbiome, resulting in altered host immunity. Omega-3 fatty acids can also directly modulate immunity through alterations in the phospholipid membranes of immune cells, inhibition of n-6 induced inflammation, down-regulation of inflammatory transcription factors, and by serving as pre-cursors to anti-inflammatory lipid mediators such as resolvins and protectins. We have previously shown that consumption by breeder mice of diets high in saturated and n-6 fatty acids have inflammatory and immune-modulating effects on offspring that are at least partially driven by vertical transmission of altered gut microbiota. To determine if parental diets high in n-3 fatty acids could also affect offspring microbiome and immunity, we fed breeding mice an n-3-rich diet with 40% calories from fat and measured immune outcomes in their offspring. We found offspring from mice fed diets high in n-3 had altered gut microbiomes and modestly enhanced anti-inflammatory IL-10 from both colonic and splenic tissue. Omega-3 pups were protected during peanut oral allergy challenge with small but measurable alterations in peanut-related serologies. However, n-3 pups displayed a tendency toward worsened responses during E. coli sepsis and had significantly worse outcomes during Staphylococcus aureus skin infection. Our results indicate excess parental n-3 fatty acid intake alters microbiome and immune response in offspring. PMID:24489864

  16. Composition of fatty acids in plasma and erythrocytes and eicosanoids level in patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonyuk Marina V

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disturbances of the fatty acids composition in plasma and red blood cells and eicosanoid synthesis play an important role in the metabolic syndrome (MS formation. Methods The observation group included 61 people with metabolic syndrome (30 patients with MS and normal levels of insulin, 31 people with MS and insulin resistance - IR. The parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in blood serum were examined. The composition of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA, fatty acid (FA of red blood cells lipids was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. Eicosanoids level in MS patients blood serum was studied by enzyme immunoassay. Results In MS patients in the absence of glucose-insulin homeostasis disturbances and in patients with IR the accumulation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (18:2 n6, 18:3 n3, 22:4 n6 and lower pool of saturated FA (12:0, 14:0, 16: 0, 17:0 in plasma were discovered. A deficit of polyunsaturated FA (18:3 n3, 20:4 n6 with a predominance of on-saturated FA (14:0, 18:0 in erythrocyte membranes was revealed. In MS patients regardless of the carbohydrate metabolism status high levels of leukotriene B4 and 6-keto-prostaglandin-F1? in serum were found. The development of IR in MS patients leads to increased synthesis of thromboxane A2. Conclusion The results revealed a disturbance in nonesterified fatty acids of plasma lipids and red blood cells, eicosanoid synthesis in MS patients. The breach of the plasma and cell membranes fatty acids compositions, synthesis of vasoactive and proinflammatory eicosanoids is an important pathogenetic part of the MS development.

  17. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in various macroalgal species from north Atlantic and tropical seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Keulen Herman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study the efficacy of using marine macroalgae as a source for polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are associated with the prevention of inflammation, cardiovascular diseases and mental disorders, was investigated. Methods The fatty acid (FA composition in lipids from seven sea weed species from the North Sea (Ulva lactuca, Chondrus crispus, Laminaria hyperborea, Fucus serratus, Undaria pinnatifida, Palmaria palmata, Ascophyllum nodosum and two from tropical seas (Caulerpa taxifolia, Sargassum natans was determined using GCMS. Four independent replicates were taken from each seaweed species. Results Omega-3 (n-3 and omega-6 (n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, were in the concentration range of 2-14 mg/g dry matter (DM, while total lipid content ranged from 7-45 mg/g DM. The n-9 FAs of the selected seaweeds accounted for 3%-56% of total FAs, n-6 FAs for 3%-32% and n-3 FAs for 8%-63%. Red and brown seaweeds contain arachidonic (C20:4, n-6 and/or eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA, C20:5, n-3, the latter being an important "fish" FA, as major PUFAs while in green seaweeds these values are low and mainly C16 FAs were found. A unique observation is the presence of another typical "fish" fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6, n-3 at ? 1 mg/g DM in S. natans. The n-6: n-3 ratio is in the range of 0.05-2.75 and in most cases below 1.0. Environmental effects on lipid-bound FA composition in seaweed species are discussed. Conclusion Marine macroalgae form a good, durable and virtually inexhaustible source for polyunsaturated fatty acids with an (n-6 FA: (n-3 FA ratio of about 1.0. This ratio is recommended by the World Health Organization to be less than 10 in order to prevent inflammatory, cardiovascular and nervous system disorders. Some marine macroalgal species, like P. palmata, contain high proportions of the "fish fatty acid" eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5, n-3, while in S. natans also docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6, n-3 was detected.

  18. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: structure elucidation and metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D John; Burkart, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  19. MITOCHONDRIAL FATTY ACID OXIDATION DISORDERS: PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL STUDIES IN MOUSE MODELS

    OpenAIRE

    Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Wood, Philip A

    2010-01-01

    Mouse models have been designed for a number of fatty acid oxidation defects. Studies in these mouse models have demonstrated that different pathogenetic mechanisms play a role in the pathophysiology of defects of fatty acid oxidation.

  20. Fatty Acid Content of Bovine Milkfat From Raw Milk to Yoghurt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Santos Junior

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The present study aimed to study the evolution of fatty acid content, focusing on rumenic acid content, from raw milk to yoghurt processed from this milk. Approach: Milk samples were collected in a dairy plant in the northwest of Parana State weekly in January 2011 (Brazilian summer. It processed one truck load of 26,000 L of refrigerated type-C (whole standardized milk with a minimum of 3% fat milk per day, mostly from the city of Lobato, Parana, produced mainly by Gir (Bos indicus cattle raised on stargrass (Cynodon nlenfuensis var. nlenfuensis pasture. Results: Saturated Fatty Acid (SFA were the most abundant, particularly palmitic (16:0, stearic (18:0 and myristic (14:0. Among the Monounsaturated Fatty Acid (MUFA, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (PUFA and trans fatty acid, oleic acid (18:1n-9, linoleic acid (18:2n-6, elaidic acid (t9-18:1 and c9, t11-18:2 (rumenic acid predominated. It was detected significant differences (p-1 of lipids, decreasing to 6.22±0.20 after pasteurization and to 5.41±0.18 mg g-1 in yoghurt. Conclusion/Recommendations: It is demonstrated that pasteurization and yoghurt making affect the CLA contents.

  1. Effect of Different Omega-6/Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Ratios on the Formation of Monohydroxylated Fatty Acids in THP-1 Derived Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Keeren

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6 and n-3 PUFA can modulate inflammatory processes. In western diets, the content of n-6 PUFA is much higher than that of n-3 PUFA, which has been suggested to promote a pro-inflammatory phenotype. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of modulating the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio on the formation of monohydroxylated fatty acid (HO-FAs derived from the n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid (AA and the n-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in THP-1 macrophages by means of LC-MS. Lipid metabolites were measured in THP-1 macrophage cell pellets. The concentration of AA-derived hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs was not significantly changed when incubated THP-1 macrophages in a high AA/(EPA+DHA ratio of 19/1 vs. a low ratio AA/(EPA+DHA of 1/1 (950.6 ± 110 ng/mg vs. 648.2 ± 92.4 ng/mg, p = 0.103. Correspondingly, the concentration of EPA-derived hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids (HEPEs and DHA-derived hydroxydocosahexaenoic acids (HDHAs were significantly increased (63.9 ± 7.8 ng/mg vs. 434.4 ± 84.3 ng/mg, p = 0.012 and 84.9 ± 18.3 ng/mg vs. 439.4 ± 82.7 ng/mg, p = 0.014, respectively. Most notable was the strong increase of 18-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (18-HEPE formation in THP-1 macrophages, with levels of 170.9 ± 40.2 ng/mg protein in the high n-3 PUFA treated cells. Thus our data indicate that THP-1 macrophages prominently utilize EPA and DHA for monohydroxylated metabolite formation, in particular 18-HEPE, which has been shown to be released by macrophages to prevent pressure overload-induced maladaptive cardiac remodeling.

  2. Effect of Different Omega-6/Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Ratios on the Formation of Monohydroxylated Fatty Acids in THP-1 Derived Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeren, Kathrin; Huang, Dan; Smyl, Christopher; Fischer, Andreas; Rothe, Michael; Weylandt, Karsten-H

    2015-01-01

    Omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6 and n-3 PUFA) can modulate inflammatory processes. In western diets, the content of n-6 PUFA is much higher than that of n-3 PUFA, which has been suggested to promote a pro-inflammatory phenotype. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of modulating the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio on the formation of monohydroxylated fatty acid (HO-FAs) derived from the n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid (AA) and the n-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in THP-1 macrophages by means of LC-MS. Lipid metabolites were measured in THP-1 macrophage cell pellets. The concentration of AA-derived hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) was not significantly changed when incubated THP-1 macrophages in a high AA/(EPA+DHA) ratio of 19/1 vs. a low ratio AA/(EPA+DHA) of 1/1 (950.6 ± 110 ng/mg vs. 648.2 ± 92.4 ng/mg, p = 0.103). Correspondingly, the concentration of EPA-derived hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids (HEPEs) and DHA-derived hydroxydocosahexaenoic acids (HDHAs) were significantly increased (63.9 ± 7.8 ng/mg vs. 434.4 ± 84.3 ng/mg, p = 0.012 and 84.9 ± 18.3 ng/mg vs. 439.4 ± 82.7 ng/mg, p = 0.014, respectively). Most notable was the strong increase of 18-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (18-HEPE) formation in THP-1 macrophages, with levels of 170.9 ± 40.2 ng/mg protein in the high n-3 PUFA treated cells. Thus our data indicate that THP-1 macrophages prominently utilize EPA and DHA for monohydroxylated metabolite formation, in particular 18-HEPE, which has been shown to be released by macrophages to prevent pressure overload-induced maladaptive cardiac remodeling. PMID:25860776

  3. Fatty acid analysis of Erwinia amylovora from Serbia and Montenegro

    OpenAIRE

    Milan Ivanovi?; Katarina Gaši?; An?elka ?ali?; Nemanja Kuzmanovi?; Mirko Ivanovi?; Aleksa Obradovi?

    2011-01-01

    Automated method of fatty acid analysis was used to identify and study heterogeneity of 41 Erwinia amylovora strains, originating from 8 plant species grown in 13 locations in Serbia and one in Montenegro. All strains contained 14:0 3OH fatty acid, characteristic for the “amylovora” group. According to fatty acid composition 39 strains were identified as E. amylovora as the first choice from the database. Due to their specific fatty acid composition, tw...

  4. Why do polyunsaturated fatty acids lower serum cholesterol?

    OpenAIRE

    Beynen, A.C.; Katan, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Replacement of saturated by polyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet may lower serum very low-density and low-density lipoprotein concentrations because the liver preferentially converts polyunsaturated fatty acids into ketone bodies instead of into very low-density lipoprotein triglycerides. Thus unlike saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids are transported to the tissues for oxidation without leaving a trail of lipoprotein remnants in the form of low-density lipoproteins.

  5. The glucose-fatty acid cycle: a physiological perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Frayn, KN

    2003-01-01

    Glucose and fatty acids are the major fuels for mammalian metabolism and it is clearly essential that mechanisms exist for mutual co-ordination of their utilization. The glucose-fatty acid cycle, as it was proposed in 1963, describes one set of mechanisms by which carbohydrate and fat metabolism interact. Since that time, the importance of the glucose-fatty acid cycle has been confirmed repeatedly, in particular by elevation of plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations and demonstration...

  6. Fatty acids composition in South African freshwater fish as indicators of food quality

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Erasmus, Chauke; Ewa, Cukrowska; Mary-Jane, Thaela-Chimuka; Luke, Chimuka; Hermogene, Nsengimana; Hlanganani, Tutu.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid classes and fatty acid composition of three commercially important freshwater fish species Oreochromis mossambicus (Mozambique tilapia), Clarias gariepinus (African catfish) and Cyprinus carpio (carp) obtained from an aquaculture, different river systems and fish markets from different provinc [...] es in South Africa were investigated. Fatty acids were extracted from the fish fillets through the Folch extraction method (using chloroform: methanol at the ratio of 2:1). Generally, tilapia fish species was found to be the richest in fatty acid composition. In all fish species analysed, palmitic acid (16:0) was found to be the most abundant fatty acid ranging from 18.24 to 21.84%. Appreciable quantities of essential polyunsaturated fatty acid such as docosahexaenoic (DHA) (22:6 n-3, 3.92 to 6.16%), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (20:5 n-3, 1.91 to 2.92%) and arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6, 7.19 to 8.50%) were also found. Observations show that fish species obtained from Gauteng Province are richer in fatty acids compared to those in Limpopo Province. The study points out that all fish species investigated contain appreciable levels of Omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and are therefore suitable for an unsaturated low-fat diet. This is important especially for poor communities who cannot afford to get a balanced diet, rich in some essential fatty acids.Therefore, it is important to determine the nutritional value of local fish, since it significantly contribute to a healthy diet in rural communities.

  7. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in horses

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Tanja, Hess; Trinette, Ross-Jones.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) are a family of essential fatty acids with many biological activities. These fatty acids are incorporated into cell membranes, changing their structural and functional characteristics. N-3 PUFA can act by modulating inflammatory responses at different l [...] evels. Omega-3 PUFA can be converted in the body to longer-chain n-3 PUFA at a limited rate and are differently converted in body systems. It appears that when specific longer-chain n-3 PUFA are desired these need to be supplemented directly in the diet. In different species some evidence indicates a potential effect on improving insulin sensitivity. Recently, a novel class of n-3 PUFA-derived anti-inflammatory mediators have been recognized, termed E-series and D-series resolvins, formed from EPA and DHA, respectively. N-3 PUFA derived resolvins and protectins are heavily involved in the resolution of inflammation. Supplementation with n-3 fatty acids in horses may help manage chronic inflammatory conditions such as osteoarthritis, equine metabolic syndrome, laminitis, and thereby help to improve longevity of sport horse.

  8. Fatty acid metabolism meets organelle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Laurence; ?opi?, Alenka; Jackson, Catherine L

    2015-03-23

    Upon nutrient deprivation, cells metabolize fatty acids (FAs) in mitochondria to supply energy, but how FAs, stored as triacylglycerols in lipid droplets, reach mitochondria has been mysterious. Rambold et al. (2015) now show that FA mobilization depends on triacylglycerol lipolysis, whereas autophagy feeds the lipid droplet pool for continued fueling of mitochondria. PMID:25805129

  9. Extraction of Fatty Acids from Microalgae.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rousková, Milena; Kohoutková, J.; Veselý, Václav; Kaštánek, František; Šolcová, Olga

    Praha : Orgit, 2013 - (Kalenda, P.; Lubojacký, J.), s. 123-128 ISBN 978-80-86238-55-5. [International Conference on Chemical Technology (ICCT 2013) /1./. Mikulov (CZ), 08.04.2013-10.04.2013] R&D Projects: GA TA ?R TE01020080 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : extraction * chlorella vulgaris * fatty acids Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  10. Effects of Long Term Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Supplementation on Membrane Lipid Composition and Growth Characteristics in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.M. Goh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effects of modifying the n-6:n-3 Fatty Acid Ratio (FAR of diets using fish oil, soybean oil and butter on growth performance and the fatty acid profile of rat fed with commercial concentrate diet. Fifty individually housed Sprague-Dawley rats (average of 130±2 g of body weight were fed concentrates at 5% of body weight daily. The treatments consisted of dietary n-6:n-3 FAR of 1.94:1, 5.67:1, 51.82:1 and 61.69:1. After feeding for 20 weeks in individual cages, rats were sacrificed 15 h after feeding and samples of blood were collected. Increasing dietary saturated fatty acid increased the body weight significantly in compared to other treatment groups. Concentrations of n-6:n-3 FAR in plasma increased linearly (p0.05 in rat plasma with different n-6:n-3 FAR. Proportions of oleic acid in plasma were unchanged by diet. The proportion of Arachidonic Acid (AA decreased (p<0.05 in plasma of rat that fed with low level of n-6:n-3 FAR in compare to the diet with higher level. Proportions of all measured long chain n-3 fatty acids were greater in plasma when diets contained more C22:5 n-3 and 22:6 n-3 from fish oil. By decreasing the dietary n-6:n-3 FAR, the proportions of long chain n-3 fatty acids in plasma increased dramatically; specifically, 22:6 n-3 and 22:5 n-3.

  11. 75 FR 71556 - Polyoxyalkylated Glycerol Fatty Acid Esters; Tolerance Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ...EPA-HQ-OPP-2009-0061; FRL-8852-2] Polyoxyalkylated Glycerol Fatty Acid Esters; Tolerance Exemption...tolerance for residues of polyoxyalkylated glycerol fatty acid esters; the mono-, di...oxide, also known as polyoxyalkylated glycerol fatty acid esters, when used as...

  12. A Review of the Metabolic Origins of Milk Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana BANC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Milk fat and its fatty acid profile are important determinants of the technological, sensorial, and nutritional properties of milk and dairy products. The two major processes contributing to the presence of fatty acids in ruminant milk are the mammary lipogenesis and the lipid metabolism in the rumen. Among fatty acids, 4:0 to 12:0, almost all 14:0 and about a half of 16:0 in milk fat derive from de novo synthesis within the mammary gland. De novo synthesis utilizes as precursors acetate and butyrate produced through carbohydrates ruminal fermentation and involves acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthetase as key enzymes. The rest of 16:0 and all of the long-chain fatty acids derive from mammary uptake of circulating lipoproteins and nonesterified fatty acids that originate from digestive absorption of lipids and body fat mobilization. Further, long-chain fatty acids as well as medium-chain fatty acids entering the mammary gland can be desaturated via ?-9 desaturase, an enzyme that acts by adding a cis-9-double bond on the fatty acid chain. Moreover, ruminal biohydrogenation of dietary unsaturated fatty acids results in the formation of numerous fatty acids available for incorporation into milk fat. Ruminal biohydrogenation is performed by rumen microbial population as a means of protection against the toxic effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Within the rumen microorganisms, bacteria are principally responsible for ruminal biohydrogenation when compared to protozoa and anaerobic fungi.

  13. 21 CFR 172.854 - Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...safflower oil, sesame oil, soybean oil, and tallow and the fatty...oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids meeting the requirements...mixture of stearic, oleic, and coconut fatty acids are used as a cloud inhibitor in vegetable and salad oils when use is not...

  14. MYOCARDIAL CONCENTRATIONS OF FATTY ACIDS IN DOGS WITH DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    To compare the myocardial concentrations of fatty acids in dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with control dogs using myocardium from 7 dogs with DCM, 16 control dogs. Myocardial tissues were homogenized and total fatty acids extracted and converted to methyl esters. Myocardial fatty acids conce...

  15. 21 CFR 172.863 - Salts of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Salts of fatty acids. 172.863 Section 172.863 Food and...Multipurpose Additives § 172.863 Salts of fatty acids. The food additive salts of fatty acids may be safely used in food and in the...

  16. 21 CFR 573.914 - Salts of volatile fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Salts of volatile fatty acids. 573.914 Section 573.914...573.914 Salts of volatile fatty acids. (a) Identity. The food...ammonium or calcium salts of volatile fatty acids and shall conform to the...

  17. FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF TWO DIFFERENT MUSCLES IN RABBITS :ALTERATIONS IN RESPONSE TO SATURATED OR UNSATURATED DIETARY FATTY ACID COMPLEMENTATION

    OpenAIRE

    Szabó, A; Romvári, R.; Fébel, H; Nagy, I.; Szendrõ, ZS.

    2001-01-01

    Szabó, A.; Romvári, R.; Fébel, H.; Nagy, I.; Szendrõ, Z. (2001). FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF TWO DIFFERENT MUSCLES IN RABBITS :ALTERATIONS IN RESPONSE TO SATURATED OR UNSATURATED DIETARY FATTY ACID COMPLEMENTATION.

  18. Evaluation of the Quantitative and Qualitative Alterations in the Fatty Acid Contents of the Sebum of Patients with Inflammatory Acne during Treatment with Systemic Lymecycline and/or Oral Fatty Acid Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira Talarico, Aline; Parra Duarte, Carla de Oliveira; Silva Pereira, Caroline; de Souza Weimann, Ellem Tatiani; Sabino de Matos, Lissa; Della Coletta, Livia Carolina; Fidelis, Maria Carolina; Vasconcellos, Cidia

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acne is a dermatosis that involves an altered sebum pattern. Objectives. (1) To evaluate if a treatment based on antibiotics (lymecycline) can alter fatty acids contents of the sebum of patients with acne; (2) to evaluate if oral supplementation of fatty acids can interfere with fatty acids contents of the sebum of patients with acne; (3) to evaluate if there is any interaction in fatty acids contents of the sebum of patients with acne when they use both antibiotics and oral supplementation of fatty acids. Methods. Forty-five male volunteers with inflammatory acne vulgaris were treated with 300?mg of lymecycline per day, with 540?mg of ?-linolenic acid, 1,200?mg of linoleic acid, and 510?mg of oleic acid per day, or with both regimens for 90 days. Every 30 days, a sample of sebum from the forehead was collected for fatty acids' chromatographic analysis. Results. Twelve fatty acids studied exhibited some kind of pattern changes during the study: C12:0, C14:0, C15:0, C16:1, C18:0, C18:1n9c+C18:1n9t, C18:2n6t, C18:3n6, C18:3n3, C20:1, C22:0, and C24:0. Conclusions. The daily administration of lymecycline and/or specific fatty acids may slightly influence some fatty acids levels present in the sebum of patients with inflammatory acne vulgaris. PMID:24191156

  19. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Composition of Maternal Diet and Erythrocyte Phospholipid Status in Chilean Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla A. Bascuñán

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chilean diets are characterized by a low supply of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA, which are critical nutrients during pregnancy and lactation, because of their role in brain and visual development. DHA is the most relevant n-3 PUFA in this period. We evaluated the dietary n-3 PUFA intake and erythrocyte phospholipids n-3 PUFA in Chilean pregnant women. Eighty healthy pregnant women (20–36 years old in the 3rd–6th month of pregnancy were included in the study. Dietary assessment was done applying a food frequency questionnaire, and data were analyzed through the Food Processor SQL® software. Fatty acids of erythrocyte phospholipids were assessed by gas-liquid chromatography. Diet composition was high in saturated fat, low in mono- and PUFA, high in n-6 PUFA (linoleic acid and low in n-3 PUFA (alpha-linolenic acid and DHA, with imbalance in the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio. Similar results were observed for fatty acids from erythrocyte phospholipids. The sample of Chilean pregnant women showed high consumption of saturated fat and low consumption of n-3 PUFA, which is reflected in the low DHA content of erythrocyte phospholipids. Imbalance between n-6/n-3 PUFA could negatively affect fetal development. New strategies are necessary to improve n-3 PUFA intake throughout pregnancy and breast feeding periods. Furthermore, it is necessary to develop dietary interventions to improve the quality of consumed foods with particular emphasis on n-3 PUFA.

  20. Tailored fatty acid synthesis via dynamic control of fatty acid elongation

    OpenAIRE

    Torella, Joseph P.; Ford, Tyler J.; Kim, Scott N.; Chen, Amanda M.; Way, Jeffrey C.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs, 4–12 carbons) are valuable as precursors to industrial chemicals and biofuels, but are not canonical products of microbial fatty acid synthesis. We engineered microbial production of the full range of even- and odd-chain–length MCFAs and found that MCFA production is limited by rapid, irreversible elongation of their acyl-ACP precursors. To address this limitation, we programmed an essential ketoacyl synthase to degrade in response to a chemical inducer, t...

  1. Autistic children exhibit decreased levels of essential Fatty acids in red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigandi, Sarah A; Shao, Hong; Qian, Steven Y; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai-Lin; Kang, Jing X

    2015-01-01

    Omega-6 (n-6) and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are essential nutrients for brain development and function. However, whether or not the levels of these fatty acids are altered in individuals with autism remains debatable. In this study, we compared the fatty acid contents between 121 autistic patients and 110 non-autistic, non-developmentally delayed controls, aged 3-17. Analysis of the fatty acid composition of red blood cell (RBC) membrane phospholipids showed that the percentage of total PUFA was lower in autistic patients than in controls; levels of n-6 arachidonic acid (AA) and n-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were particularly decreased (p < 0.001). In addition, plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory AA metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were higher in a subset of the autistic participants (n = 20) compared to controls. Our study demonstrates an alteration in the PUFA profile and increased production of a PUFA-derived metabolite in autistic patients, supporting the hypothesis that abnormal lipid metabolism is implicated in autism. PMID:25946342

  2. Autistic Children Exhibit Decreased Levels of Essential Fatty Acids in Red Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Brigandi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Omega-6 (n-6 and omega-3 (n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA are essential nutrients for brain development and function. However, whether or not the levels of these fatty acids are altered in individuals with autism remains debatable. In this study, we compared the fatty acid contents between 121 autistic patients and 110 non-autistic, non-developmentally delayed controls, aged 3–17. Analysis of the fatty acid composition of red blood cell (RBC membrane phospholipids showed that the percentage of total PUFA was lower in autistic patients than in controls; levels of n-6 arachidonic acid (AA and n-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA were particularly decreased (p < 0.001. In addition, plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory AA metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 were higher in a subset of the autistic participants (n = 20 compared to controls. Our study demonstrates an alteration in the PUFA profile and increased production of a PUFA-derived metabolite in autistic patients, supporting the hypothesis that abnormal lipid metabolism is implicated in autism.

  3. Incorporation of conjugated linoleic and alpha linolenic fatty acids into Pimedolus maculatus fillets

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ana Beatriz, Zanqui; Swami Arêa, Maruyama; Deoclécio José, Barilli; Suellen Andressa Oenning, Ribeiro; Sandra Terezinha Marques, Gomes; Jesuí Vergílio, Visentainer; Nilson Evelázio De, Souza; Wilson Rogério, Boscolo; Makoto, Matsushita.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the fatty acid composition of Pimedolus maculatus fillets of fish fed with different diets. The fish were submitted to an adaptation period (over 30 days) and fed only a control diet (diet I). After this period, the fish were divided into two groups: on [...] e group received a diet enriched with flaxseed oil (diet II), and the other received a diet enriched with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (diet III). Subsequent collections were undertaken after 25 and 50 days. Compared to the control samples, fish fed diet II showed an increase in concentrations of total fatty acid omega-3 (n-3) in the fillets, with an improvement ratio of n-6/n-3. The incorporation of CLA into fish fed diet III was successful. Supplementing the diet of Pimedolus maculatus with CLA and flaxseed oil led to improvements in nutritional quality and fatty acid profile of the fish fillets.

  4. Fatty acids and oxidative stability of meat from lambs fed carob-containing diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravador, Rufielyn S; Luciano, Giuseppe; Jongberg, Sisse; Bognanno, Matteo; Scerra, Manuel; Andersen, Mogens L; Lund, Marianne N; Priolo, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Male Comisana lambs were individually stalled and, for 56 days, were fed concentrates with 60% barley (n = 8 lambs), or concentrates in which barley was partially replaced by 24% or 35% carob pulp (n = 9 lambs in each group). The intramuscular fatty acids were analyzed and the color stability, lipid and protein oxidation were measured in fresh meat overwrapped with polyvinyl chloride film at 0, 3 or 6 days of storage at 4 °C in the dark. Carob pulp increased the concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in muscle, including the rumenic acid (P fatty acids (P < 0.01) and the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio (P = 0.01). The meat did not undergo extensive oxidative deterioration and the diet did not affect the oxidative stability parameters. Therefore, carob in lamb diet could increase PUFA in muscle without compromising meat oxidative stability. PMID:25842304

  5. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide stress derived from fatty acid beta-oxidation improves fatty acid utilization in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Doi, Hidetaka; Hoshino, Yasushi; Nakase, Kentaro; Usuda, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acids are a promising raw material for substance production because of their highly reduced and anhydrous nature, which can provide higher fermentation yields than sugars. However, they are insoluble in water and are poorly utilized by microbes in industrial fermentation production. We used fatty acids as raw materials for l-lysine fermentation by emulsification and improved the limited fatty acid-utilization ability of Escherichia coli. We obtained a fatty acid-utilizing mutant strain ...

  6. Fat content, energy value and fatty acid profile of donkey milk during lactation and implications for human nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martemucci Giovanni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aims Milk contains numerous nutrients. The content of n-3 fatty acids, the n-6/n-3 ratio, and short- and medium-chain fatty acids may promote positive health effects. In Western societies, cow’s milk fat is perceived as a risk factor for health because it is a source of a high fraction of saturated fatty acids. Recently, there has been increasing interest in donkey’s milk. In this work, the fat and energetic value and acidic composition of donkey’s milk, with reference to human nutrition, and their variations during lactation, were investigated. We also discuss the implications of the acidic profile of donkey’s milk on human nutrition. Methods Individual milk samples from lactating jennies were collected 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 and 210days after foaling, for the analysis of fat, proteins and lactose, which was achieved using an infrared milk analyser, and fatty acids composition by gas chromatography. Results The donkey’s milk was characterised by low fat and energetic (1719.2kJ·kg-1 values, a high polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA content of mainly ?-linolenic acid (ALA and linoleic acid (LA, a low n-6 to n-3 FA ratio or LA/ALA ratio, and advantageous values of atherogenic and thrombogenic indices. Among the minor PUFA, docosahesaenoic (DHA, eicosapentanoic (EPA, and arachidonic (AA acids were present in very small amounts ( The fatty acid patterns were affected by the lactation stage and showed a decrease (P Conclusions The high level of unsaturated/saturated fatty acids and PUFA-n3 content and the low n-6/n-3 ratio suggest the use of donkey’s milk as a functional food for human nutrition and its potential utilisation for infant nutrition as well as adult diets, particular for the elderly.

  7. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, body fat and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anne-Sofie Q; Hasselbalch, Ann Louise

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Based on animal studies, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been suggested to lower the risk of obesity and inflammation. We aimed to investigate if, among humans, intake of n-3 PUFAs was associated with i) total body fat, ii) body fat distribution and iii) obesity-related inflammatory markers. METHODS: The study population consisted of 1,212 healthy individuals with information on habitual food intake from food frequency questionnaires, six different measures of body fat, and levels of six circulating inflammatory markers. Multiple linear regression analysis of intakes of PUFAs in relation to outcomes were performed and adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Absolute n-3 PUFA intake, but not n-3/n-6, was inversely associated with the different measures of body fat. Among n-3 PUFA derivatives, only ?-linolenic acid (ALA) was inversely associated with body fat measures. No significant interactions with the dietary macronutrient composition were observed. Pro-inflammatory cytokineswere not associated with absolute PUFA intake, but the macrophage inflammatory protein-1? (MIP-1?) was associated with the n-3/n-6 ratio. CONCLUSION: In humans, intake of n-3 PUFAs, in particular ALA, is beneficially associated with body fatness. The favourable association is, however, not reflected in systemic levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nor is it influenced by macronutrients in the diet.

  8. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates diversification in Lepidopteran caterpillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatty acid amino acid conjugates (FACs) have been found in Noctuid as well as Sphingid caterpillar oral secretions and especially volicitin [N-(17-hydroxylinolenoyl)-L-Glutamine] and its biochemical precursor, N-linolenoyl-L-glutamine, are known elicitors of induced volatile emissions in corn plants...

  9. Fatty acid and lipoic acid biosynthesis in higher plant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, V; Macherel, D; Jaquinod, M; Douce, R; Bourguignon, J

    2000-02-18

    Fatty acid and lipoic acid biosynthesis were investigated in plant mitochondria. Although the mitochondria lack acetyl-CoA carboxylase, our experiments reveal that they contain the enzymatic equipment necessary to transform malonate into the two main building units for fatty acid synthesis: malonyl- and acetyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP). We demonstrated, by a new method based on a complementary use of high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, that the soluble mitochondrial fatty-acid synthase produces mainly three predominant acyl-ACPs as follows: octanoyl(C8)-, hexadecanoyl(C16)-, and octadecanoyl(C18)-ACP. Octanoate production is of primary interest since it has been postulated long ago to be a precursor of lipoic acid. By using a recombinant H apoprotein mutant as a potential acceptor for newly synthesized lipoic acid, we were able to detect limited amounts of lipoylated H protein in the presence of malonate, several sulfur donors, and cofactors. Finally, we present a scheme outlining the new biochemical pathway of fatty acid and lipoic acid synthesis in plant mitochondria. PMID:10671542

  10. Reactivity of Trametes laccases with fatty and resin acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, S; Holmbom, B; Spetz, P; Mustranta, A; Buchert, J

    2001-04-01

    Lipophilic extractives commonly referred to as wood pitch or wood resin can have a negative impact on paper machine runnability and product quality. The lipophilic extractives are composed mainly of fatty acids, resin acids, sterols, steryl esters and triglycerides. In this work, the suitability of laccases for the modification of fatty and resin acids was studied, using two model fractions. In the treatments, resin and fatty acid dispersions were treated with two different laccases, i.e. laccases from Trametes hirsuta and T. villosa. Different chromatographic methods were used to elucidate the effects of laccase treatments on the chemistry of the fatty and resin acids. Both laccases were able to modify the fatty and resin acids to some extent. In the case of fatty acids, a decrease in the amount of linoleic, oleic and pinolenic acids was observed, whereas the modification of resin acids resulted in a reduced amount of conjugated resin acids. PMID:11341313

  11. Identification of fatty acids in canine seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, R; Inostroza, K; Risopatrón, J; Sanchez, R; Sepúlveda, N

    2014-03-01

    Seminal plasma contains various biochemical components associated with sperm function. However, there is limited information regarding the fatty acid composition of seminal plasma and their effect on sperm. The aim of this study was to identify the fatty acid content in canine seminal plasma using gas chromatography. Twelve ejaculates were studied, the seminal plasma was obtained by centrifugation and then the lipids were extracted, methylated and analysed by chromatography. The total lipids in the seminal plasma were 2.5 ± 0.3%, corresponding to 85% saturated fatty acids (SFA) and 15% unsaturated fatty acids (UFA). The greatest proportions of SFA were palmitic acid (30.4%), stearic acid (23.4%) and myristic acid (5.3%) and of UFA oleic acid (9.0%). Therefore, the protocols and techniques used enabled the identification of 18 different fatty acids in canine seminal plasma, which constitutes a good method to evaluate and quantify the fatty acid profile in this species. PMID:23398451

  12. Effect of dietary replacement of sunflower oil with perilla oil on the absolute fatty acid composition in Nile tilapia (GIFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonera, Fabiana; Bonafe, Elton Guntendorfer; Martin, Clayton Antunes; Montanher, Paula Fernandes; Ribeiro, Ricardo Pereira; Figueiredo, Luana Caroline; Almeida, Vitor Cinque; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergílio

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the dietary replacement of sunflower oil with perilla oil in Nile tilapia (GIFT strain) at 0, 10, 20 and 30 days. There was an increase in total omega 3 fatty acids (n-3) in muscle tissue (from 63.6 to 181.5 mg g(-1)) and a decrease in total concentration of omega 6 fatty acids (n-6) ranging between 255.6 and 196.1 mgg(-1). Amongst the n-3 fatty acids, the concentrations of alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (20:6n-3) increased by 9.4 and 1.9 times, respectively, after 30 days for the perilla oil-enriched diet. The n-6/n-3, polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids (PUFA/SFA), and polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (PUFA/MUFA) ratios tended to stabilize after 20 days under the perilla oil-enriched diet. Incorporation of perilla oil as a lipid source in the diet of tilapia for 20 or 30 days resulted in significant changes in the fatty acid composition of the fish muscle tissue, contributing to increase its nutritional value. PMID:24262550

  13. Intake of fatty acids in Western Europe with emphasis on trans fatty acids: The TRANSFAIR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulshof, K. F. A. M.; Erp-Baart, M. A. van

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the intake of trans fatty acids (TFA) and other fatty acids in 14 Western European countries. Design and subjects: A maximum of 100 foods per country were sampled and centrally analysed. Each country calculated the intake of individual trans and other fatty acids, clusters of fatty acids and total fat in adults and/or the total population using the best available national food consumption data set. Results: A wide variation was observed in the intake of total fat and (clusters) of fatty acids in absolute amounts. The variation in proportion of energy derived from total fat and from clusters of fatty acids was less. Only in Finland, Italy, Norway and Portugal total fat did provide on average less than 35% of energy intake. Saturated fatty acids (SFA) provided on average between 10% and 19% of total energy intake, with the lowest contribution in most Mediterranean countries. TFA intake ranged from 0.5% (Greece, Italy) to 2.1% (Iceland) of energy intake among men and from 0.8% (Greece) to 1.9% among women (Iceland) (1.2-6.7 g/d and 1.7-4.1 g/d, respectively). The TFA intake was lowest in Mediterranean countries (0.5-0.8 en%) but was also below 1% of energy in Finland and Germany. Moderate intakes were seen in Belgium, The Netherlands, Norway and UK and highest intake in Iceland. Trans isomers of C-18:1 were the most TFA in the diet. Monounsaturated fatty acids contributed 9-12% of mean daily energy intake (except for Greece, nearly 18%) and polyunsaturated fatty acids 3-7%. Conclusion: The current intake of TFA in most Western European countries does not appear to be a reason for major concern. In several countries a considerable proportion of energy was derived from SFA. It would therefore be prudent to reduce intake of all cholesterol-raising fatty acids, TFA included. Sponsorship: Commission of the European Communities (AIR 2421); National Funds; European Industries supported the chemical analyses.

  14. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of fatty acid amide (erucamide) using fatty acid and urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Neeraj Praphulla; Singh, R P

    2007-01-01

    Ammonolysis of fatty acids to the corresponding fatty acid amides is efficiently catalysed by Candida antartica lipase (Novozym 435). In the present paper lipase-catalysed synthesis of erucamide by ammonolysis of erucic acid and urea in organic solvent medium was studied and optimal conditions for fatty amides synthesis were established. In this process erucic acid gave 88.74 % pure erucamide after 48 hour and 250 rpm at 60 degrees C with 1:4 molar ratio of erucic acid and urea, the organic solvent media is 50 ml tert-butyl alcohol (2-methyl-2-propanol). This process for synthesis is economical as we used urea in place of ammonia or other amidation reactant at atmospheric pressure. The amount of catalyst used is 3 %. PMID:17898456

  15. Effect of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) oil administered by gavage on the fatty acid composition and oxidative stress of mouse liver

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    L.P., Silva; C.K., Miyasaka; E.F., Martins; J.R.S.A., Leite; Z.G.M., Lacava; R., Curi; R.B., Azevedo.

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of daily intragastric administration of bullfrog oil (oleic, linoleic and palmitoleic acid-rich oil), corresponding to 0.4% of body weight for four weeks, on fatty acid composition and oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation and catalase activ [...] ity) in mouse liver. The activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), biomarkers of tissue injury, were determined in liver homogenates and serum. The proportions of 18:2n-6, 20:4n-6, 20:5n-3, and 22:6n-3 (polyunsaturated fatty acids, from 37 to 60%) in the total fatty acid content were increased in the liver of the bullfrog oil-treated group (P

  16. The biological significance of ?-oxidation of fatty acids

    OpenAIRE

    Miura, Yoshiro

    2013-01-01

    The author focuses on the biological significance of ?-oxidation of fatty acids. Early studies revealed that there is a subsidiary pathway for ?-oxidation of fatty acids when ?-oxidation is blocked. Many studies demonstrated that the ?-oxidation serves to provide succinyl-CoA for the citric acid cycle and for gluconeogenesis under conditions of starvation and diabetes. Acylglucosylceramides which are composed of linoleic acid, long chain ?-hydroxy fatty acids, eicosasphingenine (or trihy...

  17. Fatty acid correlates of temperament in adolescent boys with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumich, Alex L; Matsudaira, Toshiko; Heasman, Bryony; Gow, Rachel V; Ibrahimovic, Almira; Ghebremeskel, Kebreab; Crawford, Michael A; Taylor, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Atypical fatty acid metabolism has been reported in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), however, its relationship with temperament in this population is unclear. The current study investigated the association between blood levels of fatty acids implicated in brain structure and function (omega-3, omega-6, omega-9) and personality traits of stability (neuroticism, conscientiousness and agreeableness) and plasticity (extraversion and openness). Twenty right-handed adolescent boys with ADHD completed a self-report NEO-FFI personality questionnaire, and had fatty acid content assessed from red blood using gas chromatography. Pearson's correlations showed no significant associations between omega-3 levels and personality. After correction for multiple comparisons, Adrenic Acid (C22:4n6) was inversely associated with stability. Oleic acid (C18:1n9) was positively associated with plasticity. Results are in line with a role of fatty acids in brain function. They suggest that those fatty acids that are involved in myelination (Adrenic, Oleic) have the strongest associations with temperament in adolescents with ADHD. PMID:23566869

  18. OSTOPANIC ACID, A CYTOTOXIC FATTY ACID FROM Gymnopilus spectabilis

    OpenAIRE

    Nun?ez-alarcon, J.; Carlos Paredes, J. C.; Carmona, M. T.; Quin?ones, M.

    2001-01-01

    (E,E)-7,12-Dioxooctadeca-8,10-dienoic acid (ostopanic acid), a cytotoxic fatty acid, has been isolated from the fruit body of the hallucinogenic mushroom Gymnopilus spectabilis. Ergosterol, a very common metabolite in mushrooms, was also isolatedDel cuerpo fructífero de Gymnopilus spectabilis, un hongo con propiedades alucinógenas, se aisló el ácido (E,E)-7,12-dioxooctadeca-8,10-dienoico (ácido ostopánico), un ácido graso citotóxico. Ergosterol, un metabolito muy frecuente en hongos, ...

  19. Molar extinction coefficients of some fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, G.K.; Singh, Kulwant; Lark, B.S.; Gerward, L. E-mail: gerward@fysik.dtu.dk

    2002-10-01

    The attenuation of gamma rays in some fatty acids, viz. formic acid (CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}), acetic acid (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}), propionic acid (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O{sub 2}), butyric acid (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}O{sub 2}), n-hexanoic acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 12}O{sub 2}), n-caprylic acid (C{sub 8}H{sub 16}O{sub 2}), lauric acid (C{sub 12}H{sub 24}O{sub 2}), myristic acid (C{sub 14}H{sub 28}O{sub 2}), palmitic acid (C{sub 16}H{sub 32}O{sub 2}), oleic acid (C{sub 18}H{sub 34}O{sub 2}) and stearic acid (C{sub 18}H{sub 36}O{sub 2}), has been measured at the photon energies 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. Experimental values for the molar extinction coefficient, the effective atomic number and the electron density have been derived and compared with theoretical calculations. There is good agreement between experiment and theory.

  20. Laser signals' nonlinear change in fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous works showed that thin layers of fatty acids and fatty acid-cholesterol mixtures behaved as optical liquid crystals, even at low incident laser power. The paper presents an experimental and computer study of laser signals, emergent from such samples, in presence of fluctuations. The optical emergent laser beams' features at different incident parameters were experimentally determined for different type (c.w. and pulsed) lasers, as for example helium-neon and Nd3+ glass lasers. The results were correlated with the amount of cholesterol in mixtures and with their response in external electric field. These measurements are in all cases affected by fluctuations. We developed some computer-based procedures, by using the TableCurve3D from Jandel Scientific software and equations Runge-Kutta in MATLAB for taking into account these fluctuations

  1. Laser signals' nonlinear change in fatty acids

    CERN Document Server

    Ghelmez-Dumitru, M; Piscureanu, M; Sterian, A

    2003-01-01

    Previous works showed that thin layers of fatty acids and fatty acid-cholesterol mixtures behaved as optical liquid crystals, even at low incident laser power. The paper presents an experimental and computer study of laser signals, emergent from such samples, in presence of fluctuations. The optical emergent laser beams' features at different incident parameters were experimentally determined for different type (c.w. and pulsed) lasers, as for example helium-neon and Nd sup 3 sup + glass lasers. The results were correlated with the amount of cholesterol in mixtures and with their response in external electric field. These measurements are in all cases affected by fluctuations. We developed some computer-based procedures, by using the TableCurve3D from Jandel Scientific software and equations Runge-Kutta in MATLAB for taking into account these fluctuations.

  2. Separation of cis-fatty acids from saturated and trans-fatty acids by nanoporous polydicyclopentadiene membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abhinaba; Bowden, Ned B

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the separation of mixtures of fatty acid salts using a new organic solvent nanofiltration membrane based on polydicyclopentadiene (PDCPD). Mixtures of free fatty acids could not be separated by the membranes because they permeated at similar rates. When triisobutylamine was added to the fatty acids, the cis-fatty acid salts (oleic, petroselinic, vaccenic, linoleic, and linolenic acid) had slower permeation though the membranes than saturated (stearic acid) and trans-fatty acid (elaidic acid) salts. The reason for the difference in permeation was due to the formation of stable salt pairs between the amine and fatty acids that increased their cross-sectional areas. The fatty acid salts derived from saturated and trans-fatty acids were smaller than the critical area cutoff for the PDCPD membranes, so they readily permeated. In contrast, the fatty acid salts derived from the cis-fatty acids had critical areas larger than critical area cutoff of the PDPCD membranes and had slowed permeation. The partitioning coefficients of fatty acids and fatty acid salts were investigated to demonstrate that they were not responsible for the difference in permeation. The use of pressure was investigated to greatly accelerate the permeation through the membranes. For a solvent mixture of 35/65 (v/v) toluene/hexanes, the permeation of solvent was approximately 39 L m(-2) h(-1). This value is similar to values reported for permeation through membranes used in industry. The separation of a mixture of fatty acids based on the composition of soybean oil was investigated using pressure. The saturated fatty acid salts were almost completely removed from the cis-fatty acid salts when iBu(3)N was used as the amine to form the salt pairs. The separation of the cis-fatty acids found in soybean oil was investigated with Pr(3)N as the amine. The oleic acid salt (oleic acid has one cis double bond) preferentially permeated the membrane while the linoleic (two cis double bonds) and linolenic (three cis double bonds) salts were partly retained. The separation of fatty acids using membranes may have real applications in industry to purify fatty acids on a large scale. PMID:23281782

  3. Effects of Pyrazinamide on Fatty Acid Synthesis by Whole Mycobacterial Cells and Purified Fatty Acid Synthase I

    OpenAIRE

    Boshoff, Helena I; Mizrahi, Valerie; Barry, Clifton E.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of low extracellular pH and intracellular accumulation of weak organic acids were compared with respect to fatty acid synthesis by whole cells of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis. The profile of fatty acids synthesized during exposure to benzoic, nicotinic, or pyrazinoic acids, as well as that observed during intracellular hydrolysis of the corresponding amides, was not a direct consequence of modulation of fatty acid synthesis by these compounds but reflecte...

  4. The use of radioactive fatty acids for evaluation of fatty acid ?-oxidation in the animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pharmacokinetics and metabolic features of I-radionuclide labelled derivatives of aliphatic carboxylic acid were studied in experiment. The authors show the possibilities of nuclear medicine in deriving information on the activity of fatty acid ?-oxidation in the animal liver and body using compounds with C4=C11 aliphatic chain locus

  5. Trans Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mozaffarian, D; Katan, M. B.; Ascherio, A.; Stampfer, M J; Willett, W C

    2006-01-01

    Trans fats, unsaturated fatty acids with at least one double bond in the trans configuration (Figure 1), are formed during the partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils, a process that converts vegetable oils into semisolid fats for use in margarines, commercial cooking, and manufacturing processes. From the perspective of the food industry, partially hydrogenated vegetable oils are attractive because of their long shelf life, their stability during deep-frying, and their semisolidity, which ca...

  6. Nitro-fatty acids: novel anti-inflammatory lipid mediators

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    H., Rubbo.

    2013-09-06

    Full Text Available Nitro-fatty acids are formed and detected in human plasma, cell membranes, and tissue, modulating metabolic as well as inflammatory signaling pathways. Here we discuss the mechanisms of nitro-fatty acid formation as well as their key chemical and biochemical properties. The electrophilic properties [...] of nitro-fatty acids to activate anti-inflammatory signaling pathways are discussed in detail. A critical issue is the influence of nitroarachidonic acid on prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases, redirecting arachidonic acid metabolism and signaling. We also analyze in vivo data supporting nitro-fatty acids as promising pharmacological tools to prevent inflammatory diseases.

  7. Eccentric contractions affect muscle membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, JØrn Wulff; Therkildsen, K J

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated if prior eccentric contractions, and thus mechanical strain and muscle damage, exert an effect on the muscle membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition in rats, and whether a possible effect could be attenuated by dietary supplements. Twenty-three rats were randomised to three groups who received chow with added fish oil (n = 8), vitamin C (n = 8) or no supplement (n = 7). After 3 weeks of feeding, calf muscles on one side were stimulated electrically during anaesthesia causing eccentric contractions. Two days later the white gastrocnemius, a part of the stimulated calf muscle, was excised from both legs. In the muscles stimulated to contract eccentrically, compared to the control muscles, the proportion of arachidonic acid, C20:4,n-6 (17.7 +/- 0.6; 16.4 +/- 0.4% of total fatty acids, respectively) and docosapentanoeic acid, C22:5,n-3 (2.9 +/- 0.1 and 2.7 +/- 0.1% of total fatty acids, respectively) was uniformly higher across groups (P <0.02) with no differences between diet groups.The proportion of long chain polyunsaturates was also significantly higher in the eccentrically contracted (39.9 +/- 0.6% of total fatty acids) compared to the control leg (38.2 +/- 0.6% of total fatty acids; P <0.01). In contrast no differences were observed in the fatty acid composition of the triacylglycerols stored within the muscle. Thus one severe bout of eccentric contractions modulates the fatty acid composition of the muscle membrane phospholipids when compared to a control leg, and supplemental intake of fish oil or vitamin C did not attenuate this effect.

  8. Effects of Oils Rich in Linoleic and ?-Linolenic Acids on Fatty Acid Profile and Gene Expression in Goat Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Ebrahimi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alteration of the lipid content and fatty acid (FA composition of foods can result in a healthier product. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of flaxseed oil or sunflower oil in the goat diet on fatty acid composition of muscle and expression of lipogenic genes in the semitendinosus (ST muscle. Twenty-one entire male Boer kid goats were fed diets containing different levels of linoleic acid (LA and ?-linolenic acid (LNA for 100 days. Inclusion of flaxseed oil increased (p < 0.05 the ?-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3 concentration in the ST muscle. The diet high in ?-linolenic acid (p < 0.05 decreased the arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6 and conjugated linolenic acid (CLA c-9 t-11 content in the ST muscle. There was a significant (p < 0.05 upregulation of PPAR? and PPAR? gene expression and downregulation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD gene in the ST muscle for the high ?-linolenic acid group compared with the low ?-linolenic acid group. The results of the present study show that flaxseed oil as a source of ?-linolenic acid can be incorporated into the diets of goats to enrich goat meat with n-3 fatty acids, upregulate the PPAR? and PPAR?, and downregulate the SCD gene expression.

  9. DNA Methylation Perturbations in Genes Involved in Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Associated with Depression and Suicide Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Haghighi, Fatemeh; Galfalvy, Hanga; Chen, Sean; Huang, Yung-Yu; Cooper, Thomas B.; Burke, Ainsley K; OQUENDO, MARIA A.; MANN, J. JOHN; SUBLETTE, M. ELIZABETH

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status has been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and risk of suicide. Long-chain PUFAs (LC-PUFAs) are obtained in the diet or produced by sequential desaturation and elongation of shorter-chain precursor fatty acids linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) and ?-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3). We compared DNA methylation patterns in genes involved in LC-PUFA biosynthesis in major depressive disorder (MDD) with (n =?22) and without (n =?39) h...

  10. Fatty acid composition of subcutaneous adipose tissue and gastric mucosa: is there a relation with gastric ulceration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kafatos Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both in vitro and epidemiological studies indicate that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may play a protective role against peptic ulcer in humans. Adipose tissue fatty acid composition is thought to reflect dietary fatty acid intake. The aim of the present study is to investigate adipose and gastric mucosa fatty acid levels in relation to gastric ulceration status. Methods Fifty two adult outpatients undergoing upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy participated in the study. Adipose tissue samples were taken from the abdomen and buttock during the endoscopy procedure and samples from gastric tissue were taken from a subsample of 30 subjects. The presence of Helicobacter pylori was determined using the CLO test. Capillary gas chromatography was used for the extraction of 36 and 42 adipose tissue and gastric mucosa lipids respectively. Results The monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs C18:1n-12c, C16:1n-5, C16:4n-1 and the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs C16:3n-4, C20:3n-3, C20:4n-6, C21:5n-3 and C18:2n-9c,12t of the gastric mucosa were present in higher proportions in ulcer negative patients. These unsaturated fatty acids, however, each contributed less than 1% on average to total fatty acid content. In addition, higher average levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA C20:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA C22:6n-3 were detected in abdominal and buttock samples in CLO negative controls, compared to CLO positive controls. Adipose tissue and gastric mucosa n-6 and trans fatty acid levels were positively linearly correlated (r = 0.37 and 0.41 for n-6 and trans fatty acids respectively. Conclusion Certain minor MUFAs and PUFAs of the gastric mucosa appear to be present in higher proportions in ulcer negative patients. Overall, the findings provide only weak evidence of an association between the gastric mucosal fatty acids and the presence of gastric ulceration. The higher average levels of EPA and DHA in abdominal and buttock adipose tissue in CLO negative controls could be an indicator that dietary FAs inhibit Helicobacter pylori growth. Larger studies are necessary to provide evidence of a biologically relevant effect.

  11. TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL ENRICHED BY POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Leshukov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The technology of butter with the "OmegaTrin" complex with the balanced content of polynonsaturated fat acids is developed. Studied the fatty acid composition of milk - raw materials, optimal amount of insertion of polyunsaturated fatty acids, organoleptic characteristics of enriched butter; studied physico-chemical properties and biological value (biological effectiveness of the final product, fatty acid composition of a new product, set the shelf life and developed an oil recipe.

  12. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    OpenAIRE

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehy...

  13. Comparative evaluation of essential fatty acid composition of mothers' milk of some urban and suburban regions of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Susmita; Dhar, Pubali; Ghosh, Santinath

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the fatty acid composition of lipid present in breast milk of mothers residing in urban and suburban regions of West Bengal with special emphasis on n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which played a crucial role in the growth and development of neonates. Milk samples collected from 135 mothers of middle income group (average monthly income around 'Rs 10,000/-') were analysed by gas liquid chromatography after extraction and transmethylation to determine fatty acid composition. Information about the dietary intake of individual mothers was obtained through food frequency questionnaire. The fractions of n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids available in milk of urban mothers were 13.59 ± 0.94 and 3.65 ± 0.49, respectively, and in suburban mothers 12.74 ± 0.89 and 4.36 ± 0.39, respectively. The green leafy vegetables, fishes and vegetable oils were the major sources of essential fatty acids in the diet of the experimental groups of Bengali mothers. This study revealed a relationship between the alimentary habits of mothers and the concentration of essential fatty acids in breast milk of Bengali mothers. PMID:22575018

  14. ANALYSIS OF FATTY ACID CONTENT OF RAW MIANALYSIS OF FATTY ACID CONTENT OF RAW MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj ?ubo?

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work was analysedquality of raw cow’s milkof dairy cows which was fed with winter food ration of feed. Milk was observed in terms of the composition of milk fat and fatty acids during the months of August, October, December and February. The proportion of saturated fatty acids in milk fat was 63.22 % and it was found the highest proportion of palmitic acid 34.85%myristic acid accounted for 11.44 % and 10.86 % stearic acid. Linoleic acid, which is given special attention in view of the favourable effect on cholesterol, consisted of 3.48 % milk fat. The average proportion of unsaturated fatty acids in milk fat was 36.76 % of which 32.77 % were monounsaturated and polyunsaturated 4.0 %. A high proportion of milk fat formed monounsaturated oleic acid 30.92 %. The proportion of linoleic acid in milk fat was 3.48 % and 0.31 % linoleic acid.

  15. Fatty acid variability in three medicinal herbs of Panax species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiao-Jing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty acid profiling has been widely used in the bacteria species identification, we hypothesized that fatty acid characteristics might discriminate the Panax herbs according to species. To test the hypothesis, fatty acids of Panax species, including Panax ginseng, Panax notoginseng and Panax quinquefolius, were characterized and compared using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS followed by multivariate statistical analysis. Results The content of investigated 11 fatty acids, including myristic acid, pentadecanoic acid, palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, heptadecanoic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, ?-linolenic acid, arachidic acid and eicosadienoic acid, obviously varied among three species, suggesting each species has its own fatty acid pattern. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis according to the absolute and relative contents of fatty acids, showed that 30 tested samples could be clearly differentiated according to the species. Conclusions These findings demonstrated that GC-MS-based fatty acid profiling coupled with multivariate statistical analysis provides reliable platform to classify these three Panax species, which is helpful for ensuring their safety and efficacy.

  16. Fatty acid composition of cream fermented by probiotic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutfiye Yilmaz-Ersan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The production of fatty acids in cream containing one of the three probiotic microorganisms (Bifidobacterium lactis, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus was evaluated at 4±1 °C for up to 15 days. Gas chromatographic analysis of the fatty acid content showed that during storage the amount of linoleic and ?-linolenic acids increased in the probiotic cream fermented with B. lactis compared to the control cream. Probiotic bacteria were all associated with increases in medium chain and polyunsaturated fatty acid content in fermented cream. The highest amounts of saturated fatty acids were found in cream fermented with L. acidophilus, while the highest amounts of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids were found in cream fermented with B. lactis. The results of this study demonstrate that probiotic bacteria could improve the fatty acid profile of fermented creams and provide high value-added dairy products.

  17. Arachidonic acid has a dominant effect to regulate lipogenic genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes compared to omega-3 fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Hitesh; Cheema, Sukhinder Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Background The effects of long-chain n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on the regulation of adipocytes metabolism are well known. These fatty acids are generally consumed together in our diets; however, the metabolic regulation of adipocytes in the presence of these fatty acids when given together is not known. Objective To investigate the effects of n-3 PUFA and arachidonic acid (AA), an n-6 PUFA, on the regulation of adipogenic and lipogenic genes in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Methods 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated in the presence or absence of 100 µM of eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA; docosahexaenoic acid, DHA; docosapentaenoic acid, DPA and AA, either alone or AA+n-3 PUFA; control cells received bovine serum albumin alone. The mRNA expression of adipogenic and lipogenic genes was measured. The fatty acid composition of adipocytes was analyzed using gas chromatography. Results Individual n-3 PUFA or AA had no effect on the mRNA expression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-?; however, AA+EPA and AA+DPA significantly increased (PDHA and AA+DPA inhibited SCD1 gene expression (P<0.05) suggesting a dominant effect of AA. Fatty acids analysis of adipocytes revealed a higher accretion of AA compared to n-3 PUFA. Conclusions Our findings reveal that AA has a dominant effect on the regulation of lipogenic genes in adipocytes. PMID:25797050

  18. The influence of feeding linoleic, gamma-linolenic and docosahexaenoic acid rich oils on rat brain tumor fatty acids composition and fatty acid binding protein 7 mRNA expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdi Khosro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental studies indicate that gamma linolenic acid (GLA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA may inhibit glioma cells growth but effects of oral consumption of these fatty acids on brain tumor fatty acid composition have not been determined in vivo. Methods GLA oil (GLAO; 72% GLA, DHA oil (DHAO; 73% DHA were fed to adult wistar rats (1 mL/rat/day starting one week prior to C6 glioma cells implantation and continued for two weeks after implantation. Control group were fed same amount of high linoleic acid safflower oil (74–77% linoleic acid. Fatty acid composition of tumor samples was determined in a set of 8–12 animals in each group and serum fatty acid in 6 animals per each group. Gene expression of tumor fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor ? (PPAR-? and retinoid × receptor-? (RXR-? were determined in a set of 18 animals per group. Results DHAO feeding increased EPA of brain tumors and decreased ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids. Serum levels of EPA were also increased in DHAO group. A similar trend in serum and tumor levels of DHA were observed in DHAO group but it did not achieve statistical significance. GLAO increased serum concentration of GLA but had no significant effect on tumor GLA or dihomo-gamma linolenic acid (DGLA concentrations. Gene expression of FABP7 was up-regulated in tumors of DHAO group but no other significant effects were observed on EGFR, PPAR-? or RXR-? expression, and expression of these genes in tumors of GLAO were not different from SFO group. Conclusion Dietary supplementation of DHA containing oil could be an effective way to increase levels of long chain n-3 fatty acids in brain tumors and this increase may be mediated partly by up-regulation of FABP7 expression.

  19. Incorporation of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids of marine or vegetable origin into rat enterocyte phospholipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian; Christensen, Michael SØberg

    1997-01-01

    We examined time related effects of an intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on the fatty acid profiles of rat enterocyte phospholipids. Three diets containing 20 wt% fat with similar levels of linoleic acid (C18:2n-6), approximately 11 wt% of the fatty acids, were prepared. The diets were: Palm oil diet (PD), 0.6 wt% n-3 PUFA; fish oil diet (FD), 32 wt% n-3 PUFA (C20-C22); and linseed oil diet (LD), 32 wt% n-3 PUFA (C18:3n-3). Forty weanling male Wistar rats were fed PD for 34 days and then divided into three groups. Two groups of sixteen rats each were then fed FD or LD, respectively, and eight rats remained on PD as a control group. At 6, 12, 18, 24, 72, 144, and 288 hours following the change of diets rats were killed, the enterocytes were isolated and the fatty acid profiles of the intestinal phospholipids were examined. During the first 12 hours following the change from PD to FD, the content of n-3 PUFA in the intestinal phospholipids increased from less than 1 mol% to approximately 20 mol%,whereas the contents of n-6 PUFA and of monoenes were reduced from 40 mol% to 28 mol% and from 19 mol% to 12 mol%, respectively. The fatty acid profiles were then largely constant during the remaining experimental period. In the LD group, the n-3 PUFA contents rose from less than 1 mol% to 10 mol% during the first 144 hours, and the content of n-6 PUFA and monounsaturated fatty acids were reduced from 40 mol% to 36 mol% and from 19 mol% to 14 mol%, respectively. Desaturation and elongation products of C18:3n-3, such as C20:5n-3, C22:5n-3 and C22:6n-3, were observed following intake of LD. All three groups contained approximately 40 mol% of saturated fatty acids in the intestinal phospholipids. Copyright (C) 1996 Elsevier Science Inc.

  20. Saturated Long Chain Fatty acids Activate Inflammatory Signaling in Astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Sunita; Knight, Alecia G.; Gupta, Shruti; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Bruce-keller, Annadora J.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the effects of long-chain fatty acids on inflammatory signaling in cultured astrocytes. Data show that the saturated fatty acid palmitic acid, as well as lauric acid and stearic acid, trigger the release of TNF? and IL-6 from astrocytes. Unsaturated fatty acids were unable to induce cytokine release from cultured astrocytes. Furthermore, the effects of palmitic acid on cytokine release require TLR4 rather than CD36 or TLR2, and do not depend on palmitic acid metabolism t...

  1. Enrichment of decanoic acid in cuphea fatty acids via distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The introduction of a new crop often requires the development of new products and purification techniques of either the oil or fatty acids. Most new crops enter the cosmetic market first due to their high rates of returns. However, the cosmetic market often demands high purity and colorless materi...

  2. Polyunsaturated fatty acids production by Schizochytrium sp. isolated from mangrove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.W. Fan

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Five Schizochytrium strains (N-1, N-2, N-5, N-6, and N-9 were isolated from fallen, senescent leaves of mangrove tree (Kandelia candel in Hong Kong. The fungi were cultivated in glucose yeast extract medium containing 60 g of glucose, 10 g of yeast extract and 1 L of 15‰ artificial seawater, initial pH 6.0, with shaking for 52 hr at 25ºC. Biomass yields of 5 isolates ranged from 10.8 to 13.2 g/l. Isolate N-2 yielding the highest dried cell mass at 13.2 g/l and isolate N-9 grew poorly with 10.8 g/l of biomass. EPA (Eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3 yield was low in most strains, while DHA (Docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6n-3 was high on the same medium. The contents of DHA in biomass varied: 174.9, 203.6, 186.1, 171.3 and 157.9 mg/g of dried-biomass for Schizochytrium isolate N-1, N-2, N-5, N-6, and N-9, respectively. Isolate N-2 had the highest proportion of DHA in fatty acid profile with 15:0, 28.7%; 16:0, 21.3%; 18:0, 0.9%; 18:3, 0.2%; 20:4, 0.3%; 20:5, 0.9%; 22:4, 6.7%; 22:6, 36.1%; and others, 9.3%. The salinity range for growth of Schizochytrium isolates was from 0-30‰ with optimum salinity for growth between 20-30‰.

  3. Cholesterol changes the fatty acid composition of rat enterocytes

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    J., Gazzola; E.F., Martins; C.K., Miyasaka; A.C., Palanch; M.G., Vecchia; R., Curi.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of free cholesterol on the fatty acid composition and growth of rat fetal enterocytes was investigated in the absence and presence of 10% (v/v) fetal calf serum. Cholesterol caused a significant reduction of cell number after 6 and 12 h in culture. The fatty acid composition of enterocyte [...] s cultured in the presence of serum was also changed by the presence of 20 µM cholesterol. The fatty acid profile was determined by HPLC using fluorescence detection (325 nm excitation and 395 nm emission). Cholesterol (20 µM) increased the proportion (given in percentage of the total fatty acids) of the following fatty acids in cultured cells: lauric (by 42%), oleic (by 34%), linoleic (by 44%) and gamma-linolenic (by 20%) acids and reduced the proportion of palmitic (by 12%), stearic (by 20%), arachidonic (by 21%) and docosahexaenoic (by 44%) acids. In addition to modifying the content of individual fatty acids, cholesterol increased the polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio from 0.48 to 0.67 and the unsaturation index from 67.12 to 75.30. This is the first evidence that cholesterol modifies fatty acid composition possibly via de novo fatty acid synthesis and desaturation.

  4. Cholesterol changes the fatty acid composition of rat enterocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazzola J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of free cholesterol on the fatty acid composition and growth of rat fetal enterocytes was investigated in the absence and presence of 10% (v/v fetal calf serum. Cholesterol caused a significant reduction of cell number after 6 and 12 h in culture. The fatty acid composition of enterocytes cultured in the presence of serum was also changed by the presence of 20 µM cholesterol. The fatty acid profile was determined by HPLC using fluorescence detection (325 nm excitation and 395 nm emission. Cholesterol (20 µM increased the proportion (given in percentage of the total fatty acids of the following fatty acids in cultured cells: lauric (by 42%, oleic (by 34%, linoleic (by 44% and gamma-linolenic (by 20% acids and reduced the proportion of palmitic (by 12%, stearic (by 20%, arachidonic (by 21% and docosahexaenoic (by 44% acids. In addition to modifying the content of individual fatty acids, cholesterol increased the polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio from 0.48 to 0.67 and the unsaturation index from 67.12 to 75.30. This is the first evidence that cholesterol modifies fatty acid composition possibly via de novo fatty acid synthesis and desaturation.

  5. Evolution of fatty acids in medlar (Mespilus germanica L. mesocarp at different stages of ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strnad, M.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid composition of medlar (Mespilus germanica L. varied significantly among the ripening stages sampled at 157, 172 and 187 DAFs (days after full bloom. Twenty-one different fatty acids were detected in preclimacteric fruit and 17 when the climacteric began. Principal fatty acids, determined in medlar fruit harvested from October (157 and 172 DAFs to November (187 DAF were mainly palmitic acid (16:0, linoleic acid (18:2n-6, and a-linolenic acid (18:3n-3. While the content of saturated fatty acids [palmitic acid (16:0 and stearic acid (18:0] increased, the content of the essential polyunsaturated fatty acids [linoleic acid (18:2n-6 and linolenic acid (18:3n-3] decreased through ripening, in parallel with pulp darkening. The percentage of linoleic acid and a-linolenic acid in ripe, hard fruits was 60.0 and 13.5 % of dry wt at 157 DAF which decreased throughout ripening, remaining at 28.7 and 5.6 % of dry wt, respectively, in the fully softened and darkened pulp. A marked decreases in the double bond index, percentage of unsaturation and the ratio of unsaturation/saturation were also seen throughout the medlar ripening. The contribution of unsaturated fatty acid to the total fatty acid content decreased markedly as the medlar fruit became progressively softer and darkened.La composición en ácidos grasos del níspero (Mespilus germanica L. varió significativamente entre los estados de maduración muestreados a los 157, 172 y 187 DAFs (días después de la floración. Veinte y un ácidos grasos diferentes fueron detectados en el fruto preclimatérico y 17 cuando comenzó el climaterio. Los ácidos grasos principales encontrados en nísperos, recolectados desde Octubre (157 y 172 DAFs hasta Noviembre (187 DAF, fueron principalmente ácido palmítico (16:0, ácido linoléico (18:2n-6, y ácido a-linolénico (18:3n-3. En tanto que el contenido en ácidos grasos saturados (ácido palmítico (16:0 y ácido esteárico (18:0 aumentó, el contenido en ácidos grasos esenciales (ácido linoleico (18:2n-6 y ácido linolénico (18:3n-6 disminuyó durante la maduración, en paralelo con el oscurecimiento de la pulpa. El porcentaje de ácido linoleico y de ácido a-linolénico en frutos maduros sin reblandecer fue de 60.0 y 13.5 % del peso seco a 157 DAF, disminuyendo durante la maduración, y permaneciendo a 28.7 y 56 % del peso seco, respectivamente, en la pulpa completamente blanda y oscura. También se observó durante la maduración del níspero una marcada disminución en el número de dobles enlaces, en el tanto por ciento de instauración y en la relación instauración / saturación. La contribución de los ácidos grasos insaturados al contenido de ácidos grasos totales disminuyó marcadamente cuando el níspero comenzó progresivamente a reblandecerse y oscurecerse.

  6. Hazelnut variety organic acids, sugars and total lipid fatty acids

    OpenAIRE

    Botta, Roberto

    1994-01-01

    Several cultivars and selections of hazelnut kernels from Oregon and Italy were analyzed for organic acids, fatty acids, and sugars by GLC and HPCL. The major organic acid was malate which ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 mg per g kernel dry weight, with higher average values for samples grown in Italy. Oxalic, galacturonic, succinic, levulinic, acetic, and butyric acids were also found, but in small quantity. Total sugar content averaged around 4% dry weight and ranged from 2.8% to 5.6%. Sucrose...

  7. Contents of total fat, fatty acids, starch, sugars and dietary fibre in Swedish market basket diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, W; Eriksson, A; Haglund, M; Wretling, S

    2015-05-01

    The typical dietary supply of total fat, fatty acids, starch, sugars, polyols and dietary fibre in Sweden was assessed from analyses of market baskets (MB) purchased in 2005 and 2010. MB were based on food balance sheets, with each basket comprising about 130 foods, which represented more than 90 % of annual dietary supply. Foods were divided into ten to twelve categories. In 2010, total fat contributed 34 % of energy (E%), SFA 14·3 E%, MUFA 12·8 E%, PUFA 4·6 E%, n-6 fatty acids 3·6 E%, n-3 fatty acids 1·0 E% and trans-fatty acids (TFA) 0·5 E%. Glycaemic carbohydrates contributed 47 E%, monosaccharides 9 E%, sucrose 11 E%, disaccharides 15 E% and total sugars 24 E%. Added sugars contributed about 15 E%. Dietary fibre content was about 1·7 g/MJ in the 2010 MB. Compared with the 2005 MB, the dietary supply of TFA and dietary fibre was lower, otherwise differences were small. The present MB survey shows that the content of SFA and added sugars was higher than the current Nordic Nutrition Recommendations, while the content of PUFA and especially dietary fibre was lower. TFA levels decreased and dietary supply was well below the recommendations of the WHO. These results emphasise a focus on quality and food sources of fat and carbohydrates, limiting foods rich in SFA and added sugars and replacing them with foods rich in dietary fibre and cis-unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:25989998

  8. Characterization of the fatty acid synthetase system of Curtobacterium pusillum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, A; Uemura, N; Okuda, S

    1986-06-01

    Curtobacterium pusillum contains 11-cyclohexylundecanoic acid as a major component of cellular fatty acids. A trace amount of 13-cyclohexyltridecanoic acid is also present. Fatty acids other than omega-cyclohexyl fatty acids present are 13-methyltetradecanoic, 12-methyltetradecanoic, n-pentadecanoic, 14-methylpentadecanoic, 13-methylpentadecanoic, n-hexadecanoic, 15-methylhexadecanoic, 14-methylhexadecanoic, and n-heptadecanoic acids. The fatty acid synthetase system of this bacterium was studied. Various 14C-labeled precursors were added to the growth medium and the incorporation of radioactivity into cellular fatty acids was analyzed. Sodium [14C]acetate and [14C]glucose were incorporated into almost all species of cellular fatty acids, the incorporation into 11-cyclohexylundecanoic acid being predominant. [14C]Isoleucine was incorporated into 12-methyltetradecanoic and 14-methylhexadecanoic acids: [14C]leucine into 13-methyltetradecanoic and 15-methylhexadecanoic acids; and [14C]valine into 14-methylpentadecanoic acid. [14C]-Shikimic acid was incorporated almost exclusively into omega-cyclohexyl fatty acids. The fatty acid synthetase activity of the crude enzyme preparation of C. pusillum was reconstituted on the addition of acyl carrier protein. This synthetase system required NADPH and preferentially utilized cyclohexanecarbonyl-CoA as a primer. The system was also able to use branched- and straight-chain acyl-CoAs with 4 to 6 carbon atoms effectively as primers but was unable to use acetyl-CoA. However, if acetyl acyl carrier protein was used as the priming substrate, the system produced straight-chain fatty acids. The results imply that the specificity of the initial acyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein acyltransferase dictates the structure of fatty acids synthesized and that the enzymes catalyzing the subsequent chain-elongation reactions do not have the same specificity restriction. PMID:3528138

  9. Fatty-acid profile of total and polar lipids in cultured rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) raised in freshwater and seawater (Croatia) determined by transmethylation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staver, Mladenka Malenica; Jerkovi?, Igor; Giacometti, Jasminka; Malenica, Ante; Marijanovi?, Zvonimir

    2012-08-01

    Fatty acids from total lipids and polar lipids in cultured rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) raised in seawater (SW) and freshwater (FW) were identified and quantified from the muscle samples in January, April, and July. The highest total lipid and polar lipid amounts were found in April. July contents of total lipids were low, but percent of the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) was high in SW and FW environment (particularly n-3 PUFAs). Variety of 17 fatty acids was identified by GC-FID after transmethylation. The predominant fatty acids in rainbow trout from SW and FW were: docosahexaenoic acid among n-3 PUFAs, palmitic acid among saturated fatty acids (SFAs), and oleic acid among monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs). Appreciably higher n-3/n-6 ratio was found in total lipids in April (6.40, FW fish) and in polar lipids in July (18.76; SW fish). High n-3/n-6 ratio in total lipids and polar lipids of rainbow trout from SW and FW, besides beneficial n-3/n-6 ratio in the commercial fish food, could be characteristic for the local environmental conditions (Croatia). PMID:22899619

  10. Fatty Acid and Sterol Composition of Three Phytomonas Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Vataru Nakamura

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid and sterol analysis were performed on Phytomonas serpens and Phytomonas sp. grown in chemically defined and complex medium, and P. françai cultivated in complex medium. The three species of the genus Phytomonas had qualitatively identical fatty acid patterns. Oleic, linoleic, and linolenic were the major unsaturated fatty acids. Miristic and stearic were the major saturated fatty acids. Ergosterol was the only sterol isolated from Phytmonas sp. and P. serpens grown in a sterol-free medium, indicating that it was synthesized de novo. When P. françai that does not grow in defined medium was cultivated in a complex medium, cholesterol was the only sterol detected. The fatty acids and sterol isolated from Phytomonas sp. and P. serpens grown in a chemically defined lipid-free medium indicated that they were able to biosynthesize fatty acids and ergosterol from acetate or from acetate precursors such as glucose or threonine.

  11. Fatty Acid and Sterol Composition of Three Phytomonas Species

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Celso Vataru, Nakamura; Luciana, Waldow; Sandra Regina, Pelegrinello; Tânia, Ueda-Nakamura; Benício Alves de, Abreu Filho; Benedito Prado, Dias Filho.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid and sterol analysis were performed on Phytomonas serpens and Phytomonas sp. grown in chemically defined and complex medium, and P. françai cultivated in complex medium. The three species of the genus Phytomonas had qualitatively identical fatty acid patterns. Oleic, linoleic, and linoleni [...] c were the major unsaturated fatty acids. Miristic and stearic were the major saturated fatty acids. Ergosterol was the only sterol isolated from Phytmonas sp. and P. serpens grown in a sterol-free medium, indicating that it was synthesized de novo. When P. françai that does not grow in defined medium was cultivated in a complex medium, cholesterol was the only sterol detected. The fatty acids and sterol isolated from Phytomonas sp. and P. serpens grown in a chemically defined lipid-free medium indicated that they were able to biosynthesize fatty acids and ergosterol from acetate or from acetate precursors such as glucose or threonine.

  12. Metabolism of fatty acids in rat brain in microsomal membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a technique in which substrate fatty acids are incorporated into microsomal membranes followd by comparison of their rates of desaturation or elongation with those of exogenous added fatty acids it has been found that the desaturation rate is more rapid for the membrane-bound substrate than for the added fatty acid. Moreover, the product of the membrane-bound substrate is incorporated into membrane phospholipid whereas the product of the exogenous substrate is found in di- and triacyl glycerols and in free fatty acids as well. These and other findings point to a normal sequence of reaction of membrane liqids with membrane-bound substrates involving transfer of fatty acid from phospholipid to the coupled enzyme systems without ready equilibration with the free fatty acid pool

  13. The Two Carboxylases of Corynebacterium glutamicum Essential for Fatty Acid and Mycolic Acid Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gande R.; Dover L.G.; Krumbach K.; Besra G.S.; Sahm H.; Oikawa T.; Eggeling L.

    2007-01-01

    The suborder Corynebacterianeae comprises bacteria like Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium glutamicum, and these bacteria contain in addition to the linear fatty acids, unique ?-branched ?-hydroxy fatty acids, called mycolic acids. Whereas acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase activity is required to provide malonyl-CoA for fatty acid synthesis, a new type of carboxylase is apparently additionally present in these bacteria. It activates the ?-carbon of a linear fatty acid by carb...

  14. Unsaturated fatty acids and viability of Helicobacter (Campylobacter) pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, S L; Graham, D Y

    1990-01-01

    Helicobacter (Campylobacter) pylori was found to be sensitive to the toxic effects of an unsaturated fatty acid (arachidonic acid). Data are presented that support the hypothesis that exogenous catalase added to basal media enhances the growth of H. pylori by preventing the formation of toxic peroxidation products from long-chain unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:2112559

  15. Unsaturated fatty acids and viability of Helicobacter (Campylobacter) pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Hazell, S L; Graham, D. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Helicobacter (Campylobacter) pylori was found to be sensitive to the toxic effects of an unsaturated fatty acid (arachidonic acid). Data are presented that support the hypothesis that exogenous catalase added to basal media enhances the growth of H. pylori by preventing the formation of toxic peroxidation products from long-chain unsaturated fatty acids.

  16. Biosynthesis, degradation, and pharmacological importance of the fatty acid amides

    OpenAIRE

    Farrell, Emma K.; Merkler, David J.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of two biologically active fatty acid amides, N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide) and oleamide, has generated a great deal of excitement and stimulated considerable research. However, anandamide and oleamide are merely the best-known and best-understood members of a much larger family of biologically-occurring fatty acid amides. In this review, we will outline which fatty acid amides have been isolated from mammalian sources, detail what is known about how these molecul...

  17. Stabilized epoxygenated fatty acids regulate inflammation, pain, angiogenesis and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guodong; Kodani, Sean; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Epoxygenated fatty acids (EpFAs), which are lipid mediators produced by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases from polyunsaturated fatty acids, are important signaling molecules known to regulate various biological processes including inflammation, pain and angiogenesis. The EpFAs are further metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to form fatty acid diols which are usually less-active. Pharmacological inhibitors of sEH that stabilize endogenous EpFAs are being considered for human clinical use...

  18. Fatty acid variability in three medicinal herbs of Panax species

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Xiao-Jing; Huang Li-Li; Cai Xiu-Jiang; Li Peng; Wang Yi-Tao; Wan Jian-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Fatty acid profiling has been widely used in the bacteria species identification, we hypothesized that fatty acid characteristics might discriminate the Panax herbs according to species. To test the hypothesis, fatty acids of Panax species, including Panax ginseng, Panax notoginseng and Panax quinquefolius, were characterized and compared using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) followed by multivariate statistical analysis. Results The content of investigated ...

  19. Fatty Acids Composition of Vegetable Oils and Its Contribution to Dietary Energy Intake and Dependence of Cardiovascular Mortality on Dietary Intake of Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Orsavova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterizations of fatty acids composition in % of total methylester of fatty acids (FAMEs of fourteen vegetable oils—safflower, grape, silybum marianum, hemp, sunflower, wheat germ, pumpkin seed, sesame, rice bran, almond, rapeseed, peanut, olive, and coconut oil—were obtained by using gas chromatography (GC. Saturated (SFA, monounsaturated (MUFA and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, palmitic acid (C16:0; 4.6%–20.0%, oleic acid (C18:1; 6.2%–71.1% and linoleic acid (C18:2; 1.6%–79%, respectively, were found predominant. The nutritional aspect of analyzed oils was evaluated by determination of the energy contribution of SFAs (19.4%–695.7% ERDI, PUFAs (10.6%–786.8% ERDI, n-3 FAs (4.4%–117.1% ERDI and n-6 FAs (1.8%–959.2% ERDI, expressed in % ERDI of 1 g oil to energy recommended dietary intakes (ERDI for total fat (ERDI—37.7 kJ/g. The significant relationship between the reported data of total fat, SFAs, MUFAs and PUFAs intakes (% ERDI for adults and mortality caused by coronary heart diseases (CHD and cardiovascular diseases (CVD in twelve countries has not been confirmed by Spearman’s correlations.

  20. Fatty Acids Composition of Vegetable Oils and Its Contribution to Dietary Energy Intake and Dependence of Cardiovascular Mortality on Dietary Intake of Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsavova, Jana; Misurcova, Ladislava; Ambrozova, Jarmila Vavra; Vicha, Robert; Mlcek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Characterizations of fatty acids composition in % of total methylester of fatty acids (FAMEs) of fourteen vegetable oils-safflower, grape, silybum marianum, hemp, sunflower, wheat germ, pumpkin seed, sesame, rice bran, almond, rapeseed, peanut, olive, and coconut oil-were obtained by using gas chromatography (GC). Saturated (SFA), monounsaturated (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), palmitic acid (C16:0; 4.6%-20.0%), oleic acid (C18:1; 6.2%-71.1%) and linoleic acid (C18:2; 1.6%-79%), respectively, were found predominant. The nutritional aspect of analyzed oils was evaluated by determination of the energy contribution of SFAs (19.4%-695.7% ERDI), PUFAs (10.6%-786.8% ERDI), n-3 FAs (4.4%-117.1% ERDI) and n-6 FAs (1.8%-959.2% ERDI), expressed in % ERDI of 1 g oil to energy recommended dietary intakes (ERDI) for total fat (ERDI-37.7 kJ/g). The significant relationship between the reported data of total fat, SFAs, MUFAs and PUFAs intakes (% ERDI) for adults and mortality caused by coronary heart diseases (CHD) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in twelve countries has not been confirmed by Spearman's correlations. PMID:26057750

  1. The fatty acid profile of subcutaneous fat and blood plasma in pruritic dogs and dogs without skin problems.

    OpenAIRE

    Taugbøl, O; Baddaky-Taugbøl, B; Saarem, K

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in subcutaneous fat and the relative amounts of PUFAs in plasma in two groups of dogs. Group 1 included dogs with a good skin and coat condition. Group 2 was comprised of dogs with pruritus and compatible clinical signs of atopy. The fatty acid composition of the total lipid fraction was analyzed by gas chromatography. In subcutaneous fat, the concentration of adrenic acid (22:4n-6) was lower...

  2. Echium acanthocarpum hairy root cultures, a suitable system for polyunsaturated fatty acid studies and production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravelo Ángel G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The therapeutic and health promoting role of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs from fish, i.e. eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3 are well known. These same benefits may however be shared by some of their precursors, the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, such as stearidonic acid (SDA, 18:4 n-3. In order to obtain alternative sources for the large-scale production of PUFAs, new searches are being conducted focusing on higher plants oils which can contain these n-3 and n-6 C18 precursors, i.e. SDA and GLA (18:3n-6, ?-linolenic acid. Results The establishment of the novel Echium acanthocarpum hairy root cultures represents a powerful tool in order to research the accumulation and metabolism of fatty acids (FAs in a plant particularly rich in GLA and SDA. Furthermore, this study constitutes the first example of a Boraginaceae species hairy root induction and establishment for FA studies and production. The dominant PUFAs, 18:2n-6 (LA, linoleic acid and 18:3n-6 (GLA, accounted for about 50% of total FAs obtained, while the n-3 PUFAs, 18:3n-3 (ALA, ?-linolenic acid and 18:4n-3 (SDA, represented approximately 5% of the total. Production of FAs did not parallel hairy root growth, and the optimal productivity was always associated with the highest biomass density during the culture period. Assuming a compromise between FA production and hairy root biomass, it was determined that sampling times 4 and 5 gave the most useful FA yields. Total lipid amounts were in general comparable between the different hairy root lines (29.75 and 60.95 mg/g DW, with the major lipid classes being triacylglycerols. The FAs were chiefly stored in the hairy roots with very minute amounts being released into the liquid nutrient medium. Conclusions The novel results presented here show the utility and high potential of E. acanthocarpum hairy roots. They are capable of biosynthesizing and accumulating a large range of polyunsaturated FAs, including the target GLA and SDA fatty acids in appreciable quantities.

  3. Changes in the fatty acid composition of wild harlequin shrimp, Hymenocera picta Dana, 1852 from eggs, newly hatched zoea and juvenile stages: an insight into the fatty acid requirements for aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarunan Pratoomyot

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The colourful harlequin shrimp, Hymenocera picta, is a valuable marine ornamental species but low survival remains a bottleneck to successful commercial culture. Understanding the biochemical composition, notably through the determination of the fatty acid profiles in wild eggs, newly hatched and juvenile shrimp, can provide important information on the nutritional requirements of H. picta. Following analysis, the rank order of fatty acid composition was saturates > monoenes > polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs. Within the PUFA content, n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA was the major representative in all three stages; n-6 PUFA was found in lower amounts, and, arachidonic acid (20:4n-6 was not detectable. Observed increases in EPA and DHA from the eggs through to newly hatched zoea and juvenile shrimp indicate the importance of n-3 HUFA for growth and survival, i.e. as components in the formation of cell membranes. These findings should be given due consideration as a first approach to understanding the fatty acid requirements of harlequin shrimp.

  4. Fatty acids and terpenoids from Trigonia fasciculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafezoli Jair

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatty portion of the hexane extract from roots of Trigonia fasciculata has been determined by GC/MS analysis of the methyl ester mixture. Seventeen fatty acids were identified and oleic acid (38.8% was the major component. The GC/MS analysis of the less polar fraction of the non-saponifiable part of the root hexane extract allowed the identification of fifteen sesquiterpenes and alpha-santalene (28.4% was the major component. Chromatography over silica gel of the more polar fraction allowed the isolation of two known compounds: betulinic acid and friedelin, and a novel diterpene 7-(2-hydroxy-acetyl-10-hydroxy-tetradecahydro-1-methylene-4b,7,10a-trimethyl -phenantrene (6alpha-hydroxy-15-oxo-allodevadarool, all unknown for the species. Structure determination was accomplished by chemical derivatization, comparison to literature data and spectral analysis, including 2D NMR (COSY, HETCOR, COLOC and X-ray crystallography.

  5. Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atshaves, B.P.; Martin, G.G.; Hostetler, H.A.; McIntosh, A.L.; Kier, A.B.; Schroeder, F.

    2010-01-01

    While low levels of unesterified long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are normal metabolic intermediates of dietary and endogenous fat, LCFAs are also potent regulators of key receptors/enzymes, and at high levels become toxic detergents within the cell. Elevated levels of LCFAs are associated with diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Consequently, mammals evolved fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that bind/sequester these potentially toxic free fatty acids in the cytosol and present them for rapid removal in oxidative (mitochondria, peroxisomes) or storage (endoplasmic reticulum, lipid droplets) organelles. Mammals have a large (15 member) family of FABPs with multiple members occurring within a single cell type. The first described FABP, liver-FABP (L-FABP, or FABP1), is expressed in very high levels (2-5% of cytosolic protein) in liver as well as intestine and kidney. Since L-FABP facilitates uptake and metabolism of LCFAs in vitro and in cultured cells, it was expected that abnormal function or loss of L-FABP would reduce hepatic LCFA uptake/oxidation and thereby increase LCFAs available for oxidation in muscle and/or storage in adipose. This prediction was confirmed in vitro with isolated liver slices and cultured primary hepatocytes from L-FABP gene-ablated mice. Despite unaltered food consumption when fed a control diet ad libitum, the L-FABP null mice exhibited age- and sex-dependent weight gain and increased fat tissue mass. The obese phenotype was exacerbated in L-FABP null mice pair-fed a high fat diet. Taken together with other findings, these data suggest that L-FABP could have an important role in preventing age- or diet-induced obesity. PMID:20537520

  6. Acylation of cellular proteins with endogenously synthesized fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of cellular proteins contain covalently bound fatty acids. Previous studies have identified myristic acid and palmitic acid covalently linked to protein, the former usually attached to proteins by an amide linkage and the latter by ester or thio ester linkages. While in a few instances specific proteins have been isolated from cells and their fatty acid composition has been determined, the most frequent approach to the identification of protein-linked fatty acids is to biosynthetically label proteins with fatty acids added to intact cells. This procedure introduces possible bias in that only a selected fraction of proteins may be labeled, and it is not known whether the radioactive fatty acid linked to the protein is identical with that which is attached to the protein when the fatty acid is derived from endogenous sources. We have examined the distribution of protein-bound fatty acid following labeling with [3H]acetate, a general precursor of all fatty acids, using BC3H1 cells (a mouse muscle cell line) and A431 cells (a human epidermoid carcinoma). Myristate, palmitate, and stearate account for essentially all of the fatty acids linked to protein following labeling with [3H]acetate, but at least 30% of the protein-bound palmitate in these cells was present in amide linkage. In BC3H1 cells, exogenous palmitate becomes covalently bound to protein such that less than 10% of the fatty acid is present in amide linkage. These dataid is present in amide linkage. These data are compatible with multiple protein acylating activities specific for acceptor protein fatty acid chain length and linkage

  7. The fatty acid, amino acid, and mineral composition of Egyptian goose meat as affected by season, gender, and portion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldenhuys, Greta; Hoffman, Louwrens C; Muller, Nina

    2015-05-01

    With the current absence of scientific information on the nutritive aspects it is essential to investigate the fatty acid, mineral, and amino acid composition of Egyptian geese as well as the factors of influence. The forage vs. grain based diets of Egyptian geese during certain periods of the yr leads to variation in the content of the key fatty acids such as oleic acid, linoleic acid, and ?-linolenic acid. The differences in these fatty acids results in variation between the n-6/n-3 ratios of the seasons; the portions from winter (July) are within the recommendations (ratio acids. No substantial differences were found in the mineral composition of the breast portion on account of season and gender; however there were some variation in certain amino acids such as lysine and arginine due to season/diet. This research provides essential information that should be considered not only regarding the everyday consumption of Egyptian goose meat but the potential utilization and ultimate consistency of this meat product. PMID:25810407

  8. Effects of fatty acid activation on photosynthetic production of fatty acid-based biofuels in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Qianqian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct conversion of solar energy and carbon dioxide to drop in fuel molecules in a single biological system can be achieved from fatty acid-based biofuels such as fatty alcohols and alkanes. These molecules have similar properties to fossil fuels but can be produced by photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Results Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 mutant strains containing either overexpression or deletion of the slr1609 gene, which encodes an acyl-ACP synthetase (AAS, have been constructed. The complete segregation and deletion in all mutant strains was confirmed by PCR analysis. Blocking fatty acid activation by deleting slr1609 gene in wild-type Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 led to a doubling of the amount of free fatty acids and a decrease of alkane production by up to 90 percent. Overexpression of slr1609 gene in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 had no effect on the production of either free fatty acids or alkanes. Overexpression or deletion of slr1609 gene in the Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 mutant strain with the capability of making fatty alcohols by genetically introducing fatty acyl-CoA reductase respectively enhanced or reduced fatty alcohol production by 60 percent. Conclusions Fatty acid activation functionalized by the slr1609 gene is metabolically crucial for biosynthesis of fatty acid derivatives in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. It is necessary but not sufficient for efficient production of alkanes. Fatty alcohol production can be significantly improved by the overexpression of slr1609 gene.

  9. Effects of different cooking methods on fatty acid profiles in four freshwater fishes from the Laurentian Great Lakes region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Margaret R; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Braekevelt, Eric; Arts, Michael T

    2014-12-01

    Fish is often promoted as a healthy part of the human diet due its high content of long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA). Previous studies have shown that cooked fish can have different fatty acid profiles than raw fillets, depending on the cooking method and fish species. In this study, the fatty acid content of broiled, baked or fried skinless, boneless fillets of four fish species from the tributaries of the Great Lakes, or connecting rivers, was compared to fatty acid profiles in raw sections from the same fillet. Cooking treatments had little effect on n-3 fatty acid content; however, fried treatments generally had higher n-6 and MUFA content, which is likely a result of the cooking oil used (canola). Broiling or baking is generally the most healthy option presented in this study, as these methods result in lower levels of less-favourable fatty acids; however, the choice of cooking oil may also influence the overall fatty acid content in cooked fish. PMID:24996368

  10. Thiamine and fatty acid content of walleye tissue from three southern U.S. reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Vandergoot, C.S.; Bettoli, P.W.; Hinterkopf, J.P.; Zajicek, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    We determined the thiamine concentration in egg, muscle, and liver tissues of walleyes Sander vitreus and the fatty acid content of walleye eggs from three southern U.S. reservoirs. In two Tennessee reservoirs (Dale Hollow and Center Hill), in which there were alewives Alosa pseudoharengus in the forage base, natural recruitment of walleyes was not occurring; by contrast in Lake James Reservoir, North Carolina, where there were no alewives, the walleye population was sustained via natural recruitment. Female walleye tissues were collected and assayed for thiamine (vitamin B1) and fatty acid content. Thiamine pyrophosphate was found to be the predominant form of thiamine in walleye eggs. In 2000, mean total egg thiamine concentrations were similar among Center Hill, Dale Hollow, and Lake James reservoirs (2.13, 3.14, and 2.77 nmol thiamine/g, respectively). Egg thiamine concentration increased as maternal muscle (r 2 = 0.73) and liver (r2 = 0.68) thiamine concentration increased. Walleye egg thiamine does not appear to be connected to poor natural reproduction in Tennessee walleyes. Threadfin shad Dorosoma petenense, which are found in all three reservoirs, had higher thiaminase activity than alewives. Six fatty acids differed among the walleye eggs for the three reservoirs. Two were physiologically important fatty acids, arachidonic acid (20:4[n-6]) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6[n-3]), which are important eicosanoid precursors involved in the regulation of biological functions, such as immune response and reproduction. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  11. Increased production of fatty acids and triglycerides in Aspergillus oryzae by enhancing expressions of fatty acid synthesis-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamano, Koichi; Bruno, Kenneth S; Karagiosis, Sue A; Culley, David E; Deng, Shuang; Collett, James R; Umemura, Myco; Koike, Hideaki; Baker, Scott E; Machida, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Microbial production of fats and oils is being developed as a means of converting biomass to biofuels. Here we investigate enhancing expression of enzymes involved in the production of fatty acids and triglycerides as a means to increase production of these compounds in Aspergillus oryzae. Examination of the A. oryzae genome demonstrates that it contains two fatty acid synthases and several other genes that are predicted to be part of this biosynthetic pathway. We enhanced the expression of fatty acid synthesis-related genes by replacing their promoters with the promoter from the constitutively highly expressed gene tef1. We demonstrate that by simply increasing the expression of the fatty acid synthase genes we successfully increased the production of fatty acids and triglycerides by more than two-fold. Enhancement of expression of the fatty acid pathway genes ATP-citrate lyase and palmitoyl-ACP thioesterase increased productivity to a lesser extent. Increasing expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase caused no detectable change in fatty acid levels. Increases in message level for each gene were monitored using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Our data demonstrate that a simple increase in the abundance of fatty acid synthase genes can increase the detectable amount of fatty acids. PMID:22733113

  12. Polyunsaturated fatty acids reduce Fatty Acid Synthase and Hydroxy-Methyl-Glutaryl CoA-Reductase gene expression and promote apoptosis in HepG2 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miccolis Angelica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs are the two major classes of PUFAs encountered in the diet, and both classes of fatty acids are required for normal human health. Moreover, PUFAs have effects on diverse pathological processes impacting chronic disease, such as cardiovascular and immune disease, neurological disease, and cancer. Aim To investigate the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and arachidonic acid (ARA on the proliferation and apoptosis of human hepatoma cell line HepG2 after exposure to increasing concentrations of EPA or ARA for 48 h. Moreover, in the same cells the gene expression of Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS and 3-Hydroxy-3-Methyl-Glutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase (HMG-CoAR was also investigated. Method Cell growth and apoptosis were assayed by MTT and ELISA test, respectively after cell exposure to increasing concentrations of EPA and ARA. Reverse-transcription and real-time PCR was used to detect FAS and HMG-CoAR mRNA levels in treated cells. Results Our findings show that EPA inhibits HepG2 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, starting from 25 ?M (P Conclusion Our results demonstrate that EPA and ARA inhibit HepG2 cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. The down-regulation of FAS and HMG-CoAR gene expression by EPA and ARA might be one of the mechanisms for the anti-proliferative properties of PUFAs in an in vitro model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. Cellular distribution and linkage of D-(-)-3-hydroxy fatty acids in Bacteroides species.

    OpenAIRE

    Mayberry, W R

    1980-01-01

    Two strains of Bacteroides asaccharolyticus and two strains of Bacteroides fragilis were analyzed for total fatty acid, total lipid fatty acid, and total bound fatty acid profiles. Extracted lipids and defatted cell residues were subjected to sequential alkaline and acid methanolyses to distinguish ester- and amide-linked fatty acids in each fraction. In the lipid fractions, all the ester-linked fatty acids were nonhydroxylated, whereas all of the amide-linked fatty acids were hydroxylated. I...

  14. The development of radioiodinated fatty acids for myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since free fatty acids are the principal energy source for the normally oxygenated myocardium, the use of iodine-123-labeled fatty acid analogues is an attractive approach for myocardial imaging. Interest in the use of these substances results from divergent fatty acid metabolic pathways in ischemic (triglyceride storage) versus normoxic tissue (?-oxidative clearance), following flow-dependent delivery. Iodine-123-labeled fatty acids may offer a unique opportunity to identity myocardial viability using single photon emission tomography. The development of structurally-modified fatty acids became of interest because of the relatively long acquisition periods required for SPECT. The significant time required by early generation single- or dual-head SPECT systems for data acquisition requires minimal redistribution during the acquisition period to ensure accurate evaluation of the regional fatty acid distribution pattern after re-construction. Research has focussed on the evaluation of structural modifications which can be introduced into the fatty acid chain which would inhibit the subsequent ?-oxidative catabolism which normally results in rapid myocardial clearance. Introduction of a methyl group in position-3 of the fatty acid carbon chain has been shown to significantly delay myocardial clearance and iodine-123-labeled 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3- R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) is a new tracer based on this strategy

  15. Genetic variability of fatty acids in bovine milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyeurt H.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids composition of bovine milk influences the technological properties of butterfat and also presents some potential benefits for human health. Impact of feeding on fat composition is well described in the literature; less information is available about the impact of genetics. Based on few studies, essentially conducted to isolate some feeding effect, the breed seemed to influence the fatty acids composition. The variation in the activity of ?-9 desaturase, key enzyme in the production of monounsaturated fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acids in milk, could explain these differences. Very few studies have been focussing on the estimation of genetic parameters of fatty acids composition. However, the moderate heritability estimates observed by these studies for the major fatty acids could suggest a potential genetic effect.

  16. PRODUCTION OF POLYHYDROXY FATTY ACIDES FROM PALMITOLEIC ACID BY PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA PR3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydroxy fatty acids are those which contain hydroxyl groups on fatty acid backbone. They have gained important attention because of their special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity compared with other non-hydroxy fatty acids. Previously it was reported that a novel bacterial strain...

  17. Relationships Between the Intake of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids by Hens and the Fatty Acid Composition of Their Eggs

    OpenAIRE

    Bavelaar, F. J.; Beynen, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this literature survey was to establish the relationships between fatty acid intake of hens and the fatty acid composition of their eggs. The content of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) of egg yolk was not clearly influenced by alpha-linolenic acid intake, but there was a linear relationship with EPA intake albeit that the efficiency of incorporation was very low. Maximum egg yolk contents of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) of about 1.5% of total fatty acids were attained at a dietary ...

  18. Immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    P.C., Calder.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available 1. Fish oils are rich in the long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), eicosapentaenoic (20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic (22:6n-3) acids. Linseed oil and green plant tissues are rich in the precursor fatty acid, a-linolenic acid (18:3n-3). Most vegetable oils are ri [...] ch in the n-6 PUFA linoleic acid (18:2n-6), the precursor of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). 2. Arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids such as prostaglandin E2 are pro-inflammatory and regulate the functions of cells of the immune system. Consumption of fish oils leads to replacement of arachidonic acid in cell membranes by eicosapentaenoic acid. This changes the amount and alters the balance of eicosanoids produced. 3. Consumption of fish oils diminishes lymphocyte proliferation, T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity, natural killer cell activity, macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity, monocyte and neutrophil chemotaxis, major histocompatibility class II expression and antigen presentation, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukins 1 and 6, tumour necrosis factor) and adhesion molecule expression. 4. Feeding laboratory animals fish oil reduces acute and chronic inflammatory responses, improves survival to endotoxin and in models of autoimmunity and prolongs the survival of grafted organs. 5. Feeding fish oil reduces cell-mediated immune responses. 6. Fish oil supplementation may be clinically useful in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions and following transplantation. 7. n-3 PUFAs may exert their effects by modulating signal transduction and/or gene expression within inflammatory and immune cells.

  19. Immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Calder

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available 1. Fish oils are rich in the long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic (20:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic (22:6n-3 acids. Linseed oil and green plant tissues are rich in the precursor fatty acid, a-linolenic acid (18:3n-3. Most vegetable oils are rich in the n-6 PUFA linoleic acid (18:2n-6, the precursor of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6. 2. Arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids such as prostaglandin E2 are pro-inflammatory and regulate the functions of cells of the immune system. Consumption of fish oils leads to replacement of arachidonic acid in cell membranes by eicosapentaenoic acid. This changes the amount and alters the balance of eicosanoids produced. 3. Consumption of fish oils diminishes lymphocyte proliferation, T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity, natural killer cell activity, macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity, monocyte and neutrophil chemotaxis, major histocompatibility class II expression and antigen presentation, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukins 1 and 6, tumour necrosis factor and adhesion molecule expression. 4. Feeding laboratory animals fish oil reduces acute and chronic inflammatory responses, improves survival to endotoxin and in models of autoimmunity and prolongs the survival of grafted organs. 5. Feeding fish oil reduces cell-mediated immune responses. 6. Fish oil supplementation may be clinically useful in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions and following transplantation. 7. n-3 PUFAs may exert their effects by modulating signal transduction and/or gene expression within inflammatory and immune cells.

  20. 21 CFR 172.850 - Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and propylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and propylene glycol. 172.850... Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and propylene glycol. The food...additive lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and propylene glycol may be...

  1. TRIACYLGLYCEROL AND PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACID COMPOSITIONS OF THE SILVERLEAF WHITEFLY, BEMISIA ARGENTIFOLII

    Science.gov (United States)

    The identification and composition of the fatty acids associated with the major lipid classes (triacylglycerols, free fatty acids, phospholipids) within Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) nymphs were determined. Comparisons were made to the fatty acids from the interna...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...false Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700...3700 Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. (a) Chemical...generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3800 - Formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3800...polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. (a) Chemical...polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct (PMN...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Fatty acid hydroxylase-associated neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in this gene resulting in intellectual decline and optic nerve atrophy were said to have a disorder called FA2H - ... fatty acid hydroxylase-associated neurodegeneration? acids ; ataxia ; atom ; atrophy ; autosomal ; ... oxygen ; palsy ; paraparesis ; paraplegia ; perception ; pneumonia ; pyramidal ...

  5. EFFECTS OF ETHYLENE CHLOROHYDRIN ON FATTY ACID SYNTHESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male chicks weighing 700 to 900 g. received an acute or eight doses IG of 60 or 40 mg/kg ethylene chlorohydrin (ECH) respectively and were sacrificed eighteen hours after the last dose. Mitochondrial elongation of fatty acids was decreased significantly while fatty acid synthetas...

  6. Distillation of natural fatty acids and their chemical derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Well over 1,000 different fatty acids are known which are natural components of fats, oils (triacylglycerols), and other related compounds. These fatty acids can have different alkyl chain lengths, 0-6 carbon-carbon double bonds possessing cis- or trans-geometry, and can contain a variety of functio...

  7. Differentiation of Bacillus anthracis from Bacillus cereus by gas chromatographic whole-cell fatty acid analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, D.; Heitefuss, S; Seifert, H S

    1991-01-01

    Three strains of Bacillus anthracis and seven strains of Bacillus cereus were grown on complex medium and on synthetic medium. Gas chromatographic analysis of whole-cell fatty acids of strains grown on complex medium gave nearly identical fatty acid patterns. Fatty acid patterns of strains grown on synthetic medium showed a high content of branched-chain fatty acids. Significant differences between the fatty acid patterns of the two species were found. Odd iso/anteiso fatty acid ratios were a...

  8. Fatty Acids Composition in Germinating Cotton Seedlings Affected by High Temperature Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Saghir Ahmed Sheikh; Muhammad Ibrahim Keerio; Maqsood Anwar Rustamani; Noor-u-Nisa Memon

    2002-01-01

    The results of fatty acids analysis suggested that greater unsaturation occurred with increasing germination time. High temperature had a marked effect on fatty acid composition and caused significant changes especially in neutral lipid and glycollpid fatty acids. Small changes were also observed in phophollpid fatty acids. A large increase in free fatty acid was also found, since free fatty acids are known to be damaging to cells.

  9. Increased Production of Fatty Acids and Triglycerides in Aspergillus oryzae by Enhancing Expressions of Fatty Acid Synthesis-Related Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamano, Koichi; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Karagiosis, Sue A.; Culley, David E.; Deng, Shuang; Collett, James R.; Umemura, Myco; Koike, Hideaki; Baker, Scott E.; Machida, Masa

    2013-01-01

    Microbial production of fats and oils is being developedas a means of converting biomass to biofuels. Here we investigate enhancing expression of enzymes involved in the production of fatty acids and triglycerides as a means to increase production of these compounds in Aspergillusoryzae. Examination of the A.oryzaegenome demonstrates that it contains twofatty acid synthases and several other genes that are predicted to be part of this biosynthetic pathway. We enhancedthe expressionof fatty acid synthesis-related genes by replacing their promoters with thepromoter fromthe constitutively highly expressedgene tef1. We demonstrate that by simply increasing the expression of the fatty acid synthasegenes we successfullyincreasedtheproduction of fatty acids and triglyceridesby more than two fold. Enhancement of expression of the fatty acid pathway genes ATP-citrate lyase and palmitoyl-ACP thioesteraseincreasedproductivity to a lesser extent.Increasing expression ofacetyl-CoA carboxylase caused no detectable change in fatty acid levels. Increases in message level for each gene were monitored usingquantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our data demonstrates that a simple increase in the abundance of fatty acid synthase genes can increase the detectable amount of fatty acids.

  10. Radioiodinated PHIPA's; metabolically trapped fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodinated PHIPA 3-10 [13-(4'-iodophenyl)-3-(p-phenylene)tridecanoic acid] has been developed for nuclear-cardiological investigation of coronary artery disease or cardiomyopathies of various origin. The compound features a phenylene group located within the backbone of a long-chain fatty acid. In spite of its bulky structure [123I]PHIPA 3-10 is extracted by the myocardium in a manner similar to that for the unmodified fatty acid analogue, [123I]IPPA. The retention of PHIPA 3-10 in heart muscle results from the presence of the p-phenylene group which prevents more than one ?-oxidation cycle. Only one single, rapidly formed metabolite was found in rat-heart extracts. According to comparative HPLC with synthetic metabolites and mass spectrometric analysis this metabolite was identified as [123I]PHIPA 1-10, a by two methylene groups shortened PHIPA derivative. Formation of this metabolite could be suppressed by Etomoxir, a carnitine palmitoyl fransferase I inhibitor, indicating ?-oxidation of [123I]PHIPA 3-10 in mitochondria. Final evidence for the involvement of mitochondria in the degradation of [123I]PHIPA 3-10 was obtained performing density-gradient centrifugation with homogenized rat heart tissue. Labeled free PHIPA 3-10 and free metabolite peaked with the fraction containing mitochondria. With respect to its biochemical characteristics, [123I]PHIPA 3-10 may be considered as a useful tool for nmay be considered as a useful tool for nuclear cardiological investigations. (orig.)

  11. Fatty acids and terpenoids from Trigonia fasciculata

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Jair, Mafezoli; Regina Helena A., Santos; Maria Teresa P., Gambardela; Edilberto R., Silveira.

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available A fração lipídica do extrato hexânico das raízes de Trigonia fasciculata foi analisada por CG/EM sob a forma de seus ésteres metílicos, identificando-se dezessete ácidos graxos, sendo o ácido oléico (38,8%) o principal componente. A análise por CG/EM da fração menos polar da parte insaponificável do [...] extrato hexânico das raízes permitiu identificar quinze sesquiterpenos não oxigenados, sendo o alfa-santaleno (28,4%) o componente majoritário. Cromatografia em gel de sílica da fração mais polar permitiu o isolamento de dois triterpenos conhecidos, ácido betulínico e friedelina, e o diterpeno inédito 7-(2-hidroxiacetil)-10-hidroxitetradecaidro-1-metileno-4b,7,10a-trimetilfenantreno (6alfa-hidroxi-15-oxo-allodevadarool). Todas as substâncias isoladas e identificadas são inéditas para a espécie. A determinação estrutural foi realizada por derivatização química, comparação com dados da literatura, análise espectral, incluíndo RMN 2D (COSY, HETCOR e COLOC), e cristalografia de raios X. Abstract in english The fatty portion of the hexane extract from roots of Trigonia fasciculata has been determined by GC/MS analysis of the methyl ester mixture. Seventeen fatty acids were identified and oleic acid (38.8%) was the major component. The GC/MS analysis of the less polar fraction of the non-saponifiable pa [...] rt of the root hexane extract allowed the identification of fifteen sesquiterpenes and alpha-santalene (28.4%) was the major component. Chromatography over silica gel of the more polar fraction allowed the isolation of two known compounds: betulinic acid and friedelin, and a novel diterpene 7-(2-hydroxy-acetyl)-10-hydroxy-tetradecahydro-1-methylene-4b,7,10a-trimethyl -phenantrene (6alpha-hydroxy-15-oxo-allodevadarool), all unknown for the species. Structure determination was accomplished by chemical derivatization, comparison to literature data and spectral analysis, including 2D NMR (COSY, HETCOR, COLOC) and X-ray crystallography.

  12. Halogenated fatty acids : I. Formation and occurrence in lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Wesén, Clas

    1997-01-01

    Chlorinated fatty acids have been found to be major contributors to organohalogen compounds in fish, bivalves, jellyfish, and lobster, and they have been indicated to contribute considerably to organohalogens in marine mammals. Brominated fatty acids have been found in marine sponges. Also, chlorinated lipids have been found in meat exposed to hypochlorite disinfected water, and in chlorine-treated flour and in products made from such flour. Following exposure to chlorine bleached pulp mill effluents, aquatic organisms may have elevated concentrations of chlorinated fatty acids in their lipids. However, a natural production of halogenated fatty acids is also possible. In this paper we summarize the present knowledge of the occurrence of halogenated fatty acids in lipids and suggested ways of their formation. In Part II (Trends Anal. Chem. 16 (1997) 274) we deal with methods of their determination.

  13. Exogenous Isoleucine and Fatty Acid Shortening Ensure the High Content of Anteiso-C15:0 Fatty Acid Required for Low-Temperature Growth of Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Kun; Ding, Xiang; Julotok, Mudcharee; Wilkinson, Brian J.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the branched-chain fatty acid anteiso-C15:0 plays a critical role in the growth of Listeria monocytogenes at low temperatures by ensuring sufficient membrane fluidity. Studies utilizing a chemically defined minimal medium revealed that the anteiso fatty acid precursor isoleucine largely determined the fatty acid profile and fatty acid response of the organism to lowered growth temperature. When isoleucine was sufficient, the fatty acid profile was very ...

  14. Incorporated fish oil fatty acids prevent action potential shortening induced by circulating fish oil fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HesterMDen Ruijter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased consumption of fatty fish, rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (?3-PUFAs reduces the severity and number of arrhythmias. Long term ?3-PUFA-intake modulates the activity of several cardiac ion channels leading to cardiac action potential shortening. Circulating ?3-PUFAs in the bloodstream and incorporated ?3-PUFAs in the cardiac membrane have a different mechanism to shorten the action potential. It is, however, unknown whether circulating ?3-PUFAs in the bloodstream enhance or diminish the effects of incorporated ?3-PUFAs. In the present study, we address this issue. Rabbits were fed a diet rich in fish oil (?3 or sunflower oil (?9, as control for 3 weeks. Ventricular myocytes were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and action potentials were measured using the perforated patch clamp technique in the absence and presence of acutely administered ?3-PUFAs. Plasma of ?3 fed rabbits contained more free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and isolated myocytes of ?3 fed rabbits contained higher amounts of both EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in their sarcolemma compared to control. In the absence of acutely administered fatty acids, ?3 myocytes had a shorter action potential with a more negative plateau than ?9 myocytes. In the ?9 myocytes, but not in the ?3 myocytes, acute administration of a mixture of EPA+DHA shortened the action potential significantly. From these data we conclude that incorporated ?3-PUFAs into the sarcolemma and acutely administered ?3 fatty acids do not have a cumulative effect on action potential duration and morphology. As a consequence, patients with a high cardiac ?3-PUFA status will probably not benefit from short term ?3 supplementation as an antiarrhythmic therapy.

  15. Fatty acid profiles in marine and freshwater fish from fish markets in northeastern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ?uczy?ska Joanna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid compositions were studied in eight commercially important fish from fish markets: salmon, Salmo salar L.; cod, Gadus morhua L.; common sole, Solea solea (L.; European flounder, Platichthys flesus (L.; catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell; rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walb.; Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (L.; and pangasius, Pangasianodon hypophthalmus (Sauvage. The freshwater fish contained 25.69-42.18% saturated, 34.90-43.79% monounsaturated, 8.46-16.32% n-6 polyunsaturated, and 5.01-20.43% n-3 polyunsaturated acid, while marine fish contained 18.53-32.77% saturated, 17.95-49.89% monounsaturated, 3.40-11.51% n-6 polyunsaturated, and 18.74-45.42% n-3 polyunsaturated acid. Marine fish contained significantly more ?n-3 PUFA (29.79%, EPA (12.26%, DHA (13.20%, and a higher n-3/n-6 (6.95 ratio than freshwater fish (13.13, 2.47, 7.14, 1.29% (P? 0.05. There were statistically significant differences in the n-3/n-6 ratio among fish species (cod (13.40 > sole (8.47 > flounder (4.30 > rainbow trout (2.41 > catfish (1.83 ? salmon (1.63 > tilapia (0.57 ? pangasius (0.36 (P ?0.05.

  16. Differential effect of maternal diet supplementation with ?-Linolenic adcid or n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on glial cell phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine fatty acid profile in neonate rat brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz-Hernandez Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA are of crucial importance for the development of neural tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a dietary supplementation in n-3 fatty acids in female rats during gestation and lactation on fatty acid pattern in brain glial cells phosphatidylethanolamine (PE and phosphatidylserine (PS in the neonates. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were fed during the whole gestation and lactation period with a diet containing either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 0.55% and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 0.75% of total fatty acids or ?-linolenic acid (ALA, 2.90%. At two weeks of age, gastric content and brain glial cell PE and PS of rat neonates were analyzed for their fatty acid and dimethylacetal (DMA profile. Data were analyzed by bivariate and multivariate statistics. Results In the neonates from the group fed with n-3 LC-PUFA, the DHA level in gastric content (+65%, P Conclusion The present study confirms that early supplementation of maternal diet with n-3 fatty acids supplied as LC-PUFA is more efficient in increasing n-3 in brain glial cell PE and PS in the neonate than ALA. Negative correlation between n-6 DPA, a conventional marker of DHA deficiency, and DMA in PE suggests n-6 DPA that potentially be considered as a marker of tissue ethanolamine plasmalogen status. The combination of multivariate and bivariate statistics allowed to underline that the accretion pattern of n-3 LC-PUFA in PE and PS differ.

  17. Liquid crystalline state of some fatty acids and mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelmez, Mihaela A.; Honciuc, Maria; Piscureanu, Mihai C.

    1998-09-01

    The role of the fatty acids in the biological membrane structure and properties is partially known. They can exhibit a mesogenic feature and behavior in terms of the temperature, the presence of many acids of cholesterol, or other important substances for the metabolism, of external stimuli etc. We studied the arachidic, lauric, elaidic, arachidonic and butiric acids. The most important seems to be the arachidonic acid, a forerunner of phospholipids. This is an unsaturated fatty acid,with four double bounds. We found that it displayed liquid crystalline properties between 4-20 grades centrigrades; in mixture with other fatty acids or cholesterol, these properties change. The paper present considerations on the biological role of the fatty acids and mixtures, in interactions with some physical fields experimental results and some theoretical considerations.

  18. Tissue fatty acid composition and estimated ? desaturase activity after castration in chicken broilers fed with linseed or sunflower oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mašek, T; Star?evi?, K; Filipovi?, N; Stojevi?, Z; Brozi?, D; Gottstein, Z; Severin, K

    2014-04-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the influence of the short-term addition of sunflower and linseed oil and castration on fatty acid composition and desaturation indexes in chicken broilers. Forty-eight male Ross 308 chicken broilers were supplemented with 5% of sunflower or linseed oil. The four experimental groups were linseed oil supplementation and castration (LC), linseed oil without castration (LN), sunflower oil and castration (SC) and sunflower oil without castration (SN). There was no significant influence of castration or oil supplement on live weights, weight gain, feed intake or feed conversion. Castration resulted in an increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), total n3, n6, measured desaturation indexes and a decrease in the saturated fatty acid (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) content of abdominal fat. In breast muscle, castration increased PUFA and 18:3n3 values, while in the liver tissue, castration did not influence the parameters measured. Linseed oil supplementation significantly increased 18:3n3, n3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC PUFA), total n3 and decreased total n6, n6/n3 ratio, and 20:4n6 content. Values for 20:4n6 were the highest in SC and the lowest in the LC group. Linseed oil also significantly decreased ?5 and ?4 desaturation indexes in the thighs and ?5 and ?5, 6 in abdominal fat and the liver. These results suggest that short-term supplementation of basal diet with 5% of linseed oil could significantly increase n3 LC PUFA and decrease n6/n3 ratio content in the edible tissues of chicken broilers, without adverse effects on growth performance. Meanwhile, castration only improved fatty acid profile in abdominal fat, which is not nutritionally important. The interactions observed between basal diet, supplemented oil, sex hormones and other non-nutritional factors must be elucidated in future trials in order to correctly predict the nutritional value of linseed-fed poultry. PMID:23905627

  19. Immunologic effects of national cholesterol education panel step-2 diets with and without fish-derived N-3 fatty acid enrichment.

    OpenAIRE

    Meydani, S N; Lichtenstein, A.H.; Cornwall, S; Meydani, M; Goldin, B R; Rasmussen, H.; Dinarello, C. A.; Schaefer, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    Reductions in dietary fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol have been recommended to reduce the risk of heart disease in our society. The effects of these modifications on human cytokine production and immune responses have not been well studied. 22 subjects > 40 yr of age were fed a diet approximating that of the current American (14.1% of calories as saturated fatty acids, [SFA], 14.5% monounsaturated fatty acids [MUFA], 6.1% [n-6] polyunsaturated fatty acids [PUFA], 0.8% [n-3] PUFA, and 147 ...

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of fatty acid esterification for fatty acid alkyl esters production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of renewable energy source alternatives has become a planet need because of the unavoidable fossil fuel scarcity and for that reason biodiesel production has attracted growing interest over the last decade. The reaction yield for obtaining fatty acid alkyl esters varies significantly according to the operating conditions such as temperature and the feed reactants ratio and thus investigation of the thermodynamics involved in such reactional systems may afford important knowledge on the effects of process variables on biodiesel production. The present work reports a thermodynamic analysis of fatty acid esterification reaction at low pressure. For this purpose, Gibbs free energy minimization was employed with UNIFAC and modified Wilson thermodynamic models through a nonlinear programming model implementation. The methodology employed is shown to reproduce the most relevant investigations involving experimental studies and thermodynamic analysis.

  1. Effect of dietary fatty acid saturation on egg production at end-of-lay

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    G.C, Buitendach; F.H, de Witt; A, Hugo; H.J, van der Merwe; M.D, Fair.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary fatty acid saturation on production performances of laying hens at end-of-lay. Five isoenergetic (12.6 MJ AME/kg DM) and isonitrogenous (170 g CP/kg DM) diets were formulated using different lipid sources at a constant 30 g/kg inclusion [...] level. The control diet was formulated using a blend (50 : 50) of linseed- and fish oil, while the other treatments consist of pure fish oil (polyunsaturated n-3), sunflower oil (polyunsaturated n-6), high oleic acid (HO) sunflower oil (monounsaturated n-9) and tallow (SFA). Two hundred, individually caged Hy-Line Silver-Brown laying hens (20 weeks of age) were randomly allocated to the five dietary treatments (n = 40 replicates/treatment) and received the experimental diets for 54 weeks from 20 to 74 weeks of age. During weeks 58, 62, 66, 70 and 74 of age (end-of-lay period), all eggs produced were recorded and individually weighed while feed intake, as well as body weights of birds, were determined. Data for the respective collection weeks were pooled to calculate and statistical analyse production parameter means for the end-of-lay period. Average daily feed intake of birds in the polyunsaturated n-3 treatment (97.5 g/b/d) were the lowest while that of the polyunsaturated n-6 treatment (102.4 g/b/d) the highest. Furthermore, despite the significant effect of fatty acid saturation on feed intake, it had no effect on hen-day egg production, egg weight, egg output, feed efficiency or body weight of hens during end-of-lay. Since results of the current study fail to indicate a clear trend regarding dietary fatty acid saturation on feed intake of birds, it could be concluded that the long term exposure to a range of fatty acid saturation levels, has no negative effect on hen performance.

  2. Efeito sazonal sobre os ácidos graxos e colesterol do polvo Octopus vulgaris Cuvier 1797 / Seasonal effects on fatty acids and cholesterol contents in Octopus vulgaris Cuvier 1797

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Margarida Maria Monteiro, Vasconcelos; Jorge Fernando Fuentes, Zapata.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um estudo sobre o perfil de ácidos graxos e colesterol na manta de polvo comum, Octopus vulgaris, capturado na praia de Camocim - CE, no decorrer dos meses de abril a outubro em coletas bimensais. Apesar do ácido oleico (C18: 1n9) apresentar comportamento uniforme ao longo do tempo de [...] coleta, a maioria dos demais ácidos graxos foi afetada (p = 1%) pela época de coleta. Os níveis dos ácidos araquidônico (C20:4n6), oleico (C18:1n9), esteárico (C18:0) e linoleico (C18:2n6) foram superiores àqueles reportados na literatura. O somatório de ácidos graxos poli-insaturados e monoinsaturados revelou que o óleo de polvo apresenta um teor significativo de ácidos graxos insaturados. Foi observado um aumento gradativo de colesterol ao longo do tempo estudado e um comportamento inverso para a relação de ácidos graxos n3/n6. Abstract in english The aim of this study was to investigate the fatty acids and cholesterol profile in the mantle of common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, collected twice a month in in coastal waters of Camocim/CE beach over the period from April to October. Although the Oleic acid (C18:n9) did not show significant change [...] s over the months, the majority of fatty acids varied during this period of time. The Arachidonic (C20:4n6), oleic (C18:n9), stearic (C18:0), and linoleic (C18:2n6) acids were found in higher levels than those reported in the literature. Polyunsaturated and unsaturated fatty acids accounted for most of the octopus fatty acids. During the time of analysis, it was observed a gradual increase in the cholesterol and the fatty acids n3/ n6 ratio presented the opposite result, i.e., a gradual decrease.

  3. Efeito sazonal sobre os ácidos graxos e colesterol do polvo Octopus vulgaris Cuvier 1797 Seasonal effects on fatty acids and cholesterol contents in Octopus vulgaris Cuvier 1797

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Maria Monteiro Vasconcelos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um estudo sobre o perfil de ácidos graxos e colesterol na manta de polvo comum, Octopus vulgaris, capturado na praia de Camocim - CE, no decorrer dos meses de abril a outubro em coletas bimensais. Apesar do ácido oleico (C18: 1n9 apresentar comportamento uniforme ao longo do tempo de coleta, a maioria dos demais ácidos graxos foi afetada (p = 1% pela época de coleta. Os níveis dos ácidos araquidônico (C20:4n6, oleico (C18:1n9, esteárico (C18:0 e linoleico (C18:2n6 foram superiores àqueles reportados na literatura. O somatório de ácidos graxos poli-insaturados e monoinsaturados revelou que o óleo de polvo apresenta um teor significativo de ácidos graxos insaturados. Foi observado um aumento gradativo de colesterol ao longo do tempo estudado e um comportamento inverso para a relação de ácidos graxos n3/n6.The aim of this study was to investigate the fatty acids and cholesterol profile in the mantle of common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, collected twice a month in in coastal waters of Camocim/CE beach over the period from April to October. Although the Oleic acid (C18:n9 did not show significant changes over the months, the majority of fatty acids varied during this period of time. The Arachidonic (C20:4n6, oleic (C18:n9, stearic (C18:0, and linoleic (C18:2n6 acids were found in higher levels than those reported in the literature. Polyunsaturated and unsaturated fatty acids accounted for most of the octopus fatty acids. During the time of analysis, it was observed a gradual increase in the cholesterol and the fatty acids n3/ n6 ratio presented the opposite result, i.e., a gradual decrease.

  4. Fatty acid composition of milk from cows fed low purity glycerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo de Almeida Meneses

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of inclusion of low purity glycerin in the diet on the fatty acid composition of milk of crossbred cows. We used 15 crossbred Holstein x Zebu cows distributed in three Latin squares 5 x 5, the following treatments: control (no addition of glycerin in the diet; inclusion of 5% glycerin in the diet dry matter; inclusion of 10% glycerol in the diet dry matter; inclusion of 15% glycerol in the diet dry matter, and the inclusion of 20% glycerol in the diet dry matter. The inclusion of glycerin in the diet had no effect (P<0.05 the concentration of butyric acid (C4:0. In contrast, we observed a quadratic effect (P<0.05 on the concentrations of fatty acids caproic C6:0 (= 11.33 the point of maximum, caprylic C8:0 (= 9.50 the point of maximum and capric C10:0 (= 6.66 the point of maximum also short chain fatty acids, following the same trend of milk production. Decreased linearly (P<0.05 concentrations of medium chain fatty acids, fatty acids Lauric C12:0, Myristic C14:0, myristoleic C14:1, pentadecanoic C15:0, Pentadecenoico: C15:1, Palmitic C16:0 and palmitoleic C16:1. Was observed increased linearly (P<0.05 on concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids and monounsaturated. In contrast, the concentration of saturated fatty acids decreased linearly (P<0.05. The concentration of fatty acids Omega 6 series showed decreasing linear effect (P<0.05. As for the concentration of Omega 3, there was no effect of adding glycerin. The PUFA SFA-1 ratio showed linear growth (P<0.05 and the ratio n-6 n-3-1 showed a quadratic effect (P<0.05, with of 6.66 the point of maximum. The concentration of conjugated linoleic acid total had increased linearly (P<0.05. It is recommended the inclusion of glycerin in the diet of dairy cows to the level of 20% based on dry matter.

  5. Changes in fatty acid synthesis during leaf development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incorporation of [1-14C]acetate into fatty acids of leaf tissue was studied. Results are compared for serial sections of rye grass and whole leaves of other mono- and dicotyledons. Appreciable amounts of very-long-chain fatty acids which are precursors of the epidermal wax were found only in the youngest part of the leaf. Mature leaves showed a decline in linolenic acid synthesis corresponding to the full development of the chloroplast. Results indicate that the developing leaf contains rapidly changing enzyme systems for synthesizing fatty acids. (author)

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiac arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rix, Thomas A; Christensen, Jeppe H

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There are suggestions of effects of marine omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in relation to ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death and, more recently, also of possible effects related to atrial fibrillation. RECENT FINDINGS: On the basis of the recently published human studies, this article not only focusses primarily on recent developments and current knowledge on the effect of marine omega-3 PUFAs on atrial fibrillation, but also provides a status for their effects on ventricular arrhythmias. SUMMARY: Marine omega-3 PUFAs may protect against ventricular arrhythmias, and there is growing evidence for an effect of marine omega-3 PUFAs in the prevention and treatment of atrial fibrillation. Further studies are needed to establish which patients are more likely to benefit from omega-3 PUFAs, the timing of treatment, and the dosages.

  7. Tagging fatty acids with 99m tecnetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a search for a fatty acid analogue suitable for labelling with sup(99m)Tc for myocardial imaging, analogues of the general formula X-Y-COOH where the ligand groups X, Y were NH2, SH or COOH, capable of forming complexes with metal ions, were synthesized. Among many such, one compound (CH2(SH).CH2(SH).(CH2)8.COOH) was selected for further study. Injected intravenously together with a reducing agent into mice, rats and one dog, the compound proved unsatisfactory for the purpose because of its toxicity and its failure to localize in the myocardium. The search for alternative analogues and alternative labelling procedures must continue

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids as treatments for mental illness: which disorder and which fatty acid?

    OpenAIRE

    Sieswerda Lee E; Seguin Jennifer; Ross Brian M

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background A growing number of observational and epidemiological studies have suggested that mental illness, in particular mood disorders, is associated with reduced dietary intake and/or cellular abundance of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). This has prompted researchers to test the efficacy of omega-3 PUFA in a range of different psychiatric disorders. We have critically reviewed the double blind placebo controlled clinical trials published prior to April 2007 to determi...

  9. Growth Performance, Meat Quality and Fatty Acid Metabolism Response of Growing Meat Rabbits to Dietary Linoleic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R. G.; Wang, X. P.; Wang, C. Y.; Ma, M. W.; Li, F. C.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of different amounts of dietary linoleic acid (LA) on growth performance, serum biochemical traits, meat quality, fatty acids composition of muscle and liver, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT 1) mRNA expression in the liver of 9 wks old to 13 wks old growing meat rabbits. One hundred and fifty 9 wks old meat rabbits were allocated to individual cages and randomly divided into five groups. Animals in each group were fed with a diet with the following LA addition concentrations: 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 g/kg diet (as-fed basis) and LA concentrations were 0.84, 1.21, 1.34, 1.61 and 1.80% in the diet, respectively. The results showed as follows: the dietary LA levels significantly affected muscle color of LL included a* and b* of experimental rabbits (p<0.05). The linear effect of LA on serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol was obtained (p = 0.0119). The saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) contents of LL decreased and the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) content of LL increased with dietary LA increase (p<0.0001). The PUFA n-6 content and PUFA n-3 content in the LL was significantly affected by the dietary LA levels (p<0.01, p<0.05). The MUFAs content in the liver decreased and the PUFAs contents in the liver increased with dietary LA increase (p<0.0001). The PUFA n-6 content and the PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio in the liver increased and PUFA n-3 content in the liver decreased with dietary LA increase (p<0.01). The linear effect of LA on CPT 1 mRNA expression in the liver was obtained (p = 0.0081). In summary, dietary LA addition had significant effects on liver and muscle fatty acid composition (increased PUFAs) of 9 wks old to 13 wks old growing meat rabbits, but had little effects on growth performance, meat physical traits and mRNA expression of liver relative enzyme of experimental rabbits. PMID:25049677

  10. Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Erythrocyte Fatty Acid Profile in Mexican Adolescents: A Trans Fatty Acid Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maldonado-Hernández Jorge

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The type of fat consumed in the Mexican diet could predispose to the development of Metabolic Syndrome (MS which has been associated with an increased risk to develop cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Our study included adolescents between 12 and 16 years of age, divided in two groups: Control Group (n = 31 and MS Group (n = 44. Waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and HDL-cholesterol were determined. Erythrocytes’ fatty acids methyl esthers were quantified using gas chromatography with ionized flame detector. We identified 16 fatty acids (FA with chain lengths from C12 to C24, with emphasis in four trans FA (TFA isomers: vaccenic (C18:1n7t, elaidic (C18:1n9t, linoelaidic (C18:2n6t, and conjugated linoelaidic acids (C18:2n7t. MS Group had a less proportion of: myristic (C14, palmitoleic (C16:1, C18:1n7t, and linoleic acids (C18:2; and a higher one of C18:1n9t, C18:2n7t, and nervonic acids (C24:1 when compared to the control group. C24:1 and C18:1n9t had a significant positive association with MS (OR = 14.17 and OR = 12.94, respectively; whereas C14 (OR = 0.14, C18:1n7t (OR = 0.14, and C18:2 (OR = 0.22 appear to have a protective effect against the disease. The proportion of specific FAs in erythrocytes’ membranes differs between adolescents with MS and healthy controls; these FA not only showed a strong association with MS, but also correlated with most of its individual components. Interestingly, TFA displayed an antagonic behavior; while C18:1n9t had a strong association with MS, apparently C18:1n7t confers a protective effect; these results suggest that analyzing each TFA separately will constitute a more accurate approach to determine the role of TFAs in the pathogenesis of MS or other related metabolic disorders.

  11. Fatty acid chemistry of Atrichum undulatum and Hypnum andoi

    OpenAIRE

    Pejin Boris; Vujisi? Ljubodrag; Sabovljevi? Marko; Teševi? Vele; Vajs Vlatka

    2012-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of the moss species Atrichum undulatum (Hedw.) P. Beauv. (Polytrichaceae) and Hypnum andoi A.J.E. Sm. (Hypnaceae) collected in winter time were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a contribution to their chemistry. Eight fatty acids were identified in the chloroform/methanol extract 1:1 of A. undulatum (linoleic acid 26.80%, palmitic acid 22.17%, ?-linolenic acid 20.50%, oleic acid 18.49%, arachidonic acid 6...

  12. Identification of some yeasts by fatty acid profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloklah, Bassam; Alhajali, Anwar; Yaziji, Sabah

    2014-01-01

    178 yeasts isolated from various foods were identified using ID32 C strip; Saccharomyces cerevisiae (47), Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (19), Candida kefyr (33), Candida krusei (37), Candida lusitaniae (28), Cndida lipolytica (14). The yeasts were harvested, saponified, derivatized, and extracted, and fatty acid analysis was performed by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry. The yeast lipids contained Decanoic acid (C10:0), Luaric acid (C12:0), Myristoleic acid (C14:1), Myristic acid (C14:0), Pentadecanoic acid (C15:0), Palmitoleic acid C16:1), Pamitic acid (C16:0), Heptadecenoic acid (C17:1), Linoleic acid (C18:2), Linolenic acid (C18:3), Oleic acid (C18:1) and Stearic acid (C 18:0). The differences in the composition of these fatty acids could be used to identify the species as an accurate, efficient and relatively rapid method. PMID:25804068

  13. Absolute quantification of fatty acid and proximate composition of cow and goat powdered milks

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Weliton P., Batiston; Swami A., Maruyama; Sandra T. M., Gomes; Jesuí V., Visentainer; Nilson E. de, Souza; Makoto, Matsushita.

    1907-19-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho investigou a qualidade lipídica de leites processados por quantificação de ácidos graxos. Dez amostras de leite em pó integral de vaca e duas de cabra foram submetidas à extração de lipídios totais e à preparação dos ésteres metílicos de ácidos graxos. Estes foram separados em cromatóg [...] rafo a gás. A variação da quantidade de ácidos graxos por gramas de lipídios para compostos poliinsaturados, ômega 6, ômega 3 e ácido linoléico conjugado, foi respectivamente: 25,20-46,67, 12,82-31,45, 1,77-7,65 e 7,77-11,60 mg g-1. A razão n-6/n-3 foi menor para os leites em pó de vaca (2,85-6,07) em relação aos de cabra (11,31-12,75) e a quantidade de ácidos graxos trans variou de 0,09 a 0,17 g por porção de 26 g. As amostras apresentaram ácidos graxos essenciais ômega 6 e ômega 3, isômeros do ácido linoléico conjugado e quantidade de ácidos graxos trans em conformidade com a legislação brasileira. Abstract in english This work investigated of the lipid quality of processed milks by fatty acid quantification. Ten samples of dry whole milk from cow and two from goat were submitted to total lipid extraction and to fatty acid methyl ester synthesis. Then, the synthesized products were separated in a gas chromatograp [...] h. The variation of the fatty acid per total lipid gram for polyunsaturated compounds, omega-6, omega-3 and conjugated linoleic acid, was 25.20-46.67, 12.82-31.45, 1.77-7.65 and 7.77-11.60, respectively. The n-6/n-3 ratio for the cow powdered milk samples (2.85-6.07) was lesser reagarding goat milk samples (11.31-12.75) and the trans fatty acid amount varied from 0.09 to 0.17 g per 26 g portion. Essential fatty acids from the omega-3 and omega-6 groups were present in every sample, besides conjugated linoleic acid isomers. The trans fatty acid contents of the samples is in accordance with the Brazilian legislation.

  14. Influence of fatty acid oxidation rate on glycerol release from cardiac myocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiescent cardiac myocytes are characterized by low rates of fatty acid oxidation due to the reduced energy demand compared with beating hearts. The accumulation of intracellular fatty acid metabolites may, therefore, result in feed-back inhibition of the cardiac lipase responsible for the mobilization of triacylglycerols (lipolysis). The objective of this study was to examine if interventions that increase fatty acid oxidation rates in myocytes have an effect on lipolysis. Addition of 100 ?M dinitrophenol (DNP) to calcium-tolerant rat ventricular myocytes caused an increase in the rate of 14C-oleic acid oxidation from 1.11 +/- 0.06 to 2.38 +/- 0.17 nmol 14CO2/106 cells/min (115% stimulation; mean +/- S.D., n = 3). In parallel incubations, DNP increased the rate of lipolysis from 4.4 +/- 1.7 to 13.6 +/- 3.2 nmol glycerol/106 cells/30 min (215% stimulation). The addition of 1 mM barium to a modified Ringer's incubation medium produced an increase in the contractile activity of the myocytes, and increased the rates of oleic acid oxidation from 0.62 +/- 0.16 to 0.88 +/- 0.23 nmol/106 cells/min (42% stimulation; n = 6) and lipolysis from 13.1 +/- 6.5 to 22.2 +/- 6.4 nmol/106 cells/30 min (70% stimulation). These data show that stimulation of fatty acid oxidation in myocardial myocytes is accompanied by increased lipolytic rates, the latter probably due to release of feed-back inhibition of cardiac lipases by accumulated fatty acid metabolites

  15. Fatty acid profiles of ecotypes of hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens growing under cadmium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemanová, Veronika; Pavlík, Milan; Kyjaková, Pavlína; Pavlíková, Daniela

    2015-05-15

    Changes in the fatty acid (FAs) composition in response to the extent of Cd contamination of soils (0, 30, 60 and 90mgCdkg(-1)) differed between ecotypes of Noccaea caerulescens originating from France - Ganges, Slovenia - Mežica and Austria - Redlschlag. Mežica ecotype accumulated more Cd in aboveground biomass compared to Ganges and Redlschlag ecotypes. Hyperaccumulators contained saturated fatty acids (SFAs) rarely occurring in plants, as are cerotic (26:0), montanic (28:0), melissic (30:0) acids, and unusual unsaturated fatty acids (USFAs), as are 16:2, 16:3, 20:2 and 20:3. Typical USFAs occurring in the family Brassicaceae, such as erucic, oleic and arachidonic acids, were missing in tested plants. Our results clearly indicate a relationship between Cd accumulation and the FAs composition. The content of SFAs decreased and the content of USFAs increased in aboveground biomass of Ganges and Mežica ecotypes with increasing Cd concentration. Opposite trend of FAs content was determined in Redlschlag ecotype. Linoleic (18:2n-6), ?-linolenic (18:3n-3) and palmitic (16:0) acids were found in all ecotypes. The results observed in N. caerulescens ecotypes, showed that mainly Mežica ecotype has an efficient defense strategies which can be related on changes in FAs composition, mainly in VLCFAs synthesis. The most significant effect of ecotype on FAs composition was confirmed using multivariate analysis of variance. PMID:25886397

  16. Regional uptake of meal fatty acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Michael D; Sarr, Michael G; Dumesic, Daniel A; Southorn, Peter A; Levine, James A

    2003-12-01

    Two protocols were performed to study meal fatty acid metabolism. In protocol 1, 14 patients scheduled for elective intra-abdominal surgery (11 undergoing bariatric surgery for severe obesity) consumed a meal containing [3H]triolein in the evening before surgery. This allowed us to measure adipose tissue lipid specific activity (SA) in mesenteric and omental, deep and superficial abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. Intra-abdominal adipose tissue lipid SA was greater than subcutaneous lipid SA. There were no significant differences between mesenteric and omental or between deep and superficial abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. In protocol 2, meal fatty acid oxidation and uptake into subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue ([3H]triolein) were measured in six normal, healthy volunteers. Meal fatty acid oxidation (3H2O generation) plus that remaining in plasma ( approximately 1%) plus uptake into upper body subcutaneous, lower body subcutaneous, and visceral fat allowed us to account for 98 +/- 6% of meal fatty acids 24 h after meal ingestion. We conclude that omental fat is a good surrogate for visceral fat and that abdominal subcutaneous fat depots are comparable with regard to meal fatty acid metabolic studies. Using [3H]triolein, we were able to account for virtually 100% of meal fatty acids 24 h after meal ingestion. These results support the meal fatty acid tracer model as a way to study the metabolic fate of dietary fat. PMID:12915396

  17. Fatty Acid and Phytosterol Content of Commercial Saw Palmetto Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L. Lindshield

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Saw palmetto supplements are one of the most commonly consumed supplements by men with prostate cancer and/or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Some studies have found significant improvements in BPH and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS with saw palmetto supplementation, whereas others found no benefits. The variation in the efficacy in these trials may be a result of differences in the putative active components, fatty acids and phytosterols, of the saw palmetto supplements. To this end, we quantified the major fatty acids (laurate, myristate, palmitate, stearate, oleate, linoleate and phytosterols (campesterol, stigmasterol, ?-sitosterol in 20 commercially available saw palmetto supplements using GC-FID and GC-MS, respectively. Samples were classified into liquids, powders, dried berries, and tinctures. Liquid saw palmetto supplements contained significantly higher (p < 0.05 concentrations of total fatty acids (908.5 mg/g, individual fatty acids, total phytosterols (2.04 mg/g, and individual phytosterols, than the other supplement categories. Powders contained significantly higher (p < 0.05 concentrations of total fatty acids than tinctures, which contain negligible amounts of fatty acids (46.3 mg/g and phytosterols (0.10 mg/g. Our findings suggest that liquid saw palmetto supplements may be the best choice for individuals who want to take a saw palmetto supplement with the highest concentrations of both fatty acids and phytosterols.

  18. Invited commentary: dietary polyunsaturated Fatty acids and chronic systemic inflammation-a potentially intriguing link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rajiv; Steur, Marinka

    2015-06-01

    It remains largely unclear whether consumption of total and individual polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is associated with chronic systemic inflammation in healthy, free-living individuals. While available evidence (stemming principally from mechanistic studies) has indicated that greater intake of n-6 PUFAs may lead to increased levels of inflammation-for instance, by their acting as precursors to proinflammatory eicosanoids and increasing levels of oxidized linoleic acid metabolites-n-3 PUFAs are precursors to some antiinflammatory eicosanoids. New human data from a Dutch prospective study, the Rotterdam Study-as presented by Muka et al. ( Am J Epidemiol. 2015;181(11):846-856) in this issue of the Journal-now make an important contribution to the relatively scarce literature on the association of dietary n-3 and n-6 PUFAs with serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a key marker of inflammation, in a general population. The study by Muka et al. benefitted from repeated CRP measurements, comprehensive correction for potential confounding, and wide-ranging sensitivity analyses. The findings show no significant trend regarding n-3 PUFAs but indicate an important inverse association between n-6 PUFAs and chronic systemic inflammation. This study provides support for existing dietary guidelines, which encourage consumption of a combination of n-3 and n-6 PUFAs in the diet. PMID:25899093

  19. Effect of dietary fat type on the fatty acids composition of irradiated and frozen storage japanese quails meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of substitution of dietary cotton seed oil (CSO) by used restaurant oil (URO) with different percentages 25% group 2 (G2), 50% group 3 (G3) and 100% group 4 (G4) in Japanese quail diets on the fatty acids composition of their meat especially polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The effect of gamma irradiation doses (1.5, 3 and 5 kGy) at frozen storage -18 C (degree) for 2 and 4 months in comparison with unirradiated and un storage were studied. The total saturated fatty acids (SFA) in quail meat fed G4 diet (100% URO) increased significantly in comparison with SFA in G2 (25% URO) and G3 (50% URO) but there is no significant effect with G2 and G3 in comparison with G1 (100% CSO).The monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were not affected by G2 and G3 diet. Also, linoleic acid (C 18:2, n-6) had the same trend in those groups with range (32.75% to 33.35%). It is concluded that feeding a diet with URO 25% and 50% conserve the content of linoleic acid and the content of PUFA in quail meat. The irradiation doses and storage periods had no significant effect on the linoleic acid, MUFA and PUFA content.

  20. Effects of Fatty Acid Inclusion in a DMPC Bilayer Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2009-01-01

    Free fatty acids in biomembranes have been proposed to be a central component in several cellular control and regulatory mechanisms. To elucidate some fundamental elements underlying this, we have applied molecular dynamics simulations and experimental density measurements to study the molecular packing and structure of oleic acid (HOA) and stearic acid (HSA) in fluid bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). The experimental data show a small but consistent positive excess volume for fatty acid concentrations below 10 mol %. At higher concentrations the fatty acids mix ideally with fluid DMPC. The simulations, which were benchmarked against the densitometric data, revealed interesting differences in the structure and location of the fatty acids depending on their protonation status. Thus, the protonated (uncharged) acid is located rather deeply in the membrane with an average position of the carboxy group near the second carbon segment of the lipid chains with a typical end-to-end distance of 16?18 Å. This structure of the fatty acid brings about a rather tight lateral packing in the mixed membrane and a moderate ordering and hence stretching of the lipid chains. Deprotonation of the fatty acids is associated with a pronounced movement of their carboxy group to a more hydrated position at the membrane interface and a lateral expansion driven by the mutual repulsion of the anions. These changes increase both the disorder and the degree of interdigitation of the lipid chains, and they make the membrane thinner by 2?3 Å.

  1. Cholesterol changes the fatty acid composition of rat enterocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Gazzola J.; Martins E.F.; Miyasaka C.K.; Palanch A.C.; Vecchia M.G.; Curi R.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of free cholesterol on the fatty acid composition and growth of rat fetal enterocytes was investigated in the absence and presence of 10% (v/v) fetal calf serum. Cholesterol caused a significant reduction of cell number after 6 and 12 h in culture. The fatty acid composition of enterocytes cultured in the presence of serum was also changed by the presence of 20 µM cholesterol. The fatty acid profile was determined by HPLC using fluorescence detection (325 nm excitation and 395 nm ...

  2. Antiproliferative activity of synthetic fatty acid amides from renewable resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Daiane S; Piovesan, Luciana A; D'Oca, Caroline R Montes; Hack, Carolina R Lopes; Treptow, Tamara G M; Rodrigues, Marieli O; Vendramini-Costa, Débora B; Ruiz, Ana Lucia T G; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; D'Oca, Marcelo G Montes

    2015-01-15

    In the work, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of a series of synthetic fatty acid amides were investigated in seven cancer cell lines. The study revealed that most of the compounds showed antiproliferative activity against tested tumor cell lines, mainly on human glioma cells (U251) and human ovarian cancer cells with a multiple drug-resistant phenotype (NCI-ADR/RES). In addition, the fatty methyl benzylamide derived from ricinoleic acid (with the fatty acid obtained from castor oil, a renewable resource) showed a high selectivity with potent growth inhibition and cell death for the glioma cell line-the most aggressive CNS cancer. PMID:25510639

  3. Transgenic Mice Convert Carbohydrates to Essential Fatty Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, Victor J.; wang, Bin; LI, XIANGYONG; WU, Lin; Jing X. Kang

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mice (named “Omega mice”) were engineered to carry both optimized fat-1 and fat-2 genes from the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans and are capable of producing essential omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids from saturated fats or carbohydrates. When maintained on a high-saturated fat diet lacking essential fatty acids or a high-carbohydrate, no-fat diet, the Omega mice exhibit high tissue levels of both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, with a ratio of ?1?1. This study thus presents an in...

  4. Stabilized epoxygenated fatty acids regulate inflammation, pain, angiogenesis and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guodong; Kodani, Sean; Hammock, Bruce D

    2014-01-01

    Epoxygenated fatty acids (EpFAs), which are lipid mediators produced by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases from polyunsaturated fatty acids, are important signaling molecules known to regulate various biological processes including inflammation, pain and angiogenesis. The EpFAs are further metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to form fatty acid diols which are usually less-active. Pharmacological inhibitors of sEH that stabilize endogenous EpFAs are being considered for human clinical uses. Here we review the biology of ?-3 and ?-6 EpFAs on inflammation, pain, angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. PMID:24345640

  5. Alternative Sources of n-3 Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Marine Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Varela

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The main source of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA in human nutrition is currently seafood, especially oily fish. Nonetheless, due to cultural or individual preferences, convenience, geographic location, or awareness of risks associated to fatty fish consumption, the intake of fatty fish is far from supplying the recommended dietary levels. The end result observed in most western countries is not only a low supply of n-3 LC-PUFA, but also an unbalance towards the intake of n-6 fatty acids, resulting mostly from the consumption of vegetable oils. Awareness of the benefits of LC-PUFA in human health has led to the use of fish oils as food supplements. However, there is a need to explore alternatives sources of LC-PUFA, especially those of microbial origin. Microalgae species with potential to accumulate lipids in high amounts and to present elevated levels of n-3 LC-PUFA are known in marine phytoplankton. This review focuses on sources of n-3 LC-PUFA, namely eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, in marine microalgae, as alternatives to fish oils. Based on current literature, examples of marketed products and potentially new species for commercial exploitation are presented.

  6. Liver fatty acid composition in mice with or without nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is one of the most frequent causes of abnormal liver function. Because fatty acids can damage biological membranes, fatty acid accumulation in the liver may be partially responsible for the functional and morphological changes that are observed in nonalcoholic liver disease. The aim of this study was to use gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to evaluate the fatty acid composition of an experimental mouse model of NAFLD induced by high-fat feed and CCl4 and to assess the association between liver fatty acid accumulation and NAFLD. C57BL/6J mice were given high-fat feed for six consecutive weeks to develop experimental NAFLD. Meanwhile, these mice were given subcutaneous injections of a 40% CCl4-vegetable oil mixture twice per week. Results A pathological examination found that NAFLD had developed in the C57BL/6J mice. High-fat feed and CCl4 led to significant increases in C14:0, C16:0, C18:0 and C20:3 (P Conclusion These data are consistent with the hypothesis that fatty acids are deranged in mice with non-alcoholic fatty liver injury induced by high-fat feed and CCl4, which may be involved in its pathogenesis and/or progression via an unclear mechanism.

  7. Trans fatty acids in a range of UK processed foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Mark; Pinchen, Hannah; Church, Susan; Elahi, Selvarani; Walker, Margaret; Farron-Wilson, Melanie; Buttriss, Judith; Finglas, Paul

    2013-10-01

    A survey to determine the trans fatty acid content of a range of processed foods was carried out in response to recent reformulation work by the food industry to lower the artificial trans fatty acid content of processed products. Sixty two composite samples, made up of between 5 and 12 sub-samples, were collected in 2010 and were analysed for fatty acids, and a range of nutrients. The foods analysed included pizza, garlic bread, breakfast cereals, quiche, fat spreads, a range of fish and meat products, chips, savoury snacks, confectionery and ice cream. Levels of trans fatty acids were reduced considerably compared with previous UK analyses of similar foods where comparisons are possible. Concentrations of trans elaidic acid (t9-C18:1) from hydrogenated oils in all samples were <0.2g/100g food. These results confirm information provided by the food industry in 2007 on the levels of trans fats in key processed food sectors. PMID:23601386

  8. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ?tefan C. Vesa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents some general facts about omega-3 fatty acids and their role in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for the human body. Their beneficial effects in the prevention of cardiovascular disease have been known for decades. Since then, several epidemiological and interventional trials showed the value of omega-3 acids in the treatment of certain diseases. Most of them revealed the protective role of omega-3 fatty acids on heart and cardiac functions. However, some of these studies couldn?t demonstrate a positive association between fish oils and preventing cardiac events. The major cardiologic societies from European Union and United States of America recommend omega-3 fatty acids as supplements for primary and secondary prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Essential fatty acid deficiency in patients with severe fat malabsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle B; Christensen, Michael SØberg

    1997-01-01

    Essential fatty acid deficiency is commonly described in patients receiving parenteral nutrition, but the occurrence in patients with severe fat malabsorption not receiving parenteral nutrition is uncertain. One hundred twelve patients were grouped according to their degree of fat malabsorption: group 1, 50% (n = 15). Fecal fat was measured by the method of Van de Kamer the last 2 of 5 d of a 75-g fat diet. Serum fatty acids in the phospholipid fraction were measured by gas-liquid chromatography after separation by thin-layer chromatography and expressed as a percentage of total fatty acids. The concentration of linoleic acid in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 was 21.7%, 19.4%, 16.4%, and 13.4% respectively (P 25-50% of dietary fat intake and not treated with parenteral nutrition have biochemical signs of essential fatty acid deficiency. The clinical effect of these changes are yet to be elucidated.

  10. Effect of dietary fatty acids on the postprandial fatty acid composition of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins in healthy male subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bysted, Anette; Holmer, G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of trans-18: 1 isomers compared to other fatty acids, especially saturates, on the postprandial fatty acid composition of triacylglycerols ( TAG) in chylomicrons and VLDL. Design: A randomised crossover experiment where five interesterified test fats with equal amounts of palmitic acid ( P fat), stearic acid (S fat), trans-18: 1 isomers (T fat), oleic acid (O fat), or linoleic acid (L fat) were tested. Subjects: A total of 16 healthy, normolipidaemic males ( age 23 +/- 2 y) were recruited. Interventions: The participants ingested fat-rich test meals ( 1 g fat per kg body weight) and the fatty acid profiles of chylomicron and VLDL TAG were followed for 8 h. Results: The postprandial fatty acid composition of chylomicron TAG resembled that of the ingested fats. The fatty acids in chylomicron TAG were randomly distributed among the three positions in accordance with the distributions in test fats. Calculations of postprandial TAG concentrations from fatty acid data revealed increasing amounts up to 4 h but lower response curves (IAUC) for the two saturated fats in accordance with previous published data. The T fat gave results comparable to the O and L fats. The test fatty acids were much less reflected in VLDL TAG and there was no dietary influence on the response curves. Conclusions: The fatty acid composition in the test fats as well as the positional distributions of these were maintained in the chylomicrons. No specific clearing of chylomicron TAG was observed in relation to time. Sponsorship: Danish Research Development Program for Food Technology.

  11. Esterification of free fatty acids over chitosan with sulfonic acid groups

    OpenAIRE

    Caetano, Cs; Caiado, M.; Ramos, A.; Fonseca, I.; Vital, J.; Castanheiro, J.

    2013-01-01

    Chitosan, which is an abundant biopolymer, with sulfonic acid groups was used as an efficient, environmentally friendly heterogeneous catalyst for the esterification of free fatty acids with methanol into their more fatty acid methyl ester. Sulfonic acid catalysts supported on chitosan have been studied in the esterification of palmitic acid with methanol at 60 C. The sulfonic acid groups were introduced onto chitosan (CT) through cross-linking with sulfosuccinic acid (SSA). The catalytic...

  12. Specific fatty acids as metabolic modulators in the dairy cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.A. Pires

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent developments on the utilization of specific fatty acids to modulate bovine energy metabolism, with emphasis on the periparturient dairy cow. A number of experiments have assessed the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids on bovine hepatic energy metabolism using in vitro and in vivo models. Treatment of hepatocytes with specific fatty acids altered energy metabolism in vitro. For example, linolenic acid seemed to decrease hepatocyte triacylglycerol accumulation. This effect was confirmed in vivo, using parenteral infusions of emulsions derived from different fat sources to feed-restricted non-lactating cows. Additionally, polyunsaturated fatty acids can increase whole body response to insulin, potentially enhancing antilipolytic effects of insulin and muscle protein anabolism in the bovine. There is limited literature on the effects of feeding fat sources rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as fish oil and linseed oil, on metabolism of periparturient dairy cows. Available research has yielded conflicting results which need further clarification. On the other hand, specific isomers of conjugated linoleic acid consistently induce milk fat depression and are able to decrease energy export in milk by periparturient dairy cows. Nonetheless, research is still needed to assess whether these effects will ultimately benefit productivity and health status of periparturient dairy cows. Limitations of available methods to protect fatty acids from ruminal biohydrogenation are also addressed.

  13. Specific fatty acids as metabolic modulators in the dairy cow

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    J.A.A., Pires; R.R., Grummer.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent developments on the utilization of specific fatty acids to modulate bovine energy metabolism, with emphasis on the periparturient dairy cow. A number of experiments have assessed the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids on bovine hepatic energy metabolism using in vit [...] ro and in vivo models. Treatment of hepatocytes with specific fatty acids altered energy metabolism in vitro. For example, linolenic acid seemed to decrease hepatocyte triacylglycerol accumulation. This effect was confirmed in vivo, using parenteral infusions of emulsions derived from different fat sources to feed-restricted non-lactating cows. Additionally, polyunsaturated fatty acids can increase whole body response to insulin, potentially enhancing antilipolytic effects of insulin and muscle protein anabolism in the bovine. There is limited literature on the effects of feeding fat sources rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as fish oil and linseed oil, on metabolism of periparturient dairy cows. Available research has yielded conflicting results which need further clarification. On the other hand, specific isomers of conjugated linoleic acid consistently induce milk fat depression and are able to decrease energy export in milk by periparturient dairy cows. Nonetheless, research is still needed to assess whether these effects will ultimately benefit productivity and health status of periparturient dairy cows. Limitations of available methods to protect fatty acids from ruminal biohydrogenation are also addressed.

  14. Differential Roles of Unsaturated and Saturated Fatty Acids on Autophagy and Apoptosis in HepatocytesS?

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, Shuang; Ni, Hong-min; Manley, Sharon; Bockus, Abigail; Kassel, Karen M.; Luyendyk, James P.; Copple, Bryan L.; Ding, Wen-xing

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid-induced lipotoxicity plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic liver disease. Saturated fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids have differential effects on cell death and steatosis, but the mechanisms responsible for these differences are not known. Using cultured HepG2 cells and primary mouse hepatocytes, we found that unsaturated and saturated fatty acids differentially regulate autophagy and apoptosis. The unsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid, promoted the formati...

  15. Longissimus dorsi fatty acids composition of Bos indicus and Bos indicus x Bos taurus crossbred steers finished in pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prado Ivanor Nunes do

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out to evaluate the fatty acids composition of Longissimus dorsi muscle, with or without fat thickness, of Bos indicus and Bos indicus x Bos taurus crossbred steers finished in millet (Pennisetum americanum L. or star grass (Cynodon plectostachyus Pilger pasture systems with mineral or mineral protein supplementation. Neither the treatment nor the genetic group had effect on meat fatty acids composition. The cut had effect on meat fatty acid composition. The meat without fat thickness had 11% of PUFA, 43% of MUFA and 45% of SFA. The meat with fat thickness had 5% of PUFA, 44% of MUFA and 50% of SFA. PUFA/SFA ratio was 0.10 and 0.25 and n-6/n-3 ratio was 0.80 and 1.27 for cuts with and without fat thickness.

  16. Comparison of fatty acid content of fresh and frozen fillets of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Walbaum

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Celia, Chávez-Mendoza; José Arturo, García-Macías; Alma Delia, Alarcón-Rojo; Juan Ángel, Ortega-Gutiérrez; Celia, Holguín-Licón; Gabriela, Corral-Flores.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the percentage content of fatty acids (FA) of 54 rainbow trout fresh and frozen fillets. Frozen fillets were stored at -15ºC for 45 and 90 days. Saturated (SFA), monounsaturated (MUFA), polyunsaturated (PUFA), omega-6 (n-6) and omega-3 (n-3) fatty ac [...] ids were determined by gas chromatograph coupled to mass spectrometry. The results indicated that during frozen storage, SFA and MUFA content increased by 32.63 and 9.25%, respectively, while PUFA content decreased by 25.3%, n-6 by 12.4% and n-3 by 32.55%. These changes were more significant (P ? 0.05) during the first 45 d of storage. It was concluded that the frozen storage had a negative impact on meat quality of rainbow trout due to the reduction of PUFA, n-3/n-6, polyene index and PUFA/ SFA and the increase of the SFA, and atherogenic and thrombogenic indexes, which meant a substantial loss of nutritional value in the fillets of rainbow trout.

  17. Protective effect of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on myocardial resistance to ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeghichi-Hamri, Sabrina; de Lorgeril, Michel; Salen, Patricia; Chibane, Mohamed; de Leiris, Joël; Boucher, François; Laporte, François

    2010-12-01

    Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) reduce coronary heart disease (CHD) complications, such as chronic arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. Improved myocardial resistance to ischemia-reperfusion injury results in smaller myocardial infarction, which is a major factor in the occurrence of CHD complications. We hypothesized that a specific dietary fatty acid profile (low in saturated and n-6 PUFA but high in plant and marine n-3 PUFA) may improve myocardial resistance to ischemia-reperfusion injury and reduce infarct size. To test this assumption, we used a well-defined rat model of myocardial infarction. Based on our results, in comparison to a diet that is high in either saturated or n-6 PUFA but poor in plant and marine n-3 PUFA, a diet that is low in saturated fats and n-6 PUFA but rich in plant and marine n-3 PUFA results in smaller myocardial infarct size (P < .01). The effects of the 3 diets were also examined by analyzing the fatty acid composition of plasma, erythrocyte cell membranes, and the phospholipids of myocardial mitochondria. The results show a great accumulation of n-3 PUFA and a parallel decrease in arachidonic acid, the main n-6 PUFA, in plasma, cell membranes, and cardiac mitochondria (P < .0001). We conclude that improved myocardial resistance to ischemia-reperfusion may be one of the critical factors explaining the protective effects of dietary n-3 PUFA against CHD complications in humans. In addition to increasing n-3 PUFA intake, an optimal dietary pattern aimed at reducing cardiovascular mortality should include a reduction of the intake of both saturated and n-6 PUFA. PMID:21147368

  18. Relationship between sperm quality parameters and the fatty acid composition of the muscle, liver and testis of European eel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, R; Mazzeo, I; Vílchez, M C; Gallego, V; Peñaranda, D S; Pérez, L; Asturiano, J F

    2015-03-01

    This study looks at the correlations that fatty acids have with different tissues in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) during hormonally-induced sexual maturation, with different sperm quality parameters. In order to evaluate the different dynamics of the use of fatty acids, a categorization of the results from each sperm quality parameter (volume, concentration, motility and velocity) was performed. Low and moderate correlations were observed between muscle tissue and some sperm quality parameters but no high correlations were found. Eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n3, EPA) in the liver seems to have a role in determining the volume of sperm produced. This can be explained by the fact that EPA is a major requirement in the early phases of sperm production (probably as a component of the spermatozoal membrane). In addition, the levels of ?-linolenic acid (18:3-n3, ALA) and linoleic acid (18:2-n6, LA) in the liver decreased when sperm motility increased. In all the tissues, a negative correlation was observed between arachidonic acid (20:4n-6, ARA) and the different sperm velocity parameters. The fact that an increase in the consumption of ARA coincides with an increase in the speed of spermatozoa, highlights the important role that this fatty acid plays not only in sperm production, but also in sperm velocity. All this information could prove useful in the development of suitable broodstock diets to improve sperm quality and subsequently, the larval development of this species. PMID:25483240

  19. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Hanne; Tsai, Lin

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(lll)/O-2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(ll) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls, These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(ll) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed, In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts.

  20. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (?,?-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts.

  1. Lipophilic antioxidants and polyunsaturated fatty acids in lipoprotein classes: distribution and interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, V.H.; Weber, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the lipoprotein distribution of supplemented coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)), vitamin E, and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Design: Balanced three- period crossover study. Setting: University research unit. Subjects: Eighteen apparently healthy free-living non-smoking volunteers (nine women, nine men), mean age 26 +/- 3 y, recruited among the university students; no dropouts. Interventions: Three supplementation periods of 10 days: 100 m/day CoQ(10), 350 mg/day D-alpha -tocopherol, and 2g/day concentrated fish oil. Fasting venous blood samples were collected twice before the first period and then after each period. Plasma and isolated lipoproteins were analysed for cholesterol, triacylglycerol, alpha- and gamma -tocopherol, CoQ(10), and fatty acid composition. Results: Significant (P <0.05) increase in CoQ(10) and -tocopherol occurred in all lipoprotein classes after supplementation. CoQ(10) was primarily incorporated into low-density lipoprotein (LDL). alpha -tocopherol and fish oil n-3 PUFAs had similar patterns. They were equally distributed between LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), with a smaller part in VLDL. The total sum of PUFA was unchanged following all supplementations, but fish oil increased the amount of n-3 fatty acids at the expense of n-6 fatty acids. Conclusion: Lipoprotein distribution of CoQ(10) is markedly different from that of alpha -tocopherol, suggesting that they may be metabolised by distinct routes. alpha -Tocopherol is distributed similarly to n-3 fatty acids, thus providing protection on location for the oxidatively labile PUFAs.

  2. Omega-3 fatty acids in mood disorders: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review addresses the potential role of omega-3 fatty acids in mood disorders, from the biochemical rationale for their use to the growing body of data supporting their clinical efficacy.

  3. Fatty acid methyl esters production: chemical process variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Narváez Rincón

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of fatty acid methyl esters as basic oleochemicals over fatty acids, the seventies world energy crisis and the use of those oleochemicals as fuels, have increased research interest on fats and oils trans-esterification. In this document, a review about basic aspects, uses, process variables and problems associated to the production process of fatty acid methyl esters is presented. A global view of recent researches, most of them focused in finding a new catalyst with same activity as the alcohol-soluble hydroxides (NaOH, KOH, and suitable to be used in transforming fats and oils with high levels of free fatty acids and water avoiding separation problems and reducing process costs, is also discussed.

  4. Association between whole-blood polyunsaturated fatty acids in pregnant women and early fetal weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Katrine; Pedersen, L.

    2013-01-01

    Background/objectives:Studies suggest that intake of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) in pregnancy have an impact on birth weight, but only few have investigated the effect on early fetal growth. The objective of the study was to investigate the association between levels of PUFA in maternal blood in gestational week 24 and biometric measures and estimated fetal weight in gestational week 20.Subjects/methods:In the COPSAC cohort, whole-blood fatty acid composition (a biomarker of PUFA intake) from 583 women in week 24 was analyzed by gas chromatography. Biometric data (head circumference, abdominal circumference and femur length) were collected by ultra sound in week 20 and fetal weight was estimated. Associations between whole-blood PUFA (docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), total n-3 PUFA, n-6/n-3 PUFA, total n-6 PUFA) and fetal weight and biometrics measures were analyzed by multivariable-adjusted linear regression analyses. Results:There was a wide range in maternal blood DHA, which varied from 1.8 to 6.9% depending on socioeconomic status, smoking and body mass index. After adjusting for these variables, no association was observed between any of the assessed PUFA components and the circumference of head or abdomen or fetal weight. However, an inverse association was established between DHA and total n-3 PUFA and femur length (P

  5. Effect of maturation degree on fatty acid profile of different tissues in wild and farmed rohu (Labeo rohita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem, Shahid

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available During the breeding season, lots of physiological changes occur in the bodies of fish which lead to other phenotypical, anatomical and behavioral changes. To evaluate the impact of breeding on the bodily composition of fish, tests were conducted to determine the fatty acid profile of the brooder and Non-brooder wild and farmed fish. Samples were analyzed by gas liquid chromatography using a flame ionization detector.There are non significant differences in the amount of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in wild and farmed nonbrooder fish whereas in case of brooder there are significant differences. Brooder farmed fish contained more saturates in gonads approximately twice that of wild fish with C16:0 as the dominating fatty acid. C18:2n-6 and C20:5n-6 were the dominating unsaturated fatty acids in the gonads. Non-brooder fish contained more unsaturated fatty acids in the meat as compared to the brooder fish and farmed fish contained higher amounts of saturated fatty acids as compared to wild fish. C18:1n-9 and C20:4n-6 fatty acids were found in higher quantities and among the saturated acids, C16:0 is the dominating one. More or less similar results were found in the case of the liver fatty acid profile of breeding and nonbreeding fish. Fish of lower weight categories contained more unsaturated fatty acids and so better for consumption to leave the brooders of higher weight categories for the breeding of future generation.Durante la época de reproducción numerosos cambios fisiológicos ocurren en el cuerpo de los peces que guían a cambios anatómicos y de comportamiento. Para evaluar el impacto de la etapa de reproducción en la composición de los peces, ensayos para determinar el perfil de ácidos grasos fueron conducidos en peces salvajes y criados, en dos categorías de peso, maduro (booder o inmaduro (non-brooder. Las muestras fueron analizadas por cromatografía de gases usando un detector de ionización de llama. No hubo diferencias significativas en la cantidad de ácidos grasos saturados e insaturados en peces salvajes o criados non-brooder mientras que en el caso de los brooder sí hubo diferencias significativas. Los peces brooder criados contienen más ácidos grasos saturados; en gónadas aproximadamente el doble que los salvajes con el C16:0 como el ácido graso dominante. C18:2n-6 y C20:5n-6 fueron los ácidos grasos insaturados dominantes en las gónadas. Los peces non-brooder contienen más ácidos grasos insaturados en la carne que los peces brooder y los peces criados contienen mayores cantidades de ácidos grasos saturados en comparación con los peces salvajes. Los ácidos grasos C18:1n-9 y C20:4n-6 fueron encontrados en cantidades más altas y entres los saturados el C16:0 fue uno de los principales. Resultados más o menos similares fueron encontrados en el caso del perfil de ácidos grasos de hígados de peces en etapas de reproducción y no reproducción. Los peces de la categoría de pesos más bajos contienen más ácidos grasos insaturados y son mejores para el consumo y permite la cría de peces de peso más alto.

  6. Effects of heavy metals and light levels on the biosynthesis of carotenoids and fatty acids in the macroalgae Gracilaria tenuistipitata (var. liui Zhang & Xia)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ernani, Pinto; Ana Paula, Carvalho; Karina Helena Morais, Cardozo; Francisco Xavier, Malcata; Fabyana Maria dos, Anjos; Pio, Colepicolo.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We present here the effect of heavy metals and of different light intensities on the biosynthesis of fatty acids and pigments in the macroalga Gracilaria tenuistipitata (var. liui Zhang & Xia). In order to verify the fatty acid content, gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) was [...] employed. Pigments (major carotenoids and chlorophyl-a) were monitored by liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Cultures of G. tenuistipitata were exposed to cadmium (Cd2+, 200 ppb) and copper (Cu2+, 200 ppb), as well as to different light conditions (low light: 100 µmol.photons.m-2.s-1, or high light: 1000 µmol.photons.m-2.s-1). Cd2+ and Cu2+ increased the saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid content [14:0, 16:0, 18:0, 18:1 (n-7) and 18:1 (n-9)] and all major pigments (violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, chlorophyll-a and ?-carotene). Both heavy metals decreased the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) [18:2 (n-6), 18:3 (n-6), 18:5 (n-4), 20:4 (n-6), 20:5 (n-3), 22:6 (n-3)]. G. tenuistipitata cultures were exposed to high light intensity for five days and no statistically significant differences were observed in the content of fatty acids. On the other hand, the levels of pigments rose markedly for chlorophyll-a and all of the carotenoids studied.

  7. Effects of heavy metals and light levels on the biosynthesis of carotenoids and fatty acids in the macroalgae Gracilaria tenuistipitata (var. liui Zhang & Xia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernani Pinto

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We present here the effect of heavy metals and of different light intensities on the biosynthesis of fatty acids and pigments in the macroalga Gracilaria tenuistipitata (var. liui Zhang & Xia. In order to verify the fatty acid content, gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID was employed. Pigments (major carotenoids and chlorophyl-a were monitored by liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD. Cultures of G. tenuistipitata were exposed to cadmium (Cd2+, 200 ppb and copper (Cu2+, 200 ppb, as well as to different light conditions (low light: 100 µmol.photons.m-2.s-1, or high light: 1000 µmol.photons.m-2.s-1. Cd2+ and Cu2+ increased the saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid content [14:0, 16:0, 18:0, 18:1 (n-7 and 18:1 (n-9] and all major pigments (violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, chlorophyll-a and ?-carotene. Both heavy metals decreased the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA [18:2 (n-6, 18:3 (n-6, 18:5 (n-4, 20:4 (n-6, 20:5 (n-3, 22:6 (n-3]. G. tenuistipitata cultures were exposed to high light intensity for five days and no statistically significant differences were observed in the content of fatty acids. On the other hand, the levels of pigments rose markedly for chlorophyll-a and all of the carotenoids studied.

  8. Fatty acid profile of plasma, muscle and adipose tissues in Chilota lambs grazing on two different low quality pasture types in Chiloé Archipelago (Chile).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Maria A; Dannenberger, Dirk; Rivero, Jordana; Pulido, Ruben; Nuernberg, Karin

    2014-11-01

    There is no information about the effect of different pasture types on tissue fatty acid profiles of a native rustic lamb breed of the Chiloe Archipelago, the Chilota. Eight Chilota lambs were grazed on a 'Calafatal' pasture (CP), a typical secondary succession of Chiloé Archipelago (Chile) and eight Chilota lambs were located to graze on naturalized pasture (NP) of Chiloé. Botanical, chemical and lipid composition of the two types of pastures and of different lamb tissues (muscle, subcutaneous - and tail adipose tissues) and plasma were performed. Both pasture types induced high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and CLAcis-9,trans-11 proportions in Chilota meat. Thus, in muscle, Chilota lambs grazing CP showed higher sum PUFA, sum n-6 PUFA proportion and n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio compared with Chilota lambs grazing NP. In tail fats of Chilota lambs grazing CP significantly higher proportions of 18:3n-3, sum saturated fatty acids, sum PUFA, n-3 and n-6 PUFA were detected compared with Chilota lambs grazing NP. Feeding of different pasture types (CP?vs.?NP) caused significant differences in fatty acid composition of muscle and the two fat depots in Chilota lambs, but also point to tissue-specific responses of de novo synthesized fatty acid deposition in the tissues. PMID:24964067

  9. Trans fatty acids and coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyne R Benatar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Jocelyne R BenatarGreen Lane Cardiovascular Service, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New ZealandAbstract: There has been a significant increased consumption of trans fats in the developed world as we have embraced processed and take away foods in our diet in the last 40 years. These fatty acids are not essential for human nutrition and are hazardous to health. They increase the risk of cardiovascular disease more than any other macronutrient including saturated fat, through multiple mechanisms including adverse effects on lipids, endothelial function and inflammation. They are readily incorporated into cell structures such as cell membranes and the Golgi apparatus, resulting in unintended effects on multiple biological pathways. The majority of trans fats in our diet are artificially manufactured by a process of partial hydrogenation of vegetable oil with little coming from natural sources. It should be possible to replace these harmful fats in the food chain at source with concerted efforts from food manufacturers and legislators.Keywords: trans fats, coronary artery disease, hydrogenated vegetable oils

  10. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Analysis of Nitro-Fatty Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Bonacci, Gustavo; Asciutto, Eliana K.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in increased amounts during inflammation by nitric oxide and nitrite-dependent redox reactions. A more rigorous characterization of endogenously-generated species requires additional understanding of their gas-phase induced fragmentation. Thus, collision induced dissociation (CID) of nitroalkane and nitroalkene groups in fatty acids were studied in the negative ion mode to provide mass spectrometric tools for their structural char...

  11. Fatty Acid Synthase Modulates Homeostatic Responses to Myocardial Stress*

    OpenAIRE

    Razani, Babak; Zhang, Haixia; Schulze, P. Christian; Schilling, Joel D.; Verbsky, John; Lodhi, Irfan J.; Topkara, Veli K; Feng, Chu; Coleman, Trey; Kovacs, Attila; Kelly, Daniel P.; Saffitz, Jeffrey E.; Dorn, Gerald W., II; Nichols, Colin G.; Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) promotes energy storage through de novo lipogenesis and participates in signaling by the nuclear receptor PPAR? in noncardiac tissues. To determine if de novo lipogenesis is relevant to cardiac physiology, we generated and characterized FAS knockout in the myocardium (FASKard) mice. FASKard mice develop normally, manifest normal resting heart function, and have normal cardiac PPAR? signaling as well as fatty acid oxidation. However, they decompensate with stress. M...

  12. A novel SPME fibre for fatty acid determination

    OpenAIRE

    Panavait?, Dalia; Adomavi?i?t?, Edita; Vi?ka?kait?, Vida

    2006-01-01

    A novel solid phase microextraction fibre consisting of a sorbent Xiks-1 fixed on a stainless steel support is presented for the extraction of fatty acid derivatives. The sorbent is incorporated into a slot. The sorbent particles do not contact with the outer needle and thus the mechanical damage of the coating is avoided. Fatty acids were derivatized using ethyl chloroformate. The effects of extraction and desorption parameters including the extraction and desorption time, desorption tempera...

  13. Recent trends in the advanced analysis of bioactive fatty acids

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Reglero, Guillermo; Ibáñez, Elena

    2010-01-01

    The consumption of dietary fats have been long associated to chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cancer, arthritis, asthma, and cardiovascular disease; although some controversy still exists in the role of dietary fats in human health, certain fats have demonstrated their positive effect in the modulation of abnormal fatty acid and eicosanoid metabolism, both of them associated to chronic diseases. Among the different fats, some fatty acids can be used as functional ingredients such a...

  14. Comparison of fatty acid composition in conventional and organic milk

    OpenAIRE

    Anka Popovi? Vranješ; Milan Krajinovi?; Jelena Kecman; Snežana Trivunovi?; Radovan Pejanovi?; Goran Krajinovi?; Gordana Ma?ak

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the scientific research was to establish the differences between fatty acid composition in conventional milk and milk produced according to the organic production principles. In the period between February and December in 2009, the samples of raw conventional milk were analysed using the gas chromographic method to determine the fatty acid composition. Conventional milk was produced at the farm with around 700 dairy cows of Holstein breed. The farm is located in the Vrbas municipa...

  15. Microbial production of fatty acid-derived fuels and chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Lennen, Rebecca; Pfleger, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid metabolism is an attractive route to produce liquid transportation fuels and commodity oleochemicals from renewable feedstocks. Recently, genes and enzymes, which comprise metabolic pathways for producing fatty acid-derived compounds (e.g. esters, alkanes, olefins, ketones, alcohols, polyesters) have been elucidated and used in engineered microbial hosts. The resulting strains often generate products at low percentages of maximum theoretical yields, leaving significant room for met...

  16. Oxidized Fatty Acids as Inter-Kingdom Signaling Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Pohl, Carolina H.; Kock, Johan L. F.

    2014-01-01

    Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to “listen” and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plan...

  17. Fatty acid synthase and liver triglyceride metabolism: housekeeper or messenger?

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen-urstad, Anne P. L.; Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) catalyzes the de novo synthesis of fatty acids. In the liver, FAS has long been categorized as a housekeeping protein, producing fat for storage of energy when nutrients are present in excess. Most previous studies of FAS regulation have focused on the control of gene expression. However, recent findings suggest that hepatic FAS may also be involved in signaling processes that include activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?). Moreover, rep...

  18. Effect of Wood Constituents Oxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Salehi Movahed, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the mechanisms of free radicals in a model system between fatty acids oxidation process and wood components. The aim is to create a better understanding of new environmentally friendly materials for exterior wood protection. The drying mechanisms of the unsaturated fatty acids with wood model system in the real time were monitored by using RT-IR. This method together with SEC and NMR are enormously powerful spectroscopy techniques to determine the physical and chemical prop...

  19. Proximate Composition and Fatty Acids Profile in Oleaginous Seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Claudia Rodrigues; Aloísio Henrique Pereira de Souza; Makoto Matsushita; Lucia Felicidade Dias; Jesui Vergílio Visentainer; Shawany Maldonado Tonsig; Nilson Evelazio Souza

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids were quantified in oleaginous seeds: pistachio, almonds, European nuts, cashew nuts, hazelnuts, Brazil nuts, pecan nuts, and macadamia nuts. Three brands of each sample were purchased in three lots (n = 9). The proximate composition, energetic value, and fatty acids (FA) were determined by gas chromatography. All seeds had large amounts of total lipids and the highest contents (ca. 70%) were found in macadamia, pecan, and European nuts. The samples had significant amounts of crude...

  20. Arachidonic acid has a dominant effect to regulate lipogenic genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes compared to omega-3 fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Vaidya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effects of long-chain n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA on the regulation of adipocytes metabolism are well known. These fatty acids are generally consumed together in our diets; however, the metabolic regulation of adipocytes in the presence of these fatty acids when given together is not known. Objective: To investigate the effects of n-3 PUFA and arachidonic acid (AA, an n-6 PUFA, on the regulation of adipogenic and lipogenic genes in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Methods: 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated in the presence or absence of 100 µM of eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA; docosahexaenoic acid, DHA; docosapentaenoic acid, DPA and AA, either alone or AA+n-3 PUFA; control cells received bovine serum albumin alone. The mRNA expression of adipogenic and lipogenic genes was measured. The fatty acid composition of adipocytes was analyzed using gas chromatography. Results: Individual n-3 PUFA or AA had no effect on the mRNA expression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-?; however, AA+EPA and AA+DPA significantly increased (P<0.05 the expression compared to control cells (38 and 42%, respectively. AA and AA+EPA increased the mRNA expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (P<0.05. AA treatment decreased the mRNA expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD1 (P<0.01, while n-3 PUFA, except EPA, had no effect compared to control cells. AA+DHA and AA+DPA inhibited SCD1 gene expression (P<0.05 suggesting a dominant effect of AA. Fatty acids analysis of adipocytes revealed a higher accretion of AA compared to n-3 PUFA. Conclusions: Our findings reveal that AA has a dominant effect on the regulation of lipogenic genes in adipocytes.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Fatty Acid Desaturases in Cyanobacterial Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanzhi Lin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid desaturases are enzymes that introduce double bonds into the hydrocarbon chains of fatty acids. The fatty acid desaturases from 37 cyanobacterial genomes were identified and classified based upon their conserved histidine-rich motifs and phylogenetic analysis, which help to determine the amounts and distributions of desaturases in cyanobacterial species. The filamentous or N2-fixing cyanobacteria usually possess more types of fatty acid desaturases than that of unicellular species. The pathway of acyl-lipid desaturation for unicellular marine cyanobacteria Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus differs from that of other cyanobacteria, indicating different phylogenetic histories of the two genera from other cyanobacteria isolated from freshwater, soil, or symbiont. Strain Gloeobacter violaceus PCC 7421 was isolated from calcareous rock and lacks thylakoid membranes. The types and amounts of desaturases of this strain are distinct to those of other cyanobacteria, reflecting the earliest divergence of it from the cyanobacterial line. Three thermophilic unicellular strains, Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 and two Synechococcus Yellowstone species, lack highly unsaturated fatty acids in lipids and contain only one Δ9 desaturase in contrast with mesophilic strains, which is probably due to their thermic habitats. Thus, the amounts and types of fatty acid desaturases are various among different cyanobacterial species, which may result from the adaption to environments in evolution.

  2. A method for measuring fatty acid oxidation in C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elle, Ida Coordt; RØdkær, Steven Vestergaard

    2012-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans has during the past decade proven to be a valuable model organism to identify and examine molecular mechanisms regulating lipid storage and metabolism. While the primary approach has been to identify genes and pathways conferring alterations in lipid accumulation, only a few recent studies have recognized the central role of fatty acid degradation in cellular lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we show how complete oxidation of fatty acids can be determined in live C. elegans by examining oxidation of tritium-labeled fatty acids to tritiated H2O that can be measured by scintillation counting. Treating animals with sodium azide, an inhibitor of the electron transport chain, reduced 3H2O production to approximately 15%, while boiling of animals prior to assay completely blocked the production of labeled water. We demonstrate that worms fed different bacterial strains exhibit different fatty acid oxidation rates. We show that starvation results in increased fatty acid oxidation, which is independent of the transcription factor NHR-49. On the contrary, fatty acid oxidation is reduced to approximately 70% in animals lacking the worm homolog of the insulin receptor, DAF-2. Hence, the present methodology can be used to delineate the role of specific genes and pathways in the regulation of ?-oxidation in C. elegans.

  3. Improved zeolite regeneration processes for preparing saturated branched-chain fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrierite zeolite solid is an excellent catalyst for the skeletal isomerization of unsaturated linear-chain fatty acids (i.e., oleic acid) to unsaturated branched-chain fatty acids (i.e., iso-oleic acid) follow by hydrogenation to give saturated branched-chain fatty acids (i.e., isostearic acid). ...

  4. Omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention and survivorship

    OpenAIRE

    Fabian, Carol J.; Kimler, Bruce F.; Hursting, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Women with evidence of high intake ratios of the marine omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) relative to the omega-6 arachidonic acid have been found to have a reduced risk of breast cancer compared with those with low ratios in some but not all case–control and cohort studies. If increasing EPA and DHA relative to arachidonic acid is effective in reducing breast cancer risk, likely mechanisms include reduction in proinflammatory lipid derivatives, in...

  5. Changes in Oil Fatty Acid Composition During Seed Development of Sunflower

    OpenAIRE

    Onemli, F.

    2012-01-01

    Quality of vegetable oils is associated with fatty acid composition. A field study was conducted to determine accumulation of oil and fatty acids of traditional sunflower hybrid during seed development. Seeds were harvested at six times from R6 (reproductive growth stage) to over ripe of seeds. Oil content and thirteen fatty acids were identified as percentage of total fatty acids. As the results, the fatty acid composition and content of oil in crop species were monitored during seed d...

  6. Nonoxidative ethanol metabolism: formation of fatty acid ethyl esters by cholesterol esterase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, L G

    1982-01-01

    The recent identification of myocardial metabolites of ethanol--fatty acid ethyl esters--suggests that some of the pathophysiological derangements associated with alcohol-induced heart muscle disease may be a consequence of products of myocardial ethanol metabolism. The donor of the fatty acid moiety in the formation of fatty acid ethyl esters has been identified as nonesterified fatty acid. Fatty acid esterification with ethanol is shown to be mediated by cholesterol esterase (sterol-ester a...

  7. Effect of previous ascorbic acid treatment on the fatty acid profile of cobia (Rachycentron canadum fillets during frozen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftabsavar, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present research focuses on the nutritional value of the lipid retention associated with frozen cobia (Rachycentron canadum. The effect of a previous soaking in an aqueous ascorbic acid (AA solution on the fatty acid profile of fish fillets during a further frozen storage period (–18 °C was investigated. Two different AA concentrations were tested (0.25% and 0.50% and compared to control conditions. As a result of the frozen storage period (up to 6 months, marked decreases were found in the contents of fatty acid groups such as monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and n-3 polyunsaturated, as well as in the n-3/n-6 ratio. However, a preserving effect on such fatty acid parameters could be observed resulting from the previous AA treatment, which was greater when applying the 0.50% AA concentration. Assessment of the polyene index indicated an increased lipid oxidation development during the frozen storage time; this increase was partially inhibited by the previous AA soaking.Este estudio se centra en el valor nutricional lipídico de cobia (Rachycentron canadum congelada. Para ello, se investiga el efecto que un tratamiento previo con ácido ascórbico (AA puede tener sobre el perfil de ácidos grasos de filete de pescado durante su conservación en congelación (–18 °C; seis meses. Se aplicaron dos concentraciones de AA (0.25% y 0.50% que fueron comparadas con muestras control. Como resultado de la conservación en congelación, se observó un descenso importante en grupos de ácidos grasos monoinsaturados, poliinsaturados y poliinsaturados de las serie n-3, así como en la relación n-3/n-6. Sin embargo, el tratamiento previo con AA produjo un efecto protector en estos parámetros, siendo mayor al aplicar AA en la concentración superior. La medida del índice de polienos reflejó un incremento de la oxidación lipídica durante la conservación en congelación; este incremento fue parcialmente inhibido como resultado del tratamiento previo con AA.

  8. Effect of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on muscle fatty acid composition in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakr, Abdelrahim; Alimon, Abdul Razak; Yaakub, Halimatun; Abdullah, Norhani; Ivan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effects of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on different muscle fatty acid profiles in goats. Thirty-two Cacang × Boer goats were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments: (1) control diet (CD), (2) 80% decanter cake diet (DCD), (3) 80% palm kernel cake diet (PKCD) and (4) CD plus 5% palm oil (PO) supplemented diet (CPOD). After 100 days of feeding, four goats from each group were slaughtered and longissimus dorsi (LD), infraspinatus (IS) and biceps femoris (BF) were sampled for analysis of fatty acids. Goats fed the PKCD had higher (Plauric acid (C12:0) than those fed the other diets in all the muscles tested. Compared to the other diets, the concentrations of palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0) were lower (Pacid (C18:2 n-6) was higher (Pacid profile of their meat. PMID:25789610

  9. Identification of bifunctional ?12/?3 fatty acid desaturases for improving the ratio of ?3 to ?6 fatty acids in microbes and plants

    OpenAIRE

    Damude, Howard G.; Zhang, Hongxiang; Farrall, Leonard; Ripp, Kevin G.; Tomb, Jean-francois; Hollerbach, Dieter; Yadav, Narendra S.

    2006-01-01

    We report the identification of bifunctional ?12/?3 desaturases from Fusarium moniliforme, Fusarium graminearum, and Magnaporthe grisea. The bifunctional activity of these desaturases distinguishes them from all known ?12 or ?3 fatty acid desaturases. The ?3 desaturase activity of these enzymes also shows a broad ?6 fatty acid substrate specificity by their ability to convert linoleic acid (LA), ?-linolenic acid, di-homo-?-linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid to the ?3 fatty acids, ?...

  10. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid supplemented to an essential fatty acid-deficient diet alters the response to endotoxin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Pei-Ra; Malkan, Alpin; Le, Hau D; Puder, Mark; Bistrian, Bruce R

    2012-03-01

    This study examined fatty acid profiles, triene-tetraene ratios (20:3n9/20:4n6), and nutritional and inflammatory markers in rats fed an essential fatty acid-deficient (EFAD) diet provided as 2% hydrogenated coconut oil (HCO) alone for 2 weeks or with 1.3 mg of arachidonic acid (AA) and 3.3 mg of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (AA + DHA) added to achieve 2% fat. Healthy controls were fed an AIN 93M diet (AIN) with 2% soybean oil. The HCO and AA + DHA diets led to significant reductions of linoleic acid, ?-linolenic acid, and AA (20:4n6) and increases in Mead acid (20:3n9) in plasma and liver compared with the AIN diet; but the triene-tetraene levels remained well within normal. However, levels of 20:3n9 and 20:4n6 were lower in liver phospholipids in the AA + DHA than in HCO group, suggesting reduced elongation and desaturation in ?-9 and -6 pathways. The AA + DHA group also had significantly lower levels of 18:1n9 and 16:1n7 as well as 18:1n9/18:0 and 16:1n7/16:0 than the HCO group, suggesting inhibition of stearyl-Co A desaturase-1 activity. In response to lipopolysaccharide, the levels of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 were significantly lower with HCO, reflecting reduced inflammation. The AA + DHA group had higher levels of IL-6 and C-reactive protein than the HCO group but significantly lower than the AIN group. However, in response to endotoxin, interleukin-6 was higher with AA + DHA than with AIN. Feeding an EFAD diet reduces baseline inflammation and inflammatory response to endotoxin long before the development of EFAD, and added AA + DHA modifies this response. PMID:21944266

  11. Fatty acids in six small pelagic fish species and their crustacean prey from the mindanao sea, southern Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metillo, Ephrime Bicoy; Aspiras-Eya, Anna Arlene

    2014-08-01

    Fatty acids are important in human health and useful in the analysis of the marine food web, however information on tropical pelagic organisms is scarce. Six zooplanktivorous small pelagic fish species (Decapterus kurroides, Decapterus macarellus, Selar crumenophthalmus, Sardinella lemuru, Spratilloides gracilis and Stolephorus insularis) and four of their zooplanktonic crustacean prey [three sergestoid species (Acetes erythraeus, Acetes intermedius and Lucifer penicillifer) and one calanoid copepod (Acartia erythraea)] were collected from the Mindanao Sea, and their fatty acids were profiled. The resulting profiles revealed 17 fatty acids that were specific to certain species and 9 {myristic acid [C14:0], palmitic acid [C16:0], stearic acid [C18:0]; palmitoleic acid [C16:1], oleic acid [C18:1n9c], linoleic acid [C18:2n6c], linolenic acid [C18:3n3], eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) [C20:5n3] and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) [C22:6n3]} that were common to all species. Cluster analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) of fatty acids indicate a high similarity in profiles in all species, but separate fish and zooplankton clusters were obtained. Mackerel species (D. macarellus, D. kurroides and S. crumenophthalmus) had concentrations of total n-3 fatty acids that match those of their Acetes prey. The copepod A. erythraea and the sergestoid L. penicillifer exhibited the lowest values of the EPA:DHA ratio, which was most likely due to their phytoplanktivorous feeding habits, but the occurrence of the highest values of the ratio in Acetes suggests the inclusion of plant detritus in their diet. DHA values appear to affirm the trophic link among copepod, Lucifer, Acetes and mackerel species. PMID:25210591

  12. Monounsaturated fatty acids generated via stearoyl CoA desaturase-1 are endogenous inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jie; Cinar, Resat; Xiong, Keming; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Jourdan, Tony; Lin, Yuhong; Ntambi, James M.; Kunos, George

    2013-01-01

    High-fat diet–induced obesity (DIO) increases the activity of endocannabinoids, the body’s own marijuana-like substances. Endocannabinoids activate CB1 receptors in the liver to cause insulin resistance and promote the synthesis of lipids by inducing stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), the enzyme responsible for generating monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs). Here we show that endogenous, but not diet-derived, MUFAs act as potent inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase, the enzyme that deg...

  13. Effect of dietary fat source on fatty acid profile and lipid oxidation of eggs

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    E.J., King; A., Hugo; F.H., de Witt; H.J., van der Merwe; M.D., Fair.

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of supplementary dietary lipid sources on the fatty acid profile and lipid oxidation of eggs. Five isoenergetic (12.6 MJ AME/kg DM) and isonitrogenous (170 g CP/kg DM) diets were formulated, using a control diet (50 : 50 blend of fish- and linseed oil), fish oil, [...] sunflower oil, high oleic acid (HO) sunflower oil and tallow at a 30 g/kg inclusion level. Two hundred individually caged HyLine Silver-Brown hens (20 weeks of age) were randomly allocated to the five dietary treatments (n = 40 hens/treatment). Birds received the experimental diets from 20 weeks of age. At 30 weeks of age, 12 eggs per treatment were randomly selected for analyses of egg yolk fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and peroxide values (PV). Dietary lipid sources affected FAME, TBARS and PV of egg yolk significantly. The fish oil treatment resulted in the highest TBARS (0.27 mg malonaldehyde/kg yolk) and PV (3.96 milli-equivalent peroxide/kg fat) whereas the HO sunflower oil resulted in the lowest TBARS (0.13 mg malonaldehyde/kg yolk) and PV (2.77 milli-equivalent peroxide/kg fat). Fish oil also resulted in the lowest n-6 to n-3 ratio (1.16 to 1), while sunflower oil resulted in the highest ratio (24.6 to 1). Results indicate that the fatty acid profile of eggs could be altered by means of dietary intervention. However, an improvement of omega-3 type fatty acids of eggs will result in a higher susceptibility to lipid oxidation and possibly a shorter shelf-life of stored eggs.

  14. Tailored fatty acid synthesis via dynamic control of fatty acid elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torella, Joseph P; Ford, Tyler J; Kim, Scott N; Chen, Amanda M; Way, Jeffrey C; Silver, Pamela A

    2013-07-01

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs, 4-12 carbons) are valuable as precursors to industrial chemicals and biofuels, but are not canonical products of microbial fatty acid synthesis. We engineered microbial production of the full range of even- and odd-chain-length MCFAs and found that MCFA production is limited by rapid, irreversible elongation of their acyl-ACP precursors. To address this limitation, we programmed an essential ketoacyl synthase to degrade in response to a chemical inducer, thereby slowing acyl-ACP elongation and redirecting flux from phospholipid synthesis to MCFA production. Our results show that induced protein degradation can be used to dynamically alter metabolic flux, and thereby increase the yield of a desired compound. The strategy reported herein should be widely useful in a range of metabolic engineering applications in which essential enzymes divert flux away from a desired product, as well as in the production of polyketides, bioplastics, and other recursively synthesized hydrocarbons for which chain-length control is desired. PMID:23798438

  15. Effect of impaired fatty acid oxidation on myocardial kinetics of 11C- and 123I-labelled fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography with palmitate 11C and single photon imaging with terminally radioiodinated fatty acid analogues (FFA 123I) were evaluated for the noninvasive assessment of regional myocardial fatty acid metabolism during ischaemia. Decreased uptake of tracer and delayed clearance of activity in the ischaemic myocardium were reported for both 11C- and 123I-labelled compounds. However, since during ischaemia both myocardial blood flow and oxidative metabolism are reduced concomitantly, either factor can be responsible for the changes observed. Experimental preparations in which fatty acid metabolism can be modified independently of flow are helpful for the characterization of the relationship between metabolism and myocardial kinetics of labelled fatty acids. Results obtained during flow-independent inhibition of fatty acid oxidation include the following observations: - In dogs with controlled coronary perfusion the rate of clearance of palmitate 11C-activity is decreased during diminished delivery of oxygen, regardless of whether myocardial perfusion is concomitantly reduced or not. - In isolated rabbit hearts perfused at normal flow, the extraction of FFA 123I is decreased during hypoxia. - During pharmacological inhibition of fatty acid oxidation the deiodination of FFA 123I is markedly reduced in rat hearts in vivo and in vitro. (orig.).)

  16. Effect of exogenous fatty acids on biotin deprived death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of exogeneous fatty acids on cell growth and death of the biotin-requiring yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae BA-1 was examined with respect to the mechanism of synthetic pathway of fatty acid under biotin starvation. At a growth temperature of 300C, exogeneous unsaturated fatty acids, such as palmitoleic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids which promote the cell growth and suppress death effectively, were incorporated intactly into the cellular fatty acids, whereas the saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid, which supports growth but some what inhibits death, was once incorporated, and about 60% of incorporated palmitic acid was found to be desaturated. However, at an elevated temperature of 360C, even palmitic acid showed similar effects to unsaturated fatty acids in cell growth and death; following by an increased desaturation of palmitic acid. Thus the data indicate that palmitic aicd, as well as unsaturated fatty acids directly compensate for the deficiency of endogenously synthesized fatty acids caused by biotin starvation. (auth.)

  17. Amino acids and fatty acids profile of chia (Salvia hispanica L. and flax (Linum usitatissimum L. seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So?a Nitrayová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The seeds of most plants are rich in various nutrients and can provide a lot of useful health benefits. The objective of this study was to determine and compare differences in fat, fatty acids, crude protein and amino acids concentrations for chia and flax seeds. Study was carried out using brown and gold seeds of Flax (Linum usitatissimum L. and Chia (Salvia hispanica L.. The mean protein content in tested seeds ranged from 211.8 to 252.5 g/kg dry matter and in chia seed was about 13.10% higher than the average value of crude protein content in brown and gold flax seed (223.25 g/kg dry matter. Differences in the content of individual amino acids among the seeds were not statistically significant (P <0.05, except that for glutamic acid. Percentage of the essential to the total amino acids, which is considered as indicator of protein quality, was 37.87%, 33.76% and 35.18%, for chia, brown and gold flax seed respectively, which demonstrates the high quality of these proteins. The average fat content of flax seeds was about 71.42 g/kg higher than that in chia seed (321.37 g/kg dry matter. The fatty acids composition showed the presence of palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, ?- linolenic and arachidic fatty acids in all tested samples. The ?-linolenic acid constitutes on average 54.38% of the total fatty acids of flax seeds and 63.79% of chia seed, and for linoleic acid it was 15.30% and 18.89%. All seeds had low n-6 PUFA / n-3 PUFA ratio. Results of our study confirmed the excellent quality of protein and fat in chia seed, brown and gold flax seed samples. There was no significant effect of the flax seed coat colour for all measured values. Chia seed is the richest of n-3 PUFA ?-linolenic fatty acid in the vegetable world. Both, flax seed and chia seed are the good choice of healthy food to maintain a balanced serum lipid profile. It must be pointed that flax seeds must be ground to release their nutrients, but chia seeds do not.

  18. Fatty acid composition of lipid classes of basella rubra linn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seed oil of Basella rubra Linn was classified by thin layer chromatography into neutral lipids (96.1%) and polar lipids (3.9%). The neutral lipids identified were hydrocarbons (2.7%), sterol esters (3.9%), triacylglycerols (59.6%), free fatty acids (4.5%), I,3-diacylglycerols (8.7%), 1,2-diacylglycerols (6.8%), sterols (2.5%) and mono acylglycerols (7.4%). The polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamines (1.3%), phosphatidylcholines (1.4%) and lysophosphatidylethanolamines (1.2%). The fatty acid range was from C/sub 16:0/ - C/sub 18:3/ showing higher percentage of unsaturated acids. The major fatty acids were palimtic, stearic, oleic and linoleic acids. (author)

  19. Essential Fatty Acid Assimilation and Synthesis in Larvae of the Bivalve Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Fiz; Robert, René; Quéré, Claudie; Wikfors, Gary H; Soudant, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA) are important for bivalve larval survival and growth. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess for the first time through a mass-balance approach dietary EFA incorporation and synthesis within Crassostrea gigas larvae. A first experiment was carried out using two microalgae, Tisochrysis lutea (T) and Chaetoceros neogracile (Cg), as mono- and bi-specific diets. A second experiment using a similar design was performed to confirm and extend the results obtained in the first. Flow-through larval rearing was used for accurate control of food supply and measurement of ingestion. Non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids were synthetized from precursors supplied in the diet: 16:1n-7 and 18:1n-9, mediated by ?5 desaturase. Moreover, this ?5 desaturase presumably allowed larvae to convert 20:3n-6 and 20:4n-3 to 20:4n-6 and 20:5n-3, respectively, when the product EFA were poorly or not supplied in the diet, as when larvae were fed T exclusively. Under our experimental conditions, none of the diets induced 22:6n-3 synthesis; however, 22:6n-3 incorporation into larval tissues occurred selectively under non-limiting dietary supply to maintain optimal levels in the larvae. This combination of flow-through larval rearing and biochemical analysis of FA levels could be applied to additional dietary experiments to precisely define optimal levels of EFA supply. PMID:25771891

  20. Effect of weight, sex and hunting period on fatty acid composition of intramuscular and subcutaneous fat from wild boar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Art?ras Šiukš?ius

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the influence of weight, sex and month of hunting on the fatty acid composition of intramuscular and subcutaneous fat from 49 free ranging wild boars hunted in Lithuania during the winter season. A total number of 27 and 25 fatty acids were identified in the intramuscular fat and subcutaneous tissue of wild boars, respectively. The weight of the wild boar had mainly affected only the levels of separate fatty acids both in the intramuscular and subcutaneous fat. Higher levels of saturated fatty acids (SFA were found in the intramuscular and subcutaneous fat of males compared with females. The effect of both weight and sex on the levels of fatty acids was higher in the subcutaneous fat than in the intramuscular fat. Weight, sex and hunting month had no effect on PUFA/SFA and n-6 PUFA/n-3 PUFA ratios in the intramuscular and subcutaneous fat. The atherogenic (AI and thrombogenic (TI indexes and hypocholesterolemic/hypercholesterolemic ratio in subcutaneous fat were more favorable in females compared with males and in the January hunting season than in November and December.

  1. Effect of cattle breed on meat quality, muscle fiber characteristics, lipid oxidation and Fatty acids in china.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiangxue; Meng, Qingxiang; Cui, Zhenliang; Ren, Liping

    2012-06-01

    The objective was to compare meat quality, muscle fiber characteristics, lipid oxidation and fatty acids of Limousin (LIM), Simmtental (SIM), Luxi (LX), Qinchuan (QC) and Jinnan (JN) offered the same diet in China. After finishing, eight bulls from each breed were randomly selected for slaughter at 18.5 months old. Longissimus dorsi (ld) muscle was taken from the carcass for meat quality evaluations. Breed had little effect on most of meat and fat color parameters except for Hue and b* in which QC had lower values. LIM showed higher pH (24 h) and better water holding capacity than other breeds. LIM showed the lowest dry matter content but the highest crude protein. LX and LIM had higher percentage and density of red muscle fiber than other breeds. Lipid oxidations were significantly lower in LIM than in QC, with the LX, SIM and JN having the intermediate values. Compared to other four breeds, QC provided the highest values of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), n-6 fatty acids and n-3 fatty acids. In conclusion, LIM scored better on most of meat quality characteristics; however, local breeds such as LX and QC also had better muscle fiber characteristics and better fatty acids composition. PMID:25049633

  2. Effect of Cattle Breed on Meat Quality, Muscle Fiber Characteristics, Lipid Oxidation and Fatty Acids in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiangxue; Meng, Qingxiang; Cui, Zhenliang; Ren, Liping

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to compare meat quality, muscle fiber characteristics, lipid oxidation and fatty acids of Limousin (LIM), Simmtental (SIM), Luxi (LX), Qinchuan (QC) and Jinnan (JN) offered the same diet in China. After finishing, eight bulls from each breed were randomly selected for slaughter at 18.5 months old. Longissimus dorsi (ld) muscle was taken from the carcass for meat quality evaluations. Breed had little effect on most of meat and fat color parameters except for Hue and b* in which QC had lower values. LIM showed higher pH (24 h) and better water holding capacity than other breeds. LIM showed the lowest dry matter content but the highest crude protein. LX and LIM had higher percentage and density of red muscle fiber than other breeds. Lipid oxidations were significantly lower in LIM than in QC, with the LX, SIM and JN having the intermediate values. Compared to other four breeds, QC provided the highest values of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), n-6 fatty acids and n-3 fatty acids. In conclusion, LIM scored better on most of meat quality characteristics; however, local breeds such as LX and QC also had better muscle fiber characteristics and better fatty acids composition. PMID:25049633

  3. The composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids in erythrocytes of lactating mothers and their infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØrgensen, M.H.; Nielsen, P.K.

    2006-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) in breastmilk, specifically docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are important for infant brain development. Accretion of DHA in the infant brain is dependent on DHA-status, intake and metabolism. The aim of this study was to describe changes in maternal and infant erythrocyte (RBC) DHA-status during the first four months of lactation. We examined 17 mothers and their term infants at 1, 2 and 4 months of age. Milk samples and RBC from the mothers and infants were obtained and analysed for fatty acid composition. Comparative analysis of the results showed that the content of DHA in maternal RBC-phosphatidylcholine (PE) decreased over the four month period and this was not accompanied by a decrease in DHA in infant RBC-PE (P = 0.005). The ratio of n-6 PUFA to n-3 PUFA increased over time in maternal RBC-PE, but not in infant RBC-PE (P <0.001). The level of 22:5n-6 and the ratio of LCPUFA to precursor PUFAs in infant RBC was higher than in maternal RBC phospholipids. (P = and P <0.001 respectively). We found a decrease in the level of LCPUFA in milk, specifically AA. However, we did not observe a significant decrease in milk DHA, which may have been due to two outliers. These results indicate better DHA-status and a higher n-3/n-6 PUFA in RBC of infants than in mothers. Whether these differences reflect preferential n-3 PUFA transfer via breastmilk or differences in PUFA-metabolism and utilization remains to be shown.

  4. Synthesis of sup(123m)Te labeled fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four sup(123m)Te labeled fatty acid analogues were synthesized: 17-tellura-9-octadecenoic acid, 17-tellura-9-nonadecenoic acid, 18-methyl-17-tellura-9-nonadecenoic acid and 3-tellura-nonadecanoic acid. Tellurium-123m metal was solubilized in water with NaBH4. The inorganic nucleophiles produced, NaHTe or Na2Te2 were reacted with 16-bromo-9-hexadecenoic acid in a one or two step procedure to produce the sodium alkyl telluride. To this was added either methyl iodide, ethyl bromide or isopropyl bromide and the resulting 17-tellura-fatty acids isolated and formulated. Tellurium-123m labeled 3-tellura-nonadecanoic acid was synthesized via the dihexadecanyl ditelluride or the sodium hexadecanyl telluride route. (author)

  5. Urinary prostaglandin E and vasopressin excretion in essential fatty acid-deficient rats : Effect of linolenic acid supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1983-01-01

    Three groups of weanling male rats were fed on a fat-free diet for 13 weeks. One group received only the fat-free diet (FF rats), the other 2 groups received the fat-free diet and a daily supplement of 2 energy% ethyl linoleate ([n-6] rats), or 2 energy% ethyl linolenate ([n-3] rats). Urinary excretion of prostaglandin E (PGE), immunoreactive arginine vasopressin (iA VP), and kallikrein were determined. PGE was quantitated with a radioimmunoassay having 4.9% cross-reactivity with prostaglandin E (PGE). After 4 weeks on the diet, water consumption and urinary iAVP excretion increased significantly in the FF rats and the (n-3) rats compared with the (n-6) rats. Urinary PGE excretion was the same for all 3 groups during the first 10 weeks; thereafter it decreased in FF rats and (n-3) rats compared with the (n-6) rats. There was no difference in urinary PGE excretion between the FF rats and the (n-3) rats, even though large differences were found in the percentage of arachidonic acid (20:4[n-6]), icosapentaenoic acid (20:5[n-3]), and icosatrienoic acid (20:3[n-9]) of total kidney fatty acids as well as of kidney phosphatidylinositol fatty acids. Fractionation of urine extracts on high performance liquid chromatography with radioimmunoassay detection indicated that (n-3) rats excreted very little PGE, if any. Urine output followed the same pattern, as did urinary PGE excretion. Urinary kallikrein was estimated at week 12 only. It was found to be significantly lower in FF rats and (n-3) rats. Increased water consumption and increased urinary iAVP excretion seem to be early symptoms (after 4 weeks) of EFA deficiency, whereas decreased urine output and decreased urinary PGE excretion occur much later (after 10 weeks). Two energy% linolenate supplementation to a fat-free diet did not change the appearance of any of the measured EFA-deficiency symptoms except for a slightly improved growth rate. There was no evidence of a significant urinary PGE excretion in spite of an extreme enrichment of kidney lipids with 20:5(n-3). It is suggested that urinary PGE is derived from precursors delivered from an arachidonic acid pool, which is rather resistant to restriction in dietary linoleate. © 1983 American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS).

  6. Fatty acids rehabilitated long-term neurodegenerative: like symptoms in olfactory bulbectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda, Shlomo; Rabinovitz, Sharon

    2015-05-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that an olfactory bulbectomy in rats induced short-term, multifaceted, devastating Alzheimer's-like effects, which included cognitive impairment, hyperactivity, hyperthermia, and increased levels of homocysteine and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-17A. In addition, the rats exhibited an increase in the hyperphosphorylation of brain Tau proteins and in the number of neurofibrillary tangles. Here, we examined the long-term effects of the surgery and found that olfactory bulbectomy also rendered the rats to become anemic with brain iron overload. Additionally, a significant reduction in the membrane fluidity index in frontal cortex synaptosomes was found. Treatment with a mixture of n - 3/n - 6 of fatty acids restored the unwanted effect. The beneficial effects of fatty acids are mediated via the effects of fatty acids on the neuronal membrane structure and fluidity. These findings are similar to Alzheimer's symptoms, which suggest this model can be used as an animal model for Alzheimer's disease. We recommend using this model to scan potential new anti-Alzheimer's drugs. PMID:25292362

  7. Ground beef patties prepared from brisket, flank and plate have unique fatty acid and sensory characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Terronica; Miller, Rhonda K; Kerth, Chris; Smith, Stephen B

    2015-05-01

    We hypothesized that unique ground beef products could be formulated from brisket, flank, and plate primals. Primals were taken from 4 USDA Select carcasses from conventionally produced cattle, selected at random in a commercial packing plant. Lean and fat trims were separated, and ground beef was formulated from each primal to contain 10, 20, or 30% total fat. Brisket patties contained higher proportions of monounsaturated fatty acids and less saturated fatty acids than flank patties. There were no differences in n-6 or n-3 fatty acids across primal type or fat level. After cooking, brisket patties had higher bloody/serumy and fat-like descriptor values than flank patties. Plate patties generated higher amounts of lipid-derived volatiles than patties from the brisket or flank. Brisket patties generally had higher amounts of pleasant headspace volatiles whereas the plate relied more heavily on Maillard-derived volatiles than flank patties. We conclude that individual primals can be used to formulate ground beef with unique compositional and flavor characteristics. PMID:25616056

  8. Competitiveness Model and Gap Analysis of Indonesian Palm Oil-Based Fatty Acid and Fatty Alcohol Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Toni Yoyo; Arief Daryanto; Endang Gumbira-Sa’id; Mohamad Fadhil Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Oleochemicals can be derived from natural oils or fats. Palm oil-based fatty acids and fatty alcohols are the most important oleochemicals. The aims of this study are to develop a competitiveness model of Indonesian palm oil-based fatty acid and fatty alcohol industry, and to analyze the gap between the current and ideal (future) conditions of the industry, using competitiveness framework being developed by the International Institute for Management Development (IMD). This study used literatu...

  9. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders: pathophysiological studies in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Wood, Philip A

    2010-10-01

    Mouse models have been designed for a number of fatty acid oxidation defects. Studies in these mouse models have demonstrated that different pathogenetic mechanisms play a role in the pathophysiology of defects of fatty acid oxidation. Supplementation with L-carnitine does not prevent low tissue carnitine levels and induces acylcarnitine production having potentially toxic effects, as presented in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD)-deficient mice. Energy deficiency appears to be an important mechanism in the development of cardiomyopathy and skeletal myopathy in fatty acid oxidation defects and is also the underlying mechanism of cold intolerance. Hypoglycemia as one major clinical sign in all fatty acid oxidation defects occurs due to a reduced hepatic glucose output and an enhanced peripheral glucose uptake rather than to transcriptional changes that are also observed simultaneously, as presented in medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD)-deficient mice. There are reports that an impaired fatty acid oxidation also plays a role in intrauterine life. The embryonic loss demonstrated for some enzyme defects in the mouse supports this hypothesis. However, the exact mechanisms are unknown. This observation correlates to maternal hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome, as observed in pregnancies carrying a long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD)-deficient fetus. Synergistic heterozygosity has been shown in isolated patients and in mouse models to be associated with clinical phenotypes common to fatty acid oxidation disorders. Synergistic mutations may also modulate severity of the clinical phenotype and explain in part clinical heterogeneity of fatty acid oxidation defects. In summary, knowledge about the different pathogenetic mechanisms and the resulting pathophysiology allows the development of specific new therapies. PMID:20532823

  10. Use of fatty acid analysis to determine dispersal of caspian terns in the Columbia River Basin, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranto, Christina J; Parrish, Julia K; Herman, David P; Punt, André E; Olden, Julian D; Brett, Michael T; Roby, Daniel D

    2011-08-01

    Lethal control, which has been used to reduce local abundances of animals in conflict with humans or with endangered species, may not achieve management goals if animal movement is not considered. In populations with emigration and immigration, lethal control may induce compensatory immigration, if the source of attraction remains unchanged. Within the Columbia River Basin (Washington, U.S.A.), avian predators forage at dams because dams tend to reduce rates of emigration of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.), artificially concentrating these prey. We used differences in fatty acid profiles between Caspian Terns (Hydroprogne caspia) at coastal and inland breeding colonies and terns culled by a lethal control program at a mid-Columbia River dam to infer dispersal patterns. We modeled the rate of loss of fatty acid biomarkers, which are fatty acids that can be traced to a single prey species or groups of species, to infer whether and when terns foraging at dams had emigrated from the coast. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling showed that coastal terns had high levels of C(20) and C(22) monounsaturated fatty acids, whereas fatty acids of inland breeders were high in C18:3n3, C20:4n6, and C22:5n3. Models of the rate of loss of fatty acid showed that approximately 60% of the terns collected at Rock Island Dam were unlikely to have bred successfully at local (inland) sites, suggesting that terns foraging at dams come from an extensive area. Fatty acid biomarkers may provide accurate information about patterns of dispersal in animal populations and may be extremely valuable in cases where populations differ demonstrably in prey base. PMID:21771078

  11. Use of Fatty Acid Analysis to Determine Dispersal of Caspian Terns in the Columbia River Basin, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranto, C.J.; Parrish, J.K.; Herman, D.P.; Punt, A.E.; Olden, J.D.; Brett, M.T.; Roby, D.D.

    2011-01-01

    Lethal control, which has been used to reduce local abundances of animals in conflict with humans or with endangered species, may not achieve management goals if animal movement is not considered. In populations with emigration and immigration, lethal control may induce compensatory immigration, if the source of attraction remains unchanged. Within the Columbia River Basin (Washington, U.S.A.), avian predators forage at dams because dams tend to reduce rates of emigration of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.), artificially concentrating these prey. We used differences in fatty acid profiles between Caspian Terns (Hydroprogne caspia) at coastal and inland breeding colonies and terns culled by a lethal control program at a mid-Columbia River dam to infer dispersal patterns. We modeled the rate of loss of fatty acid biomarkers, which are fatty acids that can be traced to a single prey species or groups of species, to infer whether and when terns foraging at dams had emigrated from the coast. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling showed that coastal terns had high levels of C20 and C22 monounsaturated fatty acids, whereas fatty acids of inland breeders were high in C18:3n3, C20:4n6, and C22:5n3. Models of the rate of loss of fatty acid showed that approximately 60% of the terns collected at Rock Island Dam were unlikely to have bred successfully at local (inland) sites, suggesting that terns foraging at dams come from an extensive area. Fatty acid biomarkers may provide accurate information about patterns of dispersal in animal populations and may be extremely valuable in cases where populations differ demonstrably in prey base. ??2011 Society for Conservation Biology.

  12. Development of Escherichia coli MG1655 strains to produce long chain fatty acids by engineering fatty acid synthesis (FAS) metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eunyoung; Lee, Sunhee; Won, Jong-In; Han, Sung Ok; Kim, Jihyeon; Lee, Jinwon

    2011-06-10

    The goal of this research was to develop recombinant Escherichia coli to improve fatty acid synthesis (FAS). Genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxylase (accA, accB, accC), malonyl-CoA-[acyl-carrier-protein] transacylase (fabD), and acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase (EC 3.1.2.14 gene), which are all enzymes that catalyze key steps in the synthesis of fatty acids, were cloned and over-expressed in E. coli MG1655. The acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) enzyme catalyzes the addition of CO(2) to acetyl-CoA to generate malonyl-CoA. The enzyme encoded by the fabD gene converts malonyl-CoA to malonyl-[acp], and the EC 3.1.2.14 gene converts fatty acyl-ACP chains to long chain fatty acids. All the genes except for the EC 3.1.2.14 gene were homologous to E. coli genes and were used to improve the enzymatic activities to over-express components of the FAS pathway through metabolic engineering. All recombinant E. coli MG1655 strains containing various gene combinations were developed using the pTrc99A expression vector. To observe changes in metabolism, the in vitro metabolites and fatty acids produced by the recombinants were analyzed. The fatty acids (C16) from recombinant strains were produced 1.23-2.41 times higher than that from the wild type. PMID:22112270

  13. Lipid classes and fatty acid regiodistribution in triacylglycerols of seed oils of two Sambucus species (S. nigra L. and S. ebulus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulf, Francisc Vasile; Oroian, Ioan; Vodnar, Dan Cristian; Socaciu, Carmen; Pintea, Adela

    2013-01-01

    The oil content and fatty acid composition of total lipids (TLs) and main lipid classes (NLs- neutral and PLs- polar lipids) in seeds of two wild Sambucus species (S. nigra and S. ebulus) from Transylvania (Romania) were determined by capillary gas chromatography (GC-MS). In addition, the positional distribution of fatty acids in seed triacylglycerols (TAGs) was determined by hydrolysis with pancreatic lipase. The seeds were found to be rich in fat (22.40-24.90 g/100g) with high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) ranging from 68.96% (S. ebulus) to 75.15% (S. nigra). High ratios of PUFAs/SFAs (saturated fatty acids), ranging from 7.06 (S. nigra) to 7.64 (S. ebulus), and low ratios of n-6/n-3, ranging from 0.84 (S. nigra) to 1.51 (S. ebulus), were determined in both oils. The lipid classes/subclasses analyzed (PLs, MAGs--monoacylglycerols, DAGs--diacylglycerols, FFAs--free fatty acids, TAGs and SEs--sterol esters) were separated and identified using thin-layer chromatography. The fatty acid compositions of the TAG fractions were practically identical to the profiles of TLs, with the same dominating fatty acids in both analyzed species. SEs and FFAs, were characterized by high proportions of SFAs. The sn-2 position of TAGs was esterified predominantly with linoleic acid (43.56% for S. nigra and 50.41% for S. ebulus). PMID:24071984

  14. Dietary fat in relation to erythrocyte fatty acid composition in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takkunen, Markus; Agren, Jyrki; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Uusitupa, Matti; Schwab, Ursula

    2013-11-01

    Erythrocyte membrane fatty acid (EMFA) composition is used in the validation of food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) and the evaluation of dietary fat quality. In this cross-sectional study we aimed to investigate associations of diet with EMFA. Altogether, 1,033 randomly selected Finnish men, aged from 47 to 75 years filled in a FFQ and their EMFA composition was analyzed. Marine polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake correlated positively with erythrocyte eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (r(s) = 0.415 and r(s) = 0.340, respectively, P < 0.001) and inversely with all n-6 PUFA analyzed (P < 0.001). PUFA intake from spreads and cooking fats correlated positively with alpha-linolenic (ALA), linoleic (LNA) and nervonic acids (r(s) = 0.229, r(s) = 0.160 and r(s) = 0.143, respectively, P < 0.001). Milk fat intake was associated with myristic and behenic acids (r(s) = 0.186 and r(s) = 0.132, respectively P < 0.001). Butter users had lower ALA and LNA proportions (mol%) than non-users (0.16 ± 0.04 vs. 0.19 ± 0.05, P < 0.001 and 7.77 ± 1.02 vs. 8.12 ± 1.11, P = 0.001). Higher PUFA intake from meat was related to decreased long-chain n-3 (P < 0.001) and increased n-6 PUFA (P < 0.001) proportions. In conclusion, EMFA composition reflects particularly well the intakes of n-3 PUFA, whereas other associations remained lower. Yet, all main sources of dietary fat were related with EMFA. The dietary effect on the nervonic acid proportion was confirmed. PMID:23975575

  15. [Significance of evening primrose oil in the problem of the nutritional value of poly-unsaturated fatty acids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siliprandi, N

    1989-01-01

    The essential nutritional value of the polyunsaturated fatty acids can, in the light of present-day knowledge, be considered valid in all respects as regards the n-6 family which derives from linoleic acid. On the other hand, the polyunsaturated fatty acids of the n-3 family deriving from linolenic acid to not possess essential requisites as, for instance, they are ineffective for healing skin lesions caused by deficiency of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Unsaturated fatty acids taken in with the diet have a two-fold function: 1) plastic, insofar as they are necessary for the biosynthesis of the phospholipids; 2) regulatory, as precursors of prostanoids or eicosanoids (prostaglandins, thromboxanes, prostacyclins). The process of desaturation-lengthening that leads to the formation of these compounds is, however, limited by the activity of desaturase, which is in poor enough supply, especially in certain tissues, under physiological conditions and is almost non-existent in certain pathologies such as diabetes, alcoholism, anaemia and hypercholesterolaemia. The recent use of vegetable oils such as those obtained from the seeds of Evening Primrose, is of particular interest owing to the presence of gamma-linolenic acid, the product of the activity of desaturase. In the light of this unusual property, the recent nutritional-therapeutic results obtained by using this vegetable oil are described. PMID:2657494

  16. Fatty acid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle in crossbred steers fed different sources of fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Aferri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the fatty acid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle in carcasses of ¾ Bos taurus taurus ¼ Bos taurus indicus steers fed different sources of fatty acids. Thirty-six steers aged 14 months, with a mean live weight of 320 kg, were fed the following diets for 96 days: 1 control diet, containing no supplemental fat source; 2 CaSFA, diet containing 50 g calcium salts of fatty acids per kg total dry matter; 3 CS diet, containing 210 g cottonseed per kg total dry matter. The fatty acid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle was determined by gas chromatography. No difference in slaughter weight, carcass weight, backfat thickness, or longissimus dorsi muscle area was observed between animals receiving the diets CaSFA and CS. Animals consuming the two fat-supplemented diets presented higher concentrations of oleic (C18:1, palmitic (C16:0 and stearic (C18:0 acids, corresponding to an average 80.76% of total fatty acids, and higher concentrations of vaccenic acid (C18:1 t11 in the muscle when compared with the control group. Supplementation of the diet of feedlot crossbred steers with CaSFA or cottonseed did not promote significant alterations in the lipid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle.

  17. Fatty acid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle in crossbred steers fed different sources of fatty acids

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gabriela, Aferri; Paulo Roberto, Leme; Angélica Simone Cravo, Pereira; Saulo da Luz e, Silva; Soraia Marques, Putrino; José Esler de, Freitas Júnior; Francisco Palma, Rennó.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the fatty acid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle in carcasses of ¾ Bos taurus taurus ¼ Bos taurus indicus steers fed different sources of fatty acids. Thirty-six steers aged 14 months, with a mean live weight of 320 kg, were fed the following die [...] ts for 96 days: 1) control diet, containing no supplemental fat source; 2) CaSFA, diet containing 50 g calcium salts of fatty acids per kg total dry matter; 3) CS diet, containing 210 g cottonseed per kg total dry matter. The fatty acid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle was determined by gas chromatography. No difference in slaughter weight, carcass weight, backfat thickness, or longissimus dorsi muscle area was observed between animals receiving the diets CaSFA and CS. Animals consuming the two fat-supplemented diets presented higher concentrations of oleic (C18:1), palmitic (C16:0) and stearic (C18:0) acids, corresponding to an average 80.76% of total fatty acids, and higher concentrations of vaccenic acid (C18:1 t11) in the muscle when compared with the control group. Supplementation of the diet of feedlot crossbred steers with CaSFA or cottonseed did not promote significant alterations in the lipid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle.

  18. Changes in lipid content and fatty acid composition along the reproductive cycle of the freshwater mussel Dreissena polymorpha: Its modulation by clofibrate exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total lipids and fatty acid profiles were determined along the reproductive cycle of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). A total of 33 fatty acids with carbon atoms from 14 to 22 were identified: palmitic acid (16:0) was the most abundant fatty acid (13–24%) followed by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n?3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n?3) and palmitoleic acid (16:1n?7). Some individual fatty acids (16:0, 16:2n?4, 18:1n?7, 18:2n?6, 18:3n?4, 18:4n?3, 20:4n?3, 20:5n?3) were strongly related to reproductive events, while others having structural-type functions (18:0 and 22:6n?3) were rather stable during the study period. Multivariate analysis of the whole data set using the multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares method confirmed the strong relationship of fatty acid profiles with the reproductive cycle of zebra mussel. Additionally, the effects of the pharmaceutical clofibrate on lipid composition and fatty acid profiles were assessed following 7-day exposure of zebra mussels to a wide range of concentrations (20 ng/L to 2 mg/L). A significant reduction in total triglycerides (38%–48%) together with an increase in the amount of fatty acids per gram wet weight (1.5- to 2.2-fold) was observed in the exposed mussels. This work highlights the ability of clofibrate to induce changes on the lipidome of zebra mussels at concentrations as low as 200 ng/L. -- Highlights: ? Clofibrate exposure leads to a reduction of total triglycerides in zebra mussel. ? The amount of fatty acids per gram wet weight increased in exposed mussels. ? The effects were evidenced at concentrations of clofibrate as low as 200 ng/L. ? Fatty acid profiles were closely related to reproductive events.

  19. Milk Yield, Composition, and Fatty Acid Profile in Dairy Cows Fed a High-concentrate Diet Blended with Oil Mixtures Rich in Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Lam Phuoc; Suksombat, Wisitiporn

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of feeding linseed oil or/and sunflower oil mixed with fish oil on milk yield, milk composition and fatty acid (FA) profiles of dairy cows fed a high-concentrate diet, 24 crossbred primiparous lactating dairy cows in early lactation were assigned to a completely randomized design experiment. All cows were fed a high-concentrate basal diet and 0.38 kg dry matter (DM) molasses per day. Treatments were composed of a basal diet without oil supplement (Control), or diets of (DM basis) 3% linseed and fish oils (1:1, w/w, LSO-FO), or 3% sunflower and fish oils (1:1, w/w, SFO-FO), or 3% mixture (1:1:1, w/w) of linseed, sunflower, and fish oils (MIX-O). The animals fed SFO-FO had a 13.12% decrease in total dry matter intake compared with the control diet (p<0.05). No significant change was detected for milk yield; however, the animals fed the diet supplemented with SFO-FO showed a depressed milk fat yield and concentration by 35.42% and 27.20%, respectively, compared to those fed the control diet (p<0.05). Milk c9, t11-conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) proportion increased by 198.11% in the LSO-FO group relative to the control group (p<0.01). Milk C18:3n-3 (ALA) proportion was enhanced by 227.27% supplementing with LSO-FO relative to the control group (p<0.01). The proportions of milk docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were significantly increased (p<0.01) in the cows fed LSO-FO (0.38%) and MIX-O (0.23%) compared to the control group (0.01%). Dietary inclusion of LSO-FO mainly increased milk c9, t11-CLA, ALA, DHA, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), whereas feeding MIX-O improved preformed FA and unsaturated fatty acids (UFA). While the lowest n-6/n-3 ratio was found in the LSO-FO, the decreased atherogenecity index (AI) and thrombogenicity index (TI) seemed to be more extent in the MIX-O. Therefore, to maximize milk c9, t11-CLA, ALA, DHA, and n-3 PUFA and to minimize milk n-6/n-3 ratio, AI and TI, an ideal supplement would appear to be either LSO-FO or MIX-O. PMID:25925057

  20. Milk Yield, Composition, and Fatty Acid Profile in Dairy Cows Fed a High-concentrate Diet Blended with Oil Mixtures Rich in Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Lam Phuoc; Suksombat, Wisitiporn

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of feeding linseed oil or/and sunflower oil mixed with fish oil on milk yield, milk composition and fatty acid (FA) profiles of dairy cows fed a high-concentrate diet, 24 crossbred primiparous lactating dairy cows in early lactation were assigned to a completely randomized design experiment. All cows were fed a high-concentrate basal diet and 0.38 kg dry matter (DM) molasses per day. Treatments were composed of a basal diet without oil supplement (Control), or diets of (DM basis) 3% linseed and fish oils (1:1, w/w, LSO-FO), or 3% sunflower and fish oils (1:1, w/w, SFO-FO), or 3% mixture (1:1:1, w/w) of linseed, sunflower, and fish oils (MIX-O). The animals fed SFO-FO had a 13.12% decrease in total dry matter intake compared with the control diet (p<0.05). No significant change was detected for milk yield; however, the animals fed the diet supplemented with SFO-FO showed a depressed milk fat yield and concentration by 35.42% and 27.20%, respectively, compared to those fed the control diet (p<0.05). Milk c9, t11-conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) proportion increased by 198.11% in the LSO-FO group relative to the control group (p<0.01). Milk C18:3n-3 (ALA) proportion was enhanced by 227.27% supplementing with LSO-FO relative to the control group (p<0.01). The proportions of milk docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were significantly increased (p<0.01) in the cows fed LSO-FO (0.38%) and MIX-O (0.23%) compared to the control group (0.01%). Dietary inclusion of LSO-FO mainly increased milk c9, t11-CLA, ALA, DHA, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), whereas feeding MIX-O improved preformed FA and unsaturated fatty acids (UFA). While the lowest n-6/n-3 ratio was found in the LSO-FO, the decreased atherogenecity index (AI) and thrombogenicity index (TI) seemed to be more extent in the MIX-O. Therefore, to maximize milk c9, t11-CLA, ALA, DHA, and n-3 PUFA and to minimize milk n-6/n-3 ratio, AI and TI, an ideal supplement would appear to be either LSO-FO or MIX-O. PMID:25925057

  1. Lipids, fatty acids composition and carotenoids of Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in hydroponic wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barcelos Oliveira, Jorge Luiz

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Alternative culture media have been evaluated for the cultivation of microalgae, among them are, industrial and agriculture wastewaters, that make residue recycling possible by bioconverting it into a rich, nourishing biomass that can be used as a feeding complement in aquaculture and in diverse areas. The objective of this research is to determine the lipid, fatty acid profile and carotenoid produced by the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in a hydroponic wastewater, with different dilutions. The results showed that lipid contents did not present significant differences. Fatty acids were predominantly 16:0, 18:0, 18:1 and 18:3n-6. For total carotenoids, the dilution of hydroponic wastewater did not stimulate the production of these pigments. From this study, it was determined that, the use of hydroponic wastewater as an alternative culture medium for  the cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris generates good perspectives for lipid, fatty acid and carotenoid production.Medios de cultivo alternativos vienen siendo evaluados para el cultivo de microalgas, entre ellos, están los afluentes industriales y agrícolas, que posibilitan la reciclaje del residuo, bioconvirtiéndose en una biomasa enriquecida bajo el punto de vista nutricional, que puede ser utilizada como complemento alimenticio, para la acuacultura y en varias otras áreas de actuación. El presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo determinar los contenidos de lípidos, composición de ácidos grasos y carotenoides producidos por la microalga Chlorella vulgaris cultivada en solución hidropónica residual, con diferentes diluciones. Los resultados de los contenidos de lípidos totales no presentaron diferencia significativa. Los ácidos grasos predominantes fueron los 16:0, 18:0, 18:1 e 18:3n-6. Para los carotenoides totales, la dilución de la solución hidropónica residual no estimuló la producción de estos pigmentos por la microalga. La utilización de la solución hidropónica residual como medio de cultivo alternativo para Chlorella vulgaris genera buenas perspectivas para la producción de lípidos, ácidos grasos y carotenoides.

  2. Unusual fatty acid compositions of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus and the bacterium Thermotoga maritima.

    OpenAIRE

    Carballeira, N M; M. Reyes; Sostre, A; Huang, H.; Verhagen, M F; Adams, M. W.

    1997-01-01

    The fatty acid compositions of the hyperthermophilic microorganisms Thermotoga maritima and Pyrococcus furiosus were studied and compared. A total of 37 different fatty acids were identified in T. maritima, including the novel 13,14-dimethyloctacosanedioic acid. In contrast, a total of 18 different fatty acids were characterized, as minor components, in P. furiosus, and these included saturated, monounsaturated, and dicarboxylic acids. This is the first report of fatty acids from an archaeon.

  3. Fatty Acid Compositions of Five Wild Edible Mushroom Species Collected from Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Bulent Ergonul; Pelin Gunc Ergonul; Fatih Kalyoncu; Ilgaz Akata

    2012-01-01

    The fatty acids of five wild edible mushroom species (Agrocybe cylindracea, Coprinus comatus, Lactarius deliciosus, Suillus collinitus and Tricholoma myomyces) collected from different regions from Anatolia were determined. The fatty acids were identified and quantified by gas chromatography and studied using fruit bodies. Fatty acid composition varied among species. The dominant fatty acid in fruit bodies of all mushrooms was cis-linoleic acid (18: 2). Percentage of cis-linoleic acid in spec...

  4. Radioiodinated free fatty acids; can we measure myocardial metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the feasibility of radioiodinated free fatty acids for ''metabolic imaging'', the kinetics and distribution pattern of metabolites of heptadecanoic acid I 131 (HDA I 131) were studied in canine myocardium throughout metabolic interventions. In control dogs and in dogs during glucose/insulin and sodium lactate infusion, biopsy specimens were taken during a go-min period after HDA I 131 administration and analyzed. Clearly distinct patterns of distribution and elimination were seen during the metabolic interventions, indicating the usefulness of iodinated fatty acids for metabolic studies. (orig.)

  5. Note on the chromatographic analyses of marine polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D.M.; Quinn, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatography was used to study the effects of saponification/methylation and thin-layer chromatographic isolation on the analyses of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Using selected procedures, the qualitative and quantitative distribution of these acids in marine organisms can be determined with a high degree of accuracy. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  6. FATTY ACIDS PATTERN OF OLIVE OIL UNDER ORGANIC FARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasab Al-Rawashdeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic farming is considered as a mitigation strategy to face adverse effect of climate change and Consumers’ increasing their need for safe and quality food has motivated this research study. The olive oil of the Roman olive trees (Landrace Olea Europea belong to the Oleaceae family growing under organic farming (in the transition period conditions in Jordan Ajlun area was extracted by traditional method; warming water to the about 60°C and grounded the seeds make as paste then pour in the warmed water then take the oil layer floated at the surface. The oil was analyzed for fatty acids pattern and compared with Romans trees olive oil grown at Burma Agriculture Station which has organic Certificate according to the Japanese Agriculture Standard (JAS since 2007. The separation patterns of fatty acids were done by Gas Chromatography (GC. Results showed high levels of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly oleic acid (up to 67.49%, linoleic acid (13.31% and linolenic acid (0.74% in the oil of Romans trees growing in Ajlun area, while the organic olive oil from the Romans olive trees growing at Burma Station showed 68.88% of oleic acid, 11.73% of linoleic acid and 0.67% of Linolenic acid. The analysis also showed that the palmatic saturated fatty acid was 12.54% at Burma Station compared to 11.82% in Ajlun area. The medicinal value of unsaturated fatty acids play great role for reducing cholesterol rate that was found in high level of Romans olive trees (landrace.

  7. Lipid content and essential fatty acid (EFA) composition of mature Congolese breast milk are influenced by mothers' nutritional status: impact on infants' EFA supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocquelin, G; Tapsoba, S; Dop, M C; Mbemba, F; Traissac, P; Martin-Prével, Y

    1998-03-01

    Optimum infant growth and development, especially neurodevelopment and visual acuity, require sufficient n-6 and n-3 essential fatty acid supplies from the placenta or breast milk. The lipid content and fatty acid composition of mature breast milk were measured in samples from 102 randomly selected Congolese mothers of 5-month-old infants, residing in a suburban district of Brazzaville. Mean body mass index (BMI) was 22.3; 14% of mothers were energy-deficient and 22% were overweight. Breast milk samples from these mothers were low in lipids (mean, 28.70 g/l), and 75% had a lipid content below reference values. Adequate lipid content was associated with a maternal diet high in carbohydrates and low in fats. Breast milk was rich in 8:0-14:0 fatty acids (25.97% of total fatty acids) and in polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially n-3. These findings appear related to Congolese mothers' frequent consumption of high-carbohydrate foods such as processed cassava roots, wheat bread, and doughnuts known to enhance 8:0-14:0 fatty acid biosynthesis, as well as locally produced foods such as fish, vegetable oil, leafy green vegetables, and high-fat fruit that provide n-6 and n-3 essential fatty acids. Milk lipid content was inversely associated with the maternal BMI, but was unrelated to maternal age or socioeconomic status. Since the essential fatty acid content of traditional complementary foods is lower than that present in breast milk, Congolese mothers should be encouraged to postpone the introduction of such foods until their infant is 4-6 months old. PMID:9537300

  8. Meat quality and tissue fatty acid profiles in rabbits fed diets supplemented with conjugated linoleic acid.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marounek, Milan; Sk?ivanová, V.; Dokoupilová, A.; Czauderna, M.; Berladyn, A.

    2007-01-01

    Ro?. 52, ?. 12 (2007), s. 552-561. ISSN 0375-8427 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : rabbits * conjugated linoleic acid * fatty acids Subject RIV: GH - Livestock Nutrition Impact factor: 0.645, year: 2007

  9. Enhanced production of polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid by thraustochytrid protists

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, R.; Raghukumar, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    2004-01-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an important requirement in the human diet. It is also essential in the nutrition of crustaceans and aquaculture animals. Of the sources available for commercial production of DHA...

  10. Modification of essential fatty acid composition in broodstock of cultured European eel Anguilla anguilla L.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    StØttrup, Josianne; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Farmed eels had lower levels of arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) (ARA) and higher ratios of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3) (EPA):ARA compared to wild European eels collected from the Baltic Sea and southern Norwegian coast. Eels fed a formulated feed (JD) with a distribution of essential fatty acids (EFA) resembling wild European eel were sampled after 0, 5, 10, 14 and 44 weeks of feeding to examine changes in fatty acid composition (FAC) in ovaries, visceral fat and muscle. The results showed a slow but steady incorporation of EFA. Lipids are incorporated in the oocytes early in oogenesis, and the leading cohort of oocytes is rich in lipid droplets before the onset of vitellogenesis. This indicates that feeding with optimized broodstock feeds should start early to allow the incorporation of EFA in the first cohort of oocytes. At least 14 weeks of feeding is required to change lipid EFA in broodstock eel to resemble EFA in the diet or in wild fish. After 44 weeks of feeding, ARA was significantly higher in the neutral lipids of ovaries (1.9%) compared to visceral fat (1.2%) or muscle (1.0%). EPA:ARA ratios decreased two- to threefold in all tissues examined during that time. ARA and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3) (DHA) had accumulated in ovarian polar lipids

  11. Investigating the Role of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Bone Development Using Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Y.Y. Lau

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA in the diet may promote the development of a healthy skeleton and thereby reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis in later life. Studies using developing animal models suggest lowering dietary n-6 PUFA and increasing n-3 PUFA intakes, especially long chain n-3 PUFA, may be beneficial for achieving higher bone mineral content, density and stronger bones. To date, the evidence regarding the effects of ?-linolenic acid (ALA remain equivocal, in contrast to evidence from the longer chain products, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. This review reports the results of investigations into n-3 PUFA supplementation on bone fatty acid composition, strength and mineral content in developing animal models as well as the mechanistic relationships of PUFA and bone, and identifies critical areas for future research. Overall, this review supports a probable role for essential (ALA and long chain (EPA and DHA n-3 PUFA for bone health. Understanding the role of PUFA in optimizing bone health may lead to dietary strategies that promote bone development and maintenance of a healthy skeleton.

  12. Chemical composition, fatty acid profile and bioactive compounds of guava seeds (Psidium guajava L.)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ana Maria Athayde, Uchôa-thomaz; Eldina Castro, Sousa; José Osvaldo Beserra, Carioca; Selene Maia De, Morais; Alessandro De, Lima; Clécio Galvão, Martins; Cristiane Duarte, Alexandrino; Pablito Augusto Travassos, Ferreira; Ana Livya Moreira, Rodrigues; Suliane Praciano, Rodrigues; José Celso De Albuquerque, Thomaz; Jurandy Do Nascimento, Silva; Larissa Lages, Rodrigues.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize the chemical composition, determine the fatty acid profile, and quantify the bioactive compounds present in guava seed powder (Psidium guajava L.). The powder resulted from seeds obtained from guava pulp processing. The agro-industrial seeds from red guava cv. paluma [...] were used, and they were donated by a frozen pulp fruit manufacturer. They contain varying amounts of macronutrients and micronutrients, with a high content of total dietary fiber (63.94 g/100g), protein (11.19 g/100g), iron (13.8 mg/100g), zinc (3.31 mg/100g), and reduced calorie content (182 kcal/100g). Their lipid profile showed a predominance of unsaturated fatty acids (87.06%), especially linoleic acid (n6) and oleic acid (n9). The powder obtained contained significant amounts of bioactive compounds such as ascorbic acid (87.44 mg/100g), total carotenoids (1.25 mg/100 g) and insoluble dietary fiber (63.55 g/100g). With regard to their microbiological quality, the samples were found suitable for consumption. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the powder produced has favorable attributes for industrial use, and that use of these seeds would be a viable alternative to prevent various diseases and malnutrition in our country and to reduce the environmental impact of agricultural waste.

  13. Fatty acid biosynthesis VII. Substrate control of chain-length of products synthesised by rat liver fatty acid synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Carey, E.M.

    1970-01-01

    - 1. Gas-liquid and paper chromatography have been used to determine the chain-lengths of fatty acids synthesised by purified rat liver fatty acid synthetase from [1-14C]acetyl-CoA, [1,3-14C2]malonyl-CoA and from [1-14C]acetyl-CoA plus partially purified rat liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase. - 2. A wide range (C4:0–C18:0) of fatty acids was synthesised and the proportions were modified by substrate concentrations in the same manner as for purified rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase. - 3. The relative amount of radioactivity incorporated from added acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA depended on the substrate concentrations used. At excess acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA, greater amounts of acetyl-CoA were incorporated than theoretically expected from the malonyl-CoA pathway. At excess malonyl-CoA, less acetyl-CoA was incorporated than theoretically expected. - 4. An increase in the chain-length of fatty acids synthesised from malonyl-CoA was observed with increasing malonyl-CoA concentrations and malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA ratios. A similar increase was observed when increasing amounts of a malonyl-CoA generating system were added. However, at the same overall rate of synthesis, a lower proportion of long-chain fatty acids was synthesised from carboxylated acetyl-CoA than from added malonyl-CoA. - 5. It is suggested that acetyl-CoA carboxylase may carboxylate acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase.

  14. NUTRITIONAL VALUE AND FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF HOUSEHOLD COOKING ON FISH FATTY ACIDS PROFILE USING ATHEROGENICITY AND THROMBOGENICITY INDICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Reffaei W.H. Moussa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Different cooking methods were effects on the fatty acids and food nutritional qualities. Fish is the most nourished food containing a higher ratio of essential fatty acids. This study is contacted to determine the effect of different cooking methods (microwaving, boiling and grilling for preparing salmon, mackerel, sardine and tuna had on the fatty acid profiles, in particular the ?-3 fatty acid.  Depending on estimated polyunsaturated/saturated ratio and ?-6/ ?-3 ratio as a measure of the propensity of the fish and cooked fish to influence the incidence of coronary heart disease indices of atherogenicity and thrombogenicity which were identified nutritional benefit from fish lipid. Also determine the level of minerals and toxic contaminant in fish meat according different cooking methods. Study was carried on salmon, sardine, mackerel and tuna fishes. The samples were cooking by different methods. These were microwaving, grilling and boiling. By lipid extraction, fatty acids profile was determined in all fresh and processed fish. From the fatty acid profile, the atherogenicity index (AI and thrombogenicity (TI indices were calculated. Mineral and toxic hazardous mineral were also identified in the cooked fish. It could be concluded that the use of heating process of fish especially microwave is advantageous over conventional cooking like grilled and blanched fish especially with salmon and mackerel. It also, the ?3 fatty acids retarded the decline in cognition over time. So, then ?-3 also produces a potent anti-thrombotic effect by decreasing production of thromboxane. There is evidence that the type of fat is more important than the total amount of fat in the quantification of cardiovascular disease risk; therefore, the Atherogenicity Index (AI and the thrombogenicity Index (TI were also evaluated. Using grilling and boiling process in the most of the fishes were able to decrease the level of cadmium in all studied fish.

  15. / Chemical composition and fatty acid profile of rhea (Rhea americana) meat

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Pedro Fernando, Romanelli; Elizeu, Trabuco; Andréia, Borges Scriboni; Jesuí Vergílio, Visentainer; Nilson, Evelázio de Souza.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Composición química y perfil de ácidos grasos de la carne de ñandú (Rhea americana). El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la composición aproximada y el perfil de ácidos grasos en la carne de la parte intramuscular IMF) interna de la pierna de ñandú (Rhea americana). Las aves fueron criadas en [...] cautiverio, alimentadas con ración balanceada (Nutriavestruz Crescimento - Purina) y mantenidas en corral con pasto ad lib. La edad media de las aves de los dos sexos usados en la investigación fue de 12 meses y el peso medio de 23 kg. Fueron sometidas a dieta hídrica por 12 horas antes de matarlas por aplicación de descarga eléctrica. Los resultados de contenido medio de humedad, proteína, cenizas y lípidos totales fue de 74.1%, 22.8%, 1.5% y 1.6%, respectivamente. Fue posible notar una predominancia de ácidos grasos monoinsaturados (MUFA) en la gordura intramuscular (IMF) ), 42.3% y un alto porcentaje de ácidos grasos poli-insaturados (PUFA), 29.7%. Los ácidos grasos encontrados en mayor proporción en rhea IMF fueron: 18:2n 6 (24.33%), 18:1n 9 (19.25%), 16:0 (13.70%), 22:1n9 (11.40%), 18:0 (10.66%), 15:1n 10 (8.62%), 24:1n 9 (2.90%) y 20:4n 6 (1.72%). La PUFA/SFA (ácidos grasos saturados) y relación n-6/ n-3 fue 1.06 y 31.30, respectivamente. El consumo de carne de ñandú es una alternativa saludable frente a la carne roja pues su consumo presenta una menor susceptibilidad a enfermedades cardiovasculares causadas por alto consumo de grasas cuando comparado con el consumo de carne de animales domesticados. Abstract in english The purpose of this work was to determine the proximate composition and fatty acid profiles of the Gastrocnemius pars interna intramuscular fat (IMF) of rhea (Rhea americana) thighs. The birds were bred in captivity, fed with balanced feed (Nutriavestruz Crescimento - Purina) and kept in a pen with [...] grass ad lib. The birds of both sexes used in the research weighed 23 kg on average and were aged about twelve (12) months old. They were subjected to hydric diet (12 h) before slaughtering by electric shock. The rhea meat showed an average moisture, protein, ash and total lipid contents of 74.1%, 22.8%, 1.5% and 1.6%, respectively. It was noticed the predominance of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in intramuscular fat (IMF), 42.3% and a high percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), 29.7%.. The fatty acids found in higher proportion in rhea IMF were: 18:2n-6 (24.33%), 18:1n-9 (19.25%), 16:0 (13.70%), 22:1n9 (11.40%), 18:0 (10.66%), 15:1n-10 (8.62%), 24:1n-9 (2.90%) and 20:4n-6 (1.72%). The PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 ratios were 1.06 and 31.30, respectively. The consumption of rhea meat is a healthy alternative to red meat as it points to a lower susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases caused by the high consumption of fat comparatively to the consumption of meat from most domesticated animals.

  16. Self-assembly of fatty acid-alkylboladiamine salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douliez, Jean-Paul; Navailles, Laurence; Nallet, Frédéric

    2006-01-17

    Long-chain fatty acids are insoluble in aqueous solution and form crystal precipitates. It is then of particular importance to determine the physicochemical parameters allowing their dispersion in water to improve their bioavailability and their utilization as surfactants. Herein, we report a study on salt-free catanionic systems in aqueous solution made of mixtures between palmitic or stearic fatty acids and alkylboladiamines (Abd's) differing by their alkyl chain length. Phase contrast microscopy, solid-state NMR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and small-angle neutron scattering were used to characterize the phase behavior of these systems at molar ratio of fatty acid to Abd of 1 and 2. Whatever the Abd and the molar ratio, fatty acids were embedded at low temperature in a bilayer gel phase which crystallizes after a period of rest. At an equimolar ratio, the gel phases transited upon raising the temperature to an isotropic phase made of worm-like micelles except in the case of the ethylenediamine chain for which a lamellar fluid phase was observed. At a molar ratio of 2 and high temperature, fatty acids were embedded in a lamellar fluid phase which self-orients with its stacking axis perpendicular to the magnetic field. However, for a long alkylboladiamine such as spermine, worm-like micelles formed. The phase behavior at high temperature is discussed in terms of molecular volume. PMID:16401110

  17. 13C-labeled 18 : 2n-6 recovered in brush border membrane phospholipids short time after administration.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Bodil; HØy, Carl-Erik

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the short-term effect of dietary specific structured triacylglycerols (MLM, M = 8:0, L = 18:2n-6), LLL and MMM on the fatty acid composition of brush border membrane (BBM) phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Rats were administered intragastrically a bolus of ML*M, M*LM*, L*L*L* or M*M*M* (* = C-13- labeled fatty acid). Rats were decapitated 2 hours and 6 hours later, and the fatty acid composition and C-13-enrichment of BBM-PC and -PE were determined. C-13-enriched 18:2n-6 was observed in BBM-PC after intragastric administration of L*L*L* and ML*M, whereas no C-13-labeled fatty acids were recovered after administration of M*LM* or M*M*M*. Interestingly, no C-13-labeled fatty acids were detected in the BBM-PE fraction. This could be due to a lower turnover of PE than PC and to a different ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in the two phospholipid pools. Minor effects on BBM-PC and BBM-PE fatty acid profiles (mole-%) were observed. The present study demonstrated for the first time incorporation of C-13-labeled 18:2n-6 into BBM-PC 2 hours and 6 hours after intragastric administration of L*L*L* or ML*M. This emphasizes the influence of the dietary fatty acid on BBM fatty acid composition and the rapid incorporation of dietary long-chain fatty acids into intestinal enterocyte phospholipids. Medium-chain fatty acids in a single meal exert only a minor influence on the BBM phospholipid fatty acid profile.

  18. Higher fatty acids in Chlorella vulgaris (pyrenoidosa): Content of indivudual acids and use of the algae for the preparation of higher fatty acids - 14C(G)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of data on the occurrence of higher fatty acids in the lipids of C h l o r e l l a v u l g a r i s (pyrenoidosa) is presented with a view to the biosynthetical preparation of fatty acids-14C(G). (author)

  19. Arachidonic Acid Fights Palmitate – New insights into fatty acid toxicity to ?-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ortsäter, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Saturated fatty acids are toxic to pancreatic ?-cells. By inducing apoptosis, they contribute to a decrease in ?-cell mass, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. In this issue of Clinical Science, Keane and co-workers show that the polyunsaturated fatty acid arachidonic acid protects the ?-cell against the toxic effects of palmitate. As type 2 diabetes is characterised by subclinical inflammation, and arachidonic acid and metabolites thereof are produced during states of infla...

  20. Phenotypic correlations of backfat thickness with meatiness traits, intramuscular fat, longissimus muscle cholesterol and fatty acid composition in pigs

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    E., Jacyno; A., Pietruszka; M., Kaw& #281; cka; W., Biel; A., Kotodziej-Skalska.

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the phenotypic correlations of backfat thickness with meatiness traits and intramuscular fat, cholesterol and fatty acid composition in the longissimus muscle of pigs. For this study, 60 barrows and 60 gilts (Pietrain ? Duroc boars and Polish Large White [...] crossbred sows) were slaughtered at 100 kg bodyweight. Lean meat percentage (LMP), loin muscle area (LMA), backfat thickness measured at five locations and average backfat thickness (ABF), and intramuscular fat (IMF), cholesterol (CHLM) and fatty acid composition in the longissimus muscle were determined. Phenotypic correlations of individual backfat thickness measured at five locations and ABF with LMP, LMA and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), including C18 :2n-6, were negative and moderate to high, while with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), including C16:1 and C18:1 were positive and very low. Correlations of individual backfat thickness and ABF with saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and C16:0 were positive (0.29 to 0.56), while for C18:0 were low (0.10 to 0.23). Correlations of IMF and CHLM with LMP, LMA and PUFAs, especially C18:2n-6, were negative and high, while with SFAs and MUFAs were positive and moderate to high. Correlation between IMF and CHLM was high (0.74). The results of the present study indicate that increased IMF content results a significant decrease in carcass meatiness (LMP and LMA) and of PUFAs content and an increase in backfat thickness and contents of SFAs, MUFAs and CHLM.

  1. Menhaden oil, but not safflower or soybean oil, aids in restoring the polyunsaturated fatty acid profile in the novel delta-6-desaturase null mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Jessica

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA have diverse biological effects, from promoting inflammation to preventing cancer and heart disease. Growing evidence suggests that individual PUFA may have independent effects in health and disease. The individual roles of the two essential PUFA, linoleic acid (LA and ?-linolenic acid (ALA, have been difficult to discern from the actions of their highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA downstream metabolites. This issue has recently been addressed through the development of the ?-6 desaturase knock out (D6KO mouse, which lacks the rate limiting ?-6 desaturase enzyme and therefore cannot metabolize LA or ALA. However, a potential confounder in this model is the production of novel ?-5 desaturase (D5D derived fatty acids when D6KO mice are fed diets containing LA and ALA, but void of arachidonic acid. Objective The aim of the present study was to characterize how the D6KO model differentially responds to diets containing the essential n-6 and n-3 PUFA, and whether the direct provision of downstream HUFA can rescue the phenotype and prevent the production of D5D fatty acids. Methodology Liver and serum phospholipid (PL fatty acid composition was examined in D6KO and wild type mice fed i 10% safflower oil diet (SF, LA rich ii 10% soy diet (SO, LA+ALA or iii 3% menhaden oil +7% SF diet (MD, HUFA rich for 28?days (n?=?3-7/group. Results Novel D5D fatty acids were found in liver PL of D6KO fed SF or SO-fed mice, but differed in the type of D5D fatty acid depending on diet. Conversely, MD-fed D6KO mice had a liver PL fatty acid profile similar to wild-type mice. Conclusions Through careful consideration of the dietary fatty acid composition, and especially the HUFA content in order to prevent the synthesis of D5D fatty acids, the D6KO model has the potential to elucidate the independent biological and health effects of the parent n-6 and n-3 fatty acids, LA and ALA.

  2. Effects of fatty acids on human serum albumin binding centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobretsov, G E; Syrejshchikova, T I; Smolina, N V; Uzbekov, M G

    2012-07-01

    Albumin is a carrier of nonesterified long-chain fatty acids and many other ligands. The status of its binding centers was studied for various proportions of nonesterified long-chain fatty acids and albumin as exemplified by palmitic acid. The status of the binding center was tested by recording K-35 probe fluorescence decay in the subnanosecond band. This method showed the work of three types of centers. Palmitic acid enhanced binding activity of all centers, though to a different degree: if the palmitic acid/albumin proportion increased to 2-3, the probe binding to type 1 centers (located in the drug center I region) increased 1.5 times, while binding to type 3 centers increased more than 3-fold. Modification of these centers by nonesterified long-chain fatty acids was similar in the isolated human albumin preparation and in diluted blood serum. Hence, K-35 probe showed the actual status of various albumin centers, their binding capacity depending to a different measure on the fatty acid charge of albumin. PMID:22866302

  3. Concordance analysis between estimation methods of milk fatty acid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Mary Ana Petersen; Petrini, Juliana; Ferreira, Evandro Maia; Mourão, Luciana Regina Mangeti Barreto; Salvian, Mayara; Cassoli, Laerte Dagher; Pires, Alexandre Vaz; Machado, Paulo Fernando; Mourão, Gerson Barreto

    2014-08-01

    Considering the milk fatty acid influence on human health, the aim of this study was to compare gas chromatography (GC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the determination of these compounds. Fatty acid content (g/100g of fat) were obtained by both methods and compared through Pearson's correlation, linear Bayesian regression, and the Bland-Altman method. Despite the high correlations between the measurements (r=0.60-0.92), the regression coefficient values indicated higher measures for palmitic acid, oleic acid, unsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids and lower values for stearic acid, saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids estimated by GC in comparison to FTIR results. This inequality was confirmed in the Bland-Altman test, with an average bias varying from -8.65 to 6.91g/100g of fat. However, the inclusion of 94% of the samples into the concordance limits suggested that the variability of the differences between the methods was constant throughout the range of measurement. Therefore, despite the inequality between the estimates, the methods displayed the same pattern of milk fat composition, allowing similar conclusions about the milk samples under evaluation. PMID:24629954

  4. Unsaturated fatty acids promote the phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa and R. equi by RAW264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Stephanie; Fuhrmann, Herbert; Schumann, Julia

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, using the murine monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7 as a model system, we analyzed the phagocytosis rate and the bactericidal capacity of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)-enriched macrophages against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Rhodococcus equi. The P. aeruginosa strain ATCC 10145, the virulent R. equi strain ATCC 33701, and the non-virulent R. equi strain ATCC 6939 were examined. Flow cytometric detection of intracellular microorganisms in combination with viability assays were used to determine the impact of PUFA on the number of engulfed, surviving as well as replicating bacteria. Macrophage enrichment with PUFA resulted in an increase of the internalization rate of the microorganisms by the immune cells. Moreover, an impeding action of the unsaturated fatty acids on the intracellular survival rates of the virulent strains P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145 and R. equi ATCC 33701 could be observed. The n-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as well as the n-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid (AA) showed the most pronounced effects. Taken together, our data support the idea of supplementing PUFA to immunocompromised individuals as well as to people suffering from chronic infections with P. aeruginosa or R. equi to improve macrophage phagocytic and microbicidal activity. PMID:22903555

  5. Characterization and analysis of the cotton cyclopropane fatty acid synthase family and their contribution to cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawat Richa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclopropane fatty acids (CPA have been found in certain gymnosperms, Malvales, Litchi and other Sapindales. The presence of their unique strained ring structures confers physical and chemical properties characteristic of unsaturated fatty acids with the oxidative stability displayed by saturated fatty acids making them of considerable industrial interest. While cyclopropenoid fatty acids (CPE are well-known inhibitors of fatty acid desaturation in animals, CPE can also inhibit the stearoyl-CoA desaturase and interfere with the maturation and reproduction of some insect species suggesting that in addition to their traditional role as storage lipids, CPE can contribute to the protection of plants from herbivory. Results Three genes encoding cyclopropane synthase homologues GhCPS1, GhCPS2 and GhCPS3 were identified in cotton. Determination of gene transcript abundance revealed differences among the expression of GhCPS1, 2 and 3 showing high, intermediate and low levels, respectively, of transcripts in roots and stems; whereas GhCPS1 and 2 are both expressed at low levels in seeds. Analyses of fatty acid composition in different tissues indicate that the expression patterns of GhCPS1 and 2 correlate with cyclic fatty acid (CFA distribution. Deletion of the N-terminal oxidase domain lowered GhCPS's ability to produce cyclopropane fatty acid by approximately 70%. GhCPS1 and 2, but not 3 resulted in the production of cyclopropane fatty acids upon heterologous expression in yeast, tobacco BY2 cell and Arabidopsis seed. Conclusions In cotton GhCPS1 and 2 gene expression correlates with the total CFA content in roots, stems and seeds. That GhCPS1 and 2 are expressed at a similar level in seed suggests both of them can be considered potential targets for gene silencing to reduce undesirable seed CPE accumulation. Because GhCPS1 is more active in yeast than the published Sterculia CPS and shows similar activity when expressed in model plant systems, it represents a strong candidate gene for CFA accumulation via heterologous expression in production plants.

  6. Fatty acid profile, cholesterol and oxidative status in broiler chicken breast muscle fed different dietary oil sources and calcium levels

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    N.R., Abdulla; T.C., Loh; H., Akit; A.Q., Sazili; H.L., Foo; R., Mohamad; R., Abdul Rahim; M., Ebrahimi; A.B., Sabow.

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of three feeds containing 6% oils: palm oil (PO), soybean oil (SO) and linseed oil (LO); and three calcium levels (NRC recommendation, 1.25% and 1.50%) on the fatty acid profile, lipid oxidation and cholesterol concentrations of broiler breast [...] meat in a 3 ? 3 factorial experiment. A total of 378 one-day-old chicks were randomly assigned to the diets and fed for six weeks. Birds fed diet supplemented with LO, SO and PO had higher proportions of ?-linolenic, linoleic and oleic acids, respectively. The LO diet increased the total n-3 fatty acids and decreased the n-6 : n-3 compared with the PO and SO diets. Birds fed the PO diet had higher oxidative stability and cholesterol compared with those fed the SO and LO diets. However, the level of cholesterol in all treatments was within the normal range. The level of calcium and interaction between source of oil and calcium level did not influence lipid oxidation, fatty acid profile and cholesterol level of broiler breast muscle. It can be concluded that dietary LO and SO enhanced n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, respectively, while dietary PO enhanced the oleic acid and oxidative stability of broiler breast muscle. Thus, this study showed that PO can be used as an alternative oil source in broiler diets with a positive effect on the oxidative stability of chicken meat refrigerated at seven days when compared with vegetable oils that are rich in linoleic and ?-linolenic acid.

  7. 20 Years of Fatty Acid Analysis by Capillary Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcone Augusto Leal de Oliveira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A review taking into account the literature reports covering 20 years of fatty acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis is presented. This paper describes the evolution of fatty acid analysis using different CE modes such as capillary zone electrophoresis, non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis, micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography and microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography employing different detection systems, such as ultraviolet-visible, capacitively coupled contactless conductivity, laser-induced fluorescence and mass spectrometry. In summary, the present review signals that CE seems to be an interesting analytical separation technique that is very useful for screening analysis or quantification of the usual fatty acids present in different matrices, offering short analysis times and a simple sample preparation step as inherent advantages in comparison with the classical methodology, making it a separation technique that is very attractive for quality control in industry and government agencies.

  8. Synthesis and scavenging role of furan fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Rachelle A S; Peterson, Amelia C; Ziegelhoffer, Eva C; Westphall, Michael S; Tjellström, Henrik; Coon, Joshua J; Donohue, Timothy J

    2014-08-19

    Fatty acids play important functional and protective roles in living systems. This paper reports on the synthesis of a previously unidentified 19 carbon furan-containing fatty acid, 10,13-epoxy-11-methyl-octadecadienoate (9-(3-methyl-5-pentylfuran-2-yl)nonanoic acid) (19Fu-FA), in phospholipids from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We show that 19Fu-FA accumulation is increased in cells containing mutations that increase the transcriptional response of this bacterium to singlet oxygen ((1)O2), a reactive oxygen species generated by energy transfer from one or more light-excited donors to molecular oxygen. We identify a previously undescribed class of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methylases that convert a phospholipid 18 carbon cis unsaturated fatty acyl chain to a 19 carbon methylated trans unsaturated fatty acyl chain (19M-UFA). We also identify genes required for the O2-dependent conversion of this 19M-UFA to 19Fu-FA. Finally, we show that the presence of (1)O2 leads to turnover of 19Fu-Fa in vivo. We propose that furan-containing fatty acids like 19Fu-FA can act as a membrane-bound scavenger of (1)O2, which is naturally produced by integral membrane enzymes of the R. sphaeroides photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:25092314

  9. Aerobic training affects fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marini Marina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effect of exercise training on the fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes was evaluated in an experimental animal model where rats were subjected to a ten-wk aerobic training. Five groups of rats were compared: sedentary rats at 19 or 23 wks of age, rats trained at moderate or high intensity sacrificed at 19 wks of age, and rats trained at high intensity, and sacrificed following 4 weeks of sedentary life. We had already demonstrated that cardioprotection correlates with training intensity and partially persists in detrained rats. Main findings are that rats trained at higher intensity display consistent signs of lipid peroxidation but a lower ?6/?3 ratio and a lower content of trans fatty acids when compared to rats trained at lower intensity and to older sedentary rats. Trans fatty acids negatively affect cell membrane fluidity and permeability. Detrained rats showed intermediate values. Gene expression evaluation of selected enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis revealed some of the adaptive mechanisms leading to the maintenance of membrane fatty acid homeostasis following exercise. The decrease in the amount of trans fatty and in the inflammatory pathways (i.e. ?6/?3 ratio in high-intensity trained rats underscores the protective effect of high intensity aerobic training.

  10. Sunflower oil, seeds and plants with modified fatty acid distribution in the triacylglycerol molecule

    OpenAIRE

    Garce?s Manchen?o, Rafael; Marti?nez-force, Enrique

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to a sunflower oil directly obtained from sunflower seeds with at least 12 % of stearic acid referred to the total fatty acid content, characterized in that the distribution coefficient of saturated fatty acids alpha between positions sn-1 and sn-3 is at least 0.38 and to a sunflower oil directly obtained from sunflower seeds with at least 12 % of stearic acid referred to the total fatty acid content, characterized in that the distribution coefficient of saturated fatty ...

  11. Fatty-Acid composition of free-choice starter broiler diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Kessler

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were carried out to evaluate the inclusion of vegetable oils with different fatty acid content in starter and pre-starter broiler diets. In Experiment I 480 1- to 9-day-old male Ross 308 broilers were fed diets containing corn oil (CO, acid corn oil (ACO, linseed oil (LO or coconut fat (CoF. Chicks were distributed according to a factorial 2x2x2arrangement (2 free fatty acids - FFA x (2 n6:n3 ratios x (2 medium-chain fatty acids levels - AGMC. Performance responses and dry matter (DMM, crude protein (CPM, and crude fat (CFM metabolizability were evaluated. In Experiment II, 480 1- to 20-day-old male Ross 308 broilers were offered the free choice of 2 different diets: with no fat addition, or with 10% addition of the following fat sources: CO, LO, CoF, soybean soapstock (SBS, acid soybean oil (ASO, or acid cottonseed oil (ACtO. Performance responses and diet selection were evaluated. In experiment I, there were no significant effects of the diets on performance, DMM, or CPM; however, the inclusion of FFA depressed CFM. In experiment II, there was a marked preference of birds of the diets with fat inclusion, leading to the selection of diets with more than 3100 kcal/kg ME in the period of 1 to 20 days, independently of fat source. The broilers selected the high fat and energy diets since the first days of age, which resulted in better bird performance.

  12. Fatty-Acid composition of free-choice starter broiler diets

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    AM, Kessler; DS, Lubisco; MM, Vieira; AML, Ribeiro; AM, Penz Jr.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were carried out to evaluate the inclusion of vegetable oils with different fatty acid content in starter and pre-starter broiler diets. In Experiment I 480 1- to 9-day-old male Ross 308 broilers were fed diets containing corn oil (CO), acid corn oil (ACO), linseed oil (LO) or coconu [...] t fat (CoF). Chicks were distributed according to a factorial 2x2x2arrangement (2 free fatty acids - FFA ) x (2 n6:n3 ratios) x (2 medium-chain fatty acids levels - AGMC). Performance responses and dry matter (DMM), crude protein (CPM), and crude fat (CFM) metabolizability were evaluated. In Experiment II, 480 1- to 20-day-old male Ross 308 broilers were offered the free choice of 2 different diets: with no fat addition, or with 10% addition of the following fat sources: CO, LO, CoF, soybean soapstock (SBS), acid soybean oil (ASO), or acid cottonseed oil (ACtO). Performance responses and diet selection were evaluated. In experiment I, there were no significant effects of the diets on performance, DMM, or CPM; however, the inclusion of FFA depressed CFM. In experiment II, there was a marked preference of birds of the diets with fat inclusion, leading to the selection of diets with more than 3100 kcal/kg ME in the period of 1 to 20 days, independently of fat source. The broilers selected the high fat and energy diets since the first days of age, which resulted in better bird performance.

  13. Regiospecific synthesis of new fatty N-acyl trihalomethylated pyrazoline derivatives from fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of new fatty N-acyl trihalomethylated pyrazoline derivatives from fatty acid methyl esters was synthesized by the cyclo condensation of respective fatty hydrazides with 4-alkoxy- 1,1,1-trial omethyl-3-alquen-2-ones. Efficient and regiospecific cyclizations catalyzed by BF3-MeOH gave the desired products in good to excellent yields and at high purity. (author)

  14. Effects of weight loss on liver and erythrocyte polyunsaturated fatty acid pattern and oxidative stress status in obese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    ALEJANDRA, ELIZONDO; JULIA, ARAYA; RAMÓN, RODRIGO; CINZIA, SIGNORINI; CRISTIANA, SGHERRI; MARIO, COMPORTI; JAIME, PONIACHIK; LUIS A, VIDELA.

    Full Text Available Our aim was to study the influence of weight loss on the fatty acid (FA) composition of liver and erythrocyte phospholipids and oxidative stress status in obese, non-alcoholic, fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. Seven obese NAFLD patients who underwent subtotal gastrectomy with a gastro-jejunal a [...] nastomosis in roux and Y were studied immediately and 3 months after surgery. Seven non-obese patients who underwent anti-reflux surgery constituted the control group. Serum F2-isoprostane levels were measured by GS/NICI-MS/MS and FA composition was determined by GC. At the time of surgery, controls and obese patients exhibited a hepatic polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) pattern that correlated with that of erythrocytes. Three months after surgery, NAFLD patients lost 21% of initial body weight; serum F2-isoprostane levels decreased by 76%; total PUFA, long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA), n-3 PUFA, and n-3 LCPUFA increased by 22, 29, 81, and 93%, respectively; n-6/n-3 LCPUFA ratio decreased by 51%; docosahexaenoic acid/docosapentaenoic acid ratio increased by 19-fold; and the n-3 product/precursor ratio (20: 5 + 22: 5 + 22: 6)/18: 3 increased by 164% (p

  15. Fatty acid composition of certain oil seeds from nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatty acids of certain oil seeds from Nigeria were determined by gas liquid chromatography and their identification was based on comparison by authentic samples. Seeds studied in this study were Aframomum danielli K. Schum, Arachidis hypogeal L., Glycine max L., Elaesis guineensis var. tenera, Piper guineense Thonn. ex Schumach and Treculia africana Decne. ex Trec. The fatty acid composition of the oil seeds showed that they (except E. guineensis) all contained more of unsaturated fatty acids ranging from 62.80% to 86.70% for P. guineense and A. hypogeal (L.), respectively. The oils with the exception of A. danielli (7.50%) and E. guineensis (3.30%) contained linoleic acid, which is an essential fatty acid with cholesterol-lowering activity in high amount in the range of 23.10% (A. hypogeae) to 34.10% (T. africana) with G. max, having the highest percentage of 56.40%. Four of the oils also contained linolenic acid in the range of 1.20% for A. danielli to 21.60% for P. guineense. (author)

  16. Negative confounding by essential fatty acids in methylmercury neurotoxicity associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Anna L; Mogensen, Ulla Brasch

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Methylmercury, a worldwide contaminant of fish and seafood, can cause adverse effects on the developing nervous system. However, long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in seafood provide beneficial effects on brain development. Negative confounding will likely result in underestimation of both mercury toxicity and nutrient benefits unless mutual adjustment is included in the analysis. METHODS: We examined these associations in 176 Faroese children, in whom prenatal methylmercury exposure was assessed from mercury concentrations in cord blood and maternal hair. The relative concentrations of fatty acids were determined in cord serum phospholipids. Neuropsychological performance in verbal, motor, attention, spatial, and memory functions was assessed at 7 years of age. Multiple regression and structural equation models (SEMs) were carried out to determine the confounder-adjusted associations with methylmercury exposure. RESULTS: A short delay recall (in percent change) in the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) was associated with a doubling of cord blood methylmercury (-18.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]=-36.3, -1.51). The association became stronger after the inclusion of fatty acid concentrations in the analysis (-22.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]=-39.4, -4.62). In structural equation models, poorer memory function (corresponding to a lower score in the learning trials and short delay recall in CVLT) was associated with a doubling of prenatal exposure to methylmercury after the inclusion of fatty acid concentrations in the analysis (-1.94, 95% CI=-3.39, -0.49). CONCLUSIONS: Associations between prenatal exposure to methylmercury and neurobehavioral deficits in memory function at school age were strengthened after fatty acid adjustment, thus suggesting that n-3 fatty acids need to be included in analysis of similar studies to avoid underestimation of the associations with methylmercury exposure.

  17. AMPK-independent pathways regulate skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dzamko, Nicolas; Schertzer, Jonathan D.

    2008-01-01

    The activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphorylation/inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) is believed to be the principal pathway regulating fatty acid oxidation. However, during exercise AMPK activity and ACC Ser-221 phosphorylation does not always correlate with rates of fatty acid oxidation. To address this issue we have investigated the requirement for skeletal muscle AMPK in controlling aminoimidazole-4-carboxymide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) and contraction-stimulated fatty acid oxidation utilizing transgenic mice expressing a muscle-specific kinase dead (KD) AMPK alpha2. In wild-type (WT) mice, AICAR and contraction increased AMPK alpha2 and alpha1 activities, the phosphorylation of ACC2 and rates of fatty acid oxidation while tending to reduce malonyl-CoA levels. Despite no activation of AMPK in KD mice, ACC2 phosphorylation was maintained, malonyl-CoA levels were reduced and rates of fatty acid oxidation were comparable between genotypes. During treadmill exercise both KD and WT mice had similar values of respiratory exchange ratio. These studies suggested the presence of an alternative ACC2 kinase(s). Using a phosphoproteomics-based approach we identified 18 Ser/Thr protein kinases whose phosphorylation was increased by greater than 25% in contracted KD relative to WT muscle. Utilizing bioinformatics we predicted that extracellular regulated protein-serine kinase (ERK1/2), inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB protein-serine kinase beta (IKKbeta) and protein kinase D (PKD) may phosphorylate ACC2 at Ser-221 but during in vitro phosphorylation assays only AMPK phosphorylated ACC2. These data demonstrate that AMPK is not essential for the regulation of fatty acid oxidation by AICAR or muscle contraction.

  18. Metabolic engineering of yeast to produce fatty acid-derived biofuels: bottlenecks and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Feng, Xueyang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles. PMID:26106371

  19. Oxidized Fatty Acids as Inter-Kingdom Signaling Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina H. Pohl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to “listen” and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plants; between animals and fungi; between animals and bacteria and between plants and fungi. This will aid in understanding these interactions, which often have implications in ecology, agriculture as well as human and animal health.

  20. Phospholipid Fatty Acid Analysis: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, R. H.

    2008-12-01

    With their 1980 publication, Bobbie and White initiated the use of phospholipid fatty acids for the study of microbial communities. This method, integrated with a previously published biomass assay based on the colorimetric detection of orthophosphate liberated from phospholipids, provided the first quantitative method for determining microbial community structure. The method is based on a quantitative extraction of lipids from the sample matrix, isolation of the phospholipids, conversion of the phospholipid fatty acids to their corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (known by the acronym FAME) and the separation, identification and quantification of the FAME by gas chromatography. Early laboratory and field samples focused on correlating individual fatty acids to particular groups of microorganisms. Subsequent improvements to the methodology include reduced solvent volumes for extractions, improved sensitivity in the detection of orthophosphate and the use of solid phase extraction technology. Improvements in the field of gas chromatography also increased accessibility of the technique and it has been widely applied to water, sediment, soil and aerosol samples. Whole cell fatty acid analysis, a related but not equal technique, is currently used for phenotypic characterization in bacterial species descriptions and is the basis for a commercial, rapid bacterial identification system. In the early 1990ês application of multivariate statistical analysis, first cluster analysis and then principal component analysis, further improved the usefulness of the technique and allowed the development of a functional group approach to interpretation of phospholipid fatty acid profiles. Statistical techniques currently applied to the analysis of phospholipid fatty acid profiles include constrained ordinations and neutral networks. Using redundancy analysis, a form of constrained ordination, we have recently shown that both cation concentration and dissolved organic matter (DOM) quality are determinates of microbial community structure in forested headwater streams. One of the most exciting recent developments in phospholipid fatty acid analysis is the application of compound specific stable isotope analysis. We are currently applying this technique to stream sediments to help determine which microorganisms are involved in the initial processing of DOM and the technique promises to be a useful tool for assigning ecological function to microbial populations.

  1. 75 FR 20785 - Polyglyceryl Phthalate Ester of Coconut Oil Fatty Acids; Exemption from the Requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ...Polyglyceryl Phthalate Ester of Coconut Oil Fatty Acids; Exemption from the...polyglyceryl phthalate ester of coconut oil fatty acids; exemption from the...polyglyceryl phthalate ester of coconut oil fatty acids'' pursuant to a...

  2. 75 FR 70254 - Typographical Error in Summary Notice of Filing in Docket for Polymerized Fatty Acid Esters With...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ...Filing in Docket for Polymerized Fatty Acid Esters With Aminoalcohol Alkoxylates...Petition (PP) 0E7699 for polymerized fatty acid esters with aminoalcohol alkoxylates...Petition (PP) 0E7699 for polymerized fatty acid esters with aminoalcohol...

  3. Effect of dietary sunflower oil and coconut oil on adipose tissue gene expression, fatty acid composition and serum lipid profile of grower pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Mohan N Harihara; Sarmah, Babul C; Tamuli, Madan K; Das, Anubrata; Kalita, Dhireswar

    2012-08-01

    The present study was conducted to assess whether the partial replacement of feed energy by vegetable oils containing high medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFA) and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) would modify lipogenic gene expression and other parameter of fat metabolism in pigs. Eighteen pigs (17-19 kg body weight) received one of three experimental diets for 60 days (six animals per group): (i) Control diet; (ii) a diet with sunflower oil (SO) or (iii) a diet with coconut oil (CO). In diets SO and CO, 10% of the feed energy was replaced by the respective oils. The experimental treatment did not influence the performance of the pigs. In blood serum, an increased content of total cholesterol was observed for SO and CO fed animals, whereas no significant changes for total triglycerides and different lipoprotein fractions were detected. The fatty acid composition of adipose tissue was significantly modified, with an increased content of MCFA and n-6 PUFA in CO and SO fed pigs, respectively. The gene expression for fatty acid synthase was decreased for SO and CO fed pigs; for stearoyl CoA desaturase and sterol regulatory element binding protein, a depression was observed in SO but not in CO fed pigs. The results of present study suggest that the type of dietary fat can modulate the adipose tissue gene expression and fatty acid composition differentially, with minimal effect on serum lipid profile. PMID:22924174

  4. Mutant fatty acid desaturase and methods for directed mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanklin, John (Shoreham, NY); Whittle, Edward J. (Greenport, NY)

    2008-01-29

    The present invention relates to methods for producing fatty acid desaturase mutants having a substantially increased activity towards substrates with fewer than 18 carbon atom chains relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon chain length specificity, the sequences encoding the desaturases and to the desaturases that are produced by the methods. The present invention further relates to a method for altering a function of a protein, including a fatty acid desaturase, through directed mutagenesis involving identifying candidate amino acid residues, producing a library of mutants of the protein by simultaneously randomizing all amino acid candidates, and selecting for mutants which exhibit the desired alteration of function. Candidate amino acids are identified by a combination of methods. Enzymatic, binding, structural and other functions of proteins can be altered by the method.

  5. The effects of fish oil and high or low linoleic acid intake on fatty acid composition of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, C.T.; FrØkiær, Hanne

    2008-01-01

    Dietary intake of 18: 2n-6 and 18: 3n-3 may affect endogenous production and incorporation of n-3 long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA) from fish oils (170). This double-blinded controlled 2 x 2-factorial 8-week intervention investigates the effects of high and low 18: 2n-6 intake in combination with FO-supplementation on tissue fatty acid composition. Healthy young men (it 64) were randomized to capsules with FO or olive oil (control) (4-4 (2-0-5-6) ml/d) and to either sunflower oil and margarine (S/B) or rapeseed oil and a butter spread (R/K) to provide a high or a low 18: 2n-6 intake. Diet was measured by 4-d weighed dietary records at baseline, during and 8 weeks after the intervention and tissue incorporation as fatty acid composition of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The fat intervention gave a mean difference in the 18: 2n-6 intake of 7.3 g/d (95 % CI 4-6, 10-0) and a similar 18: 3n-3 intake in the groups. The R/K groups had a 0.2 % fatty acid (FA%) (95 % CI 0.0, 0.4, P=0.02) higher content of 22: 5n-3 in the PBMC, a tendency of slightly higher 20: 5n-3 (P=0.06), but no more 22: 6n-3 (P=0.83) than the SIB groups. FO effectively raised the PBMC content of all n-3 LCPUFA (P

  6. Ratios of Fatty Acids at the sn-2 Position of Triacylglycerols Containing Dihydroxy Fatty Acids in Castor Oil by Mass Sprectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The triacylglycerols (TAG) containing dihydroxy fatty acids have been recently identified by mass spectrometry in castor oil. These new dihydroxy fatty acids were proposed earlier as 11,12-dihydroxy-9-octadecenoic acid (diOH18:1), 11,12-dihydroxy-9,13-octadecadienoic acid (diOH18:2) and 11,12-dihydr...

  7. The association between n-3 fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes and insulin resistance : the Inuit Health in Transition Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseng, Trine; Witte, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between the content of n-3 fatty acids and insulin resistance in an Inuit population. STUDY DESIGN: The Inuit Health in Transition Study was carried out between 2003 and 2007 in Greenland as a cross-sectional study. Our preliminary results are based on the first 452 participants aged 18 and above. Only participants with at least 1 Inuit grandparent and without diabetes were included. METHODS: The contents of n-3 fatty acids and the n-3/n-6 ratio were measured in the erythrocyte membrane phospholipids. BMI was calculated and questions concerning diabetes and ethnicity were answered. Insulin resistance was estimated using the HOMA-IR index based on fasting-glucose and fasting-insulin. RESULTS: We found an inverse association between C20:5 n-3 (EPA), C22:3 n-3, the n-3/n-6 ratio and HOMA-IR and a positive association between C18:3 n-3 cis and HOMA-IR. When adjusted for age, gender, BMI and ethnicity, the association remained statistically significant for C20:5 n-3 (EPA),C22:3 n-3 and C18:3 n-3 cis. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that some types of n-3 fatty acids may have a protective effect against insulin resistance. The role of potential confounders such as physical activity, diet, energy intake, socio-economic status and contaminants deserves further exploration.

  8. Application of lipase technology for transesterification of fatty acid ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOKO SULISTYO

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We have reported the potency of microbial extracellular enzyme for synthesis of fatty acid ester. Further investigation was aimed to study capacity of the enzyme on bioprocess of crude palm oil by transesterification of saturated fatty acid to fatty acid ester. We have studied some lipases from culture filtrate of Candida rugosa FM-9301, Bacillus subtilis FM-9101 and Pseudomonas aerogenes FM-9201, which were preincubated in a medium containing olive oil as inducers, using a shaker under conditions that allowed for lipase production at pH 4.5-6.5 and room temperature for 5 days. Those strains shown different activities during the hydrolysis of substrates, which resulted in decreasing or increasing free fatty acids those, were liberated from media containing crude palm oil and organic solvents. The optimal transesterification condition was at temperature of 45-50?C and at pH 4.5 for C. rugosa and pH 6.0 to 7.0 for P. aerogenes and B. subtilis. Under the enzyme concentration of 50% (v/v, the transesterification was rapidly occurred, while at the concentration of 20% (v/v the enzymatically biosynthesis required longer incubation period. The substrates incubated with C. rugosa lipase exhibited higher linoleic and linolenic acid (7.16 and 2.15%, respectively, than that of B. subtilis lipase (4.85% and 1.43%, respectively, while P. aerogenes lipase (3.73% and 1.11%, respectively.

  9. Fatty acid transporter levels and palmitate oxidation rate correlate with ejection fraction in the infarcted rat heart.

    OpenAIRE

    Heather, LC; Cole, MA; Lygate, CA; Evans, RD; Stuckey, DJ; Murray, AJ; ~Neubauer, S.; CLARKE, K

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cardiac fatty acid uptake occurs predominantly via sarcolemmal transporter proteins; fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein (FABPpm) and fatty acid transporter proteins (FATP) 1 and 6. We hypothesised that levels of the fatty acid transporters would be reduced in the chronically infarcted rat heart, in parallel with reduced dependence on fatty acid utilisation. METHODS AND RESULTS: In vivo left ventricular ejection fractions, measured using e...

  10. The effect of breed on fatty acid composition of subcutaneous adipose tissues in fat-tailed sheep under identical feeding conditions

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    E., Maleki; F., Kafilzadeh; G.Y., Meng; M.A., Rajion; M., Ebrahimi.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate the fatty acid (FA) profile of subcutaneous adipose tissue and tailfat of two fat-tailed sheep breeds under identical feeding conditions. Twelve male lambs from two breeds, Sanjabi (n = 6), weighing 23.3 ± 0.48 kg, and Mehraban (n = 6), weighing 26.1 ± 2.14 kg, were [...] used in this investigation. All animals were weighed and slaughtered at the end of a 90-day fattening period and FA composition of subcutaneous adipose tissue and tailfat was determined. Significant breed differences in total FA, total polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and n-6PUFA contents were observed in the subcutaneous adipose tissue, but not in the tailfat. Breed differences were observed in the conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of subcutaneous adipose tissue, with higher levels in Sanjabi than in Mehraban lambs. Linoleic and ?-linolenic acid of subcutaneous adipose were significantly higher in the Sanjabi breed than in the Mehraban breed. Thus, adipose tissue from fat-tailed Sanjabi lamb has a higher proportion of health-promoting linoleic and ?-linolenic acids, unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) and CLA, suggesting that the Sanjabi breed could be used for producing healthier lamb products.

  11. Fatty acid profile and physical properties of milk fat from cows fed calcium salts of fatty acids with varying unsaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, P Y; Girard, V; Brisson, G J

    1998-02-01

    Holstein cows (n = 24) averaging 42 d in milk were used in a randomized complete block design during a 4-wk trial. A control total mixed ration (TMR) was compared with TMR supplemented with Ca salts of fatty acids from canola oil, soybean oil, or linseed oil. The three vegetable oils were progressively more unsaturated; the dominant fatty acids were, respectively, cis-delta-9-C18:1, C18:2, and C18:3. Apparent total tract digestibility of dry matter, crude protein, ether extract, and neutral detergent fiber was higher for rations containing Ca salts than for the control ration. Milk yield increased linearly as the unsaturation of the dominant fatty acid in the Ca salts increased. Milk fat percentage was reduced when Ca salts were added to the rations. The addition of Ca salts to the ration decreased the proportions of saturated fatty acids that contained C6 to C16 and increased the proportions of C18:0, cis-delta-C18:1, and trans-delta-11-C18:1 in milk fat. Proportions of C18:2 and C18:3 increased linearly, and cis-delta-9-C18:1 decreased linearly, as the unsaturation of the dominant fatty acid in the Ca salts increased. The proportion of fat that was liquid at 5 degrees C was higher for butter from cows fed diets containing Ca salts, but the proportion of liquid fat at 20 degrees C was not affected. Calcium salts of unsaturated fatty acids added to the diets of dairy cows improved the thermal properties of milk fat. PMID:9532502

  12. Detection of Fatty Acids Profile in Human Saliva with Special Reference to Ovulation

    OpenAIRE

    SUBBARAYALU ALAGENDRAN; Archunan, G.; Ramesh Kumar, K.; Rengarajan, R. L.; Fernandez, G.; Guzman, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    Human saliva was analyzed by Gas-Chromatography (GC) for fatty acids study throughout menstrual cycle. Thefatty acid profiles from preovulatory, ovulatory and postovulatory phase’s sample were compared to establishany qualitative and quantitative differences that might have potential value in detection of ovulation in women.In the present study, 17 different types of fatty acids were identified. The fatty acids resembling as Oleic acid,Palmitic acid and acetic acid were comparatively higher...

  13. The Omega-3 Fatty Acid Docosahexaenoic Acid Attenuates Organic Dust-Induced Airway Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Nordgren, Tara M.; Friemel, Taylor D.; Heires, Art J.; Poole, Jill A.; Wyatt, Todd A.; Romberger, Debra J.

    2014-01-01

    Workers exposed to organic dusts from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are at risk for developing airway inflammatory diseases. Available preventative and therapeutic measures for alleviating dust-induced lung disease are inadequate. Because omega-3 fatty acids can mitigate inflammatory processes, we aimed to determine whether nutritional supplementation with the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) could reduce the airway inflammatory consequences of exposures to organ...

  14. Effects of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Growth Medium on Lipid Composition and on Physicochemical Surface Properties of Lactobacilli

    OpenAIRE

    Kankaanpa?a?, P.; Yang, B.; Kallio, H.; Isolauri, E.; Salminen, S.

    2004-01-01

    Most probiotic lactobacilli adhere to intestinal surfaces, a phenomenon influenced by free polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The present study investigated whether free linoleic acid, ?-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, ?-linolenic acid, or docosahexaenoic acid in the growth medium alters the fatty acid composition of lactobacilli and their physical characteristics. The most abundant bacterial fatty acids identified were oleic, vaccenic, and dihydrosterculic acids. PUFA, especially conjug...

  15. 40 CFR 417.30 - Applicability; description of the soap manufacturing by fatty acid neutralization subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... true Applicability; description of the soap manufacturing by fatty acid neutralization...CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Soap Manufacturing by Fatty Acid...

  16. Macrocyclic lactones: A versatile source for omega radiohalogenated fatty acid analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For each omega halogenated fatty acid there exists a potential omega hydroxy fatty acid and the corresponding macrocyclic lactone. The authors have utilized such lactones as starting materials for omega /sup 123/I fatty acid analogs intended for myocardial imaging. Macrocyclic musk lactones are industrially available; 120 analogs are described in the literature. The preparation requires saponification, tosylation, and radio-iodide substitution. Iodo-fatty acids are readily separated from tosylate fatty acids on TLC. While providing a secure source of 16-iodo-hexadecanoic acid and 17-iodo-heptadecanoic acid, the scheme allows ready access to a large number of untried fatty acid analogs. Examples presented are 16-iodo-hexadecanoic acid, 16-iodo-7-hexadecanoic acid, 16-iodo-12-oxa-hexadecanoic acid, 15-iodo-pentadecanoic acid, and 15-iodo-12-keto-pentadecanoic acid. Metabolic studies are in progress in mice and dogs to assess the utility of these analogs for myocardial imaging

  17. Quantitation of fatty acids by GLC and separation of omega-6 nutraceutical fatty acid from carthamus tinctorius L. seed oil cultivated in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GLC analysis of carthamus tinctorius (safflower) yielded average hexane extracted oil content of 28% (25-30%); the oil contained high level of linoleic acid (74%). Monounsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid amounted 12.94%, while the saturated fatty acids like palmitic acid and stearic acid were 9.43 and 1.81%, respectively. Iodine value of linoleic acid was found to be 160:1 while its purity was 93.1%. (author)

  18. Fatty acid composition and ?3/?6 ratios of the muscle lipids of six fish species in Sugla Lake, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Cakmak Selim Yavuz; Zengin Gokhan; Guler Ozmen Gokalp; Aktumsek Abdurrahman; Ozparlak Haluk

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acid composition of the muscle lipids of Carassius gibelio, Pseudophoxinus anatolicus, Sander lucioperca, Tinca tinca, Vimba vimba tenella and Capoeta capoeta in Sugla Lake were determined. In all species, palmitic acid (13.25- 18.54% of total fatty acids) and oleic acid (11.93-34.23% of total fatty acids) were identified as major saturated fatty acid (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), respectively. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was found to be the major polyunsaturated fat...

  19. Fishy Business: Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Zinc Transporters and Free Zinc Availability in Human Neuronal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Damitha De Mel; Cenk Suphioglu

    2014-01-01

    Omega-3 (?-3) fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are ?-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. D...

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention and survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Carol J; Kimler, Bruce F; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Women with evidence of high intake ratios of the marine omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) relative to the omega-6 arachidonic acid have been found to have a reduced risk of breast cancer compared with those with low ratios in some but not all case-control and cohort studies. If increasing EPA and DHA relative to arachidonic acid is effective in reducing breast cancer risk, likely mechanisms include reduction in proinflammatory lipid derivatives, inhibition of nuclear factor-?B-induced cytokine production, and decreased growth factor receptor signaling as a result of alteration in membrane lipid rafts. Primary prevention trials with either risk biomarkers or cancer incidence as endpoints are underway but final results of these trials are currently unavailable. EPA and DHA supplementation is also being explored in an effort to help prevent or alleviate common problems after a breast cancer diagnosis, including cardiac and cognitive dysfunction and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The insulin-sensitizing and anabolic properties of EPA and DHA also suggest supplementation studies to determine whether these omega-3 fatty acids might reduce chemotherapy-associated loss of muscle mass and weight gain. We will briefly review relevant omega-3 fatty acid metabolism, and early investigations in breast cancer prevention and survivorship. PMID:25936773

  1. Radiometric measurement of differential metabolism of fatty acid by mycobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assay system has been developed based on automated radiometric quantification of 14CO2 produced through oxidation of [1-14C] fatty acids by mycobacteria. Two stains of M. tuberculosis (H37Rv and Erdman) and one of M. bovis (BCG) in 7H9 medium (ADC) with 1.0 microCi of one of the fatty acids (butyric, hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic) were studied. Results previously published on M. lepraemurium (Hawaiian) were also included for comparison. Both strains of M. tuberculosis had maximum 14CO2 production from hexanoic acid. Oxidation of butyric and avid oxidation of lauric acids were also found with the H37Rv strain but not with Erdman. In contrast, 14CO2 production by M. bovis was greatest from lauric and somewhat less from decanoic acid. M. lepraemurium showed increasing oxidation rates from myristic, decanoic and lauric acids. Assimilation studies of M. tuberculosis H37Rv confirmed that most of the oxidized substrates were converted into by-products with no change in those from which no oxidation was found. These data suggest that the radiometric measurement of differential fatty acid metabolism may provide a basis of strain identification of the genus Mycobacterium

  2. Biosynthesis of highly unsaturated fatty acids by hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEHDI GHASEMI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA metabolism leads to many diseases. In this study, producers of ?-linolenic acid (GLA, arachidonic acid (ARA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA were selected: Cephalosporium humicola IE (on glucose, dry biomass – 14 g/l, total lipids – 18-20%, GLA in lipids – 12.0%, Mucor globosus 11 (respectively – 15 g/l, 18% and 5% and Pythium irregulare LX (on glucose, dry biomass – 14.5 g/l, total lipids – 18-20%, 9.2 and 7.8% of ARA and EPA, respectively. On crude oil as the only source of carbon, the amount of biomass of the specified fungi decreases by 3-4 times, whereas the quantity of lipids and highly unsaturated fatty acids increases in four and 1.2 - 3.4 times, respectively. The maximum ?-linolenic acid in M. globosus and C. humicola was detected at neutral ??. Optimum volume of inoculate was 2.0-4.0%, nitrogen source NH4NO3, a carbon-nitrogen ratio 34:1. For biosynthesis of ARA and EPA by P. irregulare, the optimum nitrogen source was NH4Cl, ?? 7.0- 8.0 and ?/N - 50:1 at 28°C. The process of adaptation to stressful situation under crude oil motivated the increase of the rate of membrane phospholipids with high quantity of unsaturated fatty acids.

  3. Acute exercise increases triglyceride synthesis in skeletal muscle and prevents fatty acid–induced insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk, Simon; Horowitz, Jeffrey F.

    2007-01-01

    Fatty acid oversupply is a key mediator of skeletal m