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North American Wetlands and Mosquito Control  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Wetlands are valuable habitats that provide important social, economic, and ecological services such as flood control, water quality improvement, carbon sequestration, pollutant removal, and primary/secondary production export to terrestrial and aquatic food chains. There is disagreement about the need for mosquito control in wetlands and about the techniques utilized for mosquito abatement and their impacts upon wetlands ecosystems. Mosquito control in wetlands is a complex issue influenced by numerous factors, including many hard to quantify elements such as human perceptions, cultural predispositions, and political climate. In spite of considerable progress during the last decades, habitat protection and environmentally sound habitat management still remain inextricably tied to politics and economics. Furthermore, the connections are often complex, and occur at several levels, ranging from local businesses and politicians, to national governments and multinational institutions. Education is the key to lasting wetlands conservation. Integrated mosquito abatement strategies incorporate many approaches and practicable options, as described herein, and need to be well-defined, effective, and ecologically and economically sound for the wetland type and for the mosquito species of concern. The approach will certainly differ in response to disease outbreaks caused by mosquito-vectored pathogens versus quality of life issues caused by nuisance-biting mosquitoes. In this contribution, we provide an overview of the ecological setting and context for mosquito control in wetlands, present pertinent information on wetlands mosquitoes, review the mosquito abatement options available for current wetlands managers and mosquito control professionals, and outline some necessary considerations when devising mosquito control strategies. Although the emphasis is on North American wetlands, most of the material is applicable to wetlands everywhere.

Gabrielle E. Sakolsky-Hoopes

2012-12-01

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North American wetlands and mosquito control.  

Science.gov (United States)

Wetlands are valuable habitats that provide important social, economic, and ecological services such as flood control, water quality improvement, carbon sequestration, pollutant removal, and primary/secondary production export to terrestrial and aquatic food chains. There is disagreement about the need for mosquito control in wetlands and about the techniques utilized for mosquito abatement and their impacts upon wetlands ecosystems. Mosquito control in wetlands is a complex issue influenced by numerous factors, including many hard to quantify elements such as human perceptions, cultural predispositions, and political climate. In spite of considerable progress during the last decades, habitat protection and environmentally sound habitat management still remain inextricably tied to politics and economics. Furthermore, the connections are often complex, and occur at several levels, ranging from local businesses and politicians, to national governments and multinational institutions. Education is the key to lasting wetlands conservation. Integrated mosquito abatement strategies incorporate many approaches and practicable options, as described herein, and need to be well-defined, effective, and ecologically and economically sound for the wetland type and for the mosquito species of concern. The approach will certainly differ in response to disease outbreaks caused by mosquito-vectored pathogens versus quality of life issues caused by nuisance-biting mosquitoes. In this contribution, we provide an overview of the ecological setting and context for mosquito control in wetlands, present pertinent information on wetlands mosquitoes, review the mosquito abatement options available for current wetlands managers and mosquito control professionals, and outline some necessary considerations when devising mosquito control strategies. Although the emphasis is on North American wetlands, most of the material is applicable to wetlands everywhere. PMID:23222252

Rey, Jorge R; Walton, William E; Wolfe, Roger J; Connelly, C Roxanne; O'Connell, Sheila M; Berg, Joe; Sakolsky-Hoopes, Gabrielle E; Laderman, Aimlee D

2012-12-01

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Novel Methods for Mosquito Control using RNAi.  

Science.gov (United States)

The discovery and development of novel insecticides for vector control is a primary focus of toxicology research conducted at the Mosquito and Fly Research Unit, Gainesville, FL. Targeting critical genes/proteins in mosquitoes using RNA interference (RNAi) is being investigated as a method to devel...

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[Fighting mosquitoes in the Netherlands: risks and control of exotic mosquitoes].  

Science.gov (United States)

- Mosquitoes play a significant role globally in the transmission of so-called vector-borne diseases- In the Netherlands, native mosquitoes are capable of transmitting infectious disease. This has not resulted in outbreaks of disease over the last 50 years.- The establishment of exotic mosquito species could pose risks to public health, especially in the case of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus).- Several organisations are working together to prevent the establishment of exotic mosquitoes in the Netherlands.- A plan for controlling native mosquito species is also currently being developed. PMID:25761288

Brandwagt, D A H; Stroo, C J; Braks, M A H; Fanoy, E B

2015-01-01

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Genetic Control of Mosquitoes: population suppression strategies / Controle genético de mosquitos: estratégias de supressão de populações  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Ao longo das duas últimas décadas, morbidade e mortalidade da malária e dengue e outros patógenos tem se tornado cada vez mais um problema de Saúde Pública. O aumento na distribuição geográfica de seus respectivos vetores é acompanhada pela emergência de doenças em novas áreas. Não estão disponíveis [...] drogas específicas suficientes e não há vacinas específicas para imunizar as populações alvo. As medidas de controle de mosquitos atuais falharam em atingir os objetivos propostos, principalmente devido à grande capacidade reprodutiva dos mosquitos e alta flexibilidade genômica. O controle químico se torna cada vez mais restrito devido a sua potencial toxicidade aos seres humanos, mortalidade de organismos não alvos, resistência a inseticida além de outros impactos ambientais. Novas estratégias de controle são necessárias. A técnica do inseto estéril (SIT) é um método de supressão populacional espécie específico e ambientalmente amigável, baseia-se na criação em massa, esterilização mediante irradiação e liberação de um grande número de insetos machos. Liberar insetos carregando um gene letal dominante (RIDL) oferece uma solução a muitas limitações impostas pela técnica do inseto estéril (SIT) que limitaram sua aplicação em mosquitos e ainda assim mantém suas características de ambientalmente amigável e espécie específica. A natureza auto-limitante de mosquitos estéreis tende a deixar alguns empecilhos para uso no campo, de certa forma, menos desafiadores quando comparados a sistemas auto-propagação, característicos de estratégias de substituição de população. Sistemas auto-limitantes estão mais próximos para uso no campo, portanto pode ser apropriado considerá-lo primeiro. A perspectiva de métodos de controle genéticos contra mosquitos vetores de doenças que acometem humanos está rapidamente se tornando uma realidade, muitas decisões terão de ser tomadas em âmbito nacional, regional e internacional com relação a aspectos étnicos, sociais, culturais e de biossegurança para o uso e liberação destes métodos de controle de vetores. Abstract in english Over the last two decades, morbidity and mortality from malaria and dengue fever among other pathogens are an increasing Public Health problem. The increase in the geographic distribution of vectors is accompanied by the emergence of viruses and diseases in new areas. There are insufficient specific [...] therapeutic drugs available and there are no reliable vaccines for malaria or dengue, although some progress has been achieved, there is still a long way between its development and actual field use. Most mosquito control measures have failed to achieve their goals, mostly because of the mosquito's great reproductive capacity and genomic flexibility. Chemical control is increasingly restricted due to potential human toxicity, mortality in no target organisms, insecticide resistance, and other environmental impacts. Other strategies for mosquito control are desperately needed. The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) is a species-specific and environmentally benign method for insect population suppression, it is based on mass rearing, radiation mediated sterilization, and release of a large number of male insects. Releasing of Insects carrying a dominant lethal gene (RIDL) offers a solution to many of the drawbacks of traditional SIT that have limited its application in mosquitoes while maintaining its environmentally friendly and species-specific utility. The self-limiting nature of sterile mosquitoes tends to make the issues related to field use of these somewhat less challenging than for self-spreading systems characteristic of population replacement strategies. They also are closer to field use, so might be appropriate to consider first. The prospect of genetic control methods against mosquito vectored human diseases is rapidly becoming a reality, many decisions will need to be made on a national, regional and international level regarding the biosafety, social, cultural a

André Barretto Bruno, Wilke; Mauro Toledo, Marrelli.

2012-10-01

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Female-specific flightless phenotype for mosquito control  

OpenAIRE

Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever are increasing public health problems with an estimated 50–100 million new infections each year. Aedes aegypti is the major vector of dengue viruses in its range and control of this mosquito would reduce significantly human morbidity and mortality. Present mosquito control methods are not sufficiently effective and new approaches are needed urgently. A “sterile-male-release” strategy based on the release of mosquitoes carrying a conditional dominant ...

Fu, Guoliang; Lees, Rosemary S.; Nimmo, Derric; Aw, Diane; Jin, Li; Gray, Pam; Berendonk, Thomas U.; White-cooper, Helen; Scaife, Sarah; Kim Phuc, Hoang; Marinotti, Osvaldo; Jasinskiene, Nijole; James, Anthony A.; Alphey, Luke

2010-01-01

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Boosting the sterile insect technique to control mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mosquitoes are vectors of major diseases. Auto-dissemination recently proved very efficient to control Aedes species, using adult females contaminated with dissemination stations of juvenile hormone to treat breeding habitats, but cannot be used at large scales. Here we propose to combine it to the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) to create a new control concept, named 'boosted SIT' that might enable the area-wide eradication of mosquitoes and many other vectors and insect pests. PMID:24746400

Bouyer, Jérémy; Lefrançois, Thierry

2014-06-01

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Mosquito control then, now, and in the future.  

Science.gov (United States)

This is a memorial lecture honoring the late Professor Stanley B. Freeborn of the University of California. In the spirit of his life-long academic and research interests in mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases, I am presenting here the evolution of vector control technology, especially that pertaining to mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases during the 20th century. Vector control technology in the first half of this century was relatively simple, utilizing source reduction, larvivorous fish, petroleum hydrocarbon oils, and some simple synthetic and botanical materials. During the 2nd half of this century, however, various classes of synthetic organic chemicals, improved petroleum oil formulations, insect growth regulators, synthetic pyrethroids, and microbial control agents were developed and employed in mosquito control and control of other disease-vectoring insects. Among these groups of control agents, petroleum oil formulations have endured to be used through the whole century. It is likely that petroleum oil formulations, insect growth regulators, and microbial control agents will provide the main thrust against vectors at least during the first quarter of the 21st century. It is also possible that effective tools through the development of vaccines and molecular entomology techniques might become available for the control of vectors and vector-borne diseases during this period of the 21st century. PMID:7707066

Mulla, M S

1994-12-01

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Does the monomolecular film aquatain mosquito formula provide effective control of container-breeding mosquitoes in Australia?  

Science.gov (United States)

The mosquito control potential of the silicone-based monomolecular film Aquatain Mosquito Formula (AMF) was investigated in field tests against the backyard mosquitoes Aedes notoscriptus and Culex quinquefasciatus. Plastic tubs, with and without emergent aquatic vegetation (Cyperus alternifolius), were sampled weekly for 2 wk prior to an application of Aquatain and up to 6 wk postapplication. The mean abundance of mosquito larvae and pupae was compared between pre- and postapplication periods as well as between treatment and control tubs. There was a significant reduction in the abundance of immature stages of both Ae. notoscriptus and Cx. quinquefasciatus within 48 h of application, and the mean weekly abundance of larvae of both species was significantly lower in treatment tubs compared with control tubs for up to 6 wk postapplication. Egg rafts, larvae, and pupae were not detected in treatment tubs until 5 wk postapplication. The results indicate that AMF holds great potential for mosquito control in backyard habitats. PMID:22533087

Webb, Cameron E; Russell, Richard C

2012-03-01

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Production of wetland Chironmidae (Diptera) and the effects of using Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis for mosquito control  

OpenAIRE

Massive mosquito nuisance problems, caused by the flood-water mosquito Aedes sticticus, occur after floods in the flood plains of the River Dalälven, central Sweden. Since 2002, the biological mosquito larvicide Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) has been used to control these mosquitoes. Here, we report results from the first six years of monitoring Chironomidae, the most susceptible non-target organisms, in three wetlands with Bti-treatment against mosquitoes and in three wetlan...

Lundstro?m, J. O.; Scha?fer, M. L.; Petersson, E.; Persson Vinnersten, T. Z.; Landin, Jan; Brodin, Y.

2010-01-01

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Analyzing the control of mosquito-borne diseases by a dominant lethal genetic system  

OpenAIRE

Motivated by the failure of current methods to control dengue fever, we formulate a mathematical model to assess the impact on the spread of a mosquito-borne viral disease of a strategy that releases adult male insects homozygous for a dominant, repressible, lethal genetic trait. A dynamic model for the female adult mosquito population, which incorporates the competition for female mating between released mosquitoes and wild mosquitoes, density-dependent competition during the larval stage, a...

Atkinson, Michael P.; Su, Zheng; Alphey, Nina; Alphey, Luke S.; Coleman, Paul G.; Wein, Lawrence M.

2007-01-01

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Monitoring Malaria Vector Control Interventions: Effectiveness of Five Different Adult Mosquito Sampling Methods  

OpenAIRE

Long-term success of ongoing malaria control efforts based on mosquito bed nets (long-lasting insecticidal net) and indoor residual spraying is dependent on continuous monitoring of mosquito vectors, and thus on effective mosquito sampling tools. The objective of our study was to identify the most efficient mosquito sampling tool(s) for routine vector surveillance for malaria and lymphatic filariasis transmission in coastal Kenya. We evaluated relative efficacy of five collection methods—li...

Onyango, Shirley A.; Kitron, Uriel; Mungai, Peter; Muchiri, Eric M.; Kokwaro, Elizabeth; King, Charles H.; Mutuku, Francis M.

2013-01-01

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Mosquito Surveillance for Prevention and Control of Emerging Mosquito-Borne Diseases in Portugal — 2008–2014  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Mosquito surveillance in Europe is essential for early detection of invasive species with public health importance and prevention and control of emerging pathogens. In Portugal, a vector surveillance national program—REVIVE (REde de VIgilância de VEctores—has been operating since 2008 under the custody of Portuguese Ministry of Health. The REVIVE is responsible for the nationwide surveillance of hematophagous arthropods. Surveillance for West Nile virus (WNV and other flaviviruses in adult mosquitoes is continuously performed. Adult mosquitoes—collected mainly with Centre for Disease Control light traps baited with CO2—and larvae were systematically collected from a wide range of habitats in 20 subregions (NUTS III. Around 500,000 mosquitoes were trapped in more than 3,000 trap nights and 3,500 positive larvae surveys, in which 24 species were recorded. The viral activity detected in mosquito populations in these years has been limited to insect specific flaviviruses (ISFs non-pathogenic to humans. Rather than emergency response, REVIVE allows timely detection of changes in abundance and species diversity providing valuable knowledge to health authorities, which may take control measures of vector populations reducing its impact on public health. This work aims to present the REVIVE operation and to expose data regarding mosquito species composition and detected ISFs.

Hugo C. Osório

2014-11-01

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Challenges and Approaches for Mosquito Targeted Malaria Control  

OpenAIRE

Malaria is one of today’s most serious diseases with an enormous socioeconomic impact. While anti-malarial drugs have existed for some time and vaccines development may be underway, the most successful malaria eradication programs have thus far relied on attacking the mosquito vector that spreads the disease causing agent Plasmodium. Here we will review past, current and future perspectives of malaria vector control strategies and how these approaches have taken a promising turn thanks rece...

Ramirez, Jose? L.; Garver, Lindsey S.; Dimopoulos, George

2009-01-01

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Multiple Resistances and Complex Mechanisms of Anopheles sinensis Mosquito: A Major Obstacle to Mosquito-Borne Diseases Control and Elimination in China  

OpenAIRE

Malaria, dengue fever, and filariasis are three of the most common mosquito-borne diseases worldwide. Malaria and lymphatic filariasis can occur as concomitant human infections while also sharing common mosquito vectors. The overall prevalence and health significance of malaria and filariasis have made them top priorities for global elimination and control programmes. Pyrethroid resistance in anopheline mosquito vectors represents a highly significant problem to malaria control worldwide. Sev...

Chang, Xuelian; Zhong, Daibin; Fang, Qiang; Hartsel, Joshua; Zhou, Guofa; Shi, Linna; Fang, Fujin; Zhu, Changliang; Yan, Guiyun

2014-01-01

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Malaria mosquito control using edible fish in western Kenya: preliminary findings of a controlled study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological control methods are once again being given much research focus for malaria vector control. This is largely due to the emerging threat of strong resistance to pesticides. Larvivorous fish have been used for over 100 years in mosquito control and many species have proved effective. In the western Kenyan highlands the larvivorous fish Oreochromis niloticus L. (Perciformes: Cichlidae (formerly Tilapia nilotica is commonly farmed and eaten but has not been previously tested in the field for malaria mosquito control. Methods This fish was introduced into abandoned fishponds at an altitude of 1,880 m and the effect measured over six months on the numbers of mosquito immatures. For comparison an untreated control pond was used. During this time, all ponds were regularly cleared of emergent vegetation and fish re-stocking was not needed. Significant autocorrelation was removed from the time series data, and t-tests were used to investigate within a pond and within a mosquito type any differences before and after the introduction of O. niloticus. Mulla's formula was also used on the raw data to calculate the percentage reduction of the mosquito larvae. Results After O. niloticus introduction, mosquito densities immediately dropped in the treated ponds but increased in the control pond. This increase was apparently due to climatic factors. Mulla's formula was applied which corrects for that natural tendency to increase. The results showed that after 15 weeks the fish caused a more than 94% reduction in both Anopheles gambiae s.l. and Anopheles funestus (Diptera: Culicidae in the treated ponds, and more than 75% reduction in culicine mosquitoes. There was a highly significantly reduction in A. gambiae s.l. numbers when compared to pre-treatment levels. Conclusion This study reports the first field trial data on O. niloticus for malaria mosquito control and shows that this species, already a popular food fish in western Kenya, is an apparently sustainable mosquito control tool which also offers a source of protein and income to people in rural areas. There should be no problem with acceptance of this malaria control method since the local communities already farm this fish species.

Omlin Francois X

2007-08-01

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Late-acting dominant lethal genetic systems and mosquito control  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduction or elimination of vector populations will tend to reduce or eliminate transmission of vector-borne diseases. One potential method for environmentally-friendly, species-specific population control is the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT. SIT has not been widely used against insect disease vectors such as mosquitoes, in part because of various practical difficulties in rearing, sterilization and distribution. Additionally, vector populations with strong density-dependent effects will tend to be resistant to SIT-based control as the population-reducing effect of induced sterility will tend to be offset by reduced density-dependent mortality. Results We investigated by mathematical modeling the effect of manipulating the stage of development at which death occurs (lethal phase in an SIT program against a density-dependence-limited insect population. We found late-acting lethality to be considerably more effective than early-acting lethality. No such strains of a vector insect have been described, so as a proof-of-principle we constructed a strain of the principal vector of the dengue and yellow fever viruses, Aedes (Stegomyia aegypti, with the necessary properties of dominant, repressible, highly penetrant, late-acting lethality. Conclusion Conventional SIT induces early-acting (embryonic lethality, but genetic methods potentially allow the lethal phase to be tailored to the program. For insects with strong density-dependence, we show that lethality after the density-dependent phase would be a considerable improvement over conventional methods. For density-dependent parameters estimated from field data for Aedes aegypti, the critical release ratio for population elimination is modeled to be 27% to 540% greater for early-acting rather than late-acting lethality. Our success in developing a mosquito strain with the key features that the modeling indicated were desirable demonstrates the feasibility of this approach for improved SIT for disease control.

Scaife Sarah

2007-03-01

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Monitoring malaria vector control interventions: effectiveness of five different adult mosquito sampling methods.  

Science.gov (United States)

Long-term success of ongoing malaria control efforts based on mosquito bed nets (long-lasting insecticidal net) and indoor residual spraying is dependent on continuous monitoring of mosquito vectors, and thus on effective mosquito sampling tools. The objective of our study was to identify the most efficient mosquito sampling tool(s) for routine vector surveillance for malaria and lymphatic filariasis transmission in coastal Kenya. We evaluated relative efficacy of five collection methods--light traps associated with a person sleeping under a net, pyrethrum spray catches, Prokopack aspirator, clay pots, and urine-baited traps--in four villages representing three ecological settings along the south coast of Kenya. Of the five methods, light traps were the most efficient for collecting female Anopheles gambiae s.l. (Giles) (Diptera: Culicidae) and Anopheles funestus (Giles) (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes, whereas the Prokopack aspirator was most efficient in collecting Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) (Diptera: Culicidae) and other culicines. With the low vector densities here, and across much of sub-Saharan Africa, wherever malaria interventions, long-lasting insecticidal nets, and/or indoor residual spraying are in place, the use of a single mosquito collection method will not be sufficient to achieve a representative sample of mosquito population structure. Light traps will remain a relevant tool for host-seeking mosquitoes, especially in the absence of human landing catches. For a fair representation of the indoor mosquito population, light traps will have to be supplemented with aspirator use, which has potential for routine monitoring of indoor resting mosquitoes, and can substitute the more labor-intensive and intrusive pyrethrum spray catches. There are still no sufficiently efficient mosquito collection methods for sampling outdoor mosquitoes, particularly those that are bloodfed. PMID:24180120

Onyango, Shirley A; Kitron, Uriel; Mungai, Peter; Muchiri, Eric M; Kokwaro, Elizabeth; King, Charles H; Mutuku, Francis M

2013-09-01

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Modelling Aedes aegypti mosquito control via transgenic and sterile insect techniques: endemics and emerging outbreaks  

OpenAIRE

The invasion of pest insects often changes or destroys a native ecosystem, and can result in food shortages and disease endemics. Issues such as the environmental effects of chemical control methods, the economic burden of maintaining control strategies and the risk of pest resistance still remain, and mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever prevail in many countries, infecting over 100 million worldwide in 2010. One environmentally friendly method for mosquito control is the...

Seirin Lee, S.; Baker, R. E.; Gaffney, E. A.; White, S. M.

2013-01-01

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Control of mosquito larvae in seasonal wetlands on a wildlife refuge using VectoMax CG.  

Science.gov (United States)

There is a great need for novel insecticides to control mosquitoes. VectoMax is a new mosquito larvicide that combines toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) and Bacillus sphaericus (Bs), and is designed to provide extended mosquito control. We tested the initial efficacy and longevity of control of mosquitoes using one of the formulations, VectoMax CG, in a full-scale study conducted in seasonal wetlands. VectoMax CG was applied by air at 8.9 kg/ha to 3 wetlands and 3 others were untreated controls. VectoMax CG controlled Culex tarsalis through day 28 and showed activity against Aedes melanimon. Use of this dual-material, extended-action formulation could minimize inspection visits and reduce application costs compared to Bti and Bs alone, and its combination of toxins may forestall resistance development. PMID:22329272

Dritz, Deborah A; Lawler, Sharon P; Evkhanian, Carol; Graham, Patrick; Baracosa, Vic; Dula, Gary

2011-12-01

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Malaria mosquito control using edible fish in western Kenya: preliminary findings of a controlled study  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Biological control methods are once again being given much research focus for malaria vector control. This is largely due to the emerging threat of strong resistance to pesticides. Larvivorous fish have been used for over 100 years in mosquito control and many species have proved effective. In the western Kenyan highlands the larvivorous fish Oreochromis niloticus L. (Perciformes: Cichlidae) (formerly Tilapia nilotica) is commonly farmed and eaten but has not been previous...

Omlin Francois X; Zhou Guofa; Fv, Howard Annabel

2007-01-01

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Crustacean biodiversity as an important factor for mosquito larval control.  

Science.gov (United States)

Newly established ponds, which are highly dynamic systems with changing levels of biological interactions among species, are common larval mosquito habitats. We investigated the impact of crustacean abundance and taxa diversity on mosquito oviposition and larval development. The effects of the biological larvicide Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) on mosquito larvae were monitored according to fluctuations in crustacean communities. Populations of the mosquito Culex pipiens colonized artificial ponds that contained crustacean communities at different time points of colonization by crustaceans: 1) 'no colonization' (no crustaceans), 2) 'simultaneous colonization' by crustaceans and mosquitoes, and 3) 'head-start colonization' by crustaceans (preceding colonization by mosquitoes). All types of ponds were treated with three concentrations of Bti (10, 100, or 1,000 µg/liter). Colonization of all ponds by Cx. pipiens (in terms of oviposition, larval abundance, and larval development) decreased significantly with increasing diversity of crustacean taxa. The total abundance of crustaceans had a minor effect on colonization by Cx. pipiens. The presence of crustaceans increased the sensitivity of Cx. pipiens larvae to Bti treatment by a factor of 10 and delayed the time of recolonization. This effect of Bti was relevant in the short term. In the long term, the presence of Cx. pipiens was determined by crustacean biodiversity. PMID:24581370

Kroeger, Iris; Duquesne, Sabine; Liess, Matthias

2013-12-01

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High-throughput sorting of mosquito larvae for laboratory studies and for future vector control interventions  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquito transgenesis offers new promises for the genetic control of vector-borne infectious diseases such as malaria and dengue fever. Genetic control strategies require the release of large number of male mosquitoes into field populations, whether they are based on the use of sterile males (sterile insect technique, SIT or on introducing genetic traits conferring refractoriness to disease transmission (population replacement. However, the current absence of high-throughput techniques for sorting different mosquito populations impairs the application of these control measures. Methods A method was developed to generate large mosquito populations of the desired sex and genotype. This method combines flow cytometry and the use of Anopheles gambiae transgenic lines that differentially express fluorescent markers in males and females. Results Fluorescence-assisted sorting allowed single-step isolation of homozygous transgenic mosquitoes from a mixed population. This method was also used to select wild-type males only with high efficiency and accuracy, a highly desirable tool for genetic control strategies where the release of transgenic individuals may be problematic. Importantly, sorted males showed normal mating ability compared to their unsorted brothers. Conclusions The developed method will greatly facilitate both laboratory studies of mosquito vectorial capacity requiring high-throughput approaches and future field interventions in the fight against infectious disease vectors.

Marois Eric

2012-08-01

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A theoretical approach to predicting the success of genetic manipulation of malaria mosquitoes in malaria control  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Mosquitoes that have been genetically modified to better encapsulate the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are being considered as a possible tool in the control of malaria. Hopes for this have been raised with the identification of genes involved in the encapsulation response and with advances in the tools required to transform mosquitoes. However, we have only very little understanding of the conditions that would allow such genes to spread in natural populations. M...

Koella Jacob C; Boëte Christophe

2002-01-01

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Perspectives of people in Mali toward genetically-modified mosquitoes for malaria control  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically-modified (GM mosquitoes have been proposed as part of an integrated vector control strategy for malaria control. Public acceptance is essential prior to field trials, particularly since mosquitoes are a vector of human disease and genetically modified organisms (GMOs face strong scepticism in developed and developing nations. Despite this, in sub-Saharan Africa, where the GM mosquito effort is primarily directed, very little data is available on perspectives to GMOs. Here, results are presented of a qualitative survey of public attitudes to GM mosquitoes for malaria control in rural and urban areas of Mali, West Africa between the months of October 2008 and June 2009. Methods The sample consisted of 80 individuals - 30 living in rural communities, 30 living in urban suburbs of Bamako, and 20 Western-trained and traditional health professionals working in Bamako and Bandiagara. Questions were asked about the cause of malaria, heredity and selective breeding. This led to questions about genetic alterations, and acceptable conditions for a release of pest-resistant GM corn and malaria-refractory GM mosquitoes. Finally, participants were asked about the decision-making process in their community. Interviews were transcribed and responses were categorized according to general themes. Results Most participants cited mosquitoes as one of several causes of malaria. The concept of the gene was not widely understood; however selective breeding was understood, allowing limited communication of the concept of genetic modification. Participants were open to a release of pest-resistant GM corn, often wanting to conduct a trial themselves. The concept of a trial was reapplied to GM mosquitoes, although less frequently. Participants wanted to see evidence that GM mosquitoes can reduce malaria prevalence without negative consequences for human health and the environment. For several participants, a mosquito control programme was preferred; however a transgenic release that satisfied certain requirements was usually acceptable. Conclusions Although there were some dissenters, the majority of participants were pragmatic towards a release of GM mosquitoes. An array of social and cultural issues associated with malaria, mosquitoes and genetic engineering became apparent. If these can be successfully addressed, then social acceptance among the populations surveyed seems promising.

Famenini Shannon

2010-05-01

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Web mapping GIS: GPS under the GIS umbrella for Aedes species dengue and chikungunya vector mosquito surveillance and control  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The mosquito nuisance and the mosquito borne diseases have become major important challenging public health problems in India especially in the fast developing city like Pondicherry urban agglomeration. The Pondicherry government has been implemented full-fledged mosquito control measures, however, dengue and chikungunya epidemics was accelerating trend in Pondicherry for the recent years, and therefore, the directorate of public health, Pondicherry was requested vector control research centre (VCRC, to conduct a mosquito control evaluation survey. A team of field staff of VCRC headed by the author, Pondicherry, have conducted a detailed reconnaissance survey for collecting the site specifications of houses and the streetwise mosquito data for analyzing the density of vector mosquitoes in the wards / blocks and delineating the areas vulnerable to disease epidemics in the urban areas. The GPS GARMIN 12 XL was used to collect the field data. The ARC GIS 10.0 software was used to map the site locations (houses with mosquito’s data. The digital map of block boundary of Pondicherry was used for mapping purpose. A systematic grid sampling was applied to conduct a rapid survey for mapping Aedes species mosquito genic condition in the urban areas and the coordinates of sites of house information with breeding habitats positive in the grid sectors was collected using GPS, and the mean value of positive habitats was analyzed by quintiles method for mapping. The four blocks were selected for Aedes mosquito survey where the mosquito problem was identified as comparatively high, four numbers of wards were selected from each block, and the 40 number of houses was selected with 100 meter interval distance for mosquito breeding survey in the domestic and peripheral domestic areas in each wards. The problematic areas were identified, highlighted and recommended for web mapping GIS for Aedes mosquito surveillance continuously for monitoring the mosquito control measures in the Pondicherry urban areas and the other parts of the urban areas in the country.

M. Palaniyandi

2014-09-01

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Area-wide management of Aedes albopictus: II. Gauging the efficacy of traditional integrated pest control measures against urban container mosquitoes  

Science.gov (United States)

Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse), the Asian tiger mosquito, is an introduced invasive species in the U.S. responsible for a significant proportion of service requests to local mosquito control programs. This container-utilizing mosquito is refractory to standard mosquito abatement measures in th...

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Production of wetland Chironomidae (Diptera) and the effects of using Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis for mosquito control.  

Science.gov (United States)

Massive mosquito nuisance problems, caused by the flood-water mosquito Aedes sticticus, occur after floods in the flood plains of the River Dalälven, central Sweden. Since 2002, the biological mosquito larvicide Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) has been used to control these mosquitoes. Here, we report results from the first six years of monitoring Chironomidae, the most susceptible non-target organisms, in three wetlands with Bti-treatment against mosquitoes and in three wetlands without treatment. Emergence traps were used for continuous insect sampling from May to September each year, 2002-2007, and were emptied once a week. A total of 21,394 chironomids of 135 species were collected, and the subfamily Orthocladiinae dominated the fauna followed by Chironominae and Tanypodinae. The annual chironomid production in the wetlands was low, with an average of 1917 individuals per m(2), and 42 g ash-free dry weight per m(2). We found no reduced production of chironomids at neither family, nor subfamily level, in Bti-treated as compared to untreated wetlands. This is the first long-term follow-up study of the possible effects of Bti-based mosquito larval control on chironomid species production. In the short-term view, one species had higher production in treated areas. In the long-term view, four species had higher and one species had lower production in treated areas. We conclude that the Bti-based control of flood-water mosquitoes does not cause any major direct negative effects on chironomid production, and therefore does not seem to induce any risk for indirect negative effects on birds, bats or any other predators feeding on chironomids. PMID:19497137

Lundström, J O; Schäfer, M L; Petersson, E; Persson Vinnersten, T Z; Landin, J; Brodin, Y

2010-02-01

29

The use of bacterial larvicides in mosquito and black fly control programmes in Brazil  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Bacillus spp. based larvides are increasingly replacing, with numerous advantages, chemical insecticides in programmes for controlling black fly and mosquito populations. Brazil was among the pioneers in adopting Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (B.t.i to control black flies. However, the major current mosquito control programme in Brazil, the Programme for Eradication of Aedes aegypti launched in 1997, only recently decided to replace temephos by B.t.i based larvicides, in the State of Rio de Janeiro. In the last decade, works developed by research groups in Brazilian institutions have generated a significant contribution to this subject through the isolation of B. sphaericus new strains, the development of new products and the implementation of field trials of Bacillus efficacy against mosquito species under different environmental conditions.

Lêda Regis

2000-01-01

30

The use of bacterial larvicides in mosquito and black fly control programmes in Brazil  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Bacillus spp. based larvides are increasingly replacing, with numerous advantages, chemical insecticides in programmes for controlling black fly and mosquito populations. Brazil was among the pioneers in adopting Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (B.t.i) to control black flies. However, the major c [...] urrent mosquito control programme in Brazil, the Programme for Eradication of Aedes aegypti launched in 1997, only recently decided to replace temephos by B.t.i based larvicides, in the State of Rio de Janeiro. In the last decade, works developed by research groups in Brazilian institutions have generated a significant contribution to this subject through the isolation of B. sphaericus new strains, the development of new products and the implementation of field trials of Bacillus efficacy against mosquito species under different environmental conditions.

Lêda, Regis; Sinara B da, Silva; Maria Alice V, Melo-Santos.

31

[Environmental monitoring and control strategy of urban mosquito Culicidae (Diptera: Culicidae) populations in Wroc?aw].  

Science.gov (United States)

Among dipterans of medical and veterinary importance, the mosquitoes (Culicidae) play the most important role both as vectors and nuisance insects. Mass occurrence of floodwater mosquito species in the flooded area in Wroc?aw district (Lower Silesia, Poland) in 1997 has enhanced the already existed problem of mosquito control. A successful model of control strategy for the city based on the currently recommended integrated methodologies with special emphasis on preventive treatment of aquatic larvae with microbial insecticides has been conducted. Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis-based formulations replaced chemicals to control Culex pipiens and Culiseta annulata--two dominant species out of eight noticed during field study in Wroc?aw area in the years 1998-2000. Use of Bti larvicide or other biocontrol agent, conserving biodiversity, requires collecting entomological data, mapping and treating all breeding sources as well as the designing appropriate strategies every year. PMID:16865970

Lonc, Elzbieta; Rydzanicz, Katarzyna; Gomu?kiewicz, Boles?aw

2004-01-01

32

Recasting the theory of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission dynamics and control.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mosquito-borne diseases pose some of the greatest challenges in public health, especially in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Efforts to control these diseases have been underpinned by a theoretical framework developed for malaria by Ross and Macdonald, including models, metrics for measuring transmission, and theory of control that identifies key vulnerabilities in the transmission cycle. That framework, especially Macdonald's formula for R0 and its entomological derivative, vectorial capacity, are now used to study dynamics and design interventions for many mosquito-borne diseases. A systematic review of 388 models published between 1970 and 2010 found that the vast majority adopted the Ross-Macdonald assumption of homogeneous transmission in a well-mixed population. Studies comparing models and data question these assumptions and point to the capacity to model heterogeneous, focal transmission as the most important but relatively unexplored component in current theory. Fine-scale heterogeneity causes transmission dynamics to be nonlinear, and poses problems for modeling, epidemiology and measurement. Novel mathematical approaches show how heterogeneity arises from the biology and the landscape on which the processes of mosquito biting and pathogen transmission unfold. Emerging theory focuses attention on the ecological and social context for mosquito blood feeding, the movement of both hosts and mosquitoes, and the relevant spatial scales for measuring transmission and for modeling dynamics and control. PMID:24591453

Smith, David L; Perkins, T Alex; Reiner, Robert C; Barker, Christopher M; Niu, Tianchan; Chaves, Luis Fernando; Ellis, Alicia M; George, Dylan B; Le Menach, Arnaud; Pulliam, Juliet R C; Bisanzio, Donal; Buckee, Caroline; Chiyaka, Christinah; Cummings, Derek A T; Garcia, Andres J; Gatton, Michelle L; Gething, Peter W; Hartley, David M; Johnston, Geoffrey; Klein, Eili Y; Michael, Edwin; Lloyd, Alun L; Pigott, David M; Reisen, William K; Ruktanonchai, Nick; Singh, Brajendra K; Stoller, Jeremy; Tatem, Andrew J; Kitron, Uriel; Godfray, H Charles J; Cohen, Justin M; Hay, Simon I; Scott, Thomas W

2014-04-01

33

Light-mediated control of rhodopsin movement in mosquito photoreceptors  

OpenAIRE

Multiple mechanisms contribute to a photoreceptor's ability to adapt to ambient light conditions. The mosquito Aedes aegypti expresses the long wavelength rhodopsin Aaop1 in all R1–6 photoreceptors and most R8 photoreceptors. These photoreceptors alter the cellular location of Aaop1 and reorganize their photosensitive rhabdomeric membranes on a daily basis. During daylight periods, Aaop1 is excluded from the light sensitive rhabdomeres and localized to multi-vesicular bodies (MVBs) within t...

Hu, Xiaobang; Leming, Matthew T.; Metoxen, Alexander J.; Whaley, Michelle A.; O Tousa, Joseph E.

2012-01-01

34

Evaluation of the control of mosquitoes with insect growth regulators.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, the effectiveness of eight insect growth regulators (IGRs) (chlorfluazuron, diflubenzuron, EL-494, flufenoxuron, teflubenzuron, juglone, plumbagin and methoprene) against five mosquito vectors (Armigeres subalbatus, Aedes albopictus, Aedes aegypti, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, and Culex quinquefasciatus) was investigated in the laboratory. The EC50s of chlorfluazuron, diflubenzuron, EL-494, flufenoxuron, teflubenzuron, and methoprene against the five mosquitoes ranged from 0.0001 to 0.3 ppm and those of juglone and plumbagin from 3-25 ppm. The five mosquito species had similar tolerances to the test IGRs. At pH 5 to 9, the effectiveness of the first five chemicals was very stable. After ultraviolet irradiation or heat management (45 degrees C-60 degrees C), diflubenzuron and flufenoxuron were very stable. EL-494 was not stable when exposed to ultraviolet irradiation or heat. Under 0.1 ppm, teflubenzuron was not stable upon exposure to heat and chlorfluazuron and methoprene were not stable when exposed to ultraviolet irradiation. Piperonyl butoxide reduces the effectiveness of the five IGRs. Administration of diflubenzuron (1-5 ppm), flufenoxuron (0.025 ppm), and teflubenzuron (1-5 ppm) reduced Culex quinquefasciatus larvae in ditches by 40-90%. The administration of diflubenzuron (0.5 ppm) to containers reduced 97% of the Aedes albopictus larvae. PMID:2402025

Ho, C M; Wu, S H; Wu, C C

1990-07-01

35

Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - a 20TH symposium  

Science.gov (United States)

The 20th Annual Latin American symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 76th Annual Meeting in Lexington, KY in March 2010. The principal objective, as for the previous 19 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control spec...

36

Modelling Aedes aegypti mosquito control via transgenic and sterile insect techniques: endemics and emerging outbreaks.  

Science.gov (United States)

The invasion of pest insects often changes or destroys a native ecosystem, and can result in food shortages and disease endemics. Issues such as the environmental effects of chemical control methods, the economic burden of maintaining control strategies and the risk of pest resistance still remain, and mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever prevail in many countries, infecting over 100 million worldwide in 2010. One environmentally friendly method for mosquito control is the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). This species-specific method of insect control relies on the mass rearing, sterilization and release of large numbers of sterile insects. An alternative transgenic method is the Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal (RIDL). Our objective is to consider contrasting control strategies for two invasive scenarios via SIT and RIDL: an endemic case and an emerging outbreak. We investigate how the release rate and size of release region influence both the potential for control success and the resources needed to achieve it, under a range of conditions and control strategies, and we discuss advantageous strategies with respect to reducing the release resources and strategy costs (in terms of control mosquito numbers) required to achieve complete eradication of wild-type mosquitoes. PMID:23608633

Seirin Lee, S; Baker, R E; Gaffney, E A; White, S M

2013-08-21

37

Ross, macdonald, and a theory for the dynamics and control of mosquito-transmitted pathogens.  

Science.gov (United States)

Ronald Ross and George Macdonald are credited with developing a mathematical model of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission. A systematic historical review suggests that several mathematicians and scientists contributed to development of the Ross-Macdonald model over a period of 70 years. Ross developed two different mathematical models, Macdonald a third, and various "Ross-Macdonald" mathematical models exist. Ross-Macdonald models are best defined by a consensus set of assumptions. The mathematical model is just one part of a theory for the dynamics and control of mosquito-transmitted pathogens that also includes epidemiological and entomological concepts and metrics for measuring transmission. All the basic elements of the theory had fallen into place by the end of the Global Malaria Eradication Programme (GMEP, 1955-1969) with the concept of vectorial capacity, methods for measuring key components of transmission by mosquitoes, and a quantitative theory of vector control. The Ross-Macdonald theory has since played a central role in development of research on mosquito-borne pathogen transmission and the development of strategies for mosquito-borne disease prevention. PMID:22496640

Smith, David L; Battle, Katherine E; Hay, Simon I; Barker, Christopher M; Scott, Thomas W; McKenzie, F Ellis

2012-01-01

38

A laboratory investigation of the mosquito control potential of the monomolecular film Aquatain mosquito formula against immature stages of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus.  

Science.gov (United States)

The mosquito larvicidal and pupicidal potential of the silicone-based monomolecular film Aquatain Mosquito Formula (AMF), was investigated in laboratory trials against Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. Larval and pupal mortality was investigated in separate trials. After 48 h of exposure, mean mortality of Cx. quinquefasciatus 4th instars was 94.6%, significantly greater than the mean mortality rate of 33.6% for Ae. aegypti. After 180 min of exposure, 100% mortality of pupae was recorded for both species. Mean larval and pupal mortality rates for both species were significantly greater than mortality rates in untreated controls. The results indicate that AMF holds potential for mosquito control, especially in urban water-holding structures that are becoming increasingly popular in response to water conservation. Nontarget impacts must be investigated before this product can be considered for natural wetlands. PMID:19432076

Webb, Cameron E; Russell, Richard C

2009-03-01

39

Mosquito development and biological control in a macrophyte-based wastewater treatment plant.  

Science.gov (United States)

A one-year study of the proliferation of mosquito in a Pistia stratiotes-based waste stabilization ponds in Cameroon revealed that Mansonia and Culex were the main breeding genera with about 55% and 42% of the total imagoes respectively. Though the ponds represent a favorable breeding ground for mosquitoes, only 0.02% of captured imagoes was Anopheles gambiae, suggesting that this wastewater treatment plant does not significantly contribute to the development of the malaria vector in the area. Gambusia sp. introduced to control mosquito population in the ponds acclimatized relatively well in most of the ponds (B3-B7) and their feeding rate without any diet ranged from 15.0 to 50.2 larvae/day for a single fish. PMID:16114683

Kengne Noumsi, I M; Akoa, A; Atangana Eteme, R; Nya, J; Ngniado, P; Fonkou, T; Brissaud, F

2005-01-01

40

Laboratory evaluation of the bioinsecticide Spinosad for mosquito control.  

Science.gov (United States)

Spinosad, a naturally occurring product of the fermentation of the bacterium Saccharopolyspora spinosa, is a highly effective bioinsecticide against a broad range of agriculturally important insect pests, and this agent has an excellent environmental and mammalian toxicological profile. In this study the efficacy of a Spinosad-based product (Laser 4.8% emulsifiable concentrate) was evaluated in laboratory bioassays against laboratory-reared mosquito strains of 3 species of medical importance: Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex pipiens. Spinosad was particularly effective against larval Aedes and Culex, with a less marked activity against anophelines (24-h median lethal concentration = 0.0096, 0.0064, and 0.039 mg/liter, respectively), showing a persistence of the insecticide action of about 6 wk in laboratory containers. The activity of the Spinosad-based product against adult mosquitoes (toxicity by ingestion and a possible irritant or repellent effect on gravid females) also was evaluated. Results are discussed and compared with those available in the literature. PMID:16646328

Romi, R; Proietti, S; Di Luca, M; Cristofaro, M

2006-03-01

41

Use of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS and Shredded Waste Polystyrene (SWAP Beads for Control of Mosquitoes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Mosquitoes transmit several diseases to human. There are several measures for control of larvae. As part of Integrated Vector Management (IVM program, the utility of floating layers of polystyrene beads (EPS is a po­ten­tial alternative in habitats of mosquito larva. EPS beads prevent oviposition of mosquito as well as killing the im­ma­ture stages by forming a tick layer on the water surface.  They are cheap, environmentally safe and do not need fre­quent application and remain on the surface of water for long time. The objective of the current study was to asses the effectiveness of two types of polystyrene beads of (EPS and (SWAP for control of mosquito larvae under labo­ra­tory conditions."nMethods: Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus were used for experimental purposes. In each tray 250 lar­vae of late 3rd and early 4th instars were introduced. The experiment was conducted on 4 replicates for An. ste­phensi, Cu. quinquefasciatus and combination of both. Emerging of adult mosquitoes were calculated every day until the end of experiments."nResults: Mortality rate and Inhibition of Emerge (IE for Cu. quinquefasciatus, An. stephensi and combination of both spe­cies was 97.8%, 100% and 99.07%, respectively using EPS. In average, EPS was able to kill 98.9% of lar­vae. The fig­ures with SWAP were 63%, 91.05% and 72.65%, respectively. The average mortality for mosquitoes was 75.57%"nConclusion: EPS and SWAP beads can be very effective and practical for elimination of An. stephensi and Cx. quinquefas­ciatus under the laboratory conditions.

A Soltani

2008-12-01

42

CURRENT STATUS OF THE MOSQUITO BACULOVIRUS CUNINPV FOR CONTROL OF CULEX VECTORS OF ENCEPHALITIS  

Science.gov (United States)

Baculoviruses have been intensively investigated due to their potential as biological control agents for insects and because of their importance as gene expression vectors. Mosquito baculoviruses have been difficult if not impossible to transmit and therefore basic biological studies have been hind...

43

Multiple resistances and complex mechanisms of Anopheles sinensis mosquito: a major obstacle to mosquito-borne diseases control and elimination in China.  

Science.gov (United States)

Malaria, dengue fever, and filariasis are three of the most common mosquito-borne diseases worldwide. Malaria and lymphatic filariasis can occur as concomitant human infections while also sharing common mosquito vectors. The overall prevalence and health significance of malaria and filariasis have made them top priorities for global elimination and control programmes. Pyrethroid resistance in anopheline mosquito vectors represents a highly significant problem to malaria control worldwide. Several methods have been proposed to mitigate insecticide resistance, including rotational use of insecticides with different modes of action. Anopheles sinensis, an important malaria and filariasis vector in Southeast Asia, represents an interesting mosquito species for examining the consequences of long-term insecticide rotation use on resistance. We examined insecticide resistance in two An. Sinensis populations from central and southern China against pyrethroids, organochlorines, organophosphates, and carbamates, which are the major classes of insecticides recommended for indoor residual spray. We found that the mosquito populations were highly resistant to the four classes of insecticides. High frequency of kdr mutation was revealed in the central population, whereas no kdr mutation was detected in the southern population. The frequency of G119S mutation in the ace-1 gene was moderate in both populations. The classification and regression trees (CART) statistical analysis found that metabolic detoxification was the most important resistance mechanism, whereas target site insensitivity of L1014 kdr mutation played a less important role. Our results indicate that metabolic detoxification was the dominant mechanism of resistance compared to target site insensitivity, and suggests that long-term rotational use of various insecticides has led An. sinensis to evolve a high insecticide resistance. This study highlights the complex network of mechanisms conferring multiple resistances to chemical insecticides in mosquito vectors and it has important implication for designing and implementing vector resistance management strategies. PMID:24852174

Chang, Xuelian; Zhong, Daibin; Fang, Qiang; Hartsel, Joshua; Zhou, Guofa; Shi, Linna; Fang, Fujin; Zhu, Changliang; Yan, Guiyun

2014-05-01

44

Efficient synthesis of mosquitocidal toxins in Asticcacaulis excentricus demonstrates potential of gram-negative bacteria in mosquito control.  

Science.gov (United States)

The control of mosquitoes with chemical insecticides pollutes the environment and leads to resistance in mosquito populations. Bacterial control of mosquito larvae with Bacillus sphaericus and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, which produce protein toxins, has proved useful, safe, and nonpolluting. These bacteria do, however, suffer from disadvantages, including rapid setting, UV sensitivity, and lack of persistance of spores, proteolysis of toxins, narrow host range, and high production costs. Here we show that the Gram-negative bacterium Asticcacaulis excentricus is a promising host for delivering toxins to mosquito larvae. Plasmid-transformed A. excentricus cells expressing the binary toxin of B. sphaericus exhibited toxicity to Culex and Anopheles mosquito larvae similar to that of the high-toxicity strains of B. sphaericus which produce several toxins. A. excentricus has potential advantages as a larvicide compared with the bacilli, especially persistance in the larval feeding zone, resistance to UV light, lack of toxin-degrading proteases, and low production costs. PMID:9630898

Liu, J W; Yap, W H; Thanabalu, T; Porter, A G

1996-03-01

45

Sustainable control of mosquito larvae in the field by the combined actions of the biological insecticide Bti and natural competitors.  

Science.gov (United States)

Integrated management of mosquitoes is becoming increasingly important, particularly in relation to avoiding recolonization of ponds after larvicide treatment. We conducted for the first time field experiments that involved exposing natural populations of the mosquito species Culex pipiens to: a) application of the biological insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), b) the introduction of natural competitors (a crustacean community composed mainly of Daphnia spp.), or c) a combined treatment that involved both introduction of a crustacean community and the application of Bti. The treatment that involved only the introduction of crustaceans had no significant effect on mosquito larval populations, while treatment with Bti alone caused only a significant reduction in the abundance of mosquito larvae in the short-term (within 3-10 days after treatment). In contrast, the combined treatment rapidly reduced the abundance of mosquito larvae, which remained low throughout the entire observation period of 28 days. Growth of the introduced crustacean communities was favored by the immediate reduction in the abundance of mosquito larvae following Bti administration, thus preventing recolonization of ponds by mosquito larvae at the late period (days 14-28 after treatment). Both competition and the temporal order of establishment of different species are hence important mechanisms for efficient and sustainable mosquito control. PMID:23701611

Kroeger, Iris; Liess, Matthias; Dziock, Frank; Duquesne, Sabine

2013-06-01

46

Role of Azolla in controlling mosquito breeding in Ghaziabad district villages (U.P.).  

Science.gov (United States)

A survey was carried out during post-monsoon period (1988-89) in villages of Dhaulana Primary Health Centre, Distt. Ghaziabad (U.P.) to evaluate the utility of Azolla pinnata for the control of mosquito breeding in different habitats. Results of the survey revealed that pools, ponds, wells, rice fields and drains were infested with Azolla. Infestation rate and intensity of infestation varied from habitat to habitat. Maximum infestation (36.5%) was observed in pools and minimum (3.7%) in rice fields. Anopheline breeding was almost completely suppressed (0-1.6/dip) in pools, wells and ponds completely covered with Azolla. The breeding of Culex spp. was not completely inhibited in any habitat, though reduction in immature density was observed in comparison to control. The role of Azolla in controlling mosquito breeding and its association with the blue green algae which fixes nitrogen is discussed. PMID:1680758

Ansari, M A; Sharma, V P

1991-03-01

47

INFRAVEC: research capacity for the implementation of genetic control of mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mosquitoes represent a major and global cause of human suffering due to the diseases they transmit. These include parasitic diseases, i.e. malaria and filariasis, and viral infections such as dengue, encephalitis, and yellow fever. The threat of mosquito-borne diseases is not limited to tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Trade and climate changes have opened new niches to tropical vectors in temperate areas of the world, thus putting previously unaffected regions at risk of disease transmission. The most notable example is the spread of Aedes species, particularly the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus to southern Europe (reviewed in Ref. 1). Endogenous cases of vector-borne diseases including West Nile fever, chikungunya, and dengue are frequently being reported, highlighting the increased risk of tropical diseases for the European population. Typically, vector control measures targetting mosquitoes are in most cases carried with the use of insecticides. This approach has a number of limitations that constrain their effectiveness. Lack of resources, inadequate logistics, and the insurgence of insecticide resistance are some of the problems encountered in disease-endemic countries (DECs). More recently in Africa, the widespread use of insecticide-treated bed nets has caused a dramatic reduction in malaria mortality and morbidity. Bed nets however are a temporary solution, a testimony of the failure to implement area-wide control measures aimed at eradicating malaria. US and Europe, with well-developed economies, have also failed to control the spread of mosquito vectors, particularly Aedes species. This alarming situation clearly speaks for the need to expand the knowledge on mosquito vectors and for the urgency of developing and validating novel biological and genetic control measures that overcome the limitations of current insecticide-based approaches. During the last 10 years, significant advances have been made in understanding the biology, the genetics, and the ecology of Anopheles and Aedes mosquitoes paralleled by the development of new molecular tools for investigating gene function and mosquito ability to transmit parasite and viral diseases. They offer a compelling opportunity to design and validate new genetic vector control measures. The size and the complexity of this undertaking require a high level of capacity, effort, and technological platforms. No laboratory--or even institution--has the resources, the infrastructure capacity, and the expertise to accomplish this task alone. INFRAVEC addresses the need of the scientific community to share facilities and integrate cutting-edge knowledge and technologies that are not readily accessible but nevertheless critical to exploit genetic and genomic information in the effort to control mosquito-borne diseases. Its objective is to provide laboratories that currently operate individually with limited coordination and little sharing of technologies, with the collective research capacity of the laboratories forming the core project infrastructure. INFRAVEC has provided resources to 31 institutions from European and African countries to enhance collaborative links, to execute joint research activity, and most importantly to enable individual researchers (from PhD students to established academics) to carry complex experimental activities by assigning research packages or ‘infrastructure access’ to be executed in the laboratory facilities and infrastructures of INFRAVEC. I report here on the overall activities of INFRAVEC and its impact on the scientific community with the purpose to initiate a dialogue with all stakeholders on its future evolution. PMID:24428829

Crisanti, Andrea

2013-12-01

48

Dispersal of the parasitic ciliate Lambornella clarki: implications for ciliates in the biological control of mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lambornella clarki (Ciliophora: Tetrahymenidae), an endoparasite of Aedes sierrensis (Diptera: Culicidae), is dispersed by infected adult mosquitoes. Invasion of the ovaries induces parasitically castrated females to exhibit oviposition behavior and thereby actively disperse ciliates through deposition into water. Oviposition behavior of infected females is prolonged and mimics that of normal gravid females in their first gonotropic cycle. Adults of both sexes also passively disperse ciliates by dying on water surfaces, and infected adults are more likely to die on water than uninfected adults. Ciliates dispersed by infected adults can infect larvae and form desiccation-resistant cysts. Parasite-induced dispersal by hosts, desiccation-resistant cysts, an active host-seeking infective stage, and high infection and mortality rates all indicate significant biological control potential for these and related ciliates against container-breeding mosquitoes. PMID:3094006

Egerter, D E; Anderson, J R; Washburn, J O

1986-10-01

49

Alternative methodologies in the integrated control of urban mosquito larvae: water surface obliteration techniques  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The public health risk associated to mosquitoes has increased in Spain by the introduction of the Asian Tiger Mosquito (Aedes albopictus which is a well-known disease vector. Integrated control methodologies basically rely on larviciding by weekly applications of microbial biocides that have no residual effect. In some special cases, such as swimming pools in abandoned estates, this weekly schedule cannot be achieved due to difficulties of access and operational reasons. In these circumstances, there are no appropriate biocidal options except for Insect Growth Regulators (IGR, which do not provide more than a few weeks of residual efficiency. We present here the practical application of a well-known technique for controlling mosquito larvae in urban environments by altering the water/air interface. The adding to the water surface of a thick layer of beads made from inert, floating materials is described. The layer of beads impedes oviposition and adversely affects the breathing of the larvae. This technique avoids the regular application of chemical pesticides, as well as providing improved sustainability and higher efficiency times. Caution notes and side effects are also discussed.

Roger Eritja

2012-12-01

50

Strategies for the management of resistance in mosquitoes to the microbial control agent Bacillus sphaericus.  

Science.gov (United States)

Bacillus sphaericus (B.spi) strain 2362 has been recognized as a promising mosquito larvicide, and various preparations of this strain have been tested and used in mosquito control programs worldwide. This control agent has advantages of high efficacy, specificity, persistence, and environmental safety. However, resistance in Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes to Bsph has occurred in both laboratory and field populations, necessitating development of resistance management strategies. Studies were initiated aiming at reversing previously established Bsph resistance in a laboratory colony of Culex quinque fasciatus Say by selections with Bti alone, Bti and Bsph in rotation, or mixture. Partial restoration of susceptibility to Bsph was achieved by selection of resistant colony for 10 generations with Bti alone at LC80). After this colony was switched back to Bsph selection for 20 generations, resistance to Bsph partially increased to a stable level. Selections of Basph-resistant colonies with Bti and Bsph in rotation or mixture resulted in steady decline of resistance over 30 generations, with rapid decline in resistance noted in the initial 10-15 generations. It is interesting to note that selections with Bti and Bsph in rotation increased susceptibility to Bti in Bsph-resistant colony. It is promising that selection with Bti alone, Bsph and Bti in rotation, or mixture have a potential for developing practical strategies to overcome acquired resistance to Bsph in Cx. quinquefasciatus populations. PMID:12061449

Zahiri, Nayer S; Su, Tianyun; Mulla, Mir S

2002-05-01

51

Mosquito-borne disease surveillance by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.  

Science.gov (United States)

For a few years, a series of traditionally tropical mosquito-borne diseases, such as chikungunya fever and dengue, have posed challenges to national public health authorities in the European region. Other diseases have re-emerged, e.g. malaria in Greece, or spread to other countries, e.g. West Nile fever. These diseases are reportable within the European Union (EU), and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control collects information in various ways to provide EU member states with topical assessments of disease threats, risks and trends for prompt and appropriate public health action. Using disease-specific expert networks, the European Surveillance System (TESSy) collects standardized comparable information on all statutory communicable diseases in a database. In addition, the event-based surveillance aims to detect potential public health threats early, and to allow timely response and support to blood deferral decisions for pathogens that can be transmitted through blood donation. Laboratory capacity for early detection is implemented through external quality assessments. Other activities include the development of guidelines for the surveillance of mosquito vectors, and the production of regularly updated maps on the currently known occurrence of mosquito vector species. PMID:23607415

Zeller, H; Marrama, L; Sudre, B; Van Bortel, W; Warns-Petit, E

2013-08-01

52

MOSQUITO BIOLOGY  

Science.gov (United States)

This article summarizes current knowledge of mosquito biology. It presents basic information on mosquito morphology, geographic distribution, systematic classification, life cycles, host preference, and public and veterinary health importance. Mosquitoes belong to the order Diptera, family Culicid...

53

Monitoring the aquatic toxicity of mosquito vector control spray pesticides to freshwater receiving waters.  

Science.gov (United States)

Pesticides are applied to state and local waterways in California to control insects such as mosquitoes, which are known to serve as a vector for West Nile Virus infection of humans. The California State Water Resources Control Board adopted a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System General Permit to address the discharge to waters of the United States of pesticides resulting from adult and larval mosquito control. Because pesticides used in spray activities have the potential to cause toxicity to nontarget organisms in receiving waters, the current study was designed to determine whether toxicity testing provides additional, useful environmental risk information beyond chemical analysis in monitoring spray pesticide applications. Monitoring included a combination of aquatic toxicity tests and chemical analyses of receiving waters from agricultural, urban, and wetland habitats. The active ingredients monitored included the organophosphate pesticides malathion and naled, the pyrethroid pesticides etofenprox, permethrin, and sumithrin, pyrethrins, and piperonyl butoxide (PBO). Approximately 15% of the postapplication water samples were significantly toxic. Toxicity of half of these samples was attributed to the naled breakdown product dichlorvos. Toxicity of 2 other water samples likely occurred when PBO synergized the effects of pyrethroid pesticides that were likely present in the receiving system. Four of 43 postapplication sediment samples were significantly more toxic than their corresponding pre-application samples, but none of the observed toxicity was attributed to the application events. These results indicate that many of the spray pesticides used for adult mosquito control do not pose significant acute toxicity risk to invertebrates in receiving systems. In the case of naled in water, analysis of only the active ingredient underestimated potential impacts to the receiving system, because toxicity was attributed to the breakdown product, dichlorvos. Toxicity testing can provide useful risk information about unidentified, unmeasured toxicants or mixtures of toxicants. In this case, toxicity testing provided information that could lead to the inclusion of dichlorvos monitoring as a permit requirement. PMID:24659580

Phillips, Bryn M; Anderson, Brian S; Voorhees, Jennifer P; Siegler, Katie; Denton, Debra; TenBrook, Patti; Larsen, Karen; Isorena, Philip; Tjeerdema, Ron S

2014-07-01

54

Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America--a 22nd symposium.  

Science.gov (United States)

The 22nd Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 78th Annual Meeting in Austin, TX, in February 2012. The principal objective, as for the previous 21 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control specialists, public health workers, and academicians from Latin America. This publication includes summaries of 21 presentations that were given orally in Spanish or presented as posters by participants from Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela, and the USA. Topics addressed in the symposium included surveillance, chemical control, insecticide resistance, and genetics associated with Aedes aegypti; food sources and control of Culex; taxonomy, surveillance, and control of Anopheles vectors of malaria; and studies of dengue virus and Leishmania. PMID:22894120

Clark, Gary G; Rubio-Palis, Yasmin

2012-06-01

55

A novel cost-effective medium for the production of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis for mosquito control.  

Science.gov (United States)

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) has been used for mosquito-control programmes the world-wide. Indeed, the large-scale production of Bti for mosquito control is very expensive due to the high cost of its culture. In the present study, we attempted to widen the scope in developing cost-effective culture medium for Bti production, based on the raw materials available on the biosphere, including coconut cake powder, CCP (Cocos nucifera), neem cake powder, NCP (Azadirachta indica) and groundnut cake powder, GCP (Arachis hypogea). Among these raw materials, the biomass production of Bti, sporulation and toxin synthesizing from 'CCP' in combination with mineral salt (MnCl(2)) was comfortably satisfactory. Bioassays with mosquito species (Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti) and field trials were also satisfactory. The present investigation suggests that coconut cake-based culture medium can be used as an alternative for industrial production of Bti in mosquito-control programme. Therefore, the study is very important from the point of effective production of Bti from cost-effective culture medium for the control of mosquito vectors. PMID:22543607

Poopathi, Subbiah; Archana, B

2012-03-01

56

Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America--a 23rd symposium.  

Science.gov (United States)

The 23rd Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 79th Annual Meeting in Atlantic City, NJ, in February 2013. The principal objective, as for the previous 22 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control specialists, public health workers, and academicians from Latin America. This publication includes summaries of 49 presentations that were given orally in Spanish or presented as posters by participants from Colombia, Mexico, and the USA. Topics addressed in the symposium included: surveillance, ecology, chemical and biological control, and insecticide resistance associated with Aedes aegypti; surveillance and control of Anopheles vectors of malaria; and studies of dengue and West Nile viruses, Chagas disease, and Lutzomyia. PMID:24199500

Clark, Gary G; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso

2013-09-01

57

Aerial and Tidal Transport of Mosquito Control Pesticides into the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary  

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Full Text Available This project was undertaken as the initial monitoring program to determine if mosquito adulticides applied along the Florida Keys cause adverse ecological effects in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS.The study monitored the distribution and persistence of two mosquito adulticides,permethrin and dibrom (naled,during three separate routine applications by the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District.The approach was to determine if toxic concentrations of the pesticides entered the FKNMS by aerial drift or tidal transport.The amount of pesticide entering the FKNMS by way of aerial drift was monitored by collection on glass fiber filter pads,set on floats in a grid pattern on either side of the FKNMS.Permethrin was recovered from filter pads on the leeward side for each of the three applications,ranging from 0.5 to 50.1 µg/m² throughout the study.Tidal current transport was monitored by collection of surface and subsurface water samples at each grid site.Tidal transport of naled and dichlorvos (naled degradation productwas apparent in the adjacent waters of the FKNMS.These compounds were detected in subsurface,offshore water at 0.1 to 0.6 µg/l,14 hr after application.Permethrin was not detected in offshore water samples; however, concentrations ranging from 5.1 to 9.4 µg/l were found in surface water from the canal system adjacent to the application route.Comparison of the observed environmental concentrations with toxicity data (permethrin LC-50,96 hr for Mysidopsis bahia =0.02 µg/lindicated a potential hazard to marine invertebrates in the canals with possible tidal transport to other areas.Para determinar si los adulticidas de mosquitos,aplicados en los Cayos de la Florida,causan efectos ecológicos adversos en el Santuario Marino Nacional de los Cayos de la Florida,se monitoreó la distribución y persistencia de dos adulticidas de mosquitos.Estos fueron permetrina y dibrom (naled.Se trabajó durante tres aplicaciones rutinarias hechas por la Unidad de Control de Mosquitos de los Cayos de la Florida.La finalidad era determinar si concentraciones tóxicas de los plaguicidas llegaban al santuario por transporte aéreo o por las corrientes de marea.La cantidad de plaguicida que entra por vía aérea fue monitoreada utilizando filtros de fibra de vidrio,montados en flotadores dispuestos sistemáticamente a ambos lados del FKNMS. La Permetrina fue recuperada en filtros a sotavento del santuario durante tres aplicaciones,con un ámbito entre 0.5 y 50.1 µg/m² durante todo el estudio.El transporte por corrientes de marea fue monitoreado recolectando muestras de agua superficiales y subsuperficiales en puntos definidos.Se notó el transporte por mareas de naled y diclorvos (producto degradado de naleden aguas adyacentes al santuario.Estos compuestos fueron detectados en muestras subsuperficiales en aguas fuera de la costa con concentraciones de 0.1 a 0.6 µg/l,14 hr después de la aplicación.La Permetrina no fue detectada en muestras de agua fuera de la costa;sin embargo,hubo concentraciones de 5.1 a 9.4 µg/l en aguas superficiales del sistema de canales adyacente a la ruta de aplicación. Comparaciones de las concentraciones observadas con información toxicológica (permetrina LC-50,96 hr para Mysidopsis bahia =0.02 µg/lindican un peligro potencial para invertebrados marinos en los canales y la posibilidad de transporte por mareas a otras áreas.

R.H Pierce

2005-05-01

58

Aerial and Tidal Transport of Mosquito Control Pesticides into the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Costa Rica | Language: English Abstract in spanish Para determinar si los adulticidas de mosquitos,aplicados en los Cayos de la Florida,causan efectos ecológicos adversos en el Santuario Marino Nacional de los Cayos de la Florida,se monitoreó la distribución y persistencia de dos adulticidas de mosquitos.Estos fueron permetrina y dibrom (naled).Se t [...] rabajó durante tres aplicaciones rutinarias hechas por la Unidad de Control de Mosquitos de los Cayos de la Florida.La finalidad era determinar si concentraciones tóxicas de los plaguicidas llegaban al santuario por transporte aéreo o por las corrientes de marea.La cantidad de plaguicida que entra por vía aérea fue monitoreada utilizando filtros de fibra de vidrio,montados en flotadores dispuestos sistemáticamente a ambos lados del FKNMS. La Permetrina fue recuperada en filtros a sotavento del santuario durante tres aplicaciones,con un ámbito entre 0.5 y 50.1 µg/m² durante todo el estudio.El transporte por corrientes de marea fue monitoreado recolectando muestras de agua superficiales y subsuperficiales en puntos definidos.Se notó el transporte por mareas de naled y diclorvos (producto degradado de naled)en aguas adyacentes al santuario.Estos compuestos fueron detectados en muestras subsuperficiales en aguas fuera de la costa con concentraciones de 0.1 a 0.6 µg/l,14 hr después de la aplicación.La Permetrina no fue detectada en muestras de agua fuera de la costa;sin embargo,hubo concentraciones de 5.1 a 9.4 µg/l en aguas superficiales del sistema de canales adyacente a la ruta de aplicación. Comparaciones de las concentraciones observadas con información toxicológica (permetrina LC-50,96 hr para Mysidopsis bahia =0.02 µg/l)indican un peligro potencial para invertebrados marinos en los canales y la posibilidad de transporte por mareas a otras áreas. Abstract in english This project was undertaken as the initial monitoring program to determine if mosquito adulticides applied along the Florida Keys cause adverse ecological effects in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS).The study monitored the distribution and persistence of two mosquito adulticides,pe [...] rmethrin and dibrom (naled),during three separate routine applications by the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District.The approach was to determine if toxic concentrations of the pesticides entered the FKNMS by aerial drift or tidal transport.The amount of pesticide entering the FKNMS by way of aerial drift was monitored by collection on glass fiber filter pads,set on floats in a grid pattern on either side of the FKNMS.Permethrin was recovered from filter pads on the leeward side for each of the three applications,ranging from 0.5 to 50.1 µg/m² throughout the study.Tidal current transport was monitored by collection of surface and subsurface water samples at each grid site.Tidal transport of naled and dichlorvos (naled degradation product)was apparent in the adjacent waters of the FKNMS.These compounds were detected in subsurface,offshore water at 0.1 to 0.6 µg/l,14 hr after application.Permethrin was not detected in offshore water samples; however, concentrations ranging from 5.1 to 9.4 µg/l were found in surface water from the canal system adjacent to the application route.Comparison of the observed environmental concentrations with toxicity data (permethrin LC-50,96 hr for Mysidopsis bahia =0.02 µg/l)indicated a potential hazard to marine invertebrates in the canals with possible tidal transport to other areas.

R.H, Pierce; M.S, Henry; T.C, Blum; E.M, Mueller.

2005-05-01

59

Aerial and tidal transport of mosquito control pesticides into the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This project was undertaken as the initial monitoring program to determine if mosquito adulticides applied along the Florida Keys cause adverse ecological effects in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS). The study monitored the distribution and persistente of two mosquito adulticides, permethrin and dibrom (naled), during three separate routine applications by the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District. The approach was to determine if toxic concentrations of the pesticides entered the FKNMS by aerial drift or tidal transport. The amount of pesticide entering the FKNMS by way of aerial drift was monitored by collection on glass fiber filter pads, set on floats in a grid pattern on either side of the FKNMS. Permethrin was recovered from filter pads on the leeward side for each of the three applications, ranging from 0.5 to 50.1 ?g/m2 throughout the study. Tidal current transport was monitored by collection of surface and subsurface water samples at each grid site. Tidal transport of naled and dichlorvos (naled degradation product) was apparent in the adjacent waters of the FKNMS. These compounds were detected in subsurface, offshore water at 0.1 to 0.6 gg/l, 14 hr after application. Permethrin was not detected in offshore water samples; however, concentrations ranging from 5.1 to 9.4 ?g/1 were found in surface water from the canal system adjacent to the application route. Comparison of the observed environmental concentrations with toxicity data (permetoncentrations with toxicity data (permethrin LC-50, 96 hr for Mysidopsis bahia = 0.02 ?g/1) indicated a potential hazard to marine invertebrates in the canals with possible tidal transport to other areas

60

Aedes albopictus emergency. Mosquito control in the area of U.S.L. 16; L` emergenza aedes albopictus: il controllo delle zanzare nel territorio dell`ULSS 19  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The presented paper deal with the mosquito control in the Padova district (Italy). Control strategies and operative planning are reported, together with an example of census schedule. Further development in aedes albopictus control are pointed out.

Dalla Pozza, G. [DPM, Bologna (Italy); Galuppo, M.; Magagni, A. [AMNIUP, Padova (Italy)

1995-03-01

61

O aproveitamento do resíduo da indústria do sisal no controle de larvas de mosquitos Utilization of the waste of sisal industry in the control of mosquito larvae  

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Full Text Available Descreve-se o aproveitamento do resíduo do desfibramento das folhas de Agave sisalana, como um larvicida para o combate a mosquitos transmissores de doenças tropicais. Durante 24 horas, larvas de Aedes aegypti e Culex quinquefasciatus foram expostas a concentrações diferentes do extrato da planta para determinar as concentrações letais. Para A. aegypti foi constatada a CL50 em 322ppm e para C. quinquefasciatus em 183ppm. Foi investigada a ação de saponinas existentes na planta, ficando evidenciado que o resíduo de A. sisalana é ativo através da interação de vários dos seus componentes. Este extrato poderá ser utilizado em campo, na concentração de 100ppm para C. quinquefasciatus com um aumento do tempo de exposição para três dias, obtendo-se uma mortalidade de 100% das larvas. Este produto, porém, não é recomendado para o controle de A. aegypti, devido à necessidade de uma alta concentração para a obtenção de 100% de mortalidade das larvas e ao fato destas se desenvolverem preferencialmente em água potável.The aim of this research was to utilize the waste residues of sisal fiber separation from Agave sisalana leaves to develop a larvicide for the combat of mosquito transmitting tropical diseases. Larvae of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus were exposed to different concentrations of the Agave extract for 24 hours to determine lethal concentrations. The LC50 for A. aegypti was 322 ppm and the LC50 for C. quinquefasciatus was 183 ppm. To detect the active substances, saponins were investigated. It was found that the various components of the extract were effective in eliminating the larvae. Under field conditions, this formulation can probably be used at 100 ppm, wich causes 100% mortality of C. quinquefasciatus larvae after 3-4 days. The product is not recommended for use against A. aegypti due to the necessity for high concentrations and to the fact that the larvae of this species live frequently on drinking water. To avoid fermentation, Agave extract should be used in a dehydrated form which also represent a good formulation for practical use.

Ana Paula B. Pizarro

1999-02-01

62

O aproveitamento do resíduo da indústria do sisal no controle de larvas de mosquitos / Utilization of the waste of sisal industry in the control of mosquito larvae  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Descreve-se o aproveitamento do resíduo do desfibramento das folhas de Agave sisalana, como um larvicida para o combate a mosquitos transmissores de doenças tropicais. Durante 24 horas, larvas de Aedes aegypti e Culex quinquefasciatus foram expostas a concentrações diferentes do extrato da planta pa [...] ra determinar as concentrações letais. Para A. aegypti foi constatada a CL50 em 322ppm e para C. quinquefasciatus em 183ppm. Foi investigada a ação de saponinas existentes na planta, ficando evidenciado que o resíduo de A. sisalana é ativo através da interação de vários dos seus componentes. Este extrato poderá ser utilizado em campo, na concentração de 100ppm para C. quinquefasciatus com um aumento do tempo de exposição para três dias, obtendo-se uma mortalidade de 100% das larvas. Este produto, porém, não é recomendado para o controle de A. aegypti, devido à necessidade de uma alta concentração para a obtenção de 100% de mortalidade das larvas e ao fato destas se desenvolverem preferencialmente em água potável. Abstract in english The aim of this research was to utilize the waste residues of sisal fiber separation from Agave sisalana leaves to develop a larvicide for the combat of mosquito transmitting tropical diseases. Larvae of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus were exposed to different concentrations of the Agave e [...] xtract for 24 hours to determine lethal concentrations. The LC50 for A. aegypti was 322 ppm and the LC50 for C. quinquefasciatus was 183 ppm. To detect the active substances, saponins were investigated. It was found that the various components of the extract were effective in eliminating the larvae. Under field conditions, this formulation can probably be used at 100 ppm, wich causes 100% mortality of C. quinquefasciatus larvae after 3-4 days. The product is not recommended for use against A. aegypti due to the necessity for high concentrations and to the fact that the larvae of this species live frequently on drinking water. To avoid fermentation, Agave extract should be used in a dehydrated form which also represent a good formulation for practical use.

Ana Paula B., Pizarro; Alfredo M., Oliveira Filho; José P., Parente; Marli T.V., Melo; Celso E. dos, Santos; Paulo R., Lima.

1999-02-01

63

Biorational insecticides for control of mosquitoes and black flies in Sinaloa  

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Full Text Available In Sinaloa Mexico the presence of mosquitoes is a important health problem, and each spring-summer season appear several species which include: Aedes aegypti (Linneus, Anopheles albimanus (Wiedemann, Culex quinquefasciatus (Say and black flies of the Simulidae family. The control of larvae and adults of these insects are usually performed with chemical insecticides, so the use of biorational insecticides for control of these insects is novel, due to that have low environment impact. The objective of this work is to give known to the different biorational insecticides and their biological effects (inhibitor, insect repellent, larvicide, adulticide, that can be used to combat to different development stages of these insects. As well as show the progress of a study on the effectiveness of neem extracts, garlic, cinnamon, albahaca and cypermethrin at low doses (0.25,0.5 and 1ml/L, for control of larvae and adults of black flies in the unicipality of El Fuerte, Sinaloa. By the mode of action, the biorational that can doing use for the control of theseinsects were: Spinosad, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner var. israeliensis for larvae control, Spinosad and Beauveria bassiana (Vuill. for adults; as well as extracts of neem, garlic, cinnamon and albahaca for both stages. The preliminary results of the study showed that the effectiveness application in tourist sites, through aerial spraying of cypermethrin at low doses and the plants extracts, allow low the index of larvae and infestation of mosquitoes and blackflies, decreasing the discomfort caused by these insects in the place of study.

Cipriano García Gutiérrez

2012-09-01

64

Successful Human Infection with P. falciparum Using Three Aseptic Anopheles stephensi Mosquitoes: A New Model for Controlled Human Malaria Infection  

Science.gov (United States)

Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) is a powerful method for assessing the efficacy of anti-malaria vaccines and drugs targeting pre-erythrocytic and erythrocytic stages of the parasite. CHMI has heretofore required the bites of 5 Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoite (SPZ)-infected mosquitoes to reliably induce Pf malaria. We reported that CHMI using the bites of 3 PfSPZ-infected mosquitoes reared aseptically in compliance with current good manufacturing practices (cGMP) was successful in 6 participants. Here, we report results from a subsequent CHMI study using 3 PfSPZ-infected mosquitoes reared aseptically to validate the initial clinical trial. We also compare results of safety, tolerability, and transmission dynamics in participants undergoing CHMI using 3 PfSPZ-infected mosquitoes reared aseptically to published studies of CHMI using 5 mosquitoes. Nineteen adults aged 18–40 years were bitten by 3 Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes infected with the chloroquine-sensitive NF54 strain of Pf. All 19 participants developed malaria (100%); 12 of 19 (63%) on Day 11. The mean pre-patent period was 258.3 hours (range 210.5–333.8). The geometric mean parasitemia at first diagnosis by microscopy was 9.5 parasites/µL (range 2–44). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detected parasites an average of 79.8 hours (range 43.8–116.7) before microscopy. The mosquitoes had a geometric mean of 37,894 PfSPZ/mosquito (range 3,500–152,200). Exposure to the bites of 3 aseptically-raised, PfSPZ-infected mosquitoes is a safe, effective procedure for CHMI in malaria-naïve adults. The aseptic model should be considered as a new standard for CHMI trials in non-endemic areas. Microscopy is the gold standard used for the diagnosis of Pf malaria after CHMI, but qPCR identifies parasites earlier. If qPCR continues to be shown to be highly specific, and can be made to be practical, rapid, and standardized, it should be considered as an alternative for diagnosis. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00744133 NCT00744133 PMID:23874828

Laurens, Matthew B.; Billingsley, Peter; Richman, Adam; Eappen, Abraham G.; Adams, Matthew; Li, Tao; Chakravarty, Sumana; Gunasekera, Anusha; Jacob, Christopher G.; Sim, B. Kim Lee; Edelman, Robert; Plowe, Christopher V.; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Lyke, Kirsten E.

2013-01-01

65

Impact of Educational Intervention Regarding Mosquito Borne Diseases and Their Control Measures among The Link Workers of Urban Health Centers (UHCs of Ahmedabad City  

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Full Text Available Background: In urban area link workers are playing key role in implementing anti-larval measures and behaviour change communication at community level to prevent and control mosquito borne diseases. Objectives: To check baseline knowledge of link workers regarding mosquito borne diseases and control measures and assess their knowledge 14 days after single educational interventional training. Methodology: All 274 link workers of 17 selected UHCs out of total 57 UHCs were taken as study population and their baseline knowledge regarding mosquito borne diseases and mosquito control measures was assessed by questionnaire. Single educational training for 45 minutes was given to groups of link workers and their post– intervention knowledge for same was assessed after 14 days. Mean, Wilcoxon sign-rank test were applied. Results: Mean age of link workers was 31.3 + 4.8 years. The knowledge regarding Chikungunya, Dengue and Malaria was mosquito borne diseases was respectively 55.5%, 87.9% and 95.5% which was increase after intervention to 100%. But 14.4% did not know filariasis is mosquito borne disease even after training. All link workers know about the chemical (Temephos used for mosquito control (100% but knowledge of proper temephos dose for different volume of water containers was significantly improved after intervention. The overall knowledge regarding mosquito & mosquito control measures was significantly improved after intervention (p value <0.05. Conclusion: Even though link workers were involved in anti-larval activities since from many years, many link workers had poor knowledge regarding the mosquito borne diseases and control measures.

Fancy Manish

2012-01-01

66

Guidelines to site selection for population surveillance and mosquito control trials: a case study from Mauritius.  

Science.gov (United States)

Many novel approaches to controlling mosquito vectors through the release of sterile and mass reared males are being developed in the face of increasing insecticide resistance and other limitations of current methods. Before full scale release programmes can be undertaken there is a need for surveillance of the target population, and investigation of parameters such as dispersal and longevity of released, as compared to wild males through mark-release-recapture (MRR) and other experiments, before small scale pilot trials can be conducted. The nature of the sites used for this field work is crucial to ensure that a trial can feasibly collect sufficient and relevant information, given the available resources and practical limitations, and having secured the correct regulatory, community and ethical approvals and support. Mauritius is considering the inclusion of the sterile insect technique (SIT), for population reduction of Aedes albopictus, as a component of the Ministry of Health and Quality of Life's 'Operational Plan for Prevention and Control of Chikungunya and Dengue'. As part of an investigation into the feasibility of integrating the SIT into the Integrated Vector Management (IVM) scheme in Mauritius a pilot trial is planned. Two potential sites have been selected for this purpose, Pointe des Lascars and Panchvati, villages in the North East of the country, and population surveillance has commenced. This case study will here be used to explore the considerations which go into determining the most appropriate sites for mosquito field research. Although each situation is unique, and an ideal site may not be available, this discussion aims to help researchers to consider and balance the important factors and select field sites that will meet their needs. PMID:24280144

Iyaloo, Diana P; Elahee, Khouaildi B; Bheecarry, Ambicadutt; Lees, Rosemary Susan

2014-04-01

67

Chlorfenapyr: a pyrrole insecticide for the control of pyrethroid or DDT resistant Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Owing to the development and spread of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae in Africa there is an urgent need to develop alternative insecticides to supplement the pyrethroids. Chlorfenapyr is a pyrrole insecticide first commercialized for the control of agricultural pests and termites. Performance against An. gambiae bearing kdr (pyrethroid and DDT resistance) or Ace-1(R) insensitive acetylcholinesterase (organophosphate and carbamate resistance) mechanisms was studied using a variety of adult bioassay tests including a simulated-experimental hut system (tunnel tests) that allows uninhibited mosquito behaviour/insecticide interactions. Strains resistant to pyrethroids and organophosphates showed no cross resistance to chlorfenapyr. In cone bioassays on treated netting the mortality of adult mosquitoes showed an unexpected curvilinear response, with highest mortality occurring at intermediate dosages. Adults expressed irritability to chlorfenapyr at higher dosages, which might explain the dosage-mortality trend. Toxic activity of chlorfenapyr was slow compared to conventional neurotoxic insecticides and additional mortality occurred between 24h and 72 h. In tunnel tests, the dosage-mortality trend showed a more typical sigmoid response and most mortality occurred during the first 24h. Mosquito penetration through the holed, treated netting showed only limited inhibition and blood-feeding was not inhibited. Mortality rates in the kdr strain exposed to chlorfenapyr treated netting in tunnel tests were much higher than with permethrin treated netting over the same 100-500 mg/m(2) dosage range. Chlorfenapyr has potential for malaria control in treated-net or residual spraying applications in areas where mosquitoes are pyrethroid resistant. For treated-net applications chlorfenapyr might be combined with pyrethroid as a mixture to provide personal protection as well as to give control of resistant mosquitoes. PMID:17466253

N'Guessan, R; Boko, P; Odjo, A; Akogbéto, M; Yates, A; Rowland, M

2007-04-01

68

Analysis of Bacillus sphaericus in controlling mosquito populations in urban catch basins.  

Science.gov (United States)

The West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne infection that can be fatal to humans, equines, and avians, among others. WNV was first introduced to the United States in 1999 and is rapidly spreading across the country. Urban catch basins are thought to be prime breeding sites for mosquitoes, especially those identified as WNV carriers. The pilot study reported here was conducted in a city in southeastern Pennsylvania where there are 70,000 catch basins. The purpose of the study was 1) to determine whether catch basins are breeding sites for mosquitoes and 2) to test the effectiveness of a larvicide that uses a bacteria, Bacillus sphaericus, to eliminate mosquitoes in urban catch basins. The two-pronged study determined that catch basins are ideal locations for mosquitoes, especially Culex pipiens, and that B. sphaericus is an effective larvicide. PMID:15794460

Raval-Nelson, Palak; Soin, Ketki; Tolerud, Suzy

2005-03-01

69

The use of annual killifish in the biocontrol of the aquatic stages of mosquitoes in temporary bodies of fresh water; a potential new tool in vector control  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes that breed in temporary pools in remote areas that dry up seasonally are especially difficult to control through chemical or biological means. The annual killifish has been suggested as a means of eradicating the aquatic stages of mosquitoes in transient pools because they can maintain permanent populations in such habitats by undergoing suspended animation or diapause during the embryonic stages to survive periodic drought. However, very little is known about the predatory activity of annual killifish and their usefulness in mosquito control. Results The annual killifish, Nothobranchius guentheri, native to Tanzania, was used in this investigation. Food preference was tested under laboratory conditions by feeding juvenile killifish with 2nd instar mosquito larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus in the presence of alternative food sources, such as rotifers and chironomid larvae. Semi-field tests were conducted by introduction of hibernating killifish embryos and juvenile fish to artificial ponds in an outdoor open environment that allowed natural oviposition of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Food preference studies show that N. guentheri preferred to prey on mosquito larvae than either chironomid or rotifers. When hibernating killifish embryos were added to ponds simultaneously with the addition of freshwater, the embryos hatched and fed on mosquito larval population resulting in complete elimination of the immature stages. The introduction of juvenile fish to ponds with high density of mosquito larvae resulted in total eradication of the mosquito population due to predation by fish. Complete biocontrol of the mosquito larval population was achieved in the presence of 3 fish per m2 of pond surface area. Conclusions The annual killifish provides yet another tool that may be employed in the eradication diseases carried by mosquitoes through vector control, particularly in temporary bodies of freshwater. The fish can be conveniently transported in the absence of water in the form of hibernating embryos. Once introduced either as embryos or juveniles in ponds, the annual killifish can effectively reduce the larval population because of its aggressive predatory activity.

Adrias Araceli Q

2010-05-01

70

Assessing key safety concerns of a Wolbachia-based strategy to control dengue transmission by Aedes mosquitoes  

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Full Text Available Mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue fever, chikungunya or malaria affect millions of people each year and control solutions are urgently needed. An international research program is currently being developed that relies on the introduction of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis into Aedes aegypti to control dengue transmission. In order to prepare for open-field testing releases of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes, an intensive social research and community engagement program was undertaken in Cairns, Northern Australia. The most common concern expressed by the diverse range of community members and stakeholders surveyed was the necessity of assuring the safety of the proposed approach for humans, animals and the environment. To address these concerns a series of safety experiments were undertaken. We report in this paper on the experimental data obtained, discuss the limitations of experimental risk assessment and focus on the necessity of including community concerns in scientific research.

Jean Popovici

2010-12-01

71

Assessing key safety concerns of a Wolbachia-based strategy to control dengue transmission by Aedes mosquitoes  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue fever, chikungunya or malaria affect millions of people each year and control solutions are urgently needed. An international research program is currently being developed that relies on the introduction of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis into Ae [...] des aegypti to control dengue transmission. In order to prepare for open-field testing releases of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes, an intensive social research and community engagement program was undertaken in Cairns, Northern Australia. The most common concern expressed by the diverse range of community members and stakeholders surveyed was the necessity of assuring the safety of the proposed approach for humans, animals and the environment. To address these concerns a series of safety experiments were undertaken. We report in this paper on the experimental data obtained, discuss the limitations of experimental risk assessment and focus on the necessity of including community concerns in scientific research.

Jean, Popovici; Luciano A, Moreira; Anne, Poinsignon; Inaki, Iturbe-Ormaetxe; Darlene, McNaughton; Scott L, O' Neill.

2010-12-01

72

Perspectives in the control of infectious diseases by transgenic mosquitoes in the post-genomic era: a review  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Arthropod-borne diseases caused by a variety of microorganisms such as dengue virus and malaria parasites afflict billions of people worldwide imposing major economic and social burdens. Despite many efforts, vaccines against diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, with the exception of yellow fever, ar [...] e not available. Control of such infectious pathogens is mainly performed by vector management and treatment of affected individuals with drugs. However, the numbers of insecticide-resistant insects and drug-resistant parasites are increasing. Therefore, inspired in recent years by a lot of new data produced by genomics and post-genomics research, several scientific groups have been working on different strategies to control infectious arthropod-borne diseases. This review focuses on recent advances and perspectives towards construction of transgenic mosquitoes refractory to malaria parasites and dengue virus transmission.

Márcia Aparecida, Sperança; Margareth Lara, Capurro.

2007-06-01

73

Why do we need alternative tools to control mosquito-borne diseases in Latin America?  

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Full Text Available In this opinion paper, we discuss the potential and challenges of using the symbiont Wolbachia to block mosquito transmitted diseases such as dengue, malaria and chikungunya in Latin America.

Rafael Maciel-de-Freitas

2012-09-01

74

Insecticide treated mosquito nets for malaria control in India-experience from a tribal area on operational feasibility and uptake  

OpenAIRE

The study assessed the operational feasibility and acceptability of insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) in one Primary Health Centre (PHC) in a falciparum malaria endemic district in the state of Orissa, India, where 74% of the people are tribes and DDT indoor residual spraying had been withdrawn and ITNs introduced by the National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme. To a population of 63,920, 24,442 ITNs were distributed free of charge through 101 treatment centers during July-Augus...

Jambulingam, P.; Gunasekaran, K.; Ss, Sahu; Vijayakumar, T.

2008-01-01

75

Evaluation of a Rapid Analyte Measurement Platform for West Nile Virus Detection Based on United States Mosquito Control Programs  

OpenAIRE

The rapid analyte measurement platform (RAMP) system is an immunoassay test for West Nile virus (WNV) detection. Although reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methodology has been regarded as the gold standard for confirming WNV presence, usage of RAMP testing kits has increased in the past years. We collected RAMP test result data that were subsequently confirmed with RT-PCR methodology from mosquito control agencies to evaluate the efficacy of the RAMP testing. Results i...

Kesavaraju, Banugopan; Farajollahi, Ary; Lampman, Richard L.; Hutchinson, Michael; Krasavin, Nina M.; Graves, Sonya E.; Dickson, Sammie L.

2012-01-01

76

The fog of war: why the environmental crusade for anadromous fish species in California could disarm the state's local vector control districts in their war against mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

In California, local mosquito and vector control districts have successfully controlled mosquito and vector-borne diseases by improving drainage patterns and applying pesticides. The Bay-Delta Conservation Plan, which is a proposed habitat conservation plan for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Bay-Delta estuary, proposes to add over 70,000 acres of habitat in the Delta to improve conditions for threatened and endangered aquatic and terrestrial species. This habitat could also be a suitable mosquito breeding habitat, which will be located in close proximity to urban and suburban communities. Wetland management practices and continued pesticide applications in the Delta could mitigate the effects of a new mosquito breeding habitat. Recent legal developments, however, require districts to obtain and comply with Clean Water Act permits, which restrict the application of pesticides in or near waters of the United States. Moreover, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has taken the first step in a rulemaking process that could further limit or prohibit the use of certain vector control pesticides in the Delta. In the near term and until less harmful methods for mosquito control are available, local vector control districts' application of mosquito control pesticides should be exempt from Clean Water Act permit requirements. PMID:23856372

Siptroth, Stephen M; Shanahan, Richard P

2011-12-01

77

Review: Improving our knowledge of male mosquito biology in relation to genetic control programmes.  

Science.gov (United States)

The enormous burden placed on populations worldwide by mosquito-borne diseases, most notably malaria and dengue, is currently being tackled by the use of insecticides sprayed in residences or applied to bednets, and in the case of dengue vectors through reduction of larval breeding sites or larviciding with insecticides thereof. However, these methods are under threat from, amongst other issues, the development of insecticide resistance and the practical difficulty of maintaining long-term community-wide efforts. The sterile insect technique (SIT), whose success hinges on having a good understanding of the biology and behaviour of the male mosquito, is an additional weapon in the limited arsenal against mosquito vectors. The successful production and release of sterile males, which is the mechanism of population suppression by SIT, relies on the release of mass-reared sterile males able to confer sterility in the target population by mating with wild females. A five year Joint FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project brought together researchers from around the world to investigate the pre-mating conditions of male mosquitoes (physiology and behaviour, resource acquisition and allocation, and dispersal), the mosquito mating systems and the contribution of molecular or chemical approaches to the understanding of male mosquito mating behaviour. A summary of the existing knowledge and the main novel findings of this group is reviewed here, and further presented in the reviews and research articles that form this Acta Tropica special issue. PMID:24252487

Lees, Rosemary Susan; Knols, Bart; Bellini, Romeo; Benedict, Mark Q; Bheecarry, Ambicadutt; Bossin, Hervé Christophe; Chadee, Dave D; Charlwood, Jacques; Dabiré, Roch K; Djogbenou, Luc; Egyir-Yawson, Alexander; Gato, René; Gouagna, Louis Clément; Hassan, Mo'awia Mukhtar; Khan, Shakil Ahmed; Koekemoer, Lizette L; Lemperiere, Guy; Manoukis, Nicholas C; Mozuraitis, Raimondas; Pitts, R Jason; Simard, Frederic; Gilles, Jeremie R L

2014-04-01

78

Mosquito larval control with Bacillus sphaericus: reduction in adult populations in low-income communities in Nonthaburi Province, Thailand.  

Science.gov (United States)

During 1999 and 2000 several larvicidal treatments of Bacillus sphaericus strain 2362 water dispersible granular (WDG) formulations were made at 50 to 200 mg/m2 in mosquito developmental sites in low-income communities in Nonthaburi Province, Thailand to determine whether larviciding dense populations would results in a noticeable reduction of adult mosquitoes in small treated areas. In the treated area in 1999 (Soi Jumpa), immature populations were suppressed to extremely low levels for extended periods, especially at the higher dosages. This decline in immature populations was followed by a substantial decline in adult mosquitoes. There was a lag of 7 to 14 days post-larval treatments before maximum decline in adults was noted. Adults that emerged prior to treatments survived for 7-14 days or longer, thus no drastic reduction was noted soon after treatments. Despite a slight resurgence in adult mosquitoes during the middle of the experimental period, adult female mosquitoes (over 98% Cx quinquefasciatus), remained low during the 5-month period of trials. During the last 2 weeks (17 days post last treatment) of the experimental period, female populations reached the pre-treatment level. During the 2000 tests at Wat Pikul reduction in larvae was 87-98% for 7 weeks after first treatment at 200 mg/m2, resulting in a reduction of 24 to 73% (2 and 7 days post-treatment respectively) and 87 to 98 (2-6 weeks) in the adults. In the second and third treatments at 50 mg/m2, larval control and subsequent adult reduction were lower and shorter-lived than at the high dosage, and the fourth treatment at 100 mg/m2 did not yield a high level of reduction in the larvae (18 to 33%), but reduction of adults was still 80%. The final fifth treatment at 200 mg/m2 yielded only 18% control of larvae, suggesting tolerance to B. sphaericus at this site. It was shown that at both treated sites repeated treatments with a larvicide such as B. sphaericus could result in substantial reduction in adult mosquitoes. Vigilance for detection of resistance development should be practiced, as resistance could emerge in certain populations following a few treatments. PMID:11813660

Mulla, M S; Thavara, U; Tawatsin, A; Kong-ngamsuk, W; Chompoosri, J; Su, T

2001-12-01

79

Eficiencia del extracto de Ricinus communis para el control del mosquito Culex  

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Full Text Available Este artículo evaluó el efecto insecticida del extracto de Ricinus communis sobre larvas de mosquitos Culex. A las 24 h la mortalidad es de 8.33 % con dosis de 1 mL del extracto en una concentración de 500 ppm; 35 % en dosis de 1 mL de una concentración de 1000 ppm; 65 % en dosis de 5 mL de una concentración de 1000 ppm; 98.33 % con 10 mL en concentración de 1000 ppm; testigos 3.3 %. Cuando se evaluó el efecto insecticida del extracto aplicado por aspersión en concentraciones de 500, 750 y 1000 ppm, se consiguieron mortalidades de 18.33, 36.66 y 48.32 %, respectivamente. Ninguna de las concentraciones evaluadas alcanzó el cien por ciento de letalidad. En la prueba de semicampo, solo se logró una mortalidad de 9 %. Se evidenció que el extracto tiene un mejor efecto insecticida para el control de ejemplares inmaduros en estado larvario que sobre los adultos.

Diego Tomás Corradine Mora

2014-05-01

80

Risk assessment for adult butterflies exposed to the mosquito control pesticide naled  

Science.gov (United States)

A prospective risk assessment was conducted for adult butterflies potentially exposed to the mosquito control insecticide naled. Published acute mortality data, exposure data collected during field studies, and morphometric data (total surface area and fresh body weight) for adult butterflies were combined in a probabilistic estimate of the likelihood that adult butterfly exposure to naled following aerial applications would exceed levels associated with acute mortality. Adult butterfly exposure was estimated based on the product of (1) naled residues on samplers and (2) an exposure metric that normalized total surface area for adult butterflies to their fresh weight. The likelihood that the 10th percentile refined effect estimate for adult butterflies exposed to naled would be exceeded following aerial naled applications was 67 to 80%. The greatest risk would be for butterflies in the family Lycaenidae, and the lowest risk would be for those in the family Hesperidae, assuming equivalent sensitivity to naled. A range of potential guideline naled deposition levels is presented that, if not exceeded, would reduce the risk of adult butterfly mortality. The results for this risk assessment were compared with other risk estimates for butterflies, and the implications for adult butterflies in areas targeted by aerial naled applications are discussed.

Bargar, Timothy A.

2012-01-01

81

[Use of the herbicide diquat for the control of the aquatic plant Pistia stratiotes and its importance in the control of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae)].  

Science.gov (United States)

The feasibility of the use of the Diquat herbicide (reglone) in the control of the Pistia stratiotes aquatic plant is tested. This facilitates the reduction of mosquito larva densities by the action of natural enemies present in the ecosystem. The associated fauna is not affected by the employed concentrations of the herbicide under these conditions. PMID:9768236

Morejón Martín, P L; Montero Lago, G; Mursuli Dueñas, E J; Hernández Pérez, B A

1994-01-01

82

Systematic list of the species added to the mosquito museum at the Vector Control Research Centre, Pondicherry, India.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mosquito species housed in the mosquito museum at the Vector Control Research Centre, Pondicherry, India, were increased from 181 to 266 species belonging to 22 genera. The systematic list of the 85 species added to the collection is provided. The collection consists of a total of 31,874 adult specimens, of which 23,696 are individually mounted on minuten pins, while the rest are held in stock vials. It also includes 2,456 male genitalia and 470 female genitalia preparations, 3,523 larvae, 4,745 larval exuviae, and 3,057 pupal exuviae on microscope slides. Representative specimens of different species are available from 16 states and 3 union territories of India. PMID:21476442

Rajavel, A R; Natarajan, R; Vaidyanathan, K; Jambulingam, P

2011-03-01

83

Life-table analysis of Anopheles malaria vectors: generational mortality as tool in mosquito vector abundance and control studies  

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Full Text Available Background & objectives: Vector control will for sometime remain a primary weapon in the waragainst vector borne diseases. Malaria is of paramount importance in this with its associated highmorbidity and mortality especially in sub-Saharan Africa. This study on generational mortality associatedfactors in Anopheles mosquitoes life-table analysis was designed to investigate the fecundity,levels of mortality and mortality associated factors at the aquatic stages of anopheline malaria vectors.Methods: Mortality associated factors were investigated at the eggs, I and II instar larval, III and IVinstar larval and pupal stages of two anopheline species— Anopheles pseudopunctipennis (Theobaldand An. gambiae life-cycles in screen cages. Adult male and female mosquitoes were membrane filterfedand algae in culture medium formed the bulk of food substances for the larval stage. Environmentaltemperature of culture media, pH and some associated physio-chemical factors were also determined.Results: Results showed significant mortality rates at various aquatic stages. Infertility, cannibalismand environmental factors were the major factors responsible for mortality at the egg, larval and pupalstages respectively.Interpretation & conclusion: The aquatic stages of Anopheles mosquito mortality factor K and themortality factors at the various stages investigated k1, k2, k3 and k4 are discussed. Our recommendationsinclude further studies on the possible genetic modification of predacious An. pseudopunctipennislarvae and/or its modification for the production of sterile/infertile eggs as possible alternativesin the reduction and control of anopheline malaria burden.

Godwin Ray Anugboba Okogun

2005-06-01

84

Mosquito Lagoon environmental resources inventory  

Science.gov (United States)

This document provides a synopsis of biotic and abiotic data collected in the Mosquito Lagoon area in relation to water quality. A holistic ecological approach was used in this review to allow for summaries of climate, land use, vegetation, geohydrology, water quality, fishes, sea turtles, wading birds, marine mammals, invertebrates, shellfish, and mosquito control. The document includes a bibliographic database list of 157 citations that have references to the Mosquito Lagoon, many of which were utilized in development of the text.

Provancha, Jane A.; Hall, Carlton R.; Oddy, Donna M.

1992-01-01

85

Economic Evaluation of an Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management Program to Control the Asian Tiger Mosquito in New Jersey  

OpenAIRE

Aedes albopictus is the most invasive mosquito in the world, an important disease vector, and a biting nuisance that limits outdoor activities. Area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) is the recommended control strategy. We conducted an economic evaluation of the AW-IPM project in Mercer and Monmouth Counties, New Jersey with a controlled design (AW-IPM vs. control) from 2009 through 2011. The study analyzed financial documents and staff time for AW-IPM and surveyed an average of 415 ra...

Shepard, Donald S.; Halasa, Yara A.; Fonseca, Dina M.; Farajollahi, Ary; Healy, Sean P.; Gaugler, Randy; Bartlett-healy, Kristen; Strickman, Daniel A.; Clark, Gary G.

2014-01-01

86

The use of annual killifish in the biocontrol of the aquatic stages of mosquitoes in temporary bodies of fresh water; a potential new tool in vector control  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Mosquitoes that breed in temporary pools in remote areas that dry up seasonally are especially difficult to control through chemical or biological means. The annual killifish has been suggested as a means of eradicating the aquatic stages of mosquitoes in transient pools because they can maintain permanent populations in such habitats by undergoing suspended animation or diapause during the embryonic stages to survive periodic drought. However, very little is known about t...

Adrias Araceli Q; Matias Jonathan R

2010-01-01

87

A six-year study of insect emergence from temporary flooded wetlands in central Sweden, with and without Bti-based mosquito control  

OpenAIRE

In temporary wetlands in the River Dalalven floodplains, recurrent but irregular floods induce massive hatching of the flood-water mosquito Aedes sticticus, which causes enormous nuisance. Flood-water mosquito control using the biological larvicide Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) was commenced in parts of the floodplains during 2002, and here we report the first six years of full-season monitoring of general insect emergence from temporary wetlands with and without treatment. Em...

Persson Vinnersten, T. Z.; Lundstrom, J. O.; Schafer, M. L.; Petersson, E.; Landin, Jan

2010-01-01

88

Agent-based modelling of mosquito foraging behaviour for malaria control.  

Science.gov (United States)

Traditional environmental management programmes require extensive coverage of larval habitats to reduce drastically the emergence of adult mosquitoes. Recent studies have highlighted the impact of reduced availability of aquatic habitats on mosquito foraging for hosts and oviposition sites. In this study, we developed an agent-based model to track the status and movement of mosquitoes individually. Mosquito foraging was represented as a two-stage process: random flight when the resource was not within the mosquito's perception range and directional flight to the resource when it was detected. Three scenarios of targeted source reduction were devised to eliminate all aquatic habitats within certain distances of human habitations. For comparison, three non-targeted source reductions randomly eliminated the same numbers of aquatic habitats as their corresponding targeted scenarios. Our results show that the elimination of habitats within 100m, 200m and 300m of surrounding houses resulted in 13%, 91% and 94% reductions in malaria incidence, respectively; compared with -3%, 19% and 44%, respectively, for the corresponding conventional interventions. These findings indicate that source reduction might not require coverage of extensive areas, as previously thought, and that the distance to human habitations can be used for habitat targeting. PMID:19200566

Gu, Weidong; Novak, Robert J

2009-11-01

89

Wolbachia-Based Population Control Strategy Targeting Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquitoes Proves Efficient under Semi-Field Conditions.  

Science.gov (United States)

In mosquitoes, the maternally inherited bacterial Wolbachia induce a form of embryonic lethality called cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). This property can be used to reduce the density of mosquito field populations through inundative releases of incompatible males in order to sterilize females (Incompatible Insect Technique, or IIT, strategy). We have previously constructed the LR[wPip(Is)] line representing a good candidate for controlling field populations of the Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito in the islands of the south-western Indian Ocean. The main purpose of the present study was to fill the gap between laboratory experiments and field implementation, i.e. assessing mating competitiveness of these incompatible males under semi-field conditions. In a first set of experiments, we analyzed crossing relationships between LR[wPip(Is)] males and La Réunion field females collected as larvae in 19 distinct localities throughout the island. This investigation revealed total embryonic mortality, confirming the strong sterilizing capacity of LR[wPip(Is)] males. Subsequently, mating competitiveness of LR[wPip(Is)] males was assessed under semi-field conditions in the presence of field males and females from La Réunion. Confrontations were carried out in April and December using different ratios of LR[wPip(Is)] to field males. The results indicated that the LR[wPip(Is)] males successfully compete with field males in mating with field females, displaying even higher competitiveness than field males in April. Our results support the implementation of small-scale field tests in order to assess the feasibility of IIT against Cx. quinquefasciatus in the islands of southwestern Indian Ocean where this mosquito species is a proven competent vector for human pathogens. PMID:25768841

Atyame, Célestine M; Cattel, Julien; Lebon, Cyrille; Flores, Olivier; Dehecq, Jean-Sébastien; Weill, Mylène; Gouagna, Louis Clément; Tortosa, Pablo

2015-01-01

90

Laboratory evaluation techniques to investigate the spatial potential of repellents for push and pull mosquito control systems.  

Science.gov (United States)

A protocol has been developed for the indoor evaluation of candidate spatial repellents intended for use in push and pull systems. Single treatments (catnip oil, 1-methylpiperazine, and homopiperazine) and a mixture of catnip oil and homopiperazine were tested with yellow-fever mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti) in Y-tube olfactometers to determine 1) if these compounds inhibited mosquito host-seeking at short distances and 2) if results obtained in olfactometer tests can be correlated with a larger scale set-up, that is, a room test. All test materials significantly decreased the ability of mosquitoes to find host odors (from a human finger) by up to 96.7% (2.5% catnip and homopiperazine mix). Similar effects could be observed within a new room test set-up, which involved a repellent dispensing system and an attractive trap (BG-Sentinel). Mosquitoes captured by the BGS trap had to fly through a treatment-containing air curtain created by the dispensing system. Compared with the use of a control (ethanol solvent without candidate repellent), trap catch rates were significantly reduced when 5% catnip, 5% 1-methylpiperazine, and 5% homopiperazine were dispensed. Homopiperazine produced the greatest level of host-seeking inhibition with a 95% reduction in the trap catches. The experimental set-up was modified to test the viability of those technologies in a simple push & pull situation.. The combination of BGS trap and a 10% mix of catnip and homopiperazine helped to reduce human landing rates by up to 44.2% with a volunteer sitting behind the air curtain and the trap running in front of the curtain. PMID:23270167

Obermayr, U; Ruther, J; Bernier, U; Rose, A; Geier, M

2012-11-01

91

Alternative methodologies in the integrated control of urban mosquito larvae: water surface obliteration techniques Metodologías alternativas en el control integrado de larvas de mosquitos urbanos: técnicas de obliteración de lámina de agua Metodologias alternativas no controlo integrado de larvas de mosquitos nas áreas urbanas: técnicas de obliteração da superfície da água  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The public health risk associated to mosquitoes has increased in Spain by the introduction of the Asian Tiger Mosquito (Aedes albopictus which is a well-known disease vector. Integrated control methodologies basically rely on larviciding by weekly applications of microbial biocides that have no residual effect. In some special cases, such as swimming pools in abandoned estates, this weekly schedule cannot be achieved due to difficulties of access and operational reasons. In these circumstances, there are no appropriate biocidal options except for Insect Growth Regulators (IGR, which do not provide more than a few weeks of residual efficiency. We present here the practical application of a well-known technique for controlling mosquito larvae in urban environments by altering the water/air interface. The adding to the water surface of a thick layer of beads made from inert, floating materials is described. The layer of beads impedes oviposition and adversely affects the breathing of the larvae. This technique avoids the regular application of chemical pesticides, as well as providing improved sustainability and higher efficiency times. Caution notes and side effects are also discussed.Los mosquitos son un riesgo relevante para la salud pública que se ha visto incrementado con la llegada de Aedes albopictus, el mosquito tigre, potencial transmisor de varias enfermedades. El método de elección para su control es la eliminación de las larvas acuáticas mediante biocidas de origen biológico, que se realiza semanalmente debido a su nula persistencia. En determinados puntos donde esta periodicidad no puede mantenerse, como piscinas en fincas abandonadas, no existen opciones biocidas adecuadas más residuales exceptuando los inhibidores del crecimiento, que sin embargo no suelen proporcionar una residualidad superior a unas pocas semanas (de dos a cuatro. Se presenta la aplicación práctica de una técnica de control de larvas de mosquito en medios urbanos consistente en alterar la interfase agua/aire. Se describe la aplicación de materiales granulados inertes flotantes sobre las superficies para impedir la puesta de huevos y la respiración de las larvas, con el consiguiente beneficio de evitar la aplicación periódica de plaguicidas químicos, así como una sostenibilidad y perduración muy superiores. Se discuten asimismo los riesgos propios de estas estrategias.Os mosquitos são um risco significativo para a saúde pública, que aumentou com a chegada do Aedes albopictus, mosquito tigre, potencial transmissor de várias doenças. O método de escolha para o seu controle é a eliminação das larvas aquáticas com produtos biocidas de origem biológica, realizada semanalmente devido a sua persistência nula. Em determinados pontos onde essa recorrência não pode ser mantida, como piscinas em fazendas abandonadas, não há suficientes opções residuais biocidas com excepção dos inibidores de crescimento, mas não costumam fornecer um residual maior do que duas a quatro semanas. Apresenta-se a aplicação prática de uma técnica de controle de larvas do mosquito em ambientes urbanos consistendo em alterar a interface água/ar. Descreve-se a aplicação de materiais granulados inertes flutuando na superfície para evitar a postura de ovos e respiração das larvas, com o consequente benefício de evitar a aplicação periódica de pesticidas químicos, com uma melhor sustentabilidade e duração. Discutimos também os riscos inerentes a estas estratégias.

Roger Eritja

2012-12-01

92

- Vigilancia y control en criaderos temporales y permanentes de culícidos en Villa Clara (Vigilance and control in temporal and permanent breeding ground of mosquitoes in Villa Clara  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available El trabajo se desarrolló en la Unidad Provincial de Vigilancia y Lucha Antivectorial de la provincia de Villa Clara, en el período comprendido entre el primero de julio al primero de noviembre del 2005. Para el mismo se representaron gráficamente los 304 criaderos permanentes y 218 temporales de culícidos; distribuidos en los 13 municipios de dicha provincia. Se tomaron muestras de cuerpos de agua (28 criaderos existentes en los 13 municipios de la provincia para detectar la Densidad Larvaria según la metodología del cucharón. Se determinaron las principales especies de culícidos que habitan en la provincia y se compararon dos métodos (Temephos al 2% y peces de control para estos vectores, determinándose el costo – riesgo del Temephos al 2%, el Bacillus thurigiensis y los peces como métodos de control de mosquitos mediante una ponderización. Los datos primarios se procesaron en el sistema computarizado Excel del paquete Office XP y para el procesamiento estadístico de la efectividad de cada tratamiento se empleó la prueba de comparación de proporciones del paquete Statgraphics plus 4.1, ambos sistemas sustentados en WindowsÒ. Los resultados muestran que las especies de mosquitos más difundidas en la provincia son: el Anopheles albimanus, el Aedes mediovitatus, el Aedes scapularis, el Aedes confinis, el Culex quinquefasciatus, el Culex nigripalpus y el Culex corniger; además, los resultados demuestran la superioridad del control con peces sobre el control con Temephos ya que es más eficiente (99% versus 87% para p < 0.01 en el control de culícidos. La vigilancia con peces (no gastos en divisas y $ 1 035.08 MN es más económica que el Temephos (847 500 CUC y $ 12 490.96 MN y que el Bacillus thurigiensis (6 328 cuc y $ 8 280.64 MN. Se concluye que los peces constituyen un efectivo control para las poblaciones de culícidos, recomendando el uso de los mismos por todos los beneficios que estos representan This work was developed in the Provincial Unit of Vigilance and Vectors Against fight in Villa Clara province, between the first July to first November 2005. For the same was graphically represented the 304 permanent and 218 temporal breeding ground of mosquitoes; distributed in the 13 municipalities of this province. Were taken shows of water body (28 breeding ground existence in the 13 municipalities of the province that to detect the Density of Larva according the methodology of ladle. Were determined the species main of mosquitoes that habitat in the province and were compared two methods (Temephos 2% and fish of control for this vectors, determining the cost – risk of Temephos 2%, the Bacillus thurigiensis and fish as mosquitoes control thorough a consideration. Were primary dates process in the computerized system Excel of packet Office XP and that statistic process of effectively of each treatment was use the test of proportions comparison of packet Statgraphics plus 4.1, both systems sustained in WindowsÒ. The results showing that the mosquitoes species more disseminated in the province are: Anopheles albimanus, Aedes mediovitatus, Aedes scapularis, Aedes confinis, Culex quinquefasciatus, Culex nigripalpus and Culex corniger; besides, the results demonstrating the superiority of control with fish on the Temephos control, already that is more efficient (99% versus 87% that p < 0.01 in the mosquitoes control. The fish control (no spending in CUC and $ 1 035.08 MN is more economic than Temephos (847 500 CUC and $ 12 490.96 MN and than Bacillus thurigiensis (6 328 cuc and $ 8 280.64 MN. Was conclude that the fish constitute a control effective that the mosquitoes people, recommended the use of fish for all benefice that this represent.

Janhad L. Rodríguez Mendieta

2006-07-01

93

Evaluation of ULV and Thermal Fog Mosquito Control Applications in Temperate and Desert Environments  

Science.gov (United States)

Ultra low volume (ULV) and thermal fog aerosol dispersals of pesticides have been used against mosquitoes and other insects for half a century. Although each spray technology has advantages and disadvantages, only 7 studies have been identified that directly compare their performance in the field. U...

94

Using global information technology to detect, monitor, and control mosquito pest and disease vector populations.  

Science.gov (United States)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS), image analysis, and remote sensing comprise global information technologies that are used to characterize pest and vector populations of mosquitoes. At this national meeting, scientists from ARS and McNeese State University organized and convened a half-day sym...

95

Why do we need alternative tools to control mosquito-borne diseases in Latin America?  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english In this opinion paper, we discuss the potential and challenges of using the symbiont Wolbachia to block mosquito transmitted diseases such as dengue, malaria and chikungunya in Latin America. [...

Rafael, Maciel-de-Freitas; Raquel, Aguiar; Rafaela V, Bruno; Maria Cristina, Guimarães; Ricardo, Lourenço-de-Oliveira; Marcos HF, Sorgine; Cláudio J, Struchiner; Denise, Valle; Scott L, O' Neill; Luciano A, Moreira.

2012-09-01

96

Laboratory evaluation techniques to investigate the spatial potential of repellents for push & pull mosquito control systems  

Science.gov (United States)

A protocol has been developed for the indoor evaluation of candidate spatial repellents intended for use in push and pull systems. Single treatments (catnip oil, 1-methylpiperazine and homopiperazine) and a mixture of catnip oil and homopiperazine were tested with yellow-fever mosquitoes (Aedes aegy...

97

Efficacy of leaves extract of Calotropis procera Ait. (Asclepiadaceae) in controlling Anopheles arabiensis and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study aimed to investigate, the larvicidal, adult emergence inhibition and oviposition deterrent activity of aqueous leaves extract of Calotropis procera against Anopheles arabiensis and Culex quinquefasciatus as natural mosquito larvicide. The larvicidal activity was monitored against 2nd, 3rd and 4th instar larvae of each mosquito species 24 h post-treatment. Adult emergence inhibition activity was tested by exposing 3rd instar larvae of each mosquito species to different concentrations of extracts (200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 ppm for An. arabiensis and 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 ppm for Cx. quinquefasciatus). Probit analysis was used to analyze data from bioassay experiments. The oviposition deterrent activity was tested by using three different concentrations of extracts (1000, 500 and 200 for An. arabiensis, and 1000, 500 and 100 for Cx. quinquefasciatus) that caused high, moderate and low larval mortality in the larvicidal experiment against 3rd instar larvae. It was found that, LC50-LC90 values calculated were 273.53-783.43, 366.44-1018.59 and 454.99-1224.62 ppm for 2nd, 3rd and 4th larval instars, respectively, of An. arabiensis and 187.93-433.51, 218.27-538.27 and 264.85-769.13 ppm for 2nd, 3rd and 4th larval instars, respectively, of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Fifty percent of adult emergence inhibition (EI50) was shown at 277.90 and 183.65 ppm for An. arabiensis and Cx. quinquefasciatus, respectively. The pupal stage was not affected till a concentration of 5000 ppm. The extract showed oviposition deterrence and effective repellence against both mosquito species at different concentrations, with the observation on that maximal eggs were laid in low concentration of extract. These results suggest that the leaves extract of C. procera possess remarkable larvicidal, adult emergence inhibitor, repellent and oviposition deterrent effect against both An. arabiensis and Cx. quinquefasciatus, and might be used as natural biocides for mosquito control. PMID:23961048

Elimam, Abdalla M; Elmalik, Khitma H; Ali, Faysal S

2009-10-01

98

Efficacy of leaves extract of Calotropis procera Ait. (Asclepiadaceae) in controlling Anopheles arabiensis and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes?  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study aimed to investigate, the larvicidal, adult emergence inhibition and oviposition deterrent activity of aqueous leaves extract of Calotropis procera against Anopheles arabiensis and Culex quinquefasciatus as natural mosquito larvicide. The larvicidal activity was monitored against 2nd, 3rd and 4th instar larvae of each mosquito species 24 h post-treatment. Adult emergence inhibition activity was tested by exposing 3rd instar larvae of each mosquito species to different concentrations of extracts (200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 ppm for An. arabiensis and 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 ppm for Cx. quinquefasciatus). Probit analysis was used to analyze data from bioassay experiments. The oviposition deterrent activity was tested by using three different concentrations of extracts (1000, 500 and 200 for An. arabiensis, and 1000, 500 and 100 for Cx. quinquefasciatus) that caused high, moderate and low larval mortality in the larvicidal experiment against 3rd instar larvae. It was found that, LC50–LC90 values calculated were 273.53–783.43, 366.44–1018.59 and 454.99–1224.62 ppm for 2nd, 3rd and 4th larval instars, respectively, of An. arabiensis and 187.93–433.51, 218.27–538.27 and 264.85–769.13 ppm for 2nd, 3rd and 4th larval instars, respectively, of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Fifty percent of adult emergence inhibition (EI50) was shown at 277.90 and 183.65 ppm for An. arabiensis and Cx. quinquefasciatus, respectively. The pupal stage was not affected till a concentration of 5000 ppm. The extract showed oviposition deterrence and effective repellence against both mosquito species at different concentrations, with the observation on that maximal eggs were laid in low concentration of extract. These results suggest that the leaves extract of C. procera possess remarkable larvicidal, adult emergence inhibitor, repellent and oviposition deterrent effect against both An. arabiensis and Cx. quinquefasciatus, and might be used as natural biocides for mosquito control. PMID:23961048

Elimam, Abdalla M.; Elmalik, Khitma H.; Ali, Faysal S.

2009-01-01

99

Mosquito control pesticides and sea surface temperatures have differential effects on the survival and oxidative stress response of coral larvae.  

Science.gov (United States)

The declining health of coral reefs is intensifying worldwide at an alarming rate due to the combined effects of land-based sources of pollution and climate change. Despite the persistent use of mosquito control pesticides in populated coastal areas, studies examining the survival and physiological impacts of early life-history stages of non-targeted marine organisms are limited. In order to better understand the combined effects of mosquito pesticides and rising sea surface temperatures, we exposed larvae from the coral Porites astreoides to selected concentrations of two major mosquito pesticide ingredients, naled and permethrin, and seawater elevated +3.5 °C. Following 18-20 h of exposure, larvae exposed to naled concentrations of 2.96 µg L(-1) or greater had significantly reduced survivorship compared to controls. These effects were not detected in the presence of permethrin or elevated temperature. Furthermore, larval settlement, post-settlement survival and zooxanthellae density were not impacted by any treatment. To evaluate the sub-lethal stress response of larvae, several oxidative stress endpoints were utilized. Biomarker responses to pesticide exposure were variable and contingent upon pesticide type as well as the specific biomarker being employed. In some cases, such as with protein carbonylation and catalase gene expression, the effects of naled exposure and temperature were interactive. In other cases pesticide exposure failed to induce any sub-lethal stress response. Overall, these results demonstrate that P. astreoides larvae have a moderate degree of resistance against short-term exposure to ecologically relevant concentrations of pesticides even in the presence of elevated temperature. In addition, this work highlights the importance of considering the complexity and differential responses encountered when examining the impacts of combined stressors that occur on varying spatial scales. PMID:25527297

Ross, Cliff; Olsen, Kevin; Henry, Michael; Pierce, Richard

2015-04-01

100

Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles for the control of mosquito vectors of malaria, filariasis, and dengue.  

Science.gov (United States)

A biological method was used to synthesize stable silver nanoparticles that were tested as mosquito larvicides against Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus. Annona squamosa leaf broth (5%) reduced aqueous 1?mM AgNO? to stable silver nanoparticles with an average size of 450?nm. The structure and percentage of synthesized nanoparticles was characterized by using ultraviolet spectrophotometry, X-Ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy methods. The median lethal concentrations (LC??) of silver nanoparticles that killed fourth instars of Ae. aegypti, Cx. quinquefasciatus, and An. stephensi were 0.30, 0.41, and 2.12 ppm, respectively. Adult longevity (days) in male and female mosquitoes exposed as larvae to 0.1 ppm silver nanoparticles was reduced by ~30% (p<0.05), whereas the number of eggs laid by females exposed as larvae to 0.1 ppm silver nanoparticles decreased by 36% (p<0.05). PMID:22022807

Arjunan, Naresh Kumar; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Rejeeth, Chandrababu; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Barnard, Donald R

2012-03-01

101

History of Mosquito Releases for Control and Potential of New Molecular Capabilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Ten different field trials, of varying sizes, have been carried out with sterile mosquitoes, the majority being in the 1970's. The major trials were in India, Burma and El Salvador. The major biological problems encountered were the failure of the sterile males to mate with the wild females and density dependent larval survival. There were also several problems associated with the technology, e.g. failures in mass rearing, inappropriate release technologies and immigration into the treatment area. New transgenic developments may offer some improvements but the above constraints will still need to be solved. Systems to genetically sterilize insects in the field are being evaluated in mosquitoes and have been shown to be successful in Drosophila. The genetic constructs used in Drosophila may well function in Anopheles.

102

Mosquitoes Associated with Ditch-Plugged and Control Tidal Salt Marshes on the Delmarva Peninsula  

OpenAIRE

A study was conducted during the summer of 2009 (from July to September) to characterize mosquito communities among different habitats in five historically ditched tidal salt marshes and three adjacent wooded areas in the E.A. Vaughn Wetland Management Area on the Maryland Delmarva Peninsula, USA. Study marshes are characteristic of Atlantic coastal salt marshes that had undergone grid ditching from the 1930s to 1950s. In the autumn of 2008 (October and November) ditches were plugged near the...

Leisnham, Paul T.; Sarah Sandoval-Mohapatra

2011-01-01

103

Dispersal of the parasitic ciliate Lambornella clarki: implications for ciliates in the biological control of mosquitoes.  

OpenAIRE

Lambornella clarki (Ciliophora: Tetrahymenidae), an endoparasite of Aedes sierrensis (Diptera: Culicidae), is dispersed by infected adult mosquitoes. Invasion of the ovaries induces parasitically castrated females to exhibit oviposition behavior and thereby actively disperse ciliates through deposition into water. Oviposition behavior of infected females is prolonged and mimics that of normal gravid females in their first gonotropic cycle. Adults of both sexes also passively disperse ciliates...

Egerter, D. E.; Anderson, J. R.; Washburn, J. O.

1986-01-01

104

Transglutaminase-mediated semen coagulation controls sperm storage in the malaria mosquito  

OpenAIRE

Insect seminal fluid proteins are powerful modulators of many aspects of female physiology and behaviour including longevity, egg production, sperm storage, and remating. The crucial role of these proteins in reproduction makes them promising targets for developing tools aimed at reducing the population sizes of vectors of disease. In the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae, seminal secretions produced by the male accessory glands (MAGs) are transferred to females in the form of a coagulated m...

Rogers, D. W.; Baldini, F.; Battaglia, F.; Panico, M.; De, A.; Morris, H. R.; Catteruccia, F.

2009-01-01

105

Control of pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes with chlorfenapyr in Benin  

OpenAIRE

Objective To compare the efficacy of chlorfenapyr applied on mosquito nets and as an indoor residual spray against populations of Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus in an area of Benin that shows problematic levels of pyrethroid resistance. Method Eight-week trial conducted in experimental huts. Results Indoor residual spraying killed 82.9% of An. gambiae overall (mean mortality: 79.5%) compared to 53.5% overall (mean mortality: 61.7%) in the hut containing the lower dosed ITN. Anal...

N Guessan, R.; Boko, P.; Odjo, A.; Knols, B. G. J.; Akogbeto, M.; Rowland, M.

2009-01-01

106

The excretion of NaCl and KCl loads in mosquitoes. 1. Control data.  

Science.gov (United States)

The handling of Na(+) and K(+) loads was investigated in isolated Malpighian tubules and in whole mosquitoes of Aedes aegypti. Isolated Malpighian tubules bathed in Na(+)-rich Ringer solution secreted Na(+)-rich fluid, and tubules bathed in K(+)-rich Ringer solution secreted K(+)-rich fluid. Upon Na(+) loading the hemolymph, the mosquito removed 77% the injected Na(+) within the next 30 min. The rapid onset and magnitude of this diuresis and the excretion of more Na(+) than can be accounted for by tubular secretion in vitro is consistent with the release of the calcitonin-like diuretic hormone in the mosquito to remove the Na(+) load from the hemolymph. Downstream, K(+) was reabsorbed with water in the hindgut, which concentrated Na(+) in excreted urine hyperosmotic to the hemolymph. Upon K(+) loading the hemolymph, the mosquito took 2 h to remove 100% of the injected K(+) from the hemolymph. The excretion of K(+)-rich isosmotic urine was limited to clearing the injected K(+) from the hemolymph with a minimum of Cl(-) and water. As a result, 43.3% of the injected Cl(-) and 48.1% of the injected water were conserved. The cation retained in the hemolymph with Cl(-) was probably N-methyl-d-glucamine, which replaced Na(+) in the hemolymph injection of the K(+) load. Since the tubular secretion of K(+) accounts for the removal of the K(+) load from the hemolymph, the reabsorption of K(+), Na(+), Cl(-), and water must be inhibited in the hindgut. The agents mediating this inhibition are unknown. PMID:25056103

Hine, Rebecca M; Rouhier, Matthew F; Park, Seokhwan Terry; Qi, Zhijun; Piermarini, Peter M; Beyenbach, Klaus W

2014-10-01

107

Ross, macdonald, and a theory for the dynamics and control of mosquito-transmitted pathogens.  

OpenAIRE

Ronald Ross and George Macdonald are credited with developing a mathematical model of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission. A systematic historical review suggests that several mathematicians and scientists contributed to development of the Ross-Macdonald model over a period of 70 years. Ross developed two different mathematical models, Macdonald a third, and various “Ross-Macdonald” mathematical models exist. Ross-Macdonald models are best defined by a consensus set of assumptions. The m...

Smith, Dl; Battle, Ke; Hay, Si; Barker, Cm; Scott, Tw; Mckenzie, Fe

2012-01-01

108

Effectiveness of control measures against mosquitoes at a constructed wetland in southern California.  

Science.gov (United States)

The effectiveness of larvicide and adulticide treatments against mosquitoes at a constructed wetland in San Jacinto, California was assessed with larval surveys, trapping of emerging adults, and collections of host-seeking females by carbon dioxide-baited traps. Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti, Bactimos pellets) applied at a rate of 19 kg/ha did not demonstrably affect Culex larval and emergent adult populations. Larval populations in the seven marshes of the wetland decreased from approximately one third-fourth instar larva/dip to undetectable levels following two applications of Bacillus sphaericus (Vectolex CG) at a rate of either 19 or 23.6 kg/ha. The largest decline in the number of adult mosquitoes emerging per day from vegetated regions of the wetland occurred after B. sphaericus treatments. The Culex erythrothorax host-seeking population declined about 80-fold during September beginning three weeks after the first treatment with B. sphaericus; however, the Culex tarsalis host-seeking population did not decline abruptly until mid-October 1997. This result suggests that immigration of females from other developmental sites might be an important factor influencing the Cx. tarsalis host-seeking population at the wetlands. Safety concerns required that insecticide applications were carried out during daylight hours, and two daytime applications of adulticide (Pyrenone) in early August were ineffective against mosquitoes resting in the thick vegetation. PMID:9879071

Walton, W E; Workman, P D; Randall, L A; Jiannino, J A; Offill, Y A

1998-12-01

109

Mosquitoes, models, and dengue.  

Science.gov (United States)

In the last 10 years dengue has spread markedly through Latin America and the Caribbean (Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Barbados, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, and Brazil). The mosquito Aedes aegypti has taken advantage of increased urbanization and crowding to transmit the dengue virus. The mosquito infests tires, cans, and water jars near dwellings. The female mosquito practices multiple, interrupted feeding. Thus, mosquito infesting and feeding practices facilitate dengue transmission in crowded conditions. Factors contributing to the spread of dengue include numbers of infected and susceptible human hosts, strain of dengue virus, size of mosquito population, feeding habits, time from infection to ability to transmit virus for both vector and host, likelihood of virus transmission from human to mosquito to human, and temperature (which affects vector distribution, size, feeding habits, and extrinsic incubation period). Public health models may use simulation models to help them plan or evaluate the potential impact of different intervention strategies and/or of environmental changes (e.g., global warming). Other factors contributing to the dengue epidemic are international travel, urbanization, population growth, crowding, poverty, a weakened public health infrastructure, and limited support for sustained disease control programs. Molecular epidemiology by nucleic acid sequence analysis is another sophisticated technique used to study infectious diseases. It showed that dengue type 3 isolated from Panama and Nicaragua in 1994 was identical to that responsible for the major dengue hemorrhagic fever epidemics in Sri Lanka and India in the 1980s. Public health officials must remember three priorities relevant to dengue and other emerging infections: the need to strengthen surveillance efforts, dedicated and sustained involvement in prevention and control needs at the local level, and a strong public health infrastructure at the international, national, and local levels to maintain support for surveillance and control activities. PMID:8622446

Lifson, A R

1996-05-01

110

Anti-mosquito plants as an alternative or incremental method for malaria vector control among rural communities of Bagamoyo District, Tanzania  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Plants represent one of the most accessible resources available for mosquito control by communities in Tanzania. However, no documented statistics exist for their contribution in the management of mosquitoes and other insects except through verbal and some publications. This study aimed at assessing communities’ knowledge, attitudes and practices of using plants as an alternative method for mosquito control among selected communities in a malaria-prone area in Tanzania. Methods Questionnaires were administered to 202 respondents from four villages of Bagamoyo District, Pwani Region, in Tanzania followed by participatory rural appraisal with village health workers. Secondary data collection for plants mentioned by the communities was undertaken using different search engines such as googlescholar, PubMED and NAPRALERT. Results Results showed about 40.3% of respondents used plants to manage insects, including mosquitoes. A broad profile of plants are used, including “mwarobaini” (Azadirachta indica) (22.5%), “mtopetope” (Annona spp) (20.8%), “mchungwa/mlimau” (Citrus spp) (8.3%), “mvumbashi/uvumbati” (Ocimum spp) (7.4%), “mkorosho” (Anacadium occidentale) (7.1%), “mwembe” (5.4%) (Mangifera indica), “mpera” (4.1%) (Psidium spp) and “maganda ya nazi” (4.1%) (Cocos nucifera). Majority of respondents collected these plants from the wild (54.2%), farms (28.9%) and/or home gardens (6%). The roles played by these plants in fighting mosquitoes is reflected by the majority that deploy them with or without bed-nets (p > 0.55) or insecticidal sprays (p >0.22). Most respondents were aware that mosquitoes transmit malaria (90.6%) while few respondents associated elephantiasis/hydrocele (46.5%) and yellow fever (24.3%) with mosquitoes. Most of the ethnobotanical uses mentioned by the communities were consistent with scientific information gathered from the literature, except for Psidium guajava, which is reported for the first time in insect control. Conclusion This survey has indicated some knowledge gap among community members in managing mosquito vectors using plant. The communities need a basic health education and sensitization for effective exploitation of this valuable tool for reducing mosquitoes and associated disease burdens. On the other hand, the government of Tanzania should strengthen advocacy of botanical pesticides development, registration and regulation for public health benefits because they are source of pest control tools people rely on them. PMID:25015092

2014-01-01

111

Effectiveness of a multiple intervention strategy for the control of the tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) in Spain.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of four complementary and combined strategies to minimize the presence of the invasive mosquito Aedes albopictus, firmly established in Sant Cugat del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain. A quasi-experimental design including six neighbourhoods was performed in 2008-2009. The abundance of mosquitoes was monitored through ovitraps. The multiple intervention strategy consisted of four actions: source reduction; larvicide treatments (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis and diflubenzuron); adulticide treatments (alfacipermetrin); and cleaning up uncontrolled landfills. The results showed the number of eggs significantly reduced in the areas with intervention. In 2008, the accumulate median of eggs was 175 and 272 in the intervention and control areas, respectively. In 2009, these medians were 884 and 1668 eggs. In total, 3104 households were visited and 683 people were interviewed. During inspections inside the houses, the cooperation of citizens in 2009 was 16% higher than that in 2008 (95% CI 13-19%). These findings suggest that the strategy was effective in reducing the number of eggs. Citizen cooperation, an essential factor for success, was observed through a high level of collaboration by the home owners, who allowed entry into their private dwellings. This study could be a model for controlling the populations of Ae. albopictus in the Mediterranean region. PMID:21466887

Abramides, Gisela Chebabi; Roiz, David; Guitart, Raimon; Quintana, Salvador; Guerrero, Irene; Giménez, Nuria

2011-05-01

112

Attractive toxic sugar baits: control of mosquitoes with the low-risk active ingredient dinotefuran and potential impacts on nontarget organisms in Morocco.  

Science.gov (United States)

We evaluated the efficacy of attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) in the laboratory and field with the low-risk active ingredient dinotefuran against mosquito populations. Preliminary laboratory assays indicated that dinotefuran in solution with the sugar baits was ingested and resulted in high mortality of female Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Aedes aegypti Linnaeus. Field studies demonstrated >70% reduction of mosquito populations at 3 wk post-ATSB application. Nontarget feeding of seven insect orders-Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, Orthoptera, and Neuroptera-was evaluated in the field after application of attractive sugar baits (ASB) on vegetation by dissecting the guts and searching for food dye with a dissecting microscope. Nontargets were found stained with ASB 0.9% of the time when the application was applied on green nonflowering vegetation. Only two families were significantly impacted by the ASB application: Culicidae (mosquitoes) and Chironomidae (nonbiting midges) of the order Diptera. Pollinators of the other insect orders were not significantly impacted. No mortality was observed in the laboratory studies with predatory nontargets, wolf spiders or ground beetles, after feeding for 3 d on mosquitoes engorged on ATSB applied to vegetation. Overall, this novel control strategy had little impact on nontarget organisms, including pollinators and beneficial insects, and was effective at controlling mosquito populations, further supporting the development of ATSB for commercial use. PMID:24331613

Khallaayoune, Khalid; Qualls, Whitney A; Revay, Edita E; Allan, Sandra A; Arheart, Kristopher L; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D; Xue, Rui-De; Schlein, Yosef; Beier, John C; Müller, Günter C

2013-10-01

113

An analysis of two island groups as potential sites for trials of transgenic mosquitoes for malaria control  

Science.gov (United States)

Considerable technological advances have been made towards the generation of genetically modified mosquitoes for vector control. In contrast, less progress has been made towards field evaluations of transformed mosquitoes which are critical for evaluating the success of, and hazards associated with, genetic modification. Oceanic islands have been highlighted as potentially the best locations for such trials. However, population genetic studies are necessary to verify isolation. Here, we used a panel of genetic markers to assess for evidence of genetic isolation of two oceanic island populations of the African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s.s. We found no evidence of isolation between the Bijagós archipelago and mainland Guinea-Bissau, despite separation by distances beyond the known dispersal capabilities of this taxon. Conversely, the Comoros Islands appear to be genetically isolated from the East African mainland, and thus represent a location worthy of further investigation for field trials. Based on assessments of gene flow within and between the Comoros islands, the island of Grande Comore was found to be genetically isolated from adjacent islands and also exhibited local population structure, indicating that it may be the most suitable site for trials with existing genetic modification technologies. PMID:23789035

Marsden, Clare D; Cornel, Anthony; Lee, Yoosook; Sanford, Michelle R; Norris, Laura C; Goodell, Parker B; Nieman, Catelyn C; Han, Sarah; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Denis, Joao; Ouledi, Ahmed; Lanzaro, Gregory C

2013-01-01

114

The entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae for mosquito control. Impact on the adult stage of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae and filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus  

OpenAIRE

Insect-pathogenie fungi for mosquito control (Chapters 1-3)Malaria and lymphatic tilariasis impose serious human health burdens in the tropics. Up to 500 million cases of malaria are reported annually, resulting in an estimated 1.5-2.7million deaths, of which 90% occur in sub-Saharan Africa. Malaria is caused by protozoa of the genus Plasmodium and is transmitted through bites of mosquitoes belonging to the genus Anopheles. Lymphatic filariasis is caused by helminths, the most widespread spec...

Scholte, E. J.

2004-01-01

115

The Potential of the Sterile Insect Technique and other Genetic Methods for Control of Malaria-Transmitting Mosquitoes. Report of a Consultants Meeting  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report updates information provided by a 1993 consultant group on the use of genetic methods for control of malaria-transmitting mosquitoes. Human malaria parasites of the genus Plasmodium are exclusively transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles. Where these two groups co-exist, the transmission of the parasite to humans can create a major health problem. Malaria currently causes 2 million deaths world-wide and approximately 400 million clinical cases annually. There are ca. 15 major vector species and 30-40 vectors of lesser importance. This report considers the practicality of developing the sterile insect technique (SIT) or other genetic mechanisms in order to eradicate mosquito vectors from specific areas. This would interrupt transmission and eliminate malaria in those areas.

116

Current procedures of the integrated urban vector-mosquito control as an example in Cotonou (Benin, West Africa) and Wroc?aw area (Poland).  

Science.gov (United States)

Current strategy of Integrated Vector Management (IVM) comprises the general approach of environmentally friendly control measures. With regard to mosquitoes it includes first of all application of microbial insecticides based on Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) and B. sphaericus (Bs) delta-endotoxins as well as the reduction of breeding habitats and natural enemy augmentation. It can be achieved thorough implementation of the interdisciplinary program, i. e., understanding of mosquito vector ecology, the appropriate vector-diseases (e. g., malariometric) measurements and training of local personnel responsible for mosquito abatement activities, as well as community involvement. Biocontrol methods as an alternative to chemical insecticides result from the sustainability development concept, growing awareness of environmental pollution and the development of insecticide-resistant strains of vector-mosquito populations in many parts of the world. Although sustainable trends are usually considered in terms of the monetary and training resources within countries, environmental concerns are actually more limiting factors for the duration of an otherwise successful vector control effort. In order to meet these new needs, increasing efforts have been made in search of and application of natural enemies, such as parasites, bacterial pathogens and predators which may control populations of insect vectors. The biological control agent based on the bacterial toxins Bti and Bs has been used in the Wroc?aw's University and Municipal Mosquito Control Programs since 1998. In West-Africa biocontrol appears to be an effective and safe tool to combat malaria in addition to bed-nets, residual indoor spraying and appropriate diagnosis and treatment of malaria parasites which are the major tools in the WHO Roll Back Malaria Program. IVM studies carried out 2005-2008 in Cotonou (Benin) as well those in Wroc?aw Irrigated Fields during the last years include the following major steps: 1. Mapping of all breeding sites in the project area and recording data in a geographical information system (GIS/relational database). All districts, streets and houses are numbered for quick reference during the operation; 2. Studying mosquito vector bionomics, migration and vectorial capacity in the project area, before, during and after the routine Bti treatments; 3. Assessment of the optimum for effective larvicide insecticide dosages at major breeding sites against the different target mosquito species; 4. Implementation of the microbial control agents in the integrated routine program. Adaptation of the application equipment to the local situation, training of the field staff, and routine treatments; 5. Conducting surveillance of vector-disease (e. g., malariometric) parameters in the control and experimental area before, during, and after the application of biocontrol agents. PMID:20209805

Rydzanicz, Katarzyna; Lonc, Elzbieta; Becker, Norbert

2009-01-01

117

Efficacy of leaves extract of Calotropis procera Ait. (Asclepiadaceae) in controlling Anopheles arabiensis and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes?  

OpenAIRE

The present study aimed to investigate, the larvicidal, adult emergence inhibition and oviposition deterrent activity of aqueous leaves extract of Calotropis procera against Anopheles arabiensis and Culex quinquefasciatus as natural mosquito larvicide. The larvicidal activity was monitored against 2nd, 3rd and 4th instar larvae of each mosquito species 24 h post-treatment. Adult emergence inhibition activity was tested by exposing 3rd instar larvae of each mosquito species to different conce...

Elimam, Abdalla M.; Elmalik, Khitma H.; Ali, Faysal S.

2009-01-01

118

Made-to-measure malaria vector control strategies: rational design based on insecticide properties and coverage of blood resources for mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Eliminating malaria from highly endemic settings will require unprecedented levels of vector control. To suppress mosquito populations, vector control products targeting their blood hosts must attain high biological coverage of all available sources, rather than merely high demographic coverage of a targeted resource subset, such as humans while asleep indoors. Beyond defining biological coverage in a measurable way, the proportion of blood meals obtained from humans and the proportion of bites upon unprotected humans occurring indoors also suggest optimal target product profiles for delivering insecticides to humans or livestock. For vectors that feed only occasionally upon humans, preferred animal hosts may be optimal targets for mosquito-toxic insecticides, and vapour-phase insecticides optimized to maximize repellency, rather than toxicity, may be ideal for directly protecting people against indoor and outdoor exposure. However, for vectors that primarily feed upon people, repellent vapour-phase insecticides may be inferior to toxic ones and may undermine the impact of contact insecticides applied to human sleeping spaces, houses or clothing if combined in the same time and place. These concepts are also applicable to other mosquito-borne anthroponoses so that diverse target species could be simultaneously controlled with integrated vector management programmes. Measurements of these two crucial mosquito behavioural parameters should now be integrated into programmatically funded, longitudinal, national-scale entomological monitoring systems to inform selection of available technologies and investment in developing new ones. PMID:24739261

Killeen, Gerry F; Seyoum, Aklilu; Gimnig, John E; Stevenson, Jennifer C; Drakeley, Christopher J; Chitnis, Nakul

2014-01-01

119

Genetically Modified Mosquito: Myth and Reality  

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Full Text Available Sterile Insect Technique (SIT has been applied successfully in some agricultural pest control programs in the past, but in many cases, success has not been sustainable in the long run. Various attempts have been made to duplicate this limited success SIT application in agriculture to other areas of applications, particularly in vector control. For example, a recent mosquito control program has been initiated in Malaysia to eliminate dengue-mosquitoes Aedes aegypti by releasing large amount of genetically modified GM male mosquitoes into the field to outcompete the wild male mosquitoes. Field experimental data that has been made available in the literature is limited, rendering it difficult to make independent assessment on its short-term efficacy and long-term sustainability of this GM control strategy. This paper presents a preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of GM mosquito in controlling dengue mosquito population by means of model simulations via DEER (Dengue Encephalitis Eradication Routines. Preliminary results indicate negative conclusion regarding the effectiveness of GM mosquitoes in controlling wild A. aegypti population over the long-term. Essentially, significant reduction of wild mosquito population is possible only if large over-flooding ratios are applied. Further, repeated releases must be maintained over an infinite time horizon to continue to sustain low population of mosquitoes. Major difficulty remains to be resolved. In particular, in-depth costbenefit analysis on this control program is essential to ensure long-term institutional and social support.

Teh Su Yean

2013-02-01

120

Production and maintenance of large numbers of Dugesia tigrina (Turbellaria: Tricladida) for the control of mosquitoes in the field.  

Science.gov (United States)

Methods to increase and preserve Dugesia tigrina for mosquito control purposes through cocoon production, mechanical sectioning and cold storage were examined. Cocoon production was an ineffective and unreliable means of increasing planarian numbers, with an average of only 0.19 cocoons containing 0.74 young produced per adult per week. In comparison, mechanical sectioning proved to be more appropriate for increasing the number of planaria. One hundred planaria averaging 8 mm in length could be sectioned into 600 segments in approximately 18 min; regeneration was achieved by approximately 94% of these segments, usually within 8 days after sectioning. Techniques were developed to store planaria at 10 degrees C until needed for field release. PMID:2565362

Callahan, J L; Morris, C D

1989-03-01

121

Modelo de simulación para el control del mosquito Aedes aegypti, transmisor del dengue y la fiebre amarilla, por el crustáceo Mesocyclops spp. A simulation model for the control of the Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue and yellow fever, by the crustacean Mesocyclops spp.  

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Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Se presenta un modelo de simulación que muestra la dinámica de depredación de Mesocyclops spp., sobre Aedes aegypti MÉTODOS: Representado por cuatro ecuaciones diferenciales: H'(t, cantidad de huevos; L'(t, cantidad de larvas; A'(t, cantidad de adultos y C'(t, cantidad de copépodos. Inicialmente las ecuaciones son del tipo clásico presa-depredador, según Lotka y Volterra. Posteriormente se modifica en un sistema con respuesta funcional para invertebrados, según Holling. RESULTADOS: El primer sistema controla y estabiliza la población de mosquitos, el segundo muestra que los copepodos son inefectivos como controladores. CONCLUSIONES: Se reconoce la necesidad de estudiar sistemas presa depredador (mosquitos - copepodos con trabajos que integren pruebas de laboratorio y de campo. Solo así será posible establecer la validez en el uso de estos últimos como controladores biológicos efectivos de mosquitos.OBJETIVE: A simulation model is presented to show the predation dynamics of Mesocyclops spp. over Aedes aegypti.i METHODS: The system is represented through four differential equations. H'(t, quantity of eggs; L'(t, quantity of larvae; A'(t, quantity of adults and C'(t, quantity of copepods. Initially the equations are of the classic predator-prey type, according to Lotka (1924 and Volterra (1926. Then it is modified into a system with functional response for invertebrates, according to Holling. RESULTS: The first system effectively controls and stabilizes the mosquito population, while the second suggests that copepods may be ineffective as mosquito controllers. CONCLUSIONS: The need to study predator-prey systems (copepodos-mosquitos with projects that integrate laboratory and of field tests is recognized. Only then will it be possible to establish the validity of predators as effective biological controllers of mosquitoes.

Jonny E. Duque L.

2004-04-01

122

Modelo de simulación para el control del mosquito Aedes aegypti, transmisor del dengue y la fiebre amarilla, por el crustáceo Mesocyclops spp. / A simulation model for the control of the Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue and yellow fever, by the crustacean Mesocyclops spp.  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish OBJETIVOS: Se presenta un modelo de simulación que muestra la dinámica de depredación de Mesocyclops spp., sobre Aedes aegypti MÉTODOS: Representado por cuatro ecuaciones diferenciales: H'(t), cantidad de huevos; L'(t), cantidad de larvas; A'(t), cantidad de adultos y C'(t), cantidad de copépodos. I [...] nicialmente las ecuaciones son del tipo clásico presa-depredador, según Lotka y Volterra. Posteriormente se modifica en un sistema con respuesta funcional para invertebrados, según Holling. RESULTADOS: El primer sistema controla y estabiliza la población de mosquitos, el segundo muestra que los copepodos son inefectivos como controladores. CONCLUSIONES: Se reconoce la necesidad de estudiar sistemas presa depredador (mosquitos - copepodos) con trabajos que integren pruebas de laboratorio y de campo. Solo así será posible establecer la validez en el uso de estos últimos como controladores biológicos efectivos de mosquitos. Abstract in english OBJETIVE: A simulation model is presented to show the predation dynamics of Mesocyclops spp. over Aedes aegypti.i METHODS: The system is represented through four differential equations. H'(t), quantity of eggs; L'(t), quantity of larvae; A'(t), quantity of adults and C'(t), quantity of copepods. Ini [...] tially the equations are of the classic predator-prey type, according to Lotka (1924) and Volterra (1926). Then it is modified into a system with functional response for invertebrates, according to Holling. RESULTS: The first system effectively controls and stabilizes the mosquito population, while the second suggests that copepods may be ineffective as mosquito controllers. CONCLUSIONS: The need to study predator-prey systems (copepodos-mosquitos) with projects that integrate laboratory and of field tests is recognized. Only then will it be possible to establish the validity of predators as effective biological controllers of mosquitoes.

Jonny E., Duque L.; Anibal, Muñoz L.; Mario A., Navarro-Silva.

2004-04-01

123

Modelo de simulación para el control del mosquito Aedes aegypti, transmisor del dengue y la fiebre amarilla, por el crustáceo Mesocyclops spp. / A simulation model for the control of the Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue and yellow fever, by the crustacean Mesocyclops spp.  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Public Health | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish OBJETIVOS: Se presenta un modelo de simulación que muestra la dinámica de depredación de Mesocyclops spp., sobre Aedes aegypti MÉTODOS: Representado por cuatro ecuaciones diferenciales: H'(t), cantidad de huevos; L'(t), cantidad de larvas; A'(t), cantidad de adultos y C'(t), cantidad de copépodos. I [...] nicialmente las ecuaciones son del tipo clásico presa-depredador, según Lotka y Volterra. Posteriormente se modifica en un sistema con respuesta funcional para invertebrados, según Holling. RESULTADOS: El primer sistema controla y estabiliza la población de mosquitos, el segundo muestra que los copepodos son inefectivos como controladores. CONCLUSIONES: Se reconoce la necesidad de estudiar sistemas presa depredador (mosquitos - copepodos) con trabajos que integren pruebas de laboratorio y de campo. Solo así será posible establecer la validez en el uso de estos últimos como controladores biológicos efectivos de mosquitos. Abstract in english OBJETIVE: A simulation model is presented to show the predation dynamics of Mesocyclops spp. over Aedes aegypti.i METHODS: The system is represented through four differential equations. H'(t), quantity of eggs; L'(t), quantity of larvae; A'(t), quantity of adults and C'(t), quantity of copepods. Ini [...] tially the equations are of the classic predator-prey type, according to Lotka (1924) and Volterra (1926). Then it is modified into a system with functional response for invertebrates, according to Holling. RESULTS: The first system effectively controls and stabilizes the mosquito population, while the second suggests that copepods may be ineffective as mosquito controllers. CONCLUSIONS: The need to study predator-prey systems (copepodos-mosquitos) with projects that integrate laboratory and of field tests is recognized. Only then will it be possible to establish the validity of predators as effective biological controllers of mosquitoes.

Jonny E., Duque L.; Anibal, Muñoz L.; Mario A., Navarro-Silva.

2004-04-01

124

Insecticide treated mosquito nets for malaria control in India-experience from a tribal area on operational feasibility and uptake  

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Full Text Available The study assessed the operational feasibility and acceptability of insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs in one Primary Health Centre (PHC in a falciparum malaria endemic district in the state of Orissa, India, where 74% of the people are tribes and DDT indoor residual spraying had been withdrawn and ITNs introduced by the National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme. To a population of 63,920, 24,442 ITNs were distributed free of charge through 101 treatment centers during July-August 2002. Interview of 1,130, 1,012 and 126 respondents showed that the net use rates were 80%, 74% and 55% in the cold, rainy and summer seasons, respectively. Since using ITNs, 74.5-76.6% of the respondents observed reduction of mosquito bites and 7.2-32.1% reduction of malaria incidence; 37% expressed willingness to buy ITNs if the cost was lower and they were affordable. Up to ten months post-treatment, almost 100% mortality of vector mosquitoes was recorded on unwashed and washed nets (once or twice. Health workers re-treated the nets at the treatment centers eight months after distribution on a cost-recovery basis. The coverage reported by the PHC was only 4.2%, mainly because of unwillingness of the people to pay for re-treatment and to go to the treatment centers from their villages. When the re-treatment was continued at the villages involving personnel from several departments, the coverage improved to about 90%.Interview of 126 respondents showed that among those who got their nets re-treated, 81.4% paid cash for the re-treatment and the remainder were reluctant to pay. Majority of those who paid said that they did so due to the fear that if they did not do so they would lose benefits from other government welfare schemes. The 2nd re-treatment was therefore carried out free of charge nine months after the 1st re-treatment and thus achieved coverage of 70.4%. The study showed community acceptance to use ITNs as they perceived the benefit. Distribution and re-treatment of nets was thus possible through the PHC system, if done free of charge and when personnel from different departments, especially those at village level, were involved.

P Jambulingam

2008-03-01

125

Insecticide treated mosquito nets for malaria control in India-experience from a tribal area on operational feasibility and uptake.  

Science.gov (United States)

The study assessed the operational feasibility and acceptability of insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) in one Primary Health Centre (PHC) in a falciparum malaria endemic district in the state of Orissa, India, where 74% of the people are tribes and DDT indoor residual spraying had been withdrawn and ITNs introduced by the National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme. To a population of 63,920, 24,442 ITNs were distributed free of charge through 101 treatment centers during July-August 2002. Interview of 1,130, 1,012 and 126 respondents showed that the net use rates were 80%, 74% and 55% in the cold, rainy and summer seasons, respectively. Since using ITNs, 74.5-76.6% of the respondents observed reduction of mosquito bites and 7.2-32.1% reduction of malaria incidence; 37% expressed willingness to buy ITNs if the cost was lower and they were affordable. Up to ten months post-treatment, almost 100% mortality of vector mosquitoes was recorded on unwashed and washed nets (once or twice). Health workers re-treated the nets at the treatment centers eight months after distribution on a cost-recovery basis. The coverage reported by the PHC was only 4.2%, mainly because of unwillingness of the people to pay for re-treatment and to go to the treatment centers from their villages. When the re-treatment was continued at the villages involving personnel from several departments, the coverage improved to about 90%. Interview of 126 respondents showed that among those who got their nets re-treated, 81.4% paid cash for the re-treatment and the remainder were reluctant to pay. Majority of those who paid said that they did so due to the fear that if they did not do so they would lose benefits from other government welfare schemes. The 2nd re-treatment was therefore carried out free of charge nine months after the 1st re-treatment and thus achieved coverage of 70.4%. The study showed community acceptance to use ITNs as they perceived the benefit. Distribution and re-treatment of nets was thus possible through the PHC system, if done free of charge and when personnel from different departments, especially those at village level, were involved. PMID:18392548

Jambulingam, P; Gunasekaran, K; Sahu, Ss; Vijayakumar, T

2008-03-01

126

wFlu: Characterization and Evaluation of a Native Wolbachia from the Mosquito Aedes fluviatilis as a Potential Vector Control Agent  

OpenAIRE

There is currently considerable interest and practical progress in using the endosymbiotic bacteria Wolbachia as a vector control agent for human vector-borne diseases. Such vector control strategies may require the introduction of multiple, different Wolbachia strains into target vector populations, necessitating the identification and characterization of appropriate endosymbiont variants. Here, we report preliminary characterization of wFlu, a native Wolbachia from the neotropical mosquito ...

Baton, Luke Anthony; Pacido?nio, Etiene Casagrande; Gonc?alves, Daniela Da Silva; Moreira, Luciano Andrade

2013-01-01

127

Oral delivery of double-stranded RNA in larvae of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti: implications for pest mosquito control.  

Science.gov (United States)

RNA interference has already proven itself to be a highly versatile molecular biology tool for understanding gene function in a limited number of insect species, but its widespread use in other species will be dependent on the development of easier methods of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) delivery. This study demonstrates that RNA interference can be induced in the mosquito Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) simply by soaking larvae in a solution of dsRNA for two hours. The mRNA transcripts for ?-tubulin, chitin synthase-1 and -2, and heat shock protein 83 were reduced between 30 and 50% three days post-dsRNA treatment. The dsRNA was mixed with a visible dye to identify those individuals that fed on the dsRNA, and based on an absence of RNA interference in those individuals that contained no dye within their guts, the primary route of entry of dsRNA is likely through the gut epithelium. RNA interference was systemic in the insects, inducing measurable knock down of gene expression in tissues beyond the gut. Silencing of the ?-tubulin and chitin synthase-1 genes resulted in reduced growth and/or mortality of the larvae, demonstrating the utility of dsRNA as a potential mosquito larvicide. Silencing of chitin synthase-2 did not induce mortality in the larvae, and silencing of heat shock protein 83 only induced mortality in the insects if they were subsequently subjected to a heat stress. Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae) larvae were also soaked in dsRNA designed to specifically target either their own ?-tubulin gene, or that of A. aegypti, and significant mortality was only seen in larvae treated with dsRNA targeting their own gene, which suggests that dsRNA pesticides could be designed to be species-limited. PMID:24224468

Singh, Aditi D; Wong, Sylvia; Ryan, Calen P; Whyard, Steven

2013-01-01

128

Wolbachia-a foe for mosquitoes  

OpenAIRE

Mosquitoes act as vectors for a wide range of viral and parasitic infectious diseases such as malaria, dengue, Chickungunya, lymphatic filariasis, Japanese encephalitis and West Nile virus in humans as well as in animals. Although a wide range of insecticides are used to control mosquitoes, it has only resulted in development of resistance to such insecticides. The evolution of insecticide resistance and lack of vaccines for many mosquito-borne diseases have made these arthropods highly harmf...

Guruprasad, Nadipinayakanahalli Munikrishnappa; Jalali, Sushil Kumar; Puttaraju, Hosagavi Puttegowda

2014-01-01

129

Large-scale use of mosquito larval source management for malaria control in Africa: a cost analysis  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, large-scale use of two malaria vector control methods, long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs and indoor residual spraying (IRS is being scaled up in Africa with substantial funding from donors. A third vector control method, larval source management (LSM, has been historically very successful and is today widely used for mosquito control globally, except in Africa. With increasing risk of insecticide resistance and a shift to more exophilic vectors, LSM is now under re-evaluation for use against afro-tropical vector species. Here the costs of this intervention were evaluated. Methods The 'ingredients approach' was used to estimate the economic and financial costs per person protected per year (pppy for large-scale LSM using microbial larvicides in three ecologically diverse settings: (1 the coastal metropolitan area of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, (2 a highly populated Kenyan highland area (Vihiga District, and (3 a lakeside setting in rural western Kenya (Mbita Division. Two scenarios were examined to investigate the cost implications of using alternative product formulations. Sensitivity analyses on product prices were carried out. Results The results show that for programmes using the same granular formulation larviciding costs the least pppy in Dar es Salaam (US$0.94, approximately 60% more in Vihiga District (US$1.50 and the most in Mbita Division (US$2.50. However, these costs are reduced substantially if an alternative water-dispensable formulation is used; in Vihiga, this would reduce costs to US$0.79 and, in Mbita Division, to US$1.94. Larvicide and staff salary costs each accounted for approximately a third of the total economic costs per year. The cost pppy depends mainly on: (1 the type of formulation required for treating different aquatic habitats, (2 the human population density relative to the density of aquatic habitats and (3 the potential to target the intervention in space and/or time. Conclusion Costs for LSM compare favourably with costs for IRS and LLINs, especially in areas with moderate and focal malaria transmission where mosquito larval habitats are accessible and well defined. LSM presents an attractive tool to be integrated in ongoing malaria control effort in such settings. Further data on the epidemiological health impact of larviciding is required to establish cost effectiveness.

Worrall Eve

2011-11-01

130

[Utilization of the waste of sisal industry in the control of mosquito larvae].  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this research was to utilize the waste residues of sisal fiber separation from Agave sisalana leaves to develop a larvicide for the combat of mosquito transmitting tropical diseases. Larvae of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus were exposed to different concentrations of the Agave extract for 24 hours to determine lethal concentrations. The LC50 for A. aegypti was 322 ppm and the LC50 for C. quinquefasciatus was 183 ppm. To detect the active substances, saponins were investigated. It was found that the various components of the extract were effective in eliminating the larvae. Under field conditions, this formulation can probably be used at 100 ppm, which causes 100% mortality of C. quinquefasciatus larvae after 3-4 days. The product is not recommended for use against A. aegypti due to the necessity for high concentrations and to the fact that the larvae of this species live frequently on drinking water. To avoid fermentation, Agave extract should be used in a dehydrated form which also represent a good formulation for practical use. PMID:9927821

Pizarro, A P; Oliveira Filho, A M; Parente, J P; Melo, M T; dos Santos, C E; Lima, P R

1999-01-01

131

Anthropogenic ecological change and impacts on mosquito breeding and control strategies in salt-marshes, Northern Territory, Australia.  

Science.gov (United States)

Darwin, in the tropical north of Australia, is subject to high numbers of mosquitoes and several mosquito-borne diseases. Many of Darwin's residential areas were built in close proximity to tidally influenced swamps, where long-term storm-water run-off from nearby residences into these swamps has led to anthropogenic induced ecological change. When natural wet-dry cycles were disrupted, bare mud-flats and mangroves were transformed into perennial fresh to brackish-water reed swamps. Reed swamps provided year-round breeding habitat for many mosquito species, such that mosquito abundance was less predictable and seasonally dependent, but constant and often occurring in plague proportions. Drainage channels were constructed throughout the wetlands to reduce pooled water during dry-season months. This study assesses the impact of drainage interventions on vegetation and mosquito ecology in three salt-marshes in the Darwin area. Findings revealed a universal decline in dry-season mosquito abundance in each wetland system. However, some mosquito species increased in abundance during wet-season months. Due to the high expense and potentially detrimental environmental impacts of ecosystem and non-target species disturbance, large-scale modifications such as these are sparingly undertaken. However, our results indicate that some large scale environmental modification can assist the process of wetland restoration, as appears to be the case for these salt marsh systems. Drainage in all three systems has been restored to closer to their original salt-marsh ecosystems, while reducing mosquito abundances, thereby potentially lowering the risk of vector-borne disease transmission and mosquito pest biting problems. PMID:22476689

Jacups, Susan; Warchot, Allan; Whelan, Peter

2012-06-01

132

Evaluation of a rapid analyte measurement platform for West Nile virus detection based on United States mosquito control programs.  

Science.gov (United States)

The rapid analyte measurement platform (RAMP) system is an immunoassay test for West Nile virus (WNV) detection. Although reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methodology has been regarded as the gold standard for confirming WNV presence, usage of RAMP testing kits has increased in the past years. We collected RAMP test result data that were subsequently confirmed with RT-PCR methodology from mosquito control agencies to evaluate the efficacy of the RAMP testing. Results indicate that there are a high number of false positives (RAMP positive, RT-PCR negative) with RAMP testing. Correlation between RAMP unit values and RT-PCR cycle threshold values were varied depending on the primer/probe being compared. Comparison of RT-PCR results (on the same samples) between laboratories also indicates variation among the procedures and their potential to influence the RAMP testing efficacies. We discuss the potential issues and solutions that could prevent the high rate of false positives. PMID:22855771

Kesavaraju, Banugopan; Farajollahi, Ary; Lampman, Richard L; Hutchinson, Michael; Krasavin, Nina M; Graves, Sonya E; Dickson, Sammie L

2012-08-01

133

The urban mosquitoes of Suva, Fiji: seasonal incidence and evaluation of environmental sanitation and ULV spraying for their control.  

Science.gov (United States)

Larval surveys and oviposition traps were used to monitor urban mosquito populations in two adjacent transects in Suva, Fiji between May 1978 and August 1979. Populations of Aedes aegypti and Ae. pseudoscutellaris fluctuated seasonally with changes in rainfall, the latter species being most prevalent throughout the year. Populations of these two species were highest between December and July and lowest between August and October. Larval populations of Culex quinquefasciatus did not show a seasonal variation and larval populations of Cx. annulirostris were too low for any conclusions to be made. All species were found breeding most often in miscellaneous containers, with tyres, plant containers and flower vases also being important sources for Ae. aegypti breeding. Through environmental sanitation the Breteau Index for all species was reduced by 88%; Premise Index by 72% and the Container Index by 83%, when compared to a control area. ULV applied malathion was effective in temporarily reducing Ae. pseudoscutellaris populations from 50--100%. Effects on Ae. aegypti were inconclusive. It is concluded that through enforcement of the existing laws and strict monthly surveillance during the periods of highest seasonal density, urban Aedes and Culex populations can be maintained at an acceptable level. PMID:7411679

Goettel, M S; Toohey, M K; Pillai, J S

1980-08-01

134

A tool box for operational mosquito larval control: preliminary results and early lessons from the Urban Malaria Control Programme in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background As the population of Africa rapidly urbanizes, large populations could be protected from malaria by controlling aquatic stages of mosquitoes if cost-effective and scalable implementation systems can be designed. Methods A recently initiated Urban Malaria Control Programme in Dar es Salaam delegates responsibility for routine mosquito control and surveillance to modestly-paid community members, known as Community-Owned Resource Persons (CORPs. New vector surveillance, larviciding and management systems were designed and evaluated in 15 city wards to allow timely collection, interpretation and reaction to entomologic monitoring data using practical procedures that rely on minimal technology. After one year of baseline data collection, operational larviciding with Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis commenced in March 2006 in three selected wards. Results The procedures and staff management systems described greatly improved standards of larval surveillance relative to that reported at the outset of this programme. In the first year of the programme, over 65,000 potential Anopheles habitats were surveyed by 90 CORPs on a weekly basis. Reaction times to vector surveillance at observations were one day, week and month at ward, municipal and city levels, respectively. One year of community-based larviciding reduced transmission by the primary malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s.l., by 31% (95% C.I. = 21.6–37.6%; p = 0.04. Conclusion This novel management, monitoring and evaluation system for implementing routine larviciding of malaria vectors in African cities has shown considerable potential for sustained, rapidly responsive, data-driven and affordable application. Nevertheless, the true programmatic value of larviciding in urban Africa can only be established through longer-term programmes which are stably financed and allow the operational teams and management infrastructures to mature by learning from experience.

Govella Nico J

2008-01-01

135

Survey of Bancroftian filariasis infection in humans and Culex mosquitoes in the western Brazilian Amazon region: implications for transmission and control  

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Full Text Available Introduction The aim of this work was to identify possible lymphatic filariasis foci in the western Brazilian Amazonian that could be established from the reports of Rachou in the 1950s. The study was conducted in three cities of the western Brazilian Amazon region - Porto Velho and Guajará-Mirim (State of Rondônia and Humaitá (State of Amazonas. Methods For human infection evaluation thick blood smear stained with Giemsa was used to analyze samples collected from 10pm to 1am. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to examine mosquito vectors for the presence of Wuchereria bancrofti DNA. Humans were randomly sampled from night schools students and from inhabitants in neighborhoods lacking sanitation. Mosquitoes were collected from residences only. Results A total 2,709 night students enrolled in the Program for Education of Young Adults (EJA, and 935 people registered in the residences near the schools were examined, being 641 from Porto Velho, 214 from Guajará-Mirim and 80 from Humaitá. No individual examined was positive for the presence of microfilariae in the blood stream. A total of 7,860 female Culex quinquefasciatus specimens examined were negative by PCR. Conclusions This survey including human and mosquito examinations indicates that the western Amazon region of Brazil is not a focus of Bancroftian filariasis infection or transmission. Therefore, there is no need to be included in the Brazilian lymphatic filariasis control program.

Rodolfo Luís Korte

2013-04-01

136

Influence of climate change on mosquito development and mosquito-borne diseases in Europe.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mass occurrence of mosquitoes can have an immense impact on the quality of life in areas such as the Upper Rhine Valley. Therefore, biological and environmental measures are applied to prevent mass development in many regions of Europe. Despite successful prevention measures, the risk of contracting mosquito-borne viral diseases, such as West Nile fever, should be discounted in Central Europe. The transport of mosquitoes (e.g., through tire trade or within containers) into Germany has to be prevented. Individuals (tourists and immigrants) infected with imported vector-borne pathogens and parasites must be diagnosed and treated immediately. Mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases know no borders, and their spread is also a consequence of high mobility and globalization. Therefore, mosquito control requires international cooperation. People's increased mobility and international trade play a more important role in the dissemination of the vectors and their pathogens/parasites than increasing temperatures. PMID:19030883

Becker, Norbert

2008-12-01

137

Genetically Modified Mosquito: Myth and Reality  

OpenAIRE

Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) has been applied successfully in some agricultural pest control programs in the past, but in many cases, success has not been sustainable in the long run. Various attempts have been made to duplicate this limited success SIT application in agriculture to other areas of applications, particularly in vector control. For example, a recent mosquito control program has been initiated in Malaysia to eliminate dengue-mosquitoes Aedes aegypti by releasing large amount o...

Teh Su Yean; Koh Hock Lye; Yeap Kiew Lee

2013-01-01

138

Mosquito coil emissions and health implications.  

Science.gov (United States)

Burning mosquito coils indoors generates smoke that can control mosquitoes effectively. This practice is currently used in numerous households in Asia, Africa, and South America. However, the smoke may contain pollutants of health concern. We conducted the present study to characterize the emissions from four common brands of mosquito coils from China and two common brands from Malaysia. We used mass balance equations to determine emission rates of fine particles (particulate matter pollutant concentrations resulting from burning mosquito coils could substantially exceed health-based air quality standards or guidelines. Under the same combustion conditions, the tested Malaysian mosquito coils generated more measured pollutants than did the tested Chinese mosquito coils. We also identified a large suite of volatile organic compounds, including carcinogens and suspected carcinogens, in the coil smoke. In a set of experiments conducted in a room, we examined the size distribution of particulate matter contained in the coil smoke and found that the particles were ultrafine and fine. The findings from the present study suggest that exposure to the smoke of mosquito coils similar to the tested ones can pose significant acute and chronic health risks. For example, burning one mosquito coil would release the same amount of PM(2.5) mass as burning 75-137 cigarettes. The emission of formaldehyde from burning one coil can be as high as that released from burning 51 cigarettes. PMID:12948883

Liu, Weili; Zhang, Junfeng; Hashim, Jamal H; Jalaludin, Juliana; Hashim, Zailina; Goldstein, Bernard D

2003-09-01

139

Circadian control of permethrin-resistance in the mosquito Aedes aegypti.  

Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

Ro?. 56, ?. 9 (2010), s. 1219-1223. ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07032 Grant ostatní: Centers for Disease Control, Department of Health(TW) DOH96-DC-1206; National Science Council(TW) NSC 95-2313-B-002-084 MY3 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : insecticide resistence * median knock-down time * clock gene Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.310, year: 2010

Yang, Y.-Y.; Liu, Y.; Teng, H.-J.; Šauman, Ivo; Sehnal, František; Lee, H.-J.

2010-01-01

140

A synthetic sex ratio distortion system for the control of the human malaria mosquito  

OpenAIRE

It has been theorized that inducing extreme reproductive sex ratios could be a method to suppress or eliminate pest populations. Limited knowledge about the genetic makeup and mode of action of naturally occurring sex distorters and the prevalence of co-evolving suppressors has hampered their use for control. Here we generate a synthetic sex distortion system by exploiting the specificity of the homing endonuclease I-PpoI, which is able to selectively cleave ribosomal gene sequences of the ma...

Galizi, Roberto; Doyle, Lindsey A.; Menichelli, Miriam; Bernardini, Federica; Deredec, Anne; Burt, Austin; Stoddard, Barry L.; Windbichler, Nikolai; Crisanti, Andrea

2014-01-01

141

Lack of effects of Bacillus sphaericus (Vectolex) on nontarget organisms in a mosquito-control program in southeastern Wisconsin: a 3-year study.  

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A 3-year study (2000-2002) in southeastern Wisconsin was conducted to assess the effects of Bacillus sphaericus applied for mosquito control on nontarget wetland invertebrates. The experimental design consisted of control and treatment sites (that were applied by helicopter with Vectolex CG), each in 2 vegetation habitat types: reed canary grass marsh (Phalaris arundinacea) and cattail marsh (Typha spp.). In each of these areas, a predetermined number of timed (30-sec) D-frame aquatic net samples containing vegetation, detritus, and invertebrates were collected 1 day before spraying and 72 h after spraying to detect for effects. We examined and compared 5 bioassessment measures to determine if there was an effect of B. sphaericus on nontarget organisms during each of the sampling years. The metrics tested were (1) mean taxa richness (the mean number of all taxa), (2) mean diversity (combines taxa richness and abundances in a summary statistic; i.e., Shannon Index [H'I]), (3) Diptera richness (minus mosquitoes) as a proportion of all other taxa richness (Diptera/others richness), (4) Diptera abundance (minus mosquitoes) as a proportion of all other invertebrate abundance (Diptera/others abundance), and (5) functional group changes in percent collector-gatherers, collector-filterers, scrapers, shredders, and predators. When Vectolex was applied during 6 treatments at the labeled dosage rate in the above habitats in Brookfield, WI, no detrimental effects to nontarget organisms could be attributed to this microbial insecticide. Much of the variation in the control vs. treatment and pre vs. post plots was attributed to factors other than the effects of B. sphaericus on nontarget organisms, such as the time of sampling, natural variation that occurs in such diverse habitats as canary grass and cattail marshes, and water depth, which varied among years. PMID:16033123

Merritt, Richard W; Lessard, Joanna L; Wessell, Kelly J; Hernandez, Osvaldo; Berg, Martin B; Wallace, John R; Novak, John A; Ryan, John; Merritt, Brett W

2005-06-01

142

Interactive effects of mosquito control insecticide toxicity, hypoxia, and increased carbon dioxide on larval and juvenile eastern oysters and hard clams.  

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Mosquito control insecticide use in the coastal zone coincides with the habitat and mariculture operations of commercially and ecologically important shellfish species. Few data are available regarding insecticide toxicity to shellfish early life stages, and potential interactions with abiotic stressors, such as low oxygen and increased CO2 (low pH), are less understood. Toxicity was assessed at 4 and 21 days for larval and juvenile stages of the Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and the hard clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, using two pyrethroids (resmethrin and permethrin), an organophosphate (naled), and a juvenile growth hormone mimic (methoprene). Acute toxicity (4-day LC50) values ranged from 1.59 to >10 mg/L. Overall, clams were more susceptible to mosquito control insecticides than oysters. Naled was the most toxic compound in oyster larvae, whereas resmethrin was the most toxic compound in clam larvae. Mortality for both species generally increased with chronic insecticide exposure (21-day LC50 values ranged from 0.60 to 9.49 mg/L). Insecticide exposure also caused sublethal effects, including decreased swimming activity after 4 days in larval oysters (4-day EC50 values of 0.60 to 2.33 mg/L) and decreased growth (shell area and weight) in juvenile clams and oysters after 21 days (detected at concentrations ranging from 0.625 to 10 mg/L). Hypoxia, hypercapnia, and a combination of hypoxia and hypercapnia caused mortality in larval clams and increased resmethrin toxicity. These data will benefit both shellfish mariculture operations and environmental resource agencies as they manage the use of mosquito control insecticides near coastal ecosystems. PMID:24531857

Garcia, R N; Chung, K W; Key, P B; Burnett, L E; Coen, L D; Delorenzo, M E

2014-04-01

143

The importance of mosquito behavioural adaptations to malaria control in Africa.  

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Over the past decade the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs), in combination with improved drug therapies, indoor residual spraying (IRS), and better health infrastructure, has helped reduce malaria in many African countries for the first time in a generation. However, insecticide resistance in the vector is an evolving threat to these gains. We review emerging and historical data on behavioral resistance in response to LLINs and IRS. Overall the current literature suggests behavioral and species changes may be emerging, but the data are sparse and, at times unconvincing. However, preliminary modeling has demonstrated that behavioral resistance could have significant impacts on the effectiveness of malaria control. We propose seven recommendations to improve understanding of resistance in malaria vectors. Determining the public health impact of physiological and behavioral insecticide resistance is an urgent priority if we are to maintain the significant gains made in reducing malaria morbidity and mortality. PMID:23550770

Gatton, Michelle L; Chitnis, Nakul; Churcher, Thomas; Donnelly, Martin J; Ghani, Azra C; Godfray, H Charles J; Gould, Fred; Hastings, Ian; Marshall, John; Ranson, Hilary; Rowland, Mark; Shaman, Jeff; Lindsay, Steve W

2013-04-01

144

Toxicological effects of prolonged and intense use of mosquito coil emission in rats and its implications on malaria control / Efectos toxicológicos del uso prolongado e intenso de emisiones de espirales contra mosquitos en ratas y sus implicaciones sobre el control de la malaria  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Costa Rica | Language: English Abstract in spanish Las espirales contra los mosquitos se utilizan en los países de bajos ingresos como una opción para prevenir la malaria controlando el vector de esta enfermedad. A pesar de que algunos estudios han abordado este tema, se requiere más investigación para incrementar el conocimiento sobre los efectos a [...] dversos en la salud, causados por el uso prolongado de las espirales. En este estudio se investigaron los efectos toxicológicos de los gases de las espirales a partir de dos insecticidas fabricados en el país (con piretroides: transflutrina y d-aletrina como ingredientes activos) en machos de ratas albinas. Para esto, se registraron los índices hematológicos y bioquímicos, y se hicieron evaluaciones histopatológicas y de mutagenicidad en ratas expuestas a los gases de las espirales durante períodos de 2, 4, 8, 12 y 16 semanas. La determinación hematológica se realizó mediante un analizador de hematología automatizado para determinar el conteo de los Glóbulos Blancos (WBC), el Hematocrito (PCV), Glóbulos Rojos (RBC) y las Plaquetas (PLT), mientras que las evaluaciones bioquímicas se determinaron utilizando kits comerciales disponibles. Los cambios histopatológicos fuertes se estudiaron en el riñón, el hígado y los pulmones de ratas sacrificadas. Las anormalidades en la cabeza de los espermatozoides de las ratas se utilizaron para evaluar la mutagenicidad. El humo de las espirales contra los mosquitos producen un aumento significativo (p0.05). Las pruebas de mutagenicidad revelaron que las anormalidades en el esperma de las ratas fue estadísticamente significativa (p>0.05) al comparar el control a las 8, 12 y 16 semanas post exposición a la transflutrina. Los estudios histológicos revelaron una serie de daños pulmonares graves en las ratas expuestas al humo de la espiral, evidenciados por la acumulación intersticial, edema pulmonar y enfisema. Las acumulaciones intracelulares y la congestión sinusoidal severa de las células del hígado se observaron a partir de las 12 semanas de exposición, lo que indica daño hepático. Nuestros estudios indican que los vapores de las espirales contra mosquitos inician el daño gradual al huésped. Estos efectos patológicos deben ser tomados en cuenta por el programa de control de la malaria, particularmente a la hora de regular su uso a largo plazo y bajo techo. Abstract in english Efectos toxicológicos del uso prolongado e intenso de emisiones de espirales contra mosquitos en ratas y sus implicaciones sobre el control de la malaria. Mosquito coil is a vector control option used to prevent malaria in low income counties, while some studies have addressed this issue, additional [...] reseach is required to increase knowledge on the adverse health effects caused by the prolonged use of coils. In this study we investigated the toxicological effects of fumes from two locally manufactured mosquito coil insecticides (with pyrethroids: transfluthrin and d-allethrin as active ingredients) on male albino rats. For this, we recorded the haematological and biochemical indices, and made histopathology and mutagenicity evaluations in rats exposed to mosquito fumes during 2, 4, 8, 12 and 16 week periods. Haematological determination was performed using automated hematology analyzer to determine White Blood Cell (WBC), Packed Cell Volume (PCV), Red Blood Cell (RBC) and Platelet (PLT) counts, while biochemical evaluations were determined using available commercial kits. Gross histopathological changes were studied for the kidney, liver and lungs in sacrificed rats. The rat sperm head abnormalities assessment was used to evaluate mutagenicity. Mosquito coil fumes produced significant increase (P0.05). Mutagenicity assessment revealed sperm abnormality was statistically significant (P

Emmanuel, Taiwo Idowu; Oyenmwen Judith, Aimufua; Ejovwoke, Yomi-Onilude; Bamidele, Akinsanya; Olubumi, Adetoro Otubanjo.

1463-14-01

145

Use of insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets and other impregnated materials for malaria control in the Americas  

OpenAIRE

This article reviews the current status of the use of insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets and other impregnated materials in the Americas. Studies from Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela are examined. It is concluded that most studies have suffered from experimental design errors, short duration problems, and/or inadequate measurement of health indicators. The review brings out the great difficulty of conducting scientific studies that attempt to measure the...

Zimmerman R. H.; Voorham J.

1997-01-01

146

Evaluation of AaDOP2 receptor antagonists reveals antidepressants and antipsychotics as novel lead molecules for control of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti.  

Science.gov (United States)

The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, vectors disease-causing agents that adversely affect human health, most notably the viruses causing dengue and yellow fever. The efficacy of current mosquito control programs is challenged by the emergence of insecticide-resistant mosquito populations, suggesting an urgent need for the development of chemical insecticides with new mechanisms of action. One recently identified potential insecticide target is the A. aegypti D1-like dopamine receptor, AaDOP2. The focus of the present study was to evaluate AaDOP2 antagonism both in vitro and in vivo using assay technologies with increased throughput. The in vitro assays revealed AaDOP2 antagonism by four distinct chemical scaffolds from tricyclic antidepressant or antipsychotic chemical classes, and elucidated several structure-activity relationship trends that contributed to enhanced antagonist potency, including lipophilicity, halide substitution on the tricyclic core, and conformational rigidity. Six compounds displayed previously unparalleled potency for in vitro AaDOP2 antagonism, and among these, asenapine, methiothepin, and cis-(Z)-flupenthixol displayed subnanomolar IC50 values and caused rapid toxicity to A. aegypti larvae and/or adults in vivo. Our study revealed a significant correlation between in vitro potency for AaDOP2 antagonism and in vivo toxicity, suggesting viability of AaDOP2 as an insecticidal target. Taken together, this study expanded the repertoire of known AaDOP2 antagonists, enhanced our understanding of AaDOP2 pharmacology, provided further support for rational targeting of AaDOP2, and demonstrated the utility of efficiency-enhancing in vitro and in vivo assay technologies within our genome-to-lead pipeline for the discovery of next-generation insecticides. PMID:25332454

Conley, Jason M; Meyer, Jason M; Nuss, Andrew B; Doyle, Trevor B; Savinov, Sergey N; Hill, Catherine A; Watts, Val J

2015-01-01

147

The vasa regulatory region mediates germline expression and maternal transmission of proteins in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae: a versatile tool for genetic control strategies  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline specific promoters are an essential component of potential vector control strategies which function by genetic drive, however suitable promoters are not currently available for the main human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Results We have identified the Anopheles gambiae vasa-like gene and found its expression to be specifically localized to both the male and female gonads in adult mosquitoes. We have functionally characterised using transgenic reporter lines the regulatory regions required for driving transgene expression in a pattern mirroring that of the endogenous vasa locus. Two reporter constructs indicate the existence of distinct vasa regulatory elements within the 5' untranslated regions responsible not only for the spatial and temporal but also for the sex specific germline expression. vasa driven eGFP expression in the ovary of heterozygous mosquitoes resulted in the progressive accumulation of maternal protein and transcript in developing oocytes that were then detectable in all embryos and neonatal larvae. Conclusion We have characterized the vasa regulatory regions that are not only suited to drive transgenes in the early germline of both sexes but could also be utilized to manipulate the zygotic genome of developing embryos via maternal deposition of active molecules. We have used computational models to show that a homing endonuclease-based gene drive system can function in the presence of maternal deposition and describe a novel non-invasive control strategy based on early vasa driven homing endonuclease expression.

Burt Austin

2009-07-01

148

Plectranthus amboinicus leaf extract mediated synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles and its control of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilm and blood sucking mosquito larvae.  

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In this study, zinc oxide nanoparticles were biologically synthesized using the leaf extract of Plectranthus amboinicus (Pam-ZnO NPs). The synthesized Pam-ZnO NPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometer, FTIR, TEM and XRD analysis. TEM analysis of Pam-ZnO NPs showed the average size of about 20-50 nm. Pam-ZnO NPs control the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilms (MRSA ATCC 33591) at the concentration of 8-10 ?g/ml. Confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) images revealed that Pam-ZnO NPs strongly inhibited the biofilm forming ability of S. aureus. In addition, Pam-ZnO NPs showed 100% mortality of fourth instar mosquito larvae of Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex tritaeniorhynchus at the concentration of 8 and 10 ?g/ml. The histopathological studies of Pam-ZnO NPs treated A. stephensi and C. quinquefasciatus larvae revealed the presence of damaged cells and tissues in the mid-gut. The damaged tissues suffered major changes including rupture and disintegration of epithelial layer and cellular vacuolization. The present study conclude that Pam-ZnO NPs showed effective control of S. aureus biofilms and mosquito larvae by damaging the mid gut cells. PMID:25280336

Vijayakumar, S; Vinoj, G; Malaikozhundan, B; Shanthi, S; Vaseeharan, B

2015-02-25

149

Efficacy of a mermithid nematode Romanomermis iyengari (Welch) (Nematoda: Mermithidae) in controlling tree hole-breeding mosquito Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae) in a rubber plantation area of Kerala, India.  

Science.gov (United States)

In rubber plantations, tree holes are one of the major types of breeding habitats of Aedes mosquitoes which transmit dengue and chikungunya. A mermithid nematode, Romanomermis iyengari, was evaluated in tree holes for its efficacy in controlling Aedes albopictus. Infection of mosquito larvae by the nematode was determined through microscopic examination on the next day of application, and evaluation of immature density of mosquito was done on the seventh day. After application of the infective stage of the nematode in a host-parasite ratio of 1:3 or 1:4, the infection rates on the different larval instars of mosquito were similar, 85.7-95.8 % in first to third instars and 79.3 % in fourth instar larvae or 100 and 92.9 %, respectively. Parasite burden varied from 1.1 to 2.4, respectively, among first and third instar larvae applied at 1:3. At 1:4, the parasite burden was between 1.6 (fourth instar) and 4 (second instar). The increase in parasite burden due to parasite density was significant in all the larval instars (P?nematode-applied tree holes, there was a significant level (P?infecting the mosquito and controlling pupal emergence. PMID:23306387

Paily, K P; Chandhiran, K; Vanamail, P; Kumar, N Pradeep; Jambulingam, P

2013-03-01

150

A single crossing-over event in voltage-sensitive Na+ channel genes may cause critical failure of dengue mosquito control by insecticides.  

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The voltage-sensitive sodium (Na+) channel (Vssc) is the target site of pyrethroid insecticides. Pest insects develop resistance to this class of insecticide by acquisition of one or multiple amino acid substitution(s) in this channel. In Southeast Asia, two major Vssc types confer pyrethroid resistance in the dengue mosquito vector Aedes aegypti, namely, S989P+V1016G and F1534C. We expressed several types of Vssc in Xenopus oocytes and examined the effect of amino acid substitutions in Vssc on pyrethroid susceptibilities. S989P+V1016G and F1534C haplotypes reduced the channel sensitivity to permethrin by 100- and 25-fold, respectively, while S989P+V1016G+F1534C triple mutations reduced the channel sensitivity to permethrin by 1100-fold. S989P+V1016G and F1534C haplotypes reduced the channel sensitivity to deltamethrin by 10- and 1-fold (no reduction), respectively, but S989P+V1016G+F1534C triple mutations reduced the channel sensitivity to deltamethrin by 90-fold. These results imply that pyrethroid insecticides are highly likely to lose their effectiveness against A. aegypti if such a Vssc haplotype emerges as the result of a single crossing-over event; thus, this may cause failure to control this key mosquito vector. Here, we strongly emphasize the importance of monitoring the occurrence of triple mutations in Vssc in the field population of A. aegypti. PMID:25166902

Hirata, Koichi; Komagata, Osamu; Itokawa, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Tomita, Takashi; Kasai, Shinji

2014-08-01

151

Area-wide management of Aedes albopictus: choice of study sites based on geospatial characteristics, socioeconomic factors, and mosquito populations  

Science.gov (United States)

Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse), the Asian tiger mosquito, is an introduced invasive species in the U.S. responsible for a significant proportion of service requests to local mosquito control programs. This container-utilizing mosquito is refractory to standard mosquito abatement measures in th...

152

Eficiencia del Galgotrin 25 EC, Terfos 48 EC, Lambdacialotrina 2,5 EC e Icon 2,5 EC en el control del mosquito Aedes aegypti en el Municipio Santiago de Cuba, Cuba / Efficiency of Galgothrin 25 EC, Terfos 48 EC, Lambdacyhalothrin 2,5 EC and Icon 2,5 EC for the control of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in Santiago de Cuba municipality  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish INTRODUCCIÓN: en las epidemias o brotes de dengue los plaguicidas químicos desempeñan un papel fundamental para controlar los mosquitos adultos transmisores de la enfermedad, y como sostén del Programa de control del vector en Cuba. OBJETIVO: se realizó una investigación para conocer la efectividad [...] y la eficiencia de las formulaciones de insecticidas en uso en el control del mosquito Aedes aegypti en la provincia Santiago de Cuba, y así trazar las estrategias de su uso. MÉTODOS: los bioensayos se realizaron de acuerdo con la metodología de la OMS. Se comparó la eficacia y eficiencia entre los tratamientos de nebulizacion en frío y los de termonebulizacion con los insecticidas estudiados, mediante una prueba U de Mann Whitney. El análisis comparativo de la eficiencia entre tratamientos y cada formulación se realizó mediante una prueba de Kruskal-Wallis. RESULTADOS: al comparar las mortalidades obtenidas con ambos tratamientos se demostró que existe una diferencia altamente significativa entre ellos a favor de los tratamientos de termonebulización, lo que demuestra la eficacia de este último y su eficiencia (efectividad/costo). CONCLUSIONES: con la prueba de Kruskal-Wallis se demostró que existe una diferencia altamente significativa entre las formulaciones a favor del Galgotrin 25 EC, que es más eficiente sin DDVP. Abstract in english INTRODUCTION: In dengue epidemics or outbreaks, insecticides play an important role in controlling adult mosquitoes and in supporting the vector control program in Cuba. OBJECTIVE: To find out the effectiveness and efficiency of insecticidal formulae for Aedes aegypti mosquito control in Santiago de [...] Cuba province and to draw up the strategies for use. METHODS: Bioassays were performed according to the WHO methodology. The efficacy and efficiency of cold fogging and thermal fogging methods were compared through Mann Whitney´s U test. The comparative analysis of the efficiency of both methods and every formulation was made using Kruskal-Wallis test. RESULTS: When comparing the mortality indexes from both methods, it was observed that there was a highly significant difference between them, being the thermal fogging method the most useful because of its efficacy and efficiency (cost effectiveness). CONCLUSIONS: Kruskal-Wallis test proved that there is a highly significant difference among the various formulations. Galgothrin 25 EC is the most favourable and efficient without DDVP.

Domingo, Montada Dorta; Ivón, Calderón Morales; Daisy, Figueredo Sánchez; Eugenio, Soto Cisneros; Maureen, Leyva Silva.

2008-04-01

153

Esterases as biomarkers in Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor exposed to temephos and Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis used for mosquito control in coastal wetlands of Morbihan (Brittany, France).  

Science.gov (United States)

Since 1998, a biomonitoring programme has been implemented to assess the potential impact of chemical mosquito control on macroinvertebrates of the coastal wetlands of Morbihan (Brittany, France). Acetylcholinesterase and carboxylesterases were used as biomarkers to assess the effects of Abate 500e (a.i. temephos) and Vectobac 12 AS (a.i. endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis, Bti) in Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor. Esterase inhibition revealed a marked impact of temephos, suggesting preferential contamination of the worms through the food. In Bti-exposed N. diversicolor, random variations of esterase activities were observed, that could not be attributed to the larvicide. However, esterases only reflected indirect physiological effects of Bti, and further investigations are needed to identify biomarkers more specific of Bti endotoxins. PMID:12408646

Fourcy, D; Jumel, A; Heydorff, M; Lagadic, L

2002-01-01

154

Mosquito control insecticides: a probabilistic ecological risk assessment on drift exposures of naled, dichlorvos (naled metabolite) and permethrin to adult butterflies.  

Science.gov (United States)

A comprehensive probabilistic terrestrial ecological risk assessment (ERA) was conducted to characterize the potential risk of mosquito control insecticide (i.e., naled, it's metabolite dichlorvos, and permethrin) usage to adult butterflies in south Florida by comparing the probability distributions of environmental exposure concentrations following actual mosquito control applications at labeled rates from ten field monitoring studies with the probability distributions of butterfly species response (effects) data from our laboratory acute toxicity studies. The overlap of these distributions was used as a measure of risk to butterflies. The long-term viability (survival) of adult butterflies, following topical (thorax/wings) exposures was the environmental value we wanted to protect. Laboratory acute toxicity studies (24-h LD50) included topical exposures (thorax and wings) to five adult butterfly species and preparation of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs). The ERA indicated that the assessment endpoint of protection, of at least 90% of the species, 90% of the time (or the 10th percentile from the acute SSDs) from acute naled and permethrin exposures, is most likely not occurring when considering topical exposures to adults. Although the surface areas for adulticide exposures are greater for the wings, exposures to the thorax provide the highest potential for risk (i.e., SSD 10th percentile is lowest) for adult butterflies. Dichlorvos appeared to present no risk. The results of this ERA can be applied to other areas of the world, where these insecticides are used and where butterflies may be exposed. Since there are other sources (e.g., agriculture) of pesticides in the environment, where butterfly exposures will occur, the ERA may under-estimate the potential risks under real-world conditions. PMID:25261815

Hoang, T C; Rand, G M

2015-01-01

155

DsRed2 transient expression in Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes have been successfully genetically modified only once, despite the efforts of several laboratories to transform and establish a stable strain. We have developed a transient gene expression method, in Culex, that delivers plasmid DNA directly to the mosquito haemoly [...] mph and additional tissues. We were able to express DsRed2 fluorescent protein in adult Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes by injecting plasmids directly into their thorax. The expression of DsRed2 in adult Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes is an important stepping stone to genetic transformation and the potential use of new control strategies and genetic interactions.

Andre Barretto Bruno, Wilke; Sarah, Scaife; Luke, Alphey; Mauro Toledo, Marrelli.

2013-06-01

156

A six-year study of insect emergence from temporary flooded wetlands in central Sweden, with and without Bti-based mosquito control.  

Science.gov (United States)

In temporary wetlands in the River Dalälven floodplains, recurrent but irregular floods induce massive hatching of the flood-water mosquito Aedes sticticus, which causes enormous nuisance. Flood-water mosquito control using the biological larvicide Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) was commenced in parts of the floodplains during 2002, and here we report the first six years of full-season monitoring of general insect emergence from temporary wetlands with and without treatment. Emergence traps, which were emptied weekly, were used from May to September each year. A total of 137,153 insects of 13 taxonomic orders were collected. Diptera was highly dominating and especially the sub-order Nematocera with 18 families was a very prominent taxon. Bti-treatment effects were analysed by taxonomic order, by sub-order in Diptera and Hemiptera, and by family for Nematocera and Coleoptera for the whole study period. We found no significant negative effects of Bti treatments on the production of insects by taxonomic order, with the exception of Coleoptera in the long term. However, no significant negative effects were found for the Coleoptera families, neither in the short term nor in the long term. There was no significant negative treatment effect on Nematocera production, neither when analyzed for the whole sub-order nor when analyzed by family. However, abundance of Ceratopogonidae was significantly higher in experimental than in reference wetlands. We conclude that Bti-treatment effects on insect production may be minute in comparison to other environmental factors structuring the insect fauna of the temporary wetlands studied. PMID:20504386

Persson Vinnersten, T Z; Lundström, J O; Schäfer, M L; Petersson, E; Landin, J

2010-12-01

157

Landing response of Aedes (Stegomyia) polynesiensis mosquitoes to coloured targets.  

Science.gov (United States)

Aedes polynesiensis Marks (Diptera: Culicidae) is the primary vector of lymphatic filariasis (LF) in the island countries and territories of the South Pacific. In the development of a novel control tool, the response of Ae. polynesiensis to six different colours (three solid fabrics, two patterned fabrics and a plastic tarp) was measured using a digital photographic system. Adult mosquitoes were placed into an environmental chamber and allowed to choose between a white target and one of six experimental targets. Mosquito landing frequency and landing duration were calculated. Adult female Ae. polynesiensis preferred all of the experimental targets to the white control target. Mosquito landing frequency was highest for the solid targets (black, navy blue and red) followed in turn by the two colour pattern targets and the polyethylene target. Mosquito landing duration was greater for experimental targets when compared with white control targets. Mosquito landing frequencies did not change over time during the course of the assay. The response of male Ae. polynesiensis was also measured when exposed to a 100% cotton black target. Male mosquitoes preferred the black target to the white control target, although at levels lower than that observed in female mosquitoes. The results suggest that future investigations evaluating the visual responses of Ae. polynesiensis mosquitoes are warranted, with a special emphasis on semi-field and field-based experiments. PMID:23336712

Chambers, E W; Bossin, H C; Ritchie, S A; Russell, R C; Dobson, S L

2013-09-01

158

Crowdsourcing for large-scale mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) sampling  

Science.gov (United States)

Sampling a cosmopolitan mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) species throughout its range is logistically challenging and extremely resource intensive. Mosquito control programmes and regional networks operate at the local level and often conduct sampling activities across much of North America. A method f...

159

Biosynthesis of 130-kilodalton mosquito larvicide in the cyanobacterium Agmenellum quadruplicatum PR-6.  

OpenAIRE

The 130-kilodalton mosquito larvicidal gene, cloned from Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis, was introduced into the cyanobacterium Agmenellum quadruplicatum PR-6 by plasmid transformation. Transformed cells synthesized 130-kilodalton delta-endotoxin protein and showed mosquito larvicidal activity. Results demonstrate a potential use of a cyanobacterium for biological control of mosquitoes.

Angsuthanasombat, C.; Panyim, S.

1989-01-01

160

[Mosquitoes as vectors for exotic pathogens in Germany].  

Science.gov (United States)

As a result of intensified globalization of international trade and of substantial travel activities, mosquito-borne exotic pathogens are becoming an increasing threat for Europe. In Germany some 50 different mosquito species are known, several of which have vector competence for pathogens. During the last few years a number of zoonotic arboviruses that are pathogenic for humans have been isolated from mosquitoes in Germany including Usutu, Sindbis and Batai viruses. In addition, filarial worms, such as Dirofilaria repens have been repeatedly detected in mosquitoes from the federal state of Brandenburg. Other pathogens, in particular West Nile virus, are expected to emerge sooner or later in Germany as the virus is already circulating in neighboring countries, e.g. France, Austria and the Czech Republic. In upcoming years the risk for arbovirus transmission might increase in Germany due to increased occurrence of new so-called "invasive" mosquito species, such as the Asian bush mosquito Ochlerotatus japonicus or the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus. These invasive species are characterized by high vector competence for a broad range of pathogens and a preference for human blood meals. For risk assessment, a number of mosquito and pathogen surveillance projects have been initiated in Germany during the last few years; however, mosquito control strategies and plans of action have to be developed and put into place to allow early and efficient action against possible vector-borne epidemics. PMID:24781910

Becker, N; Krüger, A; Kuhn, C; Plenge-Bönig, A; Thomas, S M; Schmidt-Chanasit, J; Tannich, E

2014-05-01

161

Natural Plant Sugar Sources of Anopheles Mosquitoes Strongly Impact Malaria Transmission Potential  

OpenAIRE

An improved knowledge of mosquito life history could strengthen malaria vector control efforts that primarily focus on killing mosquitoes indoors using insecticide treated nets and indoor residual spraying. Natural sugar sources, usually floral nectars of plants, are a primary energy resource for adult mosquitoes but their role in regulating the dynamics of mosquito populations is unclear. To determine how the sugar availability impacts Anopheles sergentii populations, mark-release-recapture ...

Gu, Weidong; Mu?ller, Gu?nter; Schlein, Yosef; Novak, Robert J.; Beier, John C.

2011-01-01

162

Usage and Perceived Side Effects of Personal Protective Measures against Mosquitoes among Current Users in Delhi  

OpenAIRE

Background. Mosquito-borne diseases constitute an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The use of personal protective measures (PPM) like mats, bednets, screening, repellents, liquid vaporizers, mosquito coils, and so forth has been advocated as an effective tool in control of mosquito-borne diseases, but data about the safety profile of personal protective measures is still scarce. Objective. To study the usage and side effects of personal protective measures against mosquitoes among ...

Charu Kohli; Rajesh. Kumar; Meena, G. S.; Singh, M. M.; Jyotiranjan Sahoo; Ingle, G. K.

2014-01-01

163

Integrated mosquito larval source management reduces larval numbers in two highland villages in western Kenya  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background In western Kenya, malaria remains one of the major health problems and its control remains an important public health measure. Malaria control is by either use of drugs to treat patients infected with malaria parasites or by controlling the vectors. Vector control may target the free living adult or aquatic (larval) stages of mosquito. The most commonly applied control strategies target indoor resting mosquitoes. However, because mosquitoes spend a considerable time in wat...

Imbahale Susan S; Githeko Andrew; Mukabana Wolfgang R; Takken Willem

2012-01-01

164

Mitochondrial NAD+-dependent malic enzyme from Anopheles stephensi: a possible novel target for malaria mosquito control  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles stephensi mitochondrial malic enzyme (ME emerged as having a relevant role in the provision of pyruvate for the Krebs' cycle because inhibition of this enzyme results in the complete abrogation of oxygen uptake by mitochondria. Therefore, the identification of ME in mitochondria from immortalized A. stephensi (ASE cells and the investigation of the stereoselectivity of malate analogues are relevant in understanding the physiological role of ME in cells of this important malaria parasite vector and its potential as a possible novel target for insecticide development. Methods To characterize the mitochondrial ME from immortalized ASE cells (Mos. 43; ASE, mass spectrometry analyses of trypsin fragments of ME, genomic sequence analysis and biochemical assays were performed to identify the enzyme and evaluate its activity in terms of cofactor dependency and inhibitor preference. Results The encoding gene sequence and primary sequences of several peptides from mitochondrial ME were found to be highly homologous to the mitochondrial ME from Anopheles gambiae (98% and 59% homologous to the mitochondrial NADP+-dependent ME isoform from Homo sapiens. Measurements of ME activity in mosquito mitochondria isolated from ASE cells showed that (i Vmax with NAD+ was 3-fold higher than that with NADP+, (ii addition of Mg2+ or Mn2+ increased the Vmax by 9- to 21-fold, with Mn2+ 2.3-fold more effective than Mg2+, (iii succinate and fumarate increased the activity by 2- and 5-fold, respectively, at sub-saturating concentrations of malate, (iv among the analogs of L-malate tested as inhibitors of the NAD+-dependent ME catalyzed reaction, small (2- to 3-carbons organic diacids carrying a 2-hydroxyl/keto group behaved as the most potent inhibitors of ME activity (e.g., oxaloacetate, tartronic acid and oxalate. Conclusions The biochemical characterization of Anopheles stephensi ME is of critical relevance given its important role in bioenergetics, suggesting that it is a suitable target for insecticide development.

Pon Jennifer

2011-10-01

165

Spatial occurrence and hatch of field eggs of the tadpole shrimp Triops newberryi (Notostraca: Triopsidae), a potential biological control agent of immature mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

The tadpole shrimp (TPS), Triops newberryi (Packard) (Notostraca: Triopsidae) is a potential biological control agent for immature mosquitoes breeding in ephemeral habitats. The occurrence of TPS eggs in soil and their hatch were investigated in 11 flood-irrigated date gardens in the Coachella Valley of southern California in 1999. Each garden was sampled several times after the rows were recently irrigated. All these date gardens harbored from very few to a large number of eggs in the soil. Overall, the average density of total eggs on ranches with clay loam soil was significantly higher than that on ranches with silt loam soil. The average densities of total eggs were significantly lower on the ranches that were disked compared to those on the ranches that were undisked before sampling. Two types of eggs were found and designated as "fresh" (yellowish to brownish) and "old" (blackish) eggs. This is the first time that these dimorphic eggs have been reported. The density of fresh eggs was lower than that of old eggs in most soil samples. The date gardens with high egg densities were sampled for determination of vertical occurrence, where soil was sampled up to 38.5 cm deep. Fresh eggs were recovered from soil in depths up to 25.6 cm, but the densities progressively declined with depth. The old eggs, however, were recovered from all soil depths studied, and there was no obvious relationship between soil depth and their density. This pattern of vertical occurrence of TPS eggs is the result of frequent disking for weed control and fruit harvest. Hatch of TPS eggs in surface soil samples ranged from 0 to 7.2 per 100 g dried soil. Hatch of viable eggs had an inverse relationship with soil depth. No TPS hatched out from the soil samples taken deeper than 15.4 cm. Fresh and old eggs distinguished by color were subjected to hatching tests. Fresh eggs exhibited high hatch, with hatching rates of 35.5-45.0% and 40.2-60.3% for the 1st and 1st plus the 2nd hydrations respectively. The old eggs, however, did not hatch at all. These findings provide quantitative information with regard to occurrence of natural TPS populations in flood irrigated agricultural fields, which could serve as a potential regulatory force of immature mosquito populations sharing ephemeral habitats with TPS. PMID:12125864

Su, Tianyun; Mulla, Mir S

2002-06-01

166

Male Mosquitoes as Vehicles for Insecticide  

Science.gov (United States)

Background The auto-dissemination approach has been shown effective at treating cryptic refugia that remain unaffected by existing mosquito control methods. This approach relies on adult mosquito behavior to spread larvicide to breeding sites at levels that are lethal to immature mosquitoes. Prior studies demonstrate that ‘dissemination stations,’ deployed in mosquito-infested areas, can contaminate adult mosquitoes, which subsequently deliver the larvicide to breeding sites. In some situations, however, preventative measures are needed, e.g., to mitigate seasonal population increases. Here we examine a novel approach that combines elements of autocidal and auto-dissemination strategies by releasing artificially reared, male mosquitoes that are contaminated with an insecticide. Methodology Laboratory and field experiments examine for model-predicted impacts of pyriproxyfen (PPF) directly applied to adult male Aedes albopictus, including (1) the ability of PPF-treated males to cross-contaminate females and to (2) deliver PPF to breeding sites. Principal Findings Similar survivorship was observed in comparisons of PPF-treated and untreated males. Males contaminated both female adults and oviposition containers in field cage tests, at levels that eliminated immature survivorship. Field trials demonstrate an ability of PPF-treated males to transmit lethal doses to introduced oviposition containers, both in the presence and absence of indigenous females. A decline in the Ae. albopictus population was observed following the introduction of PPF-treated males, which was not observed in two untreated field sites. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrate that, in cage and open field trials, adult male Ae. albopictus can tolerate PPF and contaminate, either directly or indirectly, adult females and immature breeding sites. The results support additional development of the proposed approach, in which male mosquitoes act as vehicles for insecticide delivery, including exploration of the approach with additional medically important mosquito species. The novelty and importance of this approach is an ability to safely achieve auto-dissemination at levels of intensity that may not be possible with an auto-dissemination approach that is based on indigenous females. Specifically, artificially-reared males can be released and sustained at any density required, so that the potential for impact is limited only by the practical logistics of mosquito rearing and release, rather than natural population densities and the self-limiting impact of an intervention upon them. PMID:25590626

Mains, James W.; Brelsfoard, Corey L.; Dobson, Stephen L.

2015-01-01

167

Flavivirus-Mosquito Interactions  

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Full Text Available The Flavivirus genus is in the family Flaviviridae and is comprised of more than 70 viruses. These viruses have a broad geographic range, circulating on every continent except Antarctica. Mosquito-borne flaviviruses, such as yellow fever virus, dengue virus serotypes 1–4, Japanese encephalitis virus, and West Nile virus are responsible for significant human morbidity and mortality in affected regions. This review focuses on what is known about flavivirus-mosquito interactions and presents key data collected from the field and laboratory-based molecular and ultrastructural evaluations.

Yan-Jang S. Huang

2014-11-01

168

Modelo de simulación para el control del mosquito Aedes aegypti, transmisor del dengue y la fiebre amarilla, por el crustáceo Mesocyclops spp.  

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Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Se presenta un modelo de simulación que muestra la dinámica de depredación de Mesocyclops spp., sobre Aedes aegypti MÉTODOS: Representado por cuatro ecuaciones diferenciales: H'(t, cantidad de huevos; L'(t, cantidad de larvas; A'(t, cantidad de adultos y C'(t, cantidad de copépodos. Inicialmente las ecuaciones son del tipo clásico presa-depredador, según Lotka y Volterra. Posteriormente se modifica en un sistema con respuesta funcional para invertebrados, según Holling. RESULTADOS: El primer sistema controla y estabiliza la población de mosquitos, el segundo muestra que los copepodos son inefectivos como controladores. CONCLUSIONES: Se reconoce la necesidad de estudiar sistemas presa depredador (mosquitos - copepodos con trabajos que integren pruebas de laboratorio y de campo. Solo así será posible establecer la validez en el uso de estos últimos como controladores biológicos efectivos de mosquitos.

Navarro-Silva Mario A.

2004-01-01

169

Potential Use of Mosquito’s Salivary Components as Novel Target for The Development of Transmission Blocking Vaccine (TBV  

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Full Text Available Mosquito-borne diseases are rampant in most tropical regions of the world, especially rural, forested, and coastal areas such as Indonesia. Despite long-standing chemotherapeutic intercession and vector control programs, mosquito-borne diseases exact a heavy burden on human health in Indonesia. Two major public health problems transmitted by mosquito in Indonesia are malaria and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF, causing millions of clinical episodes occurring annually. Malaria is now recognized as a serious re-emerging threat to public health. DHF cases were first observed in 1968; since then, the incidence has been constantly increasing and the disease is now one of the principal causes of child lethality. It has been widely observed that saliva of mosquito that transmits the diseases contains several factors that could enhance pathogen infection. Therefore, it should be possible to control pathogen transmission by vaccinating the host against the molecule(s in saliva that potentiate the infection. However, specific component as a potential target for TBV in mosquito vectors of malaria & dengue, i.e. Anopheles and Aedes aegypti, has not been identified so far. This paper wanted to elaborate the potential role of salivary component from mosquitoes, particularly from Indonesian vectors as molecular target for developing TBV against two major Mosquito borne-diseases in Indonesia i.e. malaria and DHF.

KARTIKA SENJARINI

2013-11-01

170

Towards the genetic manipulation of mosquito disease vectors  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Our research is aimed at developing the technologies necessary to undertake the genetic manipulation of insect vector genomes. In the longer term, we wish to explore the potential that this technology may have for developing novel strategies for the control of vector-borne diseases. The focus of our current research has been to: i) identify and characterise endogenous transposable elements in the genomes of mosquito vectors -research has focussed on identifying both Class I and Class 11 elements and determining their structure and distribution within mosquito genomes; ii) develop and use transfection systems for mosquito cells in culture as a test bed for transformation vectors and promoters - transfection techniques, vector constructs and different promoters driving reporter genes have been utilised to optimise the transformation of both Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae cells in culture; iii) identify putative promoter sequences which are induced in the female mosquito midgut when it takes a blood meal - the Anopheles gambiae trypsin gene locus has been cloned and sequenced and the intergenic regions assessed for their ability to induce reporter gene expression in mosquito gut cells. The progress we have made in each of these areas will be described and discussed in the context of our longer term aim which is to introduce genes coding for antiparasitic agents into mosquito genomes in such a way that they are expressed in the mosquito midgut and disrupt transmission of the malaria parasite. (author)

171

Attractive toxic sugar baits: Control of mosquitoes with the low risk active ingredient dinotefuran and potential impacts on non-target organisms in Morocco  

Science.gov (United States)

We evaluated the efficacy of ATSB in the laboratory and the field with the low risk active ingredient dinotefuran against mosquito populations. Assays indicated that dinotefuran in solution with the sugar baits was ingested and resulted in high mortality of female Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes a...

172

Potential of biologically active plant oils to control mosquito larvae (Culex pipiens, Diptera: Culicidae from an egyptian locality Potencial de óleos de plantas biologicamente ativos para o controle da larva do mosquito Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae de localidade egípcia  

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Full Text Available The insecticidal effect of six commercially available plant oils was tested against 4th larval instars of Culex pipiens. Larvae were originally collected from Meit El-Attar, Qalyubia Governorate, Egypt, and then reared in the laboratory until F1 generation. The LC50 values were 32.42, 47.17, 71.37, 83.36, 86.06, and 152.94 ppm for fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-grecum, earth almond (Cyperus esculentus, mustard (Brassica compestris, olibanum (Boswellia serrata, rocket (Eruca sativa, and parsley (Carum ptroselinum, respectively. The tested oils altered some biological aspects of C. pipiens, for instance, developmental periods, pupation rates, and adult emergences. The lowest concentrations of olibanum and fenugreek oils caused remarkable prolongation of larval and pupal durations. Data also showed that the increase of concentrations was directly proportional to reduction in pupation rates and adult emergences. Remarkable decrease in pupation rate was achieved by mustard oil at 1000 ppm. Adult emergence was suppressed by earth almond and fenugreek oils at 25 ppm. In addition, the tested plant oils exhibited various morphological abnormalities on larvae, pupae, and adult stages. Consequently, fenugreek was the most potent oil and the major cause of malformation of both larval and pupal stages. Potency of the applied plant oils provided an excellent potential for controlling C. pipiens.O efeito inseticida de seis óleos de plantas comercialmente disponíveis foi testado contra larvas de 4ºinstar de Culex pipiens. Larvas foram coletadas originalmente de Meit El-Attar, Qalyubia Governorate, Egito e então cultivadas no laboratório até a geração F1. Os valores LC50 foram 32,42, 47,17, 71,37, 83,36, 86,06 e 152,94 ppm para o feno grego (Trigonella foenum-grecum, amêndoa da terra (Cyperus esculentus, mostarda (Brassica compestris, olíbano (Boswellia serrata, rocket (Eruca sativa e salsa (Carum ptroselium, respectivamente. Os óleos testados alteraram alguns aspectos biológicos do C. pipiens, por exemplo os períodos de desenvolvimento, estados de crisálida, e emergências de adultos. As concentrações mais baixas de óleo de olíbano e feno grego causaram extraordinário prolongamento da duração larval e pupal. Dados também mostraram que o aumento das concentrações foi diretamente proporcional à redução no estado de crisálida e emergências dos adultos. Notável decréscimo no estado de crisálida foi conseguido com o óleo de mostarda a 1000 ppm. Emergência de adulto foi diminuída no óleo de amêndoa da terra e feno grego a 25 ppm. Além do mais, os óleos de plantas testados, exibiram várias anormalidades morfológicas nas larvas, pupas e estádios adultos. Consequentemente, o óleo de feno grego foi o óleo mais potente e o maior causador de malformação em ambos estádios larval e pupal. Potencial dos óleos de plantas aplicados mostraram excelente resultado no controle do C. pipiens.

Hanem Fathy Khater

2008-04-01

173

Potential of biologically active plant oils to control mosquito larvae (Culex pipiens, Diptera: Culicidae) from an egyptian locality / Potencial de óleos de plantas biologicamente ativos para o controle da larva do mosquito Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) de localidade egípcia  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese O efeito inseticida de seis óleos de plantas comercialmente disponíveis foi testado contra larvas de 4ºinstar de Culex pipiens. Larvas foram coletadas originalmente de Meit El-Attar, Qalyubia Governorate, Egito e então cultivadas no laboratório até a geração F1. Os valores LC50 foram 32,42, 47,17, 7 [...] 1,37, 83,36, 86,06 e 152,94 ppm para o feno grego (Trigonella foenum-grecum), amêndoa da terra (Cyperus esculentus), mostarda (Brassica compestris), olíbano (Boswellia serrata), rocket (Eruca sativa) e salsa (Carum ptroselium), respectivamente. Os óleos testados alteraram alguns aspectos biológicos do C. pipiens, por exemplo os períodos de desenvolvimento, estados de crisálida, e emergências de adultos. As concentrações mais baixas de óleo de olíbano e feno grego causaram extraordinário prolongamento da duração larval e pupal. Dados também mostraram que o aumento das concentrações foi diretamente proporcional à redução no estado de crisálida e emergências dos adultos. Notável decréscimo no estado de crisálida foi conseguido com o óleo de mostarda a 1000 ppm. Emergência de adulto foi diminuída no óleo de amêndoa da terra e feno grego a 25 ppm. Além do mais, os óleos de plantas testados, exibiram várias anormalidades morfológicas nas larvas, pupas e estádios adultos. Consequentemente, o óleo de feno grego foi o óleo mais potente e o maior causador de malformação em ambos estádios larval e pupal. Potencial dos óleos de plantas aplicados mostraram excelente resultado no controle do C. pipiens. Abstract in english The insecticidal effect of six commercially available plant oils was tested against 4th larval instars of Culex pipiens. Larvae were originally collected from Meit El-Attar, Qalyubia Governorate, Egypt, and then reared in the laboratory until F1 generation. The LC50 values were 32.42, 47.17, 71.37, [...] 83.36, 86.06, and 152.94 ppm for fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-grecum), earth almond (Cyperus esculentus), mustard (Brassica compestris), olibanum (Boswellia serrata), rocket (Eruca sativa), and parsley (Carum ptroselinum), respectively. The tested oils altered some biological aspects of C. pipiens, for instance, developmental periods, pupation rates, and adult emergences. The lowest concentrations of olibanum and fenugreek oils caused remarkable prolongation of larval and pupal durations. Data also showed that the increase of concentrations was directly proportional to reduction in pupation rates and adult emergences. Remarkable decrease in pupation rate was achieved by mustard oil at 1000 ppm. Adult emergence was suppressed by earth almond and fenugreek oils at 25 ppm. In addition, the tested plant oils exhibited various morphological abnormalities on larvae, pupae, and adult stages. Consequently, fenugreek was the most potent oil and the major cause of malformation of both larval and pupal stages. Potency of the applied plant oils provided an excellent potential for controlling C. pipiens.

Hanem Fathy, Khater; Afaf Abdel-Salam, Shalaby.

2008-04-01

174

UV light and urban pollution: bad cocktail for mosquitoes?  

Science.gov (United States)

Mosquito breeding sites consist of water pools, which can either be large open areas or highly covered ponds with vegetation, thus with different light exposures combined with the presence in water of xenobiotics including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) generated by urban pollution. UV light and PAHs are abiotic factors known to both affect the mosquito insecticide resistance status. Nonetheless, their potential combined effects on the mosquito physiology have never been investigated. The present article aims at describing the effects of UV exposure alongside water contamination with two major PAH pollutants (fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene) on a laboratory population of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. To evaluate the effects of PAH exposure and low energetic UV (UV-A) irradiation on mosquitoes, different parameters were measured including: (1) The PAH localization and its impact on cell mortality by fluorescent microscopy; (2) The detoxification capacities (cytochrome P450, glutathione-S-transferase, esterase); (3) The responses to oxidative stress (Reactive Oxygen Species-ROS) and (4) The tolerance of mosquito larvae to a bioinsecticide (Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis-Bti) and to five chemical insecticides (DDT, imidacloprid, permethrin, propoxur and temephos). Contrasting effects regarding mosquito cell mortality, detoxification and oxidative stress were observed as being dependent on the pollutant considered, despite the fact that the two PAHs belong to the same family. Moreover, UV is able to modify pollutant effects on mosquitoes, including tolerance to three insecticides (imidacloprid, propoxur and temephos), cell damage and response to oxidative stress. Taken together, our results suggest that UV and pollution, individually or in combination, are abiotic parameters that can affect the physiology and insecticide tolerance of mosquitoes; but the complexity of their direct effect and of their interaction will require further investigation to know in which condition they can affect the efficacy of insecticide-based vector control strategies in the field. PMID:24275062

Tetreau, Guillaume; Chandor-Proust, Alexia; Faucon, Frédéric; Stalinski, Renaud; Akhouayri, Idir; Prud'homme, Sophie M; Régent-Kloeckner, Myriam; Raveton, Muriel; Reynaud, Stéphane

2014-01-01

175

A Visit to Florida's Mosquito Man  

Science.gov (United States)

This radio broadcast features an interview with George O'Meara, the world's foremost expert on mosquitoes, who studies mosquito biology and dispenses fun facts (such as: only female mosquitoes bite). There are descriptions of the most aggressive mosquito species, how to tell female mosquitoes from males, and a discussion of landing rates of mosquitoes in the Everglades National Park. The clip is 5 minutes and 30 seconds in length.

176

Avaliação de estirpes e de uma nova formulação granulada de Bacillus sphaericus Neide para o controle de mosquitos / Evaluation of isolates and a new granular formulation of Bacillus sphaericus Neide for control of mosquitoes  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Foram estudadas 19 estirpes de Bacillus sphaericus Neide obtidos no Brasil além de uma estirpe considerada padrão (2362) fornecida pelo Instituto Pasteur. A maioria das estirpes foi mais eficiente que o padrão, sendo que sete deles causaram mortalidade igual ou superior a 80%, em baixa concentração [...] (7 × 10² esporos/ml). A estirpe ESALQ MS6 foi selecionada para formulação por apresentar melhor produção, em meio de cultura líquido (3 × 10(9) UFC/ml). A formulação granulada G4 foi testada em criadouros artificiais, constituídos de baldes plásticos com 10 L de água e 20 larvas de 3º ínstar de Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae). Comparou-se a eficiência da formulação em teste, em três concentrações diferentes, com um produto comercial. As avaliações foram feitas 24 horas, sete e 18 dias após a inoculação, seguindo-se a reposição de larvas no balde. A formulação G4 foi semelhante ao produto comercial, controlando 100% das larvas nas concentrações testadas, contudo teve maior tempo de permanência dos grânulos na superfície. Em lagoas de tratamento de efluentes de cortume, a formulação G4, na concentração de 2 kg/ha reduziu o número de larvas em 21%, 47%, 85% e 94%, após 1, 3, 7 e 15 dias, respectivamente. Abstract in english Nineteen Bacillus sphaericus Neide strains obtained in Brazil were evaluated in addition to a standard strain (2362) supplied by Pasteur Institute. Most strains were more efficient than the standard, and seven of them caused mortality equal to or higher than 80%, at a low concentration (7 × 10² spor [...] es/ml). Strain ESALQ MS6 was selected for formulation, since it showed better yield in liquid culture medium (3 × 10(9) CFU/ml). The G4 granular formulation was tested in artificial rearing sites, consisting of plastic buckets containing 10 L water and twenty 3rd-instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae). The efficiency of formulation was compared against a commercial product, at three different concentrations. Evaluations were taken every 24h, at seven and 18 days after inoculation, with subsequent replacement of larvae in the bucket. The G4 formulation was similar to the commercial product, and controlled 100% of the larvae at the concentrations tested; however, the granules remained at the surface for a longer period. In tannery effluent treatment ponds, the G4 formulation at a concentration of 2 kg/ha reduced the number of larvae by 21%, 47%, 85%, and 94%, after 1, 3, 7, and 15 days, respectively.

Luis F.A., Alves; Sérgio B., Alves; José, Lopes; Rogério B., Lopes.

2006-08-01

177

A consultation on the optimization of controlled human malaria infection by mosquito bite for evaluation of candidate malaria vaccines.  

Science.gov (United States)

Early clinical investigations of candidate malaria vaccines and antimalarial medications increasingly employ an established model of controlled human malaria infection (CHMI). Study results are used to guide further clinical development of vaccines and antimalarial medications as CHMI results to date are generally predictive of efficacy in malaria-endemic areas. The urgency to rapidly develop an efficacious malaria vaccine has increased demand for efficacy studies that include CHMI and the need for comparability of study results among the different centres conducting CHMI. An initial meeting with the goal to optimize and standardise CHMI procedures was held in 2009 with follow-up meetings in March and June 2010 to harmonise methods used at different centres. The end result is a standardised document for the design and conduct of CHMI and a second document for the microscopy methods used to determine the patency endpoint. These documents will facilitate high accuracy and comparability of CHMI studies and will be revised commensurate with advances in the field. PMID:22659449

Laurens, Matthew B; Duncan, Christopher J; Epstein, Judith E; Hill, Adrian V; Komisar, Jack L; Lyke, Kirsten E; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Richie, Thomas L; Roestenberg, Meta; Sauerwein, Robert W; Spring, Michele D; Talley, Angela K; Moorthy, Vasee S

2012-08-01

178

Genetic elimination of dengue vector mosquitoes  

OpenAIRE

An approach based on mosquitoes carrying a conditional dominant lethal gene (release of insects carrying a dominant lethal, RIDL) is being developed to control the transmission of dengue viruses by vector population suppression. A transgenic strain, designated OX3604C, of the major dengue vector, Aedes aegypti, was engineered to have a repressible female-specific flightless phenotype. This strain circumvents the need for radiation-induced sterilization, allows genetic sexing resulting in male...

Wise Valdez, Megan R.; Nimmo, Derric; Betz, John; Gong, Hong-fei; James, Anthony A.; Alphey, Luke; Black, William C.

2011-01-01

179

Wolbachia Enhances West Nile Virus (WNV) Infection in the Mosquito Culex tarsalis  

OpenAIRE

Novel strategies are required to control mosquitoes and the pathogens they transmit. One attractive approach involves maternally inherited endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria. After artificial infection with Wolbachia, many mosquitoes become refractory to infection and transmission of diverse pathogens. We evaluated the effects of Wolbachia (wAlbB strain) on infection, dissemination and transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) in the naturally uninfected mosquito Culex tarsalis, which is an importa...

Dodson, Brittany L.; Hughes, Grant L.; Paul, Oluwatobi; Matacchiero, Amy C.; Kramer, Laura D.; Rasgon, Jason L.

2014-01-01

180

Trapping mosquitoes using milk products as odour baits in western Kenya  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Ample evidence has shown that blood seeking mosquitoes locate their hosts by following odours produced by the hosts. Odour baited traps would therefore, provide a solution in controlling diseases spread by mosquitoes. Comparative studies were undertaken to determine the relative efficacies of two odour baits i.e. Limburger cheese and African traditional milk cream in trapping mosquitoes in the field in western Kenya. Method Comparative efficacy studies were carried out in ...

Owino Eunice A

2010-01-01

181

Targeting gene expression to the female larval fat body of transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes  

OpenAIRE

As the fat body is a critical tissue for mosquito development, metamorphosis, immune and reproductive system function, characterization of regulatory modules targeting gene expression to the female mosquito fat body at distinct life stages is much needed for multiple, varied strategies for controlling vector-borne diseases such as dengue and malaria. The hexameric storage protein, Hexamerin-1.2, of the mosquito, Aedes atropalpus, is female-specific and uniquely expressed in the fat body of fo...

Totten, Daniel C.; Vuong, Mai; Litvinova, Oksana V.; Jinwal, Umesh K.; Gulia-nuss, Monika; Harrell, Robert A.; Benes?, Helen

2012-01-01

182

Household-Level Expenditure on Protective Measures Against Mosquitoes on the Island of La Réunion, France  

OpenAIRE

The French Ministry of Health has, for decades, dedicated numerous resources to control mosquito density on the Island of La Réunion. These efforts were strengthened following an outbreak of chikungunya, a virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, in 2005–2006. In order to understand how public perception and behaviour is affected by this vector, a study was undertaken in 2012. Public behaviour was assessed using estimates of household expenditure on protective measures against mosquitoes. In...

Thuilliez, Josselin; Bellia, Claire; Dehecq, Jean-se?bastien; Reilhes, Olivier

2014-01-01

183

Tracking the mutual shaping of the technical and social dimensions of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria control on Rusinga Island, western Kenya.  

Science.gov (United States)

BackgroundThere has been increasing effort in recent years to incorporate user needs in technology design and re-design. This project employed a bottom-up approach that engaged end users from the outset. Bottom-up approaches have the potential to bolster novel interventions and move them towards adaptive and evidence-based strategies. The present study concerns an innovative use of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) to control malaria in western Kenya. Our paper highlights the co-dependence of research associated with the development of the SMoTS technology on one hand and research for enhancing the sustainable uptake of that very same intervention within the community on the other.MethodsDuring the pre-intervention year, we examined the design, re-design and piloting of a novel technology to generate lessons for malaria elimination on Rusinga Island. Initial ideas about many technological necessities were evaluated and re-designed following feedback from various sources, including technical and social research as well as broader interactions with the social environment. We documented the interlocking of the multiple processes and activities that took place through process observation and document reviews. We analysed the data within the conceptual framework of system innovation by identifying mutual shaping between technical and social factors.ResultsOur findings illustrate how various project stakeholders including project staff, collaborators, donor, and community members simultaneously pursued interdependent technological transformations and social interests. In the ongoing process, we observed how partial outcomes in the technological domain influenced social events at a later phase and vice versa.ConclusionsLooking at malaria intervention projects employing novel technologies as niches that may evolve towards system innovation, helps to reveal interrelations between the various technical and social aspects. Revealing these interrelations requires a different role for research and different perspective on innovation where innovation is more than the technical aspects. This approach therefore requires that research is designed in a way that enables obtaining feedback from both aspects. PMID:25404420

Oria, Prisca A; Hiscox, Alexandra; Alaii, Jane; Ayugi, Margaret; Mukabana, Wolfgang; Takken, Willem; Leeuwis, Cees

2014-11-18

184

Pharmacological Validation of an Inward-Rectifier Potassium (Kir) Channel as an Insecticide Target in the Yellow Fever Mosquito Aedes aegypti  

OpenAIRE

Mosquitoes are important disease vectors that transmit a wide variety of pathogens to humans, including those that cause malaria and dengue fever. Insecticides have traditionally been deployed to control populations of disease-causing mosquitoes, but the emergence of insecticide resistance has severely limited the number of active compounds that are used against mosquitoes. Thus, to improve the control of resistant mosquitoes there is a need to identify new insecticide targets and active comp...

Rouhier, Matthew F.; Raphemot, Rene; Denton, Jerod S.; Piermarini, Peter M.

2014-01-01

185

Predictors of mosquito net use in Ghana  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past decade the malaria control community has been successful in dramatically increasing the number of households that own mosquito nets. However, as many as half of nets already in households go unused. This study examines the factors associated with use of nets owned in Ghana. Methods The data come from an August 2008 survey in Ghana of households with a pregnant woman or a guardian of a child under five, conducted during the rainy season. 1796 households were included in this analysis, which generated a sample of 1,852 mosquito nets. Using each net owned as the unit of analysis, multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationship of net used last night with 23 potentially explanatory variables having to do with characteristics of the household, of the respondent, and of the net. Odds Ratios, p-values, and confidence intervals were calculated for each variable to develop an explanatory model. Results The final multivariate model consisted of 10 variables statistically associated with whether or not the net was used the prior night: rural location, lower SES, not using coils for mosquito control, fewer nets in the household, newer nets and those in better condition, light blue colour, higher level of education of the guardian of the child under five, knowing that mosquitoes transmit malaria, and paying for the net instead of obtaining it free of charge. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that net use would increase in Ghana if coloured nets were made available in mass distributions as well as in the commercial market; if programmes emphasize that malaria is caused only by night-biting mosquitoes, and that nets protect against mosquitoes better than coils and need to be used even if coils are burning; if donated nets are replaced more frequently so that households have nets that are in good condition; and if there were support for the commercial market so that those who can afford to purchase a net and want to choose their own nets can do so.

Baume Carol A

2011-09-01

186

Sclerotization of mosquito cuticle.  

Science.gov (United States)

The mode of sclerotization of Aedes aegypti pupal and adult cuticle was examined by employing biochemical and radioactive techniques. During larval-pupal metamorphosis, tyrosine is converted to tanning precursors and is incorporated into aryl-amino adducts and beta-crosslinks. The major hydrolysis product of beta-crosslinks in pupal cases is identified to be arterenone. Examination of tanning modes in five different mosquito species shows that the ratio of quinone to beta-sclerotization not only differs within the life stages of the insects, but also differs between species. PMID:3817100

Sugumaran, M; Semensi, V

1987-02-15

187

The Role of Innate Immunity in Conditioning Mosquito Susceptibility to West Nile Virus  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses represent an emerging threat to human and livestock health globally. In particular, those transmitted by mosquitoes present the greatest challenges to disease control efforts. An understanding of the molecular basis for mosquito innate immunity to arbovirus infection is therefore critical to investigations regarding arbovirus evolution, virus-vector ecology, and mosquito vector competence. In this review, we discuss the current state of understanding regarding mosquito innate immunity to West Nile virus. We draw from the literature with respect to other virus-vector pairings to attempt to draw inferences to gaps in our knowledge about West Nile virus and relevant vectors.

Abhishek N. Prasad

2013-12-01

188

Unforeseen costs of cutting mosquito surveillance budgets.  

Science.gov (United States)

A budget proposal to stop the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funding in surveillance and research for mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue and West Nile virus has the potential to leave the country ill-prepared to handle new emerging diseases and manage existing ones. In order to demonstrate the consequences of such a measure, if implemented, we evaluated the impact of delayed control responses to dengue epidemics (a likely scenario emerging from the proposed CDC budget cut) in an economically developed urban environment. We used a mathematical model to generate hypothetical scenarios of delayed response to a dengue introduction (a consequence of halted mosquito surveillance) in the City of Cairns, Queensland, Australia. We then coupled the results of such a model with mosquito surveillance and case management costs to estimate the cumulative costs of each response scenario. Our study shows that halting mosquito surveillance can increase the management costs of epidemics by up to an order of magnitude in comparison to a strategy with sustained surveillance and early case detection. Our analysis shows that the total costs of preparedness through surveillance are far lower than the ones needed to respond to the introduction of vector-borne pathogens, even without consideration of the cost in human lives and well-being. More specifically, our findings provide a science-based justification for the re-assessment of the current proposal to slash the budget of the CDC vector-borne diseases program, and emphasize the need for improved and sustainable systems for vector-borne disease surveillance. PMID:21049010

Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M; Chaves, Luis F; Ritchie, Scott A; Davis, Joe; Kitron, Uriel

2010-01-01

189

Wolbachia enhances West Nile virus (WNV) infection in the mosquito Culex tarsalis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Novel strategies are required to control mosquitoes and the pathogens they transmit. One attractive approach involves maternally inherited endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria. After artificial infection with Wolbachia, many mosquitoes become refractory to infection and transmission of diverse pathogens. We evaluated the effects of Wolbachia (wAlbB strain) on infection, dissemination and transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) in the naturally uninfected mosquito Culex tarsalis, which is an important WNV vector in North America. After inoculation into adult female mosquitoes, Wolbachia reached high titers and disseminated widely to numerous tissues including the head, thoracic flight muscles, fat body and ovarian follicles. Contrary to other systems, Wolbachia did not inhibit WNV in this mosquito. Rather, WNV infection rate was significantly higher in Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes compared to controls. Quantitative PCR of selected innate immune genes indicated that REL1 (the activator of the antiviral Toll immune pathway) was down regulated in Wolbachia-infected relative to control mosquitoes. This is the first observation of Wolbachia-induced enhancement of a human pathogen in mosquitoes, suggesting that caution should be applied before releasing Wolbachia-infected insects as part of a vector-borne disease control program. PMID:25010200

Dodson, Brittany L; Hughes, Grant L; Paul, Oluwatobi; Matacchiero, Amy C; Kramer, Laura D; Rasgon, Jason L

2014-07-01

190

Don't Let the Bugs Bite: Preventing Dengue and Other Diseases Spread by Mosquitoes  

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

This year (2007) CDC is receiving a great many reports of cases of Dengue fever, which is spread by mosquitoes. This podcast discusses ways travelers to the tropics can protect themselves from mosquito bites.  Created: 12/10/2007 by National Center for the Prevention, Detection and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID).   Date Released: 12/10/2007.

2007-12-10

191

Response of the mosquito protein interaction network to dengue infection  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Two fifths of the world's population is at risk from dengue. The absence of effective drugs and vaccines leaves vector control as the primary intervention tool. Understanding dengue virus (DENV host interactions is essential for the development of novel control strategies. The availability of genome sequences for both human and mosquito host greatly facilitates genome-wide studies of DENV-host interactions. Results We developed the first draft of the mosquito protein interaction network using a computational approach. The weighted network includes 4,214 Aedes aegypti proteins with 10,209 interactions, among which 3,500 proteins are connected into an interconnected scale-free network. We demonstrated the application of this network for the further annotation of mosquito proteins and dissection of pathway crosstalk. Using three datasets based on physical interaction assays, genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screens and microarray assays, we identified 714 putative DENV-associated mosquito proteins. An integrated analysis of these proteins in the network highlighted four regions consisting of highly interconnected proteins with closely related functions in each of replication/transcription/translation (RTT, immunity, transport and metabolism. Putative DENV-associated proteins were further selected for validation by RNAi-mediated gene silencing, and dengue viral titer in mosquito midguts was significantly reduced for five out of ten (50.0% randomly selected genes. Conclusions Our results indicate the presence of common host requirements for DENV in mosquitoes and humans. We discuss the significance of our findings for pharmacological intervention and genetic modification of mosquitoes for blocking dengue transmission.

Pike Andrew D

2010-06-01

192

Bacterial communities associated with culex mosquito larvae and two emergent aquatic plants of bioremediation importance.  

Science.gov (United States)

Microbes are important for mosquito nutrition, growth, reproduction and control. In this study, we examined bacterial communities associated with larval mosquitoes and their habitats. Specifically, we characterized bacterial communities associated with late larval instars of the western encephalitis mosquito (Culextarsalis), the submerged portions of two emergent macrophytes (California bulrush, Schoenoplectuscalifornicus and alkali bulrush, Schoenoplectusmaritimus), and the associated water columns to investigate potential differential use of resources by mosquitoes in different wetland habitats. Using next-generation sequence data from 16S rRNA gene hypervariable regions, the alpha diversity of mosquito gut microbial communities did not differ between pond mesocosms containing distinct monotypic plants. Proteobacteria, dominated by the genus Thorsellia (Enterobacteriaceae), was the most abundant phylum recovered from C. tarsalis larvae. Approximately 49% of bacterial OTUs found in larval mosquitoes were identical to OTUs recovered from the water column and submerged portions of the two bulrushes. Plant and water samples were similar to one another, both being dominated by Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia phyla. Overall, the bacterial communities within C. tarsalis larvae were conserved and did not change across sampling dates and between two distinct plant habitats. Although Thorsellia spp. dominated mosquito gut communities, overlap of mosquito gut, plant and water-column OTUs likely reveal the effects of larval feeding. Future research will investigate the role of the key indicator groups of bacteria across the different developmental stages of this mosquito species. PMID:23967314

Duguma, Dagne; Rugman-Jones, Paul; Kaufman, Michael G; Hall, Michael W; Neufeld, Josh D; Stouthamer, Richard; Walton, William E

2013-01-01

193

Nature, Nurture and Evolution of Intra-Species Variation in Mosquito Arbovirus Transmission Competence  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Mosquitoes vary in their competence or ability to transmit arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses. Many arboviruses cause disease in humans and animals. Identifying the environmental and genetic causes of variation in mosquito competence for arboviruses is one of the great challenges in public health. Progress identifying genetic (nature and environmental (nurture factors influencing mosquito competence for arboviruses is reviewed. There is great complexity in the various traits that comprise mosquito competence. The complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors controlling these traits and the factors shaping variation in Nature are largely unknown. The norms of reaction of specific genes influencing competence, their distributions in natural populations and the effects of genetic polymorphism on phenotypic variation need to be determined. Mechanisms influencing competence are not likely due to natural selection because of the direct effects of the arbovirus on mosquito fitness. More likely the traits for mosquito competence for arboviruses are the effects of adaptations for other functions of these competence mechanisms. Determining these other functions is essential to understand the evolution and distributions of competence for arboviruses. This information is needed to assess risk from mosquito-borne disease, predict new mosquito-arbovirus systems, and provide novel strategies to mitigate mosquito-borne arbovirus transmission.

Walter J. Tabachnick

2013-01-01

194

Unforeseen Costs of Cutting Mosquito Surveillance Budgets  

OpenAIRE

A budget proposal to stop the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funding in surveillance and research for mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue and West Nile virus has the potential to leave the country ill-prepared to handle new emerging diseases and manage existing ones. In order to demonstrate the consequences of such a measure, if implemented, we evaluated the impact of delayed control responses to dengue epidemics (a likely scenario emerging from the proposed CDC budg...

Vazquez-prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Chaves, Luis F.; Ritchie, Scott A.; Davis, Joe; Kitron, Uriel

2010-01-01

195

Promoting health education and public awareness about dengue and its mosquito vector in Saudi Arabia.  

Science.gov (United States)

Currently, dengue fever is considered as main health problems in Mekkah and Jeddah of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) with dramatically increase in the number of cases reported every year. This is associated with obvious failure in the recent control and management programs for the mosquito vector (Aedes aegypti). Here, we suggested promoting the health education and public awareness among Saudi people to improve the control of dengue mosquito vector. Several suggestions and recommendations were highlighted here to ensure effectiveness in the future control and management programs of dengue mosquito vector in KSA. PMID:25403705

Aziz, Al; Al-Shami, Salman; Mahyoub, Jazem A; Hatabbi, Mesed; Ahmad, Abu; Md Rawi, Che

2014-11-18

196

REPELLENCY OF LANTANA CAMARA LEAVES SMOKE AGAINST FEMALE ANOPHELES MOSQUITOES  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The study was done to investigate the Mosquito repellency properties of the smoke of Lantana camara in different solvents viz; methanol, ethyl acetate, ethanol and diethyl ether. Plant samples were dried, burned and extracted using various solvents. The extracts were concentrated using a Rota vapor and various concentrations ranging from 50ppm-1000ppm of the repellents were prepared and evaluated. Methanol extract at 400ppm concentration significantly gave the highest protection against the bites of female Anopheles mosquito (P> 0.01 for over 300 minutes. This extract yielded significantly the better protection time (P> 0.05. The methanol extract seemed to have a steady repellency over a longer period than the rest of the extracts. The results from this study shows that the plant Lantana camara can be used effectively to repel Anopheles mosquitoes, hence a great achievement in the development of safe organic repellants to control transmission of malaria by female anopheles mosquitoes. However, more research needs to be done to identify the specific compounds which are repelling the mosquitoes their structures and also mode of action.

Akumu Edwin O, Kebenei Sellah Anthoney Swamy T* and Ngule Chrispus Mutuku

2014-01-01

197

Mosquito genomics. Highly evolvable malaria vectors: the genomes of 16 Anopheles mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Variation in vectorial capacity for human malaria among Anopheles mosquito species is determined by many factors, including behavior, immunity, and life history. To investigate the genomic basis of vectorial capacity and explore new avenues for vector control, we sequenced the genomes of 16 anopheline mosquito species from diverse locations spanning ~100 million years of evolution. Comparative analyses show faster rates of gene gain and loss, elevated gene shuffling on the X chromosome, and more intron losses, relative to Drosophila. Some determinants of vectorial capacity, such as chemosensory genes, do not show elevated turnover but instead diversify through protein-sequence changes. This dynamism of anopheline genes and genomes may contribute to their flexible capacity to take advantage of new ecological niches, including adapting to humans as primary hosts. PMID:25554792

Neafsey, Daniel E; Waterhouse, Robert M; Abai, Mohammad R; Aganezov, Sergey S; Alekseyev, Max A; Allen, James E; Amon, James; Arcà, Bruno; Arensburger, Peter; Artemov, Gleb; Assour, Lauren A; Basseri, Hamidreza; Berlin, Aaron; Birren, Bruce W; Blandin, Stephanie A; Brockman, Andrew I; Burkot, Thomas R; Burt, Austin; Chan, Clara S; Chauve, Cedric; Chiu, Joanna C; Christensen, Mikkel; Costantini, Carlo; Davidson, Victoria L M; Deligianni, Elena; Dottorini, Tania; Dritsou, Vicky; Gabriel, Stacey B; Guelbeogo, Wamdaogo M; Hall, Andrew B; Han, Mira V; Hlaing, Thaung; Hughes, Daniel S T; Jenkins, Adam M; Jiang, Xiaofang; Jungreis, Irwin; Kakani, Evdoxia G; Kamali, Maryam; Kemppainen, Petri; Kennedy, Ryan C; Kirmitzoglou, Ioannis K; Koekemoer, Lizette L; Laban, Njoroge; Langridge, Nicholas; Lawniczak, Mara K N; Lirakis, Manolis; Lobo, Neil F; Lowy, Ernesto; MacCallum, Robert M; Mao, Chunhong; Maslen, Gareth; Mbogo, Charles; McCarthy, Jenny; Michel, Kristin; Mitchell, Sara N; Moore, Wendy; Murphy, Katherine A; Naumenko, Anastasia N; Nolan, Tony; Novoa, Eva M; O'Loughlin, Samantha; Oringanje, Chioma; Oshaghi, Mohammad A; Pakpour, Nazzy; Papathanos, Philippos A; Peery, Ashley N; Povelones, Michael; Prakash, Anil; Price, David P; Rajaraman, Ashok; Reimer, Lisa J; Rinker, David C; Rokas, Antonis; Russell, Tanya L; Sagnon, N'Fale; Sharakhova, Maria V; Shea, Terrance; Simão, Felipe A; Simard, Frederic; Slotman, Michel A; Somboon, Pradya; Stegniy, Vladimir; Struchiner, Claudio J; Thomas, Gregg W C; Tojo, Marta; Topalis, Pantelis; Tubio, José M C; Unger, Maria F; Vontas, John; Walton, Catherine; Wilding, Craig S; Willis, Judith H; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Yan, Guiyun; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Zhou, Xiaofan; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Christophides, George K; Collins, Frank H; Cornman, Robert S; Crisanti, Andrea; Donnelly, Martin J; Emrich, Scott J; Fontaine, Michael C; Gelbart, William; Hahn, Matthew W; Hansen, Immo A; Howell, Paul I; Kafatos, Fotis C; Kellis, Manolis; Lawson, Daniel; Louis, Christos; Luckhart, Shirley; Muskavitch, Marc A T; Ribeiro, José M; Riehle, Michael A; Sharakhov, Igor V; Tu, Zhijian; Zwiebel, Laurence J; Besansky, Nora J

2015-01-01

198

Quantifying the Impact of Mosquitoes on Quality of Life and Enjoyment of Yard and Porch Activities in New Jersey  

OpenAIRE

The recent expansion of Aedes albopictus, a day-biting mosquito, to densely inhabited areas in the northeastern Atlantic states of the USA has dramatically increased the problem that mosquitoes create for urban and suburban residents. We quantified the impact of mosquitoes on residents' quality of life within the context of a comprehensive area-wide integrated pest management program to control Ae. albopictus in two counties (Mercer and Monmouth) in New Jersey. We interviewed residents of 121...

Halasa, Yara A.; Shepard, Donald S.; Fonseca, Dina M.; Farajollahi, Ary; Healy, Sean; Gaugler, Randy; Bartlett-healy, Kristen; Strickman, Daniel A.; Clark, Gary G.

2014-01-01

199

Population dynamics of indoor sampled mosquitoes and their implication in disease transmission in Abeokuta, south-western Nigeria  

OpenAIRE

Background & objectives: A longitudinal study was carried out to investigate the speciescomposition, seasonal abundance, parity and feeding preference of indoor sampled mosquitoes inAbeokuta, south-western Nigeria.Methods: The mosquitoes were sampled weekly from five stratified locations using Center forDisease Control (CDC) light-traps between August 2005 and July 2006. The mosquitoes wereexamined for abdominal condition and dissected for age composition. Microscopic and precipitintechniques...

M A Adeleke, C. F. Mafiana

2010-01-01

200

Protocol for Mosquito Rearing (A. gambiae)  

OpenAIRE

This protocol describes mosquito rearing in the insectary. The insectary rooms are maintained at 28°C and ~80% humidity, with a 12 hr. day/night cycle. For this procedure, you'll need mosquito cages, 10% sterile sucrose solution, paper towels, beaker, whatman filter paper, glass feeders, human blood and serum, water bath, parafilm, distilled water, clean plastic trays, mosquito food (described below), mosquito net to cover the trays, vacuum, and a collection chamber to collect...

Das, Suchismita; Garver, Lindsey; Dimopoulos, George

2007-01-01

201

Rural buyers' perception about mosquito repellants  

OpenAIRE

Mosquito repellants prevent mosquito bites and prevention of "man-mosquito contact" is a critical factor in transmission and spread of any disease through mosquitoes particularly in rural area. There has been a long standing 'bias' towards rural buyers. The rural markets are considered rigid in the nature but it is not the case in real sense. Marketing to rural buyers is not only a challenge to the marketers but to the manufacturers, communicators, national planners and economists as well. Th...

Mehta, D.; Garg, Anand; Mehta, Naveen K.

2010-01-01

202

Mosquito Infection Responses to Developing Filarial Worms  

OpenAIRE

Human lymphatic filariasis is a mosquito-vectored disease caused by the nematode parasites Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori. These are relatively large roundworms that can cause considerable damage in compatible mosquito vectors. In order to assess how mosquitoes respond to infection in compatible mosquito-filarial worm associations, microarray analysis was used to evaluate transcriptome changes in Aedes aegypti at various times during B. malayi development. Changes in tr...

Erickson, Sara M.; Xi, Zhiyong; Mayhew, George F.; Ramirez, Jose L.; Aliota, Matthew T.; Christensen, Bruce M.; Dimopoulos, George

2009-01-01

203

European Surveillance for West Nile Virus in Mosquito Populations  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A wide range of arthropod-borne viruses threaten both human and animal health either through their presence in Europe or through risk of introduction. Prominent among these is West Nile virus (WNV, primarily an avian virus, which has caused multiple outbreaks associated with human and equine mortality. Endemic outbreaks of West Nile fever have been reported in Italy, Greece, France, Romania, Hungary, Russia and Spain, with further spread expected. Most outbreaks in Western Europe have been due to infection with WNV Lineage 1. In Eastern Europe WNV Lineage 2 has been responsible for human and bird mortality, particularly in Greece, which has experienced extensive outbreaks over three consecutive years. Italy has experienced co-circulation with both virus lineages. The ability to manage this threat in a cost-effective way is dependent on early detection. Targeted surveillance for pathogens within mosquito populations offers the ability to detect viruses prior to their emergence in livestock, equine species or human populations. In addition, it can establish a baseline of mosquito-borne virus activity and allow monitoring of change to this over time. Early detection offers the opportunity to raise disease awareness, initiate vector control and preventative vaccination, now available for horses, and encourage personal protection against mosquito bites. This would have major benefits through financial savings and reduction in equid morbidity/mortality. However, effective surveillance that predicts virus outbreaks is challenged by a range of factors including limited resources, variation in mosquito capture rates (too few or too many, difficulties in mosquito identification, often reliant on specialist entomologists, and the sensitive, rapid detection of viruses in mosquito pools. Surveillance for WNV and other arboviruses within mosquito populations varies between European countries in the extent and focus of the surveillance. This study reviews the current status of WNV in mosquito populations across Europe and how this is informing our understanding of virus epidemiology. Key findings such as detection of virus, presence of vector species and invasive mosquito species are summarized, and some of the difficulties encountered when applying a cost-effective surveillance programme are highlighted.

Nicholas Johnson

2013-10-01

204

Potency of Pandanus amaryllifolius and Notophanax scutellarium as Aedes albopictus Mosquito Repellent  

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Full Text Available Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes being the vector of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF. Various effort have been done to control the mosquitoes, including using plant extract as repellent. Pandanus amaryllifolius and Notophanax scutellarium leaf were known to posses repellent activity for mosquito species. The study aimed to examine efJectiveness of P. amaryllifolius and N. scutellarium leaves as repellent for Ae. albopictus. The result study on 1 hr treatment showed that power protection of pandan leaves (N. scutellarium was 93.55%, while mangkokan leaves (P. amaryllifolius was 87.5%. Based on ANOVA analysis, there was not significantly different of power protection between N. scutellarium leaves and P. amaryllifolius leaves extracts against Ae. albopictus mosquitoes. Both of these test, plants has showed the potential to be a repellent and eliminate the emergence of Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, so it may effectively reduce contact between host and dengue vector.

Rina Marina

2012-12-01

205

Distribution of mosquito larvae in various breeding sites in National Zoo Malaysia.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mosquitoes are principal vectors of major vector-borne diseases. They are widely found throughout urban and rural areas in Malaysia. They are responsible for various vector-borne diseases such as dengue, malaria, filariasis and encephalitis. A total of 158 mosquito larvae specimens were collected from the National Zoo, Malaysia, from 11 types of breeding habitats during the study period from end of May 2007 to July 2007. Aedes albopictus was the predominant species (35.4%), followed by Tripteroides aranoides (26.6%), Lutzia halifaxii (11.4%), Aedes alboscutellatus (10.1%), Aedes caecus (8.9%), Armigeres spp. (4.4%), Malaya genurostris (2.5%) and Culex vishnui (0.6%). It is important to have a mosquito free environment in a public place like the zoo. Routine larval surveillance should be implemented for an effective mosquito control program in order to reduce mosquito population. PMID:25801269

Muhammad-Aidil, R; Imelda, A; Jeffery, J; Ngui, R; Wan Yusoff, W S; Aziz, S; Lim Y, A L; Rohela, M

2015-03-01

206

Susceptibility Status of Anopheles sundaicus Mosquitoes Against Insecticides Cypermethrin in Garut Regency  

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Full Text Available At the time of high vector populations and malaria transmission is in progress, it is necessary to use insecticides to control vector using the house spraying. To get the results as objective the eradication of the vector that is able to suppress the vector population so that no longer play a role in malaria transmission, the insecticide used should be effective against mosquitoes and the mosquitoes are still susceptible to the insecticide used. To determine the level of malaria vector mosquito susceptibility to insecticides, in the terri-tory of Garut district has conducted susceptibility tests of Anopheles sundaicus mosquitoes to insecticides Cypermethrin held in November up to December 2008. Mosquitoes tested were captured in the form of larvae from ponds and estuaries in Karyamukti Cibalong Garut, and then reared in the field insektarium. The adult level were then tested for their susceptibility. Mosquito susceptibility tests conducted using the WHO Susceptibility Test Kit as many as four repetitions performed simultaneously, while the insecticide used in the form of imprag-nated paper with a dose of 0.05%. From tests it is known that mosquito mortality rate up to 100% test. This indicates that the mosquito An. sundaicus in Garut regency of West Java, is still susceptible to the insecticide Cypermenthrin. Therefore, it can still be used in the eradication of malaria vectors in the recommended dosage of 0.20 g/m2.

Nunung Seniawati

2010-06-01

207

Contrasting patterns of tolerance between chemical and biological insecticides in mosquitoes exposed to UV-A.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mosquitoes are vectors of major human diseases, such as malaria, dengue or yellow fever. Because no efficient treatments or vaccines are available for most of these diseases, control measures rely mainly on reducing mosquito populations by the use of insecticides. Numerous biotic and abiotic factors are known to modulate the efficacy of insecticides used in mosquito control. Mosquito breeding sites vary from opened to high vegetation covered areas leading to a large ultraviolet gradient exposure. This ecological feature may affect the general physiology of the insect, including the resistance status against insecticides. In the context of their contrasted breeding sites, we assessed the impact of low-energetic ultraviolet exposure on mosquito sensitivity to biological and chemical insecticides. We show that several mosquito detoxification enzyme activities (cytochrome P450, glutathione S-transferases, esterases) were increased upon low-energy UV-A exposure. Additionally, five specific genes encoding detoxification enzymes (CYP6BB2, CYP6Z7, CYP6Z8, GSTD4, and GSTE2) previously shown to be involved in resistance to chemical insecticides were found over-transcribed in UV-A exposed mosquitoes, revealed by RT-qPCR experiments. More importantly, toxicological bioassays revealed that UV-exposed mosquitoes were more tolerant to four main chemical insecticide classes (DDT, imidacloprid, permethrin, temephos), whereas the bioinsecticide Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) appeared more toxic. The present article provides the first experimental evidence of the capacity of low-energy UV-A to increase mosquito tolerance to major chemical insecticides. This is also the first time that a metabolic resistance to chemical insecticides is linked to a higher susceptibility to a bioinsecticide. These results support the use of Bti as an efficient alternative to chemical insecticides when a metabolic resistance to chemicals has been developed by mosquitoes. PMID:23911355

Tetreau, Guillaume; Chandor-Proust, Alexia; Faucon, Frédéric; Stalinski, Renaud; Akhouayri, Idir; Prud'homme, Sophie M; Raveton, Muriel; Reynaud, Stéphane

2013-09-15

208

Impact of environment on mosquito response to pyrethroid insecticides: facts, evidences and prospects.  

Science.gov (United States)

By transmitting major human diseases such as malaria, dengue fever and filariasis, mosquito species represent a serious threat worldwide in terms of public health, and pose a significant economic burden for the African continent and developing tropical regions. Most vector control programmes aiming at controlling life-threatening mosquitoes rely on the use of chemical insecticides, mainly belonging to the pyrethroid class. However, resistance of mosquito populations to pyrethroids is increasing at a dramatic rate, threatening the efficacy of control programmes throughout insecticide-treated areas, where mosquito-borne diseases are still prevalent. In the absence of new insecticides and efficient alternative vector control methods, resistance management strategies are therefore critical, but these require a deep understanding of adaptive mechanisms underlying resistance. Although insecticide resistance mechanisms are intensively studied in mosquitoes, such adaptation is often considered as the unique result of the selection pressure caused by insecticides used for vector control. Indeed, additional environmental parameters, such as insecticides/pesticides usage in agriculture, the presence of anthropogenic or natural xenobiotics, and biotic interactions between vectors and other organisms, may affect both the overall mosquito responses to pyrethroids and the selection of resistance mechanisms. In this context, the present work aims at updating current knowledge on pyrethroid resistance mechanisms in mosquitoes and compiling available data, often from different research fields, on the impact of the environment on mosquito response to pyrethroids. Key environmental factors, such as the presence of urban or agricultural pollutants and biotic interactions between mosquitoes and their microbiome are discussed, and research perspectives to fill in knowledge gaps are suggested. PMID:23123179

Nkya, Theresia Estomih; Akhouayri, Idir; Kisinza, William; David, Jean-Philippe

2013-04-01

209

Midgut microbiota of the malaria mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae and interactions with Plasmodium falciparum infection.  

Science.gov (United States)

The susceptibility of Anopheles mosquitoes to Plasmodium infections relies on complex interactions between the insect vector and the malaria parasite. A number of studies have shown that the mosquito innate immune responses play an important role in controlling the malaria infection and that the strength of parasite clearance is under genetic control, but little is known about the influence of environmental factors on the transmission success. We present here evidence that the composition of the vector gut microbiota is one of the major components that determine the outcome of mosquito infections. A. gambiae mosquitoes collected in natural breeding sites from Cameroon were experimentally challenged with a wild P. falciparum isolate, and their gut bacterial content was submitted for pyrosequencing analysis. The meta-taxogenomic approach revealed a broader richness of the midgut bacterial flora than previously described. Unexpectedly, the majority of bacterial species were found in only a small proportion of mosquitoes, and only 20 genera were shared by 80% of individuals. We show that observed differences in gut bacterial flora of adult mosquitoes is a result of breeding in distinct sites, suggesting that the native aquatic source where larvae were grown determines the composition of the midgut microbiota. Importantly, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae in the mosquito midgut correlates significantly with the Plasmodium infection status. This striking relationship highlights the role of natural gut environment in parasite transmission. Deciphering microbe-pathogen interactions offers new perspectives to control disease transmission. PMID:22693451

Boissière, Anne; Tchioffo, Majoline T; Bachar, Dipankar; Abate, Luc; Marie, Alexandra; Nsango, Sandrine E; Shahbazkia, Hamid R; Awono-Ambene, Parfait H; Levashina, Elena A; Christen, Richard; Morlais, Isabelle

2012-01-01

210

Changes in host orientation behavior of female mosquitoes treated with a sublethal pyrethroid exposure  

Science.gov (United States)

Adult mosquito control consists of barrier treatments and areal spraying often using pyrethroids, however not all host seeking insects contacting insecticides are killed. Sublethal exposure to neurotoxic compounds can negatively affect sensory organs reducing their efficiency for locating hosts. Fe...

211

Plasmodium knowlesi in humans, macaques and mosquitoes in peninsular Malaysia  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Since a large focus of human infection with Plasmodium knowlesi, a simian malaria parasite naturally found in long-tailed and pig tailed macaques, was reported in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, it was pertinent to study the situation in peninsular Malaysia. A study was thus initiated to screen human cases of Plasmodium malariae using molecular techniques, to determine the presence of P. knowlesi in non- human primates and to elucidate its vectors. Methods Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to identify all Plasmodium species present in the human blood samples sent to the Parasitology laboratory of Institute for Medical Research. At the same time, non-human primates were also screened for malaria parasites and nested PCR was carried out to determine the presence of P. knowlesi. Mosquitoes were collected from Pahang by human landing collection and monkey-baited-traps situated on three different levels. All mosquitoes were identified and salivary glands and midguts of anopheline mosquitoes were dissected to determine the presence of malaria parasites and nested PCR was carried out on positive glands. Sequencing of the csp genes were carried on P. knowlesi samples from humans, monkeys and mosquitoes, positive by PCR. Results and Discussion Plasmodium knowlesi was detected in 77 (69.37% of the 111 human samples, 10 (6.90% of the 145 monkey blood and in 2 (1.7% Anopheles cracens. Sequence of the csp gene clustered with other P. knowlesi isolates. Conclusion Human infection with Plasmodium knowlesi is occurring in most states of peninsular Malaysia. An. cracens is the main vector. Economic exploitation of the forest is perhaps bringing monkeys, mosquitoes and humans into increased contact. A single bite from a mosquito infected with P. knowlesi is sufficient to introduce the parasite to humans. Thus, this zoonotic transmission has to be considered in the future planning of malaria control.

NorParina Ismail

2008-08-01

212

Evidence that sulfisoxazole, an antibacterial sulfonamide, can adversely affect the development of Brugia pahangi in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.  

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The average number of infective larvae recovered from Brugia pahangi-infected Aedes aegypti was approximately one-half that recovered from the controls after the former group of infected mosquitoes had ingested a 1.0% solution of sulfisoxazole diolamine (SXZ) in 10% sucrose-water for 4 consecutive days, beginning 4 days after infection. Most of the filarial larvae from the SXZ-treated mosquitoes were small and sluggish compared with those from the controls. There was no increased mortality of mosquitoes that ingested 1.0% SXZ in sugar-water for 4 days. Average filarial larval burdens were not decreased in mosquitoes that ingested a solution of 10(-6) M methotrexate (MTX), a potent dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor, in sugar-water for 4 days, beginning 4 days after infection. The distributional pattern of larval burdens in mosquitoes that ingested combined 1.0% SXZ and 10(-6) M MTX in sugar-water for 4 days closely resembled that seen in mosquitoes that had imbibed 1.0% SXZ only. Average filarial larval burdens were not decreased in mosquitoes with 4-day-old B. pahangi infections that fed upon jirds which received intraperitoneal injections of SXZ (2 g/kg) and MTX (1 mh/kh), alone and in combination, 1 hr previously. Survival of the mosquitoes that fed upon the drug-treated hosts was unaffected, as was the hatchability of their eggs and subsequent growth and development of the mosquito larvae. PMID:641660

Jaffe, J J; Doremus, H M; Meymarian, E; Chrin, L R

1978-04-01

213

Wolbachia Induces Density-Dependent Inhibition to Dengue Virus in Mosquito Cells  

OpenAIRE

Wolbachia is a maternal transmitted endosymbiotic bacterium that is estimated to infect up to 65% of insect species. The ability of Wolbachia to both induce viral interference and spread into mosquito vector population makes it possible to develop Wolbachia as a biological control agent for dengue control. While Wolbachia induces resistance to dengue virus in the transinfected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, a similar effect was not observed in Aedes albopictus, which naturally carries Wolbachia in...

Lu, Peng; Bian, Guowu; Pan, Xiaoling; Xi, Zhiyong

2012-01-01

214

Preventing the Spread of Malaria and Dengue Fever Using Genetically Modified Mosquitoes  

OpenAIRE

In this candid interview, Anthony A. James explains how mosquito genetics can be exploited to control malaria and dengue transmission. Population replacement strategy, the idea that transgenic mosquitoes can be released into the wild to control disease transmission, is introduced, as well as the concept of genetic drive and the design criterion for an effective genetic drive system. The ethical considerations of releasing genetically-modified organisms into the wild are also discussed.

James, Anthony A.

2007-01-01

215

Field Cage Studies and Progressive Evaluation of Genetically-Engineered Mosquitoes  

OpenAIRE

The absence of a commercially-available dengue vaccine or anti-viral drug makes control of Aedes aegypti, the principal dengue mosquito vector, the only available method to prevent this disease. Sustained, effective application of vector control, however, has been difficult and this led to the call for innovative strategies, including genetic approaches. Here, the authors investigated the ability of a genetically-engineered strain of Ae. aegypti to eliminate wild mosquito populations in large...

Facchinelli, Luca; Valerio, Laura; Ramsey, Janine M.; Gould, Fred; Walsh, Rachael K.; Bond, Guillermo; Robert, Michael A.; Lloyd, Alun L.; James, Anthony A.; Alphey, Luke; Scott, Thomas W.

2013-01-01

216

Effects of Age and Larval Nutrition on Phenotypic Expression of Insecticide-Resistance in Anopheles Mosquitoes  

OpenAIRE

Insecticide-resistance threatens the control of mosquito-borne diseases like malaria or dengue fever. To ensure sustainable vector control we need a full understanding of the factors driving the evolution of resistance. We test the hypothesis that the expression of insecticide-resistance depends on the available resources by rearing genetically DDT-resistant and sensitive larvae of Anopheles mosquitoes at three diet regimes, which correspond to 40%, 70% and 100% of the normal diet and exposin...

Kulma, Katarzyna; Saddler, Adam; Koella, Jacob C.

2013-01-01

217

Molecular evidence for dual pyrethroid-receptor sites on a mosquito sodium channel  

OpenAIRE

Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used as one of the most effective control measures in the global fight against agricultural arthropod pests and mosquito-borne diseases, including malaria and dengue. They exert toxic effects by altering the function of voltage-gated sodium channels, which are essential for proper electrical signaling in the nervous system. A major threat to the sustained use of pyrethroids for vector control is the emergence of mosquito resistance to pyrethroids worldwide. ...

Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Satar, Gul; Hu, Zhaonong; Nauen, Ralf; He, Sheng Yang; Zhorov, Boris S.; Dong, Ke

2013-01-01

218

Mosquito and Blackfly Category Manual.  

Science.gov (United States)

This manual provides information needed to meet the standards for pesticide applicator certification. Section one is concerned with the morphology, life cycle and breeding areas of mosquitoes and the diseases resulting from their presence. The second section covers similar categories in relation to the black fly population. Calculation methods and…

Bowman, James S.; And Others

219

Measurement of landing mosquito density on humans.  

Science.gov (United States)

In traditional vector surveillance systems, adult mosquito density and the rate of mosquito-human host contact are estimated from the mosquito numbers captured in mechanical traps. But the design of the traps, their placement in the habitat and operating time, microclimate, and other environmental factors bias mosquito responses such that trapped mosquito numbers may be at variance with the numbers actually making human contact. As an alternative to mechanical traps, direct measurement of landing mosquito density enables real-time estimation of the mosquito-human-host-contact parameter. Based on this paradigm, we studied methods to measure mosquito landing responses to a human host. Our results showed: (a) an 18% difference (P0.55) in the average number of Ae. albopictus landing on the arm (8.6±1.6min(-1)) compared with the leg (9.2±2.5min(-1)) of the same human subject; (d) differences among day-to-day landing patterns for the mosquito species we studied but measurable periodicity (Ptemperature (Pdew point temperature (P<0.0001) for Cx. quinquefasciatus. Results from this study were used to develop a procedure for safely and accurately measuring mosquito landing density on a human subject. PMID:24769003

Barnard, Donald R; Dickerson, Catherine Z; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Xue, Rui-De; Kline, Daniel L; Bernier, Ulrich R

2014-08-01

220

UV Irradiation-induced Silver Nanoparticles as Mosquito Larvicides  

OpenAIRE

Silver nanoparticles have a great potential for use in biological control including antimicrobial activity. The pest control of mosquito Aedes aegypti by means of larvicidal is still necessity in order to diminish the vector of some life-threaten diseases. In this study, polymethacrylate (PMA)-stabilized silver nanoparticles were synthesized by UV irradiation, characterized by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and zeta potential measurement and evaluated ...

Dubas, S. T.; Sereemaspun, A.; Warisnoicharoen, W.; Larpudomlert, R.; Homklinchan, C.; Sap-iam, N.

2010-01-01

221

Understanding the DNA damage response in order to achieve desired gene editing outcomes in mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mosquitoes are high-impact disease vectors with the capacity to transmit pathogenic agents that cause diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, chikungunya, and dengue. Continued growth in knowledge of genetic, molecular, and physiological pathways in mosquitoes allows for the development of novel control methods and for the continued optimization of existing ones. The emergence of site-specific nucleases as genomic engineering tools promises to expedite research of crucial biological pathways in these disease vectors. The utilization of these nucleases in a more precise and efficient manner is dependent upon knowledge and manipulation of the DNA repair pathways utilized by the mosquito. While progress has been made in deciphering DNA repair pathways in some model systems, research into the nature of the hierarchy of mosquito DNA repair pathways, as well as in mechanistic differences that may exist, is needed. In this review, we will describe progress in the use of site-specific nucleases in mosquitoes, along with the hierarchy of DNA repair in the context of mosquito chromosomal organization and structure, and how this knowledge may be manipulated to achieve precise chromosomal engineering in mosquitoes. PMID:25596822

Overcash, Justin M; Aryan, Azadeh; Myles, Kevin M; Adelman, Zach N

2015-02-01

222

Dusk to dawn activity patterns of anopheline mosquitoes in West Timor and Java, Indonesia.  

Science.gov (United States)

Malaria is a serious health issue in Indonesia. We investigated the dusk to dawn anopheline mosquito activity patterns, host-seeking and resting locations in coastal plain, hilly and highland areas in West Timor and Java. Adult mosquitoes were captured landing on humans or resting in houses or animal barns. Data analyzed were: mosquito night-time activities; period of peak activity; night-time activity in specific periods of time and for mosquito resting locations. Eleven species were recorded; data were sparse for some species therefore detailed analyses were performed for four species only. In Java Anopheles vagus was common, with a bimodal pattern of high activity. In West Timor, its activity peaked around midnight. Other species with peak activity around the middle of the night were An. barbirostris and An. subpictus. Most species showed no biting and resting preference for indoors or outdoors, although An. barbirostris preferred indoors in West Timor, but outdoors in Java. An. aconitus and An. annularis preferred resting in human dwellings; An. subpictus and An. vagus preferred resting in animal barns. An. barbirostris preferred resting in human dwellings in West Timor and in animal barns in Java. The information is useful for planning the mosquito control aspect of malaria management. For example, where mosquito species have peak activity at night indoors, bednets and indoor residual spraying should reduce malaria risk, but where mosquitoes are most active outdoors, other options may be more effective. PMID:21706933

Ndoen, Ermi; Wild, Clyde; Dale, Pat; Sipe, Neil; Dale, Mike

2011-05-01

223

Formulas of components of citronella oil against mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti).  

Science.gov (United States)

The mosquito Aedes aegypti is an epidemic vector of several diseases such as dengue fever and yellow fever. Several pesticides are used to control the mosquito population. Because of their frequent use, some mosquitoes have developed resistance. In this study, we used the Y-tube olfactometer to test essential oils of Cymbopogon species and screened specific formulas of components as repellents against Ae. aegypti. At 400 ?L, the extracted oil of citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus) and myrcene produced a low-active response by inhibiting mosquito host-seeking activity. Citronella grass, lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus), citral and myrcene also produced a low-treatment response to repellents, for more potential to affect host-seeking behavior. Furthermore, the mixture of citral, myrcene, and citronellal oil (C:M:Ci = 6:4:1) greatly affected and inhibited host-seeking behavior (76% active response; 26% treatment response with 40 ?L; 42.5%, 18% with 400 ?L; and 19%, 23% with 1000 ?L). As compared with the result for N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET; 44%, 22% with 400 ?L), adjusting the composition formulas of citronella oil had a synergistic effect, for more effective repellent against Ae. aegypti. PMID:23998314

Hsu, Wey-Shin; Yen, Jui-Hung; Wang, Yei-Shung

2013-01-01

224

Effectiveness of Mosquito Trap with Sugar Fermented Attractant to the Vector of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever  

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Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is the main vector of dengue fever that is still become health problem in the world. Various control efforts has been done at several areas through chemically or naturally control. Developing mosquitoes trapping tool is an alternative method to control mosquitoes besides insecticides utilization. This laboratorium research utilize sugar fermented process to yield CO2 as one of attractan to mosquito. Production of ethanol and CO2 can be yielded from anaerob sugar fermentation proccess (without O2 by khamir Saccharomyces cerevisiae activities. The trapped mosquitoes was observed up to 48 hours exposure, the highest average of mosquito trapped is on solution treatment with yeast 1 gram (43.2% and 40 gr sugar (48.4%. The highest effectivity of trapping tool both inside or outside was on the 14th day. There were declained amount of trapped mosquitos on 16th and 18th days. This laboratorium research has described that trapping tool with sugar fermented solution were effective to control population of dengue vector.

Endang Puji Astuti

2011-06-01

225

From predicting mosquito habitat to malaria seasons using remotely sensed data: practice, problems and perspectives.  

OpenAIRE

Remote sensing techniques are becoming increasingly important for identifying mosquito habitats, investigating malaria epidemiology and assisting malaria control. Here, Simon Hay, Bob Snow and David Rogers review the development of these techniques, from aerial photographic identification of mosquito larval habitats on the local scale through to the space-based survey of malaria risk over continental areas using increasingly sophisticated airborne and satellite-sensor technology. They indicat...

Hay, Si; Snow, Rw; Rogers, Dj

1998-01-01

226

Transgenic mosquitoes and the fight against malaria: managing technology push in a turbulent GMO world  

OpenAIRE

Genetic modification (GM) of mosquitoes (which renders them genetically modified organisms, GMOs) offers opportunities for controlling malaria. Transgenic strains of mosquitoes have been developed and evaluation of these to 1) replace or suppress wild vector populations and 2) reduce transmission and deliver public health gains are an imminent prospect. The transition of this approach from confined laboratory settings to open field trials in disease-endemic countries (DECs) is a staged proces...

Knols, B. G. J.; Bossin, H. C.; Mukabana, W. R.; Robinson, A. S.

2007-01-01

227

A push-pull system to reduce house entry of malaria mosquitoes  

OpenAIRE

Background. Mosquitoes are the dominant vectors of pathogens that cause infectious diseases such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever and filariasis. Current vector control strategies often rely on the use of pyrethroids against which mosquitoes are increasingly developing resistance. Here, a push-pull system is presented, that operates by the simultaneous use of repellent and attractive volatile odorants. Method/Results. Experiments were carried out in a semi-field set-up: a traditional house ...

Menger, David J.; Otieno, Bruno; Rijk, Marjolein; Mukabana, W. Richard; Loon, Joop Ja; Takken, Willem

2014-01-01

228

A systematic review of mathematical models of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission: 1970-2010.  

OpenAIRE

Mathematical models of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission originated in the early twentieth century to provide insights into how to most effectively combat malaria. The foundations of the Ross–Macdonald theory were established by 1970. Since then, there has been a growing interest in reducing the public health burden of mosquito-borne pathogens and an expanding use of models to guide their control. To assess how theory has changed to confront evolving public health challenges, we compiled...

Reiner, Rc; Perkins, Ta; Barker, Cm; Niu, T.; Chaves, Lf; Ellis, Am; George, Db; Le Menach, A.; Pulliam, Jr; Bisanzio, D.; Buckee, C; Chiyaka, C.; Cummings, Da; Garcia, Aj; Gatton, Ml

2013-01-01

229

Nationwide Investigation of the Pyrethroid Susceptibility of Mosquito Larvae Collected from Used Tires in Vietnam  

OpenAIRE

Pyrethroid resistance is envisioned to be a major problem for the vector control program since, at present, there are no suitable chemical substitutes for pyrethroids. Cross-resistance to knockdown agents, which are mainly used in mosquito coils and related products as spatial repellents, is the most serious concern. Since cross-resistance is a global phenomenon, we have started to monitor the distribution of mosquito resistance to pyrethroids. The first pilot study was carried out in Vietnam...

Kawada, Hitoshi; Higa, Yukiko; Nguyen, Yen T.; Tran, Son H.; Nguyen, Hoa T.; Takagi, Masahiro

2009-01-01

230

Malaria Mosquitoes Attracted by Fatal Fungus  

OpenAIRE

Insect-killing fungi such as Beauveria bassiana are being evaluated as possible active ingredients for use in novel biopesticides against mosquito vectors that transmit malaria. Fungal pathogens infect through contact and so applications of spores to surfaces such as walls, nets, or other resting sites provide possible routes to infect mosquitoes in and around domestic dwellings. However, some insects can detect and actively avoid fungal spores to reduce infection risk. If true for mosquitoes...

George, Justin; Jenkins, Nina E.; Blanford, Simon; Thomas, Matthew B.; Baker, Thomas C.

2013-01-01

231

Native Argentinean cyclopoids (Crustacea: Copepoda as predators of Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae mosquitoes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Copepods from La Plata, Argentina were investigated to characterize the local community of larvivorous copepods inhabiting mosquito breeding sites and to identify new predator species of the mosquitoes which occur in artificial containers, Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens. Diversity of larvivorous cyclopoids was highest in permanent pools. Predation by sex and age, selectivity on mosquito species, and daily predation rate during five days were studied for Acanthocyclops robustus, Diacyclops uruguayensis, Macrocyclops albidus and Mesocyclops longisetus. Female copepods presented the highest predatory capacity. No predatory preference for mosquito species was found. According to overall predation potential, copepods were ranked as follows: D. uruguayensis Se hizo una prospección de copépodos en La Plata, Argentina, con los objetivos de caracterizar la comunidad local de copépodos larvívoros en sitios de cría de mosquitos, e identificar nuevas especies depredadoras de los mosquitos de contenedores artificiales Aedes aegypti y Culex pipiens. La diversidad de ciclopoides larvívoros fue máxima en charcos permanentes. Se examinó la depredación por sexos y edad, la selectividad por especies de mosquito, y la tasa de depredación diaria durante cinco días en Acanthocyclops robustus, Diacyclops uruguayensis, Macrocyclops albidus y Mesocyclops longisetus. Los copépodos hembra presentaron la capacidad depredadora más alta. No se encontró preferencia por alguna especie de mosquito. De acuerdo al potencial de depredación en general, los copépodos se ordenan así: D. uruguayensis < A. robustus < M. albidus < M. longisetus. También se evaluó la tolerancia a la desecación del hábitat y la capacidad de resistir en agua de contenedores artificiales. D. uruguayensis y A. robustus sobrevivieron en condiciones de sequía, pero D. uruguayensis presentó menor supervivencia en agua de floreros de cementerio. M. albidus no sobrevivió condiciones de sequía y no toleró el agua extraída de contenedores artificiales. Los ciclopoides neotropicales D. uruguayensis and A. robustus son buenos candidatos y merecen investigación ulterior como agentes de control biológico de mosquitos.

María C Tranchida

2009-12-01

232

Evaluación de la trampa Mosquito Magnet® con y sin octenol para capturar mosquitos (Diptera: Culicidae) / Evaluation of the Mosquito Magnet® trap with and without octenol to collect mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae)  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available La eficiencia de la trampa Mosquito Magnet® Liberty Plus (MMLP) fue evaluada con y sin octenol para capturar mosquitos hembras adultas en Maracay, estado Aragua, Venezuela. Se realizaron capturas dos veces por semana entre las 3:00 pm y 10:00 am, un día con y otro sin octenol, durante ocho semanas e [...] ntre abril y mayo 2013 para un total de 152 horas de capturas para cada tratamiento. Se capturaron un total de 229 especímenes pertenecientes a 10 especies distribuidas en cinco géneros. En general, se capturó un número similar de mosquitos con y sin octenol. No se observaron diferencias significativas entre ambos tratamientos para las especies más abundantes (Anopheles pseudopunctipennis y Aedes angustivittatus) así como para el total de mosquitos capturados. Para ambos tratamientos se capturaron proporciones similares de hembras de Aedes aegypti y Ae. albopictus. Sin embargo, se capturaron significativamente más Culex quinquefasciatus sin octenol que con octenol. Los resultados sugieren que es factible prescindir del uso de octenol en trampas MMLP en futuros estudios de vigilancia entomológica para la prevención y control de la malaria, dengue y otros arbovirus, particularmente en áreas remotas. Sin embargo, es fundamental realizar más evaluaciones en áreas endémicas en épocas de alta abundancia de mosquitos a fin de obtener una mejor estimación de la eficacia de la trampa con y sin octenol. Abstract in english The efficiency of the Mosquito Magnet® Liberty Plus (MMLP) trap was evaluated with and without octenol for the capture of adult female mosquitoes in Maracay, Aragua state, Venezuela. Captures were carried out twice a week between 3:00 pm and 10:00 am, one day with octenol and the following without i [...] t, during 8 weeks between April and May, 2013 with a total of 152 hours of sampling effort per treatment. A total of 229 specimens belonging to 10 species distributed in 5 genera were caught. In general, similar numbers of mosquitoes were caught in traps both with and without octenol. No significant differences were observed between the two treatments for the two most abundant species (Anopheles pseudopunctipennis and Aedes angustivittatus) or for the total number of mosquitoes captured. Similar proportions of Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus females were also captured independent of the treatment used. However, significantly more Culex quinquefasciatus were caught in the traps without octenol. The results suggest that it is feasible to use the MMLP traps without octenol in future studies of entomological surveillance for the prevention and control of malaria, dengue and other arboviruses, especially in remote areas. Nevertheless, further evaluations in endemic areas should be done during periods of higher mosquito abundance in order to obtain a more precise estimate of the effectiveness of traps with and without octenol.

Yasmin, Rubio-Palis; Rodrigo, Ramírez Álvarez; Hernán, Guzmán; Yarys, Estrada.

2014-06-01

233

Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) of metropolitan Hamburg, Germany.  

Science.gov (United States)

In Europe, mosquito-related public health concerns are growing due to the increasing spread of invasive mosquito species and the recent emergence of mosquito-borne arboviruses. A vital backbone in the assessment of these issues is detailed knowledge of the mosquito fauna, i.e. regional mosquito inventories. It was therefore decided to intensify nationwide investigations on the occurrence and distribution of mosquitoes in Germany in order to update old records and to detect possible faunal changes. This paper is focussing on a densely populated metropolitan region, the federal state of Hamburg and its adjacent environs, taking two historical baseline inventories into consideration, spanning almost 100 years of mosquito research in Hamburg. In the period between 2010 and 2014, more than 10,000 juvenile, neonate and adult mosquito specimens were sampled and trapped at 105 sites in Hamburg and its environs, of which about 60% have been identified to species level, resulting in a total of 33 recorded species. Of these, Anopheles algeriensis, Culex modestus, Ochlerotatus caspius, Ochlerotatus nigrinus and Ochlerotatus sticticus are new to the area. The most common species in Hamburg are Culex pipiens/torrentium and Ochlerotatus annulipes/cantans. In contrast, two previously common species, Anopheles atroparvus and Ochlerotatus excrucians, were not detected. Despite substantial environmental changes due to reconstruction, urbanisation and renaturation in the Hamburg metropolitan region in recent decades, there has been remarkably little change within the mosquito fauna during the last century. PMID:24870250

Krüger, A; Börstler, J; Badusche, M; Lühken, R; Garms, R; Tannich, E

2014-08-01

234

Gametocytes infectiousness to mosquitoes: variable selection using random forests, and zero inflated models  

CERN Document Server

Malaria control strategies aiming at reducing disease transmission intensity may impact both oocyst intensity and infection prevalence in the mosquito vector. Thus far, mathematical models failed to identify a clear relationship between Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes and their infectiousness to mosquitoes. Natural isolates of gametocytes are genetically diverse and biologically complex. Infectiousness to mosquitoes relies on multiple parameters such as density, sex-ratio, maturity, parasite genotypes and host immune factors. In this article, we investigated how density and genetic diversity of gametocytes impact on the success of transmission in the mosquito vector. We analyzed data for which the number of covariates plus attendant interactions is at least of order of the sample size, precluding usage of classical models such as general linear models. We then considered the variable importance from random forests to address the problem of selecting the most influent variables. The selected covariates were ...

Genuer, Robin; Toussile, Wilson

2011-01-01

235

Residual effectiveness of lambda-cyhalothrin harbourage sprays against foliage-resting mosquitoes in north Queensland.  

Science.gov (United States)

The residual efficacy of lambda-cyhalothrin sprayed on foliage was evaluated against various mosquito species in sections of forest in Cairns, Queensland, Australia Weekly sweep-net collections in treated and untreated areas before and after spraying showed 87-100% reductions in mosquito numbers for the first 9 wk postspray. After that period, reductions fluctuated but remained >71% up to 14 wk posttreatment. Mosquito mortality ranged from 96 to 100% in contact bioassays of treated leaves during the 14 wk study. Our results demonstrate that spraying harborage vegetation with lambda-cyhalothrin is an extremely effective strategy for the control of sylvan and peridomestic mosquito species in tropical north Queensland. PMID:24724295

Muzari, Odwell M; Adamczyk, Rebecca; Davis, Joseph; Ritchie, Scott; Devine, Gregor

2014-03-01

236

Attracting, trapping and killing disease-transmitting mosquitoes using odor-baited stations - The Ifakara Odor-Baited Stations  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background To accelerate efforts towards control and possibly elimination of mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and lymphatic filariasis, optimally located outdoor interventions could be used to complement existing intradomicilliary vector control methods such as house spraying with insecticides and insecticidal bednets. Methods We describe a new odor-baited station for trapping, contaminating and killing disease-transmitting mosquitoes. This device, named the 'Ifakara Odor-baited Station' (Ifakara OBS, is a 4 m3 hut-shaped canvas box with seven openings, two of which may be fitted with interception traps to catch exiting mosquitoes. It is baited with synthetic human odors and may be augmented with contaminants including toxic insecticides or biological agents. Results In field trials where panels of fabric were soaked in 1% pirimiphos-methyl solution and suspended inside the Ifakara OBS, at least 73.6% of Anopheles arabiensis, 78.7% of Culex and 60% of Mansonia mosquitoes sampled while exiting the OBS, died within 24 hours. When used simply as a trap and evaluated against two existing outdoor traps, Ifakara Tent trap and Mosquito Magnet-X®, the OBS proved more efficacious than the Ifakara Tent trap in catching all mosquito species found (P ®, it was equally efficacious in catching An. arabiensis (P = 0.969, but was less efficacious against Culex (P Mansonia species (P Conclusion The Ifakara OBS is efficacious against disease-carrying mosquitoes including the malaria vector, An. arabiensis and Culicine vectors of filarial worms and arboviruses. It can be used simultaneously as a trap and as a contamination or killing station, meaning most mosquitoes which escape trapping would leave when already contaminated and die shortly afterwards. This technique has potential to complement current vector control methods, by targeting mosquitoes in places other than human dwellings, but its effectiveness in the field will require cheap, long-lasting and easy-to-use mosquito lures.

John Alex N

2010-03-01

237

Mosquito and Fly Control Research by the USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agriculture and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE) in the Deployed War-Fighter Protection (DWFP) Program  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite existing measures to prevent and control arthropod-borne diseases in military units, these diseases continue to be serious threats to deployed troops. Due to a shrinking list of safe, cost-effective pesticides for control of disease vectors, new and improved toxicants and methods for deliver...

238

Larvicidal activity of neem oil (Azadirachta indica formulation against mosquitoes  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes transmit serious human diseases, causing millions of deaths every year. Use of synthetic insecticides to control vector mosquitoes has caused physiological resistance and adverse environmental effects in addition to high operational cost. Insecticides of botanical origin have been reported as useful for control of mosquitoes. Azadirachta indica (Meliaceae and its derived products have shown a variety of insecticidal properties. The present paper discusses the larvicidal activity of neem-based biopesticide for the control of mosquitoes. Methods Larvicidal efficacy of an emulsified concentrate of neem oil formulation (neem oil with polyoxyethylene ether, sorbitan dioleate and epichlorohydrin developed by BMR & Company, Pune, India, was evaluated against late 3rd and early 4th instar larvae of different genera of mosquitoes. The larvae were exposed to different concentrations (0.5–5.0 ppm of the formulation along with untreated control. Larvicidal activity of the formulation was also evaluated in field against Anopheles, Culex, and Aedes mosquitoes. The formulation was diluted with equal volumes of water and applied @ 140 mg a.i./m2 to different mosquito breeding sites with the help of pre calibrated knapsack sprayer. Larval density was determined at pre and post application of the formulation using a standard dipper. Results Median lethal concentration (LC50 of the formulation against Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti was found to be 1.6, 1.8 and 1.7 ppm respectively. LC50 values of the formulation stored at 26°C, 40°C and 45°C for 48 hours against Ae. aegypti were 1.7, 1.7, 1.8 ppm while LC90 values were 3.7, 3.7 and 3.8 ppm respectively. Further no significant difference in LC50 and LC90 values of the formulation was observed against Ae. aegypti during 18 months storage period at room temperature. An application of the formulation at the rate of 140 mg a.i./m2 in different breeding sites under natural field conditions provided 98.1% reduction of Anopheles larvae on day 1; thereafter 100% reduction was recorded up to week 1 and more than 80% reduction up to week 3, while percent reduction against Culex larvae was 95.5% on day 1, and thereafter 80% reduction was achieved up to week 3. The formulation also showed 95.1% and, 99.7% reduction of Aedes larvae on day 1 and day 2 respectively; thereafter 100% larval control was observed up to day 7. Conclusion The neem oil formulation was found effective in controlling mosquito larvae in different breeding sites under natural field conditions. As neem trees are widely distributed in India, their formulations may prove to be an effective and eco-friendly larvicide, which could be used as an alternative for malaria control.

Dua Virendra K

2009-06-01

239

Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of 1-undec-10-enoyl-piperidines as adulticides against the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)  

Science.gov (United States)

The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti (L.), is considered the primary vector for both dengue and yellow fever. Using insecticide is one of the major ways to control this medically important insect pest. However, few new insecticides have been developed for mosquito control. As part of our collabo...

240

Insilico modeling of Wolbachia and its potentials in combating mosquito borne diseases Chikungunya and Dengue  

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Full Text Available Mosquito borne diseases are major health burden both in tropical and subtropical regions. The enormous use of insecticides to control mosquitoes causes biomagnification of chemicals in environment and mosquitoes have developed resistance to insecticides. The inefficiency of insecticides to combat mosquitoes prompted researchers to develop efficient alternative methods. Wolbachia endosymbiont is a one of efficient new approach to control mosquitoes. Wolbachia strain invade mosquitoes biology by reducing host lifespan, phenotype and inhibit virus replication. In the present study, insilico modeling and docking of Wolbachia and human pathogens Chikungunya (CHIK and Dengue (DEN virus was done. Docking is the method to find the binding affinity of protein and ligand complex molecules for finding potential inhibitor. Using Hex, we obtained energy total (e-total values in kcal/mol for all docked complex. In the contest of overall analyzing the docking E-total values of docked complexes reveals that WSP-B has show strong binding affinity than WSP-A to both DEN and CHIK. Based on obtained result, we suggest WSP-B has potential inhibitor for both DEN and CHIK virus. Further, biophysical characterization of Wolbachia will help to develop a drug to combat CHIK and DEN viruses.

N.M.Guruprasad

2013-09-01

241

Mosquito vectors of dog heartworm in the United States: vector status and factors influencing transmission efficiency.  

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Dog heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) is dependent on mosquito vectors for its maintenance and transmission among vertebrate hosts. Consequently, D. immitis abundance and distribution are closely linked with mosquito vector biology and ecology. Information on the important dog heartworm vectors in the United States is limited and no comprehensive surveillance of dog heartworm in US mosquitoes has been undertaken to date. Here, we review information gleaned from a number of field surveys documenting heartworm presence in wild mosquito populations as well as laboratory assessments of mosquito vector capacity. Various biological and ecological factors likely contribute to the relative importance of different vector species. We describe some of these factors, rank the leading criteria for efficient vectors, and present the most likely vector species found across the United States. Considering the recent emergence of drug resistance among D. immitis strains, practical knowledge of heartworm vector biology and control should be incorporated into heartworm disease management programs. We conclude by proposing that heartworm control would benefit by targeting mosquito vectors, and we suggest ways in which veterinarians can incorporate the recognition of vector importance into heartworm prevention recommendations imparted to clients. PMID:22152605

Ledesma, Nicholas; Harrington, Laura

2011-11-01

242

Targeting gene expression to the female larval fat body of transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

As the fat body is a critical tissue for mosquito development, metamorphosis, immune and reproductive system function, the characterization of regulatory modules targeting gene expression to the female mosquito fat body at distinct life stages is much needed for multiple, varied strategies for controlling vector-borne diseases such as dengue and malaria. The hexameric storage protein, Hexamerin-1.2, of the mosquito Aedes atropalpus is female-specific and uniquely expressed in the fat body of fourth instar larvae and young adults. We have identified in the Hex-1.2 gene, a short regulatory module that directs female-, tissue-, and stage-specific lacZ reporter gene expression using a heterologous promoter in transgenic lines of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. Male transgenic larvae and pupae of one line expressed no Escherichia?coli ?-galactosidase or transgene product; in two other lines reporter gene activity was highly female-biased. All transgenic lines expressed the reporter only in the fat body; however, lacZ mRNA levels were no different in males and females at any stage examined, suggesting that the gene regulatory module drives female-specific expression by post-transcriptional regulation in the heterologous mosquito. This regulatory element from the Hex-1.2 gene thus provides a new molecular tool for transgenic mosquito control as well as functional genetic analysis in aedine mosquitoes. PMID:23241066

Totten, D C; Vuong, M; Litvinova, O V; Jinwal, U K; Gulia-Nuss, M; Harrell, R A; Beneš, H

2013-02-01

243

Effects of insect growth regulators on the mosquito-parasitic nematode Romanomermis iyengari.  

Science.gov (United States)

Pyriproxyfen, a juvenile hormone analogue, diflubenzuron, a chitin synthesis inhibitor, and azadirachtin, an ecdysone agonist, are three insect growth regulators (IGRs) considered as selective and effective insecticides for mosquitoes. Romanomermis iyengari (Welch) is a mosquito-parasitic mermithid that can provide biological control against many medically important mosquito species. The compatibility of these two control tactics was tested by evaluating the sublethal effects of exposure to IGR on nematode developmental stages (preparasitic, parasitic, and preparasitic + parasitic) using Culex pipiens larvae as the host. Sublethal concentrations of IGRs were 90 % emergence inhibition of host mosquito. Preparasitic exposure to pyriproxyfen, azadirachtin, and diflurbenzuron had no effect on infectivity, parasite load, sex ratio, or male size but reduced nematode female length and increased male sex ratio at one parasite/larva. When IGRs treatments were made against the parasitic and preparasitic + parasitic stages, pyriproxyfen and azadirachtin reduced R. iyengari infectivity, parasite load, and male nematode length, whereas pyriproxyfen exposure increased male sex ratio and reduced the female R. iyengari length. Thus, IGRs have significant negative impacts on different stages of mosquito mermithid that can destabilize the balance of host-parasite population interaction. Therefore, IGRs should be used with caution in mosquito habitats where these parasites have established. PMID:23180130

Suman, Devi Shankar; Brey, Christopher W; Wang, Yi; Sanad, Manar; Shamseldean, Muhammed S M; Gaugler, Randy

2013-02-01

244

A systematic review of mosquito coils and passive emanators: defining recommendations for spatial repellency testing methodologies  

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Full Text Available Abstract Mosquito coils, vaporizer mats and emanators confer protection against mosquito bites through the spatial action of emanated vapor or airborne pyrethroid particles. These products dominate the pest control market; therefore, it is vital to characterize mosquito responses elicited by the chemical actives and their potential for disease prevention. The aim of this review was to determine effects of mosquito coils and emanators on mosquito responses that reduce human-vector contact and to propose scientific consensus on terminologies and methodologies used for evaluation of product formats that could contain spatial chemical actives, including indoor residual spraying (IRS, long lasting insecticide treated nets (LLINs and insecticide treated materials (ITMs. PubMed, (National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI, U.S. National Library of Medicine, NIH, MEDLINE, LILAC, Cochrane library, IBECS and Armed Forces Pest Management Board Literature Retrieval System search engines were used to identify studies of pyrethroid based coils and emanators with key-words “Mosquito coils” “Mosquito emanators” and “Spatial repellents”. It was concluded that there is need to improve statistical reporting of studies, and reach consensus in the methodologies and terminologies used through standardized testing guidelines. Despite differing evaluation methodologies, data showed that coils and emanators induce mortality, deterrence, repellency as well as reduce the ability of mosquitoes to feed on humans. Available data on efficacy outdoors, dose–response relationships and effective distance of coils and emanators is inadequate for developing a target product profile (TPP, which will be required for such chemicals before optimized implementation can occur for maximum benefits in disease control.

Ogoma Sheila B

2012-12-01

245

Microsporidian isolates from mosquitoes of Argentina  

Science.gov (United States)

Microsporidia are among the most common and widely distributed microbial pathogens associated with mosquitoes in nature. Since 1980 studies of microsporidia in mosquitoes of Argentina were conducted at the Laboratory of Insect Vectors of CEPAVE. Eleven morphologically unique species of microsporidia...

246

Can Wolbachia be used to control malaria?  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by Plasmodium parasites transmitted by the infectious bite of Anopheles mosquitoes. Vector control of malaria has predominantly focused on targeting the adult mosquito through insecticides and bed nets. However, current vector control methods are [...] often not sustainable for long periods so alternative methods are needed. A novel biocontrol approach for mosquito-borne diseases has recently been proposed, it uses maternally inherited endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria transinfected into mosquitoes in order to interfere with pathogen transmission. Transinfected Wolbachia strains in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the primary vector of dengue fever, directly inhibit pathogen replication, including Plasmodium gallinaceum, and also affect mosquito reproduction to allow Wolbachia to spread through mosquito populations. In addition, transient Wolbachia infections in Anopheles gambiae significantly reduce Plasmodium levels. Here we review the prospects of using a Wolbachia-based approach to reduce human malaria transmission through transinfection of Anopheles mosquitoes.

Thomas, Walker; Luciano Andrade, Moreira.

2011-08-01

247

Can Wolbachia be used to control malaria?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by Plasmodium parasites transmitted by the infectious bite of Anopheles mosquitoes. Vector control of malaria has predominantly focused on targeting the adult mosquito through insecticides and bed nets. However, current vector control methods are often not sustainable for long periods so alternative methods are needed. A novel biocontrol approach for mosquito-borne diseases has recently been proposed, it uses maternally inherited endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria transinfected into mosquitoes in order to interfere with pathogen transmission. Transinfected Wolbachia strains in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the primary vector of dengue fever, directly inhibit pathogen replication, including Plasmodium gallinaceum, and also affect mosquito reproduction to allow Wolbachia to spread through mosquito populations. In addition, transient Wolbachia infections in Anopheles gambiae significantly reduce Plasmodium levels. Here we review the prospects of using a Wolbachia-based approach to reduce human malaria transmission through transinfection of Anopheles mosquitoes.

Thomas Walker

2011-08-01

248

Elevation of dopamine level reduces host-seeking activity in the adult female mosquito Aedes albopictus  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquito-borne viruses are transmitted to human hosts via blood-feeding behavior of female mosquitoes. Female mosquitoes seek a host to take blood meals (host-seeking behavior. In order to prevent virus infections, it is important to understand how they modulate host-seeking behavior. Dopamine (DA in the central nervous system acts as a neuromediator that regulates a variety of behaviors in insects. In female mosquitoes, host-seeking behavior increases when DA levels in the head decline after emergence. However, it remains unclear whether DA directly modulates host-seeking behavior in female mosquitoes. The aim of this study was to examine whether changes in DA levels in the head affects host-seeking activity in the adult female mosquito Aedes albopictus (Ae. albopictus. Findings We compared host-seeking behavior in one group of emerging female adults treated with l-?-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA, the precursor of DA, (l-DOPA group, with that in an untreated control (control group after confirming elevation of head DA in l-DOPA group by using high-performance liquid chromatography. The content of head DA in l-DOPA group significantly remained higher than that in controls on all days examined. The host-seeking activity in the control group showed a gradual increase over the 6-day experimental period. In contrast, there was no such increase in the host-seeking activity in the l-DOPA group. Therefore, the host-seeking activity of l-DOPA group was significantly lower than that of the controls between day 3 and 6 post-emergence. Conclusion Our results indicate that elevation of DA level reduces host-seeking activity in adult female mosquito Ae. albopictus.

Fukumitsu Yuki

2012-05-01

249

Transcriptome of the adult female malaria mosquito vector Anopheles albimanus  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Malaria is transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles. Transmission is a complex phenomenon involving biological and environmental factors of humans, parasites and mosquitoes. Among more than 500 anopheline species, only a few species from different branches of the mosquito evolutionary tree transmit malaria, suggesting that their vectorial capacity has evolved independently. Anopheles albimanus (subgenus Nyssorhynchus is an important malaria vector in the Americas. The divergence time between Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria vector in Africa, and the Neotropical vectors has been estimated to be 100 My. To better understand the biological basis of malaria transmission and to develop novel and effective means of vector control, there is a need to explore the mosquito biology beyond the An. gambiae complex. Results We sequenced the transcriptome of the An. albimanus adult female. By combining Sanger, 454 and Illumina sequences from cDNA libraries derived from the midgut, cuticular fat body, dorsal vessel, salivary gland and whole body, we generated a single, high-quality assembly containing 16,669 transcripts, 92% of which mapped to the An. darlingi genome and covered 90% of the core eukaryotic genome. Bidirectional comparisons between the An. gambiae, An. darlingi and An. albimanus predicted proteomes allowed the identification of 3,772 putative orthologs. More than half of the transcripts had a match to proteins in other insect vectors and had an InterPro annotation. We identified several protein families that may be relevant to the study of Plasmodium-mosquito interaction. An open source transcript annotation browser called GDAV (Genome-Delinked Annotation Viewer was developed to facilitate public access to the data generated by this and future transcriptome projects. Conclusions We have explored the adult female transcriptome of one important New World malaria vector, An. albimanus. We identified protein-coding transcripts involved in biological processes that may be relevant to the Plasmodium lifecycle and can serve as the starting point for searching targets for novel control strategies. Our data increase the available genomic information regarding An. albimanus several hundred-fold, and will facilitate molecular research in medical entomology, evolutionary biology, genomics and proteomics of anopheline mosquito vectors. The data reported in this manuscript is accessible to the community via the VectorBase website (http://www.vectorbase.org/Other/AdditionalOrganisms/.

Martínez-Barnetche Jesús

2012-05-01

250

The sublethal affects of pyrethroid exposure on female mosquito behavior and sand fly behavior in the presence of spatial repellents.  

Science.gov (United States)

Adult mosquito control consists of barrier treatments and areal spraying often using pyrethroids, however not all host seeking insects contacting insecticides are killed. Sublethal exposure to neurotoxic compounds can negatively affect sensory organs reducing their efficiency for locating hosts. Fe...

251

The EU directives are filtering mosquitoes and swallowing camels[Electric power control]; EU-direktiver silar mygg och svaeljer kameler  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The article reviews briefly the EU directives for controlling the electric power producers and distributors and concludes that the smaller operators are more closely supervised than the larger ones. The development and the physical and financial sides of the sector are discussed.

Wellander, Dag

2005-07-01

252

Olfactory responses of the antennal trichoid sensilla to chemical repellents in the mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus.  

Science.gov (United States)

Insect repellents are widely used to protect against insect bites and thus prevent allergic reaction and the spread of disease. To gain insight into the mosquito's response to chemicals repellents, we investigated the interaction between the olfactory system of the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus Say and chemical repellents using single sensillum recording. The interactions of 50 repellent chemicals with olfactory receptor neurons were measured in six different types of mosquito sensilla: long sharp trichoid (LST), short sharp trichoid (SST), short blunt trichoid I (SBT-I), short blunt trichoid II (SBT-II), short blunt trichoid-curved (SBT-C), and grooved peg (GP). A single olfactory neuron reacted to the chemical repellents in each of the sensilla except for SBT-I and SBT-II, where two neurons were involved. Other than LST and GP, which showed no or very weak responses to the repellents tested, all the sensilla showed significant excitatory responses to certain types of repellents. Terpene-derived chemicals such as eucalyptol, ?-pinene, and camphor, stimulated olfactory receptor neurons in a dose-dependent manner and mosquitoes responded more strongly to terpene-derived chemical repellents than to non-terpene-derived chemicals such as dimethyl phthalate. Mosquitoes also exhibited a similar response to stereoisomers of chemicals such as (-)-?-pinene versus (+)-?-pinene, and (-)-menthone versus (+)-menthone. This study not only demonstrates the effects of chemical repellents on the mosquito olfactory system but also provides important information that will assist those screening new mosquito repellents and designing new mosquito control agents. PMID:24035746

Liu, Feng; Chen, Li; Appel, Arthur G; Liu, Nannan

2013-11-01

253

Application of X-ray imaging techniques for studying the morphology of malaria-transmitting mosquitoes  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The X-ray phase contrast tomography technique was applied to examine the morphology of malaria transmitting mosquitoes in support of the development of the sterile insect technique (SIT). The aim of the experiment was to detect possible damage induced by the sample preparation procedures, to perform X-ray phase-contrast imaging on freshly prepared (not fixed) and live mosquito species, and to test the new beam line set up, which was not yet fully commissioned at the time of the experiment. The ability to perform X-ray phase-contrast imaging of live mosquito specimens was confirmed. The collected still images provided data on a relatively large population of mosquitoes. The CT data were very useful to compare selected mosquito species. They confirmed that the sample preparation procedures are critical for examining the morphological details. The procedures must be further optimized in order to stabilize the sample without inducing significant damage. The most interesting results should be obtained with the high-resolution (? 0.5 micrometer) set up using the FReloN camera to be commissioned at the TOPO beam line in the 3rd quarter of 2007. If there are differences between the control and irradiated populations of mosquitoes they should show up first at the tissue level. Using the high-resolution setup it should be possible to detect such differences, if present

254

The behaviour of mosquitoes in relation to humans under holed bednets: the evidence from experimental huts  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available The physical integrity of bednets is a concern of national malaria control programs, as it is a key factor in determining the rate of replacement of bednets. It is largely assumed that increased numbers of holes will result in a loss of protection of sleepers from potentially infective bites. Experi [...] mental hut studies are valuable in understanding mosquito behaviour indoors, particularly as it relates to blood feeding and mortality. This review summarises findings from experimental hut studies, focusing on two issues: (i) the effect of different numbers or sizes of holes in bednets and (ii) feeding behaviour and mortality with holed nets as compared with unholed nets. As might be expected, increasing numbers and area of holes resulted in increased blood feeding by mosquitoes on sleepers. However, the presence of holes did not generally have a large effect on the mortality of mosquitoes. Successfully entering a holed mosquito net does not necessarily mean that mosquitoes spend less time in contact with the net, which could explain the lack in differences in mortality. Further behavioural studies are necessary to understand mosquito behaviour around nets and the importance of holed nets on malaria transmission.

Seth R, Irish.

2014-11-01

255

Importance of eaves to house entry by anopheline, but not culicine, mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Screening homes is an effective way of reducing house entry by mosquitoes. Here, we assess how important blocking the eaves is for reducing house entry by anopheline and culicine mosquitoes for houses that have screened doors and no windows. Twelve houses, with two screened doors and no windows, in which a single adult male slept, were included in a simple crossover design. In the first period, six houses were randomly selected and had the eaves blocked using a mixture of rubble and mortar; the other six were left with open eaves. Mosquitoes were sampled using CDC light traps from each house twice a week for 4 wk. Mosquito control activities and the number and type of domestic animals within the compound was recorded on each sampling occasion. Before beginning the second sampling period, homes with blocked eaves had them opened, and those with open eaves had them closed. Mosquitoes were then sampled from each house for a further 4 wk. When houses had their eaves closed, a three-fold reduction in Anopheles gambiae s.l. Giles caught indoors was observed. However, there was no reduction in total culicine numbers observed. This study demonstrates that the eaves are the major route by which An. gambiae enters houses. By contrast, culicine mosquitoes enter largely through doors and windows. Sealing the eave gap is an important method for reducing malaria transmission in homes where doors and windows are screened. PMID:19496420

Njie, Mbye; Dilger, Erin; Lindsay, Steven W; Kirby, Matthew J

2009-05-01

256

Effectiveness of mosquito magnet in preserved area on the coastal Atlantic rainforest: implication for entomological surveillance.  

Science.gov (United States)

A variety of traps are used for sampling, surveillance, and monitoring of mosquito vector species associated with parasite and pathogen transmission. Here, we assessed the performance of the Mosquito Magnet Independence trap with Lurex3 (MMI), by comparing its effectiveness with those of a Centers forDisease Control and Prevention light trap (CDC-LT) and CDC with CO2 and Lurex3 (CDC-A) in a dense tropical rainforest. Multivariate generalized linear models revealed significant differences among the traps regarding mosquito composition and abundance (deviance = 768; P = 0.016). Variance analyses indicated that the MMI captured significantly more mosquitoes compared with CDC-LT (P tropical rainforest areas. The MMI could also be used in faunal studies focusing on increasing knowledge about mosquito diversity. Considering the present positive results, the effectiveness of the MMI should additionally be evaluated in other Brazilian natural ecosystems. Further studies are also needed to address demographic data from the mosquito population sampled by the MMI. PMID:25276918

Chaves, L S M; Laporta, G Z; Sallum, M A M

2014-09-01

257

[Effectiveness of aerial application of VectoBac G larvicide granules against mosquitoes in the Olomouc region in spring 2006].  

Science.gov (United States)

In the spring 2006, a flood emergency occurred in the Olomouc region after a rapid snow thaw, with the formation of multiple periodic pools and overflows persisting for long periods. In the floodplain forests, as expected, mass occurrence of adult mosquitoes was observed, infesting the nearby villages. The mosquito emergency continued until August and mosquitoes of both the spring species, in particular, Ochlerotatus cantans, and summer species were implicated in it. To control this emergency, aerial application of VectoBac G larvicide granules based on Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (BTI) at a dose of 6.4 kg/ha was used for the first time in the Olomouc region. Its efficacy was close to 100 % for the treated water areas. The effect was clearly evident in the communities situated in the vicinity of the treated breeding grounds. Nevertheless, not all breeding grounds and blind stream meanders could be treated aerially. As a result, mosquitoes from the untreated breeding grounds caused an emergency in the nearby communities where insecticide aerosols had to be applied on a large scale, even repeatedly in some cases. The treatment of the mosquito breeding grounds with BTI based larvicide granules proved to be an effective and fully selective approach to controlling mosquitoes. Although the technology is exacting and requires professional and organizational skills, it is expected that, in the Czech Republic, this environmentally friendly approach to mosquito control will replace the large scale use of non-selective chemical aerosol insecticides. The public health protection, administrative and legislative authorities should be active in promoting the use of specific BTI based larvicides for the treatment of mosquito breeding grounds, even if located in protected areas, whenever it is needed for mosquito control in emergencies. PMID:17593805

Chmela, J; Mazánek, L; Nakládal, Z; Pesáková, L; Halirová, R

2007-04-01

258

Are insecticide-treated bednets more protective against Plasmodium falciparum than Plasmodium vivax-infected mosquitoes?  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The outcomes of insecticide-treated bednet (ITN interventions for malaria control in Papua New Guinea tend to suggest a differential protective effect against Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Little is known about the impact of ITNs on the relative abundance of mosquitoes infected with either P. falciparum or P. vivax. This paper describes the biting cycle of P. falciparum and P. vivax-infected mosquitoes and the impact of an ITN intervention on the proportion of mosquitoes infected with either parasite species. Methods Entomological investigations were performed in East Sepik (ESP and New Ireland Provinces (NIP of PNG. Mosquitoes were collected using the all-night (18:00 - 06:00 landing catch and CDC light-trap methods and species specific malaria sporozoite rates were determined by ELISA. Results and discussion The distribution of sporozoite positive mosquitoes in three four-hour periods (18:00-22:00, 22:00-02:00 & 02:00-06:00 showed that a higher proportion of P. vivax-infected mosquitoes were biting before people retired to bed under the protection of bednets. In the intervention village, the 308 mosquitoes collected before ITNs were introduced included eight (2.0% P. falciparum-positive and four (1.0% P. vivax-positive specimens, giving a parasite ratio of 2:1. The sporozoite rate determined from 908 mosquitoes caught after ITNs were introduced showed a significant decrease for P. falciparum (0.7% and a slight increase for P. vivax (1.3%, resulting in a post intervention parasite ratio of 1:2. In the East Sepik Province, where ITNs were not used, P. falciparum remained the dominant species in 12 monthly mosquito collections and monthly P. falciparum:P. vivax formula varied from 8:1 to 1.2:1. Conclusion These findings suggest that people sleeping under treated bednets may be more exposed to P. vivax than P. falciparum-infected mosquitoes before going to sleep under the protection of bednets. This difference in the biting behaviour of mosquitoes infected with different malaria parasites may partly explain the change in the P. falciparum:P. vivax formula after the introduction of ITNs.

Bockarie Moses J

2006-02-01

259

Historical applications of induced sterilisation in field populations of mosquitoes  

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Full Text Available Abstract Research on sterile mosquito technology from 1955 to the 1980s provided a substantial body of knowledge on propagation and release of sterile mosquitoes. Radiation sterilisation and chemosterilisation have been used effectively to induce dominant lethality and thereby sterilise important mosquito vectors in the laboratory. Experimental releases of chemosterilised males provided complete control of Anopheles albimanus in a small breeding population (14-15 sq km in El Salvador. Releases of radiation sterilised males failed to control either Aedes aegypti or Anopheles quadrimaculatus in the USA. Releases of radiation-sterilised and chemosterilised male Culex quinquefasciatus in the USA and India were successful in some instances. Development of genetic sexing systems for Anopheles and improved physical separation methods for Culex have made it possible to rear and release males almost exclusively (> 99% minimizing the release of potential vectors, the females. Factors that affected efficacy in some field programmes included reduction of competitiveness by radiation, immigration of fertilized females from outside the release zones, and inability of laboratory-bred males to perform in the wild. Despite significant progress, institutional commitments to carry the process further were generally lacking in the late 1970s and until recently. Now, with renewed interest and support for further assessment of this technology, this paper summarizes the current knowledge base, prioritizes some areas of investigation, and challenges scientists and administrators to maintain an awareness of progress, remain realistic about the interpretation of new findings, and make decisions about the sterile insect technique on the basis of informed scientific documentation. Areas recommended for priority research status include the establishment of genetic sexing mechanisms that can be transferred to other mosquito species, re-examination of radiation sterilisation, aerial release technology and mass rearing.

Knols Bart GJ

2009-11-01

260

Dynamics of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis and Lysinibacillus sphaericus spores in urban catch basins after simultaneous application against mosquito larvae  

OpenAIRE

Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) and Lysinibacillus sphaericus (Lsph) are extensively used in mosquito control programs. These biocides are the active ingredients of a commercial larvicide. Quantitative data on the fate of both Bti and Lsph applied together for the control of mosquitoes in urban drainage structures such as catch basins are lacking. We evaluated the dynamics and persistence of Bti and Lsph spores released through their concomitant application in urban catch basins...

Guidi, V.; Lehner, A.; Lu?thy, P.; Tonolla, M.

2013-01-01

261

Spatial mapping of gene expression in the salivary glands of the dengue vector mosquito, aedes aegypti  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are the main vectors of dengue viruses to humans. Understanding their biology and interactions with the pathogen are prerequisites for development of dengue transmission control strategies. Mosquito salivary glands are organs involved directly in pathogen transmission to vertebrate hosts. Information on the spatial distribution of gene expression in these organs is expected to assist in the development of novel disease control strategies, including...

Paolucci Pimenta Paulo; Coleman Judy; Majid Asif; Maciel Guedes Bruno; Naeem-Ullah Unsar; Juhn Jennifer; Akram Waseem; James Anthony; Marinotti Osvaldo

2011-01-01

262

Plasmodium infection brings forward mosquito oviposition.  

Science.gov (United States)

Invertebrate hosts often bring forward their reproductive effort in response to a parasitic infection. This is widely interpreted as a host-driven response aimed at compensating for the expected losses in future fitness as a result of parasitism. Here we report that mosquitoes bring forward their oviposition schedule when they are infected with Plasmodium, a parasite known to severely curtail mosquito fecundity. This response could aim at compensating for a negative time-dependent effect of the parasite on mosquito fitness, as infected mosquitoes seem to display a strong and progressive decrease in the quality of the eggs they lay. In addition, we show that this shift in oviposition date is dependent on mosquito strain: a comparison of several isogenic mosquitoes strains, one insecticide-susceptible and two insecticide-resistant ones, reveals that only the former shift their oviposition strategy when infected. This pattern suggests the existence of a costly host-driven response to parasitism, as insecticide-resistant mosquitoes have been shown to be in generally poorer condition. PMID:25788485

Vézilier, J; Nicot, A; Gandon, S; Rivero, A

2015-03-01

263

Algae in mosquito breeding sites and the effectiveness of the mosquito larvicide Bacillus thuringiensis H-14.  

Science.gov (United States)

The presence of cyanobacteria generally decreased the effectiveness of Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 (BTI) as a mosquito larvicide. The effect was more pronounced when the mosquito larvae were exposed to BTI in the presence of several cyanobacterial strains. No synergistic or antagonistic effect between the ?-endotoxin from BTI and the hepatotoxin from cyanobacteria was seen. Neurotoxic cyanobacterial strains caused very fast paralysis in mosquito larvae; the decreases in the effectiveness of BTI when tested in combination with a neurotoxic strain might be due to the effect of this paralytic action on the feeding rate of the mosquito larvae. PMID:24419936

Abdel-Hameed, A; Kiviranta, J; Sivonen, K; Niemelä, S; Carlberg, G

1993-03-01

264

Susceptibility of adult mosquitoes to insecticides in aqueous sucrose baits.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mosquitoes characteristically feed on plant-derived carbohydrates and honeydew just after emergence and intermittently during their lives. Development of toxic baits focusing on this carbohydrate-seeking behavior may potentially contribute to localized control. In the present study, ten insecticides were fed to female Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles quadrimaculatus, and Aedes taeniorhynchus in a 10% sucrose solution. Active ingredients representative of five classes of insecticides (pyrethroids, phenylpyroles, pyrroles, neonicotinoids, and macrocyclic lactones) were selected for comparison with commercial formulations used to facilitate incorporation of active ingredients into aqueous sucrose solutions. Sucrose as a phagostimulant significantly enhanced mortality to toxicants. In general, the most effective active ingredients were fipronil, deltamethrin and imidacloprid, followed by spinosad, thiamethoxam, bifenthrin, permethrin, and cyfluthrin. The least effective ingredients were chlorfenapyr and ivermectin. For some of the ingredients tested, Cx. quinquefasciatus was the least susceptible species. One-day-old male Cx. quinquefasciatus were more susceptible than females; however, no differences existed between one- and seven-day-old mosquitoes. There were no differences in susceptibility between unfed and gravid ten-day-old female Cx. quinquefasciatus to bifenthrin. In conclusion, several pesticides from different classes of compounds have potential for use in development of toxic baits for mosquitoes. PMID:21635642

Allan, Sandra A

2011-06-01

265

Fog spontaneously folds mosquito wings  

Science.gov (United States)

The flexibility of insect wings confers aerodynamic benefits, but can also present a hazard if exposed to fog or dew. Fog can cause water to accumulate on wings, bending them into tight taco shapes and rendering them useless for flight. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we use high-speed video to film the spontaneous folding of isolated mosquito wings due to the evaporation of a water drop. We predict shapes of the deformed wing using two-dimensional elastica theory, considering both surface tension and Laplace pressure. We also recommend fold-resistant geometries for the wings of flapping micro-aerial vehicles. Our work reveals the mechanism of insect wing folding and provides a framework for further study of capillarity-driven folding in both natural and biomimetic systems at small scales.

Dickerson, Andrew K.; Liu, Xing; Zhu, Ting; Hu, David L.

2015-02-01

266

Specific detection of the floodwater mosquitoes Aedes sticticus and Aedes vexans DNA in predatory diving beetles.  

Science.gov (United States)

Floodwater mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are associated with periodically flooded wet meadows, marshes, and swamps in floodplains of major rivers worldwide, and their larvae are abundant in the shallow parts of flooded areas. The nuisance caused by the blood-seeking adult female mosquitoes motivates mosquito control. Larviciding with Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis is considered the most environmentally safe method. However, some concern has been raised whether aquatic predatory insects could be indirectly affected by this reduction in a potential vital prey. Top predators in the temporary wetlands in the River Dalälven floodplains are diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), and Aedes sticticus and Ae. vexans are the target species for mosquito control. For detailed studies on this aquatic predator-prey system, we developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for detection of mosquito DNA in the guts of medium-sized diving beetles. Primers were designed for amplifying short mitochondrial DNA fragments of the cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI) gene in Ae. sticticus and Ae. vexans, respectively. Primer specificity was confirmed and half-life detectability of Ae. sticticus DNA in diving beetle guts was derived from a feeding and digestion experiment. The Ae. sticticus DNA within diving beetle guts was detected up to 12 h postfeeding, and half-life detectability was estimated to 5.6 h. In addition, field caught diving beetles were screened for Ae. sticticus and Ae. vexans DNA and in 14% of the diving beetles one or both mosquito species were detected, showing that these mosquito species are utilized as food by the diving beetles. PMID:24895318

Vinnersten, Thomas Z Persson; Halvarsson, Peter; Lundström, Jan O

2014-06-01

267

Dengue Emergence and Adaptation to Peridomestic Mosquitoes  

Science.gov (United States)

Phylogenetic evidence suggests that endemic and epidemic dengue viruses (DENV), transmitted among humans by the anthropophilic mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus, emerged when ancestral, sylvatic DENV transmitted among nonhuman primates by sylvatic Aedes mosquitoes adapted to these peridomestic vectors. We tested this hypothesis by retrospectively examining evidence for adaptation of epidemic and endemic versus sylvatic strains of DENV-2 to Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti. First and second-generation offspring of mosquitoes from different geographic regions in the Americas and Southeast Asia were tested for their susceptibility to epidemic/endemic and sylvatic DENV-2 isolates from West Africa, Southeast Asia, and Oceania. Both Aedes species were highly susceptible (up to 100% infected) to endemic/epidemic DENV-2 strains after ingesting artificial blood meals but significantly less susceptible (as low as 0%) to sylvatic DENV-2 strains. Our findings support the hypothesis that adaptation to peridomestic mosquito vectors mediated dengue emergence from sylvatic progenitor viruses. PMID:15504265

Moncayo, Abelardo C.; Fernandez, Zoraida; Ortiz, Diana; Diallo, Mawlouth; Sall, Amadou; Hartman, Sammie; Davis, C. Todd; Coffey, Lark; Mathiot, Christian C.; Tesh, Robert B.

2004-01-01

268

Spatial and temporal distribution of the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis in northern Sudan: influence of environmental factors and implications for vector control  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is an important public health problem in northern Sudan, but little is known about the dynamics of its transmission. Given the characteristic low densities of Anopheles arabiensis and the difficult terrain in this area, future vector control strategies are likely to be based on area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM that may include the sterile insect technique (SIT. To support the planning and implementation of future AW-IPM activities, larval surveys were carried out to provide key data on spatial and seasonal dynamics of local vector populations. Methods Monthly cross-sectional larval surveys were carried out between March 2005 and May 2007 in two localities (Dongola and Merowe adjacent to the river Nile. A stratified random sampling strategy based on the use of Remote Sensing (RS, Geographical Information Systems (GIS and the Global Positioning System (GPS was used to select survey locations. Breeding sites were mapped using GPS and data on larval density and breeding site characteristics were recorded using handheld computers. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify breeding site characteristics associated with increased risk of presence of larvae. Seasonal patterns in the proportion of breeding sites positive for larvae were compared visually to contemporaneous data on climate and river height. Results Of a total of 3,349 aquatic habitats sampled, 321 (9.6% contained An. arabiensis larvae. The frequency with which larvae were found varied markedly by habitat type. Although most positive sites were associated with temporary standing water around the margins of the main Nile channel, larvae were also found at brickworks and in areas of leaking pipes and canals – often far from the river. Close to the Nile channel, a distinct seasonal pattern in larval populations was evident and appeared to be linked to the rise and fall of the river level. These patterns were not evident in vector populations breeding in artificial water sources away from the river. Conclusion The GIS-based survey strategy developed in this study provides key data on the population dynamics of An. arabiensis in Northern State. Quantitative estimates of the contributions of various habitat types and their proximity to settlements provide a basis for planning a strategy for reducing malaria risk by elimination of the vector population.

Malcolm Colin A

2009-06-01

269

Population dynamics of indoor sampled mosquitoes and their implication in disease transmission in Abeokuta, south-western Nigeria  

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Full Text Available Background & objectives: A longitudinal study was carried out to investigate the speciescomposition, seasonal abundance, parity and feeding preference of indoor sampled mosquitoes inAbeokuta, south-western Nigeria.Methods: The mosquitoes were sampled weekly from five stratified locations using Center forDisease Control (CDC light-traps between August 2005 and July 2006. The mosquitoes wereexamined for abdominal condition and dissected for age composition. Microscopic and precipitintechniques were also employed for the determination of host blood source.Results: A total of 2969 mosquitoes which belong to 10 species of mosquitoes were collectedduring the study period. Mansonia africana (35.65% constituted the most abundant species followedby Culex quinquefasciatus (32.23% and Anopheles gambiae complex (13.52%. Other species indecreasing order of abundance were Coquilletidia maculipennis (8.2%, Aedes albopictus (5.9%,Ae. aegypti (1.93%, M. uniformis (1.81%, Cx. duttoni (0.25%, Cx. tigripes (0.25% and An.funestus (0.25%. Seasonal abundance revealed a significant difference (p <0.05 in the populationof mosquito vectors collected during the wet season as compared to the dry season and theirabundance was positively correlated with rainfall. The results showed that the majority of thevector species collected were unfed and nulliparous. Moreover, the blood meal test was positive forhuman blood.Conclusion: The preponderance of mosquitoes observed in the study is of public health concernsince they serve as vectors of most tropical diseases including malaria

M.A. Adeleke, C.F. Mafiana, A.B. Idowu, S.O. Sam-Wobo & O.A. Idowu

2010-03-01

270

Repelentes electrónicos contra mosquitos: propaganda y realidad  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Se presenta una revisión bibliográfica acerca del uso de dispositivos electroacústicos con supuesta acción repelente sobre las hembras de diferentes especies de mosquitos hematófagos. Se dan 15 referencias directas y 2 indirectas, en todas se concluye que estos dispositivos no protegen a quienes los [...] portan de las picadas de los mosquitos. Se dan los nombres de 9 de los dispositivos probados, así como de 16 de las principales especies de mosquitos presentes en las pruebas de campo. Estas pruebas de campo se han realizado en condiciones ecológicas muy diferentes, que van desde alaska hasta el África Ecuatorial. También se menciona el efecto potencialmente dañino al hombre de los dispositivos que emiten frecuencias a alta intensidad. Abstract in english A bibliographic review about the use of electroacustic devices with a supposed repellent action on the females of different species of hematophagous mosquitoes is presented. 15 direct references and 2 indirect ones are given, in which it is concluded that these devices do not protect those who have [...] them from the stings of mosquitoes. The names of 9 of the tested devices as well as of 16 of the main species of mosquitoes present in the field tests are mentioned. These tests have been carried out in very different ecological conditions from Alaska to Equatorial Africa. It is also stressed that the high intensity ultrasonic frequencies emitted by these devices produces a potentially harmful effect on man.

Frank, Coro; Silvia, Suárez.

1998-08-01

271

Mosquito larvicidal activity of methyl-p-hydroxybenzoate isolated from the leaves of Vitex trifolia Linn.  

Science.gov (United States)

The vector-borne diseases caused by mosquitoes are one of the major health problems in many countries especially in tropical and sub-tropical countries. The resistance of mosquitoes to synthetic chemicals and environmental toxicity created by the chemicals raised the demand for finding of alternate natural molecules that control mosquito. In the present study, a crystalline compound methyl-p-hydroxybenzoate was isolated from the methanol extract of Vitex trifolia leaves and it was identified by (1)H and (13)C NMR and single crystal X-ray diffractometer. The larvicidal potential of the isolated compound was evaluated against early 4th instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti. The compound exhibited 100% larval mortality of both the mosquitoes at 20 ppm with LC(50) values of 5.77 and 4.74 ppm against C. quinquefasciatus and A. aegypti, respectively. The methyl-p-hydroxybenzoate, which is reported for the first time to our best of knowledge from V. trifolia can be better explored for the control of mosquito population. PMID:21763671

Kannathasan, K; Senthilkumar, A; Venkatesalu, V

2011-01-01

272

Repellent properties of Cardiospermum halicacabum Linn. (Family: Sapindaceae) plant leaf extracts against three important vector mosquitoes  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective To determine repellent activity of hexane, ethyl acetate, benzene, chloroform and methanol extract of Cardiospermum halicacabum (C. halicacabum) against Culex quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus), Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti) and Anopheles stephensi (An. stephensi). Methods Evaluation was carried out in a net cage (45 cm×30 cm×25 cm) containing 100 blood starved female mosquitoes of three mosquito species and were assayed in the laboratory condition by using the protocol of WHO 2005; The plant leaf crude extracts of C. halicacabum was applied at 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/cm2 separately in the exposed area of the fore arm. Only ethanol served as control. Results In this observation, the plant crude extracts gave protection against mosquito bites without any allergic reaction to the test person, and also, the repellent activity was dependent on the strength of the plant extracts. The tested plant crude extracts had exerted promising repellent against all the three mosquitoes. Conclusions From the results it can be concluded the crude extract of C. halicacabum was potential for controlling Cx. quinquefasciatus, Ae. aegypti and An. stephensi mosquitoes. PMID:23569979

Govindarajan, M; Sivakumar, R

2012-01-01

273

Effects of sublethal pyrethroid exposure on the host-seeking behavior of female mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

A common method of adult mosquito control consists of residual application on surfaces and aerial spraying often using pyrethroids. However, not all insects that contact insecticides are killed. Sublethal exposure to neurotoxic compounds can negatively affect sensory organs and reduce efficiency of host location. Flight tracks of host-seeking female Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles albimanus, and Aedes aegypti in a wind tunnel were video-recorded to compare activation of host-seeking and patterns of flight orientation to host odors. During host-seeking flights, all three mosquito species differed significantly in flight duration, velocity, turn angle, and angular velocity. Mosquitoes were then exposed to sublethal levels (LD(25) ) of pyrethroid insecticides to evaluate the effects of the neurotoxicants 24 hours post-exposure. Significant reductions in time of activation to flight and flight direction were observed in mosquitoes exposed to deltamethrin and permethrin. Additionally, pesticide-treated Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes flew significantly slower, spent more time in flight, and turned more frequently than untreated controls. PMID:22129411

Cohnstaedt, Lee W; Allan, Sandra A

2011-12-01

274

Laboratory study on larvicidal properties of leaf extract of Calotropis procera (Family-Asclepiadaceae) against mosquito larvae.  

Science.gov (United States)

Fresh leaf extract of milkweed (Calotropis procera) showed larvicidal properties against mosquito larvae of Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti. Methanolic extracts of the same plant were, however, more effective as larvicide. C. procera is a weed growing in uncultivated soils as well as in dry, arid zones in Indian subcontinent throughout the year. The results of this study suggest the utility of milkweed as potential technology for control of mosquito larvae. PMID:16749273

Singh, R K; Mittal, P K; Dhiman, R C

2005-06-01

275

Risk factors for house-entry by culicine mosquitoes in a rural town and satellite villages in The Gambia  

OpenAIRE

Background: Screening doors, windows and eaves of houses should reduce house entry by eusynanthropic insects, including the common African house mosquito Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus and other culicines. In the pre-intervention year of a randomized controlled trial investigating the protective effects of house screening against mosquito house entry, a multi-factorial risk factor analysis study was used to identify factors influencing house entry by culicines of nuisance biting and medical i...

Kirby, M. J.; West, P.; Green, C.; Jasseh, M.; Lindsay, S. W.

2008-01-01

276

Larval midgut modifications associated with Bti resistance in the yellow fever mosquito using proteomic and transcriptomic approaches  

OpenAIRE

Background: Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis ( Bti ) is a natural larval mosquito pathogen producing pore-forming toxins targeting the midgut of Diptera larvae. It is used worldwide for mosquito control. Resistance mechanisms of an Aedes aegypti laboratory strain selected for 30 generations with field-collected leaf litter containing Bti toxins were investigated in larval midguts at two levels: 1. gene transcription using DNA microarray and RT-qPCR and 2. differential expression of bru...

Tetreau, Guillaume; Bayyareddy, Krishnareddy; Jones, Christopher M.; Stalinski, Renaud; Riaz, Muhammad A.; Paris, Margot; David, Jean-philippe; Adang, Michael J.; Despre?s, Laurence

2012-01-01

277

Mosquito Repellent Activity and Phytochemical Characterization of Essential Oils From Striga hermonthica, Hyptis spicigera and Ocimum basilicum Leaf Extracts  

OpenAIRE

The main aim of this study is to screen the phytochemicals and compare the mosquito repellent activities of essential oils from Hyptis spicigera, Striga hermonthica and Ocimum basilicum (Basil) against Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus under laboratory conditions. The global threat of malaria to human race and the need to control its advances is on the focus. Mosquito is the target being the primary host in the spread of malaria. Alkaloids, saponnins, steroids, tannins and terpenoi...

Gabi Baba; Lawal, A. O.; Sharif, Hauwa B.

2012-01-01

278

ATon, abundant novel nonautonomous mobile genetic elements in yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes are important pathogen vectors affecting human and other animals. Studies on genetic control of mosquito mediated disease transmission gained traction recently due to mosquito transgenesis technology. Active transposons are considered valuable tools to propagate pathogen resistance transgenes among mosquitoes, rendering the whole population recalcitrant to diseases. A major hurdle in this approach is the inefficient remobilization activity after the integration of heterologous transposon vectors bearing transgenes into chromosomes. Therefore, endogenous active transposons in mosquito genomes are highly desirable. Results Starting with the transposable element database of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti genome, detailed analyses of the members of each TE family were performed to identify sequences with multiple identical copies, an indicator of their latest or current transposition activity. Among a dozen of potentially active TE families, two DNA elements (TF000728 and TF000742 in TEfam are short and nonautonomous. Close inspection of the elements revealed that these two families were previously mis-categorized and, unlike other known TEs, insert specifically at dinucleotide “AT”. These two families were therefore designated as ATon-I and ATon-II. ATon-I has a total copy number of 294, among which three elements have more than 10 identical copies (146, 61 and 17. ATon-II has a total copy number of 317, among which three elements have more than 10 identical copies (84, 15 and 12. Genome wide searches revealed additional 24 ATon families in A. aegypti genome with nearly 6500 copies in total. Transposon display analysis of ATon-1 family using different A. aegypti strains suggests that the elements are similarly abundant in the tested mosquito strains. Conclusion ATons are novel mobile genetic elements bearing terminal inverted repeats and insert specifically at dinucleotide “AT”. Five ATon families contain elements existing at more than 10 identical copies, suggesting very recent or current transposition activity. A total of 24 new TE families with nearly 6000 copies were identified in this study.

Yang Guojun

2012-06-01

279

Examining the determinants of mosquito-avoidance practices in two Kenyan cities  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background This study assesses the behavioural and socio-economic factors associated with avoiding mosquitoes and preventing malaria in urban environments in Kenya. Methods Data from two cities in Kenya were gathered using a household survey and a two-stage cluster sample design. The cities were stratified based on planning and drainage observed across the urban areas. This helped control for the strong environmental and topographical variation that we assumed influences mosquito ecology. Individual interviews given to each household included questions on socio-economic status, education, housing type, water source, rubbish disposal, mosquito-prevention practices and knowledge of mosquitoes. In multivariate regression, factors measuring wealth, education level, and the communities' level of planning and drainage were used to estimate the probability that a household engages in multiple mosquito-avoidance activities, or has all members sleeping under a bed net. Results Our analysis shows that people from wealthier, more educated households were more likely to sleep under a net, in Kisumu (OR = 6.88; 95% CI = 2.56,18.49 and Malindi (OR = 3.80; 95% CI = 1.91,7.55. Similarly, the probability that households use several mosquito-prevention activities was highest among the wealthiest, best-educated households in Kisumu (OR = 5.15; 95% CI = 2.04,12.98, while in Malindi household wealth alone is the major determinant. Conclusion We demonstrate the importance of examining human-mosquito interaction in terms of how access to resources may enhance human activities. The findings illustrate that the poorest segments of society are already doing many things to protect themselves from being bitten, but they are doing less than their richer neighbours.

Githeko Andrew K

2002-11-01

280

Detection of arboviruses and other micro-organisms in experimentally infected mosquitoes using massively parallel sequencing.  

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Human disease incidence attributed to arbovirus infection is increasing throughout the world, with effective control interventions limited by issues of sustainability, insecticide resistance and the lack of effective vaccines. Several promising control strategies are currently under development, such as the release of mosquitoes trans-infected with virus-blocking Wolbachia bacteria. Implementation of any control program is dependent on effective virus surveillance and a thorough understanding of virus-vector interactions. Massively parallel sequencing has enormous potential for providing comprehensive genomic information that can be used to assess many aspects of arbovirus ecology, as well as to evaluate novel control strategies. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, we analyzed Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus experimentally infected with dengue, yellow fever or chikungunya viruses. Random amplification was used to prepare sufficient template for sequencing on the Personal Genome Machine. Viral sequences were present in all infected mosquitoes. In addition, in most cases, we were also able to identify the mosquito species and mosquito micro-organisms, including the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia. Importantly, naturally occurring Wolbachia strains could be differentiated from strains that had been trans-infected into the mosquito. The method allowed us to assemble near full-length viral genomes and detect other micro-organisms without prior sequence knowledge, in a single reaction. This is a step toward the application of massively parallel sequencing as an arbovirus surveillance tool. It has the potential to provide insight into virus transmission dynamics, and has applicability to the post-release monitoring of Wolbachia in mosquito populations. PMID:23460918

Hall-Mendelin, Sonja; Allcock, Richard; Kresoje, Nina; van den Hurk, Andrew F; Warrilow, David

2013-01-01

281

Preliminary evaluation of mosquito larvicidal efficacy of plant extracts  

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Full Text Available Mosquitoes are the most important single group ofinsects in terms of public health importance, whichtransmit a number of diseases, such as malaria, filariasis,dengue, Japanese encephalitis, etc. causing millionsof deaths every year. Repeated use of syntheticinsecticides for mosquito control has disrupted naturalbiological control systems and led to resurgencesin mosquito populations. It has also resulted in thedevelopment of resistance1, undesirable effects onnon-target organisms and fostered environmental andhuman health concern2, which initiated a search foralternative control measures. Plants are considered asa rich source of bioactive chemicals3 and they may bean alternative source of mosquito control agents.Natural products of plant origin with insecticidalproperties have been tried in the recent past for controlof variety of insect pests and vectors. Essentialoils of leaf and bark of Cryptomeria japonica demonstratedhigh larvicidal activity against Aedesaegypti (Diptera: Culicidae larvae4. Insecticidalactivity of plant essential oils has been well-describedby Isman5. Azadiractin, the active ingredient of neemhas long been recognised for its mosquito larvicidalcapability. The extracts of Murraya koenigii, Coriandrumsativam, Ferula asafetida and Trigonella foenumgraceum were found to be effective and showedencouraging results against Ae. aegypti6 and Culex(Diptera: Culicidae mosquito larvae7. It is also reportedthat many compounds with insecticidal potentialhave been isolated from the genus Piper—Pipercide,isolated from Piper negrum (black piper hasbeen found to be just as active against adjuki beanweevils as the pyrethroides8. Phytochemicals derivedfrom plant sources can act as larvicide, insect growthregulators, repellent and ovipositor attractant andhave different activities observed by many researchers9–11. However, insecticides of plant origin havebeen extensively used on agricultural pests and to avery limited extent, against insect vectors of publichealth importance.Northeastern region of India is considered as a majorbiodiversity hot spot. The eastern Himalayas range,which extends all through the northern border ofAssam, is a rich treasure house of many promisingmedicinal and aromatic plants. In the present communication,an attempt has been made to evaluate themosquito larvicidal efficacy of methanol and ethanolextracts of different parts of five indigenous plantsagainst Ae. albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae and Culexquinquefasciatus larvae in laboratory conditions.Plant materials were collected from the foothill forestsof Sonitpur district, Assam bordering ArunachalPradesh during April and May 2005. They were segregatedas leaf, stem, bark, root and fruit/pericarp andair-dried in a shady place. Dried materials wereground in a table model grinder. The ground plant materialswere dipped in solvents (methanol and ethanolShort Research Communications146 J VECT BORNE DIS 44, JUNE 2007in tightly capped jars separately for 48 h. The solventsalong with extracts were drained out, filtered andsemisolid extracts were obtained in vacuum usingrotary evaporator. The semisolid extracts were lyophilisedto obtain solid extracts. Stock solutions of desiredconcentration were prepared in distilled waterusing 1 ppm teepol as emulsifying agent and subsequentdilutions were made as per requirement. Larvicidalbioassay was carried out as per standard WHOtechniques in 500 ml glass beakers containing 250 mlof water and 25 numbers of late III or early IV instarmosquito larvae for various concentrations. Threedifferent concentrations of each extract were tried outat a time with six replicates. One control was kept witheach set of experiment and mortality was recordedafter 24 h. Five sets of experiments were conductedfor each extract. Tests were carried out under controlledlaboratory conditions (temperature 27 ± 2oCagainst laboratory reared Ae. albopictus and Cx. quinquefasciatus(Diptera: Culicidae larvae. Values obtainedwere subjected to log probit regression analysisto obtain LC50 and LC90 values with 95% confidencel

N.G. Das, D. Goswami & B. Rabha

2007-06-01

282

Riceland mosquito management practices for Anopheles quadrimaculatus larvae.  

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Two separate but related studies were conducted regarding management of Anopheles quadrimaculatus larval populations in commercial rice fields near Cleveland, MS, in 2004. Study 1 was to evaluate the effectiveness of 2 treatments of aerially applied ultra-low volume applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) against An. quadrimaculatus larvae in dense, high-canopy mid- to late-season rice crop. Study 2 was to investigate the effect of preflood treatments of lambda-cyhalothrin (Karate), which is commonly used against rice water weevil (Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus), on An. quadrimaculatus larvae. Excellent initial, but short residual control (>99% control 1 day after treatment) was observed in the Bti-treated fields in both mid- and late-season rice. Little or no effect on mosquito larvae was observed in the lambda-cyhalothrin-treated fields. Results indicate that Bti can be effectively used by mosquito management personnel to control larval populations of An. quadrimaculatus in late-season rice fields; however, lambda-cyhalothrin did not effectively control larval An. quadrimaculatus when applied preflood to rice fields. PMID:19181061

Allen, R A; Wilkes, W W; Lewis, C N; Meisch, M V

2008-12-01

283

Self-reported malaria and mosquito avoidance in relation to household risk factors in a Kenyan coastal city.  

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A geographically stratified cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2002 to investigate household-level factors associated with use of mosquito control measures and self-reported malaria in Malindi, Kenya. A total of 629 households were surveyed. Logistic regressions were used to analyse the data. Half of all households (51%) reported all occupants using an insecticide-treated bed net and at least one additional mosquito control measure such as insecticides or removal of standing water. Forty-nine per cent reported a history of malaria in the household. Of the thirteen household factors analysed, low (OR=0.23, CI 0.11, 0.48) and medium (OR=0.50, CI 0.29, 0.86) education, mud--wood--coral (OR=0.0.39, CI 0.24, 0.66) and mud block--plaster (OR=0.47, CI 0.25, 0.87) wall types, farming (OR=1.38, CI 1.01, 1.90) and travel to rural areas (OR=0.48, CI 0.26, 0.91) were significantly associated with the use of mosquito control, while controlling for other covariates in the model. History of reported malaria was not associated with the use of mosquito control (OR=1.22, CI 0.79, 1.88). Of the thirteen covariates analysed in the second model, only two household factors were associated with history of malaria: being located in the well-drained stratum (OR=0.49, CI 0.26, 0.96) and being bitten while in the house (OR=1.22, CI 0.19, 0.49). These results suggest that high socioeconomic status is associated with increased household-level mosquito control use, although household-level control may not be enough, as many people are exposed to biting mosquitoes while away from the house and in areas that are more likely to harbour mosquitoes. PMID:16221324

Keating, Joseph; Macintyre, Kate; Mbogo, Charles M; Githure, John I; Beier, John C

2005-11-01

284

Laboratory and field evaluation of spinosad, a biorational natural product, against larvae of Culex mosquitoes.  

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Spinosad, a fermentation product from the naturally occurring soil actinomycete bacterium Saccharopolyspora spinosa, has been reported to have a high level of activity against phytophagous insects and insects impacting human and animal health. It has low mammalian toxicity and a favorable environmental profile, including low persistence and no toxicity to fish and wildlife at mosquito larvicidal rates. In order to determine the activity and efficacy of spinosad against larvae of Culex mosquitoes, technical powder and liquid formulations of spinosad were tested against mosquito larvae under laboratory and field conditions. In the laboratory, spinosad powder was highly active against 2nd and 4th instars of Culex quinquefasciatus after 24 h of exposure. The extent of mortality increased slightly after 48 h of exposure. Second instars were slightly more susceptible than 4th instars. The liquid formulation showed somewhat higher activity (about 2x) than the technical powder material at both the LCs50 and LC90 levels. In field microcosm tests against natural populations of mosquitoes, the liquid formulation yielded excellent control of immature Culex spp. for 21 days at concentrations of 0.05 mg (AI)/liter and 35 days at 0.1 to 0.5 mg (AI)/liter in outdoor tubs. This formulation also yielded excellent control of natural Culex mosquitoes for 14 days or longer at 0.025 to 0.1 mg (AI)/liter in outdoor ponds. From our data, it appears that spinosad as a new mode of action has a good potential for controlling mosquito larvae. PMID:20099593

Jiang, Yongxing; Mulla, Mir S

2009-12-01

285

An insight into the sialotranscriptome of the West Nile mosquito vector, Culex tarsalis  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Saliva of adult female mosquitoes help sugar and blood feeding by providing enzymes and polypeptides that help sugar digestion, control microbial growth and counteract their vertebrate host hemostasis and inflammation. Mosquito saliva also potentiates the transmission of vector borne pathogens, including arboviruses. Culex tarsalis is a bird feeding mosquito vector of West Nile Virus closely related to C. quinquefasciatus, a mosquito relatively recently adapted to feed on humans, and the only mosquito of the genus Culex to have its sialotranscriptome so far described. Results A total of 1,753 clones randomly selected from an adult female C. tarsalis salivary glands (SG cDNA library were sequenced and used to assemble a database that yielded 809 clusters of related sequences, 675 of which were singletons. Primer extension experiments were performed in selected clones to further extend sequence coverage, allowing for the identification of 283 protein sequences, 80 of which code for putative secreted proteins. Conclusion Comparison of the C. tarsalis sialotranscriptome with that of C. quinquefasciatus reveals accelerated evolution of salivary proteins as compared to housekeeping proteins. The average amino acid identity among salivary proteins is 70.1%, while that for housekeeping proteins is 91.2% (P Aedes genus have been identified in C. tarsalis. Interestingly, a protein family so far unique to C. quinquefasciatus, with 30 genes, is also found in C. tarsalis, indicating it was not a specific C. quinquefasciatus acquisition in its evolution to optimize mammal blood feeding.

Olson Kenneth E

2010-01-01

286

Repellent Action Of Neem (Azadiracta India Seed Oil Against Aedes Aegypti Mosquitoes  

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Full Text Available Neem (Azadiracta India seed oil in appropriate amount when smeared on the surface of the hand showed excellent repellent action against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. When 1 ml of oil was spread on the hand, with an approximate area of 160 sq cm the percentage of alighting and blood fed mosquitoes in the experimental cages varied from 14 to 78 and 4 to 46 respectively. This percentage decreased to 6 to 18 and 0 to 16 respectively when the amount of oil applied was 1.5 ml. Only 0-4% of the mosquitoes alighted on the skin of which 2% only took the blood meal when 2 ml of the oil was used to cover the hand. In the control cages cent percent of the mosquitoes alighted and sucked blood. The repellent action was directly proportional to the hour of exposure to the oil. It was also observed that even after alighting on a oil- smeared skin a sizeable proportion of mosquitoes were not able to imbibe blood meal. Neem seed oil was non-toxic, non- irritating to skin.

Hati A K

1995-01-01

287

Histological and PCR xenomonitoring of culicine mosquitoes for filarial infestation in Sohag Governorate, upper Egypt.  

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The nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi; the principal etiologic agents of lymphatic filariasis are mosquito dependant in the biological transmission. Dirofilariasis is essentially a disease of canines which can also be transmitted to humans by culicine mosquitoes. The present work studied the histological and PCR xenomonitoring filarial infestation in culicine mosquitoes in Sohag Governorate. One hundred female mosquitoes of the 5 culicine spesies present in the selected localities, were dissected and histological sections of thoracic muscles were examined for filarial larvae. Also 50 female Culex pipiens molestus were collected from the same areas and tested for 3 filarial worms using PCR. Cx. pipiens molestus was the only culcine mosquito harbouring larvae of Wuchereria bancrofti and Dirofilaria spp. Results were compared and it was found that PCR proved easier to do and it gave better data as it was able to differentiate dirofilarial species. The results indicated a clear success of health authorities in anti-filariasis control measures and pointed out to avoid the hazard of possible occurrence of future cases of human dirofilariasis in Sohag Governorate. PMID:24640859

Khalifa, Refaat M A; El-Nadi, Nada A; Ahmed, Amal M; Hassan, Faten A

2013-12-01

288

Application of insecticides to vegetation as barriers against host-seeking mosquitoes.  

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The application of insecticides to perimeter vegetation for the purpose of controlling adult mosquitoes in backyards and other recreational areas has generated renewed interest among the general public. Several pyrethroids have been labeled for this use and provided, depending on chemical and formulation, up to approximately 6 wk of acceptable adult mosquito reduction. A review of past work in this area is presented. In addition, results from a recent field study by the author to determine the residual effectiveness of bifenthrin-treated vegetation as a barrier against adult mosquitoes in northwestern Florida is also presented. Bifenthrin (TalstarOne) suppressed mosquito populations in the treatment area below an annoyance action threshold of 25 mosquitoes per night in carbon dioxide-baited light traps for 5 out of the 8-wk study. Excised leaf bioassays conducted at the same time as trap collections revealed that bifenthrin-treated leaves exhibited > 70% knockdown/mortality against laboratory-reared female Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus for 4 of those weeks. PMID:18437835

Cilek, J E

2008-03-01

289

A viral over-expression system for the major malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.  

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Understanding pathogen/mosquito interactions is essential for developing novel strategies to control mosquito-borne diseases. Technical advances in reverse-genetics, such as RNA interference (RNAi), have facilitated elucidation of components of the mosquito immune system that are antagonistic to pathogen development, and host proteins essential for parasite development. Forward genetic approaches, however, are limited to generation of transgenic insects, and while powerful, mosquito transgenesis is a resource- and time-intensive technique that is not broadly available to most laboratories. The ability to easily "over-express" genes would enhance molecular studies in vector biology and expedite elucidation of pathogen-refractory genes without the need to make transgenic insects. We developed and characterized an efficient Anopheles gambiae densovirus (AgDNV) over-expression system for the major malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. High-levels of gene expression were detected at 3 days post-infection and increased over time, suggesting this is an effective system for gene induction. Strong expression was observed in the fat body and ovaries. We validated multiple short promoters for gene induction studies. Finally, we developed a polycistronic system to simultaneously express multiple genes of interest. This AgDNV-based toolset allows for consistent transduction of genes of interest and will be a powerful molecular tool for research in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes. PMID:24875042

Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Niu, Guodong; Hughes, Grant L; Rasgon, Jason L

2014-01-01

290

Anopheles gambiae corazonin: gene structure, expression and effect on mosquito heart physiology.  

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Haemolymph flow in mosquitoes is primarily driven by the contraction of a dorsal vessel that is subdivided into an abdominal heart and a thoracic aorta. The factors that regulate mosquito heart contractions are not understood, but in other insects heart physiology is partially controlled by several neurohormones. One of these is corazonin, a neuropeptide initially discovered because of its cardioacceleratory activity in the cockroach Periplaneta americana. In the present study, we describe the corazonin gene and transcript structure in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, characterize its developmental expression, and test its role in modulating heart physiology. We show that the A. gambiae corazonin gene encodes the most common form of the corazonin peptide ([Arg(7) ]-corazonin) and that it is alternatively spliced, with the only difference between the transcripts occurring in the 5' untranslated region. Analysis of the developmental expression of corazonin and the corazonin receptor revealed that transcription of both follows a bimodal distribution, with highest mRNA levels in 2nd instar larvae and during the pupa to adult transition. Finally, experiments where mosquitoes were injected with various doses of corazonin and experiments where the transcription of corazonin and the corazonin receptor were reduced by RNA interference failed to detect a significant role for this neuropeptide in modulating mosquito heart physiology. PMID:22404523

Hillyer, J F; Estévez-Lao, T Y; Funkhouser, L J; Aluoch, V A

2012-06-01

291

Load-bearing ability of the mosquito tarsus on water surfaces arising from its flexibility  

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Mosquitoes possess a remarkable ability to stand effortlessly and walk freely on water surfaces because their six legs provide a large force to support the body weight. This study is focused on the role of the tarsus (the distal segment of the mosquito leg) because it was observed that normally only the tarsi make contact with water. The maximum value of the supporting force of the tarsus (6 mm long) in contact with water is estimated as 492 ± 5 ?N, nearly 20 times the body weight of the mosquito, whereas the value for the whole leg (11 mm) is about 23 times the body weight. We demonstrate that the huge force provided by the tarsus originates from its flexibility, which ensures that the leg does not easily pierce the water. Adjustment of the initial stepping angle of the tarsus assists the mosquito to control the supporting force. These findings help to illustrate how mosquitoes stand or walk on water with only their tarsi in nearly horizontal contact with the water surface. Besides enhancing our understanding of mechanisms underlying "walking on water" by semi-aquatic insects, these investigations could provide inspiration for the biomimetic design of miniature robotics.

Kong, X. Q.; Liu, J. L.; Zhang, W. J.; Qu, Y. D.

2015-03-01

292

A systematic review of mathematical models of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission: 1970-2010.  

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Mathematical models of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission originated in the early twentieth century to provide insights into how to most effectively combat malaria. The foundations of the Ross-Macdonald theory were established by 1970. Since then, there has been a growing interest in reducing the public health burden of mosquito-borne pathogens and an expanding use of models to guide their control. To assess how theory has changed to confront evolving public health challenges, we compiled a bibliography of 325 publications from 1970 through 2010 that included at least one mathematical model of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission and then used a 79-part questionnaire to classify each of 388 associated models according to its biological assumptions. As a composite measure to interpret the multidimensional results of our survey, we assigned a numerical value to each model that measured its similarity to 15 core assumptions of the Ross-Macdonald model. Although the analysis illustrated a growing acknowledgement of geographical, ecological and epidemiological complexities in modelling transmission, most models during the past 40 years closely resemble the Ross-Macdonald model. Modern theory would benefit from an expansion around the concepts of heterogeneous mosquito biting, poorly mixed mosquito-host encounters, spatial heterogeneity and temporal variation in the transmission process. PMID:23407571

Reiner, Robert C; Perkins, T Alex; Barker, Christopher M; Niu, Tianchan; Chaves, Luis Fernando; Ellis, Alicia M; George, Dylan B; Le Menach, Arnaud; Pulliam, Juliet R C; Bisanzio, Donal; Buckee, Caroline; Chiyaka, Christinah; Cummings, Derek A T; Garcia, Andres J; Gatton, Michelle L; Gething, Peter W; Hartley, David M; Johnston, Geoffrey; Klein, Eili Y; Michael, Edwin; Lindsay, Steven W; Lloyd, Alun L; Pigott, David M; Reisen, William K; Ruktanonchai, Nick; Singh, Brajendra K; Tatem, Andrew J; Kitron, Uriel; Hay, Simon I; Scott, Thomas W; Smith, David L

2013-04-01

293

Into the environment of mosquito-borne disease: A spatial analysis of vector distribution using traditional and remotely sensed methods  

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Spatially explicit information is increasingly available for infectious disease modeling. However, such information is reluctantly or inappropriately incorporated. My dissertation research uses spatially explicit data to assess relationships between landscape and mosquito species distribution and discusses challenges regarding accurate predictive risk modeling. The goal of my research is to use remotely sensed environmental information and spatial statistical methods to better understand mosquito-borne disease epidemiology for improvement of public health responses. In addition to reviewing the progress of spatial infectious disease modeling, I present four research projects. I begin by evaluating the biases in surveillance data and build up to predictive modeling of mosquito species presence. In the first study I explore how mosquito surveillance trap types influence estimations of mosquito populations. Then. I use county-based human surveillance data and landscape variables to identify risk factors for West Nile virus disease. The third study uses satellite-based vegetation indices to identify spatial variation among West Nile virus vectors in an urban area and relates the variability to virus transmission dynamics. Finally, I explore how information from three satellite sensors of differing spatial and spectral resolution can be used to identify and distinguish mosquito habitat across central Connecticut wetlands. Analyses presented here constitute improvements to the prediction of mosquito distribution and therefore identification of disease risk factors. Current methods for mosquito surveillance data collection are labor intensive and provide an extremely limited, incomplete picture of the species composition and abundance. Human surveillance data offers additional challenges with respect to reporting bias and resolution, but is nonetheless informative in identifying environmental risk factors and disease transmission dynamics. Remotely sensed imagery supports mosquito and human disease surveillance data by providing spatially explicit, line resolution information about environmental factors relevant to vector-borne disease processes. Together, surveillance and remotely sensed environmental data facilitate improved description and modeling of disease transmission. Remote sensing can be used to develop predictive maps of mosquito distribution in relation to disease risk. This has implications for increased accuracy of mosquito control efforts. The projects presented in this dissertation enhance current public health capacities by examining the applications of spatial modeling with respect to mosquito-borne disease.

Brown, Heidi E.

294

Insecticide resistance and malaria transmission: infection rate and oocyst burden in Culex pipiens mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium relictum  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The control of most vectors of malaria is threatened by the spread of insecticide resistance. One factor that has been hitherto largely overlooked is the potential effects of insecticide resistance on the ability of mosquitoes to transmit malaria: are insecticide-resistant mosquitoes as good vectors of Plasmodium as susceptible ones? The drastic physiological changes that accompany the evolution of insecticide resistance may indeed alter the ability of vectors to transmit diseases, a possibility that, if confirmed, could have major epidemiological consequences. Methods Using a novel experimental system consisting of the avian malaria parasite (Plasmodium relictum and its natural vector (the mosquito Culex pipiens, two of the most common mechanisms of insecticide resistance (esterase overproduction and acetylcholinesterase modification were investigated for their effect on mosquito infection rate and parasite burden. For this purpose two types of experiments were carried out using (i insecticide-resistant and susceptible laboratory isogenic lines of Cx. pipiens and (ii wild Cx. pipiens collected from a population where insecticide resistant and susceptible mosquitoes coexist in sympatry. Results The isogenic line and wild-caught mosquito experiments were highly consistent in showing no effect of either esterase overproduction or of acetylcholinesterase modification on either the infection rate or on the oocyst burden of mosquitoes. The only determinant of these traits was blood meal size, which was similar across the different insecticide resistant categories in both experiments. Conclusions Insecticide resistance was found to have no effect on Plasmodium development within the mosquito. This is the first time this question has been addressed using a natural mosquito-Plasmodium combination, while taking care to standardize the genetic background against which the insecticide resistance genes operate. Infection rate and oocyst burden are but two of the factors that determine the vectorial capacity of mosquitoes. Other key determinants of parasite transmission, such as mosquito longevity and behaviour, or the parasite's incubation time, need to be investigated before concluding on whether insecticide resistance influences the ability of mosquitoes to transmit malaria.

Rivero Ana

2010-12-01

295

Strategies for controlling the epizootic amplification of arboviruses.  

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A previously validated, spatially explicit, agent-based model of arbovirus transmission among vector mosquitoes and avian hosts is used to explore the effectiveness of different insecticide control strategies for reducing rates of epizootic transmission and mosquito infection. Mosquito control within the model reduces infection rates among hosts and vectors but generally lengthens the transmission season. Insecticide application focused at oviposition sites is found to be as effective as control applied over the entire model landscape. The findings also indicate that optimum use of insecticide resources would first target areas in which bird activity is collocated with vector mosquito breeding sites, and then, if resources permit and mosquito mortality due to the insecticide is high, target other vector mosquito breeding habitats. More broadly, these experiments demonstrate that model systems provide an economical framework for testing different mosquito and mosquito-borne pathogen control strategies and can ultimately inform field interventions and enable better allocation of intervention resources. PMID:22238878

Shaman, Jeffrey

2011-11-01

296

A field bioassay to evaluate potential spatial repellents against natural mosquito populations.  

Science.gov (United States)

A field bioassay evaluating candidate chemicals as aerial repellents was developed and evaluated against natural mosquito populations in Beltsville, MD. The bioassay consisted of an attractive source surrounded by a grid of 16 septa containing a volatile candidate aerial repellent, compared with an attractive source without such a grid. The attractive source was a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light trap supplemented with carbon dioxide. Significant sources of variation included weather, position, and the differential response of mosquito species. Despite these sources of variation, significant repellent responses were obtained for catnip oil, E,Z-dihydronepetalactone, and DEET. PMID:23393752

Chauhan, K R; Aldrich, J R; McCardle, P W; White, G B; Webb, R E

2012-12-01

297

Benzoquinones from millipedes deter mosquitoes and elicit self-anointing in capuchin monkeys (Cebus spp.).  

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Neotropical monkeys of the genus Cebus anoint themselves by rubbing arthropods and plants against their pelage. A recent study has shown that free-ranging wedge-capped capuchin monkeys (C. olivaceus) in Venezuela self-anoint with a benzoquinone-secreting millipede, an activity by which they are hypothesized to appropriate chemical deterrents of mosquitoes. To evaluate the plausibility of this hypothesis, female yellow fever mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti) were presented with two millipede secretory compounds, 2-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone, on nylon-reinforced silicone membranes placed over wells filled with human blood, a highly preferred food. Mosquitoes exhibited fewer landings, fed less frequently, and flew more frequently (a possible indication of repellency) in the presence of membranes treated with benzoquinones than with controls. These compounds also elicit self-anointing in captive male and female tufted (C. apella) and white-faced (C. capucinus) capuchin monkeys. PMID:12883771

Weldon, Paul J; Aldrich, Jeffrey R; Klun, Jerome A; Oliver, James E; Debboun, Mustapha

2003-07-01

298

Field evaluation of four spatial repellent devices against Arkansas rice-land mosquitoes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Four commercially available spatial repellent devices were tested in a rice-land habitat near Stuttgart, AR, after semi-field level assessments had been made at the Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture in Gainesville, FL. OFF! Clip-On(metofluthrin), Mosquito Cognito (linalool), No-Pest Strip (dichlorvos), and ThermaCELL (d-cisltrans allethrin) were selected for this study from >20 candidate products. The units based on metofluthrin, linalool, or d-cisltrans allethrin significantly reduced captures of 1 or more of the mosquito species at surrogate human sites (unlit Centers for Disease Control and Prevention traps with CO2 and octenol). Among the mosquito species analyzed statistically (Anopheles quadrimaculatus, Culex erraticus, and Psorophora columbiae), there were significantly different responses (up to 84% reduction) to individual products, suggesting that combinations of certain spatial repellents might provide significantly greater protection. PMID:24772674

Dame, David A; Meisch, Max V; Lewis, Carolyn N; Kline, Daniel L; Clark, Gary G

2014-03-01

299

A Spatial Model of Mosquito Host-Seeking Behavior  

OpenAIRE

Mosquito host-seeking behavior and heterogeneity in host distribution are important factors in predicting the transmission dynamics of mosquito-borne infections such as dengue fever, malaria, chikungunya, and West Nile virus. We develop and analyze a new mathematical model to describe the effect of spatial heterogeneity on the contact rate between mosquito vectors and hosts. The model includes odor plumes generated by spatially distributed hosts, wind velocity, and mosquito behavior based on ...

Cummins, Bree; Cortez, Ricardo; Foppa, Ivo M.; Walbeck, Justin; Hyman, James M.

2012-01-01

300

Rapid protein profiling facilitates surveillance of invasive mosquito species  

OpenAIRE

BACKGROUND: Invasive aedine mosquito species have become a major issue in many parts of the world as most of them are recognised vectors or potentially involved in transmission of pathogens. Surveillance of these mosquitoes (e.g. Ae. aegypti, Yellow fever mosquito, Aedes albopictus, Asian tiger mosquito) is mainly done by collecting eggs using ovitraps and by identification of the larvae hatched in the laboratory. In order to replace this challenging and laborious procedure, we have evaluated...

Schaffner, Francis; Kaufmann, Christian; Pflu?ger, Valentin; Mathis, Alexander

2014-01-01

301

Fabrication of an olfactometer for mosquito behavioural studies  

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Full Text Available Background & objectives: Olfaction is the major sensory modality involved in the resource searchingbehaviour of insects including vector mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae. To date, our current countrywideknowledge on the host-seeking behaviour of Iranian mosquitoes is mainly confined to hostpreference which has exclusively come from field studies. Olfactometer is a scientific tool bywhich more naive aspects of man-vector contact can be clarified under controlled and less biasedconditions.Methods: The wind tunnel and stimulus delivery system was constructed from acrylic materialsbased on previously introduced models with some modifications. Air supply and required lightwere ensured by a powerful compressor and incandescent bulbs, respectively. Desired level oftemperature was maintained by controllable heating radiators. For humidity production a uniquein-built piezo system was devised in the course of the air flow. Fine regulators facilitated thecontinuous generatation of the humidity at a preset level.Results: Titanium tetrachloride smoke plus monitoring of the wind speed revealed that the flow ofair was proper and invariable. A desired level of humidity and temperature could be set up in just10 and 15–45 min, respectively. These physical parameters varied only ±2% (humidity and±0.15ºC (temperature in a typical 20 min duration.Conclusion: The first sophisticated olfactometer in the field of medical entomology in Iran isreported here. Fast set up and stability of physical parameters are its salient features. It is expectedthat with the aid of this olfactometer further information on the physiological principles of thehost-seeking behaviour of mosquitoes become available soon.

Seyed-Mohammad Omrani,Hassan Vatandoost,Mohammad Ali Oshaghi,Mohammad Reza Yaghoobi Ershadi,Yavar Rassi, Siavash Tirgari

2010-03-01

302

The unexpected importance of mosquito oviposition behaviour for malaria: non-productive larval habitats can be sources for malaria transmission  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes commute between blood-meal hosts and water. Thus, heterogeneity in human biting reflects underlying spatial heterogeneity in the distribution and suitability of larval habitat as well as inherent differences in the attractiveness, suitability and distribution of blood-meal hosts. One of the possible strategies of malaria control is to identify local vector species and then attack water bodies that contain their larvae. Methods Biting and host seeking, not oviposition, have been the focus of most previous studies of mosquitoes and malaria transmission. This study presents a mathematical model that incorporates mosquito oviposition behaviour. Results The model demonstrates that oviposition is one potential factor explaining heterogeneous biting and vector distribution in a landscape with a heterogeneous distribution of larval habitat. Adult female mosquitoes tend to aggregate around places where they oviposit, thereby increasing the risk of malaria, regardless of the suitability of the habitat for larval development. Thus, a water body may be unsuitable for adult mosquito emergence, but simultaneously, be a source for human malaria. Conclusion Larval density may be a misleading indicator of a habitat's importance for malaria control. Even if mosquitoes could be lured to oviposit in sprayed larval habitats, this would not necessarily mitigate – and might aggravate – the risk of malaria transmission. Forcing mosquitoes to fly away from humans in search of larval habitat may be a more efficient way to reduce the risk of malaria than killing larvae. Thus, draining, fouling, or filling standing water where mosquitoes oviposit can be more effective than applying larvicide.

Flahault Antoine

2005-05-01

303

U.S. Boy's Death Highlights Rare Mosquito-Borne Infection  

Science.gov (United States)

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. U.S. Boy's Death Highlights Rare Mosquito-Borne Infection Researchers ... said Amy Lambert, a research microbiologist with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "The disease ...

304

Reverse and Conventional Chemical Ecology Approaches for the Development of Oviposition Attractants for Culex Mosquitoes  

OpenAIRE

Synthetic mosquito oviposition attractants are sorely needed for surveillance and control programs for Culex species, which are major vectors of pathogens causing various human diseases, including filariasis, encephalitis, and West Nile encephalomyelitis. We employed novel and conventional chemical ecology approaches to identify potential attractants, which were demonstrated in field tests to be effective for monitoring populations of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus in human dwellings. Immunohistoche...

Leal, Walter S.; Barbosa, Rosa?ngela M. R.; Xu, Wei; Sayed, Zainulabeuddin; Latte, Nicolas; Chen, Angela L.; Morgan, Tania I.; Cornel, Anthony J.; Furtado, Andre?

2008-01-01

305

Effects of sublethal pyrethroid exposure on host-seeking behavior of female mosquitoes  

Science.gov (United States)

Adult mosquito control consists of residual application on surfaces and aerial spraying often using pyrethroids, however, not all insects contacting insecticides are killed. Sublethal exposure to neurotoxic compounds can negatively affect sensory organs and reducing the insect’s efficiency of host l...

306

Building a Better Mosquito: Identifying the Genes Enabling Malaria and Dengue Fever Resistance in A. gambiae and A. aegypti Mosquitoes  

OpenAIRE

In this interview, George Dimopoulos focuses on the physiological mechanisms used by mosquitoes to combat Plasmodium falciparum and dengue virus infections. Explanation is given for how key refractory genes, those genes conferring resistance to vector pathogens, are identified in the mosquito and how this knowledge can be used to generate transgenic mosquitoes that are unable to carry the malaria parasite or dengue virus.

Dimopoulos, George

2007-01-01

307

Potential negative impacts and low effectiveness in the use of African annual killifish in the biocontrol of aquatic mosquito larvae in temporary water bodies.  

Science.gov (United States)

Commentary and discussion on a recent paper promoting the use of Nothobranchius guentheri, a small African annual fish from the Island of Zanzibar as a tool to control mosquito larvae in temporary bodies of freshwater throughout Africa is presented.Arguments on major points; (1) expected low success of annual fish introductions, (2) low success of mosquito control in the field, (3) ecological threats, and (4) ethical issues are detailed.Despite serious problems with mosquito-borne diseases in tropical Africa and elsewhere, we encourage responsible means of biological control of parasite vectors. We show that effectiveness of Nothobranchius translocations is low (the previous attempts failed), likelihood of effective mosquito larvae control under field condition is negligible and ecological threats from Nothobranchius translocations from within and outside the naturally occurring range are serious. We advocate against the proposed next step of the project, i.e. field trials in Tanzania. PMID:20846414

Reichard, Martin; Watters, Brian R; Wildekamp, Rudolf H; Sonnenberg, Rainer; Nagy, Béla; Polacik, Matej; Valdesalici, Stefano; Cellerino, Alessandro; Cooper, Barry J; Hengstler, Holger; Rosenstock, John; Sainthouse, Ian

2010-01-01

308

Potential negative impacts and low effectiveness in the use of African annual killifish in the biocontrol of aquatic mosquito larvae in temporary water bodies  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Commentary and discussion on a recent paper promoting the use of Nothobranchius guentheri, a small African annual fish from the Island of Zanzibar as a tool to control mosquito larvae in temporary bodies of freshwater throughout Africa is presented. Arguments on major points; (1 expected low success of annual fish introductions, (2 low success of mosquito control in the field, (3 ecological threats, and (4 ethical issues are detailed. Despite serious problems with mosquito-borne diseases in tropical Africa and elsewhere, we encourage responsible means of biological control of parasite vectors. We show that effectiveness of Nothobranchius translocations is low (the previous attempts failed, likelihood of effective mosquito larvae control under field condition is negligible and ecological threats from Nothobranchius translocations from within and outside the naturally occurring range are serious. We advocate against the proposed next step of the project, i.e. field trials in Tanzania.

Reichard Martin

2010-09-01

309

A malaria transmission-directed model of mosquito life cycle and ecology  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major public health issue in much of the world, and the mosquito vectors which drive transmission are key targets for interventions. Mathematical models for planning malaria eradication benefit from detailed representations of local mosquito populations, their natural dynamics and their response to campaign pressures. Methods A new model is presented for mosquito population dynamics, effects of weather, and impacts of multiple simultaneous interventions. This model is then embedded in a large-scale individual-based simulation and results for local elimination of malaria are discussed. Mosquito population behaviours, such as anthropophily and indoor feeding, are included to study their effect upon the efficacy of vector control-based elimination campaigns. Results Results for vector control tools, such as bed nets, indoor spraying, larval control and space spraying, both alone and in combination, are displayed for a single-location simulation with vector species and seasonality characteristic of central Tanzania, varying baseline transmission intensity and vector bionomics. The sensitivities to habitat type, anthropophily, indoor feeding, and baseline transmission intensity are explored. Conclusions The ability to model a spectrum of local vector species with different ecologies and behaviours allows local customization of packages of interventions and exploration of the effect of proposed new tools.

Eckhoff Philip A

2011-10-01

310

Comparative genomics of small RNA regulatory pathway components in vector mosquitoes  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Small RNA regulatory pathways (SRRPs control key aspects of development and anti-viral defense in metazoans. Members of the Argonaute family of catalytic enzymes degrade target RNAs in each of these pathways. SRRPs include the microRNA, small interfering RNA (siRNA and PIWI-type gene silencing pathways. Mosquitoes generate viral siRNAs when infected with RNA arboviruses. However, in some mosquitoes, arboviruses survive antiviral RNA interference (RNAi and are transmitted via mosquito bite to a subsequent host. Increased knowledge of these pathways and functional components should increase understanding of the limitations of anti-viral defense in vector mosquitoes. To do this, we compared the genomic structure of SRRP components across three mosquito species and three major small RNA pathways. Results The Ae. aegypti, An. gambiae and Cx. pipiens genomes encode putative orthologs for all major components of the miRNA, siRNA, and piRNA pathways. Ae. aegypti and Cx. pipiens have undergone expansion of Argonaute and PIWI subfamily genes. Phylogenetic analyses were performed for these protein families. In addition, sequence pattern recognition algorithms MEME, MDScan and Weeder were used to identify upstream regulatory motifs for all SRRP components. Statistical analyses confirmed enrichment of species-specific and pathway-specific cis-elements over the rest of the genome. Conclusion Analysis of Argonaute and PIWI subfamily genes suggests that the small regulatory RNA pathways of the major arbovirus vectors, Ae. aegypti and Cx. pipiens, are evolving faster than those of the malaria vector An. gambiae and D. melanogaster. Further, protein and genomic features suggest functional differences between subclasses of PIWI proteins and provide a basis for future analyses. Common UCR elements among SRRP components indicate that 1 key components from the miRNA, siRNA, and piRNA pathways contain NF-kappaB-related and Broad complex transcription factor binding sites, 2 purifying selection has occurred to maintain common pathway-specific elements across mosquito species and 3 species-specific differences in upstream elements suggest that there may be differences in regulatory control among mosquito species. Implications for arbovirus vector competence in mosquitoes are discussed.

Foy Brian D

2008-09-01

311

Detection of Arboviruses and Other Micro-Organisms in Experimentally Infected Mosquitoes Using Massively Parallel Sequencing  

OpenAIRE

Human disease incidence attributed to arbovirus infection is increasing throughout the world, with effective control interventions limited by issues of sustainability, insecticide resistance and the lack of effective vaccines. Several promising control strategies are currently under development, such as the release of mosquitoes trans-infected with virus-blocking Wolbachia bacteria. Implementation of any control program is dependent on effective virus surveillance and a thorough understanding...

Hall-mendelin, Sonja; Allcock, Richard; Kresoje, Nina; Den Hurk, Andrew F.; Warrilow, David

2013-01-01

312

Inter-epidemic abundance and distribution of potential mosquito vectors for Rift Valley fever virus in Ngorongoro district, Tanzania  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis that primarily affects ruminants but also has the capacity to infect humans. Objective To determine the abundance and distribution of mosquito vectors in relation to their potential role in the virus transmission and maintenance in disease epidemic areas of Ngorongoro district in northern Tanzania. Methods A cross-sectional entomological investigation was carried out before the suspected RVF outbreak in October 2012. Mosquitoes were sampled both outdoors and indoors using the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) light traps and Mosquito Magnets baited with attractants. Outdoor traps were placed in proximity with breeding sites and under canopy in banana plantations close to the sleeping places of animals. Results A total of 1,823 mosquitoes were collected, of which 87% (N=1,588) were Culex pipiens complex, 12% (N=226) Aedes aegypti, and 0.5% (N=9) Anopheles species. About two-thirds (67%; N=1,095) of C. pipiens complex and nearly 100% (N=225) of A. aegypti were trapped outdoors using Mosquito Magnets. All Anopheles species were trapped indoors using CDC light traps. There were variations in abundance of C. pipiens complex and A. aegypti among different ecological and vegetation habitats. Over three quarters (78%) of C. pipiens complex and most (85%) of the A. aegypti were trapped in banana and maize farms. Both C. pipiens complex and A. aegypti were more abundant in proximity with cattle and in semi-arid thorn bushes and lower Afro-montane. The highest number of mosquitoes was recorded in villages that were most affected during the RVF epidemic of 2007. Of the tested 150 pools of C. pipiens complex and 45 pools of A. aegypti, none was infected with RVF virus. Conclusions These results provide insights into unique habitat characterisation relating to mosquito abundances and distribution in RVF epidemic-prone areas of Ngorongoro district in northern Tanzania. PMID:25613346

Mweya, Clement N.; Kimera, Sharadhuli I.; Mellau, Lesakit S. B.; Mboera, Leonard E. G.

2015-01-01

313

Inter-epidemic abundance and distribution of potential mosquito vectors for Rift Valley fever virus in Ngorongoro district, Tanzania  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Rift Valley fever (RVF is a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis that primarily affects ruminants but also has the capacity to infect humans. Objective: To determine the abundance and distribution of mosquito vectors in relation to their potential role in the virus transmission and maintenance in disease epidemic areas of Ngorongoro district in northern Tanzania. Methods: A cross-sectional entomological investigation was carried out before the suspected RVF outbreak in October 2012. Mosquitoes were sampled both outdoors and indoors using the Centre for Disease Control (CDC light traps and Mosquito Magnets baited with attractants. Outdoor traps were placed in proximity with breeding sites and under canopy in banana plantations close to the sleeping places of animals. Results: A total of 1,823 mosquitoes were collected, of which 87% (N=1,588 were Culex pipiens complex, 12% (N=226 Aedes aegypti, and 0.5% (N=9 Anopheles species. About two-thirds (67%; N=1,095 of C. pipiens complex and nearly 100% (N=225 of A. aegypti were trapped outdoors using Mosquito Magnets. All Anopheles species were trapped indoors using CDC light traps. There were variations in abundance of C. pipiens complex and A. aegypti among different ecological and vegetation habitats. Over three quarters (78% of C. pipiens complex and most (85% of the A. aegypti were trapped in banana and maize farms. Both C. pipiens complex and A. aegypti were more abundant in proximity with cattle and in semi-arid thorn bushes and lower Afro-montane. The highest number of mosquitoes was recorded in villages that were most affected during the RVF epidemic of 2007. Of the tested 150 pools of C. pipiens complex and 45 pools of A. aegypti, none was infected with RVF virus. Conclusions: These results provide insights into unique habitat characterisation relating to mosquito abundances and distribution in RVF epidemic-prone areas of Ngorongoro district in northern Tanzania.

Clement N. Mweya

2015-01-01

314

Diversity and abundance of mosquito species in relation to their larval habitats in Mizoram, North Eastern Himalayan region.  

Science.gov (United States)

The abundance, richness and diversity of anopheline and culicid mosquitoes associated with their habitats, season, and physico-chemical quality of water were surveyed along six districts of Mizoram, North Eastern Himalayan region. The productivity of permanent and temporary habitat types was quantified by carrying out weekly larval sampling using a standard dipping method for a period of three years. Diversity was estimated using the Shannon index (H'), Evenness index (Heve), similarity measures cluster analysis and MANOVA. In total, 5 genera and 20 species of mosquitoes were identified: Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles barbirostris and Anopheles vagus were the most abundant and widely-distributed species, representing 39.71%, 29.39% and 14.52% of total mosquito individuals sampled, respectively. Anopheles sp. diversity was lowest in Lunglei district (H'=0.48) and highest in Aizawl (H'=2.03), whereas Culex sp. diversity was lowest in Lawngtlai (H'=0.38), and highest in Aizawl (H'=2.99) and Kolasib (H'=2.13). This represents the first update on the diversity and geographic distribution of the mosquitoes of Mizoram. Mosquito larvae were present in both temporary and permanent habitats suitable for breeding with monthly variations dependent on rainfall intensity, temperature, humidity and location. Early instars were more abundant significantly (PMANOVA) with pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, phosphates and chlorides concentration of water. This information will be essential for designing and implementing mosquito larval control programs. PMID:24795213

Vanlalruia, Khawling; Senthilkumar, Nachimuthu; Gurusubramanian, Guruswami

2014-09-01

315

The influence of mosquito resting behaviour and associated microclimate for malaria risk  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of the mosquito and parasite life-history traits that combine to determine malaria transmission intensity are temperature sensitive. In most cases, the process-based models used to estimate malaria risk and inform control and prevention strategies utilize measures of mean outdoor temperature. Evidence suggests, however, that certain malaria vectors can spend large parts of their adult life resting indoors. Presentation of hypothesis If significant proportions of mosquitoes are resting indoors and indoor conditions differ markedly from ambient conditions, simple use of outdoor temperatures will not provide reliable estimates of malaria transmission intensity. To date, few studies have quantified the differential effects of indoor vs outdoor temperatures explicitly, reflecting a lack of proper understanding of mosquito resting behaviour and associated microclimate. Testing the hypothesis Published records from 8 village sites in East Africa revealed temperatures to be warmer indoors than outdoors and to generally show less daily variation. Exploring the effects of these temperatures on malaria parasite development rate suggested indoor-resting mosquitoes could transmit malaria between 0.3 and 22.5 days earlier than outdoor-resting mosquitoes. These differences translate to increases in transmission risk ranging from 5 to approaching 3,000%, relative to predictions based on outdoor temperatures. The pattern appears robust for low- and highland areas, with differences increasing with altitude. Implications of the hypothesis Differences in indoor vs outdoor environments lead to large differences in the limits and the intensity of malaria transmission. This finding highlights a need to better understand mosquito resting behaviour and the associated microclimate, and to broaden assessments of transmission ecology and risk to consider the potentially important role of endophily.

Thomas Matthew B

2011-07-01

316

Mosquitos (Díptera: Culicidae) vectores potenciales de arbovirus en la región de Urabá, noroccidente de Colombia[  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Introducción. Los estudios encaminados a conocer los parámetros ecológicos de las poblaciones de mosquitos selváticos, permiten establecer el riesgo de transmisión de arbovirus y aportar recomendaciones sobre prevención, vigilancia y control a las autoridades de salud. Objetivo. Determinar la divers [...] idad y abundancia de mosquitos nocturnos y crepusculares, potenciales vectores de arbovirus en zonas rurales de Apartadó y Turbo, Antioquia. Materiales y métodos. Se realizaron muestreos trimestrales. Para la recolección de mosquitos se usaron trampas CDC, Shannon y cebo humano protegido, en fragmentos de bosque, entre las 18:00 y las 06:00 horas. Se estimaron los índices de diversidad y abundancia de especies. Resultados. Se capturaron 583 mosquitos de 10 génerosy 27 especies. Las especies más abundantes fueron Coquilletidia venezuelensis (14,6 %), Aedes scapularis (14,08 %), Psorophora ferox (10,82 %) y Culex quinquefasciatus (10,3 %). La riqueza específica y los índices ecológicos calculados fueron mayores en Turbo; el fragmento de bosque estudiado en Turbo se considera de mayor riqueza y uniformidad de especies. El hallazgo de Cx. pedroi, Ae. scapularis, Ae. angustivittatus, Cq. venezuelensis, Cx. nigripalpus, Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. declarator, Mansonia titillans, Ma. pseudotitillans, Ps. ferox y Trichiprosopon digitatum reportados como vectores de arbovirus, alerta sobre la posibilidad de transmisión en la zona. Conclusión. La diversidad y abundancia de mosquitos en la zona de estudio son altas. Los análisis ecológicos más los reportes previos de capacidad vectorial de algunas de las especies registradas, permiten concluir que en la zona se pueden presentar brotes de arbovirosis. Abstract in english Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culiciadae) as potential vectors of arbovirused in the Urabá region, Northwest of Colombia [...

Gabriel, Parra-Henao; Laura, Suárez.

2012-06-01

317

Efectos de la competencia larval en los mosquitos de contenedores artificiales, Aedes aegypti y Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae en condiciones semi-controladas Effects of larval competition between the container mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae in semi-controlled conditions  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Las larvas de los mosquitos Aedes aegypti (Linneo y Culex pipiens Linneo pueden criar conjuntamente en pequeños contenedores artificiales de agua, se genera así una competencia interespecífica y/o intraespecífica. El objetivo de este trabajo fue comparar la magnitud relativa de la competencia intra e interespecífica en A. aegypti y C. pipiens, generada durante el desarrollo larval en contenedores artifi ciales. Las variables medidas como respuesta fueron la supervivencia y el tiempo de desarrollo larval, y la biomasa total producida en estado de pupa. Se criaron larvas de ambos mosquitos en neumáticos de automóvil con agua declorinada y hojarasca. Se introdujeron larvas recién eclosionadas de acuerdo a la densidad (5 estimada según un censo previo de A. aegypti y C. pipiens. Serealizaron los siguientes tratamientos agregando larvas de: (1 A. aegypti hasta alcanzar ? A. aegypti determinada según el censo previo, (2 C. pipiens hasta ? C. pipiens del censo previo, (3 A. aegypti hasta alcanzar la suma de ? A. aegypti y ? C. pipiens del censo previo, (4 C. pipiens hasta alcanzar la suma de ? A. aegypti y ? C. pipiens del censo previo y (5 A. aegypti y C. pipiens hasta ? A. aegypti y ? C. pipiens del censo previo. Las tres variables medidas fueron afectadas por los tratamientos, excepto la supervivencia y la biomasa producida por C. pipiens. Aedes aegypti fue más alterada por la competencia intraespecífica que por la competencia interespecífica. En C. pipiens, la competencia interespecífica superó en sus efectos a la competencia intraespecífica. Existió asimetría competitiva, ya que C. pipiens fue más afectada por A. aegypti que lo contrario.Larvae of Aedes aegypti (Linneo and Culex pipiens Linneo may develop together in small artificial water containers, promoting inter- and/or intra-specific competition. Our aim was to compare the relative importance of interspecific and intraspecific competition in both species during larval development in artificial containers. Larvae were bred outdoors in automobile tires with leaf litteras the nutrient source. The number of experimental larvae was set after an assessment of densities (5 from wild populations. We established the treatments: 1: A. aegypti alone at the 5 of A. aegypti in the census; 2: C. pipiens alone at the 5 of C. pipiens in the census; 3: A. aegypti alone at the 5 of A. aegypti + C. pipiens in the census; 4: C. pipiens alone at the 5 A. aegypti + 5 C. pipiens in the census; and 5: A. aegypti at the 5 of A. aegypti in the census + C. pipiens at the 5 of C. pipiens in the census. Survivorship, development time and total biomass were affected by treatments, except for survivorship and biomass of C. pipiens. Intraspecific competition outweighed interspecific competiton in A. aegypti, while the opposite trend was detected in C. pipiens. Competition was asymmetric, as C. pipiens was more affected by A. aegypti.

Analía Francia

2011-12-01

318

Efectos de la competencia larval en los mosquitos de contenedores artificiales, Aedes aegypti y Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) en condiciones semi-controladas / Effects of larval competition between the container mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) in semi-controlled conditions  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Las larvas de los mosquitos Aedes aegypti (Linneo) y Culex pipiens Linneo pueden criar conjuntamente en pequeños contenedores artificiales de agua, se genera así una competencia interespecífica y/o intraespecífica. El objetivo de este trabajo fue comparar la magnitud relativa de la competencia intra [...] e interespecífica en A. aegypti y C. pipiens, generada durante el desarrollo larval en contenedores artifi ciales. Las variables medidas como respuesta fueron la supervivencia y el tiempo de desarrollo larval, y la biomasa total producida en estado de pupa. Se criaron larvas de ambos mosquitos en neumáticos de automóvil con agua declorinada y hojarasca. Se introdujeron larvas recién eclosionadas de acuerdo a la densidad (5) estimada según un censo previo de A. aegypti y C. pipiens. Serealizaron los siguientes tratamientos agregando larvas de: (1) A. aegypti hasta alcanzar ? A. aegypti determinada según el censo previo, (2) C. pipiens hasta ? C. pipiens del censo previo, (3) A. aegypti hasta alcanzar la suma de ? A. aegypti y ? C. pipiens del censo previo, (4) C. pipiens hasta alcanzar la suma de ? A. aegypti y ? C. pipiens del censo previo y (5) A. aegypti y C. pipiens hasta ? A. aegypti y ? C. pipiens del censo previo. Las tres variables medidas fueron afectadas por los tratamientos, excepto la supervivencia y la biomasa producida por C. pipiens. Aedes aegypti fue más alterada por la competencia intraespecífica que por la competencia interespecífica. En C. pipiens, la competencia interespecífica superó en sus efectos a la competencia intraespecífica. Existió asimetría competitiva, ya que C. pipiens fue más afectada por A. aegypti que lo contrario. Abstract in english Larvae of Aedes aegypti (Linneo) and Culex pipiens Linneo may develop together in small artificial water containers, promoting inter- and/or intra-specific competition. Our aim was to compare the relative importance of interspecific and intraspecific competition in both species during larval develop [...] ment in artificial containers. Larvae were bred outdoors in automobile tires with leaf litteras the nutrient source. The number of experimental larvae was set after an assessment of densities (5) from wild populations. We established the treatments: 1: A. aegypti alone at the 5 of A. aegypti in the census; 2: C. pipiens alone at the 5 of C. pipiens in the census; 3: A. aegypti alone at the 5 of A. aegypti + C. pipiens in the census; 4: C. pipiens alone at the 5 A. aegypti + 5 C. pipiens in the census; and 5: A. aegypti at the 5 of A. aegypti in the census + C. pipiens at the 5 of C. pipiens in the census. Survivorship, development time and total biomass were affected by treatments, except for survivorship and biomass of C. pipiens. Intraspecific competition outweighed interspecific competiton in A. aegypti, while the opposite trend was detected in C. pipiens. Competition was asymmetric, as C. pipiens was more affected by A. aegypti.

Analía, Francia; Arnaldo, Maciá.

2011-12-01

319

Oviposition Site Selection by the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti and Its Implications for Dengue Control  

OpenAIRE

Controlling the mosquito Aedes aegypti is of public health importance because, at present, it is the only means to stop dengue virus transmission. Implementing successful mosquito control programs requires understanding what factors regulate population abundance, as well as anticipating how mosquitoes may adapt to control measures. In some species of mosquitoes, females choose egg-laying sites to improve the survival and growth of their offspring, a behavior that ultimately influences populat...

Wong, Jacklyn; Stoddard, Steven T.; Astete, Helvio; Morrison, Amy C.; Scott, Thomas W.

2011-01-01

320

Musings on Sketches, Artists, and Mosquito Nets  

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

Byron Breedlove reads his essay Musings on Sketches, Artists, and Mosquito Nets about the art of James Whistler and the transmission of vector borne diseases.  Created: 9/23/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/20/2014.

2014-09-23

321

Baculoviruses: Molecular Biology of Mosquito Baculoviruses  

Science.gov (United States)

Baculoviruses found in mosquitoes have been assigned to the Nucleopolyhedroviruses and are of growing interest as they may represent a separate branch within the Baculoviridae that existed prior to the split of lepidopteran nucleopolyhedroviruses and granuloviruses. They may also be ancestral to th...

322

Attractiveness of MM-X traps baited with human or synthetic odor to mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in The Gambia.  

Science.gov (United States)

Chemical cues play an important role in the host-seeking behavior of blood-feeding mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae). A field study was carried out in The Gambia to investigate the effects of human odor or synthetic odor blends on the attraction of mosquitoes. MM-X traps baited with 16 odor blends to which carbon dioxide (CO2) was added were tested in four sets of experiments. In a second series of experiments, MM-X traps with 14 odor blends without CO2 were tested. A blend of ammonia and L-lactic acid with or without CO2 was used as control odor in series 1 and 2, respectively. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traps were placed in a traditional house and an experimental house to monitor mosquito densities during the experiments. The MM-X traps caught a total number of 196,756 mosquitoes, with the most abundant species belonging to the genera Mansonia (70.6%), Anopheles (17.5%), and Culex (11.5%). The most abundant mosquito species caught by the CDC traps (56,290 in total) belonged to the genera Mansonia (59.4%), Anopheles (16.0% An. gambiae s.l. Giles, and 11.3% An. ziemanni Grünberg), and Culex (11.6%). MM-X traps baited with synthetic blends were in many cases more attractive than MM-X traps baited with human odors. Addition of CO2 to synthetic odors substantially increased the catch of all mosquito species in the MM-X traps. A blend of ammonia + L-lactic acid + CO, + 3-methylbutanoic acid was the most attractive odor for most mosquito species. The candidate odor blend shows the potential to enhance trap collections so that traps will provide better surveillance and possible control. PMID:18047195

Qiu, Yu Tong; Smallegange, Renate C; Ter, Braak Cajo J F; Spitzen, Jeroen; Van Loon, Joop J A; Jawara, Musa; Milligan, Paul; Galimard, Agnes M; Van Beek, Teris A; Knols, Bart G J; Takken, Willem

2007-11-01

323

Microsporidia parásitos de larvas de mosquito de la Costa Pacífica del Chocó  

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Full Text Available Two genera of Microsporidia were found infecting mosquito larvae in three localities on the Pacific coast of Choco. Vavraia sp. (Microsporida: Pleistophoridae was found in larvae of Wyeomyia circumcincta, W. simmsi and Anopheles albimanus collected from plants of the Bromeliacea family in Arusí y Joví. Amblyospora sp. (Microsporida: Amblyosporidae was found parasitizingAedes angustivittatuslarvae COllectedfrom a terrestrial breeding pond in the locality of Nuqur. Morphology of the spores of the two parasites under light microscopy is described, as well as preliminary data on host range when exposed to laboratory rearad Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles albimanus. Their rola in mosquito control is discussed.Se reportan dos géneros de microsporidia que parasitan larvas de mosquitos en criaderos naturales de tres localidades en la costa Pacffica Chocoana. Vavraia sp. (Microsporida: Pleistophoridae parásita larvas de Wyeomyia circumcincta, de Wyeomya simmsi y de Anopheles neivai, recolectadas en las rosetas de especies de la familia Bromeliaceae en las localidades de Arusí y Joví. Amblyospora sp. (Microsporida: Amblyosporidae parásita larvas deAedes angustivittatusde criaderos terrestres semipermanentes en la localidad de Nuquí. Se describe la morfología de estos dos microsporidia al microscopio óptico. Estudios preliminares de infección en larvas de Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus yAnopheles albimanus, criadas en laboratorio, indican que Vavraia sp. infecta las tres especies, con preferencia a Culex quinquefasciatus. Las larvas expuestas a esporas de Amblyospora sp. no presentaron infección. Se discute el posible papel de estos dos géneros en el control de las poblaciones de mosquitos.

Zuluaga Juan S.

1993-12-01

324

Mosquito larvicidal activity of seaweeds extracts against Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus  

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Objective To identify the larvicidal activity of the seaweed extracts against Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus Methods Seaweed extracts of Ulva lactuca, Caulerpa racemosa (C. racemosa), Sargassum microystum, Caulerpa scalpelliformis, Gracilaria corticata, Turbinaria decurrens, Turbinaria conoides and Caulerpa toxifolia were dissolved in DMSO to prepare a graded series of concentration. The test for the larvicidal effect of seaweeds against mosquitos larvae was conducted in accordance with the WHO standard method. Batches of 25 early 4th instar larvae of three mosquitoes were transferred to 250 mL enamel bowl containing 199 mL of distilled water and 1 mL of plant extracts (10-100 µg). Each experiment was conducted with triplicate with concurrent a control group. Results Among the seaweeds extract, C. racemosa showed toxicity against 4th instar larvae of Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi with equivalent LC50 value (0.055?6±0.010?3) µg/mL, (0.067?5±0.136?0) µg/mL and (0.066?1±0.007?6) µg/mL, respectively. Conclusions The present study concluded that, the mosquito larvicidal property of C. racemosa might be the prospective alternative source to control the mosquitoes.

Ali, Mohamed Yacoob Syed; Ravikumar, Sundaram; Beula, Johanson Margaret

2013-01-01

325

Seasonal mosquito larval abundance and composition in Kibwezi, lower eastern Kenya  

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Full Text Available Background & objectives: Changes in weather patterns especially rainfall affects the distribution and densities of mosquitoes. The objective of this study was to describe mosquito aquatic habitats, to determine larval abundance, species composition, and habitat types found in Kasayani village of Kibwezi division.Methods: A cross-sectional survey of mosquito larval habitats was conducted in Kasayani village in Kibwezi division to determine species composition, larval abundance, and habitat types found in this village. This survey was conducted during the rainy season in November and December 2006 and during the dry season in February and March 2007. Larvae were collected using the standard dipping technique and a total of 24 habitats were sampled. The primary habitats identified were water reservoir tanks, puddles, temporary pools, and tyre tracks. Results: A total of 2660 mosquito larvae were collected of which 2140 (80.45% were culicines, 503 (18.91% were Anopheles and 17 (0.64% were pupae. For culicines, 1787 (83.5% were categorized as early instars and 353 (16.5% were as late instars while in the Anopheles, 425 (84.49% were classified as early instars and 78 (15.51% were late instars. Morphological identification of the III and IV instar larvae by use of microscopy yielded 16.24% (n = 70 Anopheles gambiae complex, 1.16% (n = 5 An. funestus, 0.70% (n = 3 An. coustani, 42.46% (n = 183 Culex quinquefasciatus, 6.26% (n = 27 Cx. duttoni, and 33.18% (n = 143 Ae. aegypti. Puddles, tyre tracks and pools had highly turbid water while water reservoir tanks had clear water. Anopheles gambiae and Cx. quinquefasciatus were found in all habitat categories while Ae. aegypti were found only in water storage tanks. Interpretation & conclusion: The mosquito larval densities indicate that the inhabitants of this village are at risk of mosquito-borne diseases including malaria, which is one of the greatest causes of morbidity and mortality in this area. Furthermore, mosquito control measures targeting both the mosquito immatures and adults should be enhanced especially during the rainy season to ensure maximum protection of the inhabitants.

Joseph M. Mwangangi

2009-02-01

326

Olfactory search-image use by a mosquito-eating predator.  

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By choosing blood-carrying mosquitoes as prey, Evarcha culicivora, an East African salticid spider, specializes at feeding indirectly on vertebrate blood. It also has an exceptionally complex mate-choice system. An earlier study revealed that search-image use assists E. culicivora in finding prey and mates when restricted to using vision alone. Here we show that search-image use assists E. culicivora in finding prey and mates when restricted to using olfaction alone. After being primed with prey odour or mate odour (control: not primed with odour), spiders were transferred to an olfactometer designed to test ability to find a prey-odour or mate-odour source that was either 'cryptic' (i.e. accompanied by a masking odour source, Lantana camara) or 'conspicuous' (no L. camara odour). When tested with conspicuous odour, the identity of the priming odour had no significant effect on how many spiders found the odour source. However, when tested with cryptic odour, significantly more spiders found the odour source when primed with congruent odour and significantly fewer spiders found the odour source when primed with incongruent odour. PMID:20504813

Cross, Fiona R; Jackson, Robert R

2010-10-22

327

Time-of-day specific changes in metabolic detoxification and insecticide resistance in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.  

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Mosquitoes exhibit ?24 h rhythms in physiology and behavior, regulated by the cooperative action of an endogenous circadian clock and the environmental light:dark cycle. Here, we characterize diel (observed under light:dark conditions) time-of-day changes in metabolic detoxification and resistance to insecticide challenge in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes. A better understanding of mosquito chronobiology will yield insights into developing novel control strategies for this important disease vector. We have previously identified >2000 rhythmically expressed An. gambiae genes. These include metabolic detoxification enzymes peaking at various times throughout the day. Especially interesting was the identification of rhythmic genes encoding enzymes capable of pyrethroid and/or DDT metabolism (CYP6M2, CYP6P3, CYP6Z1, and GSTE2). We hypothesized that these temporal changes in gene expression would confer time-of-day specific changes in metabolic detoxification and responses to insecticide challenge. An. gambiae mosquitoes (adult female Pimperena and Mali-NIH strains) were tested by gene expression analysis for diel rhythms in key genes associated with insecticidal resistance. Biochemical assays for total GST, esterase, and oxidase enzymatic activities were undertaken on time-specific mosquito head and body protein lysates. To determine for rhythmic susceptibility to insecticides by survivorship, mosquitoes were exposed to DDT or deltamethrin across the diel cycle. We report the occurrence of temporal changes in GST activity in samples extracted from the body and head with a single peak at late-night to dawn, but no rhythms were detected in oxidase or esterase activity. The Pimperena strain was found to be resistant to insecticidal challenge, and subsequent genomic analysis revealed the presence of the resistance-conferring kdr mutation. We observed diel rhythmicity in key insecticide detoxification genes in the Mali-NIH strain, with peak phases as previously reported in the Pimperena strain. The insecticide sensitive Mali-NIH strain mosquitoes exhibited a diel rhythm in survivorship to DDT exposure and a bimodal variation to deltamethrin challenge. Our results demonstrate rhythms in detoxification and pesticide susceptibility in An. gambiae mosquitoes; this knowledge could be incorporated into mosquito control and experimental design strategies, and contributes to our basic understanding of mosquito biology. PMID:24631684

Balmert, Nathaniel J; Rund, Samuel S C; Ghazi, John P; Zhou, Peng; Duffield, Giles E

2014-05-01

328

Influence of amino nitrogen in the culture medium enhances the production of delta-endotoxin and biomass of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis for the large-scale production of the mosquito control agent.  

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We reported here the role of amino nitrogen in the commercial production of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis media design. The insect pathogen B. thuringiensis var. israelensis was cultured in different media containing varying initial levels of amino nitrogen sources obtained from three different commercial venders. The biomass, mosquito larval toxicity and spore count produced were measured during the fermentation process. The results showed that the higher level of initial amino nitrogen concentrations in the medium led to higher yield of biomass (dry weight 4.78 g l(-1)), larvicidal activity (LC(50) 18.52 ng ml(-1)) and spore count (3.24 x 10(11) CFU ml(-1)). Similarly decreasing the initial amino nitrogen concentration in the medium led to a decreased biomass (dry weight 1.64 g l(-1)), larvicidal activity (LC(50) 27.01 ng ml(-1)) and spore count (3.7 x 10(10) CFUml(-1)). PMID:18509685

Prabakaran, G; Hoti, S L

2008-09-01

329

Intriguing olfactory proteins from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti  

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Four antennae-specific proteins (AaegOBP1, AaegOBP2, AaegOBP3, and AaegASP1) were isolated from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti and their full-length cDNAs were cloned. RT-PCR indicated that they are expressed in female and, to a lesser extent, in male antennae, but not in control tissues (legs). AaegOBP1 and AaegOBP3 showed significant similarity to previously identified mosquito odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) in cysteine spacing pattern and sequence. Two of the isolated proteins have a total of eight cysteine residues. The similarity of the spacing pattern of the cysteine residues and amino acid sequence to those of previously identified olfactory proteins suggests that one of the cysteine-rich proteins (AaegOBP2) is an OBP. The other (AaegASP1) did not belong to any group of known OBPs. Structural analyses indicate that six of the cysteine residues in AaegOBP2 are linked in a similar pattern to the previously known cysteine pairing in OBPs, i.e., Cys-24 Cys-55, Cys-51 Cys-104, Cys-95 Cys-113. The additional disulfide bridge, Cys-38 Cys-125, knits the extended C-terminal segment of the protein to a predicted ?2-helix. As indicated by circular dichroism (CD) spectra, the extra rigidity seems to prevent the predicted formation of a C-terminal ?-helix at low pH.

Ishida, Yuko; Chen, Angela M.; Tsuruda, Jennifer M.; Cornel, Anthon J.; Debboun, Mustapha; Leal, Walter S.

2004-09-01

330

Mathematical modelling of the active hearing process in mosquitoes  

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Insects have evolved diverse and delicate morphological structures in order to capture the inherently low energy of a propagating sound wave. In mosquitoes, the capture of acoustic energy and its transduction into neuronal signals are assisted by the active mechanical participation of the scolopidia. We propose a simple microscopic mechanistic model of the active amplification in the mosquito species Toxorhynchites brevipalpis. The model is based on the description of the antenna as a forced-damped oscillator coupled to a set of active threads (ensembles of scolopidia) that provide an impulsive force when they twitch. This twitching is in turn controlled by channels that are opened and closed if the antennal oscillation reaches a critical amplitude. The model matches both qualitatively and quantitatively with recent experiments: spontaneous oscillations, nonlinear amplification, hysteresis, 2 : 1 resonances, frequency response and gain loss owing to hypoxia. The numerical simulations presented here also generate new hypotheses. In particular, the model seems to indicate that scolopidia located towards the tip of Johnston's organ are responsible for the entrainment of the other scolopidia and that they give the largest contribution to the mechanical amplification. PMID:19447819

Avitabile, D.; Homer, M.; Champneys, A. R.; Jackson, J. C.; Robert, D.

2010-01-01

331

Annotated Differentially Expressed Salivary Proteins of Susceptible and Insecticide-Resistant Mosquitoes of Anopheles stephensi.  

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Vector control is one of the major global strategies for control of malaria. However, the major obstacle for vector control is the development of multiple resistances to organochlorine, organophosphorus insecticides and pyrethroids that are currently being used in public health for spraying and in bednets. Salivary glands of vectors are the first target organ for human-vector contact during biting and parasite-vector contact prior to parasite development in the mosquito midguts. The salivary glands secrete anti-haemostatic, anti-inflammatory biologically active molecules to facilitate blood feeding from the host and also inadvertently inject malaria parasites into the vertebrate host. The Anopheles stephensi mosquito, an urban vector of malaria to both human and rodent species has been identified as a reference laboratory model to study mosquito-parasite interactions. In this study, we adopted a conventional proteomic approach of 2D-electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and bioinformatics to identify putative differentially expressed annotated functional salivary proteins between An. stephensi susceptible and multiresistant strains with same genetic background. Our results show 2D gel profile and MALDI-TOF comparisons that identified 31 differentially expressed putative modulated proteins in deltamethrin/DDT resistant strains of An. stephensi. Among these 15 proteins were found to be upregulated and 16 proteins were downregulated. Our studies interpret that An. stephensi (multiresistant) caused an upregulated expression of proteins and enzymes like cytochrome 450, short chain dehyrdogenase reductase, phosphodiesterase etc that may have an impact in insecticide resistance and xenobiotic detoxification. Our study elucidates a proteomic response of salivary glands differentially regulated proteins in response to insecticide resistance development which include structural, redox and regulatory enzymes of several pathways. These identified proteins may play a role in regulating mosquito biting behavior patterns and may have implications in the development of malaria parasites in resistant mosquitoes during parasite transmission. PMID:25742511

Vijay, Sonam; Rawal, Ritu; Kadian, Kavita; Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Sharma, Arun

2015-01-01

332

Resistencia a insecticidas en mosquitos (Diptera: Culicidae: mecanismos, deteccion y vigilancia en salud publica Inseclicide resistance in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae: mechanisms, detection and monitoring in public health  

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Full Text Available Uno de los obstaculos mas serios en los programas de control de vectores de enfermedades humanas es el desarrollo de resistencia a los insecticidas usados. Segun la Organizacion Mundial de la Salud, aproximadamente el 40% de los 506 artropodos de importancia medica presentan algun grado de resistencia a insecticidas. De estas especies. cerca del 50% son especies de mosquitos vectores de malaria, dengue, fiebre amarilla y filariasis. Los dos principales mecanismos de resistencia a insecticidas son las alteraciones en el sitio blanco y un incremento en la tasa de detoxificacion de los insecticidas. Una vez se detectan niveles de resistencia en una poblacion de vectores es fundamental determinar su base bioquimica y molecular. La identificacion de los mecanismos de resistencia permite la seleccion de los insecticidas a usar en los programas de control y la evaluacion del potencial desarrollo de resistencia a insecticidas alternativos. Esta revision presenta informacion basica acerca de los principales mecanismos de resistencia a insecticidas identificados en mosquitos vectores de enfermedades humanas y las metodologias mas usadas para su vigilancia y deteccion.Among the most serious obstacles in vector control programs for human diseases is the development of resistance to the insecticides used. According to WHO, approximately 40% of the 506 medically important arthropods show some degree of insecticide resistance. Of these species, about 50% arc species of mosquitoes that vector malaria, dengue, yellow fever and filariasis. The two principal mechanisms of insecticide resistance are alterations in the target site or an increase in the detoxification rate ofthe insecticide. Once resistance is detected in a vector population it is crucial to determine its molecular and biochemical basis. Identification of resistance mechanisms permits the selection of insecticides to use in control programs and the evaluation of potential development of resistance to alternative insecticides. This review presents basic information regarding the main mechanisms of insecticide resistance identifico in mosquito vectors of human diseases and the methodologies most used to monitor and detect them.

IDALYD FONSECA

2005-12-01

333

Identificación de una fuente humana de alimentación de mosquitos mediante la técnica de coaglutinación  

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Full Text Available Se describe la utilización de la técnica de coaglutinación para la identificación de una fuente humana de alimentación de mosquitos. La dilución de las muestras de sangre ingerida en papel de filtro se hizo en 2 mL de una solución de cloruro de sodio al 0,85 %. Se utilizó una suspensión de estafilococos sensibilizados con un suero normal de conejo como control negativo. La suspensión de Staphylococcus aureus sensibilizados con suero de conejo anti-proteínas plasmáticas humanas y suero de conejo anti-IgG humana discriminó bien entre sangre humana y no humana. No se observó aglutinación con el control negativo. Esta técnica resultó ser sensible para identificar el 100 % de las muestras de sangre humana llevadas al papel 24 h después de que los mosquitos completaron su alimentación a una temperatura de 26 a 28 °C. En mosquitos alimentados y colectados en el campo, la prueba se comportó de forma satisfactoria, en consecuencia puede ser utilizada en trabajos de rutina en el campo. Los resultados mostraron la sensibilidad y especificidad de este método para la identificación de sangre humana ingerida por mosquitos.The utilization of a coagglutination technique for the identification of a human source for feeding mosquitoes is described. The dilution of ingested blood samples in filter paper was performed in 2 mL of a sodium chloride solution at 0.85 %. It was used a suspension of sensibilized Staphylococcus aureus with rabbit's serum, human plasmatic anti-proteins, and human anti-IgG rabbit's serum discriminated well between human and non human blood. No agglutination was observed with the negative control. This technique proved to be sensitive to identify 100 % of the human blood samples taken to the paper 24 hours after the mosquitoes completed their feeding at a temperature of 26 to 28 °C. Among mosquitoes fed and collected in the fields the test had a satisfactory result. Therefore, it may be used in routine work in the fields. The results showed the sensitivity and specificity of this method for identifying human blood ingested by mosquitoses.

MAYDA CASTEX

1997-08-01

334

Patterns of spatio-temporal distribution, abundance, and diversity in a mosquito community from the eastern Smoky Hills of Kansas.  

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Nearly 30% of emerging infectious disease events are caused by vector-borne pathogens with wildlife origins. Their transmission involves a complex interplay among pathogens, arthropod vectors, the environment and host species, and they pose a risk for public health, livestock and wildlife species. Examining habitat associations of vector species known to transmit infectious diseases, and quantifying spatio-temporal dynamics of mosquito vector communities is one aspect of the holistic One Health approach that is necessary to develop effective control measures. A survey was conducted from May to August, 2010 of the abundance and diversity of mosquito species occurring in the mixed-grass prairie habitat of the Smoky Hills of Kansas. This region is an important breeding ground for North America's grassland nesting birds and, as such, it could represent an important habitat for the enzootic amplification cycle of avian malaria and infectious encephalitides, as well as spill-over events to humans and livestock. A total of 11 species, belonging to the three genera Aedes, Anopheles, and Culex, was collected during this study. Aedes nigromaculis, Ae. sollicitans, Ae. taeniorhynchus, Culex salinarius, and Cx. tarsalis accounted for 98% of the collected species. Multiple linear regression models suggested that mosquito abundances in the grasslands of the central Great Plains were explained by meteorological and environmental variables. Temporal dynamics in mosquito abundances were well supported by models that included maximum and minimum temperature indices (adjusted R(2) = 0.73). Spatial dynamics of mosquito abundances were best explained by a model containing the following environmental variables (adjusted R(2) =0.37): ground curvature, topographic wetness index, distance to woodland, and distance to road. The mosquito species we detected are known vectors for infectious encephalitides, including West Nile virus. Understanding the microhabitat characteristics of these mosquito species in a grassland ecosystem will aid in the control and management of these disease vectors. PMID:24581350

Ganser, Claudia; Wisely, Samantha M

2013-12-01

335

Mosquito and sand fly gregarines of the genus Ascogregarina and Psychodiella (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinorida, Aseptatorina)--overview of their taxonomy, life cycle, host specificity and pathogenicity.  

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Mosquitoes and sand flies are important blood-sucking vectors of human diseases such as malaria or leishmaniasis. Nevertheless, these insects also carry their own parasites, such as gregarines; these monoxenous pathogens are found exclusively in invertebrates, and some of them have been considered useful in biological control. Mosquito and sand fly gregarines originally belonging to a single genus Ascogregarina were recently divided into two genera, Ascogregarina comprising parasites of mosquitoes, bat flies, hump-backed flies and fleas and Psychodiella parasitizing sand flies. Currently, nine mosquito Ascogregarina and five Psychodiella species are described. These gregarines go through an extraordinarily interesting life cycle; the mosquito and sand fly larvae become infected by oocysts, the development continues transtadially through the larval and pupal stages to adults and is followed by transmission to the offspring by genus specific mechanisms. In adult mosquitoes, ascogregarines develop in the Malpighian tubules, and oocysts are defecated, while in the sand flies, the gregarines are located in the body cavity, their oocysts are injected into the accessory glands of females and released during oviposition. These life history differences are strongly supported by phylogenetical study of SSU rDNA proving disparate position of Ascogregarina and Psychodiella gregarines. This work reviews the current knowledge about Ascogregarina and Psychodiella gregarines parasitizing mosquitoes and sand flies, respectively. It gives a comprehensive insight into their taxonomy, life cycle, host specificity and pathogenicity, showing a very close relationship of gregarines with their hosts, which suggests a long and strong parasite-host coevolution. PMID:24797386

Lantova, Lucie; Volf, Petr

2014-12-01

336

Pathogenicity of the Fungus, Aspergillus clavatus, isolated from the locust, Oedaleus senegalensis, against larvae of the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus.  

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The use of insect pathogenic fungi is a promising alternative to chemical control against mosquitoes. Among the Hyphomycetes isolated from insects for mosquito control, the genus Aspergillus remains the least studied. In September 2005, four fungi were isolated from the Senegalese locust, Oedaleus senegalensis Kraus (Orthoptera: Acrididae), collected in Dakar, Senegal. One of these fungi, identified as Aspergillus clavatus, Desmazières (Eurotiales: Trichocomaceae) was highly pathogenic against larvae of the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti L., Anopheles gambiae s.l. Giles and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae). An application of 1.2 mg/ml dry conidia yielded 100% mortality after 24 hours against both Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus while with An. gambiae it was 95%. With unidentified species in the genus Aspergillus, mortality after 24 h was mosquito proliferation. PMID:20050773

Seye, Fawrou; Faye, Oumar; Ndiaye, Mady; Njie, Ebrima; Marie Afoutou, José

2009-01-01

337

Behavioral and electroantennographic responses of the tea mosquito, Helopeltis theivora, to female sex pheromones.  

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Responses of the tea mosquito, Helopeltis theivora (Waterhouse) (Hemiptera: Miridae), a major pest of tea, to female sex pheromone compounds were measured using wind tunnel and electroantennogram (EAG) bioassays. In the wind tunnel, male tea mosquitoes were found to be most attracted to a dichloromethane extract of the female thorax. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of female thoracic extracts and dynamic head space samples of virgin females showed the presence of five compounds: (Z)-3 hexenyl acetate, (Z)-3 hexenyl butanoate, (E)-2 hexenyl pentanoate, 2,4 dimethyl pentanal, and (E)-2-hexenol. Male tea mosquitoes were attracted to blends of (Z)-3 hexenyl acetate and (E)-2-hexenol in the wind tunnel with a 1:5 ratio eliciting the greatest response. EAG recordings of male antenna confirmed the ability of this blend to evoke antennal responses in male insects. Similarly active EAG responses were recorded toward female thoracic extract and a blend of (Z)-3 hexenyl acetate and (E)-2-hexenol. Behavioral responses of adult males are mediated by a blend of volatile female sex pheromone compounds, (Z)-3 hexenyl acetate and (E)-2-hexenol, at a ratio of 1:5. This female sex pheromone blend may be useful for tea mosquito control and management programs. PMID:19161684

Sachin, James P; Selvasundaram, R; Babu, A; Muraleedharan, N

2008-12-01

338

Antennal-Expressed Ammonium Transporters in the Malaria Vector Mosquito Anopheles gambiae  

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The principal Afrotropical malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae remains a significant threat to human health. In this anthropophagic species, females detect and respond to a range of human-derived volatile kairomones such as ammonia, lactic acid, and other carboxylic acids in their quest for blood meals. While the molecular underpinnings of mosquito olfaction and host seeking are becoming better understood, many questions remain unanswered. In this study, we have identified and characterized two candidate ammonium transporter genes, AgAmt and AgRh50 that are expressed in the mosquito antenna and may contribute to physiological and behavioral responses to ammonia, which is an important host kairomone for vector mosquitoes. AgAmt transcripts are highly enhanced in female antennae while a splice variant of AgRh50 appears to be antennal-specific. Functional expression of AgAmt in Xenopus laevis oocytes facilitates inward currents in response to both ammonium and methylammonium, while AgRh50 is able to partially complement a yeast ammonium transporter mutant strain, validating their conserved roles as ammonium transporters. We present evidence to suggest that both AgAmt and AgRh50 are in vivo ammonium transporters that are important for ammonia sensitivity in An. gambiae antennae, either by clearing ammonia from the sensillar lymph or by facilitating sensory neuron responses to environmental exposure. Accordingly, AgAmt and AgRh50 represent new and potentially important targets for the development of novel vector control strategies. PMID:25360676

Pulous, Fadi E.; Zwiebel, Laurence J.

2014-01-01

339

ELISA as an alternative tool for epidemiological surveillance for dengue in mosquitoes: a report from Thailand  

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Full Text Available Background & objectives: Dengue fever (DF, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and dengue shocksyndrome (DSS are the re-emerging infectious diseases caused by the four serotypes of dengue(DEN virus, type 1 to 4, belonging to the family Flaviviridae and genus Flavivirus. In the absenceof a safe and effective mass immunisation, the prevention and control of dengue outbreaks dependupon the surveillance of cases and mosquito vector. The aim of this work is to test enzyme-linkedimmunosorbent assay (ELISA tool for the virological surveillance of dengue.Methods: Virus-infected Aedes mosquitoes were collected from the field in order to serve as anearly warning monitoring tool for dengue outbreaks. In a prospective field study conducted fromApril to September 2000, female adult Aedes mosquitoes were caught from selected dengue-sensitivearea in Chombung district, Ratchaburi province and assayed by ELISA.Result: Approximately 18.3% were found positive for dengue virus.Conclusion: This can imply that ELISA can be an alternative tool for epidemiological surveillancefor dengue in mosquitoes.

Mayuna Srisuphanunt, Ratana Sithiprasasna, Somboon Patpoparn, Watcharee Attatippaholkun & Viroj Wiwanitkit

2007-12-01

340

Insecticide susceptibility of Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes in Ibadan, South-West Nigeria  

Science.gov (United States)

The emergence of insecticide resistance in Anopheles mosquitoes has great implications for malaria control in Nigeria. This study aimed to determine the dynamics of insecticide susceptibility levels and frequency of knockdown resistance (kdr) mutations (L1014F) in wild Anopheles coluzzii Coetzee & Wilkerson sp. n. and An. gambiae Giles ( (Diptera: Culicidae) from Ojoo and Bodija areas of Ibadan, South-West, Nigeria. Insecticide susceptibility to pyrethroids, organophosphates, carbamates and organochlorines was assessed using WHO bioassays. A subset of the mosquitoes exposed to pyrethroids and DDT was used for species and molecular form identification and kdr genotyping was determined using the Taqman real time PCR assay. The mosquitoes were resistant to pyrethroids and DDT but completely susceptible to organophosphates and carbamates. Bodja samples (n=186) comprised of An. gambiae (91.4%) and An. coluzzii (8.1%) while one An. coluzzii / An. gambiae hybrid was recorded. All mosquitoes screened in Ojoo (n=26) were An. gambiae. The 1014F kdr mutation was detected at a frequency of 24.52% and 5.8% in Bodija and Ojoo respectively. No correlation was observed between kdr genotypes and resistance phenotypes. The results indicate that metabolic resistance probably plays an important role in the resistance and highlights the need to implement insecticide resistance management strategies. PMID:25417803

Okorie, Patricia N.; Ademowo, George O.; Irving, Helen; Kelly-Hope, Louise A.; Wondji, Charles S.

2014-01-01

341

Source Reduction Behavior as an Independent Measurement of the Impact of a Public Health Education Campaign in an Integrated Vector Management Program for the Asian Tiger Mosquito  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a public health educational campaign to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats. Three communities each, within two New Jersey counties, were randomly selected to receive: (1 both education and mosquito control, (2 education only, and (3 no education or mosquito control. Four separate educational events included a 5-day elementary school curriculum in the spring, and three door to door distributions of educational brochures. Before and after each educational event, the numbers of mosquito-larval container habitats were counted in 50 randomly selected homes per study area. Container surveys allowed us to measure source reduction behavior. Although we saw reductions in container habitats in sites receiving education, they were not significantly different from the control. Our results suggest that traditional passive means of public education, which were often considered the gold standard for mosquito control programs, are not sufficient to motivate residents to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats.

Daniel Strickman

2011-05-01

342

The cell biology of mosquito vitellogenesis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Insect vitellogenesis involves coordinated activities of the fat body and oocytes. We have studied these activities at the cellular level in the mosquito. During each vitellogenic cycle, the fat body undergoes three successive stages: 1 proliferation of biosynthetic organelles, 2 vitellogenin synthesis, 3 termination of vitellogenin synthesis and degradation of biosynthetic organelles by lysosomes. Analysis with monoclonal antibodies and radiolabelling demonstrated that the mosquito yolk protein consists of two subunits (200-kDa and 65-kDa. Both subunits are glycosylated, their carbohydrate moieties are composed of high-mannose oligosaccharides. The yolk protein subunits are derived from a single 220 kDa precursor detected by an in vitro translation. Oocytes become competent to internalize proteins as a result of juvenile hormone-mediated biogenesis of endocytotic organelles. The yolk protein is then accumulated by receptor-mediated endocytosis. A pathway of the yold protein and factors determining its routing in the oocyte have been studied.

Alexander S. Raikhel

1987-01-01

343

Changes in local mosquito fauna following beaver (Castor canadensis) activity--an update.  

Science.gov (United States)

Drastic reduction of populations of univoltine temporary pool mosquitoes followed impoundment of breeding areas by beavers. Mosquito populations persist at very low levels over a 10-year period with no evidence of mosquito development in the impoundment. PMID:1357092

Butts, W L

1992-09-01

344

A 3D Analysis of Flight Behavior of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto Malaria Mosquitoes in Response to Human Odor and Heat  

OpenAIRE

Female mosquitoes use odor and heat as cues to navigate to a suitable landing site on their blood host. The way these cues affect flight behavior and modulate anemotactic responses, however, is poorly understood. We studied in-flight behavioral responses of females of the nocturnal malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto to human odor and heat. Flight-path characteristics in a wind tunnel (flow 20 cm/s) were quantified in three dimensions. With wind as the only stimulus (control), sh...

Spitzen, J.; Spoor, C. W.; Grieco, F.; Braak, C. J. F.; Beeuwkes, J.; Brugge, S. P.; Kranenbarg, S.; Noldus, L.; Leeuwen, J. L.; Takken, W.

2013-01-01

345

An Educational Interventional Study to Assess Awareness about Mosquito Breeding, Diseases Caused and Protective Measures Against them among Families Residing in an Urban Slum of Indore City  

OpenAIRE

Background: Community participation plays an important role in control of Mosquito borne diseases. This study tries to assess impact of educational intervention on various aspects of mosquito borne diseases in an urban slum. Methodology: An educational interventional study was done in 200 families residing in a slum (Badi Gwaltoli) which is in field practice area of Urban Health Centre attached to Department of Community Medicine of M.G.M.Medical College, Indore. A pretested semi-structured q...

Deepa Raghunath; Ak, Bhagwat; Sanjay Dixit; Sk, Guleri; Chetan Panwar; Chetan Patidar; Deepak Hindal; Karuna Tiwari

2013-01-01

346

Crab Hole Mosquito Bluesâ??The Story  

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

This podcast reports on a humorous song that takes a look at a very serious human and equine disease. Written and performed by the MARU Health Angels Band, Bill Dietz, director of the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity at CDC, talks about the song, "Crab Hole Mosquito Blues", and the history behind it.  Created: 5/12/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/23/2011.

2011-05-12

347

Wolbachia-Associated Bacterial Protection in the Mosquito Aedes aegypti  

OpenAIRE

Wolbachia is a commonly occurring bacterium or symbiont that lives inside the cells of insects. Recently, Wolbachia was artificially introduced into the mosquito vector dengue virus that was naturally Wolbachia-free. Wolbachia limits the growth of a range of pathogens transmitted to humans, including viruses, bacteria and parasites inside the mosquito. This “pathogen protection” forms the basis of field trials to determine if releasing Wolbachia into wild mosquito populations could reduce...

Ye, Yixin H.; Woolfit, Megan; Rance?s, Edwige; O Neill, Scott L.; Mcgraw, Elizabeth A.

2013-01-01

348

Survey of the Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) of Mayotte  

OpenAIRE

A transversal survey of immature mosquitoes was conducted on Mayotte Island (France) in the Comoros Archipelago, western Indian Ocean, with the aim to inventory the Culicidae and to document inter-species relationships in different habitats. In total 420 habitats were sampled for larvae and/or pupae mosquitoes, resulting in more than 6,000 specimens. Forty species belonging to 15 genera were collected, with eight taxa integrated for the first time to the Mayotte mosquito list. The most freque...

Le Goff, Gilbert; Goodman, Steven M.; Elguero, Eric; Robert, Vincent

2014-01-01

349

Spinosad: a biorational mosquito larvicide for use in car tires in southern Mexico  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Car tires are important habitats for mosquito development because of the high density populations they can harbor and their presence in urban settings. Water in experimental tires was treated with one of three insecticides or an untreated control. Aquatic invertebrates were sampled at weekly intervals. Eggs, larval and pupal samples were laboratory-reared to estimate seasonal fluctuations in Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus abundance. Results Spinosad treatments at 1 or 5?ppm (mg a.i./liter provided 6–8?weeks of effective control of Ae. aegypti, Ae. albopictus, Culex quinquefasiatus and Cx. coronator larvae, both in the dry season and the rainy season when mosquito populations increased markedly in southern Mexico. Spinosad continued to provide partial control of larvae for several weeks after initial recolonization of treated tires. The larvicidal performance of VectoBac 12AS (Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis was relatively poor with one week of complete control of Aedes spp. larvae and no discernible control of Culex spp., whereas the duration of larvicidal activity of 1% temephos mineral-based granules was intermediate between those of VectoBac and spinosad treatments. Populations of chironomids, ostracods and Toxorhynchites theobaldi were generally reduced in spinosad and temephos treatments, but were similar in control and VectoBac treatments. Conclusion The present study is the first to report spinosad as an effective larvicide against Cx. coronator, which is currently invading the southern United States. These results substantiate the use of spinosad as a highly effective mosquito larvicide, even in habitats such as unused car tires that can represent prolific sources of adult mosquitoes.

Marina Carlos F

2012-05-01

350

[Highest mosquito records (Diptera: Culicidae) in Venezuela].  

Science.gov (United States)

Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are holometabolous insects with aquatic immature stages, which use a broad variety of larval habitats, from ground water bodies to Phytothelmata (water deposits in plants) and artificial deposits. The availability of breeding sites often determines the upper limits of mosquito ranges. We built a database with 9,607 records with 432 localities, 19 genera and 254 species. The Andean mountains have 77% of the highest mosquito records including Aedes euris with record at 3,133 m, followed by three species of Anopheles--subgenera Kerteszia--with the upper limit of 2,680 m. Wyeomyia bicornis and Culex daumastocampa at 2,550 m were the highest records in the Central-Coastal cordillera, while the highest record in Pantepui was Wyeomyia zinzala at 2,252 m. The species associated with phytothelmata (Bromeliaceae and Sarraceniaceae) represent 60% of the records. The upper limits of Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles (Kerteszia) species could represent the theoretical limit for transmission of filariasis or arboviruses, by Culex, and malaria by Anopheles (Kerteszia) in Venezuela. Similarly, a vector of Dengue, Aedes aegypti, has not been not recorded above 2,000 m. PMID:20411719

Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Del Ventura, Fabiola; Zorrilla, Adriana; Liria, Jonathan

2010-03-01

351

Influence of biological and physicochemical characteristics of larval habitats on the body size of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae along the Kenyan coast  

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Full Text Available Background & objectives: The number and productivity of larval habitats ultimately determine thedensity of adult mosquitoes. The biological and physicochemical conditions at the larval habitataffect larval development hence affecting the adult body size. The influence of biological and physicochemicalcharacteristics on the body size of Anopheles gambiae was assessed in Jaribuni village,Kilifi district along the Kenyan Coast.Methods: Ten cages measuring 1 × 1 × 1 m (1 m3 with a netting material were placed in 10 differentaquatic habitats, which were positive for anopheline mosquito larvae. Emergent mosquitoes werecollected daily by aspiration and the wing lengths were determined by microscopy. In the habitats,physicochemical parameters were assessed: pH, surface debris, algae and emergent plants, turbidity,substrate, nitrate, ammonia, phosphate and chlorophyll a content.Results: A total of 685 anopheline and culicine mosquitoes were collected from the emergent cages.Only female mosquitoes were considered in this study. Among the Anopheles spp, 202 were An.gambiae s.s., eight An. arabiensis, two An. funestus, whereas the Culex spp was composed of 214Cx. quinquefasciatus, 10 Cx. tigripes, eight Cx. annulioris and one Cx. cumminsii. The mean winglength of the female An. gambiae s.s. mosquitoes was 3.02 mm (n = 157, while that of An. arabiensiswas 3.09 mm (n = 9. There were no associations between the wing lengths and the environmentaland chemical parameters, except for a positive correlation between wing length of An. gambiae andchlorophyll a content (r = 0.622. The day on which the mosquitoes emerged was not significant forthe anopheline (p = 0.324 or culicine mosquitoes (p = 0.374, because the mosquito emerged fromthe cages on a daily basis.Interpretation & conclusion: In conclusion, there was variability in production of emergent mosquitoesfrom different habitats, which means that there should be targeted control on these habitatsbased on productivity.

Joseph M. Mwangangi, Charles M. Mbogo, Ephantus J. Muturi, Joseph G. Nzovu, Ephantus W. Kabiru, John I. Githure, Robert J. Novak , John C. Beier

2007-06-01

352

Larval habitats and species composition of mosquitoes in Darjeeling Himalayas, India  

OpenAIRE

Background & objectives: A preliminary survey of larval mosquito habitats and temporal variationin mosquito diversity in the hill town of Darjeeling, India was made during 2003, for a qualitativeand quantitative assessment of mosquito distribution.Methods: The possible larval habitats of mosquitoes were surveyed and the species diversity in thesites positive for mosquito larvae was noted. Bi-weekly sampling from a particular habitat wascarried out to reveal the temporal variation in mosquito ...

Gautam Aditya, B.

2006-01-01

353

The Plasmodium bottleneck: malaria parasite losses in the mosquito vector  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Nearly one million people are killed every year by the malaria parasite Plasmodium. Although the disease-causing forms of the parasite exist only in the human blood, mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles are the obligate vector for transmission. Here, we review the parasite life cycle in the vector and [...] highlight the human and mosquito contributions that limit malaria parasite development in the mosquito host. We address parasite killing in its mosquito host and bottlenecks in parasite numbers that might guide intervention strategies to prevent transmission.

Ryan C, Smith; Joel, Vega-Rodríguez; Marcelo, Jacobs-Lorena.

2014-08-01

354

Efectividad y supervivencia de Romanomermis culicivorax en criaderos naturales de larvas de mosquitos / Effectiveness and survival of Romanomermis culicivorax in natural breeding sites of mosquito larvae  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Los mosquitos (Díptera: Culicidae) son transmisores de agentes causales de paludismo, dengue y encefalitis del Nilo occidental y causan fuertes molestias a los humanos. El objetivo del presente estudio fue determinar el efecto de aplicar 500 y 1000 nemátodos, Romanomermis culicivorax Ross y Smith, p [...] or metro cuadrado en poblaciones de larvas de Anopheles albimanus Wiedeman, Culex nigipalpus Theobald y Uranotaenia sapphirina Oster-Sacken, para su control en 13 criaderos naturales. El diseño experimental fue completamente al azar con arreglo factorial de dos factores (dos dosis de nemátodos y tres especies de mosquitos). La dosis de 500 nemátodos causó 74.3-87.8 % de parasitismo en larvas de las tres especies; la dosis de 1000 causó 77.2-96.9 % de parasitismo, con un incremento del parasitismo al aumentar la dosis de nemátodos (p Abstract in english Mosquitoes (Díptera: Culicidae) transmit causal agents of malaria, dengue and western Nile encephalitis, besides being extremely annoying for humans. The objective of this study was to determine the control effect of releasing 500 and 1000 Romanomermis culicivorax Ross and Smith nematodes per square [...] meter into larval populations of Anopheles albimanus Wiedeman, Culex nigripalpus Theobald, and Uranotenia sapphiriuna Oster-Sacken in 13 natural breeding sites. The experimental design was completely randomized with a factorial arrangement of two factors (two dosages of nematodes and three species of mosquitoes). The doses of 500 nematodes m-2 caused 74.3-87.8 % parasitism in larvae of the three species; the dose of 1000 nematodes m-2 caused 77.2-96.9 % parasitism; that is, parasitism was higher with the higher dose of nematodes (p

Rafael, Pérez-Pacheco; Alberto, Santamarina-Mijares; Alfonso, Vásquez-López; Sabino H., Martínez-Tomás; Javier, Suárez-Espinosa.

2009-12-01

355

Evaluation of organophosphorus and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides against six vector mosquitoe species Avaliação de inseticidas organofosforados e piretroides sintéticos contra seis mosquitos vetores  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Three organophosphorus compounds- malathion, folithion and temephos- and two synthetic pyrethroids- alphamethrin and deltamethrin- were used for monitoring the susceptibility status of larvae and adults of six vector mosquitoe species: Culex quinquefasciatus (Filariasis and Aedes albopictus (Dengue (both laboratory and field strains; laboratory strains of Aedes aegypti (Dengue, Anopheles slephensi and Anopheles culicifacies (Malaria, and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Japanese encephalitis in India. From the LC50 values obtained for these insecticides, it was found that all mosquito species including the field strains of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. albopictus were highly susceptible Except for Cx. quinquefasciatus (field strain against malathion, 100% mortality was observed at the discriminating dosages recommended by World Health Organization. The residual effect of alphamethrin, deltamethrin, malathion and folithion at 25 mg (ai/m² on different surfaces against six species of vector mosquitoes showed that alphamethrin was the most effective on all four treated surfaces (mud, plywood, cement and thatch. Nevertheless, residual efficacy lasted longer on thatch than on the other surfaces. Therefore, synthetic pyrethroids such as alphamethrin can be effectively employed in integrated vector control operations.Três compostos organo-fosforados - malation, folition e temefos -e dois piretroides sintéticos - alfametrina e deltametrina - foram usados para controlar o estado da susceptibilidade das larvas e adultos de seis mosquitos vetores na Índia. Foram utilizadas cepas de laboratório e área de Culex quinquefasciatus (filariasis e Aedes albopictus (Dengue e cepas de laboratório de Aedes aegypti (Dengue, Anopheles stephensi e Anopheles culicifacies (Malária e Culex tritaenorhynchus (encefalite japonesa. Os valores de C1(50 obtidos para esses inseticidas mostram que todas as espécies incluindo as cepas de área foram muito susceptíveis. Nos mosquitos adultos das referidas espécies salvo na cepa da área de Culex quinquefasciatus com o malathion, observou-se 100% da mortalidade às doses discriminatórias recomendadas pela Organização Mundial de Saúde. O efeito residual da alfametrina, deltametrina, malation e folition a 25 mg (ai/m² em diversas superfícies contra seis espécies de mosquitos vetores evidenciou que a alfametrina foi a mais efetiva em todas as superfícies tratadas (argila, "plywood", cimento e palha.

Domingo Montada Dorta

1993-12-01

356

Beyond RNAi: antiviral defense strategies in Drosophila and mosquito.  

Science.gov (United States)

Virus transmission and spread by arthropods is a major economic and public health concern. The ongoing dissemination of arthropod-borne viruses by blood-feeding insects is an important incentive to study antiviral immunity in these animals. RNA interference is a major mechanism for antiviral defense in insects, including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and several vector mosquitoes. However, recent data suggest that the evolutionary conserved Toll, Imd and Jak-Stat signaling pathways also contribute to antiviral immunity. Moreover, symbionts, such as the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia and the gut microflora, influence the course of virus infection in insects. These results add an additional level of complexity to antiviral immunity, but also provide novel opportunities to control the spread of arboviruses. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge and recent developments in antiviral immunity in Dipteran insects, with a focus on non-RNAi mediated inducible responses. PMID:22824741

Merkling, Sarah H; van Rij, Ronald P

2013-02-01

357

Mosquito larval productivity in rice-fields infested with Azolla in Mvomero District, Tanzania.  

Science.gov (United States)

Azolla (Salviniales: Azollaceae) is known to reduce oviposition and adult emergence of a number of mosquito species. Several species of Azolla are reportedly indigenous to Tanzania. However, the potential of Azolla as a biocontrol agent against malaria mosquitoes has not been evaluated in the country. This cross-sectional study was carried out to assess mosquito larval productivity in irrigated rice-fields infested with Azolla in Mvomero District, Tanzania. A systematic larval sampling covering all open water bodies along designed transect was carried in rice-fields. Larval density was estimated by dipping water bodies with or without Azolla. The degree of Azolla coverage was categorized as 0%, 80%. Larvae densities were categorised as low ( or = 500/m2) productivity. A total of 120 water bodies were surveyed and 105 (87.5%) had Azolla microphyla and A. pinnata at varying degrees of coverage. Of the total 105 water bodies with Azolla, 80 (76.2%) had a green Azolla mat, and 25 (23.8%) a brown Azolla mat. Eighty-eight (73.3%) of the sites were infested with anophelines and 109 (90.8%) with culicine larvae. Seventy percent of all water bodies contained anophelines and culicines in sympatric breeding, while 20.8% and 3.3% had only culicines and anophelines, respectively. The majority (82%) of mosquito breeding sites were found in area with Azolla substrate. Mosquito larva productivity was low in sites with highest (>80%) Azolla coverage. Seventy-two (81.8%) of the anopheline and 90 (82.6%) culicine breeding sites were infested with Azolla. Water bodies infested with green Azolla were more productive than those covered by brown coloured Azolla substrates for both culicines (13%) and anophelines (8%). Of the 1537 field collected larvae that hatched to adult stage, 646 (42.03%) were Anopheles gambiae s.l., 42 (2.73%) were An. funestus and 769 (50.03%) were Culex quinquefasciatus. These findings suggest that the mosquito productivity is low when the Azolla coverage is high (>80%). The promotion of Azolla in mosquito control should take into consideration the degree of Azolla coverage. PMID:19445100

Mwingira, V S; Mayala, B K; Senkoro, K P; Rumisha, S F; Shayo, E H; Mlozi, M R S; Mboera, L E G

2009-01-01

358

Anopheles plumbeus (Diptera: Culicidae in Europe: a mere nuisance mosquito or potential malaria vector?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles plumbeus has been recognized as a minor vector for human malaria in Europe since the beginning of the 20th century. In recent years this tree hole breeding mosquito species appears to have exploited novel breeding sites, including large and organically rich man-made containers, with consequently larger mosquito populations in close vicinity to humans. This lead to investigate whether current populations of An. plumbeus would be able to efficiently transmit Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite responsible for the most deadly form of malaria. Methods Anopheles plumbeus immatures were collected from a liquid manure pit in Switzerland and transferred as adults to the CEPIA (Institut Pasteur, France where they were fed on P. falciparum gametocytes produced in vitro. Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes served as controls. Development of P. falciparum in both mosquito species was followed by microscopical detection of oocysts on mosquito midguts and by sporozoite detection in the head/thorax by PCR and microscopy. Results A total of 293 wild An. plumbeus females from four independent collections successfully fed through a membrane on blood containing P. falciparum gametocytes. Oocysts were observed in mosquito midguts and P. falciparum DNA was detected in head-thorax samples in all four experiments, demonstrating, on a large mosquito sample, that An. plumbeus is indeed receptive to P. falciparum NF54 and able to produce sporozoites. Importantly, the proportion of sporozoites-infected An. plumbeus was almost similar to that of An. gambiae (31 to 88% An. plumbeus versus 67 to 97% An. gambiae. However, the number of sporozoites produced was significantly lower in infected An. plumbeus. Conclusion The results show that a sample of field-caught An. plumbeus has a moderate to high receptivity towards P. falciparum. Considering the increased mobility of humans between Europe and malaria endemic countries and changes in environment and climate, these data strongly suggest that An. plumbeus could act as a vector for malaria and thus significantly contribute to increasing the malaria transmission risk in Central-Western Europe. In locations showing high vulnerability to the presence of gametocyte carriers, the risk of transmission of malaria by An. plumbeus should be considered.

Schaffner Francis

2012-11-01

359

Re-introducing bacteria in mosquitoes - A method for determination of mosquito feeding preferences based on coloured sugar solutions  

OpenAIRE

In this study, sugar-feeding was investigated as a possible means of re-introducing bacteria into mosquito midguts with the aim of identifying bacteria that are suitable for creating paratransgenic mosquitoes. In a paratransgenic approach, bacteria are utilised to deliver effector molecules capable of inhibiting pathogen development in the midgut of the vector. To determine if mosquitoes discriminate between sterile sugar solutions and sugar solutions with bacteria, a method for screening mos...

Lindh, J. M.; Terenius, O.; Eriksson-gonzales, K.; Knols, B. G. J.; Faye, I.

2006-01-01

360

Response to Dengue virus infections altered by cytokine-like substances from mosquito cell cultures  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background With both shrimp and commercial insects such as honey bees, it is known that stable, persistent viral infections characterized by absence of disease can sometimes shift to overt disease states as a result of various stress triggers and that this can result in serious economic losses. The main research interest of our group is to understand the dynamics of stable viral infections in shrimp and how they can be destabilized by stress. Since there are no continuous cell lines for crustaceans, we have used a C6/36 mosquito cell line infected with Dengue virus to test hypotheses regarding these interactions. As a result, we accidentally discovered two new cytokine-like substances in 5 kDa extracts from supernatant solutions of acutely and persistently infected mosquito cells. Results Naïve C6/36 cells were exposed for 48 h to 5 kDa membrane filtrates prepared from the supernatant medium of stable C6/36 mosquito cell cultures persistently-infected with Dengue virus. Subsequent challenge of naïve cells with a virulent stock of Dengue virus 2 (DEN-2 and analysis by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy using anti-DEN-2 antibody revealed a dramatic reduction in the percentage of DEN-2 infected cells when compared to control cells. Similar filtrates prepared from C6/36 cells with acute DEN-2 infections were used to treat stable C6/36 mosquito cell cultures persistently-infected with Dengue virus. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed destabilization in the form of an apoptosis-like response. Proteinase K treatment removed the cell-altering activities indicating that they were caused by small polypeptides similar to those previously reported from insects. Conclusions This is the first report of cytokine-like substances that can alter the responses of mosquito cells to Dengue virus. This simple model system allows detailed molecular studies on insect cytokine production and on cytokine activity in a standard insect cell line.

Laosutthipong Chaowanee

2010-11-01

361

Male and mosquito larvae survey at the Arenal-Tempisque irrigation project, Guanacaste, Costa Rica  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Se realizó un monitoreo de machos y larvas de mosquitos durante los años 1991 a 1994 en el Proyecto de Riego Arenal-Tempisque, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Los especímenes fueron colectados en 32 giras de cuatro días cada una y cada 15 días. La colecta de adultos se hizo mediante trampas tipo CDC y la de [...] larvas con la técnica estándar del cucharón. Se identificaron un total de 1 480 larvas y 1 129 machos de culícidos, correspondientes a 21 especies de Culex, 6 especies de Aedes, 2 especies de Anopheles, Mansonia, y Psorophora y una especie de Haemagogus, Limatus, Toxorhynchites y Uranotaenia. Los resultados indican que tal y como ha ocurrido en proyectos de riego en otros países, se deben mantener estrictos programas de monitoreo con el fin de prevenir y controlar posibles problemas de salud humana y animal, en los cuales los mosquitos actúen como vectores Abstract in english A monitoring of male and larvae of mosquitoes was conducted during 1991-1994, at the Irrigation Project in Arenal-Tempisque, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. CDC CO2 -baited traps were used to collect adults of mosquitoes and dips were used for immatures of culicids. A total of 1 480 larvae and 1 129 males o [...] f culicids were identified resulting in, Aedes with 6 species, Anopheles, Mansonia and Psorophora with 2 species, Culex with 21 species and Haemagogus, Limatus, Toxorhynchites and Uranotaenia with only one species each. The results indicate that, as occurred in other countries, irrigation projects must be under strict monitoring programs to prevent and control possible health problems in which mosquitoes act as vectors

Mario, Vargas V; Jorge V, Vargas C.

2003-09-01

362

Male and mosquito larvae survey at the Arenal-Tempisque irrigation project, Guanacaste, Costa Rica  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A monitoring of male and larvae of mosquitoes was conducted during 1991-1994, at the Irrigation Project in Arenal-Tempisque, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. CDC CO2 -baited traps were used to collect adults of mosquitoes and dips were used for immatures of culicids. A total of 1 480 larvae and 1 129 males of culicids were identified resulting in, Aedes with 6 species, Anopheles, Mansonia and Psorophora with 2 species, Culex with 21 species and Haemagogus, Limatus, Toxorhynchites and Uranotaenia with only one species each. The results indicate that, as occurred in other countries, irrigation projects must be under strict monitoring programs to prevent and control possible health problems in which mosquitoes act as vectorsSe realizó un monitoreo de machos y larvas de mosquitos durante los años 1991 a 1994 en el Proyecto de Riego Arenal-Tempisque, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Los especímenes fueron colectados en 32 giras de cuatro días cada una y cada 15 días. La colecta de adultos se hizo mediante trampas tipo CDC y la de larvas con la técnica estándar del cucharón. Se identificaron un total de 1 480 larvas y 1 129 machos de culícidos, correspondientes a 21 especies de Culex, 6 especies de Aedes, 2 especies de Anopheles, Mansonia, y Psorophora y una especie de Haemagogus, Limatus, Toxorhynchites y Uranotaenia. Los resultados indican que tal y como ha ocurrido en proyectos de riego en otros países, se deben mantener estrictos programas de monitoreo con el fin de prevenir y controlar posibles problemas de salud humana y animal, en los cuales los mosquitos actúen como vectores

Mario Vargas V

2003-09-01

363

Effects of open marsh water management on numbers of larval salt marsh mosquitoes  

Science.gov (United States)

Open marsh water management (OMWM) is a commonly used approach to manage salt marsh mosquitoes than can obviate the need for pesticide application and at the same time, partially restore natural functions of grid-ditched marshes. OMWM includes a variety of hydrologic manipulations, often tailored to the specific conditions on individual marshes, so the overall effectiveness of this approach is difficult to assess. Here, we report the results of controlled field trials to assess the effects of two approaches to OMWM on larval mosquito production at National Wildlife Refuges (NWR). A traditional OMWM approach, using pond construction and radial ditches was used at Edwin B. Forsythe NWR in New Jersey, and a ditch-plugging approach was used at Parker River NWR in Massachusetts. Mosquito larvae were sampled from randomly placed stations on paired treatment and control marshes at each refuge. The proportion of sampling stations that were wet declined after OMWM at the Forsythe site, but not at the Parker River site. The proportion of samples with larvae present and mean larval densities, declined significantly at the treatment sites on both refuges relative to the control marshes. Percentage of control for the 2 yr posttreatment, compared with the 2 yr pretreatment, was >90% at both treatment sites.

James-Pirri, Mary-Jane; Ginsberg, Howard S.; Erwin, R. Michael; Taylor, Janith

2009-01-01

364

Quantifying behavioural interactions between humans and mosquitoes: Evaluating the protective efficacy of insecticidal nets against malaria transmission in rural Tanzania  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background African malaria vectors bite predominantly indoors at night so sleeping under an Insecticide-Treated Net (ITN can greatly reduce malaria risk. Behavioural adaptation by mosquitoes to increasing ITN coverage could allow vector mosquitoes to bite outside of peak sleeping hours and undermine efficacy of this key malaria prevention measure. Methods High coverage with largely untreated nets has been achieved in the Kilombero Valley, southern Tanzania through social marketing programmes. Direct surveys of nightly biting activity by An. gambiae Giles were conducted in the area before (1997 and after (2004 implementation of ITN promotion. A novel analytical model was applied to estimate the effective protection provided by an ITN, based on published experimental hut trials combined with questionnaire surveys of human sleeping behaviour and recorded mosquito biting patterns. Results An. gambiae was predominantly endophagic and nocturnal in both surveys: Approximately 90% and 80% of exposure occurred indoors and during peak sleeping hours, respectively. ITNs consistently conferred >70% protection against exposure to malaria transmission for users relative to non-users. Conclusion As ITN coverage increases, behavioural adaptation by mosquitoes remains a future possibility. The approach described allows comparison of mosquito biting patterns and ITN efficacy at multiple study sites and times. Initial results indicate ITNs remain highly effective and should remain a top-priority intervention. Combined with recently developed transmission models, this approach allows rapid, informative and cost-effective preliminary comparison of diverse control strategies in terms of protection against exposure before more costly and intensive clinical trials.

Mathenge Evan

2006-11-01

365

Assessing the efficacy of candidate mosquito repellents against the background of an attractive source that mimics a human host.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mosquito repellents are used around the globe to protect against nuisance biting and disease-transmitting mosquitoes. Recently, there has been renewed interest in the development of repellents as tools to control the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases. We present a new bioassay for the accurate assessment of candidate repellent compounds, using a synthetic odour that mimics the odour blend released by human skin. Using DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide) and PMD (p-menthane-3,8-diol) as reference compounds, nine candidate repellents were tested, of which five showed significant repellency to the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto (Diptera: Culicidae). These included: 2-nonanone; 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one; linalool; ?-decalactone, and ?-undecalactone. The lactones were also tested on the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti (Stegomyia aegypti) (Diptera: Culicidae), against which they showed similar degrees of repellency. We conclude that the lactones are highly promising repellents, particularly because these compounds are pleasant-smelling, natural products that are also present in human food sources. PMID:24797537

Menger, D J; Van Loon, J J A; Takken, W

2014-12-01

366

Evaluation of textile substrates for dispensing synthetic attractants for malaria mosquitoes  

OpenAIRE

Background The full-scale impact of odour-baited technology on the surveillance, sampling and