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Sample records for mosquito control

  1. Mosquito Control

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Mosquito Control About Mosquitoes General Information Life Cycle Information from ... is Right for You DEET Pesticides for Mosquito Control Larvicides Adulticides Misting Systems Getting Help with Mosquito ...

  2. HERBAL CONTROL OF MOSQUITO LARVAE

    Chaudhari Priyanka S, Chaudhari SV* Jangam Sampada, Shinde JS, Wankhede Sneha

    2013-01-01

    Mosquitoes are the vectors for the dreadful diseases of mankind. For control of larval stages of mosquito, herbal plant extracts/ botanical insecticides are being tried. In the present study aqueous extract of some traditional medicinal herbal plants i.e. Neem (Azadirechta indica), Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), Turmeric (Curcuma longa), Tulasi (Ocimum santum), and Ginger (Zingiber officinale) were tested for their Larvicidal activity. The successful attempt is made to kill the larvae, the prem...

  3. New Innovations in Biological Control of Mosquitoes.

    Biological control of mosquitoes is a component of an integrated pest management strategy and includes general predators, parasites and pathogens. Pathogens of mosquitoes include bacteria, viruses, fungi and protists. The most successful group for applied mosquito control include the bacteria Baci...

  4. Genetic control of Aedes mosquitoes

    Alphey, Luke; McKemey, Andrew; Nimmo, Derric; Neira Oviedo, Marco; Lacroix, Renaud; Matzen, Kelly; Beech, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Aedes mosquitoes include important vector species such as Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue. Genetic control methods are being developed for several of these species, stimulated by an urgent need owing to the poor effectiveness of current methods combined with an increase in chemical pesticide resistance. In this review we discuss the various genetic strategies that have been proposed, their present status, and future prospects. We focus particularly on those methods that are already ...

  5. Green Nanoparticles for Mosquito Control

    Namita Soni; Soam Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Here, we have used the green method for synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles. In the present study the silver (Ag) and gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by using the aqueous bark extract of Indian spice dalchini (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) (C. zyelanicum or C. verum J. Presl). Additionally, we have used these synthesized nanoparticles for mosquito control. The larvicidal activity has been tested against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and filariasis vector Culex quinquef...

  6. North American Wetlands and Mosquito Control

    Sakolsky-Hoopes, Gabrielle E.; Laderman, Aimlee D.; Joe Berg; Sheila M. O'Connell; C. Roxanne Connelly; Roger J. Wolfe; Walton, William E.; REY, JORGE R.

    2012-01-01

    Wetlands are valuable habitats that provide important social, economic, and ecological services such as flood control, water quality improvement, carbon sequestration, pollutant removal, and primary/secondary production export to terrestrial and aquatic food chains. There is disagreement about the need for mosquito control in wetlands and about the techniques utilized for mosquito abatement and their impacts upon wetlands ecosystems. Mosquito control in wetlands is a complex issue influenced ...

  7. Mosquito larval source management for controlling malaria

    Tusting, L.S.; Thwing, J.; Sinclair, D.; Fillinger, U; Gimnig, J.; Bonner, K.E.; Bottomley, C.; Lindsay, S W

    2013-01-01

    Background Malaria is an important cause of illness and death in people living in many parts of the world, especially sub-Saharan Africa. Long-lasting insecticide treated bed nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) reduce malaria transmission by targeting the adult mosquito vector and are key components of malaria control programmes. However, mosquito numbers may also be reduced by larval source management (LSM), which targets mosquito larvae as they mature in aquatic habitats. Thi...

  8. Novel Methods for Mosquito Control using RNAi.

    The discovery and development of novel insecticides for vector control is a primary focus of toxicology research conducted at the Mosquito and Fly Research Unit, Gainesville, FL. Targeting critical genes/proteins in mosquitoes using RNA interference (RNAi) is being investigated as a method to devel...

  9. MODELING AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF MOSQUITOES

    LORD, CYNTHIA C.

    2007-01-01

    Models can be useful at many different levels when considering complex issues such as biological control of mosquitoes. At an early stage, exploratory models are valuable in exploring the characteristics of an ideal biological control agent and for guidance in data collection. When more data are available, models can be used to explore alternative control strategies and the likelihood of success. There are few modeling studies that explicitly consider biological control in mosquitoes; however...

  10. Genetic Control of Mosquitoes: population suppression strategies

    André Barretto Bruno Wilke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, morbidity and mortality from malaria and dengue fever among other pathogens are an increasing Public Health problem. The increase in the geographic distribution of vectors is accompanied by the emergence of viruses and diseases in new areas. There are insufficient specific therapeutic drugs available and there are no reliable vaccines for malaria or dengue, although some progress has been achieved, there is still a long way between its development and actual field use. Most mosquito control measures have failed to achieve their goals, mostly because of the mosquito's great reproductive capacity and genomic flexibility. Chemical control is increasingly restricted due to potential human toxicity, mortality in no target organisms, insecticide resistance, and other environmental impacts. Other strategies for mosquito control are desperately needed. The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT is a species-specific and environmentally benign method for insect population suppression, it is based on mass rearing, radiation mediated sterilization, and release of a large number of male insects. Releasing of Insects carrying a dominant lethal gene (RIDL offers a solution to many of the drawbacks of traditional SIT that have limited its application in mosquitoes while maintaining its environmentally friendly and species-specific utility. The self-limiting nature of sterile mosquitoes tends to make the issues related to field use of these somewhat less challenging than for self-spreading systems characteristic of population replacement strategies. They also are closer to field use, so might be appropriate to consider first. The prospect of genetic control methods against mosquito vectored human diseases is rapidly becoming a reality, many decisions will need to be made on a national, regional and international level regarding the biosafety, social, cultural and ethical aspects of the use and deployment of these vector control methods.

  11. Paratransgenesis: a promising new strategy for mosquito vector control

    Wilke, André Barretto Bruno; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2015-01-01

    The three main mosquito genera, Anopheles, Aedes and Culex, transmit respectively malaria, dengue and lymphatic filariasis. Current mosquito control strategies have proved unsuccessful, and there still is a substantial number of morbidity and mortality from these diseases. Genetic control methods have now arisen as promising alternative strategies, based on two approaches: the replacement of a vector population by disease-refractory mosquitoes and the release of mosquitoes carrying a lethal g...

  12. Wolbachia and the biological control of mosquito-borne disease

    Iturbe-Ormaetxe, Iñaki; Walker, Thomas; O'Neill, Scott L

    2011-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases are an increasing problem in many regions of the world, and control options are limited. Mosquito infection with the endosymbiotic bacteria Wolbachia—which reduces lifespan, affects mosquito reproduction and interferes with pathogen replication—is a promising new biocontrol strategy.

  13. New Toxicants for Mosquito Control.

    The search for new active ingredients for vector control involves two main approaches. The first is the screening of large numbers of experimental compounds (synthetic and natural products) using a primary high throughput screen (HTS) bioassay using Aedes aegypti larvae. Highly active compounds are...

  14. Does polyandrous impede mosquito control by autocidal?

    K.Jayaprakash

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vector mosquito control by releasing genetically altered males has been attempted under the presumption that the females are monandrous. The present observation was through the sex–linked inheritance pattern of eye-colour and the estimation of polyandrous in in-vitro mating. A small proportion (18.2% of the female Anopheles stephensi population exhibited polyandrous on examination of 850 F1 adults when two types of males (white and black eyed where allowed to mate with homozygous white eyed females. The above results were discussed with relation to the consequences of the polyandrous trait in sterile insect technique, genetic control programmes.

  15. Salivary Biomarkers in the Control of Mosquito-Borne Diseases

    Souleymane Doucoure; Papa Makhtar Drame

    2015-01-01

    Vector control remains the most effective measure to prevent the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases. However, the classical entomo-parasitological methods used to evaluate the human exposure to mosquito bites and the effectiveness of control strategies are indirect, labor intensive, and lack sensitivity in low exposure/transmission areas. Therefore, they are limited in their accuracy and widespread use. Studying the human antibody response against the mosquito salivary proteins has provi...

  16. Mathematical model in controlling dengue transmission with sterile mosquito strategies

    Aldila, D.; Nuraini, N.; Soewono, E.

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we propose a mathematical model for controlling dengue disease transmission with sterile mosquito techniques (SIT). Sterile male introduced from lab in to habitat to compete with wild male mosquito for mating with female mosquito. Our aim is to displace gradually the natural mosquito from the habitat. Mathematical model analysis for steady states and the basic reproductive ratio are performed analytically. Numerical simulation are shown in some different scenarios. We find that SIT intervention is potential to controlling dengue spread among humans population

  17. Modelling the requirements and benefits of mosquito control interventions in the presence of mosquito dispersal

    Lutambi Angelina M; Chitnis Nakul; Smith Tom; Penny Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Vector control methods are widely used as a means to control malaria, however, the role of spatial arrangement when deploying these interventions is not well known. Understanding the effects of spatial distribution and clustering of interventions on mosquito populations can provide a guide to strategically deploying interventions to effectively maximize benefits. A recently developed discrete-space continuous-time mathematical model of mosquito population dynamics and dispersal was extended t...

  18. Genetic Methods for Control of Mosquitoes

    This summary of past experiments and pilot projects on the genetic control of mosquitoes is not intended to be an exhaustive review. Emphasis has been placed on: 1) successful research efforts on the use of the sterile insect technique (SIT) and the synthesis of useful heritable chromosomal aberrations, 2) the technical limitations in our present ability to use SIT, 3) the need for genetic evaluation of the structure of natural populations, and 4) a look at the future impact of recombinant DNA methods on genetic control. A generally optimistic point of view of the current and future situations from the author's perspective will be expressed, with emphasis on successful research efforts. Past failures will not be ignored, but neither will they be presented as irrefutable evidence of doom for genetic control.

  19. Adult vector control, mosquito ecology and malaria transmission.

    Brady, OJ; Godfray, HC; Tatem, AJ; Gething, PW; Cohen, JM; McKENZIE, FE; Alex Perkins, T.; Reiner, RC; Tusting, LS; Scott, TW; Lindsay, SW; Hay, SI; Smith, DL

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standard advice regarding vector control is to prefer interventions that reduce the lifespan of adult mosquitoes. The basis for this advice is a decades-old sensitivity analysis of 'vectorial capacity', a concept relevant for most malaria transmission models and based solely on adult mosquito population dynamics. Recent advances in micro-simulation models offer an opportunity to expand the theory of vectorial capacity to include both adult and juvenile mosquito stages in the model...

  20. Entomopathogenic fungi for mosquito control: A review

    Ernst-Jan Scholte; Bart G.J. Knols; Samson, Robert A; Willem Takken

    2004-01-01

    Fungal diseases in insects are common and widespread and can decimate their populations in spectacular epizootics. Virtually all insect orders are susceptible to fungal diseases, including Dipterans. Fungal pathogens such as Lagenidium, Coelomomyces and Culicinomyces are known to affect mosquito populations, and have been studied extensively. There are, however, many other fungi that infect and kill mosquitoes at the larval and/or adult stage. The discovery, in 1977, of the selective mosquito...

  1. Engineering the control of mosquito-borne infectious diseases

    Gabrieli, Paolo; Smidler, Andrea; Catteruccia, Flaminia

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genetic engineering are bringing new promise for controlling mosquito populations that transmit deadly pathogens. Here we discuss past and current efforts to engineer mosquito strains that are refractory to disease transmission or are suitable for suppressing wild disease-transmitting populations.

  2. Control of mosquitoes by the sterile male technique

    Field tests on the applicability of SIT to mosquito control have been conducted since the late 1950s. Early field experiments were conducted by releasing radiation-sterilized males. Methods of chemically sterilizing mosquitoes were also developed. Genetically altered strains which are partially sterile were also developed, studied and then used in field experiments. The earliest release experiments with mosquitoes were unsuccessful in introducing sterility into natural populations or reducing insect density, but identified problems and developed methodology. A summary of the releases conducted since the 1950s is given as background and then recent tests are reviewed in more detail where population control was achieved. The advances made in understanding the dynamics of field populations of mosquitoes when subjected to SIT are also reviewed. The problems associated with SIT for mosquito control - absolute density, growth rate, migration and others - are also discussed. (author)

  3. Mosquito Control in Poland: Pro- and Anti-Environmental Activities

    Gliniewicz Aleksandra; Mikulak Ewa; Rydzanicz Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito control in Poland is still dominated by the use of chemicals. Although it has been 13 years since the flood of the century, only in few cities and towns (Wroclaw, Gorzow Wielkopolski and Torun) various methods of mosquito control such as mapping of larvae development and setting time limits for the imagines occur-rence were developed. The problem of mosquito control is not only limited to adult insects, it is also much more a complex issue due to the use of insecticides in the enviro...

  4. Help Control Mosquitoes that Spread Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika Viruses

    Help Control Mosquitoes that Spread Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika Viruses B Z Z Z Z . Aside from being ... or Aedes albopictus ) can spread dengue, chikungunya, or Zika viruses. People become infected with dengue, chikungunya, or Zika ...

  5. Research in mosquito control: current challenges for a brighter future.

    Benelli, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are a key threat for millions of people worldwide, since they act as vectors for devastating pathogens and parasites. In this scenario, vector control is crucial. Mosquito larvae are usually targeted using organophosphates, insect growth regulators, and microbial agents. Indoor residual spraying and insecticide-treated bed nets are also employed. However, these chemicals have negative effects on human health and the environment and induce resistance in a number of vectors. Newer and safer tools have been recently implemented to enhance control of mosquitoes. Here, I focus on some crucial challenges about eco-friendly control of mosquito vectors, mainly the improvement of behavior-based control strategies (sterile insect technique ("SIT") and "boosted SIT") and plant-borne mosquitocidals, including green-synthesized nanoparticles. A number of hot areas that need further research and cooperation among parasitologists, entomologists, and behavioral ecologists are highlighted. PMID:26093499

  6. Novel acetylcholinesterase target site for malaria mosquito control.

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2006-01-01

    Current anticholinesterase pesticides were developed during World War II and are toxic to mammals because they target a catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterases (AChEs) in insects and in mammals. A sequence analysis of AChEs from 73 species and a three-dimensional model of a malaria-carrying mosquito (Anopheles gambiae) AChE (AgAChE) reported here show that C286 and R339 of AgAChE are conserved at the opening of the active site of AChEs in 17 invertebrate and four insect species, respectively. Both residues are absent in the active site of AChEs of human, monkey, dog, cat, cattle, rabbit, rat, and mouse. The 17 invertebrates include house mosquito, Japanese encephalitis mosquito, African malaria mosquito, German cockroach, Florida lancelet, rice leaf beetle, African bollworm, beet armyworm, codling moth, diamondback moth, domestic silkworm, honey bee, oat or wheat aphid, the greenbug, melon or cotton aphid, green peach aphid, and English grain aphid. The four insects are house mosquito, Japanese encephalitis mosquito, African malaria mosquito, and German cockroach. The discovery of the two invertebrate-specific residues enables the development of effective and safer pesticides that target the residues present only in mosquito AChEs rather than the ubiquitous serine residue, thus potentially offering an effective control of mosquito-borne malaria. Anti-AgAChE pesticides can be designed to interact with R339 and subsequently covalently bond to C286. Such pesticides would be toxic to mosquitoes but not to mammals. PMID:17183688

  7. Boosting the sterile insect technique to control mosquitoes.

    Bouyer, Jrmy; Lefranois, Thierry

    2014-06-01

    Mosquitoes are vectors of major diseases. Auto-dissemination recently proved very efficient to control Aedes species, using adult females contaminated with dissemination stations of juvenile hormone to treat breeding habitats, but cannot be used at large scales. Here we propose to combine it to the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) to create a new control concept, named 'boosted SIT' that might enable the area-wide eradication of mosquitoes and many other vectors and insect pests. PMID:24746400

  8. Introduction and control of three invasive mosquito species in the Netherlands, July-October 2010

    Scholte, E J; Den Hartog, W; Dik, M; Schoelitsz, B; Brooks, M.; Schaffner, F.; Foussadier, R.; Braks, M; Beeuwkes, J.

    2010-01-01

    In July 2010, during routine mosquito surveillance inspections at companies that import used tires, three invasive species were found at five locations in the Netherlands: the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti), the Asian tiger mosquito (Ae. albopictus), and the American rock-pool mosquito (Ae. atropalpus). This is the first time that Ae. aegypti is reported from the Netherlands. Mosquito control was initiated one week after the first invasive mosquito was found, ...

  9. Control methods against invasive Aedes mosquitoes in Europe: a review.

    Baldacchino, Frdric; Caputo, Beniamino; Chandre, Fabrice; Drago, Andrea; della Torre, Alessandra; Montarsi, Fabrizio; Rizzoli, Annapaola

    2015-11-01

    Five species of invasive Aedes mosquitoes have recently become established in Europe: Ae. albopictus, Ae. aegypti, Ae. japonicus japonicus, Ae. koreicus and Ae. atropalpus. These mosquitoes are a serious nuisance for people and are also competent vectors for several exotic pathogens such as dengue and chikungunya viruses. As they are a growing public health concern, methods to control these mosquitoes need to be implemented to reduce their biting and their potential for disease transmission. There is a crucial need to evaluate methods as part of an integrated invasive mosquito species control strategy in different European countries, taking into account local Aedes infestations and European regulations. This review presents the control methods available or in development against invasive Aedes mosquitoes, with a particular focus on those that can be implemented in Europe. These control methods are divided into five categories: environmental (source reduction), mechanical (trapping), biological (e.g. copepods, Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis, Wolbachia), chemical (insect growth regulators, pyrethroids) and genetic (sterile insect technique and genetically modified mosquitoes). We discuss the effectiveness, ecological impact, sustainability and stage of development of each control method. PMID:26037532

  10. Salivary Biomarkers in the Control of Mosquito-Borne Diseases

    Souleymane Doucoure

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vector control remains the most effective measure to prevent the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases. However, the classical entomo-parasitological methods used to evaluate the human exposure to mosquito bites and the effectiveness of control strategies are indirect, labor intensive, and lack sensitivity in low exposure/transmission areas. Therefore, they are limited in their accuracy and widespread use. Studying the human antibody response against the mosquito salivary proteins has provided new biomarkers for a direct and accurate evaluation of the human exposure to mosquito bites, at community and individual levels. In this review, we discuss the development, applications and limits of these biomarkers applied to Aedes- and Anopheles-borne diseases.

  11. Fighting Arbovirus Transmission: Natural and Engineered Control of Vector Competence in Aedes Mosquitoes

    Joy Kean; Rainey, Stephanie M.; Melanie McFarlane; Donald, Claire L.; Esther Schnettler; Alain Kohl; Emilie Pondeville

    2015-01-01

    Control of aedine mosquito vectors, either by mosquito population reduction or replacement with refractory mosquitoes, may play an essential role in the fight against arboviral diseases. In this review, we will focus on the development and application of biological approaches, both natural or engineered, to limit mosquito vector competence for arboviruses. The study of mosquito antiviral immunity has led to the identification of a number of host response mechanisms and proteins that are requi...

  12. Controle de vetores utilizando mosquitos geneticamente modificados Control de vectores utilizando mosquitos genéticamente modificados Control of vector populations using genetically modified mosquitoes

    André Barreto Bruno Wilke; Almério Castro Gomes; Delsio Natal; Mauro Toledo Marrelli

    2009-01-01

    Formas químicas de controle de mosquitos vetores são ineficazes, levando ao desenvolvimento de novas estratégias. Assim, foi realizada revisão das estratégias de controle genético de populações de mosquitos vetores baseada na técnica do inseto estéril. Uma delas consiste na liberação de machos esterilizados por radiação, a outra, na integração de um gene letal dominante associado a um promotor específico de fêmeas imaturas. Entre as vantagens sobre outras técnicas biológicas e químicas de con...

  13. Legal and policy options to minimize adverse effects of mosquito control pesticides on Florida's saltwater fisheries

    Tucker, John C.

    1992-01-01

    This report examines the regulation of mosquito control activities in Florida and makes legal and institutional recommendations to improve protection of non-target estuarine and marine organisms. Some of the more important recommendations for modification of mosquito control in Florida include: clarification of ambiguous mosquito control pesticide labels; strengthening of surveillance and reporting requirements; strengthening of enforcement efforts and authority; increased u...

  14. Novel Selective and Irreversible Mosquito Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors for Controlling Malaria and Other Mosquito-Borne Diseases

    Dou, Dengfeng; Park, Jewn Giew; Rana, Sandeep; Madden, Benjamin J.; Jiang, Haobo; Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2013-01-01

    We reported previously that insect acetylcholinesterases (AChEs) could be selectively and irreversibly inhibited by methanethiosulfonates presumably through conjugation to an insect-specific cysteine in these enzymes. However, no direct proof for the conjugation has been published to date, and doubts remain about whether such cysteine-targeting inhibitors have desirable kinetic properties for insecticide use. Here we report mass spectrometric proof of the conjugation and new chemicals that irreversibly inhibited African malaria mosquito AChE with bimolecular inhibition rate constants (kinact/KI) of 3,604-458,597 M-1sec-1 but spared human AChE. In comparison, the insecticide paraoxon irreversibly inhibited mosquito and human AChEs with kinact/KI values of 1,915 and 1,507 M-1sec-1, respectively, under the same assay conditions. These results further support our hypothesis that the insect-specific AChE cysteine is a unique and unexplored target to develop new insecticides with reduced insecticide resistance and low toxicity to mammals, fish, and birds for the control of mosquito-borne diseases.

  15. USDA Mosquito Control Product Research for the US Military

    New techniques that were developed at the USDA to protect deployed military troops from the threat of vector-borne diseases and are also applicable for use by civilian mosquito control program use are described. Techniques to be illustrated include: (1) novel military personal protection methods, (2...

  16. An incident of fenthion mosquito control and subsequent avian mortality

    Seabloom, R.W.; Pearson, G.L.; Oring, L.W.; Reilly, J.R.

    1973-01-01

    Mass mortality among migratory birds at Grand Forks, North Dakota, was attributed to a mosquito control operation employing the insecticide fenthion. The factors involved may have included the toxicity of the pesticide for birds, the method of application and coincidence with the peak of the spring warbler migration.

  17. Genetic methods for control of mosquitoes and biting flies

    The earliest research efforts on using genetic methods for the control of mosquitoes and biting flies concentrated on the evaluation of the sterile insect technique (SIT). Several successful, but generally small scale, research efforts with mosquitoes clearly documented that either chemosterilized or radiation sterilized males were effective in causing a level of genetic load that would be sufficient for the reduction or eradication of natural populations of several species. Genetic sexing strains of several species of mosquitoes have been assembled, and this aspect of breeding specialty strains is not a limiting factor in the implementation of SIT. In the largest field experiment, conducted with Anopheles albimanus in El Salvador during the 1970s, a genetic sexing strain was used operationally in a factory that produced one million sterile males per day over a one year period. Technical problems that would require extensive research of a practical nature before the implementation of SIT for mosquito control involve primarily better means for the rearing, sterilization and distribution of the insects. A successful experiment was conducted to eliminate the stable fly on the island of St. Croix, the United States Virgin Islands, and since this work in the 1970s, genetic sexing strains have been developed. A considerable amount of effort was expended on the synthesis of chromosome aberrations for the control of mosquitoes. Although the results of experimental trials indicated that aberration bearing insects could effectively inject a genetic load into the natural population, no large scale tests have ever been conducted to evaluate fully the real effectiveness of induced chromosomal aberrations. More recently, most of the research work in genetic control has been aimed at the use of recombinant DNA techniques for the development of new technology. All of these topics and an assessment of their value are discussed. (author). 30 refs

  18. Environmental factors affecting efficacy of bifenthrin-treated vegetation for mosquito control.

    The use of pesticide-treated vegetation as a barrier for control of nuisance and disease-bearing mosquitoes has become an option for mosquito management for home owners, public health and mosquito control professionals. Potted wax myrtle and azalea plants were treated with bifenthrin (0.79% AI) at ...

  19. Efficacy of neem chippings for mosquito larval control under field conditions

    Imbahale, Susan S; Mukabana, Wolfgang R

    2015-01-01

    Background An in depth understanding of mosquito breeding biology and factors regulating population sizes is fundamental for vector population control. This paper presents results from a survey of mosquito breeding habitats and the efficacy of neem chippings as a potential larvicide that can be integrated in mosquito control on Nyabondo Plateau in western Kenya. Results Six main mosquito habitat types namely artificial ponds, abandoned fish ponds, active fish ponds, open drains, temporary poo...

  20. Emergency Mosquito Control on a Selected Area in Eastern North Carolina After Hurricane Irene

    Harris, Jonathan W; RICHARDS, STEPHANIE L.; Alice Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Natural disasters such as hurricanes may contribute to mosquito abundance and, consequently, arbovirus transmission risk. In 2011, flooding from Hurricane Irene in eastern North Carolina (NC) resulted in increased mosquito populations that hindered recovery efforts. Budget shortfalls in NC have reduced the functionality of long-term mosquito surveillance and control programs; hence, many counties rely on the Federal Emergency Management Agency for post-disaster mosquito control. This pilot st...

  1. Controle de vetores utilizando mosquitos geneticamente modificados Control de vectores utilizando mosquitos genéticamente modificados Control of vector populations using genetically modified mosquitoes

    André Barreto Bruno Wilke

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Formas químicas de controle de mosquitos vetores são ineficazes, levando ao desenvolvimento de novas estratégias. Assim, foi realizada revisão das estratégias de controle genético de populações de mosquitos vetores baseada na técnica do inseto estéril. Uma delas consiste na liberação de machos esterilizados por radiação, a outra, na integração de um gene letal dominante associado a um promotor específico de fêmeas imaturas. Entre as vantagens sobre outras técnicas biológicas e químicas de controle de vetores estão: alta especificidade, não prejudicial ao meio ambiente, baixo custo de produção e alta eficácia. O uso desta técnica de modificação genética pode vir a ser uma importante ferramenta do manejo integrado de vetores.Formas químicas de control de mosquitos vectores son ineficaces, llevando al desarrollo de nuevas estrategias. Así, fue realizada revisión de las estrategias de control genético de poblaciones de mosquitos vectores basada en la técnica del insecto estéril. Una de ellas consiste en la liberación de machos esterilizados por radiación, la otra, en la integración de un gen letal dominante asociado a un promotor específico de hembras inmaduras. Entre las ventajas sobre otras técnicas biológicas y químicas de control de vectores están: la alta especificidad, no prejudicial al ambiente, bajo costo de producción y alta eficiencia. El uso de esta técnica de modificación genética puede ser una importante herramienta del manejo integrado de vectores.The ineffectiveness of current strategies for chemical control of mosquito vectors raises the need for developing novel approaches. Thus, we carried out a literature review of strategies for genetic control of mosquito populations based on the sterile insect technique. One of these strategies consists of releasing radiation-sterilized males into the population; another, of integrating a dominant lethal gene under the control of a specific promoter into immature females. Advantages of these approaches over other biological and chemical control strategies include: highly species-specific, environmentally safety, low production cost, and high efficacy. The use of this genetic modification technique will constitute an important tool for integrated vector management.

  2. Predicting the Timing and Magnitude of Tropical Mosquito Population Peaks for Maximizing Control Efficiency

    Yang, Guo-Jing; Brook, Barry W.; Bradshaw, Corey J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The transmission of mosquito-borne diseases is strongly linked to the abundance of the host vector. Identifying the environmental and biological precursors which herald the onset of peaks in mosquito abundance would give health and land-use managers the capacity to predict the timing and distribution of the most efficient and cost-effective mosquito control. We analysed a 15-year time series of monthly abundance of Aedes vigilax, a tropical mosquito species from northern Australia, to determi...

  3. Monitoring Malaria Vector Control Interventions: Effectiveness of Five Different Adult Mosquito Sampling Methods

    Onyango, Shirley A.; KITRON, URIEL; Mungai, Peter; Eric M. Muchiri; Kokwaro, Elizabeth; KING, CHARLES H.; Mutuku, Francis M.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term success of ongoing malaria control efforts based on mosquito bed nets (long-lasting insecticidal net) and indoor residual spraying is dependent on continuous monitoring of mosquito vectors, and thus on effective mosquito sampling tools. The objective of our study was to identify the most efficient mosquito sampling tool(s) for routine vector surveillance for malaria and lymphatic filariasis transmission in coastal Kenya. We evaluated relative efficacy of five collection methods—ligh...

  4. Tidal circulation alteration for salt marsh mosquito control

    Resh, Vincent H.; Balling, Steven S.

    1983-01-01

    Mosquito control ditches designed to increase tidal circulation are widely used as a physical control alternative to insecticidal applications The impact of such ditching on Pacific Coast marshlands was largely unknown before this five-year study of impact in two types of San Francisco Bay salt marshes, a Salicornia virginica (pickleweed) monoculure and a mixed vegetation marsh Results of our studies suggest that ditches cause less environmental disturbance than insecticidal applications The article describes the following environmental consequences of ditching for mosquito control: increased tidal flushing of soils occurs adjacent to ditches compared with that in the open marsh, thereby reducing ground water and soil surface salinities and water table height; primary productivity of S. virginica, as determined by both the harvest method and infrared photographic analysis, is higher directly adjacent to ditches than in the open marsh, distribution of selected arthropod populations is similar at ditches and natural channels, although arthropod community response differs seasonally; aquatic invertebrate biomass is similar within ditched and natural ponds, but diversity is lower in ditched habitats, ditching increases fish diversity and density by improving fish access from tidal channels; ditches provide additional salt marsh song sparrow habitat, although ditches are less preferred than natural channels or sloughs. Management criteria can be used to design ditches that provide effective mosquito control and reduced environmental impact

  5. Human behaviors: a threat for mosquito control?

    Dumont, Y.; Thuilliez, J.

    2015-01-01

    Community involvement and the preventive behavior of households are considered to be at the heart of vector-control strategies. In this work, we consider a simple theoretical model that enables us to take into account human behaviors that may interfere with vector control. The model reflects the trade-off between perceived costs and observed efficacy. Our theoretical results emphasize that households may reduce their protective behavior in response to mechanical elimination techniques piloted...

  6. Symbiotic control of mosquito borne disease

    Ricci, Irene; Valzano, Matteo; Ulissi, Ulisse; Epis, Sara; Cappelli, Alessia; Favia, Guido

    2012-01-01

    It is well accepted that the symbiotic relationships insects have established with several microorganisms have had a key role in their evolutionary success. Bacterial symbiosis is also prevalent in insects that are efficient disease vectors, and numerous studies have sought to decrypt the basic mechanisms of the host–symbiont relationships and develop ways to control vector borne diseases. ‘Symbiotic control’, a new multifaceted approach that uses symbiotic microorganisms to control insect pe...

  7. Mosquito Surveillance for Prevention and Control of Emerging Mosquito-Borne Diseases in Portugal — 2008–2014

    Osório, Hugo C.; Zé-Zé, Líbia; Amaro, Fátima; Alves, Maria J.

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito surveillance in Europe is essential for early detection of invasive species with public health importance and prevention and control of emerging pathogens. In Portugal, a vector surveillance national program—REVIVE (REde de VIgilância de VEctores)—has been operating since 2008 under the custody of Portuguese Ministry of Health. The REVIVE is responsible for the nationwide surveillance of hematophagous arthropods. Surveillance for West Nile virus (WNV) and other flaviviruses in adult mosquitoes is continuously performed. Adult mosquitoes—collected mainly with Centre for Disease Control light traps baited with CO2—and larvae were systematically collected from a wide range of habitats in 20 subregions (NUTS III). Around 500,000 mosquitoes were trapped in more than 3,000 trap nights and 3,500 positive larvae surveys, in which 24 species were recorded. The viral activity detected in mosquito populations in these years has been limited to insect specific flaviviruses (ISFs) non-pathogenic to humans. Rather than emergency response, REVIVE allows timely detection of changes in abundance and species diversity providing valuable knowledge to health authorities, which may take control measures of vector populations reducing its impact on public health. This work aims to present the REVIVE operation and to expose data regarding mosquito species composition and detected ISFs. PMID:25396768

  8. Fighting Arbovirus Transmission: Natural and Engineered Control of Vector Competence in Aedes Mosquitoes

    Joy Kean

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Control of aedine mosquito vectors, either by mosquito population reduction or replacement with refractory mosquitoes, may play an essential role in the fight against arboviral diseases. In this review, we will focus on the development and application of biological approaches, both natural or engineered, to limit mosquito vector competence for arboviruses. The study of mosquito antiviral immunity has led to the identification of a number of host response mechanisms and proteins that are required to control arbovirus replication in mosquitoes, though more factors influencing vector competence are likely to be discovered. We will discuss key aspects of these pathways as targets either for selection of naturally resistant mosquito populations or for mosquito genetic manipulation. Moreover, we will consider the use of endosymbiotic bacteria such as Wolbachia, which in some cases have proven to be remarkably efficient in disrupting arbovirus transmission by mosquitoes, but also the use of naturally occurring insect-specific viruses that may interfere with arboviruses in mosquito vectors. Finally, we will discuss the use of paratransgenesis as well as entomopathogenic fungi, which are also proposed strategies to control vector competence.

  9. Large-scale control of mosquito vectors of disease

    By far the most important vector borne disease is malaria transmitted by Anopheles mosquitoes causing an estimated 300-500 million clinical cases per year and 1.4-2.6 million deaths, mostly in tropical Africa (WHO 1995). The second most important mosquito borne disease is lymphatic filariasis, but there are now such effective, convenient and cheap drugs for its treatment that vector control will now have at most a supplementary role (Maxwell et al. 1999a). The only other mosquito borne disease likely to justify large-scale vector control is dengue which is carried in urban areas of Southeast Asia and Latin America by Aedes aegypti L. which was also the urban vector of yellow fever in Latin America. This mosquito was eradicated from most countries of Latin America between the 1930s and 60s but, unfortunately in recent years, it has been allowed to re-infest and cause serious dengue epidemics, except in Cuba where it has been held close to eradication (Reiter and Gubler 1997). In the 1930s and 40s, invasions by An. gambiae Giles s.l., the main tropical African malaria vector, were eradicated from Brazil (Soper and Wilson 1943) and Egypt (Shousha 1947). It is surprising that greatly increased air traffic has not led to more such invasions of apparently climatically suitable areas, e.g., of Polynesia which has no anophelines and therefore no malaria. The above mentioned temporary or permanent eradications were achieved before the advent of DDT, using larvicidal methods (of a kind which would now be considered environmentally unacceptable) carried out by rigorously disciplined teams. MALARIA Between the end of the Second World War and the 1960s, the availability of DDT for spraying of houses allowed eradication of malaria from the Soviet Union, southern Europe, the USA, northern Venezuela and Guyana, Taiwan and the Caribbean Islands, apart from Hispaniola. Its range and intensity were also greatly reduced in China, India and South Africa and, at least temporarily, in Sri Lanka. In several Latin American countries much progress was made, but this has been reversed following the abandonment of DDT without any replacement being brought into use (Roberts et al. 1997). After eradication from the Soviet Union in the 1960s, malaria epidemics are now returning to Azerbaijan and Tadjikistan following the collapse of the health system and the descent into civil war (Nikolaeva 1996). In a few instances, unlooked-for eradication has been claimed to have occurred locally as a result of DDT house spraying of species which are strongly endophilic, i.e., with a strong tendency to rest in houses. There was much enthusiasm for SIT for mosquitoes in the 1960s and early 70s but it went into eclipse, largely for political reasons (Anonymous 1975). In the 70s, it was shown in various species of mosquito that chemically sterilised males, or males carrying translocations and a meiotic drive factor or cytoplasmically incompatible with the local population, could compete reasonably well for mates as shown by induction of sterility in the eggs laid by wild females (Lofgren et al. 1974, Grover et al. 1976a, b)

  10. Mangrove distribution and mosquito control: transport of Avicennia marina propagules by mosquito-control runnels in southeast Queensland saltmarshes

    Breitfuss, M. J.; Connolly, R. M.; Dale, P. E. R.

    2003-03-01

    The saltmarsh-mangrove interface generally constitutes the landward boundary for the grey mangrove Avicennia marina var. australasica, the most widespread species on southeast Queensland shores. A. marina produces buoyant propagules, which are dispersed by tidal waters, only infrequently transported to saltmarsh by the highest spring tides. We predicted that runnelling, a form of habitat modification for mosquito control, transports and deposits mangrove propagules to saltmarsh because the runnels carry low-amplitude tides that would not normally inundate higher regions of the marsh. To test this, groups of marked A. marina propagules were released at three runnelled saltmarshes in southeast Queensland during high-amplitude, flooding and low-amplitude, non-flooding tidal events. The distance propagules were transported from their original starting positions on the saltmarsh-mangrove interface was measured and analysed to detect differences among groups at different distances from runnels. Groups of propagules released within 10 m of a runnel were always transported significantly further from the starting position and further up the saltmarsh shore after both flooding and non-flooding tides than any other groups. In addition, the pattern of stranding on saltmarsh for significantly different groups was closely associated with the path of runnel construction so that propagules were located either in the runnel or in depressions linked to the runnel that had been isolated mosquito-breeding pools prior to runnelling. Observations of A. marina plants at other runnelled sites suggest that propagules transported by runnels can establish and develop to maturity, at least in depressions and runnels, in saltmarsh. The fact that runnels transport propagules to regions of the saltmarsh beyond their normal limits of dispersion suggests a possible advantage for landward extension of the intertidal distribution of A. marina at runnelled sites and should be considered in saltmarsh management and mosquito control programmes in southeast Queensland.

  11. Malaria mosquito control using edible fish in western Kenya: preliminary findings of a controlled study

    Omlin Francois X

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological control methods are once again being given much research focus for malaria vector control. This is largely due to the emerging threat of strong resistance to pesticides. Larvivorous fish have been used for over 100 years in mosquito control and many species have proved effective. In the western Kenyan highlands the larvivorous fish Oreochromis niloticus L. (Perciformes: Cichlidae (formerly Tilapia nilotica is commonly farmed and eaten but has not been previously tested in the field for malaria mosquito control. Methods This fish was introduced into abandoned fishponds at an altitude of 1,880 m and the effect measured over six months on the numbers of mosquito immatures. For comparison an untreated control pond was used. During this time, all ponds were regularly cleared of emergent vegetation and fish re-stocking was not needed. Significant autocorrelation was removed from the time series data, and t-tests were used to investigate within a pond and within a mosquito type any differences before and after the introduction of O. niloticus. Mulla's formula was also used on the raw data to calculate the percentage reduction of the mosquito larvae. Results After O. niloticus introduction, mosquito densities immediately dropped in the treated ponds but increased in the control pond. This increase was apparently due to climatic factors. Mulla's formula was applied which corrects for that natural tendency to increase. The results showed that after 15 weeks the fish caused a more than 94% reduction in both Anopheles gambiae s.l. and Anopheles funestus (Diptera: Culicidae in the treated ponds, and more than 75% reduction in culicine mosquitoes. There was a highly significantly reduction in A. gambiae s.l. numbers when compared to pre-treatment levels. Conclusion This study reports the first field trial data on O. niloticus for malaria mosquito control and shows that this species, already a popular food fish in western Kenya, is an apparently sustainable mosquito control tool which also offers a source of protein and income to people in rural areas. There should be no problem with acceptance of this malaria control method since the local communities already farm this fish species.

  12. Annual Anastasia Arbovirus Surveillance and Mosquito Control Workshops: Summary of the Past 11 Years

    Realizing the needs of local mosquito control workers for advance training and education the Anastasia Mosquito Control District (AMCD) and the USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary entomology (CMAVE) developed a regional workshop to address these needs. Since 2004 the AMCD and CM...

  13. Monitoring malaria vector control interventions: effectiveness of five different adult mosquito sampling methods.

    Onyango, Shirley A; Kitron, Uriel; Mungai, Peter; Muchiri, Eric M; Kokwaro, Elizabeth; King, Charles H; Mutuku, Francis M

    2013-09-01

    Long-term success of ongoing malaria control efforts based on mosquito bed nets (long-lasting insecticidal net) and indoor residual spraying is dependent on continuous monitoring of mosquito vectors, and thus on effective mosquito sampling tools. The objective of our study was to identify the most efficient mosquito sampling tool(s) for routine vector surveillance for malaria and lymphatic filariasis transmission in coastal Kenya. We evaluated relative efficacy of five collection methods--light traps associated with a person sleeping under a net, pyrethrum spray catches, Prokopack aspirator, clay pots, and urine-baited traps--in four villages representing three ecological settings along the south coast of Kenya. Of the five methods, light traps were the most efficient for collecting female Anopheles gambiae s.l. (Giles) (Diptera: Culicidae) and Anopheles funestus (Giles) (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes, whereas the Prokopack aspirator was most efficient in collecting Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) (Diptera: Culicidae) and other culicines. With the low vector densities here, and across much of sub-Saharan Africa, wherever malaria interventions, long-lasting insecticidal nets, and/or indoor residual spraying are in place, the use of a single mosquito collection method will not be sufficient to achieve a representative sample of mosquito population structure. Light traps will remain a relevant tool for host-seeking mosquitoes, especially in the absence of human landing catches. For a fair representation of the indoor mosquito population, light traps will have to be supplemented with aspirator use, which has potential for routine monitoring of indoor resting mosquitoes, and can substitute the more labor-intensive and intrusive pyrethrum spray catches. There are still no sufficiently efficient mosquito collection methods for sampling outdoor mosquitoes, particularly those that are bloodfed. PMID:24180120

  14. Community Knowledge and Experience of Mosquitoes and Personal Prevention and Control Practices in Lhasa, Tibet

    Xiaobo Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since 2009, great public attention has been paid in Lhasa City (Tibet, China to mosquito bites and accompanying inflammatory complications. However, the potential contribution of knowledge levels, experiences, disease control and preventive practices (KEP towards mosquitoes has not received much attention. To investigate community KEP concerning mosquitoes in Lhasa, a cross-sectional survey was undertaken in four sub-districts of urban Lhasa in 2012. Questionnaires were designed to collect information regarding socio-demographics and KEP concerning the harmful effects of mosquitoes on participants. The scoring for KEP was developed after consultation of literature. A total of 591 eligible questionnaires were examined. The majority of respondents were female (61.8% with a mean age of 46 years. Nearly all of the respondents were of Tibetan nationality (97.4% and living in registered native households (92.7%, who have less than primary school education. The averages of overall score, knowledge score, experience score, and practice score were 9.23, 4.53, 1.80, 2.90, respectively. The registered household with the highest overall score, knowledge score and practice score was non-native. Female subjects with monthly incomes between 1000 and 3000 RMB had higher experience scores. The correlation analysis revealed that significant positive linear correlations existed between knowledge and experience, knowledge and practices, and experience and practices towards mosquitoes. Past experiences with mosquitoes can result in a better knowledge of effective mosquito control practices in the present and the future. Though the average of overall scores related to mosquitoes is high among the participants in Lhasa, however, the knowledge about the ecological habits of mosquitoes should be strengthened. The findings in this study may help to develop strategies and measures of mosquito and mosquito-borne diseases in the future, not only in Lhasa, but also in similar altitude, latitude and longitude regions worldwide.

  15. Transfer of toxin genes to alternate bacterial hosts for mosquito control

    Sergio Orduz

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes are vector of serious human and animal diseases, such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever, among others. The use of biological control agents has provide an environmentally safe and highly specific alternative to the use of chemical insecticides in the control of vector borne diseases. Bacillus thuringiensis and B. sphaericus produce toxic proteins to mosquito larvae. Great progress has been made on the biochemical and molecular characterization of such proteins and the genes encoding them. Nevertheless, the low residuality of these biological insecticides is one of the major drawbacks. This article present some interesting aspects of the mosquito larvae feeding habits and review the attempts that have been made to genetically engineer microorganisms that while are used by mosquito larvae as a food source should express the Bacillus toxin genes in order to improve the residuality and stability in the mosquito breeding ponds.

  16. Mosquito Surveillance for Prevention and Control of Emerging Mosquito-Borne Diseases in Portugal — 2008–2014

    Osório, Hugo C.; Líbia Zé-Zé; Fátima Amaro; Alves, Maria J.

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito surveillance in Europe is essential for early detection of invasive species with public health importance and prevention and control of emerging pathogens. In Portugal, a vector surveillance national program—REVIVE (REde de VIgilância de VEctores)—has been operating since 2008 under the custody of Portuguese Ministry of Health. The REVIVE is responsible for the nationwide surveillance of hematophagous arthropods. Surveillance for West Nile virus (WNV) and other flaviviruses in adult ...

  17. The use of bacterial larvicides in mosquito and black fly control programmes in Brazil

    Regis Lêda; Silva Sinara B da; Melo-Santos Maria Alice V

    2000-01-01

    Bacillus spp. based larvides are increasingly replacing, with numerous advantages, chemical insecticides in programmes for controlling black fly and mosquito populations. Brazil was among the pioneers in adopting Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (B.t.i) to control black flies. However, the major current mosquito control programme in Brazil, the Programme for Eradication of Aedes aegypti launched in 1997, only recently decided to replace temephos by B.t.i based larvicides, in the State of Ri...

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Sterile Insect Technology for Control of Anopheles Mosquito

    Anguelov, R.; Dumont, Y.; Lubuma, J.

    2011-11-01

    Sterile Insect Technology (SIT) is a nonpolluting method of insect control that relies on the release of sterile males. We study the effectiveness of the application of SIT for control of Anopheles mosquito via mathematical modeling. The theoretical analysis of the mathematical model as a dynamical system leads to the formulation of possible strategies for control of the Anopheles mosquito, also illustrated by numerical simulations.

  19. Efficacy of methoprene for mosquito control in storm water catch basins

    Butler, M.; LeBrun, R.A.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Gettman, A.D.

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of methoprene, a widely used juvenile hormone mimic, formulated as 30-day slow release Altosid? pellets, at controlling mosquitoes in underground storm water drainage catch basins. Data from applications to ?-sized cement catch basins in the laboratory, field observations from treated and untreated basins, and an experiment that confined mosquito larvae in floating emergence jars in catch basins showed that methoprene effectively controlled mosquitoes for a month under field conditions and substantially longer under laboratory conditions when applied at a dose of 3.5 g pellets per average-sized catch basin.

  20. Biological control of mosquitoes in scrap tires in Brownsville, Texas, USA and Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico.

    Uejio, Christopher K; Hayden, Mary H; Zielinski-Gutierrez, Emily; Lopez, Jose Luis Robles; Barrera, Roberto; Amador, Manuel; Thompson, Gregory; Waterman, Stephen H

    2014-06-01

    Dengue periodically circulates in southern Texas and neighboring Tamaulipas, Mexico; thus, a closer examination of human and vector ecology at the northern limits of North American transmission may improve prevention activities. Scrap tires produce large mosquito populations and increase the risk of dengue transmission. Some households choose not to pay tire disposal fees, and many tires are illegally dumped in residential areas. Biological control may provide low-cost and environmentally friendly mosquito control. This pilot study evaluated the ability of Mesocyclops longisetus to reduce mosquito populations in existing residential scrap tire piles. Mosquito populations were measured by the number of all mosquito pupae within tires or adult Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus near piles. Mesocyclops longisetus treated piles did not significantly reduce total mosquito pupae (P = 0.07) in Matamoros, Mexico. The study also evaluated the efficacy of native Toxorhynchites moctezuma which preferentially colonized tire piles under vegetation cover in Brownsville, TX. Toxorhynchites moctezuma larvae significantly reduced total mosquito pupae, but the strength of control diminished over time. PMID:25102598

  1. High-throughput sorting of mosquito larvae for laboratory studies and for future vector control interventions.

    Marois Eric; Scali Christina; Soichot Julien; Kappler Christine; Levashina Elena A; Catteruccia Flaminia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Mosquito transgenesis offers new promises for the genetic control of vector-borne infectious diseases such as malaria and dengue fever. Genetic control strategies require the release of large number of male mosquitoes into field populations, whether they are based on the use of sterile males (sterile insect technique, SIT) or on introducing genetic traits conferring refractoriness to disease transmission (population replacement). However, the current absence of high-throug...

  2. The control of mosquito-borne diseases in New York City

    Miller, James R.

    2001-01-01

    Mosquito control began in New York City in 1901. Large-scale efforts to drain marshlands occurred through the 1930s, and aerial application of pesticide occurred as early as 1956. Components of early mosquito-borne disease control were reimplemented in 1999–2000 in response to an outbreak of West Nile virus, and included promoting public and health professional awareness regarding disease causation and prevention, providing free government laboratory testing, case reporting, mapping of mosqui...

  3. A review of ultralow-volume aerial sprays of insecticide for mosquito control.

    Mount, G A; Biery, T L; Haile, D G

    1996-12-01

    This review of research on ultralow-volume (ULV) aerial sprays for mosquito control is a component of an Aerial SPray EXpert system (ASPEX). Topics include application volume, adulticiding, larviciding, droplet size, and meteorology. The review discusses the efficacy of ULV aerial sprays against many important pest and vector species of mosquitoes in a wide range of locations and habitats in the USA and in some countries of Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Nine conclusions were drawn from this review. 1) ULV applications are as effective for mosquito control as highly-diluted, water-based sprays. 2) More acres can be sprayed per aircraft load with the ULV method than with dilute sprays. 3) High-altitude ULV sprays using wide or stacked swaths could be used in emergencies if wind speed and direction data at appropriate altitudes are available to accurately place the spray. 4) Successful adult mosquito control can be achieved in dense foliage or open housing with ULV aerial sprays, but doses of insecticide must be increased. 5) ULV aerial application of mosquito larvicides can be used successfully in large areas. 6) The optimum droplet size for adult mosquito control is 5-25 microns volume median diameter (VMD). 7) For mosquito adulticiding, near optimum atomization of ULV sprays is achieved with flat-fan nozzles oriented straight down or slightly forward for high-speed aircraft (> or = 150 mph) or rotary atomizers on slow-speed aircraft (< 150 mph). 8) Optimum atomization minimizes paint spotting. 9) Maximum adult mosquito control is achieved just after sunrise and just before sunset with 2-10-mph crosswinds. PMID:9046465

  4. Achieving high coverage of larval-stage mosquito surveillance: challenges for a community-based mosquito control programme in urban Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Shoo Bryson; Govella Nicodem J; Chaki Prosper P; Hemed Abdullah; Tanner Marcel; Fillinger Ulrike; Killeen Gerry F

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Preventing malaria by controlling mosquitoes in their larval stages requires regular sensitive monitoring of vector populations and intervention coverage. The study assessed the effectiveness of operational, community-based larval habitat surveillance systems within the Urban Malaria Control Programme (UMCP) in urban Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods Cross-sectional surveys were carried out to assess the ability of community-owned resource persons (CORPs) to detect mosquito...

  5. A blinded, controlled trial of an ultrasound device as mosquito repellent.

    Sylla el-H, K; Lell, B; Kremsner, P G

    2000-05-19

    Ultrasound emitting devices are used to repel mosquitoes. We tested the repelling properties of a commercially available ultrasound device in a domestic setting in Gabon. Devices emitting three different block frequencies ranging from 3 to 11 kHz were tested in a paired, cross-over blinded and placebo controlled trial during eighteen nights in nine pairs of houses. A total of 7485 mosquitoes (10% Anopheles, 62% Culex, 27% Mansonia and 1% Aedes) were caught, 23 per house per night. There was no significant difference in landing rate between the houses with ultrasound device and the houses with placebo for any species of mosquito. Thus the ultrasound device used was not effective against mosquitoes in this strictly controlled trial. PMID:10890136

  6. High-throughput sorting of mosquito larvae for laboratory studies and for future vector control interventions

    Marois Eric

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquito transgenesis offers new promises for the genetic control of vector-borne infectious diseases such as malaria and dengue fever. Genetic control strategies require the release of large number of male mosquitoes into field populations, whether they are based on the use of sterile males (sterile insect technique, SIT or on introducing genetic traits conferring refractoriness to disease transmission (population replacement. However, the current absence of high-throughput techniques for sorting different mosquito populations impairs the application of these control measures. Methods A method was developed to generate large mosquito populations of the desired sex and genotype. This method combines flow cytometry and the use of Anopheles gambiae transgenic lines that differentially express fluorescent markers in males and females. Results Fluorescence-assisted sorting allowed single-step isolation of homozygous transgenic mosquitoes from a mixed population. This method was also used to select wild-type males only with high efficiency and accuracy, a highly desirable tool for genetic control strategies where the release of transgenic individuals may be problematic. Importantly, sorted males showed normal mating ability compared to their unsorted brothers. Conclusions The developed method will greatly facilitate both laboratory studies of mosquito vectorial capacity requiring high-throughput approaches and future field interventions in the fight against infectious disease vectors.

  7. The gecko: an environmentally friendly biological agent for mosquito control.

    Canyon, D V; Hii, J L

    1997-10-01

    Laboratory experiments with Aedes aegypti mosquitoes investigated the effects of light, mosquito density and physiological state on predation rates by the Australian gecko Gehydra dubia and the exotic Asian house gecko Hemidactylus frenatus. For both gecko species a positive correlation was demonstrated between prey density and the predation rate. Using Ae.aegypti males and unfed females as prey in a terrarium (0.054 m3), consumption rates reached 76-108/day for G.dubia and 63-109/day for H.frenatus, with significantly more female mosquitoes than males being eaten in most experiments. Comparing dark with semi-illuminated conditions no consistent contrast of predation rate was demonstrated. Gehyra dubia predation rates on various Australian mosquito species were compared in an experimental room (32 m3) for 24 h exposure with photoperiod L:D 12:12 h Five photophilic species (Aedes vigilax, Anopheles annulipes, Coquillettidia xanthogaster, Culex annulirostris, Cx sitiens) suffered 78-100% predation, compared with only 33-53% predation of four non-photophilic species: Aedes aegypti, Ae.notoscriptus, Ae.vittiger and Cx quinquefasciatus. This demonstrates the potential benefit of domestication for geckoes that learn to hunt at light. When offered a mixture of unfed, freshly blood-fed and gravid females of Ae.aegypti in an illuminated terrarium, both gecko species consumed significantly more unfed than fed or gravid female mosquitoes, presumably because the latter rested whereas the former foraged more actively. H.frenatus consumed significantly more mosquitoes of all categories than did G.dubia per 24 h: unfeds 5.1 +/- 0.1% v. 4.5 +/- 0.5%, blood-feds 4.5 +/- 0.3% v. 4.0 +/- 0.5% and gravids 4.8 +/- 0.4% v. 3.9 +/- 0.5%. Possible relevance of these results to competitive displacement of G.dubia by H.frenatus is discussed. PMID:9430109

  8. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping of Genome Regions Controlling Permethrin Resistance in the Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Strode, Clare; Flores Suarez, Adriana; Fernandez Salas, Ildefonso; Ranson, Hilary; Hemingway, Janet; BLACK, WILLIAM C.

    2008-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector of dengue and yellow fever flaviviruses. Permethrin is an insecticide used to suppress Ae. aegypti adult populations but metabolic and target site resistance to pyrethroids has evolved in many locations worldwide. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling permethrin survival in Ae. aegypti were mapped in an F3 advanced intercross line. Parents came from a collection of mosquitoes from Isla Mujeres, México, that had been selected for permethri...

  9. Simulations to compare efficacies of tetravalent dengue vaccines and mosquito vector control

    THAVARA, U.; TAWATSIN, A.; Nagao, Y.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Infection with dengue, the most prevalent mosquito-borne virus, manifests as dengue fever (DF) or the more fatal dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). DHF occurs mainly when an individual who has acquired antibodies to one serotype is inoculated with another serotype. It was reported that mosquito control may have increased the incidence of DF and DHF due to age-dependency in manifesting these illnesses or an immunological mechanism. Tetravalent dengue vaccine is currently being tested in ...

  10. An optimal control model of mosquito reduction management in a dengue endemic region

    Wijaya, Karunia Putra; Goetz, Thomas; Soewono, Edy

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is known as the responsible vector in transmitting dengue flavivirus. Unavailability of medication to cure the transmission in human blood becomes a global health issue in recent decades. World epidemiologists are encouraged to focus on inves- tigation toward an effective and inexpensive way to prevent dengue transmission, i.e. mosquito control. In this paper, we present a model depicting the dynamics of mosquito population based on indoor-outdoor life cycle classification. The ...

  11. Diffusion Model On The Efficacy Of Larvicide In Antilarval Operation Of Mosquito Control

    Basker, P.; Kumar, T. Ramesh; Prabu, S. Milton; Hemalatha, S.; Elango, S.; Padmanabhan, P.; Asokan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Mosquito control is being performed under chemical, biological and genetic and altogether it is called integrated vector control. In developing countries like India, chemical control has been given priority. Chemicals used as adulticide is becoming resistance among mosquitoes compared to larvicide. Further, the destruction of immature (larvae) stages of mosquitoes is as effective as its distribution is limited whereas adult mosquitoes turned to terrestrial mode of life and its distribution is based on its flight range, habitat, aggregation of man and animals. In this research paper, selective spray treatment over larvae of mosquitoes of a semi-infinite pool is analyzed using diffusion model. Spray chemical is conceived to spread on the surface with time and in space. A critical concentration of spray chemical is envisaged for assumed death of mosquito larvae. Diffusion is modeled Fick' law. Spray losses are lumped into a first order term. Analytical solution of the resulting partial differential equation for various values of diffusivity and loss rate constant are plotted and interpreted. The model would be useful to appraise beforehand how far and for how long spray would be effective and how much of spray chemical is required for effectiveness within specified distance and time.

  12. Perspectives of people in Mali toward genetically-modified mosquitoes for malaria control

    Famenini Shannon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically-modified (GM mosquitoes have been proposed as part of an integrated vector control strategy for malaria control. Public acceptance is essential prior to field trials, particularly since mosquitoes are a vector of human disease and genetically modified organisms (GMOs face strong scepticism in developed and developing nations. Despite this, in sub-Saharan Africa, where the GM mosquito effort is primarily directed, very little data is available on perspectives to GMOs. Here, results are presented of a qualitative survey of public attitudes to GM mosquitoes for malaria control in rural and urban areas of Mali, West Africa between the months of October 2008 and June 2009. Methods The sample consisted of 80 individuals - 30 living in rural communities, 30 living in urban suburbs of Bamako, and 20 Western-trained and traditional health professionals working in Bamako and Bandiagara. Questions were asked about the cause of malaria, heredity and selective breeding. This led to questions about genetic alterations, and acceptable conditions for a release of pest-resistant GM corn and malaria-refractory GM mosquitoes. Finally, participants were asked about the decision-making process in their community. Interviews were transcribed and responses were categorized according to general themes. Results Most participants cited mosquitoes as one of several causes of malaria. The concept of the gene was not widely understood; however selective breeding was understood, allowing limited communication of the concept of genetic modification. Participants were open to a release of pest-resistant GM corn, often wanting to conduct a trial themselves. The concept of a trial was reapplied to GM mosquitoes, although less frequently. Participants wanted to see evidence that GM mosquitoes can reduce malaria prevalence without negative consequences for human health and the environment. For several participants, a mosquito control programme was preferred; however a transgenic release that satisfied certain requirements was usually acceptable. Conclusions Although there were some dissenters, the majority of participants were pragmatic towards a release of GM mosquitoes. An array of social and cultural issues associated with malaria, mosquitoes and genetic engineering became apparent. If these can be successfully addressed, then social acceptance among the populations surveyed seems promising.

  13. Control of Mosquito-Borne Infectious Diseases: Sex and Gene Drive.

    Adelman, Zach N; Tu, Zhijian

    2016-03-01

    Sterile male releases have successfully reduced local populations of the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti, but challenges remain in scale and in separating sexes before release. The recent discovery of the first mosquito male determining factor (M factor) will facilitate our understanding of the genetic programs that initiate sexual development in mosquitoes. Manipulation of the M factor and possible intermediary factors may result in female-to-male conversion or female killing, enabling efficient sex separation and effective reduction of target mosquito populations. Given recent breakthroughs in the development of CRISPR-Cas9 reagents as a source of gene drive, more advanced technologies at driving maleness, the ultimate disease refractory phenotype, become possible and may represent efficient and self-limiting methods to control mosquito populations. PMID:26897660

  14. The use of remote sensing in mosquito control

    1973-01-01

    The technology of remote sensing, developed by the space program for identification of surface features from the vantage point of an aircraft or satellite, has substantial application in precisely locating mosquito breeding grounds. Preliminary results of the NASA technology working cooperatively with a city government agency in solving this problem are discussed.

  15. Area-wide management of Aedes albopictus: II. Gauging the efficacy of traditional integrated pest control measures against urban container mosquitoes

    Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse), the Asian tiger mosquito, is an introduced invasive species in the U.S. responsible for a significant proportion of service requests to local mosquito control programs. This container-utilizing mosquito is refractory to standard mosquito abatement measures in th...

  16. Web mapping GIS: GPS under the GIS umbrella for Aedes species dengue and chikungunya vector mosquito surveillance and control

    M.Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    The mosquito nuisance and the mosquito borne diseases have become major important challenging public health problems in India especially in the fast developing city like Pondicherry urban agglomeration. The Pondicherry government has been implemented full-fledged mosquito control measures, however, dengue and chikungunya epidemics was accelerating trend in Pondicherry for the recent years, and therefore, the directorate of public health, Pondicherry was requested vector control research centr...

  17. Comparison of mosquito control programs in seven urban sites in Africa, the Middle East, and the Americas

    IMPOINVIL, DANIEL E.; Ahmad, Sajjad; Troyo, Adriana; Keating, Joseph; Githeko, Andrew K.; Mbogo, Charles M; Kibe, Lydiah; GITHURE, JOHN I.; GAD, ADEL M.; Hassan, Ali N.; Orshan, Laor; Warburg, Alon; Calderón-Arguedas, Olger; Sánchez-Loría, Victoria M.; Velit-Suarez, Rosanna

    2007-01-01

    Mosquito control programs at seven urban sites in Kenya, Egypt, Israel, Costa Rica, and Trinidad are described and compared. Site-specific urban and disease characteristics, organizational diagrams, and strengths, weaknesses, obstacles and threats (SWOT) analysis tools are used to provide a descriptive assessment of each mosquito control program, and provide a comparison of the factors affecting mosquito abatement. The information for SWOT analysis is collected from surveys, focus group discu...

  18. The effects of zooprophylaxis and other mosquito control measures against malaria in Nouna, Burkina Faso

    Sié Ali

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the absence of large scale, organized vector control programmes, individual protective measures against mosquitoes are essential for reducing the transmission of diseases like malaria. Knowledge of the types and effectiveness of mosquito control methods used by households can aid in the development and promotion of preventive measures. Methods A matched, population-based case control study was carried out in the semi-urban region of Nouna, Burkina Faso. Surveys and mosquito captures were conducted for each participating household. Data were analysed using conditional logistic regression and Pearson's product-moment correlations. Results In Nouna, Burkina Faso, the main types of reported mosquito control measures used included sleeping under bed nets (insecticide-treated and untreated and burning mosquito coils. Most of the study households kept animals within the compound or house at night. Insecticide house sprays, donkeys, rabbits and pigs were significantly associated with a reduced risk of malaria only in univariate analyses. Conclusion Given the conflicting results of the effects of zooprophylaxis from previous studies, other community-based preventive measures, such as bed nets, coils and insecticide house-spraying, may be of more benefit.

  19. Recasting the theory of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission dynamics and control.

    Smith, David L; Perkins, T Alex; Reiner, Robert C; Barker, Christopher M; Niu, Tianchan; Chaves, Luis Fernando; Ellis, Alicia M; George, Dylan B; Le Menach, Arnaud; Pulliam, Juliet R C; Bisanzio, Donal; Buckee, Caroline; Chiyaka, Christinah; Cummings, Derek A T; Garcia, Andres J; Gatton, Michelle L; Gething, Peter W; Hartley, David M; Johnston, Geoffrey; Klein, Eili Y; Michael, Edwin; Lloyd, Alun L; Pigott, David M; Reisen, William K; Ruktanonchai, Nick; Singh, Brajendra K; Stoller, Jeremy; Tatem, Andrew J; Kitron, Uriel; Godfray, H Charles J; Cohen, Justin M; Hay, Simon I; Scott, Thomas W

    2014-04-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases pose some of the greatest challenges in public health, especially in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Efforts to control these diseases have been underpinned by a theoretical framework developed for malaria by Ross and Macdonald, including models, metrics for measuring transmission, and theory of control that identifies key vulnerabilities in the transmission cycle. That framework, especially Macdonald's formula for R0 and its entomological derivative, vectorial capacity, are now used to study dynamics and design interventions for many mosquito-borne diseases. A systematic review of 388 models published between 1970 and 2010 found that the vast majority adopted the Ross-Macdonald assumption of homogeneous transmission in a well-mixed population. Studies comparing models and data question these assumptions and point to the capacity to model heterogeneous, focal transmission as the most important but relatively unexplored component in current theory. Fine-scale heterogeneity causes transmission dynamics to be nonlinear, and poses problems for modeling, epidemiology and measurement. Novel mathematical approaches show how heterogeneity arises from the biology and the landscape on which the processes of mosquito biting and pathogen transmission unfold. Emerging theory focuses attention on the ecological and social context for mosquito blood feeding, the movement of both hosts and mosquitoes, and the relevant spatial scales for measuring transmission and for modeling dynamics and control. PMID:24591453

  20. Evaluation of nontarget effects of methoprene applied to catch basins for mosquito control

    Butler, Mari; Ginsberg, Howard S.; LeBrun, Roger A.; Gettman, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The mosquito larvicide methoprene is a juvenile growth hormone mimic that is widely used to control mosquito larvae in stormwater catch basins. This study addresses two concerns pertaining to methoprene's use for mosquito control. First, measurements of methoprene concentrations were made from water in catch basins that had been treated with methoprene and from an adjoining salt pond near where the treated catch basins emptied. The concentrations of methoprene in catch basins and at drainage outlets after application at the rates currently used for mosquito control in southern Rhode Island were 0.5 ppb and lower, orders of magnitude below what has been determined as detrimental to organisms other than mosquitoes. Second, the effects of methoprene on the communities that live in catch basins were evaluated both in simulated catch basins in the laboratory and in actual catch basins in the field. We found no evidence of declines in abundances of any taxa attributable to the application. Furthermore, we found no consistent changes in community-level parameters (e.g., taxonomic richness, and dominance-diversity relationships) related to methoprene application in either field or laboratory trials.

  1. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - a 22nd Symposium

    The 22nd Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 78th Annual Meeting in Austin, TX in February 2012. The principal objective, as for the previous 21 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control spec...

  2. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - A 21st symposium

    The 21st Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 77th Annual Meeting in Anaheim, CA in March 2011. The principal objective, as for the previous 20 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control specia...

  3. Modelling Aedes aegypti mosquito control via transgenic and sterile insect techniques: Endemics and emerging outbreaks

    Seirin Lee, S.

    2013-08-01

    The invasion of pest insects often changes or destroys a native ecosystem, and can result in food shortages and disease endemics. Issues such as the environmental effects of chemical control methods, the economic burden of maintaining control strategies and the risk of pest resistance still remain, and mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever prevail in many countries, infecting over 100 million worldwide in 2010. One environmentally friendly method for mosquito control is the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). This species-specific method of insect control relies on the mass rearing, sterilization and release of large numbers of sterile insects. An alternative transgenic method is the Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal (RIDL). Our objective is to consider contrasting control strategies for two invasive scenarios via SIT and RIDL: an endemic case and an emerging outbreak. We investigate how the release rate and size of release region influence both the potential for control success and the resources needed to achieve it, under a range of conditions and control strategies, and we discuss advantageous strategies with respect to reducing the release resources and strategy costs (in terms of control mosquito numbers) required to achieve complete eradication of wild-type mosquitoes. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - a 24th symposium

    The 24th Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 80th Annual Meeting in Seattle, WA in February 2014. The principal objective, as for the previous 23 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control spe...

  5. MOSQUITO VECTOR CONTROL AND BIOLOGY IN LATIN AMERICA - A 19TH SYMPOSIUM

    The 19th Annual Latin American symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 75th Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA, in April 2009. The principal objective, as for the previous 18 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control s...

  6. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - a 20TH symposium

    The 20th Annual Latin American symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 76th Annual Meeting in Lexington, KY in March 2010. The principal objective, as for the previous 19 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control spec...

  7. Ross, Macdonald, and a Theory for the Dynamics and Control of Mosquito-Transmitted Pathogens

    Smith, David L.; Battle, Katherine E.; Hay, Simon I.; Barker, Christopher M.; Scott, Thomas W.; McKenzie, F. Ellis

    2012-01-01

    Ronald Ross and George Macdonald are credited with developing a mathematical model of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission. A systematic historical review suggests that several mathematicians and scientists contributed to development of the Ross-Macdonald model over a period of 70 years. Ross developed two different mathematical models, Macdonald a third, and various Ross-Macdonald mathematical models exist. Ross-Macdonald models are best defined by a consensus set of assumptions. The mathematical model is just one part of a theory for the dynamics and control of mosquito-transmitted pathogens that also includes epidemiological and entomological concepts and metrics for measuring transmission. All the basic elements of the theory had fallen into place by the end of the Global Malaria Eradication Programme (GMEP, 19551969) with the concept of vectorial capacity, methods for measuring key components of transmission by mosquitoes, and a quantitative theory of vector control. The Ross-Macdonald theory has since played a central role in development of research on mosquito-borne pathogen transmission and the development of strategies for mosquito-borne disease prevention. PMID:22496640

  8. Ross, macdonald, and a theory for the dynamics and control of mosquito-transmitted pathogens.

    Smith, David L; Battle, Katherine E; Hay, Simon I; Barker, Christopher M; Scott, Thomas W; McKenzie, F Ellis

    2012-01-01

    Ronald Ross and George Macdonald are credited with developing a mathematical model of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission. A systematic historical review suggests that several mathematicians and scientists contributed to development of the Ross-Macdonald model over a period of 70 years. Ross developed two different mathematical models, Macdonald a third, and various "Ross-Macdonald" mathematical models exist. Ross-Macdonald models are best defined by a consensus set of assumptions. The mathematical model is just one part of a theory for the dynamics and control of mosquito-transmitted pathogens that also includes epidemiological and entomological concepts and metrics for measuring transmission. All the basic elements of the theory had fallen into place by the end of the Global Malaria Eradication Programme (GMEP, 1955-1969) with the concept of vectorial capacity, methods for measuring key components of transmission by mosquitoes, and a quantitative theory of vector control. The Ross-Macdonald theory has since played a central role in development of research on mosquito-borne pathogen transmission and the development of strategies for mosquito-borne disease prevention. PMID:22496640

  9. Web mapping GIS: GPS under the GIS umbrella for Aedes species dengue and chikungunya vector mosquito surveillance and control

    M. Palaniyandi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito nuisance and the mosquito borne diseases have become major important challenging public health problems in India especially in the fast developing city like Pondicherry urban agglomeration. The Pondicherry government has been implemented full-fledged mosquito control measures, however, dengue and chikungunya epidemics was accelerating trend in Pondicherry for the recent years, and therefore, the directorate of public health, Pondicherry was requested vector control research centre (VCRC, to conduct a mosquito control evaluation survey. A team of field staff of VCRC headed by the author, Pondicherry, have conducted a detailed reconnaissance survey for collecting the site specifications of houses and the streetwise mosquito data for analyzing the density of vector mosquitoes in the wards / blocks and delineating the areas vulnerable to disease epidemics in the urban areas. The GPS GARMIN 12 XL was used to collect the field data. The ARC GIS 10.0 software was used to map the site locations (houses with mosquito’s data. The digital map of block boundary of Pondicherry was used for mapping purpose. A systematic grid sampling was applied to conduct a rapid survey for mapping Aedes species mosquito genic condition in the urban areas and the coordinates of sites of house information with breeding habitats positive in the grid sectors was collected using GPS, and the mean value of positive habitats was analyzed by quintiles method for mapping. The four blocks were selected for Aedes mosquito survey where the mosquito problem was identified as comparatively high, four numbers of wards were selected from each block, and the 40 number of houses was selected with 100 meter interval distance for mosquito breeding survey in the domestic and peripheral domestic areas in each wards. The problematic areas were identified, highlighted and recommended for web mapping GIS for Aedes mosquito surveillance continuously for monitoring the mosquito control measures in the Pondicherry urban areas and the other parts of the urban areas in the country.

  10. Knowledge of mosquitos in relation to public and domestic control activities in the cities of Dar es Salaam and Tanga.

    Stephens, C; Masamu, E. T.; Kiama, M. G.; Keto, A. J.; Kinenekejo, M.; Ichimori, K; Lines, J

    1995-01-01

    A study of community awareness of mosquitos and related subjects in the residential areas of two Tanzanian cities (Dar es Salaam and Tanga) showed that residents were well aware of mosquitos. Almost all claimed to use some form of domestic mosquito control product for their personal protection, and many spend a significant portion of the household income on this. The problems of nuisance-biting and malaria transmission are usually not separated and are considered to be the result of poor envi...

  11. Cost-benefit analysis of an area-wide pest management program to control Asian tiger mosquito in New Jersey

    Area-wide pest management (AWPM) is recommended to control urban mosquitoes, such as Aedes albopictus (Asian tiger mosquito), which limit outdoor activities. We conducted a cost-benefit analysis for an AWPM in Mercer and Monmouth counties, New Jersey, as part of a controlled design with matched area...

  12. Novel Acetylcholinesterase Target Site for Malaria Mosquito Control

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2006-01-01

    Current anticholinesterase pesticides were developed during World War II and are toxic to mammals because they target a catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterases (AChEs) in insects and in mammals. A sequence analysis of AChEs from 73 species and a three-dimensional model of a malaria-carrying mosquito (Anopheles gambiae) AChE (AgAChE) reported here show that C286 and R339 of AgAChE are conserved at the opening of the active site of AChEs in 17 invertebrate and four insect species, res...

  13. MAN, MOSQUITOES AND MICROBES.

    SCHOONOVER, ROBERT A.

    THE CONTROL OF MOSQUITOES IS A MATTER OF INCREASING CONCERN IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA. A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE LIFE CYCLE, VARIOUS SPECIES, CONTROL, AND DESCRIPTION OF DISEASES TRANSMITTED BY THE MOSQUITO WAS PRESENTED. THE ARTICLE CONCLUDED THAT MOSQUITO CONTROL IS NOT ONLY A HEALTH PROBLEM, BUT ALSO A MATTER OF IMPROVED ECONOMICS IN RELATION TO…

  14. Laboratory evaluation of the bioinsecticide Spinosad for mosquito control.

    Romi, R; Proietti, S; Di Luca, M; Cristofaro, M

    2006-03-01

    Spinosad, a naturally occurring product of the fermentation of the bacterium Saccharopolyspora spinosa, is a highly effective bioinsecticide against a broad range of agriculturally important insect pests, and this agent has an excellent environmental and mammalian toxicological profile. In this study the efficacy of a Spinosad-based product (Laser 4.8% emulsifiable concentrate) was evaluated in laboratory bioassays against laboratory-reared mosquito strains of 3 species of medical importance: Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex pipiens. Spinosad was particularly effective against larval Aedes and Culex, with a less marked activity against anophelines (24-h median lethal concentration = 0.0096, 0.0064, and 0.039 mg/liter, respectively), showing a persistence of the insecticide action of about 6 wk in laboratory containers. The activity of the Spinosad-based product against adult mosquitoes (toxicity by ingestion and a possible irritant or repellent effect on gravid females) also was evaluated. Results are discussed and compared with those available in the literature. PMID:16646328

  15. Prevention and control of Zika fever as a mosquito-borne and sexually transmitted disease

    Gao, Daozhou; Lou, Yijun; He, Daihai; Porco, Travis C.; Kuang, Yang; Chowell, Gerardo; Ruan, Shigui

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic poses a major global public health emergency. It is known that ZIKV is spread by \\textit{Aedes} mosquitoes, recent studies show that ZIKV can also be transmitted via sexual contact and cases of sexually transmitted ZIKV have been confirmed in the U.S., France, and Italy. How sexual transmission affects the spread and control of ZIKV infection is not well-understood. We presented a mathematical model to investigate the impact of mosquito-borne and sexual ...

  16. Biological control of Culex mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) by the tadpole shrimp, Triops longicaudatus (Notostraca: Triopsidae).

    Tietze, N S; Mulla, M S

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory oviposition choice tests and behavioral observations indicated that the activity of tadpole shrimp, Triops longicaudatus (LeConte), near the water surface deterred gravid Culex quinquefasciatus Say from ovipositing. In the cities of Oasis and Riverside, Calif., tadpole shrimp significantly reduced the abundance of immature mosquitoes (Cx. tarsalis Coquillett and Cx. quinquefasciatus) probably due to lowered oviposition rates, as well as tadpole shrimp predation. Generally, mosquito oviposition rates in field ponds with tadpole shrimp were lower than that of controls, except when tadpole shrimp were very young (4 d after flooding) or when their abundance had declined late in the flooding period. When analyzed by pond, tadpole shrimp size was correlated inversely with abundance; however, differences in size or abundance did not affect their capacity to reduce mosquito populations. PMID:2033616

  17. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - a 23rd symposium

    The 23nd Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 79th Annual Meeting in Atlantic City, NJ in February 2013. The principal objective, as for the previous 22 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector contr...

  18. Scepticism towards insecticide treated mosquito nets for malaria control in a rural community in northwestern Tanzania

    Nnko, Soori; Whyte, Susan Reynolds; Geissler, Wenzel; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    in Mwanza region, North-Western Tanzania. The study explores reasons for scepticism and low uptake of insecticide treated mosquito nets (ITNs) that were promoted through social marketing strategy for malaria control prior to the introduction of long lasting nets (LLN). The paper breaks from...

  19. MOSQUITO VECTOR CONTROL AND BIOLOGY IN LATIN AMERICA - A 16TH SYMPOSIUM

    The 16th Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 72nd Annual Meeting in Detroit, Michigan in February 2006. The principal objective, as for the previous 15 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector cont...

  20. DOD AFPMB and USDA ARS team up to develop new insecticides for mosquito control.

    Mosquito-borne pathogens continue to be one of the leading source of human disease that cause human morbidity and moribundity worldwide. In some cases, vaccines are effective methods of disease reduction; however, in many situations, the reliance is upon insecticides for control, including the use ...

  1. MOSQUITO CONTROL PESTICIDES: ADVERSE IMPACTS TO FRESHWATER AQUATIC AND MARINE ORGANISMS

    Most of the toxicity information available for evaluating potential effects of mosquito control chemicals on non-target aquatic biota comes from acute lethality tests of 24- to 96-hr duration. These studies generally show that insecticides are more toxic to aquatic invertebrates ...

  2. Mosquito, adult (image)

    ... illustration shows an adult southern house mosquito. This mosquito feeds on blood and is the carrier of many diseases, such as encephalitis, West Nile, dengue fever, yellow fever, and others. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

  3. Knowledge of mosquitos in relation to public and domestic control activities in the cities of Dar es Salaam and Tanga.

    Stephens, C.; Masamu, E. T.; Kiama, M. G.; Keto, A. J.; Kinenekejo, M.; Ichimori, K.; Lines, J.

    1995-01-01

    A study of community awareness of mosquitos and related subjects in the residential areas of two Tanzanian cities (Dar es Salaam and Tanga) showed that residents were well aware of mosquitos. Almost all claimed to use some form of domestic mosquito control product for their personal protection, and many spend a significant portion of the household income on this. The problems of nuisance-biting and malaria transmission are usually not separated and are considered to be the result of poor environmental hygiene, for which both residents and local authorities are responsible. Although Culex mosquitos are not a primary target of the Urban Malaria Control Project (UMCP), the persistence of nuisance-biting has made residents sceptical and dissatisfied with insecticide spraying. The residents' priorities are evidently not the same as those of the health authorities, yet mutual cooperation is essential. In order to maintain community support, campaigns aimed at malaria vectors should consider the need for additional measures to control Culex mosquitos, such as those now being tried by the UMCP. Mosquito breeding sites are non-specifically associated with rubbish and standing water of all kinds, and so the actions that the community considers necessary for mosquito source reduction tend to be poorly targeted. Residents do not recognize that some sources produce malaria mosquitos while others produce nuisance mosquitos. The environmental anti-mosquito measures currently promoted by health education and other forms of propaganda are also poorly targeted. While some of them are directed at important Culex breeding sites, others are aimed at sites of little importance for mosquitos of any kind.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7704932

  4. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles from Cassia roxburghii-a most potent power for mosquito control.

    Muthukumaran, Udaiyan; Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Rajeswary, Mohan

    2015-12-01

    Mosquitoes transmit serious human diseases, causing millions of deaths every year. The use of synthetic insecticides to control vector mosquitoes has caused physiological resistance and adverse environmental effects in addition to high operational cost. Insecticides of synthesized natural products for vector control have been a priority in this area. In the present study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized using Cassia roxburghii plant leaf extract against Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus were determined. Larvae were exposed to varying concentrations of synthesized AgNPs (12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 μg/mL) and aqueous leaf extracts (60, 120, 180, 240, and 300 μg/mL) for 24 h. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectrum, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis (EDX), transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Compare to aqueous extracted synthesized AgNPs showed extensive mortality rate against An. stephensi, Ae. aegypti, and C. quinquefasciatus with the LC50 and LC90 values that were 26.35, 28.67, 31.27 and 48.81, 53.24, and 58.11 μg/mL, respectively. No mortality was observed in the control. This is the first report on mosquito larvicidal activity of plant-synthesized nanoparticles. Thus, the use of C. roxburghii to synthesize silver nanoparticles is a rapid, eco-friendly, and a single-step approach, and the AgNPs formed can be potential mosquito larvicidal agents. Therefore, this study proves that C. roxburghii is a potential bioresource for stable, reproducible nanoparticle synthesis (AgNPs) and also can be used as an efficient mosquito control agent. This is the first report on the larvicidal activity of the plant extract and AgNPs. PMID:26276645

  5. A theoretical approach to predicting the success of genetic manipulation of malaria mosquitoes in malaria control

    Koella Jacob C

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes that have been genetically modified to better encapsulate the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are being considered as a possible tool in the control of malaria. Hopes for this have been raised with the identification of genes involved in the encapsulation response and with advances in the tools required to transform mosquitoes. However, we have only very little understanding of the conditions that would allow such genes to spread in natural populations. Methods We present here a theoretical model that combines population genetical and epidemiological processes, thereby allowing one to predict not only these conditions (intensity of transmission, evolutionary cost of resistance, tools used to drive the genes but also the impact of the spread of refractoriness on the prevalence of the disease. Results The main conclusions are 1 that efficient transposons will generally be able to drive genes that confer refractoriness through populations even if there is a substantial (evolutionary cost of refractoriness, but 2 that this will decrease malaria prevalence in the human population substantially only if refractoriness is close to 100% effective. Conclusions If refractoriness is less than 100% effective (because of, for example, environmentally induced variation in the effectiveness of the mosquito's immune response, control programmes based on genetic manipulation of mosquitoes will have very little impact on the epidemiology of malaria, at least in areas with intense transmission.

  6. Interplay between insecticide-treated bed-nets and mosquito demography: implications for malaria control.

    Ngonghala, Calistus N; Mohammed-Awel, Jemal; Zhao, Ruijun; Prosper, Olivia

    2016-05-21

    Although malaria prevalence has witnessed a significant reduction within the past decade, malaria still constitutes a major health and economic problem, especially to low-income countries. Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) remain one of the primary measures for preventing the malignant disease. Unfortunately, the success of ITN campaigns is hampered by improper use and natural decay in ITN-efficacy over time. Many models aimed at studying malaria transmission and control fail to account for this decay, as well as mosquito demography and feeding preferences exhibited by mosquitoes towards humans. Omitting these factors can misrepresent disease risk, while understanding their effects on malaria dynamics can inform control policy. We present a model for malaria dynamics that incorporates these factors, and a systematic analysis, including stability and sensitivity analyses of the model under different conditions. The model with constant ITN-efficacy exhibits a backward bifurcation emphasizing the need for sustained control measures until the basic reproduction number, R0, drops below a critical value at which control is feasible. The infectious and partially immune human populations and R0 are highly sensitive to the probability that a mosquito feeds successfully on a human, ITN coverage and the maximum biting rate of mosquitoes, irrespective of whether ITN-efficacy is constant or declines over time. This implies that ITNs play an important role in disease control. When ITN-efficacy wanes over time, we identify disease risks and corresponding ITN coverage, as well as feeding preference levels for which the disease can be controlled or eradicated. Our study leads to important insights that could assist in the design and implementation of better malaria control strategies. We conclude that ITNs that can retain their effectiveness for longer periods will be more appropriate in the fight against malaria and that making more ITNs available to highly endemic regions is necessary for malaria containment. PMID:26976050

  7. Persistent oscillations and backward bifurcation in a malaria model with varying human and mosquito populations: implications for control.

    Ngonghala, Calistus N; Teboh-Ewungkem, Miranda I; Ngwa, Gideon A

    2015-06-01

    We derive and study a deterministic compartmental model for malaria transmission with varying human and mosquito populations. Our model considers disease-related deaths, asymptomatic immune humans who are also infectious, as well as mosquito demography, reproduction and feeding habits. Analysis of the model reveals the existence of a backward bifurcation and persistent limit cycles whose period and size is determined by two threshold parameters: the vectorial basic reproduction number Rm, and the disease basic reproduction number R0, whose size can be reduced by reducing Rm. We conclude that malaria dynamics are indeed oscillatory when the methodology of explicitly incorporating the mosquito's demography, feeding and reproductive patterns is considered in modeling the mosquito population dynamics. A sensitivity analysis reveals important control parameters that can affect the magnitudes of Rm and R0, threshold quantities to be taken into consideration when designing control strategies. Both Rm and the intrinsic period of oscillation are shown to be highly sensitive to the mosquito's birth constant λm and the mosquito's feeding success probability pw. Control of λm can be achieved by spraying, eliminating breeding sites or moving them away from human habitats, while pw can be controlled via the use of mosquito repellant and insecticide-treated bed-nets. The disease threshold parameter R0 is shown to be highly sensitive to pw, and the intrinsic period of oscillation is also sensitive to the rate at which reproducing mosquitoes return to breeding sites. A global sensitivity and uncertainty analysis reveals that the ability of the mosquito to reproduce and uncertainties in the estimations of the rates at which exposed humans become infectious and infectious humans recover from malaria are critical in generating uncertainties in the disease classes. PMID:24992885

  8. Genetically-modified mosquitoes for malaria control: requirements to be considered before field releases

    Tour, Y.T.; Knols, B. G. J.

    2006-01-01

    The technical feasibility of the development of transgenic mosquitoes highly refractory to (rodent) malaria parasites has been demonstrated in the laboratory. Following this proof of principle, genetic control of vectors could have an important role to play in the interruption of transmission of human malarias, if the main developmental and implementation challenges are adequately addressed. These include the establishment of a proof of efficacy and safety for humans and the environment in ca...

  9. Characterization of Aedes albopictus akirin for the control of mosquito and sand fly infestations

    Moreno-Cid, J. A.; Jimenez, M.; Cornélie, Sylvie; Molina, R; Alarcon, P.; Lacroix, M. N.; Pinal, R.; Delacour, S.; Lucientes, J.; Canales, M.; de la Lastra, J. M. P.; Villar, M.; de la Fuente, J.

    2010-01-01

    The control of arthropod vectors of pathogens that affect human and animal health is important for the eradication of vector-borne diseases. Recent evidences showed a reduction in the survival and/or fertility of mosquitoes, sand flies and poultry red mites fed in vitro with antibodies against the recombinant Aedes albopictus akirin. These experiments were the first step toward the development of a multi-target arthropod vaccine. In this study, we showed that the oviposition of A. albopictus ...

  10. QTL Mapping of Genome Regions Controlling Temephos Resistance in Larvae of the Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe del Carmen; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Suarez, Adriana Flores; Black, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector of dengue and yellow fever flaviviruses. Temephos is an organophosphate insecticide used globally to suppress Ae. aegypti larval populations but resistance has evolved in many locations. Methodology/Principal Findings Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) controlling temephos survival in Ae. aegypti larvae were mapped in a pair of F3 advanced intercross lines arising from temephos resistant parents from Solidaridad, México and temephos s...

  11. A Community level KAP study on Mosquito Control in Jamnagar District.

    Kishor M Dhaduk, Kapil M Gandha, Bhavin N Vadera, Jitesh P Mehta, Dipesh V Parmar, Sudha B Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Background: The vectors borne diseases poses an immense public health concern and are major impediments in the path of socio-economic development. Objective: To assess domestic environment as well as community level KAP on mosquito control measures in Jamnagar district. Methods & statistics: It was a cross-sectional survey of 450 household by a pre-tested proforma analyzed by Microsoft excel office 2007. It was carried out in urban, urban slum and rural areas of Jamnagar district....

  12. Natural and engineered mosquito immunity

    Alphey, Luke

    2009-01-01

    A recent paper in BMC Microbiology shows how suppression of mosquito innate immunity against a virus that the mosquito can normally tolerate increases mosquito mortality. This is just one of several approaches that may soon bring genetics-based mosquito control methods from the laboratory into the field.

  13. Characteristics of mangrove swamps managed for mosquito control in eastern Florida, USA

    Middleton, B.; Devlin, D.; Proffitt, E.; McKee, K.; Cretini, K.F.

    2008-01-01

    Manipulations of the vegetation and hydrology of wetlands for mosquito control are common worldwide, but these modifications may affect vital ecosystem processes. To control mosquitoes in mangrove swamps in eastern Florida, managers have used rotational impoundment management (RIM) as an alternative to the worldwide practice of mosquito ditching. Levees surround RIM swamps, and water is pumped into the impoundment during the summer, a season when natural swamps have low water levels. In the New World, these mosquito-managed swamps resemble the mixed basin type of mangrove swamp (based on PCA analysis). An assessment was made of RIM, natural (control), and breached-RIM (restored) swamps in eastern Florida to compare their structural complexities, soil development, and resistance to invasion. Regarding structural complexity, dominant species composition differed between these swamps; the red mangrove Rhizophora mangle occurred at a higher relative density in RIM and breached-RIM swamps, and the black mangrove Avicennia germinans had a higher relative density in natural swamps. Tree density and canopy cover were higher and tree height lower in RIM swamps than in natural and breached-RIM swamps. Soil organic matter in RIM swamps was twice that in natural or breached-RIM swamps. RIM swamps had a lower resistance to invasion by the Brazilian pepper tree Schinus terebinthifolius, which is likely attributable to the lower porewater salinity in RIM swamps. These characteristics may reflect differences in important ecosystem processes (primary production, trophic structure, nutrient cycling, decomposition). Comparative assessments of managed wetlands are vital for land managers, so that they can make informed decisions compatible with conservation objectives. ?? Inter-Research 2008.

  14. Declining malaria, rising of dengue and Zika virus: insights for mosquito vector control.

    Benelli, Giovanni; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2016-05-01

    The fight against mosquito-borne diseases is a challenge of huge public health importance. To our mind, 2015 was an extraordinary year for malaria control, due to three hot news: the Nobel Prize to Youyou Tu for the discovery of artemisinin, the development of the first vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria [i.e. RTS,S/AS01 (RTS,S)], and the fall of malaria infection rates worldwide, with special reference to sub-Saharan Africa. However, there are major challenges that still deserve attention, in order to boost malaria prevention and control. Indeed, parasite strains resistant to artemisinin have been detected, and RTS,S vaccine does not offer protection against Plasmodium vivax malaria, which predominates in many countries outside of Africa. Furthermore, the recent outbreaks of Zika virus infections, occurring in South America, Central America and the Caribbean, represent the most recent of four arrivals of important arboviruses in the Western Hemisphere, over the last 20 years. Zika virus follows dengue (which slyly arrived in the hemisphere over decades and became more aggressive in the 1990s), West Nile virus (emerged in 1999) and chikungunya (emerged in 2013). Notably, there are no specific treatments for these arboviruses. The emerging scenario highlights that the effective and eco-friendly control of mosquito vectors, with special reference to highly invasive species such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, is crucial. The concrete potential of screening plant species as sources of metabolites for parasitological purposes is worthy of attention, as elucidated by the Y. Tu's example. Notably, plant-borne molecules are often effective at few parts per million against Aedes, Ochlerotatus, Anopheles and Culex young instars, can be used for the rapid synthesis of mosquitocidal nanoformulations and even employed to prepare cheap repellents with low human toxicity. In addition, behaviour-based control tools relying to the employ of sound traps and the manipulation of swarming behaviour (i.e. "lure and kill" approach) are discussed. The importance of further research on the chemical cues routing mosquito swarming and mating dynamics is highlighted. Besides radiation, transgenic and symbiont-based mosquito control approaches, an effective option may be the employ of biological control agents of mosquito young instars, in the presence of ultra-low quantities of nanoformulated botanicals, which boost their predation rates. PMID:26932263

  15. Risk and Control of Mosquito-Borne Diseases in Southeast Asian Rubber Plantations.

    Tangena, Julie-Anne A; Thammavong, Phoutmany; Wilson, Anne L; Brey, Paul T; Lindsay, Steve W

    2016-05-01

    Unprecedented economic growth in Southeast Asia (SEA) has encouraged the expansion of rubber plantations. This land-use transformation is changing the risk of mosquito-borne diseases. Mature plantations provide ideal habitats for the mosquito vectors of malaria, dengue, and chikungunya. Migrant workers may introduce pathogens into plantation areas, most worryingly artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites. The close proximity of rubber plantations to natural forest also increases the threat from zoonoses, where new vector-borne pathogens spill over from wild animals into humans. There is therefore an urgent need to scale up vector control and access to health care for rubber workers. This requires an intersectoral approach with strong collaboration between the health sector, rubber industry, and local communities. PMID:26907494

  16. CLONING AND EXPRESSING TRYPSIN MODULATING OOSTATIC FACTOR IN Chlorella desiccata TO CONTROL MOSQUITO LARVAE.

    Borovsky, Dov; Sterner, Andeas; Powell, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    The insect peptide hormone trypsin modulating oostatic factor (TMOF), a decapeptide that is synthesized by the mosquito ovary and controls the translation of the gut's trypsin mRNA was cloned and expressed in the marine alga Chlorella desiccata. To express Aedes aegypti TMOF gene (tmfA) in C. desiccata cells, two plasmids (pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA) were engineered with pKYLX71 DNA (5 Kb) carrying the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter 35S(2) and the kanamycin resistant gene (neo), as well as, a 8 Kb nitrate reductase gene (nit) from Chlorella vulgaris. Transforming C. desiccata with pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA show that the engineered algal cells express TMOF (20 ± 4 μg ± SEM and 17 ± 3 μg ± SEM, respectively in 3 × 10(8) cells) and feeding the cells to mosquito larvae kill 75 and 60% of Ae. aegypti larvae in 4 days, respectively. Southern and Northern blots analyses show that tmfA integrated into the genome of C. desiccata by homologous recombination using the yeast 2 μ circle of replication and the nit in pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA, respectively, and the transformed algal cells express tmfA transcript. Using these algal cells it will be possible in the future to control mosquito larvae in the marsh. PMID:26440910

  17. Cost-effectiveness of novel system of mosquito surveillance and control, Brazil.

    Pepin, Kim M; Marques-Toledo, Cecilia; Scherer, Luciano; Morais, Maira M; Ellis, Brett; Eiras, Alvaro E

    2013-04-01

    Of all countries in the Western Hemisphere, Brazil has the highest economic losses caused by dengue fever. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of a novel system of vector surveillance and control, Monitoramento Inteligente da Dengue (Intelligent Dengue Monitoring System [MID]), which was implemented in 21 cities in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Traps for adult female mosquitoes were spaced at 300-m intervals throughout each city. In cities that used MID, vector control was conducted specifically at high-risk sites (indicated through daily updates by MID). In control cities, vector control proceeded according to guidelines of the Brazilian government. We estimated that MID prevented 27,191 cases of dengue fever and saved an average of $227 (median $58) per case prevented, which saved approximately $364,517 in direct costs (health care and vector control) and $7,138,940 in lost wages (societal effect) annually. MID was more effective in cities with stronger economies and more cost-effective in cities with higher levels of mosquito infestation. PMID:23628282

  18. Effects on birds of fenthion aerial application for mosquito control

    DeWeese, L.R.; McEwen, L.C.; Settimi, L.A.; Deblinger, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    Effects on birds of an aerial application of fenthion, a potent organophosphorus cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting insecticide, were assessed on four study sites 1.8 to 3.6 km2 in size. These sites were located within 121.5 km2 of wet meadows treated with 47 g of fenthion (AI) per ha in ultralow- volume formulation. Assessment methods were searches for sick or dead birds, measurements of brain ChE activity in specimens found dead or collected alive at different time intervals, and counts of bird populations. After treatment, 99 birds and 15 mammals were found sick or dead; 106 of these were on one site. Brain ChE activity in dead birds was depressed sufficiently to indicate that death was caused by an anti-ChE substance. Brain ChE activity in three common bird species collected alive showed the greatest reduction 2 days postspray. Two of these species had ChE activity that was still significantly (Pmosquito control was life threatening to many birds inhabiting treated meadows.

  19. A tool box for operational mosquito larval control: preliminary results and early lessons from the Urban Malaria Control Programme in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Govella Nico J; Chaki Prosper P; Geissbhler Yvonne; Nyika Dickson; Dongus Stefan; Vanek Michael J; William George; Kannady Khadija; Fillinger Ulrike; Mathenge Evan M; Singer Burton H; Mshinda Hassan; Lindsay Steven W; Tanner Marcel; Mtasiwa Deo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background As the population of Africa rapidly urbanizes, large populations could be protected from malaria by controlling aquatic stages of mosquitoes if cost-effective and scalable implementation systems can be designed. Methods A recently initiated Urban Malaria Control Programme in Dar es Salaam delegates responsibility for routine mosquito control and surveillance to modestly-paid community members, known as Community-Owned Resource Persons (CORPs). New vector surveillance, larv...

  20. Declining Malaria, Rising of Dengue and Zika virus: Insights for Mosquito Vector Control.

    Benelli, Giovanni; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    The fight against mosquito-borne diseases is a challenge of huge public health importance. To our mind, 2015 was an extraordinary year for malaria control, due to three hot news: the Nobel Prize to Youyou Tu for the discovery of artemisinin, the development of the first vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria [i.e. RTS,S/AS01 (RTS,S)], and the fall of malaria infection rates worldwide, with special reference to sub-Saharan Africa. However, there are major challenges that still deserve a...

  1. Anti-mosquito plants as an alternative or incremental method for malaria vector control among rural communities of Bagamoyo District, Tanzania

    Innocent, Ester; Hassanali, Ahmed; Kisinza, William NW; Mutalemwa, Prince Pp; Magesa, Stephen; Kayombo, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    Plants represent one of the most accessible resources available for mosquito control by communities in Tanzania. However, no documented statistics exist for their contribution in the management of mosquitoes and other insects except through verbal and some publications. This study aimed at assessing communities' knowledge, attitudes and practices of using plants as an alternative method for mosquito control among selected communities in a malaria-prone area in Tanzania. Questionnaires were ad...

  2. Distribution and migration of pesticide residues in mosquito control impoundments St. Lucie County, Florida, USA

    Parkinson, R. W.; Wang, T. C.; White, J. R.; David, J. R.; Hoffman, M. E.

    1993-09-01

    This project was designed to: (1) document the distribution and migration of organochlorine pesticide residues within marsh substrates of 18 St. Lucie County mosquito control impoundments located along the Indian River Lagoon estuary, and (2) evaluate the impact of water management techniques on residue mobility. Our results indicate that detectible concentrations of organochlorine compounds, applied between the late 1940s and early 1950s, are present in 16 of the 18 St. Lucie County mosquito control impoundments. These compounds are primarily restricted to the surficial, organic-rich wetland sediment, which, based upon geotechnical analysis, was exposed to the atmosphere at a time when the impoundments were subjected to pesticide treatment. Contaminated sediments are present below the surficial, organic-rich layer, suggesting that some vertical migration of pesticides has occurred. It is unlikely that leaching associated with the downward percolation of impounded water was responsible for this migration as pesticide residues were never detected within the in situ pore waters. An alternative explanation is that biological processes (e.g., rooting, burrowing) facilitated the downward flux of organochlorine compounds into sediment horizons not subjected to direct treatment. Eighty-eight surface water samples obtained from two impoundments subjected to contrasting water management techniques were analyzed for pesticide content. None of the surficial water samples collected in association with these impoundments contained detectible concentrations of organochlorine compounds. These samples were unfiltered and contained as much as 25 mg/1 of particulate organic matter. This suggests that the currently preferred management technique (RIM), which is designed to maintain water quality, limit mosquito production, and provide for ecological continuity, does not hydraulically mobilize pesticide residues into the Indian River Lagoon estuary.

  3. Mosquito Immunity against Arboviruses

    Shuzhen Sim; Natapong Jupatanakul; George Dimopoulos

    2014-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) pose a significant threat to global health, causing human disease with increasing geographic range and severity. The recent availability of the genome sequences of medically important mosquito species has kick-started investigations into the molecular basis of how mosquito vectors control arbovirus infection. Here, we discuss recent findings concerning the role of the mosquito immune system in antiviral defense, interactions between arboviruses and fundam...

  4. Aerial and Tidal Transport of Mosquito Control Pesticides into the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

    R.H Pierce

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This project was undertaken as the initial monitoring program to determine if mosquito adulticides applied along the Florida Keys cause adverse ecological effects in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS.The study monitored the distribution and persistence of two mosquito adulticides,permethrin and dibrom (naled,during three separate routine applications by the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District.The approach was to determine if toxic concentrations of the pesticides entered the FKNMS by aerial drift or tidal transport.The amount of pesticide entering the FKNMS by way of aerial drift was monitored by collection on glass fiber filter pads,set on floats in a grid pattern on either side of the FKNMS.Permethrin was recovered from filter pads on the leeward side for each of the three applications,ranging from 0.5 to 50.1 µg/m² throughout the study.Tidal current transport was monitored by collection of surface and subsurface water samples at each grid site.Tidal transport of naled and dichlorvos (naled degradation productwas apparent in the adjacent waters of the FKNMS.These compounds were detected in subsurface,offshore water at 0.1 to 0.6 µg/l,14 hr after application.Permethrin was not detected in offshore water samples; however, concentrations ranging from 5.1 to 9.4 µg/l were found in surface water from the canal system adjacent to the application route.Comparison of the observed environmental concentrations with toxicity data (permethrin LC-50,96 hr for Mysidopsis bahia =0.02 µg/lindicated a potential hazard to marine invertebrates in the canals with possible tidal transport to other areas.Para determinar si los adulticidas de mosquitos,aplicados en los Cayos de la Florida,causan efectos ecológicos adversos en el Santuario Marino Nacional de los Cayos de la Florida,se monitoreó la distribución y persistencia de dos adulticidas de mosquitos.Estos fueron permetrina y dibrom (naled.Se trabajó durante tres aplicaciones rutinarias hechas por la Unidad de Control de Mosquitos de los Cayos de la Florida.La finalidad era determinar si concentraciones tóxicas de los plaguicidas llegaban al santuario por transporte aéreo o por las corrientes de marea.La cantidad de plaguicida que entra por vía aérea fue monitoreada utilizando filtros de fibra de vidrio,montados en flotadores dispuestos sistemáticamente a ambos lados del FKNMS. La Permetrina fue recuperada en filtros a sotavento del santuario durante tres aplicaciones,con un ámbito entre 0.5 y 50.1 µg/m² durante todo el estudio.El transporte por corrientes de marea fue monitoreado recolectando muestras de agua superficiales y subsuperficiales en puntos definidos.Se notó el transporte por mareas de naled y diclorvos (producto degradado de naleden aguas adyacentes al santuario.Estos compuestos fueron detectados en muestras subsuperficiales en aguas fuera de la costa con concentraciones de 0.1 a 0.6 µg/l,14 hr después de la aplicación.La Permetrina no fue detectada en muestras de agua fuera de la costa;sin embargo,hubo concentraciones de 5.1 a 9.4 µg/l en aguas superficiales del sistema de canales adyacente a la ruta de aplicación. Comparaciones de las concentraciones observadas con información toxicológica (permetrina LC-50,96 hr para Mysidopsis bahia =0.02 µg/lindican un peligro potencial para invertebrados marinos en los canales y la posibilidad de transporte por mareas a otras áreas.

  5. Aerial and tidal transport of mosquito control pesticides into the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

    This project was undertaken as the initial monitoring program to determine if mosquito adulticides applied along the Florida Keys cause adverse ecological effects in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS). The study monitored the distribution and persistente of two mosquito adulticides, permethrin and dibrom (naled), during three separate routine applications by the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District. The approach was to determine if toxic concentrations of the pesticides entered the FKNMS by aerial drift or tidal transport. The amount of pesticide entering the FKNMS by way of aerial drift was monitored by collection on glass fiber filter pads, set on floats in a grid pattern on either side of the FKNMS. Permethrin was recovered from filter pads on the leeward side for each of the three applications, ranging from 0.5 to 50.1 μg/m2 throughout the study. Tidal current transport was monitored by collection of surface and subsurface water samples at each grid site. Tidal transport of naled and dichlorvos (naled degradation product) was apparent in the adjacent waters of the FKNMS. These compounds were detected in subsurface, offshore water at 0.1 to 0.6 gg/l, 14 hr after application. Permethrin was not detected in offshore water samples; however, concentrations ranging from 5.1 to 9.4 μg/1 were found in surface water from the canal system adjacent to the application route. Comparison of the observed environmental concentrations with toxicity data (permethrin LC-50, 96 hr for Mysidopsis bahia = 0.02 μg/1) indicated a potential hazard to marine invertebrates in the canals with possible tidal transport to other areas

  6. Achieving high coverage of larval-stage mosquito surveillance: challenges for a community-based mosquito control programme in urban Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Shoo Bryson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventing malaria by controlling mosquitoes in their larval stages requires regular sensitive monitoring of vector populations and intervention coverage. The study assessed the effectiveness of operational, community-based larval habitat surveillance systems within the Urban Malaria Control Programme (UMCP in urban Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods Cross-sectional surveys were carried out to assess the ability of community-owned resource persons (CORPs to detect mosquito breeding sites and larvae in areas with and without larviciding. Potential environmental and programmatic determinants of habitat detection coverage and detection sensitivity of mosquito larvae were recorded during guided walks with 64 different CORPs to assess the accuracy of data each had collected the previous day. Results CORPs reported the presence of 66.2% of all aquatic habitats (1,963/2,965, but only detected Anopheles larvae in 12.6% (29/230 of habitats that contained them. Detection sensitivity was particularly low for late-stage Anopheles (2.7%, 3/111, the most direct programmatic indicator of malaria vector productivity. Whether a CORP found a wet habitat or not was associated with his/her unfamiliarity with the area (Odds Ratio (OR [95% confidence interval (CI] = 0.16 [0.130, 0.203], P Conclusions Accessibility of habitats in urban settings presents a major challenge because the majority of compounds are fenced for security reasons. Furthermore, CORPs under-reported larvae especially where larvicides were applied. This UMCP system for larval surveillance in cities must be urgently revised to improve access to enclosed compounds and the sensitivity with which habitats are searched for larvae.

  7. Biochemical, molecular and microscopic studies on mosquitoes with special emphasis on Wolbachia infections, diagnostic assessment of Dengue viruses and biological control of Dengue vectors

    Mahilum, Mila

    2003-01-01

    Mosquitoes are threatening the human population as vectors of debilitating diseases such as malaria, dengue, yello and west nile fever as well as lymphatic filariasis. The knowledge on the biology of mosquitoes, pathogens and parasites transmitted by them is essential for a better control of both insects and diseases they are transmitting. This dissertation aims to increase the knowldege on the biology of vector mosquitoes as well as the pathogens. The research includes the following topics, ...

  8. The Importance of Age Dependent Mortality and the Extrinsic Incubation Period in Models of Mosquito-Borne Disease Transmission and Control

    Bellan, Steve E.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly all mathematical models of vector-borne diseases have assumed that vectors die at constant rates. However, recent empirical research suggests that mosquito mortality rates are frequently age dependent. This work develops a simple mathematical model to assess how relaxing the classical assumption of constant mortality affects the predicted effectiveness of anti-vectorial interventions. The effectiveness of mosquito control when mosquitoes die at age dependent rates was also compared acr...

  9. Pesticide Applicator Training Manual, Category 8B: Mosquito Control for New Jersey. A Training Program for the Certification of Commercial Pesticide Applicators, and Study Questions.

    Schulze, Terry L., Ed.; Kriner, Ray R., Ed.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the mimimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the mosquito control category. The text discusses the aspects of mosquito biology and control by biological, mechanical, and integrated measures. A study guide with sample and study questions is included.…

  10. Biorational insecticides for control of mosquitoes and black flies in Sinaloa

    Cipriano García Gutiérrez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In Sinaloa Mexico the presence of mosquitoes is a important health problem, and each spring-summer season appear several species which include: Aedes aegypti (Linneus, Anopheles albimanus (Wiedemann, Culex quinquefasciatus (Say and black flies of the Simulidae family. The control of larvae and adults of these insects are usually performed with chemical insecticides, so the use of biorational insecticides for control of these insects is novel, due to that have low environment impact. The objective of this work is to give known to the different biorational insecticides and their biological effects (inhibitor, insect repellent, larvicide, adulticide, that can be used to combat to different development stages of these insects. As well as show the progress of a study on the effectiveness of neem extracts, garlic, cinnamon, albahaca and cypermethrin at low doses (0.25,0.5 and 1ml/L, for control of larvae and adults of black flies in the unicipality of El Fuerte, Sinaloa. By the mode of action, the biorational that can doing use for the control of theseinsects were: Spinosad, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner var. israeliensis for larvae control, Spinosad and Beauveria bassiana (Vuill. for adults; as well as extracts of neem, garlic, cinnamon and albahaca for both stages. The preliminary results of the study showed that the effectiveness application in tourist sites, through aerial spraying of cypermethrin at low doses and the plants extracts, allow low the index of larvae and infestation of mosquitoes and blackflies, decreasing the discomfort caused by these insects in the place of study.

  11. Mosquito RNAi is the major innate immune pathway controlling arbovirus infection and transmission

    Carol D. Blair

    2011-01-01

    Mosquito-borne arboviruses cause serious diseases in humans that are increasingly becoming public health problems, yet arbovirus infections cause minimal pathology in the mosquito vector, allowing persistent infections and lifelong virus transmission. The principal mosquito innate immune response to virus infections, RNAi, differs substantially from the human immune response and this difference could be the basis for the disparate outcomes of infection in the two hosts. Understanding the mosq...

  12. Genetics as a component of vector mosquito control in East Africa

    Among the proposed genetic control methods that have been tested with a degree of success are the release of sterile males, cytoplasmically incompatible strains and strains carrying chromosomal aberrations. In East Africa, the most important mosquitoes are Anopheles gambiae sensu strictu, which transmits malaria, filariasis and the O'nyong-nyong virus; An. arabiensis, which transmits malaria, filariasis and the Tatguine virus; and An. funestus, which transmits malaria, filariasis and the O'nyong-nyong and Tanga viruses. Other important vectors are Aedes simpsoni, which transmits yellow fever, and Ae. africanus, which is responsible for the forest cycle of the disease among monkeys. Cytological examination of specimens of An. gambiae sensu lato resulted in 804 positive identifications of the XB type chromosome only, indicating that An. arabiensis is the most abundant, and probably the only, member of the complex present, and constitutes close to 65.7% of the total mosquito population. Blood meal analysis of 1024 specimens showed its marked preference for bovid (51.9%) and human (28.1%) blood. Sporozoite rating by dissection and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay averaged 0.02%. Control methods tried in the past include chemical spraying and environmental management in the Kisumu area. A trial against An. arabiensis is suggested at Karima village, in Mwea, whereby an integrated approach incorporating environmental, chemical and genetic measures could be undertaken. This would take advantage of the low population during the dry season from mid-December to mid-April and would involve biological larviciding, mass pyrethrum spraying and the release of sterile males. There is a lack of adequate genetic knowledge of this species, especially genetic markers and linkage relationships, even though chromosome maps are available and inversion polymorphism is better understood. Notice should be taken of the reportedly discouraging results of genetic control trials, where failure has been attributed to immigration, poor competitiveness of laboratory produced males, failure to mate or density dependent mortality. (author). 56 refs, 2 tabs

  13. Economic evaluation of area-wide pest management program to control asian tiger mosquito in New Jersey

    Area-wide pest management (AWPM) is recommended to control urban mosquitoes, such as Aedes albopictus, which limit outdoor activities. While several evaluations of effectiveness exist, information on costs is lacking. Economic evaluation of such a program is important to help inform policy makers an...

  14. Impact of Educational Intervention Regarding Mosquito Borne Diseases and Their Control Measures among The Link Workers of Urban Health Centers (UHCs of Ahmedabad City

    Fancy Manish

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In urban area link workers are playing key role in implementing anti-larval measures and behaviour change communication at community level to prevent and control mosquito borne diseases. Objectives: To check baseline knowledge of link workers regarding mosquito borne diseases and control measures and assess their knowledge 14 days after single educational interventional training. Methodology: All 274 link workers of 17 selected UHCs out of total 57 UHCs were taken as study population and their baseline knowledge regarding mosquito borne diseases and mosquito control measures was assessed by questionnaire. Single educational training for 45 minutes was given to groups of link workers and their post– intervention knowledge for same was assessed after 14 days. Mean, Wilcoxon sign-rank test were applied. Results: Mean age of link workers was 31.3 + 4.8 years. The knowledge regarding Chikungunya, Dengue and Malaria was mosquito borne diseases was respectively 55.5%, 87.9% and 95.5% which was increase after intervention to 100%. But 14.4% did not know filariasis is mosquito borne disease even after training. All link workers know about the chemical (Temephos used for mosquito control (100% but knowledge of proper temephos dose for different volume of water containers was significantly improved after intervention. The overall knowledge regarding mosquito & mosquito control measures was significantly improved after intervention (p value <0.05. Conclusion: Even though link workers were involved in anti-larval activities since from many years, many link workers had poor knowledge regarding the mosquito borne diseases and control measures.

  15. Insecticide Resistance in African Anopheles Mosquitoes: A Worsening Situation that Needs Urgent Action to Maintain Malaria Control.

    Ranson, Hilary; Lissenden, Natalie

    2016-03-01

    Malaria control is reliant on insecticides to control the mosquito vector. As efforts to control the disease have intensified, so has the selection pressure on mosquitoes to develop resistance to these insecticides. The distribution and strength of this resistance has increased dramatically in recent years and now threatens the success of control programs. This review provides an update on the current status of resistance to the major insecticide classes in African malaria vectors, considers the evidence that this resistance is already compromising malaria control efforts, and looks to the future to highlight some of the new insecticide-based tools under development and the challenges in ensuring they are most effectively deployed to manage resistance. PMID:26826784

  16. Controle de mosquitos com base em larvicidas no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil: a escolha do agente de controle Mosquito control based on larvicides in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil: choice of the control agent

    Antônio L. Ruas-Neto

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Desenvolveu-se neste estudo uma comparação entre larvicidas químicos e biológicos usados em programas de controle de mosquitos no Rio Grande do Sul. Em bioensaios de laboratório contra Culex quinquefasciatus constatou-se que as formulações biológicas líquidas Vectobac 12 AS e Teknar 3000 (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis, ABG 6262 líquido e em pó (B. sphaericus 2362, foram altamente eficazes. Também as formulações experimentais de B. thuringiensis israelensis produzidas em laboratórios brasileiros foram consideradas adequadas. Entre as formulações químicas, os compostos piretróides Pirisa e K-Othrine produziram resultados melhores do que os organo-fosforados Lebaycid e Abate. Estes últimos produziram respostas dez vezes mais fracas do que o previsto em outros estudos. Em condições de campo, a dose de 1250 mg/m² para as formulações biológicas foi considerada adequada para a rotina das aplicações, porque permite superar as influências físicas do meio sobre os resultados. Somente as formulações de B. sphaericus produziram interrupções nas reinfestações dos focos de culicídeos observados. Períodos de até 39 semanas sem reinfestações foram observados em focos naturais e de um mês sem sobrevivência foi observado em tanques, onde procedia-se a reinfestação artificial. Este estudo sugere que as alternativas biológicas devem ser consideradas em programas de controle de mosquitos. Elas podem superar os problemas de resistência e eliminação, bem como da ausência de efeito residual nas aplicações de larvicidas.A comparison between chemical and biological larvicides in routine operations against mosquitoes in Rio Grande do Sul State was carried out in this study. In laboratory bioassays against Culex quinquefasciatus, biological formulations Vectobac 12 AS and Teknar 3000 (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis as well as ABG 6262 (B. sphaericus 2362, both in liquid and powder form, were highly effective. Locally produced B.thuringiensis israelensis, formulations also yielded good results. Among chemical larvicides, pyrethroid compounds Pirisa and K-Othrine yielded better results than the organophosphates Lebaycid and Abate. These last formulations yielded responses ten weaker than predicted in other studies. Under field conditions, a dose of 1250 mg/m² for biological formulations was considered adequate for routine application because at this level it is possible to overcome physical influences on results. Only B.sphaericus preparations caused important disruption of mosquito colonization in active breeding sites. Up to 39 weeks were tabulated without complete colonization in natural conditions and one month in artificially colonized tanks. This study suggests that biological alternatives should be considered in mosquito control programs. They may be a solution to such problems as resistance to larvicides, elimination of natural enemies, and short-lasting effects of applications.

  17. Responses of salt marsh ecosystems to mosquito control management practices along the Atlantic Coast (U.S.A.)

    James-Pirri, Mary-Jane; Erwin, R. Michael; Prosser, Diann J.; Taylor, Janith D.

    2012-01-01

    Open marsh water management (OMWM) of salt marshes modifies grid-ditched marshes by creating permanent ponds and radial ditches in the high marsh that reduce mosquito production and enhance fish predation on mosquitoes. It is preferable to using pesticides to control salt marsh mosquito production and is commonly presented as a restoration or habitat enhancement tool for grid-ditched salt marshes. Monitoring of nekton, vegetation, groundwater level, soil salinity, and bird communities before and after OMWM at 11 (six treatment and five reference sites) Atlantic Coast (U.S.A.) salt marshes revealed high variability within and among differing OMWM techniques (ditch-plugging, reengineering of sill ditches, and the creation of ponds and radial ditches). At three marshes, the dominant nekton shifted from fish (primarily Fundulidae species) to shrimp (Palaemonidae species) after manipulations and shrimp density increased at other treatment sites. Vegetation changed at only two sites, one with construction equipment impacts (not desired) and one with a decrease in woody vegetation along existing ditches (desired). One marsh had lower groundwater level and soil salinity, and bird use, although variable, was often unrelated to OMWM manipulations. The potential effects of OMWM manipulations on non-target salt marsh resources need to be carefully considered by resource planners when managing marshes for mosquito control.

  18. The use of annual killifish in the biocontrol of the aquatic stages of mosquitoes in temporary bodies of fresh water; a potential new tool in vector control

    Adrias Araceli Q

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes that breed in temporary pools in remote areas that dry up seasonally are especially difficult to control through chemical or biological means. The annual killifish has been suggested as a means of eradicating the aquatic stages of mosquitoes in transient pools because they can maintain permanent populations in such habitats by undergoing suspended animation or diapause during the embryonic stages to survive periodic drought. However, very little is known about the predatory activity of annual killifish and their usefulness in mosquito control. Results The annual killifish, Nothobranchius guentheri, native to Tanzania, was used in this investigation. Food preference was tested under laboratory conditions by feeding juvenile killifish with 2nd instar mosquito larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus in the presence of alternative food sources, such as rotifers and chironomid larvae. Semi-field tests were conducted by introduction of hibernating killifish embryos and juvenile fish to artificial ponds in an outdoor open environment that allowed natural oviposition of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Food preference studies show that N. guentheri preferred to prey on mosquito larvae than either chironomid or rotifers. When hibernating killifish embryos were added to ponds simultaneously with the addition of freshwater, the embryos hatched and fed on mosquito larval population resulting in complete elimination of the immature stages. The introduction of juvenile fish to ponds with high density of mosquito larvae resulted in total eradication of the mosquito population due to predation by fish. Complete biocontrol of the mosquito larval population was achieved in the presence of 3 fish per m2 of pond surface area. Conclusions The annual killifish provides yet another tool that may be employed in the eradication diseases carried by mosquitoes through vector control, particularly in temporary bodies of freshwater. The fish can be conveniently transported in the absence of water in the form of hibernating embryos. Once introduced either as embryos or juveniles in ponds, the annual killifish can effectively reduce the larval population because of its aggressive predatory activity.

  19. The use of annual killifish in the biocontrol of the aquatic stages of mosquitoes in temporary bodies of fresh water; a potential new tool in vector control

    2010-01-01

    Background Mosquitoes that breed in temporary pools in remote areas that dry up seasonally are especially difficult to control through chemical or biological means. The annual killifish has been suggested as a means of eradicating the aquatic stages of mosquitoes in transient pools because they can maintain permanent populations in such habitats by undergoing suspended animation or diapause during the embryonic stages to survive periodic drought. However, very little is known about the predatory activity of annual killifish and their usefulness in mosquito control. Results The annual killifish, Nothobranchius guentheri, native to Tanzania, was used in this investigation. Food preference was tested under laboratory conditions by feeding juvenile killifish with 2nd instar mosquito larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus in the presence of alternative food sources, such as rotifers and chironomid larvae. Semi-field tests were conducted by introduction of hibernating killifish embryos and juvenile fish to artificial ponds in an outdoor open environment that allowed natural oviposition of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Food preference studies show that N. guentheri preferred to prey on mosquito larvae than either chironomid or rotifers. When hibernating killifish embryos were added to ponds simultaneously with the addition of freshwater, the embryos hatched and fed on mosquito larval population resulting in complete elimination of the immature stages. The introduction of juvenile fish to ponds with high density of mosquito larvae resulted in total eradication of the mosquito population due to predation by fish. Complete biocontrol of the mosquito larval population was achieved in the presence of 3 fish per m2 of pond surface area. Conclusions The annual killifish provides yet another tool that may be employed in the eradication diseases carried by mosquitoes through vector control, particularly in temporary bodies of freshwater. The fish can be conveniently transported in the absence of water in the form of hibernating embryos. Once introduced either as embryos or juveniles in ponds, the annual killifish can effectively reduce the larval population because of its aggressive predatory activity. PMID:20492714

  20. Why do we need alternative tools to control mosquito-borne diseases in Latin America?

    Rafael Maciel-de-Freitas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this opinion paper, we discuss the potential and challenges of using the symbiont Wolbachia to block mosquito transmitted diseases such as dengue, malaria and chikungunya in Latin America.

  1. Ingestibility, Digestibility, and Engineered Biological Control Potential of Flavobacterium hibernum, Isolated from Larval Mosquito Habitats

    Chen, Shicheng; Michael G. Kaufman; Korir, Michelle L.; Walker, Edward D

    2014-01-01

    Flavobacterium hibernum, isolated from larval habitats of the eastern tree hole mosquito, A. triseriatus, remained suspended in the larval feeding zone much longer (8 days) than other bacteria. Autofluorescent protein markers were developed for the labeling of F. hibernum with a strong flavobacterial expression system. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged F. hibernum cells were quickly consumed by larval mosquitoes at an ingestion rate of 9.5 × 104/larva/h. The ingested F. hibernum c...

  2. Review: Improving our knowledge of male mosquito biology in relation to genetic control programmes.

    Lees, Rosemary Susan; Knols, Bart; Bellini, Romeo; Benedict, Mark Q; Bheecarry, Ambicadutt; Bossin, Hervé Christophe; Chadee, Dave D; Charlwood, Jacques; Dabiré, Roch K; Djogbenou, Luc; Egyir-Yawson, Alexander; Gato, René; Gouagna, Louis Clément; Hassan, Mo'awia Mukhtar; Khan, Shakil Ahmed; Koekemoer, Lizette L; Lemperiere, Guy; Manoukis, Nicholas C; Mozuraitis, Raimondas; Pitts, R Jason; Simard, Frederic; Gilles, Jeremie R L

    2014-04-01

    The enormous burden placed on populations worldwide by mosquito-borne diseases, most notably malaria and dengue, is currently being tackled by the use of insecticides sprayed in residences or applied to bednets, and in the case of dengue vectors through reduction of larval breeding sites or larviciding with insecticides thereof. However, these methods are under threat from, amongst other issues, the development of insecticide resistance and the practical difficulty of maintaining long-term community-wide efforts. The sterile insect technique (SIT), whose success hinges on having a good understanding of the biology and behaviour of the male mosquito, is an additional weapon in the limited arsenal against mosquito vectors. The successful production and release of sterile males, which is the mechanism of population suppression by SIT, relies on the release of mass-reared sterile males able to confer sterility in the target population by mating with wild females. A five year Joint FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project brought together researchers from around the world to investigate the pre-mating conditions of male mosquitoes (physiology and behaviour, resource acquisition and allocation, and dispersal), the mosquito mating systems and the contribution of molecular or chemical approaches to the understanding of male mosquito mating behaviour. A summary of the existing knowledge and the main novel findings of this group is reviewed here, and further presented in the reviews and research articles that form this Acta Tropica special issue. PMID:24252487

  3. Perspectives in the control of infectious diseases by transgenic mosquitoes in the post-genomic era: a review

    Márcia Aparecida Sperança

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne diseases caused by a variety of microorganisms such as dengue virus and malaria parasites afflict billions of people worldwide imposing major economic and social burdens. Despite many efforts, vaccines against diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, with the exception of yellow fever, are not available. Control of such infectious pathogens is mainly performed by vector management and treatment of affected individuals with drugs. However, the numbers of insecticide-resistant insects and drug-resistant parasites are increasing. Therefore, inspired in recent years by a lot of new data produced by genomics and post-genomics research, several scientific groups have been working on different strategies to control infectious arthropod-borne diseases. This review focuses on recent advances and perspectives towards construction of transgenic mosquitoes refractory to malaria parasites and dengue virus transmission.

  4. Assessing key safety concerns of a Wolbachia-based strategy to control dengue transmission by Aedes mosquitoes

    Jean Popovici

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue fever, chikungunya or malaria affect millions of people each year and control solutions are urgently needed. An international research program is currently being developed that relies on the introduction of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis into Aedes aegypti to control dengue transmission. In order to prepare for open-field testing releases of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes, an intensive social research and community engagement program was undertaken in Cairns, Northern Australia. The most common concern expressed by the diverse range of community members and stakeholders surveyed was the necessity of assuring the safety of the proposed approach for humans, animals and the environment. To address these concerns a series of safety experiments were undertaken. We report in this paper on the experimental data obtained, discuss the limitations of experimental risk assessment and focus on the necessity of including community concerns in scientific research.

  5. Water management as a tool for malaria mosquito control? The case of the Office du Niger, Mali

    Klinkenberg, E.; Huibers, F.P.; Takken, W.; Toure, Y.T.

    2002-01-01

    A field study was carried out in the rice irrigation scheme Office du Niger, Mali, to observe malaria mosquito larval development as related to differences in field irrigation practices, such as water level, irrigation application and irrigation frequency. The main aim was to find out to what extent field water management can be considered as a tool for vector control for this irrigation system. The results show that minor differences in water management do result in small differences in mosq...

  6. Methods for Control of Vector Mosquitoes and the Possible Role of SIT

    a) China, Vietnam and Singapore. Approximately 10 million bednets are treated with insecticide in China and Vietnam annually. The nets are privately owned but treatment is provided by health authorities who also carry out house spraying in the same areas. Artesunate (from Artemesia) was shown to be effective against P. falciparun but it is resistant to other drugs; however, the combined use of artesunate and treated bednets has greatly reduced malaria burden in Vietnam in the last 10 years. Despite a sophisticated Aedes control programme, Singapore remains endemic for dengue. The use of SIT for routine control or to eradicate Ae. aegypti and Ae. albipictus from the island and nearby parts of Malaysia has been suggested. b) Indian sub-continent. Though the number of malaria cases is less than what it used to be in the 1930s, it rose in the 1960s at the height of house spraying campaigns when India used 18,000 tonnes of DDT annually. Sri Lanka switched from DDT in 1970s and India has stated that it intends to do so. Rural malaria is mainly transmitted by An. culicifacies and other species whilst urban malaria is transmitted by An. stephensi. If An. stephensi exists as 'urban islands' it should be possible to control or eradicate by SIT; however, this needs to be confirmed. In the 1970s SIT trials with Culex and Aedes showed that moderately competitive sterile males could be produced but village to village movement of Culex pointed to the fact that urban populations could be better targets. Sex separation in culicine mosquitoes can be done on the basis of pupal size. c) An. arabiensis in north east Africa and Red Sea coast. It is the only man-biting member of the An. gambiae complex in central and northern Sudan, Ethiopia and the Arabian Red Sea coast. An. arabiensis invaded Upper Egypt in 1942 and caused a malaria epidemic as it is a much more efficient vector than A. pharoensis but it was eradicated using arsenical larvicide (and some DDT) by 1945. The creation of Lake Nasser by Aswan High Dam has not (yet) led to another invasion by An. arabiensis into Egypt. There were successful house spraying programmes in the Gezira from the 1960s to 90s with switching of insecticides as resistances developed. There have been several research studies on the survival of An. arabiensis and malaria through the long dry season of eastern Sudan but the picture is far from clear. Filiriasis transmitted by Cx. pipiens is a more important mosquito borne disease than malaria in Egypt at present. d) Europe and Central Asia. Malaria disappeared from northern Europe in the first half of the 250th century. It was eradicated from southern Europe and USSR between 1940s and 60s but there has been a resurgence of major epidemics in Central Asia in the 1990s. The An. maculipennis complex is only susceptible to P. vivax, buat other species are susceptible to P. falciparum. There are thousands of imported cases of malaria into Europe each year and global warming would increase the chances of any Plasmodium gametocytes ingested by a mosquito competing their development. The prompt treatment of imported malaria cases renders infection of mosquitoes by gametocytes very improbable. Invading populations of Aedes albopictus in Italy and Albania are potential dengue vectors and have been considered as targets for eradication by SIT. e) Tropical Africa. The An. gambiae complex and An. funestus are highly anthropophilic and are therefore efficient vectors. About 80% of the world's annual 400 million clinical malaria cases are in this region as well as about 90% of worlds annual 1-2.5 million malaria deaths. The death rate is rising probably because of rising drug resistance. f) Southern Africa. DDT spraying has greatly reduced malaria burden compared to the 1930's. There was no DDT resistance and An. funestus was eradicated in South Africa and Madagascar highlands. The switch to pyrethroids in S. Africa in 1996 was followed by 4 fold increase in malaria and the re-appearance of An. funestus which was resistant to pyrethroids, but not to DDT. This resulted in a switch back to DDT in 2000. g) Latin America. As the intensity of the national DDT campaigns has waned, malaria cases have increased and this has been associated with an increase in the colonization of the Brazilian Amazon. Multiple insecticide resistance in An. albimanus in Central America in the 1970s was due to pressure from agricultural insecticides; with introduction of IPM and partial abandonment of cotton growing; however, this resistance has now declined. In 1970s there were successful field trials of SIT using chemosterilization against An. albimanus in El Salvador where genetic sexing based on Y translocation of insecticide resistance gene was used. An. aegypti was eradicated from most of the Americas (but not USA) in the 1950s as a measure to control yellow fever but there has been subsequent re-infestation resulting in dengue epidemics. Effective control has only been maintained in Cuba.

  7. Impact of Educational Intervention Regarding Mosquito Borne Diseases and Their Control Measures among The Link Workers of Urban Health Centers (UHCs) of Ahmedabad City

    Fancy Manish; Parikh Sonal,; Prajapati Arpit; Bala DV

    2012-01-01

    Background: In urban area link workers are playing key role in implementing anti-larval measures and behaviour change communication at community level to prevent and control mosquito borne diseases. Objectives: To check baseline knowledge of link workers regarding mosquito borne diseases and control measures and assess their knowledge 14 days after single educational interventional training. Methodology: All 274 link workers of 17 selected UHCs out of total 57 UHCs were taken as study populat...

  8. Pitch control of multi-channel graded-index core polymer waveguide for optical PCB using the Mosquito method

    Kinoshita, Ryota; Suganuma, Daisuke; Ishigure, Takaaki

    2014-03-01

    We successfully fabricate multi-channel GI circular-core polymer waveguides with precisely controlled pitches utilizing the Mosquito method. The Mosquito method is a very simple method for fabricating GI-core polymer optical waveguides that utilizes a micro dispenser. In this method, a viscous core monomer is directly dispensed into a cladding monomer layer before UV cured, and circular cores are formed by curing both the core and cladding under a UV exposure. Here, it is a concern that a needle position accuracy influences on the interchannel pitch when parallel cores are fabricated by parallel repetitive scan of a single needle. However, we succeeded in controlling the pitch with the Mosquito method and then, GI-core waveguides with 250.7+/-5.2 μm, 126.7+/-2.6 μm and 61.7+/-3.4 μm are successfully fabricated for the pre-set values of 250 μm, 125 μm and 62.5 μm, respectively. Then, we demonstrate a 4 × 10 Gbps transmission over the fabricated GI-core waveguide by connecting the waveguide to an MMF ribbon with a 250-μm pitch, which is realized because the pitch of the fabricated waveguide is accurately controlled to 250 μm.

  9. Comparison of dry ice-baited centers for disease control and New Jersey light traps for measuring mosquito abundance in California.

    Reisen, W K; Eldridge, B E; Scott, T W; Gutierrez, A; Takahashi, R; Lorenzen, K; DeBenedictis, J; Boyce, K; Swartzell, R

    2002-09-01

    Mosquito catch in New Jersy light traps (NJLTs) has been declining in recent years, compromising the sensitivity of the California mosquito monitoring program. Centers for Disease Control traps (CDCTs) operated without light and augmented with dry ice have been considered for replacement or augmentation. To provide information on comparative sensitivity and ability to measure abundance over time and space, catch of mosquitoes in NJLTs was compared to catch in CDCTs operated concurrently at 8-10 sites within the Coachella Valley, Kern, San Joaquin County, and Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito and Vector Control Districts. The CDCTs always collected more female mosquitoes than did NJLTs; however, differences in sensitivity varied markedly over time and space precluding the calculation of a universal conversion factor. Regressions of the catch of female Culex tarsalis in CDCTs as a function of catch in NJLTs within districts indicated that the slopes varied markedly, again precluding the derivation of a universal function. Therefore, we recommend that mosquito surveillance programs replace or supplement NJLTs with systematically operated CDCTs to enhance sampling sensitivity for females of most mosquito species. However, both trap types should be operated concurrently at several sites within each district to derive regression functions to convert historical relative abundance data from NJLTs to equivalent counts in CDCTs for retrospective analyses. PMID:12322936

  10. Eficiencia del extracto de Ricinus communis para el control del mosquito Culex

    Diego Tomás Corradine Mora

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo evaluó el efecto insecticida del extracto de Ricinus communis sobre larvas de mosquitos Culex. A las 24 h la mortalidad es de 8.33 % con dosis de 1 mL del extracto en una concentración de 500 ppm; 35 % en dosis de 1 mL de una concentración de 1000 ppm; 65 % en dosis de 5 mL de una concentración de 1000 ppm; 98.33 % con 10 mL en concentración de 1000 ppm; testigos 3.3 %. Cuando se evaluó el efecto insecticida del extracto aplicado por aspersión en concentraciones de 500, 750 y 1000 ppm, se consiguieron mortalidades de 18.33, 36.66 y 48.32 %, respectivamente. Ninguna de las concentraciones evaluadas alcanzó el cien por ciento de letalidad. En la prueba de semicampo, solo se logró una mortalidad de 9 %. Se evidenció que el extracto tiene un mejor efecto insecticida para el control de ejemplares inmaduros en estado larvario que sobre los adultos.

  11. Risk assessment for adult butterflies exposed to the mosquito control pesticide naled

    Bargar, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    A prospective risk assessment was conducted for adult butterflies potentially exposed to the mosquito control insecticide naled. Published acute mortality data, exposure data collected during field studies, and morphometric data (total surface area and fresh body weight) for adult butterflies were combined in a probabilistic estimate of the likelihood that adult butterfly exposure to naled following aerial applications would exceed levels associated with acute mortality. Adult butterfly exposure was estimated based on the product of (1) naled residues on samplers and (2) an exposure metric that normalized total surface area for adult butterflies to their fresh weight. The likelihood that the 10th percentile refined effect estimate for adult butterflies exposed to naled would be exceeded following aerial naled applications was 67 to 80%. The greatest risk would be for butterflies in the family Lycaenidae, and the lowest risk would be for those in the family Hesperidae, assuming equivalent sensitivity to naled. A range of potential guideline naled deposition levels is presented that, if not exceeded, would reduce the risk of adult butterfly mortality. The results for this risk assessment were compared with other risk estimates for butterflies, and the implications for adult butterflies in areas targeted by aerial naled applications are discussed.

  12. Life-table analysis of Anopheles malaria vectors: generational mortality as tool in mosquito vector abundance and control studies

    Godwin Ray Anugboba Okogun

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Vector control will for sometime remain a primary weapon in the waragainst vector borne diseases. Malaria is of paramount importance in this with its associated highmorbidity and mortality especially in sub-Saharan Africa. This study on generational mortality associatedfactors in Anopheles mosquitoes life-table analysis was designed to investigate the fecundity,levels of mortality and mortality associated factors at the aquatic stages of anopheline malaria vectors.Methods: Mortality associated factors were investigated at the eggs, I and II instar larval, III and IVinstar larval and pupal stages of two anopheline species— Anopheles pseudopunctipennis (Theobaldand An. gambiae life-cycles in screen cages. Adult male and female mosquitoes were membrane filterfedand algae in culture medium formed the bulk of food substances for the larval stage. Environmentaltemperature of culture media, pH and some associated physio-chemical factors were also determined.Results: Results showed significant mortality rates at various aquatic stages. Infertility, cannibalismand environmental factors were the major factors responsible for mortality at the egg, larval and pupalstages respectively.Interpretation & conclusion: The aquatic stages of Anopheles mosquito mortality factor K and themortality factors at the various stages investigated k1, k2, k3 and k4 are discussed. Our recommendationsinclude further studies on the possible genetic modification of predacious An. pseudopunctipennislarvae and/or its modification for the production of sterile/infertile eggs as possible alternativesin the reduction and control of anopheline malaria burden.

  13. Plants traditionally used as mosquito repellents and the implication for their use in vector control.

    Tisgratog, Rungarun; Sanguanpong, Unchalee; Grieco, John P; Ngoen-Kluan, Ratchadawan; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2016-05-01

    Numerous plants with insect repelling properties are native to the tropics where they are produced for a wide range of medicinal purposes. In Thailand, these native plant species have a history of use for personal protection against biting insects. From our investigation we identified 37 plant species within 14 plant families that showed some mosquito repellent properties. Of these, 9 plant species were characterized using an excito-repellency test system against several Thai mosquito species. Results from these studies revealed that five essential oils extracted from plants demonstrated promising insect repellent activity. These active ingredients show promise for further development into formulations that may serve as alternatives to DEET or possibly be used as natural bio-pesticides to kill mosquitoes. PMID:26826392

  14. The Potential for Genetic Control of Malaria-Transmitting Mosquitoes. Report of a Consultants Group Meeting. Working Material

    Since the beginning of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division Programme on the research and development of insect pest control methodology, emphasis has been placed on the basic and applied aspects of implementing the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). Special emphasis has always been directed at the assembly of technological progress into workable systems that can be implemented in developing countries. The general intention is to solve problems associated with insect pests that have an adverse impact on public health and the production of food and fibre. For certain insects, SIT has proven to be a powerful method for control, but for a variety of reasons this technology has not been tried on an operational scale for most of the pest species of insects that exact a toll on the endeavors of humans. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division convened a Consultants Group Meeting to examine 'The Potential for Genetic Control of Malaria-Transmitting Mosquitoes', with emphasis to be placed on the SIT. A group of five scientists met, 26-30 April 1993, to examine the current status and the future potential of genetic control for malaria mosquitoes. In most of the tropical, developing countries, and to some extent in temperate regions of the world, Anopheles mosquitoes cause havoc by transmitting malaria, a dreaded disease that causes high mortality amongst children and diminishes productivity of adults. The importance of malaria as a deterrent to further economic growth in a large part of the world cannot be over-emphasized. Malaria is a severe problem because there are inadequacies in the technology available for control. As a result of the deliberations at the meeting, the consultants prepared a list of recommendations concerning the consensus opinions about the development of genetic control for malaria vector control. This report presents the findings and recommendations of the Consultants Group Meeting.

  15. Using global information technology to detect, monitor, and control mosquito pest and disease vector populations.

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS), image analysis, and remote sensing comprise global information technologies that are used to characterize pest and vector populations of mosquitoes. At this national meeting, scientists from ARS and McNeese State University organized and convened a half-day sym...

  16. Efficacy of extracts of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis for the control of mosquito vectors.

    More than 1 million human cases of Chikungunya were recently reported in India. Aedes aegypti (the yellow fever mosquito) is an important disease vector in India where it transmits Chikungunya, dengue, and yellow fever viruses to humans. In this study, scientists from Bharathiar University in Coim...

  17. Mosquito Control Techniques Developed for the US Military and an Update on the AMCA

    Scientists at the USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology developed and field tested novel techniques to protect deployed military troops from diseases transmitted by mosquitoes and sand flies. Methods that proved to be very effective included (1) novel military personal prot...

  18. Laboratory evaluation techniques to investigate the spatial potential of repellents for push & pull mosquito control systems

    A protocol has been developed for the indoor evaluation of candidate spatial repellents intended for use in push and pull systems. Single treatments (catnip oil, 1-methylpiperazine and homopiperazine) and a mixture of catnip oil and homopiperazine were tested with yellow-fever mosquitoes (Aedes aegy...

  19. Application of deltamethrin-impregnated bednets for mosquito and malaria control in Yunnan, China.

    Zhang, Z; Yang, C

    1996-06-01

    The results of research in China in recent years show that: 1) Different laboratory sensitivity of adult Anopheles minimus, An. sinensis and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus to deltamethrin exist in Yunnan. Although the range and duration for the use of permethrin and deltamethrin was limited, resistance of An. minimus, An. sinensis and Cx. pipiens quinquefasciatus to different extent in some areas existed. 2) On walls built with cement and covered with a thin layer of lime on which deltamethrin at a dosage of 0.025 g/m2 was sprayed, 100% of the mosquitos were stricken down within 3 days, 80% at the 15th day, 50% at the 20th day. The residual effectiveness on the bamboo and wood walls was good and could last for over 40 days, but on the mud walls a mortality of only 40% on the spraying day was observed, indicating that deltamethrin was not suitable for this purpose. Deltamethrin spraying reduced total caught mosquitos within 30 days, but there was no difference between the effects of deltamethrin (0.025 g/m2) and DDT (2 g/m2) at the 60th day. Deltamethrin effect on reducing densities of endophilic An. vagus, An. culicifacies and exophilic An. philippinensis was better than that of DDT (lasting over 60 days), but its effect on semi-endophilic An. sinensis lasted only 15 days. Against An. mininus, it showed good effects within 20 days but did not last as long as DDT (60 days). Residual deltamethrin and DDT spraying could both control malaria vectors, reduce the infection of infants by malaria, and reduce malaria parasite carrier rates (within 50 days). 3) Laboratory experiments showed that deltamethrin-impregnated bednets at a dosage of 0.015 g/m2 had a positive effect on An. minimus. The residual effect of unwashed deltamethrin-impregnated bednets at a dosage of 0.015 mg/m2 against An. sinensis was apparent and could last for 13 months. When an impregnated bednet was washed for the first time at the 12th month, its mortality effect on An. sinensis was reduced quickly to lower than 50%. The residual effect could last for 2-3 months when washed at the 6th month, but was lost when washed for the second time at the 12th month. 4) The effects of the impregnated-bednets on An. sinensis were different, even opposite, between different investigations. However, the treated bednets caused the density of An. minimus in houses to fall by 67.94%, and the total density in houses and cattle shelters by 67.91%. Moreover, it could shorten the life span of An. minimus. It did not work on the outdoor density of An. minimus. It is necessary to integrate with other measures, for achieving the desired effect. PMID:9280005

  20. Mosquito Defense Strategies against Viral Infection.

    Cheng, Gong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Penghua; Xiao, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    Mosquito-borne viral diseases are a major concern of global health and result in significant economic losses in many countries. As natural vectors, mosquitoes are very permissive to and allow systemic and persistent arbovirus infection. Intriguingly, persistent viral propagation in mosquito tissues neither results in dramatic pathological sequelae nor impairs the vectorial behavior or lifespan, indicating that mosquitoes have evolved mechanisms to tolerate persistent infection and developed efficient antiviral strategies to restrict viral replication to nonpathogenic levels. Here we provide an overview of recent progress in understanding mosquito antiviral immunity and advances in the strategies by which mosquitoes control viral infection in specific tissues. PMID:26626596

  1. Development of Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana formulations for control of malaria mosquito larvae

    Takken Willem

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana have demonstrated effectiveness against anopheline larvae in the laboratory. However, utilising these fungi for the control of anopheline larvae under field conditions, relies on development of effective means of application as well as reducing their sensitivity to UV radiation, high temperatures and the inevitable contact with water. This study was conducted to develop formulations that facilitate the application of Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana spores for the control of anopheline larvae, and also improve their persistence under field conditions. Methods Laboratory bioassays were conducted to test the ability of aqueous (0.1% Tween 80, dry (organic and inorganic and oil (mineral and synthetic formulations to facilitate the spread of fungal spores over the water surface and improve the efficacy of formulated spores against anopheline larvae as well as improve spore survival after application. Field bioassays were then carried out to test the efficacy of the most promising formulation under field conditions in western Kenya. Results When formulated in a synthetic oil (ShellSol T, fungal spores of both Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana were easy to mix and apply to the water surface. This formulation was more effective against anopheline larvae than 0.1% Tween 80, dry powders or mineral oil formulations. ShellSol T also improved the persistence of fungal spores after application to the water. Under field conditions in Kenya, the percentage pupation of An. gambiae was significantly reduced by 39 - 50% by the ShellSol T-formulated Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana spores as compared to the effects of the application of unformulated spores. Conclusions ShellSol T is an effective carrier for fungal spores when targeting anopheline larvae under both laboratory and field conditions. Entomopathogenic fungi formulated with a suitable carrier are a promising tool for control of larval populations of malaria mosquitoes. Additional studies are required to identify the best delivery method (where, when and how to make use of the entomopathogenic potential of these fungi against anopheline larvae.

  2. First Planning Meeting on Development of the Sterile Insect Techniques for Control of Malaria-Transmitting Mosquitoes

    At the request of Member States a series of consultant's reports were commisioned over the past 10 years to assess the potential of developing and using the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) for the control of vectors of malaria. The experts reports recommended that the Agency proceed with such an evaluation. The rationale for the possible inclusion of SIT into malaria vector control were detailed in these reports. All the reports emphasized that significant R and D would be required to develop and evaluate the SIT technology for mosquitoes before operational pilot projects could be initiated. Following the last of these meetings a document was prepared in which the essential R and D components were identified. This plan also included the collection of baseline data from a potential field site in Africa and the proposal that the target species should be Anopheles arabiensis. On the basis of these activities a Technical Co-operation (TC) project was developed which focused on the identification of a potential field site and provided funds for initiation of the collection of epidemiological and entomological data from the site. The R and D requirements for mosquito SIT were addressed in two ways. Firstly by undertaking limited R and D activities at the Agency's Laboratories in Seibersdorf and secondly by elaborating a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). The first planning meeting was thus held in Vienna from 5-8 June 2001 with representatives from Ethiopia, Mali, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa and Sudan; as well as experts from the UK and the USA; and a representative from the World Health Organisation (WHO). The meeting provided a forum for the participants to summarize the current malaria situation, its control and the importance of An. arabiensis in their respective countries. The outside experts complemented these presentations by dealing with specific issues. The objectives of the meeting were to: Review the status of the control of malaria-transmitting mosquitoes in Member States including Government policies; Review the state of art for possible use of SIT for the control of malaria-transmitting mosquitoes; Formulate long-term and short-term strategies and action plans for R and D aimed at possible use of SIT for the control of An. arabiensis; Identify international and regional partners and discuss modalities for co-operation.

  3. Advantages of larval control for African malaria vectors: Low mobility and behavioural responsiveness of immature mosquito stages allow high effective coverage

    Knols Bart GJ

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on sensitivity analysis of the MacDonald-Ross model, it has long been argued that the best way to reduce malaria transmission is to target adult female mosquitoes with insecticides that can reduce the longevity and human-feeding frequency of vectors. However, these analyses have ignored a fundamental biological difference between mosquito adults and the immature stages that precede them: adults are highly mobile flying insects that can readily detect and avoid many intervention measures whereas mosquito eggs, larvae and pupae are confined within relatively small aquatic habitats and cannot readily escape control measures. Presentation of the hypothesis We hypothesize that the control of adult but not immature mosquitoes is compromised by their ability to avoid interventions such as excito-repellant insecticides. Testing the hypothesis We apply a simple model of intervention avoidance by mosquitoes and demonstrate that this can substantially reduce effective coverage, in terms of the proportion of the vector population that is covered, and overall impact on malaria transmission. We review historical evidence that larval control of African malaria vectors can be effective and conclude that the only limitations to the effective coverage of larval control are practical rather than fundamental. Implications of the hypothesis Larval control strategies against the vectors of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa could be highly effective, complementary to adult control interventions, and should be prioritized for further development, evaluation and implementation as an integral part of Rolling Back Malaria.

  4. A five-year integrated mosquito control project in Kavala (N. Greece)

    Full text: The plain of the Nestos River is a coastal area of 25,000 ha of agricultural land irrigated by the day-regulated waters of the Nestos River. Rice fields (600 individual parcels of 1,900 ha of total surface) represent the most important breeding sites during summer (five larvicide applications on average). Abandoned agricultural land (over 200 fields of 900 ha) receiving occasionally irrigation water constitutes the second most productive mosquito-breeding site (1-2 applications). Approximately 1-2% of the total surface of 6,500 ha of corn cultivation fields is poorly drained and thus about 100 ha produce at least one generation of mosquitoes during the summer. Along its 25 kilometers of seashore, the area of Nestos comprises the lagoons of Kavala (extensive aquaculture), and the last part of the delta of the Nestos River, 11,500 ha of protected wetlands under the Ramsar convention. About 2,000 ha of these wetlands harbours plants such as Arthr. fruticosum, Sal. europea, Ael. littoralis, Ju. maritimus, Sc. maritimus, representing highly productive mosquito breeding sites (1-2 generations during the summer). Ecological mapping involved 3,200 individual vegetation polygons organised in 311 different sampling stations. Larvae sampling protocol was followed on a weekly basis for the individual and/or groups of parcels in the agricultural and natural environment. All the above information was systematically monitored and transferred to an ArcView (8.3)-GIS (Geographical Information System) database for further exploitation. In addition, mosquito breeding sites were recorded in the urban environment: within 9 villages, 2,300 individual residences were monitored and 1,070 cesspools were recorded, out of which more than 50% were producing mosquitoes (1-2 applications). In total 8,500 ha were treated with larvicides by using temephos and diflubenzuron (agricultural land), Bti (natural environment) and MMF-Agnique (urban environment). 70% of the applications were made by air using a spraying helicopter (Hiller) and a specially modified ultra-light motorized (Delta type) equipped with GPS (Geographical Positioning System). During the five years of application of the project, 17 species of mosquitoes have been identified, the most important being Ochlerotatus caspius and Anopheles spp. (human bait and CO2 traps). Nuisance has been considerably reduced since the beginning of the operations, when 1,000 bites/hour were not unusual. Evaluation of the project was made twice through 200 questionnaires in year 2000 and 180 questionnaires in year 2004. Local community is fully supporting the project: 90% of the people are willing to participate financially for the continuation of the project. (author)

  5. History of Mosquito Releases for Control and Potential of New Molecular Capabilities

    Ten different field trials, of varying sizes, have been carried out with sterile mosquitoes, the majority being in the 1970's. The major trials were in India, Burma and El Salvador. The major biological problems encountered were the failure of the sterile males to mate with the wild females and density dependent larval survival. There were also several problems associated with the technology, e.g. failures in mass rearing, inappropriate release technologies and immigration into the treatment area. New transgenic developments may offer some improvements but the above constraints will still need to be solved. Systems to genetically sterilize insects in the field are being evaluated in mosquitoes and have been shown to be successful in Drosophila. The genetic constructs used in Drosophila may well function in Anopheles.

  6. Dispersal of the parasitic ciliate Lambornella clarki: implications for ciliates in the biological control of mosquitoes.

    Egerter, D E; Anderson, J R; Washburn, J O

    1986-01-01

    Lambornella clarki (Ciliophora: Tetrahymenidae), an endoparasite of Aedes sierrensis (Diptera: Culicidae), is dispersed by infected adult mosquitoes. Invasion of the ovaries induces parasitically castrated females to exhibit oviposition behavior and thereby actively disperse ciliates through deposition into water. Oviposition behavior of infected females is prolonged and mimics that of normal gravid females in their first gonotropic cycle. Adults of both sexes also passively disperse ciliates...

  7. Ross, Macdonald, and a Theory for the Dynamics and Control of Mosquito-Transmitted Pathogens

    Smith, David L; Battle, Katherine E.; Hay, Simon I; Barker, Christopher M.; Scott, Thomas W.; McKenzie, F Ellis

    2012-01-01

    Ronald Ross and George Macdonald are credited with developing a mathematical model of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission. A systematic historical review suggests that several mathematicians and scientists contributed to development of the Ross-Macdonald model over a period of 70 years. Ross developed two different mathematical models, Macdonald a third, and various “Ross-Macdonald” mathematical models exist. Ross-Macdonald models are best defined by a consensus set of assumptions. The mathe...

  8. Fermentation of a Malaysian Bacillus thuringiensis serotype H-14 isolate, a mosquito microbial control agent utilizing local wastes.

    Lee, H L; Seleena, P

    1991-03-01

    A screening program searching for indigenous microbial control agents of mosquitos in Malaysia is initiated since 1987 and to date at least 20 isolates of mosquitocidal Bacillus thuringiensis serotypes have been obtained. Preliminary field evaluation of several isolates indicated that they are highly effective in the control of medically important mosquito species. For operational purposes, there is an urgent need to produce this agent utilizing cheap and locally available wastes through fermentation biotechnology. Fermentation studies in shake-flasks containing standard nutrient broth and soya bean waste, respectively, indicate that it takes about 37 hours for a Malaysian isolate of B. thuringiensis serotype H-14 to mature. In the grated coconut waste, fishmeal and rice bran, the bacteria took 28 hours, 26 hours and 126 hours respectively to mature. The endotoxin was harvested from the standard nutrient broth at 55 hours and at 50 hours from soybean, grated coconut waste and fishmeal. The endotoxin could only be harvested 150 hours after inoculation from rice bran medium. However, no bacterial growth was detected in palm oil effluent. In terms of endotoxin and biomass production, fishmeal appears to be a suitable medium. Variations in the pH of the fermenting media were also noted. PMID:1948250

  9. A Manual of Mosquito Control Projects and Committee Assignments for 4-H and Scouts Biology Class Projects, Organized Community Service Programs, and Individuals Interested in Environmental Management.

    Hart, Richard A.

    The mosquito control projects presented in this manual were prepared from an educational viewpoint and are intended for use by students in 4-H and Scouts and as a supplement to high school and college biology course work. The major emphasis of the projects is on integrated pest management, an approach utilizing cost-effective control methods which…

  10. Pyriproxyfen for mosquito control: female sterilization or horizontal transfer to oviposition substrates by Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto and Culex quinquefasciatus

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of gravid mosquitoes as vehicles to auto-disseminate larvicides was recently demonstrated for the transfer of pyriproxyfen (PPF) by container-breeding Aedes mosquitoes and presents an appealing idea to explore for other disease vectors. The success of this approach depends on the females behaviour, the time of exposure and the amount of PPF that can be carried by an individual. We explore the effect of PPF exposure at seven time points around blood feeding on individual Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto and Culex quinquefasciatus fecundity and ability to transfer in laboratory assays. Method Mosquitoes were exposed to 2.6mg PPF per m2 at 48, 24 and 0.5hours before and after a blood meal and on the day of egg-laying. The proportion of exposed females (N?=?80-100) laying eggs, the number of eggs laid and hatched was studied. Transfer of PPF to oviposition cups was assessed by introducing 10 late instar insectary-reared An. gambiae s.s. larvae into all the cups and monitored for adult emergence inhibition. Results Exposure to PPF between 24hours before and after a blood meal had significant sterilizing effects: females of both species were 6 times less likely (Odds ratio (OR) 0.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.10-0.26) to lay eggs than unexposed females. Of the few eggs laid, the odds of an egg hatching was reduced 17 times (OR 0.06, 95% CI 0.04-0.08) in Anopheles but only 1.2 times (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.73-0.93) in Culex. Adult emergence inhibition from larvae introduced in the oviposition cups was observed only from cups in which eggs were laid. When females were exposed to PPF close to egg laying they transferred enough PPF to reduce emergence by 65-71% (95% CI 62-74%). Conclusion PPF exposure within a day before and after blood feeding affects egg-development in An. gambiae s.s. and Cx. quinquefasciatus and presents a promising opportunity for integrated control of vectors and nuisance mosquitoes. However, sterilized females are unlikely to visit an oviposition site and therefore do not transfer lethal concentrations of PPF to aquatic habitats. This suggests that for successful auto-dissemination the optimum contamination time is close to oviposition. PMID:24954695

  11. Attractive toxic sugar baits: control of mosquitoes with the low-risk active ingredient dinotefuran and potential impacts on nontarget organisms in Morocco.

    Khallaayoune, Khalid; Qualls, Whitney A; Revay, Edita E; Allan, Sandra A; Arheart, Kristopher L; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D; Xue, Rui-De; Schlein, Yosef; Beier, John C; Müller, Günter C

    2013-10-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) in the laboratory and field with the low-risk active ingredient dinotefuran against mosquito populations. Preliminary laboratory assays indicated that dinotefuran in solution with the sugar baits was ingested and resulted in high mortality of female Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Aedes aegypti Linnaeus. Field studies demonstrated >70% reduction of mosquito populations at 3 wk post-ATSB application. Nontarget feeding of seven insect orders-Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, Orthoptera, and Neuroptera-was evaluated in the field after application of attractive sugar baits (ASB) on vegetation by dissecting the guts and searching for food dye with a dissecting microscope. Nontargets were found stained with ASB 0.9% of the time when the application was applied on green nonflowering vegetation. Only two families were significantly impacted by the ASB application: Culicidae (mosquitoes) and Chironomidae (nonbiting midges) of the order Diptera. Pollinators of the other insect orders were not significantly impacted. No mortality was observed in the laboratory studies with predatory nontargets, wolf spiders or ground beetles, after feeding for 3 d on mosquitoes engorged on ATSB applied to vegetation. Overall, this novel control strategy had little impact on nontarget organisms, including pollinators and beneficial insects, and was effective at controlling mosquito populations, further supporting the development of ATSB for commercial use. PMID:24331613

  12. Genetic control of insects: Characterization of mobile genetic elements from mosquito genomes

    The Juan elements constitute a family of LINE's retroposons which are dispersed in the genome of many strains, if not all, of the three mosquito species A. Aegypti, C. pipiens and C. tarsalis. A specific Juan subfamily is amplified and dispersed in the genome of each of these species. They have been designated respectively as Juan A in A. aegypti, Juan C in C. pipiens and Juan Ct in C. tarsalis. The distribution of Juan retroposons among mosquito species does not reflect the phylogeny of these species. Furthermore, the Juan retroposons form homogeneous subfamilies: full-length copies which are reiterated in strains collected from regions covering different continents are nearly identical. These data are interpreted to indicate that the Juan retroposons have spread recently in the mosquito genomes harbouring them, perhaps upon horizontal transfer from other species. Juan A elements have been found in two isolates of A. albopictus and one isolate of A. polynesiensis, whereas numerous other isolates of these two species are devoided of any Juan-like sequence. The unfrequent presence of Juan A elements in some strains of A. albopictus and A. polynesiensis can be the result of an horizontal invasion, but more probably from cross-hybridizations which have been reported sometimes to occur between the former species and A. aegypti. No progeny is obtained when A. albopictus males containing Juan A retroposons are crossed with females lacking these elements, whereas the reciprocal cross is fertile. Such results suggest that the Juan retroposons may be responsible for incompatibilities between strains. (author). 19 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. An experimental quality control related to the regional monitoring plan against Aedes albopticus (tiger-mosquito

    Samantha Morelli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the epidemic disease caused by the Chikungunya virus detected in the Provinces of Romagna during 2007, a specific monitoring-plan against the bug-vector Aedes albopticus was set up by the Agenzia Regionale Prevenzione e Ambiente dell’Emilia Romagna (ARPA in the he Emilia-Romagna region (Italy. The analytical method consisted in the simple enumeration of the mosquitoes eggs spawned on a appropriate substratum, using an optic microscope.The aim of this study was to guarantee data comparability among the several laboratories involved in the project. Using the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA, homogeneous and comparable analytical data were emphasised.

  14. An analysis of two island groups as potential sites for trials of transgenic mosquitoes for malaria control

    Marsden, Clare D; Cornel, Anthony; Lee, Yoosook; Sanford, Michelle R; Norris, Laura C; Goodell, Parker B; Nieman, Catelyn C; Han, Sarah; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Denis, Joao; Ouledi, Ahmed; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2013-01-01

    Considerable technological advances have been made towards the generation of genetically modified mosquitoes for vector control. In contrast, less progress has been made towards field evaluations of transformed mosquitoes which are critical for evaluating the success of, and hazards associated with, genetic modification. Oceanic islands have been highlighted as potentially the best locations for such trials. However, population genetic studies are necessary to verify isolation. Here, we used a panel of genetic markers to assess for evidence of genetic isolation of two oceanic island populations of the African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s.s. We found no evidence of isolation between the Bijagós archipelago and mainland Guinea-Bissau, despite separation by distances beyond the known dispersal capabilities of this taxon. Conversely, the Comoros Islands appear to be genetically isolated from the East African mainland, and thus represent a location worthy of further investigation for field trials. Based on assessments of gene flow within and between the Comoros islands, the island of Grande Comore was found to be genetically isolated from adjacent islands and also exhibited local population structure, indicating that it may be the most suitable site for trials with existing genetic modification technologies. PMID:23789035

  15. Ingestibility, digestibility, and engineered biological control potential of Flavobacterium hibernum, isolated from larval mosquito habitats.

    Chen, Shicheng; Kaufman, Michael G; Korir, Michelle L; Walker, Edward D

    2014-02-01

    Flavobacterium hibernum, isolated from larval habitats of the eastern tree hole mosquito, A. triseriatus, remained suspended in the larval feeding zone much longer (8 days) than other bacteria. Autofluorescent protein markers were developed for the labeling of F. hibernum with a strong flavobacterial expression system. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged F. hibernum cells were quickly consumed by larval mosquitoes at an ingestion rate of 9.5 × 10(4)/larva/h. The ingested F. hibernum cells were observed mostly in the foregut and midgut and rarely in the hindgut, suggesting that cells were digested and did not pass the gut viably. The NanoLuc luciferase reporter system was validated for quantitative larval ingestion rate and bacterial fate analyses. Larvae digested 1.87 × 10(5) cells/larva/h, and few F. hibernum cells were excreted intact. Expression of the GFP::Cry11A fusion protein with the P20 chaperone protein from Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 was successfully achieved in F. hibernum. Whole-cell bioassays of recombinant F. hibernum exhibited high larvicidal activity against A. triseriatus in microplates and in microcosms simulating tree holes. F. hibernum cells persisted in microcosms at 100, 59, 30, and 10% of the initial densities at days 1, 2, 3, and 6, respectively, when larvae were absent, while larvae consumed nearly all of the F. hibernum cells within 3 days of their addition to microcosms. PMID:24296502

  16. The Potential of the Sterile Insect Technique and other Genetic Methods for Control of Malaria-Transmitting Mosquitoes. Report of a Consultants Meeting

    This report updates information provided by a 1993 consultant group on the use of genetic methods for control of malaria-transmitting mosquitoes. Human malaria parasites of the genus Plasmodium are exclusively transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles. Where these two groups co-exist, the transmission of the parasite to humans can create a major health problem. Malaria currently causes 2 million deaths world-wide and approximately 400 million clinical cases annually. There are ca. 15 major vector species and 30-40 vectors of lesser importance. This report considers the practicality of developing the sterile insect technique (SIT) or other genetic mechanisms in order to eradicate mosquito vectors from specific areas. This would interrupt transmission and eliminate malaria in those areas.

  17. Effectiveness of the area wide pest management program to control asian tiger mosquito in New Jersey: evidence from a household survey

    Households behaviors can both mitigate and measure the spread of urban mosquito species. Beginning in 2009, an area-wide pest management (AWPM) project to control Ae. Albopictus was implemented in 6 areas in Monmouth and Mercer counties, NJ. Including other activities, the project focused on increa...

  18. Control of endophagic Anopheles mosquitoes and human malaria in Guinea Bissau, West Africa by permethrin-treated bed nets.

    Jaenson, T G; Gomes, M J; Barreto dos Santos, R C; Petrarca, V; Fortini, D; Evora, J; Crato, J

    1994-01-01

    We compared the anti-mosquito and antimalarial potentialities of placebo-treated versus permethrin-impregnated bed nets in north-western Guinea Bissau. Baseline, pre-intervention entomological and parasitological data were collected during the rainy season of 1990 and bed nets were distributed shortly before the rainy season of 1991. Pairs of 3 ethnically different villages were investigated. The villages in each pair were at least 2 km apart but belonged to the same ethnic group in an ecologically similar area. After one year permethrin-treated bed nets were provided to all people in one village of each pair and placebo-treated bed nets to the other villages. About 98% of mosquitoes caught in bedrooms belonged to Anopheles gambiae and A. melas, which we consider to be the main malaria vectors in the study villages. Mean Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite rate in A. gambiae (9.6%) and A. melas (12.4%) was highest during October-November. The Plasmodium index in children 2-9 years old in the 6 villages, at the end of the rainy season 1990, ranged between 44% and 79%. Of these, 98% were identified as P. falciparum, 1% as P. malariae and 1% as mixed infections of these species. Significant reductions of Anopheles indoor resting densities and malaria parasite rates in humans were recorded in villages which had received permethrin-treated nets, but not in the control villages. The mean number of P. falciparum-infective mosquito bites received indoors in untreated villages during the rainy season was estimated to be about 4 per child and 20 per adult. This inoculation rate was reduced by at least 78% by the use of permethrin-impregnated bed nets. The malaria parasite rates and proportions of people experiencing 'disease with fever' decreased significantly in villages provided with permethrin-treated nets but not in the control villages. Impregnated nets may be an important tool to reduce disease and death due to malaria in Guinea Bissau. PMID:7886749

  19. Pyriproxyfen for the control of Australian salt-marsh mosquito, Aedes vigilax.

    Webb, Garry; Miller, Peter; Peters, Bryce

    2012-03-01

    The efficacy of pyriproxyfen against the Australian salt-marsh mosquito, Aedes vigilax, was examined in 2 laboratory and 1 semi-field study using both technical grade and formulated products. In a dose-response study, the median emergence inhibition (EI50) and EI95 values were determined to be 0.019 and 0.076 ppb, respectively, for pyriproxyfen technical grade, 0.021 and 0.092 ppb for a microencapsulated formulation (Sumilarv 90CS), and 0.054 and 0.236 ppb for the formulated s-methoprene product, Altosid Liquid Larvicide. A further laboratory comparison of the microencapsulated formulation of pyriproxyfen and Altosid, at the nominal field rate for Altosid, showed that both products provided 100% emergence inhibition and this was confirmed in a semi-field study, which also included a granular formulation of pyriproxyfen (Sumilarv 0.5G). PMID:22533086

  20. Water management for controlling the breeding of Anopheles mosquitoes in rice irrigation schemes in Kenya

    Mutero, C M; Blank, H; Konradsen, F; Hoek, Wim van der

    2000-01-01

    irrigation. The total number of 4th instars was almost the same in the intermittently irrigated subplots and the irrigation system normally practised by the farmers. The failure to eliminate larval development up to the 4th instar in the former method was attributed to residual pools of water. Larval......An experiment to assess the impact of intermittent irrigation on Anopheles larval populations, rice yields and water use was conducted in the Mwea rice irrigation scheme in Kenya. Four water regimes including intermittent irrigation were tested in a complete randomized block experimental design....... Intermittent irrigation was carried out on a weekly schedule, with flooded conditions from Saturday through Tuesday morning. Larval sampling at each plot was conducted every Monday and prior to draining of intermittently irrigated subplots on Tuesday. All the adult anopheline mosquitoes emerging from larvae...

  1. A coordinated expression of biosynthetic enzymes controls the flux of juvenile hormone precursors in the corpora allata of mosquitoes.

    Nouzova, Marcela; Edwards, Marten J; Mayoral, Jaime G; Noriega, Fernando G

    2011-09-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of metamorphosis and ovarian development in mosquitoes. Adult female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes show developmental and dynamically regulated changes of JH synthesis. Newly emerged females have corpora allata (CA) with low biosynthetic activity, but they produce high amounts of JH a day later; blood feeding results in a striking decrease in JH synthesis, but the CA returns to a high level of JH synthesis three days later. To understand the molecular bases of these dynamic changes we combined transcriptional studies of 11 of the 13 enzymes of the JH pathway with a functional analysis of JH synthesis. We detected up to a 1000-fold difference in the levels of mRNA in the CA among the JH biosynthetic enzymes studied. There was a coordinated expression of the 11 JH biosynthetic enzymes in female pupae and adult mosquito. Increases or decreases in transcript levels for all the enzymes resulted in increases or decreases of JH synthesis; suggesting that transcript changes are at least partially responsible for the dynamic changes of JH biosynthesis observed. JH synthesis by the CA was progressively increased in vitro by addition of exogenous precursors such as geranyl-diphosphate, farnesyl-diphosphate, farnesol, farnesal and farnesoic acid. These results suggest that the supply of these precursors and not the activity of the last 6 pathway enzymes is rate limiting in these glands. Nutrient reserves play a key role in the regulation of JH synthesis. Nutritionally deficient females had reduced transcript levels for the genes encoding JH biosynthetic enzymes and reduced JH synthesis. Our studies suggest that JH synthesis is controlled by the rate of flux of isoprenoids, which is the outcome of a complex interplay of changes in precursor pools, enzyme levels and external regulators such as nutrients and brain factors. Enzyme levels might need to surpass a minimum threshold to achieve a net flux of precursors through the biosynthetic pathway. In glands with low synthetic activity, the flux of isoprenoids might be limited by the activity of enzymes with low levels of expression. PMID:21554954

  2. Modelo de simulación para el control del mosquito Aedes aegypti, transmisor del dengue y la fiebre amarilla, por el crustáceo Mesocyclops spp. A simulation model for the control of the Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue and yellow fever, by the crustacean Mesocyclops spp.

    Jonny E. Duque L.

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Se presenta un modelo de simulación que muestra la dinámica de depredación de Mesocyclops spp., sobre Aedes aegypti MÉTODOS: Representado por cuatro ecuaciones diferenciales: H'(t, cantidad de huevos; L'(t, cantidad de larvas; A'(t, cantidad de adultos y C'(t, cantidad de copépodos. Inicialmente las ecuaciones son del tipo clásico presa-depredador, según Lotka y Volterra. Posteriormente se modifica en un sistema con respuesta funcional para invertebrados, según Holling. RESULTADOS: El primer sistema controla y estabiliza la población de mosquitos, el segundo muestra que los copepodos son inefectivos como controladores. CONCLUSIONES: Se reconoce la necesidad de estudiar sistemas presa depredador (mosquitos - copepodos con trabajos que integren pruebas de laboratorio y de campo. Solo así será posible establecer la validez en el uso de estos últimos como controladores biológicos efectivos de mosquitos.OBJETIVE: A simulation model is presented to show the predation dynamics of Mesocyclops spp. over Aedes aegypti.i METHODS: The system is represented through four differential equations. H'(t, quantity of eggs; L'(t, quantity of larvae; A'(t, quantity of adults and C'(t, quantity of copepods. Initially the equations are of the classic predator-prey type, according to Lotka (1924 and Volterra (1926. Then it is modified into a system with functional response for invertebrates, according to Holling. RESULTS: The first system effectively controls and stabilizes the mosquito population, while the second suggests that copepods may be ineffective as mosquito controllers. CONCLUSIONS: The need to study predator-prey systems (copepodos-mosquitos with projects that integrate laboratory and of field tests is recognized. Only then will it be possible to establish the validity of predators as effective biological controllers of mosquitoes.

  3. Genetically Modified Mosquito: Myth and Reality

    Teh Su Yean

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sterile Insect Technique (SIT has been applied successfully in some agricultural pest control programs in the past, but in many cases, success has not been sustainable in the long run. Various attempts have been made to duplicate this limited success SIT application in agriculture to other areas of applications, particularly in vector control. For example, a recent mosquito control program has been initiated in Malaysia to eliminate dengue-mosquitoes Aedes aegypti by releasing large amount of genetically modified GM male mosquitoes into the field to outcompete the wild male mosquitoes. Field experimental data that has been made available in the literature is limited, rendering it difficult to make independent assessment on its short-term efficacy and long-term sustainability of this GM control strategy. This paper presents a preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of GM mosquito in controlling dengue mosquito population by means of model simulations via DEER (Dengue Encephalitis Eradication Routines. Preliminary results indicate negative conclusion regarding the effectiveness of GM mosquitoes in controlling wild A. aegypti population over the long-term. Essentially, significant reduction of wild mosquito population is possible only if large over-flooding ratios are applied. Further, repeated releases must be maintained over an infinite time horizon to continue to sustain low population of mosquitoes. Major difficulty remains to be resolved. In particular, in-depth costbenefit analysis on this control program is essential to ensure long-term institutional and social support.

  4. Turning cigarette butt waste into an alternative control tool against an insecticide-resistant mosquito vector.

    Dieng, Hamady; Rajasaygar, Sudha; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Ahmad, Hamdan; Rawi, Che Salmah Md; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Satho, Tomomitsu; Miake, Fumio; Fukumitsu, Yuki; Saad, Ahmad Ramli; Ghani, Idris Abd; Vargas, Ronald Enrique Morales; Majid, Abdul Hafiz Ab; Abubakar, Sazaly

    2013-12-01

    Annually, 4.5 trillion cigarette butts (CBs) are flicked into our environment. Evidence exists that CB waste is deadly to aquatic life, but their lethality to the aquatic life of the main dengue vector is unknown. CBs are full of toxicants that occur naturally, during planting and manufacturing, which may act as larvicidal agents. We assessed Aedes aegypti vulnerability to Marlboro butts during its development. Overall, CBs showed insecticidal activities against larvae. At early phases of development, mortality rates were much higher in two CBs solution (2CBSol) and 3CBSol microcosms (MICRs). Larval survival gradually decreased with development in 1CBSol-MICRs. However, in great presence of CBs, mortality was high even for the late developmental stages. These results suggest that A. aegypti larvae are vulnerable to CB presence in their habitats, but this effect was seen most during the early developmental phases and in the presence of increased amounts of cigarette remnants. CB filters are being used as raw material in many sectors, i.e., brick, art, fashion, plastic industries, as a practical solution to the pollution problem, the observed butt waste toxicity to mosquito larvae open new avenues for the identification of novel insecticide products. PMID:23999373

  5. Controle de mosquitos com base em larvicidas no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil: a escolha do agente de controle

    Antnio L. Ruas-Neto

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Desenvolveu-se neste estudo uma comparao entre larvicidas qumicos e biolgicos usados em programas de controle de mosquitos no Rio Grande do Sul. Em bioensaios de laboratrio contra Culex quinquefasciatus constatou-se que as formulaes biolgicas lquidas Vectobac 12 AS e Teknar 3000 (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis, ABG 6262 lquido e em p (B. sphaericus 2362, foram altamente eficazes. Tambm as formulaes experimentais de B. thuringiensis israelensis produzidas em laboratrios brasileiros foram consideradas adequadas. Entre as formulaes qumicas, os compostos piretrides Pirisa e K-Othrine produziram resultados melhores do que os organo-fosforados Lebaycid e Abate. Estes ltimos produziram respostas dez vezes mais fracas do que o previsto em outros estudos. Em condies de campo, a dose de 1250 mg/m para as formulaes biolgicas foi considerada adequada para a rotina das aplicaes, porque permite superar as influncias fsicas do meio sobre os resultados. Somente as formulaes de B. sphaericus produziram interrupes nas reinfestaes dos focos de culicdeos observados. Perodos de at 39 semanas sem reinfestaes foram observados em focos naturais e de um ms sem sobrevivncia foi observado em tanques, onde procedia-se a reinfestao artificial. Este estudo sugere que as alternativas biolgicas devem ser consideradas em programas de controle de mosquitos. Elas podem superar os problemas de resistncia e eliminao, bem como da ausncia de efeito residual nas aplicaes de larvicidas.

  6. Controle de mosquitos com base em larvicidas no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil: a escolha do agente de controle

    Ruas-Neto Antnio L.

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Desenvolveu-se neste estudo uma comparao entre larvicidas qumicos e biolgicos usados em programas de controle de mosquitos no Rio Grande do Sul. Em bioensaios de laboratrio contra Culex quinquefasciatus constatou-se que as formulaes biolgicas lquidas Vectobac 12 AS e Teknar 3000 (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis, ABG 6262 lquido e em p (B. sphaericus 2362, foram altamente eficazes. Tambm as formulaes experimentais de B. thuringiensis israelensis produzidas em laboratrios brasileiros foram consideradas adequadas. Entre as formulaes qumicas, os compostos piretrides Pirisa e K-Othrine produziram resultados melhores do que os organo-fosforados Lebaycid e Abate. Estes ltimos produziram respostas dez vezes mais fracas do que o previsto em outros estudos. Em condies de campo, a dose de 1250 mg/m para as formulaes biolgicas foi considerada adequada para a rotina das aplicaes, porque permite superar as influncias fsicas do meio sobre os resultados. Somente as formulaes de B. sphaericus produziram interrupes nas reinfestaes dos focos de culicdeos observados. Perodos de at 39 semanas sem reinfestaes foram observados em focos naturais e de um ms sem sobrevivncia foi observado em tanques, onde procedia-se a reinfestao artificial. Este estudo sugere que as alternativas biolgicas devem ser consideradas em programas de controle de mosquitos. Elas podem superar os problemas de resistncia e eliminao, bem como da ausncia de efeito residual nas aplicaes de larvicidas.

  7. Environmental assessment: Perform open marsh water management on the former popular point mosquito control impoundment and adjacent salt marsh: Barnegat National Wildlife Refuge [now a division of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This environmental assessment evaluates a proposal by the Ocean County Mosquito Control Extermination Commission to restore a tidal salt marsh on the Barnegat...

  8. Contrasting genetic structure between mitochondrial and nuclear markers in the dengue fever mosquito from Rio de Janeiro: implications for vector control

    Rašić, Gordana; Schama, Renata; Powell, Rosanna; Maciel-de Freitas, Rafael; Endersby-Harshman, Nancy M; Filipović, Igor; Sylvestre, Gabriel; Máspero, Renato C; Hoffmann, Ary A.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent global arboviral disease that affects over 300 million people every year. Brazil has the highest number of dengue cases in the world, with the most severe epidemics in the city of Rio de Janeiro (Rio). The effective control of dengue is critically dependent on the knowledge of population genetic structuring in the primary dengue vector, the mosquito Aedes aegypti. We analyzed mitochondrial and nuclear genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism markers generated via...

  9. O aproveitamento do resíduo da indústria do sisal no controle de larvas de mosquitos

    Pizarro Ana Paula B.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se o aproveitamento do resíduo do desfibramento das folhas de Agave sisalana, como um larvicida para o combate a mosquitos transmissores de doenças tropicais. Durante 24 horas, larvas de Aedes aegypti e Culex quinquefasciatus foram expostas a concentrações diferentes do extrato da planta para determinar as concentrações letais. Para A. aegypti foi constatada a CL50 em 322ppm e para C. quinquefasciatus em 183ppm. Foi investigada a ação de saponinas existentes na planta, ficando evidenciado que o resíduo de A. sisalana é ativo através da interação de vários dos seus componentes. Este extrato poderá ser utilizado em campo, na concentração de 100ppm para C. quinquefasciatus com um aumento do tempo de exposição para três dias, obtendo-se uma mortalidade de 100% das larvas. Este produto, porém, não é recomendado para o controle de A. aegypti, devido à necessidade de uma alta concentração para a obtenção de 100% de mortalidade das larvas e ao fato destas se desenvolverem preferencialmente em água potável.

  10. A tool box for operational mosquito larval control: preliminary results and early lessons from the Urban Malaria Control Programme in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Govella Nico J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the population of Africa rapidly urbanizes, large populations could be protected from malaria by controlling aquatic stages of mosquitoes if cost-effective and scalable implementation systems can be designed. Methods A recently initiated Urban Malaria Control Programme in Dar es Salaam delegates responsibility for routine mosquito control and surveillance to modestly-paid community members, known as Community-Owned Resource Persons (CORPs. New vector surveillance, larviciding and management systems were designed and evaluated in 15 city wards to allow timely collection, interpretation and reaction to entomologic monitoring data using practical procedures that rely on minimal technology. After one year of baseline data collection, operational larviciding with Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis commenced in March 2006 in three selected wards. Results The procedures and staff management systems described greatly improved standards of larval surveillance relative to that reported at the outset of this programme. In the first year of the programme, over 65,000 potential Anopheles habitats were surveyed by 90 CORPs on a weekly basis. Reaction times to vector surveillance at observations were one day, week and month at ward, municipal and city levels, respectively. One year of community-based larviciding reduced transmission by the primary malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s.l., by 31% (95% C.I. = 21.637.6%; p = 0.04. Conclusion This novel management, monitoring and evaluation system for implementing routine larviciding of malaria vectors in African cities has shown considerable potential for sustained, rapidly responsive, data-driven and affordable application. Nevertheless, the true programmatic value of larviciding in urban Africa can only be established through longer-term programmes which are stably financed and allow the operational teams and management infrastructures to mature by learning from experience.

  11. Scepticism towards insecticide treated mosquito nets for malaria control in rural community in north-western Tanzania.

    Nnko, Soori E; Whyte, Susan R; Geissler, Wenzel P; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2012-04-01

    Despite existence of effective tools for malaria control, malaria continues to be one of the leading killer diseases especially among under-five year children and pregnant women in poor rural populations of Sub Saharan Africa. In Tanzania Mainland the disease contributes to 39.4% of the total OPD attendances. In terms of mortality, malaria is known to be responsible for more than one third of deaths among children of age below 5 years and also contributes for up to one fifth of deaths among pregnant women. This paper is based on a study conducted in a rural community along the shores of Lake Victoria in Mwanza region, North-Western Tanzania. The study explores reasons for scepticism and low uptake of insecticide treated mosquito nets (ITNs) that were promoted through social marketing strategy for malaria control prior to the introduction of long lasting nets (LLN). The paper breaks from traditional approach that tend to study low uptake of health interventions in terms of structural practical constraints--cost, accessibility, everyday priorities--or in terms of cognition--insufficient knowledge of benefits e.g. ignorance of public health messages. This paper has shown that, the majority of people who could afford the prices of ITNs and who knew where to obtain the insecticides did not necessarily buy them. This suggests that, although people tend to report cost-related factors as a barrier against the use of ITNs, there are other critical concerns at work. Without underestimating the practical factors, our study have recommended to consider critical examinations of those other concerns that hinder optimal utilization of ITN for malaria control, and the basis for those concerns. PMID:26591730

  12. Efficacy of Two Common Methods of Application of Residual Insecticide for Controlling the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse), in Urban Areas

    Marini, Lorenzo; Baseggio, Alberto; Drago, Andrea; Martini, Simone; Manella, Paolo; Romi, Roberto; Mazzon, Luca

    2015-01-01

    After its first introduction in the 1980’s the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse), has spread throughout Southern Europe. Ae. albopictus is considered an epidemiologically important vector for the transmission of many viral pathogens such as the yellow fever virus, dengue fever and Chikungunya fever, as well as several filarial nematodes such as Dirofilaria immitis or D. repens. It is therefore crucial to develop measures to reduce the risks of disease transmission by controlling the vector populations. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of two application techniques (mist vs. stretcher sprayer) and two insecticides (Etox based on the nonester pyrethroid Etofenprox vs. Microsin based on the pyrethroid type II Cypermetrin) in controlling adult tiger mosquito populations in highly populated areas. To test the effect of the two treatments pre- and post-treatment human landing rate counts were conducted for two years. After one day from the treatment we observed a 100% population decrease in mosquito abundance with both application methods and both insecticides. However, seven and 14 days after the application the stretcher sprayer showed larger population reductions than the mist sprayer. No effect of insecticide type after one day and 14 days was found, while Etox caused slightly higher population reduction than Microsin after seven days. Emergency measures to locally reduce the vector populations should adopt adulticide treatments using stretcher sprayers. However, more research is still needed to evaluate the potential negative effects of adulticide applications on non-target organisms. PMID:26248028

  13. Efficacy of Two Common Methods of Application of Residual Insecticide for Controlling the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse), in Urban Areas.

    Marini, Lorenzo; Baseggio, Alberto; Drago, Andrea; Martini, Simone; Manella, Paolo; Romi, Roberto; Mazzon, Luca

    2015-01-01

    After its first introduction in the 1980's the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse), has spread throughout Southern Europe. Ae. albopictus is considered an epidemiologically important vector for the transmission of many viral pathogens such as the yellow fever virus, dengue fever and Chikungunya fever, as well as several filarial nematodes such as Dirofilaria immitis or D. repens. It is therefore crucial to develop measures to reduce the risks of disease transmission by controlling the vector populations. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of two application techniques (mist vs. stretcher sprayer) and two insecticides (Etox based on the nonester pyrethroid Etofenprox vs. Microsin based on the pyrethroid type II Cypermetrin) in controlling adult tiger mosquito populations in highly populated areas. To test the effect of the two treatments pre- and post-treatment human landing rate counts were conducted for two years. After one day from the treatment we observed a 100% population decrease in mosquito abundance with both application methods and both insecticides. However, seven and 14 days after the application the stretcher sprayer showed larger population reductions than the mist sprayer. No effect of insecticide type after one day and 14 days was found, while Etox caused slightly higher population reduction than Microsin after seven days. Emergency measures to locally reduce the vector populations should adopt adulticide treatments using stretcher sprayers. However, more research is still needed to evaluate the potential negative effects of adulticide applications on non-target organisms. PMID:26248028

  14. Mosquito population regulation and larval source management in heterogeneous environments.

    Smith, DL; Perkins, TA; Tusting, LS; Scott, TW; Lindsay, SW

    2013-01-01

    An important question for mosquito population dynamics, mosquito-borne pathogen transmission and vector control is how mosquito populations are regulated. Here we develop simple models with heterogeneity in egg laying patterns and in the responses of larval populations to crowding in aquatic habitats. We use the models to evaluate how such heterogeneity affects mosquito population regulation and the effects of larval source management (LSM). We revisit the notion of a carrying capacity and sh...

  15. Efficacy of Mosquito Traps for Collecting Potential West Nile Mosquito Vectors in a Natural Mediterranean Wetland

    Roiz, D.; Roussel, M.; Munoz, J.; Ruiz, S.; SORIGUER, R; Figuerola, J.

    2012-01-01

    Surveillance, research, and control of mosquito-borne diseases such as West Nile virus require efficient methods for sampling mosquitoes. We compared the efficacy of BG-Sentinel and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-CO2 traps in terms of the abundances of host-seeking and blood-fed female mosquitoes and the origin of mosquito bloodmeals. Our results indicate that BG-Sentinel traps that use CO2 and attractants are as effective as CDC-CO2 traps for Cule...

  16. Molecular Analysis of Aedes aegypti Classical Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Uncovers an Ortholog of Mammalian PTP-1B Implicated in the Control of Egg Production in Mosquitoes

    Moretti, Debora Monteiro; Ahuja, Lalima Gagan; Nunes, Rodrigo Dutra; Cudischevitch, Ceclia Oliveira; Daumas-Filho, Carlos Renato Oliveira; Medeiros-Castro, Priscilla; Ventura-Martins, Guilherme; Jablonka, Willy; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Senna, Raquel; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Hartfelder, Klaus; Capurro, Margareth; Atella, Georgia Correa; Mesquita, Rafael Dias; Silva-Neto, Mrio Alberto Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs) are enzymes that catalyze phosphotyrosine dephosphorylation and modulate cell differentiation, growth and metabolism. In mammals, PTPs play a key role in the modulation of canonical pathways involved in metabolism and immunity. PTP1B is the prototype member of classical PTPs and a major target for treating human diseases, such as cancer, obesity and diabetes. These signaling enzymes are, hence, targets of a wide array of inhibitors. Anautogenous mosquitoes rely on blood meals to lay eggs and are vectors of the most prevalent human diseases. Identifying the mosquito ortholog of PTP1B and determining its involvement in egg production is, therefore, important in the search for a novel and crucial target for vector control. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an analysis to identify the ortholog of mammalian PTP1B in the Aedes aegypti genome. We identified eight genes coding for classical PTPs. In silico structural and functional analyses of proteins coded by such genes revealed that four of these code for catalytically active enzymes. Among the four genes coding for active PTPs, AAEL001919 exhibits the greatest degree of homology with the mammalian PTP1B. Next, we evaluated the role of this enzyme in egg formation. Blood feeding largely affects AAEL001919 expression, especially in the fat body and ovaries. These tissues are critically involved in the synthesis and storage of vitellogenin, the major yolk protein. Including the classical PTP inhibitor sodium orthovanadate or the PTP substrate DiFMUP in the blood meal decreased vitellogenin synthesis and egg production. Similarly, silencing AAEL001919 using RNA interference (RNAi) assays resulted in 30% suppression of egg production. Conclusions/Significance The data reported herein implicate, for the first time, a gene that codes for a classical PTP in mosquito egg formation. These findings raise the possibility that this class of enzymes may be used as novel targets to block egg formation in mosquitoes. PMID:25137153

  17. PRELIMINARY DATA ON USE OF THE INLAND SILVERSIDE, 'MENIDIA BERYLLINA', TO CONTROL MOSQUITO LARVAE

    A study of procedures for spawning and culture of the inland silverside, Menidia beryllina, was conducted. The control efficacy of young Menidia, 21 to 37 days old, was determined in the laboratory with the 1st and 2nd instars of Aedes taeniorhynchus and Anopheles quadrimaculatus...

  18. Restoring coastal wetlands that were ditched for mosquito control: a preliminary assessment of hydro-leveling as a restoration technique

    Smith, Thomas J., III; Tiling, Ginger; Leasure, Pamela S.

    2007-01-01

    The wetlands surrounding Tampa Bay, Florida were extensively ditched for mosquito control in the 1950s. Spoil from ditch construction was placed adjacent to the wetlands ditches creating mound-like features (spoil-mounds). These mounds represent a loss of 14% of the wetland area in Tampa Bay. Spoil mounds interfere with tidal flow and are locations for non-native plants to colonize (e.g., Schinus terebinthifolius). Removal of the spoil mounds to eliminate exotic plants, restore native vegetation, and re-establish natural hydrology is a restoration priority for environmental managers. Hydro-leveling, a new technique, was tested in a mangrove forest restoration project in 2004. Hydro-leveling uses a high pressure stream of water to wash sediment from the spoil mound into the adjacent wetland and ditch. To assess the effectiveness of this technique, we conducted vegetation surveys in areas that were hydro-leveled and in non-hydro-leveled areas 3 years post-project. Adult Schinus were reduced but not eliminated from hydro-leveled mounds. Schinus seedlings however were absent from hydro-leveled sites. Colonization by native species was sparse. Mangrove seedlings were essentially absent (≈2 m−2) from the centers of hydro-leveled mounds and were in low density on their edges (17 m−2) in comparison to surrounding mangrove forests (105 m−2). Hydro-leveling resulted in mortality of mangroves adjacent to the mounds being leveled. This was probably caused by burial of pneumatophores during the hydro-leveling process. For hydro-leveling to be a useful and successful restoration technique several requirements must be met. Spoil mounds must be lowered to the level of the surrounding wetlands. Spoil must be distributed further into the adjacent wetland to prevent burial of nearby native vegetation. Finally, native species may need to be planted on hydro-leveled areas to speed up the re-vegetation process.

  19. Circadian control of permethrin-resistance in the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    Yang, Y.-Y.; Liu, Y.; Teng, H.-J.; Šauman, Ivo; Sehnal, František; Lee, H.-J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 9 (2010), s. 1219-1223. ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07032 Grant ostatní: Centers for Disease Control, Department of Health(TW) DOH96-DC-1206; National Science Council(TW) NSC 95-2313-B-002-084 MY3 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : insecticide resistence * median knock-down time * clock gene Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.310, year: 2010

  20. MosquitoMap and the Mal-area calculator: new web tools to relate mosquito species distribution with vector borne disease

    Christensen Jamie; Harrison Stanley; Birney Ian; Wilkerson Richard C; Foley Desmond H; Rueda Leopoldo M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Mosquitoes are important vectors of diseases but, in spite of various mosquito faunistic surveys globally, there is a need for a spatial online database of mosquito collection data and distribution summaries. Such a resource could provide entomologists with the results of previous mosquito surveys, and vector disease control workers, preventative medicine practitioners, and health planners with information relating mosquito distribution to vector-borne disease risk. Result...

  1. Inhibition of malaria parasite development in mosquitoes by anti-mosquito-midgut antibodies.

    Lal, A A; Schriefer, M E; Sacci, J B; Goldman, I F; Louis-Wileman, V; Collins, W E; Azad, A F

    1994-01-01

    The mosquito midgut plays a central role in the development and subsequent transmission of malaria parasites. Using a rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, and the mosquito vector Anopheles stephensi, we investigated the effect of anti-mosquito-midgut antibodies on the development of malaria parasites in the mosquito. In agreement with previous studies, we found that mosquitoes that ingested antimidgut antibodies along with infectious parasites had significantly fewer oocysts than mosquitoes in the control group. We also found that the antimidgut antibodies inhibit the development and/or translocation of the sporozoites. Together, these observations open an avenue for research toward the development of a vector-based malaria parasite transmission-blocking vaccine. PMID:8262645

  2. Influence of climate change on mosquito development and mosquito-borne diseases in Europe.

    Becker, Norbert

    2008-12-01

    Mass occurrence of mosquitoes can have an immense impact on the quality of life in areas such as the Upper Rhine Valley. Therefore, biological and environmental measures are applied to prevent mass development in many regions of Europe. Despite successful prevention measures, the risk of contracting mosquito-borne viral diseases, such as West Nile fever, should be discounted in Central Europe. The transport of mosquitoes (e.g., through tire trade or within containers) into Germany has to be prevented. Individuals (tourists and immigrants) infected with imported vector-borne pathogens and parasites must be diagnosed and treated immediately. Mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases know no borders, and their spread is also a consequence of high mobility and globalization. Therefore, mosquito control requires international cooperation. People's increased mobility and international trade play a more important role in the dissemination of the vectors and their pathogens/parasites than increasing temperatures. PMID:19030883

  3. Bioactivity of citrus seed for mosquito-borne diseases larval control.

    Sumroiphon, Suchada; Yuwaree, Chumporn; Arunlertaree, Chumlong; Komalamisra, Narumon; Rongsriyam, Yupha

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the activity of citrus-seed extract against Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae. The results indicated that ethanol citrus-seed extract showed the best killing effect on Ae. aegypti larvae, followed by local liquor, and water, with LC50 of 2,267.71, 6,389.22, and 135,319.40 ppm, respectively, whereas against Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae, the LC50 were 2,639.27, 5,611.66, and 127,411.88 ppm, respectively. Temephos was tested against Ae. aegypti larvae; the LC50 was 0.00057 ppm, which was nearly 4,000,000 times less than ethanol citrus-seed extract. When ethanol citrus-seed extract and temephos were tested with Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a standard environmental organism, using LC50 of Ae. aegypti larvae at 2,267 and 0.00057 ppm, respectively, fish mortality was 0%. The results suggested that ethanol citrus-seed extract had no harmful effect on the fish, and that temephos, which is recommended by WHO, was safe for use in drinking water. However, when the LC50 dose that killed Ae. aegypti larvae for local liquor (6,389 ppm) and water extract (135,319 ppm) were tested with fish, the mortality rates were 35% and 100%, respectively. On the whole, the results suggested that ethanol citrus-seed extract is environmentally friendly and can be used in the control of Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae. PMID:17547066

  4. No association between the use of Bti for mosquito control and the dynamics of non-target aquatic invertebrates in French coastal and continental wetlands.

    Lagadic, Laurent; Schäfer, Ralf B; Roucaute, Marc; Szöcs, Eduard; Chouin, Sébastien; de Maupeou, Jérôme; Duchet, Claire; Franquet, Evelyne; Le Hunsec, Benoit; Bertrand, Céline; Fayolle, Stéphanie; Francés, Benoît; Rozier, Yves; Foussadier, Rémi; Santoni, Jean-Baptiste; Lagneau, Christophe

    2016-05-15

    The environmental safety of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is still controversial, mainly because most of the previous field studies on its undesired effects were spatially limited and did not address the relationship between community similarity and application time and frequency. No general statement can therefore be drawn on the usage conditions of Bti that insure protection of non-target organisms. The present study was conducted in eight sites distributed over the main geographical sectors where mosquito control is implemented in mainland France and Corsica. Changes in non-target aquatic invertebrates were followed at elapsed time after repeated applications of two Bti formulations (VectoBac® WDG or 12AS) up to four consecutive years. We examined the influence of both larvicide treatments and environmental variables on community dynamics and dissimilarity between treated and control areas. As it can be argued that chironomids are the most vulnerable group of non-target invertebrates, we scrutinised potential Bti-related effects on the dynamics of their community. The use of VectoBac® WDG and 12AS in coastal and continental wetlands had no immediate or long-term detectable effect on the taxonomic structure and taxa abundance of non-target aquatic invertebrate communities, including chironomids. This applied to the main habitats where mosquito larvae occur, regardless of their geographic location. Flooding, whose frequency and duration depend on local meteorological and hydrological conditions, was identified as the main environmental driver of invertebrate community dynamics. Our findings add support to the environmental safety of currently available Bti formulations when following recommended application rates and best mosquito control practices. PMID:26930319

  5. Interactive effects of mosquito control insecticide toxicity, hypoxia, and increased carbon dioxide on larval and juvenile eastern oysters and hard clams.

    Garcia, R N; Chung, K W; Key, P B; Burnett, L E; Coen, L D; Delorenzo, M E

    2014-04-01

    Mosquito control insecticide use in the coastal zone coincides with the habitat and mariculture operations of commercially and ecologically important shellfish species. Few data are available regarding insecticide toxicity to shellfish early life stages, and potential interactions with abiotic stressors, such as low oxygen and increased CO2 (low pH), are less understood. Toxicity was assessed at 4 and 21 days for larval and juvenile stages of the Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and the hard clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, using two pyrethroids (resmethrin and permethrin), an organophosphate (naled), and a juvenile growth hormone mimic (methoprene). Acute toxicity (4-day LC50) values ranged from 1.59 to >10 mg/L. Overall, clams were more susceptible to mosquito control insecticides than oysters. Naled was the most toxic compound in oyster larvae, whereas resmethrin was the most toxic compound in clam larvae. Mortality for both species generally increased with chronic insecticide exposure (21-day LC50 values ranged from 0.60 to 9.49 mg/L). Insecticide exposure also caused sublethal effects, including decreased swimming activity after 4 days in larval oysters (4-day EC50 values of 0.60 to 2.33 mg/L) and decreased growth (shell area and weight) in juvenile clams and oysters after 21 days (detected at concentrations ranging from 0.625 to 10 mg/L). Hypoxia, hypercapnia, and a combination of hypoxia and hypercapnia caused mortality in larval clams and increased resmethrin toxicity. These data will benefit both shellfish mariculture operations and environmental resource agencies as they manage the use of mosquito control insecticides near coastal ecosystems. PMID:24531857

  6. Free flight of the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    Iams, S M

    2012-01-01

    High speed video observations of free flying male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the dengue and yellow fever vector, along with custom measurement methods, enable measurement of wingbeat frequency, body position and body orientation of mosquitoes during flight. We find these mosquitoes flap their wings at approximately 850 Hz. We also generate body yaw, body pitch and wing deviation measurements with standard deviations of less than 1 degree and find that sideways velocity and acceleration are important components of mosquito motion. Rapid turns involving changes in flight direction often involve large sideways accelerations. These do not correspond to commensurate changes in body heading, and the insect's flight direction and body heading are decoupled during flight. These findings call in to question the role of yaw control in mosquito flight. In addition, using orientation data, we find that sideways accelerations are well explained by roll-based rotation of the lift vector. In contrast, the insect's body pitch...

  7. Tracking the mutual shaping of the technical and social dimensions of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria control on Rusinga Island, western Kenya

    Oria, P.A.; Hiscox, A.F.; Alaii, J.; Ayugi, M.; Mukabana, W.R.; Takken, W.; Leeuwis, C.

    2014-01-01

    Background There has been increasing effort in recent years to incorporate user needs in technology design and re-design. This project employed a bottom-up approach that engaged end users from the outset. Bottom-up approaches have the potential to bolster novel interventions and move them towards adaptive and evidence-based strategies. The present study concerns an innovative use of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) to control malaria in western Kenya. Our paper highlights the c...

  8. Diving beetle assemblages of flooded wetlands in relation to time, wetland type and Bti-based mosquito control

    Persson Vinnersten, Thomas Z.; Lundström, Jan O.; Petersson, Erik; Landin, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the abundance and taxonomic composition of the aquatic predatory insect fauna, with focus on adult diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), in eight temporary flooded wet meadows and two alder swamps in the River Dalälven floodplains, central Sweden from 2002 to 2006. Diving beetles are generalist predators and often abundant in various waters, including temporary wetlands. In the River Dalälven floodplains, recurrent floods induce massive hatching of flood-water mosquitoes (D...

  9. Introduction and establishment of tadpole shrimp Triops newberryi (Notostraca: Triopsidae) in a date garden for biological control of mosquitoes in the Coachella Valley, Southern California.

    Su, Tianyun; Mulla, Mir S

    2002-06-01

    Tadpole shrimp (TPS), Triops newberryi (Packard), has been reported to have a potential as a biocontrol agent for larval mosquitoes breeding in intermittently flooded habitats. To develop and promote this predator for controlling mosquitoes, a date garden devoid of preexisting TPS populations was chosen in the Coachella Valley, southern California in 2000 to receive introductions of TPS eggs and mature TPS. Mosquito control by TPS was assessed in the plots one year after their introductions. In a selected block on this ranch, 2 rows were stocked with TPS eggs, where soil containing approximately 2,000 eggs was spread over the surface of dry ground in each row before flooding. Another 2 rows were used for mature TPS introduction, where about 400 mature TPS were released into standing water in each row 1 day after flooding. After a single egg or mature TPS introduction, active TPS in water and viable eggs in dry surface soil were noted in increasing numbers during the 3-4 subsequent irrigations. Disking before irrigation, which turned the eggs over and mixed them into the soil column, reduced TPS egg populations at the soil surface and subsequent active TPS populations in standing water after irrigation. After one or two irrigations, viable eggs and active shrimp were found in centers adjacent to the introduced plots in the stocked rows. Ample evidence is presented to show that TPS populations were established after a single introduction of eggs or mature TPS. TPS eggs and/or newly hatched TPS were also carried into the neighboring rows across the borders by the overflowing irrigation water, and TPS populations became established there too, as active TPS were noted after each irrigation in the adjacent unstocked rows. Considering the ease and economical storage, transportation and handling, dessication--resistant eggs have advantages over mature TPS for field introductions. Mosquito control by TPS was assessed in rows with and without TPS in July 2001, one year after TPS introductions. Production of Psorophora columbiae Dyar and Knab and TPS populations were determined 4-5 days after each of 2 irrigations, when there was no or little vegetation inside the rows. As compared with the row without TPS, the presence of relatively high numbers of TPS reduced Ps. columbiae by 73 to 99% as based on the average numbers of larvae, pupae and exuviae per dip in the rows with versus without TPS. PMID:12125865

  10. Review of semiochemicals that mediate the oviposition of mosquitoes: a possible sustainable tool for the control and monitoring of Culicidae Revisão dos semioquímicos que mediam a oviposição em mosquitos: uma possível ferramenta sustentável para o monitoramento e controle de Culicidae

    Mario A. Navarro-Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice for suitable places for female mosquitoes to lay eggs is a key-factor for the survival of immature stages (eggs and larvae. This knowledge stands out in importance concerning the control of disease vectors. The selection of a place for oviposition requires a set of chemical, visual, olfactory and tactile cues that interact with the female before laying eggs, helping the localization of adequate sites for oviposition. The present paper presents a bibliographic revision on the main aspects of semiochemicals in regard to mosquitoes' oviposition, aiding the comprehension of their mechanisms and estimation of their potential as a tool for the monitoring and control of the Culicidae.A seleção de locais adequados pelas fêmeas de mosquitos para depositarem seus ovos é um fator chave para a sobrevivência de seus imaturos (ovos e larvas. O conhecimento das relações ecológicas implicadas neste processo é de grande importância quando se refere a vetores de agentes patogênicos. A determinação do local de oviposição pelas fêmeas grávidas envolve uma rede de mensagens químicas, visuais, olfativas e táteis que facilitam a localização de lugares adequados para depositarem seus ovos. Neste trabalho é apresentada uma revisão bibliográfica dos principais aspectos relacionados com semioquímicos presentes na oviposição dos mosquitos auxiliando no entendimento dos mecanismos de atuação dos mesmos e potencializando a aplicação destes semioquímicos como uma possível ferramenta de monitoramento e controle de Culicidae.

  11. Pesticides and public health: integrated methods of mosquito management.

    Rose, R. I.

    2001-01-01

    Pesticides have a role in public health as part of sustainable integrated mosquito management. Other components of such management include surveillance, source reduction or prevention, biological control, repellents, traps, and pesticide-resistance management. We assess the future use of mosquito control pesticides in view of niche markets, incentives for new product development, Environmental Protection Agency registration, the Food Quality Protection Act, and improved pest management strategies for mosquito control. PMID:11266290

  12. Plectranthus amboinicus leaf extract mediated synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles and its control of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilm and blood sucking mosquito larvae

    Vijayakumar, S.; Vinoj, G.; Malaikozhundan, B.; Shanthi, S.; Vaseeharan, B.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, zinc oxide nanoparticles were biologically synthesized using the leaf extract of Plectranthus amboinicus (Pam-ZnO NPs). The synthesized Pam-ZnO NPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometer, FTIR, TEM and XRD analysis. TEM analysis of Pam-ZnO NPs showed the average size of about 20-50 nm. Pam-ZnO NPs control the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilms (MRSA ATCC 33591) at the concentration of 8-10 μg/ml. Confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) images revealed that Pam-ZnO NPs strongly inhibited the biofilm forming ability of S. aureus. In addition, Pam-ZnO NPs showed 100% mortality of fourth instar mosquito larvae of Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex tritaeniorhynchus at the concentration of 8 and 10 μg/ml. The histopathological studies of Pam-ZnO NPs treated A. stephensi and C. quinquefasciatus larvae revealed the presence of damaged cells and tissues in the mid-gut. The damaged tissues suffered major changes including rupture and disintegration of epithelial layer and cellular vacuolization. The present study conclude that Pam-ZnO NPs showed effective control of S. aureus biofilms and mosquito larvae by damaging the mid gut cells.

  13. Contrasting genetic structure between mitochondrial and nuclear markers in the dengue fever mosquito from Rio de Janeiro: implications for vector control.

    Rašić, Gordana; Schama, Renata; Powell, Rosanna; Maciel-de Freitas, Rafael; Endersby-Harshman, Nancy M; Filipović, Igor; Sylvestre, Gabriel; Máspero, Renato C; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2015-10-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent global arboviral disease that affects over 300 million people every year. Brazil has the highest number of dengue cases in the world, with the most severe epidemics in the city of Rio de Janeiro (Rio). The effective control of dengue is critically dependent on the knowledge of population genetic structuring in the primary dengue vector, the mosquito Aedes aegypti. We analyzed mitochondrial and nuclear genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism markers generated via Restriction-site Associated DNA sequencing, as well as traditional microsatellite markers in Ae. aegypti from Rio. We found four divergent mitochondrial lineages and a strong spatial structuring of mitochondrial variation, in contrast to the overall nuclear homogeneity across Rio. Despite a low overall differentiation in the nuclear genome, we detected strong spatial structure for variation in over 20 genes that have a significantly altered expression in response to insecticides, xenobiotics, and pathogens, including the novel biocontrol agent Wolbachia. Our results indicate that high genetic diversity, spatially unconstrained admixing likely mediated by male dispersal, along with locally heterogeneous genetic variation that could affect insecticide resistance and mosquito vectorial capacity, set limits to the effectiveness of measures to control dengue fever in Rio. PMID:26495042

  14. EFFECTS OF MOSQUITO REPELLENTS ON PULMONARY FUNCTIONS

    Venkatesh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito bite transmits diseases like Malaria, Filaria, Dengue etc. and usage of repellents is very common and has been in use for a long time. The smoke contains Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons, Aldehydes and Ketones. Review of literature has shown ill effects of this smoke. Hence we intended to study the effect of mosquito repellents on lung functions. This study would be important to create awareness regarding usage of mosquito repellent and to adapt to non-harmful methods of preventing mosquito bites. PFT parameters FVC, FEV1, FEV1/ FVC %, FEF 25-75 and PEFR were recorded in mosquito coil users, liquidator’s users and controls that used neither. It was found that FVC and FEV1 were significantly less in coil and liquidators users compared to controls (P < 0.05. Also it was found that in both coil users and liquidator users FVC, FEV1, FEF 25 -75 and PEFR and showed progressive decline with increased duration of usage (P < 0.05. Hence it was concluded that mosquito coils and liquidators can cause progressive decline in lung functions. Alternative methods to combat mosquito menace, like personal and environmental hygiene and non-chemical methods of protection are therefore recommended.

  15. Mosquito-Disseminated Pyriproxyfen Yields High Breeding-Site Coverage and Boosts Juvenile Mosquito Mortality at the Neighborhood Scale

    Abad-Franch, Fernando; Zamora-Perea, Elvira; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Padilla-Torres, Samael D.; Luz, Sérgio L B

    2015-01-01

    Background Mosquito-borne pathogens pose major public health challenges worldwide. With vaccines or effective drugs still unavailable for most such pathogens, disease prevention heavily relies on vector control. To date, however, mosquito control has proven difficult, with low breeding-site coverage during control campaigns identified as a major drawback. A novel tactic exploits the egg-laying behavior of mosquitoes to have them disseminate tiny particles of a potent larvicide, pyriproxyfen (...

  16. New Non-Toxic Weapon Against Mosquitoes

    Strachan, Graham George

    2015-01-01

    Aquatain AMF is a unique silicone-based liquid for mosquito control. It spreads across the surface of standing water, forming a very thin film which lasts for at least 4 weeks. As the silicone polymer has a low surface tension, mosquito larvae and pupae cannot attach to the surface to breathe - causing them to drown. Trials have been conducted in sixteen countries, covering a wide range of mosquito-breeding situations and climatic conditions. All of the trials have been undertaken by independ...

  17. The microbiome modulates arbovirus transmission in mosquitoes.

    Hegde, Shivanand; Rasgon, Jason L; Hughes, Grant L

    2015-12-01

    Mosquito-transmitted arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) such as dengue virus, chikungunya virus, and West Nile virus constitute a major public health burden and are increasing in severity and frequency worldwide. The microbiota associated with mosquitoes (comprised of viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa) can profoundly influence many host phenotypes including vector competence, which can either be enhanced or suppressed. Thus, the tripartite interactions between the mosquito vector, its microbiota and the pathogens they transmit offer novel possibilities to control arthropod-borne diseases. PMID:26363996

  18. Outdoor host seeking behaviour of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes following initiation of malaria vector control on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea

    Reddy Vamsi P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indoor-based anti-vector interventions remain the preferred means of reducing risk of malaria transmission in malaria endemic areas around the world. Despite demonstrated success in reducing human-mosquito interactions, these methods are effective solely against endophilic vectors. It may be that outdoor locations serve as an important venue of host seeking by Anopheles gambiae sensu lato (s.l. mosquitoes where indoor vector suppression measures are employed. This paper describes the host seeking activity of anopheline mosquito vectors in the Punta Europa region of Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea. In this area, An. gambiae sensu stricto (s.s. is the primary malaria vector. The goal of the paper is to evaluate the importance of An gambiae s.l. outdoor host seeking behaviour and discuss its implications for anti-vector interventions. Methods The venue and temporal characteristics of host seeking by anopheline vectors in a hyperendemic setting was evaluated using human landing collections conducted inside and outside homes in three villages during both the wet and dry seasons in 2007 and 2008. Additionally, five bi-monthly human landing collections were conducted throughout 2009. Collections were segregated hourly to provide a time distribution of host-seeking behaviour. Results Surprisingly high levels of outdoor biting by An. gambiae senso stricto and An. melas vectors were observed throughout the night, including during the early evening and morning hours when human hosts are often outdoors. As reported previously, An. gambiae s.s. is the primary malaria vector in the Punta Europa region, where it seeks hosts outdoors at least as much as it does indoors. Further, approximately 40% of An. gambiae s.l. are feeding at times when people are often outdoors, where they are not protected by IRS or LLINs. Repeated sampling over two consecutive dry-wet season cycles indicates that this result is independent of seasonality. Conclusions An. gambiae s.l. mosquitoes currently seek hosts in outdoor venues as much as indoors in the Punta Europa region of Bioko Island. This contrasts with an earlier pre-intervention observation of exclusive endophagy of An. gambiae in this region. In light of this finding, it is proposed that the long term indoor application of insecticides may have resulted in an adaptive shift toward outdoor host seeking in An. gambiae s.s. on Bioko Island.

  19. Susceptibility of the leaf-eating beetle, Galerucella calmariensis, a biological control agent for purple loosestrife (Lythrum salcaria), to three mosquito control larvicides

    Lowe, T.P.; Hershberger, T.D.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the susceptibility of Galerucella calmariensis, a species used to control purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), to three mosquito control larvicides. Larvae and adults were fed loosestrife cuttings dipped in Abate? (3.75 g?L-1) was reduced significantly and survival was significantly lower among larvae and adults eating cuttings dipped in Abate (>0.17 g?L-1 and >2.27 g?L-1, respectively). Hatching success of eggs dipped in Altosid (>2.52 g?L-1) was reduced significantly. With exposure to Altosid, larval survival to pupation and adult emergence was reduced significantly at concentrations of >2.92 g?L-1 and >0.63 g?L-1, respectively. Altosid (>0.23 g?L-1) also delayed the onset of pupation and adult emergence among larvae that survived to pupate. Larvae that survived with exposure to Altosid (>1.72 g?L-1) grew to 70% larger than those exposed to lower concentrations. Pupal survival was unaffected with exposure to Abate and Altosid and adult survival was unaffected with exposure to Altosid. Bacillus thuringiensis var israeliensis did not adversely affect any life stage of G. calmariensis. The mean Abate concentration on cuttings exposed to operational spraying was in the range that reduced egg hatchability and adult survival but was higher than concentrations that caused complete mortality of larvae. The mean Altosid concentration on cuttings exposed to operational spraying was in the range that reduced hatching success in eggs and delayed pupation and adult emergence of larvae.

  20. Synergistic action of octopamine receptor agonists on the activity of selected novel insecticides for control of dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquito.

    Ahmed, Mohamed Ahmed Ibrahim; Vogel, Christoph Franz Adam

    2015-05-01

    Studying insecticide resistance in mosquitoes has attracted the attention of many scientists to elucidate the pathways of resistance development and to design novel strategies in order to prevent or minimize the spread and evolution of resistance. Here, we tested the synergistic action of piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and two octopamine receptor (OR) agonists, amitraz (AMZ) and chlordimeform (CDM) on selected novel insecticides to increase their lethal action on the fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti L. However, chlorfenapyr was the most toxic insecticide (LC50 = 193, 102, and 48 ng/ml, after 24, 48, and 72 h exposure, respectively) tested. Further, PBO synergized all insecticides and the most toxic combinatorial insecticide was nitenpyram even after 48 and 72 h exposure. In addition, OR agonists significantly synergized most of the selected insecticides especially after 48 and 72 h exposure. The results imply that the synergistic effects of amitraz are a promising approach in increasing the potency of certain insecticides in controlling the dengue vector Ae. aegypti mosquito. PMID:25987220

  1. Preliminary evaluation of mosquito larvicidal efficacy of plant extracts

    N.G. Das, D. Goswami & B. Rabha

    2007-01-01

    Mosquitoes are the most important single group ofinsects in terms of public health importance, whichtransmit a number of diseases, such as malaria, filariasis,dengue, Japanese encephalitis, etc. causing millionsof deaths every year. Repeated use of syntheticinsecticides for mosquito control has disrupted naturalbiological control systems and led to resurgencesin mosquito populations. It has also resulted in thedevelopment of resistance1, undesirable effects onnon-target organisms and fostered...

  2. Cutaneous reactivity to mosquito bites: effect of cetirizine and development of anti-mosquito antibodies.

    Reunala, T; Lappalainen, P; Brummer-Korvenkontio, H; Coulie, P; Palosuo, T

    1991-09-01

    Cutaneous reactivity to mosquito bites was examined in 27 adult volunteers exposed to Aedes communis mosquitoes. Twenty-three subjects showed a combination of immediate wealing and delayed bite-papules, two subjects each experienced only immediate or delayed cutaneous reactions and two were non-responsive to the bites. The mean size of wealing and the mean score of pruritus was similar in 19 non-atopic and in eight atopic volunteers. These results confirm that normal subjects exhibit different stages of sensitization to mosquito bites. At the onset of the mosquito season, immunoblotting showed that four of 21 subjects (19%) had IgG-class antibodies to a recently described 21.5 kD Aedes communis mosquito antigen. After a 10-day exposure to a mean of 47 mosquito bites, these antibodies were found in 10 subjects (48%) who exhibited both strong and weak cutaneous bite-lesions. A placebo-controlled, double-blind study with cetirizine 10 mg was performed to examine the effect of this non-sedating antihistamine on mosquito bites. The bite lesions were measured and pruritus scored at 15 min, 60 min, 12 hr, and 24 hr. Cetirizine decreased significantly immediate wealing and pruritus (P less than 0.01), but had no effect on the delayed symptoms. This result supports the view that immediate mosquito-bite reactions are histamine-mediated. PMID:1683811

  3. Ecology of mosquitoes of Midwestern Nigeria

    Godwin R.A. Okogun, Jude C. Anosike, Anthony N. Okere & Bethran E.B. Nwoke

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The ecology and distribution of various mosquito species is important inthe determination of mosquito vector abundance and associated diseases prevalence. The distributionof various mosquito genera in natural and artificial habitats and their relative species abundancewas studied between August 2002 and July 2003 in three foci (Uromi, Ekpoma and Auchi comprisingthe Esan and Etsako regions of Midwestern Nigeria.Methods: Sampling was carried out by the method of Hopkins (1952 by dipping using a pipette orladle depending on container types. Pooled contents of smaller containers were sampled with a pondnet. All breeding sources of mosquito larvae were grouped into five (5 depending on their nature,constitution and the physiochemical properties. Artificial mosquito cultures were also carried out infour different container types; plastics, metal cans, earthenware pots and bamboo strips, in parts oftwo different macro habitats subdivided into area of high human activities (AHHA and areas ofderived/secondary vegetation (ADSV. Environmental temperatures, rainfall and relative humiditywere monitored during the study.Results: The present study revealed 17 mosquito species belonging to three genera (Anopheles,Culex and Aedes which are potential vectors of four human diseases in the areas surveyed. A total of736 mosquito larvae were encountered in artificial sources and 568 larvae were harvested from naturalsources. Pools, plastics and metal cans were the predominant artificial sources of mosquito larvae.Conclusion: The contribution of human activities and increasing environmental modification to thebreeding of human disease vector mosquitoes is of importance and selective vector control measuresincluding larviciding are recommended particularly before onset of rainy season

  4. The influence of mosquito control recirculation ditches on plant biomass, production and composition in two San Francisco Bay salt marshes

    Balling, Steven S.; Resh, Vincent H.

    1983-02-01

    Vegetation of two San Francisco Bay, California, U.S.A. tidal marshes was examined to determine the effects of recirculation ditches designed to eliminate mosquito-breeding. Salicornia virginica L. biomass and production in Petaluma Marsh and plant species composition in Suisun Marsh were measured with respect to distance from ditches and natural channels. In Petaluma Marsh, both annual above-ground production estimates and infrared aerial photographs indicated that S. virginica growth rates were higher near ditches than in the open marsh. In the floristically diverse, less saline Suisun Marsh, there was a displacement of the more salt tolerant S. virginica by the less tolerant Juncus balticus Willd. and a significantly greater number of species near the ditches. Results in both marshes are correlated with low groundwater salinities near ditches and suggest that tidal circulation within ditches locally ameliorates extremes in soil conditions.

  5. The Impact of Wolbachia on Virus Infection in Mosquitoes

    Karyn N. Johnson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne viruses such as dengue, West Nile and chikungunya viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality in human populations. Since current methods are not sufficient to control disease occurrence, novel methods to control transmission of arboviruses would be beneficial. Recent studies have shown that virus infection and transmission in insects can be impeded by co-infection with the bacterium Wolbachia pipientis. Wolbachia is a maternally inherited endosymbiont that is commonly found in insects, including a number of mosquito vector species. In Drosophila, Wolbachia mediates antiviral protection against a broad range of RNA viruses. This discovery pointed to a potential strategy to interfere with mosquito transmission of arboviruses by artificially infecting mosquitoes with Wolbachia. This review outlines research on the prevalence of Wolbachia in mosquito vector species and the impact of antiviral effects in both naturally and artificially Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes.

  6. The Impact of Wolbachia on Virus Infection in Mosquitoes.

    Johnson, Karyn N

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-borne viruses such as dengue, West Nile and chikungunya viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality in human populations. Since current methods are not sufficient to control disease occurrence, novel methods to control transmission of arboviruses would be beneficial. Recent studies have shown that virus infection and transmission in insects can be impeded by co-infection with the bacterium Wolbachia pipientis. Wolbachia is a maternally inherited endosymbiont that is commonly found in insects, including a number of mosquito vector species. In Drosophila, Wolbachia mediates antiviral protection against a broad range of RNA viruses. This discovery pointed to a potential strategy to interfere with mosquito transmission of arboviruses by artificially infecting mosquitoes with Wolbachia. This review outlines research on the prevalence of Wolbachia in mosquito vector species and the impact of antiviral effects in both naturally and artificially Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes. PMID:26556361

  7. ATon, abundant novel nonautonomous mobile genetic elements in yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti)

    Yang Guojun; Wong Amy; Rooke Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Mosquitoes are important pathogen vectors affecting human and other animals. Studies on genetic control of mosquito mediated disease transmission gained traction recently due to mosquito transgenesis technology. Active transposons are considered valuable tools to propagate pathogen resistance transgenes among mosquitoes, rendering the whole population recalcitrant to diseases. A major hurdle in this approach is the inefficient remobilization activity after the integration ...

  8. Area-wide management of Aedes albopictus: choice of study sites based on geospatial characteristics, socioeconomic factors, and mosquito populations

    Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse), the Asian tiger mosquito, is an introduced invasive species in the U.S. responsible for a significant proportion of service requests to local mosquito control programs. This container-utilizing mosquito is refractory to standard mosquito abatement measures in th...

  9. Esterases as biomarkers in Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor exposed to temephos and Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis used for mosquito control in coastal wetlands of Morbihan (Brittany, France).

    Fourcy, D; Jumel, A; Heydorff, M; Lagadic, L

    2002-01-01

    Since 1998, a biomonitoring programme has been implemented to assess the potential impact of chemical mosquito control on macroinvertebrates of the coastal wetlands of Morbihan (Brittany, France). Acetylcholinesterase and carboxylesterases were used as biomarkers to assess the effects of Abate 500e (a.i. temephos) and Vectobac 12 AS (a.i. endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis, Bti) in Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor. Esterase inhibition revealed a marked impact of temephos, suggesting preferential contamination of the worms through the food. In Bti-exposed N. diversicolor, random variations of esterase activities were observed, that could not be attributed to the larvicide. However, esterases only reflected indirect physiological effects of Bti, and further investigations are needed to identify biomarkers more specific of Bti endotoxins. PMID:12408646

  10. Biocontrol of larval mosquitoes by Acilius sulcatus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)

    Banerjee Siddhartha S; Das Dipanwita; Ghosh Arup K; Mandal Samir K; Chandra Goutam; Chakraborty Sumanta

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Problems associated with resistant mosquitoes and the effects on non-target species by chemicals, evoke a reason to find alternative methods to control mosquitoes, like the use of natural predators. In this regard, aquatic coleopterans have been explored less compared to other insect predators. In the present study, an evaluation of the role of the larvae of Acilius sulcatus Linnaeus 1758 (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) as predator of mosquito immatures was made in the laboratory...

  11. Identification of mosquito repellent odours from Ocimum forskolei

    Glinwood Robert; Ghebru Maedot; Ignell Rickard; Dekker Teun; Hopkins Richard

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Native mosquito repellent plants have a good potential for integrated mosquito control in local settings. Ocimum forskolei, Lamiaceae, is used in Eritrea as a spatial mosquito repellent inside houses, either through crushing fresh plants or burning dry plants. We verified whether active repellent compounds could be identified using gas-chromatography coupled electroantennogram recordings (GC-EAD) with headspace extracts of crushed plants. Results EAD active compounds inclu...

  12. Dynamics of Bacterial Community Composition in the Malaria Mosquito's Epithelia.

    Tchioffo, Majoline T; Boissire, Anne; Abate, Luc; Nsango, Sandrine E; Bayibki, Albert N; Awono-Ambn, Parfait H; Christen, Richard; Gimonneau, Geoffrey; Morlais, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The Anopheles midgut hosts diverse bacterial communities and represents a complex ecosystem. Several evidences indicate that mosquito midgut microbiota interferes with malaria parasite transmission. However, the bacterial composition of salivary glands and ovaries, two other biologically important tissues, has not been described so far. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of the bacterial communities in the mosquito tissues from emerging mosquitoes until 8 days after a blood meal containing Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes and described the temporal colonization of the mosquito epithelia. Bacterial communities were identified in the midgut, ovaries, and salivary glands of individual mosquitoes using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found that the mosquito epithelia share a core microbiota, but some bacteria taxa were more associated with one or another tissue at a particular time point. The bacterial composition in the tissues of emerging mosquitoes varied according to the breeding site, indicating that some bacteria are acquired from the environment. Our results revealed temporal variations in the bacterial community structure, possibly as a result of the mosquito physiological changes. The abundance of Serratia significantly correlated with P. falciparum infection both in the midgut and salivary glands of malaria challenged mosquitoes, which suggests that interactions occur between microbes and parasites. These bacteria may represent promising targets for vector control strategies. Overall, this study points out the importance of characterizing bacterial communities in malaria mosquito vectors. PMID:26779155

  13. Dynamics of Bacterial Community Composition in the Malaria Mosquito's Epithelia

    Tchioffo, Majoline T.; Boissire, Anne; Abate, Luc; Nsango, Sandrine E.; Bayibki, Albert N.; Awono-Ambn, Parfait H.; Christen, Richard; Gimonneau, Geoffrey; Morlais, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The Anopheles midgut hosts diverse bacterial communities and represents a complex ecosystem. Several evidences indicate that mosquito midgut microbiota interferes with malaria parasite transmission. However, the bacterial composition of salivary glands and ovaries, two other biologically important tissues, has not been described so far. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of the bacterial communities in the mosquito tissues from emerging mosquitoes until 8 days after a blood meal containing Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes and described the temporal colonization of the mosquito epithelia. Bacterial communities were identified in the midgut, ovaries, and salivary glands of individual mosquitoes using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found that the mosquito epithelia share a core microbiota, but some bacteria taxa were more associated with one or another tissue at a particular time point. The bacterial composition in the tissues of emerging mosquitoes varied according to the breeding site, indicating that some bacteria are acquired from the environment. Our results revealed temporal variations in the bacterial community structure, possibly as a result of the mosquito physiological changes. The abundance of Serratia significantly correlated with P. falciparum infection both in the midgut and salivary glands of malaria challenged mosquitoes, which suggests that interactions occur between microbes and parasites. These bacteria may represent promising targets for vector control strategies. Overall, this study points out the importance of characterizing bacterial communities in malaria mosquito vectors. PMID:26779155

  14. Adulticidal & larvicidal efficacy of three neonicotinoids against insecticide susceptible & resistant mosquito strains

    Sreehari Uragayala

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The present study indicated that insecticide resistant strains of mosquito species tested showed more susceptibility to the three neonicotinoids tested, and the possibility of using neonicotinoids for the control of resistant mosquitoes should be explored.

  15. Higher Mosquito Production in Low-Income Neighborhoods of Baltimore and Washington, DC: Understanding Ecological Drivers and Mosquito-Borne Disease Risk in Temperate Cities

    Danielle Bodner; Dawn Biehler; LaDeau, Shannon L.; Leisnham, Paul T.

    2013-01-01

    Mosquito-vectored pathogens are responsible for devastating human diseases and are (re)emerging in many urban environments. Effective mosquito control in urban landscapes relies on improved understanding of the complex interactions between the ecological and social factors that define where mosquito populations can grow. We compared the density of mosquito habitat and pupae production across economically varying neighborhoods in two temperate U.S. cities (Baltimore, MD and Washington, DC). Se...

  16. Spectral and spatial characterization of rice field mosquito habitat

    Wood, Byron L.; Beck, Louisa R.; Washino, Robert K.; Palchick, Susan M.; Sebesta, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    Irrigated rice provides an ideal breeding habitat for Anopheles free-borni, the western malaria mosquito, throughout California. In a 1985 study, it was determined that early-season rice canopy development, as monitored using remotely sensed data, could be used to distinguish between high and low mosquito producing rice fields. This distinction could be made over two months prior to peak mosquito production. It was found that high-producing fields were located in an area characterized by a diversity of land use, including livestock pastures, whereas the low-producing fields were in an area devoted almost exclusively to the cultivation of rice. The ability to distinguish between high and low mosquito producing fields prior to peak mosquito production is important in terms of mosquito habitat surveillance and control.

  17. Chikungunya virus and its mosquito vectors.

    Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a mosquito-borne alphavirus of increasing public health significance, has caused large epidemics in Africa and the Indian Ocean basin; now it is spreading throughout the Americas. The primary vectors of CHIKV are Aedes (Ae.) aegypti and, after the introduction of a mutation in the E1 envelope protein gene, the highly anthropophilic and geographically widespread Ae. albopictus mosquito. We review here research efforts to characterize the viral genetic basis of mosquito-vector interactions, the use of RNA interference and other strategies for the control of CHIKV in mosquitoes, and the potentiation of CHIKV infection by mosquito saliva. Over the past decade, CHIKV has emerged on a truly global scale. Since 2013, CHIKV transmission has been reported throughout the Caribbean region, in North America, and in Central and South American countries, including Brazil, Columbia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Nicaragua, Panama, Suriname, and Venezuela. Closing the gaps in our knowledge of driving factors behind the rapid geographic expansion of CHIKV should be considered a research priority. The abundance of multiple primate species in many of these countries, together with species of mosquito that have never been exposed to CHIKV, may provide opportunities for this highly adaptable virus to establish sylvatic cycles that to date have not been seen outside of Africa. The short-term and long-term ecological consequences of such transmission cycles, including the impact on wildlife and people living in these areas, are completely unknown. PMID:25674945

  18. DsRed2 transient expression in Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes

    Andre Barretto Bruno Wilke

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes have been successfully genetically modified only once, despite the efforts of several laboratories to transform and establish a stable strain. We have developed a transient gene expression method, in Culex, that delivers plasmid DNA directly to the mosquito haemolymph and additional tissues. We were able to express DsRed2 fluorescent protein in adult Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes by injecting plasmids directly into their thorax. The expression of DsRed2 in adult Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes is an important stepping stone to genetic transformation and the potential use of new control strategies and genetic interactions.

  19. Induced immunity against the mosquito Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae): effects on mosquito survival and fecundity.

    Almeida, A P; Billingsley, P F

    1998-11-01

    Mice were immunised three to five times with extracts of Anopheles stephensi heads, midguts, ovaries or fat bodies. At each immunisation the effects of feeding An. stephensi on the mice was determined, and changes in mosquito longevity and fecundity examined as the immune response developed. Although variability was common between control cages, significant and consistent reductions in mosquito longevity were observed when midguts were used as immunogens. Other extracts caused transient reductions in mortality. Fecundity was reduced significantly in mosquitoes fed upon mice immunised with each extract in at least one experiment. Mosquitoes fed upon fat-body-immunised mice showed delayed egg-laying as well as overall reduction in fecundity. The results confirm the feasibility of targeting mosquito antigens for novel vaccine development, but the "shotgun" approach used probably fails to successfully hit a suitable target antigen with any consistency. The natural variation in mosquito mortality can be countered by rigorous statistical analysis which can identify subtle effects in a very "noisy" experimental system. The midgut is the obvious target organ for anti-mosquito vaccine development and future work will focus on targeting components of this tissue for further immunisations. PMID:9846609

  20. WNV Mosquito Test Results

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — List of locations and test results for pools of mosquitoes tested through the Chicago Department of Public Health Environmental Health program. The Chicago...

  1. Flavivirus-Mosquito Interactions

    Huang, Yan-Jang S.; Stephen Higgs; Kate McElroy Horne; Vanlandingham, Dana L.

    2014-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus is in the family Flaviviridae and is comprised of more than 70 viruses. These viruses have a broad geographic range, circulating on every continent except Antarctica. Mosquito-borne flaviviruses, such as yellow fever virus, dengue virus serotypes 1–4, Japanese encephalitis virus, and West Nile virus are responsible for significant human morbidity and mortality in affected regions. This review focuses on what is known about flavivirus-mosquito interactions and presents key...

  2. Mosquito-Disseminated Pyriproxyfen Yields High Breeding-Site Coverage and Boosts Juvenile Mosquito Mortality at the Neighborhood Scale

    Abad-Franch, Fernando; Zamora-Perea, Elvira; Ferraz, Gonalo; Padilla-Torres, Samael D.; Luz, Srgio L. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mosquito-borne pathogens pose major public health challenges worldwide. With vaccines or effective drugs still unavailable for most such pathogens, disease prevention heavily relies on vector control. To date, however, mosquito control has proven difficult, with low breeding-site coverage during control campaigns identified as a major drawback. A novel tactic exploits the egg-laying behavior of mosquitoes to have them disseminate tiny particles of a potent larvicide, pyriproxyfen (PPF), from resting to breeding sites, thus improving coverage. This approach has yielded promising results at small spatial scales, but its wider applicability remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a four-month trial within a 20-month study to investigate mosquito-driven dissemination of PPF dust-particles from 100 dissemination stations (DSs) deployed in a 7-ha sub-area to surveillance dwellings and sentinel breeding sites (SBSs) distributed over an urban neighborhood of about 50 ha. We assessed the impact of the trial by measuring juvenile mosquito mortality and adult mosquito emergence in each SBS-month. Using data from 1,075 dwelling-months, 2,988 SBS-months, and 29,922 individual mosquitoes, we show that mosquito-disseminated PPF yielded high coverage of dwellings (up to 100%) and SBSs (up to 94.3%). Juvenile mosquito mortality in SBSs (about 4% at baseline) increased by over one order of magnitude during PPF dissemination (about 75%). This led to a >10-fold decrease of adult mosquito emergence from SBSs, from approximately 1,0003,000 adults/month before to about 100 adults/month during PPF dissemination. Conclusions/Significance By expanding breeding-site coverage and boosting juvenile mosquito mortality, a strategy based on mosquito-disseminated PPF has potential to substantially enhance mosquito control. Sharp declines in adult mosquito emergence can lower vector/host ratios, reducing the risk of disease outbreaks. This approach is a very promising complement to current and novel mosquito control strategies; it will probably be especially relevant for the control of urban disease vectors, such as Aedes and Culex species, that often cause large epidemics. PMID:25849040

  3. Vigilancia y control en criaderos temporales y permanentes de culícidos en Villa Clara (Vigilance and control in temporal and permanent breeding ground of mosquitoes in Villa Clara

    Janhad L. Rodríguez Mendieta

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo se desarrolló en la Unidad Provincial de Vigilancia y Lucha Antivectorial de la provincia de Villa Clara, en el período comprendido entre el primero de julio al primero de noviembre del 2005. Para el mismo se representaron gráficamente los 304 criaderos permanentes y 218 temporales de culícidos; distribuidos en los 13 municipios de dicha provincia. Se tomaron muestras de cuerpos de agua (28 criaderos existentes en los 13 municipios de la provincia para detectar la Densidad Larvaria según la metodología del cucharón. Se determinaron las principales especies de culícidos que habitan en la provincia y se compararon dos métodos (Temephos al 2% y peces de control para estos vectores, determinándose el costo – riesgo del Temephos al 2%, el Bacillus thurigiensis y los peces como métodos de control de mosquitos mediante una ponderización. Los datos primarios se procesaron en el sistema computarizado Excel del paquete Office XP y para el procesamiento estadístico de la efectividad de cada tratamiento se empleó la prueba de comparación de proporciones del paquete Statgraphics plus 4.1, ambos sistemas sustentados en WindowsÒ. Los resultados muestran que las especies de mosquitos más difundidas en la provincia son: el Anopheles albimanus, el Aedes mediovitatus, el Aedes scapularis, el Aedes confinis, el Culex quinquefasciatus, el Culex nigripalpus y el Culex corniger; además, los resultados demuestran la superioridad del control con peces sobre el control con Temephos ya que es más eficiente (99% versus 87% para p < 0.01 en el control de culícidos. La vigilancia con peces (no gastos en divisas y $ 1 035.08 MN es más económica que el Temephos (847 500 CUC y $ 12 490.96 MN y que el Bacillus thurigiensis (6 328 cuc y $ 8 280.64 MN. Se concluye que los peces constituyen un efectivo control para las poblaciones de culícidos, recomendando el uso de los mismos por todos los beneficios que estos representan. This work was developed in the Provincial Unit of Vigilance and Vectors Against fight in Villa Clara province, between the first July to first November 2005. For the same was graphically represented the 304 permanent and 218 temporal breeding ground of mosquitoes; distributed in the 13 municipalities of this province. Were taken shows of water body (28 breeding ground existence in the 13 municipalities of the province that to detect the Density of Larva according the methodology of ladle. Were determined the species main of mosquitoes that habitat in the province and were compared two methods (Temephos 2% and fish of control for this vectors, determining the cost – risk of Temephos 2%, the Bacillus thurigiensis and fish as mosquitoes control thorough a consideration. Were primary dates process in the computerized system Excel of packet Office XP and that statistic process of effectively of each treatment was use the test of proportions comparison of packet Statgraphics plus 4.1, both systems sustained in WindowsÒ. The results showing that the mosquitoes species more disseminated in the province are: Anopheles albimanus, Aedes mediovitatus, Aedes scapularis, Aedes confinis, Culex quinquefasciatus, Culex nigripalpus and Culex corniger; besides, the results demonstrating the superiority of control with fish on the Temephos control, already that is more efficient (99% versus 87% that p < 0.01 in the mosquitoes control. The fish control (no spending in CUC and $ 1 035.08 MN is more economic than Temephos (847 500 CUC and $ 12 490.96 MN and than Bacillus thurigiensis (6 328 cuc and $ 8 280.64 MN. Was conclude that the fish constitute a control effective that the mosquitoes people, recommended the use of fish for all benefice that this represent.

  4. [Mosquitoes as vectors for exotic pathogens in Germany].

    Becker, N; Krger, A; Kuhn, C; Plenge-Bnig, A; Thomas, S M; Schmidt-Chanasit, J; Tannich, E

    2014-05-01

    As a result of intensified globalization of international trade and of substantial travel activities, mosquito-borne exotic pathogens are becoming an increasing threat for Europe. In Germany some 50 different mosquito species are known, several of which have vector competence for pathogens. During the last few years a number of zoonotic arboviruses that are pathogenic for humans have been isolated from mosquitoes in Germany including Usutu, Sindbis and Batai viruses. In addition, filarial worms, such as Dirofilaria repens have been repeatedly detected in mosquitoes from the federal state of Brandenburg. Other pathogens, in particular West Nile virus, are expected to emerge sooner or later in Germany as the virus is already circulating in neighboring countries, e.g. France, Austria and the Czech Republic. In upcoming years the risk for arbovirus transmission might increase in Germany due to increased occurrence of new so-called "invasive" mosquito species, such as the Asian bush mosquito Ochlerotatus japonicus or the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus. These invasive species are characterized by high vector competence for a broad range of pathogens and a preference for human blood meals. For risk assessment, a number of mosquito and pathogen surveillance projects have been initiated in Germany during the last few years; however, mosquito control strategies and plans of action have to be developed and put into place to allow early and efficient action against possible vector-borne epidemics. PMID:24781910

  5. Public Health Response to Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus Mosquitoes Invading California, USA

    Porse, Charsey Cole; Kramer, Vicki; Yoshimizu, Melissa Hardstone; Metzger, Marco; Hu, Renjie; Padgett, Kerry; Vugia, Duc J.

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, primary vectors of dengue and chikungunya viruses, were recently detected in California, USA. The threat of potential local transmission of these viruses increases as more infected travelers arrive from affected areas. Public health response has included enhanced human and mosquito surveillance, education, and intensive mosquito control.

  6. Public Health Response to Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus Mosquitoes Invading California, USA.

    Porse, Charsey Cole; Kramer, Vicki; Yoshimizu, Melissa Hardstone; Metzger, Marco; Hu, Renjie; Padgett, Kerry; Vugia, Duc J

    2015-10-01

    Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, primary vectors of dengue and chikungunya viruses, were recently detected in California, USA. The threat of potential local transmission of these viruses increases as more infected travelers arrive from affected areas. Public health response has included enhanced human and mosquito surveillance, education, and intensive mosquito control. PMID:26401891

  7. Biosynthesis of 130-kilodalton mosquito larvicide in the cyanobacterium Agmenellum quadruplicatum PR-6.

    Angsuthanasombat, C; Panyim, S

    1989-01-01

    The 130-kilodalton mosquito larvicidal gene, cloned from Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis, was introduced into the cyanobacterium Agmenellum quadruplicatum PR-6 by plasmid transformation. Transformed cells synthesized 130-kilodalton delta-endotoxin protein and showed mosquito larvicidal activity. Results demonstrate a potential use of a cyanobacterium for biological control of mosquitoes.

  8. Usage and Perceived Side Effects of Personal Protective Measures against Mosquitoes among Current Users in Delhi

    Charu Kohli; Rajesh Kumar,; Meena, G. S.; M. M. Singh; Jyotiranjan Sahoo; G. K. Ingle

    2014-01-01

    Background. Mosquito-borne diseases constitute an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The use of personal protective measures (PPM) like mats, bednets, screening, repellents, liquid vaporizers, mosquito coils, and so forth has been advocated as an effective tool in control of mosquito-borne diseases, but data about the safety profile of personal protective measures is still scarce. Objective. To study the usage and side effects of personal protective measures against mosquitoes among ...

  9. Natural Plant Sugar Sources of Anopheles Mosquitoes Strongly Impact Malaria Transmission Potential

    Gu, Weidong; Müller, Günter; Schlein, Yosef; NOVAK, ROBERT J.; BEIER, JOHN C.

    2011-01-01

    An improved knowledge of mosquito life history could strengthen malaria vector control efforts that primarily focus on killing mosquitoes indoors using insecticide treated nets and indoor residual spraying. Natural sugar sources, usually floral nectars of plants, are a primary energy resource for adult mosquitoes but their role in regulating the dynamics of mosquito populations is unclear. To determine how the sugar availability impacts Anopheles sergentii populations, mark-release-recapture ...

  10. Exogenous gypsy insulator sequences modulate transgene expression in the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles stephensi

    Carballar-Lejarazú, Rebeca; Jasinskiene, Nijole; James, Anthony A

    2013-01-01

    Malaria parasites are transmitted to humans by mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles, and these insects are the targets of innovative vector control programs. Proposed approaches include the use of genetic strategies based on transgenic mosquitoes to suppress or modify vector populations. Although substantial advances have been made in engineering resistant mosquito strains, limited efforts have been made in refining mosquito transgene expression, in particular attenuating the effects of insertio...

  11. Rapid selection against arbovirus-induced apoptosis during infection of a mosquito vector

    O’Neill, Katelyn; Olson, Bradley J. S. C.; Huang, Ning; Unis, Dave; Clem, Rollie J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the factors that cause mosquitoes to resist arbovirus infection could lead to new strategies to control disease transmission. One antiviral response that may play a role in mosquito immunity is apoptosis, a type of cell suicide that is often induced by virus infection. However, apoptosis is rarely seen in arbovirus-infected mosquitoes. To understand why, we infected mosquitoes with an arbovirus that expresses a proapoptotic gene called reaper and found that the Reaper-expressing...

  12. Environmental Assessment - Proposed Application of Aerially Applied Ultra Low Volume Naled for the Control of Adult Mosquitoes within the Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge in Lacombe, Louisiana

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document assesses the effects that aerially applied ultra low volume Naled would have on adult mosquito populations. It also offers alternatives.

  13. Spatial occurrence and hatch of field eggs of the tadpole shrimp Triops newberryi (Notostraca: Triopsidae), a potential biological control agent of immature mosquitoes.

    Su, Tianyun; Mulla, Mir S

    2002-06-01

    The tadpole shrimp (TPS), Triops newberryi (Packard) (Notostraca: Triopsidae) is a potential biological control agent for immature mosquitoes breeding in ephemeral habitats. The occurrence of TPS eggs in soil and their hatch were investigated in 11 flood-irrigated date gardens in the Coachella Valley of southern California in 1999. Each garden was sampled several times after the rows were recently irrigated. All these date gardens harbored from very few to a large number of eggs in the soil. Overall, the average density of total eggs on ranches with clay loam soil was significantly higher than that on ranches with silt loam soil. The average densities of total eggs were significantly lower on the ranches that were disked compared to those on the ranches that were undisked before sampling. Two types of eggs were found and designated as "fresh" (yellowish to brownish) and "old" (blackish) eggs. This is the first time that these dimorphic eggs have been reported. The density of fresh eggs was lower than that of old eggs in most soil samples. The date gardens with high egg densities were sampled for determination of vertical occurrence, where soil was sampled up to 38.5 cm deep. Fresh eggs were recovered from soil in depths up to 25.6 cm, but the densities progressively declined with depth. The old eggs, however, were recovered from all soil depths studied, and there was no obvious relationship between soil depth and their density. This pattern of vertical occurrence of TPS eggs is the result of frequent disking for weed control and fruit harvest. Hatch of TPS eggs in surface soil samples ranged from 0 to 7.2 per 100 g dried soil. Hatch of viable eggs had an inverse relationship with soil depth. No TPS hatched out from the soil samples taken deeper than 15.4 cm. Fresh and old eggs distinguished by color were subjected to hatching tests. Fresh eggs exhibited high hatch, with hatching rates of 35.5-45.0% and 40.2-60.3% for the 1st and 1st plus the 2nd hydrations respectively. The old eggs, however, did not hatch at all. These findings provide quantitative information with regard to occurrence of natural TPS populations in flood irrigated agricultural fields, which could serve as a potential regulatory force of immature mosquito populations sharing ephemeral habitats with TPS. PMID:12125864

  14. Attractive Toxic Sugar Baits: Control of Mosquitoes With the Low-Risk Active Ingredient Dinotefuran and Potential Impacts on Nontarget Organisms in Morocco

    Khallaayoune, Khalid; Qualls, Whitney A.; Revay, Edita E; Allan, Sandra A.; ARHEART, KRISTOPHER L.; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D.; Xue, Rui-De; Schlein, Yosef; Beier, John C; Müller, Günter C.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) in the laboratory and field with the low-risk active ingredient dinotefuran against mosquito populations. Preliminary laboratory assays indicated that dinotefuran in solution with the sugar baits was ingested and resulted in high mortality of female Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Aedes aegypti Linnaeus. Field studies demonstrated >70% reduction of mosquito populations at 3 wk post-ATSB application. Nontarget feeding of seven ins...

  15. Door to Door Survey and Community Participation to Implement a New County Mosquito Control Program in Wayne County, North Carolina, USA

    Timothy Kelley; Amanda Grantham; Anderson, Alice L.

    2009-01-01

    Community involvement in mosquito management programs provides more sustainable and effective organization and service. A door to door survey in Wayne County, NC carried out by student volunteers, resulted in 60 household responses. Residents had not previously experienced outreach from the county (88%), and 95% of them thought the student door to door survey was an effective form of outreach. One third of the residents thought mosquitoes were severe where they lived, but only 9% thought they...

  16. Disruptive technology for vector control: the Innovative Vector Control Consortium and the US Military join forces to explore transformative insecticide application technology for mosquito control programmes

    Knapp, Jennifer; MacDonald, Michael; Malone, David; Hamon, Nicholas; Richardson, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Malaria vector control technology has remained largely static for decades and there is a pressing need for innovative control tools and methodology to radically improve the quality and efficiency of current vector control practices. This report summarizes a workshop jointly organized by the Innovative Vector Control Consortium (IVCC) and the Armed Forces Pest Management Board (AFPMB) focused on public health pesticide application technology. Three main topics were discussed: the limitations w...

  17. [The recurring necessity of mosquito surveillance and research].

    Kampen, Helge; Werner, Doreen

    2015-10-01

    Hematophagous arthropods and the diseases associated with them represent a growing threat to human and animal health in Europe. After the eradication of endemic malaria from Europe in the middle of the last century, there has been a resurgence of mosquitoes as significant vectors of disease agents under the influence of continuing globalisation, as exotic species and mosquito-borne pathogens are being introduced with increasing frequency. At present, southern Europe is particularly affected by disease outbreaks and cases, but invasive mosquito species, including efficient vectors, have also emerged in Germany. While there is considerable knowledge on the vector potential of many tropical and subtropical mosquito species, corresponding data on the indigenous mosquito species are scarce. Exceptions are the Anopheles species, which were already vectors of malaria parasites in historic Europe. It must be assumed, however, that many further indigenous species are able to transmit pathogens under certain conditions and will by all means gain vector competence under a scenario of climate warming. Thus, the permanent surveillance of mosquitoes and mosquito-borne disease agents is paramount for the purposes of conducting risk analyses and modelling, in addition to research work addressing the conditions of the spread of vectors and pathogens and of pathogen transmission. Only ample data can facilitate taking appropriate prophylactic action and designing control strategies. International health organizations have realised this and started to promote data collection on mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases in the EU. At a national levels, authorities are more reluctant, although, similar to other fields of health, it has been shown for mosquito-borne diseases that preventive measures are more cost-saving than disease case management and the coverage of follow-up costs. The present article is intended to illustrate the necessity of the re-intensification of mosquito surveillance and research in Germany and other European countries. PMID:26335745

  18. Mosquito repellents in frog skin

    Williams, C. R.; Smith, B.P.C; Best, S. M.; Tyler, M.J

    2006-01-01

    The search for novel insect repellents has been driven by health concerns over established synthetic compounds such as diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET). Given the diversity of compounds known from frog skin and records of mosquito bite and ectoparasite infestation, the presence of mosquito repellents in frogs seemed plausible. We investigated frog skin secretions to confirm the existence of mosquito repellent properties. Litoria caerulea secretions were assessed for mosquito repellency by topical a...

  19. Flavivirus-Mosquito Interactions

    Yan-Jang S. Huang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Flavivirus genus is in the family Flaviviridae and is comprised of more than 70 viruses. These viruses have a broad geographic range, circulating on every continent except Antarctica. Mosquito-borne flaviviruses, such as yellow fever virus, dengue virus serotypes 1–4, Japanese encephalitis virus, and West Nile virus are responsible for significant human morbidity and mortality in affected regions. This review focuses on what is known about flavivirus-mosquito interactions and presents key data collected from the field and laboratory-based molecular and ultrastructural evaluations.

  20. Disruptive technology for vector control: the Innovative Vector Control Consortium and the US Military join forces to explore transformative insecticide application technology for mosquito control programmes.

    Knapp, Jennifer; Macdonald, Michael; Malone, David; Hamon, Nicholas; Richardson, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Malaria vector control technology has remained largely static for decades and there is a pressing need for innovative control tools and methodology to radically improve the quality and efficiency of current vector control practices. This report summarizes a workshop jointly organized by the Innovative Vector Control Consortium (IVCC) and the Armed Forces Pest Management Board (AFPMB) focused on public health pesticide application technology. Three main topics were discussed: the limitations with current tools and techniques used for indoor residual spraying (IRS), technology innovation to improve efficacy of IRS programmes, and truly disruptive application technology beyond IRS. The group identified several opportunities to improve application technology to include: insuring all IRS programmes are using constant flow valves and erosion resistant tips; introducing compression sprayer improvements that help minimize pesticide waste and human error; and moving beyond IRS by embracing the potential for new larval source management techniques and next generation technology such as unmanned "smart" spray systems. The meeting served to lay the foundation for broader collaboration between the IVCC and AFPMB and partners in industry, the World Health Organization, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and others. PMID:26409879

  1. An update on the incidence of dengue gaining strength in Saudi Arabia and current control approaches for its vector mosquito

    Aziz, Al Thabiani; Al-Shami, Salman Abdo; Mahyoub, Jazem A; Hatabbi, Mesed; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Rawi, Che Salmah Md.

    2014-01-01

    Background The cases of dengue reported earlier in the late 1990s from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) occurred in the cities of Jeddah and Makkah. Although the kingdom has ample financial resources to establish effective control measures for the dengue vector, numerous cases of dengue occur and fluctuate in numbers from year to year. This necessitates a serious review of the current vector control strategies being practiced in order to identify the existing shortcomings. This short report ...

  2. Effect of anti-mosquito antibodies on the infectivity of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei to Anopheles farauti.

    Ramasamy, M S; Ramasamy, R

    1990-04-01

    The effect of mouse anti-mosquito antibodies, present in the bloodmeal, on the infectivity of Plasmodium berghei Vincke to Anopheles farauti Laveran was investigated. Significantly fewer oocysts developed in mosquitoes feeding on mice immunized with sugar-fed mosquito midgut antigens than in mosquitoes feeding on control mice. Mosquitoes feeding on mice immunized with the midgut antigens derived from sugar-fed mosquitoes also showed reduced mortality and had lower infection rates than those fed on unimmunized mice. Blood-fed midgut antigen was less effective in producing these effects than sugar-fed midgut antigen. PMID:2132980

  3. Use of insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets and other impregnated materials for malaria control in the Americas Uso de mosquiteros y otros materiales impregnados para el control de la malaria en las Américas

    R. H. Zimmerman

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the current status of the use of insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets and other impregnated materials in the Americas. Studies from Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela are examined. It is concluded that most studies have suffered from experimental design errors, short duration problems, and/or inadequate measurement of health indicators. The review brings out the great difficulty of conducting scientific studies that attempt to measure the impact of insecticide-treated materials on malaria incidence. In particular, the low incidence of malaria in the Americas, the high prevalences of P. vivax and relapsing cases, and the relationship between human activity patterns and the crepuscular biting patterns of certain malaria vectors stand in the way of easy experimental design and execution. The utilization of impregnated mosquito nets or other impregnated materials as a major component of an integrated malaria control program would be premature at this time. However, it is recommended that well-conceived large-scale trials and interventions be considered when they are based on a thorough understanding of the dynamics of malaria transmission in the area of study.En este artículo se revisa el uso actual en las Américas de mosquiteros y otros materiales impregnados con insecticida. Se examinan diversos estudios efectuados en el Brasil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Perú, Suriname y Venezuela y se llega a la conclusión de que en su mayor parte estos estudios adolecen de graves deficiencias de diseño, problemas de excesiva brevedad, o de una medición inadecuada de los indicadores de salud. La revisión resalta la gran dificultad de llevar a cabo estudios que buscan medir el impacto de los materiales tratados con insecticidas sobre la incidencia de malaria. En particular, la baja incidencia de malaria en las Américas, las altas prevalencias de Plasmodium vivax y de casos recurrentes y la relación entre los patrones de actividad de los seres humanos y los hábitos de picadura crepusculares de los mosquitos impiden hacer experimentos de fácil diseño y ejecución. Por ahora sería prematuro usar mosquiteros u otros materiales impregnados como componentes principales de un programa integral para el control de la malaria. No obstante, se recomienda que se considere llevar a cabo ensayos bien diseñados a gran escala siempre que se basen en un conocimiento profundo de la dinámica de la transmisión de la malaria en la zona del estudio.

  4. UV light and urban pollution: Bad cocktail for mosquitoes?

    Tetreau, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.tetreau@gmail.com [Laboratoire d’Ecologie Alpine, LECA-UMR 5553, Université de Grenoble 1, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 09 (France); Department of Entomology, Cornell University, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456 (United States); Chandor-Proust, Alexia; Faucon, Frédéric; Stalinski, Renaud; Akhouayri, Idir; Prud’homme, Sophie M.; Régent-Kloeckner, Myriam; Raveton, Muriel; Reynaud, Stéphane [Laboratoire d’Ecologie Alpine, LECA-UMR 5553, Université de Grenoble 1, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 09 (France)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: •Mosquito tolerance to temephos is induced by PAHs and UV exposure. •Toxicity of fluoranthene for mosquito Malpighian tubules cells is induced by UV. •Fluoranthene crystallizes in mosquito Malpighian tubules upon UV exposure. •Mixture of two PAHs is less toxic for mosquitoes than each PAHs separately. •Combination of abiotic parameters (PAHs and UV) affect mosquito physiology. -- Abstract: Mosquito breeding sites consist of water pools, which can either be large open areas or highly covered ponds with vegetation, thus with different light exposures combined with the presence in water of xenobiotics including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) generated by urban pollution. UV light and PAHs are abiotic factors known to both affect the mosquito insecticide resistance status. Nonetheless, their potential combined effects on the mosquito physiology have never been investigated. The present article aims at describing the effects of UV exposure alongside water contamination with two major PAH pollutants (fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene) on a laboratory population of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. To evaluate the effects of PAH exposure and low energetic UV (UV-A) irradiation on mosquitoes, different parameters were measured including: (1) The PAH localization and its impact on cell mortality by fluorescent microscopy; (2) The detoxification capacities (cytochrome P450, glutathione-S-transferase, esterase); (3) The responses to oxidative stress (Reactive Oxygen Species–ROS) and (4) The tolerance of mosquito larvae to a bioinsecticide (Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis–Bti) and to five chemical insecticides (DDT, imidacloprid, permethrin, propoxur and temephos). Contrasting effects regarding mosquito cell mortality, detoxification and oxidative stress were observed as being dependent on the pollutant considered, despite the fact that the two PAHs belong to the same family. Moreover, UV is able to modify pollutant effects on mosquitoes, including tolerance to three insecticides (imidacloprid, propoxur and temephos), cell damage and response to oxidative stress. Taken together, our results suggest that UV and pollution, individually or in combination, are abiotic parameters that can affect the physiology and insecticide tolerance of mosquitoes; but the complexity of their direct effect and of their interaction will require further investigation to know in which condition they can affect the efficacy of insecticide-based vector control strategies in the field.

  5. UV light and urban pollution: Bad cocktail for mosquitoes?

    Highlights: •Mosquito tolerance to temephos is induced by PAHs and UV exposure. •Toxicity of fluoranthene for mosquito Malpighian tubules cells is induced by UV. •Fluoranthene crystallizes in mosquito Malpighian tubules upon UV exposure. •Mixture of two PAHs is less toxic for mosquitoes than each PAHs separately. •Combination of abiotic parameters (PAHs and UV) affect mosquito physiology. -- Abstract: Mosquito breeding sites consist of water pools, which can either be large open areas or highly covered ponds with vegetation, thus with different light exposures combined with the presence in water of xenobiotics including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) generated by urban pollution. UV light and PAHs are abiotic factors known to both affect the mosquito insecticide resistance status. Nonetheless, their potential combined effects on the mosquito physiology have never been investigated. The present article aims at describing the effects of UV exposure alongside water contamination with two major PAH pollutants (fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene) on a laboratory population of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. To evaluate the effects of PAH exposure and low energetic UV (UV-A) irradiation on mosquitoes, different parameters were measured including: (1) The PAH localization and its impact on cell mortality by fluorescent microscopy; (2) The detoxification capacities (cytochrome P450, glutathione-S-transferase, esterase); (3) The responses to oxidative stress (Reactive Oxygen Species–ROS) and (4) The tolerance of mosquito larvae to a bioinsecticide (Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis–Bti) and to five chemical insecticides (DDT, imidacloprid, permethrin, propoxur and temephos). Contrasting effects regarding mosquito cell mortality, detoxification and oxidative stress were observed as being dependent on the pollutant considered, despite the fact that the two PAHs belong to the same family. Moreover, UV is able to modify pollutant effects on mosquitoes, including tolerance to three insecticides (imidacloprid, propoxur and temephos), cell damage and response to oxidative stress. Taken together, our results suggest that UV and pollution, individually or in combination, are abiotic parameters that can affect the physiology and insecticide tolerance of mosquitoes; but the complexity of their direct effect and of their interaction will require further investigation to know in which condition they can affect the efficacy of insecticide-based vector control strategies in the field

  6. MosquitoMap and the Mal-area calculator: new web tools to relate mosquito species distribution with vector borne disease

    Christensen Jamie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes are important vectors of diseases but, in spite of various mosquito faunistic surveys globally, there is a need for a spatial online database of mosquito collection data and distribution summaries. Such a resource could provide entomologists with the results of previous mosquito surveys, and vector disease control workers, preventative medicine practitioners, and health planners with information relating mosquito distribution to vector-borne disease risk. Results A web application called MosquitoMap was constructed comprising mosquito collection point data stored in an ArcGIS 9.3 Server/SQL geodatabase that includes administrative area and vector species x country lookup tables. In addition to the layer containing mosquito collection points, other map layers were made available including environmental, and vector and pathogen/disease distribution layers. An application within MosquitoMap called the Mal-area calculator (MAC was constructed to quantify the area of overlap, for any area of interest, of vector, human, and disease distribution models. Data standards for mosquito records were developed for MosquitoMap. Conclusion MosquitoMap is a public domain web resource that maps and compares georeferenced mosquito collection points to other spatial information, in a geographical information system setting. The MAC quantifies the Mal-area, i.e. the area where it is theoretically possible for vector-borne disease transmission to occur, thus providing a useful decision tool where other disease information is limited. The Mal-area approach emphasizes the independent but cumulative contribution to disease risk of the vector species predicted present. MosquitoMap adds value to, and makes accessible, the results of past collecting efforts, as well as providing a template for other arthropod spatial databases.

  7. Pesticides and public health: integrated methods of mosquito management.

    Rose, R. I.

    2001-01-01

    Pesticides have a role in public health as part of sustainable integrated mosquito management. Other components of such management include surveillance, source reduction or prevention, biological control, repellents, traps, and pesticide-resistance management. We assess the future use of mosquito control pesticides in view of niche markets, incentives for new product development, Environmental Protection Agency registration, the Food Quality Protection Act, and improved pest management strate...

  8. Biocontrol of larval mosquitoes by Acilius sulcatus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae

    Banerjee Siddhartha S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problems associated with resistant mosquitoes and the effects on non-target species by chemicals, evoke a reason to find alternative methods to control mosquitoes, like the use of natural predators. In this regard, aquatic coleopterans have been explored less compared to other insect predators. In the present study, an evaluation of the role of the larvae of Acilius sulcatus Linnaeus 1758 (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae as predator of mosquito immatures was made in the laboratory. Its efficacy under field condition was also determined to emphasize its potential as bio-control agent of mosquitoes. Methods In the laboratory, the predation potential of the larvae of A. sulcatus was assessed using the larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus Say 1823 (Diptera: Culicidae as prey at varying predator and prey densities and available space. Under field conditions, the effectiveness of the larvae of A. sulcatus was evaluated through augmentative release in ten cemented tanks hosting immatures of different mosquito species at varying density. The dip density changes in the mosquito immatures were used as indicator for the effectiveness of A. sulcatus larvae. Results A single larva of A. sulcatus consumed on an average 34 IV instar larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus in a 24 h period. It was observed that feeding rate of A. sulcatus did not differ between the light-on (6 a.m. – 6 p.m., and dark (6 p.m. – 6 a.m. phases, but decreased with the volume of water i.e., space availability. The prey consumption of the larvae of A. sulcatus differed significantly (P A. sulcatus larvae, while with the withdrawal, a significant increase (p A. sulcatus in regulating mosquito immatures. In the control tanks, mean larval density did not differ (p > 0.05 throughout the study period. Conclusion the larvae of the dytiscid beetle A. sulcatus proved to be an efficient predator of mosquito immatures and may be useful in biocontrol of medically important mosquitoes.

  9. Attractive toxic sugar baits: Control of mosquitoes with the low risk active ingredient dinotefuran and potential impacts on non-target organisms in Morocco

    We evaluated the efficacy of ATSB in the laboratory and the field with the low risk active ingredient dinotefuran against mosquito populations. Assays indicated that dinotefuran in solution with the sugar baits was ingested and resulted in high mortality of female Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes a...

  10. Willingness-to-pay for an area-wide integrated Pest Managment Program to control the Asian Tiger Mosquito in New Jersey.

    Using contingent valuation, the perceived value of an area-wide, integrated pest management program for the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, implemented in Monmouth and Mercer Counties, New Jersey, was estimated. The residents’ maximum willingness-to-pay (WTP) and payment modality was estimat...

  11. Effects of nutritional factors and soil addition on growth, longevity and fecundity of the tadpole shrimp Triops newberryi (Notostraca: Triopsidae), a potential biological control agent of immature mosquitoes.

    Su, T; Mulla, M S

    2001-06-01

    The notostracan tadpole shrimp (TPS) Triops newberryi Packard has potential to be used as a biocontrol agent of immature mosquitoes. Eggs, nymphal or adult shrimps are considered to be the stages for field introduction. To yield good growth of the shrimp and high production of shrimp eggs under artificial conditions, nutritional requirements of TPS for growth, survival and fecundity need to be elucidated. In the laboratory, we evaluated various nutritional and edaphic regimens, such as soil alone, mosquito larvae or rabbit pellets alone and various combinations of these three components for culturing. These factors influenced the growth, longevity and egg production profoundly. It was shown that the simulated natural conditions, i.e. full combination of all three factors, yielded the largest TPS with longest survival and highest egg production, followed by the combinations of any two components. Any single component, soil, mosquito larvae, or rabbit pellets, did not result in good growth, survival and egg production. By formulating optimal rearing substrates, this species of TPS will yield large numbers of all stages for experimentation and field introductions. Under optimal conditions, they mature in 7-8 days and survive for about one month. Each TPS is capable of producing up to 1,000 eggs during its lifetime. These studies developed nutritional regimens for TPS mass culturing procedures, where the eggs, nymphal and adult TPS can be mass cultured for field introduction and stocking in mosquito developmental sites. PMID:11469184

  12. A GIS EARLY WARNING SYSTEM TO DETECT ELEVATED POPULATIONS OF VECTORS OF RIFT VALLEY FEVER AND THE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM FLORIDA'S MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMUNITY

    New and emerging mosquito-borne viruses such as Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus pose a global threat to animal and human health. An introduction of RVF into the U.S. could severely impact livestock industries and wild ungulates, and cause significantly more human illness than West Nile virus (WNV). ...

  13. Potential of biologically active plant oils to control mosquito larvae (Culex pipiens, Diptera: Culicidae from an egyptian locality Potencial de leos de plantas biologicamente ativos para o controle da larva do mosquito Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae de localidade egpcia

    Hanem Fathy Khater

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The insecticidal effect of six commercially available plant oils was tested against 4th larval instars of Culex pipiens. Larvae were originally collected from Meit El-Attar, Qalyubia Governorate, Egypt, and then reared in the laboratory until F1 generation. The LC50 values were 32.42, 47.17, 71.37, 83.36, 86.06, and 152.94 ppm for fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-grecum, earth almond (Cyperus esculentus, mustard (Brassica compestris, olibanum (Boswellia serrata, rocket (Eruca sativa, and parsley (Carum ptroselinum, respectively. The tested oils altered some biological aspects of C. pipiens, for instance, developmental periods, pupation rates, and adult emergences. The lowest concentrations of olibanum and fenugreek oils caused remarkable prolongation of larval and pupal durations. Data also showed that the increase of concentrations was directly proportional to reduction in pupation rates and adult emergences. Remarkable decrease in pupation rate was achieved by mustard oil at 1000 ppm. Adult emergence was suppressed by earth almond and fenugreek oils at 25 ppm. In addition, the tested plant oils exhibited various morphological abnormalities on larvae, pupae, and adult stages. Consequently, fenugreek was the most potent oil and the major cause of malformation of both larval and pupal stages. Potency of the applied plant oils provided an excellent potential for controlling C. pipiens.O efeito inseticida de seis leos de plantas comercialmente disponveis foi testado contra larvas de 4instar de Culex pipiens. Larvas foram coletadas originalmente de Meit El-Attar, Qalyubia Governorate, Egito e ento cultivadas no laboratrio at a gerao F1. Os valores LC50 foram 32,42, 47,17, 71,37, 83,36, 86,06 e 152,94 ppm para o feno grego (Trigonella foenum-grecum, amndoa da terra (Cyperus esculentus, mostarda (Brassica compestris, olbano (Boswellia serrata, rocket (Eruca sativa e salsa (Carum ptroselium, respectivamente. Os leos testados alteraram alguns aspectos biolgicos do C. pipiens, por exemplo os perodos de desenvolvimento, estados de crislida, e emergncias de adultos. As concentraes mais baixas de leo de olbano e feno grego causaram extraordinrio prolongamento da durao larval e pupal. Dados tambm mostraram que o aumento das concentraes foi diretamente proporcional reduo no estado de crislida e emergncias dos adultos. Notvel decrscimo no estado de crislida foi conseguido com o leo de mostarda a 1000 ppm. Emergncia de adulto foi diminuda no leo de amndoa da terra e feno grego a 25 ppm. Alm do mais, os leos de plantas testados, exibiram vrias anormalidades morfolgicas nas larvas, pupas e estdios adultos. Consequentemente, o leo de feno grego foi o leo mais potente e o maior causador de malformao em ambos estdios larval e pupal. Potencial dos leos de plantas aplicados mostraram excelente resultado no controle do C. pipiens.

  14. Evaluation of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB)-Barrier for control of vector and nuisance mosquitoes and its effect on non-target organisms in sub-tropical environments in Florida.

    Qualls, Whitney A; Müller, Günter C; Revay, Edita E; Allan, Sandra A; Arheart, Kristopher L; Beier, John C; Smith, Michal L; Scott, Jodi M; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D; Hausmann, Axel; Yefremova, Zoya A; Xue, Rui-De

    2014-03-01

    The efficacy of attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) with the active ingredient eugenol, an Environmental Protection Agency exempt compound, was evaluated against vector and nuisance mosquitoes in both laboratory and field studies. In the laboratory, eugenol combined in attractive sugar bait (ASB) solution provided high levels of mortality for Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Anopheles quadrimaculatus. Field studies demonstrated significant control: >70% reduction for Aedes atlanticus, Aedes. infirmatus, and Culex nigripalpus and >50% reduction for Anopheles crucians, Uranotaenia sapphirina, Culiseta melanura, and Culex erraticus three weeks post ATSB application. Furthermore, non-target feeding of six insect orders, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, and Orthoptera, was evaluated in the field after application of a dyed-ASB to flowering and non-flowering vegetation. ASB feeding (staining) was determined by dissecting the guts and searching for food dye with a dissecting microscope. The potential impact of ATSB on non-targets, applied on green non-flowering vegetation was low for all non-target groups (0.9%). However, application of the ASB to flowering vegetation resulted in significant staining of the non-target insect orders. This highlights the need for application guidelines to reduce non-target effects. No mortality was observed in laboratory studies with predatory non-targets, spiders, praying mantis, or ground beetles, after feeding for three days on mosquitoes engorged on ATSB. Overall, our laboratory and field studies support the use of eugenol as an active ingredient for controlling important vector and nuisance mosquitoes when used as an ATSB toxin. This is the first study demonstrating effective control of anophelines in non-arid environments which suggest that even in highly competitive sugar rich environments this method could be used for control of malaria in Latin American countries. PMID:24361724

  15. Visualization and live imaging analysis of a mosquito saliva protein in host animal skin using a transgenic mosquito with a secreted luciferase reporter system.

    Yamamoto, D S; Yokomine, T; Sumitani, M; Yagi, K; Matsuoka, H; Yoshida, S

    2013-12-01

    Mosquitoes inject saliva into a vertebrate host during blood feeding. The analysis of mosquito saliva in host skin is important for the elucidation of the inflammatory responses to mosquito bites, the development of antithrombotic drugs, and the transmission-blocking of vector-borne diseases. We produced transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes expressing the secretory luciferase protein (MetLuc) fused to a saliva protein (AAPP) in the salivary glands. The transgene product (AAPP-MetLuc) of transgenic mosquitoes exhibited both luciferase activity as a MetLuc and binding activity to collagen as an AAPP. The detection of luminescence in the skin of mice bitten by transgenic mosquitoes showed that AAPP-MetLuc was injected into the skin as a component of saliva via blood feeding. AAPP-MetLuc remained at the mosquito bite site in host skin with luciferase activity for at least 4?h after blood feeding. AAPP was also suspected of remaining at the site of injury caused by the mosquito bite and blocking platelet aggregation by binding to collagen. These results demonstrated the establishment of visualization and time-lapse analysis of mosquito saliva in living vertebrate host skin. This technique may facilitate the analysis of mosquito saliva after its injection into host skin, and the development of new drugs and disease control strategies. PMID:24118655

  16. Potential of biologically active plant oils to control mosquito larvae (Culex pipiens, Diptera: Culicidae) from an Egyptian locality.

    Khater, Hanem Fathy; Shalaby, Afaf Abdel-Salam

    2008-01-01

    The insecticidal effect of six commercially available plant oils was tested against 4th larval instars of Culex pipiens. Larvae were originally collected from Meit El-Attar, Qalyubia Governorate, Egypt, and then reared in the laboratory until F1 generation. The LC50 values were 32.42, 47.17, 71.37, 83.36, 86.06, and 152.94 ppm for fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-grecum), earth almond (Cyperus esculentus), mustard (Brassica compestris), olibanum (Boswellia serrata), rocket (Eruca sativa), and parsley (Carum ptroselinum), respectively. The tested oils altered some biological aspects of C. pipiens, for instance, developmental periods, pupation rates, and adult emergences. The lowest concentrations of olibanum and fenugreek oils caused remarkable prolongation of larval and pupal durations. Data also showed that the increase of concentrations was directly proportional to reduction in pupation rates and adult emergences. Remarkable decrease in pupation rate was achieved by mustard oil at 1000 ppm. Adult emergence was suppressed by earth almond and fenugreek oils at 25 ppm. In addition, the tested plant oils exhibited various morphological abnormalities on larvae, pupae, and adult stages. Consequently, fenugreek was the most potent oil and the major cause of malformation of both larval and pupal stages. Potency of the applied plant oils provided an excellent potential for controlling C. pipiens. PMID:18488090

  17. Swarming mechanisms in the yellow fever mosquito: aggregation pheromones involved in the mating behavior of Aedes aegypti

    Mosquitoes of various species mate in swarms comprised of tens to thousands flying males. Yet little information is known about mosquito swarming mechanism. Discovering chemical cues involved in mosquito biology leads to better adaptation of disease control interventions. In this study, we aimed ...

  18. Anopheles gambiae densovirus (AgDNV) has negligible effects on adult survival and transcriptome of its mosquito host

    Xiaoxia Ren; Hughes, Grant L.; Guodong Niu; Yasutsugu Suzuki; Jason L. Rasgon

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito densoviruses (DNVs) are candidate agents for paratransgenic control of malaria and other vector-borne diseases. Unlike other mosquito DNVs, the Anopheles gambiae DNV (AgDNV) is non-pathogenic to larval mosquitoes. However, the cost of infection upon adults and the molecular mechanisms underpinning infection in the mosquito host are unknown. Using life table analysis, we show that AgDNV infection has minimal effects on An. gambiae survival (no significant effect in 2 replicates and a ...

  19. The Knowledge and Experience of Dengue Mosquitoes among Housewives.

    Atik Triratnawati

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF prevention programs in Semarang, were focused through controlling mosquito breeding sites (PSN, but the implementation of PSN was not become a habit in every household. The objective of this study was to explore knowledge and experience of dengue mosquitoes among housewives in the endemic villages.The research was using qualitative methods. Subjects of the study were 17 housewives which selected by purposive sampling. The data collection was carried in Sendangmulyo village, Semarang, through observation, focus groups discussions, and indepth interviews. The techniques used to test data validity were triangulation and member checking method. Data were analyzed using content analysis approached. The results showed that housewives classifying mosquito based on time occurrence whether the presence of mosquito in environment was perceived naturally. Unoptimalized PSN behavior was based on the lack of housewives knowledge on larvae development stages. Mosquito was not considered as a threatening because night mosquito biting was directly more disturbing rather than day mosquitoes’. Health promotion program could increase dasa wisma cadres knowledge and skill, particularly on mosquito life cycle and the correct stages of PSN behavior. This study did not distinguish the demographic characteristics of informants. Further reserch could explore it or develop media based on local knowledge and experience.

  20. Towards the genetic manipulation of mosquito disease vectors

    Our research is aimed at developing the technologies necessary to undertake the genetic manipulation of insect vector genomes. In the longer term, we wish to explore the potential that this technology may have for developing novel strategies for the control of vector-borne diseases. The focus of our current research has been to: i) identify and characterise endogenous transposable elements in the genomes of mosquito vectors -research has focussed on identifying both Class I and Class 11 elements and determining their structure and distribution within mosquito genomes; ii) develop and use transfection systems for mosquito cells in culture as a test bed for transformation vectors and promoters - transfection techniques, vector constructs and different promoters driving reporter genes have been utilised to optimise the transformation of both Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae cells in culture; iii) identify putative promoter sequences which are induced in the female mosquito midgut when it takes a blood meal - the Anopheles gambiae trypsin gene locus has been cloned and sequenced and the intergenic regions assessed for their ability to induce reporter gene expression in mosquito gut cells. The progress we have made in each of these areas will be described and discussed in the context of our longer term aim which is to introduce genes coding for antiparasitic agents into mosquito genomes in such a way that they are expressed in the mosquito midgut and disrupt transmission of the malaria parasite. (author)

  1. Reproduction of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in Santa Cruz, Santiago island, Cape Verde Islands

    Duarte, Elves Heleno; Correia, Edson Eugénio; Varela, Caetano Eane; Varela, António

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes are dipterous insects with an important role in the transmission of diseases like malaria and dengue. During a dengue fever outbreak in the Cape Verde Islands in 2009, several studies were undertaken to support vector control. The present study was carried out in the district of Santa Cruz, Santiago island, to evaluate previous measures taken to control mosquito populations. Results show that mosquitoes use domestic water containers to breed. Barrels, drums and pots were all used. ...

  2. Simple intervention to reduce mosquito breeding in waste stabilisation ponds

    Ensink, Jeroen H J; Mukhtar, Muhammad; van der Hoek, Wim; Konradsen, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    Waste stabilisation ponds (WSP) are the preferred method for treatment of urban wastewater in low-income countries but, especially in arid regions, the pond systems can be important breeding sites for mosquitoes of medical importance. In a WSP system in Faisalabad, Pakistan, we assessed the impact...... of simple environmental interventions on mosquito occurrence and abundance. Reducing the amount of floating matter in the ponds, eliminating emergent vegetation and repairing cracks in the cement structure reduced the number of mosquito-positive samples in the intervention ponds to almost zero......, whereas the control ponds had a significant number of positive samples. This suggests that a combination of simple low-cost interventions is a feasible environmental management strategy for vector control in WSP systems that are located in areas where medically important mosquitoes may breed in the...

  3. Field evaluation of CDC and Mosquito Magnet X traps baited with dry ice, CO2 sachet, and octenol against mosquitoes.

    Xue, Rui-De; Doyle, Melissa A; Kline, Daniel L

    2008-06-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light traps and Mosquito Magnet X (MMX) traps baited with dry ice, octenol, and a new formulation (granular) of carbon dioxide (CO2) were evaluated against adult mosquitoes in the field. The results showed that the MMX traps (68.6%) baited with dry ice collected more mosquitoes compared to the CDC light traps (32.4%) only. The CDC traps baited with dry ice (64%) collected significantly more mosquitoes than traps baited with CO2 sachets (11%) or octenol (23%). The MMX traps baited with dry ice (85.5%) collected significantly more mosquitoes than traps baited with CO2 sachets (6.5%) or octenol (9%). The CDC traps baited with the formulations of normal and slow release CO2 sachets collected more mosquitoes than the formulation of fast release sachets. The CDC traps baited with fresh sachets and 24-h-exposed sachets collected significantly more mosquitoes than the traps baited with 48-h- and 72-h-exposed sachets. PMID:18666533

  4. Non-Genetic Determinants of Mosquito Competence for Malaria Parasites

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Vantaux, Amélie; Dabiré, Kounbobr R.; MOULINE, KARINE; Cohuet, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how mosquito vectors and malaria parasites interact is of fundamental interest, and it also offers novel perspectives for disease control. Both the genetic and environmental contexts are known to affect the ability of mosquitoes to support malaria development and transmission, i.e., vector competence. Although the role of environment has long been recognized, much work has focused on host and parasite genetic effects. However, the last few years have seen a surge of studies reve...

  5. Toxicity of a plant based mosquito repellent/killer

    Singh, Bhoopendra; Singh, Prakash Raj; Mohanty, Manoj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The mission to make humans less attractive to mosquitoes has fuelled decades of scientific research on mosquito behaviour and control. The search for the perfect topical insect repellent/killer continues. This analysis was conducted to review and explore the scientific information on toxicity produced by the ingredients/contents of a herbal product. In this process of systemic review the following methodology was applied. By doing a MEDLINE search with key words of selected plants, plant base...

  6. Mosquito larvicidal potential of four common medicinal plants of India

    Rawani, Anjali; Ghosh, Anupam; Chandra, Goutam

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Mosquitoes transmit serious human health diseases, causing millions of deaths every year. Plants may be sources of alternative mosquito control agents. The present study was carried out to assess the role of larvicidal activities of the crude extracts of four plants viz. Alternanthera sessilis L. (Amaranthaceae), Trema orientalis L. (Cannabaceae), Gardenia carinata Smith. (Rubiaceae) and Ruellia tuberosa L. (Acanthaceae) against Culex quinquefasciatus Say in laborator...

  7. Elizabethkingia anophelis: Molecular Manipulation and Interactions with Mosquito Hosts

    Chen, Shicheng; Bagdasarian, Michael; Walker, Edward D

    2015-01-01

    Flavobacteria (members of the family Flavobacteriaceae) dominate the bacterial community in the Anopheles mosquito midgut. One such commensal, Elizabethkingia anophelis, is closely associated with Anopheles mosquitoes through transstadial persistence (i.e., from one life stage to the next); these and other properties favor its development for paratransgenic applications in control of malaria parasite transmission. However, the physiological requirements of E. anophelis have not been investiga...

  8. UV light and urban pollution: bad cocktail for mosquitoes?

    Tetreau, Guillaume; Chandor-Proust, Alexia; Faucon, Frédéric; Stalinski, Renaud; Akhouayri, Idir; Prud'homme, Sophie M; Régent-Kloeckner, Myriam; Raveton, Muriel; Reynaud, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito breeding sites consist of water pools, which can either be large open areas or highly covered ponds with vegetation, thus with different light exposures combined with the presence in water of xenobiotics including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) generated by urban pollution. UV light and PAHs are abiotic factors known to both affect the mosquito insecticide resistance status. Nonetheless, their potential combined effects on the mosquito physiology have never been investigated. The present article aims at describing the effects of UV exposure alongside water contamination with two major PAH pollutants (fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene) on a laboratory population of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. To evaluate the effects of PAH exposure and low energetic UV (UV-A) irradiation on mosquitoes, different parameters were measured including: (1) The PAH localization and its impact on cell mortality by fluorescent microscopy; (2) The detoxification capacities (cytochrome P450, glutathione-S-transferase, esterase); (3) The responses to oxidative stress (Reactive Oxygen Species-ROS) and (4) The tolerance of mosquito larvae to a bioinsecticide (Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis-Bti) and to five chemical insecticides (DDT, imidacloprid, permethrin, propoxur and temephos). Contrasting effects regarding mosquito cell mortality, detoxification and oxidative stress were observed as being dependent on the pollutant considered, despite the fact that the two PAHs belong to the same family. Moreover, UV is able to modify pollutant effects on mosquitoes, including tolerance to three insecticides (imidacloprid, propoxur and temephos), cell damage and response to oxidative stress. Taken together, our results suggest that UV and pollution, individually or in combination, are abiotic parameters that can affect the physiology and insecticide tolerance of mosquitoes; but the complexity of their direct effect and of their interaction will require further investigation to know in which condition they can affect the efficacy of insecticide-based vector control strategies in the field. PMID:24275062

  9. Wolbachia induces reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent activation of the Toll pathway to control dengue virus in the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    Pan, Xiaoling; Zhou, Guoli; Wu, Jiahong; Bian, Guowu; Lu, Peng; Raikhel, Alexander S; Xi, Zhiyong

    2011-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally transmitted symbiotic bacteria that can spread within insect populations because of their unique ability to manipulate host reproduction. When introduced to nonnative mosquito hosts, Wolbachia induce resistance to a number of human pathogens, including dengue virus (DENV), Plasmodium, and filarial nematodes, but the molecular mechanism involved is unclear. In this study, we have deciphered how Wolbachia infection affects the Aedes aegypti host in inducing resistance t...

  10. Microscopic Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytemia and Infectivity to Mosquitoes in Cambodia.

    Lin, Jessica T; Ubalee, Ratawan; Lon, Chanthap; Balasubramanian, Sujata; Kuntawunginn, Worachet; Rahman, Rifat; Saingam, Piyaporn; Heng, Thay Kheang; Vy, Dav; San, Savoeun; Nuom, Sarath; Burkly, Hana; Chanarat, Nitima; Ponsa, Chanudom; Levitz, Lauren; Parobek, Christian; Chuor, Char Meng; Somethy, Sok; Spring, Michele; Lanteri, Charlotte; Gosi, Panita; Meshnick, Steven R; Saunders, David L

    2016-05-01

    Although gametocytes are essential for malaria transmission, in Africa many falciparum-infected persons without smear-detectable gametocytes still infect mosquitoes. To see whether the same is true in Southeast Asia, we determined the infectiousness of 119 falciparum-infected Cambodian adults toAnopheles dirusmosquitoes by membrane feeding. Just 5.9% of subjects infected mosquitoes. The 8.4% of patients with smear-detectable gametocytes were >20 times more likely to infect mosquitoes than those without and were the source of 96% of all mosquito infections. In low-transmission settings, targeting transmission-blocking interventions to those with microscopic gametocytemia may have an outsized effect on malaria control and elimination. PMID:26667316

  11. Pesticide-Free Device a Fatal Attraction for Mosquitoes

    2005-01-01

    Are those pesky mosquitoes getting more entertainment out of your family picnic than you are? If the answer is yes, then it is time to reclaim your backyard with assistance from an unlikely partner. Nowadays, NASA is developing tools to track and predict the spread of the West Nile Virus on a global scale, but several years ago, the Space Agency carved out some time to collaborate with an outdoor products manufacturer in order to help control mosquito populations on a local level. The technology resulting from this union leveraged a space-age heat blanket to attract mosquitoes, which would then be eliminated without the use of harmful pesticides or chemicals. technical assistance from NASA and is an environmentally safe way to reduce the mosquito population.

  12. Hey! A Mosquito Bit Me!

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Hey! A Mosquito Bit Me! KidsHealth > For Kids > Hey! A Mosquito Bit Me! Print A A A ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Hey! A Flea Bit Me! Hey! A Scorpion Stung ...

  13. Reduction of mosquito biting-pressure: spatial repellents or mosquito traps? A field comparison of seven commercially available products in Israel

    The personal protection capability of seven commercially available mosquito control devices (MCD) is compared under field conditions in Israel. Trials were performed in a high biting-pressure area inhabited by large populations of mosquito and biting midge species and using human volunteers for lan...

  14. Preliminary Analysis of Several Attractants and Spatial Repellents for the Mosquito, Aedes albopictus using an Olfactometer

    Hao, Huiling; Sun, Jingcheng; Dai, Jianqing

    2012-01-01

    Mosquito attractants and spatial repellents hold great promise in controlling mosquito pests. In assessing the effectiveness of mosquito attractants and repellents, a good olfactometer system, and optimized testing conditions, are essential. In this research, we demonstrated the usefulness of an olfactometer system, and optimized testing conditions for Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae). We found no significant difference in the biting activity of the insect between 8:00 and 22:00. Further...

  15. Potency of Pandanus amaryllifolius and Notophanax scutellarium as Aedes albopictus Mosquito Repellent

    Rina Marina; Endang Puji Astuti

    2012-01-01

    Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes being the vector of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF). Various effort have been done to control the mosquitoes, including using plant extract as repellent. Pandanus amaryllifolius and Notophanax scutellarium leaf were known to posses repellent activity for mosquito species. The study aimed to examine efJectiveness of P. amaryllifolius and N. scutellarium leaves as repellent for Ae. albopictus. The result study on 1 hr treatment showed that power prote...

  16. The Insect Growth Regulator Pyriproxyfen Terminates Egg Diapause in the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus

    Suman, Devi S.; Wang, Yi; Gaugler, Randy

    2015-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a highly invasive mosquito species that transmits chikungunya and dengue. This species overwinters as diapausing eggs in temperate climates. Early diapause termination may be a beneficial strategy for winter mosquito control; however, a mechanism to terminate the diapause process using chemicals is not known. We tested the hypothesis that a hormonal imbalance caused by the administration of juvenile hormone analog would terminate egg diapause in ...

  17. Mosquito biting activity on humans & detection of Plasmodium falciparum infection in Anopheles stephensi in Goa, India

    Korgaonkar, Nandini S.; Kumar, Ashwani; Yadav, Rajpal S.; Kabadi, Dipak; Dash, Aditya P.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Knowledge of the bionomics of mosquitoes, especially of disease vectors, is essential to plan appropriate vector avoidance and control strategies. Information on biting activity of vectors during the night hours in different seasons is important for choosing personal protection measures. This study was carried out to find out the composition of mosquito fauna biting on humans and seasonal biting trends in Goa, India. Methods: Biting activities of all mosquitoes includ...

  18. The roles of kairomones, synomones and pheromones in the chemically-mediated behaviour of male mosquitoes

    Pitts, R. J.; Mozuraitis, R.; Gauvin-Bialecki, A.; Lampérière, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of intensive study of the chemical ecology of female mosquitoes, relatively little is known about the chemical ecology of males. This short review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the chemicals that mediate male mosquito behaviour. Various trophic interactions including insect plant, insect host, and insect insect responses are emphasized. The relevance of the chemical ecology of male mosquitoes in the context of vector control programmes is discussed.

  19. THE LARVICIDAL ACTIVITY OF INDIGOFERA ARRECTA LEAF EXTRACT AGAINST CULEX MOSQUITO LARVAE

    Raheli Neema M, Ojunga M and Ramesh F*

    2014-01-01

    The present study was done to assess the larvicidal activity of the Java indigo plant against the larvae of culex mosquito. The plant leaves were extracted using methanol and water (9:1). After extraction a bioassay was conducted to test its activity in the larva of culex mosquito. The mortality data was subjected to probit analysis to determine the lethal concentration. The Java indigo leaf extract can be used as a natural insecticide control against the Culex mosquito larvae.

  20. Arbovirus-mosquito interactions: RNAi pathway.

    Olson, Ken E; Blair, Carol D

    2015-12-01

    Arthropod-borne (arbo) viruses infect hematophagous arthropods (vectors) to maintain virus transmission between vertebrate hosts. The mosquito vector actively controls arbovirus infection to minimize its fitness costs. The RNA interference (RNAi) pathway is the major antiviral response vectors use to restrict arbovirus infections. We know this because depleting RNAi gene products profoundly impacts arbovirus replication, the antiviral RNAi pathway genes undergo positive, diversifying selection and arboviruses have evolved strategies to evade the vector's RNAi responses. The vector's RNAi defense and arbovirus countermeasures lead to an arms race that prevents potential virus-induced fitness costs yet maintains arbovirus infections needed for transmission. This review will discuss the latest findings in RNAi-arbovirus interactions in the model insect (Drosophila melanogaster) and in specific mosquito vectors. PMID:26629932

  1. Spatio-temporal dynamics of mosquitoes in stream pools of a biosphere reserve of Southern Western Ghats, India.

    Anbalagan, S; Arunprasanna, V; Kannan, M; Dinakaran, S; Krishnan, M

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and temporal dynamics of mosquitoes in stream pools were examined in a biosphere reserve of the Southern Western Ghats, India. The immature mosquitoes in stream pools were collected from stream substrates of bedrock pool, boulder cavity and sand puddle. The collected larvae and pupae were reared and identified. In total, 16 species from four genera of mosquitoes were collected. The mosquito species from Culex and Anopheles were predominantly occurred. The bedrock pool had the highest diversity and abundance of mosquitoes. The statistical analyses showed that the substrate specificity and the seasons were positively related to the distribution of mosquitoes rather than spatial pattern. This study described the spatial and temporal pattern of mosquitoes in stream pools of the Southern Western Ghats. This information would be helpful to National Vector borne disease control program for surveillance and control. PMID:26434940

  2. The distribution of Culex mosquitoes in Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India

    A. Naresh Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis is an infection with the filarial worms, Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and B. timori. These parasites are transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected Culex mosquito and develop into adult worms in the lymphatic vessels, causing severe damage and swelling (lymphoedema. Mosquito control, in view of their medical as well as economical importance, assumes global importance. Geographic information system (GIS is a powerful tool to analyse the distribution of mosquitoes and their relationship to different environmental factors, and can substantially improve our ability to quantify the impacts of demographic, climatic and ecological changes in vector distribution. In the present study Culex quinquefasciatus, Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Culex gelidus were recorded in the study area. Few other factors such as larval mosquito density, number of breeding sites, human population, etc. were also analysed for its impact on the distribution of Culex mosquitoes. Distribution of Culex in the present study affirmed that C. quinquefasciatus is predominant in the entire focal area, which explains the behavioural response and capability of the species in varied zones. Information gathered from this study is being used to construct a GIS-based mapping system for distribution of Culex mosquitoes in the Coimbatore District, Tamil Nadu, India.

  3. The Role of Innate Immunity in Conditioning Mosquito Susceptibility to West Nile Virus

    Abhishek N. Prasad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses represent an emerging threat to human and livestock health globally. In particular, those transmitted by mosquitoes present the greatest challenges to disease control efforts. An understanding of the molecular basis for mosquito innate immunity to arbovirus infection is therefore critical to investigations regarding arbovirus evolution, virus-vector ecology, and mosquito vector competence. In this review, we discuss the current state of understanding regarding mosquito innate immunity to West Nile virus. We draw from the literature with respect to other virus-vector pairings to attempt to draw inferences to gaps in our knowledge about West Nile virus and relevant vectors.

  4. Mosquitoes as a Part of Wetland Biodiversity

    Schäfer, Martina

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands contain both aquatic and terrestrial environments which generates high biodiversity. However, they are commonly associated with mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae), and mosquitoes are usually regarded as negative by humans because they can cause nuisance and transmit diseases. This thesis aimed to clarify the association between mosquitoes and wetlands and to achieve a more balanced view of biodiversity in wetlands by including mosquito diversity. Studies on adult mosquito diversity and ...

  5. Response of the mosquito protein interaction network to dengue infection

    Pike Andrew D

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two fifths of the world's population is at risk from dengue. The absence of effective drugs and vaccines leaves vector control as the primary intervention tool. Understanding dengue virus (DENV host interactions is essential for the development of novel control strategies. The availability of genome sequences for both human and mosquito host greatly facilitates genome-wide studies of DENV-host interactions. Results We developed the first draft of the mosquito protein interaction network using a computational approach. The weighted network includes 4,214 Aedes aegypti proteins with 10,209 interactions, among which 3,500 proteins are connected into an interconnected scale-free network. We demonstrated the application of this network for the further annotation of mosquito proteins and dissection of pathway crosstalk. Using three datasets based on physical interaction assays, genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screens and microarray assays, we identified 714 putative DENV-associated mosquito proteins. An integrated analysis of these proteins in the network highlighted four regions consisting of highly interconnected proteins with closely related functions in each of replication/transcription/translation (RTT, immunity, transport and metabolism. Putative DENV-associated proteins were further selected for validation by RNAi-mediated gene silencing, and dengue viral titer in mosquito midguts was significantly reduced for five out of ten (50.0% randomly selected genes. Conclusions Our results indicate the presence of common host requirements for DENV in mosquitoes and humans. We discuss the significance of our findings for pharmacological intervention and genetic modification of mosquitoes for blocking dengue transmission.

  6. Application of Bifenthrin as a Barrier Spray for protection against mosquitoes near Arkansas rice fields.

    Barrier spraying is an emerging practice used to control mosquito populations and vector-borne diseases. Talstar (a.i. bifenthrin), a pyrethroid, was the pesticide chosen for this study, because of its environmental persistence and efficacy against mosquitoes. In two separate test plots near Stutt...

  7. Use of geographic information systems to depict and analyze mosquito population trends.

    Mosquitoes transmit (vector) disease agents that cause malaria, yellow fever, dengue, West Nile fever, and encephalitis. Spread of these diseases is controlled by the management of mosquito population levels, changes in which are monitored in vector surveillance programs by the use of mechanical tr...

  8. Don't Let the Bugs Bite: Preventing Dengue and Other Diseases Spread by Mosquitoes

    2007-12-10

    This year (2007) CDC is receiving a great many reports of cases of Dengue fever, which is spread by mosquitoes. This podcast discusses ways travelers to the tropics can protect themselves from mosquito bites.  Created: 12/10/2007 by National Center for the Prevention, Detection and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID).   Date Released: 12/10/2007.

  9. Wolbachia enhances West Nile virus (WNV) infection in the mosquito Culex tarsalis.

    Dodson, Brittany L; Hughes, Grant L; Paul, Oluwatobi; Matacchiero, Amy C; Kramer, Laura D; Rasgon, Jason L

    2014-07-01

    Novel strategies are required to control mosquitoes and the pathogens they transmit. One attractive approach involves maternally inherited endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria. After artificial infection with Wolbachia, many mosquitoes become refractory to infection and transmission of diverse pathogens. We evaluated the effects of Wolbachia (wAlbB strain) on infection, dissemination and transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) in the naturally uninfected mosquito Culex tarsalis, which is an important WNV vector in North America. After inoculation into adult female mosquitoes, Wolbachia reached high titers and disseminated widely to numerous tissues including the head, thoracic flight muscles, fat body and ovarian follicles. Contrary to other systems, Wolbachia did not inhibit WNV in this mosquito. Rather, WNV infection rate was significantly higher in Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes compared to controls. Quantitative PCR of selected innate immune genes indicated that REL1 (the activator of the antiviral Toll immune pathway) was down regulated in Wolbachia-infected relative to control mosquitoes. This is the first observation of Wolbachia-induced enhancement of a human pathogen in mosquitoes, suggesting that caution should be applied before releasing Wolbachia-infected insects as part of a vector-borne disease control program. PMID:25010200

  10. Mosquito Management on National Wildlife Refuges, Ecosystem Effects Study. Phase II, Part 1 - Effects of Ultra Low Volume Applications of Pyrethrin, Malathion and Permethrin on Macro-Invertebrates in the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, California

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Mosquito control districts often use ultralow volume ULV applications of insecticides to control adult mosquitoes. Few field studies have tested the effects of...

  11. Modeling Occurrence of Urban Mosquitos Based on Land Use Types and Meteorological Factors in Korea.

    Kwon, Yong-Su; Bae, Mi-Jung; Chung, Namil; Lee, Yeo-Rang; Hwang, Suntae; Kim, Sang-Ae; Choi, Young Jean; Park, Young-Seuk

    2015-10-01

    Mosquitoes are a public health concern because they are vectors of pathogen, which cause human-related diseases. It is well known that the occurrence of mosquitoes is highly influenced by meteorological conditions (e.g., temperature and precipitation) and land use, but there are insufficient studies quantifying their impacts. Therefore, three analytical methods were applied to determine the relationships between urban mosquito occurrence, land use type, and meteorological factors: cluster analysis based on land use types; principal component analysis (PCA) based on mosquito occurrence; and three prediction models, support vector machine (SVM), classification and regression tree (CART), and random forest (RF). We used mosquito data collected at 12 sites from 2011 to 2012. Mosquito abundance was highest from August to September in both years. The monitoring sites were differentiated into three clusters based on differences in land use type such as culture and sport areas, inland water, artificial grasslands, and traffic areas. These clusters were well reflected in PCA ordinations, indicating that mosquito occurrence was highly influenced by land use types. Lastly, the RF represented the highest predictive power for mosquito occurrence and temperature-related factors were the most influential. Our study will contribute to effective control and management of mosquito occurrences. PMID:26492260

  12. Nature, Nurture and Evolution of Intra-Species Variation in Mosquito Arbovirus Transmission Competence

    Walter J. Tabachnick

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes vary in their competence or ability to transmit arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses. Many arboviruses cause disease in humans and animals. Identifying the environmental and genetic causes of variation in mosquito competence for arboviruses is one of the great challenges in public health. Progress identifying genetic (nature and environmental (nurture factors influencing mosquito competence for arboviruses is reviewed. There is great complexity in the various traits that comprise mosquito competence. The complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors controlling these traits and the factors shaping variation in Nature are largely unknown. The norms of reaction of specific genes influencing competence, their distributions in natural populations and the effects of genetic polymorphism on phenotypic variation need to be determined. Mechanisms influencing competence are not likely due to natural selection because of the direct effects of the arbovirus on mosquito fitness. More likely the traits for mosquito competence for arboviruses are the effects of adaptations for other functions of these competence mechanisms. Determining these other functions is essential to understand the evolution and distributions of competence for arboviruses. This information is needed to assess risk from mosquito-borne disease, predict new mosquito-arbovirus systems, and provide novel strategies to mitigate mosquito-borne arbovirus transmission.

  13. Uso de mosquiteros y otros materiales impregnados con insecticida para el control de la malaria en las Américas Use of insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets and other impregnated materials for malaria control in the Americas

    R. H. Zimmerman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente artículo se analiza el uso actual de mosquiteros y de otros materiales impregnados con insecticida en las Américas. Se examinan diversos estudios efectuados en Brasil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Perú, Suriname y Venezuela y se llega a la conclusión de que, en su mayor parte, estos estudios adolecen de graves deficiencias de diseño experimental, problemas de excesiva brevedad, y medición inadecuada de indicadores de salud. En el análisis se resalta la gran dificultad de llevar a cabo estudios científicos que buscan determinar el efecto de los materiales tratados con insecticida en la incidencia de malaria. En particular, la baja incidencia de malaria en las Américas, la elevada prevalencia de Plasmodium vivax y de casos recurrentes, y la relación existente entre los patrones de actividad del ser humano y los hábitos de picadura crepusculares de ciertos vectores de la malaria impiden hacer experimentos de fácil diseño y ejecución. Por ahora sería prematuro usar mosquiteros u otros materiales impregnados con insecticida como componentes principales de un programa integral para el control de la malaria. No obstante, se recomienda que se considere la posibilidad de realizar ensayos e intervenciones bien diseñados a gran escala, siempre que se basen en un conocimiento profundo de la dinámica de la transmisión de la malaria en la zona en estudio.This article reviews the current status of insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets and other impregnated materials in the Americas. Studies from Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela are examined. It is concluded that most studies have suffered from experimental design errors, short duration problems, and/or inadequate measurement of health indicators. The review brings out the great difficulty of conducting scientific studies that attempt to measure the impact of insecticide-treated materials on malaria incidence. In particular, the low incidence of malaria in the Americas, the high prevalences of Plasmodium vivax and relapsing cases, and the relationship between human activity patterns and the crepuscular biting patterns of certain malaria vectors stand in the way of easy experimental design and execution. The utilization of impregnated mosquito nets or other impregnated materials as a major component of an integrated malaria control program would be premature at this time. However, it is recommended that well-conceived large-scale trials and interventions be considered when they are based on a thorough understanding of the dynamics of malaria transmission in the area of study.

  14. Female Anopheles gambiae antennae: increased transcript accumulation of the mosquito-specific odorant-binding-protein OBP2

    Hoffman Seth A; Aravind Lakshminarayanan; Velmurugan Soundarapandian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background New interventions are required to optimally and sustainably control the Anopheles sp. mosquitoes that transmit malaria and filariasis. The mosquito olfactory system is important in host seeking (transmission) and mate finding (reproduction). Understanding olfactory function could lead to development of control strategies based on repelling parasite-carrying mosquitoes or attracting them into a fatal trap. Findings Our initial focus is on odorant binding proteins with diffe...

  15. Imaginal Discs – A New Source of Chromosomes for Genome Mapping of the Yellow Fever Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    Sharakhova, Maria V; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Yang, Fan; Demin, Sergei Iu.; Severson, David W; Sharakhov, Igor V

    2011-01-01

    Author Summary Dengue fever is an emerging health threat to as much as half of the human population around the world. No vaccines or drug treatments are currently available. Thus, disease prevention is largely based on efforts to control its major mosquito vector Ae. aegypti. Novel vector control strategies, such as population replacement with pathogen-incompetent transgenic mosquitoes, rely on detailed knowledge of the genome organization for the mosquito. However, the current genome assembl...

  16. Elizabethkingia anophelis: molecular manipulation and interactions with mosquito hosts.

    Chen, Shicheng; Bagdasarian, Michael; Walker, Edward D

    2015-03-01

    Flavobacteria (members of the family Flavobacteriaceae) dominate the bacterial community in the Anopheles mosquito midgut. One such commensal, Elizabethkingia anophelis, is closely associated with Anopheles mosquitoes through transstadial persistence (i.e., from one life stage to the next); these and other properties favor its development for paratransgenic applications in control of malaria parasite transmission. However, the physiological requirements of E. anophelis have not been investigated, nor has its capacity to perpetuate despite digestion pressure in the gut been quantified. To this end, we first developed techniques for genetic manipulation of E. anophelis, including selectable markers, reporter systems (green fluorescent protein [GFP] and NanoLuc), and transposons that function in E. anophelis. A flavobacterial expression system based on the promoter PompA was integrated into the E. anophelis chromosome and showed strong promoter activity to drive GFP and NanoLuc reporter production. Introduced, GFP-tagged E. anophelis associated with mosquitoes at successive developmental stages and propagated in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi but not in Aedes triseriatus mosquitoes. Feeding NanoLuc-tagged cells to A. gambiae and A. stephensi in the larval stage led to infection rates of 71% and 82%, respectively. In contrast, a very low infection rate (3%) was detected in Aedes triseriatus mosquitoes under the same conditions. Of the initial E. anophelis cells provided to larvae, 23%, 71%, and 85% were digested in A. stephensi, A. gambiae, and Aedes triseriatus, respectively, demonstrating that E. anophelis adapted to various mosquito midgut environments differently. Bacterial cell growth increased up to 3-fold when arginine was supplemented in the defined medium. Furthermore, the number of NanoLuc-tagged cells in A. stephensi significantly increased when arginine was added to a sugar diet, showing it to be an important amino acid for E. anophelis. Animal erythrocytes promoted E. anophelis growth in vivo and in vitro, indicating that this bacterium could obtain nutrients by participating in erythrocyte lysis in the mosquito midgut. PMID:25595771

  17. Long-Lasting Permethrin-Impregnated Clothing Protects Against Mosquito Bites in Outdoor Workers.

    Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Patel, Jaymin C; Vaughn, Meagan; Funkhauser, Sheana; Ponnusamy, Loganathan; Grippin, Crystal; Jameson, Sam B; Apperson, Charles; Mores, Christopher N; Wesson, Dawn M; Colpitts, Tonya M; Meshnick, Steven R

    2015-10-01

    Outdoor exposure to mosquitoes is a risk factor for many diseases, including malaria and dengue. We have previously shown that long-lasting permethrin-impregnated clothing protects against tick and chigger bites in a double-blind randomized controlled trial in North Carolina outdoor workers. Here, we evaluated whether this clothing is protective against mosquito bites by measuring changes in antibody titers to mosquito salivary gland extracts. On average, there was a 10-fold increase in titer during the spring and summer when mosquito exposure was likely to be the highest. During the first year of the study, the increase in titer in subjects wearing treated uniforms was 2- to 2.5-fold lower than that of control subjects. This finding suggests that long-lasting permethrin-impregnated clothing provided protection against mosquito bites. PMID:26195460

  18. Haemoproteus infections (Haemosporida, Haemoproteidae) kill bird-biting mosquitoes.

    Valki?nas, Gediminas; Kazlauskien?, Rita; Bernotien?, Rasa; Bukauskait?, Dovil?; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Iezhova, Tatjana A

    2014-03-01

    Haemoproteus parasites (Haemosporida, Haemoproteidae) are widespread; some species cause severe diseases in avian hosts. Heavy Haemoproteus infections are often lethal for biting midges (Ceratopogonidae), which transmit avian haemoproteids, but there is no information regarding detrimental effect on other blood-sucking insects. We examined effects of Haemoproteus tartakovskyi (lineage hSISKIN1), Haemoproteus lanii (lineages hRB1and hRBS2) and Haemoproteus balmorali (lineage hCOLL3) on the survival of Ochlerotatus cantans, a widespread Eurasian mosquito. Wild-caught females were infected by allowing them to feed on naturally infected birds with light (0.01%) and high (3.0-9.6%) parasitaemia. Mosquitoes fed on uninfected birds were used as controls. Both experimental and control groups were maintained under the same laboratory conditions until 20 days post-exposure (dpe). Dead insects were counted daily and used for parasitological examination and PCR-based testing. No difference was discernible in the survival rate of control mosquitoes and those fed on meal with light parasitaemia. There was a highly significant difference in the survival rate between the control group and all groups fed on meals with high parasitaemia, with the greatest mortality reported 1-3 dpe. For 4 dpe, the percentage of survived control mosquitoes (88%) was 2.2-, 3.6- and 4-fold greater than that of groups fed on meals with high parasitaemia of H. balmorali, H. tartakovskyi and H. lanii, respectively. Numerous ookinetes were observed in the gut area and adjacent tissues located in the head, thorax and abdomen of infected insects 0.5-1 dpe. The migrating parasites damage organs throughout the entire body of mosquitoes; that is the main reason of mortality. To the end of this study, 46% of mosquitoes survived in control group, but the survival rates of experimental mosquitoes fed on meals with high parasitaemia were between 2.6- and 5.8-fold lower. This study indicates that widespread Haemoproteus infections are markedly virulent for bird-biting mosquitoes, which rapidly die after feeding on heavily infected blood meals. PMID:24337545

  19. Alternativas biológicas para el control de los mosquitos Aedes aegypti y Culex pipiens : Transmisores de enfermedades en la ciudad de La Plata

    Tranchida, María Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Los mosquitos son insectos conocidos por las molestias que causan sus picaduras y porque mediante ellas transmiten importantes enfermedades a los humanos y a otros mamíferos. Esta capacidad de transmitir enfermedades, es conocida como capacidad vectorial. Debido a esta capacidad de actuar como vectores, es que nace la necesidad de controlar a los mosquitos, manteniendo las poblaciones en bajas densidades.

  20. TRANSMISSION OF FOWL-POX BY MOSQUITOES

    Kligler, I. J.; Muckenfuss, R. S.; Rivers, T. M.

    1929-01-01

    Culex and Aëdes mosquitoes are capable of transmitting fowl-pox from diseased to healthy susceptible chickens. The mosquitoes remain infectious for at least 14 days following a meal on diseased fowls. PMID:19869570

  1. Mosquito genomics. Highly evolvable malaria vectors: the genomes of 16 Anopheles mosquitoes.

    Neafsey, Daniel E; Waterhouse, Robert M; Abai, Mohammad R; Aganezov, Sergey S; Alekseyev, Max A; Allen, James E; Amon, James; Arcà, Bruno; Arensburger, Peter; Artemov, Gleb; Assour, Lauren A; Basseri, Hamidreza; Berlin, Aaron; Birren, Bruce W; Blandin, Stephanie A; Brockman, Andrew I; Burkot, Thomas R; Burt, Austin; Chan, Clara S; Chauve, Cedric; Chiu, Joanna C; Christensen, Mikkel; Costantini, Carlo; Davidson, Victoria L M; Deligianni, Elena; Dottorini, Tania; Dritsou, Vicky; Gabriel, Stacey B; Guelbeogo, Wamdaogo M; Hall, Andrew B; Han, Mira V; Hlaing, Thaung; Hughes, Daniel S T; Jenkins, Adam M; Jiang, Xiaofang; Jungreis, Irwin; Kakani, Evdoxia G; Kamali, Maryam; Kemppainen, Petri; Kennedy, Ryan C; Kirmitzoglou, Ioannis K; Koekemoer, Lizette L; Laban, Njoroge; Langridge, Nicholas; Lawniczak, Mara K N; Lirakis, Manolis; Lobo, Neil F; Lowy, Ernesto; MacCallum, Robert M; Mao, Chunhong; Maslen, Gareth; Mbogo, Charles; McCarthy, Jenny; Michel, Kristin; Mitchell, Sara N; Moore, Wendy; Murphy, Katherine A; Naumenko, Anastasia N; Nolan, Tony; Novoa, Eva M; O'Loughlin, Samantha; Oringanje, Chioma; Oshaghi, Mohammad A; Pakpour, Nazzy; Papathanos, Philippos A; Peery, Ashley N; Povelones, Michael; Prakash, Anil; Price, David P; Rajaraman, Ashok; Reimer, Lisa J; Rinker, David C; Rokas, Antonis; Russell, Tanya L; Sagnon, N'Fale; Sharakhova, Maria V; Shea, Terrance; Simão, Felipe A; Simard, Frederic; Slotman, Michel A; Somboon, Pradya; Stegniy, Vladimir; Struchiner, Claudio J; Thomas, Gregg W C; Tojo, Marta; Topalis, Pantelis; Tubio, José M C; Unger, Maria F; Vontas, John; Walton, Catherine; Wilding, Craig S; Willis, Judith H; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Yan, Guiyun; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Zhou, Xiaofan; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Christophides, George K; Collins, Frank H; Cornman, Robert S; Crisanti, Andrea; Donnelly, Martin J; Emrich, Scott J; Fontaine, Michael C; Gelbart, William; Hahn, Matthew W; Hansen, Immo A; Howell, Paul I; Kafatos, Fotis C; Kellis, Manolis; Lawson, Daniel; Louis, Christos; Luckhart, Shirley; Muskavitch, Marc A T; Ribeiro, José M; Riehle, Michael A; Sharakhov, Igor V; Tu, Zhijian; Zwiebel, Laurence J; Besansky, Nora J

    2015-01-01

    Variation in vectorial capacity for human malaria among Anopheles mosquito species is determined by many factors, including behavior, immunity, and life history. To investigate the genomic basis of vectorial capacity and explore new avenues for vector control, we sequenced the genomes of 16 anopheline mosquito species from diverse locations spanning ~100 million years of evolution. Comparative analyses show faster rates of gene gain and loss, elevated gene shuffling on the X chromosome, and more intron losses, relative to Drosophila. Some determinants of vectorial capacity, such as chemosensory genes, do not show elevated turnover but instead diversify through protein-sequence changes. This dynamism of anopheline genes and genomes may contribute to their flexible capacity to take advantage of new ecological niches, including adapting to humans as primary hosts. PMID:25554792

  2. Seales fsico qumicas involucradas en la bsqueda de hospederos y en la induccin de picadura por mosquitos Physic-chemical signals involved in host localization and induction of disease vector mosquito bites

    Jos Luis Torres-Estrada

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Las hembras de los mosquitos vectores de enfermedades utilizan seales fsicas y qumicas para localizar su fuente de alimentacin sangunea en hospederos vertebrados. Los mosquitos zooflicos responden preferentemente al CO2 y al octenol liberados en la respiracin y excreciones, mientras que los mosquitos antropoflicos responden al cido lctico y a una variedad de compuestos del sudor. Estos compuestos son modificados por microrganismos saprfitos de las glndulas sebceas de la piel. Otros factores presentes en las viviendas contribuyen a la integracin de microsistemas constituidos por olores caractersticos, que explican los diferentes niveles de atraccin de mosquitos y la focalizacin de la transmisin del paludismo a una porcin de casas en localidades de reas endmicas. La identificacin de estos atrayentes qumicos y sus molculas receptoras en mosquitos puede ser utilizada como complemento de nuevos mtodos para la vigilancia epidemiolgica, para atraer a los mosquitos a trampas de colecta o para incrementar su contacto con insecticidas usados en su control, as como en la manipulacin gentica para desviar las picaduras de los mosquitos hacia otros hospederos vertebrados.Disease vector female mosquitoes respond to physic-chemical signals to localize vertebrate hosts for blood meals. Zoophylic mosquitoes preferentially respond to CO2 and octenol released in the breath and bodily fluids, while anthropophylic mosquitoes respond to lactic acid and a variety of sweat compounds. These compounds are modified by saprophytic microorganisms in the skin sebaceous glands. Other factors present in human dwellings contribute to the integration of microsystems with characteristic odors that have different attraction for mosquitoes, explaining the focalization of malaria transmission in few households in endemic areas. The identification of the chemical attractants and their molecular receptors could be used to complement new methods to attract mosquitoes to traps during epidemiological surveys, to increase their contact with insecticides in control interventions, and for genetic manipulation to divert mosquito bites towards other animal populations.

  3. BIOACTIVIDAD DE ACEITES ESENCIALES DE Minthostachys mollis CONTRA MOSQUITOS

    Gleiser, Raquel M.; María A. Bonino; Zygadlo, Julio A.

    2007-01-01

    El control químico de vectores es una herramienta principal de prevención de enfermedades transmitidas por mosquitos. Los aceites esenciales (AE) de plantas pueden ser una alternativa a los compuestos sintéticos. Se extrajeron por arrastre con vapor AE de Minthostachys mollis y se evaluó su actividad insecticida contra larvas, pupas y adultos de mosquitos, según protocolos estándar de la Organización Mundial de la Salud. Se evaluaron concentraciones entre 10 y 160 ppm del AE y se registró la ...

  4. Inhibition of malaria parasite development in mosquitoes by anti-mosquito-midgut antibodies.

    Lal, A.A.; Schriefer, M E; Sacci, J B; Goldman, I.F.; Louis-Wileman, V; Collins, W.E.; Azad, A F

    1994-01-01

    The mosquito midgut plays a central role in the development and subsequent transmission of malaria parasites. Using a rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, and the mosquito vector Anopheles stephensi, we investigated the effect of anti-mosquito-midgut antibodies on the development of malaria parasites in the mosquito. In agreement with previous studies, we found that mosquitoes that ingested antimidgut antibodies along with infectious parasites had significantly fewer oocysts than mosq...

  5. Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culiciadae) potential vectors of arbovirus in the Urabá region, Northwest of Colombia Mosquitos (Díptera: Culicidae) vectores potenciales de arbovirus en la región de Urabá, noroccidente de Colombia

    Laura Suárez; Gabriel Parra-Henao

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Studies directed to investigate ecological parameters of sylvatic mosquitoes populations allows to establish the risk of arbovirus transmission and to bring recommendations for health authorities about prevention, surveillance and control.
    Objective. To establish the diversity and abundance of arbovirus mosquitoes vectors of in rural areas of Apartado and Turbo, Antioquia.
    Materials and methods. Quarterly sampling was done. For mosquito catching in forest f...

  6. European Surveillance for West Nile Virus in Mosquito Populations

    Nicholas Johnson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of arthropod-borne viruses threaten both human and animal health either through their presence in Europe or through risk of introduction. Prominent among these is West Nile virus (WNV, primarily an avian virus, which has caused multiple outbreaks associated with human and equine mortality. Endemic outbreaks of West Nile fever have been reported in Italy, Greece, France, Romania, Hungary, Russia and Spain, with further spread expected. Most outbreaks in Western Europe have been due to infection with WNV Lineage 1. In Eastern Europe WNV Lineage 2 has been responsible for human and bird mortality, particularly in Greece, which has experienced extensive outbreaks over three consecutive years. Italy has experienced co-circulation with both virus lineages. The ability to manage this threat in a cost-effective way is dependent on early detection. Targeted surveillance for pathogens within mosquito populations offers the ability to detect viruses prior to their emergence in livestock, equine species or human populations. In addition, it can establish a baseline of mosquito-borne virus activity and allow monitoring of change to this over time. Early detection offers the opportunity to raise disease awareness, initiate vector control and preventative vaccination, now available for horses, and encourage personal protection against mosquito bites. This would have major benefits through financial savings and reduction in equid morbidity/mortality. However, effective surveillance that predicts virus outbreaks is challenged by a range of factors including limited resources, variation in mosquito capture rates (too few or too many, difficulties in mosquito identification, often reliant on specialist entomologists, and the sensitive, rapid detection of viruses in mosquito pools. Surveillance for WNV and other arboviruses within mosquito populations varies between European countries in the extent and focus of the surveillance. This study reviews the current status of WNV in mosquito populations across Europe and how this is informing our understanding of virus epidemiology. Key findings such as detection of virus, presence of vector species and invasive mosquito species are summarized, and some of the difficulties encountered when applying a cost-effective surveillance programme are highlighted.

  7. Analysing the generality of spatially predictive mosquito habitat models

    LI, Li; Bian, Ling; Yakob, Laith; Zhou, Guofa; YAN, GUIYUN

    2011-01-01

    The increasing spread of multi-drug resistant malaria in African highlands has highlighted the importance of malaria suppression through vector control. Its historical success has meant that larval control has been proposed as part of an integrated malaria vector control program. Due to high operation costs, larval control activities would benefit greatly if the locations of mosquito habitats could be identified quickly and easily, allowing for focal habitat source suppression. Several mosqui...

  8. Dissecting gene expression in mosquito

    Parsch John

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gene expression is known to vary extensively among tissues and between sexes. However, detailed descriptions of tissue- and sex-specific gene expression are available for only a few model organisms. A new study published in BMC Genomics presents such a data set for the mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, which is the vector of human malaria. In addition to providing a valuable resource for the community of mosquito researchers, the study allows comparative transcriptomic studies of dipteran insects to be extended over 250 million years of evolution, since the divergence of A. gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster.

  9. The Mosquito Online Advanced Analytic Service: a case study for school research projects in Thailand.

    Wongkoon, Siriwan; Jaroensutasinee, Mullica; Jaroensutasinee, Krisanadej

    2013-07-01

    The Mosquito Online Advanced Analytic Service (MOAAS) provides an essential tool for querying, analyzing, and visualizing patterns of mosquito larval distribution in Thailand. The MOAAS was developed using Structured Query Language (SQL) technology as a web-based tool for data entry and data access, webMathematica technology for data analysis and data visualization, and Google Earth and Google Maps for Geographic Information System (GIS) visualization. Fifteen selected schools in Thailand provided test data for MOAAS. Users performed data entry using the web-service, data analysis, and data visualization tools with webMathematica, data visualization with bar charts, mosquito larval indices, and three-dimensional (3D) bar charts overlaying on the Google Earth and Google Maps. The 3D bar charts of the number of mosquito larvae were displayed along with spatial information. The mosquito larvae information may be useful for dengue control efforts and health service communities for planning and operational activities. PMID:24050090

  10. Distribution of mosquito larvae in various breeding sites in National Zoo Malaysia.

    Muhammad-Aidil, R; Imelda, A; Jeffery, J; Ngui, R; Wan Yusoff, W S; Aziz, S; Lim, Y A L; Rohela, M

    2015-03-01

    Mosquitoes are principal vectors of major vector-borne diseases. They are widely found throughout urban and rural areas in Malaysia. They are responsible for various vector-borne diseases such as dengue, malaria, filariasis and encephalitis. A total of 158 mosquito larvae specimens were collected from the National Zoo, Malaysia, from 11 types of breeding habitats during the study period from end of May 2007 to July 2007. Aedes albopictus was the predominant species (35.4%), followed by Tripteroides aranoides (26.6%), Lutzia halifaxii (11.4%), Aedes alboscutellatus (10.1%), Aedes caecus (8.9%), Armigeres spp. (4.4%), Malaya genurostris (2.5%) and Culex vishnui (0.6%). It is important to have a mosquito free environment in a public place like the zoo. Routine larval surveillance should be implemented for an effective mosquito control program in order to reduce mosquito population. PMID:25801269

  11. Climate-based models for West Nile Culex mosquito vectors in the Northeastern US

    Gong, Hongfei; Degaetano, Arthur T.; Harrington, Laura C.

    2011-05-01

    Climate-based models simulating Culex mosquito population abundance in the Northeastern US were developed. Two West Nile vector species, Culex pipiens and Culex restuans, were included in model simulations. The model was optimized by a parameter-space search within biological bounds. Mosquito population dynamics were driven by major environmental factors including temperature, rainfall, evaporation rate and photoperiod. The results show a strong correlation between the timing of early population increases (as early warning of West Nile virus risk) and decreases in late summer. Simulated abundance was highly correlated with actual mosquito capture in New Jersey light traps and validated with field data. This climate-based model simulates the population dynamics of both the adult and immature mosquito life stage of Culex arbovirus vectors in the Northeastern US. It is expected to have direct and practical application for mosquito control and West Nile prevention programs.

  12. Using bacteria to express and display anti-Plasmodium molecules in the mosquito midgut.

    Riehle, Michael A; Moreira, Cristina K; Lampe, David; Lauzon, Carol; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2007-05-01

    Bacteria capable of colonizing mosquito midguts are attractive vehicles for delivering anti-malaria molecules. We genetically engineered Escherichia coli to display two anti-Plasmodium effector molecules, SM1 and phospholipase-A(2), on their outer membrane. Both molecules significantly inhibited Plasmodium berghei development when engineered bacteria were fed to mosquitoes 24h prior to an infective bloodmeal (SM1=41%, PLA2=23%). Furthermore, prevalence and numbers of engineered bacteria increased dramatically following a bloodmeal. However, E. coli survived poorly in mosquitoes. Therefore, Enterobacter agglomerans was isolated from mosquitoes and selected for midgut survival by multiple passages through mosquitoes. After four passages, E. agglomerans survivorship increased from 2 days to 2 weeks. Since E. agglomerans is non-pathogenic and widespread, it is an excellent candidate for paratransgenic control strategies. PMID:17224154

  13. PERCEPTIONS REGARDING MOSQUITO BORNE DISEASES IN AN URBAN AREA OF RAJKOT CITY

    Amul B. Patel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mosquito borne diseases is a growing urban problem because of unplanned urbanization, industrialization and excessive population growth coupled with rural to urban migration. For developing a suitable and effective health education strategy, it is inevitable to understand the level of knowledge of the community, their attitude and practices regarding mosquito borne diseases. Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out in an urban field practice area of Urban Health Centre in Rajkot city. Total 500 houses were selected for study by systematic random sampling. Data was collected using a semi-structured questionnaire during transmission season of vector borne diseases. The results were analyzed using the SPSS 17 software. Results: 90% respondents agreed that mosquitoes are a problem. 30.4% didn’t know breeding sites of mosquitoes. Only 11.6% of people associated clean water collections with mosquito breeding. Regarding diseases transmitted by mosquito, 62% answered malaria, 37.4% were not aware and 8.8% people mentioned about Filariasis, Dengue or Japanese encephalitis. 4.7% granted mosquito control as responsibility of community. 61.4 % were using repellents for prevention against mosquito bites and 39% not taking any preventive measure. 67.8% consulted private practitioner for treatment. Conclusion: Intensified efforts towards creating public awareness and mobilizing the community regarding the preventive measures they can take are needed. [National J of Med Res 2011; 1(2.000: 45-47

  14. Application of biogenic carbon dioxide produced by yeast with different carbon sources for attraction of mosquitoes towards adult mosquito traps.

    Sukumaran, D; Ponmariappan, S; Sharma, Atul K; Jha, Hemendra K; Wasu, Yogesh H; Sharma, Ajay K

    2016-04-01

    Surveillance is a prime requisite for controlling arthropod vectors like mosquitoes that transmit diseases such as malaria, dengue and chikungunya. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the main cues from vertebrate breath that attracts mosquitoes towards the host. Hence, CO2 is used as an attractant during surveillance of mosquitoes either from commercial cylinders or dry ice for mosquito traps. In the present study, the biogenic carbon dioxide production was optimized with different carbon sources such as glucose, simple sugar and jaggery with and without yeast peptone dextrose (YPD) media using commercial baker's yeast. The results showed that yeast produced more biogenic CO2 with simple sugar as compared to other carbon sources. Further substrate concentration was optimized for the continuous production of biogenic CO2 for a minimum of 12 h by using 10 g of baker's yeast with 50 g of simple sugar added to 1.5 l distilled water (without YPD media) in a 2-l plastic bottle. This setup was applied in field condition along with two different mosquito traps namely Mosquito Killing System (MKS) and Biogents Sentinel (BGS) trap. Biogenic CO2 from this setup has increased the trapping efficiency of MKS by 6.48-fold for Culex quinquefasciatus, 2.62-fold for Aedes albopictus and 1.5-fold for Anopheles stephensi. In the case of BGS, the efficiency was found to be increased by 3.54-fold for Ae. albopictus, 4.33-fold for An. stephensi and 1.3-fold for Armigeres subalbatus mosquitoes. On the whole, plastic bottle setup releasing biogenic CO2 from sugar and yeast has increased the efficiency of MKS traps by 6.38-fold and 2.74-fold for BGS traps as compared to traps without biogenic CO2. The present study reveals that, among different carbon sources used, simple sugar as a substance (which is economical and readily available across the world) yielded maximum biogenic CO2 with yeast. This setup can be used as an alternative to CO2 cylinder and dry ice in any adult mosquito traps to enhance their trapping efficiency of a mosquito surveillance programme. PMID:26677098

  15. Synergy in Efficacy of Fungal Entomopathogens and Permethrin against West African Insecticide-Resistant Anopheles gambiae Mosquitoes

    Farenhorst, M.; Knols, BG; Thomas, MB; Howard, AF; Takken, W.; Rowland, M; N' Guessan, R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing incidences of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors are threatening the sustainable use of contemporary chemical vector control measures. Fungal entomopathogens provide a possible additional tool for the control of insecticide-resistant malaria mosquitoes. This study investigated the compatibility of the pyrethroid insecticide permethrin and two mosquito-pathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae, against a laboratory colony and field population...

  16. Use of insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets and other impregnated materials for malaria control in the Americas Uso de mosquiteros y otros materiales impregnados para el control de la malaria en las Américas

    R. H. Zimmerman; Voorham, J.

    1997-01-01

    This article reviews the current status of the use of insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets and other impregnated materials in the Americas. Studies from Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela are examined. It is concluded that most studies have suffered from experimental design errors, short duration problems, and/or inadequate measurement of health indicators. The review brings out the great difficulty of conducting scientific studies that attempt to measure the...

  17. Contrasting patterns of tolerance between chemical and biological insecticides in mosquitoes exposed to UV-A.

    Tetreau, Guillaume; Chandor-Proust, Alexia; Faucon, Frédéric; Stalinski, Renaud; Akhouayri, Idir; Prud'homme, Sophie M; Raveton, Muriel; Reynaud, Stéphane

    2013-09-15

    Mosquitoes are vectors of major human diseases, such as malaria, dengue or yellow fever. Because no efficient treatments or vaccines are available for most of these diseases, control measures rely mainly on reducing mosquito populations by the use of insecticides. Numerous biotic and abiotic factors are known to modulate the efficacy of insecticides used in mosquito control. Mosquito breeding sites vary from opened to high vegetation covered areas leading to a large ultraviolet gradient exposure. This ecological feature may affect the general physiology of the insect, including the resistance status against insecticides. In the context of their contrasted breeding sites, we assessed the impact of low-energetic ultraviolet exposure on mosquito sensitivity to biological and chemical insecticides. We show that several mosquito detoxification enzyme activities (cytochrome P450, glutathione S-transferases, esterases) were increased upon low-energy UV-A exposure. Additionally, five specific genes encoding detoxification enzymes (CYP6BB2, CYP6Z7, CYP6Z8, GSTD4, and GSTE2) previously shown to be involved in resistance to chemical insecticides were found over-transcribed in UV-A exposed mosquitoes, revealed by RT-qPCR experiments. More importantly, toxicological bioassays revealed that UV-exposed mosquitoes were more tolerant to four main chemical insecticide classes (DDT, imidacloprid, permethrin, temephos), whereas the bioinsecticide Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) appeared more toxic. The present article provides the first experimental evidence of the capacity of low-energy UV-A to increase mosquito tolerance to major chemical insecticides. This is also the first time that a metabolic resistance to chemical insecticides is linked to a higher susceptibility to a bioinsecticide. These results support the use of Bti as an efficient alternative to chemical insecticides when a metabolic resistance to chemicals has been developed by mosquitoes. PMID:23911355

  18. Sustained reduction in prevalence of lymphatic filariasis infection in spite of missed rounds of mass drug administration in an area under mosquito nets for malaria control

    Shimada Masaaki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF was established by the World Health Organisation (WHO in 2000 with the goal of eliminating lymphatic filariasis (LF as a public health problem globally by 2020. Mass drug administration (MDA of antifilarial drugs is the principal strategy recommended for global elimination. Kenya launched a National Programme for Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (NPELF in Coast Region in 2002. During the same year a longitudinal research project to monitor trends of LF infection during MDA started in a highly endemic area in Malindi District. High coverage of insecticide treated nets (ITNs in the coastal region has been associated with dramatic decline in hospital admissions due to malaria; high usage of ITNs is also expected to have an impact on LF infection, also transmitted by mosquitoes. Results Four rounds of MDA with diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC and albendazole were given to 8 study villages over an 8-year period. Although annual MDA was not administered for several years the overall prevalence of microfilariae declined significantly from 20.9% in 2002 to 0.9% in 2009. Similarly, the prevalence of filarial antigenaemia declined from 34.6% in 2002 to 10.8% in 2009. All the examined children born since the start of the programme were negative for filarial antigen in 2009. Conclusions Despite the fact that the study villages missed MDA in some of the years, significant reductions in infection prevalence and intensity were observed at each survey. More importantly, there were no rebounds in infection prevalence between treatment rounds. However, because of confounding variables such as insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs, it is difficult to attribute the reduction to MDA alone as ITNs can lead to a significant reduction in exposure to filariasis vectors. The results indicate that national LF elimination programmes should be encouraged to continue provision of MDA albeit constraints that may lead to missing of MDA in some years.

  19. Changes in the distribution of the grey mangrove Avicennia marina (Forsk.) using large scale aerial color infrared photographs: are the changes related to habitat modification for mosquito control?

    Jones, J.; Dale, P. E. R.; Chandica, A. L.; Breitfuss, M. J.

    2004-09-01

    Runnelling, a method of habitat modification used for mosquito management in intertidal saltmarshes in Australia, alters marsh hydrology. The objective of this research was to assess if runnelling had affected the distribution of the grey mangrove ( Avicennia marina (Forsk.)) at a study site in southeast Queensland. Since runnelling is carried out in diverse marshes a second aim was to assess differences in mangrove colonisation in the two main saltmarsh species in the area. These are marine couch [ Sporobolus virginicus (L.) Kunth.] and samphire [ Sarcocornia quinqueflora (Bunge ex Ung.-Stern.)]. Runnels at the study site were in an area dominated by Sporobolus. The mangrove area was measured by classifying digital color infrared (CIR) data obtained from aerial photographs acquired in 1982, which was 3 years before runnelling, and in 1987, 1991 and 1999, 2-14 years after. Changes in the spatial extent of A. marina were identified using difference images produced from post-classification change detection. The results showed that runnels did not significantly influence the distribution of A. marina at the study site. At a more detailed level differences in A. marina establishment in the Sporobolus and Sarcocornia areas were determined from counts of trees on the aerial photographs. There was a greater proportion of mangroves in Sarcocornia than Sporobolus and this increased over time. This may be related to differences in density between the plant species, to grapsid crab activity or to other edaphic conditions. There may be implications for runnelling in Sarcocornia marshes. The large increase observed in A. marina in the area generally is likely to be related to factors such as catchment modification or tidal/sea-level changes. It is concluded that runnelling has not led to mangrove establishment in the Sporobolus dominated saltmarsh.

  20. Rural buyers' perception about mosquito repellants

    D. MEHTA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito repellants prevent mosquito bites and prevention of "man-mosquito contact" is a critical factor in transmission and spread of any disease through mosquitoes particularly in rural area. There has been a long standing 'bias' towards rural buyers. The rural markets are considered rigid in the nature but it is not the case in real sense. Marketing to rural buyers is not only a challenge to the marketers but to the manufacturers, communicators, national planners and economists as well. That is why it has been necessary to understand the various aspects of selected rural areas and consumption pattern for such a fast growing market i.e. mosquito repellants and rural buyers’ perception towards such urban products. The present paper aims to find out the factors influencing the purchase decisions of rural buyers for mosquito repellants and to study the perceptions of present and potential rural buyers' of selected mosquito repellant brands.

  1. Effect of anti-fat body antibodies on reproductive capacity of mosquito Anopheles stephensi and transmission blocking of Plasmodium vivax.

    Gulia-Nuss, Monika; Mundhalia, Aditya; Gakhar, Surendra K

    2011-07-01

    Effect of anti-mosquito-fat body antibodies on the development of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium vivax has been studied by feeding Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes with infected blood supplemented with serum from immunized rabbits. Immunogenic polypeptides were identified by western blot. Mosquitoes that ingested anti-fat body antibodies along with infectious blood meal had significantly fewer oocysts than the mosquitoes in the control group. Effect of anti-mosquito fat body antibodies on fecundity, hatchability, mortality and engorgement of mosquitoes has also been reported. A significant reduction in fecundity and hatchability was observed, however, effect on mortality and engorgement was variable and statistically insignificant. Results indicated that fat body antibodies have the potential to disrupt reproductive physiology of malaria vector An. stephensi. PMID:21800498

  2. Evaluation of commercial products for personal protection against mosquitoes.

    Revay, Edita E; Junnila, Amy; Xue, Rui-De; Kline, Daniel L; Bernier, Ulrich R; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D; Qualls, Whitney A; Ghattas, Nina; Müller, Günter C

    2013-02-01

    Human landing catch studies were conducted in a semi-field setting to determine the efficacy of seven commercial products used for personal protection against mosquitoes. Experiments were conducted in two empty, insecticide free, mesh-enclosed greenhouses, in Israel, with either 1500 Aedes albopictus or 1500 Culex pipiens released on consecutive study nights. The products tested in this study were the OFF!(®) Clip-On™ Mosquito Repellent (Metofluthrin 31.2%) and the Terminix(®) ALLCLEAR(®) Sidekick Mosquito Repeller (Cinnamon oil 10.5%; Eugenol 13%; Geranium oil 21%; Peppermint 5.3%; Lemongrass oil 2.6%), which are personal diffusers; Super Band™ Wristband (22% Citronella oil) and the PIC(®) Citronella Plus Wristband (Geraniol 15%; Lemongrass oil 5%, Citronella oil 1%); the Sonic Insect Repeller Keychain; the Mosquito Guard Patch (Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus 80mg), an adhesive-backed sticker for use on textiles; and the Mosquito Patch (vitamin B1 300mg), a transdermal patch. It was determined that the sticker, transdermal patch, wristbands and sonic device did not provide significant protection to volunteers compared with the mosquito attack rate on control volunteers who were not wearing a repellent device. The personal diffusers: - OFF!(®) Clip-On™ and Terminix(®) ALLCLEAR(®) Sidekick - provided superior protection compared with all other devices in this study. These diffusers reduced biting on the arms of volunteers by 96.28% and 95.26% respectively, for Ae. albopictus, and by 94.94% and 92.15% respectively, for Cx. pipiens. In a second trial conducted to compare these devices directly, biting was reduced by the OFF!(®) Clip-On™ and the Terminix(®) ALLCLEAR(®) by 87.55% and 92.83%, respectively, for Ae. albopictus, and by 97.22% and 94.14%, respectively, for Cx. pipiens. There was no significant difference between the performances of the two diffusers for each species. PMID:23092689

  3. Plasmodium knowlesi in humans, macaques and mosquitoes in peninsular Malaysia

    NorParina Ismail

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since a large focus of human infection with Plasmodium knowlesi, a simian malaria parasite naturally found in long-tailed and pig tailed macaques, was reported in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, it was pertinent to study the situation in peninsular Malaysia. A study was thus initiated to screen human cases of Plasmodium malariae using molecular techniques, to determine the presence of P. knowlesi in non- human primates and to elucidate its vectors. Methods Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to identify all Plasmodium species present in the human blood samples sent to the Parasitology laboratory of Institute for Medical Research. At the same time, non-human primates were also screened for malaria parasites and nested PCR was carried out to determine the presence of P. knowlesi. Mosquitoes were collected from Pahang by human landing collection and monkey-baited-traps situated on three different levels. All mosquitoes were identified and salivary glands and midguts of anopheline mosquitoes were dissected to determine the presence of malaria parasites and nested PCR was carried out on positive glands. Sequencing of the csp genes were carried on P. knowlesi samples from humans, monkeys and mosquitoes, positive by PCR. Results and Discussion Plasmodium knowlesi was detected in 77 (69.37% of the 111 human samples, 10 (6.90% of the 145 monkey blood and in 2 (1.7% Anopheles cracens. Sequence of the csp gene clustered with other P. knowlesi isolates. Conclusion Human infection with Plasmodium knowlesi is occurring in most states of peninsular Malaysia. An. cracens is the main vector. Economic exploitation of the forest is perhaps bringing monkeys, mosquitoes and humans into increased contact. A single bite from a mosquito infected with P. knowlesi is sufficient to introduce the parasite to humans. Thus, this zoonotic transmission has to be considered in the future planning of malaria control.

  4. In Zika Fight, FDA Gives Tentative OK to Tests of Gene-Modified Mosquito

    ... mosquito-borne illnesses, such as the Zika and dengue viruses. Tests similar to the one proposed in ... of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said: "We are learning more about Zika every ...

  5. Preventing the Spread of Malaria and Dengue Fever Using Genetically Modified Mosquitoes

    James, Anthony A

    2007-01-01

    In this candid interview, Anthony A. James explains how mosquito genetics can be exploited to control malaria and dengue transmission. Population replacement strategy, the idea that transgenic mosquitoes can be released into the wild to control disease transmission, is introduced, as well as the concept of genetic drive and the design criterion for an effective genetic drive system. The ethical considerations of releasing genetically-modified organisms into the wild are also discussed.

  6. Promoting health education and public awareness about dengue and its mosquito vector in Saudi Arabia

    Aziz, Al Thabiani; Salman A. Al-Shami; Mahyoub, Jazem A; Hatabbi, Mesed; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Md Rawi, Che Salmah

    2014-01-01

    Currently, dengue fever is considered as the main health problem in several parts (Mekkah, Jeddah, Jazan and Najran) of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) with dramatically increase in the number of cases reported every year. This is associated with obvious ineffectiveness in the recent control and management programs for the mosquito vector (Aedes aegypti). Here, we suggested promoting the health education and public awareness among Saudi people to improve the control of dengue mosquito vector. S...

  7. Integrating the public in mosquito management: active education by community peers can lead to significant reduction in peridomestic container mosquito habitats.

    Healy, Kristen; Hamilton, George; Crepeau, Taryn; Healy, Sean; Unlu, Isik; Farajollahi, Ary; Fonseca, Dina M

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito species that utilize peridomestic containers for immature development are commonly aggressive human biters, and because they often reach high abundance, create significant nuisance. One of these species, the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus, is an important vector of emerging infectious diseases, such as dengue, chikungunya, and Zika fevers. Integrated mosquito management (IMM) of Ae. albopictus is particularly difficult because it requires access to private yards in urban and suburban residences. It has become apparent that in the event of a public health concern due to this species, homeowners will have to be active participants in the control process by reducing mosquito habitats in their properties, an activity known as source reduction. However, limited attempts at quantifying the effect of source reduction by homeowners have had mixed results. Of note, many mosquito control programs in the US have some form of education outreach, however the primary approach is often passive focusing on the distribution of education materials as flyers. In 2010, we evaluated the use of active community peer education in a source reduction program, using AmeriCorps volunteers. The volunteers were mobilized over a 4-week period, in two areas with approximately 1,000 residences each in urban Mercer and suburban Monmouth counties in New Jersey, USA. The volunteers were first provided training on peridomestic mosquitoes and on basic approaches to reducing the number of container habitats for mosquito larvae in backyards. Within the two treatment areas the volunteers successfully engaged 758 separate homes. Repeated measures analysis of variance showed a significant reduction in container habitats in the sites where the volunteers actively engaged the community compared to untreated control areas in both counties. Our results suggest that active education using community peer educators can be an effective means of source reduction, and a critical tool in the arsenal against peridomestic mosquitoes. PMID:25255027

  8. Integrating the Public in Mosquito Management: Active Education by Community Peers Can Lead to Significant Reduction in Peridomestic Container Mosquito Habitats

    Healy, Kristen; Hamilton, George; Crepeau, Taryn; Healy, Sean; Unlu, Isik; Farajollahi, Ary; Fonseca, Dina M.

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito species that utilize peridomestic containers for immature development are commonly aggressive human biters, and because they often reach high abundance, create significant nuisance. One of these species, the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus, is an important vector of emerging infectious diseases, such as dengue, chikungunya, and Zika fevers. Integrated mosquito management (IMM) of Ae. albopictus is particularly difficult because it requires access to private yards in urban and suburban residences. It has become apparent that in the event of a public health concern due to this species, homeowners will have to be active participants in the control process by reducing mosquito habitats in their properties, an activity known as source reduction. However, limited attempts at quantifying the effect of source reduction by homeowners have had mixed results. Of note, many mosquito control programs in the US have some form of education outreach, however the primary approach is often passive focusing on the distribution of education materials as flyers. In 2010, we evaluated the use of active community peer education in a source reduction program, using AmeriCorps volunteers. The volunteers were mobilized over a 4-week period, in two areas with approximately 1,000 residences each in urban Mercer and suburban Monmouth counties in New Jersey, USA. The volunteers were first provided training on peridomestic mosquitoes and on basic approaches to reducing the number of container habitats for mosquito larvae in backyards. Within the two treatment areas the volunteers successfully engaged 758 separate homes. Repeated measures analysis of variance showed a significant reduction in container habitats in the sites where the volunteers actively engaged the community compared to untreated control areas in both counties. Our results suggest that active education using community peer educators can be an effective means of source reduction, and a critical tool in the arsenal against peridomestic mosquitoes. PMID:25255027

  9. Wash resistance and repellent properties of Africa University mosquito blankets against mosquitoes

    N. Lukwa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of permethrin-treated Africa University (AU mosquito blankets on susceptible female Anopheles gambiae sensu lato mosquitoes was studied under laboratory conditions at Africa University Campus in Mutare, Zimbabwe. Wash resistance (ability to retain an effective dose that kills ≥80% of mosquitoes after a number of washes and repellence (ability to prevent ≥80% of mosquito bites properties were studied. The AU blankets were wash resistant when 100% mortality was recorded up to 20 washes, declining to 90% after 25 washes. Untreated AU blankets did not cause any mortality on mosquitoes. However, mosquito repellence was 96%, 94%, 97.9%, 87%, 85% and 80.7% for treated AU blankets washed 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 times, respectively. Mosquito repellence was consistently above 80% from 0-25 washes. In conclusion, AU blankets washed 25 times were effective in repelling and killing An. gambiae sl mosquitoes under laboratory conditions.

  10. On speed and aerodynamic forces of mosquito.

    Ahmad, A; Rao, V R; Krishna, P R

    2000-08-01

    In the present investigation, speed of mosquitoes A. aegyptii (Linn) and Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) is measured by designing and constructing a low speed wind tunnel in the laboratory. The velocity of mosquitoes is less than the other myogenic and neurogenic insects. Lift, one of the important aerodynamic forces that a flier has to develop for its efficient flight, is studied in mosquitoes by developing a simple technique using digital single pan balance. Lift, drag and their coefficients of hovering mosquito are calculated from the knowledge of body parameters by considering the wings of mosquito as harmonic oscillator. The calculated value of lift is verified with the experimental. The study throws light on morphophysiological adaptation of mosquitoes for the generation of aerodynamic forces in hovering, tethered and forward flights. PMID:12557907

  11. Improvised microinjection technique for mosquito vectors

    Sampath, Kumar S.; Puttaraju, H. P.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Bio-manipulation technique is of primary importance during the development of transgenic mosquitoes. The study describes the variable factors that influence the viability of medically important mosquito vectors during microinjection. Methods: Three mosquito vectors belonging to the genus Aedes, Anopheles and Culex were microinjected at different developmental stages of their life cycle viz., egg, larvae, pupae and adult. Results: The improvisations revealed an increased survivability of biomanipulated mosquitoes during the embryonic and adult microinjection. The study of injecting larvae and pupae resulted in poor survivability. Interpretation & conclusions: The microinjection protocol was successfully tested on three important mosquito vectors. The critical period after biomanipulation which contributes heavily for the survivability factor was evaluated. The results provide a common protocol for biomanipulation of three mosquito vectors with enhanced survivability. PMID:23391792

  12. Members of the salivary gland surface protein (SGS) family are major immunogenic components of mosquito saliva.

    King, Jonas G; Vernick, Kenneth D; Hillyer, Julin F

    2011-11-25

    Mosquitoes transmit Plasmodium and certain arboviruses during blood feeding, when they are injected along with saliva. Mosquito saliva interferes with the host's hemostasis and inflammation response and influences the transmission success of some pathogens. One family of mosquito salivary gland proteins, named SGS, is composed of large bacterial-type proteins that in Aedes aegypti were implicated as receptors for Plasmodium on the basal salivary gland surface. Here, we characterize the biology of two SGSs in the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, and demonstrate their involvement in blood feeding. Western blots and RT-PCR showed that Sgs4 and Sgs5 are produced exclusively in female salivary glands, that expression increases with age and after blood feeding, and that protein levels fluctuate in a circadian manner. Immunohistochemistry showed that SGSs are present in the acinar cells of the distal lateral lobes and in the salivary ducts of the proximal lobes. SDS-PAGE, Western blots, bite blots, and immunization via mosquito bites showed that SGSs are highly immunogenic and form major components of mosquito saliva. Last, Western and bioinformatic analyses suggest that SGSs are secreted via a non-classical pathway that involves cleavage into a 300-kDa soluble fragment and a smaller membrane-bound fragment. Combined, these data strongly suggest that SGSs play an important role in blood feeding. Together with their role in malaria transmission, we propose that SGSs could be used as markers of human exposure to mosquito bites and in the development of disease control strategies. PMID:21965675

  13. Alteration in Bacillus thuringiensis toxicity by curing gut flora: novel approach for mosquito resistance management.

    Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Borase, Hemant P; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Patil, Satish V

    2013-09-01

    Mosquitoes are known for acquiring resistance against insecticides in many ways, namely target side mutation, enzyme modification, sequestration, quick elimination, etc. But, the role of microflora present in abundance in the larval midgut is less explored with respect to their role in insecticide resistance. During the course of their development, mosquitoes are continuously exposed to microbes and have naturally acquired midgut microbial flora. This midgut flora can modulate the mosquito's susceptibility to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) infection by degrading toxic Bt protein forms through an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that microbe-free aseptic mosquito larvae displayed an increased susceptibility to Bt toxicity compared to larvae harboring natural microbial flora. Fourth instar larvae of Anopheles stephensi were treated separately with penicillin, streptomycin, erythromycin (100 μg/ml), and mixtures of all three antibiotics and then analyzed for Bt toxicity. We have also examined the influence of the mosquito's midgut microbial flora under microaerophilic condition on the Bt protein degradation through plate, broth, TLC, and UV-vis spectrophotometric assay. A better understanding of the roles of microbiota in preventing Bt toxicity to mosquitoes could potentially lead to the development of new sustainable mosquito control strategies. PMID:23820604

  14. Understanding the DNA damage response in order to achieve desired gene editing outcomes in mosquitoes.

    Overcash, Justin M; Aryan, Azadeh; Myles, Kevin M; Adelman, Zach N

    2015-02-01

    Mosquitoes are high-impact disease vectors with the capacity to transmit pathogenic agents that cause diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, chikungunya, and dengue. Continued growth in knowledge of genetic, molecular, and physiological pathways in mosquitoes allows for the development of novel control methods and for the continued optimization of existing ones. The emergence of site-specific nucleases as genomic engineering tools promises to expedite research of crucial biological pathways in these disease vectors. The utilization of these nucleases in a more precise and efficient manner is dependent upon knowledge and manipulation of the DNA repair pathways utilized by the mosquito. While progress has been made in deciphering DNA repair pathways in some model systems, research into the nature of the hierarchy of mosquito DNA repair pathways, as well as in mechanistic differences that may exist, is needed. In this review, we will describe progress in the use of site-specific nucleases in mosquitoes, along with the hierarchy of DNA repair in the context of mosquito chromosomal organization and structure, and how this knowledge may be manipulated to achieve precise chromosomal engineering in mosquitoes. PMID:25596822

  15. Silencing an Anopheles gambiae catalase and sulfhydryl oxidase increases mosquito mortality after a blood meal.

    Magalhaes, T; Brackney, D E; Beier, J C; Foy, B D

    2008-07-01

    Catalase is a potent antioxidant, likely involved in post-blood meal homeostasis in mosquitoes. This enzyme breaks down H2O2, preventing the formation of the hydroxyl radical (HO*). Quiescins are newly classified sulfhydryl oxidases that bear a thioredoxin motif at the N-terminal and an ERV1-like portion at the C-terminal. These proteins have a major role in generating disulfides in intra- or extracellular environments, and thus participate in redox reactions. In the search for molecules to serve as targets for novel anti-mosquito strategies, we have silenced a catalase and a putative quiescin/sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX), from the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, through RNA interference (RNAi) experiments. We observed that the survival of catalase- and QSOX-silenced insects was reduced over controls following blood digestion, most likely due to the compromised ability of mosquitoes to scavenge and/or prevent damage caused by blood meal-derived oxidative stress. The higher mortality effect was more accentuated in catalase-silenced mosquitoes, where catalase activity was reduced to low levels. Lipid peroxidation was higher in QSOX-silenced mosquitoes suggesting the involvement of this protein in redox homeostasis following a blood meal. This study points to the potential of molecules involved in antioxidant response and redox metabolism to serve as targets of novel anti-mosquito strategies and offers a screening methodology for finding targetable mosquito molecules. PMID:18454489

  16. Free flight of the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    Iams, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    High speed video observations of free flying male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the dengue and yellow fever vector, along with custom measurement methods, enable measurement of wingbeat frequency, body position and body orientation of mosquitoes during flight. We find these mosquitoes flap their wings at approximately 850 Hz. We also generate body yaw, body pitch and wing deviation measurements with standard deviations of less than 1 degree and find that sideways velocity and acceleration are imp...

  17. Source Reduction Behavior as an Independent Measurement of the Impact of a Public Health Education Campaign in an Integrated Vector Management Program for the Asian Tiger Mosquito

    Daniel Strickman; Clark, Gary G; Randy Gaugler; Dina Fonseca; Isik Unlu; Ary Farajollahi; George Hamilton; Sean Healy; Taryn Crepeau; Kristen Bartlett-Healy

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a public health educational campaign to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats. Three communities each, within two New Jersey counties, were randomly selected to receive: (1) both education and mosquito control, (2) education only, and (3) no education or mosquito control. Four separate educational events included a 5-day elementary school curriculum in the spring, and three door to door distributions of educational brochures. Befo...

  18. Antibiotics in ingested human blood affect the mosquito microbiota and capacity to transmit malaria.

    Gendrin, Mathilde; Rodgers, Faye H; Yerbanga, Rakiswendé S; Ouédraogo, Jean Bosco; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Cohuet, Anna; Christophides, George K

    2015-01-01

    Malaria reduction is most efficiently achieved by vector control whereby human populations at high risk of contracting and transmitting the disease are protected from mosquito bites. Here, we identify the presence of antibiotics in the blood of malaria-infected people as a new risk of increasing disease transmission. We show that antibiotics in ingested blood enhance the susceptibility of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to malaria infection by disturbing their gut microbiota. This effect is confirmed in a semi-natural setting by feeding mosquitoes with blood of children naturally infected with Plasmodium falciparum. Antibiotic exposure additionally increases mosquito survival and fecundity, which are known to augment vectorial capacity. These findings suggest that malaria transmission may be exacerbated in areas of high antibiotic usage, and that regions targeted by mass drug administration programs against communicable diseases may necessitate increased vector control. PMID:25562286

  19. Effectiveness of Mosquito Trap with Sugar Fermented Attractant to the Vector of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    Endang Puji Astuti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is the main vector of dengue fever that is still become health problem in the world. Various control efforts has been done at several areas through chemically or naturally control. Developing mosquitoes trapping tool is an alternative method to control mosquitoes besides insecticides utilization. This laboratorium research utilize sugar fermented process to yield CO2 as one of attractan to mosquito. Production of ethanol and CO2 can be yielded from anaerob sugar fermentation proccess (without O2 by khamir Saccharomyces cerevisiae activities. The trapped mosquitoes was observed up to 48 hours exposure, the highest average of mosquito trapped is on solution treatment with yeast 1 gram (43.2% and 40 gr sugar (48.4%. The highest effectivity of trapping tool both inside or outside was on the 14th day. There were declained amount of trapped mosquitos on 16th and 18th days. This laboratorium research has described that trapping tool with sugar fermented solution were effective to control population of dengue vector.

  20. Environmental fate of mosquito adulticides and effects on non-target invertebrates in wetlands of the Sacramento Valley

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Piperonyl butoxide PBO is a synergist of pyrethroid pesticides found in many products for structural pest control, mosquito control, and home and garden uses....

  1. Direct PCR of indigenous and invasive mosquito species: a time- and cost-effective technique of mosquito barcoding.

    Werblow, A; Flechl, E; Klimpel, S; Zittra, C; Lebl, K; Kieser, K; Laciny, A; Silbermayr, K; Melaun, C; Fuehrer, H-P

    2016-03-01

    Millions of people die each year as a result of pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes. However, the morphological identification of mosquito species can be difficult even for experts. The identification of morphologically indistinguishable species, such as members of the Anopheles maculipennis complex (Diptera: Culicidae), and possible hybrids, such as Culex pipiens pipiens/Culex pipiens molestus (Diptera: Culicidae), presents a major problem. In addition, the detection and discrimination of newly introduced species can be challenging, particularly to researchers without previous experience. Because of their medical importance, the clear identification of all relevant mosquito species is essential. Using the direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method described here, DNA amplification without prior DNA extraction is possible and thus species identification after sequencing can be achieved. Different amounts of tissue (leg, head; larvae or adult) as well as different storage conditions (dry, ethanol, -20 and -80 °C) and storage times were successfully applied and showed positive results after amplification and gel electrophoresis. Overall, 28 different indigenous and non-indigenous mosquito species were analysed using a gene fragment of the COX1 gene for species differentiation and identification by sequencing this 658-bp fragment. Compared with standard PCR, this method is time- and cost-effective and could thus improve existing surveillance and control programmes. PMID:26663040

  2. Mosquito and Fly Control Research by the USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agriculture and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE) in the Deployed War-Fighter Protection (DWFP) Program

    Despite existing measures to prevent and control arthropod-borne diseases in military units, these diseases continue to be serious threats to deployed troops. Due to a shrinking list of safe, cost-effective pesticides for control of disease vectors, new and improved toxicants and methods for deliver...

  3. Cytochrome B Analysis of Mosquito Blood Meals: Identifying Wildlife Hosts of West Nile Virus Mosquito Vectors in Wyoming, USA

    Female mosquitoes commonly exhibit patterns of blood feeding from vertebrate hosts, a behavior that strongly influences mosquito pathogen infection and transmission. The vertebrate host dynamics of the mosquito transmitted arbovirus, West Nile virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, WNV) in sa...

  4. Effect of anti-mosquito midgut antibodies on development of malaria parasite, Plasmodium vivax and fecundity in vector mosquito Anopheles culicifacies (Diptera: culicidae).

    Chugh, Manoj; Adak, T; Sehrawat, Neelam; Gakhar, S K

    2011-04-01

    The effect of anti-mosquito-midgut antibodies on the development of the malaria parasite, P. vivax was studied by feeding the vector mosquito, An. culicifacies with infected blood supplemented with serum from immunized rabbits. In order to get antisera, rabbits were immunized with midgut proteins of three siblings species of Anopheles culicifacies, reported to exhibit differential vectorial capacity. The mosquitoes that ingested anti-midgut antibodies along with infectious parasites had significantly fewer oocysts compared to the control group of mosquitoes. The immunized rabbits generated high titer of antibodies. Their cross reactivity amongst various tissues of the same species and with other sibling species was also determined. Immunogenic polypeptides expressed in the midgut of glucose or blood fed An. culicifacies sibling species were identified by Western blotting. One immunogenic polypeptide of 62 kDa was exclusively present in the midgut of species A. Similarly, three polypeptides of 97, 94 and 58 kDa and one polypeptide of 23 kDa were present exclusively in species B and C respectively. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed the localization of these antigens on baso-lateral membrane and microvilli. The effects of anti-mosquito midgut antibodies on fecundity, longevity, mortality and engorgement of mosquitoes were studied. Fecundity was also reduced significantly. These observations open an avenue for research toward the development of a vector-based malaria parasite transmission-blocking vaccine. PMID:21614887

  5. Nationwide Investigation of the Pyrethroid Susceptibility of Mosquito Larvae Collected from Used Tires in Vietnam

    KAWADA, HITOSHI; Higa, Yukiko; Nguyen, Yen T.; Tran, Son H.; Hoa T. Nguyen; TAKAGI, MASAHIRO

    2009-01-01

    Pyrethroid resistance is envisioned to be a major problem for the vector control program since, at present, there are no suitable chemical substitutes for pyrethroids. Cross-resistance to knockdown agents, which are mainly used in mosquito coils and related products as spatial repellents, is the most serious concern. Since cross-resistance is a global phenomenon, we have started to monitor the distribution of mosquito resistance to pyrethroids. The first pilot study was carried out in Vietnam...

  6. Adulticidal & larvicidal efficacy of three neonicotinoids against insecticide susceptible & resistant mosquito strains

    Sreehari Uragayala; Vaishali Verma; Elamathi Natarajan; Poonam Sharma Velamuri; Raghavendra Kamaraju

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Due to ever growing insecticide resistance in mosquitoes to commonly used insecticides in many parts of the globe, there is always a need for introduction of new insecticides for the control of resistant vector mosquitoes. In this study, larvicidal and adulticidal efficacies of three neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam) were tested against resistant and susceptible populations of Anopheles stephensi Liston 1901, Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti Linnaeu...

  7. Mosquito larvicidal potential of potash alum against malaria vector Anopheles stephensi (Liston)

    Preet, Shabad; Seema, K. C.

    2010-01-01

    Mosquito larviciding may prove to be an effective tool for incorporating into integrated vector management strategies for reducing malaria transmission. Here, we report the potential of potash alum, a traditionally known salt in Indian Ayurveda and Chinese medicine system, in malaria vector control by evaluating its aqueous suspension as larvicide and growth disruptor of Anopheles stephensi, under laboratory conditions. Immature stages of the mosquito were tested using WHO guidelines. 50 and ...

  8. Native Argentinean cyclopoids (Crustacea: Copepoda as predators of Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae mosquitoes

    Mara C Tranchida

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Copepods from La Plata, Argentina were investigated to characterize the local community of larvivorous copepods inhabiting mosquito breeding sites and to identify new predator species of the mosquitoes which occur in artificial containers, Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens. Diversity of larvivorous cyclopoids was highest in permanent pools. Predation by sex and age, selectivity on mosquito species, and daily predation rate during five days were studied for Acanthocyclops robustus, Diacyclops uruguayensis, Macrocyclops albidus and Mesocyclops longisetus. Female copepods presented the highest predatory capacity. No predatory preference for mosquito species was found. According to overall predation potential, copepods were ranked as follows: D. uruguayensis Se hizo una prospeccin de coppodos en La Plata, Argentina, con los objetivos de caracterizar la comunidad local de coppodos larvvoros en sitios de cra de mosquitos, e identificar nuevas especies depredadoras de los mosquitos de contenedores artificiales Aedes aegypti y Culex pipiens. La diversidad de ciclopoides larvvoros fue mxima en charcos permanentes. Se examin la depredacin por sexos y edad, la selectividad por especies de mosquito, y la tasa de depredacin diaria durante cinco das en Acanthocyclops robustus, Diacyclops uruguayensis, Macrocyclops albidus y Mesocyclops longisetus. Los coppodos hembra presentaron la capacidad depredadora ms alta. No se encontr preferencia por alguna especie de mosquito. De acuerdo al potencial de depredacin en general, los coppodos se ordenan as: D. uruguayensis < A. robustus < M. albidus < M. longisetus. Tambin se evalu la tolerancia a la desecacin del hbitat y la capacidad de resistir en agua de contenedores artificiales. D. uruguayensis y A. robustus sobrevivieron en condiciones de sequa, pero D. uruguayensis present menor supervivencia en agua de floreros de cementerio. M. albidus no sobrevivi condiciones de sequa y no toler el agua extrada de contenedores artificiales. Los ciclopoides neotropicales D. uruguayensis and A. robustus son buenos candidatos y merecen investigacin ulterior como agentes de control biolgico de mosquitos.

  9. Modelling the Active Hearing Process in Mosquitoes

    Avitabile, Daniele; Homer, Martin; Jackson, Joe; Robert, Daniel; Champneys, Alan

    2011-11-01

    A simple microscopic mechanistic model is described of the active amplification within the Johnston's organ of the mosquito species Toxorhynchites brevipalpis. The model is based on the description of the antenna as a forced-damped oscillator coupled to a set of active threads (ensembles of scolopidia) that provide an impulsive force when they twitch. This twitching is in turn controlled by channels that are opened and closed if the antennal oscillation reaches a critical amplitude. The model matches both qualitatively and quantitatively with recent experiments. New results are presented using mathematical homogenization techniques to derive a mesoscopic model as a simple oscillator with nonlinear force and damping characteristics. It is shown how the results from this new model closely resemble those from the microscopic model as the number of threads approach physiologically correct values.

  10. Susceptibilidad y resistencia a insecticida en mosquito transmisor del dengue

    Carlos M. de la Cruz-Gallardo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El dengue es una enfermedad viral transmitida al hombre por el mosquito Aedes aegypti. El control y la prevención del dengue depende en gran medida de la aplicación de insecticidas y esta medida continúa siendo una de las estrategias importantes en el control del vector Aedes aegypti. La utilización racional de los insecticidas contra los mosquitos vectores de enfermedades requiere de la evaluación previa de la efectividad de los insecticidas, puesto que el uso intensivo y extensivo provoca resistencia en los vectores. En esta revisión se marcan los casos de resistencia en mosquitos Aedes aegypti describiendo la resistencia de éstos organismos a diferentes clases de insecticidas, además se explica el proceso de los mecanismos de resistencia, la metodología de los bioensayos propuesto por la OMS y la metodología de los Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. La evaluación de la susceptibilidad y/o resistencia a través de bioensayos permite determinar los niveles de resistencia en poblaciones de Aedes aegypti y hacer una buena toma de decisión en el uso de los insecticidas para el control vectorial.

  11. Measurement of Flying Qualities of a Dehavilland Mosquito F-8 Airplane (AAF No. 43-334960) I: Lateral and Directional Stability and Control Characteristics

    Gray, W.E.; Talmage, D.B.; Crane, H.L.

    1945-01-01

    The data presented have no bearing on performance characteristics of airplane, which were considered exceptionally good in previous tests. Some of the undesirable features of lateral and directional stability and control characteristics of the F-8 are listed. Directional stability, with rudder fixed, did not sufficiently restrict aileron yaw; rudder control was inadequate during take-off and landing, and was insufficient to fly airplane with one engine; in clean condition, power of ailerons was slightly below minimum value specified; it was difficult to trim airplane in rough air.

  12. Interplay between Plasmodium infection and resistance to insecticides in vector mosquitoes.

    Alout, Haoues; Yameogo, Bienvenue; Djogbnou, Luc Salako; Chandre, Fabrice; Dabir, Roch Kounbobr; Corbel, Vincent; Cohuet, Anna

    2014-11-01

    Despite its epidemiological importance, the impact of insecticide resistance on vector-parasite interactions and malaria transmission is poorly understood. Here, we explored the impact of Plasmodium infection on the level of insecticide resistance to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in field-caught Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto homozygous for the kdr mutation. Results showed that kdr homozygous mosquitoes that fed on infectious blood were more susceptible to DDT than mosquitoes that fed on noninfectious blood during both ookinete development (day 1 after the blood meal) and oocyst maturation (day 7 after the blood meal) but not during sporozoite invasion of the salivary glands. Plasmodium falciparum infection seemed to impose a fitness cost on mosquitoes by reducing the ability of kdr homozygous A. gambiae sensu stricto to survive exposure to DDT. These results suggest an interaction between Plasmodium infection and the insecticide susceptibility of mosquitoes carrying insecticide-resistant alleles. We discuss this finding in relation to vector control efficacy. PMID:24829465

  13. Gametocytes infectiousness to mosquitoes: variable selection using random forests, and zero inflated models

    Genuer, Robin; Toussile, Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Malaria control strategies aiming at reducing disease transmission intensity may impact both oocyst intensity and infection prevalence in the mosquito vector. Thus far, mathematical models failed to identify a clear relationship between Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes and their infectiousness to mosquitoes. Natural isolates of gametocytes are genetically diverse and biologically complex. Infectiousness to mosquitoes relies on multiple parameters such as density, sex-ratio, maturity, parasite genotypes and host immune factors. In this article, we investigated how density and genetic diversity of gametocytes impact on the success of transmission in the mosquito vector. We analyzed data for which the number of covariates plus attendant interactions is at least of order of the sample size, precluding usage of classical models such as general linear models. We then considered the variable importance from random forests to address the problem of selecting the most influent variables. The selected covariates were ...

  14. Microsporidian isolates from mosquitoes of Argentina

    Microsporidia are among the most common and widely distributed microbial pathogens associated with mosquitoes in nature. Since 1980 studies of microsporidia in mosquitoes of Argentina were conducted at the Laboratory of Insect Vectors of CEPAVE. Eleven morphologically unique species of microsporidia...

  15. Neuropeptidomics of the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    Neuropeptidomic data were collected on the mosquito Ae. aegypti which is considered the most tractable mosquito species for physiological and endocrine studies. The data were solely obtained by direct mass spectrometric profiling, including tandem fragmentation, of selected tissues from single speci...

  16. Larvicidal activity of neem oil (Azadirachta indica formulation against mosquitoes

    Dua Virendra K

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes transmit serious human diseases, causing millions of deaths every year. Use of synthetic insecticides to control vector mosquitoes has caused physiological resistance and adverse environmental effects in addition to high operational cost. Insecticides of botanical origin have been reported as useful for control of mosquitoes. Azadirachta indica (Meliaceae and its derived products have shown a variety of insecticidal properties. The present paper discusses the larvicidal activity of neem-based biopesticide for the control of mosquitoes. Methods Larvicidal efficacy of an emulsified concentrate of neem oil formulation (neem oil with polyoxyethylene ether, sorbitan dioleate and epichlorohydrin developed by BMR & Company, Pune, India, was evaluated against late 3rd and early 4th instar larvae of different genera of mosquitoes. The larvae were exposed to different concentrations (0.55.0 ppm of the formulation along with untreated control. Larvicidal activity of the formulation was also evaluated in field against Anopheles, Culex, and Aedes mosquitoes. The formulation was diluted with equal volumes of water and applied @ 140 mg a.i./m2 to different mosquito breeding sites with the help of pre calibrated knapsack sprayer. Larval density was determined at pre and post application of the formulation using a standard dipper. Results Median lethal concentration (LC50 of the formulation against Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti was found to be 1.6, 1.8 and 1.7 ppm respectively. LC50 values of the formulation stored at 26C, 40C and 45C for 48 hours against Ae. aegypti were 1.7, 1.7, 1.8 ppm while LC90 values were 3.7, 3.7 and 3.8 ppm respectively. Further no significant difference in LC50 and LC90 values of the formulation was observed against Ae. aegypti during 18 months storage period at room temperature. An application of the formulation at the rate of 140 mg a.i./m2 in different breeding sites under natural field conditions provided 98.1% reduction of Anopheles larvae on day 1; thereafter 100% reduction was recorded up to week 1 and more than 80% reduction up to week 3, while percent reduction against Culex larvae was 95.5% on day 1, and thereafter 80% reduction was achieved up to week 3. The formulation also showed 95.1% and, 99.7% reduction of Aedes larvae on day 1 and day 2 respectively; thereafter 100% larval control was observed up to day 7. Conclusion The neem oil formulation was found effective in controlling mosquito larvae in different breeding sites under natural field conditions. As neem trees are widely distributed in India, their formulations may prove to be an effective and eco-friendly larvicide, which could be used as an alternative for malaria control.

  17. New protective battle-dress impregnated against mosquito vector bites

    Pennetier Cédric; Chabi Joseph; Martin Thibaud; Chandre Fabrice; Rogier Christophe; Hougard Jean-Marc; Pages Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Mixing repellent and organophosphate (OP) insecticides to better control pyrethroid resistant mosquito vectors is a promising strategy developed for bed net impregnation. Here, we investigated the opportunity to adapt this strategy to personal protection in the form of impregnated clothes. Methods We compared standard permethrin impregnated uniforms with uniforms manually impregnated with the repellent KBR3023 alone and in combination with an organophosphate, Pirimiphos-Me...

  18. Attracting, trapping and killing disease-transmitting mosquitoes using odor-baited stations - The Ifakara Odor-Baited Stations

    John Alex N

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To accelerate efforts towards control and possibly elimination of mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and lymphatic filariasis, optimally located outdoor interventions could be used to complement existing intradomicilliary vector control methods such as house spraying with insecticides and insecticidal bednets. Methods We describe a new odor-baited station for trapping, contaminating and killing disease-transmitting mosquitoes. This device, named the 'Ifakara Odor-baited Station' (Ifakara OBS, is a 4 m3 hut-shaped canvas box with seven openings, two of which may be fitted with interception traps to catch exiting mosquitoes. It is baited with synthetic human odors and may be augmented with contaminants including toxic insecticides or biological agents. Results In field trials where panels of fabric were soaked in 1% pirimiphos-methyl solution and suspended inside the Ifakara OBS, at least 73.6% of Anopheles arabiensis, 78.7% of Culex and 60% of Mansonia mosquitoes sampled while exiting the OBS, died within 24 hours. When used simply as a trap and evaluated against two existing outdoor traps, Ifakara Tent trap and Mosquito Magnet-X®, the OBS proved more efficacious than the Ifakara Tent trap in catching all mosquito species found (P ®, it was equally efficacious in catching An. arabiensis (P = 0.969, but was less efficacious against Culex (P Mansonia species (P Conclusion The Ifakara OBS is efficacious against disease-carrying mosquitoes including the malaria vector, An. arabiensis and Culicine vectors of filarial worms and arboviruses. It can be used simultaneously as a trap and as a contamination or killing station, meaning most mosquitoes which escape trapping would leave when already contaminated and die shortly afterwards. This technique has potential to complement current vector control methods, by targeting mosquitoes in places other than human dwellings, but its effectiveness in the field will require cheap, long-lasting and easy-to-use mosquito lures.

  19. Asymptomatic humans transmit dengue virus to mosquitoes.

    Duong, Veasna; Lambrechts, Louis; Paul, Richard E; Ly, Sowath; Lay, Rath Srey; Long, Kanya C; Huy, Rekol; Tarantola, Arnaud; Scott, Thomas W; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Buchy, Philippe

    2015-11-24

    Three-quarters of the estimated 390 million dengue virus (DENV) infections each year are clinically inapparent. People with inapparent dengue virus infections are generally considered dead-end hosts for transmission because they do not reach sufficiently high viremia levels to infect mosquitoes. Here, we show that, despite their lower average level of viremia, asymptomatic people can be infectious to mosquitoes. Moreover, at a given level of viremia, DENV-infected people with no detectable symptoms or before the onset of symptoms are significantly more infectious to mosquitoes than people with symptomatic infections. Because DENV viremic people without clinical symptoms may be exposed to more mosquitoes through their undisrupted daily routines than sick people and represent the bulk of DENV infections, our data indicate that they have the potential to contribute significantly more to virus transmission to mosquitoes than previously recognized. PMID:26553981

  20. Asymptomatic humans transmit dengue virus to mosquitoes

    Duong, Veasna; Lambrechts, Louis; Paul, Richard E.; Ly, Sowath; Lay, Rath Srey; Long, Kanya C.; Huy, Rekol; Tarantola, Arnaud; Scott, Thomas W.; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Buchy, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Three-quarters of the estimated 390 million dengue virus (DENV) infections each year are clinically inapparent. People with inapparent dengue virus infections are generally considered dead-end hosts for transmission because they do not reach sufficiently high viremia levels to infect mosquitoes. Here, we show that, despite their lower average level of viremia, asymptomatic people can be infectious to mosquitoes. Moreover, at a given level of viremia, DENV-infected people with no detectable symptoms or before the onset of symptoms are significantly more infectious to mosquitoes than people with symptomatic infections. Because DENV viremic people without clinical symptoms may be exposed to more mosquitoes through their undisrupted daily routines than sick people and represent the bulk of DENV infections, our data indicate that they have the potential to contribute significantly more to virus transmission to mosquitoes than previously recognized. PMID:26553981

  1. Effects of insect growth regulators on the mosquito-parasitic nematode Romanomermis iyengari.

    Suman, Devi Shankar; Brey, Christopher W; Wang, Yi; Sanad, Manar; Shamseldean, Muhammed S M; Gaugler, Randy

    2013-02-01

    Pyriproxyfen, a juvenile hormone analogue, diflubenzuron, a chitin synthesis inhibitor, and azadirachtin, an ecdysone agonist, are three insect growth regulators (IGRs) considered as selective and effective insecticides for mosquitoes. Romanomermis iyengari (Welch) is a mosquito-parasitic mermithid that can provide biological control against many medically important mosquito species. The compatibility of these two control tactics was tested by evaluating the sublethal effects of exposure to IGR on nematode developmental stages (preparasitic, parasitic, and preparasitic + parasitic) using Culex pipiens larvae as the host. Sublethal concentrations of IGRs were 90 % emergence inhibition of host mosquito. Preparasitic exposure to pyriproxyfen, azadirachtin, and diflurbenzuron had no effect on infectivity, parasite load, sex ratio, or male size but reduced nematode female length and increased male sex ratio at one parasite/larva. When IGRs treatments were made against the parasitic and preparasitic + parasitic stages, pyriproxyfen and azadirachtin reduced R. iyengari infectivity, parasite load, and male nematode length, whereas pyriproxyfen exposure increased male sex ratio and reduced the female R. iyengari length. Thus, IGRs have significant negative impacts on different stages of mosquito mermithid that can destabilize the balance of host-parasite population interaction. Therefore, IGRs should be used with caution in mosquito habitats where these parasites have established. PMID:23180130

  2. Adulticidal & larvicidal efficacy of three neonicotinoids against insecticide susceptible & resistant mosquito strains

    Uragayala, Sreehari; Verma, Vaishali; Natarajan, Elamathi; Velamuri, Poonam Sharma; Kamaraju, Raghavendra

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Due to ever growing insecticide resistance in mosquitoes to commonly used insecticides in many parts of the globe, there is always a need for introduction of new insecticides for the control of resistant vector mosquitoes. In this study, larvicidal and adulticidal efficacies of three neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam) were tested against resistant and susceptible populations of Anopheles stephensi Liston 1901, Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti Linnaeus, and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae). Methods: Laboratory-reared mosquito species were used. Insecticide susceptibility tests were done using standard WHO procedures and using diagnostic dosages of insecticide test papers and larvicides. Adulticidal efficacy of candidate insecticides was assessed using topical application method and larval bioassays were conducted using standard WHO procedure. Results: The results of topical application on 3-5 day old female mosquitoes indicated that resistant strain of An. stephensi registered lower LC50 values than the susceptible strain. Among the three insecticides tested, thiacloprid was found more effective than the other two insecticides. Culex quinquefasciatus registered lowest LC50 for imidacloprid than the other two mosquito species tested. In larval bioassays, the LC50 values registered for imidacloprid were in the order of Cx. quinquefasciatus neonicotinoids tested, and the possibility of using neonicotinoids for the control of resistant mosquitoes should be explored. PMID:26905244

  3. Insilico modeling of Wolbachia and its potentials in combating mosquito borne diseases Chikungunya and Dengue

    N.M.Guruprasad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito borne diseases are major health burden both in tropical and subtropical regions. The enormous use of insecticides to control mosquitoes causes biomagnification of chemicals in environment and mosquitoes have developed resistance to insecticides. The inefficiency of insecticides to combat mosquitoes prompted researchers to develop efficient alternative methods. Wolbachia endosymbiont is a one of efficient new approach to control mosquitoes. Wolbachia strain invade mosquitoes biology by reducing host lifespan, phenotype and inhibit virus replication. In the present study, insilico modeling and docking of Wolbachia and human pathogens Chikungunya (CHIK and Dengue (DEN virus was done. Docking is the method to find the binding affinity of protein and ligand complex molecules for finding potential inhibitor. Using Hex, we obtained energy total (e-total values in kcal/mol for all docked complex. In the contest of overall analyzing the docking E-total values of docked complexes reveals that WSP-B has show strong binding affinity than WSP-A to both DEN and CHIK. Based on obtained result, we suggest WSP-B has potential inhibitor for both DEN and CHIK virus. Further, biophysical characterization of Wolbachia will help to develop a drug to combat CHIK and DEN viruses.

  4. Spatial and temporal distribution of the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis in northern Sudan: influence of environmental factors and implications for vector control

    Ageep, T.B.; Cox, J; M.M. Hassan; Knols, B.G.J.; Benedict, M.Q.; Malcolm, C. A.; Babiker, A.; Sayed, El, B.B.

    2009-01-01

    Background - Malaria is an important public health problem in northern Sudan, but little is known about the dynamics of its transmission. Given the characteristic low densities of Anopheles arabiensis and the difficult terrain in this area, future vector control strategies are likely to be based on area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) that may include the sterile insect technique (SIT). To support the planning and implementation of future AW-IPM activities, larval surveys were carrie...

  5. A systematic review of mosquito coils and passive emanators: defining recommendations for spatial repellency testing methodologies

    Ogoma Sheila B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mosquito coils, vaporizer mats and emanators confer protection against mosquito bites through the spatial action of emanated vapor or airborne pyrethroid particles. These products dominate the pest control market; therefore, it is vital to characterize mosquito responses elicited by the chemical actives and their potential for disease prevention. The aim of this review was to determine effects of mosquito coils and emanators on mosquito responses that reduce human-vector contact and to propose scientific consensus on terminologies and methodologies used for evaluation of product formats that could contain spatial chemical actives, including indoor residual spraying (IRS, long lasting insecticide treated nets (LLINs and insecticide treated materials (ITMs. PubMed, (National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI, U.S. National Library of Medicine, NIH, MEDLINE, LILAC, Cochrane library, IBECS and Armed Forces Pest Management Board Literature Retrieval System search engines were used to identify studies of pyrethroid based coils and emanators with key-words “Mosquito coils” “Mosquito emanators” and “Spatial repellents”. It was concluded that there is need to improve statistical reporting of studies, and reach consensus in the methodologies and terminologies used through standardized testing guidelines. Despite differing evaluation methodologies, data showed that coils and emanators induce mortality, deterrence, repellency as well as reduce the ability of mosquitoes to feed on humans. Available data on efficacy outdoors, dose–response relationships and effective distance of coils and emanators is inadequate for developing a target product profile (TPP, which will be required for such chemicals before optimized implementation can occur for maximum benefits in disease control.

  6. Can Wolbachia be used to control malaria?

    Thomas, Walker; Luciano Andrade, Moreira.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by Plasmodium parasites transmitted by the infectious bite of Anopheles mosquitoes. Vector control of malaria has predominantly focused on targeting the adult mosquito through insecticides and bed nets. However, current vector control methods are [...] often not sustainable for long periods so alternative methods are needed. A novel biocontrol approach for mosquito-borne diseases has recently been proposed, it uses maternally inherited endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria transinfected into mosquitoes in order to interfere with pathogen transmission. Transinfected Wolbachia strains in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the primary vector of dengue fever, directly inhibit pathogen replication, including Plasmodium gallinaceum, and also affect mosquito reproduction to allow Wolbachia to spread through mosquito populations. In addition, transient Wolbachia infections in Anopheles gambiae significantly reduce Plasmodium levels. Here we review the prospects of using a Wolbachia-based approach to reduce human malaria transmission through transinfection of Anopheles mosquitoes.

  7. Can Wolbachia be used to control malaria?

    Thomas Walker

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by Plasmodium parasites transmitted by the infectious bite of Anopheles mosquitoes. Vector control of malaria has predominantly focused on targeting the adult mosquito through insecticides and bed nets. However, current vector control methods are often not sustainable for long periods so alternative methods are needed. A novel biocontrol approach for mosquito-borne diseases has recently been proposed, it uses maternally inherited endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria transinfected into mosquitoes in order to interfere with pathogen transmission. Transinfected Wolbachia strains in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the primary vector of dengue fever, directly inhibit pathogen replication, including Plasmodium gallinaceum, and also affect mosquito reproduction to allow Wolbachia to spread through mosquito populations. In addition, transient Wolbachia infections in Anopheles gambiae significantly reduce Plasmodium levels. Here we review the prospects of using a Wolbachia-based approach to reduce human malaria transmission through transinfection of Anopheles mosquitoes.

  8. Evaluation of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB)-barrier for control of vector and nuisance mosquitoes and its effect on non-target organisms in sub-tropical environments in Florida

    We evaluated the efficacy of attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) in the laboratory and the field with the Environmental Protection Agency exempt active ingredient eugenol against vector and nuisance mosquitoes. In the laboratory, eugenol combined in attractive sugar bait (ASB) solution provided high...

  9. Transcriptome of the adult female malaria mosquito vector Anopheles albimanus

    Martnez-Barnetche Jess

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Malaria is transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles. Transmission is a complex phenomenon involving biological and environmental factors of humans, parasites and mosquitoes. Among more than 500 anopheline species, only a few species from different branches of the mosquito evolutionary tree transmit malaria, suggesting that their vectorial capacity has evolved independently. Anopheles albimanus (subgenus Nyssorhynchus is an important malaria vector in the Americas. The divergence time between Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria vector in Africa, and the Neotropical vectors has been estimated to be 100 My. To better understand the biological basis of malaria transmission and to develop novel and effective means of vector control, there is a need to explore the mosquito biology beyond the An. gambiae complex. Results We sequenced the transcriptome of the An. albimanus adult female. By combining Sanger, 454 and Illumina sequences from cDNA libraries derived from the midgut, cuticular fat body, dorsal vessel, salivary gland and whole body, we generated a single, high-quality assembly containing 16,669 transcripts, 92% of which mapped to the An. darlingi genome and covered 90% of the core eukaryotic genome. Bidirectional comparisons between the An. gambiae, An. darlingi and An. albimanus predicted proteomes allowed the identification of 3,772 putative orthologs. More than half of the transcripts had a match to proteins in other insect vectors and had an InterPro annotation. We identified several protein families that may be relevant to the study of Plasmodium-mosquito interaction. An open source transcript annotation browser called GDAV (Genome-Delinked Annotation Viewer was developed to facilitate public access to the data generated by this and future transcriptome projects. Conclusions We have explored the adult female transcriptome of one important New World malaria vector, An. albimanus. We identified protein-coding transcripts involved in biological processes that may be relevant to the Plasmodium lifecycle and can serve as the starting point for searching targets for novel control strategies. Our data increase the available genomic information regarding An. albimanus several hundred-fold, and will facilitate molecular research in medical entomology, evolutionary biology, genomics and proteomics of anopheline mosquito vectors. The data reported in this manuscript is accessible to the community via the VectorBase website (http://www.vectorbase.org/Other/AdditionalOrganisms/.

  10. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of 1-undec-10-enoyl-piperidines as adulticides against the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)

    The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti (L.), is considered the primary vector for both dengue and yellow fever. Using insecticide is one of the major ways to control this medically important insect pest. However, few new insecticides have been developed for mosquito control. As part of our collabo...

  11. Control of pyrethroid and DDT-resistant Anopheles gambiae by application of indoor residual spraying or mosquito nets treated with a long-lasting organophosphate insecticide, chlorpyrifos-methyl

    Chabi Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scaling up of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs and indoor residual spraying (IRS with support from the Global Fund and President's Malaria Initiative is providing increased opportunities for malaria control in Africa. The most cost-effective and longest-lasting residual insecticide DDT is also the most environmentally persistent. Alternative residual insecticides exist, but are too short-lived or too expensive to sustain. Dow Agrosciences have developed a microencapsulated formulation (CS of the organophosphate chlorpyrifos methyl as a cost-effective, long-lasting alternative to DDT. Methods Chlorpyrifos methyl CS was tested as an IRS or ITN treatment in experimental huts in an area of Benin where Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasiactus are resistant to pyrethroids, but susceptible to organophosphates. Efficacy and residual activity was compared to that of DDT and the pyrethroid lambdacyalothrin. Results IRS with chlorpyrifos methyl killed 95% of An. gambiae that entered the hut as compared to 31% with lambdacyhalothrin and 50% with DDT. Control of Cx. quinquefasciatus showed a similar trend; although the level of mortality with chlorpyrifos methyl was lower (66% it was still much higher than for DDT (14% or pyrethroid (15% treatments. Nets impregnated with lambdacyhalothrin were compromized by resistance, killing only 30% of An. gambiae and 8% of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Nets impregnated with chlorpyrifos methyl killed more (45% of An gambiae and 15% of Cx. quinquefasciatus, but its activity on netting was of short duration. Contact bioassays on the sprayed cement-sand walls over the nine months of monitoring showed no loss of activity of chlorpyrifos methyl, whereas lambdacyhalothrin and DDT lost activity within a few months of spraying. Conclusion As an IRS treatment against pyrethroid resistant mosquitoes chlorpyrifos methyl CS outperformed DDT and lambdacyhalothrin. In IRS campaigns, chlorpyrifos methyl CS should show higher, more-sustained levels of malaria transmission control than conventional formulations of DDT or pyrethroids. The remarkable residual activity indicates that cost-effective alternatives to DDT are feasible through modern formulation technology.

  12. [Trials to introduce Romanomermis culicivorax (Nematoda: Mermithidae), mosquito larva parasites, into the reservoirs of Voronezh and Moscow Province].

    Gerik, E P; Barkalova, L D; Besperstykh, Z D; Pridantseva, E A; Vladimirova, V V

    1990-01-01

    Possibility of using Romanomermis culicivorax for mosquito control in the town of Voronezh and Moscow Province has been assessed. The infection rate of mosquito larvae didn't exceed 26% when preparasitic juveniles were released into water bodies at a ratio of 1-3 thousand per 1 m2 and temperature 18-25 degrees C. There were no evidences of mermithid settlement and hibernation in the water bodies of Voronezh. High efficacy of using R. culicivorax in mosquito larvae control can only be expected in these regions under hot summer conditions. PMID:1972264

  13. Reduction of mosquito biting-pressure: spatial repellents or mosquito traps? A field comparison of seven commercially available products in Israel.

    Revay, Edita E; Kline, Daniel L; Xue, Rui-De; Qualls, Whitney A; Bernier, Ulrich R; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D; Ghattas, Nina; Pstygo, Irina; Müller, Günter C

    2013-07-01

    The present study assessed the personal protection efficiency of seven commercially available mosquito control devices (MCD) under field conditions in Israel. Trials were performed in a high biting-pressure area inhabited by large populations of mosquito and biting midge species, using human volunteers as bait in landing catch experiments. Results show that under minimal air-movement, three spatial repellent based products (ThermaCELL(®) Patio Lantern, OFF!(®) PowerPad lamp, and Terminix(®) ALLCLEAR Tabletop Mosquito Repeller) significantly reduced the biting-pressure (t-test - PRhino(®) SV3100) either significantly increased or had no effect on the biting-pressure at short distances compared with the unprotected control. Trials conducted over large areas showed that only the Blue Rhino trap was able to significantly reduce the biting-pressure (40.1% reduction), but this was only when operating four units at the corners of an intermediate sized area. PMID:23545129

  14. The role of octopamine receptor agonists in the synergistic toxicity of certain insect growth regulators (IGRs) in controlling Dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquito.

    Ahmed, Mohamed Ahmed Ibrahim; Vogel, Christoph Franz Adam

    2016-03-01

    The synergistic action of octopamine receptor agonists (OR agonists) on many insecticide classes (e.g., organophosphorus, pyrethroids, and neonicotinoids) on Aedes aegypti L. has been reported recently. An investigation of OR agonist's effect on insect growth regulators (IGRs) was undertaken to provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action. Based on the IGR bioassay, pyriproxyfen was the most potent IGR insecticide tested (EC50=0.0019ng/ml). However, the lethal toxicity results indicate that diafenthiuron was the most potent insecticide (LC50=56ng/cm(2)) on A. aegypti adults after 24h of exposure. The same trend was true after 48 and 72h of exposure. Further, the synergistic effects of OR agonists plus amitraz (AMZ) or chlordimeform (CDM) was significant on adults. Among the tested synergists, AMZ increased the potency of the selected IGRs on adults the greatest. As results, OR agonists were largely synergistic with the selected IGRs. OR agonists enhanced the lethal toxicity of IGRs, which is a valuable new tool in the field of A. aegypti control. However, further field experiments need to be done to understand the unique potential role of OR agonists and their synergistic action on IGRs. PMID:26672383

  15. Immunology and treatment of mosquito bites.

    Reunala, T; Brummer-Korvenkontio, H; Lappalainen, P; Rsnen, L; Palosuo, T

    1990-11-01

    Cutaneous reactions to mosquito bites are usually pruritic weals and delayed papules. Arthus-type local and systemic symptoms can also occur but anaphylactic reactions are very rare. Both clinical and experimental evidence suggest that the various bite reactions result from sensitization to the mosquito saliva injected into the skin during feeding. Recent immunoblot studies have shown both IgG- and IgE-class anti-mosquito antibodies, but their species-specificity and clinical importance is at present unknown. In addition to an Arthus-type mechanism, both cutaneous late-phase reactivity and cell-mediated immunity may be involved in the pathophysiology of delayed mosquito-bite lesions. Cutaneous sensitization to mosquito bites can be divided into five different stages ranging from the stages of immediate wealing and delayed bite papules, to the stage of non-reactivity. No desensitization treatment is generally available for mosquito allergy but it has recently been shown that cetirizine, a potent non-sedating antihistamine, is effective against the wealing and pruritus caused by mosquito bites. PMID:1980855

  16. A Critical Role for CLSP2 in the Modulation of Antifungal Immune Response in Mosquitoes.

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Hu, Yang; Xing, Long-Sheng; Jiang, Hong; Hu, Song-Nian; Raikhel, Alexander S; Zou, Zhen

    2015-06-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi represent a promising class of bio-insecticides for mosquito control. Thus, detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms governing anti-fungal immune response in mosquitoes is essential. In this study, we show that CLSP2 is a modulator of immune responses during anti-fungal infection in the mosquito Aedes aegypti. With a fungal infection, the expression of the CLSP2 gene is elevated. CLSP2 is cleaved upon challenge with Beauveria bassiana conidia, and the liberated CLSP2 CTL-type domain binds to fungal cell components and B. bassiana conidia. Furthermore, CLPS2 RNA interference silencing significantly increases the resistance to the fungal challenge. RNA-sequencing transcriptome analysis showed that the majority of immune genes were highly upregulated in the CLSP2-depleted mosquitoes infected with the fungus. The up-regulated immune gene cohorts belong to melanization and Toll pathways, but not to the IMD or JAK-STAT. A thioester-containing protein (TEP22), a member of α2-macroglobulin family, has been implicated in the CLSP2-modulated mosquito antifungal defense. Our study has contributed to a greater understanding of immune-modulating mechanisms in mosquitoes. PMID:26057557

  17. Application of X-ray imaging techniques for studying the morphology of malaria-transmitting mosquitoes

    The X-ray phase contrast tomography technique was applied to examine the morphology of malaria transmitting mosquitoes in support of the development of the sterile insect technique (SIT). The aim of the experiment was to detect possible damage induced by the sample preparation procedures, to perform X-ray phase-contrast imaging on freshly prepared (not fixed) and live mosquito species, and to test the new beam line set up, which was not yet fully commissioned at the time of the experiment. The ability to perform X-ray phase-contrast imaging of live mosquito specimens was confirmed. The collected still images provided data on a relatively large population of mosquitoes. The CT data were very useful to compare selected mosquito species. They confirmed that the sample preparation procedures are critical for examining the morphological details. The procedures must be further optimized in order to stabilize the sample without inducing significant damage. The most interesting results should be obtained with the high-resolution (∼ 0.5 micrometer) set up using the FReloN camera to be commissioned at the TOPO beam line in the 3rd quarter of 2007. If there are differences between the control and irradiated populations of mosquitoes they should show up first at the tissue level. Using the high-resolution setup it should be possible to detect such differences, if present

  18. Mosquito vectors of infectious diseases: are they neglected health disaster in Egypt?

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Fadil, Eman Ebrahim Abdel; Morsy, Tosson A

    2013-08-01

    In spite of the great technological progress achieved worldwide, still arthropod borne infectious diseases is a puzzle disturbing the health authorities. Among these arthropods, mosquitoes from medical, veterinary and economic point of view top all groups. They are estimated to transmit disease to more than 700 million people annually worldwide mainly in Africa, South America, Central America, Mexico and much of Asia with millions of deaths. In Europe, Russia, Greenland, Canada, the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Japan and other temperate and developed countries, mosquito bites are now mostly an irritating nuisance; but still cause some deaths each year. Mosquito-borne diseases include Malaria, West Nile Virus, Elephantiasis, Rift Valley Fever, Dengue Fever, Yellow Fever and Dog Heartworm....etc. Apart from diseases transmission, mosquitoes can make human life miserable. The successful long term mosquito control requires the ecological and biological knowledge of where and how they develop. The importance of mosquitoes is given herein to clarify the problem and to think together what one must do? PMID:24260815

  19. Adulticidal efficacy of Delonix elata against filariasis vector mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae

    Mohan Rajeswary

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the adulticidal activity and toxicity of different solvent crude extracts of Delonix elata (D. elata against filariasis vector mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus. Methods: The adulticidal activities of crude hexane, benzene, ethyl acetate, chloroform and methanol leaf and seed extracts of D. elata were assayed for their toxicity against vector mosquito Cx. quinquefasciatus. Bioassay was carried out by WHO method for determination of adulticidal activity against mosquitoes. The adult mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. Results: All extracts showed moderate adulticidal effects; however, the highest adult mortality was found in methanol extract of D. elata leaf against the adults of Cx. quinquefasciatus with the LC50 and LC90 values at 197.28 and 347.45mg/L, respectively. Conclusions: These results suggest that the leaf solvent plant extracts have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of mosquitoes. This study provides first report on the mosquito adulticidal activity of D. elata plant extracts against filariasis vector mosquito, Cx. quinquefasciatus.

  20. Wolbachia Infection Reduces Blood-Feeding Success in the Dengue Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    Turley, Andrew P.; Moreira, Luciano A.; O'Neill, Scott L.; McGraw, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The mosquito Aedes aegypti was recently transinfected with a life-shortening strain of the endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis (wMelPop) as the first step in developing a biocontrol strategy for dengue virus transmission. In addition to life-shortening, the wMelPop-infected mosquitoes also exhibit increased daytime activity and metabolic rates. Here we sought to quantify the blood-feeding behaviour of Wolbachia-infected females as an indicator of any virulence or energetic drain associated with Wolbachia infection. Methodology/Principal Findings In a series of blood-feeding trials in response to humans, we have shown that Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes do not differ in their response time to humans, but that as they age they obtain fewer and smaller blood meals than Wolbachia-uninfected controls. Lastly, we observed a behavioural characteristic in the Wolbachia infected mosquitoes best described as a bendy proboscis that may explain the decreased biting success. Conclusions/Significance Taken together the evidence suggests that wMelPop infection may be causing tissue damage in a manner that intensifies with mosquito age and that leads to reduced blood-feeding success. These behavioural changes require further investigation with respect to a possible physiological mechanism and their role in vectorial capacity of the insect. The selective decrease of feeding success in older mosquitoes may act synergistically with other Wolbachia-associated traits including life-shortening and viral protection in biocontrol strategies. PMID:19753103

  1. The behaviour of mosquitoes in relation to humans under holed bednets: the evidence from experimental huts

    Seth R Irish

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The physical integrity of bednets is a concern of national malaria control programs, as it is a key factor in determining the rate of replacement of bednets. It is largely assumed that increased numbers of holes will result in a loss of protection of sleepers from potentially infective bites. Experimental hut studies are valuable in understanding mosquito behaviour indoors, particularly as it relates to blood feeding and mortality. This review summarises findings from experimental hut studies, focusing on two issues: (i the effect of different numbers or sizes of holes in bednets and (ii feeding behaviour and mortality with holed nets as compared with unholed nets. As might be expected, increasing numbers and area of holes resulted in increased blood feeding by mosquitoes on sleepers. However, the presence of holes did not generally have a large effect on the mortality of mosquitoes. Successfully entering a holed mosquito net does not necessarily mean that mosquitoes spend less time in contact with the net, which could explain the lack in differences in mortality. Further behavioural studies are necessary to understand mosquito behaviour around nets and the importance of holed nets on malaria transmission.

  2. Anopheline and culicine mosquitoes are not repelled by surfaces treated with the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana

    Mnyone Ladslaus L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entomopathogenic fungi, Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana, are promising bio-pesticides for application against adult malaria mosquito vectors. An understanding of the behavioural responses of mosquitoes towards these fungi is necessary to guide development of fungi beyond the 'proof of concept' stage and to design suitable intervention tools. Methods Here we tested whether oil-formulations of the two fungi could be detected and avoided by adult Anopheles gambiae s.s., Anopheles arabiensis and Culex quinquefasciatus. The bioassays used a glass chamber divided into three compartments (each 250 250 250 mm: release, middle and stimulus compartments. Netting with or without fungus was fitted in front of the stimulus compartment. Mosquitoes were released and the proportion that entered the stimulus compartment was determined and compared between treatments. Treatments were untreated netting (control 1, netting with mineral oil (control 2 and fungal conidia formulated in mineral oil evaluated at three different dosages (2 1010, 4 1010 and 8 1010 conidia m-2. Results Neither fungal strain was repellent as the mean proportion of mosquitoes collected in the stimulus compartment did not differ between experiments with surfaces treated with and without fungus regardless of the fungal isolate and mosquito species tested. Conclusion Our results indicate that mineral-oil formulations of M. anisopliae and B. bassiana were not repellent against the mosquito species tested. Therefore, both fungi are suitable candidates for the further development of tools that aim to control host-seeking or resting mosquitoes using entomopathogenic fungi.

  3. Anopheline and culicine mosquitoes are not repelled by surfaces treated with the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana

    2010-01-01

    Background Entomopathogenic fungi, Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana, are promising bio-pesticides for application against adult malaria mosquito vectors. An understanding of the behavioural responses of mosquitoes towards these fungi is necessary to guide development of fungi beyond the 'proof of concept' stage and to design suitable intervention tools. Methods Here we tested whether oil-formulations of the two fungi could be detected and avoided by adult Anopheles gambiae s.s., Anopheles arabiensis and Culex quinquefasciatus. The bioassays used a glass chamber divided into three compartments (each 250 250 250 mm): release, middle and stimulus compartments. Netting with or without fungus was fitted in front of the stimulus compartment. Mosquitoes were released and the proportion that entered the stimulus compartment was determined and compared between treatments. Treatments were untreated netting (control 1), netting with mineral oil (control 2) and fungal conidia formulated in mineral oil evaluated at three different dosages (2 1010, 4 1010 and 8 1010 conidia m-2). Results Neither fungal strain was repellent as the mean proportion of mosquitoes collected in the stimulus compartment did not differ between experiments with surfaces treated with and without fungus regardless of the fungal isolate and mosquito species tested. Conclusion Our results indicate that mineral-oil formulations of M. anisopliae and B. bassiana were not repellent against the mosquito species tested. Therefore, both fungi are suitable candidates for the further development of tools that aim to control host-seeking or resting mosquitoes using entomopathogenic fungi. PMID:20799937

  4. Historical applications of induced sterilisation in field populations of mosquitoes

    Knols Bart GJ

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Research on sterile mosquito technology from 1955 to the 1980s provided a substantial body of knowledge on propagation and release of sterile mosquitoes. Radiation sterilisation and chemosterilisation have been used effectively to induce dominant lethality and thereby sterilise important mosquito vectors in the laboratory. Experimental releases of chemosterilised males provided complete control of Anopheles albimanus in a small breeding population (14-15 sq km in El Salvador. Releases of radiation sterilised males failed to control either Aedes aegypti or Anopheles quadrimaculatus in the USA. Releases of radiation-sterilised and chemosterilised male Culex quinquefasciatus in the USA and India were successful in some instances. Development of genetic sexing systems for Anopheles and improved physical separation methods for Culex have made it possible to rear and release males almost exclusively (> 99% minimizing the release of potential vectors, the females. Factors that affected efficacy in some field programmes included reduction of competitiveness by radiation, immigration of fertilized females from outside the release zones, and inability of laboratory-bred males to perform in the wild. Despite significant progress, institutional commitments to carry the process further were generally lacking in the late 1970s and until recently. Now, with renewed interest and support for further assessment of this technology, this paper summarizes the current knowledge base, prioritizes some areas of investigation, and challenges scientists and administrators to maintain an awareness of progress, remain realistic about the interpretation of new findings, and make decisions about the sterile insect technique on the basis of informed scientific documentation. Areas recommended for priority research status include the establishment of genetic sexing mechanisms that can be transferred to other mosquito species, re-examination of radiation sterilisation, aerial release technology and mass rearing.

  5. Spatial and temporal distribution of the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis in northern Sudan: influence of environmental factors and implications for vector control

    Malcolm Colin A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is an important public health problem in northern Sudan, but little is known about the dynamics of its transmission. Given the characteristic low densities of Anopheles arabiensis and the difficult terrain in this area, future vector control strategies are likely to be based on area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM that may include the sterile insect technique (SIT. To support the planning and implementation of future AW-IPM activities, larval surveys were carried out to provide key data on spatial and seasonal dynamics of local vector populations. Methods Monthly cross-sectional larval surveys were carried out between March 2005 and May 2007 in two localities (Dongola and Merowe adjacent to the river Nile. A stratified random sampling strategy based on the use of Remote Sensing (RS, Geographical Information Systems (GIS and the Global Positioning System (GPS was used to select survey locations. Breeding sites were mapped using GPS and data on larval density and breeding site characteristics were recorded using handheld computers. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify breeding site characteristics associated with increased risk of presence of larvae. Seasonal patterns in the proportion of breeding sites positive for larvae were compared visually to contemporaneous data on climate and river height. Results Of a total of 3,349 aquatic habitats sampled, 321 (9.6% contained An. arabiensis larvae. The frequency with which larvae were found varied markedly by habitat type. Although most positive sites were associated with temporary standing water around the margins of the main Nile channel, larvae were also found at brickworks and in areas of leaking pipes and canals – often far from the river. Close to the Nile channel, a distinct seasonal pattern in larval populations was evident and appeared to be linked to the rise and fall of the river level. These patterns were not evident in vector populations breeding in artificial water sources away from the river. Conclusion The GIS-based survey strategy developed in this study provides key data on the population dynamics of An. arabiensis in Northern State. Quantitative estimates of the contributions of various habitat types and their proximity to settlements provide a basis for planning a strategy for reducing malaria risk by elimination of the vector population.

  6. [Effectiveness of aerial application of VectoBac G larvicide granules against mosquitoes in the Olomouc region in spring 2006].

    Chmela, J; Mazánek, L; Nakládal, Z; Pesáková, L; Halirová, R

    2007-04-01

    In the spring 2006, a flood emergency occurred in the Olomouc region after a rapid snow thaw, with the formation of multiple periodic pools and overflows persisting for long periods. In the floodplain forests, as expected, mass occurrence of adult mosquitoes was observed, infesting the nearby villages. The mosquito emergency continued until August and mosquitoes of both the spring species, in particular, Ochlerotatus cantans, and summer species were implicated in it. To control this emergency, aerial application of VectoBac G larvicide granules based on Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (BTI) at a dose of 6.4 kg/ha was used for the first time in the Olomouc region. Its efficacy was close to 100 % for the treated water areas. The effect was clearly evident in the communities situated in the vicinity of the treated breeding grounds. Nevertheless, not all breeding grounds and blind stream meanders could be treated aerially. As a result, mosquitoes from the untreated breeding grounds caused an emergency in the nearby communities where insecticide aerosols had to be applied on a large scale, even repeatedly in some cases. The treatment of the mosquito breeding grounds with BTI based larvicide granules proved to be an effective and fully selective approach to controlling mosquitoes. Although the technology is exacting and requires professional and organizational skills, it is expected that, in the Czech Republic, this environmentally friendly approach to mosquito control will replace the large scale use of non-selective chemical aerosol insecticides. The public health protection, administrative and legislative authorities should be active in promoting the use of specific BTI based larvicides for the treatment of mosquito breeding grounds, even if located in protected areas, whenever it is needed for mosquito control in emergencies. PMID:17593805

  7. Can mosquitoes fly in the rain?

    Dickerson, Andrew; Madhavan, Nihar; Hu, David

    2011-01-01

    Collisions with raindrops are one of many obstacles insects face during flight. In this fluid dynamics video, we present a series of high-speed films of impacts between mosquitoes and raindrops. We also present drop impacts upon insect mimics, which are unsupported styrofoam balls of the same mass as mosquitoes. High-speed videography and particle tracking during collision are employed to determine the insect position versus time. We determine the magnitude of acceleration by considering the momentum transfer and impact duration. Experiments with live mosquitoes indicate a surprising ability to quickly recover flight post-collision, despite accelerations of 30-300 gravities over durations of 1 ms.

  8. The Impact of Transgenic Mosquitoes on Dengue Virulence to Humans and Mosquitoes

    Medlock, Jan; Luz, Paula M; Struchiner, Claudio J.; Galvani, Alison P.

    2009-01-01

    Dengue is a major public health concern in the tropics and subtropics. Innovative transgenic strategies to render Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the primary vector of dengue, incompetent for dengue transmission are under development. We modeled the evolutionary impact of different transgenic mosquito strategies on dengue-induced mortality, that is, dengue virulence, to both humans and mosquitoes. This model incorporates various evolutionary trade-offs in dengue virus epidemiological traits, for ex...

  9. Distribution of mosquitoes in relation to urban landscape characteristics.

    Gleiser, R M; Zalazar, L P

    2010-04-01

    The current global increase in prevalence of vector borne diseases, as well as an expansion of tropical infections to more temperate zones, justifies further studies on vector populations. Urban areas may favour viral transmission to humans through close contacts between the vectors and the vertebrate hosts, and also affecting mosquito populations by offering larval habitat, refuges and adequate microclimates to survive the winter. This work analyses the spatial distribution of potential vector mosquitoes in relation to landscape characteristics in an urban environment in a temperate climate region. Mosquitoes were trapped monthly from October 2005 to March 2006 in 25 sites within Córdoba city and suburbs with miniature light traps+CO2. Nine species were collected, and the most abundant were Culex quinquefasciatus (37.1%), C. apicinus (26.6%) and Aedes aegypti (13.9%). Species that may be involved in SLEv transmission were recorded throughout the sampling. C. quinquefasciatus was detected in 92% of the sites; however, only two sites showed consistently larger collections. The site of highest C. quinquefasciatus abundance was located within an area of high Saint Louis Encefalitis virus prevalence and risk of infection, further supporting this species involvement as a vector. Significant correlations were detected between land cover characteristics and abundance of C. apicinus, C. interfor and C. maxi that were consistent with previous knowledge about their larval habitat and domestic preferences, which may be useful for targeting vector control operations. PMID:19413916

  10. An entomological review of invasive mosquitoes in Europe.

    Medlock, J M; Hansford, K M; Versteirt, V; Cull, B; Kampen, H; Fontenille, D; Hendrickx, G; Zeller, H; Van Bortel, W; Schaffner, F

    2015-12-01

    Among the invasive mosquitoes registered all over the world, Aedes species are particularly frequent and important. As several of them are potential vectors of disease, they present significant health concerns for 21st century Europe. Five species have established in mainland Europe, with two (Aedes albopictus and Aedes japonicus) becoming widespread and two (Ae. albopictus and Aedes aegypti) implicated in disease transmission to humans in Europe. The routes of importation and spread are often enigmatic, the ability to adapt to local environments and climates are rapid, and the biting nuisance and vector potential are both an ecomonic and public health concern. Europeans are used to cases of dengue and chikungunya in travellers returning from the tropics, but the threat to health and tourism in mainland Europe is substantive. Coupled to that are the emerging issues in the European overseas territorities and this paper is the first to consider the impacts in the remoter outposts of Europe. If entomologists and public health authorities are to address the spread of these mosquitoes and mitigate their health risks they must first be prepared to share information to better understand their biology and ecology, and share data on their distribution and control successes. This paper focusses in greater detail on the entomological and ecological aspects of these mosquitoes to assist with the risk assessment process, bringing together a large amount of information gathered through the ECDC VBORNET project. PMID:25804287

  11. Asymptomatic humans transmit dengue virus to mosquitoes

    Duong, Veasna; Lambrechts, Louis; Paul, Richard E; Ly, Sowath; Lay, Rath Srey; Long, Kanya C; Huy, Rekol; Tarantola, Arnaud; Scott, Thomas W; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Buchy, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Three-quarters of the estimated 390 million dengue virus (DENV) infections each year are clinically inapparent. People with inapparent dengue virus infections are generally considered dead-end hosts for transmission because they do not reach sufficiently high viremia levels to infect mosquitoes. Here, we show that, despite their lower average level of viremia, asymptomatic people can be infectious to mosquitoes. Moreover, at a given level of viremia, DENV-infected people with no detectable sy...

  12. Aedes Mosquito Species in Western Saudi Arabia

    Alikhan, Masroor; Ghamdi, Khalid Al; Mahyoub, Jazem Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    The Aedes Meigen (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquito species populations in the western region of Saudi Arabia, especially in and around Jeddah, are increasing, therefore increasing susceptibility of humans to the dengue virus. An extensive survey was carried out for one year, and four species were identified with the help of different pictorial keys available. The identification was based on morphological characteristics of adult female Aedes mosquitoes.

  13. Mosquito immune responses to arbovirus infections

    Carol D. Blair; Olson, Ken E

    2014-01-01

    The principal mosquito innate immune response to virus infections, RNA interference (RNAi), differs substantially from the immune response to bacterial and fungal infections. The exo-siRNA pathway constitutes the major anti-arboviral RNAi response and its essential genetic components have been identified. Recent research has also implicated the Piwi-interacting RNA pathway in mosquito anti-arboviral immunity, but Piwi gene-family components involved are not well-defined. Arboviruses must evad...

  14. Forkhead transcription factors regulate mosquito reproduction

    Hansen, Immo A; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Munro, James B; Shiao, Shin-Hong; Cruz, Josefa; Lee, Iris W.; Heraty, John M.; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    Forkhead box (Fox) genes encode a family of transcription factors defined by a ‘winged helix’ DNA-binding domain. In this study we aimed to identify Fox factors that are expressed within the fat body of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti, and determine whether any of these are involved in the regulation of mosquito yolk protein gene expression. The Ae. aegypti genome contains eighteen loci that encode putative Fox factors. Our stringent cladistic analysis has profound implications for th...

  15. The Effect of Deltamethrin-treated Net Fencing around Cattle Enclosures on Outdoor-biting Mosquitoes in Kumasi, Ghana

    Maia, MF; Abonuusum, A; Lorenz, LM; Clausen, PH; Bauer, B.; Garms, R; Kruppa, T.

    2012-01-01

    Classic vector control strategies target mosquitoes indoors as the main transmitters of malaria are indoor-biting and -resting mosquitoes. However, the intensive use of insecticide-treated bed-nets (ITNs) and indoor residual spraying have put selective pressure on mosquitoes to adapt in order to obtain human blood meals. Thus, early-evening and outdoor vector activity is becoming an increasing concern. This study assessed the effect of a deltamethrin-treated net (100 mg/m(2)) attached to a on...

  16. Determined and estimated mosquito (Diptera, Culicidae) fauna in the city of Osijek, Croatia, using dry-ice baited CDC traps

    MERDIĆ, Enrih; Sudarić Bogojević, Mirta; BOCA, IVANA; Turić, Nataša

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The city of Osijek is well known as city of molesting mosquitoes. The investigation was done with the purpose of establishing a scientific basis for modern mosquito control. In this paper the results of a 10 year investigation of mosquitoes in Osijek (Croatia, south Panonnian Plain) are presented. Materials and Methods: Dry-ice baited CDC traps were used for samling. The traps were placed on 9 localities in the city of Osijek and were acive 22–24 hours a day....

  17. Mosquito larvicidal and pupaecidal potential of prodigiosin from Serratia marcescens and understanding its mechanism of action.

    Suryawanshi, Rahul K; Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Borase, Hemant P; Narkhede, Chandrakant P; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Patil, Satish V

    2015-09-01

    Mosquitoes spread lethal diseases like malaria and dengue fever to humans. Considering mosquito vector control as one of the best alternatives to reduce new infections, here we have analyzed the effect of purified pigment prodigiosin extracted from Serratia marcescens (NMCC 75) against larval and pupal stages of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. Mosquito larvicidal activities of purified prodigiosin revealed LC50 values of 14 ± 1.2, 15.6 ± 1.48, 18 ± 1.3, 21 ± 0.87 µg/ml against early IInd, IIIrd, IVth instar and pupal stages of Ae. aegypti, respectively. LC50 values for An. stephensi were found to be 19.7 ± 1.12, 24.7 ± 1.47, 26.6 ± 1.67, 32.2 ± 1.79 µg/ml against early IInd, IIIrd, IVth instar and pupae of An. stephensi, respectively. Further investigations toward understanding modes of action revealed variations in the activities of esterases, acetylcholine esterases, phosphatases, proteases and total proteins in the fourth instar larvae of Ae. aegypti indicating intrinsic difference in biochemical features due to prodigiosin treatment. Although there was no inhibition of enzymes like catalase and oxidase but may have profound inhibitory effect on carbonic anhydrase or H(+)-V-ATPase which is indicated by change in the pH of midgut and caeca of mosquito larvae. This reduced pH may be possibly due to the proton pump inhibitory activity of prodigiosin. Pure prodigiosin can prove to be an important molecule for mosquito control at larval and pupal stages of Ae. aegypti and An. stephensi. This is the first report on the mosquito pupaecidal activity of prodigiosin and its possible mechanism of action. PMID:26267052

  18. Specific detection of the floodwater mosquitoes Aedes sticticus and Aedes vexans DNA in predatory diving beetles.

    Vinnersten, Thomas Z Persson; Halvarsson, Peter; Lundström, Jan O

    2015-08-01

    Floodwater mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are associated with periodically flooded wet meadows, marshes, and swamps in floodplains of major rivers worldwide, and their larvae are abundant in the shallow parts of flooded areas. The nuisance caused by the blood-seeking adult female mosquitoes motivates mosquito control. Larviciding with Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis is considered the most environmentally safe method. However, some concern has been raised whether aquatic predatory insects could be indirectly affected by this reduction in a potential vital prey. Top predators in the temporary wetlands in the River Dalälven floodplains are diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), and Aedes sticticus and Ae. vexans are the target species for mosquito control. For detailed studies on this aquatic predator-prey system, we developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for detection of mosquito DNA in the guts of medium-sized diving beetles. Primers were designed for amplifying short mitochondrial DNA fragments of the cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI) gene in Ae. sticticus and Ae. vexans, respectively. Primer specificity was confirmed and half-life detectability of Ae. sticticus DNA in diving beetle guts was derived from a feeding and digestion experiment. The Ae. sticticus DNA within diving beetle guts was detected up to 12 h postfeeding, and half-life detectability was estimated to 5.6 h. In addition, field caught diving beetles were screened for Ae. sticticus and Ae. vexans DNA and in 14% of the diving beetles one or both mosquito species were detected, showing that these mosquito species are utilized as food by the diving beetles. PMID:24895318

  19. Odorant-Binding Proteins of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles funestus sensu stricto

    Xu, Wei; Cornel, Anthony J.; Leal, Walter S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The mosquito Anopheles funestus is one of the major malaria vector species in sub-Saharan Africa. Olfaction is essential in guiding mosquito behaviors. Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are highly expressed in insect olfactory tissues and involved in the first step of odorant reception. An improved understanding of the function of malaria mosquito OBPs may contribute to identifying new attractants/repellents and assist in the development of more efficient and environmentally friendly mosquito controlling strategies. Methodology In this study, a large screening of over 50 ecologically significant odorant compounds led to the identification of 12 ligands that elicit significant electroantennographic (EAG) responses from An. funestus female antennae. To compare the absolute efficiency/potency of these chemicals, corrections were made for differences in volatility by determining the exact amount in a stimulus puff. Fourteen AfunOBP genes were cloned and their expression patterns were analyzed. AfunOBP1, 3, 7, 20 and 66 showed olfactory tissue specificity by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that among olfactory-specific OBPs, AfunOBP1 and 3 are the most enriched OBPs in female antennae. Binding assay experiments showed that at pH 7, AfunOBP1 significantly binds to 2-undecanone, nonyl acetate, octyl acetate and 1-octen-3-ol but AfunOBP3, which shares 68% identify with AfunOBP1 at amino acid level, showed nearly no binding activity to the selected 12 EAG-active odorant compounds. Conclusion This work presents for the first time a study on the odorants and OBPs of the malaria vector mosquito An. funestus, which may provide insight into the An. funestus olfactory research, assist in a comparative study between major malaria mosquitoes An. gambiae and An. funestus olfactory system, and help developing new mosquito control strategies to reduce malaria transmission. PMID:21042539

  20. Bacteria as a source of oviposition attractant for Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    Arbaoui, A A; Chua, T H

    2014-03-01

    Since a safe and effective mass vaccination program against dengue fever is not presently available, a good way to prevent and control dengue outbreaks depends mainly on controlling the mosquito vectors. Aedes aegypti mosquito populations can be monitored and reduced by using ovitraps baited with organic infusions. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted which demonstrated that the bacteria in bamboo leaf infusion produce volatile attractants and contact chemical stimulants attractive to the female mosquitoes. The results showed that the female mosquitoes laid most of their eggs (59.9 ± 8.1 vs 2.9 ± 2.8 eggs, P<0.001) in bamboo leaf infusions when compared to distilled water. When the fresh infusion was filtered with a 0.45 μm filter membrane, the female mosquitoes laid significantly more eggs (64.1 ± 6.6 vs 4.9 ± 2.6 eggs, P<0.001) in unfiltered infusion. However when a 0.8 μm filter membrane was used, the female laid significantly more eggs (62.0 ± 4.3 vs 10.1 ± 7.8 eggs, P<0.001) in filtrate compared to a solution containing the residue. We also found that a mixture of bacteria isolated from bamboo leaf infusion serve as potent oviposition stimulants for gravid Aedes mosquitoes. Aedes aegypti laid significantly more eggs (63.3 ± 6.5 vs 3.1 ± 2.4 eggs, P<0.001) in bacteria suspension compared to sterile R2A medium. Our results suggest microbial activity has a role in the production of odorants that mediate the oviposition response of gravid mosquitoes. PMID:24862053

  1. Repelentes electrnicos contra mosquitos: propaganda y realidad

    Frank Coro

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una revisin bibliogrfica acerca del uso de dispositivos electroacsticos con supuesta accin repelente sobre las hembras de diferentes especies de mosquitos hematfagos. Se dan 15 referencias directas y 2 indirectas, en todas se concluye que estos dispositivos no protegen a quienes los portan de las picadas de los mosquitos. Se dan los nombres de 9 de los dispositivos probados, as como de 16 de las principales especies de mosquitos presentes en las pruebas de campo. Estas pruebas de campo se han realizado en condiciones ecolgicas muy diferentes, que van desde alaska hasta el frica Ecuatorial. Tambin se menciona el efecto potencialmente daino al hombre de los dispositivos que emiten frecuencias a alta intensidad.A bibliographic review about the use of electroacustic devices with a supposed repellent action on the females of different species of hematophagous mosquitoes is presented. 15 direct references and 2 indirect ones are given, in which it is concluded that these devices do not protect those who have them from the stings of mosquitoes. The names of 9 of the tested devices as well as of 16 of the main species of mosquitoes present in the field tests are mentioned. These tests have been carried out in very different ecological conditions from Alaska to Equatorial Africa. It is also stressed that the high intensity ultrasonic frequencies emitted by these devices produces a potentially harmful effect on man.

  2. Oviposition strategies of temporary pool mosquitoes in relation to weather, tidal regime and land use in a temperate wetland.

    Cardo, M V; Vezzani, D; Carbajo, A E

    2012-12-01

    Wetlands have traditionally been associated with harbouring mosquitoes, a well-known nuisance and vectors of diseases. Within mosquito life cycle, oviposition is a determinant event by shaping their individual fitness and vectorial capacity. The study was conducted in one of the main temperate wetlands in South America. We used Generalized Linear Models to study the relation between temperature, precipitation, tidal regime, land use, microenvironment, and the occurrence of floodwater (Ochlerotatus and Psorophora spp.) and raft-laying (Culex and Uranotaenia spp.) mosquitoes using temporary pools as larval habitats. Pool occurrence was negatively associated with temperature, and positively related to precipitation and high tides. As regards the land use, it was lowest in domestic areas and plantations, intermediate in secondary forests, and highest in marshes. Each oviposition strategy was best modelled as a function of different environmental factors. The occurrence of floodwater mosquitoes was positively associated with high cumulative precipitation and low tide records. Raft-laying mosquitoes were related to low temperature records, while the effect of flooding varied with the land use. In view of these results, physical (water inputs and movement), chemical, and biological (egg and larval flushing, and predatory interactions) considerations are given to provide insight in the oviposition patterns of mosquitoes occurring in this complex wetland. We finally propose the generation of a tidal flow as a control measure against floodwater mosquitoes, which are the most anthropophilic in the study area. PMID:22647341

  3. Detection of all four dengue serotypes in Aedes aegypti female mosquitoes collected in a rural area in Colombia.

    Pérez-Castro, Rosalía; Castellanos, Jaime E; Olano, Víctor A; Matiz, María Inés; Jaramillo, Juan F; Vargas, Sandra L; Sarmiento, Diana M; Stenström, Thor Axel; Overgaard, Hans J

    2016-04-01

    The Aedes aegypti vector for dengue virus (DENV) has been reported in urban and periurban areas. The information about DENV circulation in mosquitoes in Colombian rural areas is limited, so we aimed to evaluate the presence of DENV in Ae. aegypti females caught in rural locations of two Colombian municipalities, Anapoima and La Mesa. Mosquitoes from 497 rural households in 44 different rural settlements were collected. Pools of about 20 Ae. aegypti females were processed for DENV serotype detection. DENV in mosquitoes was detected in 74% of the analysed settlements with a pool positivity rate of 62%. The estimated individual mosquito infection rate was 4.12% and the minimum infection rate was 33.3/1,000 mosquitoes. All four serotypes were detected; the most frequent being DENV-2 (50%) and DENV-1 (35%). Two-three serotypes were detected simultaneously in separate pools. This is the first report on the co-occurrence of natural DENV infection of mosquitoes in Colombian rural areas. The findings are important for understanding dengue transmission and planning control strategies. A potential latent virus reservoir in rural areas could spill over to urban areas during population movements. Detecting DENV in wild-caught adult mosquitoes should be included in the development of dengue epidemic forecasting models. PMID:27074252

  4. Detection of all four dengue serotypes in Aedes aegypti female mosquitoes collected in a rural area in Colombia

    Pérez-Castro, Rosalía; Castellanos, Jaime E; Olano, Víctor A; Matiz, María Inés; Jaramillo, Juan F; Vargas, Sandra L; Sarmiento, Diana M; Stenström, Thor Axel; Overgaard, Hans J

    2016-01-01

    The Aedes aegypti vector for dengue virus (DENV) has been reported in urban and periurban areas. The information about DENV circulation in mosquitoes in Colombian rural areas is limited, so we aimed to evaluate the presence of DENV in Ae. aegypti females caught in rural locations of two Colombian municipalities, Anapoima and La Mesa. Mosquitoes from 497 rural households in 44 different rural settlements were collected. Pools of about 20 Ae. aegypti females were processed for DENV serotype detection. DENV in mosquitoes was detected in 74% of the analysed settlements with a pool positivity rate of 62%. The estimated individual mosquito infection rate was 4.12% and the minimum infection rate was 33.3/1,000 mosquitoes. All four serotypes were detected; the most frequent being DENV-2 (50%) and DENV-1 (35%). Two-three serotypes were detected simultaneously in separate pools. This is the first report on the co-occurrence of natural DENV infection of mosquitoes in Colombian rural areas. The findings are important for understanding dengue transmission and planning control strategies. A potential latent virus reservoir in rural areas could spill over to urban areas during population movements. Detecting DENV in wild-caught adult mosquitoes should be included in the development of dengue epidemic forecasting models. PMID:27074252

  5. Detection of all four dengue serotypes in Aedes aegypti female mosquitoes collected in a rural area in Colombia

    Rosalía Pérez-Castro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Aedes aegypti vector for dengue virus (DENV has been reported in urban and periurban areas. The information about DENV circulation in mosquitoes in Colombian rural areas is limited, so we aimed to evaluate the presence of DENV in Ae. aegypti females caught in rural locations of two Colombian municipalities, Anapoima and La Mesa. Mosquitoes from 497 rural households in 44 different rural settlements were collected. Pools of about 20 Ae. aegypti females were processed for DENV serotype detection. DENV in mosquitoes was detected in 74% of the analysed settlements with a pool positivity rate of 62%. The estimated individual mosquito infection rate was 4.12% and the minimum infection rate was 33.3/1,000 mosquitoes. All four serotypes were detected; the most frequent being DENV-2 (50% and DENV-1 (35%. Two-three serotypes were detected simultaneously in separate pools. This is the first report on the co-occurrence of natural DENV infection of mosquitoes in Colombian rural areas. The findings are important for understanding dengue transmission and planning control strategies. A potential latent virus reservoir in rural areas could spill over to urban areas during population movements. Detecting DENV in wild-caught adult mosquitoes should be included in the development of dengue epidemic forecasting models.

  6. Larvicidal Activity of Tephrosia vogelii Crude Extracts on Mosquito Larval Stages

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of natural products and biological insect control methods is gaining importance because of concerns about the environment, since they are more easily biodegradable. In some parts of Uganda, organic farmers have adopted the use of Tephrosia vogelii, a shrubby, leguminous and woody plant for control of storage pests. However, the efficacy of Tephrosia vogelii crude extracts in the control of Dipteran insect larvae under field conditions has not been well tested. Their use for the control of insect vectors such as mosquitoes has not also been fully evaluated. Tephrosia vogelii plant materials were collected from two selected sites, one on a higher altitude than the other using polythene study. The material was chopped, properly labeled and air-dried in a shade for two weeks. Four solvents where used for extraction: Water, Petroleum ether, Chloroform, Methanol. The extract was dried in an oven at about 32-33C for several days, after which it was weighed and stored in the fridge at 4C until the time of exposing the mosquito larvae. Shoot Evening Methanol (SEM was the most effective among methanol extracts; killing an average of 4.57 mosquito larvae in 8 min while Shoot Evening Water (SEW was the most effective of water extracts killing an average of 2.57 mosquito larvae in 8 min; hence the SEM was considered to be nearly two times more efficacious than SEW on mosquito larvae, at a concentration of 25%: 10.8% or 2.3:1 SEM: SEW, respectively. Tephrosia vogelii crude extracts could potentially therefore be used to control the larval stages of mosquitoes.

  7. The landing of field mosquitoes on permethrin-treated military uniforms in queensland, australia.

    Frances, S P; Mackenzie, D O; Sferopoulos, R; Lee, Bin

    2014-12-01

    A study to evaluate the protection provided by permethrin-treated military fabric following cold-water washing against host-seeking mosquitoes is reported. The landing/probing of native mosquitoes on Australian Defence Force Disruptive Pattern Combat Uniform shirts treated by dipping in 0.6% permethrin emulsion (Perigen Defence®, containing 500 g/l permethrin), and commercial factory treatments in the USA (Factory A) and Europe (Factory B) were recorded after 0, 1, 3, 5, and 10 washes. The study showed that significantly shorter landing/probing times compared with untreated controls were recorded for shirts treated with Factory A treatment after 0 and 1 wash, and for the Factory B treatment after 0 washes, and there were no differences between permethrin treatment and control landing. The study concludes that better methods to assess protection from landing/probing mosquitoes in the field are needed. PMID:25843139

  8. Factors influencing the predation rates of Anisops breddini (Hemiptera: Notonectidae feeding on mosquito larvae

    R. Weterings

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Notonectidae are a family of water bugs that are known to be important predators of mosquito larvae and have great potential in the biological control of vector mosquitoes. An experiment was conducted to assess mosquito larvae predation by Anisops breddini, a species common to Southeast Asia. The predation rates were recorded in context of prey density, predator density, predator size and prey type. Predation rates were strongly affected by prey type and less by prey density and predator density. They ranged between 1.2 prey items per day for pupae of Aedes aegeypti and Armigeres moultoni to 5.9 for Ae. aegypti larvae. Compared with studies on other Notonectidae species, the predation rates appear low, which is probably caused by the relative small size of the specimens used in this study. An. breddini is very common in the region and often found in urban areas; therefore, the species has potential as a biological control agent.

  9. Aedes mosquito salivary immune peptides: boost or block dengue viral infections

    Natthanej Luplertlop

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus, one of the most important arthropod-borne viruses, infected to human can severely cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. There are expected about 50 million dengue infections and 500 000 individuals are hospitalized with dengue hemorrhagic fever, mainly in Southeast Asia, Pacific, and in Americas reported each year. The rapid expansion of global dengue is one of a major public health challenge, together with not yet successful solutions of dengue epidemic control strategies. Thus, these dynamic dengue viral infections exhibited high demographic, societal, and public health infrastructure impacts on human. This review aimed to highlight the current understanding of dengue mosquito immune responses and role of mosquito salivary glands on dengue infection. These information may provide a valuable knowledge of disease pathogenesis, especially in mosquito vector and dengue virus interaction, which may help to control and prevent dengue distribution.

  10. Ecology and habitat characterization of mosquitoes in Saudi Arabia.

    Khater, E I; Sowilem, M M; Sallam, M F; Alahmed, A M

    2013-09-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) contains many of the world's mosquito vectors of parasitic and arboviral diseases. However, few studies addressed their geographic distribution and larval habitat characteristics. We carried out a 14-months mosquito survey in three KSA regions: Makkah and Al-Baha (western) and Jezan (south-western). Larvae were collected by dipping from various water habitats and adults by CDC light and BG sentinel traps. Climatic conditions and physicochemical characteristics of collection sites were recorded. We collected a total of 3331 mosquitoes {larvae (n= 2766, 83%) and adults (n= 565, 17%)} of 21 species from six genera (8 Anopheles, 8 Culex, 1 Aedes and 3 others). Larval water habitats included streams, rocky pits, seepage, leakage and containers (plastic and concrete). Of the total larvae collected, 52% (n= 1439) were Anopheles, 44.3% (n= 1226) were Culex, 0.51% (n= 14) were Aedes aegypti and 3.1% (n= 87) were from four other species. The most abundant species were Culex tritaeniorhynchus (n=1008, ~36.3%) and Anopheles dthali (n= 976, ~35.3%). The medically-important species were Anopheles arabiensis (n= 128) and Anopheles sergenti (n= 58), vectors of malaria and Culex tritaeniorhynchus, Culex quinquefasciatus (n= 53) and Ae. aegypti (n= 14), vectors of arboviral diseases. Three species are new records in KSA and all from Jezan: Anopheles superpictus (n= 3), Culex duttoni (n= 1) and Culex mimeticus (n= 1), however the numbers were very low, which requires further investigations. Only two species were collected in the adult stage, Cx. quinquefasciatus (n= 561: 551 females and 10 males) from Makkah and Culex theileri (n= 4, all females) from Al-Baha. Only 3.8% (n= 21) of Cx. quinquefasciatus females were blood-fed. This study provides new information on the bionomics of 21 mosquito species in KSA including six dominant vector species and thus adds to the scarce data available on them. This information is essential to better understand mosquito population dynamics in relation to disease transmission and control. PMID:24189671

  11. An elaborated feeding cycle model for reductions in vectorial capacity of night-biting mosquitoes by insecticide-treated nets

    Harris Anthony; Perisse Andre; McKenzie F Ellis; Takala Shannon; Le Menach Arnaud; Flahault Antoine; Smith David L

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Insecticide Treated Nets (ITNs) are an important tool for malaria control. ITNs are effective because they work on several parts of the mosquito feeding cycle, including both adult killing and repelling effects. Methods Using an elaborated description of the classic feeding cycle model, simple formulas have been derived to describe how ITNs change mosquito behaviour and the intensity of malaria transmission, as summarized by vectorial capacity and EIR. The predicted change...

  12. Exposure to deltamethrin affects development of Plasmodium falciparum inside wild pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae s.s. mosquitoes in Uganda.

    Kristan, M.; Lines, J; Nuwa, A.; Ntege, C; Meek, SR; Abeku, TA

    2016-01-01

    Background Pyrethroid resistance in African vector mosquitoes is a threat to malaria control. Resistant mosquitoes can survive insecticide doses that would normally be lethal. We studied effects of such doses on Plasmodium falciparum development inside kdr-resistant Anopheles gambiae s.s. in Uganda. Methods We collected An. gambiae s.s. homozygous for kdr-L1014S mutation, fed them on blood samples from 42 P. falciparum-infected local patients, then exposed them either to nets treated with sub...

  13. Mosquito larvae change their feeding behavior in response to kairomones from some predators.

    Roberts, Derek

    2014-03-01

    The efficacy of using predators for the biological control of mosquito disease vectors will be reduced if mosquito larvae respond to predator presence. The larvae of two mosquito species were investigated to study whether they responded to predator kairomones by increasing surface filter-feeding, which is a less active and thus less risky feeding strategy than bottom feeding. Culex quinquefasciatus Say is normally found in highly polluted water, where it will have little contact with predators. Except for some third instars, its larvae showed no response to four different types of predators. Culiseta longiareolata Macquart, living in rain-filled rock pools, is frequently attacked by a range of predators. All instars tested (second, third, and fourth instars) strongly responded to chemicals from dragonfly nymphs (Crocothemis erythraea Brullé), damselfly nymphs (Ischnura evansi Morton), and the fish Aphanius dispar Ruppel. However, they did not respond to final-instar water scorpions (Nepa cinerea L.), which would not feed on the mosquito larvae. Second- and third-instar Cs. longiareolata produced the same response to chopped up mosquito larvae as they did to dragonfly nymphs, but fourth instars produced a significantly stronger response to dragonfly nymphs-both those unfed and those fed in situ. Thus, Cs. longiareolata not only identified different predators and responded accordingly, but also responded to conspecific alarm pheromones. Cx quinquefasciatus showed little response to predators or to alarm pheromones from damaged conspecific larvae. PMID:24724285

  14. An insight into the sialotranscriptome of the West Nile mosquito vector, Culex tarsalis

    Olson Kenneth E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saliva of adult female mosquitoes help sugar and blood feeding by providing enzymes and polypeptides that help sugar digestion, control microbial growth and counteract their vertebrate host hemostasis and inflammation. Mosquito saliva also potentiates the transmission of vector borne pathogens, including arboviruses. Culex tarsalis is a bird feeding mosquito vector of West Nile Virus closely related to C. quinquefasciatus, a mosquito relatively recently adapted to feed on humans, and the only mosquito of the genus Culex to have its sialotranscriptome so far described. Results A total of 1,753 clones randomly selected from an adult female C. tarsalis salivary glands (SG cDNA library were sequenced and used to assemble a database that yielded 809 clusters of related sequences, 675 of which were singletons. Primer extension experiments were performed in selected clones to further extend sequence coverage, allowing for the identification of 283 protein sequences, 80 of which code for putative secreted proteins. Conclusion Comparison of the C. tarsalis sialotranscriptome with that of C. quinquefasciatus reveals accelerated evolution of salivary proteins as compared to housekeeping proteins. The average amino acid identity among salivary proteins is 70.1%, while that for housekeeping proteins is 91.2% (P Aedes genus have been identified in C. tarsalis. Interestingly, a protein family so far unique to C. quinquefasciatus, with 30 genes, is also found in C. tarsalis, indicating it was not a specific C. quinquefasciatus acquisition in its evolution to optimize mammal blood feeding.

  15. COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF MOSQUITO BIOCONTROL EFFICIENCY BETWEEN GUPPY (POECILIA RETICULATA AND PANCHAX MINNOW (APLOCHEILUS PANCHAX

    Sandipan Gupta and Samir Banerjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was designed to compare the mosquito biocontrol efficiency of guppy and panchax minnow, the two popular fish species which so far have been used for mosquito biocontrol here in India. Study of the predation efficiency in relation to fish size and larval size has revealed significant better predation efficiency of panchax minnow over guppy in all size groups except for pupae in small size group fishes. Study of the comparative predation efficiency under vegetative cover has revealed significant (P<0.01 higher predation efficiency for panchax minnow over guppy. Study of the comparative predation efficiency under different depth of water has revealed superior predation efficiency of guppy under shallow water depth whereas panchax minnow has shown significantly better predation efficiency with increasing water depth. So, panchax minnow is a better mosquito biocontrol agent in waterbodies with vegetative covering and in comparatively deep water bodies whereas guppy can be used for mosquito control in very shallow water depth. But overall the study has depicted the superiority of panchax minnow over guppy as mosquito biocontrol agent.

  16. Identification and Characterization of Seminal Fluid Proteins in the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus

    Boes, Kathryn E.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Wong, Alex; Harrington, Laura C.; Wolfner, Mariana F.; Sirot, Laura K.

    2014-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) is an important vector for pathogens that affect human health, including the viruses that cause dengue and Chikungunya fevers. It is also one of the world's fastest-spreading invasive species. For these reasons, it is crucial to identify strategies for controlling the reproduction and spread of this mosquito. During mating, seminal fluid proteins (Sfps) are transferred from male mosquitoes to females, and these Sfps modulate female behavior and physiology in ways that influence reproduction. Despite the importance of Sfps on female reproductive behavior in mosquitoes and other insects, the identity of Sfps in Ae. albopictus has not previously been reported. We used transcriptomics and proteomics to identify 198 Sfps in Ae. albopictus. We discuss possible functions of these Sfps in relation to Ae. albopictus reproduction-related biology. We additionally compare the sequences of these Sfps with proteins (including reported Sfps) in several other species, including Ae. aegypti. While only 72 (36.4%) of Ae. albopictus Sfps have putative orthologs in Ae. aegypti, suggesting low conservation of the complement of Sfps in these species, we find no evidence for an elevated rate of evolution or positive selection in the Sfps that are shared between the two Aedes species, suggesting high sequence conservation of those shared Sfps. Our results provide a foundation for future studies to investigate the roles of individual Sfps on feeding and reproduction in this mosquito. Functional analysis of these Sfps could inform strategies for managing the rate of pathogen transmission by Ae. albopictus. PMID:24945155

  17. On the analysis of effectiveness in mass application of mosquito repellent for dengue disease prevention

    Aldila, D.; Soewono, E.; Nuraini, N.

    2012-05-01

    Dengue disease has been known as one of dangerous vector-borne diseases and become serious threat in many tropical countries. With no vaccine and antiviral available until nowadays, and frequent appearance of extraordinary dengue outbreaks, many governments are forced to declare national problem for dengue. At this moment, the only method available to prevent dengue disease transmission is to combat the disease-carrying mosquitoes as well as to reduce the contact between human and mosquitoes. The fast growing dengue transmission in many countries in recent years indicates that the mosquito control programs are far from successful. The use of mosquito repellent is one possible instrument which could be used as an effective mass treatment to prevent the dengue outbreak during endemic period. Here in this paper a Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered (S-I-R) dengue transmission model with repellent mass treatment is being applied to portions of children and adult compartments. Analysis of the basic reproductive ratio (Ro) of the model is done. It is shown, with reasonable choices of portions of treated children and adults, in combination with reduction of mosquito population, the basic reproductive ratio can be significantly reduced and occurrence of endemic can be avoided. Numerical simulations are shown for various treatment scenarios.

  18. Role of fish as predators of mosquito larvae on the floodplain of the Gambia River.

    Louca, Vasilis; Lucas, Martyn C; Green, Clare; Majambere, Silas; Fillinger, Ulrike; Lindsay, Steve W

    2009-05-01

    We examined the potential of using native fish species in regulating mosquitoes in the floodplain of the Gambia River, the major source of mosquitoes in rural parts of The Gambia. Fishes and mosquito larvae were sampled along two 2.3-km-long transects, from the landward edge of the floodplain to the river from May to November 2005 to 2007. A semifield trial was used to test the predatory capacity of fish on mosquito larvae and the influence of fish chemical cues on oviposition. In the field, there was less chance of finding culicine larvae where Tilapia guineensis, the most common floodplain fish, were present; however, the presence of anophelines was not related to the presence or absence of any fish species. In semifield trials, both T. guineensis and Epiplatys spilargyreius were effective predators, removing all late-stage culicine and anopheline larvae within 1 d. Fewer culicines oviposited in sites with fish, suggesting that ovipositing culicine females avoid water with fish. In contrast, oviposition by anophelines was unaffected by fish. Our studies show that T. guineensis is a potential candidate for controlling mosquitoes in The Gambia. PMID:19496426

  19. Repellent Action Of Neem (Azadiracta India Seed Oil Against Aedes Aegypti Mosquitoes

    Hati A K

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Neem (Azadiracta India seed oil in appropriate amount when smeared on the surface of the hand showed excellent repellent action against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. When 1 ml of oil was spread on the hand, with an approximate area of 160 sq cm the percentage of alighting and blood fed mosquitoes in the experimental cages varied from 14 to 78 and 4 to 46 respectively. This percentage decreased to 6 to 18 and 0 to 16 respectively when the amount of oil applied was 1.5 ml. Only 0-4% of the mosquitoes alighted on the skin of which 2% only took the blood meal when 2 ml of the oil was used to cover the hand. In the control cages cent percent of the mosquitoes alighted and sucked blood. The repellent action was directly proportional to the hour of exposure to the oil. It was also observed that even after alighting on a oil- smeared skin a sizeable proportion of mosquitoes were not able to imbibe blood meal. Neem seed oil was non-toxic, non- irritating to skin.

  20. Seasonal Dynamics, Longevity, and Biting Activity of Anopheline Mosquitoes in Southwestern Ethiopia.

    Taye, Behailu; Lelisa, Kidane; Emana, Daniel; Asale, Abebe; Yewhalaw, Delenasaw

    2016-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of vector species composition, abundance, dynamics, feeding pattern, and host finding strategy is the base to determine when, what, and how control should be implemented. Thus, this study was conducted to assess entomological parameters of anopheline mosquitoes in nine villages in Seka district, southwestern Ethiopia, from June to December 2012. Mosquito collection was carried out from selected households in each of the nine study villages using light trap catches from June to December 2012. Differences in mean mosquito density, parity rates before, and after indoor residual spraying (IRS) operation were compared. In total, 1,136 adult female anopheline mosquitoes were collected during the study period. All anopheline mosquitoes collected belong to three species. Anopheles gambiae senso lato Giles was the most predominant (69.7%) followed by Anopheles coustani s.l. Laveran (22.7%) and Anopheles pharoensis Theobald (7.6%). There was significant variation in mean mosquito density among An. gambiae s.l., An. coustani s.l., and An. pharoensis. Parity rate of An. gambiae s.l. before spray operation was significantly higher than after spray operation. The highest peak biting activity of An. gambiae s.l. was between 1800 and 2100 hours. The longevity of An. gambiae s.l. ranged from 3.4 to 12.5 d. The highest vector abundance and parity rate were recorded in July and August. In conclusion, the behavioral plasticity and early biting activity of An. gambiae s.l. could affect current vector control tools (IRS and long lasting insecticidal nets). Hence, it is imperative to explore intervention tools for outdoor malaria vector control in addition to the existing IRS and long-lasting insecticidal nets. PMID:26798142

  1. Laboratory and field evaluation of spinosad, a biorational natural product, against larvae of Culex mosquitoes.

    Jiang, Yongxing; Mulla, Mir S

    2009-12-01

    Spinosad, a fermentation product from the naturally occurring soil actinomycete bacterium Saccharopolyspora spinosa, has been reported to have a high level of activity against phytophagous insects and insects impacting human and animal health. It has low mammalian toxicity and a favorable environmental profile, including low persistence and no toxicity to fish and wildlife at mosquito larvicidal rates. In order to determine the activity and efficacy of spinosad against larvae of Culex mosquitoes, technical powder and liquid formulations of spinosad were tested against mosquito larvae under laboratory and field conditions. In the laboratory, spinosad powder was highly active against 2nd and 4th instars of Culex quinquefasciatus after 24 h of exposure. The extent of mortality increased slightly after 48 h of exposure. Second instars were slightly more susceptible than 4th instars. The liquid formulation showed somewhat higher activity (about 2x) than the technical powder material at both the LCs50 and LC90 levels. In field microcosm tests against natural populations of mosquitoes, the liquid formulation yielded excellent control of immature Culex spp. for 21 days at concentrations of 0.05 mg (AI)/liter and 35 days at 0.1 to 0.5 mg (AI)/liter in outdoor tubs. This formulation also yielded excellent control of natural Culex mosquitoes for 14 days or longer at 0.025 to 0.1 mg (AI)/liter in outdoor ponds. From our data, it appears that spinosad as a new mode of action has a good potential for controlling mosquito larvae. PMID:20099593

  2. A synthetic homing endonuclease-based gene drive system in the human malaria mosquito.

    Windbichler, Nikolai; Menichelli, Miriam; Papathanos, Philippos Aris; Thyme, Summer B; Li, Hui; Ulge, Umut Y; Hovde, Blake T; Baker, David; Monnat, Raymond J; Burt, Austin; Crisanti, Andrea

    2011-05-12

    Genetic methods of manipulating or eradicating disease vector populations have long been discussed as an attractive alternative to existing control measures because of their potential advantages in terms of effectiveness and species specificity. The development of genetically engineered malaria-resistant mosquitoes has shown, as a proof of principle, the possibility of targeting the mosquito's ability to serve as a disease vector. The translation of these achievements into control measures requires an effective technology to spread a genetic modification from laboratory mosquitoes to field populations. We have suggested previously that homing endonuclease genes (HEGs), a class of simple selfish genetic elements, could be exploited for this purpose. Here we demonstrate that a synthetic genetic element, consisting of mosquito regulatory regions and the homing endonuclease gene I-SceI, can substantially increase its transmission to the progeny in transgenic mosquitoes of the human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. We show that the I-SceI element is able to invade receptive mosquito cage populations rapidly, validating mathematical models for the transmission dynamics of HEGs. Molecular analyses confirm that expression of I-SceI in the male germline induces high rates of site-specific chromosomal cleavage and gene conversion, which results in the gain of the I-SceI gene, and underlies the observed genetic drive. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism by which genetic control measures can be implemented. Our results also show in principle how sequence-specific genetic drive elements like HEGs could be used to take the step from the genetic engineering of individuals to the genetic engineering of populations. PMID:21508956

  3. Insecticide resistance and malaria transmission: infection rate and oocyst burden in Culex pipiens mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium relictum

    Rivero Ana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The control of most vectors of malaria is threatened by the spread of insecticide resistance. One factor that has been hitherto largely overlooked is the potential effects of insecticide resistance on the ability of mosquitoes to transmit malaria: are insecticide-resistant mosquitoes as good vectors of Plasmodium as susceptible ones? The drastic physiological changes that accompany the evolution of insecticide resistance may indeed alter the ability of vectors to transmit diseases, a possibility that, if confirmed, could have major epidemiological consequences. Methods Using a novel experimental system consisting of the avian malaria parasite (Plasmodium relictum and its natural vector (the mosquito Culex pipiens, two of the most common mechanisms of insecticide resistance (esterase overproduction and acetylcholinesterase modification were investigated for their effect on mosquito infection rate and parasite burden. For this purpose two types of experiments were carried out using (i insecticide-resistant and susceptible laboratory isogenic lines of Cx. pipiens and (ii wild Cx. pipiens collected from a population where insecticide resistant and susceptible mosquitoes coexist in sympatry. Results The isogenic line and wild-caught mosquito experiments were highly consistent in showing no effect of either esterase overproduction or of acetylcholinesterase modification on either the infection rate or on the oocyst burden of mosquitoes. The only determinant of these traits was blood meal size, which was similar across the different insecticide resistant categories in both experiments. Conclusions Insecticide resistance was found to have no effect on Plasmodium development within the mosquito. This is the first time this question has been addressed using a natural mosquito-Plasmodium combination, while taking care to standardize the genetic background against which the insecticide resistance genes operate. Infection rate and oocyst burden are but two of the factors that determine the vectorial capacity of mosquitoes. Other key determinants of parasite transmission, such as mosquito longevity and behaviour, or the parasite's incubation time, need to be investigated before concluding on whether insecticide resistance influences the ability of mosquitoes to transmit malaria.

  4. Into the environment of mosquito-borne disease: A spatial analysis of vector distribution using traditional and remotely sensed methods

    Brown, Heidi E.

    Spatially explicit information is increasingly available for infectious disease modeling. However, such information is reluctantly or inappropriately incorporated. My dissertation research uses spatially explicit data to assess relationships between landscape and mosquito species distribution and discusses challenges regarding accurate predictive risk modeling. The goal of my research is to use remotely sensed environmental information and spatial statistical methods to better understand mosquito-borne disease epidemiology for improvement of public health responses. In addition to reviewing the progress of spatial infectious disease modeling, I present four research projects. I begin by evaluating the biases in surveillance data and build up to predictive modeling of mosquito species presence. In the first study I explore how mosquito surveillance trap types influence estimations of mosquito populations. Then. I use county-based human surveillance data and landscape variables to identify risk factors for West Nile virus disease. The third study uses satellite-based vegetation indices to identify spatial variation among West Nile virus vectors in an urban area and relates the variability to virus transmission dynamics. Finally, I explore how information from three satellite sensors of differing spatial and spectral resolution can be used to identify and distinguish mosquito habitat across central Connecticut wetlands. Analyses presented here constitute improvements to the prediction of mosquito distribution and therefore identification of disease risk factors. Current methods for mosquito surveillance data collection are labor intensive and provide an extremely limited, incomplete picture of the species composition and abundance. Human surveillance data offers additional challenges with respect to reporting bias and resolution, but is nonetheless informative in identifying environmental risk factors and disease transmission dynamics. Remotely sensed imagery supports mosquito and human disease surveillance data by providing spatially explicit, line resolution information about environmental factors relevant to vector-borne disease processes. Together, surveillance and remotely sensed environmental data facilitate improved description and modeling of disease transmission. Remote sensing can be used to develop predictive maps of mosquito distribution in relation to disease risk. This has implications for increased accuracy of mosquito control efforts. The projects presented in this dissertation enhance current public health capacities by examining the applications of spatial modeling with respect to mosquito-borne disease.

  5. Species Composition and Relative Abundance of Mosquitoes in Swat, Pakistan

    Ikram Ilahi; Muhammad Suleman

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) was conducted in Swat Pakistan, from April to September during 2000. The survey involved the sampling of both, adult and immature stages of mosquitoes, and recovered a total of 21 species in five genera. Sampling of adult mosquitoes involved Pyrethrum spray collections, Man-biting collections, and Animal-biting collection. Immature stages of mosquitoes were collected from variety of habitats including springs, irrigation channels, rice...

  6. The Plasmodium bottleneck: malaria parasite losses in the mosquito vector

    Ryan C Smith; Joel Vega-Rodríguez; Marcelo Jacobs-Lorena

    2014-01-01

    Nearly one million people are killed every year by the malaria parasite Plasmodium. Although the disease-causing forms of the parasite exist only in the human blood, mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles are the obligate vector for transmission. Here, we review the parasite life cycle in the vector and highlight the human and mosquito contributions that limit malaria parasite development in the mosquito host. We address parasite killing in its mosquito host and bottlenecks in parasite numbers tha...

  7. Simulation Modelling of Population Dynamics of Mosquito Vectors for Rift Valley Fever Virus in a Disease Epidemic Setting

    Mweya, Clement N.; Holst, Niels; Mboera, Leonard E. G.; Kimera, Sharadhuli I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is weather dependent arboviral infection of livestock and humans. Population dynamics of mosquito vectors is associated with disease epidemics. In our study, we use daily temperature and rainfall as model inputs to simulate dynamics of mosquito vectors population...... fecundity, water level, mosquito infection, host infection, interactions, and egg time. Extensible Markup Language (XML) files were used as recipes to integrate source codes in Qt creator with Universal Simulator plug-in. We observed that Floodwater Aedines and Culicine population continued to fluctuate...... with temperature and water level over simulation period while controlled by availability of host for blood feeding. Infection in the system was introduced by floodwater Aedines. Culicines pick infection from infected host once to amplify disease epidemic. Simulated mosquito population show sudden...

  8. Molecular Perspectives on the Genetics of Mosquitoes

    Mosquitoes have been a focus of scientific study since the turn of the century, when they were first linked with human diseases. This review concentrates on the three most intensely studied genera, Anopheles, Culex, and Aedes. These genera include the principal vectors of three major groups of human pathogens: malaria parasites of the genus Plasmodium, filarial worms of the genera Wuchereria and Brugia, and numerous arboviruses. Anophelines are the only mosquitoes known to transmit human malaria parasites, a group of organisms that may be responsible for more morbidity and mortality worldwide than any other human pathogen. Anophelines also transmit filarial worms, as do Culex and Aedes species. Among the 14 or more different mosquito genera known to harbor arboviruses (Mattingly, 1973), the most important are Culex and Aedes, which include the principal vectors of yellow fever, dengue, and most encephalitis-causing arboviruses.

  9. Evaluation of botanicals as repellents against mosquitoes

    N.G. Das, I. Baruah, P.K. Talukdar & S.C. Das

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Repellent properties of three plant extractsessential oil (steam distillate of Zanthoxylumlimonella (fruits, Citrus aurantifolia (leaf and petroleum ether extract of Z. limonella (fruitswere evaluated as repellent against Aedes (S. albopictus mosquitoes in mustard (Dhara and coconut(Parachute oil base under laboratory conditions. Three concentrations10, 20 and 30% of therepellents were evaluated. Repellents in mustard oil afforded longer protection time against thebites of Aedes (S. albopictus mosquitoes than those in coconut oil. At 30% concentration, 296304 min protection time was achieved by the test repellents in mustard oil base while repellents incoconut oil exhibited 223.5245 min protection time at the same concentration. Oil of Z. limonellagave the highest protection time against the bites of Aedes (S. albopictus mosquitoes at all theconcentrations than other herbal repellents tested both in mustard and coconut oil.

  10. SNP Genotyping Defines Complex Gene-Flow Boundaries Among African Malaria Vector Mosquitoes

    Park, D. J.; Redmond, S. N.; Coulibaly, M. B.; Traoré, S. F.; Sagnon, N.; Costantini, C.; Johnson, C.; Wiegand, R. C.; Collins, F. H.; Lander, E. S.; Wirth, D. F.; Kafatos, F. C.; Besansky, N. J.; Christophides, G. K.; Muskavitch, M. A. T.

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes in the Anopheles gambiae complex show rapid ecological and behavioral diversification, traits that promote malaria transmission and complicate vector control efforts. A high-density, genome-wide mosquito SNP-genotyping array allowed mapping of genomic differentiation between populations and species that exhibit varying levels of reproductive isolation. Regions near centromeres or within polymorphic inversions exhibited the greatest genetic divergence, but divergence was also observed elsewhere in the genomes. Signals of natural selection within populations were overrepresented among genomic regions that are differentiated between populations, implying that differentiation is often driven by population-specific selective events. Complex genomic differentiation among speciating vector mosquito populations implies that tools for genome-wide monitoring of population structure will prove useful for the advancement of malaria eradication. PMID:20966254

  11. Tools for delivering entomopathogenic fungi to malaria mosquitoes: effects of delivery surfaces on fungal efficacy and persistence

    Mnyone Ladslaus L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entomopathogenic fungi infection on malaria vectors increases daily mortality rates and thus represents a control measure that could be used in integrated programmes alongside insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs and indoor residual spraying (IRS. Before entomopathogenic fungi can be integrated into control programmes, an effective delivery system must be developed. Methods The efficacy of Metarhizium anisopliae ICIPE-30 and Beauveria bassiana I93-825 (IMI 391510 (2 × 1010 conidia m-2 applied on mud panels (simulating walls of traditional Tanzanian houses, black cotton cloth and polyester netting was evaluated against adult Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto. Mosquitoes were exposed to the treated surfaces 2, 14 and 28 d after conidia were applied. Survival of mosquitoes was monitored daily. Results All fungal treatments caused a significantly increased mortality in the exposed mosquitoes, descending with time since fungal application. Mosquitoes exposed to M. anisopliae conidia on mud panels had a greater daily risk of dying compared to those exposed to conidia on either netting or cotton cloth (p B. bassiana conidia on mud panels or cotton cloth had similar daily risk of death (p = 0.14, and a higher risk than those exposed to treated polyester netting (p Conclusion Both fungal isolates reduced mosquito survival on immediate exposure and up to 28 d after application. Conidia were more effective when applied on mud panels and cotton cloth compared with polyester netting. Cotton cloth and mud, therefore, represent potential substrates for delivering fungi to mosquitoes in the field.

  12. Identification and genetic characterization of chikungunya virus from Aedes mosquito vector collected in the Lucknow district, North India.

    Nyari, N; Maan, H S; Sharma, S; Pandey, S N; Dhole, T N

    2016-06-01

    Chikungunya fever is an emerging mosquito-borne disease caused by the infection with chikungunya virus (CHIKV). The CHIKV has been rarely detected in mosquito vectors from Northern India, since vector surveillance is an effective strategy in controlling and preventing CHIKV transmission. Thus, virological investigation for CHIKV among mosquitoes of Aedes (A.) species was carried out in the Lucknow district during March 2010 to October 2011. We collected adult mosquitoes from areas with CHIKV positive patients. The adult Aedes mosquito samples were pooled, homogenized, clarified and tested for CHIKV by nonstructural protein 1 (nsP1) gene based polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total 91 mosquito pools comprising of adult A. aegypti and A. albopictus were tested for CHIKV. The partial envelope protein (E1) gene sequences of mosquito-borne CHIKV strains were analyzed for genotyping. Of 91 pools, 6 pools of A. aegypti; and 2 pools of A. albopictus mosquitoes were identified positive for CHIKV by PCR. The phylogenetic analysis revealed clustering of CHIKV strains in two sub-lineages within the monophyletic East-Central South African (ECSA) genotype. Novel amino acid changes at the positions 294 (P294L) and 295 (S295F) were observed during analysis of amino acid sequence of the partial E1 gene. This study demonstrates the genetic diversity of circulating CHIKV strains and reports the first detection of CHIKV strains in Aedes vector species from the state of Uttar Pradesh. These findings have implication for vector control strategies to mitigate vector population to prevent the likelihood of CHIKV epidemic in the near future. PMID:26943997

  13. FIELD EVALUATION OF CDC AND MOSQUITO MAGNET® X TRAPS BAITED WITH DRY ICE, CO2 SACHET, AND OCTENOL AGAINST MOSQUITOES

    CDC light traps and Mosquito Magnet® X (MMX) traps baited with dry ice, octenol, and a new formulation of CO2 (granular) were evaluated against mosquitoes in the field. The results showed that the MMX traps (68.6%) baited with dry ice collected more mosquitoes, compared to the CDC light traps (32.4%...

  14. Efectos de la competencia larval en los mosquitos de contenedores artificiales, Aedes aegypti y Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae en condiciones semi-controladas Effects of larval competition between the container mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae in semi-controlled conditions

    Analía Francia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Las larvas de los mosquitos Aedes aegypti (Linneo y Culex pipiens Linneo pueden criar conjuntamente en pequeños contenedores artificiales de agua, se genera así una competencia interespecífica y/o intraespecífica. El objetivo de este trabajo fue comparar la magnitud relativa de la competencia intra e interespecífica en A. aegypti y C. pipiens, generada durante el desarrollo larval en contenedores artifi ciales. Las variables medidas como respuesta fueron la supervivencia y el tiempo de desarrollo larval, y la biomasa total producida en estado de pupa. Se criaron larvas de ambos mosquitos en neumáticos de automóvil con agua declorinada y hojarasca. Se introdujeron larvas recién eclosionadas de acuerdo a la densidad (5 estimada según un censo previo de A. aegypti y C. pipiens. Serealizaron los siguientes tratamientos agregando larvas de: (1 A. aegypti hasta alcanzar δ A. aegypti determinada según el censo previo, (2 C. pipiens hasta δ C. pipiens del censo previo, (3 A. aegypti hasta alcanzar la suma de δ A. aegypti y δ C. pipiens del censo previo, (4 C. pipiens hasta alcanzar la suma de δ A. aegypti y δ C. pipiens del censo previo y (5 A. aegypti y C. pipiens hasta δ A. aegypti y δ C. pipiens del censo previo. Las tres variables medidas fueron afectadas por los tratamientos, excepto la supervivencia y la biomasa producida por C. pipiens. Aedes aegypti fue más alterada por la competencia intraespecífica que por la competencia interespecífica. En C. pipiens, la competencia interespecífica superó en sus efectos a la competencia intraespecífica. Existió asimetría competitiva, ya que C. pipiens fue más afectada por A. aegypti que lo contrario.Larvae of Aedes aegypti (Linneo and Culex pipiens Linneo may develop together in small artificial water containers, promoting inter- and/or intra-specific competition. Our aim was to compare the relative importance of interspecific and intraspecific competition in both species during larval development in artificial containers. Larvae were bred outdoors in automobile tires with leaf litteras the nutrient source. The number of experimental larvae was set after an assessment of densities (5 from wild populations. We established the treatments: 1: A. aegypti alone at the 5 of A. aegypti in the census; 2: C. pipiens alone at the 5 of C. pipiens in the census; 3: A. aegypti alone at the 5 of A. aegypti + C. pipiens in the census; 4: C. pipiens alone at the 5 A. aegypti + 5 C. pipiens in the census; and 5: A. aegypti at the 5 of A. aegypti in the census + C. pipiens at the 5 of C. pipiens in the census. Survivorship, development time and total biomass were affected by treatments, except for survivorship and biomass of C. pipiens. Intraspecific competition outweighed interspecific competiton in A. aegypti, while the opposite trend was detected in C. pipiens. Competition was asymmetric, as C. pipiens was more affected by A. aegypti.

  15. Modelling releases of sterile mosquitoes with different strategies.

    Li, Jia; Yuan, Zhiling

    2015-01-01

    To prevent the transmissions of malaria, dengue fever, or other mosquito-borne diseases, one effective weapon is the sterile insect technique in which sterile mosquitoes are released to reduce or eradicate the wild mosquito population. To study the impact of the sterile insect technique on disease transmission, we formulate discrete-time mathematical models, based on difference equations, for the interactive dynamics of the wild and sterile mosquitoes, incorporating different strategies in releasing sterile mosquitoes. We investigate the model dynamics and compare the impact of the different release strategies. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate rich dynamical features of the models. PMID:25377433

  16. Mosquito management in the face of natural selection.

    Agusto, Folashade B; Bewick, Sharon; Parshad, Rana D

    2012-09-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is an appealing method for managing mosquito populations while avoiding the environmental and social costs associated with more traditional control strategies like insecticide application. Success of SIT, however, hinges on sterile males being able to compete for females. As a result, heavy and/or continued use of SIT could potentially diminish its efficacy if prolonged treatments result in selection for female preference against sterile males. In this paper we extend a general differential equation model of mosquito dynamics to consider the role of female choosiness in determining the long-term usefulness of SIT as a management option. We then apply optimal control theory to our model and show how natural selection for female choosiness fundamentally alters management strategies. Our study calls into question the benefits associated with developing SIT as a management strategy, and suggests that effort should be spent studying female mate choice in order to determine its relative importance and how likely it is to impact SIT treatment goals. PMID:22617381

  17. Mosquito management in the face of natural selection

    Agusto, Folashade B.

    2012-09-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is an appealing method for managing mosquito populations while avoiding the environmental and social costs associated with more traditional control strategies like insecticide application. Success of SIT, however, hinges on sterile males being able to compete for females. As a result, heavy and/or continued use of SIT could potentially diminish its efficacy if prolonged treatments result in selection for female preference against sterile males. In this paper we extend a general differential equation model of mosquito dynamics to consider the role of female choosiness in determining the long-term usefulness of SIT as a management option. We then apply optimal control theory to our model and show how natural selection for female choosiness fundamentally alters management strategies. Our study calls into question the benefits associated with developing SIT as a management strategy, and suggests that effort should be spent studying female mate choice in order to determine its relative importance and how likely it is to impact SIT treatment goals. © 2012.

  18. Functional characterization of three MicroRNAs of the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus

    2013-01-01

    Background Temporal and stage specific expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in embryos, larvae, pupae and adults of Aedes albopictus showed differential expression levels across the four developmental stages, indicating their potential regulatory roles in mosquito development. The functional characterization of these miRNAs was not known. Accordingly our study evaluated the functional characterization of three miRNAs, which are temporally up-regulated in the various developmental stages of Ae. albopictus mosquitoes. Methods miRNA mimics, inhibitors and negative controls were designed and their knock-in and knock-down efficiency were analyzed by qRT-PCR after transfecting the mosquito cell lines C6/36, and also by injecting in their specific developmental stages. The functional role of each individual miRNA was analyzed with various parameters of development such as, hatching rate and hatching time in embryos, eclosion rate in larvae, longevity and fecundity in the adult mosquitoes. Results The knock-in with the specifically designed miRNA mimics showed increased levels of expression of miRNA compared with their normal controls. We confirmed these findings using qRT-PCR, both by in vitro expression in C6/36 mosquito cell lines after transfection as well as in in vivo expression in developmental stages of mosquitoes by microinjection. The knock-down of expression with the corresponding inhibitors showed a considerable decrease in the expression levels of these miRNAs and obvious functional effects in Ae. albopictus development, detected by a decrease in the hatching rate of embryos and eclosion rate in larvae and a marked reduction in longevity and fecundity in adults. Conclusion This study carried out by knock-in and knock-down of specifically and temporally expressed miRNAs in Ae. albopictus by microinjection is a novel study to delineate the importance of the miRNA expression in regulating mosquito development. The knock-down and loss of function of endogenously expressed miRNAs by the miRNA inhibitors in specific developmental stages had considerable effects on development, but enhancement of their gain of function was not observed on knock-in of these specific miRNAs. Hence, our study indicates that an optimal level of endogenous expression of miRNA is indispensable for the normal development and maintenance of the vectorial population density and pathogen transmissibility of this mosquito vector. PMID:23924583

  19. Comparative genomics of small RNA regulatory pathway components in vector mosquitoes

    Foy Brian D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small RNA regulatory pathways (SRRPs control key aspects of development and anti-viral defense in metazoans. Members of the Argonaute family of catalytic enzymes degrade target RNAs in each of these pathways. SRRPs include the microRNA, small interfering RNA (siRNA and PIWI-type gene silencing pathways. Mosquitoes generate viral siRNAs when infected with RNA arboviruses. However, in some mosquitoes, arboviruses survive antiviral RNA interference (RNAi and are transmitted via mosquito bite to a subsequent host. Increased knowledge of these pathways and functional components should increase understanding of the limitations of anti-viral defense in vector mosquitoes. To do this, we compared the genomic structure of SRRP components across three mosquito species and three major small RNA pathways. Results The Ae. aegypti, An. gambiae and Cx. pipiens genomes encode putative orthologs for all major components of the miRNA, siRNA, and piRNA pathways. Ae. aegypti and Cx. pipiens have undergone expansion of Argonaute and PIWI subfamily genes. Phylogenetic analyses were performed for these protein families. In addition, sequence pattern recognition algorithms MEME, MDScan and Weeder were used to identify upstream regulatory motifs for all SRRP components. Statistical analyses confirmed enrichment of species-specific and pathway-specific cis-elements over the rest of the genome. Conclusion Analysis of Argonaute and PIWI subfamily genes suggests that the small regulatory RNA pathways of the major arbovirus vectors, Ae. aegypti and Cx. pipiens, are evolving faster than those of the malaria vector An. gambiae and D. melanogaster. Further, protein and genomic features suggest functional differences between subclasses of PIWI proteins and provide a basis for future analyses. Common UCR elements among SRRP components indicate that 1 key components from the miRNA, siRNA, and piRNA pathways contain NF-kappaB-related and Broad complex transcription factor binding sites, 2 purifying selection has occurred to maintain common pathway-specific elements across mosquito species and 3 species-specific differences in upstream elements suggest that there may be differences in regulatory control among mosquito species. Implications for arbovirus vector competence in mosquitoes are discussed.

  20. Influence of trap construction on mosquito capture

    Šebesta, Oldřich; Peško, Juraj; Gelbič, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2012), s. 209-215. ISSN 1934-7391 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : CDC miniature light traps * baited lard-can traps * mosquitoes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  1. Musings on Sketches, Artists, and Mosquito Nets

    2014-09-23

    Byron Breedlove reads his essay Musings on Sketches, Artists, and Mosquito Nets about the art of James Whistler and the transmission of vector borne diseases.  Created: 9/23/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/20/2014.

  2. Malaria Mosquitoes Attracted by Fatal Fungus

    George, Justin; Jenkins, Nina E.; Blanford, Simon; Thomas, Matthew B.; Baker, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Insect-killing fungi such as Beauveria bassiana are being evaluated as possible active ingredients for use in novel biopesticides against mosquito vectors that transmit malaria. Fungal pathogens infect through contact and so applications of spores to surfaces such as walls, nets, or other resting sites provide possible routes to infect mosquitoes in and around domestic dwellings. However, some insects can detect and actively avoid fungal spores to reduce infection risk. If true for mosquitoes, such behavior could render the biopesticide approach ineffective. Here we find that the spores of B. bassiana are highly attractive to females of Anopheles stephensi, a major anopheline mosquito vector of human malaria in Asia. We further find that An. stephensi females are preferentially attracted to dead and dying caterpillars infected with B. bassiana, landing on them and subsequently becoming infected with the fungus. Females are also preferentially attracted to cloth sprayed with oil-formulated B. bassiana spores, with 95% of the attracted females becoming infected after a one-minute visit on the cloth. This is the first report of an insect being attracted to a lethal fungal pathogen. The exact mechanisms involved in this behavior remain unclear. Nonetheless, our results indicate that biopesticidal formulations comprising B. bassiana spores will be conducive to attraction and on-source visitation by malaria vectors. PMID:23658757

  3. Using infections to fight infections: paratransgenic fungi can block malaria transmission in mosquitoes.

    Rasgon, Jason L

    2011-08-01

    EVALUATION OF: Fang W, Vega-Rodrguez J, Ghosh AK et al. Development of transgenic fungi that kill human malaria parasites in mosquitoes. Science 331(6020), 1074-1077 (2011). Paratransgenesis is the genetic manipulation of insect endosymbiotic microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses or fungi. Paratransgenesis has been proposed as a potential method to control vector-borne diseases such as malaria. In this article, Fang and colleagues have used genetic manipulation to insert multiple antimalaria effector genes into the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. When the modified fungus was used to infect Anopheles mosquitoes, it expressed the antimalaria effector molecules in the mosquito hemolymph. When several different effector molecules were coexpressed, malaria levels in the mosquito salivary glands were inhibited by up to 98% compared with controls. Significant inhibition could be initiated by as little as seven fungal spores and was very rapid and long lasting. These data suggest that recombinant entomopathogenic fungi could be deployed as part of a strategy to control malaria. PMID:21861618

  4. A malaria transmission-directed model of mosquito life cycle and ecology

    Eckhoff Philip A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major public health issue in much of the world, and the mosquito vectors which drive transmission are key targets for interventions. Mathematical models for planning malaria eradication benefit from detailed representations of local mosquito populations, their natural dynamics and their response to campaign pressures. Methods A new model is presented for mosquito population dynamics, effects of weather, and impacts of multiple simultaneous interventions. This model is then embedded in a large-scale individual-based simulation and results for local elimination of malaria are discussed. Mosquito population behaviours, such as anthropophily and indoor feeding, are included to study their effect upon the efficacy of vector control-based elimination campaigns. Results Results for vector control tools, such as bed nets, indoor spraying, larval control and space spraying, both alone and in combination, are displayed for a single-location simulation with vector species and seasonality characteristic of central Tanzania, varying baseline transmission intensity and vector bionomics. The sensitivities to habitat type, anthropophily, indoor feeding, and baseline transmission intensity are explored. Conclusions The ability to model a spectrum of local vector species with different ecologies and behaviours allows local customization of packages of interventions and exploration of the effect of proposed new tools.

  5. Development of the gravid Aedes trap for the capture of adult female container-exploiting mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Eiras, Alvaro E; Buhagiar, Tamara S; Ritchie, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring dengue vector control by sampling adult Aedes aegypti (L.) recently has been used to replace both larval and pupal surveys. We have developed and evaluated the Gravid Aedes Trap (GAT) through a sequential behavioral study. The GAT does not require electricity to function, and trapped mosquitoes are identified easily during trap inspections. The GAT concept relies on visual and olfactory cues to lure gravid Ae. aegypti and an insecticide to kill trapped mosquitoes. Gravid mosquitoes are lured to a black bucket base containing oviposition attractant (infusion) and are trapped in a translucent chamber impregnated with a pyrethroid insecticide where they are killed within 3-15 min. In semifield observations, the GAT captured a significantly higher proportion of gravid mosquitoes than the double sticky ovitrap. We also demonstrated that the visual cues of the prototype GAT-LgBF (large black base bucket with a black funnel at the top of the translucent chamber) captured a significantly higher proportion of gravid mosquitoes than the other prototypes. The visual contrast created by the addition of a white lid to the top of the black funnel significantly increased the number of captured gravid mosquitoes when compared with the GAT-LgBF in semifield trials. We conclude that the GAT is more efficient in recapturing gravid Ae. aegypti when compared with sticky ovitraps. The GAT is an effective, practical, low cost, and easily transportable trap, features that are essential in large-scale monitoring programs, particularly in areas where funding is limited. PMID:24605470

  6. Feasibility of Using the Mosquito Blood Meal for Rapid and Efficient Human and Animal Virus Surveillance and Discovery.

    Yang, Yu; Garver, Lindsey S; Bingham, Karen M; Hang, Jun; Jochim, Ryan C; Davidson, Silas A; Richardson, Jason H; Jarman, Richard G

    2015-12-01

    Mosquito blood meals taken from humans and animals potentially represent a useful source of blood for the detection of blood-borne pathogens. In this feasibility study, Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes were fed with blood meals spiked with dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) and harvested at serial time points. These mosquitoes are not competent vectors, and the virus is not expected to replicate. Ingested blood was spotted on Whatman FTA cards and stored at room temperature. Mosquito abdomens were removed and stored at -80C. Control blood meal aliquots were stored in vials or applied onto FTA cards. After 4 weeks of storage, the samples were extracted using beadbeating and QIAamp Viral RNA kit (Qiagen Sciences, Germantown, MD). Recovered viral RNA was analyzed by DENV-2 TaqMan RT-PCR assay and next-generation sequencing (NGS). Overall viral RNA recovery efficiency was 15% from the directly applied dried blood spots and approximately 20% or higher for dried blood spots made by blotting mosquito midgut on FTA cards. Viral RNA in mosquito-ingested blood decreases over time, but remains detectable 24 hours after blood feeding. The viral sequences in FTA-stored specimens can be maintained at room temperature. The strategy has the potential utility in expedited zoonotic virus discovery and blood-borne pathogen surveillance. PMID:26416112

  7. The influence of mosquito resting behaviour and associated microclimate for malaria risk

    Thomas Matthew B

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of the mosquito and parasite life-history traits that combine to determine malaria transmission intensity are temperature sensitive. In most cases, the process-based models used to estimate malaria risk and inform control and prevention strategies utilize measures of mean outdoor temperature. Evidence suggests, however, that certain malaria vectors can spend large parts of their adult life resting indoors. Presentation of hypothesis If significant proportions of mosquitoes are resting indoors and indoor conditions differ markedly from ambient conditions, simple use of outdoor temperatures will not provide reliable estimates of malaria transmission intensity. To date, few studies have quantified the differential effects of indoor vs outdoor temperatures explicitly, reflecting a lack of proper understanding of mosquito resting behaviour and associated microclimate. Testing the hypothesis Published records from 8 village sites in East Africa revealed temperatures to be warmer indoors than outdoors and to generally show less daily variation. Exploring the effects of these temperatures on malaria parasite development rate suggested indoor-resting mosquitoes could transmit malaria between 0.3 and 22.5 days earlier than outdoor-resting mosquitoes. These differences translate to increases in transmission risk ranging from 5 to approaching 3,000%, relative to predictions based on outdoor temperatures. The pattern appears robust for low- and highland areas, with differences increasing with altitude. Implications of the hypothesis Differences in indoor vs outdoor environments lead to large differences in the limits and the intensity of malaria transmission. This finding highlights a need to better understand mosquito resting behaviour and the associated microclimate, and to broaden assessments of transmission ecology and risk to consider the potentially important role of endophily.

  8. Effective disposal of nitrogen waste in blood-fed Aedes aegypti mosquitoes requires alanine aminotransferase.

    Mazzalupo, Stacy; Isoe, Jun; Belloni, Virginia; Scaraffia, Patricia Y

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms responsible for the success of female mosquitoes in their disposal of excess nitrogen, we investigated the role of alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) in blood-fed Aedes aegypti. Transcript and protein levels from the 2 ALAT genes were analyzed in sucrose- and blood-fed A. aegypti tissues. ALAT1 and ALAT2 exhibit distinct expression patterns in tissues during the first gonotrophic cycle. Injection of female mosquitoes with either double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-ALAT1 or dsRNA ALAT2 significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of ALAT1 or ALAT2 in fat body, thorax, and Malpighian tubules compared with dsRNA firefly luciferase-injected control mosquitoes. The silencing of either A. aegypti ALAT1 or ALAT2 caused unexpected phenotypes such as a delay in blood digestion, a massive accumulation of uric acid in the midgut posterior region, and a significant decrease of nitrogen waste excretion during the first 48 h after blood feeding. Concurrently, the expression of genes encoding xanthine dehydrogenase and ammonia transporter (Rhesus 50 glycoprotein) were significantly increased in tissues of both ALAT1- and ALAT2-deficient females. Moreover, perturbation of ALAT1 and ALAT2 in the female mosquitoes delayed oviposition and reduced egg production. These novel findings underscore the efficient mechanisms that blood-fed mosquitoes use to avoid ammonia toxicity and free radical damage.-Mazzalupo, S., Isoe, J., Belloni, V., Scaraffia, P. Y. Effective disposal of nitrogen waste in blood-fed Aedes aegypti mosquitoes requires alanine aminotransferase. PMID:26310269

  9. "Singing in the Tube"--audiovisual assay of plant oil repellent activity against mosquitoes (Culex pipiens).

    Adams, Temitope F; Wongchai, Chatchawal; Chaidee, Anchalee; Pfeiffer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Plant essential oils have been suggested as a promising alternative to the established mosquito repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide). Searching for an assay with generally available equipment, we designed a new audiovisual assay of repellent activity against mosquitoes "Singing in the Tube," testing single mosquitoes in Drosophila cultivation tubes. Statistics with regression analysis should compensate for limitations of simple hardware. The assay was established with female Culex pipiens mosquitoes in 60 experiments, 120-h audio recording, and 2580 estimations of the distance between mosquito sitting position and the chemical. Correlations between parameters of sitting position, flight activity pattern, and flight tone spectrum were analyzed. Regression analysis of psycho-acoustic data of audio files (dB[A]) used a squared and modified sinus function determining wing beat frequency WBF ± SD (357 ± 47 Hz). Application of logistic regression defined the repelling velocity constant. The repelling velocity constant showed a decreasing order of efficiency of plant essential oils: rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), citronella (Cymbopogon nardus), tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), lemon (Citrus limon), patchouli (Pogostemon cablin), DEET, cedar wood (Cedrus atlantica). In conclusion, we suggest (1) disease vector control (e.g., impregnation of bed nets) by eight plant essential oils with repelling velocity superior to DEET, (2) simple mosquito repellency testing in Drosophila cultivation tubes, (3) automated approaches and room surveillance by generally available audio equipment (dB[A]: ISO standard 226), and (4) quantification of repellent activity by parameters of the audiovisual assay defined by correlation and regression analyses. PMID:26412058

  10. Population genetic structure of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes on Lake Victoria islands, west Kenya

    Beier John

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the genetic structure of island Anopheles gambiae populations is important for the current tactics in mosquito control and for the proposed strategy using genetically-modified mosquitoes (GMM. Genetically-isolated mosquito populations on islands are a potential site for testing GMM. The objective of this study was to determine the genetic structure of A. gambiae populations on the islands in Lake Victoria, western Kenya. Methods The genetic diversity and the population genetic structures of 13 A. gambiae populations from five islands on Lake Victoria and six villages from the surrounding mainland area in the Suba District were examined using six microsatellite markers. The distance range of sampling sites varied between 2.5 and 35.1 km. Results A similar level of genetic diversity between island mosquito populations and adjacent mainland populations was found. The average number of alleles per locus was 7.3 for the island populations and 6.8 for the mainland populations. The average observed heterozygosity was 0.32 and 0.28 for the island and mainland populations, respectively. A low but statistically significant genetic structure was detected among the island populations (FST = 0.019 and between the island and mainland populations (FST = 0.003. A total of 12 private alleles were found, and nine of them were from the island populations. Conclusion A level of genetic differentiation between the island and mainland populations was found. Large extent of gene flow between the island and mainland mosquito populations may result from wind- or human-assisted dispersal. Should the islands on Lake Victoria be used as a trial site for the release program of GMM, mosquito dispersal between the islands and between the island and the mainland should be vigorously monitored.

  11. Potential negative impacts and low effectiveness in the use of African annual killifish in the biocontrol of aquatic mosquito larvae in temporary water bodies

    Reichard Martin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Commentary and discussion on a recent paper promoting the use of Nothobranchius guentheri, a small African annual fish from the Island of Zanzibar as a tool to control mosquito larvae in temporary bodies of freshwater throughout Africa is presented. Arguments on major points; (1 expected low success of annual fish introductions, (2 low success of mosquito control in the field, (3 ecological threats, and (4 ethical issues are detailed. Despite serious problems with mosquito-borne diseases in tropical Africa and elsewhere, we encourage responsible means of biological control of parasite vectors. We show that effectiveness of Nothobranchius translocations is low (the previous attempts failed, likelihood of effective mosquito larvae control under field condition is negligible and ecological threats from Nothobranchius translocations from within and outside the naturally occurring range are serious. We advocate against the proposed next step of the project, i.e. field trials in Tanzania.

  12. Potential negative impacts and low effectiveness in the use of African annual killifish in the biocontrol of aquatic mosquito larvae in temporary water bodies

    2010-01-01

    Commentary and discussion on a recent paper promoting the use of Nothobranchius guentheri, a small African annual fish from the Island of Zanzibar as a tool to control mosquito larvae in temporary bodies of freshwater throughout Africa is presented. Arguments on major points; (1) expected low success of annual fish introductions, (2) low success of mosquito control in the field, (3) ecological threats, and (4) ethical issues are detailed. Despite serious problems with mosquito-borne diseases in tropical Africa and elsewhere, we encourage responsible means of biological control of parasite vectors. We show that effectiveness of Nothobranchius translocations is low (the previous attempts failed), likelihood of effective mosquito larvae control under field condition is negligible and ecological threats from Nothobranchius translocations from within and outside the naturally occurring range are serious. We advocate against the proposed next step of the project, i.e. field trials in Tanzania. PMID:20846414

  13. Avian malaria infections in western European mosquitoes.

    Ventim, Rita; Ramos, Jaime A; Osrio, Hugo; Lopes, Ricardo J; Prez-Tris, Javier; Mendes, Lusa

    2012-08-01

    In the complex life cycle of avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium sp.), we still have a poor understanding on the vector-parasite relationships. This study described the community of potential avian malaria vectors in four Portuguese reedbeds. We tested if their geographical distribution differed, and investigated on their Plasmodium infections. The mosquitoes' feeding preferences were evaluated using CO(2), mice, and birds as baits. The most abundant species were Culex pipiens, Culex theileri, and Ochlerotatus caspius (and, in one site, Coquillettidia richiardii). Plasmodium lineages SGS1 and SYAT05 were found in unengorged Cx. pipiens and Cx. theileri, respectively, suggesting that these mosquitoes were competent vectors of those lineages. The species' abundance was significantly different among sites, which may help to explain the observed differences in the prevalence of SGS1. At the study sites, SGS1 was detected in the most abundant mosquito species and reached a high prevalence in the most abundant passerine species. Probably, this parasite needs abundant hosts in all phases of its cycle to keep a good reservoir of infection in all its stages. Cq. richiardii showed an opportunistic feeding behavior, while Cx. pipiens appeared to be more mammophilic than previously described, perhaps because the used avian bait was not its preferential target. In one of the study sites, mosquitoes seem to be attracted to the Spotless Starling Sturnus unicolor, an abundant bird species that may be an important local reservoir of avian malaria infections. To our knowledge, this is the first report of detection of avian Plasmodium DNA from European mosquitoes. PMID:22427023

  14. Expression of trypsin modulating oostatic factor (TMOF in an entomopathogenic fungus increases its virulence towards Anopheles gambiae and reduces fecundity in the target mosquito

    Kamareddine Layla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult and larval mosquitoes regulate food digestion in their gut with trypsin modulating oostatic factor (TMOF, a decapeptide hormone synthesized by the ovaries and the neuroendocrine system. TMOF is currently being developed as a mosquitocide, however, delivery of the peptide to the mosquito remains a significant challenge. Entomopathogenic fungi offer a means for targeting mosquitoes with TMOF. Findings The efficacy of wild type and transgenic Beauveria bassiana strains expressing Aedes aegypti TMOF (Bb-Aa1 were evaluated against larvae and sugar- and blood-fed adult Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes using insect bioassays. Bb-Aa1 displayed increased virulence against larvae, and sugar and blood fed adult A. gambiae when compared to the wild type parent strain. Median lethal dose (LD50 values decreased by ~20% for larvae, and ~40% for both sugar and blood-fed mosquitoes using Bb-Aa1 relative to the wild type parent. Median lethal time (LT50 values were lower for blood-fed compared to sugar-fed mosquitoes in infections with both wild type and Bb-Aa1. However, infection using Bb-Aa1 resulted in 15% to 25% reduction in LT50 values for sugar- and blood fed mosquitoes, and ~27% for larvae, respectively, relative to the wild type parent. In addition, infection with Bb-Aa1 resulted in a dramatic reduction in fecundity of the target mosquitoes. Conclusions B. bassiana expressing Ae. aegypti TMOF exhibited increased virulence against A. gambiae compared to the wild type strain. These data expand the range and utility of entomopathogenic fungi expressing mosquito-specific molecules to improve their biological control activities against mosquito vectors of disease.

  15. Seasonal mosquito larval abundance and composition in Kibwezi, lower eastern Kenya

    Joseph M. Mwangangi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Changes in weather patterns especially rainfall affects the distribution and densities of mosquitoes. The objective of this study was to describe mosquito aquatic habitats, to determine larval abundance, species composition, and habitat types found in Kasayani village of Kibwezi division.Methods: A cross-sectional survey of mosquito larval habitats was conducted in Kasayani village in Kibwezi division to determine species composition, larval abundance, and habitat types found in this village. This survey was conducted during the rainy season in November and December 2006 and during the dry season in February and March 2007. Larvae were collected using the standard dipping technique and a total of 24 habitats were sampled. The primary habitats identified were water reservoir tanks, puddles, temporary pools, and tyre tracks. Results: A total of 2660 mosquito larvae were collected of which 2140 (80.45% were culicines, 503 (18.91% were Anopheles and 17 (0.64% were pupae. For culicines, 1787 (83.5% were categorized as early instars and 353 (16.5% were as late instars while in the Anopheles, 425 (84.49% were classified as early instars and 78 (15.51% were late instars. Morphological identification of the III and IV instar larvae by use of microscopy yielded 16.24% (n = 70 Anopheles gambiae complex, 1.16% (n = 5 An. funestus, 0.70% (n = 3 An. coustani, 42.46% (n = 183 Culex quinquefasciatus, 6.26% (n = 27 Cx. duttoni, and 33.18% (n = 143 Ae. aegypti. Puddles, tyre tracks and pools had highly turbid water while water reservoir tanks had clear water. Anopheles gambiae and Cx. quinquefasciatus were found in all habitat categories while Ae. aegypti were found only in water storage tanks. Interpretation & conclusion: The mosquito larval densities indicate that the inhabitants of this village are at risk of mosquito-borne diseases including malaria, which is one of the greatest causes of morbidity and mortality in this area. Furthermore, mosquito control measures targeting both the mosquito immatures and adults should be enhanced especially during the rainy season to ensure maximum protection of the inhabitants.

  16. Anti-mosquito antibodies and their effects on feeding, fecundity and mortality of Aedes aegypti.

    Hatfield, P R

    1988-10-01

    Anti-mosquito antibodies, produced in mice inoculated with mosquito homogenates or exposed to mosquito bites, reacted with a variety of mosquito antigens including muscle, gut, fat body and nervous tissue; those in anti-mosquito bite sera reacted solely with salivary glands. Mosquitoes fed on restrained immunized mice showed a significant increase in mortality correlated to both the titre and specificity of the anti-mosquito antibodies ingested. No changes in their fecundity or feeding success were noted. Mosquitoes exposed to unrestrained immunized mice or mosquito-bitten mice, however, showed a significant reduction in feeding success, possibly reflecting enhanced host grooming. PMID:2980191

  17. Dengue in Java, Indonesia: Relevance of Mosquito Indices as Risk Predictors

    Wijayanti, Siwi P. M.; Sunaryo, Sunaryo; Suprihatin, Suprihatin; McFarlane, Melanie; Rainey, Stephanie M.; Dietrich, Isabelle; Schnettler, Esther; Biek, Roman; Kohl, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Background No vaccine is currently available for dengue virus (DENV), therefore control programmes usually focus on managing mosquito vector populations. Entomological surveys provide the most common means of characterising vector populations and predicting the risk of local dengue virus transmission. Despite Indonesia being a country strongly affected by DENV, only limited information is available on the local factors affecting DENV transmission and the suitability of available survey methods for assessing risk. Methodology/principal findings We conducted entomological surveys in the Banyumas Regency (Central Java) where dengue cases occur on an annual basis. Four villages were sampled during the dry and rainy seasons: two villages where dengue was endemic, one where dengue cases occurred sporadically and one which was dengue-free. In addition to data for conventional larvae indices, we collected data on pupae indices, and collected adult mosquitoes for species identification in order to determine mosquito species composition and population density. Traditionally used larval indices (House indices, Container indices and Breteau indices) were found to be inadequate as indicators for DENV transmission risk. In contrast, species composition of adult mosquitoes revealed that competent vector species were dominant in dengue endemic and sporadic villages. Conclusions/significance Our data suggested that the utility of traditional larvae indices, which continue to be used in many dengue endemic countries, should be re-evaluated locally. The results highlight the need for validation of risk indicators and control strategies across DENV affected areas here and perhaps elsewhere in SE Asia. PMID:26967524

  18. The biological effects of the insect growth regulators; pyriproxyfen and diflubenzuron on the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    Kamal, Hany A; Khater, Emad I M

    2010-12-01

    The biological effects of two insect growth regulators (IGRs), pyriproxyfen and diflubenzuron against larvae of the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) have been evaluated. Mosquitoes were collected from Jeddah governorate, west of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and maintained in the laboratory. According to IC50 values obtained (concentrations which inhibit the emergence of 50% of adults), diflubenzuron (0.00036 ppm) proved to be more effective by 11.4 fold of pyriproxyfen (0.0041 ppm). In addition to the delayed lethal action, larval treatment with the two IGRs, pyriproxyfen and diflubenzuron led to pronounced reduction in the reproductive potential of mosquito adults that emerged from these treatments. Pyriproxyfen caused a 33.2% decrease in egg production compared to 25.5% for diflubenzuron. The reduction in egg hatchability was by 40.6 and 36.2% for pyriproxyfen and diflubenzuron, respectively, with up to 4 fold higher reduction rates than in the control tests. These results shed light on the extended biological effects of IGRs on mosquitoes and encourage further testing of IGRs for wider use in the control of Ae. aegypti and other important disease vectors in Arabia and the world. PMID:21268527

  19. Evaluation of mosquito larvicidal effect of Nagarmotha (Cyperus rotundus extracts against Aedes aegypti L. larvae

    Md Hashmat Imam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mosquitoes transmit serious human diseases such as malaria, filariasis, Japanese encephalitis, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever and yellow fever causing millions of deaths every year. Extensive use of chemical insecticides for control of vector borne diseases has created problems related to physiological resistance to vectors, adverse environmental effects, high operational cost and community acceptance. Plants may be a source of alternative agents for control of mosquitoes because they are rich in bioactive chemicals and biodegradable. In this study, mosquito larvicidal activity of Cyperus rotundus against Aedes aegypti larvae was assessed in laboratory according to World Health Organisation guidelines 2005 with slight modification. Materials and Methods: Five concentrations of petroleum ether (PE and ethyl alcohol (EA extracts of C. rotundus in the range of 200-1000 ppm were used in bioassay against late 3 rd and 4 th instar larvae of A. aegypti. Observation of mortality response was assessed after 24 h. The mortality data were subjected to probit regression analysis to determine the median lethal concentration LC 50 and LC 90 . C. rotundus. Results: PE extract and EA extract produce 98% and 97% mortality at 1,000 ppm, respectively. PE extracts exhibits LC 50 443.80 ppm and LC 90 882.98 ppm whereas EA extract exhibits LC 50 594.22 ppm and LC 90 936.25 ppm. Conclusion: PE and EA extracts of C. rotundus showed good mosquito larvicidal potential.

  20. Intriguing olfactory proteins from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    Ishida, Yuko; Chen, Angela M.; Tsuruda, Jennifer M.; Cornel, Anthon J.; Debboun, Mustapha; Leal, Walter S.

    2004-09-01

    Four antennae-specific proteins (AaegOBP1, AaegOBP2, AaegOBP3, and AaegASP1) were isolated from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti and their full-length cDNAs were cloned. RT-PCR indicated that they are expressed in female and, to a lesser extent, in male antennae, but not in control tissues (legs). AaegOBP1 and AaegOBP3 showed significant similarity to previously identified mosquito odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) in cysteine spacing pattern and sequence. Two of the isolated proteins have a total of eight cysteine residues. The similarity of the spacing pattern of the cysteine residues and amino acid sequence to those of previously identified olfactory proteins suggests that one of the cysteine-rich proteins (AaegOBP2) is an OBP. The other (AaegASP1) did not belong to any group of known OBPs. Structural analyses indicate that six of the cysteine residues in AaegOBP2 are linked in a similar pattern to the previously known cysteine pairing in OBPs, i.e., Cys-24 Cys-55, Cys-51 Cys-104, Cys-95 Cys-113. The additional disulfide bridge, Cys-38 Cys-125, knits the extended C-terminal segment of the protein to a predicted α2-helix. As indicated by circular dichroism (CD) spectra, the extra rigidity seems to prevent the predicted formation of a C-terminal α-helix at low pH.

  1. Bioefficacy of crude extract of Cyperus aromaticus (Family: Cyperaceae ) cultured cells, against Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes

    Kamiabi, Fatemeh; Jaal, Zairi; Keng, Chan Lai

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the growth inhibition activity of the crude extract of Cyperus aromaticus (C. aromaticus) cultured cells against the 3rd instar larvae of Aedes aegypti (Linn.) and Aedes albopictus Skuse (Ae. albopictus) under laboratory conditions, and determine the sublethal effects (EI50) of the crude extract of C. aromaticus cultured cells on some biological and morphological parameters of both Aedes mosquito species during two generations as well. Methods The cell suspension cultures of C. aromaticus were activated from five callus lines (P4, Pa, Z1, Z6 and Ml) derived from the root explants of in vitro plantlets. The cultured cells were extracted in chloroform and used as plant material for the present study. For detection of juvenile hormone III, the crude extracts were analyzed by HPLC. Then the crude extracts of the three C. aromaticus cultured cell lines which contained varied amounts of juvenile hormone III [high level (P4 cell line), medium level (Z1 cell line) and low level (Ml cell line)] were tested against Aedes mosquito species. Laboratory evaluation was performed against late third instar larvae of the Vector Control Research Unit strains of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus using the standard WHO method. The effects of EI50 of the C. aromaticus cultured P4 cells on fecundity, fertility, growth period, sex ratio, adult size and longevity of Aedes mosquitoes were assessed. Results Bioassay tests presented the remarkable growth inhibition activity of the crude extracts of C. aromaticus cultured cells against the two Aedes mosquitoes. Between the two mosquito species, Ae. albopictus was more susceptible to the crude extracts with lower EI50 values. EI50 of the crude extract of C. aromaticus cultured cells (P4) increased the sterility indices in the parental generation females in both Aedes mosquito species. A significant delay in the pupal formation and adult emergence were observed in the parental generation of the both mosquito species. The sex ratio of the adult population either parental or F1 generation of the Aedes mosquito species was not significantly affected by the EI50 dosage of the crude extract of C. aromaticus cultured P4 cells. A significant decrease in the wing length of the treated adult (female and male) of Aedes aegypti as well as the treated female of Ae. albopictus were observed. Longevity of the adult female of the parental generation of both Aedes mosquitoes as well as females of F1 generation of Ae. albopictus were significantly decreased. Conclusions The present study revealed the potential of the crude extract of C. aromaticus cultured cells in controlling vector mosquito populations in the effort to reduce the transmission of vector borne diseases. PMID:24075340

  2. Annotated differentially expressed salivary proteins of susceptible and insecticide-resistant mosquitoes of Anopheles stephensi.

    Vijay, Sonam; Rawal, Ritu; Kadian, Kavita; Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Sharma, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Vector control is one of the major global strategies for control of malaria. However, the major obstacle for vector control is the development of multiple resistances to organochlorine, organophosphorus insecticides and pyrethroids that are currently being used in public health for spraying and in bednets. Salivary glands of vectors are the first target organ for human-vector contact during biting and parasite-vector contact prior to parasite development in the mosquito midguts. The salivary glands secrete anti-haemostatic, anti-inflammatory biologically active molecules to facilitate blood feeding from the host and also inadvertently inject malaria parasites into the vertebrate host. The Anopheles stephensi mosquito, an urban vector of malaria to both human and rodent species has been identified as a reference laboratory model to study mosquito-parasite interactions. In this study, we adopted a conventional proteomic approach of 2D-electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and bioinformatics to identify putative differentially expressed annotated functional salivary proteins between An. stephensi susceptible and multiresistant strains with same genetic background. Our results show 2D gel profile and MALDI-TOF comparisons that identified 31 differentially expressed putative modulated proteins in deltamethrin/DDT resistant strains of An. stephensi. Among these 15 proteins were found to be upregulated and 16 proteins were downregulated. Our studies interpret that An. stephensi (multiresistant) caused an upregulated expression of proteins and enzymes like cytochrome 450, short chain dehyrdogenase reductase, phosphodiesterase etc that may have an impact in insecticide resistance and xenobiotic detoxification. Our study elucidates a proteomic response of salivary glands differentially regulated proteins in response to insecticide resistance development which include structural, redox and regulatory enzymes of several pathways. These identified proteins may play a role in regulating mosquito biting behavior patterns and may have implications in the development of malaria parasites in resistant mosquitoes during parasite transmission. PMID:25742511

  3. The Insect Growth Regulator Pyriproxyfen Terminates Egg Diapause in the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus

    2015-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a highly invasive mosquito species that transmits chikungunya and dengue. This species overwinters as diapausing eggs in temperate climates. Early diapause termination may be a beneficial strategy for winter mosquito control; however, a mechanism to terminate the diapause process using chemicals is not known. We tested the hypothesis that a hormonal imbalance caused by the administration of juvenile hormone analog would terminate egg diapause in A. albopictus. We tested the insect growth regulator pyriproxyfen on all developmental stages to identify a susceptible stage for diapause termination. We found that pyriproxyfen treatment of mosquito eggs terminated embryonic diapause. The highest rates of diapause termination were recorded in newly deposited (78.9%) and fully embryonated (74.7%) eggs at 0.1 and 1 ppm, respectively. Hatching was completed earlier in newly deposited eggs (25–30 days) compared to fully embryonated eggs (71–80 days). The combined mortality from premature diapause termination and ovicidal activity was 98.2% in newly deposited and >98.9% in fully embryonated eggs at 1 ppm. The control diapause eggs did not hatch under diapausing conditions. Pyriproxyfen exposure to larvae, pupae and adults did not prevent the females from ovipositing diapausing eggs. There was no effect of pyriproxyfen on diapausing egg embryonic developmental time. We also observed mortality in diapausing eggs laid by females exposed to pyriproxyfen immediately after blood feeding. There was no mortality in eggs laid by females that survived larval and pupal exposures. In conclusion, diapausing eggs were the more susceptible to pyriproxyfen diapause termination compared to other life stages. This is the first report of diapause termination in A. albopictus with a juvenile hormone analog. We believe our findings will be useful in developing a new control strategy against overwintering mosquito populations. PMID:26090954

  4. The Insect Growth Regulator Pyriproxyfen Terminates Egg Diapause in the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus.

    Suman, Devi S; Wang, Yi; Gaugler, Randy

    2015-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a highly invasive mosquito species that transmits chikungunya and dengue. This species overwinters as diapausing eggs in temperate climates. Early diapause termination may be a beneficial strategy for winter mosquito control; however, a mechanism to terminate the diapause process using chemicals is not known. We tested the hypothesis that a hormonal imbalance caused by the administration of juvenile hormone analog would terminate egg diapause in A. albopictus. We tested the insect growth regulator pyriproxyfen on all developmental stages to identify a susceptible stage for diapause termination. We found that pyriproxyfen treatment of mosquito eggs terminated embryonic diapause. The highest rates of diapause termination were recorded in newly deposited (78.9%) and fully embryonated (74.7%) eggs at 0.1 and 1 ppm, respectively. Hatching was completed earlier in newly deposited eggs (25-30 days) compared to fully embryonated eggs (71-80 days). The combined mortality from premature diapause termination and ovicidal activity was 98.2% in newly deposited and >98.9% in fully embryonated eggs at 1 ppm. The control diapause eggs did not hatch under diapausing conditions. Pyriproxyfen exposure to larvae, pupae and adults did not prevent the females from ovipositing diapausing eggs. There was no effect of pyriproxyfen on diapausing egg embryonic developmental time. We also observed mortality in diapausing eggs laid by females exposed to pyriproxyfen immediately after blood feeding. There was no mortality in eggs laid by females that survived larval and pupal exposures. In conclusion, diapausing eggs were the more susceptible to pyriproxyfen diapause termination compared to other life stages. This is the first report of diapause termination in A. albopictus with a juvenile hormone analog. We believe our findings will be useful in developing a new control strategy against overwintering mosquito populations. PMID:26090954

  5. Resistencia a insecticidas en mosquitos (Diptera: Culicidae: mecanismos, deteccion y vigilancia en salud publica Inseclicide resistance in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae: mechanisms, detection and monitoring in public health

    IDALYD FONSECA

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Uno de los obstaculos mas serios en los programas de control de vectores de enfermedades humanas es el desarrollo de resistencia a los insecticidas usados. Segun la Organizacion Mundial de la Salud, aproximadamente el 40% de los 506 artropodos de importancia medica presentan algun grado de resistencia a insecticidas. De estas especies. cerca del 50% son especies de mosquitos vectores de malaria, dengue, fiebre amarilla y filariasis. Los dos principales mecanismos de resistencia a insecticidas son las alteraciones en el sitio blanco y un incremento en la tasa de detoxificacion de los insecticidas. Una vez se detectan niveles de resistencia en una poblacion de vectores es fundamental determinar su base bioquimica y molecular. La identificacion de los mecanismos de resistencia permite la seleccion de los insecticidas a usar en los programas de control y la evaluacion del potencial desarrollo de resistencia a insecticidas alternativos. Esta revision presenta informacion basica acerca de los principales mecanismos de resistencia a insecticidas identificados en mosquitos vectores de enfermedades humanas y las metodologias mas usadas para su vigilancia y deteccion.Among the most serious obstacles in vector control programs for human diseases is the development of resistance to the insecticides used. According to WHO, approximately 40% of the 506 medically important arthropods show some degree of insecticide resistance. Of these species, about 50% arc species of mosquitoes that vector malaria, dengue, yellow fever and filariasis. The two principal mechanisms of insecticide resistance are alterations in the target site or an increase in the detoxification rate ofthe insecticide. Once resistance is detected in a vector population it is crucial to determine its molecular and biochemical basis. Identification of resistance mechanisms permits the selection of insecticides to use in control programs and the evaluation of potential development of resistance to alternative insecticides. This review presents basic information regarding the main mechanisms of insecticide resistance identifico in mosquito vectors of human diseases and the methodologies most used to monitor and detect them.

  6. The Potential Use of Wolbachia-Based Mosquito Biocontrol Strategies for Japanese Encephalitis.

    Jeffries, Claire L; Walker, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a zoonotic pathogen transmitted by the infectious bite of Culex mosquitoes. The virus causes the development of the disease Japanese encephalitis (JE) in a small proportion of those infected, predominantly affecting children in eastern and southern Asia. Annual JE incidence estimates range from 50,000-175,000, with 25%-30% of cases resulting in mortality. It is estimated that 3 billion people live in countries in which JEV is endemic. The virus exists in an enzootic transmission cycle, with mosquitoes transmitting JEV between birds as reservoir hosts and pigs as amplifying hosts. Zoonotic infection occurs as a result of spillover events from the main transmission cycle. The reservoir avian hosts include cattle egrets, pond herons, and other species of water birds belonging to the family Ardeidae. Irrigated rice fields provide an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes and attract migratory birds, maintaining the transmission of JEV. Although multiple vaccines have been developed for JEV, they are expensive and require multiple doses to maintain efficacy and immunity. As humans are a "dead-end" host for the virus, vaccination of the human population is unlikely to result in eradication. Therefore, vector control of the principal mosquito vector, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, represents a more promising strategy for reducing transmission. Current vector control strategies include intermittent irrigation of rice fields and space spraying of insecticides during outbreaks. However, Cx. Tritaeniorhynchus is subject to heavy exposure to pesticides in rice fields, and as a result, insecticide resistance has developed. In recent years, significant advancements have been made in the potential use of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia for mosquito biocontrol. The successful transinfection of Wolbachia strains from Drosophila flies to Aedes (Stegomyia) mosquitoes has resulted in the generation of "dengue-refractory" mosquito lines. The successful establishment of Wolbachia in wild Aedes aegypti populations has recently been demonstrated, and open releases in dengue-endemic countries are ongoing. This review outlines the current control methods for JEV in addition to highlighting the potential use of Wolbachia-based biocontrol strategies to impact transmission. JEV and dengue virus are both members of the Flavivirus genus, and the successful establishment of Drosophila Wolbachia strains in Cx. Tritaeniorhynchus, as the principal vector of JEV, is predicted to significantly impact JEV transmission. PMID:26086337

  7. Pharmacological validation of an inward-rectifier potassium (Kir) channel as an insecticide target in the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    Rouhier, Matthew F; Raphemot, Rene; Denton, Jerod S; Piermarini, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Mosquitoes are important disease vectors that transmit a wide variety of pathogens to humans, including those that cause malaria and dengue fever. Insecticides have traditionally been deployed to control populations of disease-causing mosquitoes, but the emergence of insecticide resistance has severely limited the number of active compounds that are used against mosquitoes. Thus, to improve the control of resistant mosquitoes there is a need to identify new insecticide targets and active compounds for insecticide development. Recently we demonstrated that inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channels and small molecule inhibitors of Kir channels offer promising new molecular targets and active compounds, respectively, for insecticide development. Here we provide pharmacological validation of a specific mosquito Kir channel (AeKir1) in the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. We show that VU590, a small-molecule inhibitor of mammalian Kir1.1 and Kir7.1 channels, potently inhibits AeKir1 but not another mosquito Kir channel (AeKir2B) in vitro. Moreover, we show that a previously identified inhibitor of AeKir1 (VU573) elicits an unexpected agonistic effect on AeKir2B in vitro. Injection of VU590 into the hemolymph of adult female mosquitoes significantly inhibits their capacity to excrete urine and kills them within 24 h, suggesting a mechanism of action on the excretory system. Importantly, a structurally-related VU590 analog (VU608), which weakly blocks AeKir1 in vitro, has no significant effects on their excretory capacity and does not kill mosquitoes. These observations suggest that the toxic effects of VU590 are associated with its inhibition of AeKir1. PMID:24959745

  8. Apoptosis and immunity: characterizing the cell death machinery in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    Cooper, Dawn Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Mosquito-borne viruses represent some of the most devastating of the emerging infectious diseases. The Dengue viruses (DENv) that cause Dengue Fever, Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever and Dengue Shock Syndrome are examples of epidemic re-emerging human diseases. There are no vaccines available for DENv; and control programs rely on reducing populations of the principle vector, Aedes aegypti. Novel control strategies are essential and these will rely on a mechanistic understanding of the molecular and ...

  9. Needs for Monitoring Mosquito Transmission of Malaria in a Pre-Elimination World

    James, Stephanie; Takken, Willem; Collins, Frank H.; Gottlieb, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As global efforts to eliminate malaria intensify, accurate information on vector populations and transmission dynamics is critical for directing control efforts, developing new control tools, and predicting the effects of these interventions under various conditions. Currently available sampling tools for mosquito population monitoring suffer from well-recognized limitations. As reported in this workshop summary, a recent gathering of medical entomologists, modelers, and malaria experts revie...

  10. Detecting malaria sporozoites in live, field-collected mosquitoes.

    Habluetzel, A; Merzagora, L; Jenni, L; Betschart, B; Rotigliano, G; Esposito, F

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for identifying malaria-infected mosquitoes, without killing them or hampering their fitness. Individual mosquitoes were induced to salivate on coverslips, and sporozoites, deposited on the glass surface, were visualized by Giemsa staining. Of 21 mosquitoes found to contain sporozoites by salivary gland dissection, 13 had delivered sporozoites on coverslips. A positive correlation was found between the amount of saliva expelled and ejection of sporozoites, indicating that the sensitivity of the method may be increased by improving the probing behaviour of the mosquitoes. The procedure described may be suitable for selecting infected mosquitoes which are able to eject sporozoites during probing. Being applicable to wild Anopheles and to large numbers of mosquitoes, the method lends itself for use in field studies on malaria. PMID:1440771

  11. Fate of blood meal iron in mosquitos

    Zhou, Guoli; Kohlhepp, Pete; Geiser, Dawn; Frasquillo, Maria del Carmen; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz; Winzerling, Joy J.

    2007-01-01

    Iron is an essential element of living cells and organisms as a component of numerous metabolic pathways. Hemoglobin and ferric-transferrin in vertebrate host blood are the two major iron sources for female mosquitoes. We used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and radioisotope-labeling to quantify the fate of iron supplied from hemoglobin or as transferrin in Aedes aegypti. At the end of the first gonotrophic cycloe, ~87% of the ingested total meal heme iron was excreted, ...

  12. Climate change and mosquito-borne disease.

    Reiter, P.

    2001-01-01

    Global atmospheric temperatures are presently in a warming phase that began 250--300 years ago. Speculations on the potential impact of continued warming on human health often focus on mosquito-borne diseases. Elementary models suggest that higher global temperatures will enhance their transmission rates and extend their geographic ranges. However, the histories of three such diseases--malaria, yellow fever, and dengue--reveal that climate has rarely been the principal determinant of their pr...

  13. In silico evidence for the species-specific conservation of mosquito retroposons: implications as a molecular biomarker

    Byarugaba Wilson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes are the transmissive vectors for several infectious pathogens that affect man. However, the control of mosquitoes through insecticide and pesticide spraying has proved difficult in the past. We hypothesized that, by virtue of their reported vertical inheritance among mosquitoes, group II introns a class of small coding ribonucleic acids (scRNAs may form a potential species-specific biomarker. Structurally, introns are a six-moiety complex. Depending on the function of the protein encoded within the IV moiety, the highly mobile class of group II introns or retroposons is sub-divided into two: Restriction Endonuclease (REase-like and Apurinic aPyramydinic Endonuclease (APE-like. REase-like retroposons are thought to be the ancestors of APE retroposons. Our aim in this study was to find evidence for the highly species-specific conservation of the APE subclass of mosquito retroposons. Methods and Results In silico targeted sequence alignments were conducted across a 1,779-organism genome database (1,518 bacterial, 59 archeal, 201 eukaryotic, and the human, using three mosquito retroposon sequence tags (RST as BLASTN queries [AJ970181 and AJ90201 of Culex pipien origin and AJ970301 of Anoplese sinensis origin]. At a calibration of E = 10, A & D = 100, default filtration and a homology cut-off of >95% identity, no hits were found on any of the 1,518 bacterial genomes. Eleven (100% and 15 (100% hits obtained on the 201-eukaryote genome database were homologs (>95% score of C.pipien quinquefasciatus JHB retroposons, but none of An. sinensis. Twenty and 221 low score (3043% identity spurious hits were found at flanking ends of genes and contigs in the human genome with the C.pipien and An. sinensis RSTs respectively. Functional and positional inference revealed these to be possible relatives of human genomic spliceosomes. We advance two models for the application of mosquito RST: as precursors for developing molecular biomarkers for mosquitoes, and as RST-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb-DDT immunoconjugates to enhance targeted toxicity. Conclusion We offer evidence to support the species-specific conservation of mosquito retroposons among lower taxa. Our findings suggest that retroposons may therefore constitute a unique biomarker for mosquito species that may be exploited in molecular entomology. Mosquito RST-specific MAbs may possibly permit synthesis of DDT immunoconjugates that could be used to achieve species-tailored toxicity.

  14. [Changes in range of mosquito-borne diseases affected by global climatic fluctuations].

    Rydzanicz, Katarzyna; Kiewra, Dorota; Lonc, Elzbieta

    2006-01-01

    Climate models suggest the strong possibility of range increase of the diseases transmitted by parasitic arthropods, mostly mosquitoes. In predicting processes of malaria and Dengue diseases dispersion the estimation of risk is based mostly on reproduction rate of vector species. These models allow to calculate the critical threshold of host density which is necessary to maintain parasites and pathogens transmission. Such studies based on integrated mathematical modelling indicate widespread increase of risk due to expansion of the areas suitable for mosquito-borne diseases transmission. This predicted increase is the most pronounced at the borders of the endemic areas and at higher altitudes within malaria and Dengue areas. The simulated change in mosquito-borne diseases risk must be interpreted on the basis of local environmental conditions as well as the effects of socio-economic developments and control disease programs. Apart from mathematical models the sequencing of proteins and DNA of vectors and their pathogens as well as satellite technology (GIS) are taken into consideration. It is supposed that potential impact of global climate change on malaria and Dengue risk can be reduced by constant warning system based on biological monitoring of mosquito vector species and their pathogens. Efficient care system connected with full diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of transmission diseases are also required. PMID:17120987

  15. Hydrology and Mosquito Population Dynamics around a Hydropower Reservoir in Africa

    Endo, N.; Eltahir, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Malaria is associated with dams because their reservoirs provide mosquitoes, the vector of malaria, with permanent breeding sites. The risk of contracting malaria is likely to be enhanced following the increasing trend of hydropower dam construction to satisfy the expanding energy needs in developing countries. A close examination of its adverse health impacts is critical in the design, construction, and operation phases. We will present results of extensive field studies in 2012 and 2013 around the Koka Reservoir, Ethiopia. The results uncover the importance of reservoir management especially after the rainy seasons. Furthermore, we show the capability of a newly modified hydrology, entomology and malaria transmission simulator, HYDREMATS (Bomblies et al, 2008), and its potential as a tool for evaluating environmental management strategies to control malaria. HYDREMATS was developed to represent how the hydrology in nearby villages is impacted by the reservoir system, and the role of different types of vector ecologies associated with different Anopheles mosquito species. The hydrology component of HYDREMATS simulates three different mosquito breeding habitats: rain-fed pools, groundwater pools, and shoreline water. The entomology component simulates the life cycles of An. funestus and An. arabiensis, the two main vectors around the reservoir. The model was calibrated over the 2012-2013 period. The impact of reservoir water level management on the mosquito population is explored based on numerical model simulations and field experiments.

  16. ELISA as an alternative tool for epidemiological surveillance for dengue in mosquitoes: a report from Thailand

    Mayuna Srisuphanunt, Ratana Sithiprasasna, Somboon Patpoparn, Watcharee Attatippaholkun & Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Dengue fever (DF, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and dengue shocksyndrome (DSS are the re-emerging infectious diseases caused by the four serotypes of dengue(DEN virus, type 1 to 4, belonging to the family Flaviviridae and genus Flavivirus. In the absenceof a safe and effective mass immunisation, the prevention and control of dengue outbreaks dependupon the surveillance of cases and mosquito vector. The aim of this work is to test enzyme-linkedimmunosorbent assay (ELISA tool for the virological surveillance of dengue.Methods: Virus-infected Aedes mosquitoes were collected from the field in order to serve as anearly warning monitoring tool for dengue outbreaks. In a prospective field study conducted fromApril to September 2000, female adult Aedes mosquitoes were caught from selected dengue-sensitivearea in Chombung district, Ratchaburi province and assayed by ELISA.Result: Approximately 18.3% were found positive for dengue virus.Conclusion: This can imply that ELISA can be an alternative tool for epidemiological surveillancefor dengue in mosquitoes.

  17. Artificial Neural Network applied as a methodology of mosquito species identification.

    Lorenz, Camila; Ferraudo, Antonio Sergio; Suesdek, Lincoln

    2015-12-01

    There are about 200 species of mosquitoes (Culicidae) known to be vectors of pathogens that cause diseases in humans. Correct identification of mosquito species is an essential step in the development of effective control strategies for these diseases; recognizing the vectors of pathogens is integral to understanding transmission. Unfortunately, taxonomic identification of mosquitoes is a laborious task, which requires trained experts, and it is jeopardized by the high variability of morphological and molecular characters found within the Culicidae family. In this context, the development of an automatized species identification method would be a valuable and more accessible resource to non-taxonomist and health professionals. In this work, an artificial neural network (ANN) technique was proposed for the identification and classification of 17 species of the genera Anopheles, Aedes, and Culex, based on wing shape characters. We tested the hypothesis that classification using ANN is better than traditional classification by discriminant analysis (DA). Thirty-two wing shape principal components were used as input to a Multilayer Perceptron Classification ANN. The obtained ANN correctly identified species with accuracy rates ranging from 85.70% to 100%, and classified species more efficiently than did the traditional method of multivariate discriminant analysis. The results highlight the power of ANNs to diagnose mosquito species and to partly automatize taxonomic identification. These findings also support the hypothesis that wing venation patterns are species-specific, and thus should be included in taxonomic keys. PMID:26394186

  18. Studies on mosquitoes breeding in rock pools on inselbergs around Zaria, northern Nigeria

    David A. Adebote

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Rainwater often collects in depressions on rocks to form pools that are ideal breeding sites of mosquito vectors of diseases. Knowledge on the existence of disease vectors in these remote and relatively inaccessible locations could improve epidemiologic understanding and control capabilities. This study identifies mosquito species, their relative abundance and physicochemical characteristics of breeding microhabitats in rock pools on four inselbergs in northern Nigeria.Methods: Soup ladle dipper was used to obtain representative samples of larval mosquitoes breeding in 141 rock pools on four inselbergs. Physicochemical parameters (depth, electrical conductivity, pH, surface area, temperature and total dissolved solids of the pools were determined. Larvae were preserved in 70% alcohol and identified microscopically to species using taxonomic keys. Statistical correlation analysis and ANOVA were used to test the associations between physicochemical parameters and mosquito abundance, and for differences amongst inselbergs. Results: Of 2991 larvae, five species of mosquito distributed in three genera (Anopheles, Aedes and Culex including Ae. vittatus (92.88%, An. ardensis (0.13%, An. distinctus (1.67%, An. wilsoni (0.13% and Cx. ingrami (5.18% bred in the rock pools, Up to five species occurred per pool in various conspecific and heterogeneric combinations. Except for Ae. vittatus, the physicochemical parameters of the pools correlate significantly with species abundance. Conclusion: Ae. vittatus, a potential vector of yellow fever in Nigeria breeds profusely in rock pools on inselbergs around Zaria. For comprehensive vector implication and control, rock pools should be amongst the habitats of focus in yellow fever epidemiology.

  19. Advances in methods for colour marking of mosquitoes

    2013-01-01

    Background Different techniques are available for colour marking insects and each technique may be suitable for different insect species. Mosquitoes can be marked to determine population size, distribution and flight distance or distinguish closely related species. In this study, two methods of colour marking mosquitoes were described in detail and the impact of both methods on the survival and host-seeking behaviour of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto was investigated. Me...

  20. Nonlinear auditory mechanism enhances female sounds for male mosquitoes

    Jackson, Joseph C.; Robert, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Sound plays an important role in the life history of mosquitoes. Male mosquitoes detect females by the sound generated by their wingbeat. Because female wings are weak acoustic radiators, males have been driven by sexual selection to evolve sensitive acoustic sensors. Mosquito antennae are very sensitive acoustic receivers, featuring up to 16,000 sensory cells, a number comparable with that contained in the human cochlea. The antennal sound receiver exhibits frequency selectivity, input ampli...