WorldWideScience

Sample records for midrobial community analysis

  1. Community analysis in social networks

    OpenAIRE

    Arenas, Alex; Danon, Leon; Diaz-Guilera, Albert; Gleiser, Pablo M.; Guimera, Roger

    2003-01-01

    We present an empirical study of different social networks obtained from digital repositories. Our analysis reveals the community structure and provides a useful visualising technique. We investigate the scaling properties of the community size distribution, and that find all the networks exhibit power law scaling in the community size distributions with exponent either -0.5 or -1. Finally we find that the networks' community structure is topologically self-similar using the Horton-Strahler i...

  2. Chapter 11. Community analysis-based methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y.; Wu, C.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Holden, P.A.

    2010-05-01

    Microbial communities are each a composite of populations whose presence and relative abundance in water or other environmental samples are a direct manifestation of environmental conditions, including the introduction of microbe-rich fecal material and factors promoting persistence of the microbes therein. As shown by culture-independent methods, different animal-host fecal microbial communities appear distinctive, suggesting that their community profiles can be used to differentiate fecal samples and to potentially reveal the presence of host fecal material in environmental waters. Cross-comparisons of microbial communities from different hosts also reveal relative abundances of genetic groups that can be used to distinguish sources. In increasing order of their information richness, several community analysis methods hold promise for MST applications: phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), cloning/sequencing, and PhyloChip. Specific case studies involving TRFLP and PhyloChip approaches demonstrate the ability of community-based analyses of contaminated waters to confirm a diagnosis of water quality based on host-specific marker(s). The success of community-based MST for comprehensively confirming fecal sources relies extensively upon using appropriate multivariate statistical approaches. While community-based MST is still under evaluation and development as a primary diagnostic tool, results presented herein demonstrate its promise. Coupled with its inherently comprehensive ability to capture an unprecedented amount of microbiological data that is relevant to water quality, the tools for microbial community analysis are increasingly accessible, and community-based approaches have unparalleled potential for translation into rapid, perhaps real-time, monitoring platforms.

  3. Link Analysis for Communities Detection on Facebook

    CERN Document Server

    Mellah, Mohamed Adnane; Hamou, Reda Mohamed; Kumar, A V Senthil

    2014-01-01

    Social networks have become a part in the daily life of millions of users, which offer wide range of interests and practices. The main characteristic of social networks is its ability to gather different individuals around a common point of view or collective beliefs. Among the current social networking sites, Facebook is the most popular, which has the highest number of users. However, in Facebook, the existence of communities (groups)is a critical question; thus, many researchers focus on potential communities by using techniques like data mining and web mining. In this work, we present four approaches based on link analysis techniques to detect prospective groups and their members

  4. Community detection algorithms: a comparative analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Lancichinetti, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Uncovering the community structure exhibited by real networks is a crucial step towards an understanding of complex systems that goes beyond the local organization of their constituents. Many algorithms have been proposed so far, but none of them has been subjected to strict tests to evaluate their performance. Most of the sporadic tests performed so far involved small networks with known community structure and/or artificial graphs with a simplified structure, which is very uncommon in real systems. Here we test several methods against a recently introduced class of benchmark graphs, with heterogeneous distributions of degree and community size. The methods are also tested against the benchmark by Girvan and Newman and on random graphs. As a result of our analysis, three recent algorithms introduced by Rosvall and Bergstrom, Blondel et al. and Ronhovde and Nussinov, respectively, have an excellent performance, with the additional advantage of low computational complexity, which enables one to analyze large s...

  5. Social network analysis community detection and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Missaoui, Rokia

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to recent progress in social network analysis with a high focus on community detection and evolution. The eleven chapters cover the identification of cohesive groups, core components and key players either in static or dynamic networks of different kinds and levels of heterogeneity. Other important topics in social network analysis such as influential detection and maximization, information propagation, user behavior analysis, as well as network modeling and visualization are also presented. Many studies are validated through real social networks such as Twitter. This edit

  6. Metagenomic analysis of microbial communities and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Lars

    From small clone libraries to large next-generation sequencing datasets – the field of community genomics or metagenomics has developed tremendously within the last years. This chapter will summarize some of these developments and will also highlight pitfalls of current metagenomic analyses. It...... will illustrate the general workflow of a metagenomic study and introduce the three different metagenomic approaches: (1) the random shotgun approach that focuses on the metagenome as a whole, (2) the targeted approach that focuses on metagenomic amplicon sequences, and (3) the function-driven approach...... that uses heterologous expression of metagenomic DNA fragments to discover novel metabolic functions. Lastly, the chapter will shortly discuss the meta-analysis of gene expression of microbial communities, more precisely metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics....

  7. Metrics for Community Analysis: A Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Tanmoy; Dalmia, Ayushi; Mukherjee, Animesh; Ganguly, Niloy

    2016-01-01

    Detecting and analyzing dense groups or communities from social and information networks has attracted immense attention over last one decade due to its enormous applicability in different domains. Community detection is an ill-defined problem, as the nature of the communities is not known in advance. The problem has turned out to be even complicated due to the fact that communities emerge in the network in various forms - disjoint, overlapping, hierarchical etc. Various heuristics have been ...

  8. Metrics for Community Analysis: A Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Tanmoy; Mukherjee, Animesh; Ganguly, Niloy

    2016-01-01

    Detecting and analyzing dense groups or communities from social and information networks has attracted immense attention over last one decade due to its enormous applicability in different domains. Community detection is an ill-defined problem, as the nature of the communities is not known in advance. The problem has turned out to be even complicated due to the fact that communities emerge in the network in various forms - disjoint, overlapping, hierarchical etc. Various heuristics have been proposed depending upon the application in hand. All these heuristics have been materialized in the form of new metrics, which in most cases are used as optimization functions for detecting the community structure, or provide an indication of the goodness of detected communities during evaluation. There arises a need for an organized and detailed survey of the metrics proposed with respect to community detection and evaluation. In this survey, we present a comprehensive and structured overview of the start-of-the-art metr...

  9. An Analysis of Chinese Community Education Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoqing PAN

    2014-01-01

    Based on the systematic review of the government- issued regulatory documents related to community education using the leading Chinese data base of WanFang, the article maps the terrain of community education in china from 1992 to present. It is found that community education in China has experienced a fundamental change from being responsible merely for out-of-school ethic education for primary and secondary school students before 21st century to training and education activities for adults ...

  10. Analysis of Community Forest Management in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2015-01-01

    The major role tropical forests play in biodiversity and climate change has led the world to search for effective ways to slow down deforestation. Community forest management (CFM) is an example of the broader concept of community-based natural resources management (CBNRM). As part of the decentralization policy in many countries, mainly in Africa and Asia, CFM was expected to promote: (i) ...

  11. Community Based Procurement : Value for Money Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank, (WB)

    2009-01-01

    In the India operations of the World Bank, there is little evidence as yet to substantiate that community based procurement results in value for money in a fair and transparent manner. In order to understand community based procurement in relation to Value for Money (VFM), governance and accountability, a study was needed to explore these concepts and their dynamics. The present study focu...

  12. ANALYSIS OF VIRTUAL COMMUNITIES IN TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvena DENCHEVA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet has changed the way companies interact with customers. Customers have become the active part of the communication with business. Virtual communities are the most popular implication of the usage of Internet into business world. The article presents the nature of virtual communities and how they are functioning in the hospitality industry. The web site of hotel Dobruzda-Dobrich has been analyzed regarding its Internet presence. Internet marketing strategy for improving its internet presence is presented in the paper.

  13. ANALYSIS OF VIRTUAL COMMUNITIES IN TOURISM

    OpenAIRE

    Silvena DENCHEVA

    2013-01-01

    Internet has changed the way companies interact with customers. Customers have become the active part of the communication with business. Virtual communities are the most popular implication of the usage of Internet into business world. The article presents the nature of virtual communities and how they are functioning in the hospitality industry. The web site of hotel Dobruzda-Dobrich has been analyzed regarding its Internet presence. Internet marketing strategy for improving its internet p...

  14. An Analysis of Chinese Community Education Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing PAN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the systematic review of the government- issued regulatory documents related to community education using the leading Chinese data base of WanFang, the article maps the terrain of community education in china from 1992 to present. It is found that community education in China has experienced a fundamental change from being responsible merely for out-of-school ethic education for primary and secondary school students before 21st century to training and education activities for adults in need of them under social transformation. In addition, it grows from mere community education committee responsible for its work to a comparatively complete system capable of rallying necessary human and material resources to ensure its function. The changes of community education policy were directly motivated by the domestic socioeconomic development in the past 30 years and the global educational notion of lifelong learning and building a learning society. Finally, the problems such as the absence of national laws and some others in current community education in China are discussed.

  15. Enhancing Sentiment Analysis on Twitter Using Community Detection

    OpenAIRE

    William Deitrick; Benjamin Valyou; Wes Jones; Joshua Timian; Wei Hu

    2013-01-01

    The increasing popularity of social media in recent years has created new opportunities to study the interactions of different groups of people. Never before have so many data about such a large number of individuals been readily available for analysis. Two popular topics in the study of social networks are community detection and sentiment analysis. Community detection seeks to find groups of associated individuals within networks, and sentiment analysis attempts to determine how individual...

  16. Interspecific associations and community structure: A local survey and analysis in a grass community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Interspecific associations in the plant community may help to understand the self-organizing assembly and succession of the community. In present study, Pearson correlation, net correlation, Spearman rank correlation, and point correlation were used to detect the interspecific (inter-family associations of grass species (families using the sampling data collected in a grass community of Zhuhai, China. We found that most associations between grass species (families were positive associations. The competition/interference/niche separation between grass species (families was not significant. A lot of pairs of grass species and families with statistically significant interspecific (inter-family associations based on four correlation measures were discovered. Cluster trees for grass species/families were obtained by using cluster analysis. Relationship among positive/negative associations, interspecific relationship and community succession/stability/robustness was discussed. I held that species with significant positive or negative associations are generally keystone species in the community. Although both negative and positive associations occur in the community succession, the adaptation and selection will finally result in the successful coexistence of the species with significant positive associations in the climax community. As the advance of community succession, the significant positive associations increase and maximize in climax community, and the significant negative associations increase to a maximum and then decline into climax community. Dominance of significant positive associations in the climax community means the relative stablility and equilibrium of the community. No significant associations usually account for the majority of possible interspecific associations at each phase of community succession. They guarantee the robustness of community. They are candidates of keystone species. Lose of some existing keystone species might be filled with some species previously with no significant associations. In addition, a Java program, associCoeff, re-writed from my earlier work, was introduced. A large number of data were thus given also.

  17. Community health psychology : promoting analysis and action for social change

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Catherine; Murray, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Community health psychology is concerned with the theory and method of working with communities to combat disease and to promote health. This introductory article outlines key assumptions and debates underlying this area of research and practice – in the interests of framing the papers in this special edition of the Journal of Health Psychology. Attention is given to the value of emphasising the community level of analysis and action; the role of collective action in improving health; psycho-...

  18. Density Analysis of Network Community Divisions

    CERN Document Server

    Holmstrm, E; Brnnlund, J; Holmstr\\"om, Erik; Bock, Nicolas; Br\\"{a}nnlund, Johan

    2006-01-01

    We present a compact matrix formulation of the modularity, a commonly used quality measure for the community division in a network. Using this formulation we calculate the density of modularities, a statistical measure of the probability of finding a particular modularity for a random but valid community division into $C$ communities. We present our results for some well--known and some artificial networks, and we conclude that the general features of the modularity density are quite similar for the different networks. From a simple model of the modularity we conclude that all nnected networks must show similar shapes of their modularity densities. The general features of this density may give valuable information in the search for good optimization schemes of the modularity.

  19. Vulnerability metrics and analysis for communities in complex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper applies the problem of community detection in complex networks to identify sets of network elements that are critical to the connectivity of the network and its communities. Specifically, the paper defines a vulnerability set and value for each of the communities in a complex network. Also, for each community it identifies a value of relative vulnerability in comparison with the remaining communities. The approach allows to visualize/identify the critical elements of a complex network. This is an important first step for many recent problems arising in social networks, critical infrastructures and homeland security. By identifying these elements one can prioritize resource allocation to protect, interdict or improve performance in these types of systems. The sets and metrics introduced are illustrated with numerous examples and discussions. Based on the analysis of the examples the manuscript provides an intuitive description of a community's presence in the interior or periphery of a network.

  20. Cross‐cultural analysis of the Wikipedia community

    OpenAIRE

    Shachaf, Pnina; Hara , Noriko; Hew, Khe Foon

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a cross‐cultural analysis of four Wikipedias in different languages and demonstrates their roles as communities of practice (CoPs). Prior research on CoPs and on the Wikipedia community often lacks cross‐cultural analysis. Despite the fact that over 75% of Wikipedia is written in languages other than English, research on Wikipedia primarily focuses on the English Wikipedia and tends to overlook the Wikipedias in other languages. This paper first argues that W...

  1. Bacterial community analysis of Indonesian hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, G C; Gaffar, S; Cowan, D A; Suharto, A R

    2001-06-12

    We report the first attempts to describe thermophilic bacterial communities in Indonesia's thermal springs using molecular phylogenetic analyses. 16S rRNA genes from laboratory cultures and DNA directly amplified from three hot springs in West Java were sequenced. The 22 sequences obtained were assignable to the taxa Proteobacteria, Bacillus and Flavobacterium, including a number of clades not normally associated with thermophily. PMID:11410357

  2. Bayesian mixture analysis for metagenomic community profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Morfopoulou, Sofia; Plagnol, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Deep sequencing of clinical samples is now an established tool for the detection of infectious pathogens, with direct medical applications. The large amount of data generated produces an opportunity to detect species even at very low levels, provided that computational tools can effectively profile the relevant metagenomic communities. Data interpretation is complicated by the fact that short sequencing reads can match multiple organisms and by the lack of completeness of existing...

  3. Southern African development community regional situation analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Farr, J.L.; Gumiremhete, R.; Davies, J; Robins, N.S.

    2005-01-01

    The Southern African Development Community (SADC) groups fourteen sovereign states in the southern and eastern Africa region for the main purpose of fostering co-operation for mutual benefit from development of the resources of the whole region. The region accounts for almost 70% gross domestic product of sub-Saharan Africa and is home to almost a third of its people. In the context of water resources, conditions in the SADC region are highly variable with respect to the relati...

  4. Link Analysis for Communities Detection on Facebook

    OpenAIRE

    Mellah, Mohamed Adnane; Amine, Abdelmalek; Hamou, Reda Mohamed; Kumar, A. V. Senthil

    2014-01-01

    Social networks have become a part in the daily life of millions of users, which offer wide range of interests and practices. The main characteristic of social networks is its ability to gather different individuals around a common point of view or collective beliefs. Among the current social networking sites, Facebook is the most popular, which has the highest number of users. However, in Facebook, the existence of communities (groups)is a critical question; thus, many researchers focus on p...

  5. Community Analysis of Social Network in MMOG

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng PANG; Chen, Changjia

    2010-01-01

    Massive Multiplayer Online Games (MMOG) have attracted millions of players in recent years. In MMOG, players organize themselves voluntarily and fulfill collective tasks together. Because each player can join different activities, one player may show different social relationship with others in different activities. In the paper we proposed the incremental label propagation algorithm to search the cliques accurately and quickly. Then we analyzed community structure characteristics on multi-ac...

  6. Microbial community analysis in biotrickling filters treating isopropanol air emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Gil, María del Carmen; Alvarez Hornos, Francisco Javier; San-Valero, Pau; Marzal Doménech, Paula; Gabaldón García, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of the microbial community was analysed over one year in two biotrickling filters operating under intermittent feeding conditions and treating isopropanol emissions, a pollutant typically found in the flexography sector. Each reactor was packed with one media: plastic cross-flow-structured material or polypropylene rings. The communities were monitored by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the 16S rRNA region....

  7. Metagenomic analysis of the microbial community in kefir grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbantoglu, Ufuk; Cakar, Atilla; Dogan, Haluk; Abaci, Neslihan; Ustek, Duran; Sayood, Khalid; Can, Handan

    2014-08-01

    Kefir grains as a probiotic have been subject to microbial community identification using culture-dependent and independent methods that target specific strains in the community, or that are based on limited 16S rRNA analysis. We performed whole genome shotgun pyrosequencing using two Turkish Kefir grains. Sequencing generated 3,682,455 high quality reads for a total of ∼1.6 Gbp of data assembled into 6151 contigs with a total length of ∼24 Mbp. Species identification mapped 88.16% and 93.81% of the reads rendering 4 Mpb of assembly that did not show any homology to known bacterial sequences. Identified communities in the two grains showed high concordance where Lactobacillus was the most abundant genus with a mapped abundance of 99.42% and 99.79%. This genus was dominantly represented by three species Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus helveticus with a total mapped abundance of 97.63% and 98.74%. We compared and verified our findings with 16S pyrosequencing and model based 16S data analysis. Our results suggest that microbial community profiling using whole genome shotgun data is feasible, can identify novel species data, and has the potential to generate a more accurate and detailed assessment of the underlying bacterial community, especially for low abundance species. PMID:24750812

  8. SmashCommunity: A metagenomic annotation and analysis tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Harrington, Eoghan D; Foerstner, Konrad U; Raes, Jeroen; Bork, Peer

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY: SmashCommunity is a stand-alone metagenomic annotation and analysis pipeline suitable for data from Sanger and 454 sequencing technologies. It supports state-of-the-art software for essential metagenomic tasks such as assembly and gene prediction. It provides tools to estimate the...... quantitative phylogenetic and functional compositions of metagenomes, to compare compositions of multiple metagenomes and to produce intuitive visual representations of such analyses. AVAILABILITY: SmashCommunity is freely available at http://www.bork.embl.de/software/smash CONTACT: bork@embl.de....

  9. Analysis of virtual communities supporting OSS projects using social network analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Toral Marín, Sergio Luis; Martínez Torres, María del Rocío; Barrero, Federico

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the behaviour of virtual communities for Open Source Software (OSS) projects. The development of OSS projects relies on virtual communities, which are built on relationships among members, being their final objective sharing knowledge and improving the underlying project. This study addresses the interactive collaboration in these kinds of communities applying social network analysis (SNA). In particular, SNA techniques will be used to identify those members pl...

  10. Microbial community analysis of ambient temperature anaerobic digesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciotola, R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Food, Agriculture and Biological Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This paper reported on a study in which designs for Chinese and Indian fixed-dome anaerobic digesters were modified in an effort to produce smaller and more affordable digesters. While these types of systems are common in tropical regions of developing countries, they have not been used in colder climates because of the low biogas yield during the winter months. Although there is evidence that sufficient biogas production can be maintained in colder temperatures through design and operational changes, there is a lack of knowledge about the seasonal changes in the composition of the microbial communities in ambient temperature digesters. More knowledge is needed to design and operate systems for maximum biogas yield in temperate climates. The purpose of this study was to cultivate a microbial community that maximizes biogas production at psychrophilic temperatures. The study was conducted on a 300 gallon experimental anaerobic digester on the campus of Ohio State University. Culture-independent methods were used on weekly samples collected from the digester in order to examine microbial community response to changes in ambient temperature. Microbial community profiles were established using universal bacterial and archaeal primers that targeted the 16S rRNA gene. In addition to the methanogenic archaea, this analysis also targeted some of the other numerically and functionally important microbial taxa in anaerobic digesters, such as hydrolytic, fermentative, acetogenic and sulfate reducing bacteria. According to preliminary results, the composition of the microbial community shifts with changes in seasonal temperature.

  11. A Large-Scale Community Structure Analysis In Facebook

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrara, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Understanding social dynamics that govern human phenomena, such as communications and social relationships is a major problem in current computational social sciences. In particular, given the unprecedented success of online social networks (OSNs), in this paper we are concerned with the analysis of aggregation patterns and social dynamics occurring among users of the largest OSN as the date: Facebook. In detail, we discuss the mesoscopic features of the community structure of this network, c...

  12. Illusions of Resilience? An Analysis of Community Responses to Change in Northern Norway.

    OpenAIRE

    Helene Amundsen

    2012-01-01

    This article contributes to our understanding of community resilience. Community resilience is the ability of a community to cope and adjust to stresses caused by social, political, and environmental change and to engage community resources to overcome adversity and take advantage of opportunities in response to change. Through an analysis of local responses to multiple challenges, six dimensions of community resilience were found in one village in northern Norway. These dimensions; community...

  13. A Large-Scale Community Structure Analysis In Facebook

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present a large-scale community structure detection and analysis applied to the largest Online Social Network actually existing, namely Facebook. This network gathers more than 500 millions users at 2011. The structure and the characteristics of this social network have been widely investigated during the last years. Although some related work focuses on analyzing clustering phenomena on a small scale, this is the first large-scale study which considers a significant sample of the network. The process of data mining from the social network platform is here described, in order to clarify how the required information has been acquired avoiding privacy related issues. Data have been collected adopting two different techniques of graph mining, and are here discussed accordingly to the structural properties of these samples which have been already investigated in previous works. To the purpose of discovering the community structure of the considered samples, we devised and described two efficient c...

  14. AN ANALYSIS OF ENERGY USE ON COMMUNITY COLLEGE CAMPUSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    York, C.M.

    1980-03-01

    This paper provides an analysis of energy use on community college campuses which justifies the introduction of a simple model for describing that energy use. The model is then applied to the data from 80 campuses to determine average values for the parameters of the model. The model can be used to measure the energy savings of conservation programs as well as the cost avoidance associated with those savings. Because the model explicitly takes into account variations in weather, it provides an essential tool for evaluating energy conservation programs.

  15. Analysis of community structure in networks of correlated data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, S.; Jensen, P.; Arenas, A.

    2008-12-25

    We present a reformulation of modularity that allows the analysis of the community structure in networks of correlated data. The new modularity preserves the probabilistic semantics of the original definition even when the network is directed, weighted, signed, and has self-loops. This is the most general condition one can find in the study of any network, in particular those defined from correlated data. We apply our results to a real network of correlated data between stores in the city of Lyon (France).

  16. Spatial analysis of early successional, temperate forest community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R. H.; Williams, C. A.; MacLean, R. G.; Epstein, H. E.; Vanderhoof, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    The global importance of sequestration of carbon by temperate forests makes characterizing the regrowth of these forests post-disturbance both ecologically and economically important. High intensity disturbances, such as logging, result in substantial alteration of community composition post-disturbance, creating the potential for alterations to the cycling of carbon, water, and nutrients in the ecosystem. Because logging pressure in New England continues to increase, understanding how forest ecosystems in this region respond to disturbance is crucial. This study aims to characterize interspecies interactions within New England forests by identifying synchronous and asynchronous colocation of species following a disturbance. To accomplish this, line-intercept surveys of vegetation were conducted in a clearcut forest stand located within the Harvard Forest LTER site. Survey data collected two (2010) and five (2013) years post-clearcut were analyzed using a one-dimensional Ripley's K. From 2010 to 2013, an increase in the number of interspecies relationships was observed, indicating the development of community structure. Additionally, the analysis found an increase in total vegetative cover from 2010 to 2013, and also found the majority of observed interspecies relationships to be asynchronous relationships. Together, these results imply an increase in resource competition that had the potential to drive the increase in community structure. Specifically, an increase in community structure led to the development of three distinct sub-communities: homogenous fern, tree seedling canopy over ground cover, and shrub dominated. This creates a patchy landscape in the early successional forest that allows for high species diversity (Shannon's H = 2.455). Based on the results of the Ripley's K analyses, species demonstrated definite patterns of synchronicity and asynchronicity based on both specific species interactions as well as functional group interactions. These analyses have important application for species conservation and for predicting the regeneration of tree seedlings, and provide unique information about the interspecies interactions of New England forest communities during one of the most rich and dynamic phases of succession, allowing for more informed decisions to be made regarding the regrowth of forests following a high-intensity disturbance.

  17. The local community development and the community-based tourism : a comparative conceptual analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvie PARENT; Klein, Juan-Luis; Jolin, Louis

    2009-01-01

    According to the authors of this paper, mass tourism does not generate the development of local communities but rather their devitalization. This paper presents a cross-literature survey on community-based tourism and local community development. It proposes some links between these two approaches and asserts that community-based tourism can be a strategy to trigger local community development. It address the conditions under which the convergence of these two approaches may allow the launchi...

  18. Seasonal and Spatial Changes of Microorganism Communities in Constructed Wetlands: A Community Level Physiological Profiling Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grard Merlin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In constructed wetlands, microorganisms associated with plants are assumed to play a major role. A one-year survey was conducted in five vertical flow constructed wetland systems that had been operating from 2 months to 8 years in small French villages (100500 People Equivalent to provide a better understanding of microbiological activity. The objective of our study was to highlight the most important factor generating variability between microorganisms communities compared to treatment performances. Results of community level physiological profiling using Biolog Ecoplates were analyzed using principal component analysis. The greatest microbial activity was observed in the oldest wetland during summer. Profiles of fed and rest bed were differentiated by the nature of the main carbon source metabolized. Whereas carbohydrates and carboxylic acids appeared to be better assimilated with fed beds, it seemed that phosphate compounds as well as amines allowed better growth in the plates inoculated with samples of rest beds. In all fed beds, the most important parameters affecting the diversity were the season and the age of the wetlands. There were only slight profile differences between surface and subsurface samples and between the first and second stage samples.

  19. Community-centric analysis of user engagement in Skype social network

    OpenAIRE

    Rossetti, Giulio; PAPPALARDO Luca; Kikas, Riivo; Pedreschi, Dino; Giannotti, Fosca; Dumas, Marlon

    2015-01-01

    Traditional approaches to user engagement analysis focus on individual users. In this paper we address user engagement analysis at the level of groups of users (social communities). From the entire Skype social network we extract communities by means of representative community detection methods each one providing node partitions having their own peculiarities. We then examine user engagement in the extracted communities putting into evidence clear relations between topological and geographic...

  20. Bacterial community analysis of contaminant soils from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows: Shortly after the Chernobyl accident in 1986, vegetation, contaminated soil and other radioactive debris were buried in situ in trenches. The aims of this work are to analyse the structure of bacterial communities evolving in this environment since 20 years, and to evaluate the potential role of microorganisms in radionuclide migration in soils. Therefore, soil samples exhibiting contrasted radionuclides content were collected in and around the trench number 22. Bacterial communities were examined using a genetic fingerprinting method that allowed a comparative profiling of the samples (DGGE), with universal and group-specific PCR primers. Our results indicate that Chernobyl soil samples host a wide diversity of Bacteria, with stable patterns for Firmicutes and Actinobacteria and more variable for Proteobacteria. A collection of 650 aerobic and anaerobic culturable isolates was also constructed. A phylogenetic analysis of 250 heterotrophic aerobic isolates revealed that 5 phyla are represented: Beta-, Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and spore-forming Firmicutes, which is largely dominant. These collection will be screened for the presence of radionuclide-accumulating species in order to estimate the potential influence of microorganisms in radionuclides migration in soils

  1. The local community development and the community-based tourism : a comparative conceptual analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie PARENT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the authors of this paper, mass tourism does not generate the development of local communities but rather their devitalization. This paper presents a cross-literature survey on community-based tourism and local community development. It proposes some links between these two approaches and asserts that community-based tourism can be a strategy to trigger local community development. It address the conditions under which the convergence of these two approaches may allow the launching of development initiatives liable to counter the devitalization and impoverishment process which characterizes certain mass tourism oriented places.

  2. GeoChips for Analysis of Microbial Functional Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-09-30

    Functional gene arrays (FGA) are microarrays that contain probes for genes encoding proteins or enzymes involved in functions of interest and allow for the study of thousands of genes at one time. The most comprehensive FGA to date is the GeoChip, which contains ~;;24,000 probes for ~;;10,000 genes involved in the geochemical cycling of C, N, P, and S, as well as genes involved in metal resistance and reduction and contaminant degradation. This chapter details the methods necessary for GeoChip analysis. Methods covered include preparation of DNA (whole community genome amplification and labeling), array setup (prehybridization steps), hybridization (sample and hybridization buffers), and post hybridization steps (slide washing and array scanning).

  3. Detecting network communities: an application to phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Roberto F S; Rocha-Neto, Ivan C; Santos, Leonardo B L; de Santana, Charles N; Diniz, Marcelo V C; Lobão, Thierry Petit; Goés-Neto, Aristóteles; Pinho, Suani T R; El-Hani, Charbel N

    2011-05-01

    This paper proposes a new method to identify communities in generally weighted complex networks and apply it to phylogenetic analysis. In this case, weights correspond to the similarity indexes among protein sequences, which can be used for network construction so that the network structure can be analyzed to recover phylogenetically useful information from its properties. The analyses discussed here are mainly based on the modular character of protein similarity networks, explored through the Newman-Girvan algorithm, with the help of the neighborhood matrix . The most relevant networks are found when the network topology changes abruptly revealing distinct modules related to the sets of organisms to which the proteins belong. Sound biological information can be retrieved by the computational routines used in the network approach, without using biological assumptions other than those incorporated by BLAST. Usually, all the main bacterial phyla and, in some cases, also some bacterial classes corresponded totally (100%) or to a great extent (>70%) to the modules. We checked for internal consistency in the obtained results, and we scored close to 84% of matches for community pertinence when comparisons between the results were performed. To illustrate how to use the network-based method, we employed data for enzymes involved in the chitin metabolic pathway that are present in more than 100 organisms from an original data set containing 1,695 organisms, downloaded from GenBank on May 19, 2007. A preliminary comparison between the outcomes of the network-based method and the results of methods based on Bayesian, distance, likelihood, and parsimony criteria suggests that the former is as reliable as these commonly used methods. We conclude that the network-based method can be used as a powerful tool for retrieving modularity information from weighted networks, which is useful for phylogenetic analysis. PMID:21573202

  4. Integrating software architectures for distributed simulations and simulation analysis communities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsby, Michael E.; Fellig, Daniel; Linebarger, John Michael; Moore, Patrick Curtis; Sa, Timothy J.; Hawley, Marilyn F.

    2005-10-01

    The one-year Software Architecture LDRD (No.79819) was a cross-site effort between Sandia California and Sandia New Mexico. The purpose of this research was to further develop and demonstrate integrating software architecture frameworks for distributed simulation and distributed collaboration in the homeland security domain. The integrated frameworks were initially developed through the Weapons of Mass Destruction Decision Analysis Center (WMD-DAC), sited at SNL/CA, and the National Infrastructure Simulation & Analysis Center (NISAC), sited at SNL/NM. The primary deliverable was a demonstration of both a federation of distributed simulations and a federation of distributed collaborative simulation analysis communities in the context of the same integrated scenario, which was the release of smallpox in San Diego, California. To our knowledge this was the first time such a combination of federations under a single scenario has ever been demonstrated. A secondary deliverable was the creation of the standalone GroupMeld{trademark} collaboration client, which uses the GroupMeld{trademark} synchronous collaboration framework. In addition, a small pilot experiment that used both integrating frameworks allowed a greater range of crisis management options to be performed and evaluated than would have been possible without the use of the frameworks.

  5. Community College Student Mental Health: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Daniel Seth; Davison, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study explores community college student mental health by comparing the responses of California community college and traditional university students on the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II (ACHA-NCHA II). Using MANOVA, we compared community college and traditional university students, examining…

  6. The Ambivalence of Community: A Critical Analysis of Rural Education's Oldest Trope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The concept of community has been central to the discourse of rural education for generations. At the same time, community has been and continues to be a deeply problematic concept. I begin this analysis with Raymond Williams's characterization of the idea of community as a uniquely positive concept, arguing that this framing is, as Williams

  7. USING SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS TO EVALUATE COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING OF A REGIONAL COMMUNITY CANCER NETWORK

    OpenAIRE

    Luque, John; Tyson, Dinorah Martinez; Lee, Ji-hyun; Gwede, Clement; Vadaparampil, Susan; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Meade, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) is one of 25 Community Network Programs funded by the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s) Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities with the objectives to create a collaborative infrastructure of academic and community based organizations and to develop effective and sustainable interventions to reduce cancer health disparities. In order to describe the network characteristics of the TBCCN as part of our ongoing evaluation efforts, we conducted ...

  8. Functional analysis of natural microbial consortia using community proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Denef, Vincent [University of California, Berkeley; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that microbial communities, not individual microorganisms, are the relevant ecological units, yet what we know about metabolic functioning of microbial communities could be written on a postage stamp. The recent developments in comprehensive molecular methods promise to gain a better understanding of how organisms within communities interact and how communities and their populations evolve. Here we highlight recent advances and insights gathered by the application of proteogenomics to microbial communities. We explore the history of how unrelated fields of microbial ecology, genomics, biological mass spectrometry and informatics converge to the development of a new field of metaproteomics.

  9. Community

    OpenAIRE

    Sichling, Florian

    2008-01-01

    The term community in the English language can be traced back to the 14th century and originates from the French word comuneté and the Latin word communitatem. In English the term initially came to denote five distinct senses. Community served as a distinction of the common people from those of rank (1), as a denotation of a state or organized society (2), the people of a district (3), as a designation for the community of shared interests (4) and as a sense of common identity and characteris...

  10. Metagenomic analysis of microbial community in uranium-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xun; Luo, Xuegang; Zhao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Uranium tailing is a serious pollution challenge for the environment. Based on metagenomic sequencing analysis, we explored the functional and structural diversity of the microbial community in six soil samples taken at different soil depths from uranium-contaminated and uncontaminated areas. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Orthology (KO) groups were obtained using a Basic Local Alignment Search Tool search based on the universal protein resource database. The KO-pathway network was then constructed using the selected KOs. Finally, alpha and beta diversity analyses were performed to explore the differences in soil bacterial diversity between the radioactive soil and uncontaminated soil. In total, 30-68 million high-quality reads were obtained. Sequence assembly yielded 286,615 contigs; and these contigs mostly annotated to 1699 KOs. The KO distributions were similar among the six soil samples. Moreover, the proportion of the metabolism of other amino acids (e.g., beta-alanine, taurine, and hypotaurine) and signal transduction was significantly lower in radioactive soil than in uncontaminated soil, whereas the proportion of membrane transport and carbohydrate metabolism was higher. Additionally, KOs were mostly enriched in ATP-binding cassette transporters and two-component systems. According to diversity analyses, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla in radioactive and uncontaminated soil, and Robiginitalea, Microlunatus, and Alicyclobacillus were the dominant genera in radioactive soil. Taken together, these results demonstrate that soil microbial community, structure, and functions show significant changes in uranium-contaminated soil. The dominant categories such as Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria may be applied in environmental governance for uranium-contaminated soil in southern China. PMID:26433967

  11. Enhancing the Analysis of Rural Community Resilience: Evidence from Community land Ownership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerratt, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Resilience, and specifically the resilience of (rural) communities, is an increasingly-ubiquitous concept, particularly in the contexts of resistance to shocks, climate change, and environmental disasters. The dominant discourse concerning (community) resilience centres around bounce-back from external shocks. In this paper, I argue that it is…

  12. Website Sharing in Online Health Communities: A Descriptive Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nath, Chinmoy; HUH, JINA; Adupa, Abhishek Kalyan; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R

    2016-01-01

    Background An increasing number of people visit online health communities to seek health information. In these communities, people share experiences and information with others, often complemented with links to different websites. Understanding how people share websites can help us understand patients’ needs in online health communities and improve how peer patients share health information online. Objective Our goal was to understand (1) what kinds of websites are shared, (2) information qua...

  13. Separation of the bacterial species, Escherichia coli, from mixed-species microbial communities for transcriptome analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Holder Diane; Dai Dongjuan; Raskin Lutgarde; Xi Chuanwu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The study of bacterial species interactions in a mixed-species community can be facilitated by transcriptome analysis of one species in the community using cDNA microarray technology. However, current applications of microarrays are mostly limited to single species studies. The purpose of this study is to develop a method to separate one species, Escherichia coli as an example, from mixed-species communities for transcriptome analysis. Results E. coli cells were separated ...

  14. Bacterial community analysis of Tatsoi cultivated by hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ok K; Kim, Hun; Kim, Hyun J; Baker, Christopher A; Ricke, Steven C

    2016-07-01

    Tatsoi (Brassica narinosa) is a popular Asian salad green that is mostly consumed as a source of fresh produce. The purpose of this study was to assess the microbial diversity of Tatsoi cultivated in a hydroponic system and of its ecosystem. Tatsoi leaves, nutrient solution, and perlite/earth samples from a trickle feed system (TFS) and an ebb-and-flow system (EFS) were collected and their microbial communities were analyzed by pyrosequencing analysis. The results showed that most bacteria in the leaves from the TFS contained genus Sporosarcina (99.6%), while Rhizobium (60.4%) was dominant in the leaves from the EFS. Genus Paucibacter (18.21%) and Pelomonas (12.37%) were the most abundant microbiota in the nutrient solution samples of the TFS. In the EFS, the nutrient solution samples contained mostly genus Rhodococcus and Acinetobacter. Potential microbial transfer between the leaves and the ecosystem was observed in the EFS, while samples in the TFS were found to share only one species between the leaves, nutrient solution, and earth. Together, these results show that the bacterial populations in Tatsoi and in its ecosystem are highly diverse based on the cultivation system. PMID:27070460

  15. Potential application of ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis to the microbial community analysis of agronomic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Seishi; Fujimura, Tatsuhito; Ytow, Nozomi

    2005-07-13

    Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) has been applied to the microbial community analysis of agronomic products in combination with a simple and rapid DNA extraction method, consisting of a one-step extraction and two-step purification, for a variety of agronomic products. RISA appears to be a useful tool for the study of the community structures of food-associated microbes and their use as a unique fingerprinting signature for each agronomic product. Sequencing analyses of amplicons generated from RISA suggest that this method can detect conventional microbes. In the case of RISA of wasabi paste DNA, the sequences of the amplicons showed high similarity to the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris and the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis, whereas several food-associated bacteria (Lactococcus lactis, Lactococcus raffinolactis, and Lactococcus sakei) were detected using this technique in sausage DNA. Unexpectedly, the sequencing analyses also revealed the presence of several microbes that possessed high similarity to human bacterial pathogens such as Weissella confusa and Yersinia pestis. The results suggest that RISA will be a useful method for routine microbial community analysis in agronomic products. PMID:15998122

  16. Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The term community in the English language can be traced back to the 14th century and originates from the French word comuneté and the Latin word communitatem. In English the term initially came to denote five distinct senses. Community served as a distinction of the common people from those of rank (1, as a denotation of a state or organized society (2, the people of a district (3, as a designation for the community of shared interests (4 and as a sense of common identity and characteristics (5. In these early meanings of the term it is important to note the distinction between the designation of actual social groups on the one hand and the indication of a particular relational quality on the other.

  17. Revisiting the Sense of Community Index: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obst, Patricia L.; White, Katherine M.

    2004-01-01

    The Sense of Community Index (SCI) is one of the most commonly used measures of Psychological Sense of Community (PSOC). There is much discussion in the literature as to the validity of the scale as a measure not only of overall PSOC, but also of the dimensions (Membership, Influence, Needs Fulfillment, and Emotional Connection) theorized by…

  18. Community College Student Mental Health: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Though there are at least 12.4 million community college students, accounting for 44% of all undergraduates within the United States (Cohen & Brawer, 2008), little academic research has explored the mental health needs of community college students as a distinct population ( Floyd, 2003; Townsend & LaPaglia, 2000; Townsend, Donaldson,

  19. Community Development in Israel and the Netherlands. A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Ralph M.

    This exploratory study seeks to analyze and compare the practice of community work in The Netherlands and Israel, and the key variables shaping its character, role, and influence. The two countries are small, highly urbanized welfare democracies relying on central government financing of community and social work, and are characterized by…

  20. New spectral approach for community structure analysis on complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Danila, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    A simple but efficient spectral approach for analyzing the community structure of complex networks is introduced. It works the same way for all types of networks by spectrally splitting the adjacency matrix into a "unipartite" and a "multipartite" component whose entries provide measures of the affinity or antagonism between the nodes in a manner that clearly reveals the communities and also provides additional information, including a ranking of the links and nodes and the highlighting of the "gateway" links that are important in connecting the communities together. Two algorithms are then proposed to achieve the actual partition into communities. These algorithms can be tuned to discard the overlaps and produce the most meaningful non-overlapping community structure.

  1. Finding Astronomical Communities Through Co-readership Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Henneken, Edwin A.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Eichhorn, Guenther; Accomazzi, Alberto; Grant, Carolyn S.; Thompson, Donna; Bohlen, Elizabeth; Murray, Stephen S.

    2007-01-01

    Whenever a large group of people are engaged in an activity, communities will form. The nature of these communities depends on the relationship considered. In the group of people who regularly use scholarly literature, a relationship like ``person i and person j have cited the same paper'' might reveal communities of people working in a particular field. On this poster, we will investigate the relationship ``person i and person j have read the same paper''. Using the data logs of the NASA/Smi...

  2. Determining Biosignatures by Complexity Analysis in Antarctic Cryptoendolithic Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrie-Lombardi, M. C.; Bhartia, R.; Nealson, K. H.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems of life detection is that of identifying biosignatures across a wide range of scales using multiple co-registered probes. The technique should be of equal utility across a wide range of search spaces from remote sensors probing volumes of space or planetary surfaces, visual eye or camera searches across the surface of a rock in Antarctica, low resolution microscopic scanning of a rock or a space craft in situ, or high resolution electron microscope and computerized tomography scanning of geobiological samples. We describe here an approach to this problem which derives in large part from past work done in the area of astrophysics - namely the analysis of complexity in galactic signals by data compression methods. This approach is a radically new one for geobiology and astrobiology, and allows us to assess the complexity (and thus potential biogenicity) of an object being examined. This is done by considering the information within pixels of an image (regardless the sensor used to gather the information) as an energetic system capable of description in terms of classical thermodynamics. The image data space is searched by an algorithm that judges complexity via data compression (e.g., the more compressible it is, the less complex, and vice versa) and maximum entropy as originally outlined by Shannon. At present we are implementing methods to utilize images from multiple sensors gathering different kinds of information (e.g., visible gray-scale data, color analyses, UV fluorescence, chemical information, etc). We present here preliminary data from deep UV fluorescence and ESEM (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope) images from a layered cryptoendolithic community of an Antarctic rock.

  3. Illusions of Resilience? An Analysis of Community Responses to Change in Northern Norway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Amundsen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contributes to our understanding of community resilience. Community resilience is the ability of a community to cope and adjust to stresses caused by social, political, and environmental change and to engage community resources to overcome adversity and take advantage of opportunities in response to change. Through an analysis of local responses to multiple challenges, six dimensions of community resilience were found in one village in northern Norway. These dimensions; community resources, community networks, institutions and services, people–place connections, active agents, and learning; are activated in processes and activities in the village to respond to current challenges. Although this corroborates findings from other community resilience research, this research suggests that community resilience is both complex and dynamic over time. Although communities may consider themselves resilient to today’s challenges, the rate and magnitude of expected systemic global changes, especially climate change, means that future resilience cannot be taken for granted. This work concludes that there is a risk that community resilience may be an illusion, leading to complacency about the need for adaption to multiple factors of change. Hence, the ability of communities to actively engage in reflexive learning processes is of importance for both adaptation and future resilience.

  4. A Unified Community Detection, Visualization and Analysis method

    CERN Document Server

    Crampes, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Community detection in social graphs has attracted researchers' interest for a long time. With the widespread of social networks on the Internet it has recently become an important research domain. Most contributions focus upon the definition of algorithms for optimizing the so-called modularity function. In the first place interest was limited to unipartite graph inputs and partitioned community outputs. Recently bipartite graphs, directed graphs and overlapping communities have been investigated. Few contributions embrace at the same time the three types of nodes. In this paper we present a method which unifies commmunity detection for the three types of nodes and at the same time merges partitionned and overlapping communities. Moreover results are visualized in such a way that they can be analyzed and semantically interpreted. For validation we experiment this method on well known simple benchmarks. It is then applied to real data in three cases. In two examples of photos sets with tagged people we reveal...

  5. Pyrosequencing analysis of eukaryotic and bacterial communities in faucet biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruyin; Yu, Zhisheng; Guo, Hongguang; Liu, Miaomiao; Zhang, Hongxun; Yang, Min

    2012-10-01

    In order to understand the microbial communities in drinking water biofilms, both eukaryotic and bacterial communities in three faucet biofilms were characterized by 454 pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR approaches. Microbial assemblages of the biofilms were dominated by bacteria, with Sphingomonadales, Rhizobiales, and Burkholderiales comprising the major bacterial populations. Although about 2 years of biofilm development occurred, the microbial community at site WSW still demonstrates the characteristics of a young biofilm community, e.g. low biomass, abundant aggregating bacteria (Blastomonas spp. and Acidovorax spp.) etc. Hartmannella of amoebae was the dominant eukaryotic predator in the biofilms, and correlated closely with biofilm bacterial biomass. Nonetheless, there was no obvious association of pathogens with amoebae in the faucet biofilms. In contrast, residual chlorine seems to be a dominant factor impacting the abundance of Legionella and Mycobacterium, two primary potential opportunistic pathogens detected in all faucet biofilms. PMID:22846772

  6. Community structure of complex software systems: Analysis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Šubelj, Lovro; 10.1016/j.physa.2011.03.036

    2011-01-01

    Due to notable discoveries in the fast evolving field of complex networks, recent research in software engineering has also focused on representing software systems with networks. Previous work has observed that these networks follow scale-free degree distributions and reveal small-world phenomena, while we here explore another property commonly found in different complex networks, i.e. community structure. We adopt class dependency networks, where nodes represent software classes and edges represent dependencies among them, and show that these networks reveal a significant community structure, characterized by similar properties as observed in other complex networks. However, although intuitive and anticipated by different phenomena, identified communities do not exactly correspond to software packages. We empirically confirm our observations on several networks constructed from Java and various third party libraries, and propose different applications of community detection to software engineering.

  7. Comprehensive spectral approach for community structure analysis on complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danila, Bogdan

    2016-02-01

    A simple but efficient spectral approach for analyzing the community structure of complex networks is introduced. It works the same way for all types of networks, by spectrally splitting the adjacency matrix into a "unipartite" and a "multipartite" component. These two matrices reveal the structure of the network from different perspectives and can be analyzed at different levels of detail. Their entries, or the entries of their lower-rank approximations, provide measures of the affinity or antagonism between the nodes that highlight the communities and the "gateway" links that connect them together. An algorithm is then proposed to achieve the automatic assignment of the nodes to communities based on the information provided by either matrix. This algorithm naturally generates overlapping communities but can also be tuned to eliminate the overlaps.

  8. Identifying communities of practice through ontology network analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alani, Harith; Dasmahapatra, Srinandan; O'Hara, Kieron; Shadbolt, Nigel

    2003-01-01

    Communities of practice--groups of individuals interested in a particular job, procedure, or work domain--informally swap insights on work-related tasks, often through quick chats by the water cooler. They act as corporate memories, transfer best practice, provide mechanisms for situated learning, and act as foci for innovation.1,2 Increasingly, organizations are harnessing communities of practice to carry out important knowledge management functions.3 However, a significant first step is ide...

  9. Analysis of Computer Science Communities Based on DBLP

    OpenAIRE

    Biryukov, Maria; Dong, Cailing

    2010-01-01

    It is popular nowadays to bring techniques from bibliometrics and scientometrics into the world of digital libraries to analyze the collaboration patterns and explore mechanisms which underlie community development. In this paper we use the DBLP data to investigate the author's scientific career and provide an in-depth exploration of some of the computer science communities. We compare them in terms of productivity, population stability and collaboration trends.Besides we use these features t...

  10. Fuzzy analysis of community detection in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dawei; Xie, Fuding; Zhang, Yong; Dong, Fangyan; Hirota, Kaoru

    2010-11-01

    A snowball algorithm is proposed to find community structures in complex networks by introducing the definition of community core and some quantitative conditions. A community core is first constructed, and then its neighbors, satisfying the quantitative conditions, will be tied to this core until no node can be added. Subsequently, one by one, all communities in the network are obtained by repeating this process. The use of the local information in the proposed algorithm directly leads to the reduction of complexity. The algorithm runs in O(n+m) time for a general network and O(n) for a sparse network, where n is the number of vertices and m is the number of edges in a network. The algorithm fast produces the desired results when applied to search for communities in a benchmark and five classical real-world networks, which are widely used to test algorithms of community detection in the complex network. Furthermore, unlike existing methods, neither global modularity nor local modularity is utilized in the proposal. By converting the considered problem into a graph, the proposed algorithm can also be applied to solve other cluster problems in data mining.

  11. Community characteristics that attract physicians in Japan: a cross-sectional analysis of community demographic and economic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyokawa Satoshi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many countries, there is a surplus of physicians in some communities and a shortage in others. Population size is known to be correlated with the number of physicians in a community, and is conventionally considered to represent the power of communities to attract physicians. However, associations between other demographic/economic variables and the number of physicians in a community have not been fully evaluated. This study seeks other parameters that correlate with the physician population and show which characteristics of a community determine its "attractiveness" to physicians. Methods Associations between the number of physicians and selected demographic/economic/life-related variables of all of Japan's 3132 municipalities were examined. In order to exclude the confounding effect of community size, correlations between the physician-to-population ratio and other variable-to-population ratios or variable-to-area ratios were evaluated with simple correlation and multiple regression analyses. The equity of physician distribution against each variable was evaluated by the orenz curve and Gini index. Results Among the 21 variables selected, the service industry workers-to-population ratio (0.543, commercial land price (0.527, sales of goods per person (0.472, and daytime population density (0.451 were better correlated with the physician-to-population ratio than was population density (0.409. Multiple regression analysis showed that the service industry worker-to-population ratio, the daytime population density, and the elderly rate were each independently correlated with the physician-to-population ratio (standardized regression coefficient 0.393, 0.355, 0.089 respectively; each p Conclusion Daytime population and service industry population in a municipality are better parameters of community attractiveness to physicians than population. Because attractiveness is supposed to consist of medical demand and the amenities of urban life, the two parameters may represent the amount of medical demand and/or the extent of urban amenities of the community more precisely than population does. The conventional demand-supply analysis based solely on population as the demand parameter may overestimate the inequity of the physician distribution among communities.

  12. Analysis on Influencing Factors of Community Safety Culture Based on the Structural Equation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhixin; Jingzhen XU; Zhang, Lihua

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to research community safety culture building train of thought through the analysis of the influence factors of community safety culture, This study employs a Likert scale method for the design of questionnaire, investigate community through questionnaire, obtain the relevant data, and by use of the structural equation model (SEM) of statistics, puts forward that the factors including economy, society, education, since and technology, and management form important...

  13. Impact analysis and community development needs at the salt site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) has developed a socioeconomic program for a nuclear waste repository constructed in salt. The program is comprised of three elements: impact assessment, impact mitigation, and impact monitoring. The first element, impact assessment, is the focus of ONWI's current activities. Socioeconomic data has been collected for seven salt sites in Texas, Utah, Mississippi and Louisiana. Demographic, economic, community service, governmental and social structure information has been assembled into data base reports for each site area. These socioeconomic reports will be the basis for analyzing community-related impacts. Socioeconomic effects are currently being evaluated for the environmental assessment document required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The approach to evaluating socioeconomic impacts for the environmental assessment impact includes developing the data base necessary for evaluation; assessing impacts of baseline population projected by the states; assessing project-related impacts through the use of an inmigration model and responding to socioeconomic issues raised in public meetings and hearings. The siting, construction, and operation of nuclear repositories will involve an extended period of time and an increased workforce, which can result in some impacts similar to those of other large development projects. The communities affected by a repository site will face increased demands for housing, community services (transportation, sewer and water, schools, etc.) and land, as well as a desire to maintain the community's ''character''. The management of this expansion and other related community impacts should be structured to meet community needs and goals. The management process should include the formation of an impact management comment, a public participation program, and a technical assistance program

  14. Community violence and urban childhood asthma: a multilevel analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternthal, M.J.; Jun, H-J.; Earls, F.; Wright, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the association between community violence exposure and childhood asthma risk in a multilevel, multimethod, longitudinal study controlling for individual- and neighbourhood-level confounders and pathway variables. Analyses included 2,071 children aged 0–9 yrs at enrolment from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Multilevel logistic regression models estimated the likelihood of asthma, controlling for individual-level (child’s age, sex, race/ethnicity, maternal asthma, socioeconomic status and family violence in the home) and neighbourhood-level confounders (concentrated disadvantage, collective efficacy and social disorder), and pathway variables (maternal smoking, breastfeeding). In adjusted analyses, medium (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.17–2.19) and high levels (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.12–2.18) of community violence were associated with increased asthma risk, relative to low levels. The increased asthma risk remained for African Americans when models included community violence and all other individual-level covariates, but attenuated to borderline nonsignificance when further adjusting for collective efficacy. Community violence is associated with asthma risk when controlling for individual- and neighborhood-level confounders. Neither community violence, nor the other individual-level factors, fully accounted for the excess asthma burden among African Americans. These data suggest that public health interventions outside the biomedical model may be needed to reduce asthma in disadvantaged populations. PMID:20413538

  15. Perspective for Aquaponic Systems: "Omic" Technologies for Microbial Community Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguia-Fragozo, Perla; Alatorre-Jacome, Oscar; Rico-Garcia, Enrique; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Cruz-Hernandez, Andres; Ocampo-Velazquez, Rosalia V; Garcia-Trejo, Juan F; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G

    2015-01-01

    Aquaponics is the combined production of aquaculture and hydroponics, connected by a water recirculation system. In this productive system, the microbial community is responsible for carrying out the nutrient dynamics between the components. The nutrimental transformations mainly consist in the transformation of chemical species from toxic compounds into available nutrients. In this particular field, the microbial research, the "Omic" technologies will allow a broader scope of studies about a current microbial profile inside aquaponics community, even in those species that currently are unculturable. This approach can also be useful to understand complex interactions of living components in the system. Until now, the analog studies were made to set up the microbial characterization on recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS). However, microbial community composition of aquaponics is still unknown. "Omic" technologies like metagenomic can help to reveal taxonomic diversity. The perspectives are also to begin the first attempts to sketch the functional diversity inside aquaponic systems and its ecological relationships. The knowledge of the emergent properties inside the microbial community, as well as the understanding of the biosynthesis pathways, can derive in future biotechnological applications. Thus, the aim of this review is to show potential applications of current "Omic" tools to characterize the microbial community in aquaponic systems. PMID:26509157

  16. Course-Shopping in the Urban Community Colleges: An Analysis of Student Drop and Add Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Maxwell, William B.; Cypers, Scott; Moon, Hye Sun; Lester, Jaime

    This study examines the course shopping behaviors of approximately 5,000 community college students enrolled across the nine campuses of the Los Angeles Community College District in spring 2001. The sample students are representative of the district. For the purpose of this analysis, the authors define course shopping as: (1) cyclic shopping, the…

  17. Comparative analysis of the microbial communities inhabiting halite evaporites of the Atacama Desert

    OpenAIRE

    Ríos, Asunción de los; Valea, Sergio; Ascaso, Carmen; Davila, Alfonso F.; Kastovsky, Jan; McKay, Christopher P.; Wierzchos, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Molecular biology and microscopy techniques were used to characterize the microbial communities inside halide evaporites from different parts of th Atacama Desert. Denaturing gradient fel eletrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed that the evaporite rocks harbor communities predominantly made up of cyanobacteria, along with heterotrophic bacteria an archae...

  18. The Community College and a Rising Global Imaginary: An Analysis of Practical Reasoning, 1950-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, David F.; Palmadessa, Allison L.

    2015-01-01

    Through an analysis of 245 issues of the "Community College Journal" published between 1950 and 2013, we show how three discourses--international understanding and geopolitics, economic competitiveness, and global citizenship--informed practical reasoning about a rising global imaginary and its implications for the community college. By…

  19. Analysis of Computer Science Communities Based on DBLP

    CERN Document Server

    Biryukov, Maria; 10.1007/978-3-642-15464-5_24

    2010-01-01

    It is popular nowadays to bring techniques from bibliometrics and scientometrics into the world of digital libraries to analyze the collaboration patterns and explore mechanisms which underlie community development. In this paper we use the DBLP data to investigate the author's scientific career and provide an in-depth exploration of some of the computer science communities. We compare them in terms of productivity, population stability and collaboration trends.Besides we use these features to compare the sets of topranked conferences with their lower ranked counterparts.

  20. Seasonal and Spatial Changes of Microorganism Communities in Constructed Wetlands: A Community Level Physiological Profiling Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Grard Merlin; Florent Chazarenc; Jacques Brisson

    2010-01-01

    In constructed wetlands, microorganisms associated with plants are assumed to play a major role. A one-year survey was conducted in five vertical flow constructed wetland systems that had been operating from 2 months to 8 years in small French villages (100500 People Equivalent) to provide a better understanding of microbiological activity. The objective of our study was to highlight the most important factor generating variability between microorganisms communities compared to treatme...

  1. Conceptualizing age-friendly community characteristics in a sample of urban elders: an exploratory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard J; Lehning, Amanda J; Dunkle, Ruth E

    2013-01-01

    Accurate conceptualization and measurement of age-friendly community characteristics would help to reduce barriers to documenting the effects on elders of interventions to create such communities. This article contributes to the measurement of age-friendly communities through an exploratory factor analysis of items reflecting an existing US Environmental Protection Agency policy framework. From a sample of urban elders (n = 1,376), we identified 6 factors associated with demographic and health characteristics: access to business and leisure, social interaction, access to health care, neighborhood problems, social support, and community engagement. Future research should explore the effects of these factors across contexts and populations. PMID:23350565

  2. Defining Campus Violence: A Phenomenological Analysis of Community Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Matthew J.; Caldwell, Rebecca J.; Goldman, Emily Grey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive an empirically based understanding of campus violence. Grounded in a communication paradigm offered by sociolinguistic scholars, we adopted a phenomenological approach for conducting and analyzing 23 interviews from campus community stakeholders, including students, staff, faculty, administrators, and

  3. Professional Communities and Student Achievement--A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomos, Catalina; Hofman, Roelande H.; Bosker, Roel J.

    2011-01-01

    In the past 3 decades, the concept of professional community has gained considerable momentum in the theoretical and empirical studies in this field. At the same time, the concept has faced conceptual and methodological difficulties in that as yet no universal definition has been formulated and that its operationalization differs in the various

  4. Community College Mission Influence on Culture: An Organizational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, E. Gerome

    2013-01-01

    Strong agreement of mission and culture has been found in more effective colleges (Fjortoft & Smart, 1994). For leaders, the culture of an organization provides the context for which decisions about organizational change processes can be made (Malm, 2008). The purpose of this study was to explore the culture present within a community college…

  5. Control of Community Information: An Analysis of Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Karen E.; Wilkinson, Margaret Ann

    1996-01-01

    Explores the differences between information and referral agencies and online community networks from an information policy perspective. Analyzes which has control within the following six facets: agency ownership and governance, funding, information flow, access, ownership of information, and quality control. Confirms distinctive roles, and

  6. COMMUNITY LEVEL ANALYSIS OF VECTOR-BORNE DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological community structure is particularly important in vector-borne zoonotic diseases with complex life cycles. Single population models, such as the so-called Ross-Macdonald model (Baily, 1982), have been important in developing and characterizing our current understanding...

  7. On the Analysis of a Label Propagation Algorithm for Community Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Kothapalli, Kishore; Pemmaraju, Sriram V.; Sardeshmukh, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    This paper initiates formal analysis of a simple, distributed algorithm for community detection on networks. We analyze an algorithm that we call \\textsc{Max-LPA}, both in terms of its convergence time and in terms of the "quality" of the communities detected. \\textsc{Max-LPA} is an instance of a class of community detection algorithms called \\textit{label propagation} algorithms. As far as we know, most analysis of label propagation algorithms thus far has been empirical in nature and in thi...

  8. Evaluation of next generation sequencing for the analysis of Eimeria communities in wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Elke T; Lott, Matthew J; Eldridge, Mark D B; Power, Michelle L

    2016-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques are well-established for studying bacterial communities but not yet for microbial eukaryotes. Parasite communities remain poorly studied, due in part to the lack of reliable and accessible molecular methods to analyse eukaryotic communities. We aimed to develop and evaluate a methodology to analyse communities of the protozoan parasite Eimeria from populations of the Australian marsupial Petrogale penicillata (brush-tailed rock-wallaby) using NGS. An oocyst purification method for small sample sizes and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol for the 18S rRNA locus targeting Eimeria was developed and optimised prior to sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform. A data analysis approach was developed by modifying methods from bacterial metagenomics and utilising existing Eimeria sequences in GenBank. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU) assignment at a high similarity threshold (97%) was more accurate at assigning Eimeria contigs into Eimeria OTUs but at a lower threshold (95%) there was greater resolution between OTU consensus sequences. The assessment of two amplification PCR methods prior to Illumina MiSeq, single and nested PCR, determined that single PCR was more sensitive to Eimeria as more Eimeria OTUs were detected in single amplicons. We have developed a simple and cost-effective approach to a data analysis pipeline for community analysis of eukaryotic organisms using Eimeria communities as a model. The pipeline provides a basis for evaluation using other eukaryotic organisms and potential for diverse community analysis studies. PMID:26944624

  9. Using Analysis of Governance to Unpack Community-Based Conservation: A Case Study from Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lance W.; Makupa, Enock

    2015-11-01

    Community-based conservation policies and programs are often hollow with little real devolution. But to pass a judgment of community-based or not community-based on such initiatives and programs obscures what is actually a suite of attributes. In this paper, we analyze governance around a specific case of what is nominally community-based conservation—Ikona Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in Tanzania—using two complementary sets of criteria. The first relates to governance "powers": planning powers, regulatory powers, spending powers, revenue-generating powers, and the power to enter into agreements. The second set of criteria derive from the understanding of governance as a set of social functions: social coordination, shaping power, setting direction, and building community. The analysis helps to detail ways in which the Tanzanian state through policy and regulations has constrained the potential for Ikona WMA to empower communities and community actors. Although it has some features of community-based conservation, community input into how the governance social functions would be carried out in the WMA was constrained from the start and is now largely out of community hands. The two governance powers that have any significant community-based flavor—spending powers and revenue-generating powers—relate to the WMA's tourism activities, but even here the picture is equivocal at best. The unpacking of governance that we have done, however, reveals that community empowerment through the processes associated with creating and recognizing indigenous and community-conserved areas is something that can be pursued through multiple channels, some of which might be more strategic than others.

  10. A Comparative Analysis of Community Wind Power Development Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bolinger, Mark; WISER Ryan; Wind, Tom; Juhl, Dan; Grace, Robert; West, Peter(Department of Mathematics, King’s College, London, WC2R 2LS, U.K.)

    2005-01-01

    For years, farmers in the United States have looked with envy on their European counterparts ability to profitably farm the wind through ownership of distributed, utility-scale wind projects. Only within the past few years, however, has farmer- or community-owned wind power development become a reality in the United States. The primary hurdle to this type of development in the United States has been devising and implementing suitable business and legal structures that enable such project...

  11. Community structure of complex software systems: Analysis and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Šubelj, Lovro; Bajec, Marko

    2011-01-01

    Due to notable discoveries in the fast evolving field of complex networks, recent research in software engineering has also focused on representing software systems with networks. Previous work has observed that these networks follow scale-free degree distributions and reveal small-world phenomena, while we here explore another property commonly found in different complex networks, i.e. community structure. We adopt class dependency networks, where nodes represent software classes and edges r...

  12. Community projects: an experimental analysis of a fair implementation process

    OpenAIRE

    Cicognani, Simona; D'Ambrosio, Anna; Güth, Werner; Pfuderer, Simone; Ploner, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    We define and experimentally test a public provision mechanism that meets three basic ethical requirements and allows community members to influence, via monetary bids, which of several projects is implemented. For each project, participants are assigned personal values, which can be positive or negative. We provide either public or private information about personal values. This produces two distinct public provision games, which are experimentally implemented and analyzed for various projec...

  13. Newcomer Integration in Online Knowledge Building Communities: Automated Dialogue Analysis in Integrative vs. Non-Integrative Blogger Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Nistor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Online knowledge building communities (OKBC reunite participants engaged in collaborative discourse. OKBCs can be made smart by adding tools that predict how likely an OKBC is to integrate newcomers in existing dialogues and socio-cognitive structures. Starting from Bakhtins dialogical approach and polyphony theory, and building on the concept of inter- animation of voices, this study explores the relationship between newcomer integration and dialogue quality in OKBCs. The automated analysis tool Important Moments was employed to compare two dialogues, from an integrative and from a non-integrative blog-based OKBC. In the former, the concepts, lexical chains and inter-animation moments occurred more frequently than in the latter. Also, newcomer comments were linked to less lexical chains in the integrative community than in the non-integrative OKBC. These findings suggest close relationships between dialogue quality and newcomer integration, which can be used for designing smart OKBCs.

  14. AN ANALYSIS OF PHARMACY SERVICES BY PHARMACIST IN COMMUNITY PHARMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Joseph Herman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Up to now there are more than 60 schools of pharmacy with a variety of accreditation level in lndonesia. Previous study found that the standard of pharmaceutical services at various service facilities (hospitals, primary health care and community pharmacy can not be fully implemented because of the limited competency of pharmacist. This study was conducted to identify the qualification of pharmacist who delivers services in community pharmacy in compliance with the Indonesian Health Law No. 36 of 2009. As mandated in the Health Law No. 36 of 2009, the government is obliged to establish minimum requirements that must be possessed. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in 2010 at 2 community pharmacies in each of 3 cities, i.e. Bandung, DI Yogyakarta and Surabaya. Other than ten pharmacists delivering services in community pharmacies, there were pharmacists as informants from 4 institutions in each city selected, i.e. six pharmacists from two Schools of Pharmacy, three pharmacists from three Regional Indonesian Pharmacists Association,six pharmacists from three District Health Offices and three Provincial Health Offices. Primary data collection through in-depth interviews and observation as well as secondary data collection concerning standard operating procedures, monitoring documentation and academic curricula has been used. Descriptive data were analysed qualitatively Results: The findings indicate that pharmacists' qualification to deliver services in a community pharmacy in accordance with the Government Regulation No. 51 of 2009, Standards of Pharmacy Services in Community Pharmacy and Good Pharmaceutical Practices (GPP was varied. Most pharmacists have already understood their roles in pharmacy service, but to practice it in accordance with the standards or guidelines they are still having problems. It is also acknowledged by pharmacists in other institutions, including School of Pharmacy, Regional Indonesian Pharmacists Association, Provincial and District Health Offices. To practise such as stated by the Indonesian Health Law No. 36 of 2009, the Government Regulation No. 51 of 2009. Conclusion: The Standards of Pharmaceutical Services and GPP requires prevailing role of pharmacists in community pharmacy in terms of time and capability Training or continuing development is also needed through upgrading, seminars, socialization and supervision in the community pharmacy practices which may involve cooperation with professional organizations needs to be improved. Key words: Pharmacist, Qualification, Community Pharmacy, Pharmacy Practices ABSTRAK Latar Belakang: Di lndonesia sampai saat ini terdapat lebih dari 60 Perguruan Tinggi Farmasi dengan berbagai tingkat akreditasi. Penelitian sebelumnya menemukan bahwa Standard Pelayanan Farmasi belum dapat dilaksanakan sepenuhnya pada berbagai fasilitas pelayanan kesehatan (rumah sakit, puskesmas dan apotek karena keterbatasan kompetensi apoteker. Studi ini bertujuan mengidentifikasi kualifikasi apoteker yang melakukan pelayanan farmasi di apotek komunitas dalam rangka memenuhi ketentuan Undang-Undang RI No. 36 tahun 2009 tentang Kesehatan. Sebagaimana diamanatkan oleh Undang-Undang pemerintah berkewajiban persyaratan mimimum yang harus dimiliki. Metode: Penelitian potong lintang ini dilaksanakan dalam tahun 2010 pada masing-masing 2 apotek komunitas di 3 kota, yaitu Bandung, DI Yogyakarta dan Surabaya. Sebagai responden penelitian selain 10 orang apoteker apotek komunitas juga diambil 6 apoteker dari 6 PT Farmasi, 3 apoteker dari Pengurus Ikatan Apoteker lndonesia dan 6 apoteker dari Dinas Kesehatan Provinsi dan Kota. Di samping data primer dikumpulkan melalui wawancara mendalam dan observasi dengan menggunakan daftar tilik di unit apotek, juga dikumpulkan data sekunder tentang SOP pelayanan farmasi, dokumentasi monitoring dan kurikulum PT Farmasi. Hasil: Analisis data secara kualitatif deskriptif menunjukkan bahwa kualifikasi apoteker yang memberikan pelayanan farmasi di apotek komunitas dalam rangka memenuhi ketentuan Peraturan Pemerintah No. 51 tahun 2009, Standard Pelayanan Farmasi di Apotek dan Good Pharmacy Practice bervariasi. Pada umumnya apoteker memahami perannya dalam pelayanan farmasi, tetapi untuk melaksanakannya sesuai dengan standard atau pedoman masih menghadapi berbagai kendala. Hal ini juga diakui oleh apoteker dari PT Farmasi, Pengurus lAI dan Dinas Kesehatan. Pelaksanaan sesuai dengan Undang­Undang RI No. 36 tahun 2009, Peraturan Pemerintah No. 51 tahun 2009. Kesimpulan: Standard Pelayanan Farmasi di Apotek dan GPP menuntut peran yang dominan dari apoteker di apotek komunitas dalam hal waktu dan kemampuan. Pelatihan dan pendidikan berkelanjutan juga dibutuhkan, antara lain melalui penataran, seminar, sosialisasi dan supervisi praktik farmasi di apotek komunitas yang mungkin melibatkan kerja sama dengan organisasi profesi dan PT Farmasi. Kata kunci: Apotek, Kualifikasi, Apotek Komunitas, Praktek Kefarmasian

  15. Identifying Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities: A Spatial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Hernandez, Maricruz; Yamashita, Takashi; Kinney, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Guided by the concept of aging in place and potential policy implications, the study analyzed naturally occurring retirement communities (NORCs; 40% or greater house owners and renters aged 65 years and older) and whether there were spatiotemporal patterns in Ohio between 2000 and 2010. Method Data were derived from the 2000 and 2010 census tracts. Geovisualization was used to visually examine the distribution of NORCs in 2000 and 2010. Global Morans I was used to quantify the spatial distribution of NORCs in Ohio and Local Morans I was used to identify clusters of NORCs (i.e., hot spots). Results The number of NORCs slightly decreased despite the overall increase of the older population from 2000 to 2010. NORCs were identified in one of the 3 most populous counties (i.e., Cuyahoga) and its neighboring counties. A number of hot spots were identified in Cuyahoga County (among Ohios most populous and NORC-rich counties), both in 2000 and 2010. There were different patterns including emerging, disappearing, and enduring NORCs and disproportionate distributions of NORCs across the state between 2000 and 2010. Discussion Locating NORCs could aid governments to create aging in place sensitive policies to address issues of independence, social care, health care, volunteerism, and community participation. PMID:24958694

  16. High-Resolution Melt Analysis for Rapid Comparison of Bacterial Community Compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmsø, Mathis Hjort; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Bælum, Jacob; Feld, Louise; Holben, William E.; Jacobsen, Carsten Suhr

    2014-01-01

    In the study of bacterial community composition, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing is today among the preferred methods of analysis. The cost of nucleotide sequence analysis, including requisite computational and bioinformatic steps, however, takes up a large part of many research budgets. High-r...

  17. Analysis of the microbial community and geochemistry of a sediment core from Great Slave Lake, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jesmine; Woodward, John; Tulaczyk, Slawek; Christoffersen, Poul; Cummings, Stephen P

    2011-02-01

    Sediment cores taken from Great Slave Lake, Canada, were analysed to investigate their metabolically active microbial populations and geochemistry. The amplification of cDNA detected metabolically active bacterial (50 separate bands) and archaeal (49 separate band) communities. The bacterial communities were further resolved indicating active actinobacterial and ?-proteobacterial communities (36 and 43 individual bands respectively). Redundancy discriminate analysis and Monte Carlo permutation testing demonstrated the significant impact of geochemical parameters on microbial community structures. Geochemical analyses suggest that the upper 0.4m represents soil weathering and erosion in the lake catchment. An increase in organic carbon in the lower core suggests either more primary productivity, indicating warmer climate conditions, associated with Holocene Climatic Optimum conditions pre 5,000years BP or change from a reducing environment in the lower core to an oxidizing environment during more recent deposition. Drivers for bacterial, archaeal and actinobacterial community structures were sediment particle size, and its mineral composition. Depth also significantly affected ?- proteobacterial community structure. In contrast the organic carbon content did not significantly shape the microbial community structures within the sediment. This study indicates that geochemical parameters significantly contribute to microbial community structure in these sediments. PMID:20803250

  18. A global meta-analysis of the relative extent of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefert, Andrew; Violle, Cyrille; Chalmandrier, Loïc; Albert, Cécile H; Taudiere, Adrien; Fajardo, Alex; Aarssen, Lonnie W; Baraloto, Christopher; Carlucci, Marcos B; Cianciaruso, Marcus V; de L Dantas, Vinícius; de Bello, Francesco; Duarte, Leandro D S; Fonseca, Carlos R; Freschet, Grégoire T; Gaucherand, Stéphanie; Gross, Nicolas; Hikosaka, Kouki; Jackson, Benjamin; Jung, Vincent; Kamiyama, Chiho; Katabuchi, Masatoshi; Kembel, Steven W; Kichenin, Emilie; Kraft, Nathan J B; Lagerström, Anna; Bagousse-Pinguet, Yoann Le; Li, Yuanzhi; Mason, Norman; Messier, Julie; Nakashizuka, Tohru; Overton, Jacob McC; Peltzer, Duane A; Pérez-Ramos, I M; Pillar, Valério D; Prentice, Honor C; Richardson, Sarah; Sasaki, Takehiro; Schamp, Brandon S; Schöb, Christian; Shipley, Bill; Sundqvist, Maja; Sykes, Martin T; Vandewalle, Marie; Wardle, David A

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that accounting for intraspecific trait variation (ITV) may better address major questions in community ecology. However, a general picture of the relative extent of ITV compared to interspecific trait variation in plant communities is still missing. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relative extent of ITV within and among plant communities worldwide, using a data set encompassing 629 communities (plots) and 36 functional traits. Overall, ITV accounted for 25% of the total trait variation within communities and 32% of the total trait variation among communities on average. The relative extent of ITV tended to be greater for whole-plant (e.g. plant height) vs. organ-level traits and for leaf chemical (e.g. leaf N and P concentration) vs. leaf morphological (e.g. leaf area and thickness) traits. The relative amount of ITV decreased with increasing species richness and spatial extent, but did not vary with plant growth form or climate. These results highlight global patterns in the relative importance of ITV in plant communities, providing practical guidelines for when researchers should include ITV in trait-based community and ecosystem studies. PMID:26415616

  19. Molecular analysis of the microbial community structures in water-flooding petroleum reservoirs with different temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    L.-Y. Wang; R.-Y. Duan; J.-F. Liu; S.-Z. Yang; J.-D. Gu; B.-Z. Mu

    2012-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors regulating the activity and determining the composition of the microbial community. Analysis of microbial communities from six water-flooding petroleum reservoirs at temperatures from 20 to 63 °C by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicates the presence of physiologically diverse and temperature-dependent microorganisms in these subterrestrial ecosystems. In high-temperature petroleum reservoirs, most of the archaeal ...

  20. Predicting the performance of a strategic alliance: an analysis of the Community Clinical Oncology Program.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaluzny, A D; Lacey, L M; Warnecke, R.; Hynes, D. M.; Morrissey, J.; Ford, L; Sondik, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study is designed to examine the effects of environment and structure of the Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) on performance as measured by patient accrual to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-approved treatment protocols. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. Data and analysis are part of a larger evaluation of the NCI Community Clinical Oncology Program during its second funding cycle, June 1987-May 1990. Data, taken from primary and secondary sources, included a survey of sel...

  1. Who connects with whom? A social network analysis of an online open source software community

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Cuihua; Monge, Peter

    2011-01-01

    By examining “who connects with whom” in an online community using social network analysis, this study tests the social drivers that shape the collaboration dynamics among a group of participants from SourceForge, the largest open source community on the Web. The formation of the online social network was explored by testing two distinct network attachment logics: strategic selection and homophily. Both logics received some support. Taken together, the results are suggestive of a “performance...

  2. Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance Dissemination across Plasmid Communities Classified by Network Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akifumi Yamashita

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The global clustering of gene families through network analysis has been demonstrated in whole genome, plasmid, and microbiome analyses. In this study, we carried out a plasmidome network analysis of all available complete bacterial plasmids to determine plasmid associations. A blastp clustering search at 100% aa identity cut-off and sharing at least one gene between plasmids, followed by a multilevel community network analysis revealed that a surprisingly large number of the plasmids were connected by one largest connected component (LCC, with dozens of community sub-groupings. The LCC consisted mainly of Bacilli and Gammaproteobacteria plasmids. Intriguingly, horizontal gene transfer (HGT was noted between different phyla (i.e., Staphylococcus and Pasteurellaceae, suggesting that Pasteurellaceae can acquire antimicrobial resistance (AMR genes from closely contacting Staphylococcus spp., which produce the external supplement of V-factor (NAD. Such community network analysis facilitate displaying possible recent HGTs like a class 1 integron, str and tet resistance markers between communities. Furthermore, the distribution of the Inc replicon type and AMR genes, such as the extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL CTX-M or the carbapenemases KPC NDM-1, implies that such genes generally circulate within limited communities belonging to typical bacterial genera. Thus, plasmidome network analysis provides a remarkable discriminatory power for plasmid-related HGT and evolution.

  3. Capacity factor analysis for evaluating water and sanitation infrastructure choices for developing communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouabid, Ali; Louis, Garrick E

    2015-09-15

    40% of the world's population lacks access to adequate supplies of water and sanitation services to sustain human health. In fact, more than 780 million people lack access to safe water supplies and about 2.5 billion people lack access to basic sanitation. Appropriate technology for water supply and sanitation (Watsan) systems is critical for sustained access to these services. Current approaches for the selection of Watsan technologies in developing communities have a high failure rate. It is estimated that 30%-60% of Watsan installed infrastructures in developing countries are not operating. Inappropriate technology is a common explanation for the high rate of failure of Watsan infrastructure, particularly in lower-income communities (Palaniappan et al., 2008). This paper presents the capacity factor analysis (CFA) model, for the assessment of a community's capacity to manage and sustain access to water supply and sanitation services. The CFA model is used for the assessment of a community's capacity to operate, and maintain a municipal sanitation service (MSS) such as, drinking water supply, wastewater and sewage treatment, and management of solid waste. The assessment of the community's capacity is based on seven capacity factors that have been identified as playing a key role in the sustainability of municipal sanitation services in developing communities (Louis, 2002). These capacity factors and their constituents are defined for each municipal sanitation service. Benchmarks and international standards for the constituents of the CFs are used to assess the capacity factors. The assessment of the community's capacity factors leads to determine the overall community capacity level (CCL) to manage a MSS. The CCL can then be used to assist the community in the selection of appropriate Watsan technologies for their MSS needs. The selection is done from Watsan technologies that require a capacity level to operate them that matches the assessed CCL of the community. PMID:26203872

  4. Regional-scale analysis of subtidal rocky shore community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrien-Courtel, Sandrine; Le Gal, Aodren; Grall, Jacques

    2013-12-01

    The French monitoring network, REseau BENThique (REBENT), was launched by the Ministry of the Environment in 2003 following the 1999 Erika oil spill. REBENT aimed to acquire baseline knowledge of coastal benthic habitat distributions with a special focus on biological diversity. This study analyzed data from 38 subtidal rocky reef sites collected by a single diving team of marine biologists along the coast of Brittany from 2004 to 2010. At each site, the depth limits of the algal belts were determined between 0 and -40 m Chart Datum (CD); the flora and fauna compositions and abundances were sampled at -3 and -8 m CD. A total of 364 taxa (156 flora and 208 fauna), belonging to 12 phyla, were identified. The results showed that the depth limit and density of kelp beds increased as water turbidity decreased; moreover, several changes in community structure could be related to water turbidity and temperature. Thus, northern and southern Brittany showed strong differences in diversity and structure of the dominant kelp species ( Laminaria hyperborea and Saccorhiza polyschides). The results from this kelp habitat composition survey (dominant kelp species and indicator species) provided important information for local pressure assessments, like increases in turbidity. The data also provided a reference that could be useful for detecting changes in coastal water temperatures due to global warming.

  5. Investigating Student Communities with Network Analysis of Interactions in a Physics Learning Center

    CERN Document Server

    Brewe, Eric; Sawtelle, Vashti

    2011-01-01

    Developing a sense of community among students is one of the three pillars of an overall reform effort to increase participation in physics, and the sciences more broadly, at Florida International University. The emergence of a research and learning community, embedded within a course reform effort, has contributed to increased recruitment and retention of physics majors. Finn and Rock [1] link the academic and social integration of students to increased rates of retention. We utilize social network analysis to quantify interactions in Florida International University's Physics Learning Center (PLC) that support the development of academic and social integration,. The tools of social network analysis allow us to visualize and quantify student interactions, and characterize the roles of students within a social network. After providing a brief introduction to social network analysis, we use sequential multiple regression modeling to evaluate factors which contribute to participation in the learning community. ...

  6. Archaeal and bacterial community analysis of several Yellowstone National Park hot springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, D. R.; Takacs-Vesbach, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    The hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are home to a diverse assemblage of microorganisms. Culture-independent studies have significantly expanded our understanding of the diversity of both Bacteria and Archaea present in YNP springs as well as the geochemical and ecological controls on communities. While the ecological analysis of Bacteria among the physicochemically heterogenous springs of YNP has been previously conducted, less is known about the extent of diversity of Archaeal communities and the chemical and ecological controls on their populations. Here we report a culture-independent analysis of 31 hot spring archaeal and bacterial communities of YNP springs using next generation sequencing. We found the phylogenetic diversity of Archaea to be generally comparable to that of co-occurring bacterial communities although overall, in the springs we investigated, diversity was higher for Bacteria than Archaea. Chemical and physical controls were similar for both domains with pH correlating most strongly with community composition. Community differences reflected the partitioning of taxonomic groups in low or high pH springs for both domains. Results will be discussed in a geochemical and ecological context.

  7. Simulation and Strategy Analysis of the Eco-community Planning by Using of Computer Software Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jingxin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the living comfort level of the low-income groups, and the belonging of the affordable housing community residents, the research group take Nanyang green community housing design as the research object, using the computer software for community planning phase of the thermal environment, wind environment, light environment for simulation analysis. The result showed the micro-climate, thermal environment, and adjusting the temperature of the district as well which is the affordable housing community worthy of promotion of green building technologies for small and medium-sized cities. It also provides the reference for the similar project planning in the process of ventilation, lighting, shading, such as green design strategy research.

  8. Addressing cancer disparities via community network mobilization and intersectoral partnerships: a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Salhi, Carmel; Achille, Erline; Baril, Nashira; D'Entremont, Kerrie; Grullon, Milagro; Judge, Christine; Oppenheimer, Sarah; Reeves, Chrasandra; Savage, Clara; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2012-01-01

    Community mobilization and collaboration among diverse partners are vital components of the effort to reduce and eliminate cancer disparities in the United States. We studied the development and impact of intersectoral connections among the members of the Massachusetts Community Network for Cancer Education, Research, and Training (MassCONECT). As one of the Community Network Program sites funded by the National Cancer Institute, this infrastructure-building initiative utilized principles of Community-based Participatory Research (CBPR) to unite community coalitions, researchers, policymakers, and other important stakeholders to address cancer disparities in three Massachusetts communities: Boston, Lawrence, and Worcester. We conducted a cross-sectional, sociometric network analysis four years after the network was formed. A total of 38 of 55 members participated in the study (69% response rate). Over four years of collaboration, the number of intersectoral connections reported by members (intersectoral out-degree) increased, as did the extent to which such connections were reported reciprocally (intersectoral reciprocity). We assessed relationships between these markers of intersectoral collaboration and three intermediate outcomes in the effort to reduce and eliminate cancer disparities: delivery of community activities, policy engagement, and grants/publications. We found a positive and statistically significant relationship between intersectoral out-degree and community activities and policy engagement (the relationship was borderline significant for grants/publications). We found a positive and statistically significant relationship between intersectoral reciprocity and community activities and grants/publications (the relationship was borderline significant for policy engagement). The study suggests that intersectoral connections may be important drivers of diverse intermediate outcomes in the effort to reduce and eliminate cancer disparities. The findings support investment in infrastructure-building and intersectoral mobilization in addressing disparities and highlight the benefits of using CBPR approaches for such work. PMID:22384156

  9. Zooplankton community analysis in the Changjiang River estuary by single-gene-targeted metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fangping; Wang, Minxiao; Li, Chaolun; Sun, Song

    2014-07-01

    DNA barcoding provides accurate identification of zooplankton species through all life stages. Single-gene-targeted metagenomic analysis based on DNA barcode databases can facilitate longterm monitoring of zooplankton communities. With the help of the available zooplankton databases, the zooplankton community of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary was studied using a single-gene-targeted metagenomic method to estimate the species richness of this community. A total of 856 mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences were determined. The environmental barcodes were clustered into 70 molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs). Forty-two MOTUs matched barcoded marine organisms with more than 90% similarity and were assigned to either the species (similarity>96%) or genus level (similaritymetagenomic analysis is a useful tool for zooplankton studies, with which specimens from all life history stages can be identified quickly and effectively with a comprehensive database.

  10. Assessment of diversity indices for the characterization of the soil prokaryotic community by metagenomic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, T. I.; Tkhakakhova, A. K.; Kutovaya, O. V.

    2015-04-01

    The diversity indices used in ecology for assessing the metagenomes of soil prokaryotic communities at different phylogenetic levels were compared. The following indices were considered: the number of detected taxa and the Shannon, Menhinick, Margalef, Simpson, Chao1, and ACE indices. The diversity analysis of the prokaryotic communities in the upper horizons of a typical chernozem (Haplic Chernozem (Pachic)), a dark chestnut soil (Haplic Kastanozem (Chromic)), and an extremely arid desert soil (Endosalic Calcisol (Yermic)) was based on the analysis of 16S rRNA genes. The Menhinick, Margalef, Chao1, and ACE indices gave similar results for the classification of the communities according to their diversity levels; the Simpson index gave good results only for the high-level taxa (phyla); the best results were obtained with the Shannon index. In general, all the indices used showed a decrease in the diversity of the soil prokaryotes in the following sequence: chernozem > dark chestnut soil > extremely arid desert soil.

  11. Inventory of activation analysis facilities available in the European Community to Industrial users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This inventory includes lists of activation equipment produced in the European Community, facilities available for industrial users and activation laboratories existing in the European companies. The aim of this inventory is to provide all information that may be useful, to companies interested in activation analysis, as well as to give an idea on existing routine applications and on the European market in facilities

  12. Critical Social Network Analysis in Community Colleges: Peer Effects and Credit Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzlez Canch, Manuel S.; Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses the importance of conducting critical social network analysis (CSNA) in higher education. To illustrate the benefits of CSNA, the authors use existing institutional data to examine peer effects in community colleges. The chapter ends with a discussion of the implications of using a CSNA approach to measure inequities in

  13. Evaluation for Community-Based Programs: The Integration of Logic Models and Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helitzer, Deborah; Hollis, Christine; de Hernandez, Brisa Urquieta; Sanders, Margaret; Roybal, Suzanne; Van Deusen, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss the utility of and value of the use of logic models for program evaluation of community-based programs and more specifically, the integration of logic models and factor analysis to develop and revise a survey as part of an effective evaluation plan. Principal results: Diverse stakeholders with varying outlooks used a logic…

  14. Bacterial community and proteome analysis of fresh-cut lettuce as affected by packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carli, Mariasole; De Rossi, Patrizia; Paganin, Patrizia; Del Fiore, Antonella; Lecce, Francesca; Capodicasa, Cristina; Bianco, Linda; Perrotta, Gaetano; Mengoni, Alessio; Bacci, Giovanni; Daroda, Lorenza; Dalmastri, Claudia; Donini, Marcello; Bevivino, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    With the growing demand of fresh-cut vegetables, a variety of packaging films are produced specifically to improve safety and quality of the fresh vegetables over the storage period. The aim of our work was to evaluate the influence of different packaging films on the quality of fresh-cut lettuce analyzing changes in bacterial community composition and modifications at the proteome level, by means of culture-dependent/culture-independent methods and differential gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry analysis. Total viable counts indicated the presence of a highly variable and complex microbial flora, around a mean value of 6.26 log10 CFUg(-1). Analysis of terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism data indicated that bacterial communities changed with packaging films and time, showing differences in community composition and diversity indices between the commercially available package (F) and the new packages (A and C), in the first days after packaging. Also proteomic analysis revealed significant changes, involving proteins related to energy metabolism, photosynthesis, plant defense and oxidative stress processes, between F and A/C packages. In conclusion, microbiological and proteomic analysis have proved to be powerful tools to provide new insights into both the composition of leaf-associated bacterial communities and protein content of fresh-cut lettuce during the shelf-life storage process. PMID:26511951

  15. A Discourse Analysis of Collaboration between Academic and Student Affairs in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Needham Yancey

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the nature of collaboration between academic affairs and student affairs units in the community college context from a qualitative perspective. A discourse analysis study was conducted to explore the ways in which collaborative practice was discussed and understood by chief and midlevel academic and…

  16. Using Participatory Analysis for Community Action: Idea Book. Information Collection and Exchange Publication No. M0086

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace Corps, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This idea book addresses key concepts in two earlier Peace Corps' publications, "Participatory Analysis for Community Action (PACA) Manual" [ICE No. M0053], and the "Gender and Development Training Manual" [ICE No. M0054]. These previous resources were large training manuals that introduced PACA to staff and Volunteers in the context of the Peace…

  17. Critical Social Network Analysis in Community Colleges: Peer Effects and Credit Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Canché, Manuel S.; Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses the importance of conducting critical social network analysis (CSNA) in higher education. To illustrate the benefits of CSNA, the authors use existing institutional data to examine peer effects in community colleges. The chapter ends with a discussion of the implications of using a CSNA approach to measure inequities in…

  18. A Social Network Analysis of Teaching and Research Collaboration in a Teachers' Virtual Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaofan; Hu, Xiaoyong; Hu, Qintai; Liu, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    Analysing the structure of a social network can help us understand the key factors influencing interaction and collaboration in a virtual learning community (VLC). Here, we describe the mechanisms used in social network analysis (SNA) to analyse the social network structure of a VLC for teachers and discuss the relationship between face-to-face…

  19. Metagenomic Analysis of Bacterial Communities of Antarctic Surface Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatina, Anna; Medvedeva, Sofia; Shmakov, Sergey; Logacheva, Maria D.; Krylenkov, Vjacheslav; Severinov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of bacteria present in surface snow around four Russian stations in Eastern Antarctica was studied by high throughput sequencing of amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments and shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Considerable class- and genus-level variation between the samples was revealed indicating a presence of inter-site diversity of bacteria in Antarctic snow. Flavobacterium was a major genus in one sampling site and was also detected in other sites. The diversity of flavobacterial type II-C CRISPR spacers in the samples was investigated by metagenome sequencing. Thousands of unique spacers were revealed with less than 35% overlap between the sampling sites, indicating an enormous natural variety of flavobacterial CRISPR spacers and, by extension, high level of adaptive activity of the corresponding CRISPR-Cas system. None of the spacers matched known spacers of flavobacterial isolates from the Northern hemisphere. Moreover, the percentage of spacers with matches with Antarctic metagenomic sequences obtained in this work was significantly higher than with sequences from much larger publically available environmental metagenomic database. The results indicate that despite the overall very high level of diversity, Antarctic Flavobacteria comprise a separate pool that experiences pressures from mobile genetic elements different from those present in other parts of the world. The results also establish analysis of metagenomic CRISPR spacer content as a powerful tool to study bacterial populations diversity. PMID:27064693

  20. Metagenomic analysis of the turkey gut RNA virus community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffler Brian E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral enteric disease is an ongoing economic burden to poultry producers worldwide, and despite considerable research, no single virus has emerged as a likely causative agent and target for prevention and control efforts. Historically, electron microscopy has been used to identify suspect viruses, with many small, round viruses eluding classification based solely on morphology. National and regional surveys using molecular diagnostics have revealed that suspect viruses continuously circulate in United States poultry, with many viruses appearing concomitantly and in healthy birds. High-throughput nucleic acid pyrosequencing is a powerful diagnostic technology capable of determining the full genomic repertoire present in a complex environmental sample. We utilized the Roche/454 Life Sciences GS-FLX platform to compile an RNA virus metagenome from turkey flocks experiencing enteric disease. This approach yielded numerous sequences homologous to viruses in the BLAST nr protein database, many of which have not been described in turkeys. Our analysis of this turkey gut RNA metagenome focuses in particular on the turkey-origin members of the Picornavirales, the Caliciviridae, and the turkey Picobirnaviruses.

  1. Biological soil crusts from arctic environments: characterization of the prokaryotic community and exopolysaccharidic matrix analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnai, Gianmarco; Ventura, Stefano; Mascalchi, Cristina; Rossi, Federico; Adessi, Alessandra; De Philippis, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are highly specialized topsoil microbial communities widespread in many ecosystems, from deserts to polar regions. BSCs play an active role in promoting soil fertility and plant growth. In Arctic environments BSCs are involved in promoting primary succession after deglaciation, increasing moisture availability and nutrient immission at the topsoil. The organisms residing on BSCs produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in response to the environmental characteristics, thus contributing to the increase of constraint tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate the taxonomic diversity of microbial communities, together with the analysis of the chemical features of EPS, from BSC samples collected in several sites near Ny-?lesund, Norway. The phylogenetic composition of the prokaryotic community was assessed through a metagenomic approach. Exopolysaccharidic fractions were quantified using ion-exchange chromatography to determine the monosaccharidic composition. Size exclusion chromatography was used to determine the distribution of the EPS fractions. Abundance of phototrophic microorganisms, which are known to contribute to EPS excretion, was also evaluated. Results underlined the complexity of the microbial communities, showing a high level of diversity within the BSC sampled analyzed. The analysis of the polysaccharide composition displayed a high number of constituent sugars; the matrix was found to be constituted by two main fractions, a higher molecular weight (2 10 exp(6) Da) and a lower molecular weight fraction (EPS of BSCs matrix in relationship with the microbial communities in cold environments.

  2. Bovine Genome Database: supporting community annotation and analysis of the Bos taurus genome

    OpenAIRE

    Childs Kevin L; Dickens C Michael; Sundaram Jaideep P; Childers Christopher P; Reese Justin T; Vile Donald C; Elsik Christine G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background A goal of the Bovine Genome Database (BGD; http://BovineGenome.org) has been to support the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium (BGSAC) in the annotation and analysis of the bovine genome. We were faced with several challenges, including the need to maintain consistent quality despite diversity in annotation expertise in the research community, the need to maintain consistent data formats, and the need to minimize the potential duplication of annotation effort...

  3. Using Interaction Analysis to reveal Self-Regulated Learning in Virtual Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Dettori, Giuliana; Persico, Donatella

    2007-01-01

    Aim of this paper is to analyse whether Interaction Analysis can help investigate the practice and development of Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) in Virtual Learning Communities (VLC). Interaction analysis is increasingly used to study learning dynamics within online activities. It proceeds by searching expressions that reveal the aspects under study in the written messages exchanged by the learners. To this end, we devised and classified a number of indicators suggesting the existence of self-...

  4. Separation of the bacterial species, Escherichia coli, from mixed-species microbial communities for transcriptome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holder Diane

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of bacterial species interactions in a mixed-species community can be facilitated by transcriptome analysis of one species in the community using cDNA microarray technology. However, current applications of microarrays are mostly limited to single species studies. The purpose of this study is to develop a method to separate one species, Escherichia coli as an example, from mixed-species communities for transcriptome analysis. Results E. coli cells were separated from a dual-species (E. coli and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia community using immuno-magnetic separation (IMS. High recovery rates of E. coli were achieved. The purity of E. coli cells was as high as 95.0% separated from suspended mixtures consisting of 1.1 - 71.3% E. coli, and as high as 96.0% separated from biofilms with 8.1% E. coli cells. Biofilms were pre-dispersed into single-cell suspensions. The reagent RNAlater (Ambion, Austin, TX was used during biofilm dispersion and IMS to preserve the transcriptome of E. coli. A microarray study and quantitative PCR confirmed that very few E. coli genes (only about eight out of 4,289 ORFs exhibited a significant change in expression during dispersion and separation, indicating that transcriptional profiles of E. coli were well preserved. Conclusions A method based on immuno-magnetic separation (IMS and application of RNAlater was developed to separate a bacterial species, E. coli as an example, from mixed-species communities while preserving its transcriptome. The method combined with cDNA microarray analysis should be very useful to study species interactions in mixed-species communities.

  5. Learning Communities in Undergraduate STEM Education: A Quantitative Analysis of how Sense of Community Influences Retention of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archie, T.; Newman, P.

    2012-12-01

    Countless programs are aimed at retaining first year college students in their majors and at their institutions. Additionally, first year students in STEM majors are retained at lower rates, than non-STEM majors. Previous research has shown that students who leave the institution are not as academically and socially integrated into the campus community than students who persist at an institution. Residential learning communities can be thought of as a retention tool by enhancing the academic and social integration of their participants. Academic integration has historically been measured by academic success as indicated by GPA, while social integration has been more difficult to measure. We adapted the Sense of Community Index (SCI) as a measure of social integration. Sense of community (SOC) has been defined as ''a feeling that members have of belonging, a feeling that members matter to one another and to the group, and a shared faith that members' needs will be met through their commitment to be together''. This quantitative study examines sense of community as a means of social integration and explores the relationship between learning communities, students' sense of community, and their intent to persist at a large public university and within their current major. An online survey of 60 first-year college students in a Natural Resources College, examined the relationships between learning community participation, sense of community, and student retention. A logistic regression of sense of community was very effective in predicting students' intent to stay or leave the institution. Structural equation models showed that sense of community was strongly positively related to a students' intent to stay or leave the institution for non-learning community participants, but not for learning community participants. We hypothesized that learning community participants sense of community needs would be more fully met than non-learning community participants. Learning community students showed a weak correlation between sense of community and intent to persist in their major, indicating that these students' departure decisions were based on factors other than sense of community. These finding were consistent with previous research of sense of community which has supported this construct as a needs based hierarchical theory. For example, if students' sense of community needs are met, then they can focus on higher level needs, such as academic success. Conversely, if students' sense of community needs are not being fully met, then this factor remains salient in terms of influencing their departure decision. Our results suggest that learning communities fulfill students' sense of community needs, thus this factor has less influence on learning community participants' decision to leave the institution than their counterparts who do not participate in a learning community. Our results suggest that learning communities are effective in fulfilling students' sense of community needs, thus allowing them to focus their energies on higher order needs such as academic success.

  6. Trenton ICES: demonstration of a grid-connected integrated community energy system. Phase II. Volumes 1 and 2. Preliminary design of ICES system and analysis of community ownership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-22

    Preliminary design and evaluation for the system has been carried out. The findings of this study are: (1) it is technically feasible, utilizing commercially available hardware; (2) under utility ownership and operation, it will not be economically competitive with conventional alternatives for heating and cooling buildings (analysis contained in companion report under separate cover); (3) under utility ownership and operation, no restrictions have been identified that would prevent the project from proceeding; (4) under community ownership, preliminary analysis indicates that thermal energy produced by Trenton ICES will be approximately 12 percent less expensive than thermal energy produced by oil-fired boilers; and (5) a review and update of institutional analyses performed during Phase 2 has identified no factors that would preclude community ownership and operation of the Trenton ICES. The background data produced for the analysis of the Trenton ICES based on utility ownership and operation can, in large part, be used as the bases for a detailed analysis of community ownership.

  7. Molecular community analysis of magnesium-rich bittern brine recovered from a Tunisian solar saltern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baati, Houda; Jarboui, Raja; Gharsallah, Nji; Sghir, Abdelghani; Ammar, Emna

    2011-12-01

    The microbial community of a magnesium-rich bittern brine saturated with NaCl (380-400 g/L) from a Tunisian solar saltern was investigated using a molecular approach based on 16S rRNA gene analysis and viability tests. The results revealed the existence of microbial flora. Viability test assessment showed that 46.4% of this flora was viable but not detectable by culturability tests. 16S rRNA genes from 49 bacterial clones and 38 archaeal clones were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Eleven operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined by the DOTUR program with 97% sequence similarity were generated for Bacteria. These OTUs were affiliated with Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria. The archaeal community composition exhibited more diversity with 38 clones, resulting in 13 OTUs affiliated with the Euryarchaeota phylum. Diversity measurement showed a more diverse archaeal than bacterial community at the saturated pond. PMID:22107448

  8. Individual and community risk factors and sexually transmitted diseases among arrested youths: a two level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Richard; Belenko, Steven; Childs, Kristina; Wareham, Jennifer; Schmeidler, James

    2009-08-01

    High rates of infection for chlamydia and gonorrhea have been noted among youths involved in the juvenile justice system. Although both individual and community-level factors have been found to be associated with sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk, their relative importance has not been tested in this population. A two-level logistic regression analysis was completed to assess the influence of individual-level and community-level predictors on STD test results among arrested youths processed at a centralized intake facility. Results from weighted two level logistic regression analyses (n = 1,368) indicated individual-level factors of gender (being female), age, race (being African American), and criminal history predicted the youths' positive STD status. For the community-level predictors, concentrated disadvantage significantly and positively predicted the youths' STD status. Implications of these findings for future research and public health policy are discussed. PMID:19224357

  9. Service utilization in community health centers in China: a comparison analysis with local hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaohang

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being an important part of China's Urban Health Care Reform System, Community Health Centers (CHCs have been established throughout the entire country and are presently undergoing substantial reconstruction. However, the services being delivered by the CHCs are far from reaching their performance targets. In order to assess the role of the CHCs, we examined their performance in six cities located in regions of South-East China. The purpose of this investigation was to identify the utilization and the efficiency of community health resources that are able to provide basic medical and public health services. Methods The study was approved by Peking University Health Science Center Institutional Reviewing Board (NO: IRB00001052-T1. Data were collected from all the local health bureaux and processed using SPSS software. Methods of analysis mainly included: descriptive analysis, paired T-test and one-way ANOVA. Results The six main functions of the CHCs were not fully exploited and the surveys that were collected on their efficiency and utilization of resources indicate that they have a low level of performance and lack the trust of local communities. Furthermore, the CHCs seriously lack funding support and operate under difficult circumstances, and residents have less positive attitudes towards them. Conclusion The community health service must be adjusted according to the requirements of urban medical and health reform, taking into account communities' health needs. More research is required on the living standards and health needs of residents living within the CHC's range, taking into consideration the users' needs in expanding the newly implemented service, and at the same time revising the old service system so as to make the development of CHCs realistic and capable of providing a better service to patients. Several suggestions are put forward for an attainable scheme for developing a community health service.

  10. Habitat niche community-level analysis of an amphibian assemblage at Lake Nabugabo, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Behangana

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Community structure was studied across six different habitat types in an amphibian assemblage constituted by 24 species belonging to five families, from Lake Nabugabo, Uganda. We employed a suite of different statistical methods, including univariate, multivariate, and Monte Carlo procedures to investigate the randomness/nonrandomness and the seasonal effects (wet versus dry season of the community assembly. We calculated for each species in each habitat type an index of relative abundance by using a time constrained counting technique, with 48 1-h counts for each habitat type. Co-occurrence was analysed by C score with 30 000 simulations; resource partitioning patterns by RA2 and RA3 algorithms with 30 000 simulations; and apparent dissimilarity among species in terms of habitat use by UPGMA dendrograms. After pooling data from wet and dry seasons, it resulted that the amphibian community was non-randomly assembled according to C-score analyses, but both RA2 and RA3 were unable to uncover any competitive structure for the dataset. Seasonal effects were evident, and although C score analyses confirmed a nonrandom structure for the community under study (particularly in wet season, RA3 showed that species with high relative abundance tended to significantly concentrate in one habitat type (swamp forest rather than to partition the habitat resource. UPGMA dendrograms grouped the species differently in dry versus wet seasons. Overall, the comparative evidence of 1 non-random community structure according to C-score analysis, and 2 absence of resource partitioning according to niche overlap null models analysis, suggests that community organization in Lake Nabugabo amphibians is generated by habitat affinities rather than by interspecific competition.

  11. Application of Nonlinear Analysis Methods for Identifying Relationships Between Microbial Community Structure and Groundwater Geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between groundwater geochemistry and microbial community structure can be complex and difficult to assess. We applied nonlinear and generalized linear data analysis methods to relate microbial biomarkers (phospholipids fatty acids, PLFA) to groundwater geochemical characteristics at the Shiprock uranium mill tailings disposal site that is primarily contaminated by uranium, sulfate, and nitrate. First, predictive models were constructed using feedforward artificial neural networks (NN) to predict PLFA classes from geochemistry. To reduce the danger of overfitting, parsimonious NN architectures were selected based on pruning of hidden nodes and elimination of redundant predictor (geochemical) variables. The resulting NN models greatly outperformed the generalized linear models. Sensitivity analysis indicated that tritium, which was indicative of riverine influences, and uranium were important in predicting the distributions of the PLFA classes. In contrast, nitrate concentration and inorganic carbon were least important, and total ionic strength was of intermediate importance. Second, nonlinear principal components (NPC) were extracted from the PLFA data using a variant of the feedforward NN. The NPC grouped the samples according to similar geochemistry. PLFA indicators of Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes were associated with the groups of wells with lower levels of contamination. The more contaminated samples contained microbial communities that were predominated by terminally branched saturates and branched monounsaturates that are indicative of metal reducers, actinomycetes, and Gram-positive bacteria. These results indicate that the microbial community at the site is coupled to the geochemistry and knowledge of the geochemistry allows prediction of the community composition

  12. A causal loop analysis of the sustainability of integrated community case management in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarriot, Eric; Morrow, Melanie; Langston, Anne; Weiss, Jennifer; Landegger, Justine; Tsuma, Laban

    2015-04-01

    Expansion of community health services in Rwanda has come with the national scale up of integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) of malaria, pneumonia and diarrhea. We used a sustainability assessment framework as part of a large-scale project evaluation to identify factors affecting iCCM sustainability (2011). We then (2012) used causal-loop analysis to identify systems determinants of iCCM sustainability from a national systems perspective. This allows us to develop three high-probability future scenarios putting the achievements of community health at risk, and to recommend mitigating strategies. Our causal loop diagram highlights both balancing and reinforcing loops of cause and effect in the national iCCM system. Financial, political and technical scenarios carry high probability for threatening the sustainability through: (1) reduction in performance-based financing resources, (2) political shocks and erosion of political commitment for community health, and (3) insufficient progress in resolving district health systems--"building blocks"--performance gaps. In a complex health system, the consequences of choices may be delayed and hard to predict precisely. Causal loop analysis and scenario mapping make explicit complex cause-and-effects relationships and high probability risks, which need to be anticipated and mitigated. PMID:25779620

  13. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B H

    2016-01-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions. PMID:27193869

  14. Application of Nonlinear Analysis Methods for Identifying Relationships Between Microbial Community Structure and Groundwater Geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schryver, Jack C.; Brandt, Craig C.; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Palumbo, A V.; Peacock, Aaron D.; White, David C.; McKinley, James P.; Long, Philip E.

    2006-02-01

    The relationship between groundwater geochemistry and microbial community structure can be complex and difficult to assess. We applied nonlinear and generalized linear data analysis methods to relate microbial biomarkers (phospholipids fatty acids, PLFA) to groundwater geochemical characteristics at the Shiprock uranium mill tailings disposal site that is primarily contaminated by uranium, sulfate, and nitrate. First, predictive models were constructed using feedforward artificial neural networks (NN) to predict PLFA classes from geochemistry. To reduce the danger of overfitting, parsimonious NN architectures were selected based on pruning of hidden nodes and elimination of redundant predictor (geochemical) variables. The resulting NN models greatly outperformed the generalized linear models. Sensitivity analysis indicated that tritium, which was indicative of riverine influences, and uranium were important in predicting the distributions of the PLFA classes. In contrast, nitrate concentration and inorganic carbon were least important, and total ionic strength was of intermediate importance. Second, nonlinear principal components (NPC) were extracted from the PLFA data using a variant of the feedforward NN. The NPC grouped the samples according to similar geochemistry. PLFA indicators of Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes were associated with the groups of wells with lower levels of contamination. The more contaminated samples contained microbial communities that were predominated by terminally branched saturates and branched monounsaturates that are indicative of metal reducers, actinomycetes, and Gram-positive bacteria. These results indicate that the microbial community at the site is coupled to the geochemistry and knowledge of the geochemistry allows prediction of the community composition.

  15. Zooplankton diversity analysis through single-gene sequencing of a community sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Mutsumi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oceans cover more than 70% of the earth's surface and are critical for the homeostasis of the environment. Among the components of the ocean ecosystem, zooplankton play vital roles in energy and matter transfer through the system. Despite their importance, understanding of zooplankton biodiversity is limited because of their fragile nature, small body size, and the large number of species from various taxonomic phyla. Here we present the results of single-gene zooplankton community analysis using a method that determines a large number of mitochondrial COI gene sequences from a bulk zooplankton sample. This approach will enable us to estimate the species richness of almost the entire zooplankton community. Results A sample was collected from a depth of 721 m to the surface in the western equatorial Pacific off Pohnpei Island, Micronesia, with a plankton net equipped with a 2-m2 mouth opening. A total of 1,336 mitochondrial COI gene sequences were determined from the cDNA library made from the sample. From the determined sequences, the occurrence of 189 species of zooplankton was estimated. BLASTN search results showed high degrees of similarity (>98% between the query and database for 10 species, including holozooplankton and merozooplankton. Conclusion In conjunction with the Census of Marine Zooplankton and Barcode of Life projects, single-gene zooplankton community analysis will be a powerful tool for estimating the species richness of zooplankton communities.

  16. Mean-variance portfolio analysis data for optimizing community-based photovoltaic investment

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Shakouri; Hyun Woo Lee

    2016-01-01

    The amount of electricity generated by Photovoltaic (PV) systems is affected by factors such as shading, building orientation and roof slope. To increase electricity generation and reduce volatility in generation of PV systems, a portfolio of PV systems can be made which takes advantages of the potential synergy among neighboring buildings. This paper contains data supporting the research article entitled: PACPIM: new decision-support model of optimized portfolio analysis for community-based ...

  17. Analysis of domestic tourism between the Spanish peninsular autonomous communities: specialization and competitive advantage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J. Benítez Rochel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an implementation of shift share analysis ofnational tourism between the Spanish peninsular autonomous communities withovernight stays in hotels data. Thus, it achieves a more complete interpretation ofthe available statistical information. Among other things, it allows us to know theposition which each region has in terms of specialization and competitive advantageand, hence, the potential markets for development can be identified.

  18. Integrated community case management in Malawi: an analysis of innovation and institutional characteristics for policy adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Daniela C; Banda, Hastings; Namakhoma, Ireen

    2015-12-01

    In 2007, Malawi became an early adopter of integrated community case management for childhood illnesses (iCCM), a policy aimed at community-level treatment for malaria, diarrhoea and pneumonia for children below 5 years. Through a retrospective case study, this article explores critical issues in implementation that arose during policy formulation through the lens of the innovation (i.e. iCCM) and of the institutions involved in the policy process. Data analysis is founded on a documentary review and 21 in-depth stakeholder interviews across institutions in Malawi. Findings indicate that the characteristics of iCCM made it a suitable policy to address persistent challenges in child mortality, namely that ill children were not interacting with health workers on a timely basis and consequently were dying in their communities. Further, iCCM was compatible with the Malawian health system due to the ability to build on an existing community health worker cadre of health surveillance assistants (HSAs) and previous experiences with treatment provision at the community level. In terms of institutions, the Ministry of Health (MoH) demonstrated leadership in the overall policy process despite early challenges of co-ordination within the MoH. WHO, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and implementing organizations played a supportive role in their position as knowledge brokers. Greater challenges were faced in the organizational capacity of the MoH. Regulatory issues around HSA training as well as concerns around supervision and overburdening of HSAs were discussed, though not fully addressed during policy development. Similarly, the financial sustainability of iCCM, including the mechanisms for channelling funding flows, also remains an unresolved issue. This analysis highlights the role of implementation questions during policy development. Despite several outstanding concerns, the compatibility between iCCM as a policy alternative and the local context laid the foundation for Malawi's road to early adoption of iCCM. PMID:26516153

  19. Studying the Complex Communities of Ants and Their Symbionts Using Ecological Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivens, Aniek B F; von Beeren, Christoph; Blüthgen, Nico; Kronauer, Daniel J C

    2016-03-11

    Ant colonies provide well-protected and resource-rich environments for a plethora of symbionts. Historically, most studies of ants and their symbionts have had a narrow taxonomic scope, often focusing on a single ant or symbiont species. Here we discuss the prospects of studying these assemblies in a community ecology context using the framework of ecological network analysis. We introduce three basic network metrics that we consider particularly relevant for improving our knowledge of ant-symbiont communities: interaction specificity, network modularity, and phylogenetic signal. We then discuss army ant symbionts as examples of large and primarily parasitic communities, and symbiotic sternorrhynchans as examples of generally smaller and primarily mutualistic communities in the context of these network analyses. We argue that this approach will provide new and complementary insights into the evolutionary and ecological dynamics between ants and their many associates, and will facilitate comparisons across different ant-symbiont assemblages as well as across different types of ecological networks. PMID:26982442

  20. Bacterioplankton community analysis in tilapia ponds by Illumina high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Li Min; Barry, Kamira; Hu, Geng Dong; Meng, Shun Long; Song, Chao; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jia Zhang; Xu, Pao

    2016-01-01

    The changes of microbial community in aquaculture systems under the effects of stocking densities and seasonality were investigated in tilapia ponds. Total DNAs were extracted from the water samples, 16S rRNA gene was amplified and the bacterial community analyzed by Illumina high-throughput sequencing obtaining 3486 OTUs, from a total read of 715,842 sequences. Basing on the analysis of bacterial compositions, richness, diversity, bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance, water sample comparisons and existence of specific bacterial taxa within three fish ponds in a 4months period, the study conclusively observed that the dominant phylum in all water samples were similar, and they included; Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes and Chlorobi, distributed in different proportions in the different months and ponds. The seasonal changes had a more pronounced effect on the bacterioplankton community than the stocking densities; however some differences between the ponds were more likely caused by feed coefficient than by stocking densities. At the same time, most bacterial communities were affected by the nutrient input except phylum Cyanobacteria that was also affected by the feed control of tilapia. PMID:26712625

  1. MG-RAST, a Metagenomics Service for Analysis of Microbial Community Structure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Kevin P; Glass, Elizabeth M; Meyer, Folker

    2016-01-01

    Approaches in molecular biology, particularly those that deal with high-throughput sequencing of entire microbial communities (the field of metagenomics), are rapidly advancing our understanding of the composition and functional content of microbial communities involved in climate change, environmental pollution, human health, biotechnology, etc. Metagenomics provides researchers with the most complete picture of the taxonomic (i.e., what organisms are there) and functional (i.e., what are those organisms doing) composition of natively sampled microbial communities, making it possible to perform investigations that include organisms that were previously intractable to laboratory-controlled culturing; currently, these constitute the vast majority of all microbes on the planet. All organisms contained in environmental samples are sequenced in a culture-independent manner, most often with 16S ribosomal amplicon methods to investigate the taxonomic or whole-genome shotgun-based methods to investigate the functional content of sampled communities. Metagenomics allows researchers to characterize the community composition and functional content of microbial communities, but it cannot show which functional processes are active; however, near parallel developments in transcriptomics promise a dramatic increase in our knowledge in this area as well. Since 2008, MG-RAST (Meyer et al., BMC Bioinformatics 9:386, 2008) has served as a public resource for annotation and analysis of metagenomic sequence data, providing a repository that currently houses more than 150,000 data sets (containing 60+ tera-base-pairs) with more than 23,000 publically available. MG-RAST, or the metagenomics RAST (rapid annotation using subsystems technology) server makes it possible for users to upload raw metagenomic sequence data in (preferably) fastq or fasta format. Assessments of sequence quality, annotation with respect to multiple reference databases, are performed automatically with minimal input from the user (see Subheading 4 at the end of this chapter for more details). Post-annotation analysis and visualization are also possible, directly through the web interface, or with tools like matR (metagenomic analysis tools for R, covered later in this chapter) that utilize the MG-RAST API ( http://api.metagenomics.anl.gov/api.html ) to easily download data from any stage in the MG-RAST processing pipeline. Over the years, MG-RAST has undergone substantial revisions to keep pace with the dramatic growth in the number, size, and types of sequence data that accompany constantly evolving developments in metagenomics and related -omic sciences (e.g., metatranscriptomics). PMID:26791506

  2. Analysis of the composition of bacterial communities in oil reservoirs from a southern offshore Brazilian basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sette, Lara D; Simioni, Karen C M; Vasconcellos, Suzan P; Dussan, Lucia J; Neto, Eugnio V S; Oliveira, Valria M

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the bacterial community structure of two distinct oil samples from a petroleum field in Brazil by using both molecular, based on the construction of 16S rRNA gene libraries, and cultivation methods. Statistical comparisons of libraries based on Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis (ARDRA) data revealed no significant differences between the communities recovered in the non-biodegraded (NBD) and highly biodegraded oils (HBD). BlastN analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences representative of distinct ribotypes from both oils showed the presence of nine different bacterial genera in these samples, encompassing members of the genera Arcobacter, Halanaerobium, Marinobacter, Propionibacterium, Streptomyces, Leuconostoc, Acinetobacter, Bacillus and Streptococcus. Enrichments obtained using oil as inoculum and sole carbon source yielded bacterial isolates showing high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Bacillus subtilis, Brevibacillus sp., Dietzia sp. and Methylobacterium sp. Comparison between the data obtained using cultivation-independent and enrichment cultures suggests that different selection of community members may occur when using distinct approaches. All the organisms found, except for Leuconostoc sp. and Streptococus sp., have been previously reported in the literature as hydrocarbon degraders and/or associated to oil field environments. PMID:17072536

  3. Community cyberinfrastructure for Advanced Microbial Ecology Research and Analysis: the CAMERA resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shulei; Chen, Jing; Li, Weizhong; Altintas, Ilkay; Lin, Abel; Peltier, Steve; Stocks, Karen; Allen, Eric E; Ellisman, Mark; Grethe, Jeffrey; Wooley, John

    2011-01-01

    The Community Cyberinfrastructure for Advanced Microbial Ecology Research and Analysis (CAMERA, http://camera.calit2.net/) is a database and associated computational infrastructure that provides a single system for depositing, locating, analyzing, visualizing and sharing data about microbial biology through an advanced web-based analysis portal. CAMERA collects and links metadata relevant to environmental metagenome data sets with annotation in a semantically-aware environment allowing users to write expressive semantic queries against the database. To meet the needs of the research community, users are able to query metadata categories such as habitat, sample type, time, location and other environmental physicochemical parameters. CAMERA is compliant with the standards promulgated by the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), and sustains a role within the GSC in extending standards for content and format of the metagenomic data and metadata and its submission to the CAMERA repository. To ensure wide, ready access to data and annotation, CAMERA also provides data submission tools to allow researchers to share and forward data to other metagenomics sites and community data archives such as GenBank. It has multiple interfaces for easy submission of large or complex data sets, and supports pre-registration of samples for sequencing. CAMERA integrates a growing list of tools and viewers for querying, analyzing, annotating and comparing metagenome and genome data. PMID:21045053

  4. On the Analysis of a Label Propagation Algorithm for Community Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Kothapalli, Kishore; Sardeshmukh, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    This paper initiates formal analysis of a simple, distributed algorithm for community detection on networks. We analyze an algorithm that we call \\textsc{Max-LPA}, both in terms of its convergence time and in terms of the "quality" of the communities detected. \\textsc{Max-LPA} is an instance of a class of community detection algorithms called \\textit{label propagation} algorithms. As far as we know, most analysis of label propagation algorithms thus far has been empirical in nature and in this paper we seek a theoretical understanding of label propagation algorithms. In our main result, we define a clustered version of \\er random graphs with clusters $V_1, V_2,..., V_k$ where the probability $p$, of an edge connecting nodes within a cluster $V_i$ is higher than $p'$, the probability of an edge connecting nodes in distinct clusters. We show that even with fairly general restrictions on $p$ and $p'$ ($p = \\Omega(\\frac{1}{n^{1/4-\\epsilon}})$ for any $\\epsilon > 0$, $p' = O(p^2)$, where $n$ is the number of nodes...

  5. Prospective policy analysis: how an epistemic community informed policymaking on intentional self poisoning in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Zwi B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Policy analysis is often retrospective and not well suited to helping policy makers decide what to do; in contrast prospective policy analysis seeks to assist in formulating responses to challenging public policy questions. Suicide in Sri Lanka is a major public health problem, with ingestion of pesticides being the primary method. Previous policy interventions have been associated with reduced mortality through restricting access to the most toxic pesticides. Additional means of reducing access are still needed. Methods The prospective policy analysis comprised two stages. The first used a consensus activity within a well defined policy community to generate and frame policy options. The second broadened the analysis to include other stakeholders. We report the consensus activity with seven actors from agriculture, health, and academia. Policy options were identified through two rounds of discussion along with ratings by each participant on their degree of support for each option. Data were analysed quantitatively and discussions analysed with Nvivo 8 to code prominent and recurrent themes. Results The main finding was the strong support and consensus for two proposals: further regulation of pesticides and the novel idea of repackaging pesticides into non-lethal doses. Participants identified several factors that were supportive of future policy change including a strong legislative framework, good links between agriculture, health and academia, and a collaborative relationship with industry. Identified barriers and potential threats to policy change included political interference, difficulties of intersectoral collaboration, acceptability of options to the community, difficulty of implementation in rural communities and the challenge of reducing mortality. Conclusions The development and consideration of policy options within this epistemic community reflected an appreciation and understanding of many of the factors that can facilitate or thwart policy change. The understanding of context, evidence and ideas, implementation and impact influenced how the participants considered and rated the options. Use of epistemic community actors identified the level of support for each option, helped elaborate the particularities of context, as well as the power and influence of ideas. Further examination of the potential barriers and opportunities for these options will determine if broader consensus, involving a wider range of stakeholders, can be achieved and policy change promoted.

  6. Mean-variance portfolio analysis data for optimizing community-based photovoltaic investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakouri, Mahmoud; Lee, Hyun Woo

    2016-03-01

    The amount of electricity generated by Photovoltaic (PV) systems is affected by factors such as shading, building orientation and roof slope. To increase electricity generation and reduce volatility in generation of PV systems, a portfolio of PV systems can be made which takes advantages of the potential synergy among neighboring buildings. This paper contains data supporting the research article entitled: PACPIM: new decision-support model of optimized portfolio analysis for community-based photovoltaic investment [1]. We present a set of data relating to physical properties of 24 houses in Oregon, USA, along with simulated hourly electricity data for the installed PV systems. The developed Matlab code to construct optimized portfolios is also provided in . The application of these files can be generalized to variety of communities interested in investing on PV systems. PMID:26937458

  7. Mean-variance portfolio analysis data for optimizing community-based photovoltaic investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Shakouri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The amount of electricity generated by Photovoltaic (PV systems is affected by factors such as shading, building orientation and roof slope. To increase electricity generation and reduce volatility in generation of PV systems, a portfolio of PV systems can be made which takes advantages of the potential synergy among neighboring buildings. This paper contains data supporting the research article entitled: PACPIM: new decision-support model of optimized portfolio analysis for community-based photovoltaic investment [1]. We present a set of data relating to physical properties of 24 houses in Oregon, USA, along with simulated hourly electricity data for the installed PV systems. The developed Matlab code to construct optimized portfolios is also provided in Supplementary materials. The application of these files can be generalized to variety of communities interested in investing on PV systems.

  8. A cluster analysis of people on Community Treatment Orders in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Lisa M; Reece, John E; McDermott, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the clinical, social and demographic characteristics of 164 people on Community Treatment Orders (CTOs) in one area mental health service in Victoria, Australia. The results of an exploratory cluster analysis are presented to address the question of whether people on Community Treatment Orders can be categorised into statistically reliable, qualitatively distinct groupings. The data are presented in the context of key stakeholder perspectives on the current use and purpose of CTOs. Three stable clusters emerged and each potentially reflects how social dimensions, as well as clinical issues, influence decision making regarding the implementation of CTOs. These findings are important in the context of policy and practice in Victoria, where the use of CTOs is common practice, and orders are generally made for a 12 month period. The potential for improved targeting of CTOs and more specific treatment planning is identified. PMID:17084453

  9. An Analysis of Interactions Within and Between Extreme Right Communities in Social Media

    CERN Document Server

    O'Callaghan, Derek; Conway, Maura; Carthy, Joe; Cunningham, Pádraig

    2012-01-01

    Many extreme right groups have had an online presence for some time through the use of dedicated websites. This has been accompanied by increased activity in social media websites in recent years, which may enable the dissemination of extreme right content to a wider audience. In this paper, we present exploratory analysis of the activity of a selection of such groups on Twitter, using network representations based on reciprocal follower and mentions interactions. We find that stable communities of related users are present within individual country networks, where these communities are usually associated with variants of extreme right ideology. Furthermore, we also identify the presence of international relationships between certain groups across geopolitical boundaries.

  10. Succession of Bacterial Community Structure along the Changjiang River Determined by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Clone Library Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masataka; Nakahara, Tadaatsu; Xu, Baohua; Uchiyama, Hiroo

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial community structure along the Changjiang River (which is more than 2,500 km long) was studied by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone library analysis of PCR-amplified 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) with universal bacterial primer sets. DGGE profiles and principal-component analysis (PCA) demonstrated that the bacterial community gradually changed from upstream to downstream in both 1998 and 1999. Bacterial diversity, as determined by the Shannon index (H′), grad...

  11. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography of Respiratory Quinones for Microbial Community Analysis in Environmental and Biological Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Koichi Fujie; Hiroyuki Daimon; Yoichi Atsuta; Muhammad Hanif

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community structure plays a significant role in environmental assessment and animal health management. The development of a superior analytical strategy for the characterization of microbial community structure is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we developed an effective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method for the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinones (RQ) in environmental and biological samples. RQ profile analysi...

  12. agriGO: a GO analysis toolkit for the agricultural community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhou; Zhou, Xin; Ling, Yi; Zhang, Zhenhai; Su, Zhen

    2010-07-01

    Gene Ontology (GO), the de facto standard in gene functionality description, is used widely in functional annotation and enrichment analysis. Here, we introduce agriGO, an integrated web-based GO analysis toolkit for the agricultural community, using the advantages of our previous GO enrichment tool (EasyGO), to meet analysis demands from new technologies and research objectives. EasyGO is valuable for its proficiency, and has proved useful in uncovering biological knowledge in massive data sets from high-throughput experiments. For agriGO, the system architecture and website interface were redesigned to improve performance and accessibility. The supported organisms and gene identifiers were substantially expanded (including 38 agricultural species composed of 274 data types). The requirement on user input is more flexible, in that user-defined reference and annotation are accepted. Moreover, a new analysis approach using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis strategy and customizable features is provided. Four tools, SEA (Singular enrichment analysis), PAGE (Parametric Analysis of Gene set Enrichment), BLAST4ID (Transfer IDs by BLAST) and SEACOMPARE (Cross comparison of SEA), are integrated as a toolkit to meet different demands. We also provide a cross-comparison service so that different data sets can be compared and explored in a visualized way. Lastly, agriGO functions as a GO data repository with search and download functions; agriGO is publicly accessible at http://bioinfo.cau.edu.cn/agriGO/. PMID:20435677

  13. PIXE analysis of hair samples from artisanal mining communities in the Acupan region, Benguet, Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mountainous regions of Benguet Province in the Philippines is home to some 10,000 small-scale miners who make out a living by extracting gold. In these communities, the method of extraction still involves the use of mercury, via amalgamation. In the separation of gold from mercury the method involves the release of mercury vapor into the atmosphere. This is therefore expected to affect the people living in the nearby areas. This study involves the accumulation of baseline data on the extent of mercury contamination in humans through the analysis of their hair. In 1989, Hursh et al. [Arch. Environ. Health 44 (2) (1989) 120] studied human volunteers and found that uptake of mercury vapor through the skin is only about 1% of the uptake through inhalation [World Health Organization, IPCS, EHC118, Inorganic Mercury, Geneva, 1991, p. 42]. In this light, any residual mercury which might have deposited in human hair is speculated to give an indication of how much mercury vapor the subject could have actually inhaled. A high concentration of mercury in the sample can therefore be indicative of the high rate of intake of the mercury vapor through inhalation. A sampling of the community consisted of both male (83%) and female (17%) subjects who ranged in age from 8 to 66 years old. Hair analysis was done using particle induced X-ray emission at the Iwate Medical University through Dr. Sera. With Zn set as a standard element, the rest of the elements were determined using the standard-free method. In order to obtain the conversion coefficient for hair samples, many hair samples were analyzed by this method and the internal standard method which involves the preparation of the hair samples by chemical ashing. The results obtained were comparable. The PIXE results for these samples showed the analysis of 26 elements but for our purposes, however, only the mercury analysis will be considered. Results of the analysis showed the hair samples to contain 0-27 ppm, with only seven of the 70 respondents showing no traces of mercury, while nine had levels beyond the 5 ppm limit set by the Human Biomonitor II [Bundesgesundheitsblatt 39 (1996) 221]. Further studies using PIXE analysis of hair is recommended on the same communities with a wider area base to show that PIXE analysis on hair samples as an alternative procedure which is faster without sacrificing reliability

  14. Strainer: software for analysis of population variation in community genomic datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyson Gene W

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomic analyses of microbial communities that are comprehensive enough to provide multiple samples of most loci in the genomes of the dominant organism types will also reveal patterns of genetic variation within natural populations. New bioinformatic tools will enable visualization and comprehensive analysis of this sequence variation and inference of recent evolutionary and ecological processes. Results We have developed a software package for analysis and visualization of genetic variation in populations and reconstruction of strain variants from otherwise co-assembled sequences. Sequencing reads can be clustered by matching patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms to generate predicted gene and protein variant sequences, identify conserved intergenic regulatory sequences, and determine the quantity and distribution of recombination events. Conclusion The Strainer software, a first generation metagenomic bioinformatics tool, facilitates comprehension and analysis of heterogeneity intrinsic in natural communities. The program reveals the degree of clustering among closely related sequence variants and provides a rapid means to generate gene and protein sequences for functional, ecological, and evolutionary analyses.

  15. Using local injury surveillance for community-based injury prevention: an analysis of scandinavian WHO safe community and canadian safe community foundation programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Per; Bourne, Michael; Coggan, Carolyn

    2007-03-01

    Injury surveillance is widely recognized as a critical prerequisite for effective injury prevention, yet few studies have investigated its use by community-based injury prevention programmes. This study examined the extent to which local injury data were collected, documented, analysed, linked to injury prevention action and used for evaluation among WHO Safe Communities in Scandinavia (25 programmes) and the Canadian Safe Community Foundation (SCF) network (16 programmes). For each programme, a key informant with relevant local knowledge was selected to respond to an emailed questionnaire. The study demonstrates that community-based injury prevention programmes experience difficulties accessing and effectively utilizing local injury surveillance data. The findings suggest that the responding SCF programmes approach injury prevention more scientifically than the Scandinavian WHO-designated Safe Community programmes, by making greater use of injury surveillance for assessment, integration into prevention strategies and measures, and evaluation. Despite study limitations, such as the low response rate among Canadian programmes and a large number of non-responses to two questions, the results highlight the importance of, and need for, greater use of local injury surveillance. PMID:17624009

  16. Contaminants reduce the richness and evenness of marine communities: A review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiversity of marine ecosystems is integral to their stability and function and is threatened by anthropogenic processes. We conducted a literature review and meta-analysis of 216 studies to understand the effects of common contaminants upon diversity in various marine communities. The most common diversity measures were species richness, the Shannon-Wiener index (H') and Pielou evenness (J). Largest effect sizes were observed for species richness, which tended to be the most sensitive index. Pollution was associated with marine communities containing fewer species or taxa than their pristine counterparts. Marine habitats did not vary in their susceptibility to contamination, rather a ∼40% reduction in richness occurred across all habitats. No class of contaminant was associated with significantly greater impacts on diversity than any other. Survey studies identified larger effects than laboratory or field experiments. Anthropogenic contamination is strongly associated with reductions in the species richness and evenness of marine habitats. - Contamination substantially reduces the biodiversity of marine communities in all major habitat types and across all major contaminant classes.

  17. Ecomorphological analysis of trophic niche partitioning in a tropical savannah bat community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Luis F; Herrel, Anthony; van Damme, R; Matthysen, E

    2002-06-22

    The exceptional diversity of neotropical bat communities is sustained by an intricate partitioning of available resources among the member species. Trophical specialization is considered an important evolutionary avenue towards niche partitioning in neotropical phyllostomid bats. From an ancestral insectivorous condition, phyllostomids evolved into highly specialized frugivorous, carnivorous, nectarivorous, piscivorous and even sanguivorous species. Previously, correlations between cranial morphology and trophic ecology within this group have been documented. Here, we examine the evolutionary relationships between bite force and head shape in over 20 species of bats from a single tropical savannah bat community. The results show that bite force increases exponentially with body size across all species examined. Despite the significant differences between large dietary groups using traditional analysis (i.e. non-phylogenetic) and the strong evolutionary correlations between body mass and bite force, phylogenetic analyses indicated no differences in bite performance between insectivorous, omnivorous and frugivorous bats. Comparisons of three species with highly specialized feeding habits (nectarivory, piscivory and sanguivory) with the rest of the species in the community indicate that specialization into these niches comes at the expense of bite performance and, hence, may result in a reduction of the trophic niche breadth. PMID:12065044

  18. Sourdough microbial community dynamics: An analysis during French organic bread-making processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhomme, Emilie; Urien, Charlotte; Legrand, Judith; Dousset, Xavier; Onno, Bernard; Sicard, Delphine

    2016-02-01

    Natural sourdoughs are commonly used in bread-making processes, especially for organic bread. Despite its role in bread flavor and dough rise, the stability of the sourdough microbial community during and between bread-making processes is debated. We investigated the dynamics of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeast communities in traditional organic sourdoughs of five French bakeries during the bread-making process and several months apart using classical and molecular microbiology techniques. Sourdoughs were sampled at four steps of the bread-making process with repetition. The analysis of microbial density over 68 sourdough/dough samples revealed that both LAB and yeast counts changed along the bread-making process and between bread-making runs. The species composition was less variable. A total of six LAB and nine yeast species was identified from 520 and 1675 isolates, respectively. The dominant LAB species was Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, found for all bakeries and each bread-making run. The dominant yeast species changed only once between bread-making processes but differed between bakeries. They mostly belonged to the Kazachstania clade. Overall, this study highlights the change of population density within the bread-making process and between bread-making runs and the relative stability of the sourdough species community during bread-making process. PMID:26611168

  19. Comparative pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial community change in biofilm formed on seawater reverse osmosis membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In S; Lee, Jinwook; Kima, Sung-Jo; Yu, Hye-Weon; Jang, Am

    2014-01-01

    The change in bacterial community structure induced by bacterial competition and succession was investigated during seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) in order to elucidate a possible link between the bacterial consortium on SWRO membranes and biofouling. To date, there has been no definitive characterization of the microbial diversity in SWRO in terms of distinguishing time-dependent changes in the richness or abundance of bacterial species. For bacterial succession within biofilms on the membrane surface, SWRO using a cross-flow filtration membrane test unit was operated for 5 and 100h, respectively. As results of the pyrosequencing analysis, bacterial communities differed considerably among seawater and the 5 and 100 h samples. From a total of 33,876 pyrosequences (using a 95% sequence similarity), there were less than 1% of shared species, confirming the influence of the operational time factor and lack of similarity of these communities. During SWRO operation, the abundance of Pseudomonas stutzeri BBSPN3 (GU594474) belonging to gamma-Proteobacteria suggest that biofouling of SWRO membrane might be driven by the dominant influence of a specific species. In addition, among the bacterial competition of five bacterial species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus sp., Rhodobacter sp., Flavobacterium sp., and Mycobacterium sp.) competing for bacterial colonization on the SWRO membrane surfaces, it was exhibited that Bacillus sp. was the most dominant. The dominant influences ofPseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. on biofouling during actual SWRO is decisive depending on higher removal efficiency of the seawater pretreatment. PMID:24600849

  20. Optimization of preservation and processing of sea anemones for microbial community analysis using molecular tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Joana; Coelho, Francisco J R C; Peixe, Luísa; Gomes, Newton C M; Calado, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    For several years, knowledge on the microbiome associated with marine invertebrates was impaired by the challenges associated with the characterization of bacterial communities. With the advent of culture independent molecular tools it is possible to gain new insights on the diversity and richness of microorganisms associated with marine invertebrates. In the present study, we evaluated if different preservation and processing methodologies (prior to DNA extraction) can affect the bacterial diversity retrieved from snakelocks anemone Anemonia viridis. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) community fingerprints were used as proxy to determine the bacterial diversity retrieved (H'). Statistical analyses indicated that preservation significantly affects H'. The best approach to preserve and process A. viridis biomass for bacterial community fingerprint analysis was flash freezing in liquid nitrogen (preservation) followed by the use of a mechanical homogenizer (process), as it consistently yielded higher H'. Alternatively, biomass samples can be processed fresh followed by cell lyses using a mechanical homogenizer or mortar &pestle. The suitability of employing these two alternative procedures was further reinforced by the quantification of the 16S rRNA gene; no significant differences were recorded when comparing these two approaches and the use of liquid nitrogen followed by processing with a mechanical homogenizer. PMID:25384534

  1. Community analysis of biting midges (Culicoides Latr.) on livestock farms in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S. A.; Banta, G.; Rasmussen, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Henrik Skovgrd

    2014-01-01

    This study presents descriptive statistics and community analysis of adult biting midges trapped at 16 livestock farms by means of light traps on Zealand and Lolland-Falster, Denmark. A total of 9,047 male and female Culicoides divided into 24 species, were caught. Biotic and abiotic factors rang...... pulicaris. Furthermore, Culicoides riethi and Culicoides puncticollis (subgenus Monoculicoides) were recorded in high numbers on individual farms. C. puncticollis was found for the first time in Denmark and so far only recorded from Zealand....

  2. Prevalence and invasiveness of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shipeng Li; Juan Li; Yanhong Qiao; Xue Ning; Ting Zeng; Xuzhuang Shen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Reports suggest that the prevalence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has increased, and that CA-MRSA is more virulent than healthcare-associated (HA)-MRSA. Aims: The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the invasiveness and prevalence of CA-MRSA in patients; we systematically reviewed the literature by conducting a meta-analysis. Materials and Methods: We searched the MEDLINE and PUBMED databases from the year these data...

  3. Evaluation of SOVAT: An OLAP-GIS decision support system for community health assessment data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmanto Bambang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data analysis in community health assessment (CHA involves the collection, integration, and analysis of large numerical and spatial data sets in order to identify health priorities. Geographic Information Systems (GIS enable for management and analysis using spatial data, but have limitations in performing analysis of numerical data because of its traditional database architecture. On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP is a multidimensional datawarehouse designed to facilitate querying of large numerical data. Coupling the spatial capabilities of GIS with the numerical analysis of OLAP, might enhance CHA data analysis. OLAP-GIS systems have been developed by university researchers and corporations, yet their potential for CHA data analysis is not well understood. To evaluate the potential of an OLAP-GIS decision support system for CHA problem solving, we compared OLAP-GIS to the standard information technology (IT currently used by many public health professionals. Methods SOVAT, an OLAP-GIS decision support system developed at the University of Pittsburgh, was compared against current IT for data analysis for CHA. For this study, current IT was considered the combined use of SPSS and GIS ("SPSS-GIS". Graduate students, researchers, and faculty in the health sciences at the University of Pittsburgh were recruited. Each round consisted of: an instructional video of the system being evaluated, two practice tasks, five assessment tasks, and one post-study questionnaire. Objective and subjective measurement included: task completion time, success in answering the tasks, and system satisfaction. Results Thirteen individuals participated. Inferential statistics were analyzed using linear mixed model analysis. SOVAT was statistically significant (α = .01 from SPSS-GIS for satisfaction and time (p Conclusion Using SOVAT, tasks were completed more efficiently, with a higher rate of success, and with greater satisfaction, than the combined use of SPSS and GIS. The results from this study indicate a potential for OLAP-GIS decision support systems as a valuable tool for CHA data analysis.

  4. Quantitative microbial community analysis of three different sulfidic mine tailing dumps generating acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Dagmar; Schippers, Axel

    2008-08-01

    The microbial communities of three different sulfidic and acidic mine waste tailing dumps located in Botswana, Germany, and Sweden were quantitatively analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), catalyzed reporter deposition-FISH (CARD-FISH), Sybr green II direct counting, and the most probable number (MPN) cultivation technique. Depth profiles of cell numbers showed that the compositions of the microbial communities are greatly different at the three sites and also strongly varied between zones of oxidized and unoxidized tailings. Maximum cell numbers of up to 10(9) cells g(-1) dry weight were determined in the pyrite or pyrrhotite oxidation zones, whereas cell numbers in unoxidized tailings were significantly lower. Bacteria dominated over Archaea and Eukarya at all tailing sites. The acidophilic Fe(II)- and/or sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus spp. dominated over the acidophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing Leptospirillum spp. among the Bacteria at two sites. The two genera were equally abundant at the third site. The acidophilic Fe(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing Sulfobacillus spp. were generally less abundant. The acidophilic Fe(III)-reducing Acidiphilium spp. could be found at only one site. The neutrophilic Fe(III)-reducing Geobacteraceae as well as the dsrA gene of sulfate reducers were quantifiable at all three sites. FISH analysis provided reliable data only for tailing zones with high microbial activity, whereas CARD-FISH, Q-PCR, Sybr green II staining, and MPN were suitable methods for a quantitative microbial community analysis of tailings in general. PMID:18586975

  5. Quantitative Microbial Community Analysis of Three Different Sulfidic Mine Tailing Dumps Generating Acid Mine Drainage▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Dagmar; Schippers, Axel

    2008-01-01

    The microbial communities of three different sulfidic and acidic mine waste tailing dumps located in Botswana, Germany, and Sweden were quantitatively analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), catalyzed reporter deposition-FISH (CARD-FISH), Sybr green II direct counting, and the most probable number (MPN) cultivation technique. Depth profiles of cell numbers showed that the compositions of the microbial communities are greatly different at the three sites and also strongly varied between zones of oxidized and unoxidized tailings. Maximum cell numbers of up to 109 cells g−1 dry weight were determined in the pyrite or pyrrhotite oxidation zones, whereas cell numbers in unoxidized tailings were significantly lower. Bacteria dominated over Archaea and Eukarya at all tailing sites. The acidophilic Fe(II)- and/or sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus spp. dominated over the acidophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing Leptospirillum spp. among the Bacteria at two sites. The two genera were equally abundant at the third site. The acidophilic Fe(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing Sulfobacillus spp. were generally less abundant. The acidophilic Fe(III)-reducing Acidiphilium spp. could be found at only one site. The neutrophilic Fe(III)-reducing Geobacteraceae as well as the dsrA gene of sulfate reducers were quantifiable at all three sites. FISH analysis provided reliable data only for tailing zones with high microbial activity, whereas CARD-FISH, Q-PCR, Sybr green II staining, and MPN were suitable methods for a quantitative microbial community analysis of tailings in general. PMID:18586975

  6. End to End Digitisation and Analysis of Three-Dimensional Coral Models, from Communities to Corallites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Heredia, Luis; Benzoni, Francesca; Murphy, Emma; Reynaud, Emmanuel G.

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs hosts nearly 25% of all marine species and provide food sources for half a billion people worldwide while only a very small percentage have been surveyed. Advances in technology and processing along with affordable underwater cameras and Internet availability gives us the possibility to provide tools and softwares to survey entire coral reefs. Holistic ecological analyses of corals require not only the community view (10s to 100s of meters), but also the single colony analysis as well as corallite identification. As corals are three-dimensional, classical approaches to determine percent cover and structural complexity across spatial scales are inefficient, time-consuming and limited to experts. Here we propose an end-to-end approach to estimate these parameters using low-cost equipment (GoPro, Canon) and freeware (123D Catch, Meshmixer and Netfabb), allowing every community to participate in surveys and monitoring of their coral ecosystem. We demonstrate our approach on 9 species of underwater colonies in ranging size and morphology. 3D models of underwater colonies, fresh samples and bleached skeletons with high quality texture mapping and detailed topographic morphology were produced, and Surface Area and Volume measurements (parameters widely used for ecological and coral health studies) were calculated and analysed. Moreover, we integrated collected sample models with micro-photogrammetry models of individual corallites to aid identification and colony and polyp scale analysis. PMID:26901845

  7. Integrated Community Energy Systems: engineering analysis and design bibliography. [368 citations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calm, J.M.; Sapienza, G.R.

    1979-05-01

    This bibliography cites 368 documents that may be helpful in the planning, analysis, and design of Integrated Community Energy Systems. It has been prepared for use primarily by engineers and others involved in the development and implementation of ICES concepts. These documents include products of a number of Government research, development, demonstration, and commercialization programs; selected studies and references from the literature of various technical societies and institutions; and other selected material. The key programs which have produced cited reports are the Department of Energy Community Systems Program (DOE/CSP), the Department of Housing and Urban Development Modular Integrated Utility Systems Program (HUD/MIUS), and the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare Integrated Utility Systems Program (HEW/IUS). The cited documents address experience gained both in the U.S. and in other countries. Several general engineering references and bibliographies pertaining to technologies or analytical methods that may be helpful in the analysis and design of ICES are also included. The body of relevant literature is rapidly growing and future updates are therefore planned. Each citation includes identifying information, a source, descriptive information, and an abstract. The citations are indexed both by subjects and authors, and the subject index is extensively cross-referenced to simplify its use.

  8. FoodMicrobionet: A database for the visualisation and exploration of food bacterial communities based on network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Eugenio; Cocolin, Luca; De Filippis, Francesca; Zotta, Teresa; Ferrocino, Ilario; O'Sullivan, Orla; Neviani, Erasmo; De Angelis, Maria; Cotter, Paul D; Ercolini, Danilo

    2016-02-16

    Amplicon targeted high-throughput sequencing has become a popular tool for the culture-independent analysis of microbial communities. Although the data obtained with this approach are portable and the number of sequences available in public databases is increasing, no tool has been developed yet for the analysis and presentation of data obtained in different studies. This work describes an approach for the development of a database for the rapid exploration and analysis of data on food microbial communities. Data from seventeen studies investigating the structure of bacterial communities in dairy, meat, sourdough and fermented vegetable products, obtained by 16S rRNA gene targeted high-throughput sequencing, were collated and analysed using Gephi, a network analysis software. The resulting database, which we named FoodMicrobionet, was used to analyse nodes and network properties and to build an interactive web-based visualisation. The latter allows the visual exploration of the relationships between Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) and samples and the identification of core- and sample-specific bacterial communities. It also provides additional search tools and hyperlinks for the rapid selection of food groups and OTUs and for rapid access to external resources (NCBI taxonomy, digital versions of the original articles). Microbial interaction network analysis was carried out using CoNet on datasets extracted from FoodMicrobionet: the complexity of interaction networks was much lower than that found for other bacterial communities (human microbiome, soil and other environments). This may reflect both a bias in the dataset (which was dominated by fermented foods and starter cultures) and the lower complexity of food bacterial communities. Although some technical challenges exist, and are discussed here, the net result is a valuable tool for the exploration of food bacterial communities by the scientific community and food industry. PMID:26704067

  9. Microbial community analysis of shallow subsurface samples with PCR-DGGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is part of the site investigations for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Olkiluoto bedrock. The purpose of the research was to study the suitability of PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) method for monitoring of hydrogeomicrobiology of Olkiluoto repository site. PCR-DGGE method has been applied for monitoring microbial processes in several applications. The benefit of the method is that microorganisms are not cultivated but the presence of microbial communities can be monitored by direct DNA extractions from the environmental samples. Partial 16SrDNA gene sequence is specifically amplified by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) which detect bacteria as a group. The gene sequences are separated in DGGE, and the nucleotide bands are then cut out, extracted, sequenced and identified by the genelibraries by e.g. Blast program. PCR-DGGE method can be used to detect microorganisms which are present abundantly in the microbial communities because small quantities of genes cannot be separated reliably. However, generally the microorganisms involved in several environmental processes are naturally enriched and present as major population. This makes it possible to utilize PCRDGGE as a monitoring method. In this study, we studied the structure of microbial communities in ten ground water samples originating from Olkiluoto. Two universal bacterial primer sets were compared which amplified two different regions of the 16SrDNA gene. The longer sequence amplified resulted in fewer bands in DGGE, in addition there were problems with purification of the sequences after DGGE. The shorter sequence gave more bands in DGGE and more clear results without any amplification problems. Comparison of the sequences from the gene-libraries resulted in the detection of the same species by both primer sets, in addition some different species were detected. Several species were anaerobic bacteria, such as acetogenic and sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) indicating low redox potential of the samples. In addition phylogenetic trees were constructed for the sequences identified with both long and short primer sets. Phylogenetic trees were in good agreement with each other and indicated similar communties with both methods. In addition we also evaluated the suitability of primers amplifying SRB from the water samples. However, even though the microbial community analysis with the 16SrDNA gene indicated that SRB were present in the microbial community their amplification with the primers used was not successful. (orig.)

  10. Microbial community analysis of shallow subsurface samples with PCR-DGGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itaevaara, M.; Suihko, M.-L.; Kapanen, A.; Piskonen, R.; Juvonen, R. [VTT Biotechnology, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-11-15

    This work is part of the site investigations for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Olkiluoto bedrock. The purpose of the research was to study the suitability of PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) method for monitoring of hydrogeomicrobiology of Olkiluoto repository site. PCR-DGGE method has been applied for monitoring microbial processes in several applications. The benefit of the method is that microorganisms are not cultivated but the presence of microbial communities can be monitored by direct DNA extractions from the environmental samples. Partial 16SrDNA gene sequence is specifically amplified by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) which detect bacteria as a group. The gene sequences are separated in DGGE, and the nucleotide bands are then cut out, extracted, sequenced and identified by the genelibraries by e.g. Blast program. PCR-DGGE method can be used to detect microorganisms which are present abundantly in the microbial communities because small quantities of genes cannot be separated reliably. However, generally the microorganisms involved in several environmental processes are naturally enriched and present as major population. This makes it possible to utilize PCRDGGE as a monitoring method. In this study, we studied the structure of microbial communities in ten ground water samples originating from Olkiluoto. Two universal bacterial primer sets were compared which amplified two different regions of the 16SrDNA gene. The longer sequence amplified resulted in fewer bands in DGGE, in addition there were problems with purification of the sequences after DGGE. The shorter sequence gave more bands in DGGE and more clear results without any amplification problems. Comparison of the sequences from the gene-libraries resulted in the detection of the same species by both primer sets, in addition some different species were detected. Several species were anaerobic bacteria, such as acetogenic and sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) indicating low redox potential of the samples. In addition phylogenetic trees were constructed for the sequences identified with both long and short primer sets. Phylogenetic trees were in good agreement with each other and indicated similar communties with both methods. In addition we also evaluated the suitability of primers amplifying SRB from the water samples. However, even though the microbial community analysis with the 16SrDNA gene indicated that SRB were present in the microbial community their amplification with the primers used was not successful. (orig.)

  11. Newcomer Integration in Online Knowledge Building Communities: Automated Dialogue Analysis in Integrative vs. Non-Integrative Blogger Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolae Nistor; Costin-Gabriel Chiru; Nicolas Bresser

    2014-01-01

    Online knowledge building communities (OKBC) reunite participants engaged in collaborative discourse. OKBCs can be made „smart“ by adding tools that predict how likely an OKBC is to integrate newcomers in existing dialogues and socio-cognitive structures. Starting from Bakhtin’s dialogical approach and polyphony theory, and building on the concept of inter- animation of voices, this study explores the relationship between newcomer integration and dialogue quality in OKBCs. The automated analy...

  12. An Analysis of the Collaborations between the California Workforce Investment Boards and the California Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver-Dockins, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Various types of partnerships exist between community colleges and community agencies, groups, and organizations (Cohen & Brawer, 2003). Community colleges partner with business and industry, non-profit organizations, governmental agencies and other educational institutions. One such partnership is between California community colleges and

  13. Functional community analysis of brain: a new approach for EEG-based investigation of the brain pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadlou, Mehran; Adeli, Hojjat

    2011-09-15

    Analysis of structure of the brain functional connectivity (SBFC) is a fundamental issue for understanding of the brain cognition as well as the pathology of brain disorders. Analysis of communities among sub-parts of a system is increasingly used for social, ecological, and other networks. This paper presents a new methodology for investigation of the SBFC and understanding of the brain based on graph theory and community pattern analysis of functional connectivity graph of the brain obtained from encephalograms (EEGs). The methodology consists of three main parts: fuzzy synchronization likelihood (FSL), community partitioning, and decisions based on partitions. As an example application, the methodology is applied to analysis of brain of patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and the problem of discrimination of ADHD EEGs from healthy (non-ADHD) EEGs. PMID:21586331

  14. Metagenome-scale analysis yields insights into the structure and function of microbial communities in a copper bioleaching heap

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xian; Niu, Jiaojiao; Liang, Yili; Liu, Xueduan; Yin, Huaqun

    2016-01-01

    Background Metagenomics allows us to acquire the potential resources from both cultivatable and uncultivable microorganisms in the environment. Here, shotgun metagenome sequencing was used to investigate microbial communities from the surface layer of low grade copper tailings that were industrially bioleached at the Dexing Copper Mine, China. A bioinformatics analysis was further performed to elucidate structural and functional properties of the microbial communities in a copper bioleaching ...

  15. Cambio: a file format translation and analysis application for the nuclear response emergency community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambio is an application intended to automatically read and display any spectrum file of any format in the world that the nuclear emergency response community might encounter. Cambio also provides an analysis capability suitable for HPGe spectra when detector response and scattering environment are not well known. Why is Cambio needed: (1) Cambio solves the following problem - With over 50 types of formats from instruments used in the field and new format variations appearing frequently, it is impractical for every responder to have current versions of the manufacturer's software from every instrument used in the field; (2) Cambio converts field spectra to any one of several common formats that are used for analysis, saving valuable time in an emergency situation; (3) Cambio provides basic tools for comparing spectra, calibrating spectra, and isotope identification with analysis suited especially for HPGe spectra; and (4) Cambio has a batch processing capability to automatically translate a large number of archival spectral files of any format to one of several common formats, such as the IAEA SPE or the DHS N42. Currently over 540 analysts and members of the nuclear emergency response community worldwide are on the distribution list for updates to Cambio. Cambio users come from all levels of government, university, and commercial partners around the world that support efforts to counter terrorist nuclear activities. Cambio is Unclassified Unlimited Release (UUR) and distributed by internet downloads with email notifications whenever a new build of Cambio provides for new formats, bug fixes, or new or improved capabilities. Cambio is also provided as a DLL to the Karlsruhe Institute for Transuranium Elements so that Cambio's automatic file-reading capability can be included at the Nucleonica web site.

  16. Comparative analysis of microbial community between different cathode systems of microbial fuel cells for denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Xu, Ming; Lu, Yi; Fang, Fang; Cao, Jiashun

    2016-03-01

    Two types of cathodic biofilm in microbial fuel cells (MFC) were established for comparison on their performance and microbial communities. Complete autotrophic simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) without organics addition was achieved in nitrifying-MFC (N-MFC) with a total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of 0.35 mg/(L·h), which was even higher than that in denitrifying-MFC (D-MFC) at same TN level. Integrated denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis based on both 16S rRNA and nirK genes showed that Alpha-, Gammaproteobacteria were the main denitrifier communities. Some potential autotrophic denitrifying bacteria which can use electrons and reducing power from cathodes, such as Shewanella oneidensis, Shewanella loihica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Starkeya novella and Rhodopseudomonas palustris were identified and selectively enriched on cathode biofilms. Further, relative abundance of denitrifying bacteria characterized by nirK/16S ratios was much higher in biofilm than suspended sludge according to real-time polymerase chain reaction. The highest enrichment efficiency for denitrifiers was obtained in N-MFC cathode biofilms, which confirmed autotrophic denitrifying bacteria enrichment is the key factor for a D-MFC system. PMID:26278100

  17. Evaluation of phytoplankton community composition in the eutrophic Masan Bay by HPLC pigment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Bae; Hong, Sokjin; Lee, Won-Chan; Lee, Yong-Woo; Kim, Hyung Chul; Cho, Yoonsik

    2015-03-01

    To assess the spatiotemporal changes in phytoplankton community composition in relation to the environment of Masan Bay, a semi-enclosed bay on the southern coast of Korea, photosynthetic pigments and environmental variables were analyzed in seawater, every month between March and November 2010. The level of dissolved inorganic nutrients was highest between July and September when the freshwater influx was at its peak, whereas chlorophyll a level was highest in April and August. Phosphate concentration was low in April (average: 0.22 +/- 0.17 microM), indicating the role of phosphate as a growth-limiting factor for phytoplankton. The results of pigment analysis indicate that dinoflagellate blooms occurred under favorable conditions, where competition with diatoms occurred. Fucoxanthin- and chlorophyll b-containing phytoplankton dominated the surface layer of Masan Bay from July to September. The composition of phytoplankton community in Masan Bay changed dramatically each month according to variations in the amount and composition of nutrients introduced through surface runoff. PMID:25895275

  18. Community analysis of plant biomass-degrading microorganisms from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D; Podar, Mircea; Mosher, Jennifer J; Palumbo, Anthony V; Phelps, Tommy J; Keller, Martin; Elkins, James G

    2015-02-01

    The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels can potentially be improved by employing robust microorganisms and enzymes that efficiently deconstruct plant polysaccharides at elevated temperatures. Many of the geothermal features of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are surrounded by vegetation providing a source of allochthonic material to support heterotrophic microbial communities adapted to utilize plant biomass as a primary carbon and energy source. In this study, a well-known hot spring environment, Obsidian Pool (OBP), was examined for potential biomass-active microorganisms using cultivation-independent and enrichment techniques. Analysis of 33,684 archaeal and 43,784 bacterial quality-filtered 16S rRNA gene pyrosequences revealed that archaeal diversity in the main pool was higher than bacterial; however, in the vegetated area, overall bacterial diversity was significantly higher. Of notable interest was a flooded depression adjacent to OBP supporting a stand of Juncus tweedyi, a heat-tolerant rush commonly found growing near geothermal features in YNP. The microbial community from heated sediments surrounding the plants was enriched in members of the Firmicutes including potentially (hemi)cellulolytic bacteria from the genera Clostridium, Anaerobacter, Caloramator, Caldicellulosiruptor, and Thermoanaerobacter. Enrichment cultures containing model and real biomass substrates were established at a wide range of temperatures (55-85 °C). Microbial activity was observed up to 80 °C on all substrates including Avicel, xylan, switchgrass, and Populus sp. Independent of substrate, Caloramator was enriched at lower (65 °C) temperatures. PMID:25319238

  19. DGGE and multivariate analysis of a yeast community in spontaneous cocoa fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, A C R; Marques, E L S; Dias, J C T; Rezende, R P

    2015-01-01

    Cocoa bean is the main raw material used in the production of chocolate. In southern Bahia, Brazil, cocoa farming and processing is an important economic activity. The fermentation of cocoa is the processing stage that yields important chocolate flavor precursors and complex microbial involvement is essential for this process. In this study, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoreses (DGGE) was used to investigate the diversity of yeasts present during the spontaneous fermentation of cocoa in southern Bahia. The DGGE analysis revealed a richness of 8 to 13 distinct bands of varied intensities among the samples; and samples taken at 24, 36, and 48 h into the fermentation process were found to group with 70% similarity and showed the greatest diversity of bands. Hierarchical clustering showed that all samples had common operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and the highest number of OTUs was found in the 48 h sample. Variations in pH and temperature observed within the fermenting mass over time possibly had direct effects on the composition of the existing microbial community. The findings reported here indicate that a heterogeneous yeast community is involved in the complex cocoa fermentation process, which is known to involve a succession of specialized microorganisms. PMID:26782494

  20. Aerobic remediation of petroleum sludge through soil supplementation: Microbial community analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Enhanced aerobic-degradation of PAHs was noticed with increasing soil concentration. ► Lower ring PAHs showed superior degradation over higher ring PAHs. ► Role of dehydrogenase activity, redox pattern and dissolved oxygen was investigated. ► Community analysis detected survival of efficient aromatic degrading microorganisms. - Abstract: The effect of soil concentration on the aerobic degradation of real-field petroleum sludge was studied in slurry phase reactor. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) showed effective removal but found to depend on the soil concentration. Aromatic fraction (48.12%) documented effective degradation compared to aliphatics (47.31%), NSO (28.69%) and asphaltenes (26.66%). PAHs profile showed efficient degradation of twelve individual aromatic compounds where lower ring compounds showed relatively higher degradation efficiency compared to the higher ring compounds. The redox behaviour and dehydrogenase activity showed a linear increment with the degradation pattern. Microbial community composition and changes during bioremediation were studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Among the 12 organisms identified, Proteobacteria was found to be dominant representing 50% of the total population (25% of γ-proteobacteria; 16.6% of β-proteobacteria; 8.3% of α-proteobacteria), while 33.3% were of uncultured bacteria and 16.6% were of firmicutes.

  1. Aerobic remediation of petroleum sludge through soil supplementation: Microbial community analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M. Venkateswar; Devi, M. Prathima; Chandrasekhar, K.; Goud, R. Kannaiah [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre (BEEC), Indian Institute of Chemical Technology CSIR-IICT, Hyderabad 500 607 (India); Mohan, S. Venkata, E-mail: vmohan_s@yahoo.com [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre (BEEC), Indian Institute of Chemical Technology CSIR-IICT, Hyderabad 500 607 (India)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced aerobic-degradation of PAHs was noticed with increasing soil concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lower ring PAHs showed superior degradation over higher ring PAHs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of dehydrogenase activity, redox pattern and dissolved oxygen was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Community analysis detected survival of efficient aromatic degrading microorganisms. - Abstract: The effect of soil concentration on the aerobic degradation of real-field petroleum sludge was studied in slurry phase reactor. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) showed effective removal but found to depend on the soil concentration. Aromatic fraction (48.12%) documented effective degradation compared to aliphatics (47.31%), NSO (28.69%) and asphaltenes (26.66%). PAHs profile showed efficient degradation of twelve individual aromatic compounds where lower ring compounds showed relatively higher degradation efficiency compared to the higher ring compounds. The redox behaviour and dehydrogenase activity showed a linear increment with the degradation pattern. Microbial community composition and changes during bioremediation were studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Among the 12 organisms identified, Proteobacteria was found to be dominant representing 50% of the total population (25% of {gamma}-proteobacteria; 16.6% of {beta}-proteobacteria; 8.3% of {alpha}-proteobacteria), while 33.3% were of uncultured bacteria and 16.6% were of firmicutes.

  2. Molecular analysis of the microbial community structures in water-flooding petroleum reservoirs with different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.-Y. Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of microbial communities from six water-flooding petroleum reservoirs at temperatures from 21 to 63 °C by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicates the presence of physiologically diverse and temperature-dependent microorganisms in these subterrestrial ecosystems. In samples originating from high-temperature petroleum reservoirs, most of the archaeal sequences belong to thermophiles affiliated with members of the genera Thermococcus, Methanothermobacter and the order Thermoplasmatales, whereas bacterial sequences predominantly belong to the phyla Firmicutes, Thermotogae and Thermodesulfobacteria. In contrast to high-temperature petroleum reservoirs, microorganisms belonging to the Proteobacteria, Methanobacteriales and Methanomicrobiales were the most encountered in samples collected from low-temperature petroleum reservoirs. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA revealed that temperature, mineralization, ionic type as well as volatile fatty acids showed correlation with the microbial community structures, in particular members of the Firmicutes and the genus Methanothermobacter showed positive correlation with temperature and the concentration of acetate. Overall, these data indicate the large occurrence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in petroleum reservoirs and imply that acetate metabolism via syntrophic oxidation may represent the main methanogenic pathway in high-temperature petroleum reservoirs.

  3. Molecular analysis of the microbial community structures in water-flooding petroleum reservoirs with different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.-Y.; Duan, R.-Y.; Liu, J.-F.; Yang, S.-Z.; Gu, J.-D.; Mu, B.-Z.

    2012-11-01

    Analyses of microbial communities from six water-flooding petroleum reservoirs at temperatures from 21 to 63 °C by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicates the presence of physiologically diverse and temperature-dependent microorganisms in these subterrestrial ecosystems. In samples originating from high-temperature petroleum reservoirs, most of the archaeal sequences belong to thermophiles affiliated with members of the genera Thermococcus, Methanothermobacter and the order Thermoplasmatales, whereas bacterial sequences predominantly belong to the phyla Firmicutes, Thermotogae and Thermodesulfobacteria. In contrast to high-temperature petroleum reservoirs, microorganisms belonging to the Proteobacteria, Methanobacteriales and Methanomicrobiales were the most encountered in samples collected from low-temperature petroleum reservoirs. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that temperature, mineralization, ionic type as well as volatile fatty acids showed correlation with the microbial community structures, in particular members of the Firmicutes and the genus Methanothermobacter showed positive correlation with temperature and the concentration of acetate. Overall, these data indicate the large occurrence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in petroleum reservoirs and imply that acetate metabolism via syntrophic oxidation may represent the main methanogenic pathway in high-temperature petroleum reservoirs.

  4. GeoChip-based analysis of the functional gene diversity and metabolic potential of soil microbial communities of mangroves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shijie; Li, Jiangwei; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Tian, Yun; Lin, Guanghui; Zhou, Jizhong; Zheng, Tianling

    2013-08-01

    Mangroves are unique and highly productive ecosystems and harbor very special microbial communities. Although the phylogenetic diversity of sediment microbial communities of mangrove habitats has been examined extensively, little is known regarding their functional gene diversity and metabolic potential. In this study, a high-throughput functional gene array (GeoChip 4.0) was used to analyze the functional diversity, composition, structure, and metabolic potential of microbial communities in mangrove habitats from mangrove national nature reserves in China. GeoChip data indicated that these microbial communities were functionally diverse as measured by the number of genes detected, unique genes, and various diversity indices. Almost all key functional gene categories targeted by GeoChip 4.0 were detected in the mangrove microbial communities, including carbon (C) fixation, C degradation, methane generation, nitrogen (N) fixation, nitrification, denitrification, ammonification, N reduction, sulfur (S) metabolism, metal resistance, antibiotic resistance, and organic contaminant degradation. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all detected genes showed that Spartina alterniflora (HH), an invasive species, did not harbor significantly different microbial communities from Aegiceras corniculatum (THY), a native species, but did differ from other species, Kenaelia candel (QQ), Aricennia marina (BGR), and mangrove-free mud flat (GT). Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) results indicated the microbial community structure was largely shaped by surrounding environmental variables, such as total nitrogen (TN), total carbon (TC), pH, C/N ratio, and especially salinity. This study presents a comprehensive survey of functional gene diversity of soil microbial communities from different mangrove habitats/species and provides new insights into our understanding of the functional potential of microbial communities in mangrove ecosystems. PMID:23135227

  5. Microchip-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism for on-site analysis of bacterial communities in freshwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Matsukawa, Syuhei; Shintome, Yoko; Ichijo, Tomoaki; Nasu, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Assessing microbiological quality assurance by monitoring bacteria in various sources of freshwater used for human consumption, recreation, and food preparation is important for a healthy life. Bacterial number and their community structure in freshwater should be determined as quickly as possible, and "real-time" and "on-site" microbiological methods are required. In this study, we examined the protocol for microchip-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, which uses microchip electrophoresis for rapid microbial community analysis. The availability of microchip-based T-RFLP was compared with conventional T-RFLP analysis, which uses a capillary electrophoresis system, with freshwater samples (spring water, river water, groundwater, and hydroponics solution). The detection limit of targeted bacteria by on-chip T-RFLP analysis was 1% (10(3) cells/mL). The fragment sizes determined by the two analysis methods were highly correlated (r(2)=0.98). On-chip T-RFLP analysis was completed within 15 min. T-RFLP profiles of nine hydroponics solution samples were analyzed by multidimensional scaling. Considerable changes and stability in bacterial community structure during hydroponic culture were detected by both analyses. These results show that on-chip T-RFLP analysis can monitor changes in bacterial community structure, as well as conventional T-RFLP analysis. The present results indicate that on-chip T-RFLP analysis is an effective tool for rapid and "on-site" bacterial community profiling in freshwater environments, as well as freshwater used for medical and industrial purposes. PMID:23902975

  6. An analysis of a low-energy, low-water use community in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez Alcocer, Jose Luis

    This study investigated how to determine a potential scenario to reduce energy, water and transportation use in Mexico City by implementing low-energy, low-water use communities. The proposed mixed-use community has multi-family apartments and a small grocery store. The research included the analysis of: case studies, energy simulation, and hand calculations for water, transportation and cost analysis. The previous case studies reviewed include: communities in Mexico City, Mexico, Austin, Texas, Phoenix, Arizona, New York City, New York and San Diego, California in terms of successful low-energy, low-water use projects. The analysis and comparison of these centers showed that the Multifamiliar Miguel Aleman is an excellent candidate to be examined for Mexico City. This technical potential study evaluated energy conserving measures such as low-energy appliances and efficient lighting that could be applied to the apartments in Mexico City to reduce energy-use. The use of the simulations and manual calculations showed that the application of the mixed-use concept was successful in reducing the energy and water use and the corresponding carbon footprint. Finally, this technical potential study showed taking people out of their cars as a result of the presence of the on-site grocery store, small recreation center and park on the ground floor also reduced their overall transportation energy-use. The improvement of the whole community (i.e., apartments plus grocery store) using energy-efficient measures provided a reduction of 70 percent of energy from the base-case. In addition a 69 percent reduction in water-use was achieved by using water-saving fixtures and greywater reuse technologies for the complex. The combination of high-efficiency automobiles and the presence of the on-site grocery store, small recreation center and park potentially reduced the transportation energy-use by 65 percent. The analysis showed an energy cost reduction of 82 percent reduction for apartments and a 22 percent reduction for the store. In addition, for water cost there was a 70 percent reduction for apartments and a 16 percent reduction for the store. Overall, a 64 total percent reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2) was accomplished by saving energy-use in the apartments, the grocery store and transportation. Finally, a guide has been created for Mexico City to establish strategies and actions based on the results of this work in order to reduce overall energy and water-use in Mexico City. The guide is expected to be useful in the short term in Mexico City, and could be potentially adopted in the long term in other countries in the same manner as which Brazil and Colombia adopted the Mexican CONAVI's 2010 Housing Building Code.

  7. A study of microbial communities in selected samples using phospholipid fatty acids analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatty acid patterns of phospholipids were determined in different environmental samples using phospholipid fatty acids analysis (PLFA) in order to characterise microbial community structures. Hyporheic gravel-sand sediment samples were collected from Sitka Stream, muddy sediment samples from several weirs on Morava River, activated and digested sludge from Olomouc water purification plant and sand samples from filters in Olomouc-Cernovir water treatment plant. Profiles of PLFA indicate a clear difference between these types of samples. The muddy sediments showed high percentages of ester-linked polyunsaturated fatty acids contributed by river phytoplankton. The longer chain fatty acids (26 - 30 grad C), indicators for organic matter of allochthonous origin, increased in the hyporheic sediments. Activated and digested sludge contain much poorer profiles than other samples, probably because of the lower occurrence of bacteria. (authors)

  8. Social acceptance of wind energy development and planning in rural communities of Australia: A consumer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Social acceptance is necessary for widespread adoption of new renewable energy technologies. A lack of social acceptance by local community residents is a barrier to increasing the renewable energy mix and targets in Australia. This study empirically evaluated predictor importance of key constructs of social acceptance, using responses from a sample of 226 survey respondents in Australia. Regression analysis suggest that ‘Concerns with wind turbines’ was the predictor most strongly correlated with Social Acceptance, followed by ‘Annoyance with wind turbines’, and then ‘Consultation with stakeholders’. Implications of the study and recommendations for consideration by various interest groups (such as policy makers, and potential entrepreneurs) are discussed. This research contributes to theory building rather than theory testing of social acceptance of wind energy development

  9. Household waste compositional analysis variation from insular communities in the framework of waste prevention strategy plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorpas, Antonis A; Lasaridi, Katia; Voukkali, Irene; Loizia, Pantelitsa; Chroni, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Waste management planning requires reliable data regarding waste generation, affecting factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. In order to decrease the environmental impacts of waste management the choice of prevention plan as well as the treatment method must be based on the features of the waste that are produced in a specific area. Factors such as culture, economic development, climate, and energy sources have an impact on waste composition; composition influences the need of collecting waste more or less frequently of waste collection and disposition. The research question was to discover the main barriers concerning the compositional analysis in Insular Communities under warm climate conditions and the findings from this study enabled the main contents of a waste management plan to be established. These included advice to residents on waste minimisation, liaison with stakeholders and the expansion of kerbside recycling schemes. PMID:25690412

  10. Place-classification analysis of community vulnerability to near-field tsunami threats in the U.S. Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, N. J.; Spielman, S.

    2012-12-01

    Near-field tsunami hazards are credible threats to many coastal communities throughout the world. Along the U.S. Pacific Northwest coast, low-lying areas could be inundated by a series of catastrophic tsunamis that begin to arrive in a matter of minutes following a major Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) earthquake. Previous research has documented the residents, employees, tourists at public venues, customers at local businesses, and vulnerable populations at dependent-care facilities that are in CSZ-related tsunami-prone areas of northern California, Oregon, and the open-ocean coast of Washington. Community inventories of demographic attributes and other characteristics of the at-risk population have helped emergency managers to develop preparedness and outreach efforts. Although useful for distinct risk-reduction issues, these data can be difficult to fully appreciate holistically given the large number of community attributes. This presentation summarizes analytical efforts to classify communities with similar characteristics of community exposure to tsunami hazards. This work builds on past State-focused inventories of community exposure to CSZ-related tsunami hazards in northern California, Oregon, and Washington. Attributes used in the classification, or cluster analysis, fall into several categories, including demography of residents, spatial extent of the developed footprint based on mid-resolution land cover data, distribution of the local workforce, and the number and type of public venues, dependent-care facilities, and community-support businesses. As we were unsure of the number of different types of communities, we used an unsupervised-model-based clustering algorithm and a v-fold, cross-validation procedure (v=50) to identify the appropriate number of community types. Ultimately we selected class solutions that provided the appropriate balance between parsimony and model fit. The goal of the exposure classification is to provide emergency managers with a general sense of the types of communities in tsunami hazard zones based on similar exposure characteristics instead of only providing an exhaustive list of attributes for individual communities. This community-exposure classification scheme can be then used to target and prioritize risk-reduction efforts that address common issues across multiple communities, instead of community-specific efforts. Examples include risk-reduction efforts that focus on similar demographic attributes of the at-risk population or on the type of service populations that dominate tsunami-prone areas. The presentation will include a discussion of the utility of proposed place classifications to support regional preparedness and outreach efforts.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Prokaryotic Communities Associated with Organic and Conventional Farming Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershina, Elizaveta; Valkonen, Jari; Kurki, Pivi; Ivanova, Ekaterina; Chirak, Evgeny; Korvigo, Ilia; Provorov, Nykolay; Andronov, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important challenges in agriculture is to determine the effectiveness and environmental impact of certain farming practices. The aim of present study was to determine and compare the taxonomic composition of the microbiomes established in soil following long-term exposure (14 years) to a conventional and organic farming systems (CFS and OFS accordingly). Soil from unclared forest next to the fields was used as a control. The analysis was based on RT-PCR and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes of bacteria and archaea. The number of bacteria was significantly lower in CFS than in OFS and woodland. The highest amount of archaea was detected in woodland, whereas the amounts in CFS and OFS were lower and similar. The most common phyla in the soil microbial communities analyzed were Proteobacteria (57.9%), Acidobacteria (16.1%), Actinobacteria (7.9%), Verrucomicrobia (2.0%), Bacteroidetes (2.7%) and Firmicutes (4.8%). Woodland soil differed from croplands in the taxonomic composition of microbial phyla. Croplands were enriched with Proteobacteria (mainly the genus Pseudomonas), while Acidobacteria were detected almost exclusively in woodland soil. The most pronounced differences between the CFS and OFS microbiomes were found within the genus Pseudomonas, which significantly (pRhizobium (mainly Rhizobium leguminosarum) and Clostridium. Thus, the fields under OFS and CFS did not differ greatly for the composition of the microbiome. These results, which were also confirmed by cluster analysis, indicated that microbial communities in the field soil do not necessarily differ largely between conventional and organic farming systems. PMID:26684619

  12. Bovine Genome Database: supporting community annotation and analysis of the Bos taurus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Childs Kevin L

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A goal of the Bovine Genome Database (BGD; http://BovineGenome.org has been to support the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium (BGSAC in the annotation and analysis of the bovine genome. We were faced with several challenges, including the need to maintain consistent quality despite diversity in annotation expertise in the research community, the need to maintain consistent data formats, and the need to minimize the potential duplication of annotation effort. With new sequencing technologies allowing many more eukaryotic genomes to be sequenced, the demand for collaborative annotation is likely to increase. Here we present our approach, challenges and solutions facilitating a large distributed annotation project. Results and Discussion BGD has provided annotation tools that supported 147 members of the BGSAC in contributing 3,871 gene models over a fifteen-week period, and these annotations have been integrated into the bovine Official Gene Set. Our approach has been to provide an annotation system, which includes a BLAST site, multiple genome browsers, an annotation portal, and the Apollo Annotation Editor configured to connect directly to our Chado database. In addition to implementing and integrating components of the annotation system, we have performed computational analyses to create gene evidence tracks and a consensus gene set, which can be viewed on individual gene pages at BGD. Conclusions We have provided annotation tools that alleviate challenges associated with distributed annotation. Our system provides a consistent set of data to all annotators and eliminates the need for annotators to format data. Involving the bovine research community in genome annotation has allowed us to leverage expertise in various areas of bovine biology to provide biological insight into the genome sequence.

  13. Metagenomic Analysis of the Indian Ocean Picocyanobacterial Community: Structure, Potential Function and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Beatriz; Nylander, Johan A A; Ininbergs, Karolina; Dupont, Christopher L; Allen, Andrew E; Yooseph, Shibu; Rusch, Douglas B; Bergman, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Unicellular cyanobacteria are ubiquitous photoautotrophic microbes that contribute substantially to global primary production. Picocyanobacteria such as Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus depend on chlorophyll a-binding protein complexes to capture light energy. In addition, Synechococcus has accessory pigments organized into phycobilisomes, and Prochlorococcus contains chlorophyll b. Across a surface water transect spanning the sparsely studied tropical Indian Ocean, we examined Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus occurrence, taxonomy and habitat preference in an evolutionary context. Shotgun sequencing of size fractionated microbial communities from 0.1 μm to 20 μm and subsequent phylogenetic analysis indicated that cyanobacteria account for up to 15% of annotated reads, with the genera Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus comprising 90% of the cyanobacterial reads, even in the largest size fraction (3.0-20 mm). Phylogenetic analyses of cyanobacterial light-harvesting genes (chl-binding pcb/isiA, allophycocyanin (apcAB), phycocyanin (cpcAB) and phycoerythin (cpeAB)) mostly identified picocyanobacteria clades comprised of overlapping sequences obtained from Indian Ocean, Atlantic and/or Pacific Oceans samples. Habitat reconstructions coupled with phylogenetic analysis of the Indian Ocean samples suggested that large Synechococcus-like ancestors in coastal waters expanded their ecological niche towards open oligotrophic waters in the Indian Ocean through lineage diversification and associated streamlining of genomes (e.g. loss of phycobilisomes and acquisition of Chl b); resulting in contemporary small celled Prochlorococcus. Comparative metagenomic analysis with picocyanobacteria populations in other oceans suggests that this evolutionary scenario may be globally important. PMID:27196065

  14. Microbial community analysis of perchlorate-reducing cultures growing on zero-valent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic microbial mixed cultures demonstrated its ability to completely remove perchlorate in the presence of zero-valent iron. In order to understand the major microbial reaction in the iron-supported culture, community analysis comprising of microbial fatty acids and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) techniques was performed for perchlorate reducing cultures. Analysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and subsequent principal component analysis (PCA) showed clear distinctions not only between iron-supported perchlorate reducing culture and seed bacteria, but also among perchlorate-reducing cultures receiving different electron donors. The DGGE pattern targeting the chlorite dismutase (cld) gene showed that iron-supported perchlorate reducing culture is similar to hydrogen-fed cultures as compared to acetate-fed culture. The phylogenetic tree suggested that the dominant microbial reaction may be a combination of the autotrophic and heterotrophic reduction of perchlorate. Both molecular and chemotaxonomic experimental results support further understanding in the function of zero-valent iron as an adequate electron source for enhancing the microbial perchlorate reduction in natural and engineered systems.

  15. Energy Strategies towards Sustainability : a comparative analysis of community energy plans from Sweden and Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Acosta, Kerly; Sangari, Arash; Webster, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    This thesis examines community energy planning in Sweden and Canada with the aim of revealing strategies that move communities towards energy sustainability. Unsustainable energy activities are identified as major threats on both local and global levels. The challenges for energy systems are discussed and a possible scenario of a future community with sustainable energy production and consumption is presented. The literature review examines community energy planning guidebooks and key theoret...

  16. Numeric Input Relations for Relational Learning with Applications to Community Structure Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jiuchuan; Jaeger, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    model parameters and latent feature values for a variety of models that can be expressed in the high-level RBN representation. Specifically, we propose a model that allows us to interpret learned latent feature values as community centrality degrees by which we can identify nodes that are central for...... one community, that are hubs between communities, or that are isolated nodes. In a multi-relational setting, the model also provides a characterization of how different relations are associated with each community....

  17. Communities and beyond: mesoscopic analysis of a large social network with complementary methods

    OpenAIRE

    Tibely, Gergely; Kovanen, Lauri; Karsai, Marton; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertesz, Janos; Saramaki, Jari

    2010-01-01

    Community detection methods have so far been tested mostly on small empirical networks and on synthetic benchmarks. Much less is known about their performance on large real-world networks, which nonetheless are a significant target for application. We analyze the performance of three state-of-the-art community detection methods by using them to identify communities in a large social network constructed from mobile phone call records. We find that all methods detect communities that are meanin...

  18. Creating community action plans for obesity prevention using the ANGELO (Analysis Grid for Elements Linked to Obesity) Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmons, A; Mavoa, H M; Bell, A C; de Courten, Maximilian; Schaaf, D; Schultz, J; Swinburn, B A

    2009-01-01

    Community-based interventions are an important component of obesity prevention efforts. The literature provides little guidance on priority-setting for obesity prevention in communities, especially for socially and culturally diverse populations. This paper reports on the process of developing...... prioritized, community-participatory action plans for obesity prevention projects in children and adolescents using the ANGELO (Analysis Grid for Elements Linked to Obesity) Framework. We combined stakeholder engagement processes, the ANGELO Framework (scans for environmental barriers, targeted behaviours...... communities; however, several unique sociocultural elements emerged in some cultural groups which informed their action plans. Youth were actively engaged in adolescent projects, allowing their needs to be incorporated into the action plans initiating the process of ownership. A common structure for the...

  19. Back to Basics – The Influence of DNA Extraction and Primer Choice on Phylogenetic Analysis of Activated Sludge Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Karst, Søren Michael; Ziegler, Anja Sloth; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-01-01

    DNA extraction and primer choice have a large effect on the observed community structure in allmicrobial amplicon sequencing analyses. Although the biases are well known, no com- prehensive analysis has been conducted in activated sludge communities. In this study we systematically explored the...... impact of a number of parameters on the observed microbial community: bead beating intensity, primer choice, extracellular DNA removal, and various PCR settings. In total, 176 samples were subjected to 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, and selected samples were investigated throughmetagenomics and...... metatranscriptomics. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization was used as a DNA extraction-independent method for qualitative comparison. In general, an effect on the observed community was found on all parameters tested, although bead beating and primer choice had the largest effect. The effect of bead...

  20. Back to basics – the influence of DNA extraction and primer choice on phylogenetic analysis in activated sludge communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Karst, Søren Michael; Ziegler, Anja Sloth; Nielsen, Kåre Lehmann; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    DNA extraction and primer choice have a large effect on the observed community structure in all phylogenetic analyses. Although the biases are well known, no comprehensive analysis have been conducted in activated sludge communities. In this study we investigated the effect of bead beating...... intensity and primer choice on the observed community using 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (qFISH) was used as a DNA extraction independent method to evaluate the results. The bead beating intensity correlated with cell-wall strength and showed that the...... manufacture recommended settings were insufficient to retrieve a large part of the community. In addition, the in silico “best” primer set was found to greatly underestimate a number of important phyla when compared to qFISH results. The findings underline the need for sample specific and DNA extraction...

  1. Public and Tribal Community College Institutional Review Boards: A National Descriptive Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocean, Mia; Hirschi, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    It is currently unknown how many Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) exist at community colleges. This study investigates the percentage of public and Tribal community colleges that have active IRBs. It also examines the potential relationships between states that allow community colleges to confer baccalaureate degrees, or that have articulation…

  2. Timecourse analysis of photosynthetic microbial communities that degrade cellulose and fix nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, A.; van der Heyde, R.; Sheets, M.; Zhang, L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, X.; Slikas, B.; Amaral-Zettler, L. A.; Huang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Cellulose is an abundant polymer derived from plant matter and it is also a nitrogen poor resource. Nutrient cycling is carried out by microbial communities in nature, and bacteria that degrade cellulose must be able to obtain a source of fixed nitrogen for growth. We used light wavelength selection to enrich for a series of anoxygenic photosynthetic microbial communities from marine and freshwater environments that degrade cellulose and fix nitrogen. This research examines how the communities carry out these processes. We compare community composition and metabolite production measured using high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography over time of growth of the communities. A freshwater community grown at 590nm showed the highest metabolic rates. Acetate and propionate reached maximum concentration at around day 4 and hydrogen concentrations peaked at 5uM on day 6 at stationary phase. There was no methane production by this culture suggesting methanogens were not present or inactive. In contrast, methanogenesis was very active in another freshwater community grown at 760/940nm. This culture showed acetate and propionate accumulation and hydrogen gas concentrations that decreased over time as well suggesting that hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was occurring. A similar trend was observed in a marine community grown at 470nm. This work can enable determination of factors important for efficient community nutrient cycling and understanding of community dynamics. Future work will be done to determine the roles of the individual species of bacteria within the communities and to investigate the potential of these communities in biofuel production.

  3. An Analysis of Gender and Major Differences upon Undergraduate Student Attitudes about Community Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P. K.; Shukla, Monica P.

    2014-01-01

    Community Service Learning (CSL) believes that university and colleges should incorporate community based service projects into courses. There are faculty and administrator supporters who argue for such proposals to require community service learning components into classes, but there are also faculty and administrator critics of such proposals.…

  4. Beyond Streptococcus mutans: dental caries onset linked to multiple species by 16S rRNA community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Erin L; Beall, Clifford J; Kutsch, Stacey R; Firestone, Noah D; Leys, Eugene J; Griffen, Ann L

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries in very young children may be severe, result in serious infection, and require general anesthesia for treatment. Dental caries results from a shift within the biofilm community specific to the tooth surface, and acidogenic species are responsible for caries. Streptococcus mutans, the most common acid producer in caries, is not always present and occurs as part of a complex microbial community. Understanding the degree to which multiple acidogenic species provide functional redundancy and resilience to caries-associated communities will be important for developing biologic interventions. In addition, microbial community interactions in health and caries pathogenesis are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate bacterial community profiles associated with the onset of caries in the primary dentition. In a combination cross-sectional and longitudinal design, bacterial community profiles at progressive stages of caries and over time were examined and compared to those of health. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used for bacterial community analysis. Streptococcus mutans was the dominant species in many, but not all, subjects with caries. Elevated levels of S. salivarius, S. sobrinus, and S. parasanguinis were also associated with caries, especially in subjects with no or low levels of S. mutans, suggesting these species are alternative pathogens, and that multiple species may need to be targeted for interventions. Veillonella, which metabolizes lactate, was associated with caries and was highly correlated with total acid producing species. Among children without previous history of caries, Veillonella, but not S. mutans or other acid-producing species, predicted future caries. Bacterial community diversity was reduced in caries as compared to health, as many species appeared to occur at lower levels or be lost as caries advanced, including the Streptococcus mitis group, Neisseria, and Streptococcus sanguinis. This may have implications for bacterial community resilience and the restoration of oral health. PMID:23091642

  5. Community Influences on Married Women's Safer Sex Negotiation Attitudes in Bangladesh: A Multilevel Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesmin, Syeda S; Cready, Cynthia M

    2016-02-01

    The influence of disadvantaged or deprived community on individuals' health risk-behaviors is increasingly being documented in a growing body of literature. However, little is known about the effects of community characteristics on women's sexual attitudes and behaviors. To examine community effects on married women's safer sex negotiation attitudes, we analyzed cross-sectional data from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys on a sample of 15,134 married women in 600 communities. We estimated two multilevel logistic regression models. Model 1, which included only individual-level variables, showed that women's autonomy/empowerment, age, and HIV knowledge had significant associations with their safer sex negotiation attitudes. We did not find any socioeconomic status gradient in safer sex negotiation attitudes at the individual level. Adding community-level variables in Model 2 significantly improved the fit of the model. Strikingly, we found that higher community-level poverty was associated with greater positive safer sex negotiation attitudes. Prevailing gender norms and overall women's empowerment in the community also had significant effects. While research on community influences calls for focusing on disadvantaged communities, our research highlights the importance of not underestimating the challenges that married women in economically privileged communities may face in negotiating safer sex. To have sufficient and equitable impact on married women's sexual and reproductive health, sexual and reproductive health promotion policies and programs need to be directed to women in wealthier communities as well. PMID:26162431

  6. Voluntary Participation in Community Economic Development in Canada: An Empirical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Lamb

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is an empirical analysis of an individual's decision to participate in community economic development (CED initiatives in Canada. The objective of the analysis is to better understand how individuals make decisions to volunteer time toward CED initiatives and to determine whether the determinants of participation in CED are unique when compared to those of participation in volunteer activities in general. The dataset employed is Statistics Canada's 2004 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (CSGVP. To date, there has been no prior econometric analysis of the decision to participate in community economic development initiatives in Canada. Results suggest a role for both public policymakers and practitioners in influencing participation in CED. / Cet article constitue une analyse empirique du processus de prise de décision chez les individus en ce qui a trait à la participation aux initiatives canadiennes de développement économique communautaire (DÉC. Le but de l'analyse est de mieux comprendre la façon dont les individus prennent la décision de consacrer du temps au bénévolat dans les initiatives de DÉC. Elle sert aussi à trancher la question de savoir si les facteurs de participation aux initiatives de développement économique communautaire sont uniques ou communs à la participation à des activités bénévoles en général. Les données employées dans le cadre de cette analyse sont puisées de l'Enquête canadienne sur le don, le bénévolat et la participation effectuée par Statistique Canada en 2004. À ce jour, aucune analyse économétrique n'a été menée sur la décision de participer aux initiatives canadiennes de DÉC. Les résultats suggèrent que les responsables de l'élaboration des politiques ainsi que les praticiens influencent tous deux la participation aux initiatives de DÉC.

  7. Household waste compositional analysis variation from insular communities in the framework of waste prevention strategy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Waste framework directive has set clear waste prevention procedures. • Household Compositional analysis. • Waste management plans. • Zero waste approach. • Waste generation. - Abstract: Waste management planning requires reliable data regarding waste generation, affecting factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. In order to decrease the environmental impacts of waste management the choice of prevention plan as well as the treatment method must be based on the features of the waste that are produced in a specific area. Factors such as culture, economic development, climate, and energy sources have an impact on waste composition; composition influences the need of collecting waste more or less frequently of waste collection and disposition. The research question was to discover the main barriers concerning the compositional analysis in Insular Communities under warm climate conditions and the findings from this study enabled the main contents of a waste management plan to be established. These included advice to residents on waste minimisation, liaison with stakeholders and the expansion of kerbside recycling schemes

  8. Bacterial community analysis of cypermethrin enrichment cultures and bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Shamsa; Sultan, Sikander; Kertesz, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Cypermethrin is widely used for insect control; however, its toxicity toward aquatic life requires its complete removal from contaminated areas where the natural degradation ability of microbes can be utilized. Agricultural soil with extensive history of CM application was used to prepare enrichment cultures using cypermethrin as sole carbon source for isolation of cypermethrin degrading bacteria and bacterial community analysis using PCR-DGGE of 16 S rRNA gene. DGGE analysis revealed that dominant members of CM enrichment culture were associated with α-proteobacteria followed by γ-proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. Three potential CM-degrading isolates identified as Ochrobactrum anthropi JCm1, Bacillus megaterium JCm2, and Rhodococcus sp. JCm5 degraded 86-100% of CM (100 mg L(-1) ) within 10 days. These isolates were also able to degrade other pyrethroids, carbofuran, and cypermethrin degradation products. Enzyme activity assays revealed that enzymes involved in CM-degradation were inducible and showed activity when strains were grown on cypermethrin. Degradation kinetics of cypermethrin (200 mg kg(-1)) in soils inoculated with isolates JCm1, JCm2, and JCm5 suggested time-dependent disappearance of cypermethrin with rate constants of 0.0516, 0.0425, and 0.0807 d(-1), respectively, following first order rate kinetics. The isolated bacterial strains were among dominant genera selected under CM enriched conditions and represent valuable candidates for in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils and waters. PMID:25656248

  9. Social Development Needs Analysis as a tool for SIA to guide corporate-community investment: Applications in the minerals industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mining companies are faced with growing societal demands that a sufficient portion of the benefits from mining should flow to local communities to ensure they are adequately compensated for the negative social impacts they experience. This paper considers how a more equitable benefit distribution system can be achieved through voluntary initiatives, recognising companies as potential agents for social development through the provision of improved services and infrastructure, capacity-building, employment and local economic development initiatives. Social Development Needs Analysis is introduced as an enhancement to participatory Social Impact Assessment methods to give practical guidance to site managers in evaluating community investment alternatives. Social Development Needs Analysis aims to identify the priority social issues that need to be addressed in order for a company to contribute to a net positive impact in the community while building assets for the business

  10. Analysis of the distal gut bacterial community by 454-pyrosequencing in captive giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZahal, Ousama; Valdes, Eduardo V; McBride, Brian W

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the structure of the fecal bacterial community of five giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) at Disney's Animal Kingdom, FL. Fecal genomic DNA was extracted and variable regions 1-3 of the 16S rRNA gene was PCR-amplified and then sequenced. The MOTHUR software-program was used for sequence processing, diversity analysis, and classification. A total of 181,689 non-chimeric bacterial sequences were obtained, and average number of sequences per sample was 36,338 -± 8,818. Sequences were assigned to 8,284 operational taxonomic units (OTU) with 95% of genetic similarity, which included 2,942 singletons (36%). Number of OTUs per sample was 2,554 ± 264. Samples were normalized and alpha (intra-sample) diversity indices; Chao1, Inverse Simpson, Shannon, and coverage were estimated as 3,712 ± 430, 116 -± 70, 6.1 ± 0.4, and 96 ± 1%, respectively. Thirteen phyla were detected and Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Spirochaetes were the most dominant phyla (more than 2% of total sequences), and constituted 92% of the classified sequences, 66% of total sequences, and 43% of total OTUs. Our computation predicted that three OTUs were likely to be present in at least three of the five samples at greater than 1% dominance rate. These OTUs were Treponema, an unidentified OTU belonging to the order Bacteroidales, and Ruminococcus. This report was the first to characterize the bacterial community of the distal gut in giraffes utilizing fecal samples, and it demonstrated that the distal gut of giraffes is likely a potential reservoir for a number of undocumented species of bacteria. Zoo Biol. 35:42-50, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26584008

  11. Pyrosequencing analysis of the protist communities in a High Arctic meromictic lake: DNA preservation and change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ConnieLovejoy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available High Arctic meromictic lakes are extreme environments characterized by cold temperatures, low nutrient inputs from their polar desert catchments and prolonged periods of low irradiance and darkness. These lakes are permanently stratified with an oxygenated freshwater layer (mixolimnion overlying a saline, anoxic water column (monimolimnion. The physical and chemical properties of the deepest known lake of this type in the circumpolar Arctic, Lake A, on the far northern coast of Ellesmere Island, Canada, have been studied over the last 15 years, but little is known about the lakes biological communities. We applied high-throughput sequencing of the V4 region of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene to investigate the protist communities down the water column at three sampling times: under the ice at the end of winter in 2008, during an unusual period of warming and ice-out the same year, and again under the ice in mid-summer 2009. Sequences of many protist taxa occurred throughout the water column at all sampling times, including in the deep anoxic layer where growth is highly unlikely. Furthermore, there were sequences for taxonomic groups including diatoms and marine taxa, which have never been observed in Lake A by microscopic analysis. However the sequences of other taxa such as ciliates, chrysophytes, Cercozoa and Telonema varied with depth, between years and during the transition to ice-free conditions. These results imply that there are seasonally active taxa in the surface waters of the lake that are sensitive to depth and change with time. DNA from these taxa is superimposed upon background DNA from multiple internal and external sources that is preserved in the deep, cold, largely anoxic water column.

  12. The Prevalence of Thyroid Nodules and an Analysis of Related Lifestyle Factors in Beijing Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hua; Tian, Yongfeng; Yan, Wenhua; Kong, Yue; Wang, Haibin; Wang, Anping; Dou, Jingtao; Liang, Ping; Mu, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid nodules (TNs) have annual increasing trends worldwide, and large-scale investigations on the prevalence of TNs in Beijing communities have not been conducted since the introduction of salt iodization in 1995. We performed a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of TNs, their epidemiological characteristics, and their correlation with lifestyle factors. A total of 6324 permanent residents aged 18 years or older (mean age, 52.15 ± 11.58 years) from seven representative communities in Beijing were included in the analyses. Once informed consent was obtained, the subjects were asked to complete questionnaires, a physical examination, and thyroid ultrasound. A total of 3100 cases had TNs. The overall prevalence rate was 49.0%, and the age-standardized prevalence was 40.1%, which increased significantly as age increased (p alcohol consumption and TNs, and there were no significant differences in the prevalence among different groups of taste preference. The prevalence decreased with an increased frequency of seafood intake (p = 0.015) and with higher literacy levels (p exercise intensity (p < 0.001, p = 0.009). Logistic regression analysis showed that age (Odds ratio (OR) = 1.039 (1.034-1.044), p < 0.001), the female sex (OR = 1.789 (1.527-2.097)), Body mass index (BMI) (OR = 1.019 (1.005-1.034)), and current smoking habits (OR = 1.246 (1.046-1.483)) were independent risk factors for TNs. Our findings indicate that there is a high prevalence of TNs in Beijing, with a higher prevalence in females than in males. Moreover, the prevalence increases as age increases. Smoking and BMI are independent risk factors for TNs. Therefore, intervention against smoking and weight loss might help reduce the risk of TN occurrence. PMID:27110805

  13. Professional Learning Communities and Teacher Well-Being? A Comparative Analysis of Primary Schools in England and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Rosemary; Vulliamy, Graham; Sarja, Anneli; Hamalainen, Seppo; Poikonen, Pirjo-Liisa

    2009-01-01

    The article is a comparative analysis of the policy and practice of professional learning communities (PLCs) in primary schools in England and Finland. The concept of PLC has become a globally fashionable one and has been explicitly advocated in policy documents in both countries. Drawing from a database of qualitative semi-structured interviews

  14. Community perspectives on public health biobanking: an analysis of community meetings on the Michigan BioTrust for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Daniel B; Platt, Tevah; Platt, Jodyn; King, Susan B; Kardia, Sharon L R

    2014-04-01

    Biobanks raise challenges for developing ethically sound and practicable consent policies. Biobanks comprised of dried bloodspots (DBS) left over from newborn screening, maintained for long-term storage, and potential secondary research applications are no exception. Michigan has been a leader in transforming its DBS collection, marketing its biobank of de-identified samples for health research use. The Michigan BioTrust for Health includes approximately 4 million unconsented retrospective samples collected as early as 1984 and prospective samples added since the fall of 2010 with blanket parental consent. We engaged Michigan citizens to ascertain public attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs about the BioTrust and informed consent. A convenience sampling of 393 participants from communities around the state of Michigan (oversampling for minority populations) participated in meetings addressing newborn screening, the BioTrust and informed consent, yielding quantitative and qualitative survey and discussion data. Participants affirmed the principle of voluntary informed participation in research and advocated for greater public awareness of the existence of the BioTrust. Most expressed support for the use of DBS for research and a desire for greater involvement in granting permission for research use. Opinions varied as to which specific research uses were acceptable. Participants indicated a desire for greater engagement, public awareness, and more active decision making on the part of biobank participants and parents. Diversity of opinion over which research areas were deemed acceptable problematizes the blanket consent model that currently applies to the BioTrust's prospective DBS collection and that could become the new norm for research using de-identified data under proposed changes to the Common Rule. PMID:23893769

  15. Comparative study of three analysis methods (TTGE, flow cytometry and HPLC) for xenobiotic impact assessment on phytoplankton communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowski-Haberkorn, Sabine; Quiniou, Louis; Beker, Beatriz; Haberkorn, Hansy; Marie, Dominique; de la Broise, Denis

    2009-04-01

    The impacts of the fungicide Opus (epoxiconazole) on marine phytoplankton communities were assessed in a 12-day field experiment using in situ microcosms maintained underwater at 6 m depth. Three community analysis methods were compared for their sensitivity threshold in fungicide impact detection. When phytoplankton communities were exposed to 1 microg l(-1) of epoxiconazole, no effects could be demonstrated using TTGE (Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis), flow cytometry or HPLC. When exposed to 10 microg l(-1), TTGE fingerprints from PCR amplified 18S rDNA of communities exhibited significant differences compared with controls (ANOSIM, P = 0.028). Neither flow cytometry counts, nor HPLC pigment profiles allowed to show significant differences in microcosms exposed to 10 microg l(-1) of epoxiconazole. When exposed to 100 microg l(-1), all three methods allowed to detect significant differences in treated microcosms, as compared to controls. The TTGE analysis appears in this study as the most sensitive method for fungicide impact assessment on eukaryote microbial communities. PMID:19096934

  16. Environmental innovation and employment dynamics in different technology fields : an analysis based on the German community innovation survey 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Horbach, Jens; Rennings, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The employment effects of environmental technologies are in the focus of politicians but there are only few studies analyzing these effects for different environmental innovation fields. We use the 2009 wave of the German part of the Community Innovation Panel (CIS) allowing for such an analysis at the firm level. The main focus of the paper lies on the analysis of the adaptation behavior of firms with respect to the relationship of employment and (environmental) innovation. We use an endogen...

  17. Analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) to characterize microbial communities in aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Scow, Kate M.

    This paper reviews published applications of lipid-based biochemical techniques for characterizing microbial communities in aquifers and other deep subsurface habitats. These techniques, such as phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, can provide information on a variety of microbial characteristics, such as biomass, physiology, taxonomic and functional identity, and overall community composition. In addition, multivariate statistical analysis of lipid data can relate spatial or temporal changes in microbial communities to environmental factors. The use of lipid-based techniques in the study of groundwater microbiology is advantageous because they do not require culturing and can provide quantitative data on entire communities. However, combined effects of physiological and phylogenetic changes on the lipid composition of a community can confound interpretation of the data, and many questions remain about the validity of various lipid techniques. Despite these caveats, lipid-based research has begun to show trends in community composition in contaminated and pristine aquifers that contribute to our understanding of groundwater microbial ecology and have potential for use in optimization of bioremediation of groundwater pollutants. Résumé Ce papier passe en revue les applications des techniques biochimiques basées sur les lipides pour caractériser les communautés microbiennes présentes dans les aquifères et dans les autres habitats souterrains profonds. Ces techniques, telles que l'analyse des acides gras phospholipidiques (PLFA), peuvent fournir des informations sur un ensemble de caractères microbiens, tels que la biomasse, la physiologie, l'identité taxonomique et fonctionnelle, et surtout la composition de la communauté. En outre, l'analyse statistique multivariée des données sur les lipides peut établir les liens entre des changements spatiaux ou temporels dans la communauté microbienne et des facteurs environnementaux. L'utilisation des techniques basées sur les lipides dans l'étude de la microbiologie des eaux souterraines est intéressante parce qu'elle ne nécessite pas de mise en culture et qu'elle peut fournir des données quantitatives sur les communautés dans leur ensemble. Toutefois, les effets combinés de changements physiologiques et phylogénétiques sur la composition d'une communauté peuvent brouiller l'interprétation des données de nombreuses questions se posent sur la validité des différentes techniques lipidiques. Malgré ces oppositions, la recherche basée sur les lipides a commencéà montrer des tendances dans la composition des communautés dans les aquifères pollués et dans ceux non perturbés ces résultats contribuent ainsi à notre compréhension de l'écologie microbienne des eaux souterraines et montrent qu'il existe un potentiel pour leur utilisation en vue d'une optimisation de la dépollution biologique des eaux souterraines. Resumen Se revisan distintas técnicas bioquímicas que se basan en el análisis de lípidos para caracterizar las comunidades microbianas en hábitats subsuperficiales, incluyendo acuíferos. Estas técnicas, entre las que se incluye el análisis de ácidos grasos fosfolípidos (PLFA), pueden proporcionar información sobre toda una serie de características de las comunidades microbianas, como su biomasa, fisiología, identidad taxonómica y funcional y composición. Además, el análisis estadístico multivariado de los datos de lípidos permite relacionar los cambios espaciales o temporales en las comunidades microbianas con factores ambientales. Las técnicas basadas en lípidos son muy útiles para el estudio microbiológico de las aguas subterráneas, puesto que no requieren cultivos y además proporcionan datos cuantitativos de comunidades completas. Sin embargo, la acción combinada de los cambios fisiológicos y filogenéticos en la composición de lípidos en una comunidad pueden confundir la interpretación de los datos, por lo existen muchas cuestiones abiertas respecto a la validez de algunas de estas técnicas. A pesar de estas dificultades, estas técnicas han permitido detectar diferentes tendencias en la composición de las comunidades en acuíferos con y sin contaminación, lo que contribuye a nuestro entendimiento de la ecología microbiana de los acuíferos. Este último aspecto tiene un uso potencial en la optimización de los métodos de biorremediación de acuíferos.

  18. Meta-Transcriptomic Analysis of a Chromate-Reducing Aquifer Microbial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.; Han, R.; Karaoz, U.

    2010-12-01

    A major challenge for microbial ecology that has become more tractable in the advent of new molecular techniques is characterizing gene expression in complex microbial communities. We are using meta-transcriptomic analysis to characterize functional changes in an aquifer-derived, chromate-reducing microbial community as it transitions through various electron-accepting conditions. We inoculated anaerobic microcosms with groundwater from the Cr-contaminated Hanford 100H site and supplemented them with lactate and electron acceptors present at the site, namely, nitrate, sulfate, and Fe(III). The microcosms progressed successively through various electron-accepting conditions (e.g., denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, and ferric iron-reducing conditions, as well as nitrate-dependent, chemolithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing conditions). Cr(VI) was rapidly reduced initially and again upon further Cr(VI) amendments. Extensive geochemical sampling and analysis (e.g., lactate, acetate, chloride, nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, dissolved Cr(VI), total Fe(II)), RNA/DNA harvesting, and PhyloChip analyses were conducted. Methods were developed for removal of rRNA from total RNA in preparation for meta-transcriptome sequencing. To date, samples representing denitrifying and fermentative/sulfate-reducing conditions have been sequenced using 454 Titanium technology. Of the non-rRNA related reads for the denitrifying sample (which was also actively reducing chromate), ca. 8% were associated with denitrification and ca. 0.9% were associated with chromate resistance/transport, in contrast to the fermentative/sulfate-reducing sample (in which chromate had already been reduced), which had zero reads associated with either of these categories but many predicted proteins associated with sulfate-reducing bacteria. We observed sequences for key functional transcripts that were unique at the nucleotide level compared to the GenBank non-redundant database [such as L-lactate dehydrogenase (iron-sulfur-cluster-binding subunit), cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase (nirS) (from the denitrifying phase), and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA, dsrB) (from the sulfate-reducing phase)]. One potential advantage of this approach is that such important genes may not have been detected using more traditional techniques, including PCR-based methods and a priori functional microarrays.

  19. A socio-political analysis of policies and incentives applicable to community wind in Oregon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a new type of ownership structure, community owned wind projects are becoming more and more important in today's wind energy generation in the U.S. Unlike traditional large wind farms, community wind features local ownership and small-scale generation capacity. The goal of this paper is to identify policies, incentives, and regulations in place that are applicable to community wind projects in Oregon by interviewing project representatives and governmental officials and to depict the Oregon context from strategic, tactical, and operational perspectives for researchers, farmers, private businesses, government entities, and others who are interested in learning about the community wind in the state. - Highlights: ► We identified policies, incentives, and regulations applicable to community wind in Oregon. ► We interviewed project representatives and governmental officials. ► Results were analyzed from strategic, tactical, and operational perspectives. ► We concluded the paper by proposing policy prescriptions for community wind development.

  20. Communities and beyond: mesoscopic analysis of a large social network with complementary methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibély, Gergely; Kovanen, Lauri; Karsai, Márton; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János; Saramäki, Jari

    2011-05-01

    Community detection methods have so far been tested mostly on small empirical networks and on synthetic benchmarks. Much less is known about their performance on large real-world networks, which nonetheless are a significant target for application. We analyze the performance of three state-of-the-art community detection methods by using them to identify communities in a large social network constructed from mobile phone call records. We find that all methods detect communities that are meaningful in some respects but fall short in others, and that there often is a hierarchical relationship between communities detected by different methods. Our results suggest that community detection methods could be useful in studying the general mesoscale structure of networks, as opposed to only trying to identify dense structures. PMID:21728623

  1. Communities and beyond: mesoscopic analysis of a large social network with complementary methods

    CERN Document Server

    Tibely, Gergely; Kovanen, Lauri; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertesz, Janos; Saramaki, Jari

    2010-01-01

    Large complex networks show different levels of organization. At the mesoscopic scale communities are considered the most important structures that relate to system function but also other formations like trees or stars may appear. Communities are characterized as groups of nodes with dense internal and loose inter-group connectivity, but beyond this simple notion, even the definition of a community is a controversial issue. Numerous community detection methods have been proposed and assessed either on small empirical networks or larger synthetic benchmarks. However, little is known about their performance on large real-world networks and about the meaningfulness of the community structure they produce. Here we apply three community detection methods, Infomap, the Louvain method, and clique percolation to a large real-world social network based on mobile telephone calls and compare their results. Benchmarks are fabricated to capture only selected aspects of reality, while large empirical networks are much mor...

  2. Impact of Dynamic Interactions on Multi-Scale Analysis of Community Structure in Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Rumi; Lerman, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    To find interesting structure in networks, community detection algorithms have to take into account not only the network topology, but also dynamics of interactions between nodes. We investigate this claim using the paradigm of synchronization in a network of coupled oscillators. As the network evolves to a global steady state, nodes belonging to the same community synchronize faster than nodes belonging to different communities. Traditionally, nodes in network synchronization models are coup...

  3. Community characteristics associated with where urgent care centers are located: a cross-sectional analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Sidney T; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the community characteristics associated with non-hospital-based urgent care centres wherever they are located. Design National cross-sectional study evaluating the association between non-hospital-based urgent care centers, and their demographic characteristics in a community, using descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regressions. Setting Communities in the USA with non-hospital-based urgent care centers, as identified using a 2014 national database from ...

  4. Metagenomic analysis of the bacterial community of the Sea of Azov

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matishov, D. G.; Stakheev, V. V.; Chirak, E. L.; Glushchenko, G. Yu.

    2015-09-01

    The taxonomic composition of microorganisms in the Sea of Azov has been estimated by the methods of multiple parallel sequencing. The true level of biological diversity of microorganisms has been shown. The prokaryotic community throughout the Sea of Azov, including the Taganrog Bay, demonstrates the structural features typical of a marine community. Despite the shallowness of the body of water, microbial communities in the Sea of Azov are clearly distinguishable between the surface and bottom clusters.

  5. The Deaf community in Flanders and South Africa : An ethnographic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Van Herreweghe, Mieke; Vermeerbergen, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    Schein (1989) proposes a theory of Deaf Community development and applies his theory to the situation in the USA. He hypothesizes five factors: These factors and their interactions account for the unique social-psychological behavior of Deaf people that resulted in the development of the phenomenon called the Deaf community" (p. 200). The demographic factor refers to a first precondition for the development of a Deaf community, viz. that there is a critical mass, i.e. both in actual numbers ...

  6. A Capacity Building Approach to Increase Sports Participation in Disadvantaged Urban Communities: A Multilevel Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Marlier, Mathieu; Cardon, Greet; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Willem, Annick

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence showed that community capacity building is one of the key methods to reach health improvements within disadvantaged communities. Physical activity and sports participation are important means to reach health improvements. This study investigates a capacity building method which aims at increasing sports participation in the community, especially for individuals at higher risk of sports deprivation. The main aims of the present study, are the following: (1) to examine differenc...

  7. Waveforms and Sonic Boom Perception and Response (WSPR): Low-Boom Community Response Program Pilot Test Design, Execution, and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Juliet A.; Hodgdon, Kathleen K.; Krecker, Peg; Cowart, Robbie; Hobbs, Chris; Wilmer, Clif; Koening, Carrie; Holmes, Theresa; Gaugler, Trent; Shumway, Durland L.; Rosenberger, James L.; Philips, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    The Waveforms and Sonic boom Perception and Response (WSPR) Program was designed to test and demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of techniques to gather data relating human subjective response to multiple low-amplitude sonic booms. It was in essence a practice session for future wider scale testing on naive communities, using a purpose built low-boom demonstrator aircraft. The low-boom community response pilot experiment was conducted in California in November 2011. The WSPR team acquired sufficient data to assess and evaluate the effectiveness of the various physical and psychological data gathering techniques and analysis methods.

  8. Analysis of the evolution of microbial communities associated with different cultures of rotifer strains belonging to different cryptic species of the Brachionus plicatilis species

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Z.; Dierckens, K.; Defoirdt, T.; Sorgeloos, P; Boon, N.; Z. Bao; Bossier, P

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of the composition of microbial communities associated with cultures of 3 different strains belonging to different cryptic species of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis was monitored during four subsequent cycles of batch cultivation using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, cluster analysis, multidimensional scaling and principal component analysis. The data suggest that the evolving microbial communities are different with different B. plicatilis strain cultures. Moreover,...

  9. Taxonomic and functional metagenomic analysis of anodic communities in two pilot-scale microbial fuel cells treating different industrial wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseleva, Larisa; Garushyants, Sofya K; Ma, Hongwu; Simpson, David J W; Fedorovich, Viatcheslav; Cohen, Michael F; Goryanin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The combined processes of microbial biodegradation accompanied by extracellular electron transfer make microbial fuel cells (MFCs) a promising new technology for cost-effective and sustainable wastewater treatment. Although a number of microbial species that build biofilms on the anode surfaces of operating MFCs have been identified, studies on the metagenomics of entire electrogenic communities are limited. Here we present the results of whole-genome metagenomic analysis of electrochemically active robust anodic microbial communities, and their anaerobic digester (AD) sludge inocula, from two pilot-scale MFC bioreactors fed with different distillery wastewaters operated under ambient conditions in distinct climatic zones. Taxonomic analysis showed that Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were abundant in AD sludge from distinct climatic zones, and constituted the dominant core of the MFC microbiomes. Functional analysis revealed species involved in degradation of organic compounds commonly present in food industry wastewaters. Also, accumulation of methanogenic Archaea was observed in the electrogenic biofilms, suggesting a possibility for simultaneous electricity and biogas recovery from one integrated wastewater treatment system. Finally, we found a range of species within the anode communities possessing the capacity for extracellular electron transfer, both via direct contact and electron shuttles, and show differential distribution of bacterial groups on the carbon cloth and activated carbon granules of the anode surface. Overall, this study provides insights into structural shifts that occur in the transition from an AD sludge to an MFC microbial community and the metabolic potential of electrochemically active microbial populations with wastewater-treating MFCs. PMID:26673789

  10. What goes in must come out: testing for biases in molecular analysis of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, T E Anne; Dumbrell, Alex J; Helgason, Thorunn

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are widely distributed microbes that form obligate symbioses with the majority of terrestrial plants, altering nutrient transfers between soils and plants, thereby profoundly affecting plant growth and ecosystem properties. Molecular methods are commonly used in the study of AM fungal communities. However, the biases associated with PCR amplification of these organisms and their ability to be utilized quantitatively has never been fully tested. We used Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis to characterise artificial community templates containing known quantities of defined AM fungal genotypes. This was compared to a parallel in silico analysis that predicted the results of this experiment in the absence of bias. The data suggest that when used quantitatively the TRFLP protocol tested is a powerful, repeatable method for AM fungal community analysis. However, we suggest some limitations to its use for population-level analyses. We found no evidence of PCR bias, supporting the quantitative use of other PCR-based methods for the study of AM fungi such as next generation amplicon sequencing. This finding greatly improves our confidence in methods that quantitatively examine AM fungal communities, providing a greater understanding of the ecology of these important fungi. PMID:25275629

  11. [Canonical correspondence analysis of summer phytoplankton community and its environmental factors in Hanfeng Lake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Fei; Zhao, Xiu-Lan; He, Bing-Hui; Huang, Qi

    2015-03-01

    The phytoplankton community in Hanfeng Lake Reservoir, located in the Three Gorges Reservoir Areas of Yangtze River, was investigated from Jun to August 2013. The results showed that 72 species belonging to 7 phyla of phytoplankton were detected in the water. The dominant species were Synedra, Navicula, Melosira, Cocconeis, Scenedesmus, Pseudoanabaena and Merismopedia. The phytoplankton at the entrance of Donghe River was mainly composed of Bacillariophyta, while that at the entrance of Nanhe River was dominated by Cyanophyta and Chlorophyta. Canonical correspondence analysis was applied to investigate the relationships between the distribution of phytoplankton and the environmental factors. The results showed that the species of phytoplankton at the entrance of the Donghe River were influenced by the physiochemical properties of the water, while those at the entrance of Nanhe River were affected by the nutrient status of the water. The key factors influencing the distributions of phytoplankton were temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, total nitrogen (TN), dissolved nitrogen (DN) and dissolved phosphorus (DP). PMID:25929059

  12. A comprehensive study on volatile fatty acids production from rice straw coupled with microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwon Woo; Seo, Charles; Jung, Kwonsu; Chang, Ho Nam; Kim, Woong; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Rice straw is one of the most abundant renewable energy sources available. Through anaerobic acidogenesis, the substance of rice straw can be converted to volatile fatty acids (VFAs). VFAs itself is of value and is a precursor to biofuels. Hence, it can be converted to mixed alcohols by addition of hydrogen, and biodiesel can be produced as a carbon source for oleaginous microorganism. To maximize VFAs production during anaerobic digestion (AD), response surface analysis (RSM) was carried out with respect to temperature, substrate concentration, and pH variables. Optimization results showed maximal VFAs concentration of 12.37 g/L at 39.23 C, 52.85 g/L of rice straw, and pH 10. In quantification of microbial community by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the bacterial profile showed that the growth of methanogens was effectively inhibited by methanogenic inhibitors. Furthermore, 454 pyrosequencing showed that members of the Ruminococcaceae family, capable of hydrolyzing lignocellulosic biomass, were the most dominant species in many RSM trials. This study provided a useful insight on the biological improvement of AD performance through the combinational linkage between process parameters and microbial information. PMID:25651880

  13. Bacterial and Fungal Communities in Tempeh as Reveal by Amplified Ribosomal Intergenic Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CECILIA ANNA SEUMAHU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tempeh is an Indonesian traditional fermented food produced using Rhizopus as a starter culture. In practice, however, the starter culture as well as fermentation processes would yield a polymicrobial fermentation, which generated a unique tempeh flavor and texture. This condition makes Indonesian tempeh as one of the most complex fermented food, while at the same time would make it difficult to scale up tempeh production with uniform quality and consistency. The aim of this study was to compare a number of tempeh microbial communities employing Amplified Ribosomal Intergenic Sequence Analysis (ARISA. Fresh tempeh samples were obtained from tempeh producers in Java and Moluccas. 16S rRNA gene libraries and DNA sequencing were employed to analyze further the nature of bacterial diversity in two selected tempeh samples. The results of our study showed that different tempeh producer possessed different Bacterial ARISA (BARISA or fungi ARISA (FARISA profiles. However, BARISA profiles were found to be more discriminative than FARISA, and therefore BARISA would be more useful for tempeh genetic fingerprint or barcoding.

  14. Reliability analysis of time series force plate data of community dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christoph; Grger, Ines; Rupprecht, Roland; Meichtry, Andr; Tibesku, Carsten Oliver; Gassmann, Karl-Gnter

    2010-01-01

    Frequency-based analysis of body sway has been used to distinguish between healthy young, healthy elderly adults and elderly adults with Huntingtons disease. Our aim was to assess the reliability of spectral-based outcomes of the centre of pressure (CoP) kinematics in order to determine if these outcomes could be tested for their capability to distinguish between elderly fallers and non-fallers in a future study. We have studied balance for 30 community dwelling healthy older adults 60 years or older. Four test conditions were used. Three successive trials were performed for each condition. CoP kinematics were estimated with a force platform with three strain gauges set in a triangular position. The frequency content of these signals was estimated. Intrasession correlation coefficients (ICC's) were then calculated for all test conditions. The reliability of the selected parameters varied between low and high (ICC 0.652-0.939). The ICC's for the narrow stance tests were higher compared to tests with normal standing conditions (0.771-0.94) to (0.652-0.865). The highest value was obtained in the high frequency band (0.939). These measures should be viewed with caution when screening geriatric patients because their reliability cannot always be assumed. PMID:20153904

  15. Earth Science Community IT Resources through a Unified Data and Analysis Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Y.; Webb, F. H.; Kedar, S.; Pierce, M.; Scharber, M.; Argus, D. F.; Aydin, G.; Chang, R.; Dong, D.; Fang, P.; Granat, R. A.; Jamason, P.; Newport, B. J.; Owen, S. E.; Parker, J. W.; Prawirodirdjo, L.; Vernon, F.; Wadsworth, G.

    2006-12-01

    We are in the process of merging the capabilities of three NASA-funded projects under the umbrella of the NASA Access Project, "Modeling and On-the-fly Solutions for Solid Earth Sciences (MOSES)" to facilitate data mining and modeling of rapidly expanding multi-disciplinary geoscience data sets. (1) The SCIGN- REASoN project is focused on the combination, validation, archive, and delivery of high-level data products and data mining capabilities from space geodetic measurements, in particular from over 600 CGPS stations in Western North America; (2) The QuakeSim project is developing linked Web service environments for supporting high performance models of crustal deformation from a variety of geophysical sensors, including GPS and seismic instruments; (3) The SENH-Applications GPS/Seismic integration project has developed a prototype real-time GPS/seismic displacement meter for seismic hazard mitigation and monitoring of critical infrastructure. The focus of the MOSES project is to enable direct interaction between modelers and data/data-product providers using Web services, within a unified portal architecture. Modeling applications include, for example, time series analysis of continuous and real-time data (e.g., RDAHMM and st_filter programs) and fault dislocation modeling (e.g., Simplex program). Community resources include access to extensive infrastructure and distributed data archive holdings, an on-line map server/client linked to a GIS database, a "GPS Explorer" data portal that is extensible to heterogeneous data sets, and "Geophysical Resource Web Services." We present the current capabilities of the unified data and analysis portal, and provide a few examples of combinations of independent geophysical measurements.

  16. Riparian plant community responses to increased flooding: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garssen, Annemarie G; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Soons, Merel B

    2015-08-01

    A future higher risk of severe flooding of streams and rivers has been projected to change riparian plant community composition and species richness, but the extent and direction of the expected change remain uncertain. We conducted a meta-analysis to synthesize globally available experimental evidence and assess the effects of increased flooding on (1) riparian adult plant and seedling survival, (2) riparian plant biomass and (3) riparian plant species composition and richness. We evaluated which plant traits are of key importance for the response of riparian plant species to flooding. We identified and analysed 53 papers from ISI Web of Knowledge which presented quantitative experimental results on flooding treatments and corresponding control situations. Our meta-analysis demonstrated how longer duration of flooding, greater depth of flooding and, particularly, their combination reduce seedling survival of most riparian species. Plant height above water level, ability to elongate shoots and plasticity in root porosity were decisive for adult plant survival and growth during longer periods of flooding. Both 'quiescence' and 'escape' proved to be successful strategies promoting riparian plant survival, which was reflected in the wide variation in survival (full range between 0 and 100%) under fully submerged conditions, while plants that protrude above the water level (>20 cm) almost all survive. Our survey confirmed that the projected increase in the duration and depth of flooding periods is sufficient to result in species shifts. These shifts may lead to increased or decreased riparian species richness depending on the nutrient, climatic and hydrological status of the catchment. Species richness was generally reduced at flooded sites in nutrient-rich catchments and sites that previously experienced relatively stable hydrographs (e.g. rain-fed lowland streams). Species richness usually increased at sites in desert and semi-arid climate regions (e.g. intermittent streams). PMID:25752818

  17. Building a Community Infrastructure for Scalable On-Line Performance Analysis Tools around Open|Speedshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Barton

    2014-06-30

    Peta-scale computing environments pose significant challenges for both system and application developers and addressing them required more than simply scaling up existing tera-scale solutions. Performance analysis tools play an important role in gaining this understanding, but previous monolithic tools with fixed feature sets have not sufficed. Instead, this project worked on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a general, flexible tool infrastructure supporting the construction of performance tools as “pipelines” of high-quality tool building blocks. These tool building blocks provide common performance tool functionality, and are designed for scalability, lightweight data acquisition and analysis, and interoperability. For this project, we built on Open|SpeedShop, a modular and extensible open source performance analysis tool set. The design and implementation of such a general and reusable infrastructure targeted for petascale systems required us to address several challenging research issues. All components needed to be designed for scale, a task made more difficult by the need to provide general modules. The infrastructure needed to support online data aggregation to cope with the large amounts of performance and debugging data. We needed to be able to map any combination of tool components to each target architecture. And we needed to design interoperable tool APIs and workflows that were concrete enough to support the required functionality, yet provide the necessary flexibility to address a wide range of tools. A major result of this project is the ability to use this scalable infrastructure to quickly create tools that match with a machine architecture and a performance problem that needs to be understood. Another benefit is the ability for application engineers to use the highly scalable, interoperable version of Open|SpeedShop, which are reassembled from the tool building blocks into a flexible, multi-user interface set of tools. This set of tools targeted at Office of Science Leadership Class computer systems and selected Office of Science application codes. We describe the contributions made by the team at the University of Wisconsin. The project built on the efforts in Open|SpeedShop funded by DOE/NNSA and the DOE/NNSA Tri-Lab community, extended Open|Speedshop to the Office of Science Leadership Class Computing Facilities, and addressed new challenges found on these cutting edge systems. Work done under this project at Wisconsin can be divided into two categories, new algorithms and techniques for debugging, and foundation infrastructure work on our Dyninst binary analysis and instrumentation toolkits and MRNet scalability infrastructure.

  18. How Are Community Interventions Conceptualized and Conducted? An Analysis of Published Accounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickett, Edison J.; Espino, Susan Ryerson; Hawe, Penelope

    2011-01-01

    Recent discussions about the conduct of community interventions suggest the importance of developing more comprehensive theorizing about their nature and effects. The present study is an effort to infer how community interventions are theorized by the way they are represented in the peer-reviewed scholarly literature. A coding of a random sample

  19. Seasonal changes in the microbial community of a salt marsh, measured by phospholipid fatty acid analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keith-Roach, Miranda; Bryan, N.D.; Bardgett, R.D.; Livens, F.R.

    2002-01-01

    Microbial activity within the environment can have distinct geochemical effects, and so changes in a microbial community structure can result in geochemical change. We examined seasonal changes in both the microbial community and the geochemistry of an inter-tidal salt marsh in north-west England...

  20. Sense of Community Belonging and Health in Canada: A Regional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison; Chowhan, James

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the association between sense of community belonging and health among settlements of different size and across the urban to rural continuum in Canada. Using data from the recent 2007/08 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), the objective is to identify the major health, social and geographic determinants of sense of…

  1. A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Hollow Water's Community Holistic Circle Healing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Joe; Parker, Ted; Couture, Ruth; Laboucane, Patti

    Four Native American communities in Manitoba (Canada) known as Hollow Water devised a healing system for sexual abuse--the Hollow Water First Nation Community Holistic Circle Healing (CHCH). While integrating elements of a number of federal and provincially funded services, the 13-step CHCH healing process is based on the seven Midewin teachings…

  2. Onset and Progression of Disruptive Behavior Problems among Community Boys and Girls: A Prospective Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Jaelyn R.; Nicholson, Jody S.; Borkowski, John G.; Whitman, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder are the most common forms of psychopathology seen among community youth. This study investigated prospective symptomatology of these disruptive behavior disorders from ages 5 though 14 in an at-risk community-based sample of 170 boys and girls born to…

  3. Onset and Progression of Disruptive Behavior Problems among Community Boys and Girls: A Prospective Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Jaelyn R.; Nicholson, Jody S.; Borkowski, John G.; Whitman, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder are the most common forms of psychopathology seen among community youth. This study investigated prospective symptomatology of these disruptive behavior disorders from ages 5 though 14 in an at-risk community-based sample of 170 boys and girls born to

  4. Conceptualizing the impact of special events on community health service levels: an operational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Adam; Turris, Sheila A; Bowles, Ron

    2014-10-01

    Mass gatherings (MG) impact their host and surrounding communities and with inadequate planning, may impair baseline emergency health services. Mass gatherings do not occur in a vacuum; they have both consumptive and disruptive effects that extend beyond the event itself. Mass gatherings occur in real geographic locations that include not only the event site, but also the surrounding neighborhoods and communities. In addition, the impact of small, medium, or large special events may be felt for days, or even months, prior to and following the actual events. Current MG reports tend to focus on the events themselves during published event dates and may underestimate the full impact of a given MG on its host community. In order to account for, and mitigate, the full effects of MGs on community health services, researchers would benefit from a common model of community impact. Using an operations lens, two concepts are presented, the "vortex" and the "ripple," as metaphors and a theoretical model for exploring the broader impact of MGs on host communities. Special events and MGs impact host communities by drawing upon resources (vortex) and by disrupting normal, baseline services (ripple). These effects are felt with diminishing impact as one moves geographically further from the event center, and can be felt before, during, and after the event dates. Well executed medical and safety plans for events with appropriate, comprehensive risk assessments and stakeholder engagement have the best chance of ameliorating the potential negative impact of MGs on communities. PMID:25188753

  5. Creating community action plans for obesity prevention using the ANGELO (Analysis Grid for Elements Linked to Obesity) Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmons, A; Mavoa, H M; Bell, A C; de Courten, Maximilian; Schaaf, D; Schultz, J; Swinburn, B A

    2009-01-01

    Community-based interventions are an important component of obesity prevention efforts. The literature provides little guidance on priority-setting for obesity prevention in communities, especially for socially and culturally diverse populations. This paper reports on the process of developing...... prioritized, community-participatory action plans for obesity prevention projects in children and adolescents using the ANGELO (Analysis Grid for Elements Linked to Obesity) Framework. We combined stakeholder engagement processes, the ANGELO Framework (scans for environmental barriers, targeted behaviours......, gaps in skills and knowledge) and workshops with key stakeholders to create action plans for six diverse obesity prevention projects in Australia (n = 3), New Zealand, Fiji and Tonga from 2002 to 2005. Some sites included sociocultural contextual analyses in the environmental scans. Target groups were...

  6. The Prevalence of Thyroid Nodules and an Analysis of Related Lifestyle Factors in Beijing Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid nodules (TNs have annual increasing trends worldwide, and large-scale investigations on the prevalence of TNs in Beijing communities have not been conducted since the introduction of salt iodization in 1995. We performed a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of TNs, their epidemiological characteristics, and their correlation with lifestyle factors. A total of 6324 permanent residents aged 18 years or older (mean age, 52.15 ± 11.58 years from seven representative communities in Beijing were included in the analyses. Once informed consent was obtained, the subjects were asked to complete questionnaires, a physical examination, and thyroid ultrasound. A total of 3100 cases had TNs. The overall prevalence rate was 49.0%, and the age-standardized prevalence was 40.1%, which increased significantly as age increased (p < 0.001. The prevalence was significantly higher in females compared to males (p < 0.001, and it was significantly higher among female current smokers and former smokers compared to non-smokers (p = 0.007. There was no correlation between alcohol consumption and TNs, and there were no significant differences in the prevalence among different groups of taste preference. The prevalence decreased with an increased frequency of seafood intake (p = 0.015 and with higher literacy levels (p < 0.001. The Cochran–Armitage trend test showed that the prevalence significantly increased with decreased physical labor and exercise intensity (p < 0.001, p = 0.009. Logistic regression analysis showed that age (Odds ratio (OR = 1.039 (1.034–1.044, p < 0.001, the female sex (OR = 1.789 (1.527–2.097, Body mass index (BMI (OR = 1.019 (1.005–1.034, and current smoking habits (OR = 1.246 (1.046–1.483 were independent risk factors for TNs. Our findings indicate that there is a high prevalence of TNs in Beijing, with a higher prevalence in females than in males. Moreover, the prevalence increases as age increases. Smoking and BMI are independent risk factors for TNs. Therefore, intervention against smoking and weight loss might help reduce the risk of TN occurrence.

  7. Conceptual Analysis for the Strategic and Operational Knowledge Man-agement of a Port Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia DURAN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ports working in a network-community that is composed of a group of associative enterprises and logistic chains require managing their strategic and operational knowledge for achieving the efficiency of their activities at both levels. A conceptual model is presented that allows the development of a strategy for a port community through a strategic planning approach using operational knowledge. The different actors that participate in the community, their roles, and the main processes in which they participate are characterized. Then the vision and the mission of the community, and the strategic objectives in the four perspectives of the Balanced Scorecard: financial, clients, processes, and learning and growth, are defined. Finally, a set of indicators oriented toward the knowledge management of the main actors participating in the community is designed.

  8. Regional inequalities in under-5 mortality in Nigeria: a population-based analysis of individual- and community-level determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antai Diddy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regions with geographically diverse ecology and socioeconomic circumstances may have different disease exposures and child health outcomes. This study assessed variations in the risks of death in children under age 5 across regions of Nigeria and determined characteristics at the individual and community levels that explain possible variations among regions. Methods Multilevel Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed using a nationally representative sample of 6,029 children from 2,735 mothers aged 15-49 years and nested within 365 communities from the 2003 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey. Hazard ratios (HR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were used to express measures of association among the characteristics. Variance partition coefficients and Wald statistic were used to express measures of variation. Results Patterns of under-5 mortality cluster within families and communities. The risks of under-5 deaths were significantly higher for children of mothers residing in the South South (Niger Delta region (HR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.76-2.20 and children of mothers residing in communities with a low proportion of mothers attending prenatal care by a doctor (HR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.15-1.86. In addition, the cross-level interaction between mothers' education and community prenatal care by a doctor was associated with a more than 40% higher risk of dying (HR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.21-1.78. Conclusion The findings suggest the need to differentially focus on community-level interventions aimed at increasing maternal and child health care utilization and improving the socioeconomic position of mothers, especially in disadvantaged regions such as the South South (Niger Delta region. Further studies on community-levels determinants of under-5 mortality are needed.

  9. Comparison of droplet digital PCR and quantitative real-time PCR in mcrA-based methanogen community analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Gwan Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Two different quantitative PCR platforms, droplet digital PCR (dd-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR, were compared in a mcrA-based methanogen community assay that quantifies ten methanogen sub-groups. Both technologies exhibited similar PCR efficiencies over at least four orders of magnitude and the same lower limits of detection (8 copies?L-DNA extract?1. The mcrA-based methanogen communities in three full-scale anaerobic digesters were examined using the two technologies. dd-PCR detected seven groups from the digesters, while qPCR did five groups, indicating that dd-PCR is more sensitive for DNA quantification. Linear regression showed quantitative agreements between both of the technologies (R2=0.590.98 in the five groups that were concurrently detected. Principal component analysis from the two datasets consistently indicated a substantial difference in the community composition among the digesters and revealed similar levels of differentiation among the communities. The combined results suggest that dd-PCR is more promising for examining methanogenic archaeal communities in biotechnological processes.

  10. Community health orientation of Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism: A bibliometric analysis of Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanica Kaushal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endocrine and metabolic diseases especially diabetes have become focus areas for public health professionals. Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism (IJEM, a publication of Endocrine Society of India, is a peer-reviewed online journal, which covers technical and clinical studies related to health, ethical and social issues in field of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolism. This bibliometric analysis assesses the journal from a community health perspective. Materials and Methods: Every article published in IJEM over a period of 4 years (2011-2014 was accessed to review coverage of community health in the field of endocrinology. Results: Seven editorials, 30 review articles, 41 original articles, 12 brief communications, 20 letter to editors, 4 articles on guidelines and 2 in the section "endocrinology and gender" directly or indirectly dealt with community health aspects of endocrinology. Together these amounted to 17% of all articles published through these 4 years. There were 14 articles on general, 60 pertaining to pancreas and diabetes, 10 on thyroid, 7 on pituitary/adrenal/gonads, 21 on obesity and metabolism and 4 on parathyroid and bone; all community medicine related. Conclusion: Community health is an integral part of the modern endocrinology diabetology and metabolism practice and it received adequate journal space during the last 4 years. The coverage is broad based involving all the major endocrine disorders.

  11. ClimatePipes: User-Friendly Data Access, Manipulation, Analysis & Visualization of Community Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, A.; DeMarle, D.; Burnett, B.; Harris, C.; Silva, W.; Osmari, D.; Geveci, B.; Silva, C.; Doutriaux, C.; Williams, D. N.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of climate change will resonate through a broad range of fields including public health, infrastructure, water resources, and many others. Long-term coordinated planning, funding, and action are required for climate change adaptation and mitigation. Unfortunately, widespread use of climate data (simulated and observed) in non-climate science communities is impeded by factors such as large data size, lack of adequate metadata, poor documentation, and lack of sufficient computational and visualization resources. We present ClimatePipes to address many of these challenges by creating an open source platform that provides state-of-the-art, user-friendly data access, analysis, and visualization for climate and other relevant geospatial datasets, making the climate data available to non-researchers, decision-makers, and other stakeholders. The overarching goals of ClimatePipes are: - Enable users to explore real-world questions related to climate change. - Provide tools for data access, analysis, and visualization. - Facilitate collaboration by enabling users to share datasets, workflows, and visualization. ClimatePipes uses a web-based application platform for its widespread support on mainstream operating systems, ease-of-use, and inherent collaboration support. The front-end of ClimatePipes uses HTML5 (WebGL, Canvas2D, CSS3) to deliver state-of-the-art visualization and to provide a best-in-class user experience. The back-end of the ClimatePipes is built around Python using the Visualization Toolkit (VTK, http://vtk.org), Climate Data Analysis Tools (CDAT, http://uv-cdat.llnl.gov), and other climate and geospatial data processing tools such as GDAL and PROJ4. ClimatePipes web-interface to query and access data from remote sources (such as ESGF). Shown in the figure is climate data layer from ESGF on top of map data layer from OpenStreetMap. The ClimatePipes workflow editor provides flexibility and fine grained control, and uses the VisTrails (http://www.vistrails.org) workflow engine in the backend.

  12. Response of soybean rhizosphere communities to human hygiene water addition as determined by community level physiological profiling (CLPP) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhof, L.; Santoro, M.; Garland, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we describe an experiment conducted at Kennedy Space Center in the biomass production chamber (BPC) using soybean plants for purification and processing of human hygiene water. Specifically, we tested whether it was possible to detect changes in the root-associated bacterial assemblage of the plants and ultimately to identify the specific microorganism(s) which differed when plants were exposed to hygiene water and other hydroponic media. Plants were grown in hydroponics media corresponding to four different treatments: control (Hoagland's solution), artificial gray water (Hoagland's+surfactant), filtered gray water collected from human subjects on site, and unfiltered gray water. Differences in rhizosphere microbial populations in all experimental treatments were observed when compared to the control treatment using both community level physiological profiles (BIOLOG) and molecular fingerprinting of 16S rRNA genes by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (TRFLP). Furthermore, screening of a clonal library of 16S rRNA genes by TRFLP yielded nearly full length SSU genes associated with the various treatments. Most 16S rRNA genes were affiliated with the Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Variovorax, Burkholderia, Bordetella and Isosphaera groups. This molecular approach demonstrated the ability to rapidly detect and identify microorganisms unique to experimental treatments and provides a means to fingerprint microbial communities in the biosystems being developed at NASA for optimizing advanced life support operations.

  13. Social Network and Content Analysis of the North American Carbon Program as a Scientific Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly E.; Ihli, Monica; Hendrick, Oscar; Delgado-Arias, Sabrina; Escobar, Vanessa M.; Griffith, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The North American Carbon Program (NACP) was formed to further the scientific understanding of sources, sinks, and stocks of carbon in Earth's environment. Carbon cycle science integrates multidisciplinary research, providing decision-support information for managing climate and carbon-related change across multiple sectors of society. This investigation uses the conceptual framework of com-munities of practice (CoP) to explore the role that the NACP has played in connecting researchers into a carbon cycle knowledge network, and in enabling them to conduct physical science that includes ideas from social science. A CoP describes the communities formed when people consistently engage in shared communication and activities toward a common passion or learning goal. We apply the CoP model by using keyword analysis of abstracts from scientific publications to analyze the research outputs of the NACP in terms of its knowledge domain. We also construct a co-authorship network from the publications of core NACP members, describe the structure and social pathways within the community. Results of the content analysis indicate that the NACP community of practice has substantially expanded its research on human and social impacts on the carbon cycle, contributing to a better understanding of how human and physical processes interact with one another. Results of the co-authorship social network analysis demonstrate that the NACP has formed a tightly connected community with many social pathways through which knowledge may flow, and that it has also expanded its network of institutions involved in carbon cycle research over the past seven years.

  14. Microbial community of salt crystals processed from Mediterranean seawater based on 16S rRNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baati, Houda; Guermazi, Sonda; Gharsallah, Neji; Sghir, Abdelghani; Ammar, Emna

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA was used to investigate for the first time the structure of the microbial community that inhabits salt crystals retrieved from the bottom of a solar saltern, located in the coastal area of the Mediterranean Sea (Sfax, Tunisia). This community lives in an extremely salty environment of 250-310 g/L total dissolved salt. A total of 78 bacterial 16S rRNA clone sequences making up to 21 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), determined by the DOTUR program to 97% sequence similarity, was analyzed. These OTUs were affiliated to Bacteroidetes (71.4% of OTUs), and gamma-Proteobacteria and alpha-Proteobacteria (equally represented by 14.2% of the OTUs observed). The archaeal community composition appeared more diverse with 68 clones, resulting in 44 OTUs, all affiliated with the Euryarchaeota phylum. Of the bacterial and archaeal clones showing <97% 16S rRNA sequence identity with sequences in public databases, 47.6% and 84.1% respectively were novel clones. Both rarefaction curves and diversity measurements (Simpson, Shannon-Weaver, Chao) showed a more diverse archaeal than bacterial community at the Tunisian solar saltern pond. The analysis of an increasing clone's number may reveal additional local diversity. PMID:20130693

  15. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography of Respiratory Quinones for Microbial Community Analysis in Environmental and Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Fujie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial community structure plays a significant role in environmental assessment and animal health management. The development of a superior analytical strategy for the characterization of microbial community structure is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we developed an effective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC method for the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinones (RQ in environmental and biological samples. RQ profile analysis is one of the most widely used culture-independent tools for characterizing microbial community structure. A UPLC equipped with a photo diode array (PDA detector was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of ubiquinones (UQ and menaquinones (MK without tedious pretreatment. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 extraction with the solid-phase cartridge trap proved to be a more effective and rapid method for extracting respiratory quinones, compared to a conventional organic solvent extraction method. This methodology leads to a successful analytical procedure that involves a significant reduction in the complexity and sample preparation time. Application of the optimized methodology to characterize microbial communities based on the RQ profile was demonstrated for a variety of environmental samples (activated sludge, digested sludge, and compost and biological samples (swine and Japanese quail feces.

  16. Supercritical fluid extraction and ultra performance liquid chromatography of respiratory quinones for microbial community analysis in environmental and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Atsuta, Yoichi; Fujie, Koichi; Daimon, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community structure plays a significant role in environmental assessment and animal health management. The development of a superior analytical strategy for the characterization of microbial community structure is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we developed an effective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method for the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinones (RQ) in environmental and biological samples. RQ profile analysis is one of the most widely used culture-independent tools for characterizing microbial community structure. A UPLC equipped with a photo diode array (PDA) detector was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of ubiquinones (UQ) and menaquinones (MK) without tedious pretreatment. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) extraction with the solid-phase cartridge trap proved to be a more effective and rapid method for extracting respiratory quinones, compared to a conventional organic solvent extraction method. This methodology leads to a successful analytical procedure that involves a significant reduction in the complexity and sample preparation time. Application of the optimized methodology to characterize microbial communities based on the RQ profile was demonstrated for a variety of environmental samples (activated sludge, digested sludge, and compost) and biological samples (swine and Japanese quail feces). PMID:22391598

  17. Integrating Phenological, Trait and Environmental Data For Continental Scale Analysis: A Community Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltzin, J. F.; Walls, R.; Guralnick, R. P.; Rosemartin, A.; Deck, J.; Powers, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    There is a wealth of biodiversity and environmental data that can provide the basis for addressing global scale questions of societal concern. However, our ability to discover, access and integrate these data for use in broader analyses is hampered by the lack of standardized languages and systems. New tools (e.g. ontologies, data standards, integration tools, unique identifiers) are being developed that enable establishment of a framework for linked and open data. Relative to other domains, these tools are nascent in biodiversity and environmental sciences and will require effort to develop, though work can capitalize on lessons learned from previous efforts. Here we discuss needed next steps to provide consistently described and formatted ecological data for immediate application in ecological analysis, focusing on integrating phenology, trait and environmental data to understand local to continental-scale biophysical processes and inform natural resource management practices. As more sources of data become available at finer spatial and temporal resolution, e.g., from national standardized earth observing systems (e.g., NEON, LTER and LTAR Networks, USA NPN), these challenges will become more acute. Here we provide an overview of the standards and ontology development landscape specifically related to phenological and trait data, and identify requirements to overcome current challenges. Second, we outline a workflow for formatting and integrating existing datasets to address key scientific and resource management questions such as: "What traits determine differential phenological responses to changing environmental conditions?" or "What is the role of granularity of observation, and of spatiotemporal scale, in controlling phenological responses to different driving variables?" Third, we discuss methods to semantically annotate datasets to greatly decrease time needed to assemble heterogeneous data for use in ecological analyses on varying spatial scales. We close by making a call to interested community members for a working group to model phenology, trait and environmental data products from continental-scale efforts (e.g. NEON, USA-NPN and others) focusing on ways to assure discoverability and interoperability.

  18. Metagenomic analysis of the bacterial community associated with the taproot of sugar beet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Okubo, Takashi; Okazaki, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Megumi; Kakizaki, Kaori; Hanzawa, Eiko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Asanome, Noriyuki; Tanaka, Fukuyo; Sekiyama, Yasuyo; Ikeda, Seishi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed a metagenome of the bacterial community associated with the taproot of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) in order to investigate the genes involved in plant growth-promoting traits (PGPTs), namely 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, indole acetic acid (IAA), N2 fixation, phosphate solubilization, pyrroloquinoline quinone, siderophores, and plant disease suppression as well as methanol, sucrose, and betaine utilization. The most frequently detected gene among the PGPT categories encoded β-1,3-glucanase (18 per 10(5) reads), which plays a role in the suppression of plant diseases. Genes involved in phosphate solubilization (e.g., for quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase), methanol utilization (e.g., for methanol dehydrogenase), siderophore production (e.g. isochorismate pyruvate lyase), and ACC deaminase were also abundant. These results suggested that such PGPTs are crucially involved in supporting the growth of sugar beet. In contrast, genes for IAA production (iaaM and ipdC) were less abundant (~1 per 10(5) reads). N2 fixation genes (nifHDK) were not detected; bacterial N2 -fixing activity was not observed in the (15)N2 -feeding experiment. An analysis of nitrogen metabolism suggested that the sugar beet microbiome mainly utilized ammonium and nitroalkane as nitrogen sources. Thus, N2 fixation and IAA production did not appear to contribute to sugar beet growth. Taxonomic assignment of this metagenome revealed the high abundance of Mesorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Streptomyces, suggesting that these genera have ecologically important roles in the taproot of sugar beet. Bradyrhizobium-assigned reads in particular were found in almost all categories of dominant PGPTs with high abundance. The present study revealed the characteristic functional genes in the taproot-associated microbiome of sugar beet, and suggest the opportunity to select sugar beet growth-promoting bacteria. PMID:25740621

  19. Land use change and landslide characteristics analysis for community-based disaster mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yuan; Huang, Wen-Lin

    2013-05-01

    On August 8, 2009, Typhoon Morakot brought heavy rain to Taiwan, causing numerous landslides and debris flows in the Taihe village area of Meishan Township, Chiayi County, in south-central Taiwan. In the Taihe land is primary used for agriculture and land use management may be a factor in the area's landslides. This study explores Typhoon Morakot-induced landslides and land use changes between 1999 and 2009 using GIS with the aid of field investigation. Spot 5 satellite images with a resolution of 2.5 m are used for landslide interpretation and manually digitalized in GIS. A statistical analysis for landslide frequency-area distribution was used to identify the landslide characteristics associated with different types of land use. There were 243 landslides with a total area of 2.75 km(2) in the study area. The area is located in intrinsically fragile combinations of sandstone and shale. Typhoon Morakot-induced landslides show a power-law distribution in the study area. Landslides were mainly located in steep slope areas containing natural forest and in areas planted with bamboo, tea, and betel nut. Land covered with natural forest shows the highest landslide ratio, followed by bamboo, betel nut, and tea. Landslides thus show a higher ratio in areas planted with shallow root vegetation such as bamboo, betel nut, and tea. Furthermore, the degree of basin development is proportional to the landslide ratio. The results show that a change in vegetation cover results in a modified landslide area and frequency and changed land use areas have higher landslide ratios than non-changed. Land use management and community-based disaster prevention are needed in mountainous areas of Taiwan for hazard mitigation. PMID:22961329

  20. Acoustic Analysis of Inhaler Sounds From Community-Dwelling Asthmatic Patients for Automatic Assessment of Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'arcy, Shona; Costello, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Inhalers are devices which deliver medication to the airways in the treatment of chronic respiratory diseases. When used correctly inhalers relieve and improve patients' symptoms. However, adherence to inhaler medication has been demonstrated to be poor, leading to reduced clinical outcomes, wasted medication, and higher healthcare costs. There is a clinical need for a system that can accurately monitor inhaler adherence as currently no method exists to evaluate how patients use their inhalers between clinic visits. This paper presents a method of automatically evaluating inhaler adherence through acoustic analysis of inhaler sounds. An acoustic monitoring device was employed to record the sounds patients produce while using a Diskus dry powder inhaler, in addition to the time and date patients use the inhaler. An algorithm was designed and developed to automatically detect inhaler events from the audio signals and provide feedback regarding patient adherence. The algorithm was evaluated on 407 audio files obtained from 12 community dwelling asthmatic patients. Results of the automatic classification were compared against two expert human raters. For patient data for whom the human raters Cohen's kappa agreement score was \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${>}{0.81}$\\end{document}, results indicated that the algorithm's accuracy was 83% in determining the correct inhaler technique score compared with the raters. This paper has several clinical implications as it demonstrates the feasibility of using acoustics to objectively monitor patient inhaler adherence and provide real-time personalized medical care for a chronic respiratory illness.

  1. [Analysis of microbial community of a Beijing simulator water distribution system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Wen-Jun; Jin, Li-Yan; Gu, Jun-Nong

    2008-05-01

    Identification of compositions of the biofilm in a Beijing simulator water distribution system pipe networks by PCR and single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique and analysis of its heterotrophic bacterial by heterotrophic plate count (HPC) were performed. Results showed that when the water velocities were same, the count of heterotrophic bacterial on the zinficated steel wall was about five times of the PVC. On the other hand, when the pipe materials were zinficated steel, the count of heterotrophic bacterial in the deadwater pipe wall was about 1/5 of the 0.6 m/s region. The difference of the bacterial count maybe related to the smooth of the water pipe surface and the velocity of flow which affected the attachment of the microorganisms and the quantity of O2 and nourishment, respectively. Same SSCP electrophoresis profiles were observed between samples from different material pipes and water velocities. After sequencing and contrasting with the GenBank, the identity of three bands from the SSCP gel with Bacillus cereus (GenBank AB190077), Peudomonas sp. yged143 (GenBank EF419342) and a unclassified bacteria, Bacterium UASWS0134 (GenBank DQ190347) were 100%, 99% and 94%, respectively. The sameness of the microbial community structure may be induced by the samples which were from the same simulator system and the sampling regions were near and the microorganisms could transform in these regions easily. The observed potential pathogens of Bacillus cereus and Peudomonas sp. should lead to a consideration of the microbiology safety of drinking water. PMID:18624174

  2. Prevalence and invasiveness of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipeng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reports suggest that the prevalence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA has increased, and that CA-MRSA is more virulent than healthcare-associated (HA-MRSA. Aims: The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the invasiveness and prevalence of CA-MRSA in patients; we systematically reviewed the literature by conducting a meta-analysis. Materials and Methods: We searched the MEDLINE and PUBMED databases from the year these databases were established to January 2013. Results: The pooled CA-MRSA prevalence among 50,737 patients from 33 studies was 39.0% (range, 30.8-47.8%. The pooled CA-MRSA prevalence rates among pediatric and adult patients with MRSA infection were 50.2% (range, 37.5-62.8% and 42.3% (range, 16.4-73.3%, respectively. The pooled CA-MRSA prevalence rates of MRSA-infected patients in Asia, Europe, and North America were 23.1% (range, 12.0-39.8%, 37.4% (range, 21.1-56.4%, and 47.4% (range, 35.8-59.4%, respectively. Using the random effects model, we determined that the pooled odds ratio of invasive infections in CA- and HA-MRSA was 0.30 (95% confidence interval: 0.08-1.10; P = 0.07, test for heterogeneity P < 0.00001. Conclusions: The prevalence of CA-MRSA in MRSA infection varied with area and population. No difference in the ability to cause invasive infections was found between CA- and HA-MRSA. This finding challenges the view that CA-MRSA is more virulent than HA-MRSA.

  3. Examining experiences of transition, instability and coping for young offenders in the community: A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Rebecca A; Priest, Helena M

    2016-04-01

    This article explores experiences of transition, instability and coping using a qualitative approach with young offenders within a specialist forensic child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS). Participants were four young people (aged 14-17 years) on community orders under the supervision of local youth offending teams (YOTs). Semi-structured interviews were conducted and data analysed using an inductive thematic analysis approach. Three main themes were identified: (i) people and places; (ii) growth; and (iii) managing difficult experiences. Findings suggest that young offenders are exposed to a wide range of challenging contextual factors including unpredictable or inadequate home environments, numerous transitions (between family members/foster placements and schools), limited engagement with educational settings and a lack of social support, supporting the findings of Paton et al. Findings also portrayed a sense of participants' 'psychological growth' with development along a trajectory from a young child 'acting out' in response to the environments in which they were living; through a more reflective stage, in which they were able to begin to consider the situations they found themselves in; before reaching a position in which they were able to look beyond their day-to-day circumstances with some hope that their lives could be different in the future. Furthermore, accounts revealed that these young people had a limited range of functional coping strategies and had largely negative experiences of services. Clinical implications and the need for further research developing professionals' understanding of the influence of early experiences on young offenders' behaviour are discussed. PMID:25940541

  4. Determinants of participation restriction among community dwelling stroke survivors: A path analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Anne M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apart from promoting physical recovery and assisting in activities of daily living, a major challenge in stroke rehabilitation is to minimize psychosocial morbidity and to promote the reintegration of stroke survivors into their family and community. The identification of key factors influencing long-term outcome are essential in developing more effective rehabilitation measures for reducing stroke-related morbidity. The aim of this study was to test a theoretical model of predictors of participation restriction which included the direct and indirect effects between psychosocial outcomes, physical outcome, and socio-demographic variables at 12 months after stroke. Methods Data were collected from 188 stroke survivors at 12 months following their discharge from one of the two rehabilitation hospitals in Hong Kong. The settings included patients' homes and residential care facilities. Path analysis was used to test a hypothesized model of participation restriction at 12 months. Results The path coefficients show functional ability having the largest direct effect on participation restriction (β = 0.51. The results also show that more depressive symptoms (β = -0.27, low state self-esteem (β = 0.20, female gender (β = 0.13, older age (β = -0.11 and living in a residential care facility (β = -0.12 have a direct effect on participation restriction. The explanatory variables accounted for 71% of the variance in explaining participation restriction at 12 months. Conclusion Identification of stroke survivors at risk of high levels of participation restriction, depressive symptoms and low self-esteem will assist health professionals to devise appropriate rehabilitation interventions that target improving both physical and psychosocial functioning.

  5. Comparative Human Health Risk Analysis of Coastal Community Water and Waste Service Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a pilot approach to describe adverse human health effects from alternative decentralized community water systems compared to conventional centralized services (business-as-usual [BAU]), selected chemical and microbial hazards were assessed using disability adjusted life years ...

  6. Multi-scale analysis of the European airspace using network community detection

    CERN Document Server

    Gurtner, Grald; Cipolla, Marco; Lillo, Fabrizio; Mantegna, Rosario Nunzio; Miccich, Salvatore; Pozzi, Simone

    2013-01-01

    We show that the European airspace can be represented as a multi-scale traffic network whose nodes are airports, sectors, or navigation points and links are defined and weighted according to the traffic of flights between the nodes. By using a unique database of the air traffic in the European airspace, we investigate the architecture of these networks with a special emphasis on their community structure. We propose that unsupervised network community detection algorithms can be used to monitor the current use of the airspaces and improve it by guiding the design of new ones. Specifically, we compare the performance of three community detection algorithms, also by using a null model which takes into account the spatial distance between nodes, and we discuss their ability to find communities that could be used to define new control units of the airspace.

  7. ANALYSIS OF STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT for ECOTOURISM DEVELOPMENT TOWARD COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT AND NATURAL CONSERVATION at TM GUNUNG HALIMUN SALAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurniawan Gilang Widagdyo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to analyze ecotourism development within Taman Nasional Gunung Halimun Salak (TNGHS area and determine association among its elements which is ecotourism activities, community involvement, and natural conservation. To convey comprehensive and factual result, theoretical considerations appear as basis for this study as well as qualitative and quantitative analysis. Some theories tend to be guidance that will be confront with qualitative data that was obtain from interview with several expertise and community’s representative and compare with questionnaire distribution to determine how significant association occur between those three variables. The statistical analysis explains that ecotourism deliver positive impact toward local community and natural conservationDOI: 10.15408/etk.v11i1.1871

  8. Longitudinal Analysis of Discussion Topics in an Online Breast Cancer Community using Convolutional Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shaodian; Grave, Edouard; Sklar, Elizabeth; Elhadad, Noemie

    2016-01-01

    Identifying topics of discussions in online health communities (OHC) is critical to various applications, but can be difficult because topics of OHC content are usually heterogeneous and domain-dependent. In this paper, we provide a multi-class schema, an annotated dataset, and supervised classifiers based on convolutional neural network (CNN) and other models for the task of classifying discussion topics. We apply the CNN classifier to the most popular breast cancer online community, and car...

  9. Analysis of Structural and Physiological Profiles To Assess the Effects of Cu on Biofilm Microbial Communities

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of copper on the structure and physiology of freshwater biofilm microbial communities. For this purpose, biofilms that were grown during 4 weeks in a shallow, slightly polluted ditch were exposed, in aquaria in our laboratory, to a range of copper concentrations (0, 1, 3, and 10 μM). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed changes in the bacterial community in all aquaria. The extent of change was related to the concentration of copper applied, indi...

  10. Analysis of structural and physiological profiles to assess the effects of Cu on biofilm microbial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Massieux, B.; Boivin, M. E. Y.; Ende, F.P. van den; Langenskiöld, J.; Marvan, P.; BARRANGUET, C; Admiraal, W; Laanbroek, H.J.; Zwart, G

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of copper on the structure and physiology of freshwater biofilm microbial communities. For this purpose, biofilms that were grown during 4 weeks in a shallow, slightly polluted ditch were exposed, in aquaria in our laboratory, to a range of copper concentrations (0, 1, 3, and 10 M). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed changes in the bacterial community in all aquaria. The extent of change was related to the concentration of copper applied, indic...

  11. Spatial organization and drivers of the virtual water trade: a community-structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trade of agricultural commodities can be associated with a virtual transfer of the local freshwater resources used for the production of these goods. Thus, trade of food products virtually transfers large amounts of water from areas of food production to far consumption regions, a process termed the ‘globalization of water’. We consider the (time-varying) community structure of the virtual water network for the years 1986–2008. The communities are groups of countries with dense internal connections, while the connections are sparser among different communities. Between 1986 and 2008, the ratio between virtual water flows within communities and the total global trade of virtual water has continuously increased, indicating the existence of well defined clusters of virtual water transfers. In some cases (e.g. Central and North America and Europe in recent years) the virtual water communities correspond to geographically coherent regions, suggesting the occurrence of an ongoing process of regionalization of water resources. However, most communities also include countries located on different ‘sides’ of the world. As such, geographic proximity only partly explains the community structure of virtual water trade. Similarly, the global distribution of people and wealth, whose effect on the virtual water trade is expressed through simple ‘gravity models’, is unable to explain the strength of virtual water communities observed in the past few decades. A gravity model based on the availability of and demand for virtual water in different countries has higher explanatory power, but the drivers of the virtual water fluxes are yet to be adequately identified. (letter)

  12. Culture dependent and independent analysis of bacterial communities associated with commercial salad leaf vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Colin R.; Randolph, Kevin C; Osborn, Shelly L; Heather L. Tyler

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants harbor a diverse bacterial community, both as epiphytes on the plant surface and as endophytes within plant tissue. While some plant-associated bacteria act as plant pathogens or promote plant growth, others may be human pathogens. The aim of the current study was to determine the bacterial community composition of organic and conventionally grown leafy salad vegetables at the point of consumption using both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Results Total cu...

  13. Litter quality versus soil microbial community controls over decomposition: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Cory C; Reed, Sasha C; Keller, Adrienne B; Nemergut, Diana R; O'Neill, Sean P; Ostertag, Rebecca; Vitousek, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    The possible effects of soil microbial community structure on organic matter decomposition rates have been widely acknowledged, but are poorly understood. Understanding these relationships is complicated by the fact that microbial community structure and function are likely to both affect and be affected by organic matter quality and chemistry, thus it is difficult to draw mechanistic conclusions from field studies. We conducted a reciprocal soil inoculum litter transplant laboratory incubation experiment using samples collected from a set of sites that have similar climate and plant species composition but vary significantly in bacterial community structure and litter quality. The results showed that litter quality explained the majority of variation in decomposition rates under controlled laboratory conditions: over the course of the 162-day incubation, litter quality explained nearly two-thirds (64%) of variation in decomposition rates, and a smaller proportion (25%) was explained by variation in the inoculum type. In addition, the relative importance of inoculum type on soil respiration increased over the course of the experiment, and was significantly higher in microcosms with lower litter quality relative to those with higher quality litter. We also used molecular phylogenetics to examine the relationships between bacterial community composition and soil respiration in samples through time. Pyrosequencing revealed that bacterial community composition explained 32 % of the variation in respiration rates. However, equal portions (i.e., 16%) of the variation in bacterial community composition were explained by inoculum type and litter quality, reflecting the importance of both the meta-community and the environment in bacterial assembly. Taken together, these results indicate that the effects of changing microbial community composition on decomposition are likely to be smaller than the potential effects of climate change and/or litter quality changes in response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations or atmospheric nutrient deposition. PMID:24022257

  14. Inside an Open Source Software Community: Empirical Analysis on Individual and Group Level

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang Maass

    2004-01-01

    An established Open Source Software community (Apache Cocoon) was explored using an online questionnaire about demographic data and individual and group-related factors. Individual factors encompassed forms of contributions, motivation, expertise and knowledge. Role structures, expectations towards other members, trust and collaboration issues were analysed at group level. More than 60% of the developer community completed this questionnaire. Results provide a valuable basis for deeper unders...

  15. Comparative Analysis of the Composition of Intestinal Bacterial Communities in Dastarcus helophoroides Fed Different Diets

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei-Wei; He, Cai; Cui, Jun; Wang, Hai-dong; Li, Meng-Lou

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of the intestinal bacterial communities in Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) larvae and adults was assayed by PCR-DGGE to determine whether different artificial diets could influence these bacterial communities. Two diets were used for feeding the larvae and four for the adults. Escherichia, Desemzia, Staphylococcus, Asticcacaulis, Cellvibrio, Aurantimonas, and Planomicrobium were isolated from the gut of the adults, with Escherichia and Staphylococ...

  16. Biological oxygen demand optode analysis of coral reef-associated microbial communities exposed to algal exudates

    OpenAIRE

    AK Gregg; Hatay, M; AF Haas; NL Robinett; Barott, K.; MJA Vermeij; KL Marhaver; Meirelles, P.; Thompson, F.; F Rohwer

    2013-01-01

    Algae-derived dissolved organic matter has been hypothesized to induce mortality of reef building corals. One proposed killing mechanism is a zone of hypoxia created by rapidly growing microbes. To investigate this hypothesis, biological oxygen demand (BOD) optodes were used to quantify the change in oxygen concentrations of microbial communities following exposure to exudates generated by turf algae and crustose coralline algae (CCA). BOD optodes were embedded with microbial communities cult...

  17. OOPS, Turning MIT Opencourseware into Chinese: An analysis of a community of practice of global translators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi Miyoung Lee

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available An all-volunteer organization called the Opensource Opencourseware Prototype System (OOPS, headquartered in Taiwan, was initially designed to translate open source materials from MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW site into Chinese. Given the recent plethora of open educational resources (OER, such as the OCW, the growing use of such resources by the world community, and the emergence of online global education communities to localize resources such as the OOPS, a key goal of this research was to understand how the OOPS members negotiate meanings and form a collective identity in this cross-continent online community. To help with our explorations and analyses within the OOPS translation community, several core principles from Etienne Wenger’s concept of Communities of Practice (COP guided our analyses, including mutual engagement, joint enterprise, shared repertoire, reification, and overall identity of the community. In this paper, we detail how each of these key components was uniquely manifested within the OOPS. Three issues appeared central to the emergence, success, and challenges of the community such as OOPS: 1 strong, stable, and fairly democratic leadership; 2 participation incentives; and 3 online storytelling or opportunities to share one’s translation successes, struggles, and advice within an asynchronous discussion forum. While an extremely high level of enthusiasm among the OOPS members underpinned the success of the OOPS, discussion continues on issues related to quality control, purpose and scope, and forms of legitimate participation. This study, therefore, provides an initial window into the emergence and functioning of an online global education COP in the OER movement. Future research directions related to online global educational communities are discussed.

  18. Blended Learning and Sense of Community: A Comparative Analysis with Traditional and Fully Online Graduate Courses

    OpenAIRE

    Fred Rovai and Hope Jordan

    2004-01-01

    Blended learning is a hybrid of classroom and online learning that includes some of the conveniences of online courses without the complete loss of face-to-face contact. The present study used a causal-comparative design to examine the relationship of sense of community between traditional classroom, blended, and fully online higher education learning environments. Evidence is provided to suggest that blended courses produce a stronger sense of community among students than either traditional...

  19. Blended Learning and Sense of Community: A Comparative Analysis with Traditional and Fully Online Graduate Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Rovai and Hope Jordan

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning is a hybrid of classroom and online learning that includes some of the conveniences of online courses without the complete loss of face-to-face contact. The present study used a causal-comparative design to examine the relationship of sense of community between traditional classroom, blended, and fully online higher education learning environments. Evidence is provided to suggest that blended courses produce a stronger sense of community among students than either traditional or fully online courses.

  20. Multi-Scale Analysis of the European Airspace Using Network Community Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Gurtner, Grald; Vitali, Stefania; Cipolla, Marco; Lillo, Fabrizio; Mantegna, Rosario Nunzio; Miccich, Salvatore; Pozzi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    We show that the European airspace can be represented as a multi-scale traffic network whose nodes are airports, sectors, or navigation points and links are defined and weighted according to the traffic of flights between the nodes. By using a unique database of the air traffic in the European airspace, we investigate the architecture of these networks with a special emphasis on their community structure. We propose that unsupervised network community detection algorithms can be used to monit...

  1. Oral health conditions and frailty in Mexican community-dwelling elderly: a cross sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castrejón-Pérez Roberto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral health is an important component of general well-being for the elderly. Oral health-related problems include loss of teeth, nonfunctional removable dental prostheses, lesions of the oral mucosa, periodontitis, and root caries. They affect food selection, speaking ability, mastication, social relations, and quality of life. Frailty is a geriatric syndrome that confers vulnerability to negative health-related outcomes. The association between oral health and frailty has not been explored thoroughly. This study sought to identify associations between the presence of some oral health conditions, and frailty status among Mexican community-dwelling elderly. Methods Analysis of baseline data of the Mexican Study of Nutritional and Psychosocial Markers of Frailty, a cohort study carried out in a representative sample of people aged 70 and older residing in one district of Mexico City. Frailty was defined as the presence of three or more of the following five components: weight loss, exhaustion, slowness, weakness, and low physical activity. Oral health variables included self-perception of oral health compared with others of the same age; utilization of dental services during the last year, number of teeth, dental condition (edentate, partially edentate, or completely dentate, utilization and functionality of removable partial or complete dentures, severe periodontitis, self-reported chewing problems and xerostomia. Covariates included were gender, age, years of education, cognitive performance, smoking status, recent falls, hospitalization, number of drugs, and comorbidity. The association between frailty and dental variables was determined performing a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Final models were adjusted by socio-demographic and health factors Results Of the 838 participants examined, 699 had the information needed to establish the criteria for diagnosis of frailty. Those who had a higher probability of being frail included women (OR = 1.9, those who reported myocardial infarction (OR = 3.8, urinary incontinence (OR = 2.7, those who rated their oral health worse than others (OR = 3.2, and those who did not use dental services (OR = 2.1. For each additional year of age and each additional drug consumed, the probability of being frail increased 10% and 30%, respectively. Conclusions Utilization of dental services and self-perception of oral health were associated with a higher probability of being frail.

  2. Biological oxygen demand optode analysis of coral reef-associated microbial communities exposed to algal exudates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AK Gregg

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Algae-derived dissolved organic matter has been hypothesized to induce mortality of reef building corals. One proposed killing mechanism is a zone of hypoxia created by rapidly growing microbes. To investigate this hypothesis, biological oxygen demand (BOD optodes were used to quantify the change in oxygen concentrations of microbial communities following exposure to exudates generated by turf algae and crustose coralline algae (CCA. BOD optodes were embedded with microbial communities cultured from Montastraea annularis and Mussismilia hispida, and respiration was measured during exposure to turf and CCA exudates. The oxygen concentrations along the optodes were visualized with a low-cost Submersible Oxygen Optode Recorder (SOOpR system. With this system we observed that exposure to exudates derived from turf algae stimulated higher oxygen drawdown by the coral-associated bacteria than CCA exudates or seawater controls. Furthermore, in both turf and CCA exudate treatments, all microbial communities (coral-, algae-associated and pelagic contributed significantly to the observed oxygen drawdown. This suggests that the driving factor for elevated oxygen consumption rates is the source of exudates rather than the initially introduced microbial community. Our results demonstrate that exudates from turf algae may contribute to hypoxia-induced coral stress in two different coral genera as a result of increased biological oxygen demand of the local microbial community. Additionally, the SOOpR system developed here can be applied to measure the BOD of any culturable microbe or microbial community.

  3. Using latent class analysis to model prescription medications in the measurement of falling among a community elderly population

    OpenAIRE

    Hardigan, Patrick C; Schwartz, David C; Hardigan, William D

    2013-01-01

    Background Falls among the elderly are a major public health concern. Therefore, the possibility of a modeling technique which could better estimate fall probability is both timely and needed. Using biomedical, pharmacological and demographic variables as predictors, latent class analysis (LCA) is demonstrated as a tool for the prediction of falls among community dwelling elderly. Methods Using a retrospective data-set a two-step LCA modeling approach was employed. First, we looked for the op...

  4. Cost and cost-effectiveness analysis of a community mobilisation intervention to reduce intimate partner violence in Kampala, Uganda.

    OpenAIRE

    Michaels-Igbokwe, C; Abramsky, T.; DeVries, K.; Michau, L.; Musuya, T; Watts, C

    2016-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) poses a major public health concern. To date there are few rigorous economic evaluations of interventions aimed at preventing IPV in low-income settings. This study provides a cost and cost effectiveness analysis of SASA!, a community mobilisation intervention to change social norms and prevent IPV. An economic evaluation alongside a cluster randomised controlled trial. Both financial and economic costs were collected retrospectively from the provider's p...

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Spontaneous Cocoa Bean Fermentation Metagenome Reveals New Insights into Its Bacterial and Fungal Community Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Illeghems, Koen; De Vuyst, Luc; Papalexandratou, Zoi; Weckx, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    This is the first report on the phylogenetic analysis of the community diversity of a single spontaneous cocoa bean box fermentation sample through a metagenomic approach involving 454 pyrosequencing. Several sequence-based and composition-based taxonomic profiling tools were used and evaluated to avoid software-dependent results and their outcome was validated by comparison with previously obtained culture-dependent and culture-independent data. Overall, this approach revealed a wider bacter...

  6. Regional inequalities in under-5 mortality in Nigeria: a population-based analysis of individual- and community-level determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Antai Diddy

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Regions with geographically diverse ecology and socioeconomic circumstances may have different disease exposures and child health outcomes. This study assessed variations in the risks of death in children under age 5 across regions of Nigeria and determined characteristics at the individual and community levels that explain possible variations among regions. Methods Multilevel Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed using a nationally representative sample of 6,029...

  7. Spontaneous Communities of Learning: A Social Analysis of Learning Ecosystems in Massively Multiplayer Online Gaming (MMOG) Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Galarneau, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    This research project is comprised of a cross-cultural ethnography and social network analysis that seeks to illuminate the spontaneous communities of learning/practice that emerge around the relatively recent phenomenon of massively multiplayer online games. While these games can be played individually to greater or lesser degrees depending on the game, the game play mechanics are generally such that true mastery of the game can often only be achieved by working collaboratively with other pl...

  8. Effects of site and plant species on rhizosphere community structure as revealed by molecular analysis of microbial guilds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rodrigo; Gtz, Monika; Mrotzek, Nicole; Lottmann, Jana; Berg, Gabriele; Smalla, Kornelia

    2006-05-01

    The bacterial and fungal rhizosphere communities of strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch.) and oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) were analysed using molecular fingerprints. We aimed to determine to what extent the structure of different microbial groups in the rhizosphere is influenced by plant species and sampling site. Total community DNA was extracted from bulk and rhizosphere soil taken from three sites in Germany in two consecutive years. Bacterial, fungal and group-specific (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria) primers were used to PCR-amplify 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA gene fragments from community DNA prior to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. Bacterial fingerprints of soil DNA revealed a high number of equally abundant faint bands, while rhizosphere fingerprints displayed a higher proportion of dominant bands and reduced richness, suggesting selection of bacterial populations in this environment. Plant specificity was detected in the rhizosphere by bacterial and group-specific DGGE profiles. Different bulk soil community fingerprints were revealed for each sampling site. The plant species was a determinant factor in shaping similar actinobacterial communities in the strawberry rhizosphere from different sites in both years. Higher heterogeneity of DGGE profiles within soil and rhizosphere replicates was observed for the fungi. Plant-specific composition of fungal communities in the rhizosphere could also be detected, but not in all cases. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments obtained from dominant DGGE bands detected in the bacterial profiles of the Rostock site revealed that Streptomyces sp. and Rhizobium sp. were among the dominant ribotypes in the strawberry rhizosphere, while sequences from Arthrobacter sp. corresponded to dominant bands from oilseed rape bacterial fingerprints. PMID:16629753

  9. Microbial community analysis of fouled reverse osmosis membranes used in water recycling

    KAUST Repository

    Ayache, C.

    2013-06-01

    Biofouling on RO membranes has major cost implications in water reclamation. In this study membranes and water samples were collected from a RO pilot-plant operated on two sites to study the differences in microbial communities in order to develop a better understanding of the biofouling. For the two sites studied, the examination of the front membrane of the first stage and the tail membrane of the second stage of the RO train using 16S rRNA gene-based molecular technique showed that bacteria were similar on both stages and no significant effect of the membrane location within the RO train on the biofilm development could be discerned. However, the comparison of the identified bacteria from membrane samples between the two sites showed that each site is specific, leading to a different composition of microbial communities. The different nutrient concentrations in the RO feed water due to the different biological pre-treatments are one potential explanation for the observed differences in the microbial communities. Seasonal variations also play a major role in the development of microbial communities as shown by the significant differences observed between the communities measured in the samples in winter and summer on the second site. The results did not show similarity between the species identified on the RO membranes and in the feed water. Hence, the relationship of microbial community between the water generated during the pre-treatment process and RO membranes is not obvious. From this study, results showed that there is an actual need to investigate the development of microbial communities on membrane surface in real conditions in order to suggest tailored solutions for biofouling control and removal. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Molecular genetic monitoring of bacterial communities in manzala lake, egypt, based on 16S rRNA gene analysis

    OpenAIRE

    El Saied, H.E.

    2007-01-01

    A first molecular genetic study on the diversity of bacterial communities at Manzala Lake, Egypt, was determined by culture-independent 16S rRNA gene analysis. Bulk DNAs were extracted from water and sediment at two different sampling sites namely; Bashtir and Genka, in the lake. The 16S rRNA gene was positively amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from bulk DNA of each sample, cloned and sequenced. The sequence analysis of one hundred clones from each clone library obtained number of...

  11. Functional gene array-based analysis of microbial community structure in groundwaters with a gradient of contaminant levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, P.J.; Wu, L.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Schadt, C.W.; Watson, D.B.; Jardine, P.M.; Palumbo, A.V.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2009-06-15

    To understand how contaminants affect microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure, six groundwater monitoring wells from the Field Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP; Oak Ridge, TN), with a wide range of pH, nitrate, and heavy metal contamination were investigated. DNA from the groundwater community was analyzed with a functional gene array containing 2006 probes to detect genes involved in metal resistance, sulfate reduction, organic contaminant degradation, and carbon and nitrogen cycling. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. Highly contaminated wells had lower gene diversity but greater signal intensity than the pristine well. The microbial composition was heterogeneous, with 17-70% overlap between different wells. Metal-resistant and metal-reducing microorganisms were detected in both contaminated and pristine wells, suggesting the potential for successful bioremediation of metal-contaminated groundwaters. In addition, results of Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis indicate that nitrate, sulfate, pH, uranium, and technetium have a significant (p < 0.05) effect on microbial community structure. This study provides an overall picture of microbial community structure in contaminated environments with functional gene arrays by showing that diversity and heterogeneity can vary greatly in relation to contamination.

  12. [Analysis of the bacterial community developing in the course of Sphagnum moss decomposition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulichevskaia, I S; Belova, S E; Kevbrin, V V; Dedysh, S N; Zavarzin, G A

    2007-01-01

    Slow degradation of organic matter in acidic Sphagnum peat bogs suggests a limited activity of organotrophic microorganisms. Monitoring of the Sphagnum debris decomposition in a laboratory simulation experiment showed that this process was accompanied by a shift in the water color to brownish due to accumulation of humic substances and by the development of a specific bacterial community with a density of 2.4 x 10(7) cells ml(-1). About half of these organisms are metabolically active and detectable with rRNA-specific oligonucleotide probes. Molecular identification of the components of this microbial community showed the numerical dominance of bacteria affiliated with the phyla Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Phanctomycetes. The population sizes of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, which are believed to be the main agents of bacterially-mediated decomposition in eutrophic wetlands, were low. The numbers of planctomycetes increased at the final stage of Sphagnum decomposition. The representative isolates of Alphaproteobacteria were able to utilize galacturonic acid, the only low-molecular-weight organic compound detected in the water samples; the representatives of Planctomycetes were able to decompose some heteropolysaccharides, which points to the possible functional role of these groups of microorganisms in the community under study. Thus, the composition of the bacterial community responsible for Sphagnum decomposition in acidic and low-mineral oligotrophic conditions seems to be fundamentally different from that of the bacterial community which decomposes plant debris in eutrophic ecosystems at neutral pH. PMID:18069332

  13. High-throughput nucleotide sequence analysis of diverse bacterial communities in leachates of decomposing pig carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hak Yang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The leachate generated by the decomposition of animal carcass has been implicated as an environmental contaminant surrounding the burial site. High-throughput nucleotide sequencing was conducted to investigate the bacterial communities in leachates from the decomposition of pig carcasses. We acquired 51,230 reads from six different samples (1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 14 week-old carcasses and found that sequences representing the phylum Firmicutes predominated. The diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences in the leachate was the highest at 6 weeks, in contrast to those at 2 and 14 weeks. The relative abundance of Firmicutes was reduced, while the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria increased from 3–6 weeks. The representation of phyla was restored after 14 weeks. However, the community structures between the samples taken at 1–2 and 14 weeks differed at the bacterial classification level. The trend in pH was similar to the changes seen in bacterial communities, indicating that the pH of the leachate could be related to the shift in the microbial community. The results indicate that the composition of bacterial communities in leachates of decomposing pig carcasses shifted continuously during the study period and might be influenced by the burial site.

  14. Perspective for Aquaponic Systems: “Omic” Technologies for Microbial Community Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguia-Fragozo, Perla; Alatorre-Jacome, Oscar; Rico-Garcia, Enrique; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Cruz-Hernandez, Andres; Ocampo-Velazquez, Rosalia V.; Garcia-Trejo, Juan F.; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G.

    2015-01-01

    Aquaponics is the combined production of aquaculture and hydroponics, connected by a water recirculation system. In this productive system, the microbial community is responsible for carrying out the nutrient dynamics between the components. The nutrimental transformations mainly consist in the transformation of chemical species from toxic compounds into available nutrients. In this particular field, the microbial research, the “Omic” technologies will allow a broader scope of studies about a current microbial profile inside aquaponics community, even in those species that currently are unculturable. This approach can also be useful to understand complex interactions of living components in the system. Until now, the analog studies were made to set up the microbial characterization on recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS). However, microbial community composition of aquaponics is still unknown. “Omic” technologies like metagenomic can help to reveal taxonomic diversity. The perspectives are also to begin the first attempts to sketch the functional diversity inside aquaponic systems and its ecological relationships. The knowledge of the emergent properties inside the microbial community, as well as the understanding of the biosynthesis pathways, can derive in future biotechnological applications. Thus, the aim of this review is to show potential applications of current “Omic” tools to characterize the microbial community in aquaponic systems. PMID:26509157

  15. Analysis of community properties and node properties to understand the structure of the bus transport network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yeran; Mburu, Lucy; Wang, Shaohua

    2016-05-01

    Akin to most infrastructures, intraurban bus networks are large and highly complex. Understanding the composition of such networks requires an intricate decomposition of the network into modules, taking into account the manner in which network links are distributed among the nodes. There exists for each set of highly interlinked nodes little connectivity with the next set of highly interlinked nodes. This inherent property of nodes makes community detection a popular approach for analyzing the structure of complex networks. In this study, we attempt to understand the structure of the intraurban bus network of Ireland's capital city, Dublin in a two-step approach. We first analyze the modular structure of the network by identifying potential communities. Secondly, we assess the prominence of each network node by examining the module-based topological properties of the nodes. Results of this empirical study reveal a clear pattern of independent communities, indicating thus, an implicit multi-community structure of the intraurban bus network. Examination of the geographic characteristics of the identified communities shows a degree of socio-economic divisions of the Dublin city. Furthermore, a large majority of the important nodes (vital transportation hubs) are located at the city center, implying that most of the bus lines in Dublin city tend to intersect the city's core.

  16. Molecular analysis of microbial community in arsenic-rich groundwater of Kolsor, West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Angana; Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial community composition within the highly arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater from Kolsur, West Bengal was analyzed over a period of 3 years using 16S rRNA gene clone library and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Molecular phylogenetic study revealed abundance of α-Proteobacteria (56%) and Firmicutes (29%) along with members of β-Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Sphingobacteria as relatively minor groups. Along with consistent physicochemical environment, a stable microbial community structure comprising of bacterial genera Agrobacterium-Rhizobium, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Anoxybacillus and Penibacillus was recorded over the three years study period. Presence of cytosolic arsenate reductase (arsC) gene was observed within the microbial community. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all the arsC sequences were closely related to the same gene from γ-proteobacterial members while the community was consisted of mainly α-proteobacterial groups. Such phylogenetic incongruence between 16S rRNA and arsC genes possibly indicated horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of the ars genes within the groundwater community. Overall, the study reported a nearly stable geomicrobial environment and genetic determinant related to As homeostasis gene, and provided a better insight on biogeochemistry of As contaminated aquifer of West Bengal. PMID:26634393

  17. The current status of community drug testing via the analysis of drugs and drug metabolites in sewage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm J. Reid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years the analysis of drug residues in sewage has been promoted as a means of estimating the level of drug use in communities. Measured drug residue concentrations in the sewage are used to determine the load (total mass of the drug being used by the entire community. Knowledge of the size or population of the community then allows for the calculation of drug-use relative to population (typically drug-mass/day/1000 inhabitants which facilitates comparisons between differing communities or populations. Studies have been performed in many European countries, including Norway, as well as in the US and Australia. The approach has successfully estimated the use of cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDMA, cannabis, nicotine and alcohol. The analysis of biomarkers of drug use in sewage has great potential to support and complement existing techniques for estimating levels of drug use, and as such has been identified as a promising development by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA; www.emcdda.europa.eu/wastewater-analysis. The approach is not without its challenges, and ongoing collaboration across Europe aims at agreeing upon best-practice and harmonising the methods being used. In Norway development is being performed through the NFR RUSMIDDEL funded DrugMon (www.niva.no/drugmon project that has led to the development of many new techniques, significantly improved our understanding of the uncertainties associated with the approach and allowed the coordination of Europe wide collaboration which has included all important intercalibration exercises. Application of the technique can provide evidence-based and real-time estimates of collective drug use with the resulting data used to improve the much needed estimates of drug use and dependency.

  18. Learning Community and Nonlearning Community Students in a Midwestern Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laanan, Frankie Santos; Jackson, Dimitra Lynette; Stebleton, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The research on learning communities has focused primarily on students at four-year colleges and universities. There is a dearth of studies that examine learning communities in community colleges. The purpose of this comparative study was to conduct an analysis of learning community and nonlearning community students in a community college located…

  19. Microbial Community Analysis of a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Using Potato Wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen Li; Rishika Haynes; Eugene Sato; Malcolm Shields; Yoshiko Fujita; Chikashi Sato

    2014-04-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) convert chemical energy to electrical energy via bioelectrochemical reactions mediated by microorganisms. We investigated the diversity of the microbial community in an air cathode single chamber MFC that utilized potato-process wastewater as substrate. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) results indicated that the bacterial communities on the anode, cathode, control electrode, and MFC bulk fluid were similar, but differed dramatically from that of the anaerobic domestic sludge and potato wastewater inoculum. The 16S rDNA sequencing results showed that microbial species detected on the anode were predominantly within the phyla of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Fluorescent microscopy results indicated that there was a clear enhancement of biofilm formation on the anode. Results of this study could help improve understanding of the complexity of microbial communities and optimize the microbial composition for generating electricity by MFCs that utilize potato wastewater.

  20. Palliative care nursing in rural and urban community settings: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasalainen, Sharon; Brazil, Kevin; Wilson, Donna M; Willison, Kathleen; Marshall, Denise; Taniguchi, Alan; Williams, Allison

    2011-07-01

    Nurses have key roles in the coordination and delivery of community-based palliative care. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences between rural and urban community nurses' delivery of palliative care services. A survey was distributed to 277 nurses employed by a community agency in Ontario, Canada, and a 60% response rate was obtained. Nurses reported spending 27% of their time providing palliative care. Rural and urban nurses had similar roles in palliative care but rural nurses spent more time travelling and were more confident in their ability to provide palliative care. Both groups of nurses reported moderate job satisfaction and moderate satisfaction with the level of interdisciplinary collaboration in their practice. Several barriers to and facilitators of optimal palliative care provision were identified. The study results provide information about the needs of nurses that practise in these settings and may provide a basis for the development of strategies to address these needs. PMID:21841703

  1. Microbial community analysis of a single chamber microbial fuel cell using potato wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Haynes, Rishika; Sato, Eugene; Shields, Malcolm S; Fujita, Yoshiko; Sato, Chikashi

    2014-04-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) convert chemical energy to electrical energy via bio-electrochemical reactions mediated by microorganisms. This study investigated the diversity of the microbial community in an air cathode single chamber MFC that used potato-process wastewater as substrate. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism results indicated that the bacterial communities on the anode, cathode, control electrode, and MFC bulk fluid were similar, but differed dramatically from that of the anaerobic domestic sludge and potato wastewater inoculum. The 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing results showed that microbial species detected on the anode were predominantly within the phyla of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Fluorescent microscopy results indicated that there was a clear enhancement of biofilm formation on the anode. Results of this study could help improve understanding of the complexity of microbial communities and optimize the microbial composition for generating electricity by MFCs that use potato wastewater. PMID:24851328

  2. Community Energy: Analysis of Hydrogen Distributed Energy Systems with Photovoltaics for Load Leveling and Vehicle Refueling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage could complement PV electricity generation at the community level. Because PV generation is intermittent, strategies must be implemented to integrate it into the electricity system. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies offer possible PV integration strategies, including the community-level approaches analyzed in this report: (1) using hydrogen production, storage, and reconversion to electricity to level PV generation and grid loads (reconversion scenario); (2) using hydrogen production and storage to capture peak PV generation and refuel hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) (hydrogen fueling scenario); and (3) a comparison scenario using a battery system to store electricity for EV nighttime charging (electric charging scenario).

  3. Comparative analysis of microbial community of novel lactic acid fermentation inoculated with different undefined mixed cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shaobo; Gliniewicz, Karol; Mendes-Soares, Helena; Settles, Matthew L; Forney, Larry J; Coats, Erik R; McDonald, Armando G

    2015-03-01

    Three undefined mixed cultures (activated sludge) from different municipal wastewater treatment plants were used as seeds in a novel lactic acid fermentation process fed with potato peel waste (PPW). Anaerobic sequencing batch fermenters were run under identical conditions to produce predominantly lactic acid. Illumina sequencing was used to examine the 16S rRNA genes of bacteria in the three seeds and fermenters. Results showed that the structure of microbial communities of three seeds were different. All three fermentation products had unique community structures that were dominated (>96%) by species of the genus Lactobacillus, while members of this genus constituted wastes to produce lactic acid. PMID:25545096

  4. Analysis of GLBTQ youth community-based programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kenneth D; Hammack, Phillip L; Himes, Heather L

    2012-01-01

    Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (GLBTQ) youth face oppression despite some increases in cultural support for GLBTQ individuals. Research has revealed the psychological and social distress associated with oppression and the benefits of peer social support programs. This study was conducted to analyze the types and frequency of services, age of participants, and organizational structures of the 116 GLBTQ community-based programs operating in the United States. Using an Internet survey, information from 61 of the programs was secured. The results revealed the community-based youth programs provide critical and unique programs and services that can promote the mental and physical health of GLBTQ youth. PMID:23101498

  5. Multiple myeloma in South Cumbria 1974-80: problems of health analysis in small communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of seven cases of multiple myeloma over seven years in a small community 15 miles from a plant reprocessing nuclear fuel caused much local concern. A case control study of 34 confirmed cases in the health district during 1974 to 1980 revealed no excess of known risk factors among the 23 cases for whom informants could be traced. The possible effects of exposure to marine discharges of radioactive material cannot be completely ruled out, but dose estimates make this highly unlikely. Such studies are a necessary response by community physicians to the population they serve but have major practical and theoretical limitations. (author)

  6. Analysis of soil fungal communities by amplicon pyrosequencing: current approaches to data analysis and the introduction of the pipeline SEED

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Větrovský, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 8 (2013), s. 1027-1037. ISSN 0178-2762 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12050; GA MŠk LD12048; GA ČR GAP504/12/0709 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Fungal community * Internal transcribed spacer * Pyrosequencing pipeline Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.396, year: 2013

  7. RisaAligner software for aligning fluorescence data between Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer chips: Application to soil microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Elisabeth; Fabrègue, Olivier; Scorretti, Riccardo; Reboulet, Jérémy; Simonet, Pascal; Dawson, Lorna; Demanèche, Sandrine

    2015-12-01

    Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA) is a high-resolution and highly reproducible fingerprinting technique for discriminating between microbial communities. The community profiles can be visualized using the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer. Comparison between fingerprints relies upon precise estimation of all amplified DNA fragment lengths; however, size standard computation can vary between gel runs. For complex samples such as soil microbial communities, discrimination by fragment size is not always sufficient. In such cases, the comparison of whole fluorescence data as a function of time (electrophoregrams) is more appropriate. When electrophoregrams [fluorescence = f (time)] are used, and more than one chip is involved, electrophoregram comparisons are challenging due to experimental variations between chips and the lack of correction by the Agilent software in such situations. Here we present RisaAligner software for analyzing and comparing electrophoregrams from Agilent chips using a nonlinear ladder-alignment algorithm. We demonstrate the robustness and substantial improvement of data analysis by analyzing soil microbial profiles obtained with Agilent DNA 1000 and High Sensitivity chips. PMID:26651514

  8. Evaluating community investments in the mining sector using multi-criteria decision analysis to integrate SIA with business planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaining senior management's commitment to long-term social development projects, which are characterised by uncertainty and complexity, is made easier if projects are shown to benefit the site's strategic goals. However, even though the business case for community investment may have been accepted at a general level, as a strategy for competitive differentiation, risk mitigation and a desire to deliver - and to be seen to deliver - a 'net benefit' to affected communities, mining operations are still faced with implementation challenges. Case study research on mining companies, including interviews with social investment decision-makers, has assisted in developing the Social Investment Decision Analysis Tool (SIDAT), a decision model for evaluating social projects in order to create value for both the company and the community. Multi-criteria decision analysis techniques integrating business planning processes with social impact assessment have proved useful in assisting mining companies think beyond the traditional drivers (i.e. seeking access to required lands and peaceful relations with neighbours), to broader issues of how they can meet their business goals and contribute to sustainable development in the regions in which they operate

  9. MARRIAGE RITUAL TEXT OF BALINESE TRADITIONAL COMMUNITY: AN ANALYSIS OF FUNCTIONAL SYSTEMIC LINGUISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Sutama

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Marriage Ritual Text of Balinese Traditional Community (Teks Ritual‘Pewiwahan’ Masyarakat Adat Bali, hereon abbreviated to TRPMAB in this dissertationis analyzed in the perspective of linguistic studies using the functional systemic linguistictheory. TRPMAB is a dialogic text containing a discussion, and is terminologicallytermed as a conversational text. It refers to the use of Balinese language (Bahasa Bali,hereon abbreviated to BB in a marriage ritual. There are two inseparable systems in it;they are BB system and social system, which are widely termed as cultural system.The method employed in this study is field method, meaning that the researcherwent directly to the field or to the location where TRPMAP took place. The researcherdirectly took part as both the active and passive participant. In this way, the researchcould observe TRPMAB directly.The population of the study includes all TPRB in Bali. Considering that thepopulation is too wide, then samples were taken to represent all the population. Thesamples total 10 which were obtained from the biggest marriage processions in Bali. Outof the 10 samples, 6 units of text were selected as the corpus of the study. The selectionwas made based on particular criteria including quality. It is this corpus which wasanalyzed to support and examine the hypothesis related to the text analyzed.The analysis of TRPMAB includes: the structure of the texts, the mood, thetransitivity, the theme-rheme and the logical relationship between the clause and theideology. The findings are as follows:(1 TRPMAB is a text which has a number of structural dimensions such as (acultural structure, (b macro structure, that is, the structure related to the situationalcontext made up of field, tenor and mode, (c micro structure, (d structure of meaning,that is, the structure related to the sequence of meanings between the participants withinthe dialogue, and (e the texture, that is, the intact successive relationship of meaningsamong parts of the text.(2 TRPMB is a text which has a particular system of mood according to thesystem in Balinese language. The structure of clausal mood is made up of subjectfollowed predicate (S?P, the structure of clausal mood is made up of mood and residue,and the system of modality is made up of modalization.(3 TRPMB is a text which has macro transitivity termed as transitivity, that is,the system of valency existing among the processes and participants. The processes usedare ordered as follows: mental process (1,361, existential process (1.071, verbal process(461, relational process (222, behavior process (105 and material process (225. Addedtogether, there are 3,445 processes.(4 TRPMAB is a text which has complete composition of theme - rheme such as(a the theme of intra participants, that is, the theme which occupies the first position inthe structure of mood; (b the topical theme, that is, the theme which occupies the initialposition in the structure of transitivity; and (c the textual theme, that is, the theme whichoccupies the initial position in the text.(5 TRAPMAB is a text which is constructed by the logic syntactic and semanticrelationships. As far as the logic semantic relationship is concerned, only expandedrelationship of meaning has been found, that is, a type of relationship in which themeaning of the secondary clause extends or develops the meaning of the primary clauseby elaboration, extension and multiplicity.Apart from being bound to the Balinese cultural context, it is also bound toideology. As far as the Balinese culture is concerned, the ideology referred to is the onewhich is adhered to in the Balinese culture, that is, the one which is related to Hinduismand covers values, esthetics and social patterns. The ideological analysis formulates thatthat the ideology of TRPMAB can be identified through field, participants and mode.

  10. Analysis of institutional mechanisms that support community response to impacts of floods in the middle-zambezi river basin, Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhonda, P.; Mabiza, C.; Makurira, H.; Kujinga, K.; Nhapi, I.; Goldin, J.; Mashauri, D. A.

    In recent years, the frequency of occurrence of floods has increased in Southern Africa. An increase in the frequency of extreme events is partly attributed to climate change. Floods negatively impact on livelihoods, especially those classified as poor, mainly by reducing livelihood options and also contributing to reduced crop yields. In response to these climatic events, governments within Southern Africa have formulated policies which try to mitigate the impacts of floods. Floods can be deadly, often occurring at short notice, lasting for short periods, and causing widespread damage to infrastructure. This study analysed institutional mechanisms in Mbire District of Zimbabwe which aim at mitigating the impact of floods. The study used both quantitative (i.e. questionnaires) and qualitative (i.e. key informant interviews, focus group discussions and observations) data collection methods. Secondary data such as policy and legislation documents and operational manuals of organisations that support communities affected by disasters were reviewed. Qualitative data was analysed using the thematic approach and social network analysis using UCINET 6. Quantitative data were analysed using SPSS 19.0. The study found out that there exists institutional framework that has been developed at the national and local level to support communities in the study area in response to the impacts of floods. This is supported by various pieces of legislation that are housed in different government departments. However, the existing institutional framework does not effectively strengthen disaster management mechanisms at the local level. Lack of financial resources and appropriate training and skills to undertake flood management activities reduce the capacity of communities and disaster management organisations to effectively mitigate the impacts of floods. The study also found that there are inadequate hydro-meteorological stations to enable accurate forecasts. Even in those cases where forecasts predicting extreme weather events have been made, communities have difficulties accessing and interpreting such forecasts due to inadequate communication systems. Such factors reduce the preparedness of communities to deal with extreme weather events.

  11. From reaching every district to reaching every community: analysis and response to the challenge of equity in immunization in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan Soeung, Sann; Grundy, John; Duncan, Richard; Thor, Rasoka; Bilous, Julian B

    2013-08-01

    BACKGROUND An international review of the Cambodian Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) in 2010 and other data show that despite immunization coverage increases and vaccine preventable diseases incidence reductions, inequities in access to immunization services exist. Utilizing immunization and health systems literature, analysis of global health databases and the EPI review findings, this paper examines the characteristics of immunization access and outcome inequities, and describes proposed longer-term strategic and operational responses to these problems. Findings The national programme has evolved from earlier central and provincial level planning to strengthening routine immunization coverage through the District level 'Reaching Every District Strategy'. However, despite remarkable improvements, the review found over 20% of children surveyed were not fully immunized, primarily from communities where inequities of both access and impact persist. These inequities relate mainly to socio-economic exposures including wealth and education level, population mobility and ethnicity. To address these problems, a shift in strategic and operational response is proposed that will include (a) a re-focus of planning on facility level to detect disadvantaged communities, (b) establishment of monitoring systems to provide detailed information on community access and utilization, (c) development of communication strategies and health networks that enable providers to adjust service delivery according to the needs of vulnerable populations, and (d) securing financial, management and political commitment for 'reaching every community'. CONCLUSIONS For Cambodia to achieve its immunization equity objectives and disease reduction goals, a shift of emphasis to health centre and community is needed. This approach will maximize the benefits of new vaccine introduction in the coming 'Decade of Vaccines', plus potentially extend the reach of other life-saving maternal and child health interventions to the socially disadvantaged, both in Cambodia and in other countries with a similar level of development. PMID:23048124

  12. Out of the laboratory and into the community. 26 years of applied behavior analysis at the Juniper Gardens Children's Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, C R; Carta, J J; Hart, B; Kamps, D; Terry, B; Arreaga-Mayer, C; Atwater, J; Walker, D; Risley, T; Delquadri, J C

    1992-11-01

    Application of Skinner's principles to socially significant human behavior had been well articulated by 1968 (Baer, Wolf, & Risley, 1968). Applications of these principles by Baer, Wolf, Risley, Hall, Hart, Christophersen, and their colleagues were in evidence as early as 1964 in the homes, schools, and clinics of inner-city Kansas City, Kansas, at the Juniper Gardens Housing Project. The work continues relatively uninterrupted, having contributed extensively to the literature of applied behavior analysis and the lives of community residents. This article describes the project and illustrates how applied behavioral research was initiated and extended, how the work addressed general concerns in psychology, and how it continues to address contemporary concerns within the community. PMID:1482007

  13. Analysis of denitrifier community in a bioaugmented sequencing batch reactor for the treatment of coking wastewater containing pyridine and quinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yaohui; Xing, Rui; Wen, Donghui; Tang, Xiaoyan [Peking Univ., Beijing (CN). Key Lab. of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education); Sun, Qinghua [Peking Univ., Beijing (CN). Key Lab. of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education); Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing (China). Inst. of Environmental Health and Related Product Safety

    2011-05-15

    The denitrifier community and associated nitrate and nitrite reduction in the bioaugmented and general sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) during the treatment of coking wastewater containing pyridine and quinoline were investigated. The efficiency and stability of nitrate and nitrite reduction in SBR was considerably improved after inoculation with four pyridine- or quinoline-degrading bacterial strains (including three denitrifying strains). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) based on the nosZ gene revealed that the structures of the denitrifier communities in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented reactors were distinct and varied during the course of the experiment. Bioaugmentation protected indigenous denitrifiers from disruptions caused by pyridine and quinoline. Clone library analysis showed that one of the added denitrifiers comprised approximately 6% of the denitrifier population in the bioaugmented sludge. (orig.)

  14. Nitrifying Community Analysis in a Single Submerged Attached-Growth Bioreactor for Treatment of High-Ammonia Waste Stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, April Z.; Pedros, Philip B; Kristiansen, Anja; Onnis-Hayden, Annalisa; Schramm, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the nitrifying community structure in a single-stage submerged attached-growth bioreactor (SAGB) that successfully achieved stable nitrogen removal over nitrite of a high-strength ammonia wastewater. The reactor was operated with intermittent aeration and external carbon...... addition (methanol). With influent ammonia and total Kjeldahl nitrogen ranging from 537 to 968 mg/L and 643 to1510 mg/L, respectively, 85% nitrogen removal was obtained, and effluent was dominated by nitrite (NO2 −/NOx >0.95). Nitrifying community analysis using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH...... biofilm. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were not detectable in the biofilm samples with probes for either Nitrospira sp. or Nitrobacter sp., which indicated that NOB were either absent from the biofilters or present in numbers below the detection limit of FISH (<0.1% of the total biofilm). Nitrite...

  15. The change of microbial community from chlorinated solvent-contaminated groundwater after biostimulation using the metagenome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chih-Ming; Liao, Hung-Yu; Chien, Chih-Ching; Tseng, Yi-Kuan; Tang, Petrus; Lin, Chih-En; Chen, Ssu-Ching

    2016-01-25

    The compositions of bacterial community in one site contaminated with PCE/TCE after the slow polycolloid-releasing substrate (SPRS) (contained vegetable oil, cane molasses, and surfactants) addition were analyzed. Results show that SPRS caused a rapid enhancement of reductive dechlorination of TCE. The transformation of PCE/TCE into ethene was observed after 20 days of operation. To compare the change of bacterial communities before and after SPRS addition, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing using the metagenome analysis was performed. Results demonstrated the detection of the increased amounts of Dehalogenimonas by 2.2-fold, Pseudomonas by 3.4-fold and Sulfuricurvum by 4-fold with the analysis of the ribosomal database project (RDP). Metagenomic DNA was extracted from PCE/TCE-contaminated groundwater after SPRS addition, and subjected to sequencing. Results obtained from metagenomic sequencing indicate that genes from Dehalococcoides mccartyi was ranked as the second abundant bacteria among all of the detected bacteria via the analysis of the lowest common ancestor (LCA). Abundance of these bacterial groups, as shown above suggests their role in TCE biodegradation. Functional analysis of the metagenome, with the specific reference to chloroalkane and chloroalkene degradation, revealed the presence of some genes responsible for TCE biodegradation. Overall, results of this study provided new insights for a better understanding of the potential of biostimulation on TCE-contaminated sites. PMID:26474376

  16. Analysis of the Integration of Skill Standards into Community College Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Steven R.; Woo, Hui-Jeong; Marvel, Matthew R.

    2005-01-01

    The utilization of skill standards in the curriculum development process has become an increasingly prominent aspect of the reform movement in career and technical education (CTE) over the past 10 years. Data were collected across 10 CTE program areas from a nationally representative sample of community colleges. The authors discuss the extent to…

  17. A Re-Examination of the Community of Inquiry Framework: Social Network and Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Peter; Hayes, Suzanne; Vickers, Jason; Gozza-Cohen, Mary; Uzuner, Sedef; Mehta, Ruchi; Valchova, Anna; Rangan, Prahalad

    2010-01-01

    This study provides a simultaneous examination of all components of the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework (Garrison, Anderson & Archer, 2000; Anderson, Rourke, Garrison & Archer, 2001; and Rourke, Garrison, Anderson & Archer, 1999) and seeks to extend previous work into the nature, development, and relationships between the constructs of…

  18. Time-series analysis of six whale-fall communities in Monterey Canyon, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundsten, Lonny; Schlining, Kyra L.; Frasier, Kaitlin; Johnson, Shannon B.; Kuhnz, Linda A.; Harvey, Julio B. J.; Clague, Gillian; Vrijenhoek, Robert C.

    2010-12-01

    Dead whale carcasses that sink to the deep seafloor introduce a massive pulse of energy capable of hosting dynamic communities of organisms in an otherwise food-limited environment. Through long-term observations of one natural and five implanted whale carcasses in Monterey Canyon, CA, this study suggests that: (1) depth and related physical conditions play a crucial role in species composition; (2) the majority of species in these communities are background deep-sea taxa; and (3) carcass degradation occurs sub-decadally. Remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) equipped with studio quality video cameras were used to survey whales during 0.8 to seven year periods, depending on the carcass. All organisms were identified to the lowest possible taxon. Community differences among whale-falls seemed to be most strongly related to depth and water temperature. The communities changed significantly from initial establishment shortly after a carcass' arrival at the seafloor through multiple years of steady degradation. The majority of species found at the whale-falls were background taxa commonly seen in Monterey Bay. While populations of species characterized as bone specialists, seep restricted, and of unknown habitat affinities were also observed, sometimes in great abundance, they contributed minimally to overall species richness. All whale carcasses, shallow and deep, exhibited sub-decadal degradation and a time-series of mosaic images at the deepest whale site illustrates the rapidity at which the carcasses degrade.

  19. Teaching Community Survival Skills to Mentally Retarded Adults: A Review and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James E.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The article reviews research on training mentally retarded adults in the following community survival skills: travel training, money management, meal preparation, clothing and personal care, telephone skill, housekeeping, self-medication, leisure skills, social skills, and conversation. Results are said to indicate the value of behavioral…

  20. Microbial Communities in Biofilms of an Acid Mine Drainage Site Determined by Phospholipid Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Gupta, S.; Fang, J.

    2008-12-01

    Phospholipids were extracted to determine the microbial biomass and community structure of biofims from an acid mine drainage (AMD) at the Green Valley coal mine site (GVS) in western Indiana. The distribution of specific biomarkers indicated the presence of a variety of microorganisms. Phototrophic microeukaryotes, which include Euglena mutabilis, algae, and cyanobacteria were the most dominant organisms, as indicated by the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The presence of terminally methyl branched fatty acids suggests the presence of Gram-positive bacteria, and the mid-methyl branched fatty acids indicates the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Fungi appear to also be an important part of the AMD microbial communities as suggested by the presence of 18:2 fatty acid. The acidophilic microeukaryotes Euglena dominated the biofilm microbial communities. These microorganisms appear to play a prominent role in the formation and preservation of stromatolites and in releasing oxygen to the atmosphere by oxygenic photosynthesis. Thus, the AMD environment comprises a host of microorganisms spreading out within the phylogenetic tree of life. Novel insights on the roles of microbial consortia in the formation and preservation of stromatolites and the production of oxygen through photosynthesis in AMD systems may have significance in the understanding of the interaction of Precambrian microbial communities in environments that produced microbially-mediated sedimentary structures and that caused oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere.

  1. A global meta-analysis of the relative extent of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siefert, A.; Violle, C.; Chalmandrier, L.; Albert, C. H.; Taudiere, A.; Fajardo, A.; Aarssen, L. W.; Baraloto, Ch.; Carlucci, M. B.; Cianciaruso, M. V.; de L. Dantas, V.; de Bello, Francesco; Duarte, L. D. S.; Fonseca, C. R.; Freschet, G. T.; Gaucherand, S.; Gross, N.; Hikosaka, K.; Jackson, B.; Jung, V.; Kamiyama, Ch.; Katabuchi, M.; Kembel, S. W.; Kichenin, E.; Kraft, N. J. B.; Lagerström, A.; Bagousse-Pinguet, Y. L.; Li, Y.; Mason, N.; Messier, J.; Nakashizuka, T.; Overton, J. McC.; Peltzer, D. A.; Pérez-Ramos, I. M.; Pillar, V. D.; Prentice, H. C.; Richardson, S.; Sasaki, T.; Schamp, B. S.; Schöb, C.; Shipley, B.; Sundqvist, M.; Sykes, M. T.; Vandewalle, M.; Wardle, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 12 (2015), s. 1406-1419. ISSN 1461-023X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP505/12/1296 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : community ecology * functional diversity * interspecific variation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 10.689, year: 2014

  2. Community Involvement and Victimization at School: An Analysis through Family, Personal and Social Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Teresa Isabel; Musitu, Gonzalo; Ramos, Manuel Jesus; Murgui, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The present study analyzes the impact of adolescents' community involvement on victimization by peers at school through various indicators of family, personal and social adjustment (openness of communication with mother and father, life satisfaction, social self-esteem, and loneliness). Participating in the project were 565 adolescents aged 11 to…

  3. Course Shopping in Urban Community Colleges: An Analysis of Student Drop and Add Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Maxwell, William E.; Cypers, Scott; Moon, Hye Sun; Lester, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the course shopping behaviors among a sample of approximately 5,000 community college students enrolled across nine campuses of a large urban district. The sample was purposely designed as an analytic, rather than a random, sample that sought to obtain adequate numbers of students in course areas that were of theoretical and of…

  4. Implications of the "My School" Website for Disadvantaged Communities: A Bourdieuian Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the theoretical constructs of Pierre Bourdieu, this article explores implications of the Australian "My School" website for schools located in disadvantaged communities. These implications flow from the legitimisation of certain cultural practices through the hidden linkages between scholastic aptitude and cultural heritage…

  5. Comparative analysis of the composition of intestinal bacterial communities in Dastarcus helophoroides fed different diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Wei; He, Cai; Cui, Jun; Wang, Hai-Dong; Li, Meng-Lou

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of the intestinal bacterial communities in Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) larvae and adults was assayed by PCR-DGGE to determine whether different artificial diets could influence these bacterial communities. Two diets were used for feeding the larvae and four for the adults. Escherichia, Desemzia, Staphylococcus, Asticcacaulis, Cellvibrio, Aurantimonas, and Planomicrobium were isolated from the gut of the adults, with Escherichia and Staphylococcus being the main bacterial communities, and the quantities of intestinal bacterial were different in the adults fed different diets. Specifically, the amount of intestinal bacteria from the adults fed different diets had the following ranking according to the major component of the diet: ant powder > darkling beetle pupa powder > cricket powder > silkworm pupa powder. Escherichia, Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Kurthia, Planococcaceae, Ralstonia, Leptothrix, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas were isolated from the gut of the larvae. The quantity of intestinal bacteria from the larvae fed the darkling beetle pupae was greater than that from the larvae fed other artificial diets. This study, for the first time, investigated the effect of artificial diets on the bacterial community and the intestinal microbial diversity of D. helophoroides. PMID:25373234

  6. Community Involvement and Victimization at School: An Analysis through Family, Personal and Social Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Teresa Isabel; Musitu, Gonzalo; Ramos, Manuel Jesus; Murgui, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The present study analyzes the impact of adolescents' community involvement on victimization by peers at school through various indicators of family, personal and social adjustment (openness of communication with mother and father, life satisfaction, social self-esteem, and loneliness). Participating in the project were 565 adolescents aged 11 to

  7. Math College-Readiness of Texas Community College Students: A Multi-Year Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Reni A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the college-readiness in math of Texas community college students using archival data from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). Data analyzed were the rate of all first-time in college (FTIC) developmental education students who scored below the Texas college-readiness standards

  8. Math Readiness of Texas Community College Developmental Education Students: A Multiyear Statewide Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Reni A.; Slate, John R.; Saxon, D. Patrick; Barnes, Wally

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, we examined the college readiness in math of Texas community college students using archival data from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Data analyzed were the rate of all first-time in college (FTIC) developmental education students who scored below the Texas college readiness standards in math and the rates of

  9. Internationalization Efforts in United States Community Colleges: A Comparative Analysis of Urban, Suburban, and Rural Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Natalie J.

    2011-01-01

    With community colleges educating up to one-half of all U.S. undergraduates, more focus on internationalization is warranted in order to ensure student competitiveness in today's global labor pool. This ex post facto study of 2006 survey data from the American Council on Education (ACE) found a low level of internationalization occurring at most

  10. Math Readiness of Texas Community College Developmental Education Students: A Multiyear Statewide Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Reni A.; Slate, John R.; Saxon, D. Patrick; Barnes, Wally

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, we examined the college readiness in math of Texas community college students using archival data from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Data analyzed were the rate of all first-time in college (FTIC) developmental education students who scored below the Texas college readiness standards in math and the rates of…

  11. Stable isotope analysis reveals community-level variation in fish trophodynamics across a fringing coral reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, A. S. J.; Waite, A. M.; Humphries, S.

    2012-12-01

    In contrast to trophodynamic variations, the marked zonation in physical and biological processes across coral reefs and the concomitant changes in habitat and community structure are well documented. In this study, we demonstrate consistent spatial changes in the community-level trophodynamics of 46 species of fish across the fringing Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, using tissue stable isotope and fatty acid analyses. Increasing nitrogen (δ15N) and decreasing carbon (δ13C) isotope ratios in the tissues of herbivores, planktivores and carnivores with increasing proximity to the ocean were indicative of increased reliance on oceanic productivity. In contrast, detritivores and corallivores displayed no spatial change in δ15N or δ13C, indicative of the dependence on reef-derived material across the reef. Higher δ13C, as well as increased benthic- and bacterial-specific fatty acids, suggested reliance on reef-derived production increased in back-reef habitats. Genus-level analyses supported community- and trophic group-level trends, with isotope modelling of species from five genera ( Abudefduf sexfasciatus, Chromis viridis, Dascyllus spp., Pomacentrus spp. and Stegastes spp.), demonstrating declining access to oceanic zooplankton and, in the case of Pomacentrus spp. and Stegastes spp., a switch to herbivory in the back-reef. The spatial changes in fish trophodynamics suggest that the relative roles of oceanic and reef-derived nutrients warrant more detailed consideration in reef-level community ecology.

  12. Math College-Readiness of Texas Community College Students: A Multi-Year Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Reni A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the college-readiness in math of Texas community college students using archival data from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). Data analyzed were the rate of all first-time in college (FTIC) developmental education students who scored below the Texas college-readiness standards…

  13. Analysis of written advertising material distributed through community pharmacies in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Aqeel SA; Al-Sabhan JF; Sultan NY

    2013-01-01

    Background: Advertising is a crucial component of pharmaceutical industry promotion. Research indicates that information on advertisement materials might be inadequate, inaccurate, biased, and misleading. Objective: To analyse and critically assess the information presented in print pharmaceutical advertisements in Saudi Arabia.Methods: Pharmaceutical advertisements were collected from 280 community pharmacies in Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia. The advertisements were evaluated using criteria deri...

  14. Financial Aid Tipping Points: An Analysis of Aid and Academic Achievement at a California Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coria, Elizabeth; Hoffman, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between financial aid awards and measures of student academic achievement. Financial aid and academic records for 11,956 students attending an urban California community college were examined and analyzed using simultaneous linear regression and two-way factorial ANOVAs. Findings revealed a…

  15. Blended Learning and Sense of Community: A Comparative Analysis with Traditional and Fully Online Graduate Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovai, Alfred P.; Jordan, Hope M.

    2004-01-01

    Blended learning is a hybrid of classroom and online learning that includes some of the conveniences of online courses without the complete loss of face-to-face contact. The present study used a causal-comparative design to examine the relationship of sense of community between traditional classroom, blended, and fully online higher education…

  16. Pyrosequencing Analysis of Bacterial Biofilm Communities in Water Meters of a Drinking Water Distribution System▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Hwang, Chiachi; Ling, Fangqiong; Andersen, Gary L.; Mark W. LeChevallier; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2010-01-01

    The applicability of 454 pyrosequencing to characterize bacterial biofilm communities from two water meters of a drinking water distribution system was assessed. Differences in bacterial diversity and composition were observed. A better understanding of the bacterial ecology of drinking water biofilms will allow for effective management of water quality in distribution systems.

  17. System Analysis of Library and Information Services to the Spanish Speaking Community of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello-Argandona, Roberto; Haro, Roberto Peter

    This study focuses on factors contributing to the low level of effectiveness of library and information services to the Spanish speaking community as reported in the literature. It analyzes, using an open system approach, models developed by public and academic libraries to serve the Spanish speaking population. Problems contributing to the

  18. Learning and Sense of Community: A Comparative Analysis of African American and Caucasian Online Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovai, Alfred P.; Gallien, Louis B., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    A study addressed how four variables used to operationalize learning and sense of community differed between African American and Caucasian students enrolled in an online graduate course. The African American only section of the course and the Caucasian students in the mixed section represented a homogeneous subset, while the African American…

  19. A functional analysis of resistance of plant communities to disturbance: a case study of Beijing nature reserves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohong Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant communities in Beijing nature reserves are undergoing unprecedented disturbance due to city expansion. To examine the resistance of plant communities to disturbance is thus of both theoretical and practical significance. We surveyed 22 plant community plots in Labagoumen and Songshan nature reserves. A total of 213 plant species were recorded, and 33 plant functional traits were measured for each species. The functional implications of each trait to disturbance, such as potential for restoration, resistance to fire, grazing and exotic invasion, were quantified according to published information. We calculated a functional index for each species, growth form and plant association, respectively. Regression analysis was used to detect the relationship between species richness and functional index at the community level. We found that the plant restoration index ranged between 4.36 and 10.15, and was significantly higher for herbs than for woody plants, while index of resistance to disturbance by grazing ranged between 10.27 and 23.15, and was significantly higher for woody plants than for herbs. Resistance to fire ranged between 9.01 and 22.15, with trees showing greatest resistance followed, in turn, by shrubs and herbs, while resistance to exotic invasion ranged from 4.41 to10.54, and was again highest for trees. At the community level, plant associations with Populus davidiana as the dominant species were at the top position of a decreasing sequence as determined by functional index of each association. Species richness was not correlated with any functional index at the layer of trees and herbs, but was significantly and positively correlated with resistance index to fire, grazing and exotic invasion within the shrub layer. The information obtained from our research will be important to the future vegetation restoration and management of Beijing nature reserves. Although the functional index of a community is determined to a large extent by the dynamics of dominant species, species richness is fundamental to ecosystem stability. Species redundancy may be detectable in a specific community layer or under a given type of disturbance, but might not be so in all situations.

  20. Land Cover Change Community-based Processing and Analysis System (LC-ComPS): Lessons Learned from Technology Infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, J.; Rao, A.; Gao, F.; Davis, P.; Jackson, G.; Huang, C.; Weinstein, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Land Cover Change Community-based Processing and Analysis System (LC-ComPS) combines grid technology, existing science modules, and dynamic workflows to enable users to complete advanced land data processing on data available from local and distributed archives. Changes in land cover represent a direct link between human activities and the global environment, and in turn affect Earth's climate. Thus characterizing land cover change has become a major goal for Earth observation science. Many science algorithms exist to generate new products (e.g., surface reflectance, change detection) used to study land cover change. The overall objective of the LC-ComPS is to release a set of tools and services to the land science community that can be implemented as a flexible LC-ComPS to produce surface reflectance and land-cover change information with ground resolution on the order of Landsat-class instruments. This package includes software modules for pre-processing Landsat-type satellite imagery (calibration, atmospheric correction, orthorectification, precision registration, BRDF correction) for performing land-cover change analysis and includes pre-built workflow chains to automatically generate surface reflectance and land-cover change products based on user input. In order to meet the project objectives, the team created the infrastructure (i.e., client-server system with graphical and machine interfaces) to expand the use of these existing science algorithm capabilities in a community with distributed, large data archives and processing centers. Because of the distributed nature of the user community, grid technology was chosen to unite the dispersed community resources. At that time, grid computing was not used consistently and operationally within the Earth science research community. Therefore, there was a learning curve to configure and implement the underlying public key infrastructure (PKI) interfaces, required for the user authentication, secure file transfer and remote job execution on the grid network of machines. In addition, science support was needed to vet that the grid technology did not have any adverse affects of the science module outputs. Other open source, unproven technologies, such as a workflow package to manage jobs submitted by the user, were infused into the overall system with successful results. This presentation will discuss the basic capabilities of LC-ComPS, explain how the technology was infused, and provide lessons learned for using and integrating the various technologies while developing and operating the system, and finally outline plans moving forward (maintenance and operations decisions) based on the experience to date.

  1. A comparative analysis of traditional and online lab science transfer courses in the rural community college

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrea

    Through distance learning, the community college system has moved beyond geographical boundaries to serve all students and provide educational opportunities at a distance to individuals previously out of reach of the college community. With the inception of the Mississippi Virtual Community College (MSVCC) in January 2000, Mississippi's public community colleges have experienced unprecedented growth in online enrollments and online course offerings to include the laboratory sciences; however, transfer of online lab science courses are problematic for individuals who wish to gain admittance to Medical, Dental, and Pharmacy schools in Mississippi. Currently online lab science courses are not accepted for transfer for students seeking admission to Mississippi Medical, Dental, or Pharmacy schools. The need for this study, the statement of the problem, and the purpose of the study address transfer issues related to the transfer of online lab science courses in Mississippi and the impact of such on the student and community college. The study also addresses existing doubts regarding online course delivery as a viable method of lab science delivery. The purpose of the study was to investigate differences between online instructional delivery as compared to traditional face-to-face delivery with the following research questions to: (1) Investigate the perception of quality of online courses as compared to traditional face-to-face courses. (2) Investigate the difference in student performance in online transfer lab science courses as compared to student performance in traditional face-to-face lab science courses. The results of this 13 semester study show significant differences in both perception of quality and student performance between online instructional delivery as compared to traditional face-to-face delivery. The findings demonstrate a need for Mississippi Dental, Medical, and Pharmacy schools to reexamine the articulation agreement between IHL and Community and Junior Colleges and consider accepting online lab sciences courses taken at the community college as transfer for admission to Medical, Dental, and Pharmacy schools. Conclusions are included in the study; however, additional studies are needed to address the issue of student performance in the online lab science classroom.

  2. Metagenome analysis of a complex community reveals the metabolic blueprint of anammox bacterium ‘Candidatus Jettenia asiatica’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZiyeHu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Anammox bacteria are key players in the global nitrogen cycle and responsible for up to 50% of global nitrogen loss. Because of their cost effective application in anaerobic nitrogen removal, the anammox bacteria are widely implemented in wastewater treatment. Currently, five genera of anammox bacteria have been identified, together forming a deep branching order in the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobium- Chlamydiae (PVC superphylum. Members of all genera have been detected in wastewater treatment plants, but metagenomic information is not yet available for all genera. Here we report the metagenomic analysis of an enrichment dominated by ‘Candidatus Jettenia asiatica’. The whole microbial community o\tf a granular sludge anammox reactor was sequenced using both illumina and 454 pyrosequencing. The sludge was previously shown to have a ~50% enrichment of the anammox bacterium ‘Candidatus Jettenia asiatica’ by 16S rRNA gene analysis. After de novo assembly 37,432 contigs with an average length of 571 nt were obtained. The contigs were then analyzed by BLASTx searches against the protein sequences of ‘Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis’ and a set of 25 genes essential in anammox metabolism were detected. Additionally all reads were mapped to the genome of an anammox strain KSU-1 and de novo assembly was performed again using the reads that could be mapped on KSU-1. Using this approach, a gene encoding copper-containing nitrite reductase NirK was identified in the genome, instead of cytochrome cd1-type nitrite reductase NirS that is responsible for the nitrite reduction of ‘Ca. Kuenenia stuttgartiensis’ and ‘Ca. Scalindua profunda’. Finally, the community composition was investigated through MetaCluster analysis, 16S rRNA gene analysis and read mapping, which showed the presence of other important community members such as aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, methane producing microorganisms and denitrifying methanotroph 'Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera'.

  3. Analysis of bacterial and archaeal communities along a high-molecular-weight polyacrylamide transportation pipeline system in an oil field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai-Yun; Li, Jing-Yan; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Liu, Jin-Feng; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Viscosity loss of high-molecular-weight partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) solution was observed in a water injection pipeline before being injected into subterranean oil wells. In order to investigate the possible involvement of microorganisms in HPAM viscosity loss, both bacterial and archaeal community compositions of four samples collected from different points of the transportation pipeline were analyzed using PCR-amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and clone library construction method together with the analysis of physicochemical properties of HPAM solution and environmental factors. Further, the relationship between environmental factors and HPAM properties with microorganisms were delineated by canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). Diverse bacterial and archaeal groups were detected in the four samples. The microbial community of initial solution S1 gathered from the make-up tank is similar to solution S2 gathered from the first filter, and that of solution S3 obtained between the first and the second filter is similar to that of solution S4 obtained between the second filter and the injection well. Members of the genus Acinetobacter sp. were detected with high abundance in S3 and S4 in which HPAM viscosity was considerably reduced, suggesting that they likely played a considerable role in HPAM viscosity loss. This study presents information on microbial community diversity in the HPAM transportation pipeline and the possible involvement of microorganisms in HPAM viscosity loss and biodegradation. The results will help to understand the microbial community contribution made to viscosity change and are beneficial for providing information for microbial control in oil fields. PMID:25849654

  4. Analysis of Bacterial and Archaeal Communities along a High-Molecular-Weight Polyacrylamide Transportation Pipeline System in an Oil Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Yun Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Viscosity loss of high-molecular-weight partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM solution was observed in a water injection pipeline before being injected into subterranean oil wells. In order to investigate the possible involvement of microorganisms in HPAM viscosity loss, both bacterial and archaeal community compositions of four samples collected from different points of the transportation pipeline were analyzed using PCR-amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and clone library construction method together with the analysis of physicochemical properties of HPAM solution and environmental factors. Further, the relationship between environmental factors and HPAM properties with microorganisms were delineated by canonical correspondence analysis (CCA. Diverse bacterial and archaeal groups were detected in the four samples. The microbial community of initial solution S1 gathered from the make-up tank is similar to solution S2 gathered from the first filter, and that of solution S3 obtained between the first and the second filter is similar to that of solution S4 obtained between the second filter and the injection well. Members of the genus Acinetobacter sp. were detected with high abundance in S3 and S4 in which HPAM viscosity was considerably reduced, suggesting that they likely played a considerable role in HPAM viscosity loss. This study presents information on microbial community diversity in the HPAM transportation pipeline and the possible involvement of microorganisms in HPAM viscosity loss and biodegradation. The results will help to understand the microbial community contribution made to viscosity change and are beneficial for providing information for microbial control in oil fields.

  5. Mangrove community in an abandoned brick kiln: A structural and association analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Manna

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of brick kiln along the Hoogly rever sites of lower Bengal is very usual and this phenomenon is not only restricted to India alone but also to the other south Asian countries. The abandoned brick Kiln are important habitat for the formation of mangrove community due to tidal action, loose silty substratum and less anthropogenic interference. In this context, the aim of the present study is to visualize how the structural and association pattern regulate the community dynamics of a mangrove ecosystem. Materials and Methods: The entire study area was divided into 37 units (Quadrats of 27.31 sq m. Structural parameters like density, relative density, abundance, relative abundance, frequency, relative basal area were measured based on vegetation map, prepared through satellite image and ground truthing. Association indices (Ochiai, Dice and Jaccard were measured based on 2X2 contingency/species association table. Results: Out of 10 species under 10 genera and 9 families found in the present habitat, Sonneratia caseolaris is the only mangrove tree species with 155 individuals along with other mangrove associates like Cryptocoryne ciliata, Crinum viviparum, Acanthus ilicifolius and Derris scandens. The high importance value index of Sonneratia caseolaris, Cryptocoryne ciliata, and Crinum viviparum indicated their significant role in community formation. The strong positive association of these 3 species also suggests to help in developing community in stressed environment. Conclusion: Identification of such potential mangrove habitat and study of their community dynamics would be helpful to find out the nature of mangrove establishment for future afforestation programme of threatened mangrove species.

  6. Extended local similarity analysis (eLSA of microbial community and other time series data with replicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Li C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing availability of time series microbial community data from metagenomics and other molecular biological studies has enabled the analysis of large-scale microbial co-occurrence and association networks. Among the many analytical techniques available, the Local Similarity Analysis (LSA method is unique in that it captures local and potentially time-delayed co-occurrence and association patterns in time series data that cannot otherwise be identified by ordinary correlation analysis. However LSA, as originally developed, does not consider time series data with replicates, which hinders the full exploitation of available information. With replicates, it is possible to understand the variability of local similarity (LS score and to obtain its confidence interval. Results We extended our LSA technique to time series data with replicates and termed it extended LSA, or eLSA. Simulations showed the capability of eLSA to capture subinterval and time-delayed associations. We implemented the eLSA technique into an easy-to-use analytic software package. The software pipeline integrates data normalization, statistical correlation calculation, statistical significance evaluation, and association network construction steps. We applied the eLSA technique to microbial community and gene expression datasets, where unique time-dependent associations were identified. Conclusions The extended LSA analysis technique was demonstrated to reveal statistically significant local and potentially time-delayed association patterns in replicated time series data beyond that of ordinary correlation analysis. These statistically significant associations can provide insights to the real dynamics of biological systems. The newly designed eLSA software efficiently streamlines the analysis and is freely available from the eLSA homepage, which can be accessed at http://meta.usc.edu/softs/lsa.

  7. Comparative analysis of two community stressors' long-term mental health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation directly compared the long-term mental health consequences of two community-wide stressors, the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear accident and widespread unemployment due to layoff, in demographically comparable samples of women. Results showed a marked degree of similarity in the stressors' effects: Levels of subclinical symptomatology were elevated to similar degrees in each sample during the year following stressor onset, and symptom levels remained elevated in each sample 2 to 3 1/2 years later. Moreover, variables identified as predictors of enduring psychological distress were virtually identical for the two samples. Additional analyses revealed that the mental health status of unemployed husbands mediated the negative psychological effects of layoff on their wives. Implications of these results for understanding the long-term consequences of exposure to community-wide stress are discussed

  8. A comparative analysis of two community stressors' long-term mental health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, M A; Bromet, E J; Schulberg, H C

    1987-04-01

    The investigation directly compared the long-term mental health consequences of two community-wide stressors, the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear accident and widespread unemployment due to layoff, in demographically comparable samples of women. Results showed a marked degree of similarity in the stressors' effects: Levels of subclinical symptomatology were elevated to similar degrees in each sample during the year following stressor onset, and symptom levels remained elevated in each sample 2 to 3 1/2 years later. Moreover, variables identified as predictors of enduring psychological distress were virtually identical for the two samples. Additional analyses revealed that the mental health status of unemployed husbands mediated the negative psychological effects of layoff on their wives. Implications of these results for understanding the long-term consequences of exposure to community-wide stress are discussed. PMID:3604998

  9. Comparative analysis of two community stressors' long-term mental health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dew, M.A.; Bromet, E.J.; Schulberg, H.C.

    1987-04-01

    The investigation directly compared the long-term mental health consequences of two community-wide stressors, the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear accident and widespread unemployment due to layoff, in demographically comparable samples of women. Results showed a marked degree of similarity in the stressors' effects: Levels of subclinical symptomatology were elevated to similar degrees in each sample during the year following stressor onset, and symptom levels remained elevated in each sample 2 to 3 1/2 years later. Moreover, variables identified as predictors of enduring psychological distress were virtually identical for the two samples. Additional analyses revealed that the mental health status of unemployed husbands mediated the negative psychological effects of layoff on their wives. Implications of these results for understanding the long-term consequences of exposure to community-wide stress are discussed.

  10. Analysis of a benthic community food web using isotopically labelled potential food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments was designed to reveal the trophic structure of a benthic community using kelp holdfasts as microcosms within the kelp-bed community. The experimental food comprised zooplankton represented by 3H2O-labelled Artemia sp. eggs and nauplii (200 to 300 ?m), detritus derived from 14C-labelled kelp (60 to 90 ?m), and phytoplankton represented by 14C-labelled Dunaliella primolecta (5 to 10 ?m) cultures. Separate experiments of short duration (1 to 2 h) were used to indicate the primary consumers on each type of food, while longer experiments (4, 8 and 16 h) suggested the secondary consumers (coprophagous and carnivorous species). Several species were found to be omnivorous. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of lipophilic pigments from a phototrophic microbial mat community by high performance liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, A. C.; Cronin, S. E.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    As assay for lipophilic pigments in phototrophic microbial mat communities using reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography was developed which allows the separation of 15 carotenoids and chloropigments in a single 30 min program. Lipophilic pigments in a laminated mat from a commercial salina near Laguna Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico reflected their source organisms. Myxoxanthophyll, echinenone, canthaxanthin, and zeaxanthin were derived from cyanobacteria; chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin from diatoms; chlorophyll a from cyanobacteria and diatoms; bacteriochlorophylls a and c, bacteriophaeophytin a, and gamma-carotene from Chloroflexus spp.; and beta-carotene from a variety of phototrophs. Sensitivity of detection was 0.6-6.1 ng for carotenoids and 1.7-12 ng for most chloropigments. This assay represents a significant improvement over previous analyses of lipophilic pigments in microbial mats and promises to have a wider application to other types of phototrophic communities.

  12. Geographic analysis of thermal equilibria: A bioenergetic model for predicting thermal response of aquatic insect communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal regime immediately downstream from bottom release reservoirs is often characterized by reduced diel and seasonal (winter warm/summer cool) conditions. These unusual thermal patterns have often been implicated as a primary factor underlying observed downstream changes in the species composition of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities. The potential mechanisms for selective elimination of benthic species by unusual thermal regimes has been reviewed. Although the effects of temperature on the rate and magnitude of larval growth and development has been included in the list of potential mechanisms, only recently have field studies below dams focused on this interrelationship. This study investigates the overall community structure as well as the seasonal pattern of larval growth and development for several univoltine species of insects in the Delaware River below or near the hypolimnetic discharge of the Cannonsville and Pepeacton dams. These dams, which are located on the West and East branches of the Delaware River, respectively, produce a thermal gradient extending about 70 km downstream

  13. PCR-DGGE analysis of the microbial communities in three different Chinese "Baiyunbian" liquor fermentation starters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaomao; Hu, Yuanliang; Yan, Nanfeng; Huang, Yingna; Peng, Nan; Liang, Yunxiang; Zhao, Shumiao

    2014-08-01

    A systematic investigation was performed on the bacterial, Bacillus, fungal, and yeast communities of the three types of Daqu (mechanically prepared, manually prepared, and mixed prepared) used in Baiyunbian Company by reconditioning PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The DGGE results showed that the microbes in the three types of Daqu were mainly thermotolerant and thermophilic microbes, and the most dominant bacterial species were Bacillus and Virgibacillus, followed by Lactobacillus and Trichococcus. Furthermore, the dominant fungi were found to be molds, such as Rasamsonia, Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Monascus, and the dominant yeasts were Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomycopsis fibuligera, Pichia anomala, and Debaryomyces hansenii. In general, the three types of Daqu showed slight differences in microbial communities, and the Shannon indexes (H') of the manually prepared and mechanically prepared Daqu were similar. The results suggest that mechanically prepared Daqu can replace manually prepared Daqu in liquor production, and this research provides useful information for liquor production and process improvement. PMID:24809292

  14. Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities; June 18, 2004 -- January 31, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedden, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to compile completed studies on the economic impact of wind farms in rural communities and then to compare these studies. By summarizing the studies in an Excel spreadsheet, the raw data from a study is easily compared with the data from other studies. In this way, graphs can be made and conclusions drawn. Additionally, the creation of a database in which economic impact studies are summarized allows a greater understanding of the type of information gathered in an economic impact study, the type of information that is most helpful in using these studies to promote wind energy development in rural communities, and the limitations on collecting data for these studies.

  15. A strategic analysis of NOKIA diversifying into the provision of community phone services

    OpenAIRE

    Gikunda, Agatha Mutheu

    2007-01-01

    Nokia predicts that by 2008, 80% of mobile phone sales will come from New-Growth Markets. New-Growth Markets consist of high-income consumers capable of purchasing expensive handsets, and low-income consumers that have thus far been unable to afford cellular phones. This paper investigates the feasibility of Nokia creating Community Phone Services. A prospective business model involves rollout of services by Franchisees, following guidelines from the firm. This paper finds that the business p...

  16. Community Analysis of Ammonia and Nitrite Oxidizers during Start-Up of Nitritation Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Egli, Konrad; Langer, Christian; Siegrist, Hans-Ruedi; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.; Wagner, Michael; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2003-01-01

    Partial nitrification of ammonium to nitrite under oxic conditions (nitritation) is a critical process for the effective use of alternative nitrogen removal technologies from wastewater. Here we investigated the conditions which promote establishment of a suitable microbial community for performing nitritation when starting from regular sewage sludge. Reactors were operated in duplicate under different conditions (pH, temperature, and dilution rate) and were fed with 50 mM ammonium either as ...

  17. Dynamic social network analysis and recommender technologies in scientific communities : the case of computer science

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Manh Cuong

    2013-01-01

    The Web in general, and the Web 2.0, in particular, have changed the way in which scientific information is created, exchanged and consumed. Online accessible digital libraries bring the access to large collection of scientific literature to the research community. Information sharing and research results dissemination are much faster than before. The large amount of scientific data available on the Web gives unique opportunities and also raise challenges for understanding the organization an...

  18. Molecular Analysis of the Bacterial Communities in Crude Oil Samples from Two Brazilian Offshore Petroleum Platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Korenblum; Diogo Bastos Souza; Monica Penna; Lucy Seldin

    2012-01-01

    Crude oil samples with high- and low-water content from two offshore platforms (PA and PB) in Campos Basin, Brazil, were assessed for bacterial communities by 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries. RDP Classifier was used to analyze a total of 156 clones within four libraries obtained from two platforms. The clone sequences were mainly affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria (78.2% of the total clones); however, clones associated with Betaproteobacteria (10.9%), Alphaproteobacteria (9%), and Firmic...

  19. Metagenomic Analysis of the Bacterial Community Associated with the Taproot of Sugar Beet

    OpenAIRE

    Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Okubo, Takashi; Okazaki, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Megumi; Kakizaki, Kaori; Hanzawa, Eiko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Asanome, Noriyuki; Tanaka, Fukuyo; Sekiyama, Yasuyo; Ikeda, Seishi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed a metagenome of the bacterial community associated with the taproot of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) in order to investigate the genes involved in plant growth-promoting traits (PGPTs), namely 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, indole acetic acid (IAA), N2 fixation, phosphate solubilization, pyrroloquinoline quinone, siderophores, and plant disease suppression as well as methanol, sucrose, and betaine utilization. The most frequently detected gene among the PGP...

  20. Managing variability and scarcity. An analysis of Engaruka : A Maasai smallholder irrigation farming community

    OpenAIRE

    Caretta, Martina Angela

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the common-pool regime of Engaruka, a smallholder irrigation farming community in northern Tanzania. Irrigation is a complex issue due to water asymmetry. Water use is regulated in Engaruka through boundary, allocation, input and penalty rules by a users’ association that controls and negotiates water allocation to avoid conflicts among headenders and tailenders. As different crops – maize and beans, bananas and vegetables – are cultivated, different watering schemes are...

  1. Identification of Household Bacterial Community and Analysis of Species Shared with Human Microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Bong-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Microbial populations in indoor environments, where we live and eat, are important for public health. Various bacterial species reside in the kitchen, and refrigerators, the major means of food storage within kitchens, can be a direct source of food borne illness. Therefore, the monitoring of microbiota in the refrigerator is important for food safety. We investigated and compared bacterial communities that reside in the vegetable compartment of the refrigerator and on the seat of the toilet,...

  2. Rural Communities on the Cambodian Central Plain: A Comparative Analysis Based on Five Communes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Diepart

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Rural Development in Cambodia in Transition With nearly 85 percent of its population living in rural communities, it is obvious that rural development issues occupy a prominent place in the overall development of Cambodia. As the country’s population rapidly increases, people in rural areas depend upon agriculture as their means of subsistence. In parallel, agriculture must meet the growing and diversifying urban food demand, while generating resources for export. The complex pro...

  3. Molecular Analysis of a Bacterial Chitinolytic Community in an Upland Pasture

    OpenAIRE

    Metcalfe, A. C.; Krsek, M.; Gooday, G. W.; Prosser, J.I.; Wellington, E. M. H.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of agricultural-improvement treatments on the chitinolytic activity and diversity of a microbial community were investigated within an upland pasture. The treatments of interest were lime and treated sewage sludge, both commonly applied to pasture land to improve fertility. Burial of chitin-containing litter bags at the field site resulted in enrichment of bacteria according to 16S rRNA fingerprinting. Chitinolytic-activity measurements showed that the highest activity occurred in...

  4. Communities and Hierarchical Structures in Dynamic Social Networks: Analysis and Visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Frédéric; Simonetto, Paolo; Zaidi, Faraz; Jourdan, Fabien; Bourqui, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Detection of community structures in social networks has attracted lots of attention in the domain of sociology and behavioral sciences. Social networks also exhibit dynamic nature as these networks change continuously with the passage of time. Social networks might also present a hierarchical structure led by individuals that play important roles in a society such as Managers and Decision Makers. Detection and Visualization of these networks changing over time is a challenging problem where ...

  5. A multiple criteria analysis for-household solid waste management in the urban community of Dakar

    OpenAIRE

    Kapepula, K. M.; Colson, Gérard; Sabri, Karim; Thonart, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Household solid waste management is a severe problem in big cities of developing countries. Mismanaged solid waste dumpsites produce bad sanitary, ecological and economic consequences for the whole population, especially for the poorest urban inhabitants. Dealing with this problem, this paper utilizes field data collected in the urban community of Dakar, in view of ranking nine areas of the city with respect to multiple criteria of nuisance. Nine criteria are built and organized in three fami...

  6. Review and analysis of discharge limitation practice in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important area of application of radiation protection philosophy is that concerning the setting of discharge limits for radioactive effluents from nuclear installations. In the European Community, as elsewhere, the scientific basis for discharge authorization and limitation has undergone an evolution reflecting developments in radiation protection; in particular, the principle of optimization had to be assimilated in the regulatory process, a requirement imposed on Member States of the European Community by virtue of the Euratom Directive on Basic Safety Standards. An outline of past and present authorization procedures and discharge limits is presented, based on written and verbal submissions made to two ad-hoc meetings of experts convened by the Commission of the European Communities for the purposes of comparison and mutual exchange of information and techniques. Additionally, the Commission, responding to recent calls by the European Parliament and environmental groups, pledged to re-examine the value of setting regulatory emission standards for nuclear installations. This re-examination involved the consultation, on basic policy for limiting releases, of the Group of Experts which advises the Commission on radiation protection, in the light of recent advances in this field. Moreover, an investigation was undertaken of the application of national regulatory provisions concerning activity discharges of certain nuclear installations. A critical review is presented here of the methods and their application for fixing discharge limits for radioactive effluents from nuclear installations in Member States of the European Community. The implications of using as the basis for discharge limitation a dose criterion or an emission standard are discussed and conclusions drawn concerning the advisability of adopting uniform emission standards for plants of the same design regardless of differences in environmental characteristics. (author). 8 refs

  7. A Fast-Track East African Community Monetary Union? Convergence Evidence from a Cointegration Analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Buigut

    2011-01-01

    There is a proposal for a fast-tracked approach to the African Community (EAC) monetary union. This paper uses cointegration techniques to determine whether the member countries would form a successful monetary union based on the long-run behavior of nominal and real exchange rates and monetary base. The three variables are each analyzed for co-movements among the five countries. The empirical results indicate only partial convergence for the variables considered, suggesting there could be su...

  8. Analysis of Sclerotia-Associated Fungal Communities in Cool-Temperate Forest Soils in North Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Amasya, Anzilni F.; Narisawa, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    We herein investigated sclerotia that were obtained from cool-temperate forests in Mt. Chokai and Mt. Iwaki in north Japan and tentatively identified as the resting bodies of Cenococcum geophilum. The profiles of sclerotia-associated fungal communities were obtained through T-RFLP combined with clone library techniques. Our results showed that sclerotia in Mt. Chokai and Mt. Iwaki were predominated by Arthrinium arundinis and Inonotus sp., respectively. The results of the present study sugges...

  9. Health and the Roma Community: analysis of the situation in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    La Parra Casado, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The situation of the Spanish Roma population, in terms of health, was virtually unknown until now. Despite the importance of the Spanish Roma community, estimated to total approximately 500,000 to 700,000 people, it has been invisible in the National Health Surveys [Encuesta Nacional de Salud de España (ENSE)] that the Ministry of Health and Consumption, initially with the Centre of Sociological Research, and today, with the National Statistics Institute, has been producing in order to determ...

  10. Analysis of the Community Health Agent Training Course in relation to violence against women

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Maria de Souza Philippi; Patrícia Alves de Souza

    2010-01-01

    Violence has caused a worldwide impact, being considered a Public Health problem. The World Health Organization (WHO) definesviolence as “the intentional use of physical force or power, threatened or actual, against oneself, another person or against a group or community, which either results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm, maldevelopment or deprivation”.There are several kinds of violence (domestic, sexual, etc) which make it an endemism that af...

  11. Ant communities as indicators of environmental health. Successional analysis in a rehabilitation context.

    OpenAIRE

    L. OTTONETTI; TUCCI, L; Santini, G

    2004-01-01

    Ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) communities were sampled with pitfall traps in four different habitats inside and near a rehabilitated lignite mining district in Tuscany (Italy). The four habitats were: (i) open fields, (ii) a middle-age mixed plantation (10 years), (iii) an old-age mixed plantation (20 years) and (iv) an oak woodland not directly affected by mining activities. The aims of the study were a) to assess the suitability of Mediterranean ant assemblages as indicators in biomonitorin...

  12. Multilevel analysis of HIV related risk behaviors among heroin users in a low prevalence community

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Shui; Goggins William; Li Huizhen

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Injecting drug users (IDU) are at increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Their HIV prevalence however varies from place to place and may not be directly linked with the level of individual risk. This study explores the relative importance of individual and community level characteristics in the practice of HIV-related risk behaviors in IDU in Hong Kong where the HIV prevalence has remained low at below 1%. Methods Methadone clinics were used as the...

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Indigenous Research Guidelines to Inform Genomic Research in Indigenous Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Jay Maddock; Nicole K. Taniguchi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic research has potential benefits for improving health, such as identifying molecular characteristics of a disease, understanding disease prevalence and treatment, and developing treatments tailored to patients based on individual genetic characteristics of their disease. Indigenous people are often targeted for genetic research because genes are easier to study in communities that practice endogamy. Therefore, populations perceived to be more homogenous, such as Indigenous ...

  14. A Sociolinguistic Analysis of Use and Perception of Insults: Tlemcen Speech Community

    OpenAIRE

    Babou-Sekkal, Meryem

    2013-01-01

    The present research paper aims at elucidating the relationship between language, culture, and emotions. It focuses on the unpleasantness of insult and name calling as a sociolinguistic behaviour and the paradox which concerns these unkind habits in a Muslims speech community - Tlemcenian people are taken as a case in point-. The research work is also based on a quantitative and qualitative analyses presented and interpreted under the form of graphs and numbers.

  15. MARRIAGE RITUAL TEXT OF BALINESE TRADITIONAL COMMUNITY: AN ANALYSIS OF FUNCTIONAL SYSTEMIC LINGUISTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Putu Sutama; I Gusti Made Sutjaja; Aron Meko Mbete; Mahyuni -

    2012-01-01

    The Marriage Ritual Text of Balinese Traditional Community (Teks Ritual‘Pewiwahan’ Masyarakat Adat Bali, hereon abbreviated to TRPMAB) in this dissertationis analyzed in the perspective of linguistic studies using the functional systemic linguistictheory. TRPMAB is a dialogic text containing a discussion, and is terminologicallytermed as a conversational text. It refers to the use of Balinese language (Bahasa Bali,hereon abbreviated to BB) in a marriage ritual. There are two inseparable syste...

  16. International Trade and Integration of the European Community : An Econometric Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jaquemin, Alexis; Sapir, Andr

    1987-01-01

    The paper contributes to the policy debate on European integration by analyzing intra-Community trade and studying the structural determinants of European competitiveness. Four types of explanatory factors of intra-EC trade are distinguished: (1) factors related to inter-industry trade; (2) factors pertaining to intra-industry trade; (3) factors which reflect natural and policy-induced barriers to trade; and (4) factors reflecting supply constraints. Distinction is drawn between two contrasti...

  17. Pyrosequence analysis of bacterial communities in aerobic bioreactors treating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Singleton, David R.; Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Two aerobic, lab-scale, slurry-phase bioreactors were used to examine the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil and the associated bacterial communities. The two bioreactors were operated under semi-continuous (draw-and-fill) conditions at a residence time of 35 days, but one was fed weekly and the other monthly. Most of the quantified PAHs, including high-molecular-weight compounds, were removed to a greater extent in the weekly-fed bioreactor, which ...

  18. Molecular analysis of the microbial community structures in water-flooding petroleum reservoirs with different temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, L.-Y.; Duan, R.-Y.; Liu, J.-F.; Yang, S.-Z.; Gu, J.-D.; Mu, B.-Z.

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of microbial communities from six water-flooding petroleum reservoirs at temperatures from 21 to 63 °C by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicates the presence of physiologically diverse and temperature-dependent microorganisms in these subterrestrial ecosystems. In samples originating from high-temperature petroleum reservoirs, most of the archaeal sequences belong to thermophiles affiliated with members of the genera Thermococcus, Methanothermobacter and the order ...

  19. Analysis of Bacterial Community Associated with Aaptos sp. from Rote and Seribu Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EKOWATI CHASANAH

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aaptos sp. is a marine sponge that could produce bioactive compounds such as aaptamin, aaptosin, and isoaaptamin which have activities as antitumor, antimicrobial, and antiviral. Community of bacteria associated with the sponge might correlate with production of those bioactive compounds and be affected by water environment where the sponge grow. The presence of anthropogenic stressor such as pollutans might become a burden to the waters where the biota grown and could affect the microbial biodiversity in the sponge and its active metabolite produced. The objective of this research was to analyze bacterial community associated with Aaptos sp. from Rote Island and Seribu Islands, using T-RFLP method. The results showed that bacterial community associated with Aaptos sp. from both sampling sites shared 40.81% similarity in which they were dominated by the same bacteria class of Actinobacteria, Flavobacteria, α-proteobacteria, δ-proteobacteria, and γ–proteobacteria. The bacteria collected from Rote island were more highly distributed and diverse than those from Seribu Islands. A total of 23 classes of microorganism were identified in Rote Island waters, while in Seribu Islands was 14 classes of microorganism. The presence of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria in Aaptos sp., is allegedly involved in the production of secondary metabolites.

  20. Integrated metagenomics and network analysis of soil microbial community of the forest timberline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Junjun; Zhang, Yuguang; Deng, Ye; Cong, Jing; Lu, Hui; Sun, Xin; Yang, Caiyun; Yuan, Tong; van Nostrand, Joy D.; Li, Diqiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The forest timberline responds quickly and markedly to climate changes, rendering it a ready indicator. Climate warming has caused an upshift of the timberline worldwide. However, the impact on belowground ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles remain elusive. To understand soil microbial ecology of the timberline, we analyzed microbial communities via 16s rRNA Illumina sequencing, a microarray-based tool named GeoChip 4.0 and a random matrix theory-based association network approach. We selected 24 sampling sites at two vegetation belts forming the timberline of Shennongjia Mountain in Hubei Province of China, a region with extraordinarily rich biodiversity. We found that temperature, among all of measured environmental parameters, showed the most significant and extensive linkages with microbial biomass, microbial diversity and composition at both taxonomic and functional gene levels, and microbial association network. Therefore, temperature was the best predictor for microbial community variations in the timberline. Furthermore, abundances of nitrogen cycle and phosphorus cycle genes were concomitant with NH4+-N, NO3--N and total phosphorus, offering tangible clues to the underlying mechanisms of soil biogeochemical cycles. As the first glimpse at both taxonomic and functional compositions of soil microbial community of the timberline, our findings have major implications for predicting consequences of future timberline upshift.

  1. Specific deterrence, community context, and drunk driving: an event history analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Bae; Teske, Raymond H C

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies about recidivism of offenders have focused primarily on the nature of the sanctions and factors specific to the individual offender. This study addressed both individual and community factors, using a cohort of felony-level, driving while intoxicated (DWI) probationers (N = 370) charged in Harris County, Texas. The study investigated specific deterrent effects of sanctions on success or failure of probationers while controlling for the community contexts to observe how informal social control processes contextualize individual-level predictors. Results of a series of event history analyses tracking probationers for a period of 8 years indicated that severity of punishment, swiftness of punishment, criminal history, and completion of DWI education programs significantly affected the probationer's survival time, whereas no significant influence of community contexts on survival time or success was observed. Reducing the felony charge to a misdemeanor, a shorter period of probation, and past criminal history, combined with an almost immediate guilty plea, were significantly associated with short-term failure on probation. PMID:25646012

  2. Analysis of effect of nicotine on microbial community structure in sediment using PCR-DGGE fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-dong Ruan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Solid or liquid waste containing a high concentration of nicotine can pollute sediment in rivers and lakes, and may destroy the ecological balance if it is directly discharged into the environment without any treatment. In this study, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method was used to analyze the variation of the microbial community structure in the control and nicotine-contaminated sediment samples with nicotine concentration and time of exposure. The results demonstrated that the growth of some bacterial species in the nicotine-contaminated sediment samples was inhibited during the exposure. Some bacteria decreased in species diversity and in quantity with the increase of nicotine concentration or time of exposure, while other bacteria were enriched under the effect of nicotine, and their DGGE bands changed from undertones to deep colors. The microbial community structure, however, showed a wide variation in the nicotine-contaminated sediment samples, especially in the sediment samples treated with high-concentration nicotine. The Jaccard index was only 35.1% between the initial sediment sample and the sediment sample with a nicotine concentration of 0.030 μg/g after 28 d of exposure. Diversity indices showed that the contaminated groups had a similar trend over time. The diversity indices of contaminated groups all decreased in the first 7 d after exposure, then increased until day 42. It has been found that nicotine decreased the diversity of the microbial community in the sediment.

  3. A Comparative Analysis of a Community and General Sample of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyper, Lisette; Fernee, Henk; Keuzenkamp, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Samples recruited at lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) venues have certain benefits, but a major drawback is that these samples are prone to bias as they only contain LGB participants who visit such venues. Empirical data with regard to the potential differences between LGB community samples and LGB general samples may shed some light on the generalizability of research findings from convenience samples recruited through LGB venues. The current study attempted to contribute to existing knowledge by examining differences in social demographics, sexual orientation, minority stress, and mental health between a convenience sample recruited at LGB venues ("community sample," N = 3,403) and an LGB sample recruited from a general research panel in the Netherlands ("panel sample," N = 1,000). Various differences were found. In general, community participants were younger, reported a more exclusive same-sex sexual orientation, were more open about their sexual orientation, had lower levels of internalized homonegativity, and encountered more negative social reactions on their LGB status. They also reported higher levels of psychological distress and suicidality. The Nagelkerke R (2) of the analyses (which were adjusted for sociodemographic differences) ranged from .08 (suicide plans among men) to .27 (sexual attraction among women). However, while the estimates of sociodemographics, sexual orientation, minority stress, and mental well-being differed, the relationships between these constructs were comparable in both samples. Implications and suggestions for future studies are discussed. PMID:25564037

  4. Preventing waterborne diseases: analysis of a community health worker program in rural Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Neal; Mutukkanu, Thingalraj; Nadimuthu, Alexander; Thiyagaran, Initha; Sullivan-Marx, Eileen

    2012-04-01

    Community health worker (CHW) programs have become popular tools in reducing the burden of childhood illnesses. However, the efficacy of CHWs in facilitating behavior change, as a means of preventing waterborne diseases, remains unclear. Using a household survey (n = 225),in rural Tamil Nadu, South India, we assessed the effects of a CHW program on knowledge, attitudes and practices related to diarrheal illness through comparison with a control population that was not enrolled in the program. The CHW program in the experimental village entailed behavior change aimed at preventing diarrheal illness through home visits, community events and health education. Correlates of four key variables on knowledge of drinking water contamination and behavior change were examined by using logistic regression models. We found that while the program was effective in raising awareness of drinking water contamination, it did not significantly increase hygiene and water sanitation practices in the village community in comparison to the control population. Furthermore, villagers enrolled in the CHW program were unable to recognize the connections between contaminated drinking water and disease. The results of our survey indicated the CHW program did not significantly affect behavior in the experimental village. Possible shortcomings in the program are discussed. PMID:21922165

  5. PhyloChip microarray analysis reveals altered gastrointestinal microbial communities in a rat model of colonic hypersensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, T.A.; Holmes, S.; Alekseyenko, A.V.; Shenoy, M.; DeSantis, T.; Wu, C.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Winston, J.; Sonnenburg, J.; Pasricha, P.J.; Spormann, A.

    2010-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, episodic gastrointestinal disorder that is prevalent in a significant fraction of western human populations; and changes in the microbiota of the large bowel have been implicated in the pathology of the disease. Using a novel comprehensive, high-density DNA microarray (PhyloChip) we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the microbial community of the large bowel in a rat model in which intracolonic acetic acid in neonates was used to induce long lasting colonic hypersensitivity and decreased stool water content and frequency, representing the equivalent of human constipation-predominant IBS. Our results revealed a significantly increased compositional difference in the microbial communities in rats with neonatal irritation as compared with controls. Even more striking was the dramatic change in the ratio of Firmicutes relative to Bacteroidetes, where neonatally irritated rats were enriched more with Bacteroidetes and also contained a different composition of species within this phylum. Our study also revealed differences at the level of bacterial families and species. The PhyloChip is a useful and convenient method to study enteric microflora. Further, this rat model system may be a useful experimental platform to study the causes and consequences of changes in microbial community composition associated with IBS.

  6. Ad hoc supervision of general practice registrars as a 'community of practice': analysis, interpretation and re-presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, T; Brown, J; Morrison, J; Nestel, D

    2016-05-01

    General practice registrars in Australia undertake most of their vocational training in accredited general practices. They typically see patients alone from the start of their community-based training and are expected to seek timely ad hoc support from their supervisor. Such ad hoc encounters are a mechanism for ensuring patient safety, but also provide an opportunity for learning and teaching. Wenger's (Communities of practice: learning, meaning, and identity. Cambridge University Press, New York, 1998) social theory of learning ('communities of practice') guided a secondary analysis of audio-recordings of ad hoc encounters. Data from one encounter is re-presented as an extended sequence to maintain congruence with the theoretical perspective and enhance vicariousness. An interpretive commentary communicates key features of Wenger's theory and highlights the researchers' interpretations. We argue that one encounter can reveal universal understandings of clinical supervision and that the process of naturalistic generalisation allows readers to transfer others' experiences to their own contexts. The paper raises significant analytic, interpretive, and representational issues. We highlight that report writing is an important, but infrequently discussed, part of research design. We discuss the challenges of supporting the learning and teaching that arises from adopting a socio-cultural lens and argue that such a perspective importantly captures the complex range of issues that work-based practitioners have to grapple with. This offers a challenge to how we research and seek to influence work-based learning and teaching in health care settings. PMID:26384813

  7. Building ties: social capital network analysis of a forest community in a biosphere reserve in Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Reyes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Governance of the commons depends on the capacity to generate collective action. Networks and rules that foster that collective action have been defined as social capital. However, their causal link is still not fully understood. We use social network analysis to assess social capital, decision-making, and collective action in a forest-based common pool resource management in La Sepultura Biosphere Reserve (Chiapas, Mexico. Our research analyzes the productive networks and the evolution of coffee groups in one community. The network shows some centrality, with richer landholders tending to occupy core positions and poorer landless peasants occupying peripheral ones. This has fostered the community's environmentally oriented development but has also caused internal conflicts. Market requirements have shaped different but complementary productive networks, where organic coffee commercialization is the main source of bridging ties, which has resulted in more connectivity and resilience. Conservation attitudes, along with the institutional setting of the community, have promoted collective action. The unresolved conflicts, however, still leave some concerns about governance in the future.

  8. Analysis of links between groundwater recharge and discharge areas and wetland plant communities distribution in Middle Biebrza Basin, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygoruk, Mateusz; Batelaan, Okke; Okruszko, Tomasz; Kotowski, Wiktor; Rycharski, Marek; Chormanski, Jaroslaw; Miroslaw-Swiatek, Dorota

    2010-05-01

    Natural evolution of wetlands is strongly dependent on groundwater dynamics, soil aeration and climate. These environmental factors determine the constant development of wetland plant communities and peat forming processes. Depending on spatial distribution of groundwater flow systems and recharge and discharge conditions, shallow groundwater can also be influenced by phreatophytic plants. Such feedback plays an important role in wetland development, especially when landuse or climate changes occur. Thus, understanding the links between dynamics of biotopic and biocenotic relations is crucial for wetland management aimed at the comprehensive set of conservation strategies. Main aim of this study was to review links between valuable wetland plant communities and the groundwater recharge/discharge conditions of particular habitats of Middle Biebrza Basin, Poland. The study area consists of various types of wetland landscapes, of which the dominant are fens. Organogenic top layer is intersected locally by sandy dunes and glaci-fluvial residual plateaus. The northern boundary of the study area is covered with an outwash plateau. A three-dimensional regional groundwater flow model was set up to quantify groundwater system and flow paths. Model calibration involved measured heads of the unconfined organogenic top layer and the underlaying, confined sandy aquifer. Measured thickness of unsaturated zone as well as physical parameters of organogenic layer were taken into account in interpretation of shallow groundwater dynamics. Recharge to groundwater was spatially distributed in accordance to analysis of measured precipitation-groundwater level relationships. Cell-by-cell flow analysis and groundwater exfiltration analysis were applied to map groundwater recharge and discharge areas within the modelled area. Results of groundwater modelling were validated with phytosociologic research combined with remote-sensing based spatial analysis of wetland habitats distribution. Results indicated spatial distibution of water balance components of different wetland habitats. In areas of fen plant communities, modelled intensity of vertical upward groundwater flow to the top layer is significantly higher than in ombrotrophic habitats. Research indicated, that spatial patterns of groundwater recharge/discharge intensity is strongly linked to areal distribution of water quality dependent phreatophytic plant communities. In certain areas, simulated drainage conditions increased the thickness of the unsaturated zone, which explains a crucial response of wetland evolution in the last centuries: redirection of groundwater flow towards artificial canals resulted in diminished throughflow in organogenic layer, which causes accumulation of acidic rain water and - consequently - development of ombrotrophic habitats.

  9. The Financial Analysis of a Modern Scheme for Managing Waste Proposed for the Urban Community Arieş, Cluj County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Monica SCORȚAR

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a scheme for managingwaste, proposed for the urban community of Arieş,Cluj County, in which we are going to show themain activities that should be accomplished withthe support of the local public administration.Based on the analysis of the waste flows, thedemographic trends and the waste generatingtrends, we propose a scheme for managingwaste that has a major investment component,an administrative re-organizing component andan educational one. We suggest a scheme whichincludes advanced techniques and methods fortreating waste. Moreover, we demonstrated thatthe efficiency of the scheme cannot be conceivedoutside a circuit for valorizing and recycling theuseful materials contained in the waste.

  10. Recycling of carbon/energy taxes and the labor market. A general equilibrium analysis for the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantitative assessment of a cost shift from labor to energy by means of a carbon/energy tax is provided. In the analysis a general equilibrium model for the European Community is utilized, focusing on the modelling of labor supply. The importance of the feedback from an induced increase in labor demand to wage formation is highlighted. (It is shown that the goals of C)2 reduction and improved employment are complementary, provided that the reduction in labor costs, financed by the carbon/energy tax, is not offset by increased wage claims. Under this condition reduced CO2 is consistent with an increase in GDP. 1 fig., 3 tabs., 17 refs

  11. Community patterns of stigma towards persons living with HIV: A population-based latent class analysis from rural Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brugha Ruairí

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The negative effects of stigma on persons living with HIV (PLHIV have been documented in many settings and it is thought that stigma against PLHIV leads to more difficulties for those who need to access HIV testing, treatment and care, as well as to limited community uptake of HIV prevention and testing messages. In order to understand and prevent stigma towards PLHIV, it is important to be able to measure stigma within communities and to understand which factors are associated with higher stigma. Methods To analyze patterns of community stigma and determinants to stigma toward PLHIV, we performed an exploratory population-based survey with 1874 randomly sampled adults within a demographic surveillance site (DSS in rural Vietnam. Participants were interviewed regarding knowledge of HIV and attitudes towards persons living with HIV. Data were linked to socioeconomic and migration data from the DSS and latent class analysis and multinomial logistic regression were conducted to examine stigma group sub-types and factors associated with stigma group membership. Results We found unexpectedly high and complex patterns of stigma against PLHIV in this rural setting. Women had the greatest odds of belong to the highest stigma group (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.42-2.37, while those with more education had lower odds of highest stigma group membership (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.32-0.62 for secondary education; OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.10-0.35 for tertiary education. Long-term migration out of the district (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.4-0.91, feeling at-risk for HIV (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.27-0.66, having heard of HIV from more sources (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.3-0.66, and knowing someone with HIV (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.58-0.99 were all associated with lower odds of highest stigma group membership. Nearly 20% of the population was highly unsure of their attitudes towards PLHIV and persons in this group had significantly lower odds of feeling at-risk for HIV (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.33-0.90 or of knowing someone with HIV (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.22-0.46. Conclusions Stigma towards PLHIV is high generally, and very high in some sub-groups, in this community setting. Future stigma prevention efforts could be enhanced by analyzing community stigma sub-groups and tailoring intervention messages to community patterns of stigma.

  12. Community patterns of stigma towards persons living with HIV: A population-based latent class analysis from rural Vietnam

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pharris, Anastasia

    2011-09-18

    Abstract Background The negative effects of stigma on persons living with HIV (PLHIV) have been documented in many settings and it is thought that stigma against PLHIV leads to more difficulties for those who need to access HIV testing, treatment and care, as well as to limited community uptake of HIV prevention and testing messages. In order to understand and prevent stigma towards PLHIV, it is important to be able to measure stigma within communities and to understand which factors are associated with higher stigma. Methods To analyze patterns of community stigma and determinants to stigma toward PLHIV, we performed an exploratory population-based survey with 1874 randomly sampled adults within a demographic surveillance site (DSS) in rural Vietnam. Participants were interviewed regarding knowledge of HIV and attitudes towards persons living with HIV. Data were linked to socioeconomic and migration data from the DSS and latent class analysis and multinomial logistic regression were conducted to examine stigma group sub-types and factors associated with stigma group membership. Results We found unexpectedly high and complex patterns of stigma against PLHIV in this rural setting. Women had the greatest odds of belong to the highest stigma group (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.42-2.37), while those with more education had lower odds of highest stigma group membership (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.32-0.62 for secondary education; OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.10-0.35 for tertiary education). Long-term migration out of the district (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.4-0.91), feeling at-risk for HIV (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.27-0.66), having heard of HIV from more sources (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.3-0.66), and knowing someone with HIV (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.58-0.99) were all associated with lower odds of highest stigma group membership. Nearly 20% of the population was highly unsure of their attitudes towards PLHIV and persons in this group had significantly lower odds of feeling at-risk for HIV (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.33-0.90) or of knowing someone with HIV (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.22-0.46). Conclusions Stigma towards PLHIV is high generally, and very high in some sub-groups, in this community setting. Future stigma prevention efforts could be enhanced by analyzing community stigma sub-groups and tailoring intervention messages to community patterns of stigma.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of atmospheric halotolerant bacterial communities at high altitude in an Asian dust (KOSA) arrival region, Suzu City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maki, Teruya, E-mail: makiteru@t.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Susuki, Shinzi; Kobayashi, Fumihisa [College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Kakikawa, Makiko [Institute of Nature and Environmental Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Tobo, Yutaka [Frontier Science Organization, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Yamada, Maromu [Faculty of Environmental and Symbiotic Science, Prefectural University of Kumamoto, 3-1-100 Tsukide, Kumamoto 862-8502 (Japan); Higashi, Tomomi [Hygiene, Kanazawa University School of Medicine, 13-1 Takara-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-8640 (Japan); Matsuki, Atsushi; Hong, Chunsang [Frontier Science Organization, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Hasegawa, Hiroshi [College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Iwasaka, Yasunobu [Frontier Science Organization, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    The microbial communities transported by Asian desert dust (KOSA) events have attracted much attention as bioaerosols because the transported microorganisms are thought to influence the downwind ecosystems in Korea and Japan. However, the atmospheric microbial community has not been investigated at high altitude in the KOSA arrival area. In this study, to estimate the viability and diversity of atmospheric halotolerant bacteria, which are expected to resist to various environmental stresses as well as high salinities, bioaerosol samples were collected at 10 and 600 m above the ground within the KOSA arrival area, Suzu City, Japan, during KOSA events. During the sampling period, the particle numbers at 600 m were higher than those at 10 m, suggesting that large particles of aerosol fall from the high altitude of 600 m to the ground surface. The microorganisms in bioaerosol samples grew in media containing up to 15% NaCl concentrations demonstrating the viability of the halotolerant bacteria in bioaerosol samples. The PCR-DGGE analysis using 16S rDNA revealed that the bacterial species in NaCl-amended cultures were similar to the bacteria detected from the genomic DNA directly extracted from the bioaerosol samples. The 16S rDNA sequences of bacterial communities in bioaerosol samples were classified into 4 phylotypes belonging to the Bacilluscereus or Bacillussubtilis group. The bioaerosol samples collected at 600 m included 2 phylotypes belonging to B. subtilis, and one phylotype among all 4 phylotypes was identical between the samples at 10 and 600 m. In the atmosphere at 600 m, the halotolerant bacterial community was expected to remain viable, and the species composition was expected to include a few species of the genus Bacillus. During this investigation period, these atmospheric bacteria may have been vertically transported to the ground surface, where the long-range KOSA particle transport from China is frequently observed.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of atmospheric halotolerant bacterial communities at high altitude in an Asian dust (KOSA) arrival region, Suzu City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microbial communities transported by Asian desert dust (KOSA) events have attracted much attention as bioaerosols because the transported microorganisms are thought to influence the downwind ecosystems in Korea and Japan. However, the atmospheric microbial community has not been investigated at high altitude in the KOSA arrival area. In this study, to estimate the viability and diversity of atmospheric halotolerant bacteria, which are expected to resist to various environmental stresses as well as high salinities, bioaerosol samples were collected at 10 and 600 m above the ground within the KOSA arrival area, Suzu City, Japan, during KOSA events. During the sampling period, the particle numbers at 600 m were higher than those at 10 m, suggesting that large particles of aerosol fall from the high altitude of 600 m to the ground surface. The microorganisms in bioaerosol samples grew in media containing up to 15% NaCl concentrations demonstrating the viability of the halotolerant bacteria in bioaerosol samples. The PCR-DGGE analysis using 16S rDNA revealed that the bacterial species in NaCl-amended cultures were similar to the bacteria detected from the genomic DNA directly extracted from the bioaerosol samples. The 16S rDNA sequences of bacterial communities in bioaerosol samples were classified into 4 phylotypes belonging to the Bacilluscereus or Bacillussubtilis group. The bioaerosol samples collected at 600 m included 2 phylotypes belonging to B. subtilis, and one phylotype among all 4 phylotypes was identical between the samples at 10 and 600 m. In the atmosphere at 600 m, the halotolerant bacterial community was expected to remain viable, and the species composition was expected to include a few species of the genus Bacillus. During this investigation period, these atmospheric bacteria may have been vertically transported to the ground surface, where the long-range KOSA particle transport from China is frequently observed.

  15. Effect of dissolved oxygen on elemental sulfur generation in sulfide and nitrate removal process: characterization, pathway, and microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Tingting; Zhou, Jiti

    2016-03-01

    Microaerobic bioreactor treatment for enriched sulfide and nitrate has been demonstrated as an effective strategy to improve the efficiencies of elemental sulfur (S(0)) generation, sulfide oxidation, and nitrate reduction. However, there is little detailed information for the effect and mechanism of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the variations of microbial community in sulfur generation, sulfide oxidation, and nitrate reduction systems. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was employed to evaluate the variations of microbial community structures in a sulfide oxidation and nitrate reduction reactor under different DO conditions (DO 0-0.7 mg · L(-1)). Experimental results revealed that the activity of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) could be greatly stimulated in 0.1-0.3 mg-DO · L(-1). However, when the DO concentration was further elevated to more than 0.5 mg · L(-1), the abundance of NRB was markedly decreased, while the heterotrophic microorganisms, especially carbon degradation species, were enriched. The reaction pathways for sulfide and nitrate removal under microaerobic conditions were also deduced by combining batch experiments with functional species analysis. It was likely that the oxidation of sulfide to sulfur could be performed by both aerobic heterotrophic SOB and sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification bacteria with oxygen and nitrate as terminal electron acceptor, respectively. The nitrate could be reduced to nitrite by both autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification, and then the generated nitrite could be completely converted to nitrogen gas via heterotrophic denitrification. This study provides new insights into the impacts of microaerobic conditions on the microbial community functional structures of sulfide-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing, and sulfur-producing bioreactors, which revealing the potential linkage between functional microbial communities and reactor performance. PMID:26603764

  16. Developing a Referral Protocol for Community-Based Occupational Therapy Services in Taiwan: A Logistic Regression Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hui-Fen; Chang, Ling-Hui; Tsai, Athena Yi-Jung; Huang, Wen-Ni; Wang, Jye

    2016-01-01

    Because resources for long-term care services are limited, timely and appropriate referral for rehabilitation services is critical for optimizing clients' functions and successfully integrating them into the community. We investigated which client characteristics are most relevant in predicting Taiwan's community-based occupational therapy (OT) service referral based on experts' beliefs. Data were collected in face-to-face interviews using the Multidimensional Assessment Instrument (MDAI). Community-dwelling participants (n = 221) ≥ 18 years old who reported disabilities in the previous National Survey of Long-term Care Needs in Taiwan were enrolled. The standard for referral was the judgment and agreement of two experienced occupational therapists who reviewed the results of the MDAI. Logistic regressions and Generalized Additive Models were used for analysis. Two predictive models were proposed, one using basic activities of daily living (BADLs) and one using instrumental ADLs (IADLs). Dementia, psychiatric disorders, cognitive impairment, joint range-of-motion limitations, fear of falling, behavioral or emotional problems, expressive deficits (in the BADL-based model), and limitations in IADLs or BADLs were significantly correlated with the need for referral. Both models showed high area under the curve (AUC) values on receiver operating curve testing (AUC = 0.977 and 0.972, respectively). The probability of being referred for community OT services was calculated using the referral algorithm. The referral protocol facilitated communication between healthcare professionals to make appropriate decisions for OT referrals. The methods and findings should be useful for developing referral protocols for other long-term care services. PMID:26863544

  17. Analysis of rbcL sequences reveals the global biodiversity, community structure, and biogeographical pattern of thermoacidophilic red algae (Cyanidiales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Zhan, Shing Hei; Lin, Yiching; Tang, Sen-Lin; Liu, Shao-Lun

    2015-08-01

    Thermoacidophilic cyanidia (Cyanidiales) are the primary photosynthetic eukaryotes in volcanic areas. These red algae also serve as important model organisms for studying life in extreme habitats. The global biodiversity and community structure of Cyanidiales remain unclear despite previous sampling efforts. Here, we surveyed the Cyanidiales biodiversity in the Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) area in Taiwan using environmental DNA sequencing. We generated 174 rbcL sequences from eight samples from four regions in the TVG area, and combined them with 239 publicly available rbcL sequences collected worldwide. Species delimita-tion using this large rbcL data set suggested at least 20 Cyanidiales OTUs (operational taxono-mic units) worldwide, almost three times the presently recognized seven species. Results from environmental DNA showed that OTUs in the TVG area were divided into three groups: (i) dominant in hot springs with 92%-99% sequence identity to Galdieria maxima; (ii) largely distributed in drier and more acidic microhabitats with 99% identity to G. partita; and (iii) primarily distributed in cooler microhabitats and lacking identity to known cyanidia species (a novel Cyanidiales lineage). In both global and individual area analyses, we observed greater species diversity in non-aquatic than aquatic habitats. Community structure analysis showed high similarity between the TVG community and West Pacific-Iceland communities, reflecting their geographic proximity to each other. Our study is the first examination of the global species diversity and biogeographic affinity of cyanidia. Additionally, our data illuminate the influence of microhabitat type on Cyanidiales diversity and highlight intriguing questions for future ecological research. PMID:26986790

  18. Adirondack lakes survey: An interpretive analysis of fish communities and water chemistry, 1984--1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, J.P. (Baker (Joan P.), Raleigh, NC (USA)); Gherini, S.A.; Munson, R.K. (Tetra Tech, Inc., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Christensen, S.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Driscoll, C.T. (Syracuse Univ., NY (USA)); Gallagher, J. (Adirondack Lakes Survey Corp., Ray Brook, NY (USA)); Newton, R.M. (Smith Coll., Northampton, MA (USA)); Reckhow, K.H. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA)); Schofield, C.L. (Co

    1990-01-01

    The Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation (ALSC) was formed as a cooperative effort of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation to better characterize the chemical and biological status of Adirondack lakes. Between 1984 and 1987, the ALSC surveyed 1469 lakes within the Adirondack ecological zone. As a follow-up to the survey, the ALSC sponsored a series of interpretive analyses of the ALSC data base. The primary objectives of these analyses were as follows: Evaluate the influence of mineral acids (from acidic deposition) and nonmineral acids (natural organic acids) on lake pH levels; classify Adirondack lakes according to lake and watershed features expected to influence their responsiveness to changes in acidic deposition; evaluate the sensitivity of Adirondack lakes to changes in environmental conditions, such as changes in mineral acids or dissolved organic carbon concentrations; identify lake characteristics important in explaining the observed present-day status of fish communities in Adirondack lakes, in particular the relative importance of lake acidity; evaluate changes that have occurred over time in Adirondack fish communities and probable causes for these trends by using the available historical data on fish communities in the Adirondacks and the ALSC data base; and determine the degree to which the existing fish resource might be at risk from continued acidic deposition, or might recover if acidity levels were reduced. The basic approach examined relationships observed in the ALSC data base among watershed characteristics, lake chemistry, and fish status. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  19. Comparative analysis of bacterial communities in a potato field as determined by pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inceoglu, Özgül; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Salles, Joana Falcão; Semenov, Alexander V; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Background: Plants selectively attract particular soil microorganisms, in particular consumers of root-excreted compounds. It is unclear to what extent cultivar type and/or growth stage affect this process. Methodology/Principal Findings: DNA-based pyrosequencing was used to characterize the...... obtained (5,700 to 38,000 per sample). Across all samples, rank abundance distributions best fitted the power law model, which indicates a community composed of a few highly dominant species next to numerous rare species. Grouping of the sequences showed that members of the Actinobacteria...

  20. Status and egalitarianism in traditional communities : An analysis of funeral attendance in six Zimbabwean villages.

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, Abigail; Stein, Mattea

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores two hypotheses concerning the role of status in relationships between rich and poor in traditional communities by analyzing who goes to whose funerals in six Zimbabwean villages.  Funerals allow status to be observed because non-attendance is a sign of disrespect.  We find that the richer a household hosting a funeral, the less likely heads of neighbouring households are to attend.  Thus, the status-for-insurance hypothesis - that the poor bestow status upon the rich in re...

  1. Wisdom Way Solar Village: Design, Construction, and Analysis of a Low Energy Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, R.

    2012-08-01

    This report describes work conducted at the Wisdom Way Solar Village (WWSV), a community of 10 high performance duplexes (20 homes) in Greenfield, MA, constructed by Rural Development, Inc. (RDI). Building America's CARB team monitored temperatures and comfort in several homes during the winter of 2009-2010, and tracked utility bill information from 13 occupied homes. Because of efficient lights, appliances, and conscientious home occupants, the energy generated by the solar electric systems exceeded the electric energy used in most homes.

  2. Economic analysis of community solar heating systems that use annual cycle thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.; Hooper, F. C.; McClenahan, J. D.

    1981-02-01

    Systems were sized for three housing configurations: single unit dwellings, 10 unit, and 200 unit apartment complexes in 50, 200, 400, and 1000 unit communities in 10 geographic locations in the United States. Thermal energy is stored in large, constructed, underground tanks. Costs were assigned to each component of every system in order to allow calculation of total costs. Results are presented as normalized system costs per unit of heat delivered per building unit. These methods allow: identification of the relative importance of each system component in the overall cost; and identification of the key variables that determine the optimum sizing of a district solar heating system.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of the hyperthermophilic pink filament community in Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park.

    OpenAIRE

    Reysenbach, A.L.; Wickham, G S; Pace, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of a well-known pink filament community associated with the 84 to 88 degrees C outflow from Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, was examined. Three phylogenetic types ("phylotypes"), designated EM 3, EM 17, and EM 19, were identified by cloning and sequencing the small subunit rRNA genes (16S rDNA) obtained by PCR amplification of mixed-population DNA. All three phylotypes diverge deeply within the phylogenetic domain Bacteria sensu Woese (C. R. Woese, O. Kan...

  4. Item Response Theory Analysis of Intimate-Partner Violence in a Community Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Jose, Anita; Olino, Thomas M; O’Leary, K. Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The Revised Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS2; Straus, Hamby, Boney-McCoy, & Sugarman, 1996) is a widely used measure of physical, psychological, and sexual aggression as well as injury and negotiation between partners. In this study, we analyzed male-to-female and female-to-male physical aggression using data from 453 community couples. We used item-response theory (IRT) to assess the range and precision of physical aggression severity in the past year, as evaluated by the CTS2. Our analyses supp...

  5. Hierarchical spatial point process analysis for a plant community with high biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illian, Janine B.; Møller, Jesper; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    A complex multivariate spatial point pattern of a plant community with high biodiversity is modelled using a hierarchical multivariate point process model. In the model, interactions between plants with different post-fire regeneration strategies are of key interest. We consider initially a maximum...... likelihood approach to inference where problems arise due to unknown interaction radii for the plants. We next demonstrate that a Bayesian approach provides a flexible framework for incorporating prior information concerning the interaction radii. From an ecological perspective, we are able both to confirm...

  6. Spatial point process analysis for a plant community with high biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illian, Janine; Møller, Jesper; Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge

    A complex multivariate spatial point pattern for a plant community with high biodiversity is modelled using a hierarchical multivariate point process model. In the model, interactions between plants with different post-fire regeneration strategies are of key interest. We consider initially a...... maximum likelihood approach to inference where problems arise due to unknown interaction radii for the plants. We next demonstrate that a Bayesian approach provides a flexible framework for incorporating prior information concerning the interaction radii. From an ecological perspective, we are able both...

  7. Pre-design and life cycle cost analysis of a hybrid power system for rural and remote communities in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Sayed Shah Danish

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In view of the present situation of the Afghanistan electricity sector, the photovoltaic and diesel generator stand-alone hybrid power system is increasingly attractive for application in rural and remote communities. Thousands of rural communities in Afghanistan depend solely on traditional kerosene for illumination and rarely have access to electricity sources such as DC battery for radio and other small appliances. This study is conducted to offer real-life solution to this problem. The hybrid system is investigated to meet the domestic load demand that is estimated based on the communities’ electricity consumption culture. At first, customary pre-design is pursued. Afterwards, the break-even point and net present value algorithms are applied for economic analysis. That makes this study differ from the previous academic literature. The concepts developed in this study are targeted for a cost-effective hybrid system, which is appropriate for rural and remote residents’ lifestyle change and improvement. Based on the academic research methods, overall analysis procedures can fit as an analogy, especially for developing countries.

  8. Municipal solid waste management: Identification and analysis of engineering indexes representing demand and costs generated in virtuous Italian communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Collection and analysis of real life data in the field of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) generation and costs for management. • Study of 92 virtuous Italian communities. • Elaboration of trends of engineering indexes useful during design and evaluation of MSWM systems. - Abstract: The definition and utilisation of engineering indexes in the field of Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) is an issue of interest for technicians and scientists, which is widely discussed in literature. Specifically, the availability of consolidated engineering indexes is useful when new waste collection services are designed, along with when their performance is evaluated after a warm-up period. However, most published works in the field of MSWM complete their study with an analysis of isolated case studies. Conversely, decision makers require tools for information collection and exchange in order to trace the trends of these engineering indexes in large experiments. In this paper, common engineering indexes are presented and their values analysed in virtuous Italian communities, with the aim of contributing to the creation of a useful database whose data could be used during experiments, by indicating examples of MSWM demand profiles and the costs required to manage them

  9. Multi criteria analysis for sustainability assessments of electricity generation systems in a rural community in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amigun, B.; Mehlwana, M. [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (South Africa). Sustainable Energy Futures, Natural Resources and the Environment; Musango, J.K. [Department of Energy (DoE), Pretoria (South Africa); Brent, A.C. [Stellenbosch Univ. (South Africa). Centre for Renewable and Sustainable Energy Studies

    2011-07-01

    One of the key challenges of the energy policy in South Africa is to ensure that rural areas have access to electricity. This is reflected in the key energy policy documents (the 1998 Energy White Paper and the 2002 Renewable Energy White Paper). Both these documents identified renewable energy resources as immediate alternatives to grid electricity in especially remote rural communities that are characterised by low population densities. Centralised energy generation and transmission is very costly and inefficient in these areas due to greater transmission and distribution losses. While the cost of electricity in South Africa is relatively cheaper, it is not accessible for many rural households. There are still over two million households in rural areas without access to electricity. This paper presents a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) technique to compare various electricity technologies (mainly renewables) in a specific rural community of South Africa using social, economic, environment and technical indicators. These technologies were than ranked against each indicator assuming that the high-level criteria have equal importance for sustainable development. It is demonstrated that energy from wind is the most sustainable, followed by photovoltaic, anaerobic digestion (biogas) and then gasification. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to verify the stability of the priority ranking. The outcome of this study will specifically assist energy planners and decision-makers to choose the best alternative from a range of technology alternatives in a milieu of conflicting and competing criteria. (orig.)

  10. Community analysis of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in roots of Poncirus trifoliata and Citrus reticulata based on SSU rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Yin

    2014-01-01

    Morphological observation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) species in rhizospheric soil could not accurately reflect the actual AMF colonizing status in roots, while molecular identification of indigenous AMF colonizing citrus rootstocks at present was rare in China. In our study, community of AMF colonizing trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.) and red tangerine (Citrus reticulata Blanco) were analyzed based on small subunit of ribosomal DNA genes. Morphological observation showed that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization, spore density, and hyphal length did not differ significantly between two rootstocks. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 173 screened AMF sequences clustered in at least 10 discrete groups (GLO1~GLO10), all belonging to the genus of Glomus Sensu Lato. Among them, GLO1 clade (clustering with uncultured Glomus) accounting for 54.43% clones was the most common in trifoliate orange roots, while GLO6 clade (clustering with Glomus intraradices) accounting for 35.00% clones was the most common in red tangerine roots. Although, Shannon-Wiener indices exhibited no notable differences between both rootstocks, relative proportions of observed clades analysis revealed that composition of AMF communities colonizing two rootstocks varied severely. The results indicated that native AMF species in citrus rhizosphere had diverse colonization potential between two different rootstocks in the present orchards. PMID:25162057

  11. A local scale analysis on influencing factors of NOx emissions: Evidence from the Community of Madrid, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with an important pollution problem affecting millions of people, especially in urban areas and large cities: NOx. This dangerous pollutant is emitted by high temperature combustion and therefore its main source is transportation, which in turn is a consequence of an increase in population and better economic conditions. To examine the determinants of NOx emissions in the Community of Madrid, which is one of the most densely populated regions in Europe, we use an augmented STIRPAT model and a massive dataset which includes kriging estimates of pollution records and integrates various sources of information. Unlike previous research, we carry out our analysis at local level, where the relationship between socio-economic factors and environment becomes more complex, by considering the 179 municipalities of the Community over the period 2000–2009. Our results suggest a positive and statistically significant relationship between private transport-related variables and NOx. Interestingly, the coefficients of the variables related to public transportation are all significant with different signs. The overall outcome illustrates that policy makers should encourage a significant modal shift towards public transport and invest in attractive alternative means of transport and particularly railways in order to reduce transport energy use and mitigate pollutant emissions. - Highlights: • We analyse the impact of transportation on NOx emissions in Madrid, Spain. • An augment STIRPAT model is used for empirical analysis. • We use a massive database which includes kriging estimates of pollution records. • Public transport-related variables show significant relationships with NOx

  12. Community Analysis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Roots of Poncirus trifoliata and Citrus reticulata Based on SSU rDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin

    2014-01-01

    Morphological observation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) species in rhizospheric soil could not accurately reflect the actual AMF colonizing status in roots, while molecular identification of indigenous AMF colonizing citrus rootstocks at present was rare in China. In our study, community of AMF colonizing trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.) and red tangerine (Citrus reticulata Blanco) were analyzed based on small subunit of ribosomal DNA genes. Morphological observation showed that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization, spore density, and hyphal length did not differ significantly between two rootstocks. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 173 screened AMF sequences clustered in at least 10 discrete groups (GLO1~GLO10), all belonging to the genus of Glomus Sensu Lato. Among them, GLO1 clade (clustering with uncultured Glomus) accounting for 54.43% clones was the most common in trifoliate orange roots, while GLO6 clade (clustering with Glomus intraradices) accounting for 35.00% clones was the most common in red tangerine roots. Although, Shannon-Wiener indices exhibited no notable differences between both rootstocks, relative proportions of observed clades analysis revealed that composition of AMF communities colonizing two rootstocks varied severely. The results indicated that native AMF species in citrus rhizosphere had diverse colonization potential between two different rootstocks in the present orchards. PMID:25162057

  13. An objective analysis of the QBO in ERA-Interim and the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Abraham; Richter, Jadwiga H.; Bacmeister, Julio T.

    2014-11-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) is the dominant mode of variability in the tropical stratosphere, which is in large part driven by upward propagating atmospheric waves. For over three decades researchers have investigated an extratropical impact due to the vacillation of the tropical winds. The choice of a single altitude to define the QBO introduces an ambiguity into the analysis of correlations between the tropical and extratropical manifestations of this wave-driven phenomenon. It has been previously demonstrated that using empirical orthogonal functions, this ambiguity can be resolved, by calculating the phase of the QBO from the first two principal components of the stratospheric zonal mean wind. As general circulation models begin to simulate the QBO, a standard and objective means of comparing simulations with observations should be adopted. This objective analysis of the extratropical QBO is presented for the ERA-Interim reanalysis and a version of the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5, which exhibits a spontaneously generated QBO.

  14. Online participation: a content analysis of differences in utilization of two online cancer communities by men and women, patients and family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginossar, Tamar

    2008-01-01

    The Internet provides a new modality for health communication by facilitating the creation of virtual communities. These communities have the potential to influence health behavior beyond traditional FTF support groups. This study utilized content analysis of 1,424 e-mail messages posted to 2 online cancer communities to examine uses of these groups. Findings revealed (a) similarities in the content of communication in the 2 virtual communities, (b) gender differences in participation, and (c) differences in utilization of these online groups between patients and family members. These results are discussed in light of the diverse uses of online cancer communities that they reveal, the role of family members in support seeking and provision, and gender communication styles in health computer-mediated communication. PMID:18443988

  15. Cost-Benefit Analysis of a Community-Based Stroke Prevention Program in Bao Shan District, Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Huang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is a serious problem faced by society. This disease brings not only health problems to individuals suffering from it, but also a serious economic burden to patients and their families. Moreover, it reduces social benefits and the labor force. Therefore, it is important to think about the efficient control and prevention of this disease. It is well known that hypertension is the main cause of stroke. In Bao Shan District, located in Shanghai, China, a community-based prevention program has been in place since 1995. The program is trying to reduce the number of stroke patients and the costs to treat them, mainly by hypertension control and treatment.Objectives: The purpose of this paper is to show the data, describe the results and give a cost-benefit analysis of the program according to data from 1995 to 1997. Methods: The data is calculated by using the method of cost-benefit analysis. Results: According to the cost-benefit analysis of the program, because the incidence of stroke goes down after the hypertension prevention work is taken, the16 patients will not face economic loss because of stoke after the prevention. This is the biggest benefit of this community-based program. The input of this program is RMB 293,573 and the output is RMB 1,062.204; the ratio of cost and benefit is: cost: benefit=1:3.57. (the official currency of the People's Republic of China; RMB/USD currency exchange rate is 1: 0.1473.Conclusion: The economic burden and the Cost-Benefit Analysis can provide important data to the medical and public health departments in order to make the pertinent prevention policy.

  16. Microbial community analysis of a full-scale membrane bioreactor treating industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, D; Ramdhani, N; Bux, F

    2008-01-01

    A Kubotatrade mark submerged membrane bio-reactor was applied to treat wastewater from a sugar manufacturing industry. To achieve optimal results, fundamental and extended understanding of the microbiology is important. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to evaluate the microbial community present. The majority of cells visualized in the sludge flocs by staining with the DNA fluorochrome DAPI, hybridized strongly with a bacterial probe. Probes specific for the alpha-, beta-, and gamma-subclasses of proteobacteria and high G + C Gram positive bacteria were used to characterize the community structures by in situ hybridization. Sampling was carried out over 12 weeks and samples were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde for gram positive organisms and ice cold ethanol for gram negative organisms. The activated sludge population usually constitutes about 80 to 90% of proteobacteria. However, in this study it was found that a relatively small amount of proteobacteria was present within the system. No positive hybridization signal was observed with any of the applied eubacterial family- level probes. PMID:19001712

  17. Economic analysis of community solar heating systems that use annual cycle thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.; Hooper, F.C.; McClenahan, J.D.

    1981-02-01

    The economics of community-scale solar systems that incorporate a centralized annual cycle thermal energy storage (ACTES) coupled to a distribution system is examined. Systems were sized for three housing configurations: single-unit dwellings, 10-unit, and 200-unit apartment complexes in 50-, 200-, 400-, and 1000-unit communities in 10 geographic locations in the United States. Thermal energy is stored in large, constructed, underground tanks. Costs were assigned to each component of every system in order to allow calculation of total costs. Results are presented as normalized system costs per unit of heat delivered per building unit. These methods allow: (1) identification of the relative importance of each system component in the overall cost; and (2) identification of the key variables that determine the optimum sizing of a district solar heating system. In more northerly locations, collectors are a larger component of cost. In southern locations, distribution networks are a larger proportion of total cost. Larger, more compact buildings are, in general, less expensive to heat. For the two smaller-scale building configurations, a broad minima in total costs versus system size is often observed.

  18. Analysis of Knowledge Level and Perception on Singkawang City Community towards Generic Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forid Morison

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Survey data show that the use of generic medicines in Indonesia is relatively very small, which only amounted 7%. This is due to lack of knowledge and poor perceptions towards generic medicines. Knowledge level and perceptions towards generic medicines are inflenced by community characteristics and information resource regarding generic medicines. The aim of this study was to determine the association between community characteristic and information resources with knowledge level and perception towards generic medicines. This study was an analytical survey with cross-sectional descriptive approach on 142 selected respondents who were fulfi inclusion and exclusion criteria. This study was conducted in June 2014 at several randomly selected locations on Singkawang City. The study show that 76 respondents (53.5% had inadequate knowledge and 123 respondents (86.6% had a good perception towards generic medicines. There is signifiant relationship between ethnicity (p=0.000 and information resources (p=0.009 with knowledge level regarding generic medicines at signifiance level of p<0.05. Although good perceptions were noted among the respondents, widespread dissemination of information regarding generic medicines should be continued to increase generic medicines used.

  19. Norwegian deep-water coral reefs: cultivation and molecular analysis of planktonic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sigmund; Lynch, Michael D J; Ray, Jessica L; Neufeld, Josh D; Hovland, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Deep-sea coral reefs do not receive sunlight and depend on plankton. Little is known about the plankton composition at such reefs, even though they constitute habitats for many invertebrates and fish. We investigated plankton communities from three reefs at 260-350 m depth at hydrocarbon fields off the mid-Norwegian coast using a combination of cultivation and small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene and transcript sequencing. Eight months incubations of a reef water sample with minimal medium, supplemented with carbon dioxide and gaseous alkanes at in situ-like conditions, enabled isolation of mostly Alphaproteobacteria (Sulfitobacter, Loktanella), Gammaproteobacteria (Colwellia) and Flavobacteria (Polaribacter). The relative abundance of isolates in the original sample ranged from ∼ 0.01% to 0.80%. Comparisons of bacterial SSU sequences from filtered plankton of reef and non-reef control samples indicated high abundance and metabolic activity of primarily Alphaproteobacteria (SAR11 Ia), Gammaproteobacteria (ARCTIC96BD-19), but also of Deltaproteobacteria (Nitrospina, SAR324). Eukaryote SSU sequences indicated metabolically active microalgae and animals, including codfish, at the reef sites. The plankton community composition varied between reefs and differed between DNA and RNA assessments. Over 5000 operational taxonomic units were detected, some indicators of reef sites (e.g. Flavobacteria, Cercozoa, Demospongiae) and some more active at reef sites (e.g. Gammaproteobacteria, Ciliophora, Copepoda). PMID:24911121

  20. Analysis of Fuel Cell Driven Ground Source Heat Pump Systems in Community Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Keun Shin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a fuel cell driven ground source heat pump (GSHP system is applied in a community building and heat pump system performance is analyzed by computational methods. Conduction heat transfer between the brine pipe and ground is analyzed by TEACH code in order to predict the performance of the heat pump system. The predicted coefficient of performance (COP of the heat pump system and the energy cost were compared with the variation of the location of the objective building, the water saturation rate of the soil, and the driven powers of the heat pump system. Compared to the late-night electricity driven system, a significant reduction of energy cost can be accomplished by employing the fuel cell driven heat pump system. This is due to the low cost of electricity production of the fuel cell system and to the application of the recovered waste heat generated during the electricity production process to the heating of the community building.

  1. Analysis of Active Methylotrophic Communities: When DNA-SIP Meets High-Throughput Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, Martin; Grob, Carolina; Howat, Alexandra M; Burns, Oliver J; Chen, Yin; Neufeld, Josh D; Murrell, J Colin

    2016-01-01

    Methylotrophs are microorganisms ubiquitous in the environment that can metabolize one-carbon (C1) compounds as carbon and/or energy sources. The activity of these prokaryotes impacts biogeochemical cycles within their respective habitats and can determine whether these habitats act as sources or sinks of C1 compounds. Due to the high importance of C1 compounds, not only in biogeochemical cycles, but also for climatic processes, it is vital to understand the contributions of these microorganisms to carbon cycling in different environments. One of the most challenging questions when investigating methylotrophs, but also in environmental microbiology in general, is which species contribute to the environmental processes of interest, or "who does what, where and when?" Metabolic labeling with C1 compounds substituted with (13)C, a technique called stable isotope probing, is a key method to trace carbon fluxes within methylotrophic communities. The incorporation of (13)C into the biomass of active methylotrophs leads to an increase in the molecular mass of their biomolecules. For DNA-based stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP), labeled and unlabeled DNA is separated by isopycnic ultracentrifugation. The ability to specifically analyze DNA of active methylotrophs from a complex background community by high-throughput sequencing techniques, i.e. targeted metagenomics, is the hallmark strength of DNA-SIP for elucidating ecosystem functioning, and a protocol is detailed in this chapter. PMID:26791507

  2. Community Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bródka, Piotr; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The continuous interest in the social network area contributes to the fast development of this field. The new possibilities of obtaining and storing data facilitate deeper analysis of the entire social network, extracted social groups and single individuals as well. One of the most interesting research topic is the network dynamics and dynamics of social groups in particular, it means analysis of group evolution over time. It is the natural step forward after social community extraction. Having communities extracted, appropriate knowledge and methods for dynamic analysis may be applied in order to identify changes as well as to predict the future of all or some selected groups. Furthermore, knowing the most probably change of a given group some additional steps may be performed in order to change this predicted future according to specific needs. Such ability would be a powerful tool in the hands of human resource managers, personnel recruitment, marketing, telecommunication companies, etc.

  3. Using Social Network Analysis To Map Participation And Non-participation In Health Promotion and Community-building Among Vulnerable Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    -building project aiming at increasing upward mobility and social capital within the area and increase equity in health. This presentation will outline the tensions and contradictions which accompany policies and interventions that seek to strengthen local communities as a means of promoting health. Emerging...... capacities for collective and collaborative problemsolving is seen as key to successful community building (Kretzmann and McKnight, 1993). By using social network analysis and Bourdieu’s definition of capital, this study aimed to identify patterns of participation and non-participation in a community...... findings from the network analysis and the factors that promote or hinder participation in voluntary activities will be presented. Particular focus will be on the range of factors that hinder widespread voluntary participation in community building with residents having limited opportunities for developing...

  4. Analysis of the strongylid nematodes (Nematoda: Strongylidae) community after deworming of brood horses in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmina, T A; Kharchenko, V A; Starovir, A I; Dvojnos, G M

    2005-08-10

    Communities of intestinal helminths in horses are commonly studied post mortem. The study objectives were here to examine the species composition of the strongylid community in brood horses in Ukraine after deworming with an aversectin drug Univerm. The site distribution of the strongylid species was analysed according to dynamics of their expulsion in faeces. Forty-four horses of different ages from Poltavska oblast (22 horses), Kyivska oblast (17 horses) and Sumska oblast (5 horses) of Ukraine were included in the study. Horses were treated with Univerm anthelmintic (0.2% aversectin) at a dose rate of 0.5mg aversectin preparation per kg body weight. Faecal sampling (200 g each) was performed at 24, 36, 48 and 60 h post treatment, and all nematodes expelled were collected and identified. The largest numbers of strongylids were expelled at 24--36 h after treatment. Twenty-five nematode species from the subfamilies Strongylinae and Cyathostominae were identified. The number of strongylid species found per horse ranged from 7 to 20, on an average 11+/-3.6 (S.D.). The number of cyathostomin species found per horse ranged from 7 to 16, on an average 10+/-2.3 (S.D.). Cylicocyclus nassatus and Cyathostomum catinatum were the most dominant species were found in 100% of horses, amounting to 36.3% and 17.6% of the total number of strongylids collected, respectively. C. longibursatus, C. ashworthi, Cylicostephanus calicatus, C. leptostomus and C. minutus were identified in more than 80% horses and represented 39.9% of the total number of strongylids collected. The dynamics of the different strongylid species expelled was irregular. Correlation between the time of cyathostomin species expulsion in faeces and their predicted localisation inside the horse intestine was found. Species mainly localised in the caecum were found in faeces later than those species localised in the dorsal and ventral colons. Larvae and adult Parascaris equorum, Oxyuris equi and botfly larvae from the genus Gasterophilus were also found in horse faeces. This investigation shows that is possible to study the horse strongylid community after deworming with aid of an aversectin drug. The results obtained here correspond to those recorded in previous autopsy surveys in other countries. PMID:15979240

  5. Higher Education Research as Tribe, Territory and/or Community: A Co-Citation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tight, Malcolm

    2008-01-01

    This article builds upon existing research which has been mapping and analysing the field of higher education research, and, in particular, on the analysis of the articles (n = 406) in 17 specialist higher education journals published in the English language outside of North America during the year 2000. It extends that analysis by examining the…

  6. First Comparative Analysis of the Community Structures and Carbon Metabolic Pathways of the Bacteria Associated with Alvinocaris longirostris in a Hydrothermal Vent of Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qing-lei; Zeng, Zhi-gang; Chen, Shuai; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Alvinocaris longirostris is a species of shrimp existing in the hydrothermal fields of Okinawa Trough. To date the structure and function of the microbial community associated with A. longirostris are essentially unknown. In this study, by employment of the techniques of high through-put sequencing and clone library construction and analysis, we compared for the first time the community structures and metabolic profiles of microbes associated with the gill and gut of A. longirostris in a hydrothermal field of Okinawa Trough. Fourteen phyla were detected in the gill and gut communities, of which 11 phyla were shared by both tissues. Proteobacteria made up a substantial proportion in both tissues, while Firmicutes was abundant only in gut. Although gill and gut communities were similar in bacterial diversities, the bacterial community structures in these two tissues were significantly different. Further, we discovered for the first time the existence in the gill and gut communities of A. longirostris the genes (cbbM and aclB) encoding the key enzymes of Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle and the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle, and that both cbbM and aclB were significantly more abundant in gill than in gut. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence that at least two carbon fixation pathways are present in both the gill and the gut communities of A. longirostris, and that the communities in different tissues likely differ in autotrophic productivity. PMID:27111851

  7. Metaproteomic Analysis of a Chemosynthetic Hydrothermal Vent Community Reveals Insights into Key-Metabolic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, I.; Stokke, R.; Lanzen, A.; Pedersen, R.; vres, L.; Urich, T.

    2010-12-01

    In 2005 researchers at the Centre for Geobiology, University of Bergen, Norway, discovered two active vent fields at the southwestern Mohns Ridge in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea. The fields harbours both low-temperature iron deposits and high-temperature white smoker vents. Distinct microbial mats were abundantly present and located in close vicinity to the hydrothermal vent sites. Characteristics of the mat environment were steep physical and chemical gradients with temperatures ranging from 10C in the top layer to 90C at 10 cm bsf and high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and methane. The work presented here focus on the In situ community activities, and is part of an integrated strategy combining metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics to in-depth characterise these newly discovered hydrothermal vent communities. Extracted proteins were separated via SDS-PAGE. Peptides extracted after In-gel tryptic digest was injected into an Ultimate 3000 nanoLC system connected to a linear quadropole ion trap-orbitrap (LTQ-Orbitrap XL) mass spectrometer equipped with a nanoelectrospray ion source. A custom database of open reading frames (ORFs) from the combined metatranscriptome and metagenome datasets was implemented and searched against using Mascot 2.2; the IRMa tool box [1] was used in peptide validation. Validated ORFs were subjected to a Blastp search against Refseq with an E-value cut-off of 0.001. A total of 1097 proteins with ? 2 peptides were identified of which 921 gave a hit against Refseq, containing 519 unique proteins. Key enzymes of the sulfur oxidation pathway (sox) were found, which were taxonomically affiliated to Epsilonproteobacteria. In addition, this group actively expressed hydrogenases and membrane proteins involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chains. Enzymes of dissimilatory sulfate-reduction (APS-reductase, AprAB and DsrA2) were found with closest hit to members of the Deltaproteobacteria. These findings indicate an internal sulfur cycle within the community. The community contained expressed enzymes of a variety of carbon metabolism pathways. Key enzymes of the reverse TCA cycle for fixation of CO2 and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for oxidation of acetyl-CoA and / or the fixation of CO2 were found. Key enzymes of aerobic and anaerobic methane-oxidation pathways were identified as well, namely particulate methane monooxygenase and methyl-Coenzyme M reductase. Various house-keeping gene-products, like cold- and heat shock proteins as well as ribosomal proteins and ATP synthases were identified. This approach has a future potential of broadening our understanding of environmental complexity and regulation in response to geochemical constraints. [1] Dupierris, V., Masselon, C., Court, M., Kieffer-Jaquinod, S., and Bruley, C. (2009) A toolbox for validation of mass spectrometry peptides identification and generation of database: IRMa. Bioinformatics 25, 1980-1981.

  8. Analysis of Aquatic Insects Communities of Awba Reservoir and its Physico-Chemical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.O.K. Popoola

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the Awba reservoir insects communities and the health status through the determination of insects abundance, composition, distribution and water qualities parameters. Water samples and insects were collected bi-weekly from August through December, 2009. Insects were sampled using standard entomological methods, while water samples was analyzed using standard Winklers titrimetric and APHA methods to determine the chemical properties. Water analyses and insects identifications were conducted in the laboratory in Department of Zoology, University of Ibadan, Oyo State. The results show that only DO and phosphate-phosphorus had significant difference (p<0.05. A total of 1,154 insects were recorded, Chironomidae and Culicidae were most abundance. The chemical properties and the distinct taxa found in the water suggest that the water body is polluted and may be dangerous to the health of people around the reservoir.

  9. Assessing community-based conservation projects: A systematic review and multilevel analysis of attitudinal, behavioral, ecological, and economic outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooks Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-based conservation (CBC promotes the idea that long-term conservation success requires engaging with, and providing benefits for local communities. Though widespread, CBC projects are not always successful or free of controversy. With criticisms on all sides of the conservation debates, it is critical to have a better understanding of (1 whether CBC is an effective conservation tool, and (2 of the factors associated with the success or failure of CBC projects, and the scale at which these factors operate. Recent CBC reviews have typically examined only a single resource domain, have limited geographic scope, consider only one outcome, or ignore the nested nature of socioecological systems. To remedy these issues, we use a newly coded global comparative database of CBC projects identified by systematic review to evaluate success in four outcome domains (attitudes, behaviors, ecological, economic and explore synergies and tradeoffs among these outcomes. We test hypotheses about how features of the national context (H-NC, project design (H-PD, and local community characteristics (H-CC affect these four measures of success. Methods To add to a sample of 62 projects that we used from previous systematic reviews, we systematically searched the conservation literature using six terms in four online databases. To increase the number of projects for each country in order to conduct a multilevel analysis, we also conducted a secondary search using the Advancing Conservation in a Social Context online library. We coded projects for 65 pieces of information. We conducted bivariate analyses using two-dimensional contingency tables and proportional odds logistic regression and conducted multivariate analyses by fitting reduced form proportional odds logistic regression models that were selected using a forward stepwise AIC approach. Results The primary and secondary searches produced 74 new projects to go along with the 62 projects from previous reviews for a total of 136 projects. The analyses suggest that project design, particularly capacity building in local communities, is critical in generating success across all outcomes. In addition, some community characteristics, such as tenure regimes and supportive cultural beliefs and institutions, are important for some aspects of project success. Surprisingly, there is less evidence that national context systematically influences project outcomes. Conclusions Our study supports the idea that conservation projects should be carefully designed to be effective and that some characteristics of local communities can facilitate success. That well-designed projects can prevail over disadvantages relating to the pre-existing national and local context is encouraging. As the evidence base on CBC grows, it will be useful to repeat this analysis with additional search terms, and consider additional variables related to national context to further evaluate the role of broader socio-political and economic contexts.

  10. Comparative analysis of a nontraditional general chemistry textbook and selected traditional textbooks used in Texas community colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvato, Steven Walter

    The purpose of this study was to analyze questions within the chapters of a nontraditional general chemistry textbook and the four general chemistry textbooks most widely used by Texas community colleges in order to determine if the questions require higher- or lower-order thinking according to Bloom's taxonomy. The study employed quantitative methods. Bloom's taxonomy (Bloom, Engelhart, Furst, Hill, & Krathwohl, 1956) was utilized as the main instrument in the study. Additional tools were used to help classify the questions into the proper category of the taxonomy (McBeath, 1992; Metfessel, Michael, & Kirsner, 1969). The top four general chemistry textbooks used in Texas community colleges and Chemistry: A Project of the American Chemical Society (Bell et al., 2005) were analyzed during the fall semester of 2010 in order to categorize the questions within the chapters into one of the six levels of Bloom's taxonomy. Two coders were used to assess reliability. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential methods. The descriptive method involved calculation of the frequencies and percentages of coded questions from the books as belonging to the six categories of the taxonomy. Questions were dichotomized into higher- and lower-order thinking questions. The inferential methods involved chi-square tests of association to determine if there were statistically significant differences among the four traditional college general chemistry textbooks in the proportions of higher- and lower-order questions and if there were statistically significant differences between the nontraditional chemistry textbook and the four traditional general chemistry textbooks. Findings indicated statistically significant differences among the four textbooks frequently used in Texas community colleges in the number of higher- and lower-level questions. Statistically significant differences were also found among the four textbooks and the nontraditional textbook. After the analysis of the data, conclusions were drawn, implications for practice were delineated, and recommendations for future research were given.

  11. Assessing the sustainability of forest management: an application of multi-criteria decision analysis to community forests in northern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balana, Bedru Babulo; Mathijs, Erik; Muys, Bart

    2010-06-01

    Continuous deterioration of the natural resource base has become a serious threat to both the ecological systems and economic production in Ethiopia. Many of these problems have been attributed directly or indirectly to the rapid dwindling of the country's forest cover which is associated with unsustainable forest use and management. Closing community woodlands from human and livestock intervention to promote natural regeneration of forests has been one of the environmental restoration strategies pursued in the degraded highland areas of northern Ethiopia. However, local pressure to use reforested community lands for economic benefit has become a major threat to forest sustainability. Using locally identified sets of criteria and indicators for sustainable community forest management, this paper applies a multi-criteria decision analysis tool to evaluate forest management problems in the northern province of Tigray, Ethiopia. Three MCA methods - ranking, pair-wise comparison, and scoring - were used in evaluating the sets of criteria and indicators and alternative forest management scenarios. Results from the study indicate a number of noteworthy points: 1) MCA techniques both for identifying local level sustainability criteria and indicators and evaluating management schemes in a participatory decision environment appear to be effective tools to address local resource management problems; 2) Evaluated against the selected sets of criteria and indicators, the current forest management regime in the study area is not on a sustainable path; 3) Acquainting local people with adequate environmental knowledge and raising local awareness about the long-term consequences of environmental degradation ranked first among the set of sustainability criteria; and 4) In order to harmonize both environmental and economic objectives, the present 'ecological-biased' forest management regime needs to be substituted by an appropriate holistic scheme that takes into account stakeholders' multiple preferences and priority rankings. PMID:20206436

  12. ABC-VED Analysis of a Drug Store in the Department of Community Medicine of a Medical College in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Anand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A matrix based on coupling of cost (always, better and control analysis and criticality (vital, essential and desirable analysis was employed for drug inventory containing 129 items of drug store in the Department of Community Medicine of a Medical College in Delhi. The annual drug expenditure incurred on 129 drug items for the year 2010-2011 was found to be Rs. 4,35,847.85. On always, better and control analysis, 18.6, 24.0 and 57.4% drugs were found to be always, better and control category items, respectively, amounting for 69.1, 20.8 and 10.1% of annual drug expenditure. About 13.2 (17, 38.8 (50 and 48.0% (62 items were found to be vital, essential and desirable category items, respectively, amounting for 18.7, 49.5 and 31.8% of annual drug expenditure. Based on always, better and control-vital, essential and desirable matrix analysis there were 37 (28.68% items in category I, 53 (41.09% items in category II and 39 (30.23% items in category III, amounting for 73.0, 22.2 and 4.8% of annual drug expenditure, respectively. To conclude, scientific inventory management tools are needed to be applied in routine for efficient management of the pharmacy stores as it contributes to not only in improvement in patient care but also judicious use of resources as well.

  13. New Agilent platform DNA microarrays for transcriptome analysis of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei for the malaria research community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kafsack Bjrn F C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarrays have been a valuable tool in malaria research for over a decade but remain in limited use in part due their relatively high cost, poor availability, and technical difficulty. With the aim of alleviating some of these factors next-generation DNA microarrays for genome-wide transcriptome analysis for both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei using the Agilent 8x15K platform were designed. Methods Probe design was adapted from previously published methods and based on the most current transcript predictions available at the time for P. falciparum or P. berghei. Array performance and transcriptome analysis was determined using dye-coupled, aminoallyl-labelled cDNA and streamlined methods for hybridization, washing, and array analysis were developed. Results The new array design marks a notable improvement in the number of transcripts covered and average number of probes per transcript. Array performance was excellent across a wide range of transcript abundance, with low inter-array and inter-probe variability for relative abundance measurements and it recapitulated previously observed transcriptional patterns. Additionally, improvements in sensitivity permitted a 20-fold reduction in necessary starting RNA amounts, further reducing experimental costs and widening the range of application. Conclusions DNA microarrays utilizing the Agilent 8x15K platform for genome-wide transcript analysis in P. falciparum and P. berghei mark an improvement in coverage and sensitivity, increased availability to the research community, and simplification of the experimental methods.

  14. The methodology for developing a prospective meta-analysis in the family planning community

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson Janet C; Teal Stephanie B; Lathrop Eva H; Lotke Pamela S; Edelman Alison B; Espey Eve; Turok David K; Simonsen Sara E; Schulz Kenneth F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Prospective meta-analysis (PMA) is a collaborative research design in which individual sites perform randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and pool the data for meta-analysis. Members of the PMA collaboration agree upon specific research interventions and outcome measures, ideally before initiation but at least prior to any individual trial publishing results. This allows for uniform reporting of primary and secondary outcomes. With this approach, heterogeneity among trials ...

  15. System Analysis in International Development: From Concept to Application in Flood Prone Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Keating, A; R. Mechler; Magnuszewski, P.; Liu, W; Mochizuki, J.

    2015-01-01

    Disasters pose a growing threat to sustainable development. Disaster risk management efforts have largely failed to arrest key drivers of uncontrolled urbanization and proliferation of assets in high risk areas. Systems analysis provides a unique interpretation of this failure, and a new pathway for remedy. Increasing “buzz” around the concept of disaster “resilience” (fundamentally a systems concept) has opened the door for the application of systems analysis in the complex arena of the soci...

  16. Project Final Report: Building a Community Infrastructure for Scalable On-Line Performance Analysis Tools around Open|SpeedShop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galarowicz, James

    2014-01-06

    In this project we created a community tool infrastructure for program development tools targeting Petascale class machines and beyond. This includes tools for performance analysis, debugging, and correctness tools, as well as tuning and optimization frameworks. The developed infrastructure provides a comprehensive and extensible set of individual tool building components. We started with the basic elements necessary across all tools in such an infrastructure followed by a set of generic core modules that allow a comprehensive performance analysis at scale. Further, we developed a methodology and workflow that allows others to add or replace modules, to integrate parts into their own tools, or to customize existing solutions. In order to form the core modules, we built on the existing Open|SpeedShop infrastructure and decomposed it into individual modules that match the necessary tool components. At the same time, we addressed the challenges found in performance tools for petascale systems in each module. When assembled, this instantiation of community tool infrastructure provides an enhanced version of Open|SpeedShop, which, while completely different in its architecture, provides scalable performance analysis for petascale applications through a familiar interface. This project also built upon and enhances capabilities and reusability of project partner components as specified in the original project proposal. The overall project team’s work over the project funding cycle was focused on several areas of research, which are described in the following sections. The reminder of this report also highlights related work as well as preliminary work that supported the project. In addition to the project partners funded by the Office of Science under this grant, the project team included several collaborators who contribute to the overall design of the envisioned tool infrastructure. In particular, the project team worked closely with the other two DOE NNSA laboratories Los Alamos and Sandia leveraging co-funding for Krell by ASC’s Common Computing Environment (CCE) program as laid out in the original proposal. The ASC CCE co-funding, coordinated through LLNL, was for 50% of the total project funding, with the ASC CCE portion of the funding going entirely to Krell, while the ASCR funding itself was split between Krell and the funded partners. This report covers the entire project from both funding sources. Additionally, the team leveraged the expertise of software engineering researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, who specialize in software framework design, in order to achieve a broadly acceptable component framework. The Component Based Tool Framework (CBTF) software has been released to the community. Information related to the project and the released software can be found on the CBTF wiki page at: http://sourceforge.net/p/cbtf/wiki/Home

  17. EUROPLANET-RI modelling service for the planetary science community: European Modelling and Data Analysis Facility (EMDAF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodachenko, Maxim; Miller, Steven; Stoeckler, Robert; Topf, Florian

    2010-05-01

    Computational modeling and observational data analysis are two major aspects of the modern scientific research. Both appear nowadays under extensive development and application. Many of the scientific goals of planetary space missions require robust models of planetary objects and environments as well as efficient data analysis algorithms, to predict conditions for mission planning and to interpret the experimental data. Europe has great strength in these areas, but it is insufficiently coordinated; individual groups, models, techniques and algorithms need to be coupled and integrated. Existing level of scientific cooperation and the technical capabilities for operative communication, allow considerable progress in the development of a distributed international Research Infrastructure (RI) which is based on the existing in Europe computational modelling and data analysis centers, providing the scientific community with dedicated services in the fields of their computational and data analysis expertise. These services will appear as a product of the collaborative communication and joint research efforts of the numerical and data analysis experts together with planetary scientists. The major goal of the EUROPLANET-RI / EMDAF is to make computational models and data analysis algorithms associated with particular national RIs and teams, as well as their outputs, more readily available to their potential user community and more tailored to scientific user requirements, without compromising front-line specialized research on model and data analysis algorithms development and software implementation. This objective will be met through four keys subdivisions/tasks of EMAF: 1) an Interactive Catalogue of Planetary Models; 2) a Distributed Planetary Modelling Laboratory; 3) a Distributed Data Analysis Laboratory, and 4) enabling Models and Routines for High Performance Computing Grids. Using the advantages of the coordinated operation and efficient communication between the involved computational modelling, research and data analysis expert teams and their related research infrastructures, EMDAF will provide a 1) flexible, 2) scientific user oriented, 3) continuously developing and fast upgrading computational and data analysis service to support and intensify the European planetary scientific research. At the beginning EMDAF will create a set of demonstrators and operational tests of this service in key areas of European planetary science. This work will aim at the following objectives: (a) Development and implementation of tools for distant interactive communication between the planetary scientists and computing experts (including related RIs); (b) Development of standard routine packages, and user-friendly interfaces for operation of the existing numerical codes and data analysis algorithms by the specialized planetary scientists; (c) Development of a prototype of numerical modelling services "on demand" for space missions and planetary researchers; (d) Development of a prototype of data analysis services "on demand" for space missions and planetary researchers; (e) Development of a prototype of coordinated interconnected simulations of planetary phenomena and objects (global multi-model simulators); (f) Providing the demonstrators of a coordinated use of high performance computing facilities (super-computer networks), done in cooperation with European HPC Grid DEISA.

  18. Pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial communities in Lake Bosten, a large brackish inland lake in the arid northwest of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Gao, Guang; Tang, Xiangming; Shao, Keqiang; Gong, Yi

    2016-06-01

    The bacteria inhabiting brackish lake environments are poorly known, and there are few studies on the microbial diversity of these environments. Lake Bosten, a large brackish inland lake, is the largest lake in Xinjiang Province in northwestern China. Because sediments record past limnic changes, the analysis of sedimentary bacteria in Lake Bosten may help elucidate bacterial responses to environmental change. We employed 454 pyrosequencing to investigate the diversity and bacterial community composition in Lake Bosten. A total of 48 230 high-quality sequence reads with 16 314 operational taxonomic units were successfully obtained from the 4 selected samples, and they were numerically dominated by members of the Deltaproteobacteria (17.1%), Chloroflexi (16.1%), Betaproteobacteria (12.6%), Bacteroidetes (6.6%), and Firmicutes (5.7%) groups, accounting for more than 58.1% of the bacterial sequences. The sediment bacterial communities and diversity were consistently different along the 2 geographic environmental gradients: (i) freshwater-brackish water gradient and (ii) oligotrophic-mesotrophic habitat gradient. Deltaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Betaproteobacteria were amplified throughout all of the sampling sites. More Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were found near the Kaidu River estuary (site 14). Our investigation showed that Proteobacteria did not display any systematic change along the salinity gradient, and numerous 16S rRNA sequences could not be identified at the genus level. Our data will provide a better understanding of the diversity and distribution of bacteria in arid region brackish lakes. PMID:27045804

  19. Study of a two species microbial community by an inferential comparative genomic analysis tool: Spatial Analytical Microbial Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Valverde, Paloma; Daniel, Douglas; Fox, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Most molecular fingerprinting techniques, including denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) [1], comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) [2], real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) [3], destroy community structure and/or cellular integrity, therefore lost the info. of the spatial locus and the in situ genomic copy number of the cells. An alternative technique, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) doesn't require sample disintegration but needs to develop specific markers and doesn't provide info. related to genomic copy number. Here, a microbial analysis tool, Spatial Analytical Microbial Imaging (SAMI), is described. An application was performed with a mixture of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and E. coli K-12 MG1655. The intrinsic property of their genome, reflected by the average fluorescence intensity (AFI), distinguished them in 3D. And their growth rates were inferred by comparing the total genomic fluorescence binding area (GFA) with that of the pure culture standards. A 93% of accuracy in differentiating the species was achieved. •SAMI does not require sample disintegration and preserves the community spatial structure.•It measures the 3D locus of cells within the mixture and may differentiate them according to the property of their genome.•It allows assessment of the growth rate of the cells within the mixture by comparing their genomic copy number with that of the pure culture standards. PMID:26258051

  20. Analysis of the bacterial community composition in acidic well water used for drinking in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Ana; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2014-08-01

    Potable water is a resource out of reach for millions worldwide, and the available water may be chemically and microbiologically compromised. This is particularly acute in Africa, where water-networks may be non-existent or restricted to a small fraction of the urban population, as in the case of Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. This study was carried out seasonally in Bolama (11N), where unprotected hand-dug wells with acidic water are the sole source of water for the population. We inspected the free-living bacterial community dynamics by automated rRNA intergenic spacer analyses, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and cloning approaches. The results revealed a clear seasonal shift in bacterial assemblage composition and microbial abundance within the same sampling site. Temperature, pH and turbidity, together with the infiltration and percolation of surface water, which takes place in the wet season, seemed to be the driving factors in the shaping and selection of the bacterial community and deterioration of water quality. Analysis of 16S rDNA sequences revealed several potential pathogenic bacteria and uncultured bacteria associated with water and sediments, corroborating the importance of a culture-independent approach in drinking water monitoring. PMID:25108716

  1. HydroDesktop as a Community Designed and Developed Resource for Hydrologic Data Discovery and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    As has been seen in other informatics fields, well-documented and appropriately licensed open source software tools have the potential to significantly increase both opportunities and motivation for inter-institutional science and technology collaboration. The CUAHSI HIS (and related HydroShare) projects have aimed to foster such activities in hydrology resulting in the development of many useful community software components including the HydroDesktop software application. HydroDesktop is an open source, GIS-based, scriptable software application for discovering data on the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System and related resources. It includes a well-defined plugin architecture and interface to allow 3rd party developers to create extensions and add new functionality without requiring recompiling of the full source code. HydroDesktop is built in the C# programming language and uses the open source DotSpatial GIS engine for spatial data management. Capabilities include data search, discovery, download, visualization, and export. An extension that integrates the R programming language with HydroDesktop provides scripting and data automation capabilities and an OpenMI plugin provides the ability to link models. Current revision and updates to HydroDesktop include migration of core business logic to cross platform, scriptable Python code modules that can be executed in any operating system or linked into other software front-end applications.

  2. Metagenomic analysis of a permafrost microbial community reveals a rapid response to thaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackelprang, Rachel; Waldrop, Mark P; DeAngelis, Kristen M; David, Maude M; Chavarria, Krystle L; Blazewicz, Steven J; Rubin, Edward M; Jansson, Janet K

    2011-12-15

    Permafrost contains an estimated 1672?Pg carbon (C), an amount roughly equivalent to the total currently contained within land plants and the atmosphere. This reservoir of C is vulnerable to decomposition as rising global temperatures cause the permafrost to thaw. During thaw, trapped organic matter may become more accessible for microbial degradation and result in greenhouse gas emissions. Despite recent advances in the use of molecular tools to study permafrost microbial communities, their response to thaw remains unclear. Here we use deep metagenomic sequencing to determine the impact of thaw on microbial phylogenetic and functional genes, and relate these data to measurements of methane emissions. Metagenomics, the direct sequencing of DNA from the environment, allows the examination of whole biochemical pathways and associated processes, as opposed to individual pieces of the metabolic puzzle. Our metagenome analyses reveal that during transition from a frozen to a thawed state there are rapid shifts in many microbial, phylogenetic and functional gene abundances and pathways. After one week of incubation at 5?C, permafrost metagenomes converge to be more similar to each other than while they are frozen. We find that multiple genes involved in cycling of C and nitrogen shift rapidly during thaw. We also construct the first draft genome from a complex soil metagenome, which corresponds to a novel methanogen. Methane previously accumulated in permafrost is released during thaw and subsequently consumed by methanotrophic bacteria. Together these data point towards the importance of rapid cycling of methane and nitrogen in thawing permafrost. PMID:22056985

  3. Analysis of written advertising material distributed through community pharmacies in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Aqeel SA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advertising is a crucial component of pharmaceutical industry promotion. Research indicates that information on advertisement materials might be inadequate, inaccurate, biased, and misleading. Objective: To analyse and critically assess the information presented in print pharmaceutical advertisements in Saudi Arabia.Methods: Pharmaceutical advertisements were collected from 280 community pharmacies in Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia. The advertisements were evaluated using criteria derived from the Saudi Food and Drug Authority (SFDA regulation, the World Health Organization (WHO ethical medicinal drug promotion criteria, and other principles reported in similar studies. The data were extracted independently by two of the researchers using a standardized assessment form. Results: One hundred eighty five printed advertisements were included in the final sample. Approximately half of the advertisements (n = 94, 51% were for over-the-counter (OTC medications, and 71 (38% were for prescription-only medication. Information such as the name of active ingredients was available in 168 (90.8% advertisements, therapeutic uses were mentioned in 156 (98.7% of analysed advertisements. Safety information related to side effects, precautions, and major interactions were stated in 53 (28.5%, 58 (31%, and 33 (16.5% advertisements, respectively. Only 119 advertisements (64% provided references for information presented. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that print advertisements do not convey all the information necessary for safe prescribing. These results have implications for the regulation of drug advertising and the continuing education of pharmacists.

  4. Microbiological community analysis of vermicompost tea and its influence on the growth of vegetables and cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, J I; Franke-Whittle, I H; Haindl, S; Insam, H; Braun, R

    2012-07-01

    Vermicompost, the digestion product of organic material by earthworms, has been widely reported to have a more positive effect on plant growth and plant health than conventional compost. A study was conducted to investigate the effects of different vermicompost elutriates (aerated compost teas) on soils and plant growth. The teas were analyzed by chemical, microbiological, and molecular methods accompanied by plant growth tests at laboratory and field scale. The number of microorganisms in the teas increased during the extraction process and was affected by substrate addition. The vermicompost tea found to increase plant growth best under laboratory tests was applied to cereals (wheat and barley) and vegetables (Raphanus sativus, Rucola selvatica, and Pisum sativum) in a field study. The results revealed no effects of tea application on plant yield; however, sensoric tests indicated an improvement in crop quality. The soils from laboratory and field studies were investigated to detect possible microbial or chemical changes. The results indicated that minor changes to the soil microbial community occurred following tea application by foliar spray in both the laboratory-scale and field-scale experiments. PMID:22712623

  5. Considering external information to improve the phylogenetic comparison of microbial communities: a new approach based on constrained Double Principal Coordinates Analysis (cDPCoA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dray, S; Pavoine, S; Aguirre de Cárcer, D

    2015-03-01

    The use of next-generation sequencing technologies is revolutionizing microbial ecology by allowing a deep phylogenetic coverage of tens to thousands of samples simultaneously. Double Principal Coordinates Analysis (DPCoA) is a multivariate method, developed in community ecology, able to integrate a distance matrix describing differences among species (e.g. phylogenetic distances) in the analysis of a species abundance matrix. This ordination technique has been used recently to describe microbial communities taking into account phylogenetic relatedness. In this work, we extend DPCoA to integrate the information of external variables measured on communities. The constrained Double Principal Coordinates Analysis (cDPCoA) is able to enforce a priori classifications to retrieve subtle differences and (or) remove the effect of confounding factors. We describe the main principles of this new approach and demonstrate its usefulness by providing application examples based on published 16S rRNA gene data sets. PMID:24974884

  6. Use of the SRI electronic satellite image analysis console for mapping southern Arizona plant communities from ERTS-1 imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Cloud-free imagery covering the Tucson, Ariz., region for the period from August 22 to November 2, 1972, was used to determine the utility of ERTS-1 data for discriminating boundaries between plant communities. The following studies were made from imagery analyzed by use of an Electronic Satellite Image Analysis Console: (1) console-generated color composites from MSS-5 and MSS-6 bands were recorded photographically from the console color monitor. The color photographs were then used to compare with short-term changes in vegetative cover observed on the ground; (2) using the console, microdensitometric traces were made along selected traverses to quantify changes in scene irradiance across the image field; (3) quantitative plant coverage data, collected at ground-truth stations along the traverses, were compared with the densitometric values.

  7. Analysis of expansions of a bus transit network considering the needs identified by the community: case study

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Promothes, Saha; Debbie, Shinstine.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Expansion analyses are performed on a bus transit network in the City of Laramie area in Wyoming. Expansion analysis is based on the needs identified by the bus transportation agency and the community. This paper examines the expansions, operations and sustainability of a bus transit in a s [...] mall city having a population of 30,000 people. When funding is limited, it is very important to identify the best route that provides the services to the more people. Gravity model and ArcGIS software have been used to analyze the data. This paper examines the background of the transportation agency and existing services, finally develops a bus routing model for identifying future expansions. This research identified that one of the existing bus stops account for 1% of the ridership which can be closed. This research also found that adding a new loop considering same number of buses would increase the ridership significantly without increasing headway.

  8. Microbial community analysis in a long-term membrane-less microbial electrolysis cell with hydrogen and methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Laura; Ruiz, Yolanda; Baeza, Juan A; Guisasola, Albert; Corts, Pilar

    2015-12-01

    A single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) aiming at hydrogen production with acetate as sole carbon source failed due to methanogenesis build-up despite the significant amount of 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) dosage, 50 mM. Specific batch experiments and a thorough microbial community analysis, pyrosequencing and qPCR, of cathode, anode and medium were performed to understand these observations. The experimental data rebuts different hypothesis and shows that methanogenesis at high BES concentration was likely due to the capacity of some Archaea (hydrogen-oxidizing genus Methanobrevibacter) to resist high BES concentration up to 200 mM. Methanobrevibacter, of the Methanobacteriales order, represented almost the 98% of the total Archaea in the cathode whereas Geobacter was highly abundant in the anode (72% of bacteria). Moreover, at higher BES concentration (up to 200 mM), methanogenesis activity decreased resulting in an increase of homoacetogenic activity, which challenged the performance of the MEC for H2 production. PMID:26138343

  9. New Visualization and Analysis Tools for Magnetospheric, Heliospheric, and Solar Models from the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, D.; LaSota, J.; Donti, N.; Boblitt, J.; Mullinix, R.; Maddox, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed new analysis tools to help scientists analyze space weather simulation data executed at the CCMC. Space Weather Explorer 2 is a Java-based application that can visualize, in 2D and 3D, large data files on common hardware. A new WebGL and HTML5-based version of Space Weather Explorer, along with a data streaming server, allows even more users to access larger datasets than normally possible. The tool allows users to remotely and easily share visualization data with others, bringing collaborative research to a new level. We will demonstrate how these tools enable new insights into the structures and dynamics of complex heliophysics phenomena such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flux transfer events (FTEs), and Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of a spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation metagenome reveals new insights into its bacterial and fungal community diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illeghems, Koen; De Vuyst, Luc; Papalexandratou, Zoi; Weckx, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    This is the first report on the phylogenetic analysis of the community diversity of a single spontaneous cocoa bean box fermentation sample through a metagenomic approach involving 454 pyrosequencing. Several sequence-based and composition-based taxonomic profiling tools were used and evaluated to avoid software-dependent results and their outcome was validated by comparison with previously obtained culture-dependent and culture-independent data. Overall, this approach revealed a wider bacterial (mainly γ-Proteobacteria) and fungal diversity than previously found. Further, the use of a combination of different classification methods, in a software-independent way, helped to understand the actual composition of the microbial ecosystem under study. In addition, bacteriophage-related sequences were found. The bacterial diversity depended partially on the methods used, as composition-based methods predicted a wider diversity than sequence-based methods, and as classification methods based solely on phylogenetic marker genes predicted a more restricted diversity compared with methods that took all reads into account. The metagenomic sequencing analysis identified Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Acetobacter pasteurianus as the prevailing species. Also, the presence of occasional members of the cocoa bean fermentation process was revealed (such as Erwinia tasmaniensis, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Oenococcus oeni). Furthermore, the sequence reads associated with viral communities were of a restricted diversity, dominated by Myoviridae and Siphoviridae, and reflecting Lactobacillus as the dominant host. To conclude, an accurate overview of all members of a cocoa bean fermentation process sample was revealed, indicating the superiority of metagenomic sequencing over previously used techniques. PMID:22666442

  11. Phylogenetic analysis and in situ identification of the intestinal microbial community of rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss , Walbaum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, I.; Spanggaard, Bettina; Appel, K.F.; Rossen, L.; Nielsen, T.; Gram, Lone

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To identify the dominant culturable and nonculturable microbiota of rainbow trout intestine.Methods and Results: Microbial density of rainbow trout intestine was estimated by direct microscopic counts (4('),6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, DAPI) and by culturing on tryptone soya agar (TSA). Diff...... correlation was seen between cultivation results and in situ analysis, however, a molecular approach was crucial for the identification of organisms uncultivated on TSA......). Differential gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of bacterial DNA from intestinal samples, re-amplification of bands and sequence analysis was used to identify the bacteria that dominated samples where aerobic counts were less than or equal to2% of the DAPI counts. 16S rDNA gene sequences of 146 bacterial...... isolates and three sequences of uncultured bacteria were identified. A set of oligonucleotide probes was constructed and used to detect and enumerate the bacterial community structure of the gastrointestinal tract of rainbow trout by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Members of the gamma subclass...

  12. Fusion Energy: Contextual Analysis of the Information Panels Developed by the Scientific Community versus Citizen Discourse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents an exploratory study on the impact of scientific dissemination, particularly a comparative analysis of two discourses on fusion energy as an alternative energy future. The report introduces a comparative analysis of the institutional discourse, as portrayed by the scientific jargon used in a European travelling exhibition on nuclear fusion Fusion Expo, and the social discourse, as illustrated by a citizen deliberation on this very same exhibition. Through textual analysis, the scientific discourse as deployed in the informative panels at the Fusion Expo is compared with the citizen discourse as developed in the discussions within the citizen groups. The ConText software was applied for such analysis. The purpose is to analyze how visitors assimilate, capture and understand highly technical information. Results suggest that, in despite of convergence points, the two discourses present certain differences, showing diverse levels of communication. The scientific discourse shows a great profusion of formalisms and technicalities of scientific jargon. The citizen discourse shows abundance of words associated with daily life and the more practical aspects (economy, efficiency), concerning institutional and evaluative references. In sum, the study shows that although there are a few common communicative spaces, there are still very few turning points. These data indicate that although exhibitions can be a good tool to disseminate advances in fusion energy in informal learning contexts, public feedback is a powerful tool for improving the quality of social dialogue. (Author)

  13. PHYTOPLANKTON PIGMENT ANALYSIS BY HPLC FOR ASSESSING COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A technique to rapidly assess phytoplankton dynamics is being evaluated for its utility in the Great Lakes. Comparison to traditional microscopic techniques and to more recent in-situ FluoroProbe technology will allow us to determine if HPLC pigment analysis can provide unique a...

  14. Sensitivity analysis in the WWTP modelling community – new opportunities and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sin, Gürkan; Ruano, M.V.; Neumann, Marc B.; Ribes, J.; Gernaey, Krist; Ferrer, J.; Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.van; Gujer, Willi

    2010-01-01

    design (BSM1 plant layout) using Standardized Regression Coefficients (SRC) and (ii) Applying sensitivity analysis to help fine-tuning a fuzzy controller for a BNPR plant using Morris Screening. The results obtained from each case study are then critically discussed in view of practical applications of...

  15. Assessment of Soil Microbial Communities Using a Combined Quantitative PCR and Length Heterogeneity Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular based approaches to assess microbial biomass and diversity from soil and other ecosystems are rapidly becoming the standard methodology for analysis. While these techniques are advantageous because they do not rely on the need to culture organisms, each technique may have its own biases a...

  16. Comprehensive Meta-analysis of Ontology Annotated 16S rRNA Profiles Identifies Beta Diversity Clusters of Environmental Bacterial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschel, Andreas; Anwar, Muhammad Zohaib; Manohar, Vimitha

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensive mapping of environmental microbiomes in terms of their compositional features remains a great challenge in understanding the microbial biosphere of the Earth. It bears promise to identify the driving forces behind the observed community patterns and whether community assembly happens deterministically. Advances in Next Generation Sequencing allow large community profiling studies, exceeding sequencing data output of conventional methods in scale by orders of magnitude. However, appropriate collection systems are still in a nascent state. We here present a database of 20,427 diverse environmental 16S rRNA profiles from 2,426 independent studies, which forms the foundation of our meta-analysis. We conducted a sample size adaptive all-against-all beta diversity comparison while also respecting phylogenetic relationships of Operational Taxonomic Units(OTUs). After conventional hierarchical clustering we systematically test for enrichment of Environmental Ontology terms and their abstractions in all possible clusters. This post-hoc algorithm provides a novel formalism that quantifies to what extend compositional and semantic similarity of microbial community samples coincide. We automatically visualize significantly enriched subclusters on a comprehensive dendrogram of microbial communities. As a result we obtain the hitherto most differentiated and comprehensive view on global patterns of microbial community diversity. We observe strong clusterability of microbial communities in ecosystems such as human/mammal-associated, geothermal, fresh water, plant-associated, soils and rhizosphere microbiomes, whereas hypersaline and anthropogenic samples are less homogeneous. Moreover, saline samples appear less cohesive in terms of compositional properties than previously reported. PMID:26458130

  17. Multi-scales analysis of the global change impact on the diversity of the aphid communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this project is to investigate the effects of global change on the biodiversity of aphid communities in Western Europe. Biodiversity has been examined at 3 levels: total number of species, phenology and reproductive strategy. Data were provided by EXAMINE, the European suction traps network which has been now operating for 35 years. 392 different species have been identified. At each location, total number of species has been regularly increasing, one additional species being caught every 1 or 2 years depending on location. This is due to introduced species but also to warming which favours rare species. No general trend of increasing density has been detected, but phenological earliness of almost all species (annual date of first appearance in suction traps) is strongly correlated with temperature and especially with mean daily temperature (during more or less long periods of time lying principally in February and March) or number of days below 0 C. Strong relationships between aphid phenology and environmental variables have been found and there is strong discrimination between species with different life cycle strategies, and between species feeding on herbs and trees, suggesting the possible value of trait-based groupings in predicting responses to environmental changes. These preliminary results suggest that 1) biodiversity has increased during the last decades; 2) there is a pool of species among which some of them reach a detectable density only during years where temperatures are high enough; 3) a set of newly introduced species succeed in settling being favoured by warming and 4) phenology of aphids is expected to advance and their abundance to increase with temperature, and the possible role of natural enemies to regulate abundant species is discussed. (author)

  18. Metagenomic analysis of a permafrost microbial community reveals a rapid response to thaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKelprang, R.; Waldrop, M.P.; Deangelis, K.M.; David, M.M.; Chavarria, K.L.; Blazewicz, S.J.; Rubin, E.M.; Jansson, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    Permafrost contains an estimated 1672????????Pg carbon (C), an amount roughly equivalent to the total currently contained within land plants and the atmosphere. This reservoir of C is vulnerable to decomposition as rising global temperatures cause the permafrost to thaw. During thaw, trapped organic matter may become more accessible for microbial degradation and result in greenhouse gas emissions. Despite recent advances in the use of molecular tools to study permafrost microbial communities, their response to thaw remains unclear. Here we use deep metagenomic sequencing to determine the impact of thaw on microbial phylogenetic and functional genes, and relate these data to measurements of methane emissions. Metagenomics, the direct sequencing of DNA from the environment, allows the examination of whole biochemical pathways and associated processes, as opposed to individual pieces of the metabolic puzzle. Our metagenome analyses reveal that during transition from a frozen to a thawed state there are rapid shifts in many microbial, phylogenetic and functional gene abundances and pathways. After one week of incubation at 5 ??C, permafrost metagenomes converge to be more similar to each other than while they are frozen. We find that multiple genes involved in cycling of C and nitrogen shift rapidly during thaw. We also construct the first draft genome from a complex soil metagenome, which corresponds to a novel methanogen. Methane previously accumulated in permafrost is released during thaw and subsequently consumed by methanotrophic bacteria. Together these data point towards the importance of rapid cycling of methane and nitrogen in thawing permafrost. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  19. (Draft) Community air pollution and mortality: Analysis of 1980 data from US metropolitan areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-11-01

    1980 data from up to 149 metropolitan areas were used to define cross-sectional associations between community air pollution and excess'' human mortality. The regression model proposed by Ozkaynak and Thurston (1987), which accounted for age, race, education, poverty, and population density, was evaluated and several new models were developed. The new models also accounted for migration, drinking water hardness, and smoking, and included a more detailed description of race. Cause-of-death categories analyzed include all causes, all non-external'' causes, major cardiovascular diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Both annual mortality rates and their logarithms were analyzed. Air quality data were obtained from the EPA AIRS database (TSP, SO[sub 4][sup =], Mn, and ozone) and from the inhalable particulate network (PM[sub 15], PM[sub 2.5] and SO[sub 4][sup =], for 63[sup 4] locations). The data on particulates were averaged across all monitoring stations available for each SMSA and the TSP data were restricted to the year 1980. The associations between mortality and air pollution were found to be dependent on the socioeconomic factors included in the models, the specific locations included in the data set, and the type of statistical model used. Statistically significant associations were found as follows: between TSP and mortality due to non-external causes with log-linear models, but not with a linear model betweenestimated 10-year average (1980--90) ozone levels and 1980 non-external and cardiovascular deaths; and between TSP and COPD mortality for both linear and log-linear models. When the sulfate contribution to TSP was subtracted, the relationship with COPD mortality was strengthened.

  20. (Draft) Community air pollution and mortality: Analysis of 1980 data from US metropolitan areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-11-01

    1980 data from up to 149 metropolitan areas were used to define cross-sectional associations between community air pollution and ``excess`` human mortality. The regression model proposed by Ozkaynak and Thurston (1987), which accounted for age, race, education, poverty, and population density, was evaluated and several new models were developed. The new models also accounted for migration, drinking water hardness, and smoking, and included a more detailed description of race. Cause-of-death categories analyzed include all causes, all ``non-external`` causes, major cardiovascular diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Both annual mortality rates and their logarithms were analyzed. Air quality data were obtained from the EPA AIRS database (TSP, SO{sub 4}{sup =}, Mn, and ozone) and from the inhalable particulate network (PM{sub 15}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub 4}{sup =}, for 63{sup 4} locations). The data on particulates were averaged across all monitoring stations available for each SMSA and the TSP data were restricted to the year 1980. The associations between mortality and air pollution were found to be dependent on the socioeconomic factors included in the models, the specific locations included in the data set, and the type of statistical model used. Statistically significant associations were found as follows: between TSP and mortality due to non-external causes with log-linear models, but not with a linear model betweenestimated 10-year average (1980--90) ozone levels and 1980 non-external and cardiovascular deaths; and between TSP and COPD mortality for both linear and log-linear models. When the sulfate contribution to TSP was subtracted, the relationship with COPD mortality was strengthened.

  1. Community extraction for social networks

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yunpeng; Levina, Elizaveta; Zhu, Ji

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of networks and in particular discovering communities within networks has been a focus of recent work in several fields and has diverse applications. Most community detection methods focus on partitioning the entire network into communities, with the expectation of many ties within communities and few ties between. However, many networks contain nodes that do not fit in with any of the communities, and forcing every node into a community can distort results. Here we propose a new fra...

  2. The prevalence of child sexual abuse in community and student samples: A meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pereda Beltran, Noemí; Guilera Ferré, Georgina; Forns, Maria, 1946-; Gómez Benito, Juana

    2009-01-01

    Background: Studies conducted internationally confirm that child sexual abuse is a much more widespread problem than previously thought, with even the lowest prevalence rates including a large number of victims that need to be taken into account. Objective: To carry out a meta-analysis of the prevalence of child sexual abuse in order to establish an overall international figure. Methods: Studies were retrieved from various electronic databases. The measure of interest was the prevalence of ab...

  3. Unraveling the Dynamics of Digital Library Community: a Social Network Analysis Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Monica

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the networks of ‘academic community’ of Digital Library (DL) using various Social Network Analysis (SNA) tools and metrics. Digital Library emerged from convergence of several fields. This study is expected to give insight of how an interdisciplinary discipline evolved and emerged. Our research is in the direction of understanding the centrifugal forces in the shaping of the interdisciplinary field, most prolific countries and institutions of dig...

  4. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community

    OpenAIRE

    Ostraat ML; Mills KC; Guzan KA; Murry D

    2013-01-01

    Michele L Ostraat, Karmann C Mills, Kimberly A Guzan, Damaris MurryRTI International, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and l...

  5. The methodology for developing a prospective meta-analysis in the family planning community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobson Janet C

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prospective meta-analysis (PMA is a collaborative research design in which individual sites perform randomized controlled trials (RCTs and pool the data for meta-analysis. Members of the PMA collaboration agree upon specific research interventions and outcome measures, ideally before initiation but at least prior to any individual trial publishing results. This allows for uniform reporting of primary and secondary outcomes. With this approach, heterogeneity among trials contributing data for the final meta-analysis is minimized while each site maintains the freedom to design a specific trial. This paper describes the process of creating a PMA collaboration to evaluate the impact of misoprostol on ease of intrauterine device (IUD insertion in nulliparous women. Methods After the principal investigator developed a preliminary PMA protocol, he identified potential collaborating investigators at other sites. One site already had a trial underway and another site was in the planning stages of a trial meeting PMA requirements. Investigators at six sites joined the PMA collaborative. Each site committed to enroll subjects to meet a pre-determined total sample size. A final common research plan and site responsibilities were developed and agreed upon through email and face-to-face meetings. Each site committed to contribute individual patient data to the PMA collaboration, and these data will be analyzed and prepared as a multi-site publication. Individual sites retain the ability to analyze and publish their site's independent findings. Results All six sites have obtained Institutional Review Board approval and each has obtained individual funding to meet the needs of that site's study. Sites have shared resources including study protocols and consents to decrease costs and improve study flow. This PMA protocol is registered with the Cochrane Collaboration and data will be analyzed according to Cochrane standards for meta-analysis. Conclusions PMA is a novel research method that improves meta-analysis by including several study sites, establishing uniform reporting of specific outcomes, and yet allowing some independence on the part of individual sites with respect to the conduct of research. The inclusion of several sites increases statistical power to address important clinical questions. Compared to multi-center trials, PMA methodology encourages collaboration, aids in the development of new investigators, decreases study costs, and decreases time to publication. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00613366, NCT00886834, NCT01001897, NCT01147497 and NCT01307111

  6. Microbial community analysis and bioclogging identification in a Managed Artificial Recharge system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Carme; Folch, Albert; Gaju, Nria; Martnez-Alonso, Maira; Grau, Alba; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Managed Artificial Recharge (MAR) is a well-known technique that aims at increasing the aquifer resources while managing its quality. In order to increase water resources in the Barcelona conurbation, an area with significant quantitative and qualitative groundwater disturbances, a MAR facility was built in Sant Vicen dels Horts, Catalonia, Spain. The system, constructed in 2009 consists of a sedimentation pond that pre-treats the water that is then diverted to the final recharge pond. The facility was originally aimed at increasing the availability of supply water during scarcity periods. Later, it was considered as a good test site to study best infiltration practices regarding water quality evolution. For this purpose, a reactive layer was installed in 2011 at the bottom of the pond. This was composed by organic compost and autochthonous material. Small proportions of iron oxides and clay were added to promote ionic adsorption and exchange. The objective of the layer was to boost microbial activity that would be structured in depth according to the presence of a marked redox profile, thus enhancing the reduction of all organic matter, including a number of recalcitrant compounds. In the last 3 years, site studies were focused on the layer's efficiency (i.e., percentage of organic pollutants degradation). It was found that degradation is occurring despite the infiltration rate has been significantly reduced. In our most recent work, we took a step further in the study of the processes occurring in the facility, and specifically with those related to the presence of the reactive layer. We focused on characterizing microbial communities in the system by combining the sampling of soil in the recharge pond bottom, water of the vadose zone, and groundwater in the aquifer zone from a series of nearby piezometers. Molecular techniques, such as Denaturing Gradient of Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), were applied to the water and soil samples. This information was matched with physicochemical parameters of the water sampled in the existing piezometers, allowing relating them with different measured hydrogeological parameters (conductivity, dissolved oxygen, temperature and Eh). This information is an initial step to understand how the reactive layer induces microbiological activity and therefore degradation and bioclogging processes in the studied MAR system.

  7. Analysis of pH-driven disruption of oral microbial communities in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, D J; Marsh, P D

    1998-01-01

    Previously, a mixed culture chemostat system was used to demonstrate that the pH generated from carbohydrate metabolism, rather than carbohydrate availability per se, was responsible for the shifts observed in the oral microflora which are associated with high carbohydrate diets and the development of dental caries. The aim of this study was to determine more accurately the microbially generated pH at which such shifts occurred. Nine oral bacteria were grown in three independent chemostats, and pulsed with glucose on 10 consecutive days. In one chemostat, pH control was discontinued for 6 h, and the pH fall was restricted to a minimum value of pH 5.5; the pH fall was arrested in the other two chemostats at either pH 5. 0, or at pH 4.5. When the pH was allowed to fall, the numbers and proportions of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus rhamnosus increased; this increase was directly related to the magnitude of the pH fall. Veillonella dispar was the most numerous organism following all glucose pulsing regimes, especially at low pH. The increase in proportions of acidogenic bacteria was accompanied by a fall in the proportions of acid-sensitive species (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella nigrescens, Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus oralis). The counts of these species were relatively stable between pH 5.5 and 4.5, but were markedly reduced when the pH fell below pH 4.5; Neisseria subflava could not persist in the culture at pH 4.5 or below. The data suggest that the disruption of communities associated with glucose metabolism and low pH can be explained in terms of a two-stage process. A fall in pH to a value between pH 5.5 and 4.5 may allow the enrichment of potentially cariogenic species, whilst permitting species associated with health to remain relatively unaffected. A further reduction in pH (mutans streptococci or lactobacilli are competitive at pH values low enough to demineralise enamel, and thus suggest that a broader range of micro-organisms may be associated with caries initiation. PMID:9745120

  8. Community contextual predictors of endoscopic colorectal cancer screening in the USA: spatial multilevel regression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mobley Lee R

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and endoscopic screening can both detect and prevent cancer, but utilization is suboptimal and varies across geographic regions. We use multilevel regression to examine the various predictors of individuals' decisions to utilize endoscopic CRC screening. Study subjects are a 100% population cohort of Medicare beneficiaries identified in 2001 and followed through 2005. The outcome variable is a binary indicator of any sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy use over this period. We analyze each state separately and map the findings for all states together to reveal patterns in the observed heterogeneity across states. Results We estimate a fully adjusted model for each state, based on a comprehensive socio-ecological model. We focus the discussion on the independent contributions of each of three community contextual variables that are amenable to policy intervention. Prevalence of Medicare managed care in one's neighborhood was associated with lower probability of screening in 12 states and higher probability in 19 states. Prevalence of poor English language ability among elders in one's neighborhood was associated with lower probability of screening in 15 states and higher probability in 6 states. Prevalence of poverty in one's neighborhood was associated with lower probability of screening in 36 states and higher probability in 5 states. Conclusions There are considerable differences across states in the socio-ecological context of CRC screening by endoscopy, suggesting that the current decentralized configuration of state-specific comprehensive cancer control programs is well suited to respond to the observed heterogeneity. We find that interventions to mediate language barriers are more critically needed in some states than in others. Medicare managed care penetration, hypothesized to affect information about and diffusion of new endoscopic technologies, has a positive association in only a minority of states. This suggests that managed care plans' promotion of this cost-increasing technology has been rather limited. Area poverty has a negative impact in the vast majority of states, but is positive in five states, suggesting there are some effective cancer control policies in place targeting the poor with supplemental resources promoting CRC screening.

  9. Place-classification analysis of community vulnerability to near-field tsunami threats in the U.S. Pacific Northwest (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, N. J.; Jones, J.; Spielman, S.

    2013-12-01

    Near-field tsunami hazards are credible threats to many coastal communities throughout the world. Along the U.S. Pacific Northwest coast, low-lying areas could be inundated by a series of catastrophic tsunami waves that begin to arrive in a matter of minutes following a Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) earthquake. This presentation summarizes analytical efforts to classify communities with similar characteristics of community vulnerability to tsunami hazards. This work builds on past State-focused inventories of community exposure to CSZ-related tsunami hazards in northern California, Oregon, and Washington. Attributes used in the classification, or cluster analysis, include demography of residents, spatial extent of the developed footprint based on mid-resolution land cover data, distribution of the local workforce, and the number and type of public venues, dependent-care facilities, and community-support businesses. Population distributions also are characterized by a function of travel time to safety, based on anisotropic, path-distance, geospatial modeling. We used an unsupervised-model-based clustering algorithm and a v-fold, cross-validation procedure (v=50) to identify the appropriate number of community types. We selected class solutions that provided the appropriate balance between parsimony and model fit. The goal of the vulnerability classification is to provide emergency managers with a general sense of the types of communities in tsunami hazard zones based on similar characteristics instead of only providing an exhaustive list of attributes for individual communities. This classification scheme can be then used to target and prioritize risk-reduction efforts that address common issues across multiple communities. The presentation will include a discussion of the utility of proposed place classifications to support regional preparedness and outreach efforts.

  10. A Community Organizing Case Study: An Analysis of Cap-It's Strategy to Prevent the Location of a Toxic Waste Incinerator in Their Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J

    1992-01-01

    With the great proliferation of chemical manufacturing in the past half-century, the dilemma of dealing with the waste produced has become an increasing problem facing communities. One method that is gaining increased acceptance by both government and industry is incineration. Many citizens have formed groups to protest these facilities because of their concerns about health risks, especially exposure to carcinogens. This case study profiles one such group, CAP-IT, a collection of middle-class residents living in a small working-class town and their successful battle to prevent the siting of a hazardous waste incinerator. CAP-IT's strategy will be critiqued using methods advanced by Lee Staples, Nicholas Freudenburg and Kurt Lewin to demonstrate the power of community organizing activities. PMID:20840988

  11. Oligonucleotide Fingerprinting of rRNA Genes for Analysis of Fungal Community Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Valinsky, Lea; Della Vedova, Gianluca; Jiang, Tao; Borneman, James

    2002-01-01

    Thorough assessments of fungal diversity are currently hindered by technological limitations. Here we describe a new method for identifying fungi, oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes (OFRG). ORFG sorts arrayed rRNA gene (ribosomal DNA [rDNA]) clones into taxonomic clusters through a series of hybridization experiments, each using a single oligonucleotide probe. A simulated annealing algorithm was used to design an OFRG probe set for fungal rDNA. Analysis of 1,536 fungal rDNA clones d...

  12. The use of phospholipid fatty acid analysis to measure impact of acid rock drainage on microbial communities in sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, E A; Holden, P J; Stone, D J M; Harch, B D; Foster, L J

    2004-10-01

    The impact of acid rock drainage (ARD) and eutrophication on microbial communities in stream sediments above and below an abandoned mine site in the Adelaide Hills, South Australia, was quantified by PLFA analysis. Multivariate analysis of water quality parameters, including anions, soluble heavy metals, pH, and conductivity, as well as total extractable metal concentrations in sediments, produced clustering of sample sites into three distinct groups. These groups corresponded with levels of nutrient enrichment and/or concentration of pollutants associated with ARD. Total PLFA concentration, which is indicative of microbial biomass, was reduced by >70% at sites along the stream between the mine site and as far as 18 km downstream. Further downstream, however, recovery of the microbial abundance was apparent, possibly reflecting dilution effect by downstream tributaries. Total PLFA was >40% higher at, and immediately below, the mine site (0-0.1 km), compared with sites further downstream (2.5-18 km), even after accounting for differences in specific surface area of different sediment samples. The increased microbial population in the proximity of the mine source may be associated with the presence of a thriving iron-oxidizing bacteria community as a consequence of optimal conditions for these organisms while the lower microbial population further downstream corresponded with greater sediments' metal concentrations. PCA of relative abundance revealed a number of PLFAs which were most influential in discriminating between ARD-polluted sites and the rest of the sites. These PLFA included the hydroxy fatty acids: 2OH12:0, 3OH12:0, 2OH16:0; the fungal marker: 18:2omega6; the sulfate-reducing bacteria marker 10Me16:1omega7; and the saturated fatty acids 12:0, 16:0, 18:0. Partial constrained ordination revealed that the environmental parameters with the greatest bearing on the PLFA profiles included pH, soluble aluminum, total extractable iron, and zinc. The study demonstrated the successful application of PLFA analysis to rapidly assess the toxicity of ARD-affected waters and sediments and to differentiate this response from the effects of other pollutants, such as increased nutrients and salinity. PMID:15692850

  13. Determinants of the lethality of climate-related disasters in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM): a cross-country analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrewin, Aisha N.; Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose M.; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2015-07-01

    Floods and storms are climate-related hazards posing high mortality risk to Caribbean Community (CARICOM) nations. However risk factors for their lethality remain untested. We conducted an ecological study investigating risk factors for flood and storm lethality in CARICOM nations for the period 1980-2012. Lethality - deaths versus no deaths per disaster event- was the outcome. We examined biophysical and social vulnerability proxies and a decadal effect as predictors. We developed our regression model via multivariate analysis using a generalized logistic regression model with quasi-binomial distribution; removal of multi-collinear variables and backward elimination. Robustness was checked through subset analysis. We found significant positive associations between lethality, percentage of total land dedicated to agriculture (odds ratio [OR] 1.032; 95% CI: 1.013-1.053) and percentage urban population (OR 1.029, 95% CI 1.003-1.057). Deaths were more likely in the 2000-2012 period versus 1980-1989 (OR 3.708, 95% CI 1.615-8.737). Robustness checks revealed similar coefficients and directions of association. Population health in CARICOM nations is being increasingly impacted by climate-related disasters connected to increasing urbanization and land use patterns. Our findings support the evidence base for setting sustainable development goals (SDG).

  14. Characteristics of phytoplankton community structure during and after a bloom of the dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea by HPLC pigment analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chun-Kwan; Wong, Chong-Kim

    2009-06-01

    A bloom of the dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea was detected for the first time in inner Tolo Harbor, Hong Kong in 2 000. Water samples were collected at eight stations along a transect passing through a red tide patch for microscopic analysis of phytoplankton composition and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of phytoplankton pigments. During the bloom, the density of dinoflagellates was 1.1106 cells L-1 within the patch and 8.6105 cells L-1 outside the patch where the phytoplankton community was dominated by diatoms. After the bloom the S. trochoidea began to decrease in density and was replaced by diatoms as the dominating bloom-causing organisms at all stations, and the density of dinoflagellates at most stations was less than 1.0 106 cells L-1. The status of S. trochoidea as the causative species of the bloom was indicated by the presence of peridinin, the marker pigment for dinoflagellates. The shift from dinoflagellates to diatoms was marked by the decline of peridinin and the prevalence of fucoxanthin. Phytoplankton pigment markers also revealed the presence of other minor phytoplankton assemblages such as cryptomonads and blue-green algal.

  15. Development of a bacterial cell enrichment method and its application to the community analysis in soybean stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Seishi; Kaneko, Takakazu; Okubo, Takashi; Rallos, Lynn E E; Eda, Shima; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Sato, Shusei; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2009-11-01

    A method was developed for enriching bacterial cells from soybean stems which was recalcitrant for a culture-independent analysis of bacterial community due to the interference with plant DNA. Stem homogenates were fractionated by a series of differential centrifugations followed by a Nycodenz density gradient centrifugation. The efficiency of bacterial cell enrichment was assessed by ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). The intensity and the number of bacterial amplicons of RISA were markedly increased in the DNA extracted from the enriched bacterial cells compared to that in the DNA directly extracted from soybean stems. The phylogenetic diversity of the enriched bacterial cells was evaluated by analyzing a clone library of 16S rRNA gene in comparison with those of the culturable fractions of the enriched and non-enriched stem-associated bacteria, endophytic bacteria, and epiphytic bacteria. The results indicated that the method was able to enrich both endophytic and epiphytic bacteria from soybean stems, and was useful to assess the bacterial diversity based on a 16S rRNA gene clone library. When the sequence data from all clones (1,332 sequences) were combined, 72 operational taxonomic units were affiliated with Proteobacteria (Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria), Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes, which also provided the most comprehensive set of data on the bacterial diversity in the aerial parts of soybeans. PMID:19662454

  16. Spatial variability in distribution and prevalence of Caribbean scleractinian coral and octocoral diseases. I. Community-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Ernesto; Cróquer, Aldo

    2009-02-25

    Geographic assessments of coral diseases are needed to understand their local and geographic spatial-temporal variability. Coral and octocoral diseases and their prevalence were assessed along 4 permanent 10 x 2 m band-transects in each of 3 depth habitats (15 m) in each of 2 reefs in each of 6 countries across the wider Caribbean during the summer and fall of 2005. A permutational multivariate analysis of variance was used to test variability of major diseases and community level disease prevalence in corals and octocorals among habitats, reefs and countries. The most common and damaging diseases reported for the region were found in most reefs surveyed, but prevalence at the community level was generally low (ca. 2%) increasing from northern to southern latitudes. A significant interaction between sites (nested within country) and depth habitats was found (F = 2.1, df = 12, p = 0.02), with higher prevalence of coral diseases in deep habitats of Culebrita, Puerto Rico (14.8 +/- SE 6.5%) and in shallow habitats of Roldán, Panama (10.2 +/- SE 3.5%). The relative importance of each particular disease was dependent on site and habitat (depth intervals) (F = 1.7, df = 12, p = 0.001), with black band disease more prevalent in shallow habitats of Rita's, Bermuda (1.7 +/- SE 0.4%) and yellow band disease (YBD) more prevalent in deeper habitats of Chub Cut, Bermuda (3.7 +/- SE 0.5%). There was a significant interaction of total octocoral diseases with country and habitat (F = 2.8, df = 10, p = 0.04) with higher prevalence in deeper habitats of Curaçao (25.9 +/- SE 4.2%). Our results indicate that patterns of prevalence of coral and octocoral diseases were not consistent across the different spatial scales, showing differences produced by particular diseases and community composition present. There were no widespread epizootics, but local white plague-II and YBD epizootics were observed in Puerto Rico and other localities. PMID:19402453

  17. “Until they know how much you care”: A qualitative analysis of an innovative practice in community pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Melczak, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This qualitative study was concerned with investigating community pharmacists’ thoughts on the use of two brief scales to measure patient outcomes and therapeutic alliance in the context of their Medication Therapy Management (MTM services. The scales were originally developed for use in behavioral healthcare, but were used in a novel (community pharmacy setting as part of a previous parent study. We describe this practice (using these scales in a novel setting as an innovative practice, report on the pharmacists’ experiences with the practice, and discuss relative advantages and disadvantages for integrating the use of the scales as part of routine practice.Methods: Six community pharmacy practitioners participated in a semi-structured interview pertaining to the use of the scales in their MTM services. Pharmacist interviews were transcribed, analyzed according to qualitative content analysis methodology, and presented in relation to the guiding interview questions.Results: Pharmacists had varying opinions on the use of the scales as part of their practice. Initial concerns included patient (misunderstanding about the purpose and proper completion of the scales, as well as apprehension about the use of the information. These concerns were largely resolved through education, repeated use, and routinization. Pharmacists, in general, saw a value to using these scales in clinical practice, for clinical and professional reasons, although there was variability on the degree to which pharmacists integrated the scales into practice after the study completion. Pharmacists had varied opinions as well as on the degree to which the use of the scales would impact medication adherence. Pharmacists were most surprised by how much participation in this study prompted them to reflect on their interactions with patients.Conclusions: Pharmacists, in general, were receptive to participating in the parent study and using two brief scales to measure patient outcomes and therapeutic alliance. Pharmacists had varying opinions on the degree to which the use of these scales could impact patient medication adherence, although they perceived other value and benefits secondary to the interactions. While most pharmacists did not maintain formal use of the scales after study end, they took away general principles of patient-centered care and individualized feedback.

  18. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis Of Microbial Communities From Active Layer And Permafrost After Short-Term Thaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chauhan, A.; Saarunya, G.; Murphy, J.; Williams, D.; Layton, A. C.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Sanders, R.; Lau, C. M.; myneni, S.; Phelps, T. J.; Fountain, A. G.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    .Permafrost areas occupy 20-25% of the Earth and extend of 1 km depths. The total number of prokaryotes and their biomass in cold regions are estimated to be 1 x 1030 cells and 140 x1015 g of C, respectively. Thus these environments serve as a reservoir of microbial and biogeochemical activity, which is likely to increase upon thawing. We are currently performing long-term thawing experiments at 4o C on 18, geochemically well-characterized, 1 meter long, intact cores consisting of active-layer (0-70 cm depth) and permafrost, collected from a 7 meter diameter ice-wedge polygon located at the McGill Arctic Research Station on Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada. The organic carbon content of these cores averages ~1% at depth but increases to 5.4% in the top 10 cm. The cores were subdivided into four treatment groups: saturated cores (thawed while receiving artificial rain), drained cores (being thawed under natural hydrological conditions), dark cores (thawed under natural hydrological conditions with no light input) and control cores (maintain permafrost table at 70 cm depth). Over the course of 10 weeks the cores were progressively thawed from -4oC to 4oC from the top down to simulate spring thaw conditions in the Arctic. The temperatures at 5 cm, 35 cm, 65 cm, and below the permafrost table in the core were recorded continuously. Pore water and gas samples from 4 depths in each core were collected every two weeks and analyzed for pH, anions, cations, H2, CH4, CO, O2, N2, CO2 and δ13C of CO2. Headspace gas samples were collected weekly and analyzed for the same gases as the pore gases. Sediment sub-samples from the 4 depths were collected and total community genomic DNA (gDNA) was isolated using FastDNA SPIN kit followed by Qiagen column purification. The average yield of gDNA was ~3.5 μg/g of soil for the upper 5 cm active layers and decreased to ~1.5 μg/g of soil in the permafrost. The bacterial 16S copy numbers estimated by real-time quantitative PCR decreased with depth from 7x108 to 1x108 copies /g of soil. Characterization of the metagenomic sequences derived from the samples before thawing elucidated differences between the permafrost and active-layer with Acidobacteria and Alpha-Proteobacteria are being significantly higher in active layer than in permafrost, on the contrary permafrost had higher abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes than active layer. Currently additional metagenomic DNA illumina libraries for 20 samples after 1 week thawing are in preparation and will be analyzed to determine whether variations in the metagenomic sequences are correlated to the geochemical data.

  19. Microbial community structure analysis of produced water from a high-temperature North Sea oil-field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, Hkon; Garshol, Frydis; Madsen, Marit; Birkeland, Nils-Kre

    2008-01-01

    Molecular and culture-based methods were used to investigate the microbial diversity in produced water obtained from the high-temperature Troll oil formation in the North Sea. 16S rRNA gene libraries were generated from total community DNA, using universal archaeal or bacterial oligonucleotide primer sets. Sequence analysis of 88 clones in the bacterial library indicated that they originated from members of Firmicutes (48 sequences), Bacteroidetes (17 sequences), delta-Proteobacteria (15 sequences), Spirochaetes (5 sequences), Thermotogales (2 sequences) and gamma-Proteobacteria (1 sequence). Twenty-two sequences in the archaeal library were close relatives to members of the genera Methanococcus (18 sequences), Methanolobus (3 sequences) and Thermococcus (1 sequence). Most of the bacterial sequences shared less than 95% identity with their closest match in GenBank, indicating that the produced water harbours a unique community of novel bacterial species or genera. Members of the thermophilic genera Thermosipho, Thermotoga, Anaerophaga and Thermovirga were isolated. The Troll formations are not injected with sea water. Thus, dramatic changes of the in situ conditions have been avoided, and a common source of continuous contamination from injection water can be excluded. However, the majority of the organisms detected in the gene libraries were most closely related to cultivated organisms with optimum temperatures for growth well below the in situ reservoir temperature (70 degrees C), indicating that produced water from the Troll platform harbours a substantial amount of non-indigenous organisms. This was confirmed by the isolation of a number of mesophilic and moderately thermophilic organisms that were unable to grow at reservoir temperature. PMID:17588160

  20. Metagenome Sequence Analysis of Filamentous Microbial Communities Obtained from Geochemically Distinct Geothermal Channels Reveals Specialization of Three Aquificales Lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WilliamP.Inskeep

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Aquificales are thermophilic microorganisms that inhabit hydrothermal systems worldwide and are considered one of the earliest lineages of the domain Bacteria. We analyzed metagenome sequence obtained from six thermal ‘filamentous streamer’ communities (~40 Mbp per site, which targeted three different groups of Aquificales found in Yellowstone National Park (YNP. Unassembled metagenome sequence and PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed that acidic, sulfidic sites were dominated by Hydrogenobaculum (Aquificaceae populations, whereas the circumneutral pH (6.5 - 7.8 sites containing dissolved sulfide were dominated by Sulfurihydrogenibium spp. (Hydrogenothermaceae. Thermocrinis (Aquificaceae populations were found primarily in the circumneutral sites with undetectable sulfide, and to a lesser extent in one sulfidic system at pH 8. Phylogenetic analysis of assembled sequence containing 16S rRNA genes as well as conserved protein-encoding genes revealed that the composition and function of these communities varied across geochemical conditions. Each Aquificales lineage contained genes for CO2 fixation by the reverse TCA cycle, but only the Sulfurihydrogenibium populations perform citrate cleavage using ATP citrate lyase (Acl. The Aquificaceae populations use an alternative pathway catalyzed by two separate enzymes, citryl CoA synthetase (Ccs and citryl CoA lyase (Ccl. All three Aquificales lineages contained evidence of aerobic respiration, albeit due to completely different types of heme Cu oxidases (subunit I involved in oxygen reduction. The distribution of Aquificales populations and differences among functional genes involved in energy generation and electron transport is consistent with the hypothesis that geochemical parameters (e.g., pH, sulfide, H2, O2 have resulted in niche specialization among members of the Aquificales.

  1. Comparison of Rock Varnish Bacterial Communities with Surrounding Non-Varnished Rock Surfaces: Taxon-Specific Analysis and Morphological Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Alfonso; Ahmed, Engy; Ciccazzo, Sonia; Sikorski, Johannes; Overmann, Jrg; Holmstrm, Sara J M; Brusetti, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    Rock varnish is a thin layer of Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides with embedded clay minerals that contain an increased Mn/Fe ratio compared to that of the Earth's crust. Even if the study of rock varnish has important implications in several fields, the composition of epilithic bacterial communities and the distribution of taxa on varnish surfaces are still not wholly described. The aim of this study was (i) to identify the bacterial taxa which show the greatest variation between varnish and non-varnish environments, collected from the same rock, and (ii) to describe the morphology of epilithic communities through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Triplicate samples of rock surfaces with varnish and triplicate samples without varnish were collected from five sites in Matsch Valley (South Tyrol, Italy). The V4 region of 16S rRNA gene was analyzed by Illumina sequencing. Fifty-five ubiquitous taxa have been examined to assess variation between varnish and non-varnish. Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, Proteobacteria along with minor taxa such as Solirubrobacterales, Conexibaxter, and Rhodopila showed significant variations of abundance, diversity, or both responding to the ecology (presence/absence of varnish). Other taxa, such as the genus Edaphobacter, showed a more marked spatial variation responding to the sampling site. SEM images showed a multitude of bacterial morphologies and structures involved in the process of attachment and creation of a suitable environment for growth. The features emerging from this analysis suggest that the highly oxidative Fe and Mn-rich varnish environment favors anoxigenic autotrophy and establishment of highly specialized bacteria. PMID:25921518

  2. Metagenome sequence analysis of filamentous microbial communities obtained from geochemically distinct geothermal channels reveals specialization of three aquificales lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina; Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus J; Rusch, Douglas B; Tringe, Susannah G; Kozubal, Mark A; Hamamura, Natsuko; Macur, Richard E; Fouke, Bruce W; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; McDermott, Timothy R; Jennings, Ryan deM; Hengartner, Nicolas W; Xie, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The Aquificales are thermophilic microorganisms that inhabit hydrothermal systems worldwide and are considered one of the earliest lineages of the domain Bacteria. We analyzed metagenome sequence obtained from six thermal "filamentous streamer" communities (∼40 Mbp per site), which targeted three different groups of Aquificales found in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Unassembled metagenome sequence and PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed that acidic, sulfidic sites were dominated by Hydrogenobaculum (Aquificaceae) populations, whereas the circum-neutral pH (6.5-7.8) sites containing dissolved sulfide were dominated by Sulfurihydrogenibium spp. (Hydrogenothermaceae). Thermocrinis (Aquificaceae) populations were found primarily in the circum-neutral sites with undetectable sulfide, and to a lesser extent in one sulfidic system at pH 8. Phylogenetic analysis of assembled sequence containing 16S rRNA genes as well as conserved protein-encoding genes revealed that the composition and function of these communities varied across geochemical conditions. Each Aquificales lineage contained genes for CO2 fixation by the reverse-TCA cycle, but only the Sulfurihydrogenibium populations perform citrate cleavage using ATP citrate lyase (Acl). The Aquificaceae populations use an alternative pathway catalyzed by two separate enzymes, citryl-CoA synthetase (Ccs), and citryl-CoA lyase (Ccl). All three Aquificales lineages contained evidence of aerobic respiration, albeit due to completely different types of heme Cu oxidases (subunit I) involved in oxygen reduction. The distribution of Aquificales populations and differences among functional genes involved in energy generation and electron transport is consistent with the hypothesis that geochemical parameters (e.g., pH, sulfide, H2, O2) have resulted in niche specialization among members of the Aquificales. PMID:23755042

  3. Intercomparison of the community multiscale air quality model and CALGRID using process analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Susan M; Lamb, Brian K

    2005-08-01

    This study was designed to examine the similarities and differences between two advanced photochemical air quality modeling systems: EPA Models-3/CMAQ and CALGRID/CALMET. Both modeling systems were applied to an ozone episode that occurred along the I-5 urban corridor in western Washington and Oregon during July 11-14, 1996. Both models employed the same modeling domain and used the same detailed gridded emission inventory. The CMAQ model was run using both the CB-IV and RADM2 chemical mechanisms, while CALGRID was used with the SAPRC-97 chemical mechanism. Outputfrom the Mesoscale Meteorological Model (MM5) employed with observational nudging was used in both models. The two modeling systems, representing three chemical mechanisms and two sets of meteorological inputs, were evaluated in terms of statistical performance measures for both 1- and 8-h average observed ozone concentrations. The results showed that the different versions of the systems were more similar than different, and all versions performed well in the Portland region and downwind of Seattle but performed poorly in the more rural region north of Seattle. Improving the meteorological input into the CALGRID/CALMET system with planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameters from the Models-3/CMAQ meteorology preprocessor (MCIP) improved the performance of the CALGRID/CALMET system. The 8-h ensemble case was often the best performer of all the cases indicating that the models perform better over longer analysis periods. The 1-h ensemble case, derived from all runs, was not necessarily an improvement over the five individual cases, but the standard deviation about the mean provided a measure of overall modeling uncertainty. Process analysis was applied to examine the contribution of the individual processes to the species conservation equation. The process analysis results indicated that the two modeling systems arrive at similar solutions by very different means. Transport rates are faster and exhibit greater fluctuations in the CMAQ cases than in the CALGRID cases, which lead to different placement of the urban ozone plumes. The CALGRID cases, which rely on the SAPRC97 chemical mechanism, exhibited a greater diurnal production/loss cycle of ozone concentrations per hour compared to either the RADM2 or CBIV chemical mechanisms in the CMAQ cases. These results demonstrate the need for specialized process field measurements to confirm whether we are modeling ozone with valid processes. PMID:16124311

  4. Application of ARDRA and PLFA analysis in characterizing the bacterial communities of the food, gut and excrement of saprophagous larvae of Penthetria holosericea (Diptera: Bibionidae): a pilot study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oravecz, O.; Elhottová, Dana; Krištůfek, Václav; Šustr, Vladimír; Frouz, Jan; Tříska, Jan; Márialigeti, K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2004), s. 83-93. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB6066903; GA ČR GA526/99/P033 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : ARDRA * PLFA analysis * bacterial community Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.034, year: 2004

  5. A Multilevel Analysis of the Impact of a Professional Learning Community, Faculty Trust in Colleagues and Collective Efficacy on Teacher Commitment to Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John Chi-kin; Zhang, Zhonghua; Yin, Hongbiao

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between a professional learning community (PLC), faculty trust in colleagues, teachers' collective efficacy, and their commitment to students. The findings from exploratory factor analysis indicated that three clear components could be extracted from the scale of Professional Learning Communities…

  6. 'The government cannot do it all alone': realist analysis of the minutes of community health committee meetings in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abimbola, Seye; Molemodile, Shola K; Okonkwo, Ononuju A; Negin, Joel; Jan, Stephen; Martiniuk, Alexandra L

    2016-04-01

    Since the mid-1980s, the national health policy in Nigeria has sought to inspire community engagement in primary health care by bringing communities into partnership with service providers through community health committees. Using a realist approach to understand how and under what circumstances the committees function, we explored 581 meeting minutes from 129 committees across four states in Nigeria (Lagos, Benue, Nasarawa and Kaduna). We found that community health committees provide opportunities for improving the demand and supply of health care in their community. Committees demonstrate five modes of functioning: through meetings (as 'village square'), reaching out within their community (as 'community connectors'), lobbying governments for support (as 'government botherers'), inducing and augmenting government support (as 'back-up government') and taking control of health care in their community (as 'general overseers'). In performing these functions, community health committees operate within and through the existing social, cultural and religious structures of their community, thereby providing an opportunity for the health facility with which they are linked to be responsive to the needs and values of the community. But due to power asymmetries, committees have limited capacity to influence health facilities for improved performance, and governments for improved health service provision. This is perhaps because national guidelines are not clear on their accountability functions; they are not aware of the minimum standards of services to expect; and they have a limited sense of legitimacy in their relations with sub-national governments because they are established as the consequence of a national policy. Committees therefore tend to promote collective action for self-support more than collective action for demanding accountability. To function optimally, community health committees require national government or non-government organization mentoring and support; they need to be enshrined in law to bolster their sense of legitimacy; and they also require financial support to subsidise their operation costs especially in geographically large communities. PMID:26210167

  7. Energy analysis of the coal fuel cycle: Community health and resource change in an Appalachian coal county

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of steadily expanding coal development in this decade in the USA, there has been little systematic assessment of occupational and public health implications of increased production in specific regions of the USA. Preliminary analysis of a prototype Appalachian area is presented. Anderson County, Tennessee, the prototype area chosen for evaluation, lies in the Upper East Tennessee Coalfield. This county is uniquely suited for study since every process of the coal fuel cycle (extraction, transport, combustion, power production and waste disposal) takes place within the county boundary. By extensive exploitation of both surface and underground methods of extraction, this county has maintained a leading position in Tennessee's coal production for several years. Concepts of energy analysis and systematized data presentation were used to convert information gathered from diverse sources into comparable energy units (kcal). Concepts and methodology implemented in the analysis can be applied most appropriately to existing conditions in other counties of the Appalachian Coal Basin. Findings are presented for calendar year 1978. For the year of study, the major energy loss to the county was depletion of the coal resource base by use of inefficient mining techniques (a loss of 10.5x1012kcal fuel equivalents). Another loss is to community health, which is depleted by lost productivity of, and compensation payments to, victims of mining accidents and occupational disease such as 'black lung' (15x109kcal). Another countywide depletion process is roadbed and bridge deterioration caused by large volumes of heavy coal-haul vehicular traffic (10x109kcal). These losses are being borne mainly by residents of the Appalachian host region, with little systematic compensation by consumers of the coal resource. It is expected that these losses will increase in magnitude as national coal use increases. (author)

  8. Purification of high ammonia wastewater in a biofilm airlift loop bioreactor with microbial communities analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Dandan; Sun, Liping; Wen, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    A 70 m(3) gas-liquid-solid three-phase flow airlift loop bioreactor, in which biofilm attached on granular active carbon carriers, was used for purification of the high ammonia wastewater from bioethanol production. Under the optimum operating conditions, COD and NH4 (+)-N average removal rate of 89.0 and 98.6 % were obtained at hydraulic retention time of 10 h. Scanning electron microscopy was applied for observation of the biofilm formation. High contaminants removal efficiency was achieved by holding high biomass concentration in the reactor due to the attached biofilm over the carriers. The 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis indicated that 68.6 % of the clones were affiliated with the two phyla Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, and residual clones clustered with various sequences from uncultured bacteria. The presence of various anoxic/anaerobic bacteria indicated that the oxygen gradient inside the biofilm could provide appropriate micro-environment for nitrogen removal through simultaneous nitrification and denitrification. PMID:25344088

  9. A community of curious souls: an analysis of commenting behavior on TED talks videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Andrew; Thelwall, Mike; Mongeon, Philippe; Sugimoto, Cassidy R

    2014-01-01

    The TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) Talks website hosts video recordings of various experts, celebrities, academics, and others who discuss their topics of expertise. Funded by advertising and members but provided free online, TED Talks have been viewed over a billion times and are a science communication phenomenon. Although the organization has been derided for its populist slant and emphasis on entertainment value, no previous research has assessed audience reactions in order to determine the degree to which presenter characteristics and platform affect the reception of a video. This article addresses this issue via a content analysis of comments left on both the TED website and the YouTube platform (on which TED Talks videos are also posted). It was found that commenters were more likely to discuss the characteristics of a presenter on YouTube, whereas commenters tended to engage with the talk content on the TED website. In addition, people tended to be more emotional when the speaker was a woman (by leaving comments that were either positive or negative). The results can inform future efforts to popularize science amongst the public, as well as to provide insights for those looking to disseminate information via Internet videos. PMID:24718634

  10. [Descriptive analysis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in an expatriate community in Yaounde-Cameroon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhecke, C; Nguimfack, R Ndi Kweti; Berry, A; Marchou, B

    2014-12-01

    Malaria is an endemic disease in Cameroon. Expatriate population is also affected by malaria risk. Many studies are published on malaria, but few are focused on the expatriate population. The objective was to describe epidemiological characteristics andmanagement ofmalaria at Plasmodium falciparum in Yaounde expatriate population. This is a retrospective analysis of all patients treated at health center of the French Embassy in Yaounde in 2013 with a diagnosis of malaria. 103 cases were recruited. Out of them, 32.7% came from the outskirts of Yaounde, 25.2% from the coastal area of Cameroon, and 20.4% from the center of Yaounde. 22 patients were hospitalized, including 6 in Emergency department. 3 deaths were reported during this period. Severe malaria cases are regularly detected in expatriate population inYaounde and preferentially patients, who are over 50 years old, long stay residents in Cameroon and they paid less attention on prevention and vector control. This study confirms the presence of urban malaria in Yaounde and the need to adopt measures including prophylaxis. To the ignorance of risk and the poor adherence to prophylactic measures, it appears important that the various embassies in northern countries have specific information to their expatriates living in endemic areas. PMID:25158843

  11. Climate-induced signatures in the zooplankton communities: a meta-analysis at a European scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Cotrim Marques

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Several recent studies have revealed the impacts of the climate variability in the dynamic of zooplankton in different estuarine ecosystems, imposing a need for more and continued global studies. Presently, there is a growing appreciation in international collaborations to compare and contrast estuarine ecosystem response to climate variability across geographical gradients, including long-term changes in zooplankton. We performed a meta-analysis comprising field data from 7 location (Mondego estuary-Portugal, Seine estuary- France, Sheldt estuary- Belgium, Kiel fjord - Germany, Gulf of Riga- Latvia, Gulf of Bothnia – Sweden and Finland Archipelagos. The use of climatic modes (e.g. NAO, ENSO has proven useful in investigating links between climatic variations and ecological patterns. Therefore, the main focus will be to test the influence of the NAO on abundance of organisms, key species, local environment and whether these relationships are generally positive, whether they are sensitive to methodological differences among studies, between taxonomic group and key species. The knowledge gained will contribute to quantitatively evaluate the multi-scale structure of climate and marine environment and to identify a set of environmental indicators to assess the estuarine ecosystem state and risks for ecological shifts.

  12. Analysis of cocaine and nicotine metabolites in wastewater by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Cross abuse index patterns on a major community

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, lvaro; Silva, Nuno; Bronze, M. R.; Ferreira, Joo; Morais, Jos

    2014-01-01

    "A method based on sample preparation by solid phase extraction and analysis by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry was validated and used for simultaneous analysis of cocaine, benzoylecgonine and cotinine in samples collected at the major wastewater treatment plant in the city of Lisbon. The aim was to estimate the consumption of both cocaine and nicotine in this community and establish an index involving both drugs supported by the relevance of nicotine as a significant anthropogeni...

  13. Visual analysis of the quantitative composition of metagenomic communities: the AmphoraVizu webserver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerepesi, Csaba; Szalkai, Balázs; Grolmusz, Vince

    2015-04-01

    Low-cost DNA sequencing methods have given rise to an enormous development of metagenomics in the past few years. One basic--and difficult--task is the phylogenetic annotation of the metagenomic samples studied. The difficulty comes from the fact that the typical environmental sample contains hundreds of unknown and still uncharacterized microorganisms. There are several possible methods to assign at least partial phylogenetic information to these uncharacterized data. Originally, the 16S ribosomal RNA was used as phylogenetic marker, then genome sequence alignments and similarity measures between the unknown genome and the reference genomes were applied (e.g., in the MEGAN software), and more recently, phylogeny-based methods applying suitable sets of marker genes were suggested (AMPHORA, AMPHORA2, and the webserver implementation AmphoraNet). Here, we present a visual analysis tool that is capable of demonstrating the quantitative relations gained from the output of the AMPHORA2 program or the easy-to-use AmphoraNet webserver. Our web-based tool, the AmphoraVizu webserver, makes the phylogenetic distribution of the metagenomic sample clearly visible by using the native output format of AMPHORA2 or AmphoraNet. The user may set the phylogenetic resolution (i.e., superkingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species) along with the chart type and will receive the distribution data detailed for all relevant marker genes in the sample. For publication quality results, the chart labels can be customized by the user. The visualization webserver is available at the address http://amphoravizu.pitgroup.org. The AmphoraNet webserver is available at http://amphoranet.pitgroup.org. The open-source version of the AmphoraVizu program is available for download at http://pitgroup.org/apps/amphoravizu/AmphoraVizu.pl. PMID:25296554

  14. Implications of Strain- and Species-Level Sequence Divergence for Community and Isolate Shotgun Proteomic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denef, Vincent [University of California, Berkeley; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley

    2007-01-01

    The recent surge in microbial genomic sequencing, combined with the development of high-throughput liquid chromatography-mass-spectrometry-based (LC/LC-MS/MS) proteomics, has raised the question of the extent to which genomic information of one strain or environmental sample can be used to profile proteomes of related strains or samples. Even with decreasing sequencing costs, it remains impractical to obtain genomic sequence for every strain or sample analyzed. Here, we evaluate how shotgun proteomics is affected by amino acid divergence between the sample and the genomic database using a probability-based model and a random mutation simulation model constrained by experimental data. To assess the effects of nonrandom distribution of mutations, we also evaluated identification levels using in silico peptide data from sequenced isolates with average amino acid identities (AAI) varying between 76 and 98%. We compared the predictions to experimental protein identification levels for a sample that was evaluated using a database that included genomic information for the dominant organism and for a closely related variant (95% AAI). The range of models set the boundaries at which half of the proteins in a proteomic experiment can be identified to be 77-92% AAI between orthologs in the sample and database. Consistent with this prediction, experimental data indicated loss of half the identifiable proteins at 90% AAI. Additional analysis indicated a 6.4% reduction of the initial protein coverage per 1% amino acid divergence and total identification loss at 86% AAI. Consequently, shotgun proteomics is capable of cross-strain identifications but avoids most crossspecies false positives.

  15. Critical analysis of sustainable community planning and development principles as applied within the Tlokwe Municipality / Bernice Bernadette van Schalkwyk.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Schalkwyk, Bernice Bernadette

    2012-01-01

    Due to the current high levels of urbanisation and the lingering effects of Apartheid, South African municipalities have experienced difficulties in planning for sustainability and more specifically sustainable community development. Sustainable community development is needed in order to achieve more integrated and sustainable towns and cities with an improved urban environment and a higher quality of life. Due to this sustainable community development is of particular relevance to South Afr...

  16. A Multifactor Analysis of Fungal and Bacterial Community Structure in the Root Microbiome of Mature Populus deltoides Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Shakya, Migun; Gottel, Neil; Castro, Hector; Yang, Zamin K; Gunter, Lee; Labb, Jessy; Muchero, Wellington; Bonito, Gregory; Vilgalys, Rytas; Tuskan, Gerald; Podar, Mircea; Schadt, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal communities associated with plant roots are central to the host health, survival and growth. However, a robust understanding of the root-microbiome and the factors that drive host associated microbial community structure have remained elusive, especially in mature perennial plants from natural settings. Here, we investigated relationships of bacterial and fungal communities in the rhizosphere and root endosphere of the riparian tree species Populus deltoides, and the infl...

  17. Analysis of composition and structure of coastal to mesopelagic bacterioplankton communities in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    GaryMKing; BradleyTolar

    2013-01-01

    16S rRNA gene amplicons were pyrosequenced to assess bacterioplankton community composition, diversity and phylogenetic community structure for 17 stations in the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM) sampled in March 2010. Statistical analyses showed that samples from depths ≤ 100 m differed distinctly from deeper samples. SAR 11 α-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes dominated communities at depths ≤ 100 m, which were characterized by high α-Proteobacteria/γ-Proteobacteria ratios (α/γ > 1.7). Th...

  18. Validation of the knowledge, attitude and perceived practice of asthma instrument among community pharmacists using Rasch analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Akram, Waqas; Hussein, Maryam S.E.; AHMAD, Sohail; Mamat, Mohd N.; Ismail, Nahlah E.

    2015-01-01

    There is no instrument which collectively assesses the knowledge, attitude and perceived practice of asthma among community pharmacists. Therefore, this study aimed to validate the instrument which measured the knowledge, attitude and perceived practice of asthma among community pharmacists by producing empirical evidence of validity and reliability of the items using Rasch model (Bond & Fox software®) for dichotomous and polytomous data. This baseline study recruited 33 community pharmacists...

  19. Forest Policy Scenario Analysis: Sensitivity of Songbird Community to Changes in Forest Cover Amount and Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Baker

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in mature forest cover amount, composition, and configuration can be of significant consequence to wildlife populations. The response of wildlife to forest patterns is of concern to forest managers because it lies at the heart of such competing approaches to forest planning as aggregated vs. dispersed harvest block layouts. In this study, we developed a species assessment framework to evaluate the outcomes of forest management scenarios on biodiversity conservation objectives. Scenarios were assessed in the context of a broad range of forest structures and patterns that would be expected to occur under natural disturbance and succession processes. Spatial habitat models were used to predict the effects of varying degrees of mature forest cover amount, composition, and configuration on habitat occupancy for a set of 13 focal songbird species. We used a spatially explicit harvest scheduling program to model forest management options and simulate future forest conditions resulting from alternative forest management scenarios, and used a process-based fire-simulation model to simulate future forest conditions resulting from natural wildfire disturbance. Spatial pattern signatures were derived for both habitat occupancy and forest conditions, and these were placed in the context of the simulated range of natural variation. Strategic policy analyses were set in the context of current Ontario forest management policies. This included use of sequential time-restricted harvest blocks (created for Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus conservation and delayed harvest areas (created for American marten (Martes americana atrata conservation. This approach increased the realism of the analysis, but reduced the generality of interpretations. We found that forest management options that create linear strips of old forest deviate the most from simulated natural patterns, and had the greatest negative effects on habitat occupancy, whereas policy options that specify deferment and timing of harvest for large blocks helped ensure the stable presence of an intact mature forest matrix over time. The management scenario that focused on maintaining compositional targets best supported biodiversity objectives by providing the composition patterns required by the 13 focal species, but this scenario may be improved by adding some broad-scale spatial objectives to better maintain large blocks of interior forest habitat through time.

  20. Pastoral power in the community pharmacy: A Foucauldian analysis of services to promote patient adherence to new medicine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Justin; Latif, Asam; Boyd, Matthew; Barber, Nick; Elliott, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Community pharmacists play a growing role in the delivery of primary healthcare. This has led many to consider the changing power of the pharmacy profession in relation to other professions and patient groups. This paper contributes to these debates through developing a Foucauldian analysis of the changing dynamics of power brought about by extended roles in medicines management and patient education. Examining the New Medicine Service, the study considers how both patient and pharmacist subjectivities are transformed as pharmacists seek to survey patient's medicine use, diagnose non-adherence to prescribed medicines, and provide education to promote behaviour change. These extended roles in medicines management and patient education expand the 'pharmacy gaze' to further aspects of patient health and lifestyle, and more significantly, established a form of 'pastoral power' as pharmacists become responsible for shaping patients' self-regulating subjectivities. In concert, pharmacists are themselves enrolled within a new governing regime where their identities are conditioned by corporate and policy rationalities for the modernisation of primary care. PMID:26692093