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Sample records for medical student professionalism

  1. MEDICAL ETHICS COURSE IMPROVES MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM: MEDICAL STUDENTS´ OPINIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Sotoodeh Jahromi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Training physicians who are expert in many medical aspects is the most improtant mission of medical universities. One of these aspects, is professional behavior achievement. One of the important goals in training of ethics, is recognition of conflicts in different parts of ethics and having logical viewpoint for resolving and analyzing these conflicts. This descriptive and analytical study was done to evaluate the efficacy of medical ethics education in medical students´ professional attitudes improvement. One hundred and two medical students were selected randomly in different steps of education and were questioned and their opinions correlation with stage of education and gender were evaluated. There was a significant difference between female viewpoint (in roles of ethic course which is presented in preclinical step in professional attitude improvement (P = 0.009 and also a significant difference was seen in the viewpoint score between student stage with intern stage (P = 0.031. Medical students in educational student stage believe ethic course improve medical professionalism. Since there is no special course to train medical students in professionalism, some interventions are required in this field to improve this aspect of physicians' professional life.

  2. Pretoria medical students' perspectives on the assessable attributes of professionalism

    OpenAIRE

    Van Rooyen, Marietjie; Treadwell, Ina

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Professionalism forms an important aspect of medicine's contract with society, and it is therefore important that it should be assessed and developed in medical schools. For the effective assessment of medical students' professionalism, clear objectives, or outcomes based on a clear definition of professionalism, have to be accepted by society, the faculty and the students. A Physician's Charter, 'Medical Professionalism in the New Millennium', was published by the Annals of Inter...

  3. Team-based assessment of professional behavior in medical students

    OpenAIRE

    RAEE, HOJAT; Amini, Mitra; MOMEN NASAB, AMENEH; MALEK POUR, ABDOLRASOUL; JAFARI, MOHAMMAD MORAD

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Self and peer assessment provides important information about the individual’s performance and behavior in all aspects of their professional environment work. The aim of this study is to evaluate the professional behavior and performance in medical students in the form of team based assessment.

  4. Wanted: role models - medical students’ perceptions of professionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byszewski Anna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transformation of medical students to become medical professionals is a core competency required for physicians in the 21st century. Role modeling was traditionally the key method of transmitting this skill. Medical schools are developing medical curricula which are explicit in ensuring students develop the professional competency and understand the values and attributes of this role. The purpose of this study was to determine student perception of professionalism at the University of Ottawa and gain insights for improvement in promotion of professionalism in undergraduate medical education. Methods Survey on student perception of professionalism in general, the curriculum and learning environment at the University of Ottawa, and the perception of student behaviors, was developed by faculty and students and sent electronically to all University of Ottawa medical students. The survey included both quantitative items including an adapted Pritzker list and qualitative responses to eight open ended questions on professionalism at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa. All analyses were performed using SAS version 9.1 (SAS Institute Inc. Cary, NC, USA. Chi-square and Fischer’s exact test (for cell count less than 5 were used to derive p-values for categorical variables by level of student learning. Results The response rate was 45.6% (255 of 559 students for all four years of the curriculum. 63% of the responses were from students in years 1 and 2 (preclerkship. Students identified role modeling as the single most important aspect of professionalism. The strongest curricular recommendations included faculty-led case scenario sessions, enhancing interprofessional interactions and the creation of special awards to staff and students to “celebrate” professionalism. Current evaluation systems were considered least effective. The importance of role modeling and information on how to report lapses and breaches was highlighted in the answers to the open ended questions. Conclusions Students identify the need for strong positive role models in their learning environment, and for effective evaluation of the professionalism of students and teachers. Medical school leaders must facilitate development of these components within the MD education and faculty development programs as well as in clinical milieus where student learning occurs.

  5. Professional development of medical students: problems and promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, D

    1997-12-01

    Observers and critics of the medical profession, both within and without, urge that more attention be paid to the moral sensibilities, the characters, of medical students. Passing on particular moral values and actions to physicians has always been an essential core of medical training, and this call for renewal is not new in modern medicine. Some of the structures and characteristics of modern medical education, however, often work directly against the professionalism that the education espouses. For example, medical students are socialized into a hierarchy that has broad implications for relations among health care professionals, other health care workers, and patients, and academic medicine has not promoted and taught critical reflection about the values and consequences of this hierarchy. Further, behind the formal curriculum lies the "hidden curriculum" of values that are unconsciously or half-consciously passed on from the faculty and older trainees. Two resources for thinking anew about professional development for medical students are feminist standpoint theory and critical multicultural theory, each of which raises important and fundamental questions about defining the role of medicine in society and the role of the physician in medicine. The author discusses these two theories and their implications for medical education, showing how they can be used to move discussions of professional development into analysis of the widespread social consequences of how a society organizes its health care and into critical reflection on the nature of medical knowledge. PMID:9435711

  6. The training and professional expectations of medical students in Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique

    OpenAIRE

    Fronteira Inês; Rodrigues Amabélia; Fresta Mário; Sidat Mohsin; Ferrinho Paulo; da Silva Florinda; Mercer Hugo; Cabral Jorge; Dussault Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the professional expectations of medical students during the 2007-2008 academic year at the public medical schools of Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique, and to identify their social and geographical origins, their professional expectations and difficulties relating to their education and professional future. Methods Data were collected through a standardised questionnaire applied to all medical students registered dur...

  7. Substance Use and Attitudes on Professional Conduct among Medical Students: A Single-Institution Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Daisi; Tolova, Vera; Socha, Edward; Samenow, Charles P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to examine how specific substance-use behavior, including nonmedical prescription stimulant (NPS) use, among U.S. medical students correlates with their attitudes and beliefs toward professionalism. Method: An anonymous survey was distributed to all medical students at a private medical university (46% response rate).…

  8. Restoring medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat, James L

    2012-08-21

    The essence of medical professionalism is placing dedication to the welfare of patients above physicians' personal or proprietary interests. Medicine has become deprofessionalized as a consequence of socioeconomic factors leading to increasing commercialization and perverse financial incentives converting it into a business, the presence of unmanaged conflicts of interest, challenges to medical authority by insurance companies and the consumerism movement, and by gradual changes in the attitudes of physicians. Organized medicine has responded by making explicit its standards of professionalism and its dedication to preserving them. Medical educators have studied the means to develop professional attitudes and behaviors among medical students and residents. Modeling the characteristics of professional behavior by virtuous physicians remains the most effective method to instill professional behaviors in trainees. Restoring professionalism may be abetted by changes in physicians' financial incentives through innovative models of health care delivery, by physicians reducing their conflicts of interest, and by medical societies rejecting a guild identity. PMID:22915177

  9. Evaluating Explicit and Implicit Stigma of Mental Illness in Mental Health Professionals and Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Kopera, Maciej; Suszek, Hubert; Bonar, Erin; Myszka, Maciej; Gmaj, Bart?omiej; Ilgen, Mark; Wojnar, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated explicit and implicit attitudes towards people with mental illness among medical students (non-professionals) with no previous contact with mentally ill patients and psychiatrists and psychotherapists (professionals) who had at least 2 years of professional contact with mentally ill patients. Explicit attitudes where assessed by self-report. Implicit attitudes were measured with the Go/No-Go Association Task, a variant of the Implicit Association Test that does not requ...

  10. Survey of the Importance of Professional Behaviors among Medical Students, Residents, and Attending Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreale, Mary K.; Balon, Richard; Arfken, Cynthia L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared the importance of items related to professional behavior among medical students rotating through their psychiatry clerkship, psychiatry residents, and attending psychiatrists. Method: The authors sent an electronic survey with 43 items (rated on the scale 1: Not at All Important; to 5: Very Important) to medical

  11. Learning professional skills and attitudes : Medical students' attitudes towards communication skills andgroup learning

    OpenAIRE

    Lumma-Sellenthin, Antje

    2013-01-01

    Medical education aims at forming studentsprofessional identity. This includes skills and attitudes such as communication and teamwork skills. One of the thesis’ aims is to identify students’ typical difficulties with learning communication skills, and to understand how these affect their identity development. Group discussions of student-patient interviews were video-taped, and selected discussions were transcribed and analyzed. Students had difficulties in establishing trustful relationsh...

  12. Twelve tips for addressing medical student and resident physician lapses in professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougas, Steven; Gentilesco, Bethany; Green, Emily; Flores, Libertad

    2015-10-01

    Medical educators have gained significant ground in the practical and scholarly approach to professionalism. When a lapse occurs, thoughtful remediation to address the underlying issue can have a positive impact on medical students and resident physicians, while failure to address lapses, or to do so ineffectively, can have long-term consequences for learners and potentially patients. Despite these high stakes, educators are often hesitant to address lapses in professionalism, possibly due to a lack of time and familiarity with the process. Attention must be paid to generalizable, hands-on recommendations for daily use so that clinicians and administrators feel well equipped to tackle this often difficult yet valuable task. This article reviews the literature related to addressing unprofessional behavior among trainees in medicine and connects it to the shared experience of medical educators at one institution. The framework presented aims to provide practical guidance and empowerment for educators responsible for addressing medical student and resident physician lapses in professionalism. PMID:25665630

  13. Evaluating medical student communication/professionalism skills from a patient's perspective

    OpenAIRE

    LarryE.Davis

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate medical student's communication and professionalism skills from the perspective of the ambulatory patient and later compare these skills in their first year of residency. Methods: Students in third year neurology clerkship clinics see patients alone followed by a revisit with an attending neurologist. The patient is then asked to complete a voluntary, anonymous, Likert scale questionnaire rating the student on friendliness, listening to the patient, respecting the patien...

  14. Evaluating Medical Student Communication/Professionalism Skills from a Patient’s Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Larry E.; King, Molly K.; Wayne, Sharon J.; Kalishman, Summers G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate medical students’ communication and professionalism skills from the perspective of the ambulatory patient and later compare these skills in their first year of residency. Methods: Students in third year neurology clerkship clinics see patients alone followed by a revisit with an attending neurologist. The patient is then asked to complete a voluntary, anonymous, Likert scale questionnaire rating the student on friendliness, listening to the patient, respecting the patient,...

  15. The training and professional expectations of medical students in Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fronteira Inês

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the professional expectations of medical students during the 2007-2008 academic year at the public medical schools of Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique, and to identify their social and geographical origins, their professional expectations and difficulties relating to their education and professional future. Methods Data were collected through a standardised questionnaire applied to all medical students registered during the 2007-2008 academic year. Results Students decide to study medicine at an early age. Relatives and friends seem to have an especially important influence in encouraging, reinforcing and promoting the desire to be a doctor. The degree of feminization of the student population differs among the different countries. Although most medical students are from outside the capital cities, expectations of getting into medical school are already associated with migration from the periphery to the capital city, even before entering medical education. Academic performance is poor. This seems to be related to difficulties in accessing materials, finances and insufficient high school preparation. Medical students recognize the public sector demand but their expectations are to combine public sector practice with private work, in order to improve their earnings. Salary expectations of students vary between the three countries. Approximately 75% want to train as hospital specialists and to follow a hospital-based career. A significant proportion is unsure about their future area of specialization, which for many students is equated with migration to study abroad. Conclusions Medical education is an important national investment, but the returns obtained are not as efficient as expected. Investments in high-school preparation, tutoring, and infrastructure are likely to have a significant impact on the success rate of medical schools. Special attention should be given to the socialization of students and the role model status of their teachers. In countries with scarce medical resources, the hospital orientation of students' expectations is understandable, although it should be associated with the development of skills to coordinate hospital work with the network of peripheral facilities. Developing a local postgraduate training capacity for doctors might be an important strategy to help retain medical doctors in the home country.

  16. An analysis of the professional and academic interest of medical radiation science students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research analyses the interest that medical radiation science (MRS) students have about their academic and professional world when they are given the independence to freely choose a topic to research. The research setting includes students of three different MRS degrees who have had, up until the point that this research was carried out, more common learning than degree specific learning. To analyse student interest, a thematic analysis of the self selected topics to be researched for a group work project was undertaken. The results indicate that there are statistically significant differences in interest between students of the three MRS degrees, with students within a degree sharing a strong single unifying common interest in their academic or professional world.

  17. The Medical Migration: Experiences and Perspectives of Medical Students for the Professional Career

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    Elena TOADER

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a short overview over the determinants and implications of medics’ international migration and to determine if the international migration of medics can be considered a predictable phenomenon, from the Romanian medical student’s perspective. The study has been conducted on a group of students from the University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Gr. T. Popa” from Ia?i, Romania. The research was conducted on an availability sample of 158 students from the 3rd to 6th year of study, which responded to an auto-administrated questionnaire. The results are in accordance with the results of other similar studies, namely that students are considering international migration to more developed countries as an option for their career development.

  18. Developing a Patient Focussed Professional Identity: An Exploratory Investigation of Medical Students' Encounters with Patient Partnership in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jennifer; Bull, Rosalind; Rooney, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Patient encounters are central to the provision of learning opportunities for medical students and their development as medical professionals. The primary aim of the study reported in this paper was to discover how partnering medical students with patients with chronic illness in undergraduate learning influenced the development of a patient…

  19. Developing pre-qualification inter-professional education for nursing and medical students: sampling student attitudes to guide development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, Sue; Boohan, Mairead; Moutray, Marianne; Jenkins, John

    2004-03-01

    Teamwork and collaboration are regarded as important goals for health and social care education and inter-professional education (IPE) the vehicle to achieve this. However, there is debate concerning the best strategies for implementation, location and delivery of IPE. This exploratory study was undertaken to anticipate some of the problems of implementing a pre-qualification IPE programme for Children's Branch nursing students and medical students undertaking a Paediatrics module and to identify strategies to maximise success. A modified version of the readiness for inter-professional learning scale (RIPLS), including additional open-ended questions, was used with a convenient, purposeful sample of 20 medical and 10 nursing students. Both groups regarded learning team-working skills as important. Medical students regarded IPE as a means to learn about team-work and professional roles otherwise they indicated a preference for a discipline-based approach. Both groups were found to have acquired a strong sense of their own professional role. Both perceived IPE as disadvantageous if it impeded their own professional learning. Results also highlighted the importance of class size, stage of learning, appropriate skills and subject in IPE planning. We conclude that a small exploratory study can provide a useful guide for programme planning and additional qualitative data can enable a more comprehensive explanation of results. PMID:19038133

  20. Validation of a Method for Measuring Medical Students' Critical Reflections on Professionalism in Gross Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Pawlina, Wojciech; Drake, Richard L.; Szostek, Jason H.; Reed, Darcy A.; Lachman, Nirusha; McBride, Jennifer M.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Improving professional attitudes and behaviors requires critical self reflection. Research on reflection is necessary to understand professionalism among medical students. The aims of this prospective validation study at the Mayo Medical School and Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine were: (1) to develop and validate a new instrument for…

  1. Multidimensional representations: The knowledge domain of germs held by students, teachers and medical professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rua, Melissa Jo

    The present study examined the understandings held by 5th, 8th, and 11th-grade students, their teachers and medical professionals about germs. Specifically, this study describes the content and structure of students' and adults' conceptions in the areas of germ contraction, transmission, and treatment of infectious and non-infectious diseases caused by microorganisms. Naturalistic and empirical research methods were used to investigate participants' conceptions. Between and within group similarities were found using data from concept maps on the topic "flu," drawings of germs, a 20 word card sort related to germs and illness, and a semi-structured interview. Concept maps were coded according to techniques by Novak and Gowan (1984). Drawings of germs were coded into four main categories (bacteria, viruses, animal cell, other) and five subcategories (disease, caricature, insect, protozoa, unclassified). Cluster patterns for the card sorts of each group were found using multidimensional scaling techniques. Six coding categories emerged from the interview transcripts: (a) transmission, (b) treatment, (c) effect of weather on illness, (d) immune response, (e) location of germs, and (f) similarities and differences between bacteria and viruses. The findings showed students, teachers and medical professionals have different understandings about bacteria and viruses and the structures of those understandings vary. Gaps or holes in the participants knowledge were found in areas such as: (a) how germs are transmitted, (b) where germs are found, (c) how the body transports and uses medicine, (d) how the immune system functions, (e) the difference between vaccines and non-prescription medicines, (f) differences that exist between bacteria and viruses, and (g) bacterial resistance to medication. The youngest students relied heavily upon personal experiences with germs rather than formal instruction when explaining their conceptions. As a result, the influence of media was evident in the students' understandings and images of microbes. Students also viewed germs as a human problem rather than seeing microorganisms as an independent member of the ecosystem. Teachers' explanations about germs varied in explicitness based on the grade level they taught while medical professionals based their understandings on formal knowledge and tended to use explicit technical language in their explanations of the phenomena.

  2. Developing a patient focussed professional identity: an exploratory investigation of medical students' encounters with patient partnership in learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jennifer; Bull, Rosalind; Rooney, Kim

    2015-05-01

    Patient encounters are central to the provision of learning opportunities for medical students and their development as medical professionals. The primary aim of the study reported in this paper was to discover how partnering medical students with patients with chronic illness in undergraduate learning influenced the development of a patient centred professional identity and professionalism. An exploratory interpretive research design was used to address the research aim within a patient partner program (P3). Three qualitative data collection methods were used: (1) focus groups (2) extended response questionnaire and (3) semi-structured interviews. Data were coded and analysed thematically. The professional identity of medical students is constructed along traditional lines in the preclinical years. Patient-partnership offers a disruption to this development by way of an intersection with patients with chronic illness which potentially allows meaningful construction of what a patient-centred identity should be. This point of reflection provides an opportunity to engage at a higher level in medical identity development and professionalism. The findings discussed in this paper further stimulate the patient-centred agenda by understanding the conflict associated with the student-patient nexus in medical education and its potential for building professionalism and a patient-centred professional identity. To continue the drive for a patient-centred professional identity there must be ongoing engagement with patients in medical education, preferably commencing early in a student's journey so that it becomes the expected norm. This study has highlighted that a true patient-centred emphasis is being encountered too late in their socialisation process. PMID:25008246

  3. Can personal qualities of medical students predict in-course examination success and professional behaviour? An exploratory prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Adam Jane; Bore Miles; McKendree Jean; Munro Don; Powis David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Over two-thirds of UK medical schools are augmenting their selection procedures for medical students by using the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT), which employs tests of cognitive and non-cognitive personal qualities, but clear evidence of the tests’ predictive validity is lacking. This study explores whether academic performance and professional behaviours that are important in a health professional context can be predicted by these measures, when taken befo...

  4. Relationship of creative projects in anatomy to medical student professionalism, test performance and stress: an exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Thai Trung M; Ross Marianne; Boker John R; Mourra Sarah; Nguyen Vincent P; Shapiro Johanna; Leonard Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The anatomy course offers important opportunities to develop professionalism at an early stage in medical education. It is an academically significant course that also engenders stress in some students. Methods Over a three-year period, 115 of 297 students completed creative projects. Thirty-four project completers and 47 non-completers consented to participate in the study. Projects were analyzed for professionalism themes using grounded theory. A subset of project comple...

  5. Percepções de alunos de medicina sobre marketing médico / Undergraduate medical student's perceptions regarding professional marketing

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Fernando Henrique Canhoto, Alves; Fernanda Pedrosa, Torres; Hilda Satie, Suto; Lunia Sofia Lima, Azevedo; Marcell Maduro, Barbosa; Renato Martins, Pedro; Ana Carolina Delazia Albuquerque, Santana; Daniella, Rantin; Fábio Henrique Luiz, Leonardo; Marina Gomes de, Andrade; Natasha Nicos, Ferreira; Antonio, Pazin Filho.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Marketing médico é um assunto controverso, principalmente no que concerne a princípios éticos. Portanto, frente à competição acirrada de mercado, é necessário o preparo profissional. Conhecer a percepção dos alunos de Medicina pode auxiliar na estruturação de alternativas de capacitação. [...] METODOLOGIA: Inicialmente, identificaram-se crenças sobre marketing médico através de grupo focal composto por 12 alunos. Com base nesses dados, dez afirmações para avaliar atitudes foram aplicadas aos alunos de uma Faculdade de Medicina pública brasileira. RESULTADOS: Observou-se falta de clareza sobre o conceito de marketing, preocupação com princípios éticos e necessidade de marketing no mercado competitivo. Na fase de aplicação, foram obtidas 280 respostas de diversos estágios do curso. Apenas 16,8% admitiram contato com o tema. Houve clareza sobre ética em relação ao paciente, influenciada positivamente pela progressão no curso, mas houve divergência na ética entre profissionais. CONCLUSÕES: Marketing médico é uma área pouco compreendida e relegada ao currículo oculto, sendo influenciada por transposições inadequadas de métodos didáticos destinados à comunicação profissional para a população leiga. Novos métodos de ensino, como a educação tutorial, podem ser uma alternativa para lidar com essas situações. Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Professional marketing is a controversial topic, mainly regarding ethical principles. Therefore, increasing market competion turns professional capacitation mandatory. To know under graduation medical student's perceptions could help to develop educational alternatives to face this probl [...] em. METODOLOGY: First, professional marketing believes were identified through focus group methodology including twelve students. Based on these results, ten affirmatives were constructed to evaluate attitudes and applied to the students of a Brazilian public medicine school. RESULTS: It was observed lack of a clear definition of marketing, preoccupation regarding ethical principles and need to employ marketing strategies in a competitive market. At the survey stage, 280 answers from different stages of the course were obtained. Only 16.8% admitted to have had previous contact with the topic. Clear ethical standards for medical-patient relationship were determined, increasing with course progression. However inter-professional ethical principles was more subject to confusion. CONCLUSION: Professional marketing is poorly understood and it is relegated to the occult curricula, being influenced by didactic methods inadequately transposed for marketing strategies. Newer educational methods, like mentoring, could be an alternative to deal with these situations.Tutoria.

  6. Changes in Wellbeing and Professional Values among Medical Undergraduate Students: A Narrative Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbassat, Jochanan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Educators are concerned by the high prevalence of emotional distress among medical students, and by the alleged decline in their humanitarian values. Objective To re-examine these concerns by reviewing studies of medical students' wellbeing and development. Method Narrative review of the literature. Main findings: (a) Medical

  7. Medical professionalism: the trainees' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, Declan; Elsharkawy, Ahmed; Newbery, Nina

    2006-01-01

    Medical professionalism is deeply embedded in medical practice in the UK but, with changes in the modern healthcare climate, its nature and role have been increasingly challenged. The Royal College of Physicians (RCP) therefore convened a working party to consider the concept of medical professionalism, to clarify its value and purpose, and to define it. As part of this project, the RCP Trainees Committee was commissioned to survey trainees to obtain their views on the matter. A questionnaire was sent to 19,190 medical and surgical trainees, and 4,576 medical students; 2,175 responses were received. The results were clear. Junior doctors and medical students see medicine as a profession which is learnt through apprenticeship and defined by responsibility towards patients, and which requires qualities such as altruism and humility. They believe that professionalism maintains and improves patient care; that standards of care should be defined and regulated by the profession; and that training should be directed by the profession. Furthermore, the overwhelming majority think that a reduction in medical professionalism would lead to people leaving the profession. PMID:16521359

  8. Professionalism in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Sean; Southgate, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Medical professionalism in today's society requires the exhibition of a range of qualities deployed in the service of patients, rather than more traditionally defined aspects such as mastery, autonomy and self-regulation. These qualities incorporate demonstrated clinical competence; aspiring to excellence in practice while demonstrating humility…

  9. Comparison of peer-led versus professional-led training in basic life support for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Takashi Fujiwara1, Mai Nishimura2, Ryoko Honda3, Takashi Nishiyama4, Masahiro Nomoto5, Naoto Kobayashi6, Masayuki Ikeda71Division of Educational Training, Kurashiki Central Hospital, Kurashiki, Japan, 2Sixth-year medical student, 3Department of Anaesthesiology and Resuscitology, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, 5Department of Therapeutics, 6Medical Education Center, Ehime University School of Medicine, Ehime, Japan, 7Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, JapanBackground: The effect of peer-led training in basic life support (BLS in the education of medical students has not been assessed.Subjects and methods: This study was a randomized controlled trial with a blinded outcome assessor. A total of 74 fourth-year medical students at Ehime University School of Medicine, Japan were randomly assigned to BLS training conducted by either a senior medical student (peer-led group or a health professional (professional-led group. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of chest compressions with adequate depth (38–51 mm by means of a training mannequin evaluated 20 weeks after BLS training. Secondary outcome measures were compression depth, compression rate, proportion of participants who could ensure adequate compression depth (38–51 mm and adequate compression rate (90–110/minute, and retention of BLS knowledge as assessed by 22-point questionnaire.Results: Percentage chest compressions with adequate depth (mean ± SD was 54.5% ± 31.8% in the peer-led group and 52.4% ± 35.6% in the professional-led group. The 95% confidence interval (CI of difference of the means was –18.7% to 22.8%. The proportion of participants who could ensure an adequate mean compression rate was 17/23 (73.9% in the peer-led group but only 8/22 (36.4% in the professional-led group (P = 0.011. On the 22-point questionnaire administered 20 weeks after training, the peer-led group scored 17.2 ± 2.3 whereas the professional-led group scored 17.8 ± 2.0. The 95% CI of difference of the means was –1.72 to 0.57.Conclusion: Peer-led training in BLS by medical students is feasible and as effective as health professional-led training.Keywords: basic life support, education, training, randomized controlled trial 

  10. Can personal qualities of medical students predict in-course examination success and professional behaviour? An exploratory prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Jane

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over two-thirds of UK medical schools are augmenting their selection procedures for medical students by using the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT, which employs tests of cognitive and non-cognitive personal qualities, but clear evidence of the tests’ predictive validity is lacking. This study explores whether academic performance and professional behaviours that are important in a health professional context can be predicted by these measures, when taken before or very early in the medical course. Methods This prospective cohort study follows the progress of the entire student cohort who entered Hull York Medical School in September 2007, having taken the UKCAT cognitive tests in 2006 and the non-cognitive tests a year later. This paper reports on the students’ first and second academic years of study. The main outcome measures were regular, repeated tutor assessment of individual students’ interpersonal skills and professional behaviour, and annual examination performance in the three domains of recall and application of knowledge, evaluation of data, and communication and practical clinical skills. The relationships between non-cognitive test scores, cognitive test scores, tutor assessments and examination results were explored using the Pearson product–moment correlations for each group of data; the data for students obtaining the top and bottom 20% of the summative examination results were compared using Analysis of Variance. Results Personal qualities measured by non-cognitive tests showed a number of statistically significant relationships with ratings of behaviour made by tutors, with performance in each year’s objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs, and with themed written summative examination marks in each year. Cognitive ability scores were also significantly related to each year’s examination results, but seldom to professional behaviours. The top 20% of examination achievers could be differentiated from the bottom 20% on both non-cognitive and cognitive measures. Conclusions This study shows numerous significant relationships between both cognitive and non-cognitive test scores, academic examination scores and indicators of professional behaviours in medical students. This suggests that measurement of non-cognitive personal qualities in applicants to medical school could make a useful contribution to selection and admission decisions. Further research is required in larger representative groups, and with more refined predictor measures and behavioural assessment methods, to establish beyond doubt the incremental validity of such measures over conventional cognitive assessments.

  11. The development of vaccination perspectives among chiropractic, naturopathic and medical students: a case study of professional enculturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtry, Angus; Wilson, Kumanan; Clarkin, Chantalle; Walji, Rishma; Kilian, Brendan C; Kilian, Carney C; Lohfeld, Lynne; Alolabi, Bashar; Hagino, Carol; Busse, Jason W

    2015-12-01

    An important influence on parents' decisions about pediatric vaccination (children under 6 years of age) is the attitude of their health care providers, including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers. Very limited qualitative research exists, however, on how attitudes towards vaccination develop among healthcare professionals in-training. We explored perspective development among three groups of students: medical, chiropractic, and naturopathic. We conducted focus group sessions with participants from each year of study at three different healthcare training programs in Ontario, Canada. Semi-structured and open-ended questions were used to elicit dynamic interaction among participants and explore how they constructed their attitudes toward vaccination at the beginning and part way through their professional training. Analyses of verbatim transcripts of audiotaped interviews were conducted both inductively and deductively using questions structured by existing literature on learning, professional socialization and interprofessional relations. We found five major themes and each theme was illustrated with representative quotes. Numerous unexpected insights emerged within these themes, including students' general open-mindedness towards pediatric vaccination at the beginning of their training; the powerful influence of both formal education and informal socialization; uncritical acceptance of the vaccination views of senior or respected professionals; students' preference for multiple perspectives rather than one-sided, didactic instruction; the absence of explicit socio-cultural tensions among professions; and how divergences among professional students' perspectives result from differing emphases with respect to lifestyle, individual choice, public health and epidemiological factors-rather than disagreement concerning the biomedical evidence. This last finding implies that their different perspectives on pediatric vaccination may be complementary rather than irreconcilable. Our findings should be considered by developers of professional and interprofessional educational curricula and public health officials formulating policy on pediatric vaccination. PMID:25805358

  12. Evaluación de las actitudes hacia el profesionalismo en estudiantes de medicina / Evaluation of attitudes toward professionalism in medical students

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Eliseo, Bustamante; Álvaro, Sanabria.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. El profesionalismo es un área de interés en las facultades de medicina del mundo. El uso de un cuestionario puede ser útil para evaluar el profesionalismo en Colombia. El objetivo fue evaluarlo en estudiantes de medicina, mediante la escala de actitudes ante el profesionalismo de Penn [...] State University College of Medicine (PSCOM) y su cambio al pasar de los semestres básicos a los clínicos. Métodos. Se hizo un estudio de corte trasversal con 250 estudiantes de medicina, utilizando la escala PSCOM. Se determinaron variables socioeconómicas y académicas. Se midieron las actitudes hacia el profesionalismo. Los datos se reportan en frecuencia y se comparan entre los semestres básicos y los de clínicas. Resultados. Hubo una reorganización de prioridades dentro de cada dominio de la escala, en comparación con lo propuesto originalmente. La mayor frecuencia de respuesta negativa fue de 58 % en el dominio servicio. Varios ítems decayeron al pasar de los semestres básicos a los de clínicas. Conclusión. Las actitudes de los estudiantes ante los factores que caracterizan el profesionalismo médico, demuestran que existen debilidades importantes que son un desafío para la educación de pregrado y que requieren estrategias que permitan desarrollar las habilidades profesionales dentro del currículo. Abstract in english Introduction: Professionalism is a subject of interest in medical schools around the world. The use of a questionnaire could be useful to assess professionalism in Colombia. The aim was to assess The Penn State University College of Medicine (PSCOM) Professionalism Questionnaire in medical students [...] and its change from basic to clinical settings. Methods: We completed a cross-sectional survey of 250 medical students using the PSCOM scale. We assessed socioeconomic and academic variables. Attitudes toward professionalism were also measured. Data are reported in frequency and comparisons were made between the basic and the clinical semesters. Results: We found reorganization in the priorities within each original scale domain in comparison with the original order. The most negative answer was 58% in the service domain. Some items decreased when students went from basic to clinical semesters. Conclusion: Medical students' attitudes toward factors that define professionalism show important weaknesses. This is a challenge for graduate education and it makes it necessary to introduce strategies to develop professional skills into the curriculum.

  13. Turkish students’ perceptions of professionalism at the beginning and at the end of medical education: a cross-sectional qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Volkan Kavas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Medical students’ perceptions of professionalism might reflect the impact of the current educational processes on their professional identity development. This study focuses on Ankara University Faculty of Medicine students’ perceptions of ‘good doctor’ along with the factors effective on the formation of these perceptions. Method: Six focus groups with 59 medical students from Grade-1 and Grade-6 were held. The transcripts of discussions were analyzed thematically. Results: Results regarding ‘being a good physician’ mostly mirrored the findings of previous studies framing the medical professionalism concept. The thematic pattern of the discussions on the relation between professional development and medical education suggests that students suffer from a gradual erosion of perception during medical education. That the education cannot either change the person for the better or might downgrade the person instead of improving her/him were shared by participants from both grades. Students consider clinical practice and role models two main variables determining the person's qualification as a professional. Conclusions: The formal and hidden programs determine the quality and efficacy of the professional education together. Attempts to restructure medical education must recognize the reciprocal dynamics between these two components and, thus, should carefully work out the practical aspect of the educational processes.

  14. E-LEARNING IN HIGHER PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL EDUCATION: WHAT DO STUDENTS THINK ABOUT IT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Evgenevna Petrova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The trend in the development of modern medicine is the use of telecommunications and electronic (computer technologies. The aim of the study was to investigate the views of the higher medical school students on the prevalence and acceptability of different methods of pedagogical influence and control of educational activities of using traditional and computer technologies. According to the methodological principles of quantitative sociology in order to obtain standardized and comparable assessments, ensuring anonymity of the responses, the authors conducted a survey involving students of the pediatric and general medicine faculties of the Ural State Medical Academy, USMA (n = 625 in October 2012.The authors found that students actively accepted new educational technologies, preferring to use a differentiated approach to learning and problem-solving tasks, demonstrating the high level of testing as an effective tool for monitoring training activities. At the same time to obtain more objective data it is necessary to know teachers’ motivation, and barriers between new and "old" technologies.

  15. Emotional Intelligence and Medical Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that IQ alone does not contribute to the professional success of medical professionals. Professionals who are trained to be clinically competent, but have inadequate social skills for practice have proved to be less successful in their profession. Emotional intelligence (EI), which has already proved to be a key attribute for…

  16. Psychological Health of First-Year Health Professional Students in a Medical University in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadayam G Gomathi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the psychological health of first-year health professional students and to study sources of student stress. Methods: All first-year students (N = 125 of the Gulf Medical University (GMU in Ajman, United Arab Emirates (UAE, were invited to participate in a voluntary, anonymous, self-administered, questionnaire-based survey in January 2011. Psychological health was assessed using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. A 24-item questionnaire, with items related to academic, psychosocial and health domains was used to identify sources of stress. Pearson’s chi-squared test and the Mann-Whitney U-test were used for testing the association between psychological morbidity and sources of stress. Results: A total of 112 students (89.6% completed the survey and the overall prevalence of psychological morbidity was found to be 33.6%. The main academic-related sources of stress were ‘frequency of exams’, ‘academic workload’, and ‘time management’. Major psychosocial stressors were ‘worries regarding future’, ‘high parental expectations’, ‘anxiety’, and ‘dealing with members of the opposite sex’. Health-related issues were ‘irregular eating habits’, ‘lack of exercise’, and ‘sleep-related problems’. Psychological morbidity was not significantly associated with any of the demographic factors studied. However, total stress scores and academics-related domain scores were significantly associated with psychological morbidity. Conclusion: Psychological morbidity was seen in one in three first-year students attending GMU. While worries regarding the future and parental expectations were sources of stress for many students, psychological morbidity was found to be significantly associated with only the total stress and the academic-related domain scores.

  17. Building Research Capacity of Medical Students and Health Professionals in Rural Communities: Leveraging a Rural Clinical School's Resources to Conduct Research Skills Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, Kaye E.; Moffatt, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    The paper reports on a project where the objective was for the Rural Clinical School, The University of Queensland, Australia, to design an acceptable model of research skills workshops for medical students and rural health professionals. Eight, interactive research skills workshops focused on skill development were conducted in rural Queensland,…

  18. Professional-cultural humanitarian values and psychology-pedagogical support of their development in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veretelnikova Y.Y.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data of the experimental model of the psychology-pedagogical conditions providing the effectiveness of the professional-cultural humanitarian values' development in future doctors within the course of foreign language

  19. Willingness to work in rural areas and the role of intrinsic versus extrinsic professional motivations - a survey of medical students in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzodzomenyo Mawuli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retaining health workers in rural areas is challenging for a number of reasons, ranging from personal preferences to difficult work conditions and low remuneration. This paper assesses the influence of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation on willingness to accept postings to deprived areas among medical students in Ghana. Methods A computer-based survey involving 302 fourth year medical students was conducted from May-August 2009. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between students' willingness to accept rural postings and their professional motivations, rural exposure and family parental professional and educational status (PPES. Results Over 85% of students were born in urban areas and 57% came from affluent backgrounds. Nearly two-thirds of students reported strong intrinsic motivation to study medicine. After controlling for demographic characteristics and rural exposure, motivational factors did not influence willingness to practice in rural areas. High family PPES was consistently associated with lower willingness to work in rural areas. Conclusions Although most Ghanaian medical students are motivated to study medicine by the desire to help others, this does not translate into willingness to work in rural areas. Efforts should be made to build on intrinsic motivation during medical training and in designing rural postings, as well as favour lower PPES students for admission.

  20. El profesionalismo médico / Medical professionalism

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    José Félix, Patiño Restrepo.

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available La ética y el profesionalismo constituyen el fundamento de la actividad de la medicina, que es una empresa intensamente moral. El profesionalismo no es sólo la base del contrato social de la medicina, sino, principalmente, una fuerza estructuralmente estabilizadora y moralmente protectora de la soci [...] edad. Un profesional es la persona que se ubica en una de las disciplinas eruditas y que actúa observando los estándares técnicos, éticos y deontológicos de una profesión. El concepto de profesionalismo incluye cuatro componentes fundamentales: 1) conocimiento especializado; 2) autonomía en la toma de decisiones; 3) compromiso de servicio a la sociedad; 4) autorregulación. La transformación corporativa de los sistemas de salud que ha ocurrido principalmente en Colombia y en los Estados Unidos constituye una amenaza de destrucción del profesionalismo médico. Es el fenómeno, ya declarado como una ominosa incipiente realidad, de la desprofesionalización de la medicina, que pasaría de ser una noble profesión a convertirse en un simple oficio al servicio de los intereses corporativos. Como reacción se ha conformado un movimiento médico global, el Medical Professionalism Project que pretende el fortalecimiento del profesionalismo en el nuevo milenio a través de la implementación de tres principios y diez responsabilidades profesionales fundamentales. Abstract in english Medicine is an intensely moral endeavor and its practice is based on ethics and professionalism. The social contract of medicine rests on professionalism, but, furthermore, professionalism is both a stablilizing and a morally protective force in society. A professional is the person that engages in [...] one of the learned professions and is characterized by conforming to the technical and ethical standards of a profession. The concept of professionalism incorporates four components: 1) specialized knowledge; 2) autonomy for decision-making processes; 3) commitment of service to society; 4) auto-regulation. The corporate transformation of health care services that takes place mainly in Colombia and the USA, is threatening to destroy medical professionalism. There is a widespread accepted although incipient, ominous social phenomenon: the deprofessionalization of medicine, the transformation of a noble profession into a simple trade to serve corporate interests. But there is global reaction intending to strengthen medical professionalism in the new millennium, and the Medical Professionalism Project has been launched as an international effort with a charter consisting of three principles and 10 commitments.

  1. Comparison of peer-led versus professional-led training in basic life support for medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara T.; Nishimura M.; Honda R.; Nishiyama T; Nomoto M; Kobayashi N; Ikeda M

    2011-01-01

    Takashi Fujiwara1, Mai Nishimura2, Ryoko Honda3, Takashi Nishiyama4, Masahiro Nomoto5, Naoto Kobayashi6, Masayuki Ikeda71Division of Educational Training, Kurashiki Central Hospital, Kurashiki, Japan, 2Sixth-year medical student, 3Department of Anaesthesiology and Resuscitology, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, 5Department of Therapeutics, 6Medical Education Center, Ehime University School of Medicine, Ehime, Japan, 7Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University School of Medi...

  2. Medical professionalism: an experimental look at physicians’ Facebook profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph W. Clyde; Domenech Rodríguez, Melanie M.; Christian Geiser

    2014-01-01

    Background: Use of social networking services (SNS) is on the rise. While many users sign in for personal purposes, it is not uncommon for professionals to connect over SNSs with clients, students, and patients. Methods: The present study used an experimental approach to examine how medical doctors’ SNS profiles impacted potential patients’ impressions of professionalism. Participants (N=250 students) were randomly assigned to view one of six Facebook profiles. Profiles were populated with 1)...

  3. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology, and nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard, Kitt

    Background: Welfare technology is considered to be cost effective and to promote consistent quality in health care (1, 2). Due to the pervasive deployment of telemedicine and the political focus thereon, it is very important that health professional students gain an understanding of its benefits and limitations and that they develop competences related to telemedicine practices. Because close interprofessional and intersectoral cooperation is required in the care and treatment of patients by the use of telemedicine, development of telemedicine competences must take place in an inter-professional context. Aims: The purpose of the project was • to develop practice oriented competences related to telemedicine in an inter-professional and a cross-sectoral context among health professional students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology-, and nursing education. • to motivate and retain male students by the use of simulation training that involves technology. Methodology:The project was settled as a cross-professional telemedicine course on health educations. Nursing students (N=20) and physiotherapy students (N=34) participated actively and the scenarios were filmed and enacted via Adobe Connect. Students were divided into groups, and some students acted health professionals, while others acted patients. Excerpts of the recordings were analyzed and discussed with a focus on successful telemedical care and treatments well as challenges and they were followed by evaluation and qualitative interviews. Recordings, field notes, memos and observations of students and lecturers were used as empirical material for follow-up research. Data were analyzed in order to categorize the theoretical perspectives relating to learning and motivation. Results: Evaluations and follow-up research showed that students developed competences equivalent to novice level through simulation training (3). The project gave rise to wide project on Occupational Therapy education and medical laboratory technology education too. Follow-up research concludes that the boys who participated in the project responded positively to simulation training, as many of the girls did. Further results and perspectives will be presented at the conference. References: 1. Accelerating innovation: the power of the crowd. Global lessons in e-Health implementation d Documents/e-health-implementation Case study: UK Department of Health: Whole System Demonstrator program 2. Danske Regioner, Kommunernes Landsforening, Ministeriet for Sundhed og Forebyggelse, Social- og Integrationsministeriet, Erhvervs- og Vækstministeriet, Økonomi- og Indenrigsministeriet & Finansministeriet (2012): National handlingsplan for udbredelse af telemedicin, Fonden for Velfærdsteknologi 3. Nortvig, Anne-Mette et. Eriksen, Kathrine Krageskov. Teknologistøttet simulationsundervisning som translokation for teoretisk viden og praktisk handlen. Læring & Medier (LOM) – nr. 11 – 2013. ISSN: 1903-248X 4. Murray C, Grant MJ, Howarth ML, Leigh J.The use of simulation as a teaching and learning approach to support practice learning. Nurse Education in Practice 2008;8[1]:5-8. 5. Watson K, Wright A, Morris N, McMeeken J, Rivett D, Blackstock F, et al. Can simulation replace part of clinical time? Two parallel randomised controlled trials. Med Educ 2012;46[7]:657-667 6. Dieckmann P, Friis SM, Lippert A, Østergaard D. Goals, Success Factors, and Barriers for Simulation-Based Learning A Qualitative Interview Study in Health Care. Simulation & Gaming 2012;43[5]:627-647. 7. Dreyfus, Stuart E.; Dreyfus, Hubert L. (February 1980). A Five-Stage Model of the Mental Activities Involved in Directed Skill Acquisition. Washington, DC: Storming Media. Retrieved June 13, 2010.

  4. A graduação médica e a prática profissional na perspectiva de discentes / Undergraduate medical education and professional practice from a student's perspective

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Marcos Augusto, Filisbino; Vardeli Alves de, Moraes.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudo transversal quantitativo descritivo observacional, realizado com discentes do internato da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Goiás. OBJETIVOS: Conhecer a expectativa de prática profissional de discentes do internato e observar possíveis dissonâncias em relação ao perfil do disc [...] ente preconizado pelas Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais e projeto político-pedagógico da instituição. METODOLOGIA: Foi utilizado um questionário distribuído aos 222 discentes do internato da instituição no ano de 2012. A amostra consta de 190 discentes, que correspondem a 85% do universo de análise. A significância estatística foi calculada pelo Teste do Sinal. RESULTADOS: O perfil sociodemográfico caracteriza discentes com idade média de 23,8 anos, solteiros, sendo que 66% pertencem às classes sociais A e B. O ideal do perfil de prática profissional demonstra que 84% pretendem ser especialistas, 96% desejam cursar residência médica, sendo estatisticamente significante (p = 0,0001), e 70% não pretendem, a priori, trabalhar na Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF) (p = 0,005). CONCLUSÃO: O estudo demonstra discentes com perfil socioeconômico elevado, que pretendem ser especialistas, cursar residência médica e não veem a ESF como uma meta-fim. Abstract in english INTRODUCTION: The aim of this research is to identify, in terms of professional practice, the ideal internship students in the Medical School of the Federal University of Goiás (UFG) and to observe possible dissonances in relation to the graduate profile as advocated by the National Curriculum Guide [...] lines and by the Political Pedagogical Project of this institution. METHODS: In 2012, two hundred and twenty-two medical internship students of the institution received a survey questionnaire. The sample of this research consisted of one hundred and ninety research subjects, representing 85% of the sample universe. The statistical significance was calculated using the Sign Test. RESULTS: The socio-demographic profile characterizes the students with an average age of 23.8 years old, unmarried, 66% of whom belong to social classes A and B. The ideal profile of professional practice shows that 84% want to become specialists, whereas 96% want to engage in medical residency, which is statistically significant (p = 0.0001), and 70% do not intend to work with Family Health Strategy Programs (p = 0.005). CONCLUSION: This study shows that students with high socio-economic profile, who want to become specialists, undergo a medical residency program and do not see the Family Health Strategy as a professional goal.

  5. Toward a normative definition of medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, H M

    2000-06-01

    In recent years, professionalism in medicine has gained increasing attention. Many have called for a return to medical professionalism as a way to respond to the corporate transformation of the U.S. health care system. Yet there is no common understanding of what is meant by the word professionalism. To encourage dialog and to arrive eventually at some consensus, one needs a normative definition. The author proposes such a definition and asserts that the concept of medical professionalism must be grounded both in the nature of a profession and in the nature of physicians' work. Attributes of medical professionalism reflect societal expectations as they relate to physicians' responsibilities, not only to individual patients but to wider communities as well. The author identifies nine behaviors that constitute medical professionalism and that physicians must exhibit if they are to meet their obligations to their patients, their communities, and their profession. (For example, "Physicians subordinate their own interests to the interests of others.") He argues that physicians must fully comprehend what medical professionalism entails. Serious negative consequences will ensue if physicians cease to exemplify the behaviors that constitute medical professionalism and hence abrogate their responsibilities both to their patients and to their chosen calling. PMID:10875505

  6. 78 FR 18990 - Medical Professionals Recruitment and Continuing Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Medical Professionals Recruitment and Continuing Education Programs... cooperative agreement applications for support for medical professionals' recruitment and continuing education... cooperative agreement is to enhance medical professional recruitment and continuing education...

  7. Medical professionalism: an experimental look at physicians’ Facebook profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph W. Clyde

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of social networking services (SNS is on the rise. While many users sign in for personal purposes, it is not uncommon for professionals to connect over SNSs with clients, students, and patients. Methods: The present study used an experimental approach to examine how medical doctors’ SNS profiles impacted potential patients’ impressions of professionalism. Participants (N=250 students were randomly assigned to view one of six Facebook profiles. Profiles were populated with 1 solely professional material, 2 personal material that was strictly healthy, or 3 personal material that included unhealthy behavior. Profiles portrayed a male or female physician resulting in a total of six experimental conditions. Medical professionalism was measured with the First Impressions of Medical Professionalism (FIMP scale, specifically developed for this study. Results: There was a large and statistically significant main effect for profile type, F(2, 250=54.77, p<0.001, ?p2=0.31. Post hoc tests indicated that personal profiles that contained healthy behavior were rated as most professional followed by profiles with strictly professional content. Personal unhealthy profiles were rated as least professional. Additionally, female profiles consistently received higher professionalism ratings across all three profile types [F(1, 250=5.04, p=0.026, ?p2=0.02]. Conclusion: Our results suggest that a physician's SNS profile affects a patient's perception of that physician's medical professionalism. A personal, healthy profile may augment a patient's perception of that physician's character virtues if the profile content upholds the decorum of the medical field.

  8. TO STUDY THE KNOWLEDGE ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF THE PHARMACOVIGILANCE AMONG THE SECOND PROFESSIONAL MBBS STUDENTS OF THE J. N . INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, IMPHAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oinam Joychandra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim and object of the present study is to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of ADRs among the 2 nd professional MBBS students and also to find out the ways for implementation of Pharmacovigilance Programme of India (PvPi. MATERIAL AND METHOD : The material is the pretested questionnaire on knowledge, attitude , and practice on Pharmacovigila nce. The design of the study is cross sectional study. Percentage, proportions and means are used for descriptive statistics while the associations are calc ulated using corresponding tests for the associations . RESULTS: The knowledge of the students on Pharmacovig ilence in connection with Over t he Counter/self - medication (52%; minimum need of surveillance on marketing (74%; present surveillance on marketing as low as 60%; need of CME on ADRs along with Pharmacovigil a nce among student at least (64% as the ADRs on elderly (57%, children(58%, Pregnancy (64%. Similarly out of 24 questions on Attitude, only 7 questions on Reporting, Multi National Company, Dr ug Controller of India, Disability and Compensation are selected for statistical analysis. The percentage of the students who has heard and seen ADRs 64.5. CONCLUSION: Most of the ADRs are avoidable if there is good communication and reports which plays a pivotal role in minimizing the ADRs. Drugs must be prescribed rationally and polypharmacy should be avoided as much as possible. To avoid the iatrogenic diseases, Pharm acovigilance is a matter of great concern for the health care providers and for the general mass too.

  9. Expectativas de los estudiantes de medicina de la Universidad de Buenos Aires sobre su práctica profesional Medical students' attitudes regarding professional practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl A. Borracci

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aunque la elección de la carrera de medicina por los jóvenes implica algún grado de conocimiento de las condiciones laborales actuales del médico, las expectativas de los estudiantes de medicina con respecto a su práctica profesional futura rara vez han sido estudiadas en la Argentina. El objetivo fue recabar información sobre las expectativas que tienen los estudiantes de medicina próximos a graduarse, con respecto a su práctica profesional futura. Entre septiembre y diciembre de 2008 se encuestaron 125 estudiantes que cursaban el Internado Anual Rotatorio. Por medio de una encuesta anónima se recolectó información sobre las expectativas que tenían con respecto a su futura práctica profesional. Respondieron la encuesta 82.4% (103/125 de los encuestados. El 98.0% (101/103 expresó que deseaba ingresar a un programa de residencias. Con respecto a la elección de la especialidad, pediatría y psiquiatría fueron preferentes entre las mujeres (27% vs. 8%, p = 0.029 y 27% vs. 3%, p = 0.004, mientras que traumatología fue preponderante entre los varones (18% vs. 2%, p = 0.019. La mediana de ingresos esperados a 5 años fue $4.000 (mínimo: $1.500, máximo: $10.000, a 10 años $7.000 (mínimo: $3,000, máximo: $20.000 y a 20 años $10.000 (mínimo: $3 000, máximo: $30.000, según valores ajustados a diciembre de 2008 ($3.0 = US$ 1.0. En conclusión, las especialidades elegidas parecen depender del proceso de feminización de la carrera; mientras que los ingresos esperados podrían exceder la verdadera renta actual de los médicos. Se destaca la intención de participar en la docencia y el escaso interés por la investigación.Although the choice to study medicine implies some knowledge of the current working situation of practitioners, medical students' expectations regarding their future professional practice have been rarely investigated in Argentina. The aim of this work was to collect data about the expectations of senior medical students regarding their future professional practice. One hundred and twenty-five senior medical students were surveyed between September and December 2008. By using an anonymous survey, information regarding the expectations about their future professional practice was collected. The survey was answered by 82.4% (103/125 of the students and 98.0% (101/103 expressed their desire to enter a residence programme. Regarding specialty, pediatrics and psychiatry were the most chosen by women (27% vs. 8%, p=0.029 and 27% vs. 3%, p=0.004, and orthopedic surgery was the predominant choice in men (18% vs. 2%, p=0.019. Median of expected income at 5 years post graduation was $ 4.000 (minimum: $1,500, maximum: $10.000, at 10 years $7.000 (minimum: $3.000, maximum: $ 20.000 and at 20 years $10.000 (minimum: $3.000, maximum: $30 000, according to money value adjusted to December 2008 ($3.0 = US$ 1.0. In conclusion, chosen specialties seem to be dependent on the increasing number of female students, the expected income would exceed the current remuneration of physicians. Noterworthy finding out the students' willingness to be involved in teaching and the less interest in research.

  10. Evaluating professionalism in medical undergraduates using selected response questions: findings from an item response modelling study

    OpenAIRE

    McLachlan John C; Finn Gabrielle M; Tiffin Paul A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Professionalism is a difficult construct to define in medical students but aspects of this concept may be important in predicting the risk of postgraduate misconduct. For this reason attempts are being made to evaluate medical students' professionalism. This study investigated the psychometric properties of Selected Response Questions (SRQs) relating to the theme of professional conduct and ethics comparing them with two sets of control items: those testing pure knowledge ...

  11. Métodos y formas de organización en el proceso de formación profesional de los estudiantes de medicina / Methods and ways to organize the professional formation of medical students

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Norma, Santoyo Reina; Martha, Valladares Hernández; Ciro, Suárez Blanco; José G, Sanabria Negrín; Zoila C, Fernández Montequín.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available En el presente artículo se realiza una valoración del papel que juegan los métodos problémicos en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de los estudiantes de la Carrera de Medicina y por tanto en el proceso de formación profesional estrechamente vinculados con los modos de actuación más generales que [...] deben asumir los egresados en el desempeño profesional. La necesidad de acercar cada vez más el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje a la realidad cotidiana y a la solución de los problemas reales que se presentan en la sociedad, convierten a este componente didáctico en una verdadera herramienta para desarrollar el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje, a través de formas organizativas acordes a la dinámica y recursos didácticos de los tiempos actuales. Abstract in english In this article an assessment of the role of problem-solving methods in the teaching-learning process for the academic formation of medical students was conducted. Its close relation to the general ways of behaviour, which should be assumed by the health professionals in their daily working performa [...] nce, is also analyzed. The need to make a day to day approach to the teaching-learning process with the reality and the solution of the real problems in the society, and the transformation of the didactic components into a tool to develop the teaching-learning process by means of organized ways, being in harmony with the dynamics and the didactic resources of the current times.

  12. Métodos y formas de organización en el proceso de formación profesional de los estudiantes de medicina Methods and ways to organize the professional formation of medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Santoyo Reina

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available En el presente artículo se realiza una valoración del papel que juegan los métodos problémicos en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de los estudiantes de la Carrera de Medicina y por tanto en el proceso de formación profesional estrechamente vinculados con los modos de actuación más generales que deben asumir los egresados en el desempeño profesional. La necesidad de acercar cada vez más el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje a la realidad cotidiana y a la solución de los problemas reales que se presentan en la sociedad, convierten a este componente didáctico en una verdadera herramienta para desarrollar el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje, a través de formas organizativas acordes a la dinámica y recursos didácticos de los tiempos actuales.In this article an assessment of the role of problem-solving methods in the teaching-learning process for the academic formation of medical students was conducted. Its close relation to the general ways of behaviour, which should be assumed by the health professionals in their daily working performance, is also analyzed. The need to make a day to day approach to the teaching-learning process with the reality and the solution of the real problems in the society, and the transformation of the didactic components into a tool to develop the teaching-learning process by means of organized ways, being in harmony with the dynamics and the didactic resources of the current times.

  13. Growing professionalism in pharmacy students

    OpenAIRE

    Peng-Nam Yeoh

    2012-01-01

    IMU is one of 17 institutions of higherlearning conducting the Bachelor of Pharmacy coursein Malaysia. The White paper on pharmacy studentprofessionalism by the Task Force of the AmericanPharmaceutical Association Academy of Students ofPharmacy together with the American Association ofColleges of Pharmacy Council of Deans mentioned10 essential traits of a professional, recommendingtheir early development. Since the beginning of theIMU Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm) (Hons) coursein July 2004 on...

  14. [Professional medical education in Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikova, I Iu; Romantsov, M G; Shul'diakov, A A

    2013-09-01

    There is a tendency to increase the role of education process in the life of the individual, caused by necessity of new knowledge, experience and skills, which is the effective measure to adapt human being to the current social and economic conditions. The idea of education as a relatively short period of life is gone. It becomes obvious, that use of forms and types of adult education becomes limited and inefficient. The development of the modern education system involves training with a high level of independence and leadership of the individual student; provision by vocational education institutions a wide range of educational services; adequate to the needs of the labor market; variability of methods and forms of education; active use of the modern educational technology as one of the most convenient ways of training. PMID:25510102

  15. Use of Internet resources by German medical professionals.

    OpenAIRE

    Obst, O. (Oliver)

    1998-01-01

    A survey of German medical professionals, students, and librarians was performed in 1995 to examine how they used the Internet. The great majority used e-mail, the Web, and Internet sources based in the United States. Respondents claimed various advantages from Internet use. There was a clearly expressed need for Internet courses as well as evaluation and presentation of Internet sources. A majority of respondents wanted the librarians to provide Internet related services. A follow-up survey ...

  16. Should teachers of medical ethics and health professionals remain value neutral in order to respect the autonomy of students and patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøgeskov, Benjamín Olivares

    2013-09-01

    This article describes the pedagogical and ethical problems that ensue when ethical neutrality is mandated as the sole acceptable stance for teachers of ethics and health professionals (especially in public institutions). This paper argues that such a mandate can (1) violate public employees' own ethical integrity by forcing them to adopt the current legal order as their own ethical code; (2) erode trust, by requiring that the professional or teacher betray the honesty that patients and students commonly expect; and, finally, (3) undermine--by affirming that all opinions are equally acceptable--he pedagogical aim of generating critical thinking. Nevertheless, the article warns teachers and professionals against defending their own convictions by appealing to authority or the power of public office. The correct way to avoid ethical neutrality, this article asserts, is by distinguishing "opinion" from "argument": by not merely articulating, but providing convincing arguments for, one's own professional ethical opinions. PMID:24340483

  17. The training and expectations of medical students in Mozambique

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves Luzia; Adam Yussuf; Schwalbach João; Sousa Fernando; Ferrinho Paulo

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background This paper describes the socio-economic profile of medical students in the 1998/99 academic year at the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (UEM) Medical Faculty in Maputo. It aims to identify their social and geographical origins in addition to their expectations and difficulties regarding their education and professional future. Methods The data were collected through a questionnaire administered to all medical students at the faculty. Results Although most medical students we...

  18. The physically disabled medical student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiens, S

    1987-01-01

    Previous literature on physically disabled medical students is reviewed, and its implications are examined. Although they encounter significant obstacles to their acceptance into medical school due to stereotyped attitudes, environmental barriers, and recent legal decisions, these students are nevertheless applying to and successfully completing medical school. Common coping strategies for students with mobility, visual, and hearing impairments are briefly outlined. PMID:2962981

  19. Medical Informatics For Medical Students And Medical Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Jai MOHAN

    2010-01-01

    The importance of incorporating medical (or health)informatics into the education of medical students andmedical practitioners is being increasingly recognised.The advances in information and communicationtechnology and the pervasion of the Internet intoeveryday life have important implications forhealthcare services and medical education.Students and practitioners should learn to utilisebiomedical information for problem solving anddecision making based on evidence. The extensiveintroduction...

  20. The attitudes of medical students to research

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    D, Nel; R J, Burman; R, Hoffman; S, Randera-Rees.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The workforce of 'physician-scientists' is ageing and decreasing in numbers. The responsibility to combat this trend rests on future generations of healthcare professionals and it is therefore valuable to evaluate medical students' attitudes towards research. OBJECTIVE: To establish the [...] attitudes of University of Cape Town (UCT) medical students towards research and to investigate the factors influencing these attitudes. METHODS: An anonymous, cross-sectional, self-administered questionnaire was administered to medical students from years 1 to 6 studying medicine at UCT in 2011. Questions were primarily closed-ended and consisted of Likert scales. RESULTS: Out of a population of 1 195 medical students, 733 were sampled (63%); 65% were female, 53% were preclinical students (years 1 - 3) and 47% were in their clinical years (year 4 - 6). Overall, 61% of students had a positive attitude towards research and 74% felt that participation in research was important to their medical school education; 22% had been involved in voluntarily extracurricular research, 4% had presented at a scientific meeting and 3% had published in peer-reviewed journals. A number of perceived barriers to student research were identified including a lack of adequate training, time and research opportunities. CONCLUSION: Students believed that research was important and had a positive attitude towards it. However, few had been involved in voluntary research and produced work worthy of presentation and/or publication. Addressing identified barriers and improving students' attitudes may begin to reverse the trend in declining numbers of physician-scientists.

  1. Stress and mental health among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backovi? Dušan V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medical studies bring many stressful activities to students. Prolonged stress can make adverse effects to mental health and lead to further professional burnout. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the association of stress impact and adverse effects of medical studies with psychological distress among medical students. Methods. The cross sectional study was conducted on 367 fourth­year medical students of the Faculty of Medicine in Belgrade, by means of the anonymous questionnaire, containing: socio­demographic data, self­reported health status and stressful influences of studying activities. Mental health status was estimated by General Health Questionnaire (GHQ­12. Results. More than 50% of students perceive frequent feeling of psychic tension, and one third has problems with insomnia. Nearly one­half of students assessed their general stress level as moderate or high. Exams were estimated as high stressor in 63.1% of all students. Stressful effects of communication with teaching staff were reported by one quarter of the examinees. The scores of GHQ­12 were above the threshold in 55.6 % of all students. Mental health problems among students were most significantly associated with stressful experience during exams and contacts with teaching staff. Conclusion. Academic stress makes great influence on mental health of medical students. Reduction of stress effects should be directed to optimization of the examination process and improvement of communication skills. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 175078

  2. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology, and nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard, Kitt

    2014-01-01

    Background: Welfare technology is considered to be cost effective and to promote consistent quality in health care (1, 2). Due to the pervasive deployment of telemedicine and the political focus thereon, it is very important that health professional students gain an understanding of its benefits and limitations and that they develop competences related to telemedicine practices. Because close interprofessional and intersectoral cooperation is required in the care and treatment of patients by the...

  3. Medical students, medical schools and international health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Gregory J; Thompson, James E; Bourke, Victor C; Moloney, Gregory

    2007-11-01

    Over the past decade, student participation in international health has moved beyond individual elective terms in developing countries to collective responses led by student international health organisations. There are now at least 10 such organisations, with more than 500 medical students participating at a local or national level each year. Student international health organisations can deliver short- and long-term benefits to developing countries, while equipping students with skills such as leadership, teamwork and cultural sensitivity. Activities include delivery of medical equipment, fundraising, educating university communities, and acting as advocates for social justice. We believe Australian medical schools must formally incorporate international health into their curricula, drawing upon the experiences of schools in Europe and North America. PMID:17949334

  4. Influencing factors of mental health of medical students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Meng, Heng; Chen, Hui; Xu, Xin-hao; Liu, Zhuo; Luo, Ai; Feng, Zhan-chun

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the mental health status of medical students in China, and analyzed the influencing factors in order to provide evidence for mental health education for medical students. A stratified cluster sampling method was used to recruit medical students from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China. The questionnaire survey on general information and Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) were used for investigation and analysis. The results showed among the 1137 valid questionnaires, 278 (24.45%) participants had SCL-90 score ? 160. The top three mental problems of medical students were obsessive-compulsive disorder, interpersonal sensitivity and depression in terms of the factor score ? 2.5 and the number of participants who reflected on the diseases. The third-year medical students had the worst mental health status, and fifth-year medical students had the best mental health status. Students from rural area had more psychological problems than those from urban area; furthermore, students with high professional satisfaction, those who were the single child of the family, non-poor students, and those whose parents had high education level had better mental health status. It was concluded that the mental health of medical students is not optimistic in China. Medical students have some mental health problems of different degrees. Factors that influence the mental health of medical students include academic pressure, professional satisfaction level and family environment. PMID:24939314

  5. Medical students' attitudes to complementary medical therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Furnham, A.; D. Hanna; Vincent, CA

    1995-01-01

    One hundred and eighty medical students completed one of five versions of a questionnaire concerning their attitudes to five complementary therapies: acupuncture, herbalism, homoeopathy, hypnosis, and osteopathy. Very few significant statistical differences in students' attitudes to the five therapies were found, suggesting that students had similar attitudes, which were generally positive, despite the fact that they considered they knew little about the therapies. These results are discussed...

  6. Developing the "why" facet of medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Numerous articles have been published that discuss medical professionalism from the perspective of "what-to-be" and "what-to-do". In this paradigm, for doctors to effectively execute the "right" attitudes and behaviors, they must incorporate a "know-how" attitude or "reflective practice" into their professional lives. However, definitions of "what" change over time in an evolving social context. For physicians to be able to continue incorporating the right new attitudes and behaviors, they must also develop a "know-why" perspective. The health care market follows the criteria of a "market for lemons". The high degree of information asymmetry seen in health care is a strong risk factor for adverse selection, producing an excess of defective articles of commerce in the market. In this case, the processes of signaling and screening, two known solutions for adverse selection in general, cannot bridge the information gap between patients and doctors, since patients must put their lives and their privacy into doctors' hands. Professionalism, therefore, is used by doctors to win the trust of patients, their caregivers and society at large. This is the "why"-level intellect, in which the physician sets developing public trust as a goal for his own self-actualization and develops it in conjunction with altruism. This is a key to success for the physician as a doctor and as a person. PMID:18218567

  7. Attitudes to reporting medication error among differing healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Sarvadikar, Ajit; Prescott, Gordon; Williams, David

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aims Medication error reporting is an important measure to prevent medication error incidents in a healthcare system and can serve as an important tool for improving patient safety. This study aimed to investigate attitudes of healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses, and pharmacists) in reporting medication errors. Methods Fifty-six healthcare professionals working at a 900-bed tertiary referral...

  8. The Relationship between Promotions Committees' Identification of Problem Medical Students and Subsequent State Medical Board Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Sally A.; Petrusa, Emil; Gruppen, Larry D.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have found unprofessional behavior in medical school was associated with disciplinary action by state medical boards. For medical schools, promotions committees are responsible for identifying which students do not demonstrate academic performance and professional behavior acceptable for promotion and graduation. The objective of this…

  9. WORK LIFE BALANCE OF MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS; AN EXPLORATORY STUDY: WORK LIFE BALANCE OF MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitanjali Upadhaya

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to focus on the work life balance of medical practitioners. The present study tried to explore the factors responsible in maintaining work life balance for individuals associated with medical field. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine the latent factors. The findings from study revealed that significant relationship exists between the job stress and family life of an individual. This study concluded that in order to improve work life balance of medical professionals the restructuring of individual job is required.

  10. Exploring reflective 'critical incident' documentation of professionalism lapses in a medical undergraduate setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLachlan John C

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measuring professionalism in undergraduate medical students is a difficult process, and no one method has currently emerged as the definitive means of assessment in this field. Student skills in reflection have been shown to be highly important in the development of professional behaviours. By studying student reflections on lapses in professional judgement, recorded as 'critical incidents', it is possible to explore themes which are significant for the development of professional behaviour in an undergraduate setting. Methods We examined critical incident reporting combined with optional written student reflection as a method for exploring professionalism in undergraduate medical students. 228 students split between Year 1 and 2 of one academic year of undergraduate medicine were studied retrospectively and a grounded theory approach to analysis was employed. Results This year generated 16 critical incident reports and corresponding student reflections, all of which were considered. In addition to identifying the nature of the critical incidents, 3 principal themes emerged. These were the impact and consequences of the report having been made, student reactions to the events (both positive and negative, and student responses regarding future actions. Conclusion This study indicates that unprofessional behaviour can be identified and challenged by both the faculty and the students involved, and suggests that positive behavioural changes might be made with the aim of preventing future occurrences. We provide a low cost approach of measuring and recording professional behaviour.

  11. Continuing education for medical professionals: a reflective model.

    OpenAIRE

    Brigley, S.; Young, Y; Littlejohns, P.; McEwen, J

    1997-01-01

    The Royal Colleges and their Faculties have moved continuing professional development up the agenda of doctors in the UK. The low educational value and failure to change professional practice of much continuing medical education has led to criticism of its emphasis on formal, didactic teaching and academic knowledge. The ubiquitous scientific or technical bias in medical education makes questionable assumptions about the nature of professional knowledge, how professionals learn, and the linka...

  12. [Profile and professional expectations for nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonín, M; Ballester, D; Esteve, J; Guilera, A; Pérez, I; Ortega, O; Tarruella, M; Peya, M; Guitard, M L; Ricomà, R; Teixidor, M; Ubiergo, I; Valls, M; Zabalegui, A

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the profile corresponding to students enrolled in first, second and third year courses to become registered nurses in Catalonia, along with their professional and job expectations; the authors examine students' perceptions of the university environment. This information will be a great aid to, on the one hand, update the performances and initiatives taken by those responsible for nursing schools, and on the other hand, to obtain a preliminary view on future nursing professionals. At the same time, this information will provide useful elements for students themselves to reflect on their studies and their future as professionals. PMID:19711701

  13. Impacto social de la telemedicina en la formación profesional de los estudiantes de ciencias médicas Social impact of telemedicine on the professional training of the medical sciences students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy María Rodríguez Beltrán

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available La educación médica y la medicina son prácticas sociales cuyos fines y medios tienen que definirse históricamente, considerando las necesidades de cada país al respecto y la reorientación didáctica que exige su desarrollo científico para que puedan determinarse, con precisión, los conocimientos requeridos para afrontar situaciones sanitarias epidemiológica y socialmente prioritarias. En este artículo se analizan algunas de las consecuencias generales relacionadas con el empleo de las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones, particularmente en la educación superior, y cómo devienen retos que deben asumir las universidades, específicamente de ciencias médicas, en la formación de sus profesionales.Medical education and medical career are social practices whose aims and resources have to be historically defined, considering the needs of each country on this respect and the didactic reorientation that demands their scientific development so that the knowledge required to face epidemiologically and socially high-priority health situations can be accurately determined. Some of the general consequences related to the use of the information and communications technologies are analyzed in this work, particularly in the higher education, and how they become challenges that should be assumed by the universities, specifically of medical sciences, in the training of their professionals.

  14. Impacto social de la telemedicina en la formación profesional de los estudiantes de ciencias médicas / Social impact of telemedicine on the professional training of the medical sciences students

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Nancy María, Rodríguez Beltrán; María Elena, Pardo Gómez; José Manuel, Izquierdo Lao.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available La educación médica y la medicina son prácticas sociales cuyos fines y medios tienen que definirse históricamente, considerando las necesidades de cada país al respecto y la reorientación didáctica que exige su desarrollo científico para que puedan determinarse, con precisión, los conocimientos requ [...] eridos para afrontar situaciones sanitarias epidemiológica y socialmente prioritarias. En este artículo se analizan algunas de las consecuencias generales relacionadas con el empleo de las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones, particularmente en la educación superior, y cómo devienen retos que deben asumir las universidades, específicamente de ciencias médicas, en la formación de sus profesionales. Abstract in english Medical education and medical career are social practices whose aims and resources have to be historically defined, considering the needs of each country on this respect and the didactic reorientation that demands their scientific development so that the knowledge required to face epidemiologically [...] and socially high-priority health situations can be accurately determined. Some of the general consequences related to the use of the information and communications technologies are analyzed in this work, particularly in the higher education, and how they become challenges that should be assumed by the universities, specifically of medical sciences, in the training of their professionals.

  15. Can Spiritual Intelligence Affect Professionalism in Medical Faculty Members?

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Karimi Moonaghi; Maryam Akbari Lakeh; Abbas Makarem; Habibolah Esmaeili

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Regarding to the importance of spiritual intelligence and professionalism in faculty development, this study aimed to determine the level of spiritual intelligence, the level of professional development and leadership, and performance of professional responsibilities as two components of professionalism, and the relationship between spiritual intelligence and professionalism.Methods: This is a correlation cross-sectional study with 160 medical faculty members as subjects, which ...

  16. Spanish adaptation of The Penn State College of Medicine Scale to assess professionalism in medical students / Adaptación al idioma español de la escala del Penn State College of Medicine para medición del profesionalismo en estudiantes de medicina

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Eliseo, Bustamante; Álvaro, Sanabria.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. El profesionalismo es un área de interés en las facultades de medicina del mundo. El uso de un cuestionario puede ser útil para evaluar el profesionalismo en Colombia. Objetivo. Adaptar la escala de profesionalismo para estudiantes de medicina del Penn State University College of Medic [...] ine al idioma español como instrumento válido para evaluarlo. Materiales y métodos. Se siguieron las guías para adaptación de instrumentos del proyecto IQOLA, realizando traducción y traducción inversa, así como una prueba piloto y una evaluación de las características psicométricas en 250 estudiantes. Se evaluó la correlación entre ítems y escala y la validez interna con el alfa de Chronbach y se hizo un análisis factorial de componentes principales. Resultados. El alfa de Cronbach global fue de 0,86, la medida de Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin fue de 0,83 y el test de esfericidad de Bartlett tuvo un valor de p>0,00001. Se encontraron seis factores que explicaron 93 % de la varianza total y cuatro nuevos factores que emergieron del análisis factorial. Ocho ítems tuvieron alta singularidad. Conclusión. La escala del Penn State University College of Medicine mide con buen nivel de confiabilidad las actitudes hacia el profesionalismo en los estudiantes de medicina. No obstante, la estructura de la escala mostró diferencias al ser validada en estudiantes latinoamericanos. Abstract in english Introduction: Professionalism is a subject of interest in medical schools around the world. The use of a questionnaire could be useful to assess professionalism in Colombia. Objective: To adapt The Penn State University College of Medicine Professionalism Questionnaire as a culturally valid instrume [...] nt in the Spanish language. Materials and methods: We followed recommendations from the IQOLA project and used forward and back translation with four independent translations, as well as a pilot evaluation and an evaluation of psychometric features with 250 students. We evaluated item-scale correlations and internal consistency with Chronbach´s alpha test and conducted a principal components factor analysis. Results: Global Cronbach´s alpha was 0.86, the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy was 0.83, and Bartlett´s test of sphericity had a p >0.00001. We found six factors that explained 93% of the total variance and four new factors emerged in the factor analysis, while eight items had high uniqueness. Conclusion: The Penn State University College of Medicine Scale measures professionalism attitudes in medical students with good reliability. However, the structure of the scale demonstrated differences when used in the Latin American medical student population.

  17. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Medical Learners and Practicing Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Mueller

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement, good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional. Furthermore, professionalism is associated with better clinical outcomes. Hence, medical learners and practicing physicians should be taught and assessed for professionalism. A number of methods can be used to teach professionalism (e.g. didactic lectures, web-based modules, role modeling, reflection, interactive methods, etc.. Because of the nature of professionalism, no single tool for assessing it among medical learners and practicing physicians exists. Instead, multiple assessment tools must be used (e.g. multi-source feedback using 360-degree reviews, patient feedback, critical incident reports, etc.. Data should be gathered continuously throughout an individual’s career. For the individual learner or practicing physician, data generated by these tools can be used to create a “professionalism portfolio,” the totality of which represents a picture of the individual’s professionalism. This portfolio in turn can be used for formative and summative feedback. Data from professionalism assessments can also be used for developing professionalism curricula and generating research hypotheses. Health care leaders should support teaching and assessing professionalism at all levels of learning and practice and promote learning environments and institutional cultures that are consistent with professionalism precepts.

  18. Teaching and assessing professionalism in medical learners and practicing physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Paul S

    2015-04-01

    Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement), good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional. Furthermore, professionalism is associated with better clinical outcomes. Hence, medical learners and practicing physicians should be taught and assessed for professionalism. A number of methods can be used to teach professionalism (e.g. didactic lectures, web-based modules, role modeling, reflection, interactive methods, etc.). Because of the nature of professionalism, no single tool for assessing it among medical learners and practicing physicians exists. Instead, multiple assessment tools must be used (e.g. multi-source feedback using 360-degree reviews, patient feedback, critical incident reports, etc.). Data should be gathered continuously throughout an individual's career. For the individual learner or practicing physician, data generated by these tools can be used to create a "professionalism portfolio," the totality of which represents a picture of the individual's professionalism. This portfolio in turn can be used for formative and summative feedback. Data from professionalism assessments can also be used for developing professionalism curricula and generating research hypotheses. Health care leaders should support teaching and assessing professionalism at all levels of learning and practice and promote learning environments and institutional cultures that are consistent with professionalism precepts. PMID:25973263

  19. SELF-MEDICATION IN MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuj Jain

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-medication is consumption of medicinal products for treating diseases without a prescription resulting in wastage of resources, increased drug resistance and causes health hazards. Selfmedication, often without adult guidance, has been reported to be a common practice during adolescence. Similar to other preventable health-risk behaviors initiated in early adolescence, it has become a cause for concern universally. The main problem with self medication with antimicrobials is the emergence of pathogenic resistance. Antimicrobial resistance is an existing problem world-wide, mainly in developing countries. The aim and objective of this study was to evaluate the knowledge regarding self medication among medical students of Uttar Pradesh Rural Institute Of Medical Sciences and Research, Saifai. This was a questionnaire based study of 4 months duration.

  20. Identity Development in Student Affairs Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Heather A.

    2003-01-01

    A person's identity is closely tied to what he or she does professionally. This qualitative inquiry explores the perceptions of eight student affairs practitioners in relation to the development of their professional identities. The influences of pre-graduate, graduate, and post-graduate school experiences were elicited. Implications for fostering…

  1. Mentorship for medical students : space for something else

    OpenAIRE

    Kalén, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Mentorship has been used in undergraduate medical education to support students ? learning and development. The medical education literature describes various goals for mentoring, various designs of mentoring programs, and various roles and functions of the mentor. The aim of the thesis was to deepen the understanding of the meaning of mentoring for medical students ? professional and personal development and to contribute new knowledge that will be useful when designing mentoring programs fo...

  2. STUDENTS’ OPPINION ABOUT PROFESSIONAL ETHICS RELATION OF THE TEACHERS

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Stojanovska

    2013-01-01

    Professional teacher’s ethics is a collection of moral codes of their professional work. It is significant that the teaching profession respects certain designated professional-ethical codes of conduct between the teachers and the students, with their colleagues and other people they professionally cooperate with.     This study is focused on analysis of the professional ethical relation of teachers towards students, seen from student’s point of view. These are the results of student’s report...

  3. Students friendly medical examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Chandra Chaurasia

    2014-04-01

    always a burden. The professional exams of universities are the matter of their norms and regulation, but we have day-to-day assessment through-out duration; this is enough to moralize them and prepare before final professional examination. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 412-412

  4. Medical Student Health Promotion: The Increasing Role of Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrook, Kristi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The author proposes courses of action for medical schools to increase positive health promotion among medical students. Method: This article will review the current literature on medical student health care. Strategies of action for medical schools are proposed for increasing student wellness. Results: Medical schools can positively…

  5. Patient suicide: model for medical student teaching and mourning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, D W

    1979-09-01

    The molding of the physician's role and identity takes place during crucial clinical years in medical training. This professional identity is influenced by experiences and models. The suicide of a medical student's patient provides a natural experiment for observing and working with important aspects of the developmental process of physicians in integrating the affective component of clinical work and learning. The facilitation of grief and mourning in a medical student and his five colleagues assigned to the same outpatient psychiatric rotation are important aspects of the clinical, educational, and professional developmental issues raised by the patient's death. PMID:499794

  6. Medical students in general practice: students' learning experiences and perspectives from supervisors and patients

    OpenAIRE

    Haffling, Ann-Christin

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades considerably more of medical students’ clinical training has shifted into general practice. The aim of this thesis was to study medical students’ learning experiences in general practice, work-based assessment, and the perspectives of GP supervisors and patients. Results Senior students’ learning in a portfolio pilot was mainly on patient-centred communication, clinical reasoning and professional development. Junior students appreciated contact with good rol...

  7. Passionate Virtue: Conceptions of Medical Professionalism in Popular Romance Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Medical romance fiction is a subgenre of popular romance fiction that features medical professionals in their work environment. This essay explores the way professionalism is portrayed in popular medical romance fiction written during the early twenty-first century, a period of significant disruption in both the public image and self-understanding of organized medicine. I analyze a selection of contemporary medical romance novels, published between 2008 and 2012, demonstrating that medical romance fiction is a form of public intervention in apparently insular debates over medical professionalism. I conclude that they promote "nostalgic professionalism," a vision of physicians as a select group of highly educated, self-regulated experts who provide, with a caring and altruistic attitude, a vitally important service to society, while at the same time generating implicit critiques of it. PMID:26095841

  8. Teaching recovery to medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Feeney, Larkin

    2013-03-01

    Community mental health services are evolving toward more holistic, patient-centered, recovery-based practices. This change necessitates an attitudinal shift from mental health workers, and training in recovery principles is helpful in achieving this change. Medical students often have narrow, doctor-centered concepts of mental health care. Traditional clinical placements in psychiatry do little to address this. We evaluated a recovery-focused teaching program for medical students in psychiatry.

  9. Medical Informatics For Medical Students And Medical Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai MOHAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of incorporating medical (or healthinformatics into the education of medical students andmedical practitioners is being increasingly recognised.The advances in information and communicationtechnology and the pervasion of the Internet intoeveryday life have important implications forhealthcare services and medical education.Students and practitioners should learn to utilisebiomedical information for problem solving anddecision making based on evidence. The extensiveintroduction of electronic health information systemsinto hospitals and clinics and at the enterprise level inMalaysia and elsewhere is driving a demand for healthprofessionals who have at least basic skills in andappreciation of the use of these technologies.The essential clinical informatics skills have beenidentified and should be incorporated into theundergraduate medical curriculum. It is recommendedthat these be introduced in stages and integrated intoexisting programmes rather than taught as a separatemodule. At the same time, medical schools shouldsupport the integration of e-learning in the educationalprocess in view of the numerous potential benefits.

  10. Using gross anatomy to teach and assess professionalism in the first year of medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, William J

    2006-07-01

    The public is uneasy about the lack of professionalism in physicians chronicled in the different news media. Since professionalism is a set of values developed over a period of time, it is imperative that the evaluation of medical students in regard to these values begins early in their medical school education. In the Gross Anatomy laboratory there are opportunities for students to display such aspects of professionalism as responsibility/accountability for actions, working with others (teamwork), respect for patients, and social responsibility. Because students spend a significant time in the Gross Anatomy laboratory with the faculty, this setting can provide the forum for faculty to assess the expression of principles of professionalism by the students. This requires faculty who are committed to evaluating the progress of students in this regard. Faculty can monitor work ethic, interpersonal relationships, and overall attitude of these students throughout the course. Thus, aspects of professionalism can be introduced, monitored, and evaluated as early as the first semester of medical school. PMID:16683238

  11. Die angestrebte oder befürchtete berufliche Zukunft von Wittener Medizinstudierenden [The aimed or feared professional future of medical students at the Univesity of Witten/Herdecke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zupanic, Michaela

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] The current challenges of educational policy seem to be associated to changes of the health care system, to counteract concerns regarding the lack of physicians, supply shortage and migration of specialists. Therefore, expectations, wishes and concerns relevant to the anticipated everyday life as a physician of medical students at the Witten/Herdecke University (UWH were acquired with an online questionnaire. Useful for a direct comparison the results of the online survey ‘Medical Study and Future’ throughout Germany have been used. Findings from this survey are common characteristics regarding the choice of the profession and planning of an establishment as a general practitioner and clear differences in reflecting on future issues in the occupational field.[german] Die aktuellen bildungspolitischen Herausforderungen scheinen sich als direkte Reaktion auf Änderungen im Gesundheitssystem zu manifestieren, um den Befürchtungen von Ärztemangel, Versorgungsengpass und Abwanderung von qualifizierten Fachärzten entgegen zu wirken. Deshalb wurden mit einer Online-Befragung die Erwartungen, Wünsche und Befürchtungen von Wittener Medizinstudierenden bzgl. des antizipierten beruflichen Alltags als Ärztin oder Arzt erfasst. Zum direkten Vergleich standen die Ergebnisse einer bundesweiten Online-Umfrage zur Zukunft von Medizinstudierenden zur Verfügung. Dabei zeigen sich Gemeinsamkeiten zwischen den beiden Gruppen bzgl. der angestrebten Fachrichtung und der Planung einer Niederlassung, aber auch deutliche Unterschiede in der Einschätzung zukünftiger beruflicher Problemfelder.

  12. The Differential Impact of Various Assessment Parameters on the Medical Students Performance in the Professional Anatomy Examination in a New Medical School El Impacto Diferencial de Varios Parámetros de Evaluación del Desempeño de Estudiantes de Medicina en el Examen Profesional de Anatomía en una Nueva Escuela de Medicina

    OpenAIRE

    L.A.J. Shittu; Zachariah, M.P.; Izegbu, M.C.; O. A. Adesanya; Ashiru, O.A.

    2006-01-01

    There is a dearth of knowledge on the level of agreement between all the various assessment tasks on the same content area, in order to test this hypothesis we adopted the concept of convergent validity and also to isolate area of academic weakness among the students and to readjust the curriculum content to balance the weakness. A blinded cohort retrospective study was carried out on a total of sixty-six third year medical students who had sat for their first professional examination in anat...

  13. Student Affairs Capitalism and Early-Career Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jenny J.; Helm, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This study explores student affairs capitalism as the alteration of professional practice towards the financial interests of institutions. Student affairs capitalism has the potential to create dynamics in which the interests of students become secondary to the institution's economic needs. This study examined this phenomenon from the…

  14. Evaluating professionalism in medical undergraduates using selected response questions: findings from an item response modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLachlan John C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Professionalism is a difficult construct to define in medical students but aspects of this concept may be important in predicting the risk of postgraduate misconduct. For this reason attempts are being made to evaluate medical students' professionalism. This study investigated the psychometric properties of Selected Response Questions (SRQs relating to the theme of professional conduct and ethics comparing them with two sets of control items: those testing pure knowledge of anatomy, and; items evaluating the ability to integrate and apply knowledge ("skills". The performance of students on the SRQs was also compared with two external measures estimating aspects of professionalism in students; peer ratings of professionalism and their Conscientiousness Index, an objective measure of behaviours at medical school. Methods Item Response Theory (IRT was used to analyse both question and student performance for SRQs relating to knowledge of professionalism, pure anatomy and skills. The relative difficulties, discrimination and 'guessabilities' of each theme of question were compared with each other using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Student performance on each topic was compared with the measures of conscientiousness and professionalism using parametric and non-parametric tests as appropriate. A post-hoc analysis of power for the IRT modelling was conducted using a Monte Carlo simulation. Results Professionalism items were less difficult compared to the anatomy and skills SRQs, poorer at discriminating between candidates and more erratically answered when compared to anatomy questions. Moreover professionalism item performance was uncorrelated with the standardised Conscientiousness Index scores (rho = 0.009, p = 0.90. In contrast there were modest but significant correlations between standardised Conscientiousness Index scores and performance at anatomy items (rho = 0.20, p = 0.006 though not skills (rho = .11, p = .1. Likewise, students with high peer ratings for professionalism had superior performance on anatomy SRQs but not professionalism themed questions. A trend of borderline significance (p = .07 was observed for performance on skills SRQs and professionalism nomination status. Conclusions SRQs related to professionalism are likely to have relatively poor psychometric properties and lack associations with other constructs associated with undergraduate professional behaviour. The findings suggest that such questions should not be included in undergraduate examinations and may raise issues with the introduction of Situational Judgement Tests into Foundation Years selection.

  15. Knowledge and Attitudes about Organ Donation Among Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    N. Bilgel; G. Sadikoglu; H. Bilgel

    2006-01-01

    In almost every country, the organ supply for transplantation does not match the increasing demand; health professionals may play an important role in eliminating barriers and increasing organ donation. Therefore, assessing medical students’ knowledge and attitudes regarding organ donation is important for the future organ supply. Some 409 of 508 first- and second-year medical students answered an anonymous, multiple-choice questionnaire about demographic variables, knowledge about transplant...

  16. Do students learn to be more conscientious at medical school?

    OpenAIRE

    Chaytor Andrew T; Spence Jacqueline; Armstrong Ann; McLachlan John C

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Professionalism in medical students is not only difficult to define but difficult to teach and measure. As negative behaviour in medical students is associated with post-graduate disciplinary action it would be useful to have a model whereby unprofessional behaviour at the undergraduate level can easily be identified to permit appropriate intervention. We have previously developed a scalar measure of conscientiousness, the Conscientiousness Index (CI), which positively cor...

  17. [Good death: euthanasia in the eyes of medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku?e, Josef; Va?harová, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Both in the general public and in the professional communities, very diverse notions of euthanasia can be found. At the same time determining of the precise semantics of euthanasia is one of the crucial prerequisites for subsequent meaningful ethical discussion of euthanasia. The paper analyzes an empirical study investigating the understanding of euthanasia by medical students. The aim of the conducted research was to identify the semantic definitions of euthanasia used by the first-year medical students. PMID:24968293

  18. Acciones metodológicas para incentivar el uso del inglés en estudiantes y profesionales de ciencias médicas / Methodological actions to incentivate the use of the English language in medical sciences students and professionals

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Adela, Quesada Lima; Elizabeth, Finalet Marrero; Uvaldo, Recino Pineda; Yagima, Fleites García.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento: la enseñanza del inglés ha enfatizado en la importancia de conocer este idioma desde diferentes perspectivas; su dominio es requisito indispensable para el éxito en diversos ámbitos profesionales y académicos. Objetivo: elaborar acciones metodológicas para incentivar el uso del idioma in [...] glés en estudiantes y profesionales de las ciencias médicas. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo transversal en la Filial Universitaria "Lidia Doce Sánchez" de Sagua la Grande, Villa Clara, en el curso escolar 2012-2013. Se utilizaron métodos teóricos: análisis-síntesis, inductivo-deductivo; empíricos: análisis documental y encuesta en forma de cuestionario a estudiantes y de entrevista a los profesionales y el criterio de especialistas para la valoración de la propuesta. Resultados: los instrumentos aplicados demostraron insuficiencias en el tratamiento metodológico y carencias de conocimientos del idioma en los profesores de las asignaturas participantes para lograr la adecuada implementación de la estrategia curricular de inglés en cada carrera, y la innegable afirmación de que este idioma constituye una necesidad en los profesionales de las ciencias médicas del territorio. Se elaboraron acciones metodológicas. Conclusión: las acciones metodológicas fueron valoradas por especialistas como pertinentes, son factibles de aplicar por la disponibilidad de recursos humanos y materiales para llevarlas a vías de hecho y tienen calidad científico pedagógica para su implementación. Abstract in english Background: the teaching of English has emphasized the importance of knowing this language from different perspectives; its command is an indispensable requirement for the success in diverse professional and academic environments. Objective: to elaborate methodological actions to motivate the use of [...] the English language in the medical sciences students and professionals. Methods: it was carried out a cross-sectional descriptive study in "Lidia Doce Sánchez University site from" Sagua la Grande, Villa Clara, in the academic year 2012-2013. Theoretical methods were used: analysis-synthesis, inductive-deductive; empiric ones: documental analysis and an interview in questionnaire form was applied to the students and the professionals were also interviewed and the specialists´ criteria for the valuation of the proposal. Results: the applied instruments demonstrated inadequacies in the methodological treatment and lack of knowledge of the language in the participant professors of the subjects, to achieve the appropriate implementation of the English language curricular strategy in each career, and the undeniable statement that this language constitutes a necessity for the medical sciences professionals of the territory. Methodological actions were elaborated. Conclusion: the methodological actions were valued by specialists as pertinent, they are feasible to be applied for the availability of human resources and materials to put them into practice and they have pedagogic and scientific quality for their implementation.

  19. The education and training of professionals. The perspective of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics (SEFM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is twofold. First, to revise some European Communities' recommendations regarding qualification, education and training of professionals involved in ionisation radiation practices, to respond to the Directive 97/43 EURATOM. And then, as Medical Physicists are directly concerned with these practices, to describe how the Spanish Society of Medical Physics deals with the challenge of improving the competence of Medical Physicists in order to assure the best patient protection against ionisation radiation. Therefore, to achieve the first aim, the point of view of the European Federation of Organisations on Medical Physics (EFOMP) concerning the introduction of the 'Medical Physics Expert' and their guidelines for Continuous Professional Development are reviewed, as well as the point of view of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO) in professional education matters. Referring to the second aim, after succeeding in the recognition of the Medical Physics Speciality in Spain in 1997, the SEFM is now promoting the Continuous Education and Training of their specialists through its Education Committee (Comision de Docencia de la SEFM), so that they can cope with all new professional challenges. Moreover, a number of SEFM members are also involved in education matters to others professionals: Medicine students, nurses, Radiation Technologists, etc. In conclusion, the SEFM has always been aware of the importance of specialisation and continuous education of all professionals involved in radiation ionisation practices, as a way to contribute to guarantee the best radiation protection to the patients. (author)

  20. EVALUATION OF PERSONALITY TYPE OF FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Even though research in health professional education has confirmed that non - cognitive factors like personality has importance in selection , training and academic performance of the students. To prepare competent medical doctors , medical schools need to monitor and assess the students at regular intervals. Personality typing is a useful tool for counsell ing , motivation and guidance of the students and if considered while developing of course will enhance learning and improve the performance of the medical students. So it is necessary a blend of personality characteristics with the cognitive ability of learner during medical education to become a successful medical student. Aim of the present study was to assess the personality type using Myers - Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI among the first year medical students of J . N . Medical College Belgaum. METHODOLOG Y : One hundred and fifty students gave consent and enrolled in this study. Consented students were subjected to MBTI questionnaire to identify their personality type. RESULTS : MBTI questionnaire was used to identified personality type of the students , out of 150 students were 80 Extroverts (E , 70 Introverts (I , 90 Perceivers (P , 60 Judgers (J , 76 Filling , 57 sensing , 93 intuitive , 74 thinking type i e E>I , P>J , F>S and N>T. The most common personality type was ENFP (14% remaining types showed INFP (12% , INTP (9.3%. INFJ , ENFJ , ESFJ , ESFP were of equal percentage (6.7%. CONCLUSION : It has been seen that different type of personalities are found in different medical schools and health professionals and poor performance and drop out of the student occur from the course when the course structure , teaching format and personality type do not match. Hence there is a need to assess every individual’s personality type which helps in counseling and guidance to learners as a part of remedial measures especially for the low achievers to maximize the learning and students who are prone to drop out from the course in the medical school.

  1. Towards Improved Medication Use : Increasing Understanding of Professional Efforts

    OpenAIRE

    Björkman, Ingeborg

    2006-01-01

    Professionals and researchers have developed a number of strategies aimed at improving the quality and safety of medication use. However, studies continue to demonstrate persistent problems. For instance, the first paper in this thesis reveals the prevalence of potentially harmful drug combinations among elderly people in Europe. The following four papers focus on two professional groups and how they have approached safety and quality issues related to medication use: 1) the Swedish drug and ...

  2. Medical Information, Health Sciences Librarians, and Professional Liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Arthur W.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the professional liability of medical librarians and their employers in the delivery of information to physicians. Steps for librarians to take to protect themselves from professional liability and to insulate physicians and institutions from vicarious liability are suggested. (12 references) (MES)

  3. Professional usage of smart phone applications in medical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Kishan Kumar Yadalla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional use of mobile computing and communication devices such as the smartphones are increasingly becoming popular. With the advent of downloadable applications related to health and medical sciences, these are fast becoming a part of healthcare professionals. This article highlights the popular smartphone applications used among the healthcare providers and its role in revolutionizing the future of healthcare delivery system.

  4. Professional identity formation: creating a longitudinal framework through TIME (Transformation in Medical Education).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Mark D; Buck, Era; Luk, John; Ambriz, Frank; Boisaubin, Eugene V; Clark, Mark A; Mihalic, Angela P; Sadler, John Z; Sapire, Kenneth J; Spike, Jeffrey P; Vince, Alan; Dalrymple, John L

    2015-06-01

    The University of Texas System established the Transformation in Medical Education (TIME) initiative to reconfigure and shorten medical education from college matriculation through medical school graduation. One of the key changes proposed as part of the TIME initiative was to begin emphasizing professional identity formation (PIF) at the premedical level. The TIME Steering Committee appointed an interdisciplinary task force to explore the fundamentals of PIF and to formulate strategies that would help students develop their professional identity as they transform into physicians. In this article, the authors describe the task force's process for defining PIF and developing a framework, which includes 10 key aspects, 6 domains, and 30 subdomains to characterize the complexity of physician identity. The task force mapped this framework onto three developmental phases of medical education typified by the undergraduate student, the clerkship-level medical student, and the graduating medical student. The task force provided strategies for the promotion and assessment of PIF for each subdomain at each of the three phases, in addition to references and resources. Assessments were suggested for student feedback, curriculum evaluation, and theoretical development. The authors emphasize the importance of longitudinal, formative assessment using a combination of existing assessment methods. Though not unique to the medical profession, PIF is critical to the practice of exemplary medicine and the well-being of patients and physicians. PMID:25853688

  5. WICHE's PSEP: Professional Student Exchange Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) has been providing Western residents with "affordable access to the healthcare professions" for more than 55 years through its Professional Student Exchange Program (PSEP). If an individual enrolls through WICHE's PSEP, he pays reduced tuition at out-of-state public and private…

  6. Self Medication Practices among Medical Students of a Private Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Kasulkar, Arti A.; Gupta, M.

    2015-01-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate various aspects of self-medication in medical students. A prospective, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was carried out among 488 medical students selected by simple random sampling from January 2013 to June 2013. Data was collected and analyzed for counts and percentage. Students reported self-medication in the preceding one year was 71.7 % and the prevalence was more in final year students. Fever and headache were the most frequently reported i...

  7. Bullying among medical students in a Saudi medical school

    OpenAIRE

    Alzahrani Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Bullying and sexual harassment of medical students by their teachers appears to be widespread phenomenon. However, nothing is published about its prevalence in conservative countries such as Saudi Arabia. This survey aims to ascertain the extent of these mistreatments among students in a Saudi medical school. Findings A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on a group of 542 clinical years’ medical students in a Saudi medical school to explore students' percep...

  8. Medical students’ readiness to provide smoking cessation help

    OpenAIRE

    Andreeva, T.I.; Andreicheva, E.N.; Ananjeva, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the Global Health Professions Student Survey questionnaire, 770 students of Kazan Medical University, third and fifth years were surveyed. About 90% responded that health professionals should be educated to provide smoking cessation help, while one in five reported to have acquired such skills. Students were more likely to consider quit advice effective if they got classes on smoking cessation and relevant medicines. Classes just on tobacco health impact were not associated with high...

  9. Self-medication patterns among medical students in South India

    OpenAIRE

    Nitasha Bhat; Nimmy Thakolkaran; Sanjay Pattanshetty; Ashwini Kumar; Animesh Jain; Rashmi Kundapur; Sanjeev Badiger; Nowshin Ullal

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundSelf-medication results in wastage of resources, increases resistance of pathogens and generally causes serious health hazards such as adverse drug reactions, prolonged suffering and drug dependence. This study was undertaken to determine the reasons for self-medication and the pattern of self-medication among medical students.MethodThis cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at the K.S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore. The participants were medical students from first to ...

  10. Association of academic stress with sleeping difficulties in medical students of a Pakistani medical school: a cross sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Waqas, Ahmed; Khan, Spogmai; Sharif, Waqar; Khalid, Uzma; Ali, Asad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Medicine is one of the most stressful fields of education because of its highly demanding professional and academic requirements. Psychological stress, anxiety, depression and sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in medical students.

  11. Preparing for export? Medical and nursing student migration intentions post-qualification in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Gavin George; Candice Reardon

    2013-01-01

    Background: The migration of health professionals can have a profound impact on health systems around the globe. The International Organization for Migration’s (IOM) Mobility of Health Professionals Research Project (MoHProf) aimed to improve knowledge about the migration of healthcare professionals and understand migration intentions and factorsinfluencing the migration of medical and nursing students.Objectives: The study aimed to determine the proportion of nursing and medical students who...

  12. The relationship between promotions committees' identification of problem medical students and subsequent state medical board actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Sally A; Petrusa, Emil; Gruppen, Larry D

    2015-05-01

    Studies have found unprofessional behavior in medical school was associated with disciplinary action by state medical boards. For medical schools, promotions committees are responsible for identifying which students do not demonstrate academic performance and professional behavior acceptable for promotion and graduation. The objective of this study was to determine if student identification by promotions committees during medical school was associated with disciplinary actions by state medical boards later in practice. We reviewed 20 years of promotions committees' records from a single institution and noted students identified by promotions committees for performance or behavioral issues. These were compared with disciplinary action reports from the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) for graduates. Over the two decades, 2,131 students matriculated and 2,078 of these graduated. The promotions committees identified 140 students for poor academic performance or behavioral problems (140/2,078, 6.7 %). Of these, 108 students graduated. FSMB records showed 29 of the 2,078 graduates had sanctions by state boards (29/2,078, 1.4 %). Only four students that had actions by state medical boards were among the 108 graduated students identified by medical school promotions committees (4/108, 3.7 %). Of the students not identified by promotions committees, 25 eventually had disciplinary actions (25/1,970, 1.3 %). The odds of having state medical board action if identified by promotions committees was 3.0 (CI 1.02-8.8, p students by medical school promotions committees was later associated with state medical board actions. However, most graduates with state medical board actions were not identified by medical school promotions committees. PMID:25134665

  13. Self?medication patterns among medical students in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitasha Bhat

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSelf-medication results in wastage of resources, increases resistance of pathogens and generally causes serious health hazards such as adverse drug reactions, prolonged suffering and drug dependence. This study was undertaken to determine the reasons for self-medication and the pattern of self-medication among medical students.MethodThis cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at the K.S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore. The participants were medical students from first to final year. Medical students were selected through convenience sampling. The data was collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire. The data was analysed using SPSS version 16 and the results expressed as proportions.ResultsA total of 200 students, 121 (60.5% female and 79 (39.5% male, were included in the study. Of the medical students surveyed, self-medication was reported among 92%. The respondents who used self-medication found it to be time-saving in providing relief from minor ailments. The most common ailments for which self-medication were used were: the common cold (69%, fever (63% and headache (60%. The students consulted their textbooks (39% and seniors or classmates (38% for the medications. Antipyretics (71%, analgesics (65%, antihistamines (37% and antibiotics (34% were the most common self-medicated drugs. Of the respondents, 33% were unaware of the adverse effects of the medication and 5% had experienced adverse reactions. The majority (64% of students advised medications to others, more often to family and friends.ConclusionThe prevalence of self-medication among medical students is high, facilitated by the easy availability of drugs and information from textbooks or seniors. A significant number of students are unaware of the adverse effects of the medication that they themselves take and suggest to others. Therefore, potential problems of self-medication should be emphasised to the students.

  14. The impact of social media and technology on professionalism in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essary, Alison C

    2011-01-01

    The use of social media is the norm among the digital native generation, with 75% of the Millennial Generation connected through Facebook. For students in medical education who struggle to distinguish between personal and professional boundaries, social media provides yet another challenge. Incidents of unprofessional conduct and academic dismissal have been reported. Administration, faculty, and students would benefit from clear policies and procedures, case scenarios of social media violations, and suggestions for using social media wisely. PMID:22308935

  15. Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Burgoyne, Louise N.; Siun O'Flynn; Geraldine B. Boylan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a) gauge students’ awareness of research activities, (b) compare students’ perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c) determine students’ motivation for research and (d) obtain students’ personal views on doing research. Methods: Undergraduate medical students (N=317) completed a research skills questionnaire develo...

  16. Implementation of different initiatives to develop a culture of professionalism in the medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Enith; Correa, Ramonita

    2009-06-01

    Different initiatives have been implemented in the Professionalism Program of the San Juan Bautista School of Medicine to develop in the students a culture of professionalism and to promote moral, ethical, altruistic, and humanistic values. The Program was incorporated into the curriculum with the fusion of medical ethics, public health, legal medicine, and the history of medicine. The principal objective of the present study is to evaluate the implemented initiatives of the Professionalism Program which begins during the first year with the White Coat Ceremony, and culminates at graduation with a Humana Award given to the graduate that develops the highest degree of professionalism. The implemented initiatives were evaluated with a final written exam, and an assessment using an anonymous questionnaire. The median course grades for first and second year students were 92 and 94 percent respectively. In terms of the assessment, both groups in medical ethics demonstrated that they had acquired 92 percent of the competencies. The topics discussed in public health helped both groups to see the patients as a biopsychosocial entity; in legal medicine the first year group acquired 95% of competencies, while the second year achieved only 76 percent; regarding history of medicine both groups agreed that it is relevant in their career. Based on the results of the assessment, and grades obtained through written examination and other evaluation tools, it can be concluded that the initiatives of the Professionalism Program have been beneficial to the students in developing a culture of professionalism. PMID:19530555

  17. Self-medication in health students from two Brazilian universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delprina de G. Rocha de Carvalho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Self medication is a component of self care and it is considered as primary public health resource in health care system. It can be defined as use of non-prescription medicines by people on their own initiative. Dentists, together with doctors and veterinarians, comprise the professional classes that may and must prescribe medications for their patients. On the other hand, the nursing professionals are the ones who more administer drugs to patients in the ambulatory and hospital. Objective: This study was aimed to find out the frequency of self medication in selected university students, to find out the difference in the proportions of self medication between dentistry and nursing students, as well to evaluate the students’ knowledge of harmful effects of self medication and common problems of students that use the self medication. Material and methods: We were applied 209 questionnaires among dentistry students from the 3rd to 8th semesters at the Paulista University/Goiânia and 542 among nursing students from the 3rd to 8th semesters at the Estacio de Sa University of Goiás. Results and conclusion: In the present study was observed a high rate of self-medication among undergraduate students in the health area,particularly among the dentistry and nurse students. The result was alarming because the professional him/herself who should educate patients and dissuade them from this practice is a habitual user; it makes it more difficult to aspire to the future inhibition and reduction of this practice that is so harmful to health.

  18. Stress among medical students in a Thai medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saipanish, Ratana

    2003-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence and sources of stress among Thai medical students. The questionnaires,which consisted of the Thai Stress Test (TST) and questions asking about sources of stress, were sent to all medical students in the Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Thailand. A total of 686 students participated. The results showed that about 61.4% of students had some degree of stress. Seventeen students (2.4%) reported a high level of stress. The prevalence of stress is highest among third-year medical students. Academic problems were found to be a major cause of stress among all students. The most prevalent source of academic stress was the test/exam. Other sources of stress in medical school and their relationships are also discussed. The findings can help medical teachers understand more about stress among their students and guide the way to improvement in an academic context, which is important for student achievement. PMID:14522672

  19. Great expectations: teaching ethics to medical students in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Kevin Gary; Fellingham, Robyn

    2014-12-01

    Many academic philosophers and ethicists are appointed to teach ethics to medical students. We explore exactly what this task entails. In South Africa the Health Professions Council's curriculum for training medical practitioners requires not only that students be taught to apply ethical theory to issues and be made aware of the legal and regulatory requirements of their profession, it also expects moral formation and the inculcation of professional virtue in students. We explore whether such expectations are reasonable. We defend the claim that physicians ought to be persons of virtuous character, on the grounds of the social contract between society and the profession. We further argue that since the expectations of virtue of health care professionals are reasonable, it is also sound reasoning to expect ethics teachers to try to inculcate such virtues in their students, so far as this is possible. Furthermore, this requires of such teachers that they be suitable role models of ethical practice and virtue, themselves. We claim that this applies to ethics teachers who are themselves not members of the medical profession, too, even though they are not bound by the same social contract as doctors. We conclude that those who accept employment as teachers of ethics to medical students, where as part of their contractual obligation they are expected to inculcate moral values in their students, ought to be prepared to accept their responsibility to be professionally ethical, themselves. PMID:23409954

  20. Homophobia in Medical Students of the University of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, R. W. M.; Au, K. P.; Chan, W. K.; Cheung, L. W. M.; Lam, C. Y. Y.; Liu, H. H. W.; Ng, L. Y.; Wong, M. Y.; Wong, W. C.

    2009-01-01

    Homosexuality is now accepted as a normal variant of human sexuality, but homophobia among healthcare professionals is well documented. Establishment of trustful doctor-patient relationships is impossible in the presence of homophobia. We were interested to examine the extent of homophobia among medical students, the future doctors. This article…

  1. Self medication practices among medical students of a private institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti A Kasulkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to evaluate various aspects of self-medication in medical students. A prospective, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was carried out among 488 medical students selected by simple random sampling from January 2013 to June 2013. Data was collected and analyzed for counts and percentage. Students reported self-medication in the preceding one year was 71.7 % and the prevalence was more in final year students. Fever and headache were the most frequently reported illnesses, commonly used drugs were antipyretics and analgesics, obtained information through reading material, and reasons quoted were minor ailments and quick relief. Majority students agreed that medical knowledge is necessary for administration of medicine by self. Self-medication is highly prevalent in medical students, which is quite alarming.

  2. Self Medication Practices among Medical Students of a Private Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasulkar, Arti A; Gupta, M

    2015-01-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate various aspects of self-medication in medical students. A prospective, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was carried out among 488 medical students selected by simple random sampling from January 2013 to June 2013. Data was collected and analyzed for counts and percentage. Students reported self-medication in the preceding one year was 71.7 % and the prevalence was more in final year students. Fever and headache were the most frequently reported illnesses, commonly used drugs were antipyretics and analgesics, obtained information through reading material, and reasons quoted were minor ailments and quick relief. Majority students agreed that medical knowledge is necessary for administration of medicine by self. Self-medication is highly prevalent in medical students, which is quite alarming. PMID:26009650

  3. Professional reading and the Medical Radiation Science Practitioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Updating professional knowledge is a central tenet of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and professional reading is a common method health practitioners use to update their professional knowledge. This paper reports the level of professional reading by Medical Radiation Science (MRS) practitioners in Australia and examines organisational support for professional reading. Materials and Methods: Survey design was used to collect data from MRS practitioners. A questionnaire was sent to 1142 Australian practitioners, which allowed self-report data to be collected on the length of time practitioners engage in professional reading and the time workplaces allocate to practitioners for professional reading. Results: Of the 362 MRS practitioners who returned the survey, 93.9% engaged in professional reading on a weekly basis. In contrast, only 28.9% of respondents reported that their workplace allocates time for professional reading to practitioners. MRS practitioners employed in universities engaged in higher levels of reading than their colleagues employed in clinical workplaces (p < 0.01) and more university workplaces allocated time for professional reading to their employees than clinical workplaces (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences for clinical practitioners in level of reading across geographic, organisational and professional demographic factors. Significant differences in workplace allocation of time for professional reading in clinical workplaces were evident for health sector (p < 0.01); work environment (p < 0.01); geographic location (p < 0.01) and area of specialisation (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The vast majority of respondent MRS practitioners engage in professional reading to update their professional knowledge. This demonstrates an ongoing commitment at the individual practitioner level for updating professional knowledge. Updating professional knowledge is an organisational as well as an individual practitioner issue. Whilst the majority of organisations do not currently support MRS practitioners with time allocation for professional reading, there were organisations currently providing this form of support to their employees. Wider adoption of protected time for professional reading would provide much needed organisational support to practitioners and reduce the identified inequity that currently exists across the MRS profession.

  4. Professional reading and the Medical Radiation Science Practitioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, Madeleine, E-mail: mshanahan@rmit.edu.a [School of Medical Science, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); Herrington, Anthony [Head, School of Regional, Remote and eLearning (RRE), Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Herrington, Jan [School of Education, Murdoch University, Perth (Australia)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Updating professional knowledge is a central tenet of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and professional reading is a common method health practitioners use to update their professional knowledge. This paper reports the level of professional reading by Medical Radiation Science (MRS) practitioners in Australia and examines organisational support for professional reading. Materials and Methods: Survey design was used to collect data from MRS practitioners. A questionnaire was sent to 1142 Australian practitioners, which allowed self-report data to be collected on the length of time practitioners engage in professional reading and the time workplaces allocate to practitioners for professional reading. Results: Of the 362 MRS practitioners who returned the survey, 93.9% engaged in professional reading on a weekly basis. In contrast, only 28.9% of respondents reported that their workplace allocates time for professional reading to practitioners. MRS practitioners employed in universities engaged in higher levels of reading than their colleagues employed in clinical workplaces (p < 0.01) and more university workplaces allocated time for professional reading to their employees than clinical workplaces (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences for clinical practitioners in level of reading across geographic, organisational and professional demographic factors. Significant differences in workplace allocation of time for professional reading in clinical workplaces were evident for health sector (p < 0.01); work environment (p < 0.01); geographic location (p < 0.01) and area of specialisation (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The vast majority of respondent MRS practitioners engage in professional reading to update their professional knowledge. This demonstrates an ongoing commitment at the individual practitioner level for updating professional knowledge. Updating professional knowledge is an organisational as well as an individual practitioner issue. Whilst the majority of organisations do not currently support MRS practitioners with time allocation for professional reading, there were organisations currently providing this form of support to their employees. Wider adoption of protected time for professional reading would provide much needed organisational support to practitioners and reduce the identified inequity that currently exists across the MRS profession.

  5. A Study of Stress among Students of Professional Colleges from an Urban area in India

    OpenAIRE

    Vivek B. Waghachavare; Dhumale, Girish B.; Kadam, Yugantara R.; Alka D. Gore

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Various studies across the globe have emphasised that students undertaking professional courses, such as medical and dental studies, are subjected to higher stress. Excessive stress could lead to psychological problems like depression and anxiety. The objective of the current study was to assess stress among students of various professional colleges and its association with various academic, social and health-related factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from ...

  6. Prevalence of Burnout in Senior Medical Students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadvand A.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Burnout is caused by high-stress jobs and could induce somatic, psychological disorders and negative attitude to professional actives so that this condition causes poor relationship with the patient. This study aimed at investigating burnout in senior medical students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences.Methods: This research was a cross sectional study carried out on all senior medical students (N=56 in 2008. Data were obtained by two questionnaires including demographic questionnaire and Maslach burnout Inventory. They were then analyzed using SPSS software and Chi square Test. Results: The findings showed that the majority of medical students (91.1% had burnout and only 8.9% of them had not burnout. Severe burnout was in 16% of students. There was not any significant relationship between burnout and sex, age, smoking, duration of education, interest in medical course and marital status P<0.05.Conclusion: The results of the study showed that burnout is common problem in senior medical students and need special consideration. Therefore medical students should be encouraged to seek help and adequate facilities by holding workshops of life-skill training and coping with stress. However, burnout should be paid special attention in medical students by counseling centers of University for prevention of consequences.

  7. Prevalence of Burnout in Senior Medical Students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Akkasheh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Burnout is caused by high-stress jobs and could induce somatic, psychological disorders and negative attitude to professional actives so that this condition causes poor relationship with  the patient. This study aimed at investigating burnout in senior medical students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This research was a cross sectional study carried out on all senior medical students (N=56 in 2008. Data were obtained by two questionnaires including demographic questionnaire and Maslach burnout Inventory. They were then analyzed using SPSS software and Chi square Test. Results: The findings showed that the majority of medical students (91.1% had burnout and only 8.9% of them had not burnout. Severe burnout was in 16% of students. There was not any significant relationship between burnout and sex, age, smoking, duration of education, interest in medical course and marital status P<0.05. Conclusion: The results of the study showed that burnout is common problem in senior medical students and need special consideration. Therefore medical students  should be encouraged to seek help and adequate facilities by holding workshops of life-skill training and coping with stress. However, burnout should be paid special attention in medical students by counseling centers of University for prevention of consequences.

     

  8. Perceptions of medical students undergoing cadaveric training: a sociocognitive perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Njoku, C.O.; Mr. E. O. Ewunonu; Mr. A. N. Eteudo; Ugwu, A.C.; Mr. O. A. Egwu

    2008-01-01

    The emotional and sociocognitive aspects of human dissection are important aspects of professionalism in medical training and so should be critically evaluated in the present day changing society. Medical students of Ebonyi State University, Nigeria completed 390 questionnaires. The questionnaires included questions seeking demographic information; open-ended questions on their first experience of dissection and suggestions on improvements in training. The Visual analogue scale (VAS) was used...

  9. Prevention of Hepatitis B; knowledge and practices among Medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Anjali Singh; Shikha Jain

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B is the major infectious disease of mankind. It is the most common cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepato-cellular carcinoma World wide. The health professionals are at the maximum risk. Vaccination against Hepatitis B can prevent this deadly disease. This survey was conducted to assess the knowledge and status of Hepatitis B vaccination among the medical students of B.J.Medical College, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

  10. Medical professionalism among clinical physicians in two tertiary hospitals, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Chunmei; Fu, Xinqiao

    2013-11-01

    In order to investigate medical professional attitudes and behaviors in China and explore the influencing factors with a focus on hospital internal management, we developed a 13-item professional attitudes and 11-item behaviors inventory. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 390 physicians mainly in four specialties in two tertiary Chinese hospitals in 2011. 306 completed questionnaires were collected. More than 90% of respondents agreed with at least nine of the 13 specific statements about principles. However, responses on behaviors were not necessarily consistent with those on attitudes. 80.3% of respondents reported that they usually or always participated in quality improvement activities and 48.2% reported that they usually or always participated in peer evaluations of colleagues' quality of care. Some 47.8% had encountered incompetent colleagues and 17.7% had encountered significant medical errors caused by colleagues. Among those who had encountered incompetence or significant medical errors, almost two thirds had never reported their concerns to the hospital or other relevant authorities. Half of the physicians did not obtain enough continuing medical education credits. Physicians' professional reported behaviors were influenced by their personal and professional characteristics, professional attitudes, and assessment of hospital internal management constitutions. For example, participation in decision-making had a significant role in professional reported behaviors of protecting patient confidentiality, improving quality of care, and self-regulation, with those sometimes or often participating in decision-making indicating higher levels of reported behaviors than those who seldom participated (odds ratios: 1.84; 4.31, 2.44; 3.31). The results showed Chinese physicians demonstrated positive attitudes to professionalism principles. However, their reported behaviors were at times inconsistent with their attitudes, especially in the areas of competence, quality improvement, and self-regulation. One of effective strategies to facilitate Chinese physicians' professionalism may be to improving hospital management. PMID:23102754

  11. An evolving perspective on physical activity counselling by medical professionals

    OpenAIRE

    McPhail Steven; Schippers Mandy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Physical inactivity is a modifiable risk factor for many chronic conditions and a leading cause of premature mortality. An increasing proportion of adults worldwide are not engaging in a level of physical activity sufficient to prevent or alleviate these adverse effects. Medical professionals have been identified as potentially powerful sources of influence for those who do not meet minimum physical activity guidelines. Health professionals are respected and expected sourc...

  12. Evolution of Professional Training Forms in Medical Institution of Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebedeva M.N.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Training methodology of medical students has been a subject for profound reforms during the recent years. Revolutionary technological progress is one of the reasons for this process; another reason is a constant search for the most efficient educational ideology. The article presents a historical review of medical education systems in Russia and in Europe. Innovational methods of problem-oriented training, involving use of recent electronic and technical achievements significantly differs traditional scheme, described as a «tutor-student» system. The present work focuses particularly on scientific research as a part of medical training, and its role in preparation of modern medical practitioners. It is stated that doctor is a person who combines professional skills and personal qualities. Therefore complex of technocratic and humanitarian aspects in medical education assists in development of successful training system.

  13. Planeación estratégica para el fortalecimiento de la ética profesional de Enfermería en la filial Nuevitas Strategic plan for strengthening professional ethics of nursing students from the affiliate medical school of Nuevitas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niurkis Milanés Céspedes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se comprobó que existe una deficiente aplicación y sistematización de los valores éticos profesionales en docentes y estudiantes de licenciatura en enfermería de la Filial de Ciencias Médicas de Nuevitas, por lo que se realizó un estudio descriptivo, cualitativo, fundamentado en la metodología de la investigación-acción, con el objetivo de diseñar una propuesta de planeación estratégica que contribuya al fortalecimiento de los mismos. El universo de la investigación abarcó a todos los sujetos involucrados en el proceso de formación de esta especialidad, escogiendo como muestra al 100% de los estudiantes del nuevo modelo formativo y al 100% de los docentes categorizados. El estudio se realiza de forma retrospectiva y con un corte transversal, pues se enmarca en el período de los cursos 2008-2009. A través de encuestas, la observación a las evaluaciones realizadas en la educación en el trabajo, las entrevistas, y el análisis se pudo valorar la efectividad de la propuesta, que permitirá perfeccionar el fortalecimiento de valores éticos profesionales en el proceso de enseñanza aprendizaje, mediante acciones concretas diseñadas a partir de las debilidades y amenazas encontradas en el diagnóstico estratégico, lo que reforzará la labor educativa y la calidad de la atención de enfermería. Se concluye que el nivel de preparación del claustro de profesores y de los estudiantes de enfermería aún resulta insuficiente. Por lo tanto, es necesaria la actualización de este tema desde posiciones humanistas.During the academic year 2008-2009, a descriptive, qualitative study was carried out to design a strategic plan to contribute to strengthening the professional ethical values of both professors and nursing students from Nuevitas’s affiliate medical school. The universe comprised every subject involved in the nursing formation process. The sample included 100 % of new-formative-model students, as well as 100 % of categorized professors. Results showed a deficient preparation of professors and students. The proposal’s effectiveness was assessed through evaluations, interviews, and analysis.

  14. Planeación estratégica para el fortalecimiento de la ética profesional de Enfermería en la filial Nuevitas / Strategic plan for strengthening professional ethics of nursing students from the affiliate medical school of Nuevitas

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Niurkis, Milanés Céspedes; Alberto, Bujardón Mendoza; Odelaisy, Tamarit Castillo; Vilda Magalys, Valdés Cervantes.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se comprobó que existe una deficiente aplicación y sistematización de los valores éticos profesionales en docentes y estudiantes de licenciatura en enfermería de la Filial de Ciencias Médicas de Nuevitas, por lo que se realizó un estudio descriptivo, cualitativo, fundamentado en la metodología de la [...] investigación-acción, con el objetivo de diseñar una propuesta de planeación estratégica que contribuya al fortalecimiento de los mismos. El universo de la investigación abarcó a todos los sujetos involucrados en el proceso de formación de esta especialidad, escogiendo como muestra al 100% de los estudiantes del nuevo modelo formativo y al 100% de los docentes categorizados. El estudio se realiza de forma retrospectiva y con un corte transversal, pues se enmarca en el período de los cursos 2008-2009. A través de encuestas, la observación a las evaluaciones realizadas en la educación en el trabajo, las entrevistas, y el análisis se pudo valorar la efectividad de la propuesta, que permitirá perfeccionar el fortalecimiento de valores éticos profesionales en el proceso de enseñanza aprendizaje, mediante acciones concretas diseñadas a partir de las debilidades y amenazas encontradas en el diagnóstico estratégico, lo que reforzará la labor educativa y la calidad de la atención de enfermería. Se concluye que el nivel de preparación del claustro de profesores y de los estudiantes de enfermería aún resulta insuficiente. Por lo tanto, es necesaria la actualización de este tema desde posiciones humanistas. Abstract in english During the academic year 2008-2009, a descriptive, qualitative study was carried out to design a strategic plan to contribute to strengthening the professional ethical values of both professors and nursing students from Nuevitas’s affiliate medical school. The universe comprised every subject involv [...] ed in the nursing formation process. The sample included 100 % of new-formative-model students, as well as 100 % of categorized professors. Results showed a deficient preparation of professors and students. The proposal’s effectiveness was assessed through evaluations, interviews, and analysis.

  15. Self-Medication Practices and Risk Factors for Self-Medication among Medical Students in Belgrade, Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukovic, Jasminka Adzic; Miletic, Vladimir; Pekmezovic, Tatjana; Trajkovic, Goran; Ratkovic, Nevena; Aleksic, Danijela; Grgurevic, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Self-medication among future health care professionals can represent a serious threat to professionalism in medicine and it has potential to put at risk public trust into this profession. The aim of this research was to investigate prevalence and risk factors for self-medication among population of medical students, because it was previously shown that their attitudes towards pharmacotherapy could affect the way they could prescribe medication in the future. Material and Methods Research was performed as a cross-sectional study and it included 1296 (84.1%) 1st, 3rd and 6th year students of School of Medicine, University of Belgrade. Students filled out a demographic and self-medication questionnaire created for the purpose of this research and the Physical Health Questionnaire – 9 (PHQ-9). Questions about self-medication were related to the period of the previous year. Results Self-medication was reported by 79.9% students. The most frequently self-prescribed medications were analgesics (55.4%). Independent risk factors for self-medication were possession of home-pharmacies (OR?=?5.3, CI 95% 3.89–7.23), lower level of father's education (OR?=?1.6, CI 95% 1.18–2.25), consumption of alcoholic beverages (OR?=?1.5, CI 95% 1.13–2.08), less than 1 hour spent in physical activity per week (OR?=?1.4, CI 95% 1.00–2.02), female gender (OR?=?1.4, CI 95% 1.02–1.89), older age (OR?=?1.1, CI 95% 1.07–1.21) and higher PHQ-9 score (OR?=?1.09, CI 95% 1.05–1.12). Conclusions Self-medication is an important issue among population of medical students. Prevalence of self-medication could be controlled through regulatory authorities and further education. PMID:25503967

  16. Rasch analysis of professional behavior in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, R; Verhulst, S J; Roberts, N K; Dorsey, J K

    2015-12-01

    The use of students' "consumer feedback" to assess faculty behavior and improve the process of medical education is a significant challenge. We used quantitative Rasch measurement to analyze pre-categorized student comments listed by 385 graduating medical students. We found that students differed little with respect to the number of comments they provided and that their comments indeed form a probabilistic Rasch hierarchy. However, different hierarchies were found across medical departments and faculty. An analysis of these interactions provides valuable, detailed, and quantitative information that can augment qualitative research approaches. In addition, we suggest how the Rasch scaling of student comments can assist researchers in the design and implementation of new faculty evaluation instruments. Finally, the interactions between student and department identified a subset of behaviors that appear to guide and possibly elicit students' comments. PMID:25737275

  17. The impact of management on medical professionalism: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerato, Dino; Salvatore, Domenico; Fattore, Giovanni

    2012-05-01

    In the last three decades, medical doctors have increasingly been exposed to management control measures. This phenomenon has been reflected in a number of studies in various disciplines, including sociology, organisation studies, management, and health service research. This article seeks to provide a comprehensive overview of the studies dealing with the impact of management on professional control. In particular, it seeks to bridge the diversity of assumptions, theoretical perspectives and conceptual underpinnings at play, by exploring synergies between them and opening up new horizons for research. The review shows how the relationship between clinicians and management has been analysed at an organisational level using two interconnected analytical frameworks focusing on the sociocultural and task-related dimensions of professionalism. In the final discussion, we argue that comparative, longitudinal and cross-sectional research is necessary, and there is a need to overcome the hegemony/resistance framework in current analyses of the impact of management on professionalism. Such an approach would contribute to the revision of macro theories of professionalism and stimulate emerging research by examining different perspectives towards management in medical specialisations. This approach might also stimulate a discussion of medical professionals' relationships with members of other professional groups, including nurses and healthcare managers. PMID:21929618

  18. Medical students' learning from patient-led teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how medical students perceive the experience of learning from patient instructors (patients with rheumatism who teach health professionals and students) in the context of coupled faculty-led and patient-led teaching session. This was an explorative study with a qualitative approach based on focus group interviews. Analysis was based on a prior developed model of the characteristics of learning from patient instructors. The authors used this model as sensitizi...

  19. Assessing medical students’ competence in calculating drug doses

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine Harries; Julia Botha

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests that healthcare professionals are not optimally able to calculate medicine doses and various strategies have been employed to improve these skills. In this study, the performance of third and fourth year medical students was assessed and the success of various educational interventions investigated. Students were given four types of dosing calculations typical of those required in an emergency setting. Full competence (at the 100% level) was defined as correctly answering al...

  20. Students as Clients in a Professional/Client Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    Proposes the metaphor of professional/client rather than student-as-customer to characterize the relationship between professors and students. Uses examples of fitness trainer, management consultant, accounting service, and mountain guide to illustrate faculty and student roles. (SK)

  1. Prevalence of smoking habits, attitudes, knowledge and beliefs among Health Professional School students: a cross-sectional study

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Margherita, Ferrante; Rosella, Saulle; Caterina, Ledda; Roberto, Pappalardo; Roberto, Fallico; Giuseppe, La Torre; Maria, Fiore.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine smoking prevalence, attitudes, knowledge and behaviours/beliefs among Health Professional School students according to the Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS) approach. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in Catania University Medical Schools. The GH [...] PSS questionnaires were self-administered. Logistic regression model was performed. The level of significance was p

  2. Medical student fitness to practise committees at UK medical schools

    OpenAIRE

    Aldridge Jocelyne; Bray Sally A; David Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim was to explore the structures for managing student fitness to practise hearings in medical schools in the UK. We surveyed by email the named fitness to practise leads of all full members of the UK Medical Schools Council with a medical undergraduate programme. We asked whether student fitness to practise cases were considered by a committee/panel dedicated to medicine, or by one which also considered other undergraduate health and social care students. Findings All...

  3. Hiring a professional medical writer: is it equivalent to ghostwriting?

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Natasha; Das, Saurendra

    2014-01-01

    Authors of articles published in medical journals are often busy researchers who cannot afford time devoted to writing. Though they are experts in their own therapeutic area, more often than not, researchers find it difficult to actually write and publish their research. Professional medical writers with their expertise in writing clear, concise, comprehensible, and coherent content are often a great support to researchers. Their contribution to the manuscript is usually focused on getting a ...

  4. Midwives in medical student and resident education and the development of the medical education caucus toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoff, Kari; Natch, Amy; McConaughey, Edie; Salstrom, Jan; Schelling, Karen; Seger, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Midwives have been involved formally and informally in the training of medical students and residents for many years. Recent reductions in resident work hours, emphasis on collaborative practice, and a focus on midwives as key members of the maternity care model have increased the involvement of midwives in medical education. Midwives work in academic settings as educators to teach the midwifery model of care, collaboration, teamwork, and professionalism to medical students and residents. In 2009, members of the American College of Nurse-Midwives formed the Medical Education Caucus (MECA) to discuss the needs of midwives teaching medical students and residents; the group has held a workshop annually over the last 4 years. In 2014, MECA workshop facilitators developed a toolkit to support and formalize the role of midwives involved in medical student and resident education. The MECA toolkit provides a roadmap for midwives beginning involvement and continuing or expanding the role of midwives in medical education. This article describes the history of midwives in medical education, the development and growth of MECA, and the resulting toolkit created to support and formalize the role of midwives as educators in medical student and resident education, as well as common challenges for the midwife in academic medicine. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health. PMID:25980324

  5. The training and expectations of medical students in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalves Luzia

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the socio-economic profile of medical students in the 1998/99 academic year at the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (UEM Medical Faculty in Maputo. It aims to identify their social and geographical origins in addition to their expectations and difficulties regarding their education and professional future. Methods The data were collected through a questionnaire administered to all medical students at the faculty. Results Although most medical students were from outside Maputo City and Maputo Province, expectations of getting into medical school were already associated with a migration from the periphery to the capital city, even before entering medical education. This lays the basis for the concentration of physicians in the capital city once their term of compulsory rural employment as junior doctors is completed. The decision to become a doctor was taken at an early age. Close relatives, or family friends seem to have been an especially important variable in encouraging, reinforcing and promoting the desire to be a doctor. The academic performance of medical students was dismal. This seems to be related to several difficulties such as lack of library facilities, inadequate financial support, as well as poor high school preparation. Only one fifth of the students reported receiving financial support from the Mozambican government to subsidize their medical studies. Conclusion Medical students seem to know that they will be needed in the public sector, and that this represents an opportunity to contribute to the public's welfare. Nevertheless, their expectations are, already as medical students, to combine their public sector practice with private medical work in order to improve their earnings.

  6. Does personality predict medical students' attitudes to learning communication skills?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Molinuevo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine whether personality is related to medical students' attitudes towards learning communication skills and self-ratings on communication skills. Methods: 524 first- and 507 second-year medical students completed the Communications Skills Attitudes Scale and rated their own communication skills. First-year students answered the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and second-year students the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses, controlling for gender, were conducted to study the impact of personality on attitudes. Analysis of variance followed by post hoc Duncan test was used to compare differences in personality traits depending on students' self-ratings on communication skills. Results: After controlling for gender, personality traits predicted differences in attitudes and were significantly related to medical students' self-ratings. Medical students with higher scores on psychoticism or aggression-hostility showed worse attitudes. Students who tended to have a better self-image scored higher on extraversion, psychoticism, impulsive-sensation seeking, or aggression-hostility traits. Conclusions: Findings support the consideration of personality traits for better student career guidance and counselling. Some students could have more difficulties to internalize certain healthcare professional competencies and show more resistance to attitude change.

  7. Preparing Students to Write a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Cheryl; Schneider, Paige P.; Johnson, Corey W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a process for guiding students through the writing of a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper and a one-page philosophy statement suitable for use in students' professional portfolios. The authors describe how the review of recreation education literature, scholarship on teaching and learning, and assessment of student

  8. Professional Student Exchange Program (PSEP), 2008-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) Professional Student Exchange Program enables students in 12 Western states to enroll in selected out-of-state professional programs, usually because those fields of study are not available at public institutions in their home states. Exchange students receive preference in admission.…

  9. Professional Learning Communities: Teachers' Perceptions and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Professional Learning Communities (PLC's) are designed to help schools improve student achievement; all decisions are based on the needs of students. PLC's are an effective way to receive professional development (PD), allow for collaboration with fellow teachers, and offer timely intervention to all students. In a district known for PLC…

  10. Propuesta de textos para orientar profesionalmente a los estudiantes diferidos del grupo de ciencias médicas / Proposal of texts for the professional orientation of the group of students of the medical sciences who are in the army

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Blanca Rosa, Pérez Obregón; Yadamila de la Caridad, García Cedeño.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo transversal, desde septiembre 2011 a mayo del 2012, para diagnosticar los conocimientos sobre orientación profesional y proponer textos para lograrla en los diferidos del grupo de las ciencias médicas. El universo son los 31 estudiantes de la Unidad Militar 3698. Se [...] utilizaron métodos de los niveles teórico: analítico-sintético e inducción-deducción y empíricos: el análisis documental, para revisar los programas y orientaciones metodológicas de las asignaturas del Curso de superación cultural; y encuesta a estudiantes, además se indagó el criterio de especialistas para valorar la calidad y pertinencia de la propuesta. Los resultados están relacionados con el bajo nivel de conocimientos de los alumnos sobre su futura labor, la cual no se intenciona desde las asignaturas. Se proponen 8 textos para ese empeño desde el Programa especial de la asignatura práctica de la lengua española, explicados metodológicamente. Fueron valorados como excelentes con algunas sugerencias ya asumidas en la propuesta. Abstract in english A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out, from September 2011 to May 2012, to diagnose the knowledge about professional orientation and to propose some texts to achieve this purpose in the group of students of the medical sciences who are in the army. The universe comprises 31 students wh [...] o are at the Army base 3698. Different methods were used, from the theoretical level: analytic-synthetic and induction _deduction and from the empirical level: analysis of documents to check the syllabus and methodological guidelines for cultural upgrading; a survey was applied to the students and the specialist´s criterion method was used to value the quality and pertinence of the proposal. The outcomes are related to the low level of knowledge of the students about their future work, which is not worked out through the subjects. Eight texts are proposed to achieve this goal through the special syllabus of the Spanish language, which are methodologically explained. They were valued as excellent with some suggestions that were taken into account in this proposal.

  11. Medical Students' Affirmation of Ethics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrmann, Jon A.; Hoop, Jinger; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Despite the acknowledged importance of ethics education in medical school, little empirical work has been done to assess the needs and preferences of medical students regarding ethics curricula. Methods: Eighty-three medical students at the University of New Mexico participated in a self-administered written survey including 41 scaled…

  12. Medical Students’ Research – Facilitators and Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Unnikrishnan, B; Kanchan, Tanuj; Holla, Ramesh; Kumar, Nithin; Rekha, T.; Mithra, Prasanna; Kulkarni, Vaman; B Reshmi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Undergraduate research in medicine is important to expose and encourage the students towards the newer advances and research practices. The present study was taken up in a medical institute to assess the perception of the medical faculty about research undertaken by the medical undergraduates, and identifying the barriers faced by them in training undergraduate students for research.

  13. The medical student and the suicidal patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, N A

    1997-01-01

    Today's medical students are being confronted with ethical situations of far greater complexity than were their predecessors and yet the medical education system does little to prepare students for the ethical dilemmas which they inevitably face when entering the hospital environment. The following article addresses the issues surrounding a case where a patient has told a student in confidence of his plans to commit suicide. What should the student do? The only way for the student to prevent ...

  14. Knowledge of and Adherence to Hygiene Guidelines among Medical Students in Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert, Verena G.; Paul Schlumm; Kessler, Harald H.; Andreas Frings

    2013-01-01

    Background. Adherence to hygiene guidelines is of utmost importance for healthcare professionals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge on and the adherence to hygiene guidelines among medical students in Austria. Additionally, a possible difference between female and male students was investigated. Methods. An open paper-based survey among third-year medical students at the Medical University of Graz was conducted. The questionnaire consisted of 20 single-choice questions cover...

  15. Students learning from patients: let's get real in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Alan; Bligh, John

    2008-03-01

    Medical students must be prepared for working in inter-professional and multi-disciplinary clinical teams centred on a patient's care pathway. While there has been a good deal of rhetoric surrounding patient-centred medical education, there has been little attempt to conceptualise such a practice beyond the level of describing education of communication skills and empathy within a broad 'professionalism' framework. Paradoxically, while aiming to strengthen patient-student interactions, this approach tends to refocus on the role modelling of the physician, and opportunities for potentially deep collaborative working relationships between students and patients are missed. A radical overhaul of conventional doctor-led medical education may be necessary, that also challenges the orthodoxies of individualistic student-centred approaches, leading to an authentic patient-centred model that shifts the locus of learning from the relationship between doctor as educator and student to the relationship between patient and student, with expert doctor as resource. Drawing on contemporary poststructuralist theory of text and identity construction, and on innovative models of work-based learning, the potential quality of relationship between student and patient is articulated in terms of collaborative knowledge production, involving close reading with the patient as text, through dialogue. Here, a medical 'education' displaces traditional forms of medical 'training' that typically involve individual information reproduction. Students may, paradoxically, improve clinical acumen through consideration of silences, gaps, and contradictions in patients as texts, rather than treating communication as transparent. Such paradoxical effects have been systematically occluded or denied in traditional medical education. PMID:17075690

  16. Learning medical English: a prerequisite for successful academic and professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljevi?, Nataša; Vuleti?, Aleksandar; Jovkovi?, Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present specificities of the English language teaching necessary for successful education and professional training of medical students. In contemporary globalized world the English language has become the basic language of communication in all scientific fields including the field of medical science. It is well established that Medical English teaching should primarily focus on stable linguistic competence in English that is created by means of content and context based curriculum, thus preparing students for active use of English upon graduation. In order to achieve this it is very important that English language teaching be based on specific real situations in which the language is to be used. In addition, students should be encouraged to adapt practical skills applicable in specific future professional setting. Medical English teaching represents constant challenge for teachers because they need to be flexible, open to new approaches and methods, make decisions and adapt themselves to constant changes. In addition, long-term learning is at the core of higher education, and being equal partners, both students and teachers should be aware that education is a two-way process. PMID:26012139

  17. Learning medical English: A prerequisite for successful academic and professional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosavljevi? Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present specificities of the English language teaching necessary for successful education and professional training of medical students. In contemporary globalized world the English language has become the basic language of communication in all scientific fields including the field of medical science. It is well established that Medical English teaching should primarily focus on stable linguistic competence in English that is created by means of content and context based curriculum, thus preparing students for active use of English upon graduation. In order to achieve this it is very important that English language teaching be based on specific real situations in which the language is to be used. In addition, students should be encouraged to adapt practical skills applicable in specific future professional setting. Medical English teaching represents constant challenge for teachers because they need to be flexible, open to new approaches and methods, make decisions and adapt themselves to constant changes. In addition, long-term learning is at the core of higher education, and being equal partners, both students and teachers should be aware that education is a two-way process.

  18. A Dissecting Competition for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samalia, Latika; Stringer, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    After repeated requests from medical students for more cadaver dissection opportunities, a voluntary dissecting "competition" was initiated for the third year medical students in 2006. This has been held annually on five occasions since, offering up to 30 dissection stations and accommodating an average of 53 students (range 40-66) per year,…

  19. A study of professional competence for radiological technology department students in Taiwan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, so many medical institutions established and the increasing use of the high technological medical imaging equipment, it makes radiological technology become the main instrument for the medical diagnostic and radiation therapy. However, the medical radiological technologies play the important role to operate all the related radiological machines. If they do not use the machines adequately, it will increase the patients' radiation absorbed dose. Then, the whole society health may be influenced. Therefore, constructing the professional competence of the medical radiological technologists is an important course. The purpose of this research are: (1) to construct the index of professional competence with radiological technology students, (2) to discuss the professional competence for the graduates from the department of radiological technology to be the reference for the Ministry of Examination for the license test of radiological technologists, (3) to provide the direction of the radiological technology department development. (author)

  20. Medical student fitness to practise committees at UK medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldridge Jocelyne

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to explore the structures for managing student fitness to practise hearings in medical schools in the UK. We surveyed by email the named fitness to practise leads of all full members of the UK Medical Schools Council with a medical undergraduate programme. We asked whether student fitness to practise cases were considered by a committee/panel dedicated to medicine, or by one which also considered other undergraduate health and social care students. Findings All 31 medical schools responded. 19 medical schools had a fitness to practise committee dealing with medical students only. Three had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and dentistry. One had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and veterinary medicine. Eight had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and two or more other programmes, such as dentistry, nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, dietetics, social work, pharmacy, psychology, audiology, speech therapy, operating department practice, veterinary medicine and education. Conclusion All 31 UK medical schools with undergraduate programmes have a fitness to practise committee to deal with students whose behaviour has given rise to concern about their fitness to practise. The variation in governance structures for student fitness to practise committees/panels can in part be explained by variations in University structures and the extent to which Universities co-manage undergraduate medicine with other courses.

  1. National Library of Medicine Web Resources for Student Health Professionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Womble, R.

    2010-04-02

    Familiarize students affiliated with the Student National Medical Association with the National Library of Medicine's online resources that address medical conditions, health disparities, and public health preparedness needs.

  2. Do students learn to be more conscientious at medical school?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaytor Andrew T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Professionalism in medical students is not only difficult to define but difficult to teach and measure. As negative behaviour in medical students is associated with post-graduate disciplinary action it would be useful to have a model whereby unprofessional behaviour at the undergraduate level can easily be identified to permit appropriate intervention. We have previously developed a scalar measure of conscientiousness, the Conscientiousness Index (CI, which positively correlates to estimates of professional behaviour in undergraduate medical students. By comparing CI points awarded in year 1 and year 2 of study we were able to use the CI model to determine whether teaching and clinical exposure had any effect on students’ conscientiousness. Methods CI points were collected by administrative staff from 3 successive cohorts of students in years 1 and 2 of study. Points were awarded to students for activities such as submission of immunisation status and criminal record checks, submission of summative assignments by a specified date and attendance at compulsory teaching sessions. CI points were then converted to a percentage of maximal possible scores (CI % to permit direct comparison between years 1 and 2 of study. Results CI % scores were generally high with each year of study for each cohort showing negatively skewed normal distributions with peaks > 89%. There was a high degree of correlation of CI % scores between year 1 and year 2 of study for each cohort alone and when cohort data was combined. When the change in CI % from year 1 to year 2 for all students was compared there was no significant difference in conscientiousness observed. Conclusions We have provided evidence that use of a CI model in undergraduate medical students provides a reliable measure of conscientiousness that is easy to implement. Importantly this study shows that measurement of conscientiousness by the CI model in medical students does not change between years 1 and 2 study suggesting that it is a stable characteristic and not modified by teaching and clinical exposure.

  3. Attitudes toward people with mental illness among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi Poreddi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Globally, people with mental illness frequently encounter stigma, prejudice, and discrimination by public and health care professionals. Research related to medical students? attitudes toward people with mental illness is limited from India. Aim: The aim was to assess and compare the attitudes toward people with mental illness among medical students?. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study design was carried out among medical students, who were exposed (n = 115 and not exposed (n = 61 to psychiatry training using self-reporting questionnaire. Results: Our findings showed improvement in students? attitudes after exposure to psychiatry in benevolent (t = 2.510, P < 0.013 and stigmatization (t = 2.656, P < 0.009 domains. Further, gender, residence, and contact with mental illness were the factors that found to be influencing students? attitudes toward mental illness. Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that psychiatric education proved to be effective in changing the attitudes of medical students toward mental illness to a certain extent. However, there is an urgent need to review the current curriculum to prepare undergraduate medical students to provide holistic care to the people with mental health problems.

  4. An evolving perspective on physical activity counselling by medical professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McPhail Steven

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity is a modifiable risk factor for many chronic conditions and a leading cause of premature mortality. An increasing proportion of adults worldwide are not engaging in a level of physical activity sufficient to prevent or alleviate these adverse effects. Medical professionals have been identified as potentially powerful sources of influence for those who do not meet minimum physical activity guidelines. Health professionals are respected and expected sources of advice and they reach a large and relevant proportion of the population. Despite this potential, health professionals are not routinely practicing physical activity promotion. Discussion Medical professionals experience several known barriers to physical activity promotion including lack of time and lack of perceived efficacy in changing physical activity behaviour in patients. Furthermore, evidence for effective physical activity promotion by medical professionals is inconclusive. To address these problems, new approaches to physical activity promotion are being proposed. These include collaborating with community based physical activity behaviour change interventions, preparing patients for effective brief counselling during a consultation with the medical professional, and use of interactive behaviour change technology. Summary It is important that we recognise the latent risk of physical inactivity among patients presenting in clinical settings. Preparation for improving patient physical activity behaviours should commence before the consultation and may include physical activity screening. Medical professionals should also identify suitable community interventions to which they can refer physically inactive patients. Outsourcing the majority of a comprehensive physical activity intervention to community based interventions will reduce the required clinical consultation time for addressing the issue with each patient. Priorities for future research include investigating ways to promote successful referrals and subsequent engagement in comprehensive community support programs to increase physical activity levels of inactive patients. Additionally, future clinical trials of physical activity interventions should be evaluated in the context of a broader framework of outcomes to inform a systematic consideration of broad strengths and weaknesses regarding not only efficacy but cost-effectiveness and likelihood of successful translation of interventions to clinical contexts.

  5. Bullying among medical students in a Saudi medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzahrani Hasan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bullying and sexual harassment of medical students by their teachers appears to be widespread phenomenon. However, nothing is published about its prevalence in conservative countries such as Saudi Arabia. This survey aims to ascertain the extent of these mistreatments among students in a Saudi medical school. Findings A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on a group of 542 clinical years’ medical students in a Saudi medical school to explore students' perceptions of their educational environment including exposure to different kinds of bullying. Bullying was defined as “a “persistent behaviour against a medical student that is intimidating, degrading, offensive or malicious and undermines the confidence and self- esteem of the recipient”. Results revealed that more than one quarter (28.0% of the surveyed students reported exposure to some sort of bullying during their clinical. Ninety percent of the reported insults were verbal, 6% sexual and 4% physical. Males were more exposed but difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions Bullying among Saudi medical students is an existing problem. A policy against bullying and harassment should be adopted in all of medical colleges to monitor this phenomenon and support students who have been bullied.

  6. Smoke-free medical students' meetings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Colin; Rudkjøbing, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Medical students of the world have signalled their commitment to health promotion by prohibiting smoking at the semiannual general assembly meetings of the International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA). Although initially adopted in 2000, the smoke-free bylaw took 5 years to come into force. This year finally saw compliance with the bylaw on March 1, 2005, at the IFMSA General Assembly in Antalya, Turkey, when medical students who wanted to smoke had to do so outside.

  7. Internet and medical student in Marrakech

    OpenAIRE

    Hattab Nadia; Lahmiti Saad; Abdelaziz Ahmed; Saidi Halim; Fikry Tarik

    2010-01-01

    Background: The implementation of ICT in the academic curriculum is a part of the e-reform of the undergraduate education currently ongoing at the Moroccan medical school. In order to evaluate the efficiency of such reform, the authors have conducted a survey at the Marrakech school of medicine including 200 students. Materials and Methods: A comparison between the third year medical students and sixth year medical students was performed in our university Hospital. Results: The majorit...

  8. Behaviour and burnout in medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Jo Cecil; Calum McHale; Jo Hart; Anita Laidlaw

    2014-01-01

    Background: Burnout is prevalent in doctors and can impact on job dissatisfaction and patient care. In medical students, burnout is associated with poorer self-rated health; however, it is unclear what factors influence its development. This study investigated whether health behaviours predict burnout in medical students. Methods: Medical students (n=356) at the Universities of St Andrews and Manchester completed an online questionnaire assessing: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation ...

  9. Attitudes of Asian medical students towards smoking.

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, S F; Moid, I.; Khan, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--There have been numerous studies on smoking habits among young adults in developed countries. Similar data from developing countries are scanty. METHODS--A survey of medical students from one of the medical colleges in Pakistan assessed their smoking habits and attitudes towards smoking. In June 1993 a coded survey questionnaire was sent to each medical student at The Aga Khan Medical University in Karachi requesting data on their smoking habits, their attitudes towards smoking in...

  10. Factors influencing the choice of a medical specialty among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areeba Saif

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The choice of a medical specialty by a medical student is a complex process in which several factors play a contributory role, making the decision process an evolving one as the medical student undergoes different experiences in his/her professional journey. In our study, we attempted to identify factors that play a significant role in influencing medical students towards choosing a specialty and also to delineate the differences that exist amongst students’ priorities based on gender and year of study at a medical university.Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey conducted on the medical students enrolled at Dow Medical College. Students from all five years of the medicine program were randomly selected. A self-administered questionnaire based on 16 questions was designed. The first part comprised of bio-data and specification of the choice of career by the participants. The second part comprised 13 factors influencing students’ choices, that were to be rated by the students in the order of their importance. Mann Whitney test, Kruskal Wallis test and Tukey’s test was performed for comparison.Results: Out of 400 candidates that successfully completed the study, all except one planned to specialize in one of the three major fields. 233 (58.4% students wanted to pursue medicine, 156 (39.1% surgery and only 10 (2.5% wanted to adopt research as their career. Significant differences were found in working hours, duration of residency and influence during clinical rotations between the two specialties.Conclusion: These findings re-enforce the recently evolving idea that all disparities existing between different specialties should be resolved so as to ensure an equal spread of doctors in all fields. There is also a need to introduce more female friendly legislations and more incentives need to be offered to medical graduates to prompt more of them to choose a future career in research.

  11. SELF-MEDICATION IN MEDICAL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Anuj Jain; Chandni Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Self-medication is consumption of medicinal products for treating diseases without a prescription resulting in wastage of resources, increased drug resistance and causes health hazards. Selfmedication, often without adult guidance, has been reported to be a common practice during adolescence. Similar to other preventable health-risk behaviors initiated in early adolescence, it has become a cause for concern universally. The main problem with self medication with antimicrobials is ...

  12. Burnout syndrom as a mental health problem among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backovi? Dušan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mental health problems of adolescents are among the prevailing problems of public health. While studying for their future medical profession, the students of medicine have to exchange emotions with the patients intensively, and the empathic relationship itself bears a risk of eventual ”emotional depletion”, which leads to ”professional lack of emotions”. The study was aimed at presenting burnout syndrome as a challenge for mental health of medical students, its importance for the future professional engagement of doctors and the possibilities of its prevention. Methods. The authors of this paper review and analyze data and conclusions of previous national and international studies from this field and suggest possibilities of overcoming the condition of burnout. Results. The frequency of burnout syndrome, which is the synonym for the above mentioned condition of emotional exhaustion, is twice as high in medical professionals, particularly young ones, as in other professions on average. Burnout syndrome is nowadays regarded as a psychological distress experienced during the educational process and it has been observed in as many as 50% of medical students. The most significant factors independently associated with student burnout are: personality traits, stressful personal life events and learning and training conditions at their faculties. Conclusions. It is of utmost importance to understand the causes and consequences of psychological distress in students, and the faculties should not only identify these problems, but also endeavor to promote health by developing strategies for improving personal well-being, which are important for future doctors to achieve professional success and develop resistance to stress.

  13. Medical student participation in surface anatomy classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, R; Brough, H; Ellis, H

    2006-10-01

    Surface anatomy is an integral part of medical education and enables medical students to learn skills for future medical practice. In the past decade, there has been a decline in the teaching of anatomy in the medical curriculum, and this study seeks to assess the attitudes of medical students to participation in surface anatomy classes. Consequently, all first year medical students at the Guy's, King's and St Thomas's Medical School, London, were asked to fill in an anonymous questionnaire at the end of their last surface anatomy session of the year. A total of 290 medical students completed the questionnaires, resulting in an 81.6% response rate. The students had a mean age of 19.6 years (range 18-32) and 104 (35.9%) of them were male. Seventy-six students (26.2%) were subjects in surface anatomy tutorials (60.5% male). Students generally volunteered because no one else did. Of the volunteers, 38.2% would rather not have been subjects, because of embarrassment, inability to make notes, or to see clearly the material being taught. Female medical students from ethnic minority groups were especially reluctant to volunteer to be subjects. Single-sex classes improved the volunteer rate to some extent, but not dramatically. Students appreciate the importance of surface anatomy to cadaveric study and to future clinical practice. Computer models, lectures, and videos are complementary but cannot be a substitute for peer group models, artists' models being the only alternative. PMID:16302232

  14. Patient attitudes towards medical students at Damascus University teaching hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed-Hassan Rima M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cooperation of patients and their consent to involve medical students in their care is vital to clinical education, but large numbers of students and lack of experience as well as loss of privacy may evoke negative attitudes of patients, which may sometimes adversely affect the clinical teaching environment. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of patients towards medical students at Damascus University hospitals, and to explore the determinants of those attitudes thus discussing possible implications applicable to clinical teaching. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at three teaching hospitals affiliated to the Faculty of Medicine at Damascus University. Four hundred patients were interviewed between March and April 2011 by a trained sociologist using a structured questionnaire. Results Of the patients interviewed, 67.8% approved the presence of medical students during the medical consultation and 58.2% of them felt comfortable with the presence of students, especially among patients with better socio-economic characteristics. 81.5% of the patients agreed to be examined by students in the presence of the supervisor, while 40.2% gave agreement even in the absence of the supervisor. Privacy was the most important factor in the patients' reticence towards examination by the students, whilst the relative safety and comfort if a supervisor was available determined patients' agreement. Conclusions The study concluded overall positive attitudes to the medical students' involvement in medical education. However, it is essential that students and clinical supervisors understand and adhere to professional and ethical conduct when involving patients in medical education.

  15. Hearing the Voice of Medical Students Worldwide

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Brian A; Wong, Amanda; Singla, Mohit

    2005-01-01

    The Student Forum, a new section of PLoS Medicine, is a space where medical students from across the world can exchange ideas about the critical issues affecting health and health care from their unique perspective

  16. Teacher training program for medical students: improvements needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Diggele C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Christie van Diggele,1 Annette Burgess,2 Craig Mellis21The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Sydney Medical School – Central, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaIntroduction: Skills in peer teaching, assessment, and feedback are increasingly documented internationally as required graduate attributes in medicine. Yet these skills are rarely taught in medical schools. We sought to design and deliver a short but effective teacher training (TT program for medical students that could be easily integrated into the professional development curriculum. This study sought to evaluate such a pilot program, based on student perception.Methods: The study took place at a major metropolitan teaching hospital, where 38 medical students were invited to attend a voluntary, newly designed four-module TT program. In total, 23/38 (61% of invited students attended. Mixed methods were used for evaluation. Questionnaires were completed by 21/23 (91% of students, and 6/23 (26% of students participated in a focus group.Results: Students reported that as a result of the program they felt more confident to facilitate small group teaching activities and to provide feedback to peers using the suggested frameworks. Students would like the program to contain more in-depth educational theory and to allow a more time for small group learning activities. They would also like to see opportunities for participation across all clinical schools.Conclusion: The TT program was successful in increasing student awareness of educational theory and practice, thereby improving their confidence in teaching and assessing their peers and making them feel better prepared for their careers as medical practitioners. Key improvements to the program are needed in terms of more in-depth theory and more time spent on small group learning. This might be achieved by complementing the course with e-learning.Keywords: teacher training, medical students, peer teaching, peer assessment

  17. System of continuing education and professional development of medical radiation physicists in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The active process of technical equipment of radiation therapy, nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology departments requires increased staffing of qualified medical physicists in Russia. To work with the radiotherapy equipment, treatment and diagnostic procedures available in Russian clinics today, it is necessary to have 1,000 medical radiation physics, 30% of which should have a high degree of professional excellence. To achieve the required high technology equipment and procedure level it is essential to have 5,000 specialists. Today Russia has only 280 medical radiation physicists, 25 of which have high qualification - less than 10%. The efficient exploitation of modern radiation therapeutic diagnostic technologies and equipment demands highly qualified medical radiation physicists. However, in Russia the medical physicist responsibilities in the clinic are carried out by the specialists who do not have the basic radiation physics education and the necessary basis of physical and technical knowledge. Medical and clinical physics knowledge is acquired at random through various courses, by self education or empirically without quality and thoroughness control. It is natural that it adversely affects the physical and technical maintenance of radiation therapy and, in the end, the cancer patient treatment quality. Medical physicists are required in different areas, such as: 1. clinics together with the physician to deliver procedures in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology 2. scientific and engineering organizations involved in the new radiological equipment and technology development 3. universities and other educational institutions engaged in the system of continuing education and professional development of medical physicists and research activities 4. companies supplying medical radiological equipment 5. companies busy with the equipment maintenance, adjustment and certification 6. project organizations involved in scientific planning, design and development of the system equipment of radiation therapeutic and diagnostic centres. It is understood that the areas mentioned above demand specific knowledge and skills from the medical physicists and this should be taken into consideration when elaborating the educational programmes. There are several departments of 'medical physics' speciality in Russian universities. However, the approved student education programme does not meet the modern requirements. Practically, there are no qualified medical physics professors in universities. Therefore, as before, the majority of graduates and medical physicists in clinics do not fit the necessary qualification. The Association of Medical Physicists in Russia (AMPR) has developed and realized the programme on the system of continuing education and professional development of medical radiation physicists based on the cycle of special courses on different sections of radiation therapeutic and diagnostic physics. AMPR and the leading oncology centres in Russia regularly organize courses. The ESTRO teaching courses, supported by the IAEA, also contribute a lot to the professional education of Russian medical physicists. For the efficient organization of scientific and education activities, mainly in the field of the continuing education and professional development of medical physicists, AMPR has established a non-profit Institute of Medical Physics and Engineering (IMPE) which has united practically all leading scientists and professors in medical radiation physics. The group of highly skilled professors is chosen from the best Russian specialists and specially prepared for the training courses. Guidelines and recommendations are developed. Practical studies are conducted in the leading oncology centres. A viable education and training system allows to provide the necessary professional knowledge level, individual qualification control and certification of medical physicists. However, AMPR and IMPE are doing on their own without support from the government, sponsors and investors. AMPR and IMPE a re i

  18. Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burgoyne, Louise N

    2010-01-01

    Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a) gauge students\\' awareness of research activities, (b) compare students\\' perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c) determine students\\' motivation for research and (d) obtain students\\' personal views on doing research.

  19. ELearning acceptance in hospitals: continuing medical education of healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Bachmann, Larissa; Cantoni, Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    ELearning provides healthcare professionals an interesting alternative of participating to Continuing Medical Education (CME) activities. It offers the possibility to attend courses at a distance, and it allows creating personal learning schedules without needing to leave the job or the family. Hospitals can choose to organize CME activities for their employees and therefore may also opt to offer eLearning activities. The research studies eLearning acceptance in the CME of healthcare p...

  20. Monitoring the Veterinary Medical Student Experience: An Institutional Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, RoseAnn; Mavis, Brian E; Lloyd, James W; Grabill, Chandra M; Henry, Rebecca C; Patterson, Coretta C

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary medical school challenges students academically and personally, and some students report depression and anxiety at rates higher than the general population and other medical students. This study describes changes in veterinary medical student self-esteem (SE) over four years of professional education, attending to differences between high and low SE students and the characteristics specific to low SE veterinary medical students. The study population was students enrolled at the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine from 2006 to 2012. We used data from the annual anonymous survey administered college-wide that is used to monitor the curriculum and learning environment. The survey asked respondents to rate their knowledge and skill development, learning environment, perceptions of stress, skill development, and SE. Participants also provided information on their academic performance and demographics. A contrasting groups design was used: high and low SE students were compared using logistic regression to identify factors associated with low SE. A total of 1,653 respondents met inclusion criteria: 789 low SE and 864 high SE students. The proportion of high and low SE students varied over time, with the greatest proportion of low SE students during the second-year of the program. Perceived stress was associated with low SE, whereas perceived supportive learning environment and skill development were associated with high SE. These data have provided impetus for curricular and learning environment changes to enhance student support. They also provide guidance for additional research to better understand various student academic trajectories and their implications for success. PMID:26421517

  1. Patient safety and technology-driven medication : a qualitative study on how graduate nursing students navigate through complex medication administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The technology-driven medication process is complex, involving advanced technologies, patient participation and increased safety measures. Medication administration errors are frequently reported, with nurses implicated in 26-38% of in-hospital cases. This points to the need for new ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. AIM: To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. METHODS: 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using the systematic horizontal phenomenological-hermeneutic template methodology. RESULTS: The interviews uncovered that understanding the technologies; professionalism and patient safety are three crucial elements in the medication process. The students expressed positivity and confidence in using technology, but were fearful of committing serious medication errors. From the nursing students' perspective, experienced nurses deviate from existing guidelines, leaving them feeling isolated in practical learning situations. CONCLUSION: Having an unclear nursing role model for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient adherence to the medication process, still remains to be studied.

  2. Research knowledge in undergraduate school in Brazil: a comparison between medical and law students

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Bezerril Andrade; Antonio José Souza Reis Filho; Vitor Rosa Ramos de Mendonça; Manoel Barral-Netto

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Exposure to science education during college may affect a student’s profile, and research experience may be associated with better professional performance. We hypothesized that the impact of research experience obtained during graduate study differs among professional curricula and among graduate courses. Methods: A validated multiple-choice questionnaire concerning scientific concepts was given to students in the first and fourth years of medical and law school at a public Brazil...

  3. Pharmacy Internship : Students’ Learning in a Professional Practice Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Wallman, Andy

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to explore Swedish pharmacist students’ learning during pharmacy internship. Internships are meant to introduce students to professional practice. Education programs have to reflect changes in the professional role, and take into account that learning in a professional practice setting differs from organized formal education. This thesis includes both quantitative and qualitative research approaches and applies workplace learning theories. A scheme for measuring pha...

  4. Factors affecting the performance of undergraduate medical students: A perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Mandal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Performance of medical students in developing nations like India is perceived to have largely declined. Aims: We attempted to assess the reasons behind such trends. Settings and Design: Students in their third year of medical study were given a predesigned, pretested structured and validated questionnaire that they filled in anonymously. The key areas assessed were concentration, interest and understanding of the subject and other perceived causes of poor performance. Tests for descriptive statistics were applied for evaluation. Results and Conclusions: One hundred and fifty students participated in the study. Fifty-five (36.66% students performed poorly. Male gender, inability to clear the previous professional examination at the first attempt, difficulty in understanding medium of instruction, self-assessed depression, sleep disorders and perceived parental and peer pressure and dissatisfaction with career choice were significantly linked with poor performance (P<0.05 for each factor. Socioeconomic status and regularity in class were not linked to academic performance.

  5. Comprehensive Healthcare module: medical and pharmacy students’ shared learning experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai-Eng Tan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Comprehensive Healthcare (CHC module was developed to introduce pre-clinical medical and pharmacy students to the concept of comprehensive healthcare. This study aims to explore their shared learning experiences within this module. Methodology: During this module, medical and pharmacy students conducted visits to patients’ homes and to related community-based organisations in small groups. They were required to write a reflective journal on their experiences regarding working with other professions as part of their module assessment. Highly scored reflective journals written by students from the 2011/2012 academic session were selected for analysis. Their shared learning experiences were identified via thematic analysis. We also analysed students’ feedback regarding the module. Results: Analysis of 25 selected reflective journals revealed several important themes: ‘Understanding of impact of illness and its relation to holistic care’, ‘Awareness of the role of various healthcare professions’ and ‘Generic or soft skills for inter-professional collaboration’. Although the primary objective of the module was to expose students to comprehensive healthcare, the students learnt skills required for future collaborative practice from their experiences. Discussion: The CHC module provided early clinical exposure to community-based health issues and incorporated some elements of inter-professional education. The students learnt about the roles of other healthcare professions and acquired soft skills required for future collaborative practice during this module.

  6. Implementation of a professional enrichment program to enhance medical school experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda R. Adkison

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Medical students experience stress during medical education that can negatively impact performance. Typical curricula in U.S. medical schools are rigorously intense and provide little or no time off between courses in the first two years of training. This intensity contributes to increased stress for students accustomed to performing academically near the top of the class prior to matriculating in medical school. We describe an innovative new academic calendar that was modified to create a Professional Enrichment Program. Students can step back from the rigors of coursework and engage in several types of activities in order to decompress from recent studying and examinations. These activities include electives, service opportunities, independent study, and clinical experiences that are self-selected by students. Students and faculty complete surveys about the activities they completed and the usefulness of their choices. Results show broad approval of the program with the greatest results supporting an appreciation of time to decompress and an increase in time for family and personal activities.

  7. Teaching communication skills and medical ethics to undergraduate medical student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SADIA AHSIN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to improve communication skills and knowledge of bioethics of last year medical students doing clerkship and to evaluate the effectiveness of using workshops for this purpose from students’ point of view, in order to continue such programs in future. Methods: After Ethical approval for the study a two-day workshop on teaching effective communication skills and principles of medical ethics was planned and conducted by the department of Medical Education through multidisciplinary faculty of Foundation University Medical College, Pakistan. A total of 102 last year medical students participated in this workshop. The students were divided into 8 groups each containing 12 students. A team of pre trained facilitators for each group conducted the group activities. Teaching strategies including interactive discussions on basic principles of doctor-patient relationship, power point presentations, day to day case scenarios, video clips and presentations involving students in role plays were used. Pre and post workshop self evaluation proformas about knowledge and skills of communication and medical ethics were rated (0=none, 1=below average, 2=average, 3=above average, 4=very good, 5=excellent by the students. Results: 89 out of 102 participants returned the proformas. A significant percentage of students (%82 showed improvement in their knowledge and skills of appreciating bioethical issues like valid informed consent, patient confidentiality, end of life issues and breaking bad news by rating as “very good” after participation in the workshop. More than %70 students recommended this activity for other students. Conclusion: Teaching through interactive workshops was found to be an effective method as reflected by students’ feedback. Therefore, the program will be continued in future.

  8. Training Medical Students in Empathic Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, Hannah Barnhill

    2011-01-01

    Empathy is an important component of the doctor-patient relationship, yet previous studies point to its steady decline in medical students as they progress through medical school and residency programs. Empathy training has thus been identified as a goal of instruction, yet it is unclear how this training can best be implemented within the medical

  9. The characteristics of depressive symptoms in medical students during medical education and training: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade Arthur; Alves Tânia; Baldassin Sergio; Nogueira Martins Luiz

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Medical education and training can contribute to the development of depressive symptoms that might lead to possible academic and professional consequences. We aimed to investigate the characteristics of depressive symptoms among 481 medical students (79.8% of the total who matriculated). Methods The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and cluster analyses were used in order to better describe the characteristics of depressive symptoms. Medical education and training in Brazil ...

  10. The Differential Impact of Various Assessment Parameters on the Medical Students Performance in the Professional Anatomy Examination in a New Medical School / El Impacto Diferencial de Varios Parámetros de Evaluación del Desempeño de Estudiantes de Medicina en el Examen Profesional de Anatomía en una Nueva Escuela de Medicina

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    L. A. J., Shittu; M. P., Zachariah; M. C., Izegbu; O. A., Adesanya; O. A., Ashiru.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Existe escasez de conocimiento sobre el nivel de concordancia entre todas las varias tareas de evalución sobre los contenidos de una misma área. En orden a evaluar esta hipótesis, adoptamos el concepto de validez convergente y también de área aislada, de falta de solidez académica entre los estudian [...] tes y readecuar el contenido curricular para balancear esa falta de solidez. Se llevó a cabo un estudio retrospectivo al azar sobre un total de 66 alumnos de Medicina de Tercer Año, quienes tuvieron su primer examen profesional de Anatomía en la nueva Escuela de Medicina de la Universidad del Estado de Lagos, Nigeria. Usando registros de sus grados en varios parámetros de evaluación: promedio final de la evaluación del Curso, preguntas cortas de redacción, ítemes de selección múltiple y prácticas. La media + desviación estándar, correlación de Person con el t-test de Sudents (p Abstract in english There is a dearth of knowledge on the level of agreement between all the various assessment tasks on the same content area, in order to test this hypothesis we adopted the concept of convergent validity and also to isolate area of academic weakness among the students and to readjust the curriculum c [...] ontent to balance the weakness. A blinded cohort retrospective study was carried out on a total of sixty-six third year medical students who had sat for their first professional examination in anatomy in the new medical college of Lagos State University. Using records of their grades in the various assessments parameters- the average end-in course assessment, short essays question (SEQ), multiple-choice questions (MCQ), and practical (Steeple-chase). The mean + S.D. Pearson's correlation with students t-test (p

  11. Do you think it's a disease? a survey of medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Erueti Chrissy; Glasziou Paul; Mar Chris; van Driel Mieke L

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The management of medical conditions is influenced by whether clinicians regard them as "disease" or "not a disease". The aim of the survey was to determine how medical students classify a range of conditions they might encounter in their professional lives and whether a different name for a condition would influence their decision in the categorisation of the condition as a 'disease' or 'not a disease'. Methods We surveyed 3 concurrent years of medical students to classif...

  12. Evaluation of internet access and utilization by medical students in Lahore, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Raza Ali; Jadoon Bilal A; Ullah Sami; Mansoorulhaq Hafiz; Zahid Muhammad F; Jadoon Nauman A; Hussain Mansoor; Yaqoob Rehan; Shahzad Mohammad A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The internet is increasingly being used worldwide in imparting medical education and improving its delivery. It has become an important tool for healthcare professionals training but the data on its use by medical students in developing countries is lacking with no study on the subject from Pakistan. This study was, therefore, carried out with an aim to evaluate the pattern of internet access and utilization by medical students in Pakistan. Methods A structured pre-tested ...

  13. Attitudes of Medical Students, Clinicians and Sports Scientists Towards Exercise Counselling

    OpenAIRE

    Abbyrhamy Gnanendran; David B. Pyne; Kieran E. Fallon; Peter A. Fricker

    2011-01-01

    We compared the amount of exercise undertaken by medical students, clinicians, and sport scientists with the National Australian Physical Activity (NAPA) Guidelines. A second aim was to compare attitudes to exercise counselling as preventive medicine between university- and clinic-based professionals. The research setting was a university medical school and a sports science sports medicine centre. A 20-item questionnaire was completed by 216 individuals (131 medical students, 43 clinicians an...

  14. Medical students' perception of dyad practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Rasmussen, Maria B; Bjørck, Sebastian; Gustafsson, Amandus; Ringsted, Charlotte V

    2014-01-01

    Training in pairs (dyad practice) has been shown to improve efficiency of clinical skills training compared with single practice but little is known about students' perception of dyad practice. The aim of this study was to explore the reactions and attitudes of medical students who were instructed to work in pairs during clinical skills training. A follow-up pilot survey consisting of four open-ended questions was administered to 24 fourth-year medical students, who completed four hours of dyad ...

  15. Medical Students’ Perception of Their Educational Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Preethi G Pai; Menezes, Vishma; Srikanth,; Subramanian, Atreya M.; Shenoy, Jnaneshwara P

    2014-01-01

    Background: Students’ perception of the environment within which they study has shown to have a significant impact on their behavior, academic progress and sense of well-being. This study was undertaken to evaluate the students’ perception of their learning environment in an Indian medical school following traditional curricula and to study differences, if any, between the students according to the stages of medical education, i.e., the pre-clinical and clinical stages.

  16. Perceived stress amongst medical and dental students

    OpenAIRE

    Harihar Chilukuri; Sowjanya Bachali; Nagaiah Jupalle Naidu; Ahmed Shaik Basha; Samuvel Verrapam Selvam

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reports in the last decade have shown that healthcare students face a high degree of stress. Cumulative stress leads to depression and suicidal behaviour in some of them.Aims: This study was designed to identify levels of perceived stress amongst medical and dental students in a private institution of South India.Methods: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey carried out on the first year undergraduate medical and dental students. Perceived stress was assessed using the Pe...

  17. A Medical-Model Professional Development School: Effects of Training Experience on the First Year of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Trisha Gerrish

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in teacher efficacy for classroom management, instructional strategies, and student engagement between teachers who trained in a full-time, yearlong, medical-model professional development school (PDS) and their experience as a first year teacher in comparison to teachers who participated…

  18. Emotional intelligence and perceived stress in healthcare students: a multi-institutional, multi-professional survey

    OpenAIRE

    McKendree Jean; Birks Yvonne; Watt Ian

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Emotional intelligence (EI) is increasingly discussed as having a potential role in medicine, nursing, and other healthcare disciplines, both for personal mental health and professional practice. Stress has been identified as being high for students in healthcare courses. This study investigated whether EI and stress differed among students in four health professions (dental, nursing, graduate mental health workers, medical) and whether there was evidence that EI might ser...

  19. Recording and podcasting of lectures for students of medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Pierre; Cuggia, Marc; Le Beux, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) becomes an important way for the knowledge transmission, especially in the field of medicine. Podcasting (mobile broadcast content) has recently emerged as an efficient tool for distributing information towards professionals, especially for e-learning contents.The goal of this work is to implement software and hardware tools for collecting medical lectures at its source by direct recording (halls and classrooms) and provide the automatic delivery of these resources for students on different type of devices (computer, smartphone or videogames console). We describe the overall architecture and the methods used by medical students to master this technology in their daily activities. We highlight the benefits and the limits of the Podcast technologies for medical education. PMID:21893751

  20. Low back pain among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroder, Philipp; Runer, Armin; Resch, Herbert; Tauber, Mark

    2011-02-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is known to affect both older and younger adults. Medical schools tend to have time-consuming curricula, possibly perpetuating a sedentary lifestyle, and a high prevalence of LBP among medical students. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of sedentary lifestyle and the 12-month prevalence of LBP in a sample group of medical students in comparison to a random sample of physical education students. A retrospective study involving a questionnaire-based inquiry of 103 medical students showed that they were approximately 2.5 times less physically active than the 107 physical education students (p sitting (p students was 53.4% (95% CI: 43.8%-63.0%), as compared to 60.7% (95% CI: 51.4% -70.0%) in the sample group of physical education students, yielding no statistically significant difference (p = 0.329). These data reveal a high prevalence of low back pain among students, which is rather alarming considering their young age. Strangely, the prevalence of LBP was not higher in medical students than in physically more active students, in spite of their sedentary lifestyle. According to the literature, the sitting position is no longer considered as a risk factor for low back pain. PMID:21473452

  1. What medical students value from their teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Maria Theresa; Tani, Massimiliano

    2007-08-01

    As Australian medical educators become more accustomed to the increasing pressures imposed upon them, there is a risk that the traditional educational relationship between a student and his or her teacher is replaced by a pure transactional relationship between a customer and his or her supplier. A large sample of medical students surveyed revealed that medical students seem to value directed rather than independent learning. New approaches to teaching, such as being innovative or entertaining, as well as facilitating participation, do not appear to be very important to medical students. Medical students do not seem to have strong preferences when it comes to assessment, contradicting some of the fundamental suggestions of the recent educational literature, in which assessment is often viewed as a key element in the formation and the direction of learning. The fact that medical students seem to reject many of the paradigms of the psychology-based educational literature, at least based on the large sample surveyed at the University of New South Wales, suggests that caution should be used in the development of training programs for teachers in medical faculties, and that learning and teaching should ensure that students' expectations and teachers' training do not mismatch. PMID:17669057

  2. Experiences of combat medical technician continuous professional development on operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall-Carrick, J V

    2012-09-01

    Whilst on operations, British military medical staff strive to provide high quality medical care to deployed soldiers. The application of UK Health Care Governance principles, particularly Clinical Professional Development (CPD), is especially challenging on operations. This article highlights some of the difficulties faced and the solutions generated to facilitate good CPD of Combat Medical Technicians (CMTs) deployed to Afghanistan on Operation HERRICK 13. The article describes the opportunities for CMTs to develop their skills in the assessment and management of trauma and primary health complaints. It also describes the difficulties in capturing this development especially when the supervision of CMTs was limited, with variable communication modalities and within the current limitations of the CMT portfolio. Solutions described include the use of individual reflective practice, face-to-face supervision and assessment by Medical Officers, Significant Event Reports, the mandatory After Action Review Process, and the development of formal standardised CMT CPD. This included refresher training after return from leave, Senior Medical Officer (SMO) weekly lectures and the SMO weekly report. Finally, the future of CMT CPD is raised and it is hoped that this article will stimulate debate into how to approach these challenges and refine these processes further. PMID:23472578

  3. The Key Role of a Transition Course in Preparing Medical Students for Internship

    OpenAIRE

    Teo, Alan R.; Harleman, Elizabeth; O’Sullivan, Patricia S.; Maa, John

    2011-01-01

    Among the core transitions in medical education is the one from medical school to residency. Despite this challenging transition, the final year of medical school is known as lacking structure and clarity. The authors examine the preparation of medical students for the professional and personal challenges of internship in the context of transition courses. They first describe the development of a residency transition course, offered since 2001 at the University of California, San Francisco, S...

  4. Social Justice in Medical Education: Strengths and Challenges of a Student-Driven Social Justice Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrose, Adrian Jacques H; Andaya, January M; Yamada, Seiji; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2014-01-01

    In the current rapidly evolving healthcare environment of the United States, social justice programs in pre-medical and medical education are needed to cultivate socially conscious and health professionals inclined to interdisciplinary collaborations. To address ongoing healthcare inequalities, medical education must help medical students to become physicians skilled not only in the biomedical management of diseases, but also in identifying and addressing social and structural determinants of...

  5. Analysis of test anxiety in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panti? Marina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Most students experience some level of anxiety during the exam. However, when anxiety affects the exam performance, it represents a problem. Test anxiety is a special form of anxiety, which is characterized with somatic, cognitive and behavioral symptoms of anxiety in situations of preparing and performing tests and exams. Test anxiety turns into a problem when it becomes so high that it interferes with test preparation and performance. The objective of this study was to ascertain the presence of test anxiety in medical students and to analyze some aspects of test anxiety in medical students of different gender, at different years of studying and possibility of failing a year. Material and methods. The study sample consisted of 198 students of Belgrade University School of Medicine of all years. Test anxiety was assessed by the Test Anxiety Inventory. Results. The following results have been obtained in the study: 1. Medical students generally present moderate level of test anxiety; 2. female students have statistically significant more intense symptoms of test anxiety than male students; 3. the most intense symptoms are in the 3rd year and the least are in the 4th year of studies; 4. there is no statistically significant difference in the presence of symptoms of test anxiety among the students who have repeated one of the years of studies and regular students. Conclusion. There is a considerable number of medical students who have intense symptoms of test anxiety and these students require help and support.

  6. Discourses of student orientation to medical education programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel H. Ellaway

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although medical students’ initial orientation is an important point of transition in medical education, there is a paucity of literature on the subject and major variations in the ways that different institutions orient incoming medical students to their programs. Methods: We conducted a discourse analysis of medical education orientation in the literature and on data from a survey of peer institutions’ approaches to orientation. Results: These two discourses of orientation had clear similarities, in particular, the critical role of ceremony and symbols, and the focus on developing professionalism and physician identities. There were also differences between them, in particular, in the way that the discourse in the literature focused on the symbolic and professional aspects of orientation; something we have called ‘cultural orientation’. Meanwhile, those who were responsible for orientation in their own institutions tended to focus on the practical and social dimensions. Conclusion: By examining how orientation has been described and discussed, we identify three domains of orientation: cultural, social, and practical. These domains are relatively distinct in terms of the activities associated with them, and in terms of who is involved in organizing and running these activities. We also describe orientation as a liminal activity system on the threshold of medical school where incoming students initially cross into the profession. Interestingly, this state of ambiguity also extends to the scholarship of orientation with only some of its aspects attracting formal enquiry, even though there is a growing interest in transitions in medical education as a whole. We hope, therefore, that this study can help to legitimize enquiry into orientation in all its forms and that it can begin to situate the role of orientation more firmly within the firmament of medical education practice and research.

  7. SELF MEDICATION PATTERN, INCIDENCE AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH IT, AMONG FIRST YEAR MBBS STUDENTS OF MEDICAL COLLEGE JAMMU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusrat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Self - medication is quite common practice in general and particularly among medical students. Self - medication can be defined as obtaining and consuming medication without the advice of a clinician for treatment of an ailment. There can be many reasons for increased likelihood of self - medication among the medical students like easy access and senior medical student’s advice, easy access to physician’s samples, because of the white coat, from pharmacist / chemist shops. 1 However self - medication can be quite harmful and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It could lead to various complications and side effects like - habituation and addiction, poisoning, hyper vitaminosis, antibiotic resistance and incorrect and delayed diagnosis, over diagnosis or under diagnosis, at times really serious and fatal consequences can occur. It results in wastage of resources, increase resistance of pathogens and can causes serious hazards like adverse drug reaction, prolonged suffering and drug dependence. This study was performed to assess and evaluate the incidence and awareness of self - medications among the medical students of first professional MBBS in medical college Ja mmu. A study on one hundred medical students of Jammu medical college was conducted to assess and evaluates the pattern of self - medication among these students. This study was done to know the frequencies and reasons and the pattern of self - medication among young medical students of Jammu region. A detail questionnaire was prepared and each student was asked to fill up the Performa and then the data was analyzed. It was found that self - medication is very common (90 % and is comparable to studies from other parts of the world. For most of them the reason for self - medication was common cold . The result emphasizes the amount of problem in the society about self - medication and lack of awareness about side effects. Hence more strict regulations are needed to avoid more healthcare problems and have a responsible pattern of self - medication. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : To determine the prevalence and pattern of self - medication among medical students of Jammu. To assess and evaluate the reasons, factors and problems related to self - medications.

  8. Debt crisis ahead for Irish medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, C; Doyle, B; O'Flynn, S

    2014-06-01

    Internationally medical student debt is a cause of concern. A survey of medical students in UCC (response rate of 191 representing 35% of the EU student cohort) reveals that 34 (26%) of direct entry medicine (DEM) students and 36 (61%) graduate entrants (GEM) have a loan with an anticipated average debt of Euro17,300 and Euro80,000 on graduation respectively. Fifty-three (90%) graduate entrants and 75 (57%) direct entrants revealed that they often worry about their current financial situation. Fifty-three (28%) of students have a part-time job and many were concerned about the degree to which this conflicted with their academic workload. 118 (89%) of school leavers and 48 (81%) graduates received financial assistance from their families to fund their college expenses. Student responses recommended the introduction of a government supported low interest rate loan and other incentives to help service high levels of debt associated with medical education. PMID:24988840

  9. Medical students’ perceptions of their development of ‘soft skills’ Part I : a qualitative research methodology

    OpenAIRE

    W. J. Schurink; Kruger, Christa; Bergh, Anne-Marie; Van Staden, C.W.; J.L. Roos; Pickworth, G.E.; Joubert, Pierre M.; Du Preez, R.R.; Grey, Somarie V.; Lindeque, B.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following the introduction of a new, integrated, problem-oriented undergraduate medical curriculum at the University of Pretoria (UP) in 1997, a research project was undertaken to study interpersonal skills, professional attitudes, teamwork, ethics and related topics – which have come to be known collectively as ‘soft skills’. This contribution is the first of two articles on the professional socialisation of medical students and their development of ‘soft skills’. It describes...

  10. A survey of medical students attending an international ?student conference

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Mamo; Chantal Fenech

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the lifestyle choices of international medical students attending a ?student conference. ?Study Design: Questionnaire-based census study.?Methods: A pre-tested structured questionnaire was given to the 481 delegates attending an ?international medical student conference in 2009 in Macedonia. The respondents were asked ?questions on their demographics, physical activity, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, sexual ?activity and nutritional intake. The results obtained fr...

  11. Spectrum of tablet computer use by medical students and residents at an academic medical center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The value of tablet computer use in medical education is an area of considerable interest, with preliminary investigations showing that the majority of medical trainees feel that tablet computers added value to the curriculum. This study investigated potential differences in tablet computer use between medical students and resident physicians. Materials & Methods. Data collection for this survey was accomplished with an anonymous online questionnaire shared with the medical students and residents at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM) in July and August of 2012. Results. There were 76 medical student responses (26% response rate) and 66 resident/fellow responses to this survey (21% response rate). Residents/fellows were more likely to use tablet computers several times daily than medical students (32% vs. 20%, p = 0.035). The most common reported uses were for accessing medical reference applications (46%), e-Books (45%), and board study (32%). Residents were more likely than students to use a tablet computer to access an electronic medical record (41% vs. 21%, p = 0.010), review radiology images (27% vs. 12%, p = 0.019), and enter patient care orders (26% vs. 3%, p < 0.001). Discussion. This study shows a high prevalence and frequency of tablet computer use among physicians in training at this academic medical center. Most residents and students use tablet computers to access medical references, e-Books, and to study for board exams. Residents were more likely to use tablet computers to complete clinical tasks. Conclusions. Tablet computer use among medical students and resident physicians was common in this survey. All learners used tablet computers for point of care references and board study. Resident physicians were more likely to use tablet computers to access the EMR, enter patient care orders, and review radiology studies. This difference is likely due to the differing educational and professional demands placed on resident physicians. Further study is needed better understand how tablet computers and other mobile devices may assist in medical education and patient care. PMID:26246973

  12. Developmental life of the medical student: curriculum considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitt, Don R

    2015-02-01

    Few medical educators would dispute that the emotional development and well being of the medical student is of critical importance in the pathway to physicianhood. It has been suggested that failure to address this aspect of medical education may account for various health problems and levels of impairment during medical school and beyond. Some authors have suggested that the personal development and "professionalization" of the student occurs through modeling, the medical school "culture," and the "hidden curriculum." In recognition of the randomness, incompleteness, or inadequacy of this approach, a number of attempts have been made to address this important but difficult dimension of medical education. However, programs designed to foster self-reflection and appreciation of affect in the physician-patient relationship are often limited as electives or unsupported by faculty and staff and therefore fall short of their objective. The author proposes that a pedagogical framework based on an analogy of life cycle theory (a la Erikson or others) offers a schema within which to consider efforts being made in medical curricula to promote self-awareness, appreciation of affect in oneself and one's patients, and a context in which to minimize the risk of illness and impairment. PMID:25001431

  13. Attitudes to cadaveric organ donation in Irish preclinical medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Kevin C

    2011-06-01

    There is a worldwide shortage of organs for transplantation. It has been shown that the attitude of healthcare professionals can improve the rates of organ donation, and that educational programs aimed at improving both attitudes and knowledge base of professionals can have positive outcomes. Although there has been research carried out on this topic, there has been none in Ireland. Anatomy dissection can be a stressor to medical students-we investigate the attitudes of Irish students to organ donation and how they change with exposure to anatomy dissection. A questionnaire was administered to first year students in the School of Medicine in University College Dublin, Ireland, three times over a nine-week period at the commencement of classes in an academic year. The attitudes of the students were positive throughout regarding organ donation by a stranger, a family member, or themselves. There was, however, a significant decrease in support for the donation of a family member\\'s organs in a minority of students. Irish students\\' attitudes to postmortem organ donation are positive and are not changed by exposure to the dissecting room. There is support for the donation of organs, and willingness among students to donate their own organs and support donation by family members.

  14. Professionalism in Student Online Social Networking: The Role of Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, A.; Kienhuis, M.; Pisani, H.; Shahwan-Akl, L.; White, K.

    2013-01-01

    Social media now form a common part of university students' experience. Both at university and after graduation, in their personal and professional lives, social media offer opportunities for connection previously unavailable. The ubiquitous nature of social networking has brought with it professional and ethical issues that need to be…

  15. Student Preparation for Professional Practice in Early Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Jennifer R.; Coufal, Kathy L.; Subramanian, Anu

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of students for professional practice in the field of early intervention has changed as a result of mandates through Part C, Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The purpose of this survey research was to describe the knowledge and skill areas, specific to early intervention, included in pre-professional curricula…

  16. Emergency Medicine for medical students world wide!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perinpam, Larshan; Thi Huynh, Anh-Nhi

    2015-01-01

    A guest blog from Larshan Perinpam (President of ISAEM) and Anh-Nhi Thi Huynh (Vice president of external affairs, ISAEM) - http://blogs.bmj.com/emj/2015/04/17/emergency-medicine-for-medical-students-world-wide/

  17. Continuous mentoring of medical students provides space for reflection and awareness of their own development

    OpenAIRE

    Susanne Kalén; Sari Ponzer; Astrid Seeberger; Anna Kiessling; Charlotte Silén

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to increase under-standing of the meaning of continuous group and individual mentoring for medical students´ personal and professional development. Methods: A qualitative approach with individual student interviews and directed content analysis was chosen to investigate and interpret the meaning of mentorship. Results: Five themes emerged: psychosocial support by the mentor, a relationship with a physician beneath the professional surface, space for someth...

  18. AWARENESS ABOUT TOBACCO USE AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS OF UTTARAKHAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Sharma

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide tobacco is the second most common cause of death. It is the biggest enemy of public health, still people smoke knowing well the consequences. In addition to the high public health costs of treating tobacco-caused diseases, tobacco kills people at the height of their productivity, depriving families of bread winners and nations of a healthy workforce. Tobacco addiction mostly starts at adolescence. Various reasons cited by adolescents being; peer pressure, stress or for fun. Research Question: What is the level of awareness regarding tobacco use among medical students? Objectives: To assess awareness about tobacco abuse among medical students of Uttarakhand. Study Design: Cross-Sectional epidemiological study. Settings and Participants: Medical and Dental students of all professionals excluding Interns of two Medical and two Dental colleges of Uttarakhand were selected for survey. Study Period: May 2008 to October 2008 Sample Size: 400 Medical and Dental students. Sampling Technique: Simple stratified random sampling. Study Variable: A predesigned, pretested, self-administered questionnaire was used for collecting information on Age, Sex, Socio-demographic profile, Knowledge and awareness regarding Tobacco use, etc.  Statistical Analysis: Standard statistical package i.e. SPSS, Microsoft Excel.  Results: Life time prevalence of tobacco use was found to be 31.75%, the most common reasons cited by students was peer pressure 33.7%. The level of awareness regarding the harmful effects of tobacco smoking was found to be 91.8%. Majority 68.3% of tobacco users think that media plays an important source for creating awareness about harmful effects of tobacco. 83.25% students are against tobacco advertisements and support ban, 84.75% on tobacco use in public place. 83.75% students surveyed believed that the preventive measures taken up by the Government are not sufficient.

  19. Medical students’ attitudes toward gay men

    OpenAIRE

    Matharu Kabir; Kravitz Richard L; McMahon Graham T; Wilson Machelle D; Fitzgerald Faith T

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Healthcare providers’ attitudes toward sexual minorities influence patient comfort and outcomes. This study characterized medical student attitudes toward gay men, focusing on behavior, personhood, gay civil rights, and male toughness. Methods A cross-sectional web-based anonymous survey was sent to medical students enrolled at the University of California, Davis (N?=?371) with a response rate of 68%. Results Few respondents expressed negative attitudes toward gay men or w...

  20. The Differential Impact of Various Assessment Parameters on the Medical Students Performance in the Professional Anatomy Examination in a New Medical School El Impacto Diferencial de Varios Parámetros de Evaluación del Desempeño de Estudiantes de Medicina en el Examen Profesional de Anatomía en una Nueva Escuela de Medicina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. J. Shittu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a dearth of knowledge on the level of agreement between all the various assessment tasks on the same content area, in order to test this hypothesis we adopted the concept of convergent validity and also to isolate area of academic weakness among the students and to readjust the curriculum content to balance the weakness. A blinded cohort retrospective study was carried out on a total of sixty-six third year medical students who had sat for their first professional examination in anatomy in the new medical college of Lagos State University. Using records of their grades in the various assessments parameters- the average end-in course assessment, short essays question (SEQ, multiple-choice questions (MCQ, and practical (Steeple-chase. The mean + S.D. Pearson's correlation with students t-test (pExiste escasez de conocimiento sobre el nivel de concordancia entre todas las varias tareas de evalución sobre los contenidos de una misma área. En orden a evaluar esta hipótesis, adoptamos el concepto de validez convergente y también de área aislada, de falta de solidez académica entre los estudiantes y readecuar el contenido curricular para balancear esa falta de solidez. Se llevó a cabo un estudio retrospectivo al azar sobre un total de 66 alumnos de Medicina de Tercer Año, quienes tuvieron su primer examen profesional de Anatomía en la nueva Escuela de Medicina de la Universidad del Estado de Lagos, Nigeria. Usando registros de sus grados en varios parámetros de evaluación: promedio final de la evaluación del Curso, preguntas cortas de redacción, ítemes de selección múltiple y prácticas. La media + desviación estándar, correlación de Person con el t-test de Sudents (p< 0.05 fueron analizados con el programa SPSS 11 (SPSS inc. Chicago, Illinois. La parte práctica fue significativamente correlacionada con todo el rendimiento (r = 0.89, p< 0.01; con un valor del t-Students de 6.15 (p< 0.01. Aunque las preguntas cortas mostraron correlación significativa para la totalidad de lo hecho (r =0.72; p<0.01, el valor de t de 0,4 no fue significativo, pero estuvo dentro de un rango aceptable. La parte práctica, selección múltiple y preguntas cortas de redacción y final del curso, mostraron un orden de clasificación de relativo desempeño en las tareas de evaluación, lo que indica que, en general, la actividad de los estudiantes en el examen profesional fue mejor que en el examen del curso y de ahí, la necesidad de readecuar este patrón y enfatizar el rol de evaluación dentro del curso en el curriculum

  1. Practice location preferences of Alabama medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, D W; Miller, H L; Roberts, R W

    1985-09-01

    Factors that help determine physicians' practice locations and specialties were listed by 396 students and 103 medical school faculty members at the University of Alabama School of Medicine. The students preferred practice locations similar in size to their hometowns. Their specialty choices were closely related to both practice location preferences and hometown sizes. However, there was a tendency among the students to prefer a small city (20,000 to 100,000 population) practice location irrespective of their hometown sizes or specialty choices. Factors such as spouse's preference, proximity of relatives, and financial incentives were not related to the students' practice location preferences. Faculty members reported they believed that medical education biases students toward urban and nonprimary care practice, and one-third of them said that they were role models for the students' specialty choices. However, the students said faculty members had little influence on their specialty choices while acknowledging the importance of clinical experiences. In general, Alabama medical students are similar to medical students elsewhere with respect to determinants of practice location preference. PMID:4032444

  2. Ireland's medical brain drain: migration intentions of Irish medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gouda, Pishoy

    2015-12-01

    To provide the optimum level of healthcare, it is important that the supply of well-trained doctors meets the demand. However, despite many initiatives, Ireland continues to have a shortfall of physicians, which has been projected to persist. Our study aimed to investigate the migration intentions of Irish medical students and identify the factors that influence their decisions in order to design appropriate interventions to sustain the supply of trained doctors in order to maintain a viable medical system.

  3. Career choices among medical students in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Moslehuddin Ahmed

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available SM Moslehuddin Ahmed1, Md Anwarul Azim Majumdar2, Rezina Karim3, Sayeeda Rahman2, Nuzhat Rahman41Department of Community Medicine, Uttara Adhunik Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 2Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, Bradford, UK; 3Department of Microbiology, Uttara Adhunik Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 4Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAIntroduction: Information regarding career choices of medical students is important to plan human resources for health, design need-based educational programs, and ensure equitable and quality health care services in a country.Aim: The aim of the study is to identify career choices, nature of career, intended practice locations, and reasons for career choices of Bangladesh medical students.Method: First-, third-, and fifth-year students of Bangladesh Medical College and Uttara Adhunik Medical College completed a self-report questionnaire on career choices, nature of career, intended practice locations, and reasons for career choices. The students were requested to choose three long-term choices from the given specialties.Results: A total of 132 students responded (46 males and 86 females and response rate was 75%. The popular choices (first choice among males and females were medical specialty, surgical specialty, obstetrics and gynecology, and general practice. For first, second, and third choices altogether, male students chose surgical specialties and female students preferred medical specialties. The leading reasons for selecting a specialty were personal interest and wide job opportunity. More than 67% of respondents wanted to join private services and about 90% chose major cities as practice locations. About 43% of respondents expressed willingness to practice medicine in Bangladesh, whereas 51% of total respondents wanted to practice abroad.Discussion: Majority of students intended to specialize in established clinical specialties and subsequently practice in major cities, and more than half wanted to immigrate to other countries. Basic medical subjects and service-oriented (lifestyle-related and preventive/social medical specialties were found to be less attractive. If this pattern continues, Bangladesh will suffer a chronic shortage of health personnel in certain specialties and in rural areas.Conclusions: Reorientation of health care and medical education is needed along with policy settings to attract doctors to the scarcity and high-priority disciplines so that imbalances encountered would be minimal in future.Keywords: career choices, medical students, Bangladesh 

  4. Do medical students require education on issues related to plagiarism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Joe; Jacob, Molly

    2015-01-01

    In the course of our professional experience, we have seen that many medical students plagiarise. We hypothesised that they do so out of ignorance and that they require formal education on the subject. With this objective in mind, we conducted a teaching session on issues related to plagiarism. As a part of this, we administered a quiz to assess their baseline knowledge on plagiarism and a questionnaire to determine their attitudes towards it. We followed this up with an interactive teaching session, in which we discussed various aspects of plagiarism. We subjected the data obtained from the quiz and questionnaire to bivariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 423 medical students participated in the study. Their average score for the quiz was 4.96±1.67 (out of 10). Age, gender and years in medical school were not significantly associated with knowledge regarding plagiarism. The knowledge scores were negatively correlated with permissive attitudes towards plagiarism and positively correlated with attitudes critical of the practice. Men had significantly higher scores on permissive attitudes compared to women . In conclusion, we found that the medical students' knowledge regarding plagiarism was limited. Those with low knowledge scores tended to have permissive attitudes towards plagiarism and were less critical of the practice. We recommend the inclusion of formal instruction on this subject in the medical curriculum, so that this form of academic misconduct can be tackled. PMID:25671582

  5. Supporting Students in Recovery on College Campuses: Opportunities for Student Affairs Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Perron, Brian E.; Grahovac, Ivana D.; Uppal, Joseph S.; Granillo, M. Teresa; Shutter, Jamie; Porter, Carolyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the significant attention that drugs and alcohol receive on college campuses, few resources and supports are available to students who are recovering from an addiction. Student affairs professionals are uniquely positioned to support these students with a variety of strategies. This article summarizes what is currently known about college students in recovery and ways that student affairs professionals can help build an infrastructure of formal and informal supports for this underserv...

  6. National ultrasound curriculum for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltarowich, Oksana H; Di Salvo, Donald N; Scoutt, Leslie M; Brown, Douglas L; Cox, Christian W; DiPietro, Michael A; Glazer, Daniel I; Hamper, Ulrike M; Manning, Maria A; Nazarian, Levon N; Neutze, Janet A; Romero, Miriam; Stephenson, Jason W; Dubinsky, Theodore J

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) is an extremely useful diagnostic imaging modality because of its real-time capability, noninvasiveness, portability, and relatively low cost. It carries none of the potential risks of ionizing radiation exposure or intravenous contrast administration. For these reasons, numerous medical specialties now rely on US not only for diagnosis and guidance for procedures, but also as an extension of the physical examination. In addition, many medical school educators recognize the usefulness of this technique as an aid to teaching anatomy, physiology, pathology, and physical diagnosis. Radiologists are especially interested in teaching medical students the appropriate use of US in clinical practice. Educators who recognize the power of this tool have sought to incorporate it into the medical school curriculum. The basic question that educators should ask themselves is: "What should a student graduating from medical school know about US?" To aid them in answering this question, US specialists from the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound and the Alliance of Medical School Educators in Radiology have collaborated in the design of a US curriculum for medical students. The implementation of such a curriculum will vary from institution to institution, depending on the resources of the medical school and space in the overall curriculum. Two different examples of how US can be incorporated vertically or horizontally into a curriculum are described, along with an explanation as to how this curriculum satisfies the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies, modified for the education of our future physicians. PMID:24901774

  7. Perceptions of medical students undergoing cadaveric training: a sociocognitive perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. C. O. Njoku

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The emotional and sociocognitive aspects of human dissection are important aspects of professionalism in medical training and so should be critically evaluated in the present day changing society. Medical students of Ebonyi State University, Nigeria completed 390 questionnaires. The questionnaires included questions seeking demographic information; open-ended questions on their first experience of dissection and suggestions on improvements in training. The Visual analogue scale (VAS was used to assess anxiety and satisfaction levels. The questionnaires were analyzed statistically with P<0.05 indicating level of significance. Majority (35.7% of the students was excited/fulfilled after their first experience and 41.5% were of the opinion that life in humans is more appreciated by dissection. Their mean anxiety level was 3.42 while satisfaction rating was 7.13 on a scale of 1-10. A greater number of students suggested that conducive learning environment and improved preservation techniques would improve satisfaction (30.3% and 33.1% respectively. A Conducive environment and better preservation of cadavers are the major factors that improve satisfaction. Psychosocial factors should be assessed constantly to ascertain attitudinal changes of students, which will be helpful in quality of professional formation.

  8. Practice Location Preferences of Alabama Medical Students;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, David W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Factors that help determine physicians' practice locations and specialties were listed by students and medical school faculty at the University of Alabama School of Medicine. Students, while acknowledging the importance of clinical experiences, said faculty members had little influence on their specialty choices. (Author/MLW)

  9. PSYCHOACTIVE SUBSTANCE USE AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, R.V. Zulfikar; Vankar, G.K.

    1994-01-01

    Using a standard epidemiological survey instrument for psychoactive drug use, 215 medical students in three classes were studied. One third of all students reported non-medical drug use. The substances ever used were: betel nut 13%, smokeless tobacco 3%, cigarettes 12%, alcohol 12.5%, cannabis 0.9% and benzodiazepines 3.7%. Last month use was reported for four substances and daily use was reported for cigarettes only (3.2%). Cigarette and benzodiazepine use mostly began after entry to medical...

  10. A proposal for clinical genetics (genetics in medicine) education for medical technologists and other health professionals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohzaki, Hidetsugu

    2014-01-01

    Since the completion of the Human Genome Project, technology has developed markedly in fields such as medical genetics and genetic counseling in the medical arena. In particular, this technology has advanced the discovery of and ways of understanding various genes responsible for genetic diseases, and genetic polymorphisms thought to be associated with disease. Some have been implicated as factors in common lifestyle diseases and have increased the significance of genetic testing. In Japan, doctors and other health professionals, such as nurse and medical technologists have been engaged in genetic testing and genetic disease treatment. Chromosomal and gene aberrations were detected mainly by medical technologists. However, due to the nature of medical technologists who have to provide various clinical tests, such as blood test, pre-medical technology students are required to cover tremendous knowledge of different academic fields to pass the national exam. Therefore, the time allowed for such students to study chromosomal and gene analysis is quite limited. Moreover, they are forced to enter the medical setting without receiving sufficient training. Among them, only few medical technologists specialize in chromosomal and gene analysis. However, with the advancement of clinical genetics and development of chromosomal and gene analysis, conducting clinical practice is becoming more and more difficult for medical technologists who just passed the national exam. Also, doctors and other health professionals have not been able to keep up with service demands either. This paper attempts to address knowledge and skills gaps (especially clinical genetics, English, and ICT literacy) of medical technologists and we propose educational methods to prepare medical genetics professionals in Japan to meet these gaps. PMID:25202688

  11. Social Media Etiquette for the Modern Medical Student: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Harrison

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Most medical students worldwide are using some form of social media platform to supplement their learning via file sharing and to stay up-to-date on medical events. Often, social media may blur the line between socialization and educational use, so it is important to be aware of how one is utilizing social media and how to remain professional. Research has yielded some troublesome themes of misconduct: drunken behaviour, violations of confidentiality and defamation of institutions. Because there is no universal policy to monitor online professionalism, there exists the potential for indiscretions to occur. It has been reported that misdemeanours can affect future residency placements and employment for medical students. Accordingly, studies suggest that educators need to recognize this new era of professionalism and adapt policies and reprimands to meet modern outlets where professionalism may be violated.

  12. Drinking among medical students: a questionnaire survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Collier, D. J.; Beales, I. L.

    1989-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of drinking among medical students a questionnaire on smoking, exercise, drinking, and weight was distributed among the students available. A total of 260 replies were received from an estimated available population of 350 students (134 men and 126 women). The mean alcohol consumption obtained by a quantity-frequency measure was 20.5 units/week for male students and 14.6 units/week for female students. Retrospective diary reports showed mean (SE) consumptions of 18 (2...

  13. Medical students’ anxiety on beginning clinical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Imran Ali Shah; Mukhtar Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Background: The switch to the hospital-based course represents a significant stressful change in medical students’ experience. Objective: To investigate the anxiety levels in students in various clinical situations. Method: A 40-item questionnaire based study was conducted to assess students’ anxieties about potential anxiety provoking clinical situations and respondent ratings were requested for each of the 40 items on the list. Results: ‘Getting diagnoses wrong’ was the biggest worry overal...

  14. Advice from Professionals to Student Journalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanchyk, Linda

    1998-01-01

    Lists current professional journalists who were also high school journalists and surveys them for advice for today's scholastic journalists. Advises working on a staff; reading and writing everything possible; staying aware of current events; and getting comfortable with technology. (PA)

  15. Associations of Pass-Fail Outcomes with Psychological Health of First-Year Medical Students in a Malaysian Medical School

    OpenAIRE

    Yusoff, Muhamad S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The demanding and intense environment of medical training can create excessive pressures on medical students that eventually lead to unfavorable consequences, either at a personal or professional level. These consequences can include poor academic performance and impaired cognitive ability. This study was designed to explore associations between pass-fail outcome and psychological health parameters (i.e. stress, anxiety, and depression symptoms). Methods: A cross-sectional study w...

  16. Validated instruments used to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Symons Andrew B; Isaiah New; McGuigan Denise; Gunukula Sameer K; Lam Wai; Akl Elie A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Instruments to detect changes in attitudes towards people with disabilities are important for evaluation of training programs and for research. While we were interested in instruments specific for medical students, we aimed to systematically review the medical literature for validated survey instruments used to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability. Methods We electronically searched Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ...

  17. Professional behaviours demonstrated by undergraduate dental students using an incident reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C L; Grey, N J A

    2015-05-22

    Critical incident reporting is widely used across healthcare and other sectors for reporting adverse events or behaviours. More recently it has been used in medical education as a means of assessing student professionalism. The aims of this study were to determine the usage of critical incident forms when reporting behaviours related to professionalism demonstrated by undergraduate dental students, and the types of behaviours exhibited. Three types of form could be awarded for highly professional (green), minor unprofessional (yellow) and serious unprofessional (red) behaviours. All forms completed over a two-year period were analysed recording the year of student, type of card and demographic of the member of staff reporting the incident. All text relating to the nature of the incident was entered into a qualitative data analysis software package and analysed thematically. In total, 583 cards were awarded, 55% green, 34% yellow and 11% red. Seventy-four percent of cards were awarded in a clinical environment, with administrative staff using them the most (29%). The overwhelming professional behaviours demonstrated related to altruism. The most common unprofessional behaviours related to a lack of conscientiousness, although a greater range of common unprofessional behaviours were reported. In conclusion, critical incidents forms were widely used for reporting both professional and unprofessional behaviours particularly in clinical environments by a range of staff. Such forms may be a valuable addition to the professionalism assessment portfolio, capturing behaviours not previously reported using traditional methods. PMID:25998353

  18. Developing Professionals: Student Experiences of a Real-Client Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Kate

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the learning potential of the student experience of working with real clients in a final-year undergraduate unit that aims to develop professional skills. Students, working in consultancy teams, developed communication strategies for a not-for-profit organisation. A teaching intervention was trialled late in semester to…

  19. Assessing Student Interest and Familiarity with Professional Psychology Specialty Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark-Wroblewski, Kimberly; Wiggins, Tina L.; Ryan, Joseph J.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined undergraduate psychology students' (N = 83) self-reported interest in and familiarity with five specialty areas in professional psychology: counseling psychology, clinical psychology, school psychology, forensic psychology, and criminal profiling. Results suggest that although students are quite interested in careers…

  20. The Future of Our Organizations: Students and Early Career Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushko, Oksana; Wang, Sherry C.; Warrior, Anitra M.

    2012-01-01

    This response focuses on the significance of ethnic minority psychology organizations and other related membership structures to early career psychologists (ECPs) and counseling psychology students. We discuss not only reasons for why students and ECPs may not be joining professional organizations, but also strategies for recruiting, supporting,…

  1. Perspectives of Online Graduate Preparation Programs for Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Sara; Diepenbrock, Amy

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory research study utilized qualitative and quantitative research methods to determine how midlevel student affairs professionals perceive online education for preparation in the field. The participants noted that they do not perceive online education as equivalent to master's degree preparation programs for student affairs…

  2. Virtual patient simulation: Promotion of clinical reasoning abilities of medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Rokhsareh Aghili; Khamseh, Mohammad E.; Mansoureh Taghavinia; Mojtaba Malek; Zahra Emami; Baradaran, Hamid R; Mahboobeh Khabaz Mafinejad

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Virtual patient simulation (VPS) is used in the education of health care professionals. This method brings an opportunity for the learner to examine necessary diagnostic and therapeutic skills. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of VPS on clinical reasoning abilities of medical students and to evaluate their attitude towards VPS in clinical endocrinology course in a teacher centered educational environment.Methods: Fifty-one medical students in their 6th academic yea...

  3. Knowledge, attitude and practice of tobacco smoking by medical students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Haqwi Ali; Tamim Hani; Asery Ali

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tobacco consumption is associated with considerable negative impact on health. Health professionals, including future doctors, should have a leading role in combating smoking in the community. Objectives: The aims of the study were to assess the prevalence of smoking among medical students of newly established medical colleges in Riyadh city, the capital of Saudi Arabia, as well as to assess students? attitude, practice and their knowledge on the risk factors of tobacco ...

  4. ATTITUDE TOWARDS CHEATING AMONG STUDENTS OF PROFESSIONALAND NON PROFESSIONAL COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHRAWAN SHINDE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was done to compare the attitude towards cheating of the professional and nonprofessional course students. In this study the sample consisted of 20 professional and 20 nonprofessional course students, studying in DEI and University. For the measurement of Attitude towards Cheating, Attitude towards cheating scale by Sharma was administered on the sample. It consists of 35 statements which are either positive or negative. Responses were to be obtained on five point scale. t-test was used for statistical analysis. The finding of this study showed that the students of professional courses have more positive attitude towards cheating as compared to the students of nonprofessional course. The value of t=16.59** was found to be statistically significant at .01 level between the two group of subjects.

  5. Assessing Deaf Cultural Competency of Physicians and Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Lisa; LaHousse, Sheila F.; Nakaji, Melanie C.; SADLER, GEORGIA ROBINS

    2010-01-01

    The Medical Students, Cancer Control, and the Deaf Community Training program (DCT) intended to create physicians who were culturally competent to care for deaf patients were evaluated. DCT medical students (n?=?22), UCSD medical faculty (n?=?131), and non-DCT medical students (n?=?211) were anonymously surveyed about their perceptions related to deaf patients, deaf cultural competency, and interpreter use. The faculty and non-DCT medical students displayed less knowledge than the DCT student...

  6. Medical students on the value of role models for developing ‘soft skills’ - “That’s the way you do it”

    OpenAIRE

    Joubert, Pierre M.; Kruger, Christa; Bergh, Anne-Marie; Pickworth, G.E.; Van Staden, C.W.; J.L. Roos; W. J. Schurink; Du Preez, R.R.; Grey, Somarie V.; Lindeque, B.G.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Soft Skills Project examined the professional development of medical students at the University of Pretoria, especially their doctor-patient interaction skills and professional socialisation. This paper reports on one of the findings of the project, namely the importance that medical students attach to role models in the development of soft skills. METHODS: We used a qualitative method with symbolic interactionism and grounded theory as framework. Fourty two final-year...

  7. Occupational Therapy Students’ Perspectives of Professionalism: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa M. Sullivan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professionalism is a dynamic, socially constructed idea, rendering it difficult to comprehend. Though characterized by the demonstration of values and behaviors, its meaning has not been fully explored and remains tacit. To explore how first- and second-year master’s of occupational therapy students conceptualize professionalism. Method: This qualitative pilot study evolved from an interpretivist theoretical perspective. Convenience sampling yielded four first-year and seven second-year students from one entry-level master’s program to participate in two separate focus groups. Line-by-line constant comparison methods were used to analyze the data and identify categories. An audit trail, peer debriefing, and member checking were employed. Results: Data analysis of the first-year focus group generated three categories: Searching for explicit examples, Responsibility to the profession, and Building and fulfilling societal responsibility. Analysis of the second-year focus group yielded two categories: Professional values and behaviors and Professionalism as socially constructed. Conclusion: Professionalism is a dynamic concept requiring nuanced understandings specific to context. Students should be encouraged to develop reflective abilities allowing them to analyze and act in a way that is most appropriate for the situation. Understanding students’ conceptualizations of professionalism may better allow occupational therapy regulators, managers, and academic and fieldwork educators to identify teaching and research priorities.

  8. Competency in ECG Interpretation Among Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kope?, Grzegorz; Mago?, Wojciech; Ho?da, Mateusz; Podolec, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Background Electrocardiogram (ECG) is commonly used in diagnosis of heart diseases, including many life-threatening disorders. We aimed to assess skills in ECG interpretation among Polish medical students and to analyze the determinants of these skills. Material/Methods Undergraduates from all Polish medical schools were asked to complete a web-based survey containing 18 ECG strips. Questions concerned primary ECG parameters (rate, rhythm, and axis), emergencies, and common ECG abnormalities. Analysis was restricted to students in their clinical years (4th–6th), and students in their preclinical years (1st–3rd) were used as controls. Results We enrolled 536 medical students (females: n=299; 55.8%), aged 19 to 31 (23±1.6) years from all Polish medical schools. Most (72%) were in their clinical years. The overall rate of good response was better in students in years 4th–5th than those in years 1st–3rd (66% vs. 56%; pstudents who reported ECG self-learning (69% vs. 62%; pstudents who attended or did not attend regular ECG classes (66% vs. 66%; p=0.99). On multivariable analysis (pstudents in their clinical years have a good level of competency in interpreting the primary ECG parameters, but their ability to recognize ECG signs of emergencies and common heart abnormalities is low. ECG interpretation skills are determined by self-education but not by attendance at regular ECG classes. Our results indicate qualitative and quantitative deficiencies in teaching ECG interpretation at medical schools. PMID:26541993

  9. Why medical students choose primary care careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassler, W J; Wartman, S A; Silliman, R A

    1991-01-01

    To determine what factors distinguish medical students who choose primary care careers, 381 graduating medical students at eight New England medical schools were surveyed by questionnaire prior to the 1988 National Resident Matching Program. Students were asked to indicate the degrees of influence that various factors had on their specialty choices, using a Likert-type scale ranging from "totally unimportant" to "decisive." Compared with their peers who chose high-technology specialties, those who chose primary care were more likely to be motivated by the opportunities to provide direct patient care (p less than .001), care in an ambulatory setting (p less than .001), and continuity of care (p less than .001) and the opportunity to be involved in the psychosocial aspects of medical care (p less than .001). Those who chose high-technology specialties were more likely to be motivated by desires for a large income (p less than .001) and more prestige (p less than .005), and the opportunities for research (p less than .001), more regular hours (p less than .005), more leisure and family time (p less than .001), and a better call schedule as a resident (p less than .01). Neither student age, race, sex, marital status, and level of debt nor concern about the increasing regulation of medical practice, malpractice, health manpower reports, and the increasing numbers of elderly, chronically ill, and AIDS patients were found to be significant factors in the students' choice of primary care. PMID:1985676

  10. Physiological assessment of military professional adaptation and organism functional status of higher military schools resident students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondrashov V.V.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of the study of organism functional status of resident students of military medical higher schools in different situations and modes of professional education (during their study day, round-the clock shifts in a clinic, duties, and an examination period in the process of military professional adaptation have been analyzed. The technique of functional body status optimization which takes into account both psycho-physiological specificity of military professional training as well as the regularities of psycho-physiologic reserve-capacity changes and military professional adaptation has been worked out. It constitutes the sum total of physiologically proved structural and functional components such as adaptation improvements, correction and recreation of functional body status

  11. Chest radiograph interpretation by medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To assess the ability of final year medical students to interpret conventional chest radiographs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten conventional chest radiographs were selected from a teaching hospital radiology department library that were good radiological examples of common conditions. All were conditions that a medical student should be expected to recognize by the end of their training. One normal radiograph was included. The radiographs were shown to 52 final year medical students who were asked to describe their findings. RESULTS: The median score achieved was 12.5 out of 20 (range 6-18). There was no difference between the median scores of male and female students (12.5 and 12.3, respectively, p=0.82) but male students were more likely to be certain of their answers than female students (median certainty scores 23.0 and 14.0, respectively). The overall degree of certainty was low. On no radiograph were more than 25% of students definite about their answer. Students had received little formal radiology teaching (2-42 h, median 21) and few expressed an interest in radiology as a career. Only two (3.8%) students thought they were good at interpreting chest radiographs, 17 (32.7%) thought they were bad or awful. CONCLUSION: Medical students reaching the end of their training do not perform well at interpreting simple chest radiographs. They lack confidence and have received little formal radiological tuition. Perhaps as a result, few are interested in radiology as a career, which is a matter for concern in view of the current shortage of radiologists in the UK

  12. Knowledge and Attitudes about Organ Donation Among Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bilgel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In almost every country, the organ supply for transplantation does not match the increasing demand; health professionals may play an important role in eliminating barriers and increasing organ donation. Therefore, assessing medical students’ knowledge and attitudes regarding organ donation is important for the future organ supply. Some 409 of 508 first- and second-year medical students answered an anonymous, multiple-choice questionnaire about demographic variables, knowledge about transplant issues, and willingness to donate organs. The mean age was 20.3±1.8 years (range: 17 to 29 years; 50.1% were male, 49.9% were female. Some 44.8% of the total respondents reported that they had sufficient knowledge about organ donation, and 40.1% reported knowledge about organ transplantation. The primary source of their knowledge was reported as the media (72.1%. Willingness to donate their own organs was 58.4% and willingness as to their relatives’ organs was 39.9%. The acceptance of live organ donation was higher (74.6% than cadaver donation. Only 1.2% had a organ donation card. Female students were more willing to donate their own and their relatives’ organs. Since medical students are prospective leaders of promoting organ donation action, these issues should be taught within the context of social medicine lessons, and desirable behavioral changes should be implemented.

  13. Joint Curriculum Development of the Training Program for Five-Year, Rural-Oriented, Tuition-Waived Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Xiang-Xin; Niu, Li; Xia, Xiu-Long; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    To alleviate the shortage of competent undergraduate-level medical professionals in the central and western rural regions of China, from 2010 to 2012, the Chinese government mandated 100 medical colleges to recruit 30,000 rural-oriented, tuition-waived medical students (RTMS) for the township and village hospitals. But no educational curriculum is…

  14. Improvements in CanMEDS competencies for medical students in an interdisciplinary and voluntary setting

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    Vildbrad MD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mads Dam Vildbrad, Johanne Marie Lyhne International Medical Cooperation Committee, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Background: To practice medicine, doctors must master leadership, communication, team management, and collaboration, in addition to medical knowledge. The CanMEDS framework describes seven roles of a doctor, but the six nonmedical expert roles are de-emphasized in the academic medical curriculum. Innovative opportunities are needed for medical students to develop as participants in a world of interdisciplinary health care. Methods: We founded a volunteer-based, interdisciplinary, student-run project called SUNDdag (HEALTHday with 60 students from 12 different educational backgrounds. To evaluate the learning outcomes of the project, we conducted a cross-sectional study using an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire. Results: Students joined the project due to it being health-promoting, volunteer-based, and interdisciplinary. The medical students reported a significant increase of skills in all seven roles except for “medical expert”. They reported an increased understanding of the non-health-related students' skills. Conclusion: In their future careers, medical students must collaborate with health care professionals in a team-based approach to patient care and with non-health-related professionals in administrative tasks. Interdisciplinary volunteer-based initiatives like SUNDdag are potential platforms for medical students to improve their CanMEDS competencies. We encourage students to initiate similar projects and we encourage faculties to support volunteer-based, interdisciplinary initiatives due to their favorable cost-benefit ratio. Keywords: medical education, voluntarism, interprofessional education, medical students

  15. BUILDING PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS THROUGH THE BUSINESS GAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Alekseevna Araslanova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Present-day competency-based higher education places demands on the specialist’s professional knowledge and competence. Contemporary pedagogy is in search of new efficient ways of building various competencies in university students. The author studies the process of buil-ding professional competencies of the specialist in the field of document support of management through business games, a quasi-investigative activity, which involves both the student and the teacher. The article looks at the concepts of competence, professional competence and the business game and provides examples of joint group classes in various subjects involving business games. The study empirically proves the efficiency of the business game as a teaching technique and highlights specific professional and general competencies, which it helps to develop.

  16. Acclimating international graduate students to professional engineering ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Byron; Austin, Katherine; Lawson, William; Gorsuch, Greta; Darwin, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    This article describes the education portion of an ongoing grant-sponsored education and research project designed to help graduate students in all engineering disciplines learn about the basic ethical principles, rules, and obligations associated with engineering practice in the United States. While the curriculum developed for this project is used for both domestic and international students, the educational materials were designed to be sensitive to the specific needs of international graduate students. In recent years, engineering programs in the United States have sought to develop a larger role for professional ethics education in the curriculum. Accreditation requirements, as well as pressures from the private sector, have helped facilitate this shift in focus. Almost half of all engineering graduate students in the U.S. are international students. Further, research indicates that the majority of these students will remain in the U.S. to work post-graduation. It is therefore in the interest of the profession that these students, coming from diverse backgrounds, receive some formal exposure to the professional and ethical expectations and norms of the engineering profession in the United States to help ensure that they have the knowledge and skills--non-technical as well as technical--required in today's engineering profession. In becoming acculturated to professional norms in a host country, international students face challenges that domestic students do not encounter; such as cultural competency, language proficiency, and acculturation stress. Mitigating these challenges must be a consideration in the development of any effective education materials. The present article discusses the project rationale and describes the development of on-line instructional materials aimed at helping international engineering graduate students acclimate to professional engineering ethics standards in the United States. Finally, a brief data summary of students' perceptions of the usefulness of the content and instructional interface is provided to demonstrate the initial effectiveness of the materials and to present a case for project sustainability. PMID:19798587

  17. Preparing for export? Medical and nursing student migration intentions post-qualification in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin George

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The migration of health professionals can have a profound impact on health systems around the globe. The International Organization for Migration’s (IOM Mobility of Health Professionals Research Project (MoHProf aimed to improve knowledge about the migration of healthcare professionals and understand migration intentions and factorsinfluencing the migration of medical and nursing students.Objectives: The study aimed to determine the proportion of nursing and medical students who were intending to emigrate, their attitudes and beliefs about, and the factors influencing their decision to emigrate.Method: This study was conducted at three medical schools and one nursing school in South Africa (n = 298 amongst 260 medical and 38 nursing students. One hundred and twenty-five students were in the final year of their studies and 143 were in their prefinal year. Thirty students did not indicate the year of their studies. Every student present on the day of data collection completed a questionnaire comprising psychometric and survey-based questions. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data.Results: More than a third (37% of the respondents intended to work or specialise abroad. The majority of medical (58.9% and nursing (66.6% students intended to leave SA within five years of completing their medical or nursing studies. The perception of poor working conditions within the health sector, such as long work hours, high patient loads, inadequate resources and occupational hazards, influenced medical students to consider emigrating fromSouth Africa.Conclusion: The high number of medical and nursing students intending to emigrate requires a reassessment of effectiveness of retention strategies for doctors and nurses in the South African healthcare system and actions to improve working conditions in the public healthcare sector.

  18. Students of Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezelbash Sima

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social anxiety is an important factor in peoples’ mental health. Good mental health while studying in university makes students able to deal effectively with numerous stressors that they experience. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the social anxiety of nursing students in grades one to four of medical universities in Tehran. Methods: In this analytic cross-sectional study, 400 students from universities of medical sciences in Tehran were recruited by stratified sampling with proportional allocation. Data were collected during the first semester in 2010. Students completed a two-part questionnaire including the Liebowitz social anxiety questionnaire and a demographic information form. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics methods and an analytical test by SPSS statistical software. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the total scores of social anxiety of first- to fourth-year students. The mean score of the avoidance of social interaction dimension in fourth-year students was significantly lower than in first year students (p<0.05. Conclusion: In regard to the relationship between social anxiety and interpersonal communication as an associated part of nursing care, decrease of social anxiety of students could play an important role in their mental health. According to the results of this study, it seems that the placement of students in the nursing education system does not produce any changes in their social anxiety.

  19. Relationships between Drug Company Representatives and Medical Students: Medical School Policies and Attitudes of Student Affairs Deans and Third-Year Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierles, Frederick; Brodkey, Amy; Cleary, Lynn; McCurdy, Frederick A.; Mintz, Matthew; Frank, Julia; Lynn, Deborah Joanne; Chao, Jason; Morgenstern, Bruce; Shore, William; Woodard, John

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The authors sought to ascertain the details of medical school policies about relationships between drug companies and medical students as well as student affairs deans' attitudes about these interactions. Methods: In 2005, the authors surveyed deans and student affairs deans at all U.S. medical schools and asked whether their schools…

  20. The sources of professional confidence in occupational therapy students

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Kathy, Holland; Lyn, Middleton; Leana, Uys.

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: While undergraduate training in South Africa places an emphasis on ensuring the competence of occupational therapy graduates, very little attention has been paid to exploring their professional confidence, despite the fact that this has been highlighted as an issue for students. The fo [...] undation for professional confidence is laid during student years, and is influenced by a number of determinants, which this study aimed to identify. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Qualitative methodology was used with a purposive sample of nineteen final year occupational therapy students. Students were invited to participate voluntarily in focus group interviews and/or submit their reflective journal. Five lecturers and six clinical supervisors at the University concerned also participated in focus group interviews. Deductive thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. RESULTS: Two broad themes emerged. The first theme, external determinants, included clinical experience, relationships with peers, staff and patients, and the changing environment in which they worked. The second theme, internal determinants, included certain identified personal characteristics and influencers. The external and internal sources of professional confidence beliefs were either within the control of the student, or the lecturer/clinical supervisor or the profession. DISCUSSION: A number of recommendations ranging from re-thinking clinical practicals and supervision are made. These findings have implications for student selection, teaching methodology and experiences, and the professional identity of the profession. Greater formal emphasis needs to be placed on confidence building during the undergraduate experience.

  1. Writing about an experience of illness in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang K

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Kun Hwang,1 Huan Fan,1 Se Won Hwang2 1Department of Plastic Surgery, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, Korea; 2Peninsula Medical School, Exeter, UK Abstract: Pathography is defined as “historical biography from a medical, psychological, and psychiatric viewpoint.” We thought that writing about an experience of illness might help students understand patients’ experience and in turn grow in terms of self-understanding. Participants included 151 medical students. Students wrote about their own experience of illness and were asked to answer questions from the Likert scale. Most students wrote about themselves (79.2%; however, some students (20.8% wrote about the illness of others. Among the 149 pathographies, ecopathography was most frequent (30.9%, followed by testimonial pathography (25.5%; angry pathography (13.4% and alternative pathography (12.1% were relatively less frequent. Eighty-eight pathographies (59.1% showed 120 expressions of family relationship. Among the 120 cases, worrying about family members was most frequent (47.5%, followed by reliance on a family member (32.5%. All students wrote about the enlightenment experienced on returning to daily life. The sense of belonging together was most frequent (38.3%, followed by gratitude for living (20.8%, resolution to be a good doctor (18.1%, and a will to live and be healthy (12.1%. Answers on the Likert scale (total 5 for pathography beneficence were very high in understanding desirable doctor image (4.46, attaining morals and personality as a health care professional (4.49, and understanding basic communication skills (4.46. Writing about an experience of illness allows students to better understand patients’ experience and to grow in self-understanding. Keywords: writing, disease, patients, narration, pathography

  2. BIRTH ORDER AMONG NORTHERN INDIAN MEDICAL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Vinay Agarwal; Sunil Kumar Garg; Megha Kulshreshtha Mishra; Lalita Chaudhary

    2011-01-01

    Background: Birth order is claimed to be linked with academic achievement. However, many scientists do not accept it. Objective: To assess the association of birth order in North Indian medical students with number of attempts to cross the competition bar. Study design: Cross sectional study. Setting and participation: M.B.B.S. 1st year students of L.L.R.M. Medical College, Meerut. Statistical analysis used: Chi Square test. Methods: Enquiry of Birth order and number of attempts to crack the ...

  3. Health professionals' use of documents obtained through the Regional Medical Library Network.

    OpenAIRE

    Lovas, I.; Graham, E; Flack, V

    1991-01-01

    The Pacific Southwest Regional Medical Library Service (PSRMLS) studied how health professionals use documents obtained through the regional medical library (RML) network and how various factors, such as delivery time, affected that use. A random sample of libraries in Region 7 of the RML network was selected to survey health professionals who had received documents through the interlibrary loan (ILL) network. The survey provided data about the purposes for which health professionals requeste...

  4. Professional Notes: Reaching All Students via Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Music teachers are often the Pied Pipers of their schools, attracting the interest of students by the nature of the subject they teach. Their students who excel are often the best and brightest, since music reading and music production demand higher-level thinking skills, motor ability, and in the case of ensemble performance, social skills. As…

  5. Medical students' perceptions in relation to ethnicity and gender: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seale Clive

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The British medical student population has undergone rapid diversification over the last decades. This study focuses on medical students' views about their experiences in relation to ethnicity and gender during their undergraduate training within the context of the hidden curriculum in one British medical school as part of a wider qualitative research project into undergraduate medical education. Method We interviewed 36 undergraduate medical students in one British Medical School, across all five years of training using a semi-structured interview schedule. We selected them by random and quota sampling, stratified by sex and ethnicity and used the whole medical school population as a sampling frame. Data analyses involved the identification of common themes, reported by means of illustrative quotations and simple counts. Results The students provided information about variations patterned by gender in their motivation and influences when deciding to study medicine. Issues in relation to ethnicity were: gaining independence from parents, perceived limitations to career prospects, incompatibility of some religious beliefs with some medical practices and acquired open-mindedness towards students and patients from different ethnic backgrounds. Despite claiming no experiences of gender difference during medical training, female and male students expressed gender stereotypes, e.g. that women bring particularly caring and sympathetic attitudes to medicine, or that surgery requires the physical strength and competitiveness stereotypically associated with men that are likely to support the continuation of gender differentiation in medical careers. Conclusion The key themes identified in this paper in relation to ethnicity and to gender have important implications for medical educators and for those concerned with professional development. The results suggest a need to open up aspects of these relatively covert elements of student culture to scrutiny and debate and to take an explicitly wider view of the influence of what has sometimes been called the hidden curriculum upon the training of medical professionals and the practice of medicine.

  6. Validated instruments used to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Symons Andrew B

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Instruments to detect changes in attitudes towards people with disabilities are important for evaluation of training programs and for research. While we were interested in instruments specific for medical students, we aimed to systematically review the medical literature for validated survey instruments used to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability. Methods We electronically searched Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Health and Psychosocial Instruments. We included papers reporting on the development and/or validation of survey instruments to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability. We excluded papers in which the attitudes were not measured in a provider-patient context. Two reviewers carried out titles and abstracts screening, full texts screening, and data abstraction in a duplicate and independent manner using standardized and pilot tested forms. Results We identified seven validated survey instruments used for healthcare students and professionals. These instruments were originally developed for the following target populations: general population (n = 4; dental students (n = 1; nursing students (n = 1; and rehabilitation professionals (n = 1. The types of validity reported for these instruments were content validity (n = 3, criterion-related validity (n = 1, construct validity (n = 2, face validity (n = 1, discriminant validity (n = 1, and responsiveness (n = 1. The most widely validated and used tool (ATDP was developed in the late 1960s while the most recent instrument was developed in the early 1990s. Conclusion Of the seven identified validated instruments, less than half were specifically designed for healthcare students and professionals and none for medical students. There is a need to develop and validate a contemporary instrument specifically for medical students.

  7. The influence of personal and environmental factors on professionalism in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Shanafelt Tait D; West Colin P

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Professionalism is a critical quality for physicians to possess. Physician professionalism has received increased attention in recent years, with many authorities suggesting that professionalism is in decline. An understanding of the factors contributing to professionalism may allow the development of more effective approaches to promoting this quality in medical education. Discussion We propose a model of personal and environmental factors that contribute to physician pro...

  8. EVALUATION OF THE PERSPECTIVES OF THE ACADEMIC MEDICAL STAFF AND RESIDENTS CONCERNING CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN A MEDICAL FACULTY

    OpenAIRE

    Seyhan H?d?ro?lu; Muhammed Fatih Önsüz; Ahmet Topuzo?lu; Melda Karavu?

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the perspectives of the academic medical staff and residents concerning continuing professional development in a medical faculty.Method: This descriptive research was performed on 152 academic medical staff and residents who was accepted to participate in the study in a medical faculty in August 2007. Study data was collected through face to face interviews by a questionnaire made up of three parts and 40 questions.Results: Sixty-seven point eig...

  9. A Study about Library Usage by Undergraduate Medical Students in a Medical College in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N K Goel, S S Sarpal, Abhiruchi Galhotra, Abhadeep

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since no study has been done regarding use of library in medical students in North India and very few studies in whole of India that is why this study was conceived. Objective: To study the use of library by medical students in all the professional courses in Government Medical College, Chandigarh U.T. Material and Methods: 235 students were administered pre-structured and pre-tested proforma in classroom and guided filling of proforma was done by authors. Results: Maximum students (265 were in the age group of 18-25 years.122 students felt that their objectives were partially fulfilled in the library, 71 felt their objectives were fully fulfilled in the library, while 20 felt none of their objectives were fulfilled in the library. 64.5 % students were visiting library for updating their knowledge, 31.7% for retrieving literature, 18.7% for information on a specific disease, 12.6% for research purposes, 6.7% for diagnosis, 2.6% for publications, 2.2% for patient care. Among the IT services available 57% were using computer, 54.1% were utilising internet, 47.01% were using E mail, 32.5% were using E books, 31.3%were using CD ROM, and 28.3% were using telephone. Out of benefits available of using IT services 75.7% said it lead to better access to information, 51.8% said it provided quick information, 42.9% said it lead to contact with distant personnel, 44.75% believed it lead to improvement in quality of work, 22.7%said it lead to decrease in use of postal mail, 10.8% said it lead to decrease in use of telephone, 10.1% said it lead to decrease in use of print version. 34.3 %( 91 students opined that there was need for an orientation programme regarding the use of IT services in the library.

  10. A student-initiated and student-facilitated international health elective for preclinical medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Nirali Vora; Mina Chang; Hemang Pandya; Aliya Hasham; Cathy Lazarus

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Global health education is becoming more important for developing well-rounded physicians and may encourage students toward a career in primary care. Many medical schools, however, lack adequate and structured opportunities for students beginning the curriculum. Methods: Second-year medical students initiated, designed, and facilitated a pass–fail international health elective, providing a curricular framework for preclinical medical students wishing to gain exposure to t...

  11. "I'm too used to it": a longitudinal qualitative study of third year female medical students' experiences of gendered encounters in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaria, Palav; Abedin, Sakena; Berg, David; Nunez-Smith, Marcella

    2012-04-01

    Although the number of women entering medical school has been steadily rising in the U.S.A., female medical students continue to report instances of sexual harassment and gender discrimination. The full spectrum of such experiences and their effect on the professional identity formation of female students over time remains largely unknown. To investigate these experiences, we interviewed 12 third year female medical students at a private New England medical school over several points during the 2006-2007 academic year. Using theoretical frameworks of gender performance and the centrality of student-patient and student-supervisor relationships, we were better able to understand how female medical students interpret the role of 'woman doctor' and the effect of negative and positive gendered interactions on the evolution of their professional identity. We found that participants quickly learned how to confront and respond to inappropriate behavior from male patients and found interactions with female patients and supervisors particularly rewarding. However, they did not feel equipped to respond to the unprofessional behavior of male supervisors, resulting in feelings of guilt and resignation over time that such events would be a part of their professional identity. The rapid acculturation to unprofessional behavior and resignation described by participants has implications for not only professional identity formation of female students but specialty choices and issues of future physician workforce. PMID:22341202

  12. Medical students' perception of dyad practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Rasmussen, Maria B

    2014-01-01

    Training in pairs (dyad practice) has been shown to improve efficiency of clinical skills training compared with single practice but little is known about students' perception of dyad practice. The aim of this study was to explore the reactions and attitudes of medical students who were instructed to work in pairs during clinical skills training. A follow-up pilot survey consisting of four open-ended questions was administered to 24 fourth-year medical students, who completed four hours of dyad practice in managing patient encounters. The responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. The students felt dyad practice improved their self-efficacy through social interaction with peers, provided useful insight through observation, and contributed with shared memory of what to do, when they forgot essential steps of the physical examination of the patient. However, some students were concerned about decreased hands-on practice and many students preferred to continue practising alone after completing the initial training. Dyad practice is well received by students during initial skills training and is associated with several benefits to learning through peer observation, feedback and cognitive support. Whether dyad training is suited for more advanced learners is a subject for future research.

  13. Selected physical characteristics of medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Lajos Ángyán

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to measure selected anthropometrical characteris-tics, motor abilities and cardiorespiratory functions of medical students. Eighty-seven students were involved in this investigation. The students were categorized into five groups: (1 recreational, doing sport activities irregularly, (2 basketball and (3 handball players, having training at least two times per week, as well as men (4 and women (5 students entering medical school. In all groups the mean body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio were at the upper level of the normal range, while body fat percentage was similar to standards for sedentary subjects. Better motor per-formances were obtained from the basketball and handball players than from the other groups. Static strength for the sample was somewhat above the normal sedentary level. The resting blood pressure and heart rate for most subjects were in the normal. Cardiovascular risk factors were found in six students. Their systolic blood pressure was above 140 mm Hg. There were no sub-jects identified with low blood pressure. The heart rate was elevated for three students from the recreational group, and in the women. Bradycardia did not occur. The vital capacity and the ability to hold one?s breath was at the upper level of the normal range. The present results emphasis the need to improve the students` prevention oriented life style through participation in exercising.

  14. Using Computer and Internet for Medical Literature Searching Among Medical Students in Hadramout University, Yemen

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulla Salim Bin Ghouth

    2008-01-01

    Background: Some researchers have observed that medical students used computer and internet for nonmedical purposes. Is this the case among medical students in a newly established medical college of Hadramout University in Yemen? Objectives: To assess the knowledge and usage of computer and internet among medical students of Hadramout University, find out the medical applications for which they use internet, and the factors that encourage the students to use computer and internet, with an...

  15. Professional International Service Learning as an International Service Learning Opportunity Appropriate for Graduate or Professional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, Elizabeth; Lee, Hee Yun

    2015-01-01

    Graduate and professional schools are increasingly using short-term international study abroad courses as one way for internationalizing their curriculum. While international service learning can be a means for improving students' engagement in international learning experiences and providing a structure for learning, it is difficult to design…

  16. Introducing medical students to careers in medical education: the student track at an annual medical education conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Benjamin; Plack, Margaret; Suzuki, Mari; Arepalli, Sruthi; Schroth, Scott; Stagnaro-Green, Alex

    2013-08-01

    Few avenues exist to familiarize medical students with careers as clinician-educators, and the clinician-educator career pathway has not been well defined. In this article, the authors describe how they integrated a career-oriented student track into the 2011 Northeast Group on Educational Affairs (NEGEA) annual retreat to introduce students to careers in medical education. Annual education conferences are principal sources of educational scholarship, networking, collaboration, and information sharing; as such, they represent attractive venues for early exposure to the culture of medical education. The authors' goal in creating the NEGEA conference student track was to excite students about careers in medical education by providing them with an array of opportunities for active involvement in both student-specific and general conference activities.The authors draw from their experience to provide a guide for recruiting student participants to career-building student tracks. They also offer a guide for developing future student tracks, based on their experience and grounded in social cognitive career theory. Although their focus is on medical education, they believe these guides will be useful for educators planning a conference-based student track in any field. PMID:23807107

  17. Relación estudiante de medicina-enfermo: visión de los estudiantes / Medical student - patient relationschip: the students' perspective

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Juan Pablo, Beca I; Francisca, Browne L; Paula, Repetto L; Armando, Ortiz P; Camila, Salas A.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available [...] Abstract in english Background: The relationship between medical students and patients has special characteristics that require to be well understood to prepare both students and tutors. Aim: To learn about medical students' thoughts and experiences once they start working with patients, how do they solve difficulties [...] or problems and their perceptions about professional roles and patient rights. Material and methods: Qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews applied to 30 volunteer third year medical students who were beginning their clinical practice. The answers to open questions were transcribed and then analized and grouped by topics and categories. Results: Helping others was the main motivation to go to medical school. Other reasons were scientific interest and social status. Students felt prepared to communicate with patients. However they felt anxious, stressful and fearful of not being competent or not being able to answer patients' questions. There were some differences between male and female students' feelings. Nevertheless students declared that they had rewarding experiences with patients. They all recognized that patients have the right to reject being treated by students. The answers also showed that the first clinical experiences led to significant changes in their views of the medical profession. Conclusions: Students are aware of their trainee condition, the benefits that they obtain being in contact with patients and of their limitations. Patients must voluntarily accept to be subject of the students' training program and informed consent procedures need to be developed

  18. Self-medication with analgesics among medical students and interns in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nahla Khamis; Alamoudi, Banan Mohammad; Baamer, Wejdan Omar; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and predictors of self-medication with analgesics among senior medical students and interns in King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 504 participants in 2013. A multistage stratified random sampling was used. A confidential, anonymous & self-administered questionnaire was used to collect personal & socio-demographic data. Data about self-medication and self-medication with analgesics during the preceding 6 months were also inquired. Both descriptive and analytical statistics were done by SPSS version 18 & Epi-Info. Results: During the 6 months preceding the study, 75.2% and 55.4% of participants used self -medication & analgesic self-medication, respectively. The first predictor of utilization of analgesic self-medication was living with family (aOR; 1.96, 95% CI: 1.22-3.14), followed by age >21 years & non- professional jobs of fathers. Conclusion: Alarming high rates of self medication and self-medication with analgesics were observed among medical students and interns. Self-medication needs improvement through educational, regulatory and managerial strategies. PMID:25878607

  19. Understanding of cardiovascular phenomena in medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Undergraduate (UG) medical students of II Semester of different institutions were surveyed to determine the prevalence of 13 different misconceptions (conceptual difficulties) about cardiovascular physiology. The prevalence of these misconceptions ranged from 75.60% to 25.30%. Methods: A list of questionnaire was selected that were diagnostic for difficulties that can seriously interfere with students mastery of the topic. Diagnostic questions were generally of the form: 'If x increases, then will y increases/decrease/show no change'. Results: The result suggests that students have a number of underlying conceptual difficulties about cardio-vascular phenomena. Our possible source of some misconceptions is the students inability to apply simple general models to specific cardiovascular phenomena. Conclusion: UG students may understand less than they appear to 'know'. Some implications of these results for teachers of physiology and medicine are explained. (author)

  20. Stress in first year medical students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somnath Salgar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress in medical students is not uncommon and is process orientated. Although minimal amount of stress is desirable and is necessary to spark in a healthy competitive spirit, the undue stress has undesirable impact on students.Objective: The present study was designed with an aim to evaluate different stress factors among the first MBBS students.Method: The participants were asked to complete a pre-tested and pre-designed questionnaire that included a list of sources of stress.Results: The most common stress factor reported by participants were high parental expectations (80.9%, vast syllabus (73%, worry about future (71.3%, long duration of course (67.3%, frequency of examinations (66.7%, performance in formative and summative examination (66%, low self esteem (62.3%, lack of sleep (54% and lack of emotional and social support (38%.Conclusion: The life of medical student is stressful. Our study highlights the need for interventions in to cope up stress in medical education. Student counselling and informal mentorship is need of hour.

  1. Being Professional : Students Struggling in School and Traineeship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    The paper discusses students' process of acquiring a feeling of being professionals within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on what seems to be a paradox within the programme: the future care helper being constructed within the overall term ‘the professional care helper’ in the school setting but the job being closely related to daily life's routine tasks; the paper points to difficulties for students in identifying the exact content of the term ‘professional’. Furthermore students seem to be uncertain about their ‘professionalism’ in relation to other health professionals, when they are in the work place setting. The analysis indicates that the care work programme still struggles to make a clear distinction between the former non-paid female domestic work and the current work carried out by the care workers. The analysis mobilises the concept ‘storyline’, c.f. Bronwyn Davies and the empirical material consists of observations and interviews in the theoretical periodsand in the traineeships.

  2. Personal characteristics of students entering higher medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akimova O.V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the structure of personal features of students decided to devote their life to medical profession, their personal readiness for a profession of a doctor. 241 students going to enter the Saratov Medical University in 2013 serve as an object of research. Methods of research included psychology tests on a self-assessment of a mental state, ability to empathy, a motivation orientation. Result. It was revealed that the majority of respondents low level of uneasiness, low level of frustration, the average level of aggression, the average level of a rigidity, and also high rates on an empathy scale. The types of the personality in relation to work are emotive and intuitive. Prevalence of motive of achievement of success or motive of avoiding of failures directly depends on specifics of a situation. Conclusion. Students possess qualities which are necessary in professional activity for doctors, namely high resistance to stress, absence of fear before difficulties, low level of rigidity, high level of empathy, the average level of aggression. Students are motivated on success, in situations when they are fully confident.

  3. Attitudes Of Medical Students Towards Relationship With Pharmaceutical Company: Do We Need A Change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Shahu Ingole

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Promotion by pharmaceutical company often takes advantage of mental shortcuts. Significant deficiencies have been found in student’s knowledge about pharmaceutical marketing expenditures, professional ethics and accuracy of drug information. The purpose of study was to assess the attitudes of medical students towards relationship with pharmaceutical companies and drug promotion by them. Methods: To assess the attitudes, a prevalidated questionnaire consisting of 18 questions was designed. Questionnaire was istributed when a series of lectures were scheduled for the entire medical class (253 medical students. Completed questionnaires werecollected at the end of the session and analysis was done using statistical methods. Results: Overall 81% of the medical students were of the opinion that pharmaceutical companies should be allowed to interact with them at the college level. About 95% believe that the information given by MRs is reliable and confirmation of the claims is not required (75% students. Overall 68% students believe that drug promotional offers never compromise the decision making of the physicians. About 70% students think that physicians should be compensated with gifts by medical representatives whenever their drugs are prescribed. Conclusion: The medical students are generally not opposed to interact with MR at some point of time or receive gifts from them. Also many students may not be conscious potential subconscious expectations of give-and-take relationship. Perhaps, the insight gained from our study will be used to reinforce the existing teaching curriculum with added emphasis on this issue.

  4. A comprehensive medical student career development program improves medical student satisfaction with career planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Brian J; Hammoud, Maya M; Middleton, Eric; Moroney, Donney; Schigelone, Amy

    2007-01-01

    In 1999, the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) initiated a new career development program (CDP). The CDP incorporates the 4-phase career development model described by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Careers in Medicine (CiM). The CDP offers self-assessment exercises with guidance from trained counselors for 1st- and 2nd-year medical students. Career exploration experiences include Career Seminar Series luncheons, shadow experiences with faculty, and a shadow program with second-year (M2) and fourth-year (M4) medical students. During the decision-making phase, students work with trained faculty career advisors (FCA). Mandatory sessions are held on career selection, preparing the residency application, interviewing, and program evaluation. During the implementation phase, students meet with deans or counselors to discuss residency application and matching. An "at-risk plan" assists students who may have difficulty matching. The CiM Web site is extensively used during the 4 stages. Data from the AAMC and UMMS Graduation Questionnaires (GQ) show significant improvements for UMMS students in overall satisfaction with career planning services and with faculty mentoring, career assessment activities, career information, and personnel availability. By 2003, UMMS students had significantly higher satisfaction in all measured areas of career planning services when compared with all other U.S. medical students. PMID:17331000

  5. Students' response to disaster: a lesson for health care professional schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Humberto

    2010-11-16

    The response of medical students, young physicians, and other health professionals to the February 2010 earthquake and tsunami in Chile provides important lessons about health care delivery during disasters and about the development of professionalism. Tertiary and secondary care of victims of these disasters was possible because local and national resources were available and field hospitals provided by Chile's armed forces and foreign countries replaced damaged hospitals. However, primary care of persons living on the outskirts of towns and in small villages and coves that were destroyed and isolated by the disaster required the involvement of volunteer groups that were largely composed of students and other young members of the health professions, all of whom were motivated by solidarity, compassion, and social commitment. This experience, similar to previous catastrophes in Chile and elsewhere, reinforces that medical and other health professional schools must instill in graduates an understanding that the privileges of being a health professional come with responsibilities to society. Beyond providing high-quality scientific and technological education, curricula in these schools should include training that enables graduates to meaningfully contribute in the setting of unexpected disasters and that nurtures a sense of responsibility to do so. PMID:21079222

  6. STUDY OF PATIENTS’ ACCEPTABILITY AND ATTITUDE TOWARDS THE UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL STUDENTS IN A TERTIARY CARE TEACHING HOSPITAL OF EASTERN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Debasis Bandyopadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patients have always been part of medical education. The patients’ co-operation with the undergraduate medical students is vital in clinical education. Patient contact is an integral component of medical education, training and assessment. It provides students and doctors with an opportunity to learn and to develop their professional skills, attitudes and identity. Patients can also benefit from involvement in teaching and training, by increasing their own knowledge, and indirectl...

  7. Prevalence of smoking habits, attitudes, knowledge and beliefs among Health Professional School students: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Ferrante

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine smoking prevalence, attitudes, knowledge and behaviours/beliefs among Health Professional School students according to the Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS approach. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in Catania University Medical Schools. The GHPSS questionnaires were self-administered. Logistic regression model was performed. The level of significance was p < 0.05. RESULTS: 422 students answered to the questionnaire. Prevalence of current smokers was 38.2%. 94.3% of the total sample believe that health professionals should receive specific training to quit smoking, but only 21.3% of the sample received it during the study courses. CONCLUSIONS: Given the high prevalence of smokers among health professionals and their key role both as advisers and behavioral models, our results highlight the importance of focusing attention on smoking cessation training addressed to them.

  8. Study Motives and Career Choices of Iranian Medical and Dental Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Vahid Dastjerdi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To compare the study motives and career choices of senior undergraduate medical and dental students in Iran. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey study involving final year medical and dental students from 4 dental and medical schools was conducted in 2010. The questionnaire was designed in three sections (Demographic details, motivational items and career choice items and after confirming the validity and reliability of the questions, it was distributed among the students. Data were entered into SPSS; statistical analysis included logistic regression and multiple linear regression. The response rate was 62% (n=219 for medical and 64% (n=300 for dental students. The factor analysis identified six motivational items: "Social and professional status", "Health care and people", "Others recommendation", "personal interest and nature of occupation", "Occupational experience" and "Personal life". Medical students were more influenced by "Playing a role in community health" and "Personal interest". "Work independence" and "Social factors" however were two major influential factors among dental students. There were significant differences in important influences by age (Social and professional status, Others' recommendation, Parents education (Social and professional status, Health care and people, Personal life and marital status (single >married: Occupational experience, married > single: Personal life. Engaging in postgraduate studies was the first career preference among 90.9% and 89.8% of dental and medical students respectively. Medical and dental students report a wide range of motivational factors in studying medicine/dentistry and future career plans which is affected by age, parents' education and marital status.

  9. Burnout: Treatment and Prevention Strategies for College Student Affairs Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, Roger

    1990-01-01

    Presents possible prevention and treatment strategies for combating burnout among college student affairs professionals. Includes definition of burnout, review of symptoms of burnout, discussion of causes of burnout, and suggestions for treatment and prevention of burnout. Interventions discussed include personal counseling, using stress…

  10. Online Social Networking among Professional Students: Impact on Interpersonal Relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Nevil Johnson Raju1 , Blessy Prabha Valsaraj 2 , Judith A Noronha3

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the correlation of online social network usage and quality of interpersonal relationship among 350 third students of four different year professional colleges of Manipal University. The study found that a weak negative correlation exist between online social network usage and perceived quality of interpersonal relationship.

  11. Evaluating American History Teachers' Professional Development: Effects on Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Paz, Susan; Malkus, Nathaniel; Monte-Sano, Chauncey; Montanaro, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The United States government has invested nearly one billion dollars in funding to professional historians and history educators across the country since 2000 to strengthen the teaching of American history in elementary and secondary schools, yet we know little about how these programs impact student learning. Using data from one such Teaching…

  12. Online Social Networking among Professional Students: Impact on Interpersonal Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevil Johnson Raju1 , Blessy Prabha Valsaraj 2 , Judith A Noronha3

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the correlation of online social network usage and quality of interpersonal relationship among 350 third students of four different year professional colleges of Manipal University. The study found that a weak negative correlation exist between online social network usage and perceived quality of interpersonal relationship.

  13. The Civil Behavior of Students: A Survey of School Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Keely; Caldarella, Paul; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.; Young, K. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Many authors regard education as a way of increasing civility in society, and some have implemented interventions to improve civility in schools. However, very little empirical data exist on the extent and nature of students' civil behavior. The present study systematically gathered data from 251 school professionals regarding their perceptions of…

  14. Reduction of Racial Prejudice in Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi-Pearson, Catherine; Castillo, Linda; Maples, Mary Finn

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the impact of gender, race, intergroup contact, and diversity training on racial prejudice of student affairs professionals. Diversity training and race of participants were statistically significant contributors to change in racial prejudice. Findings suggest that racial prejudice decreases as diversity training increases.…

  15. Do medical students want to learn about global health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anya Göpfert

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: One objective of the United Nations Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health relates to ensuring a sufficiently skilled workforce. To prepare future healthcare professionals for their role in the 21st century as members of this workforce, awareness of global health is essential, but few studies have explored student perspectives on such education. The main objectives of this study were to establish the views of medical students on learning about women's and children's health in low-income countries, to identify the nature and extent of learning already experienced, and to assess the demand for such learning. Design: A questionnaire survey was conducted at three meetings of the International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA. Questionnaires were distributed to 500 participants from 75 countries and 336 medical schools, and 492 usable questionnaires were returned. Data were analysed using SPSS Version 20 and statistical analysis was undertaken using Fisher's exact test. Results: There were 492 questionnaires included in the analysis. Forty-eight per cent of participants were from low–middle income countries and 52% were from high-income countries. Less than half (43% of the respondents had received some teaching on women's and children's health in low-income countries. Teaching received was primarily (96% through lectures in the second year of study. Ninety-one per cent of respondents thought such teaching would be important and stated that group work (66% would be the preferred method. In total, only 14% thought they had received sufficient teaching on global health and on women's and children's health in low-income countries. Conclusions: This study has revealed a high demand among medical students for global health teaching, particularly on women's and children's health in low-income countries. The timing and methods of existing teaching on these topics does not match that desired by medical students. To help address this gap, a collaborative approach is proposed which includes students’ views in the processes for revitalising medical curricula to meet the needs of the 21st century.

  16. What do medical students think about their quality of life? A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tempski Patricia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical education can affect medical students’ physical and mental health as well as their quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess medical students’ perceptions of their quality of life and its relationship with medical education. Methods First- to sixth-year students from six Brazilian medical schools were interviewed using focus groups to explore what medical student’s lives are like, factors related to increases and decreases of their quality of life during medical school, and how they deal with the difficulties in their training. Results Students reported a variety of difficulties and crises during medical school. Factors that were reported to decrease their quality of life included competition, unprepared teachers, excessive activities, and medical school schedules that demanded exclusive dedication. Contact with pain, death and suffering and harsh social realities influence their quality of life, as well as frustrations with the program and insecurity regarding their professional future. The scarcity of time for studying, leisure activities, relationships, and rest was considered the main factor of influence. Among factors that increase quality of life are good teachers, classes with good didactic approaches, active learning methodologies, contact with patients, and efficient time management. Students also reported that meaningful relationships with family members, friends, or teachers increase their quality of life. Conclusion Quality of teachers, curricula, healthy lifestyles related to eating habits, sleep, and physical activity modify medical students’ quality of life. Lack of time due to medical school obligations was a major impact factor. Students affirm their quality of life is influenced by their medical school experiences, but they also reframe their difficulties, herein represented by their poor quality of life, understood as necessary and inherent to the process of becoming doctors.

  17. Summer Students: getting professional at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The summer season at CERN is known for the traditional visit of Summer Students coming from Member and non-Member States. This time, a total of 176 future scientists are spending part of their summer with us, learning and working in the laboratory. Summer Students enjoying a lecture on particle physics by Ronald Kleiss. Now that summer has finally arrived, you'll have noticed some changes at CERN: longer queues at the bar, faces you don't recognise in the corridors, and a breath of fresh air, but where is it coming from? The answer is easy: the Summer Students are here! Aged between 20 and 27, this group of 176 future scientists has been selected from 600 candidates to spend their summer at the Laboratory. This year, there are 24 more 'Summies' than last following a recommendation in the 2000 5-yearly review to increase the number of students. The Summies mainly come from Member States, but this year there are also 11 Americans, two Mexicans, an Armenian, a Turk, a Pakistani and two South Africans. Judith N...

  18. A Student's View of Our Professional Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kari R.; Donaldson, J. Ana

    2003-01-01

    Presents the response of an undergraduate student in a class on media planning and production at the University of Northern Iowa to the following midterm question: Discuss how communication and a sense of community among instructional technologists influence the definition and perception of instructional technology. (MES)

  19. [Kolb's learning styles in medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borracci, Raúl A; Arribalzaga, Eduardo B

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the relationship of Kolb's learning styles in academic success or failure in medical students. A prospective cohort study in 116 medical students of a private Argentine university was performed between March 2005 and March 2011. The follow-up included two cut-offs; during 2005-2006 the students' learning styles were determined and five years later, when individuals had to end their career, they were grouped into graduated, delayed or dropped status. At the end of the period, 50% of the students ended successfully, 24.1% abandoned and 25.9% was delayed. Learning styles were assimilator in 60.3% of cases, divergent in 14.7%, accommodator in 6.9%, convergent in 6.0% and undefined in 12.1%. In conclusion, the follow-up during the career demonstrated that convergent or undefined styles had a tendency to abandon the career, while delayed students had a more theoretical and reflexive style than successful individuals. The results observed in convergent students differed from other reports. This difference would be explained by a particular characteristic of the sample or by the teaching and evaluation profile of the university. PMID:25919867

  20. Medical Students’ Perception of Their Educational Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Preethi G; Menezes, Vishma; Srikanth; Subramanian, Atreya M.; Shenoy, Jnaneshwara P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Students’ perception of the environment within which they study has shown to have a significant impact on their behavior, academic progress and sense of well-being. This study was undertaken to evaluate the students’ perception of their learning environment in an Indian medical school following traditional curricula and to study differences, if any, between the students according to the stages of medical education, i.e., the pre-clinical and clinical stages. Methodology: In the present study, the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) inventory was administered to undergraduate medical students of first (n = 227), third (n = 175), fifth (n = 171) and seventh (n = 123) semesters. Scores obtained were expressed as mean ± Standard Deviation (SD) and analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Dunnett’s test. P-value domains of perception, the registrars in all semesters had a more positive perception of learning (Average mean score: 29.44), their perception of course organizers moved in the right direction (Average mean score: 26.86), their academic self-perception was more on the positive side (Average mean score: 20.14), they had a more positive perception of atmosphere (Average mean score: 29.07) and their social self-perception could be graded as not too bad (Average mean score: 17.02). Conclusion: The present study revealed that all the groups of students perceived their learning environment positively. However, a few problematic areas of learning environment were perceived such as: students were stressed more often; they felt that the course organizers were authoritarian and emphasized factual learning. Implementing more problem-based learning, student counseling and workshops on teaching-learning for educators might enable us to remedy and enrich our learning environment. PMID:24596737

  1. Medical student service learning program teaches secondary students about career opportunities in health and medical fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpa, Kelly; Vakharia, Kavita; Caruso, Catherine A; Vechery, Colin; Sipple, Lanette; Wang, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Engagement of academic medical centers in community outreach provides the public with a better understanding of basic terms and concepts used in biomedical sciences and increases awareness of important health information. Medical students at one academic medical center initiated an educational outreach program, called PULSE, that targets secondary students to foster their interest in healthcare and medicine. High school student participants are engaged in a semester-long course that relies on interactive lectures, problem-based learning sessions, mentoring relationships with medical students, and opportunities for shadowing healthcare providers. To date, the curriculum has been offered for 7 consecutive years. To determine the impact that participation in the curriculum has had on college/career choices and to identify areas for improvement, an electronic questionnaire was sent to former participants. Based on a 32% response rate, 81% of former participants indicated that participation in the course influenced their decision to pursue a medical/science-related career. More than half (67%) of respondents indicated intent to pursue a MD/PhD or other postgraduate degree. Based on responses obtained, additional opportunities to incorporate laboratory-based research and simulation sessions should be explored. In addition, a more formalized mentoring component has been added to the course to enhance communication between medical students and mentees. Health/medicine-related educational outreach programs targeting high school students may serve as a pipeline to introduce or reinforce career opportunities in healthcare and related sciences. PMID:26628654

  2. Smoothing out transitions: how pedagogy influences medical students' achievement of self-regulated learning goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Casey B

    2007-08-01

    Medical school is an academic and developmental path toward a professional life demanding self-regulation and self-education. Thus, many medical schools include in their goals for medical student education their graduates' ability to self-assess and self-regulate their education upon graduation and throughout their professional lives. This study explores links between medical students' use of self-regulated learning as it relates to motivation, autonomy, and control, and how these influenced their experiences in medical school. Subjects were medical students in two distinct medical school environments, "Problem-based learning" and "Traditional." PBL students described a rough transition into medical school, but once they felt comfortable with the autonomy and control PBL gave them, they embraced the independence and responsibility. They found themselves motivated to learning for learning's sake, and able to channel their motivation into effective transitions from the classrooms into the clerkships. Traditional students had a rougher transition from the classrooms to the clerkships. In the first two years they relied on faculty to direct and control learning, and they channeled their motivation toward achieving the highest grade. In the clerkships, they found faculty expected them to be more independent and self-directed than they felt prepared to be, and they struggled to assume responsibility for their learning. Self-regulated learning can help smooth out the transitions through medical school by preparing first and second year students for expectations in the third and fourth years, which can then maximize learning in the clinical milieu, and prepare medical students for a lifetime of learning. PMID:16767503

  3. Features of professionally applied physical preperation of med?cal students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gubka P.I.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It is defined the development and support of a certain level of important psychical and physical qualities from professional point. The experiment has been carried out by the participation of the students of the Medical Academy. Along with other physical exercises particular attention has been paid to special respiratory exercises. The ways of physical culture and sport that improve general and specific professional and physical capacity for work have been shown. The methods of combining correctly organized breathing and psychological tuning with as a result of a favorable influence on a person's organism are also considered. It has been proved that suggested exercises have promoted the improvement of important psychical and physical qualities from professional point, as well as raising the individual's capacity for work, freeing from nervous stress.

  4. Motivation towards medical career choice and future career plans of Polish medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G?siorowski, Jakub; Rudowicz, El?bieta; Safranow, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    This longitudinal study aimed at investigating Polish medical students' career choice motivation, factors influencing specialty choices, professional plans and expectations. The same cohort of students responded to the same questionnaire, at the end of Year 1 and Year 6. The Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U tests and logistic regression were used in analyses. The results showed that altruistic and scientific reasons were the main motives for choosing a medical career. The motives remained stable over time. The effect of gender on altruistic motivation was stronger at the end of the study, with females' rating higher. The most favored career paths were associated with non-primary care specializations and work in a hospital. Results of the multivariate logistic regression showed that primary care specializations were more attractive to females, final year students, those from small agglomerations, and those less concerned about high earnings. Preferences regarding sector of work were formed at later stages of training. A preference shift was observed, between Year 1 and Year 6, towards favoring work in the public sector. Predictors of the desire to work in the public sector were: being a male and the final year student, paying less attention to high earnings, wanting certainty of finding work, having a stronger need for interesting and socially important work. A significant decline in the level of interest in seeking employment abroad was observed with the progress of studies. Our findings are likely to provide useful information for educators, policy planners and policy makers. PMID:25352498

  5. Teaching Interpersonal Communication Competence to Medical Students through Theatre in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Jonna; Pyorala, Eeva; Isotalus, Pekka

    2010-01-01

    Effective communication skills are considered essential to a physician's professional competence. Thus, Finnish medical schools include communication skills training in their curricula. Today it is essential to ensure that students graduate with the interpersonal communication competence (ICC) necessary to succeed in their profession. Experiential…

  6. Medical Students' Emotional Development in Early Clinical Experience: A Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Laan, Roland; Dornan, Tim; Koopmans, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Dealing with emotions is a critical feature of professional behaviour. There are no comprehensive theoretical models, however, explaining how medical students learn about emotions. We aimed to explore factors affecting their emotions and how they learn to deal with emotions in themselves and others. During a first-year nursing attachment in…

  7. Cigarette Smoking among Medical Students in China and Modifiable Risk Factors for Smoking Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinguang; Tang, Xiaolan; Stanton, Bonita; Li, Hanwu; Chen, Weiqing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The reduction of tobacco use among medical students is a potentially powerful strategy to reduce tobacco use among future health professionals, who in turn, can have significant impact on tobacco use among patients as well as the general population in China. The goal of this study is to update information on the prevalence of cigarette…

  8. Suicidal ideation and attempt among South African medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Van Niekerk, L.; Scribante, L.; Raubenhelmer, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    International data reveal that medical students are at higher risk of attempting suicide than the general population. We aimed to determine the prevalence of suicidal ideation and attempt among South African medical students from three universities and identify key predisposing risk factors. Data were collected via a questionnaire to medical students on demographics, mental health history, depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation and attempt. A total of 874 medical students...

  9. Resilience of students and their readiness for professional functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichurin V.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: in structure of specialist’s psychological readiness for professional functioning important place is taken by formation of the so-called professionally significant personality’s features. Person’s resilience shall be related to them as well. The purpose is to clear up the existing tendencies in respect to resilience and its components in students. Material and methods: in the research 130 students of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V.Lazaryan, participated. From them 73 were boys and 57 - girls. Their age was 17-20 years old. Diagnostic of resilience level and its components (commitment, control, challenge was conducted with the help of resilience questionnaire by S. Maddy, adapted by D. Leontyev and Ye. Rasskazova. Results: we determined indicators of resilience, characteristic for modern students. The received results permit to speak about psychological readiness of modern students for professional functioning by factor of resilience. Conclusions: 1 absolute majority of students have high indicators of resilience and indicators within standards; 2 boys and girls have statistically significant differences by factor “involvement”.

  10. Humanities mini-course curricula for midcareer health professionals at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kimberly R; George, Daniel R

    2012-08-01

    The field of medical humanities has traditionally focused on medical students and, more recently, on premedical undergraduates. Comparatively little formal humanities pedagogy has been dedicated to midcareer health professionals. To address this lack, the Department of Humanities at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center designed eight annual humanities mini-courses for faculty and staff throughout the college and medical center.These mini-courses fell into four categories: reading, reflection, and discussion; creative expression; technology; and ethics. They were geared toward midcareer health professionals who were seeking new intellectual and creative stimulation and variety in daily routine. They also provided humanities faculty the opportunity to devote attention to topics that capitalize on their professional training and that interest them personally.Participants indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the mini-courses for four principal reasons: (1) learning the tools and methodologies of a new discipline or domain other than biomedicine, (2) using their minds and training in uncustomary ways, (3) forming new alliances with colleagues (which served to lessen the sense of professional isolation), and (4) enjoying a respite from the stressful flow of the workday. Humanities faculty facilitators provided more mixed responses but agreed that conducting the mini-courses had been a positive overall experience.Although this article provides a foundational framework for the development of a humanities mini-course series, the authors encourage others to replicate these curricula in other medical settings as an important step toward a robust pedagogy designed for midcareer health care professionals. PMID:22827992

  11. Library Use by Medical Students: A Comparison of Two Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-nien; Lin, Pei-chun; Chang, Sung-Shan; Sun, Hao-chang

    2011-01-01

    This study explored 1) whether there were any differences in the way medical students used library resources under problem-based learning (PBL) and scenario-based learning (SBL) curricula; and 2) what improvements the library could make to facilitate its use by medical students using the different curricula. Twenty medical students selected from…

  12. When Patients Decline Medical Student Participation: The Preceptors' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tricia S.; Skye, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    Patients' receptivity towards medical student participation has been examined predominantly from the patient and/or the medical student perspective. Few studies have investigated the preceptor's perspective. The study examined preceptors' experience with patients declining medical student participation in clinical care and identified…

  13. Specialty preferences among medical students in a Kenyan university

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka; Eric Thuo Mbugua

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although in the recent years gender distribution in medical schools has changed, with the proportion of female medical students drastically increasing, medical specialties continue to have gender disparities. This study aimed at determining gender differences in career choices among medical students in Kenya.

  14. The unmet need for safe abortion in Turkey: a role for medical abortion and training of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihciokur, Sare; Akin, Ayse; Dogan, Bahar Guciz; Ozvaris, Sevkat Bahar

    2015-02-01

    Abortion has been legal and safe in Turkey since 1983, but the unmet need for safe abortion services remains high. Many medical practitioners believe that the introduction of medical abortion would address this. However, since 2012 there has been political opposition to the provision of abortion services. The government has been threatening to restrict the law, and following an administrative change in booking of appointments, some hospital clinics that provided family planning and abortion services had to stop providing abortions. Thus, the availability of safe abortion depends not only on permissive legislation but also political support and the ability of health professionals to provide it. We conducted a study among university medical school students in three provinces on their knowledge of abortion and abortion methods, to try to understand their future practice intentions. Pre-tested, structured, self-administered questionnaires were answered by 209 final-year medical students. The students' level of knowledge of abortion and abortion methods was very low. More than three-quarters had heard of surgical abortion, but only 56% mentioned medical abortion. Although nearly 90% supported making abortion services available in Turkey, their willingness to provide surgical abortion (16%) or medical abortion (15%) was low, due to lack of knowledge. Abortion care, including medical abortion, needs to be included in the medical school curriculum in order to safeguard this women's health service. PMID:25702066

  15. Professional examination stress induced hemodynamic changes in first year MBBS students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandarajan B.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years there has been a rising optimistic reception on the stresses involved in professional examination as this may affect student’s wellbeing, learning and academic performance.Competitiveness in today’s world has made stress inevitable in life. Medical students face stress in all stages of their academic career, including pre-clinical, paraclinical, and clinical years. The students of first M.B.B.S. probably face a major stress especially during the first credit examination.Materials and Methods: Study was carried out among first year MBBS students of Sri Muthukumaran Medical College during November 2012. 108 first year MBBS students were randomly selected and first part of study captured personal data. The rest comprised anthropometric measurements [ht(cms , wt(kgs] and pulse rate and blood pressure recordings  ten days before, on the day(one hour before the examination and ten days after first credit examination. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software version 2.0. Student’s t- test was used to compare the data and p value < 0.05 was considered significant.Result: The overall response rate was 72% (108 out of 150 students. It was observed that 29 males (60 % and 32 (53% females students were having increase in pulse rate and systolic blood pressure one hour before the examination compared to pulse rate(PR and systolic blood pressure(SBP ten days before and ten days after the examination. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP was also increased one hour before to examination compared to ten days before examination, though the difference was not statistically significant.Conclusion: It is evident that the first year MBBS students undergo stress during their academic examinations and need for the hour is to use interventions like social and psychological to improve the quality of life. Student advisors and counsellors can train students about stress management.

  16. LEARNING STYLES ADOPTED BY MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmay Shah

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning results in gain of knowledge, skills and attitudes. Some like to learn by seeing, some by hearing and some by demonstration. Learning style influences the retention of information and depth of comprehension. Understanding their preferred learning styles as visual, auditory, read-write or kinesthetic learners will help improve the teaching methods adopted. Role of the educator necessitates making the most of each teaching opportunity by understanding the characteristics of the learning audience and incorporating demonstrated principles of adult educational design, with a focus on collaborative learning and variety in presentation techniques. The goal is to provide student oriented education, producing efficient doctors. A cross-sectional study among 92 medical students of the Govt. Medical College, Bhavnagar, conducted in 2009. VARK questionnaire was used to access their learning preference. Preference for different learning styles were, visual (V 1.08%, auditory (A 20.65%, reading/writing (R 2.17% and kinesthetic (K 17.39%. 41.30% of the total 92 students preferred a single mode of information presentation. Of the 92 students who preferred multiple modes of information presentation, some preferred two modes (bimodal, 31.52%, some preferred three modes (tri-modal, 27.13%, and only one student preferred quadri-modal.

  17. Volunteering in Nha Trang, Vietnam: Senior Medical Students’ Perspectives of a Surgical Mission Trip

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Don; Nguyen, Kim T

    2011-01-01

    Vietnam has had a long history of international mission teams that volunteer needed surgical care to underserved populations for various medical problems. As senior medical students, we joined a non-profit organization’s surgical mission trip led by a community practice surgeon and staffed by 32 health care professionals to provide cleft lip and palate reconstructions for 75 patients at a local hospital in Nha Trang, Vietnam. As a surgical mission team in a resource-poor country, we intended ...

  18. [Medical students' evaluation of clinical departments can help low score departments to improve their effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Betina Ristorp; Brandi, Ulrik; Schroeder, Torben V

    2014-03-24

    Development of professional identity is essential for medical students to become good doctors. Introduction to the clinical setting, role models, reflection, structure, learning strategy and inclusion in community of practice are important factors. Four observations and 15 interviews were made and revealed big differences in educational practice in four different clinical departments. The departments with low evaluation scores need to improve their practice. Individual guidance inside the department, which adjusts for medical specialty, potentials and challenges, could initiate future progress. PMID:25349930

  19. First Year Medical Students? AIDS Knowledge and Attitude

    OpenAIRE

    Amalraj Edwin R; Chandrasekaran Nirmala; Solomon Sunithi; Sumbandam Raja P

    1995-01-01

    Research Question: What is the level of knowledge, sexual practices and attitude of medical students towards AIDS/ HIV. Objective: To assess the knowledge, sexual practices and attitudes of medical students in relation to HIV/AIDS. Study Design: Cross- sectional. Participants: 409 first year medical students. Study variables: Sex knowledge, sexual practices, Attitudes, Risk perception. Results: 92% of the students had heard about AIDS predominantly through mass media. Many students had...

  20. Canaries in the coal mine: Personal and professional impact of undergoing whole genome sequencing on medical professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierhut, Heather; McCarthy Veach, Patricia; LeRoy, Bonnie

    2015-11-01

    Public interest in personal whole genome sequencing is increasing. The technology is publicly available and is being used as an educational tool in higher education. Empirical evidence regarding its utility is vital. The goals of this study were to characterize the process of whole genome sequencing in a population of medical and basic science professionals undergoing whole genome sequencing as a part of an educational symposium. Thirty-eight individuals completed one or more surveys from the time of informed consent for whole genome sequencing to 3 months post-symposium. The four surveys assessed demographics, decision-making, communication, decision regret, and personal and professional impact. The most prevalent motivation to participate was professional enhancement, followed by curiosity about the technology, and personal health benefits. The most important initial impact concerned medical implications. Over time, however, impact on professional development was greater than on personal health. Anticipated reactions to receiving whole genome sequencing results generally matched participants' actual reactions and decision regret remained low over time. Benefits and risks of whole genome sequencing included medically actionable results and misunderstanding by healthcare providers. Whole genome sequencing generally had a positive impact professionally and personally on participants. Further education of providers and the public about whole genome sequencing and psychosocial support is warranted. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26219924

  1. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences electronic health record and medical informatics training for undergraduate health professionals*

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Jan K; Newton, Bruce W; Boone, Steven E

    2010-01-01

    The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is planning interprofessional training in electronic health records (EHRs) and medical informatics. Training will be integrated throughout the curricula and will include seminars on broad concepts supplemented with online modules, didactic lectures, and hands-on experiences. Training will prepare future health professionals to use EHRs, evidence-based medicine, medical decision support, and point-of-care tools to reduce errors, improve st...

  2. Pharmacy Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Medical Marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Karen E; Woods, Barbara

    2015-08-25

    Objective. To determine pharmacy students' knowledge of and attitudes toward medical marijuana and to determine if pharmacy students need additional education on the topic. Methods. Pharmacy students were asked to complete a survey on medical marijuana that assessed their knowledge of, medical uses of, adverse effects with, and attitudes toward medical marijuana through 23 Likert-scale questions. Results. Three hundred eleven students completed the survey. Fifty-eight percent of the students felt that medical marijuana should be legalized in all states. However, the majority of students did not feel comfortable answering consumers' questions regarding efficacy, safety, or drug interactions related to the substance. Accurate responses for diseases or conditions for permitted medical marijuana use was low, with only cancer (91%) and glaucoma (57%) identified by more than half the students. Conclusion. With an increasing number of states adopting medical marijuana use, pharmacy schools need to evaluate the adequacy of medical marijuana education in their curriculum. PMID:26430272

  3. Pharmacy Students’ Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Medical Marijuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine pharmacy students’ knowledge of and attitudes toward medical marijuana and to determine if pharmacy students need additional education on the topic. Methods. Pharmacy students were asked to complete a survey on medical marijuana that assessed their knowledge of, medical uses of, adverse effects with, and attitudes toward medical marijuana through 23 Likert-scale questions. Results. Three hundred eleven students completed the survey. Fifty-eight percent of the students felt that medical marijuana should be legalized in all states. However, the majority of students did not feel comfortable answering consumers’ questions regarding efficacy, safety, or drug interactions related to the substance. Accurate responses for diseases or conditions for permitted medical marijuana use was low, with only cancer (91%) and glaucoma (57%) identified by more than half the students. Conclusion. With an increasing number of states adopting medical marijuana use, pharmacy schools need to evaluate the adequacy of medical marijuana education in their curriculum. PMID:26430272

  4. EVALUATION OF THE PERSPECTIVES OF THE ACADEMIC MEDICAL STAFF AND RESIDENTS CONCERNING CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN A MEDICAL FACULTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyhan H?d?ro?lu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the perspectives of the academic medical staff and residents concerning continuing professional development in a medical faculty.Method: This descriptive research was performed on 152 academic medical staff and residents who was accepted to participate in the study in a medical faculty in August 2007. Study data was collected through face to face interviews by a questionnaire made up of three parts and 40 questions.Results: Sixty-seven point eight percent of the participants were informed about the continuing medical education and 7.9% of them were informed about continuing professional development. 45.4% participated in activities concerning continuing medical education. The factor negatively affecting participation in activities was lack of information (44.7%. Educational activities inside the department were found as the activities most frequented, 66.4% and courses in the congresses were found as the most effective educational activities (49.2%.Conclusion: The participants were well-informed about continuing medical education, while their knowledge about continuing professional development was low. Inducing and motivating doctors for participating in continuing professional development activities is critically important for both doctors and health care system.

  5. Medical students' beliefs about nine different specialties.

    OpenAIRE

    Furnham, A F

    1986-01-01

    A total of 449 preclinical and postclinical students from three London University medical schools completed one of nine versions of a 50 item questionnaire seeking their attitudes to nine specialties: anaesthetics, general practice, gynaecology, hospital medicine, paediatrics, pathology, psychiatry, radiology, and surgery. There were three main findings. Firstly, though item by item analysis yielded interesting and predictable differences, such as the negative attitudes to psychiatry, the stu...

  6. Federal state educational standards of higher professional education. Discipline «Law»: perspectives of introduction in medical institutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erugina ?.V.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the positive and negative impact of the new Federal state educational standards of higher professional education on the quality of studying the discipline «Law» in medical schools

  7. Perceptions of good medical practice in the NHS: a survey of senior health professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchinson, A; Williams, M.; Meadows, K; Barbour, R.S.; Jones, R.

    1999-01-01

    Objectives - To categorise senior health professionals' experience with poor medical practice in hospitals and in general practice, to describe perceptions which senior NHS staff have of good medical practice, and to describe how problems of poor medical practice are currently managed. Design - A postal questionnaire survey. The questionnaire sought perceptions of good medical practice, asked participants to characterise deviations from good practice, and to describe e...

  8. The moral education of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, R

    1998-01-01

    The author begins his essay by discussing George Eliot's novel Middlemarch, in which a doctor, early in his career, wanders from his idealistic commitment to serving the poor. Although he establishes a prominent practice, he considers himself a failure because "he had not done what he once meant to do." The essay explores how many of us (physicians included) forsake certain ideals or principles--not in one grand gesture, but in moment-to-moment decisions, in day-to-day rationalizations and self-deceptions, until we find ourselves caught in lives whose implications we have long ago stopped examining, never mind judging. Medical education barrages students with information, fosters sometimes ruthless competition, and perpetuates rote memorization and an obsession with test scores--all of which stifle moral reflection. Apart from radically rethinking medical education (doing away with the MCAT, for example, as Lewis Thomas proposed), how can we teach students to consider what it means to be a good doctor? Calling upon the work of Eliot, Walker Percy, and others, the author discusses how the study of literature can broaden and deepen the inner lives of medical students and encourage moral reflectiveness. PMID:9447202

  9. Emotional intelligence scale for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotional Intelligence has been associated with positive outcome process in varied professions. There is paucity of Indian literature on the subject; especially involving medical undergraduates; and presently there is no scale available to measure the same in the Indian scenario. Objective: To develop a scale to measure Emotional Intelligence among medical undergraduates. Materials and Methods: Four domains of Emotional intelligence were selected, viz. Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social-Awareness & Social-Skills and these were included for the purpose of domains of the scale. On the basis of focused group discussions and in-depth deliberations with experts, undergraduate and postgraduate medical students a pool of 50 items was generated. The items were reduced to 27 based on expert consensus and on the basis of frequency of endorsement by expert reviews. It was followed by a pilot study of 50 undergraduates. This completed the preparation of the preliminary draft based on content analysis. The questionnaire was then administered in 480 students and the data was analyzed by appropriate statistical methods. For the purpose of concurrent validity, emotional intelligence scale developed by Dr. Ekta was used. Results: The Cronbach?s Alpha for Internal Consistency Reliability was 0.68. The EIS had a significant correlation with social awareness domain of Emotional Intelligence Test (EIT establishing Concurrent Validity. Conclusion: Emotional Intelligence Scale for medical undergraduates was constructed. Reliability and concurrent validity were also established for the same.

  10. Effect of personality development program for medical and nursing students: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Nebhinani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Personal development is an ongoing but complex process and it is crucial for the medical educator to recognize the trait and design the training for optimal development of students. Though importance of human personality is widely recognized for functional efficiency of an individual and organization, but its recognition is grossly missing from medical curriculum. Aim: To organize and evaluate the 'Personality Development Program' for medical and nursing students.Methods: First year medical and nursing students were recruited through total enumeration method. 'Personality development program' was conducted by a trained psychologist and it was evaluated through 'partially open ended anonymous structured feedback'.Results: Majority of the students found this program relevant, comprehensive and purposeful. Again majority had perceived some improvement in their confidence and level of communication, interpersonal relationships, planned time schedule, emotional confidence, and better stress management. They have also narrated shortcomings of the program along with some constructive suggestions.Conclusion: This preliminary attempt for personality development was highly appreciated by the students as well as their supervisors as a means to professional development. It further emphasizes the vital need of ongoing programs both for enhancing personality and professionalism.Key words: Personality development, enhancement, medical and nursing students

  11. The nursing students' viewpoints on influential clinical instructor in Jahrom University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Najafipour

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Clinical teachers have an important role in creating an environment for effective clinical teaching to students. In addition, the faculty has a significant impact on the students' feeling of success or failure in professional competence. This study was performed to determine the characteristics of an influential instructor according to the nursing students' viewpoints in Jahrom University of Medical Sciences.Material and Methods:In this cross-sectional survey, 75 nursing students of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences were selected by census sampling method. The data collection tool was a valid and reliable questionnaire consisting of 4 domains including professional competence, interpersonal relationship, personality characteristics, and teaching ability. The data were analyzed by SPSS.Results:The results showed that influential clinical teacher must be professionally competent (mean=4.4 ± 0.80, have interpersonal relationships (mean=4.2 ± 0.96 have good personality characteristics (mean=4.1 ± 0.95, and have high eaching ability (mean=4 ± 0.89. According to the students, the most important characteristics of an influential clinical instructor are having interest in patient care (98.4%, having sufficient professional knowledge (80%, explaining and demonstrating new nursing techniques (80%, performing nursing skills procedures (86.3%, being honest with the students and creating motivation in students (83%.Conclusion:The nursing students' viewpoints indicated that influential clinical instructor has an important role in promoting quality nursing experience and in getting knowledge, professional skills and attitude. Nursing faculty should plan for promoting professional competency in clinical instructors.

  12. Medical Student Mistreatment Results in Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heru, Alison; Gagne, Gerard; Strong, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors assessed medical student attitudes regarding mistreatment and symptoms of posttraumatic stress in those students who reported exposure to mistreatment. Methods: Third- and fourth-year medical students (N = 71) responded to questions from a vignette in which a student is mistreated and then described any mistreatment they had…

  13. Attitudes of Medical Graduate and Undergraduate Students toward the Learning and Application of Medical Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yazhou; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Yanqi; Liu, Xiaoyu; Yi, Dong

    2015-01-01

    It is clear that the teaching of medical statistics needs to be improved, yet areas for priority are unclear as medical students' learning and application of statistics at different levels is not well known. Our goal is to assess the attitudes of medical students toward the learning and application of medical statistics, and discover their…

  14. Medical Student Attitudes about Mental Illness: Does Medical-School Education Reduce Stigma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korszun, Ania; Dinos, Sokratis; Ahmed, Kamran; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reducing stigma associated with mental illness is an important aim of medical education, yet evidence indicates that medical students' attitudes toward patients with mental health problems deteriorate as they progress through medical school. Objectives: Authors examined medical students' attitudes to mental illness, as compared with…

  15. The Impact of Social Media on Medical Professionalism: A Systematic Qualitative Review of Challenges and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Gholami-Kordkheili, Fatemeh; Wild, Verina; Strech, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background: The rising impact of social media on the private and working lives of health care professionals has made researchers and health care institutions study and rethink the concept and content of medical professionalism in the digital age. In the last decade, several specific policies, original research studies, and comments have been published on the responsible use of social media by health care professionals. However, there is no systematic literature review that analyzes the full s...

  16. Mindfulness training for stress management: a randomised controlled study of medical and psychology students

    OpenAIRE

    de Vibe, Michael; Solhaug, Ida; Tyssen, Reidar; Friborg, Oddgeir; Rosenvinge, Jan H; Sørlie, Tore; Bjørndal, Arild

    2013-01-01

    Background: Distress and burnout among medical and psychology professionals are commonly reported and have implications for the quality of patient care delivered. Already in the course of university studies, medicine and psychology students report mental distress and low life satisfaction. There is a need for interventions that promote better coping skills in students in order to prevent distress and future burnout. This study examines the effect of a seven-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduc...

  17. Does reflection have an effect upon case-solving abilities of undergraduate medical students?

    OpenAIRE

    Koole Sebastiaan; Dornan Tim; Aper Leen; Scherpbier Albert; Valcke Martin; Cohen-Schotanus Janke; Derese Anselme

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Reflection on professional experience is increasingly accepted as a critical attribute for health care practice; however, evidence that it has a positive impact on performance remains scarce. This study investigated whether, after allowing for the effects of knowledge and consultation skills, reflection had an independent effect on students’ ability to solve problem cases. Methods Data was collected from 362 undergraduate medical students at Ghent University solving video ...

  18. Automated Assessment of Medical Students’ Clinical Exposures according to AAMC Geriatric Competencies

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yukun; Wrenn, Jesse; Xu, Hua; Spickard, Anderson; Habermann, Ralf; Powers, James; Denny, Joshua C

    2014-01-01

    Competence is essential for health care professionals. Current methods to assess competency, however, do not efficiently capture medical students’ experience. In this preliminary study, we used machine learning and natural language processing (NLP) to identify geriatric competency exposures from students’ clinical notes. The system applied NLP to generate the concepts and related features from notes. We extracted a refined list of concepts associated with corresponding competencies. This syst...

  19. Exploring UK medical and social work students' legal literacy: comparisons, contrasts and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston-Shoot, Michael; McKimm, Judy

    2013-05-01

    To ensure acceptable practice standards both doctors and social workers should draw on relevant legal rules when reaching professional judgements concerning, for instance, children requiring protection, people with severe mental distress and adults at risk, information sharing, consent to intervention and service user involvement in their care and treatment. Many practitioners use the law to maintain high standards of professionalism. However, research has uncovered limited awareness of legal rules and poor standards of health and social care. Academic benchmarks and practice requirements for health and social care professions centrally position legal knowledge for secure decision-making. Model curricula exist. However, the outcomes of the taught curriculum on students' confidence in their legal knowledge and skills have been relatively overlooked. This article introduces the concept of legal literacy, a distillation of knowledge, understanding, skills and values that enables practitioners to connect relevant legal rules with their professional practice, to appreciate the roles and duties of other practitioners and to communicate effectively across organisational boundaries. It presents the outcomes for a 2006-2009 study of 1154 UK medical and 638 social work students of their law learning for practice, response rates of 46% and 68%. Significant differences were found between medical and social work students' attitudes towards the law, and in their self-ratings of legal knowledge and skills. Confidence levels were low and anxiety high, especially among medical students, although law teaching had some positive outcomes on knowledge and skill development. Social work and medical students associated different themes with the law, the latter especially foregrounding ethics, negligence and liability, which could affect inter-professional working. Students are not fully prepared for legally literate practice, with a consequent need to review the time allocated for, and the content of law learning and the subsequent availability of continuing professional development. PMID:23379906

  20. Further testing the impact of shift schedule on task scale variables for medical laboratory professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Gary; Fertig, Jason; Lopez, Andrea; Aaronson, William; Holladay, Blair

    2007-01-01

    Using a broader sample of medical laboratory professionals, this study extended prior work by Blau and Lunz testing the impact of shift schedule on task scales. Overall the results supported the study hypothesis-i.e., medical laboratory professionals on a fixed day shift have lower job content routinization (higher task enrichment) than fixed evening and night and rotating shifts. Future research issues and study limitations are briefly discussed. PMID:18293804

  1. Antibiotics Self-Medication among Southern Iranian University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sarahroodi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the knowledge and behavior toward antibiotic self-medication among medical and non-medical university students in Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 200 students randomly chosen from a medical and a non-medical university in Ahwaz, South of Iran in 2008. Data was collected using self administered questionnaires with open-ended and close-ended items. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS 14 and the results were presented as the percentage 97.5% of respondents filled and returned the questionnaire. Self-medication with antibiotics was reported by 42.2% of the medical and 48% of the non-medical students during the last 3 months. Respiratory problems such as sore throat and common cold was the main indication for self-medication with antibiotics (73.3% and amoxicillin was the most commonly used antibiotic in both groups. The choice of self-medication was based on medical knowledge among medical students (50% and on a previous suggestion by a physician (32.6% for the non-medical ones. The prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics among medical and non-medical students was high. Educational programs are needed to teach university students about the potential problems of self-medication with antibiotics.

  2. A Multivariate Analysis of Personality, Values and Expectations as Correlates of Career Aspirations of Final Year Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mary E.; Searle, Judy; Creed, Peter A.; Ng, Shu-Kay

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on the career intentions of 179 final year medical students who completed an online survey that included measures of personality, values, professional and lifestyle expectations, and well-being. Logistic regression analyses identified the determinants of preferred medical specialty, practice location and hours of work.…

  3. Can gynaecology teaching associates provide high quality effective training for medical students in the United Kingdom? Comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Pickard, Sally; Baraitser, Paula; Rymer, Janice; Piper, Johanna

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To train laywomen to become professional patients in order to teach medical students speculum and bimanual examination, to assess their effectiveness in this role, and to incorporate this method of teaching into the undergraduate curriculum of a medical school in the United Kingdom.

  4. Medical students’ attitudes toward gay men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matharu Kabir

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare providers’ attitudes toward sexual minorities influence patient comfort and outcomes. This study characterized medical student attitudes toward gay men, focusing on behavior, personhood, gay civil rights, and male toughness. Methods A cross-sectional web-based anonymous survey was sent to medical students enrolled at the University of California, Davis (N?=?371 with a response rate of 68%. Results Few respondents expressed negative attitudes toward gay men or would deny them civil rights. More negative responses were seen with respect to aspects of intimate behavior and homosexuality as a natural form of sexual expression. Men and students younger than 25?years old were more likely to endorse negative attitudes toward behavior as well as more traditional views on male toughness. Conclusions We show that an important minority of students express discomfort with the behavior of gay men and hold to a narrow construction of male identity. These findings suggest that competency training must move beyond conceptual discussions and address attitudes toward behaviors through new pedagogical approaches.

  5. Sleep quality in Zanjan university medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghoreishi A

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep has a major role in daily cycles and reconstruction of physical and mental abilities. Regarding the importance of this feature, we decided to determine sleep quality in medical students.Methods: A questionnaire containing demographic data, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was prepared. We distributed the questionnaires using a census method to every student at the Zanjan Faculty of Medicine. The completed questionnaires were collected and the data was analyzed using SPSS.Results: A total of 224 students answered the questionnaire, with 133 (59.4% students evaluated to have good sleep quality and 91 (40.6% poor sleep quality. Of these 91 students, 38% were female and 44.8% were male (p=0.307. The prevalence of poor sleep quality according to the four stages of medical training was 24.6% of those in basic sciences, 42.9% of those in physiopathology, 41.7% of externs, and 53.5% of interns (p=0.008. According to residential status, the prevalence of poor sleep quality was 61.5% among students living with their spouse, 44.6% for students living in their own private homes, 37.6% among students living in the dormitory, and 20.8% for those living with their parents (p=0.024. According to marital status, 35.8% of singles and 64.9% of married students had poor sleep quality (p=0.001. According to financial status, 57.9%, 46.9%, and 33.9% of those from low, moderate and high economic classes, respectively, were sleep deprived (p=0.049. Among those with average grades of under 16 and over 16 out of 20, 47.5% and 32%, respectively, were suffering from poor sleep quality (p=0.047. There was no obvious relationship between sleep quality and BMI, sex, or history of depression or anxiety.Conclusion: Poor sleep quality was significantly associated with lower grades, economic status, living arrangement and type of training. A large number of students quality of life and work may suffer because sleep deprivation.

  6. Using standardized patients to assess communication skills in medical and nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgoyne Louise

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of recent developments in medical and nursing education have highlighted the importance of communication and consultation skills (CCS. Although such skills are taught in all medical and nursing undergraduate curriculums, there is no comprehensive screening or assessment programme of CCS using professionally trained Standardized Patients Educators (SPE's in Ireland. This study was designed to test the content, process and acceptability of a screening programme in CCS with Irish medical and nursing students using trained SPE's and a previously validated global rating scale for CCS. Methods Eight tutors from the Schools of Nursing and Medicine at University College Cork were trained in the use of a validated communication skills and attitudes holistic assessment tool. A total of forty six medical students (Year 2 of 5 and sixty four nursing students (Year 2/3 of 4 were selected to under go individual CCS assessment by the tutors via an SPE led scenario. Immediate formative feedback was provided by the SPE's for the students. Students who did not pass the assessment were referred for remediation CCS learning. Results Almost three quarters of medical students (33/46; 72% and 81% of nursing students (56/64 passed the CCS assessment in both communication and attitudes categories. All nursing students had English as their first language. Nine of thirteen medical students referred for enhanced learning in CCS did not have English as their first language. Conclusions A significant proportion of both medical and nursing students required referral for enhanced training in CCS. Medical students requiring enhanced training were more likely not to have English as a first language.

  7. Using standardized patients to assess communication skills in medical and nursing students

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, C Anthony

    2010-03-17

    Abstract Background A number of recent developments in medical and nursing education have highlighted the importance of communication and consultation skills (CCS). Although such skills are taught in all medical and nursing undergraduate curriculums, there is no comprehensive screening or assessment programme of CCS using professionally trained Standardized Patients Educators (SPE\\'s) in Ireland. This study was designed to test the content, process and acceptability of a screening programme in CCS with Irish medical and nursing students using trained SPE\\'s and a previously validated global rating scale for CCS. Methods Eight tutors from the Schools of Nursing and Medicine at University College Cork were trained in the use of a validated communication skills and attitudes holistic assessment tool. A total of forty six medical students (Year 2 of 5) and sixty four nursing students (Year 2\\/3 of 4) were selected to under go individual CCS assessment by the tutors via an SPE led scenario. Immediate formative feedback was provided by the SPE\\'s for the students. Students who did not pass the assessment were referred for remediation CCS learning. Results Almost three quarters of medical students (33\\/46; 72%) and 81% of nursing students (56\\/64) passed the CCS assessment in both communication and attitudes categories. All nursing students had English as their first language. Nine of thirteen medical students referred for enhanced learning in CCS did not have English as their first language. Conclusions A significant proportion of both medical and nursing students required referral for enhanced training in CCS. Medical students requiring enhanced training were more likely not to have English as a first language.

  8. A student-initiated and student-facilitated international health elective for preclinical medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirali Vora

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Global health education is becoming more important for developing well-rounded physicians and may encourage students toward a career in primary care. Many medical schools, however, lack adequate and structured opportunities for students beginning the curriculum. Methods: Second-year medical students initiated, designed, and facilitated a pass–fail international health elective, providing a curricular framework for preclinical medical students wishing to gain exposure to the clinical and cultural practices of a developing country. Results: All course participants (N=30 completed a post-travel questionnaire within one week of sharing their experiences. Screening reflection essays for common themes that fulfill university core competencies yielded specific global health learning outcomes, including analysis of health care determinants. Conclusion: Medical students successfully implemented a sustainable global health curriculum for preclinical student peers. Financial constraints, language, and organizational burdens limit student participation. In future, long-term studies should analyze career impact and benefits to the host country.

  9. The relationship between spirituality and burnout among medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Wachholtz, Amy; Rogoff, MaiLan

    2013-01-01

    Medical student burnout has been associated with depression, loss of empathy, and suicidal ideation. Spirituality has been identified in previous studies as a protective factor in coping with the stress but has not been examined as a factor in medical student burnout. An internet link to an anonymous survey was sent via email to medical students at a public northeastern medical school; 259/469 (55.2%) completed it. The survey included measures of spirituality, burnout, psychological distress,...

  10. Internet Behaviour Pattern in Undergraduate Medical Students in Mangalore

    OpenAIRE

    VIDYAMAVILA CHATHOTH; BHAGYALAKSHMI KODAVANJI; NAYANATARA ARUNKUMAR; SHEILA RAMESH PAI

    2013-01-01

    Considering the explosive growth in internet use among medical students in India, this study aimed to determine the prevalence of internet addiction in undergraduate medical students.This cross-sectional study involved 90 subjects (18-20 years of age) selected by random sampling from the first year undergraduate medical student population at Kasturba Medical College Mangalore. Young’s Internet addiction test questionnaire was administered. Based on the scoring, subjects were classified into n...

  11. Implementation of a professional enrichment program to enhance medical school experience

    OpenAIRE

    Adkison, Linda R; Andrea L. Hanson

    2013-01-01

    Medical students experience stress during medical education that can negatively impact performance. Typical curricula in U.S. medical schools are rigorously intense and provide little or no time off between courses in the first two years of training. This intensity contributes to increased stress for students accustomed to performing academically near the top of the class prior to matriculating in medical school. We describe an innovative new academic calendar that was modified to create a Pr...

  12. [Continuing medical education in pediatrics: maintaining of professional competence with different interactive models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thivierge, R L; Saintonge, J; Rousseau, E; Weber, M L

    1991-01-01

    The forming of professional competence constitutes the primary mission of the university. It follows that the maintenance of professional competence is part of that same mission. Physicians will always remain the first motor of their own competence, but the university will play a major role in organizing and providing continuing medical education activities. At the University of Montreal, many CME programs are regularly offered to practising physicians concerned by pediatric patients (400 pediatricians and 7,000 family physicians). These programs include the following collective activities: 1), biannual convention on pediatric updates; 2), one-day meeting on selected topics; 3), advanced pediatric life support courses; 4), regional conference touring programs by university staff. We have also developed the following individual CME activities: 1), CME letter; 2), self-evaluation questionnaires; 3), miniresidency programs; 4), CME TV series; 5), problem-solving slide series. All these activities are planned according to a need assessment basis and an on-going evaluation process. Priority is given to interactive methods of student-teacher relationship. PMID:1663231

  13. High School Vocational Counseling Role in Leveraging Students` Professional Inclinations

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Br?tucu; Anca Madar; Nicoleta Andreea Neac?u; Dana Bo?cor; Codru?a Adina B?ltescu

    2014-01-01

    The experience of many countries with a well-educated workforce highlights the important role of vocational counselling services for advantageous youth professional orientation. Researchers manifest in their turn, a growing interest to study the role of vocational counselling, from the perspective of increasing the efficiency of investment in education and strengthening the capacity of enterprises to meet the challenges of the knowledge economy. In Romania, high school students have access to...

  14. Knowledge and attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine among medical students in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akan Hulya

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study aims to examine knowledge and attitudes towards Complementary and Alternative Medicine among medical students in Turkey, and find out whether they want to be trained in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out between October and December 2010 among medical students. Data were collected from a total of seven medical schools. Findings The study included 943 medical students. The most well known methods among the students were herbal treatment (81.2?%, acupuncture (80.8?%, hypnosis (78.8?%, body-based practices including massage (77?% and meditation (65.2?%, respectively. Acupuncture, aromatherapy, herbal treatment and meditation were better known among female participants compared to males (p? Conclusions Majority of the medical students were familiar with the CAM methods widely used in Turkey, while most of them had positive attitudes towards CAM as well as willingness to receive training on the subject, and they were likely to recommend CAM methods to their patients in their future professional lives. With its gradual scientific development and increasing popularity, there appears a need for a coordinated policy in integrating CAM into the medical curriculum, by taking expectations of and feedback from medical students into consideration in setting educational standards.

  15. Self-Medication Practice and Perceptions Among Undergraduate Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. H., Vardhamane; B.V., Patil; Santoshkumar, Jeevangi; Binjawadgi, Ashok S; Kanaki, Anand R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Self-medication practice is widespread in many countries and the irrational use of drugs is a cause of concern.It assumes a special significance among medical students as they are exposed to knowledge about diseases and drugs. Aim: To assess practice and perception of self medication among undergraduate medical students. Materials and Methods: It is a cross-sectional study in which study population consisted of undergraduate medical students of Mahadevappa Rampure Medical College Gulbarga, Karnataka, India. This study was conducted from March to April 2014. Total 448 students were taken. Out of which 8 incomplete questionnaires were excluded and 440 were analysed. The students who took self-medication during last six months were included. Written informed consent was obtained from each volunteer prior to the study. Students were given a questionnaire that include both open and close ended questions about self-medication practice. Ethical Approval: Ethics Committee approval was obtained from the Institutional Ethics Committee of Mahadevappa Rampure Medical College, Gulbarga, India, prior to the commencement of the study. Statistical Analysis: Data was analysed and presented as counts and percentages. Results: It was found that 388 (88.18%) students practiced self medication. The principal morbidity for seeking self medication was cold and cough as reported by 304 (78.35%) students. Antibiotics were most commonly self medicated as reported by 248 (63.91%) students, out of which only 92 (37.1%) students completed the full course of antibiotic regimen. Only 176 (40%) students opined that self medication is part of self care. Conclusion: Self-medication is widely practiced among undergraduate medical students. In this situation, we should educate the students about advantages and disadvantages of self medication. PMID:25653969

  16. Escuelas de Medicina: los estudiantes de hoy Medical schools: Students today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Kunakov

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Physicians that are faculty members in medical schools receive new students every year, and they are expected to prepare those students to become professionals. They usually appeal to their experience to meet that challenge. However, newer generations of students are different, and experience, with no formal training for teaching them, can be insuffcient. New characteristics of students can be related to their early contact in life with information technology. Their brain has been somehow modifed by stimuli offered by this technology, and the way they learn has also been modifed. This paper is a refection about how students have changed and it analyzes how their learning experience needs to be modifed accordingly. Teaching based only on experience might be insuffcient to fulfll the expectations of young students that have chosen the medical profession for their future.

  17. Escuelas de Medicina: los estudiantes de hoy / Medical schools: Students today

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Natasha, Kunakov.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available [...] Abstract in english Physicians that are faculty members in medical schools receive new students every year, and they are expected to prepare those students to become professionals. They usually appeal to their experience to meet that challenge. However, newer generations of students are different, and experience, with [...] no formal training for teaching them, can be insuffcient. New characteristics of students can be related to their early contact in life with information technology. Their brain has been somehow modifed by stimuli offered by this technology, and the way they learn has also been modifed. This paper is a refection about how students have changed and it analyzes how their learning experience needs to be modifed accordingly. Teaching based only on experience might be insuffcient to fulfll the expectations of young students that have chosen the medical profession for their future.

  18. Students' attitudes towards the introduction of a Personal and Professional Development portfolio: potential barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleland Jennifer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Portfolios, widely used in undergraduate and postgraduate medicine, have variable purposes, formats and success. A recent systematic review summarised factors necessary for successful portfolio introduction but there are no studies investigating the views of students inexperienced in portfolio use towards portfolio learning. This study's aim was to survey student views about a prospective Professional and Personal Development (PPD portfolio. Methods This was a qualitative, focus group study. All focus groups were taped and transcribed verbatim, and anonymised. The transcripts were analysed inductively, using framework analysis. Results Four focus groups were carried out with 32 undergraduate medical students naïve in portfolio use. Three themes relevant to portfolio introduction emerged. The first theme was the need for clear information and support for portfolio introduction, and anxieties about how this could be supported effectively. The second was that students had negative views about reflective learning and whether this could be taught and assessed, believing formal assessment could foster socially acceptable content. The third was that participants revealed little understanding of reflective learning and its potential benefits. Rather portfolios were seen as useful for concrete purposes (e.g., job applications not intrinsic benefits. Conclusion Undergraduate medical students without experience of portfolios are anxious about portfolio introduction. They require support in developing reflective learning skills. Care must be taken to ensure students do not see portfolios as merely yet another assessment hurdle.

  19. Using Sales Management Students to Manage Professional Selling Students in an Innovative Active Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Joyce A.; Hawes, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an application of active learning within two different courses: professional selling and sales management. Students assumed the roles of sales representatives and sales managers for an actual fund-raiser--a golf outing--sponsored by a student chapter of the American Marketing Association. The sales project encompassed an…

  20. Radioisotopes in the training of medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the discovery of radioisotopes for the progress of science in general and that of biochemistry and physiology in particular has led us to provide experimental practice which enables medical students to become effectively acquainted with the properties and methods of use of radioisotopes, the measurement of their activity, and the possible risks involved in handling them. We have included in the exercises in quantitative determination for third-year medical students (the last pre-clinical year), practice in calibrating micropipettes using a 24Na solution prepared in the TRICO Centre's reactor by irradiating sodium carbonate with slow neutrons. The students make several GM-counter measurements of the activity of the stock solution over a period of time and of the activity of five samples taken with two different micropipettes. They then calculate, by measuring the decay in activity, the half-life of the isotope and relate their measurements to a reference time. In this way they calculate the volume of their micropipettes and the accuracy of the measurements. By means of a statistical analysis they compare the averages for the two pipettes and the accuracy of two operators. (author)

  1. Developing health science students into integrated health professionals: a practical tool for learning

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan Madeleine; Gibbs Trevor J; Olckers Lorna

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background An integrated sense of professionalism enables health professionals to draw on relevant knowledge in context and to apply a set of professional responsibilities and ethical principles in the midst of changing work environments 12. Inculcating professionalism is therefore a critical goal of health professional education. Two multi-professional courses for first year Health Science students at the University of Cape Town, South Africa aim to lay the foundation for becoming a...

  2. KNOWELDGE ON EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS IN BANGALORE, KARNATAKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception (EC refers to methods that women can use to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse , method failure or incorrect use. Unwanted pregnancy followed by unsafe abortion can be avoided by using different contraceptive methods including emergency contraceptives. Inadequate awareness of EC leads to its misuse among the youth , as it may lead to avoidance of condoms which places them at risk for STIs/HIV. The objective of this study is to assess knowledge about emergency contraceptives among M.B.B.S. students. This is a cross - sectional stud y. Data was collected from Second year medical students of Bangalore Medical College & Research Institute , Bangalore using Pre - tested semi - structured self - administered questionnaire. The total number of participants was 86 out of this females were 48.8% (4 2. 97.6% (84 participants heard about EC , 50% (43 said their source of information about EC is health professionals and 58.2% (50 knew EC to be taken within 72 hours of unprotected sex. There is a lack of complete awareness about EC among studied popul ation. As they are the health care providers in future , their knowledge regarding EC will be useful in educating public especially youth.

  3. A comparison of red-green color vision deficiency between medical and non-medical students in Pakistan.

    OpenAIRE

    Qamar A. Siddiqui; Sikander A. Shaikh; Tahir Z. Qureshi; Mirza M. Subhan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To investigate the prevalence of red-green color vision deficiency (CVD) among medical and dental students compared with non-medical students. METHODS This descriptive, cross-sectional study compared the prevalence of CVD between medical and non-medical Pakistani students. A total of 926 medical and dental students from Baqai Medical University, Karachi, Pakistan were compared with 7288 non-medical students from Nadirshaw Edulji Dinshaw University of Engineering and Techno...

  4. The essential role of medical ethics education in achieving professionalism: the Romanell Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrese, Joseph A; Malek, Janet; Watson, Katie; Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani; Green, Michael J; McCullough, Laurence B; Geller, Gail; Braddock, Clarence H; Doukas, David J

    2015-06-01

    This article-the Romanell Report-offers an analysis of the current state of medical ethics education in the United States, focusing in particular on its essential role in cultivating professionalism among medical learners. Education in ethics has become an integral part of medical education and training over the past three decades and has received particular attention in recent years because of the increasing emphasis placed on professional formation by accrediting bodies such as the Liaison Committee on Medical Education and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Yet, despite the development of standards, milestones, and competencies related to professionalism, there is no consensus about the specific goals of medical ethics education, the essential knowledge and skills expected of learners, the best pedagogical methods and processes for implementation, and optimal strategies for assessment. Moreover, the quality, extent, and focus of medical ethics instruction vary, particularly at the graduate medical education level. Although variation in methods of instruction and assessment may be appropriate, ultimately medical ethics education must address the overarching articulated expectations of the major accrediting organizations. With the aim of aiding medical ethics educators in meeting these expectations, the Romanell Report describes current practices in ethics education and offers guidance in several areas: educational goals and objectives, teaching methods, assessment strategies, and other challenges and opportunities (including course structure and faculty development). The report concludes by proposing an agenda for future research. PMID:25881647

  5. Medication Adherence in Schizophrenia: Exploring Patients', Carers' and Professionals' Views

    OpenAIRE

    Kikkert, Martijn J.; Schene, Aart H.; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Robson, Debbie; Born, Anja; Helm, Hedda; Nose, Michela; Goss, Claudia; Thornicroft, Graham; Gray, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    One of the major clinical problems in the treatment of people with schizophrenia is suboptimal medication adherence. Most research focusing on determinants of nonadherence use quantitative research methods. These studies have some important limitations in exploring the decision-making process of patients concerning medication. In this study we explore factors influencing medication adherence behavior in people with schizophrenia using concept mapping. Concept mapping is a structured qualitati...

  6. Evaluation of internet access and utilization by medical students in Lahore, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raza Ali

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The internet is increasingly being used worldwide in imparting medical education and improving its delivery. It has become an important tool for healthcare professionals training but the data on its use by medical students in developing countries is lacking with no study on the subject from Pakistan. This study was, therefore, carried out with an aim to evaluate the pattern of internet access and utilization by medical students in Pakistan. Methods A structured pre-tested questionnaire was administered to a group of 750 medical students in clinical years studying at various public and private medical colleges in Lahore. The questions were related to patterns of internet access, purpose of use and self reported confidence in performing various internet related tasks, use of health related websites to supplement learning and the problems faced by students in using internet at the institution. Results A total of 532 medical students (70.9% returned the questionnaire. The mean age of study participants was 21.04 years (SD 1.96 years. Majority of the respondents (84.0% reported experience with internet use. About half of the students (42.1% were using internet occasionally with 23.1%, 20.9% and 13.9% doing so frequently, regularly and rarely respectively. About two third of the students (61.0% stated that they use internet for both academic and professional activities. Most of the participants preferred to use internet at home (70.5%. Self reported ability to search for required article from PubMed and PakMedinet was reported by only 34.0% of the entire sample. Students were moderately confident in performing various internet related tasks including downloading medical books from internet, searching internet for classification of diseases and downloading full text article. Health related websites were being accessed by 55.1% students to supplement their learning process. Lack of time, inadequate number of available computers and lack of support from staff were cited as the most common problems faced by students while accessing internet in the institution premises. There were significant differences among male and female students with respect to the place of internet use (p = 0.001 and the ability to search online databases for required articles (p = 0.014. Conclusions Majority of the medical students in this study had access to internet and were using it for both academic and personal reasons. Nevertheless, it was seen that there is under utilization of the potential of internet resources to augment learning. Increase in awareness, availability of requisite facilities and training in computing skills are required to enable better utilization of digital resources of digital resources by medical students.

  7. Patients' attitudes towards the presence of medical students during consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Tawfiqur Rahman; Moosa, Ali A; Cushing, Annie; Bestwick, Jonathan

    2006-11-01

    This study analyses the attitudes of patients towards the presence of medical students during consultations. It was conducted in a very culturally and ethnically diverse part of London. The study aimed to investigate the factors, particularly ethnicity, which influence patients' attitudes towards medical students. A total of 422 patients participated in the study, which was conducted in general practice and hospital outpatient waiting areas in the London Boroughs of Tower Hamlets and Hackney. In general, the results demonstrate that patients are positive towards medical student participation during consultations. In particular, older patients, patients born in the UK and patients with prior experience of medical students seem to be particularly favourable towards students. However, compared with the White-British population, the non-White-British population appears to be more negative towards medical student participation. This study highlights the need for patient education regarding the importance, for the training of future doctors, of medical student involvement in consultations. PMID:17594546

  8. Students' Views on Factors Affecting Empathy in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winseman, Jeffrey; Malik, Abid; Morison, Julie; Balkoski, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Empathy is a prominent goal of medical education that is too often underachieved. Using concept mapping, the authors constructed a student-generated conceptual model of factors viewed as affecting empathy during medical education. Methods: During the 2005-2006 academic year, 293 medical students and interns answered a brainstorming…

  9. Willingness of Medical Students for Hepatitis B & C Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Mahsud, Muhammad Amin Jan; Hussain, Javed; Khan, Muhammad Hussain; Khan, Habibullah; Noman, Nargis; Rabi, Fazle, Din, Siraj ud

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health care workers including medical students are vulnerable to hepatitis B & C virus infections. The objective of this study was to determine the level of willingness for screening among medical students. Methodology: This cross-sectional survey was carried out at Gomal Medical College, Dera Ismail Khan from 1st April 2010 to 15 June…

  10. Child Psychiatry: What Are We Teaching Medical Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The author describes child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) undergraduate teaching in American and Canadian medical schools. Methods: A survey asking for information on CAP teaching, student interest in CAP, and opinions about the CAP importance was sent to the medical student psychiatry director at 142 accredited medical schools in the…

  11. Smoking Health Professional Student: An Attitudinal Challenge for Health Promotion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cauchi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco is a major preventable cause of premature morbidity and mortality. Health professionals are uniquely positioned to provide targeted interventions and should be empowered to provide cessation counselling that influence patient smoking. A cross-sectional national survey was administered to all third year students in four disciplines at the University of Malta. The Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS questionnaire was distributed to collect standardised demographic, smoking prevalence, behavioural, and attitudinal data. 81.9% completed the questionnaire (n = 173/211. A positive significant association between tobacco smoke exposure at home and current smoking status was identified. Non-smokers regarded anti-tobacco policies more favourably than smokers, being more likely to agree with banning of tobacco sales to adolescents (OR 3.6; 95% CI: 2.5–5.3; p ? 0.001; and with a smoking ban in all public places (OR 8.9; 95% CI: 6.1–13.1; p ? 0.001. Non-smokers favoured a role for health professionals in promoting smoking cessation (OR 5.1; 95% CI: 3.1–8.5; p ? 0.001. Knowledge of antidepressants as tools for smoking cessation was also associated with a perceived role for skilled health professionals in cessation counselling (OR 4.9; 95% CI: 1.8–13.3; p = 0.002. Smoking negatively influences beliefs and attitudes of students toward tobacco control. There is a need to adopt a standard undergraduate curriculum containing comprehensive tobacco prevention and cessation training to improve their effectiveness as role models.

  12. International students in United States’ medical schools: does the medical community know they exist?

    OpenAIRE

    Jashodeep Datta; Miller, Bonnie M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Matriculation of international students to United States’ (US) medical schools has not mirrored the remarkable influx of these students to other US institutions of higher education. Methods: While these students’ numbers are on the rise, the visibility for their unique issues remains largely ignored in the medical literature. Results: These students are disadvantaged in the medical school admissions process due to financial and immigration-related concerns, and acade...

  13. Effectiveness of the Course of Medical Ethics for Undergraduate Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Fariba Asghari; Aniseh Samadi; Taraneh Dormohammadi

    2009-01-01

    Judgment This study was done in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the revisions made in the course of medical ethics for undergraduate medical students.Medical Students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences who took the course of medical ethics in a semester before the implementation of the revision and those who took the course after the implementation of the revision at the beginning and at the end of course responded to two questionnaires (one for evaluating knowledge and the other...

  14. Patients' view on medical students in dermatology practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seval Do?ruk Kaçar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Practical training of medical students, especially in specialties such as dermatology, is performed in outpatient clinics where mostly outpatients are encountered. The aim of this study was to compare patients’ perspectives on medical students in two university hospitals (X–Y situated in different regions of Turkey. Materials and Methods: A total of 250 patients, who visited outpatient clinics of X (group 1 and Y (group 2 university hospitals during practical training for fifth year medical students, were included in this study. A questionnaire composed of 16 items was filled by all patients. The first eight questions were about patients’ consent and preferences on the presence of medical students during their interview and the remaining eight questions inquired patients’ overall thoughts on medical students. Results: The patients in both groups were willing to be a part of the educational programme of medical students (39.8%, 53.5%, respectively. The patients were aware that they had the right to refuse the presence of medical students (61.0%, 62.3% and majority wanted to be informed on the presence of medical students during the interview (72.4%, 80.7%. While patients in group 1 evaluated being with medical students as pleasurable (43.1%, patients in group 2 did not agree (44.7%. In addition, both groups were not bothered to share personal information with medical students (50.4%, 44.7% and stated that they would recommend their friends and relatives to have a physical examination done by medical students (51.2%, 41.2%. Conclusion: The active role of medical students during dermatology training is positively viewed by patients in both western and eastern parts of our country. The patients’ request on being informed for the presence of medical students during clinical examination reveals the requirement of oral and written informed consent.

  15. Improving Feedback for Medical Students in a Family Medicine Clerkship

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D.G.; Tiberius, R.; Talbot, Y.; Schiralli, V.; Rickett, M.

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate whether feedback to medical students could be improved by asking teachers to complete a student performance rating form during a family practice clerkship, the authors had students and teachers fill out a questionnaire. Teachers in the intervention group reported observing students more frequently. Students' perceptions of feedback frequency correlated strongly with their ratings of feedback quality. PMID:21234079

  16. Herpetic Esophagitis in Immunocompetent Medical Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Andréia Vidica; Bonfim, Vinícius Mendes; de Alencar, Luciana Rodrigues; Pinto, Sebastião Alves; de Araújo Filho, João Alves

    2014-01-01

    Esophagitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) is often documented during periods of immunosuppression in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); it is rare in immunocompetent diagnosed patients. Case reports of herpetic esophagitis in students of health sciences are extremely rare. The disease presents with a clinical picture characterized by acute odynophagia and retrosternal pain without obvious causes and ulcers, evidenced endoscopically in the middistal esophagus. Diagnosis depends on endoscopy, biopsies for pathology studies, and immunohistochemistry techniques. The disease course is often benign; however, treatment with acyclovir speeds the disappearance of symptoms and limits the severity of infection. In this report, we present a case of herpetic esophagitis in an immunocompetent medical student, with reference to its clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment. The disease may have manifested as a result of emotional stress experienced by the patient. PMID:24707416

  17. Facilitating the development of professional identity through peer assisted learning in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess A; Nestel D

    2014-01-01

    Annette Burgess,1 Debra Nestel2 1Sydney Medical School – Central, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2School of Rural Health/HealthPEER, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing, and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Peer assisted learning (PAL) is well documented in the medical education literature. In this paper, the authors explored the role of PAL in a graduate entry medical program with respect to the development of professional identity. T...

  18. Interns as teachers of medical students: a pilot programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunne, B

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, rising numbers of medical students and an increasingly demanding clinical workload has put pressures on the educational systems for medical students in the hospital. Bedside teaching remains central to education, but tutorial delivery by registrars, tutors and consultants has proven to be increasingly difficult with the greater numbers of students now in the undergraduate system.

  19. The medical student as a patient: attitudes towards involvement in the quality and safety of health care.

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, RE; Joshi, D.; Patel, K.; Briggs, M; Vincent, CA

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, factors that affect patients' willingness and ability to participate in safety-relevant behaviours have been investigated. However, how trained healthcare professionals or medical students would feel participating in safety-relevant behaviours as a patient in hospital remains largely unexplored. OBJECTIVES: To investigate medical students' willingness to participate in behaviours related to the quality and safety of their health care. DESIGN: A cross-sectional exp...

  20. An Assessment of the Level of Awareness, Attitudes, and Opinions of the Medical Students Concerning HIV and AIDS in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Rohit Kumar; Wong, Shirley; CHAKRAVARTHI, SRIKUMAR; Barua, Ankur

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Human Immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has become one of the most serious health problems in the world. Medical students awareness, attitudes and opinions must be assessed as they are leading health care professionals who provide treatment and care to the HIV and AIDS individuals. This survey was conducted to assess the level of awareness, attitudes and opinions of third year till fifth year medical students concerning HIV and ...

  1. Graduating Pharmacy Students’ Perspectives on E-Professionalism and Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Ness, Genevieve Lynn; Sheehan, Amy Heck; Snyder, Margie E.; Jordan, Joseph; Cunningham, Jean E.; Gettig, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine the use patterns of social media among graduating pharmacy students, characterize students’ views and opinions of professionalism on popular social media sites, and compare responses about social media behavior among students seeking different types of employment.

  2. What Contributes to First-Year Student Teachers' Sense of Professional Agency in the Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soini, Tiina; Pietarinen, Janne; Toom, Auli; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    This study explores Finnish first-year primary teacher students' (N = 244) sense of professional agency in the classroom. In addition, the interrelation between student teachers' sense of professional agency and the perceptions of teacher education as a learning environment is explored. The sense of professional agency in the classroom…

  3. First Year Medical Students? AIDS Knowledge and Attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalraj Edwin R

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: What is the level of knowledge, sexual practices and attitude of medical students towards AIDS/ HIV. Objective: To assess the knowledge, sexual practices and attitudes of medical students in relation to HIV/AIDS. Study Design: Cross- sectional. Participants: 409 first year medical students. Study variables: Sex knowledge, sexual practices, Attitudes, Risk perception. Results: 92% of the students had heard about AIDS predominantly through mass media. Many students had misconception about transmission of HIV infection should not be allowed to work in the clinic or hospital. 36% of male and 9% of female students admitted indulging in safe sexual practices mostly with their friends.

  4. Educational Assessment of Medical Student Rotation in Emergency Ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, J Christian; Cusick, Seric; Scruggs, William; Henson, Travis W.; Anderson, Craig L.; Barajas, Graciela

    2007-01-01

    Background: Medical student ultrasound education is sparse. In 2002, we began the first medical student rotation in emergency ultrasound. Objective: To evaluate if medical students can learn and retain sonographic skills during a two- or four-week elective. Methods: We gave students an exam on the first and last days of the rotation. Six months later, students took the exam a third time. A control group was used for comparison. Results: Over a 19-month period, we enrolled 45 students (25 on t...

  5. Perceptions and Practices of Self-Medication among Medical Students in Coastal South India

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Nithin; Kanchan, Tanuj; Unnikrishnan, Bhaskaran; Rekha, T.; Mithra, Prasanna; Kulkarni, Vaman; Papanna, Mohan Kumar; Holla, Ramesh; Uppal, Surabhi

    2013-01-01

    Self-medication is a common practice worldwide and the irrational use of drugs is a cause of concern. This study assessed the prevalence of self-medication among the medical students in South India. The data was analysed using SPSS version 11.5. A total of 440 students were included in the study. The prevalence of self-medication was 78.6%. A larger number of females were self-medicating (81.2%) than males (75.3%). The majority of the students self-medicated because of the illness being too t...

  6. Evaluation of a Danish pharmacist student-physician medication review collaboration model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Susanne; SØrensen, Ellen Westh

    2014-01-01

    Background Interprofessional collaboration between pharmacists and physicians to conduct joint home medication reviews (HMR) is important for optimizing the medical treatment of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. However, collaboration has proved difficult to achieve. The HMR programme "Medisam" was launched in 2009 at the University of Copenhagen with the aim of "developing, implementing and evaluating a collaboration model for HMRs and medicine reconciliations in Denmark". The Medisam programme involves patients, pharmacy internship students, the (pharmacist) supervisor of the pharmacy students and physicians. Objective To explore if it was possible through the Medisam programme to obtain a fruitful HMR collaboration between pharmacy internship students and physicians as a means to develop HMR collaboration between trained pharmacists and physicians further. Setting Ten matching pairs of student-physician collaboration were studied across Denmark. Method Semi-structured interviews about existing collaboration were conducted with pharmacy internship students in the HMR programme, their supervisors and physicians partners. The theoretical framework forming the analyses was derived especially from works of Bradley et al. (Res Soc Adm Pharm 8:36-46, 2012), and Snyder et al. (Res Soc Adm Pharm 6:307-23, 2010) on pharmacists/physician collaboration. Main outcome measure The development of inter-professional collaboration between students and physicians according to the three collaboration drivers: trustworthiness, role specification and professional interaction. Results Full collaboration was not achieved. Physicians found collaboration satisfactory, students however expressed the need of more interaction with physicians. The written collaboration contracts did not ensure a possible need of students to re-negotiate roles and tasks, and did therefore not entirely ensure role specification. Developing mutual professional interdependence through students being recognized by physicians to contribute to improved patient outcomes was also limited. Conclusion Some challenges to fruitful collaboration were identified. Solutions to these challenges include students and their pharmacist supervisors to find ways to present their collaborative needs to physicians and for students to illustrate more explicitly the benefits patient achieve if physicians implement the recommendations of students.

  7. A Longitudinal Study of Determinants of Career Satisfaction in Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia A. Reed, PhD

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Context: There is evidence of significant career dissatisfaction among practicing physicians and those considering medicine as a profession. Most research on career satisfaction has examined practicing physicians. This study was undertaken to look at determinants of satisfaction in those at the earliest stage of their medical careers ? medical students. Methods: As part of a larger study, students comprising one class at the University of Washington School of Medicine were surveyed three times over the course of their medical education. For the present study we examined measures specifically related to determinants of career satisfaction. Findings: Over time, students? sense of the importance of most measured determinants of satisfaction showed significant change, the majority of which were in the direction of decreased importance. However, most of the change was relative. That is, factors that students considered to be most important at the start of medical school continued to be most important throughout the educational experience and those factors students considered to be least important at Year 1 continued to be least important at Years 2 and 4. Discussion: These findings have implications for medical education, a time when students are forming expectations that will impact their career satisfaction. In addition to information on career satisfaction, students should understand the professional values of medicine, their own values and expectations, current practice patterns, economics, and the role of advocacy.

  8. Improving Feedback for Medical Students in a Family Medicine Clerkship: Evaluating medical student performance using frequent feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D G; Tiberius, R; Talbot, Y; Schiralli, V; Rickett, M

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate whether feedback to medical students could be improved by asking teachers to complete a student performance rating form during a family practice clerkship, the authors had students and teachers fill out a questionnaire. Teachers in the intervention group reported observing students more frequently. Students' perceptions of feedback frequency correlated strongly with their ratings of feedback quality. PMID:21234079

  9. Improving Feedback for Medical Students in a Family Medicine Clerkship: Evaluating medical student performance using frequent feedback

    OpenAIRE

    White, D.G.; Tiberius, R.; Talbot, Y.; Schiralli, V.; Rickett, M.

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate whether feedback to medical students could be improved by asking teachers to complete a student performance rating form during a family practice clerkship, the authors had students and teachers fill out a questionnaire. Teachers in the intervention group reported observing students more frequently. Students' perceptions of feedback frequency correlated strongly with their ratings of feedback quality.

  10. What is the reward? Medical students’ learning and personal development during a research project course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riitta Möller

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Until recently, the outcome of medical students’ research projects has mainly been assessed in terms of scientific publications, whereas other results important for students’ development have been less studied. The aim of this study was to investigate medical students’ experiences of learning as an outcome of the research project course. Method: Written reflections of 50 students were analyzed by manifest inductive content analysis. Results: Three categories emerged: ‘thinking as a scientist’, ‘working as a scientist’, and ‘personal development’. Students became more aware about the nature of knowledge, how to generate new knowledge, and developed skills in scientific thinking and critical appraisal. Unexpectedly, effects on personal characteristics, such as self-confidence, self-discipline, independence, and time management skills were also acknowledged. Conclusions: We conclude that individual research projects enhance research-specific skills and competencies needed in evidence-based clinical work and are beneficial for personal and professional development.

  11. What is the reward? Medical students’ learning and personal development during a research project course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Riitta; Shoshan, Maria; Heikkilä, Kristiina

    2015-01-01

    Background Until recently, the outcome of medical students’ research projects has mainly been assessed in terms of scientific publications, whereas other results important for students’ development have been less studied. The aim of this study was to investigate medical students’ experiences of learning as an outcome of the research project course. Method Written reflections of 50 students were analyzed by manifest inductive content analysis. Results Three categories emerged: ‘thinking as a scientist’, ‘working as a scientist’, and ‘personal development’. Students became more aware about the nature of knowledge, how to generate new knowledge, and developed skills in scientific thinking and critical appraisal. Unexpectedly, effects on personal characteristics, such as self-confidence, self-discipline, independence, and time management skills were also acknowledged. Conclusions We conclude that individual research projects enhance research-specific skills and competencies needed in evidence-based clinical work and are beneficial for personal and professional development. PMID:26344390

  12. INTERNSHIP ROLES IN TRAINING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPEMENT OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Anca-Ioana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Romanian specialist`s studies show a harsh reality: Romanian universities programs have only theoretical value, creating specialists but not for real life, but for a more abstract environment. Our university graduates are doing very well in a stable economic and institutional environment that offers relatively easy material and financial resources, with a set of skills and professional skills which fail to meet harsh reality of the labor market. An effective solution for professional skills development is the accumulation of work experience during college in the environment and on the job we have in view by following an internship program. As a form of practical education through work, internship meets young people, particularly students keen to gain experience through practical work in a job within a company or institution chosen, giving them the opportunity to translate theoretical knowledge into practice and to develop skills and experience of labor market activities that waits for them. This paper is an original applied research conducted in the West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration. It aims to identify whether there is a need for specialization Management students to acquire work experience before graduating, to what extent they are able to assess their skills and work in a company and especially the role of internship programs in professional and personal development of students. The results show that participation in an internship program is beneficial not only for students but also for employers. Leading to increased competences and to training and professional skills and personal development, internship becomes a more attractive alternative for young people because it gives them the opportunity to be “a ringer" of an employee on the position you have in view. Without being employed, students can gain practical experience in a certain position they sought in a company or institution on the labor market, practical experience they need so much and they can also learn what responsibilities and tasks the job entails and whether or not they are suitable for that position.

  13. IMPACT OF MEDICAL SCHOOL EXPERIENCES ON SENIOR MEDICAL STUDENTS' INTEREST IN PSYCHIATRY

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, P. John; Kumaraswamy, N.

    1995-01-01

    This is a questionnaire study analyzing the influence of various medical school experiences on 146 final year medical students' interest and respect for psychiatry. The results indicated that clinical postings, lectures, contact with psychiatric patients and psychiatry faculty had a positive influence on majority of students. Many students perceived non-psychiatric faculty and fellow students as critical of psychiatry. Students with greater career interest in psychiatry were more positively i...

  14. Medical students with low self-efficacy bolstered by calling to medical speciality

    OpenAIRE

    Goodin, Joel B.; Duffy, Ryan D.; Borges, Nicole J.; Ulman, Catherine A.; D’Brot, Vanessa M.; Manuel, R. Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to understand the degree to which medical students’ self-efficacy (SE) moderates the influence of calling on students’ speciality commitment, emphasizing the need to understand variables that predict primary care specialization. The researchers hypothesized that students who perceived their career as a calling would be more committed to their speciality, especially when students had high SE. Medical students (Years 1–4; N = 152) completed an online survey to rate thei...

  15. Los valores ético profesionales del médico. Su diagnóstico Diagnosing Ethical -Professional values in medical doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca M Seijo Echevarría

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Con el propósito de diagnosticar la interiorización de los valores éticos profesionales a los alumnos de medicina seleccionados, se realiza esta investigación descriptiva causal. Para ello se determina el Sistema de Valores Éticos de la profesión médica en Camagüey, luego de un estudio profundo de los Códigos de Ética Médica Internacionales y Nacionales y la utilización de diferentes métodos y procedimientos propios de las investigaciones psicológicas y pedagógicas, éstos últimos apoyaron también la realización del diagnóstico de la situación actual de los estudiantes, donde se evidencia una diferencia notoria entre la auto evaluación y la co-evaluación siendo necesario acercar estos criterios. Valores como responsabilidad, profesionalidad, ser culto, internacionalismo y honestidad tienen dificultades en su asimilación. Queda demostrado que la metodología empleada es factible de ser utilizada para el diagnóstico al responder los resultados con las expectativasWith the purpose of diagnostic the ins and outs of the ethical professional values to the selected medicine students this descriptive investigation was carried out. With that purpose the System of Ethical Values of the medical profession in Camaguey was set after a deep study of the International and National Codes of medical Ethics and the use of different methods and procedures of psychological and pedagogic investigations, these also supported the doing of the diagnosis of the current situation of the students, where a notorius difference is evidenced between the self evaluation and the coevaluation being necessary to bring near these approaches. Values as responsability, internacionalism and honesty have difficulties to be cultivated. It is demostrated that the used methodology is feasible of being used for the diagnosis when responding the resultswith expectations

  16. Learning Professionalism in Athletic Training Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Debbie I.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Student learning of professionalism in athletic training education programs (ATEPs) can be varied and even elusive. The purpose of this article is to define professionalism and discuss its development in athletic training students. Background: Medical professions have studied extensively how students learn professionalism. However, with…

  17. Improving medical students’ knowledge of genetic disease: a review of current and emerging pedagogical practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolyniak, Michael J; Bemis, Lynne T; Prunuske, Amy J

    2015-01-01

    Genetics is an essential subject to be mastered by health professional students of all types. However, technological advances in genomics and recent pedagogical research have changed the way in which many medical training programs teach genetics to their students. These advances favor a more experience-based education focused primarily on developing student’s critical thinking skills. In this review, we examine the current state of genetics education at both the preclinical and clinical levels and the ways in which medical and pedagogical research have guided reforms to current and emerging teaching practices in genetics. We discover exciting trends taking place in which genetics is integrated with other scientific disciplines both horizontally and vertically across medical curricula to emphasize training in scientific critical thinking skills among students via the evaluation of clinical evidence and consultation of online databases. These trends will produce future health professionals with the skills and confidence necessary to embrace the new tools of medical practice that have emerged from scientific advances in genetics, genomics, and bioinformatics.

  18. Does Gender Predict Medical Students’ Stress in Mansoura, Egypt?

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa Amr , MD; Abdel Hady El Gilany, MD; Aly El-Hawary, MD

    2008-01-01

    Background: Medical education is perceived as being stressful with negative effects on students’ mental health. However, few studies have addressed the influence of gender on stress in medical students.Aim: To compare male and female medical students in Egypt on sources of stress, perception of stress, anxiety, depression, physical symptomatology, and personality profile.Methods: Data were collected through an anonymous self-administered questionnaire covering socio-demographic data, stressor...

  19. Gadget Dependency among Medical College Students in Delhi

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, N.; Krishnamurthy, V.; J Majhi; Gupta, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gadget holds the great importance in everyday life. Mobile phone and internet usage have become universal practice especially among the student community. Gadgets usage has both pros and cons. Objective: To assess the magnitude of gadget utilization among medical college students in Delhi and to estimate the burden of gadget dependency. Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted in three medical colleges. The participants were 957 medical students selected by systematic ra...

  20. The exam skills workshop as formative assessment for ?medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Hashim Z?.; Miller A?.; Fahim N.?

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of medical students is a complicated process with medical schools ?making constant updates. This ensures that assessment is not only comprehensive and robust, but ?also standardised and fair. Nowadays, there is more stress laid upon the importance of formative ?assessment in medical schools.?Introduction: Some University of Nottingham students undertake their final year surgical ?placement at the Lincoln County Hospital. Each rotation has 6 students and runs over 9 ...

  1. Medical student debt and major life choices other than specialty

    OpenAIRE

    James Rohlfing; Ryan Navarro; Maniya, Omar Z.; Byron D. Hughes; Rogalsky, Derek K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Median indebtedness at graduation is now more than $170,000 for graduates of US Medical Schools. Debate still exists as to whether higher debt levels influence students to choose high paying non-primary care specialties. Notably, no previous research on the topic has taken into account cost of attendance when constructing a debt model, nor has any research examined the non-career major life decisions that medical students face. Methods: Medical students were surveyed using an anon...

  2. Association of academic stress with sleeping difficulties in medical students of a Pakistani medical school: a cross sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Waqas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medicine is one of the most stressful fields of education because of its highly demanding professional and academic requirements. Psychological stress, anxiety, depression and sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in medical students. Methods. This cross-sectional study was undertaken at the Combined Military Hospital Lahore Medical College and the Institute of Dentistry in Lahore (CMH LMC, Pakistan. Students enrolled in all yearly courses for the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS degree were included. The questionnaire consisted of four sections: (1 demographics (2 a table listing 34 potential stressors, (3 the 14-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-14, and (4 the Pittsburgh Quality of Sleep Index (PSQI. Logistic regression was run to identify associations between group of stressors, gender, year of study, student’s background, stress and quality of sleep. Results. Total response rate was 93.9% (263/280 respondents returned the questionnaire. The mean (SD PSS-14 score was 30 (6.97. Logistic regression analysis showed that cases of high-level stress were associated with year of study and academic-related stressors only. Univariate analysis identified 157 cases with high stress levels (59.7%. The mean (SD PSQI score was 8.1 (3.12. According to PSQI score, 203/263 respondents (77% were poor sleepers. Logistic regression showed that mean PSS-14 score was a significant predictor of PSQI score (OR 1.99, P < 0.05. Conclusion. We found a very high prevalence of academic stress and poor sleep quality among medical students. Many medical students reported using sedatives more than once a week. Academic stressors contributed significantly to stress and sleep disorders in medical students.

  3. Oral cancer awareness of undergraduate medical and dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogden Graham R

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of oral cancer is increasing in the United Kingdom. Early detection of oral cancers makes them more amenable to treatment and allows the greatest chance of cure. Delay in presentation and/or referral has a significant effect on the associated morbidity and mortality. Lack of general medical practitioner and general dental practitioner oral cancer knowledge has been shown to contribute to delays in referral and treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the oral cancer awareness of future general medical and general dental practitioners by assessing undergraduate medical and dental students' knowledge of prevention and early detection of oral cancer. Method Questionnaires were delivered to undergraduate medical and dental students at the University of Dundee, assessing oral examination habits, delivery of advice on oral cancer risk factors, knowledge of oral cancer risk factors and clinical appearance, preferred point of referral and requests for further information. Results Undergraduate medical students were less likely to examine patients' oral mucosa routinely and less likely to advise patients about risk factors for oral cancer. Medical students identified fewer oral cancer risk factors. In particular alcohol use was identified poorly. Medical students also identified fewer oral changes associated with oral cancer. Erythroplakia and erythroleukoplakia were identified poorly. Medical students felt less well informed regarding oral cancer. 86% and 92% of undergraduate medical and dental students respectively requested further information about oral cancer. Conclusion This study highlights the need for improved education of undergraduate medical and dental students regarding oral cancer.

  4. 'Workshops in healing' for senior medical students: a 5-year overview and appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearsley, John H; Lobb, Elizabeth A

    2014-12-01

    We report upon the design, content and feedback from an interactive, experiential series of Workshops in Healing for senior medical students. Fifty-six final year medical students enrolled in 2×3?h workshops designed around the core themes of 'physician know thyself' (Workshop 1) and 'confronting suffering' (Workshop 2). Of the 56 students who initially enrolled, 48 students completed both workshops and provided a written open-ended reflection of their learning experience. The study, undertaken over a consecutive 5-year period (2008-2012), employed an emergent, qualitative design using thematic analysis of the reflective comments. We found that the design and content of both workshops promoted transformative learning for these final year medical students. Students identified the following benefits: (1) the opportunity to reaffirm their commitment to their chosen career path; (2) the value of listening to other students share their stories; (3) the importance of the timing of the workshops to occur after exams; (4) the use of various mediums such as art, poetry, music and contemporary/classic literature to present concepts of suffering and healing; and (5) the creation of a safe and confidential space. Students reported that these innovative workshops gave them a renewed sense of drive and enthusiasm for their chosen career. They highlighted the importance of addressing an aspect of medicine (healing) not covered in the traditional medical curriculum. Workshops in Healing helped them to rediscover a deeper meaning to medicine and their roles as future healthcare professionals. PMID:24473159

  5. Are medical students accepted by patients in teaching hospitals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Marwan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide, patients are the cornerstone of bedside teaching of medical students. In this study, the authors aimed to assess patients’ acceptability toward medical students in teaching hospitals of the Faculty of Medicine of Kuwait University. Methods: Ninehundred and ninety five patients were approached in 14 teaching hospitals; 932 patients agreed to participate (refusal rate is 6.3%. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Results: In general, higher acceptance of students by patients was found when there is no direct contact between the patient and the student (e.g., reading patients’ files, presenting in outpatient clinic, observing doctors performing examination or procedures compared to other situations (e.g., performing physical examination or procedures. Pediatrics patients showed higher acceptance of students compared to patients in other specialties, while Obstetrics/Gynecology patients showed the highest refusal of students. Gender of patients (especially females and students appeared to affect the degree of acceptance of medical students by patients. Majority of the patients (436; 46.8% believed that the presence of medical students in hospitals improves the quality of health care. Conclusion: Patients are an important factor of bedside teaching. Clinical tutors must take advantage of patients who accept medical students. Clinical tutors and medical students should master essential communication skills to convince patients in accepting students, thus improving bedside teaching. Also, using simulation and standardization should be considered to address scenarios that most patients are unwilling to allow students to participate.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF ADVERSE DRUG REACTION REPORTING CULTURE IN SECOND PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATES AT TERTIARY CARE TEACHING HOSPITAL: A HEALTH IMPERATIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to under reporting of ADRs by clinicians, second professional medical under graduates were sensitized about ADR reporting. METHODS: ‘Sensitization of Medical Under graduates for ADR Reporting’ (SMUAR Model was introduced for promoting ADR notification by clinicians. One year prospective study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital with the help of 2nd Prof MBBS students. The students were asked to collect ADRs from clinical departments. Group of eight students were assigned to visit clinical departments (OPD/IPD every consecutive month for a year. Naranjo’s Scale was calculated for the reported ADRs. RESULTS: 72 ADRs were reported by batch 2010 of our tertiary care teaching hospital from Medicine, Dermatology, Surgery, etc. Maximum numbers of ADRs were reported by Medicine Department. Maximum ADRs (27 were reported in the age group of 21-40 years. The majority of the ADRs were reported with antimicrobials followed by analgesics, anti inflammatory and anti- pyretics. Most of the reported ADRs were skin related (52% followed by gastrointestinal system (GIT (16% and central nervous system (CNS (16%. Causality assessment by Naranjo’s scale revealed that most of the ADRs belonged to “possible” 40(55.56% category. Most of the ADRs (61.11% were of Type A (Augmented / predictable. CONCLUSION: Due to the involvement of medical undergraduates ADR reporting increased in our institute. The ‘SMUAR Model’ used by second professional MBBS medical undergraduates, assisted clinicians to report ADRs more effectively. The use of this model may strengthen the Pharmacovigilance Program in India by increasing the spontaneous reporting by clinicians and hence promote safe use of drug in patients.

  7. Internet Access and Utilization among Medical Undergraduate and Post Graduate Students of a Medical College in Madhya Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Chhari, Swarupa Chakole

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "Background: Internet is a worldwide computer network allowing communication among millions of users and access to different resources.. Over the last several decades studies have shown that the use of computerized information systems by medical professionals can improve the quality of care, enhance the use of evidence-based treatment, and maintain and update knowledge. AIM: To evaluate the pattern of internet access and utilization by medical students in Ujjain. Methods: Cross sectional study conducted on all the undergraduate & post graduate. Open –ended semi-structured questionnaire was used. Results: A total of 507 UG & 127 PG students were approached and 386(76% UG,119(93% PG’s completed the questionnaires. Majority of the respondents (87.0% reported having knowledge of internet use. About 365(72% of the study subjects own computer, being significantly higher among PG’s(89%0 as compared to UG’s(67%.Main purpose of using internet as cited by UG’s was email/chatting(74%,where as dissertation work was main purpose among PG(66%.Slow speed of internet was the main problem faced by the subjects 299(595 while accessing the website. Conclusion: Majority of the medical students in this study had access to internet and were using it for both academic and personal reasons. Students should be trained to extract valuable information from the special medical web sites and should be encouraged to check the authenticity of information by correlating with existing evidences."

  8. The characteristics of depressive symptoms in medical students during medical education and training: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Andrade Arthur

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical education and training can contribute to the development of depressive symptoms that might lead to possible academic and professional consequences. We aimed to investigate the characteristics of depressive symptoms among 481 medical students (79.8% of the total who matriculated. Methods The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and cluster analyses were used in order to better describe the characteristics of depressive symptoms. Medical education and training in Brazil is divided into basic (1st and 2nd years, intermediate (3rd and 4th years, and internship (5th and 6th years periods. The study organized each item from the BDI into the following three clusters: affective, cognitive, and somatic. Statistical analyses were performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey corrected for multiple comparisons. Results There were 184 (38.2% students with depressive symptoms (BDI > 9. The internship period resulted in the highest BDI scores in comparison to both the basic (p Conclusion There is a high prevalence towards depressive symptoms among medical students, particularly females, in the internship level, mainly involving the somatic and affective clusters, and not having a parent who practiced medicine. The active assessment of these students in evaluating their depressive symptoms is important in order to prevent the development of co-morbidities and suicide risk.

  9. Self-Medication Practice and Perceptions Among Undergraduate Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Shivaraj B; S. H., Vardhamane; B.V., Patil; Santoshkumar, Jeevangi; Binjawadgi, Ashok S; Kanaki, Anand R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Self-medication practice is widespread in many countries and the irrational use of drugs is a cause of concern.It assumes a special significance among medical students as they are exposed to knowledge about diseases and drugs.

  10. USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY BY THE MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malar Sivaraman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Usage of information technology is increasing among university students. The extent of usage among medical students is not studied well. The aim of the study is to assess the usage pattern of information technology by first year and second year medical students of government Kilpauk medical college. Chennai. Method : 200 students of first year and second year students were participated in this study. They were interviewed using pretested questionnaire to bring out the different pattern of the internet use and application knowledge of information technology in medical field. Results: Among 200 students 84% of second years and43% of first years access the internet using their mobile phones .The application knowledge of information technology (IT is 97% in second year students when compared to first year student45%.Majority of students(97% prefers computer classes to be included in medical curriculum. Conclusion: The usage of information technology by the second year medical students are increasing when compared to the newly admitted students and also the purpose of using IT and knowledge of IT in medical field also improving when they are entering second year.

  11. A course on professional development for astronomy graduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Eileen D.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasingly wide-spread recognition in astronomy that professional training must broaden beyond its traditional approaches to academic classes and research. Many recent community advisory reports, including the National Academy of Sciences Decadal survey, Astro2010, recommend that graduate education accommodate the variety of career paths taken by graduates, taking into account the wide range of activities scientists engage in and the skills necessary to succeed in career options both inside and outside academia and specific scientific disciplines. In response to this need, Indiana University has recently offered a new graduate seminar in astronomy to provide this broader perspective and to prepare students for a variety of career paths after graduate school. The course uses a mixture of class discussion on selected topics supplemented by short readings, activities that prepare students for seeking employment and practice some necessary skills, and discussions with astronomers who have followed a variety of career paths. An important part of the seminar is the practical preparation of complete applications for typical positions students are likely to pursue following graduation, and the revision of these applications to be appropriate for a non-traditional career path. The goal of the course is to make students aware of the many options for careers that will be available to them and the skills that will be important for their success, and to equip students with strategies for following a personally satisfying career path.

  12. SELF-MEDICATION AMONG DENTAL UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS: A GROWING CONCERN

    OpenAIRE

    Suruchi Aditya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-medication is an important component of self-care. Though it is widely practiced globally, very few studies have evaluated its pattern and prevalence in dental students.Aim: The study was conducted to compare pattern of self-medication practices between junior and senior dental undergraduate students.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, anonymous, descriptive study with a six month illness recall that evaluated two groups of dental students- Group I: second year BDS students...

  13. Medical Students as Facilitators for Laparoscopic Simulator Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Cathrine; Bjerrum, Flemming; Mahmood, Badar; Sørensen, Jette Led; Strandbygaard, Jeanett

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Teaching basic clinical skills to student peers and residents by medical students has previously been shown effective. This study examines if medical students can facilitate laparoscopic procedural tasks to residents using a virtual reality simulator. METHODS: This was a retrospective study comparing 2 groups of gynecology residents. One group was instructed by 2 student facilitators, and a resident facilitator instructed the other group. Facilitators in both the groups were experien...

  14. Swedish medical students' expectations of their future life

    OpenAIRE

    Saima Diderichsen; Jenny Andersson; Johansson, Eva. E.; Petra Verdonk; Antoine Lagro-Janssen; Katarina Hamberg

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate future life expectations among male and female medical students in their first and final year. Methods: The study was cross-sectional and conducted at a Swedish medical school. Out of 600 invited students, 507 (85%) answered an open-ended question about their future life, 298 (59%) first-year students and 209 (41%) last-year students. Women constituted 60% of the respondents. A mixed model design was applied; qualitative content analysis was utilized to create stati...

  15. Does personality predict medical students' attitudes to learning communication skills?

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz Molinuevo; Rafael Torrubia

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether personality is related to medical students' attitudes towards learning communication skills and self-ratings on communication skills. Methods: 524 first- and 507 second-year medical students completed the Communications Skills Attitudes Scale and rated their own communication skills. First-year students answered the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and second-year students the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses, control...

  16. Preferred Learning Styles of Professional Undergraduate and Graduate Athletic Training Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, Sarah; Hansen, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Context: Recognizing the preferred learning style of professional undergraduate and graduate athletic training students will equip educators to more effectively improve their teaching methods and optimize student learning. Objective: To determine the preferred learning style of professional undergraduate and graduate athletic training students

  17. Assessing Cocurricular Impacts on the Development of Business Student Professionalism: Supporting Rites of Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wresch, William; Pondell, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    "Professionalism" has a wide variety of definitions. The authors review some of those definitions and then explore stages students pass through as they move from student to business professional. Based on literature from the systems psychodynamics field, the authors examine stages in student identity building, including social defenses,…

  18. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Kron Frederick W; Gjerde Craig L; Sen Ananda; Fetters Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of ...

  19. A study of stress in medical students at Seth G.S. Medical College.

    OpenAIRE

    Supe A

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is usually observed that medical students undergo tremendous stress during various stages of the MBBS course. There is a high rate of suicide among them. METHODS: To determine incidence of stress and factors controlling stress in medical students at various stages of MBBS course at Seth G S Medical college, 238 students (First year 98, Second 76, Third 64) were asked to complete a questionnaire on personal data (gender, stay at hostel, mode of travel, time spent in travel every...

  20. Western medical ethics taught to junior medical students can cross cultural and linguistic boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Margolis Stephen A; Ypinazar Valmae A

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about teaching medical ethics across cultural and linguistic boundaries. This study examined two successive cohorts of first year medical students in a six year undergraduate MBBS program. Methods The objective was to investigate whether Arabic speaking students studying medicine in an Arabic country would be able to correctly identify some of the principles of Western medical ethical reasoning. This cohort study was conducted on first year students in a si...

  1. An innovative OSCE clinical log station: a quantitative study of its influence on Log use by medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson Judith N; Rienits Helen; Corrin Linda; Olmos Martin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background A Clinical Log was introduced as part of a medical student learning portfolio, aiming to develop a habit of critical reflection while learning was taking place, and provide feedback to students and the institution on learning progress. It was designed as a longitudinal self-directed structured record of student learning events, with reflection on these for personal and professional development, and actions planned or taken for learning. As incentive was needed to encourage...

  2. E-learning program for medical students in dermatology

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Cristiana Silveira, Silva; Murilo Barreto, Souza; Roberto Silveira, Silva Filho; Luciana Molina de, Medeiros; Paulo Ricardo, Criado.

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dermatological disorders are common in medical practice. In medical school, however, the time devoted to teaching dermatology is usually very limited. Therefore, online educational systems have increasingly been used in medical education settings to enhance exposure to dermatology. OBJ [...] ECTIVE: The present study was designed to develop a e-learning program for medical students in dermatology and evaluate the impact of this program on learning. METHODS: This prospective study included second year medical students at the University of Technology and Science, Salvador, Brazil. All students attended discussion seminars and practical activities, and half of the students had adjunct online seminars (blended learning). Tests were given to all students before and after the courses, and test scores were evaluated. RESULTS: Students who participated in online discussions associated with face-to-face activities (blended learning) had significantly higher posttest scores (9.0 + 0.8) than those who only participated in classes (7.75+1.8, p

  3. Medical Students Learning Communication Skills in a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Muhammad J.; Major, Stella; Mirza, Deen M.; Prinsloo, Engela A. M.; Osman, Ossama; Amiri, Leena; McLean, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Communications skills (CS) training for medical interviewing is increasingly being conducted in English at medical schools worldwide. In this study, we sought to identify whether Arabic-speaking medical students experienced difficulty with the different components of the CS training that were conducted in English. Methods: Individual third-year preclinical medical students (N = 45) were videotaped while interviewing simulated patients. Each student assessed his/her performance on a 13-item (5-point scale) assessment form, which was also completed by the tutor and other students in the group. Results: Of the 13 components of their CS training, tutors awarded the lowest marks for students’ abilities to express empathy, ask about patients’ feelings, use transition statements, ask about functional impact, and elicit patients’ expectations (P <0.001). Conclusion: The expression of empathy and the ability to elicit patients’ feelings and expectations are difficult to develop in medical students learning CS in a second language. PMID:23573389

  4. MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY IN VIH CONTAGION AFTER BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS

    OpenAIRE

    R. Ortiz de Lejarazu Leonardo; Eiros Bouza JM; M. Domínguez-Gil González; Aitor M. Curiel López de Arcaute

    2005-01-01

    SUMMARYIn Spain a million and a half blood transfusions by year are carried out, that supposes between 2 and 10 cases of infection of VIH by year. The present state of science invites to do something more with tests to detect other virological and immunological markers, in order to identify seronegative carriers and thus avoid HIV transmission by them. We must consider the possibility to incur in professional responsibilities if we do not report adequate of this risk or if we do not provide p...

  5. Efficacy of Accent Modification Training for International Medical Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Poonam; Huang, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    International medical graduates (IMGs) comprise 26% of the U.S. physician work force. While IMGs bring all their knowledge and expertise, their pronunciation and intonation patterns often become a barrier in their ability to be understood. This breakdown in communication can affect physician-patient or physician-staff understanding and hence…

  6. Sleep disturbances among medical students: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Muhammad Chanchal; Fraser, Kristin; Rumana, Nahid; Abdullah, Ahmad Faris; Shahana, Nahid; Hanly, Patrick J; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury

    2015-01-15

    Medical students carry a large academic load which could potentially contribute to poor sleep quality above and beyond that already experienced by modern society. In this global literature review of the medical students' sleep experience, we find that poor sleep is not only common among medical students, but its prevalence is also higher than in non-medical students and the general population. Several factors including medical students' attitudes, knowledge of sleep, and academic demands have been identified as causative factors, but other potential mechanisms are incompletely understood. A better understanding about the etiology of sleep problems in medical trainees is essential if we hope to improve the overall quality of medical students' lives, including their academic performance. Sleep self-awareness and general knowledge appear insufficient in many studied cohorts, so increasing education for students might be one beneficial intervention. We conclude that there is ample evidence for a high prevalence of the problem, and research in this area should now expand towards initiatives to improve general sleep education for medical students, identify students at risk, and target them with programs to improve sleep. PMID:25515274

  7. High School Vocational Counseling Role in Leveraging Students` Professional Inclinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Br?tucu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The experience of many countries with a well-educated workforce highlights the important role of vocational counselling services for advantageous youth professional orientation. Researchers manifest in their turn, a growing interest to study the role of vocational counselling, from the perspective of increasing the efficiency of investment in education and strengthening the capacity of enterprises to meet the challenges of the knowledge economy. In Romania, high school students have access to career guidance services, but there is little information on the extent to which they use or how useful they consider these services. Many times, there is a social conformism among high school graduates, which determines them to choose professions valued at a certain moment, without making a personal judgment. The aim of this paper is to analyse, as a good practice, the role of high school graduate vocational counselling in developing professional skills, in order to help them make the right career decision. In order to monitor the high school students` opinions on the vocational guidance and their perceptions of the integration in the labour market, a market research study has been conducted. This is a survey conducted on a sample of 2,364 high school students in their final year of study (twelve grade. The research has shown that a reduced percentage of the interviewed high school students have knowledge about the vocational guidance activity. From those who have used these services, most of them were satisfied. The study also highlighted the fact that the most important criteria for getting a job are the skills acquired during studies.

  8. Association of academic stress with sleeping difficulties in medical students of a Pakistani medical school: a cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Ahmed; Khan, Spogmai; Sharif, Waqar; Khalid, Uzma; Ali, Asad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Medicine is one of the most stressful fields of education because of its highly demanding professional and academic requirements. Psychological stress, anxiety, depression and sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in medical students. Methods. This cross-sectional study was undertaken at the Combined Military Hospital Lahore Medical College and the Institute of Dentistry in Lahore (CMH LMC), Pakistan. Students enrolled in all yearly courses for the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) degree were included. The questionnaire consisted of four sections: (1) demographics (2) a table listing 34 potential stressors, (3) the 14-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-14), and (4) the Pittsburgh Quality of Sleep Index (PSQI). Logistic regression was run to identify associations between group of stressors, gender, year of study, student's background, stress and quality of sleep. Results. Total response rate was 93.9% (263/280 respondents returned the questionnaire). The mean (SD) PSS-14 score was 30 (6.97). Logistic regression analysis showed that cases of high-level stress were associated with year of study and academic-related stressors only. Univariate analysis identified 157 cases with high stress levels (59.7%). The mean (SD) PSQI score was 8.1 (3.12). According to PSQI score, 203/263 respondents (77%) were poor sleepers. Logistic regression showed that mean PSS-14 score was a significant predictor of PSQI score (OR 1.99, P sleep quality among medical students. Many medical students reported using sedatives more than once a week. Academic stressors contributed significantly to stress and sleep disorders in medical students. PMID:25802809

  9. Female medical students are estimated to have a higher risk for developing eating disorders than male medical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing, Nete; Bak, Nanna Hasle; Pedersen, Laura Erna Toftegaard; Petersson, Birgit H

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that university students are at risk for eating disorders. However, risk behaviour has not been studied among Danish medical students, nor have the gender differences in risk behaviour been described in a Danish context.

  10. Self-reported tobacco smoking practices among medical students and their perceptions towards training about tobacco smoking in medical curricula: A cross-sectional, questionnaire survey in Malaysia, India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Mohsin; Pereira Xavier V; Islam Md R; Rahman Mahbubur; Kumar HN Harsha; Menezes Ritesh G; Suri Sushil; Sreeramareddy Chandrashekhar T; Sathian Brijesh; Shetty Ullasa; Vaswani Vina R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Tobacco smoking issues in developing countries are usually taught non-systematically as and when the topic arose. The World Health Organisation and Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS) have suggested introducing a separate integrated tobacco module into medical school curricula. Our aim was to assess medical students' tobacco smoking habits, their practices towards patients' smoking habits and attitude towards teaching about smoking in medical schools. Methods...

  11. Do you think it's a disease? a survey of medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erueti Chrissy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of medical conditions is influenced by whether clinicians regard them as "disease" or "not a disease". The aim of the survey was to determine how medical students classify a range of conditions they might encounter in their professional lives and whether a different name for a condition would influence their decision in the categorisation of the condition as a 'disease' or 'not a disease'. Methods We surveyed 3 concurrent years of medical students to classify 36 candidate conditions into "disease" and "non-disease". The conditions were given a 'medical' label and a (lay label and positioned where possible in alternate columns of the survey. Results The response rate was 96% (183 of 190 students attending a lecture: 80% of students concurred on 16 conditions as "disease" (eg diabetes, tuberculosis, and 4 as "non-disease" (eg baldness, menopause, fractured skull and heat stroke. The remaining 16 conditions (with 21-79% agreement were more contentious (especially obesity, infertility, hay fever, alcoholism, and restless leg syndrome. Three pairs of conditions had both a more, and a less, medical label: the more medical labels (myalgic encephalomyelitis, hypertension, and erectile dysfunction were more frequently classified as 'disease' than the less medical (chronic fatigue syndrome, high blood pressure, and impotence, respectively, significantly different for the first two pairs. Conclusions Some conditions excluded from the classification of "disease" were unexpected (eg fractured skull and heat stroke. Students were mostly concordant on what conditions should be classified as "disease". They were more likely to classify synonyms as 'disease' if the label was medical. The findings indicate there is still a problem 30 years on in the concept of 'what is a disease'. Our findings suggest that we should be addressing such concepts to medical students.

  12. Consumption of alcohol, cigarettes and illegal substances among physicians and medical students in Brandenburg and Saxony (Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kugler Joachim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients regard health care professionals as role models for leading a healthy lifestyle. Health care professionals' own behaviour and attitudes concerning healthy lifestyle have an influence in counselling patients. The aim of this study was to assess consumption of alcohol, cigarettes and illegal substances among physicians and medical students in two German states: Brandenburg and Saxony. Methods Socio-demographic data and individual risk behaviour was collected by an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. Physicians were approached via mail and students were recruited during tutorials or lectures. Results 41.6% of physicians and 60.9% of medical students responded to the questionnaire; more than 50% of the respondents in both groups were females. The majority of respondents consumed alcohol at least once per week; median daily alcohol consumption ranged from 3.88 g/d (female medical students to 12.6 g/d (male physicians. A significantly higher percentage of men (p Conclusion More than one third of the medical students and health care professionals showed problematic alcohol-drinking behaviour. Although the proportion of non-smokers in the investigated sample was higher than in the general population, when compared to the general population, medical students between 18-24 reported higher consumption of illegal substances. These results indicate that methods for educating and promoting healthy lifestyle, particularly with respect to excessive alcohol consumption, tobacco use and abuse of illegal drugs should be considered.

  13. Knowledge, attitude and practice of tobacco smoking by medical students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Haqwi Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco consumption is associated with considerable negative impact on health. Health professionals, including future doctors, should have a leading role in combating smoking in the community. Objectives: The aims of the study were to assess the prevalence of smoking among medical students of newly established medical colleges in Riyadh city, the capital of Saudi Arabia, as well as to assess students? attitude, practice and their knowledge on the risk factors of tobacco consumption. Methods: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study of students from two medical colleges in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia was carried out. The questionnaire used was anonymous, self-administered and developed mainly from Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS. Results: A total of 215 students participated in this study. Forty students (19% indicated that they smoke tobacco at the time of the study. All of them were males, which raise the prevalence among male students to 24%. Tobacco smoking was practiced by males more than females (P value < 0.0001 and by senior more than junior students (< 0.0001. About 94% of the study sample indicated that smoking could cause serious illnesses. About 90% of the students indicated that they would advice their patients to quit smoking in the future and 88% thought that smoking should be banned in public areas. Forty-four students (20% thought that smoking has some beneficial effects, mainly as a coping strategy for stress alleviation. Conclusion: Despite good knowledge about the hazards of tobacco consumption, about 25% of the medical students in this study continue to smoke. The main reported reasons should be addressed urgently by policy-makers. Special efforts should be taken to educate medical students on the effective strategies in managing stress during their study as they thought that tobacco smoking could be used as a coping strategy to face such a stress.

  14. The self-medication in elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Nogueira Valença, Raimunda Medeiros Germano, Rejane Maria Paiva de Menezes

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the complex theme of self-medication in the elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing. Methodology: this is a theoretical essay based on a literature review of the narrative type. It was selected articles indexed in databases Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO and the Database of Nursing (BDENF, from 2003 to 2009, using as descriptors: self-medication, nursing and elderly people. It was also used books and manuals of the ministry of health. From the reading and qualitative synthesis of abstracts, were set up two axes of analysis and reflection: Aging and self: views on the issue and Medication in the elderly people: the role of health professionals and nursing. Results: the elderly people are the age group that uses more drugs. Self-medication is a practice that can generate serious health risks such as intoxication. The qualified professional should guide the public about the medicine to lessen the risk and effectively as possible. Conclusion: it was conclude that the use of knowledge of health professionals and nurses to help to reduce the risks associated with self-medication and problems related to use of medicines, contributing to the improvement of quality of life of older people.

  15. Changes in students' moral development during medical school: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patenaude, Johane; Niyonsenga, Theophile; Fafard, Diane

    2003-01-01

    Introduction The requirements of professionalism and the expected qualities of medical staff, including high moral character, motivate institutions to care about the ethical development of students during their medical education. We assessed progress in moral reasoning in a cohort of medical students over the first 3 years of their education. Methods We invited all 92 medical students enrolled at the University of Sherbrooke, Que., to complete a questionnaire on moral reasoning at the start of their first year of medical school and at the end of their third year. We used the French version of Kohlberg's Moral Judgment Interview. Responses to the questionnaire were coded by stage of moral development, and weighted average scores were assigned according to frequency of use of each stage. Results Of the 92 medical students, 54 completed the questionnaire in the fall of the first year and again at the end of their third year. The average age of the students at the end of the third year was 21 years, and 79% of the students included in the study were women. Over the 3-year period, the stage of moral development did not change substantially (i.e., by more than half a stage) for 39 (72%) of the students, shifted to a lower stage for 7 (13%) and shifted to a higher stage for 8 (15%). The overall mean change in stage was not significant (from mean 3.46 in year 1 to 3.48 in year 3, p = 0.86); however, the overall mean change in weighted average scores showed a significant decline in moral development (p = 0.028). Interpretation Temporal variations in students' scores show a levelling process of their moral reasoning. This finding prompts us to ask whether a hidden curriculum exists in the structure of medical education that inhibits rather than facilitates the development of moral reasoning. PMID:12668541

  16. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and Medical Students: Letter from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengxue; Jiang, Chengsheng; Donovan, Connor; Wen, Yufeng; Wenjie, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the knowledge of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) among Chinese medical students. Methods: A structured questionnaire on MERS was conducted among 214 medical students in China. Results: The average correction of the single question varied from 36.0% to 89.7%. There is a significant difference on MERS knowledge among different majors of medical students (p < 0.05). Management students scored significantly higher than students of other majors (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Chinese medical students had good knowledge of MERS. The MERS knowledge score varied among students of different majors. Education on disease control should be included in the school curriculum. PMID:26512679

  17. Can achievement goal theory provide a useful motivational perspective for explaining psychosocial attributes of medical students?

    OpenAIRE

    Madjar Nir; Bachner Yaacov G; Kushnir Talma

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Psychosocial competence and frustration tolerance are important characteristics of skilled medical professionals. In the present study we explored the usefulness of applying a comprehensive motivational theory (Goal orientations), for this purpose. According to goal orientation theory, learning motivation is defined as the general goals students pursue during learning (either mastery goals - gaining new knowledge; or performance goals - gaining a positive evaluation of com...

  18. The conceptualisation of "soft skills" among medical students before and after curriculum reform

    OpenAIRE

    van Staden, C. W.; Joubert, Pierre M.; Pickworth, G.E.; J.L. Roos; Bergh, Anne-Marie; Kruger, Christa; W. J. Schurink; Du Preez, R.R.; Grey, Somarie V.; Lindeque, B.G.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This paper reports on the conceptualisation of "soft skills" as part of a study carried out among two groups of undergraduate medical students before and after curriculum reform at the School of Medicine of the University of Pretoria. Congruent with a call from the World Psychiatric Association, the curriculum reform that was undertaken aimed, inter alia, to place more emphasis on soft skills, including professional interpersonal and social skills, communication skills, an...

  19. Program to improve the effectiveness of education and professional activities of college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Vlaskina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a training program on “Psychology of effective professional activity”, realized on the basis of the Ural College of the Beauty Industry. The purpose of this discipline is to improve the effectiveness of education and professional activities of college students acquiring professions of “Human-Human” type. To improve effectiveness of education and professional activities, this program provides formation of professionally important qualities of students. The results of the program can be: students’ acquisition of knowledge required for the effective performance of professional activities (ways to prevent burnout, increase self-confidence, etc.; mastery of professional skills (planning, simulation, etc.; formation of professionally important qualities (stress, tolerance, etc.; increasing the efficiency of their professional activities.

  20. Recruitment and Professional Image of Students at One of the Regional Universities in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tímea Ceglédi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we study the social recruitment and professional image of students at the University of Debrecen. Social recruitment shows significant differences between the faculties and the branches. The students in the high prestige faculties come from highmiddle class and middle class families. The students of the faculties that were judged having average prestige are from the middle class and the rate of low-middle class students is significantly greater in branches with lower prestige. Important differences were found in the professional image of the students with an education major and not education majors and also in case of the „ideal professional” and the „practical, necessary knowledge”. Both are partly formed by the professional socialization of the students and partly by the stereotypes. As a consequence there are also big differences between the professional image and the future expectations of the students with an education major and with other majors attending the same faculty.

  1. Research on cultivating medical students’ self-learning ability using teaching system integrated with learning analysis technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Wu, Cheng; He, Qian; Wang, Shi-Yong; Ma, Xiu-Qiang; Wang, Ri; Li, Bing; He, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Along with the advancement of information technology and the era of big data education, using learning process data to provide strategic decision-making in cultivating and improving medical students’ self-learning ability has become a trend in educational research. Educator Abuwen Toffler said once, the illiterates in the future may not be the people not able to read and write, but not capable to know how to learn. Serving as educational institutions cultivating medical students’ learning ability, colleges and universities should not only instruct specific professional knowledge and skills, but also develop medical students’ self-learning ability. In this research, we built a teaching system which can help to restore medical students’ self-learning processes and analyze their learning outcomes and behaviors. To evaluate the effectiveness of the system in supporting medical students’ self-learning, an experiment was conducted in 116 medical students from two grades. The results indicated that problems in self-learning process through this system was consistent with problems raised from traditional classroom teaching. Moreover, the experimental group (using this system) acted better than control group (using traditional classroom teaching) to some extent. Thus, this system can not only help medical students to develop their self-learning ability, but also enhances the ability of teachers to target medical students’ questions quickly, improving the efficiency of answering questions in class.

  2. Research on cultivating medical students' self-learning ability using teaching system integrated with learning analysis technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Wu, Cheng; He, Qian; Wang, Shi-Yong; Ma, Xiu-Qiang; Wang, Ri; Li, Bing; He, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Along with the advancement of information technology and the era of big data education, using learning process data to provide strategic decision-making in cultivating and improving medical students' self-learning ability has become a trend in educational research. Educator Abuwen Toffler said once, the illiterates in the future may not be the people not able to read and write, but not capable to know how to learn. Serving as educational institutions cultivating medical students' learning ability, colleges and universities should not only instruct specific professional knowledge and skills, but also develop medical students' self-learning ability. In this research, we built a teaching system which can help to restore medical students' self-learning processes and analyze their learning outcomes and behaviors. To evaluate the effectiveness of the system in supporting medical students' self-learning, an experiment was conducted in 116 medical students from two grades. The results indicated that problems in self-learning process through this system was consistent with problems raised from traditional classroom teaching. Moreover, the experimental group (using this system) acted better than control group (using traditional classroom teaching) to some extent. Thus, this system can not only help medical students to develop their self-learning ability, but also enhances the ability of teachers to target medical students' questions quickly, improving the efficiency of answering questions in class. PMID:26550446

  3. With Intègre®, Leverage Every Medical Professionals' Skills and Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Denis

    Intègre® is a decision-support software specially designed for collective processes. Collecting all required information for decision making, Intègre harmonizes representations and processes collected data to check users' decisions coherency. During their consultation, specialist doctors access to analysis' results and to patients' data, stored in their own databases or in administration's systems. Then they get supported by Intègre to produce diagnosis in total coherency with medical guidelines and existing information.

  4. The Effect of Stress on Medical Students in a Private Medical University in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

    2007-01-01

    Stress amongst medical students is oftenoverlooked. Intelligent students are not always the mostcomposed. This study aimed to look at both male andfemale students of three different ethnic groups and theeffects of stress in areas such as academic, social,financial and their everyday life. The Chinese studentsreported significantly less “academic stress” than theMalay students, and the Malay students reportedsignificantly less “financial stress” compared to theChinese and Indian students. Medi...

  5. Emotional Burnout, Perceived Sources of Job Stress, Professional Fulfillment, and Engagement among Medical Residents in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Sami Abdo Radman Al-Dubai; Kurubaran Ganasegeran; Wilson Perianayagam; Krishna Gopal Rampal

    2013-01-01

    This study was the first to explore factors associated with emotional burnout (EB) among medical residents in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a universal sample of 205 medical residents in a Malaysian general hospital. The self-administered questionnaire used consisted of questions on sociodemographics and work characteristics, sources of job stress, professional fulfillment, engagement, and EB. EB was measured using the emotional exhaustion subscale, the Maslach Burnout In...

  6. An introduction to infertility counseling: a guide for mental health and medical professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Brennan; Boivin, Jacky; Norré, Jan; Smith, Cassandra; Thorn, Petra; Wischmann, Tewes

    2012-01-01

    The practice of infertility counseling delivered by mental health and medical professionals has become more sophisticated and widespread over the past decade. This paper summarizes information presented at the second campus workshop of the Special Interest Group of Psychology and Counseling of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE). This group is dedicated to improving infertility services by creating meaningful connections between mental health and medical professi...

  7. Teaching Medical Students Basic Neurotransmitter Pharmacology Using Primary Research Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Amy C.; Devonshire, Ian M.; Greenfield, Susan A.; Dommett, Eleanor J.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We…

  8. Anatomy Drawing Screencasts: Enabling Flexible Learning for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional lecture remains an essential method of disseminating information to medical students. However, due to the constant development of the modern medical curriculum many institutions are embracing novel means for delivering the core anatomy syllabus. Using mobile media devices is one such way, enabling students to access core material…

  9. Training Medical Students about Hazardous Drinking Using Simple Assessment Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Jesús López-Torres; Pretel, Fernando Andrés; Bravo, Beatriz Navarro; Rabadan, Francisco Escobar; Serrano Selva, Juan Pedro; Latorre Postigo, Jose Miguel; Martínez, Ignacio Párraga

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the ability of medical students to identify hazardous drinkers using screening tools recommended in clinical practice. Design: Observational cross-sectional study. Setting: Faculty of Medicine of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. Method: The medical students learnt to use Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and…

  10. Therapy 101: A Psychotherapy Curriculum for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Fotouh, Frieda; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This pilot project, designed and taught by a resident, created a curriculum to introduce medical students to the practice of psychotherapy. Medical students who are knowledgeable about psychotherapy can become physicians who are able to refer patients to psychotherapeutic treatments. A search of the literature did not identify a…

  11. Computer and Internet use among Undergraduate Medical Students in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Ayatollahi, Ali; Ayatollahi, Jamshid; Ayatollahi, Fatemeh; Ayatollahi, Reza; Shahcheraghi, Seyed Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Although computer technologies are now widely used in medicine, little is known about its use among medical students in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the competence and access to computer and internet among the medical students.

  12. Usage of emergency contraception between medical related and non-medical related students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khalid, A K

    2009-04-01

    Teenagers and young adultshave the most risk of unplanned pregnancy, due to lack of awareness to see a family planning provider after unprotected sexual intercourse. In addition, nearly one in five physicians is reluctant to provide information regarding Emergency Contraception (EC) to women and this may contribute to their lack of awareness. This study was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding the use of EC between medical related students compared to non-medical related students. Data collection was done using questionnaires distributed among students in University College Cork (UCC). 93% of medically related students were aware of EC compared to only 73.5% of non-medically related students. Medical related students also were more aware about the mechanism of action and detailed knowledge of EC compared to the non-medical students. This study has proven that medically related students have more detailed knowledge regarding EC compared to non-medical related students. However, there was no significant difference noted regarding the attitude and practice between the two groups.

  13. The key role of a transition course in preparing medical students for internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Alan R; Harleman, Elizabeth; O'sullivan, Patricia S; Maa, John

    2011-07-01

    Among the core transitions in medical education is the one from medical school to residency. Despite this challenging transition, the final year of medical school is known as lacking structure and clarity. The authors examine the preparation of medical students for the professional and personal challenges of internship in the context of transition courses. They first describe the development of a residency transition course, offered since 2001 at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine (UCSF), exploring aspects of a needs assessment, course goals and content, core competencies, and course implementation. They then critically analyze the course, judging it successful based on high subjective satisfaction scores and increased perceived preparedness data. Next, the authors discuss the national context of transition courses, perspectives of various stakeholders, and lessons learned from the UCSF experience. Finally, they consider future directions, suggesting that internship transition courses be a standard part of the medical school curriculum. PMID:21617513

  14. Should an iBSc in Management be compulsory for all UK medical students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh B

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bharpoor Singh,1 Natalie Ramjeeawon,2 Neil Shah,1 Shawmian Singagireson1 1Imperial College London, London, UK; 2University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UKThe UK medical school system has traditionally offered an intercalated science degree (iBSc to supplement their regular medical degree. However, in recent times with an increasing focus on leadership in the National Health Service (NHS, there has been a shift. More medical schools now offer the option to study an iBSc in Management.I have just spent a year completing an iBSc in Management at Imperial College Business School. Throughout the year I became more and more immersed in our intricate health care system, which is only really apparent to health care professionals whilst on the job. My question to the General Medical Council is – should an iBSc in Management be compulsory for all UK medical students?

  15. Consumption of alcohol, cigarettes and illegal substances among physicians and medical students in Brandenburg and Saxony (Germany)

    OpenAIRE

    Kugler Joachim; Klewer Jörg; Voigt Roger; Göbel Anne; Mittag Dirk; Twork Sabine; Voigt Karen; Bornstein Stefan R; Bergmann Antje

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients regard health care professionals as role models for leading a healthy lifestyle. Health care professionals' own behaviour and attitudes concerning healthy lifestyle have an influence in counselling patients. The aim of this study was to assess consumption of alcohol, cigarettes and illegal substances among physicians and medical students in two German states: Brandenburg and Saxony. Methods Socio-demographic data and individual risk behaviour was collected by an a...

  16. The relationship between spirituality and burnout among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachholtz, Amy; Rogoff, MaiLan

    2013-01-01

    Medical student burnout has been associated with depression, loss of empathy, and suicidal ideation. Spirituality has been identified in previous studies as a protective factor in coping with the stress but has not been examined as a factor in medical student burnout. An internet link to an anonymous survey was sent via email to medical students at a public northeastern medical school; 259/469 (55.2%) completed it. The survey included measures of spirituality, burnout, psychological distress, coping, and general happiness. A Pearson-r correlation showed significant inverse correlations between measures of spirituality and measures of psychological distress/burnout (r's ranging from -.62 to -.14; p's relationships. PMID:25485165

  17. Students' attitudes to ethics in the medical school curriculum.

    OpenAIRE

    Shelp, E E; Russell, M. L.; Grose, N P

    1981-01-01

    A survey of 106 medical students assessing their interest in and attitudes to medical ethics in the curriculum is reported by the authors. Results indicate that 64 per cent of the students rated the importance of medical ethics to good medical care as high or critical and 66 per cent desired to learn more about the topic. However, in reports of patient encounters identifying ethical issues, less than six per cent of the students reported a frequency of more than one such patient encounter per...

  18. International students in United States’ medical schools: does the medical community know they exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jashodeep Datta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Matriculation of international students to United States’ (US medical schools has not mirrored the remarkable influx of these students to other US institutions of higher education. Methods: While these students’ numbers are on the rise, the visibility for their unique issues remains largely ignored in the medical literature. Results: These students are disadvantaged in the medical school admissions process due to financial and immigration-related concerns, and academic standards for admittance also continue to be significantly higher compared with their US-citizen peers. Furthermore, it is simply beyond the mission of many medical schools – both public and private – to support international students’ education, especially since federal, state-allocated or institutional funds are limited and these institutions have a commitment to fulfill the healthcare education needs of qualified domestic candidates. In spite of these obstacles, a select group of international students do gain admission to US medical schools and, upon graduation, are credentialed equally as their US-citizen counterparts by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME. However, owing to their foreign citizenship, these students have visa requirements for post-graduate training that may adversely impact their candidacy for residency placement. Conclusion: By raising such issues, this article aims to increase the awareness of considerations pertinent to this unique population of medical students. The argument is also made to support continued recruitment of international students to US medical schools in spite of these impediments. In our experience, these students are not only qualified to tackle the rigors of a US medical education, but also enrich the cultural diversity of the medical student body. Moreover, these graduates could effectively complement the efforts to augment US physician workforce diversity while contributing to healthcare disparity eradication, minority health issues, and service in medically underserved areas.

  19. Factors affecting future specialty choice among medical students in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawan Al-Fouzan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Choosing a medical specialty can be either a daunting and confusing experience for some medical students and junior doctors or a foregone conclusion to others. The aim of this study is to evaluate factors affecting future specialty choice among medical students in Kuwait University. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from medical students registered in Kuwait University during the academic year 2011/2012. Chi-square test and logistic regression were used to test the association between deciding a future specialty and students’ sociodemographic and academic factors. Results: Of the 422 students approached, 387 (91.7% decided to participate. A total of 144 (37.2% students made a decision regarding their choice of future medical specialty. Pediatrics, general surgery, and cardiology were the most desired specialties – 18 (12.5%, 17 (11.8%, and 16 (11.1% students requested these specialties, respectively. Only 61 (42.4% of those who selected a future specialty received advice regarding their choice. Looking for a good treatment outcome for patients (66; 45.8% and a challenging specialty (58; 40.3% were the most influencing incentives when selecting a future specialty. Students in the clinical phase of their study were 3.014 (95% CI: 1.498–6.065 more likely to report on their decision regarding a future specialty compared to students in the basic medical sciences phase (p=0.002. Conclusion : A variety of factors appeared to inspire medical students in Kuwait to choose a future medical specialty. When identified, these factors can be used by mentors of medical students and directors of residency training programs to motivate students to choose specialties that are limited in Kuwait.

  20. Teaching Fellows in undergraduate medical education-the ?student’s perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hashim Z.?; Miller A.?; Fahim N?; Sam M.?

    2012-01-01

    Background: Currently there is a lack of data exploring the value added by Clinical Teaching ?Fellow posts over teaching led by regular working clinicians.?Aim: To explore the perceptions of medical students regarding the value attached to having ?fulltime Teaching Fellows to deliver undergraduate medical education. ?Method: A total of 521 clinical year medical students from the University of Leicester were ?asked to complete an online questionnaire.?Result: 375 medical students responded t...

  1. Student Affairs Standards and Competencies: Examining the Professional Standards and Competencies of California Community College Student Government Advisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Anthony Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the professional standards and competencies that California community college student government advisors perceive as important, their confidence level in those professional standards and competencies and the role that they believe professional organizations can play in developing those skills. This study…

  2. Structure and state of the university of physical culture studentsprofessional-pedagogical motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanchenko N. I.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The state and dynamics of the university of physical culture students’ motivation was determined. The complex of diagnostic methods was used to determine the level of professional-pedagogical motivation, which was directed on outlining motivation components and its development levels determination. The research involved 232 students. It was found that for the 1 st year students the first place was obtained by the professional-cognitive interest, second by achievement motive and third by professional intention. For the 4 th year students, the first place is possessed by professional cognitive interest, then followed by motives referred to professional and then – motives of achievement. The diagnostics have outlined absence of certain professional intentions. Also from first to fourth year of studies the tendency of increasing the amount of students interest of which is not connected either to physical culture, sports nor to pedagogical activity is followed.

  3. Using Theater to Increase Empathy Training in Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Jo Marie; Trial, Janet; Piver, Debra E.; Schaff, Pamela B.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Developing and nurturing empathy in medical trainees has been recognized as an essential element of medical education. Theater may be a unique instructional modality to increase empathy training. Methods: A multi-disciplinary team developed a theater workshop for first year medical students. Through the use of theater games, art images…

  4. Improving the medical student experience using electronic timetabling

    OpenAIRE

    Vivekanantham S; Ravindran RP

    2014-01-01

    Sayinthen Vivekanantham, Rahul Prashanth Ravindran Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKTechnology within health care delivery is improving at an unprecedented rate.1 Medical students demonstrate a preference towards mobile learning2 and familiarity with technology is essential to medical practice.1 We believe electronic timetables are an underutilized technology that can be embraced by institutions delivering medical education.

  5. Social Learning: Medical Student Perceptions of Geriatric House Calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Linda; Willett, Rita; Selby-Penczak, Rachel; McKnight, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    Bandura's social learning theory provides a useful conceptual framework to understand medical students' perceptions of a house calls experience at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine. Social learning and role modeling reflect Liaison Committee on Medical Education guidelines for "Medical schools (to) ensure that the learning…

  6. An Analysis of Student Choices in Medical Ethical Dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloshin, Phyllis Lerman

    This report describes a study undertaken to assess student choices in medical ethical dilemmas. Medical ethical dilemmas are interpreted to include problems such as abortion, euthanasia, sterilization, experimentation on humans, allocation of scarce medical resources, and physician and health personnel training. The major purpose of the study was…

  7. Measurement of psychosocial health in medical students: Validation of the Jefferson Medical College's Questionnaire in Mexico

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Adelina, Alcorta; Jesús, Ancer; Donato, Saldívar; Santos, Guzmán; María V., Bermúdez; Juan, Montes; Juan F., González; Silvia, Tavitas; Francisco J., Rodríguez; Marco V., Gómez; Ana M., Salinas; Mohammadreza, Hojat; Stefan M., Fernández Zambrano.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Como la literatura consigna, los estudiantes y profesionales de la Medicina en comparación con la población general y de otras carreras conforman una población que resulta vulnerable frente a los trastornos de salud psicosocial. En la investigación psicosocial de la educación médica un punto clave c [...] orresponde a la identificación de medidas relevantes con cualidades psicométricas. En el presente trabajo se analiza la validez y confiabilidad de un conjunto de escalas psicosociales aplicadas a 3.603 alumnos de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (México). Las escalas administradas fueron: Soledad, Ansiedad ante los exámenes, Ansiedad general, Autoestima, Extroversión, Locus de control externo, Neuroticismo, Depresión, Eventos estresantes en la vida, Percepción de relaciones tempranas con los padres y amigos y Percepción de estado de salud general. Estas escalas fueron propuestas por investigadores de la Escuela de Medicina de Jefferson (Estados Unidos). Se confirmó la unidimensionalidad y la validez de constructo de las mediciones de Soledad, Ansiedad ante los exámenes, Ansiedad general, Autoestima y Extroversión. Así también, la magnitud y dirección de las correlaciones interescalas apoyaron la validez convergente y discriminante, con excepción de Locus de control externo y Neuroticismo. Los resultados confirman las propiedades psicométricas de las escalas, las cuales son útiles para proveer información a los educadores médicos y a profesionales de la salud mental en la detección temprana de problemas psicosociales quienes en conjunto pueden coadyuvar en la optimización de la salud mental de los estudiantes de escuelas de Medicina a través de programas académicos acordes a sus necesidades. Abstract in english The greater the psychosocial health, the greater is the well-being and the capacity for adaptation and overcoming problems and common life frustrations in family, relationships, and work. Medical students and practicing physicians, in comparison with the general population and that of other professi [...] ons, are exposed to academic and professional stress and therefore are vulnerable to psychosocial health problems and certain specific dysfunctions that may compromise their physical, mental, and social health. In the field of psychosocial research in medical education, the key issue is to find relevant and psychometrically sound measures. The Jefferson Medical College's Psychosocial Questionnaire contains abridged versions of nine personality tests, as well as questions about respondents' relationships with parents in the first five years of life and with classmates in the early schooling. The scales in the questionnaire have shown satisfactory internal consistency reliability and construct validity through factor analysis. To our knowledge, in Mexico, there is not a specific questionnaire that measures psychosocial profile in a non-clinical population such as medical students. The present study adapted and translated the questionnaire from English to Spanish in order to evaluate its validity and reliability in Mexican medical students, to further learn its predictive validity of academic performance. In this study, we compared the factor structure in Mexico to the results obtained in the United States research. Implications for predicting academic and clinical performance of medical students and physicians were discussed. Study participants consisted of 3,603 matriculates at the Escuela de Medicina de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (Mexico). Psychosocial measures included Loneliness, Test anxiety, General anxiety, Self-esteem, Extroversion, External locus of control, Neuroticism, Depression, Stressful life events, Perceptions of early relationships with mother and father, Peer relationships and Perception of health, used by researchers at Jefferson Medical College in the United States. The items were translated into Spanish and back translated from Spanish to English, following the guidelines for adaptation of instrument

  8. Antibiotics Self-Medication among Southern Iranian University Students

    OpenAIRE

    S Sarahroodi; A. Arzi; A.F. Sawalha; A. Ashtarinezhad

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the knowledge and behavior toward antibiotic self-medication among medical and non-medical university students in Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 200 students randomly chosen from a medical and a non-medical university in Ahwaz, South of Iran in 2008. Data was collected using self administered questionnaires with open-ended and close-ended items. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS 14 and the results were presented as the p...

  9. Social justice in medical education: strengths and challenges of a student-driven social justice curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Adrian Jacques H; Andaya, January M; Yamada, Seiji; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2014-08-01

    In the current rapidly evolving healthcare environment of the United States, social justice programs in pre-medical and medical education are needed to cultivate socially conscious and health professionals inclined to interdisciplinary collaborations. To address ongoing healthcare inequalities, medical education must help medical students to become physicians skilled not only in the biomedical management of diseases, but also in identifying and addressing social and structural determinants of the patients' daily lives. Using a longitudinal Problem-Based Learning (PBL) methodology, the medical students and faculty advisers at the University of Hawai'i John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) developed the Social Justice Curriculum Program (SJCP) to supplement the biomedical curriculum. The SJCP consists of three components: (1) active self-directed learning and didactics, (2) implementation and action, and (3) self-reflection and personal growth. The purpose of introducing a student-driven SJ curriculum is to expose the students to various components of SJ in health and medicine, and maximize engagement by using their own inputs for content and design. It is our hope that the SJCP will serve as a logistic and research-oriented model for future student-driven SJ programs that respond to global health inequalities by cultivating skills and interest in leadership and community service. PMID:25157325

  10. Vocación médica en médicos de prestigiada conducta profesional / Medical vocation in physicians with prestigious professional behavior

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Alberto, Perales; Alfonso, Mendoza; Elard, Sánchez.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Propósito: Estudiar la vocación médica desde una perspectiva científica. Objetivos: Analizar la vocación médica respecto a sus orígenes y factores asociados a su desarrollo en médicos considerados ejemplos de conducta profesional y vocación médica. Diseño: Investigación cualitativa, con muestreo de [...] caso típico y entrevistas en profundidad. Institución: Instituto de Ética en Salud, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú. Participantes: Médicos. Metodología: La muestra estuvo conformada por 76 médicos seleccionados en base a criterios pre-establecidos, miembros de las cuatro instituciones médicas más prestigiadas del país: Academia Nacional de Medicina, Academia Peruana de Cirugía y Facultades de Medicina de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos y Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Se obtuvo su consentimiento informado. Principales medidas de resultados: Orígenes y factores asociados a vocación médica. Resultados: El 82% correspondió al sexo masculino; edad promedio 71,6 años, con rango de edad 49 a 88 años; 8% era hijo/a de médico y 14% tenía otro familiar médico; 30% era el/la mayor de los hijos. La vocación médica no siguió un patrón único, pudiendo iniciarse en diferentes momentos del ciclo vital, incluso después de que el alumno hubo ingresado a la Facultad de Medicina. Entre los factores explicativos más frecuentemente asociados destacaron una dinámica personal y la influencia familiar, aunque hubo dos casos en los que no se encontró factor explicativo alguno. A base de los resultados se presenta definiciones de vocación y vocación médica. Conclusiones: El análisis de la información permite entender la vocación médica como un proceso que se genera en un ser humano en virtud de dos factores: uno individual y otro social (entorno que estimula su desarrollo). Su inicio puede ocurrir a edades y en formas variadas constituyéndose, finalmente, en parte del ‘proyecto de ser’ (se dan ejemplos específicos). Abstract in english Purpose: To study medical vocation from a scientific perspective. Objectives: To analyze origins and development-associated factors of medical vocation in physicians considered examples of high-level professional behavior and medical vocation. Design: Qualitative study, with typical case sampling an [...] d in-depth interviews. Setting: Institute on Ethics in Health, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Peru. Participants: Physicians. Methodology: The sample consisted in 76 physicians selected by pre-established criteria from the four more prestigious Peruvian medical institutions: National Academy of Medicine, Peruvian Academy of Surgery, San Marcos University’s and Peruvian Cayetano Heredia University’s Schools of Medicine. Informed consent was previously obtained. Main outcome measures: Medical vocation origins and associated factors. Results: Eighty-two per cent of physicians interviewed were male, 71.6 year-old average with range 49-88 years; only in 8% their father was MD also and in 14% a family member was MD. In 30% the physician was the oldest son/daughter. Medical vocation did not follow a unique pattern and begun in different periods of the vital cycle even after the student had been admitted to the School of Medicine. Most frequently associated factors were personal dynamics and family influence, and in two cases no explanation was found. Upon results vocation and medical vocation definitions are proposed. Conclusions: Data analysis allows understanding medical vocation as a process generated in a human being on account of two factors: individual (the subject) and social (the environment that stimulates its development). Its beginning may occur at different ages and in several ways, finally becoming part of the ‘oneself project’ (specific examples are given).

  11. Anatomy teaching with portable ultrasound to medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Swamy Meenakshi; Searle Roger F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Medical students as future clinicians will apply their anatomy knowledge in medical imaging. There are various radiological resources available for the medical students to learn anatomy and contextualise it to the clinical setting. Ultrasound is a safe and non- invasive imaging procedure commonly used in clinical practice. This study aimed to use portable ultrasound and evaluate its impact as an adjunct to cadaveric anatomy teaching together with cross sectional anatomy im...

  12. Medical student and patient perspectives on bedside teaching.

    OpenAIRE

    Nahid Kianmehr; Mani Mofidi; Reza Yazdanpanah; Marjan A. Ahmadi

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the perspectives of medical students and patients on bedside teaching (BST). METHODS A cross-sectional study was undertaken to elicit patients and learners opinions on BST in Hazrat Rasool Hospital, a university teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran. From June 2008 to September 2008, 100 fourth-year medical students and 100 adult patients admitted to the general medical service of a teaching hospital were chosen randomly. Patients who stayed for a minimum of 48 hou...

  13. PBL and critical thinking disposition in Chinese medical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Emmersen, Jeppe; Toft, Egon; Sun, Baozhi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of problem-based learning (PBL) and the development of critical thinking disposition (CT) and academic achievement in Chinese medical students using a cross-sectional randomized design. Medical students from China Medical University (CMU) were randomized to PBL or non-PBL teaching at the commencement of the study. After five years of study, CT was scored by a Chinese version of the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI...

  14. Correlating students' educational background, study habits, and resource usage with learning success in medical histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvig, Daniel; Holaday, Louisa W; Purkiss, Joel; Hortsch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Histology is a traditional core basic science component of most medical and dental education programs and presents a didactic challenge for many students. Identifying students that are likely to struggle with histology would allow for early intervention to support and encourage their learning success. To identify student characteristics that are associated with learning success in histology, three first-year medical school classes at the University of Michigan (>440 students) were surveyed about their educational background, attitudes toward learning histology, and their use of histology learning strategies and resources. These characteristics were linked with the students' quiz and examination results in histology. Students who reported previous experience in histology or pathology and hold science or biomedical science college degrees usually did well in histology. Learning success in histology was also positively associated with students' perception that histology is important for their professional career. Other positive indicators were in-person participation in teacher-guided learning experiences, specifically lecture and laboratory sessions. In contrast, students who relied on watching histology lectures by video rather than going to lectures in-person performed significantly worse. These characteristics and learning strategies of students who did well in this very visual and challenging study subject should be of help for identifying and advising students early, who might be at risk of failing a histology course or component. PMID:24706527

  15. Suicidal ideation and attempt among South African medical students

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    L, van Niekerk; L, Scribante; P J, Raubenheimer.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available International data reveal that medical students are at higher risk of attempting suicide than the general population. We aimed to determine the prevalence of suicidal ideation and attempt among South African medical students from three universities and identify key predisposing risk factors. Data we [...] re collected via a questionnaire to medical students on demographics, mental health history, depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation and attempt. A total of 874 medical students from three universities were enrolled. We found a high prevalence of suicidal ideation (32.3%) and suicidal attempt (6.9%), which is three times higher than the general age-appropriate South African population. Simple screening questionnaires can identify such students, enabling universities to provide targeted and improved support for at-risk students

  16. Gadget Dependency among Medical College Students in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Gupta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gadget holds the great importance in everyday life. Mobile phone and internet usage have become universal practice especially among the student community. Gadgets usage has both pros and cons. Objective: To assess the magnitude of gadget utilization among medical college students in Delhi and to estimate the burden of gadget dependency. Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted in three medical colleges. The participants were 957 medical students selected by systematic random sampling, interviewed using a self-administered questionnaire. Result: The sample consisted of 485 (50.7% males and 472 (49.3% females, aged 17-25 years. Gadgets of at least one variety were uniformly used by all the students, 22.4% of the students surveyed were found to be gadget dependent.  Conclusion: Our study shows high prevalence of gadget dependency among medical students. There is need to create awareness regarding the problem of gadget dependency and its social and health effects. 

  17. Interns as teachers of medical students: a pilot programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunne, B

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, rising numbers of medical students and an increasingly demanding clinical workload has put pressures on the educational systems for medical students in the hospital. Bedside teaching remains central to education, but tutorial delivery by registrars, tutors and consultants has proven to be increasingly difficult with the greater numbers of students now in the undergraduate system. AIMS: We have performed a pilot study to determine the feasibility of developing a Junior Tutor Programme, to assist in the delivery of tutorials to undergraduate medical students. METHODS: This was designed and delivered by interns under the supervision of the academic staff in the Departments of Medicine and Surgery in Connolly Hospital. The programme was evaluated by a questionnaire filled in by the students anonymously. RESULTS: A supervised programme of tutorials delivered by interns is a potentially useful way to ensure delivery of clinical teaching to undergraduate medical students.

  18. To What Extent Does Continuing Professional Education (CPE) and Continuing Medical Education (CME) Affect Physicians Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kathleen A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore to what extent is there an understanding among physicians as to how continuing professional education (CPE) and Continuing Medical Education (CME) affect physicians practice? To address the question, focus groups were used to begin a process of identifying the components within each type of education so that…

  19. Medicines in Pharmacy Students’ Residence and Self-medication Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Auta, A; Banwat, SB; Sariem, CN; Shalkur, D; Nasara, B; Atuluku, MO

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying the types of medicines in pharmacy students’ residence and to determine if a relationship exists between keeping medicines in students’ accommodation and self-medication practices. A cross-sectional survey of a random sample of 240 undergraduate pharmacy students of the University of Jos, Jos, Nigeria, was carried out. Participating students were given a self-administered questionnaire, and only 188 students returned their filled questionnaire. The data col...

  20. Medical professionalism in China and the United States: a transcultural interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jing-Bao; Smith, Kirk L; Cong, Yali; Hu, Linying; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    As in other societies, medical professionalism in the Peoples' Republic of China has been rapidly evolving. One of the major events in this process was the endorsement in 2005 of the document, "Medical Professionalism in the New Millennium: A Physician Charter," by the Chinese Medical Doctor Association (hereafter, the Charter)(1). More recently, a national survey, the first on such a large scale, was conducted on Chinese physicians' attitudes toward the fundamental principles and core commitments put forward in the Charter. Based on empirical findings from that study and comparing them to the published results of a similar American survey, the authors offer an in-depth interpretation of significant cross-cultural differences and important transcultural commonalities. The broader historical, socio-economic, and ethical issues relating to salient Chinese cultural practices such as family consent, familism (the custom of deferring decisions to family members), and the withholding of medical information, as well as controversial topics such as not respecting patients' autonomy, are examined. The Chinese Survey found that Chinese physicians supported the principles of the Charter in general. Here we argue that Chinese culture and traditional medical ethics are broadly compatible with the moral commitments demanded by modern medical professionalism. Methodologically and theoretically-recognizing the problems inherent in the hoary but still popular habit of dichotomizing cultures and in relativism-a transcultural approach is adopted that gives greater (due) weight to the internal moral diversity present within every culture, the common ground shared by different cultures, and the primacy of morality. Genuine cross-cultural dialogue, including a constructive Chinese-American dialogue in the area of medical professionalism, is not only possible, but necessary. PMID:25794294

  1. Medical students' self-report of mental health conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Strous, Rael D; Netta Shoenfeld; Avi Lehman; Aharon Wolf; Leah Snyder; Ori Barzilai

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the subjective presence of a range of subsyndromal and syndromal mental health conditions in medical students, and to compare the presence of these conditions between preclinical and clinical training. Methods: A cross sectional study was used among first-and fifth-year medical students. Student reported their mental health conditions using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria, the fourth version (DSM-IV). Data analysis was based on 110...

  2. Patient attitudes towards medical students at Damascus University teaching hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed-Hassan Rima M; Bashour Hyam N; Koudsi Abir Y

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The cooperation of patients and their consent to involve medical students in their care is vital to clinical education, but large numbers of students and lack of experience as well as loss of privacy may evoke negative attitudes of patients, which may sometimes adversely affect the clinical teaching environment. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of patients towards medical students at Damascus University hospitals, and to explore the determinants of those attitudes...

  3. NUTRITION HABITS AND FOOD CONSUMPTION FREQUENCIES OF MEDICAL FACULTY STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ay?e Emel ÖNAL; GÜRTEK?N, Ba?ak; Özel, Sevda; ERB?L, Suna; AYVAZ, Özkan; GÜNGÖR, Günay

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACTObjective: Medical faculty students may develop irregular eating habits for reasons such as their social – economic situations, adaptation to faculty life, dormitory or their new environment.  As a result, some students eventually ignore their basic food requirements and have a diet that is cabohydrate, saturated fat and cholesterol rich. Our aim was to search the nutritional habits and food consumption of medical faculty students in order to provide a healthy diet advice.Material and...

  4. MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY IN VIH CONTAGION AFTER BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ortiz de Lejarazu Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARYIn Spain a million and a half blood transfusions by year are carried out, that supposes between 2 and 10 cases of infection of VIH by year. The present state of science invites to do something more with tests to detect other virological and immunological markers, in order to identify seronegative carriers and thus avoid HIV transmission by them. We must consider the possibility to incur in professional responsibilities if we do not report adequate of this risk or if we do not provide patients all the cares that require, according to the state of the science so called lex artis.RESUMENEn España se realizan un millón y medio de transfusiones de sangre al año, lo que supone un riesgo de entre 2 y 10 casos de infección de VIH a través de las mismas. El estado actual de la ciencia invita a hacer algo más pudiéndose ampliar los estudios de marcadores víricos e inmunológicos, para identificar a portadores seronegativos y así tratar de evitar la transmisión del virus de inmunodeficiencia humana a través de ellos. Debemos considerar la posibilidad de incurrir en responsabilidades profesionales si no informamos adecuadamente de este riesgo o si no proporcionamos a los pacientes todos los cuidados que requieren, según el estado actual de la ciencia, lo que denominamos lex artis.

  5. Illicit methylphenidate use among Iranian medical students: prevalence and knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Habibzadeh Mahasti Alizadeh Ayoub Malek

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Afshin Habibzadeh1 Mahasti Alizadeh2 Ayoub Malek3 Leili Maghbooli1 Mohammadali M Shoja4 Kamyar Ghabili41Students' Research Committee, 2Department of Community Medicine, 3Department of Psychiatry, 4Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranBackground: Methylphenidate, a medication prescribed for individuals suffering from attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, is increasingly being misused by students.Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate the frequency of methylphenidate use among a group of Iranian medical students and to assess their knowledge of methylphenidate.Methods: Anonymous, self-administered questionnaires were completed by all medical students entering the university between 2000 and 2007.Results: Methylphenidate users’ mean knowledge score was higher than that of nonusers (15.83 ± 3.14 vs 13.66 ± 3.10, P = 0.008. Age, gender, and school year were positively correlated with knowledge score (P < 0.05. Data analysis demonstrated that 27 participants (8.7% had taken methylphenidate at least once in their lifetime. The respondents believed that the most common motive for methylphenidate use among youths was that it aided concentration and therefore ability to study.Conclusion: This study indicates a relatively low level of knowledge about methylphenidate among Iranian medical students. More educational programs regarding the use of methylphenidate are required and should be focused on the student suppliers, clinicians, pharmacists, and medical students.Keywords: methylphenidate, medical student, prevalence, Iran

  6. A Comparative Study of the Perceptions of Professional Staff on Their Contribution to Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Julie-Anne; Dollard, Emma; Banks, Nicci

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of professional staff on their contribution to student outcomes. An online Delphi survey method was used to collect data from two expert panels: professional staff based in faculties and professional staff based in central university departments. The aim of this method is for the panels to reach consensus. The…

  7. Professional Values of RN-to-BSN Students in an Online Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koomey, Cynthia L; Osteen, Kathryn; Gray, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Professional values are an important component of nursing education. This cross-sectional study assessed the professional values of 222 students in an online RN-to-BSN program. Higher scores were related to items reflecting direct patient care and accountability for nursing practice. Items focusing on nursing theory, cost of care, and professional nursing organization revealed lower scores. PMID:25783813

  8. Health inequalities, physician citizens and professional medical associations: an Australian case study

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    Naccarella Lucio

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As socioeconomic health inequalities persist and widen, the health effects of adversity are a constant presence in the daily work of physicians. Gruen and colleagues suggest that, in responding to important population health issues such as this, defining those areas of professional obligation in contrast to professional aspiration should be on the basis of evidence and feasibility. Drawing this line between obligation and aspiration is a part of the work of professional medical colleges and associations, and in doing so they must respond to members as well as a range of other interest groups. Our aim was to explore the usefulness of Gruen's model of physician responsibility in defining how professional medical colleges and associations should lead the profession in responding to socioeconomic health inequalities. Methods We report a case study of how the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners is responding to the issue of health inequalities through its work. We undertook a consultation (80 interviews with stakeholders internal and external to the College and two focus groups with general practitioners and program and policy review of core programs of College interest and responsibility: general practitioner training and setting of practice standards, as well as its work in public advocacy. Results Some strategies within each of these College program areas were seen as legitimate professional obligations in responding to socioeconomic health inequality. However, other strategies, while potentially professional obligations within Gruen's model, were nevertheless contested. The key difference between these lay in different moral orientations. Actions where agreement existed were based on an ethos of care and compassion. Actions that were contested were based on an ethos of justice and human rights. Conclusion Colleges and professional medical associations have a role in explicitly leading a debate about values, engaging both external stakeholder and practicing member constituencies. This is an important and necessary step in defining an agreed role for the profession in addressing health inequalities.

  9. Using Computer and Internet for Medical Literature Searching Among Medical Students in Hadramout University, Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Salim Bin Ghouth

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some researchers have observed that medical students used computer and internet for nonmedical purposes. Is this the case among medical students in a newly established medical college of Hadramout University in Yemen?Objectives: To assess the knowledge and usage of computer and internet among medical students of Hadramout University, find out the medical applications for which they use internet, and the factors that encourage the students to use computer and internet, with an emphasis on gender variations.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, data were collected from 102 randomly selected students from second to sixth year at the academic year 2005/2006 by using structured questionnaire of 23 items. Results: Seventy four students have computer at home (73%, 77 students use internet for general purposes (76.2% and lesser use internet for educational and research purposes, with significant gender variations. The students opined that accessibility of internet in the college (84.2% and training about online searching (74.3% were the most expected factors to improve using of internet for medical research.Conclusion: Incorporating online search of medical literature in curriculum planning is essential to improve the student skills in research.

  10. Inhaled medication for asthma management: evaluation of how asthma patients, medical students, and doctors use the different devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniz Janaína Barbosa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma results from a combination of three essential features: airflow obstruction, hyperresponsiveness of airways to endogenous or exogenous stimuli and inflammation. Inadequacy of the techniques to use different inhalation devices is one of the causes of therapeutic failure. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate how 20 medical students, 36 resident physicians of Internal Medicine/Pediatrics, and 40 asthma patients used three devices for inhalation therapy containing placebo. All patients were followed at the Pulmonary Outpatient Service of Botucatu Medical School and had been using inhaled medication for at least six months. The following devices were evaluated: metered dose inhalers (MDI, dry powder inhalers (DPI, and MDI attached to a spacer device. A single observer applied a protocol containing the main steps necessary to obtain a good inhaler technique to follow and grade the use of different devices. Health care professionals tested all three devices and patients tested only the device being used on their management. MDI was the device best known by doctors and patients. MDI use was associated with errors related to the coordination between inspiration and device activation. Failure to exhale completely before inhalation of the powder was the most frequent error observed with DPI use. In summary, patients did not receive precise instruction on how to use inhaled medication and health care professionals were not well prepared to adequately teach their patients.

  11. STUDENTS' SOCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL MOBILITY AS A PREREQUISITE OF DYNAMIC CAREER PROSPECTS

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    Evald F. Zeer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the problems of students' social and professional mobility in the post-industrial society, given the dynamism and uncertainty of future career prospects, and variability and multidimensionality of individual career trajectories.The research is aimed at defining the phenomenon of social and professional mobility, determining factors of professional growth, and functional structural characteristics of mobility development.The scientific novelty involves the author's interpretation and conceptual analysis of students’ socio-professional mobility, and its contribution to the future professional growth. The author considers both the objective and subjective factors affecting the uncertainty of students' professional future: objective factors include socio-economic conditions of postindustrial society, systems of vocational education and guidance; subjective factors deal with the intrapersonal conflicts of professional self-determination, discrepancy of socio-professional orientation, and low auto-competency level.The research findings reveal the structure and characteristic features of students' social and professional mobility: psycho-physiological qualities, cognitive abilities, socio-professional experience and orientation, as well as the negative impact factors. Based on the content analysis and expert evaluation, the author singles out and defines the key characteristics of students’ mobility: adaptability, initiative, innovativeness, learning ability, behavioral flexibility, reflexivity and excessive activity.Practical significance: the research outcomes provide the ground for extrapolation of students' career prospects in vocational schools, career counseling and job placement centers.

  12. Stress in medical students: A cross sectional study

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    Hiteshkumar Muktilal Chauhan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Stress occurs when pressure is greater than resources available. Medical education has many factors causing stress among the medical students. This study was conducted to find out the prevalence of stress among medical students and to know the factors causing stress in them.Methods: This is a cross sectional study, conducted on the Ist MBBS to III/IInd MBBS students of B. J. Medical College, Ahmedabad, using a semistructured self administered questionnaire, in October 2010. A total of 200 students both male & female were participated in this study.Results: Among all 200 students, who were responded the questionnaire, 174 (87% students felt stress at one or other time. Out of total 174 stressed students, 93 (53.45% were female, while 81 (46.55% were of male.  Among which Ist & III/IInd MBBS students were more stressed 92% & 90% respectively. Vast medical course, language problems, frequent examinations, homesickness, improper mess food & high parental expectations are the main stressors.Conclusion: Medical students are highly affected with stress, which affect their academic performance as well as their health & day to day activities also. Review academic & exam schedules, changing the exam pattern, adding some recreational activities, better interaction with the faculty and proper guidance, will help them to cope up with stress.

  13. Los estudiantes de medicina como parte del equipo de salud / Medical students as members of the health care team

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Juan Pablo, Beca I; María Inés, Gómez B; Francisca, Browne L; Jorge, Browne S.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available [...] Abstract in english Background: Teaching hospitals include both undergraduate and postgraduate students, but the role of medical students in the health care team has not been clearly established. Aim: To know the opinion of different professionals about the role of medical students and how this opinion may have an infl [...] uence in medical education. Material and Methods: A qualitative method was used, asking open questions to focus groups of physicians, nurses and midwives, technicians and undergraduate medical students of 4th and 5th grade. Results: Physicians believe that medical students have no special role in the health care team, nurses think that they may help in commu-nication with patients, and technicians (nurses’s aids) value their companionship and closeness with patients. Medical students recognize that their main function is to learn but they are aware that they do help patients. They suggest increasing their integration with other students of other health related careers. Conclusions: Although medical students are usually not seen as part of the health care team, they may fulfll a role with patients during their clinical learning practice. This would improve the quality of their training and the multidisciplinary work of the health care team.

  14. Los estudiantes de medicina como parte del equipo de salud Medical students as members of the health care team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Beca I

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teaching hospitals include both undergraduate and postgraduate students, but the role of medical students in the health care team has not been clearly established. Aim: To know the opinion of different professionals about the role of medical students and how this opinion may have an influence in medical education. Material and Methods: A qualitative method was used, asking open questions to focus groups of physicians, nurses and midwives, technicians and undergraduate medical students of 4th and 5th grade. Results: Physicians believe that medical students have no special role in the health care team, nurses think that they may help in commu-nication with patients, and technicians (nurses’s aids value their companionship and closeness with patients. Medical students recognize that their main function is to learn but they are aware that they do help patients. They suggest increasing their integration with other students of other health related careers. Conclusions: Although medical students are usually not seen as part of the health care team, they may fulfll a role with patients during their clinical learning practice. This would improve the quality of their training and the multidisciplinary work of the health care team.

  15. Reform of the Method for Evaluating the Teaching of Medical Linguistics to Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongkui; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Longlu

    2014-01-01

    Explorating reform of the teaching evaluation method for vocational competency-based education (CBE) curricula for medical students is a very important process in following international medical education standards, intensify ing education and teaching reforms, enhancing teaching management, and improving the quality of medical education. This…

  16. Teaching Pharmacology at a Nepalese Medical School: The Student Perspective

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    Shankar PR, ,

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundKIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal conducts problem-basedpharmacology learning during small-group practical sessions.The present study was carried out to obtain student feedbackregarding the sessions and suggestions for improvement.MethodThe questionnaire-based study was carried out among firstyear medical students during July 2009. Respondents wereenrolled after explaining the aims and objectives of the studyand obtaining written, informed consent. Basic demographicinformation and student agreement with a set of 30statements using a modified Likert-type scale was noted.ResultsSixty-four of the 75 students (86% participated. The mediantotal score was 107 (maximum score 150 and was higheramong males, students from within the Kathmandu valley andself-financing students. The differences were not statisticallysignificant. The suggestions for improvement were improvingthe physical infrastructure of the lab and providing more timefor the practical exercises.ConclusionStudent opinion was favourable. The findings would be ofinterest to medical educators especially in developingcountries.

  17. Prevalence, pattern and perceptions of self-medication in medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Pandya, Rushi N.; Kunal S. Jhaveri; Falgun I. Vyas; Patel, Varsha J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The use of self-medication is highly prevalent in the community more so amongst the medical students. Self-medication can be defined as the use of drugs to treat self-diagnosed disorders or symptoms, or the intermittent or continued use of a prescribed drug for chronic or recurrent disease or symptoms. Aims and Objectives: To study the prevalence and pattern of use of self-medication among medical students from first year to internship. Methods: This cross sectional study was carr...

  18. Profesionalismo médico: aspectos históricos y religiosos / Medical professionalism: Historical and religious aspects

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    José Adolfo, Rodríguez P.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available [...] Abstract in english The essence of the medical profession resides in the medical act, whereupon a sick human being meets another with the power to heal him or her. The source of this power has evolved from the divinity itself through magic to science or acquired knowledge. This power implies acknowledgement of values t [...] hat are inherent to the profession as well as responsibility toward one's own conscience and toward society, elements considered constitutive of what we now call professionalism. From antiquity these principles have evolved into behavioral codes containing variable components according to the different ages and cultures, but also permenent core values such as respect for life, altruism, and honesty, among others. Scientific and technological advances have magnified medical power but at the same time they have required that the philosophical and ethical principles that ought to inform professional practice be made explicit. This happens at a time when certitudes are questioned or abandoned, relativism and secularism pervade culture, and traditional medical values are challenged. Therefore, consensus attainment appears for some as the only legitimation of the ethics of professional medical acts, while for others the ancestral principles and values of medicine have permanent validity as objective goods based on the dignity of the human person

  19. Attitudes of undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University towards medical practice and migration, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Deressa Wakgari; Azazh Aklilu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The health care system of Ethiopia is facing a serious shortage of health workforce. While a number of strategies have been developed to improve the training and retention of medical doctors in the country, understanding the perceptions and attitudes of medical students towards their training, future practice and intent to migrate can contribute in addressing the problem. This study was carried out to assess the attitudes of Ethiopian medical students towards their trainin...

  20. Vocabulary Learning Strategies of Medical Students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Seddigh; Nasrin Shokrpur

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the use of vocabulary learning strategies among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) in Iran as an EFL context. A questionnaire was administered to 120 medical students (53 males, 67 females) to identify; 1) the effective types of vocabulary learning strategies used by the learners and 2) the differences in vocabulary strategy use based on gender. The results revealed that guessing and dictionary strategies were the most frequently u...