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Sample records for medical student professionalism

  1. MEDICAL ETHICS COURSE IMPROVES MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM: MEDICAL STUDENTS´ OPINIONS

    Abdolreza Sotoodeh Jahromi; Mehrnoosh Maalhagh; Fateme Mohseniyan; Alireza Yousefi; Abdoulhossein Madani

    2014-01-01

    Training physicians who are expert in many medical aspects is the most improtant mission of medical universities. One of these aspects, is professional behavior achievement. One of the important goals in training of ethics, is recognition of conflicts in different parts of ethics and having logical viewpoint for resolving and analyzing these conflicts. This descriptive and analytical study was done to evaluate the efficacy of medical ethics education in medical students´ professional at...

  2. [Medical students' attitudes regarding professional practice].

    Borracci, Raúl A; Pittaluga, Roberto D; Manente, Diego; Giorgi, Mariano A; Rubio, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Although the choice to study medicine implies some knowledge of the current working situation of practitioners, medical students' expectations regarding their future professional practice have been rarely investigated in Argentina. The aim of this work was to collect data about the expectations of senior medical students regarding their future professional practice. One hundred and twenty-five senior medical students were surveyed between September and December 2008. By using an anonymous survey, information regarding the expectations about their future professional practice was collected. The survey was answered by 82.4% (103/125) of the students and 98.0% (101/103) expressed their desire to enter a residence programme. Regarding specialty, pediatrics and psychiatry were the most chosen by women (27% vs. 8%, p=0.029 and 27% vs. 3%, p=0.004), and orthopedic surgery was the predominant choice in men (18% vs. 2%, p=0.019). Median of expected income at 5 years post graduation was $ 4.000 (minimum: $1,500, maximum: $10.000), at 10 years $7.000 (minimum: $3.000, maximum: $ 20.000) and at 20 years $10.000 (minimum: $3.000, maximum: $30,000), according to money value adjusted to December 2008 ($3.0 = US$ 1.0). In conclusion, chosen specialties seem to be dependent on the increasing number of female students, the expected income would exceed the current remuneration of physicians. Noteworthy finding out the students' willingness to be involved in teaching and the less interest in research. PMID:20053598

  3. Shiraz medical students’ perceptions of their colleagues’ professional behavior

    MEHRDAD ASKARIAN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today, development of professionalism is a critical aim of medical schools. Studies have demonstrated that medical students’ perceived level of professionalism is inadequate worldwide. This study aimed to investigate the medical students’ perceptions of their colleagues’ professional behavior. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study with 280 medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in their fifth to seventh year of study as the sample. The study was performed during one month in 2013, using stratified random sampling method. The instrument of the study was the Persian version of the questionnaire of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM.The questionnaire includes demographic information, questions about the meaning of the professionalism, history of medical ethics education programs and 12 behavioral questions. The data were analyzed using student t-test and Pearson correlation test. The significance level was set as 0.05. Results: Forty percent of respondents did not know the meaning of professionalism. The mean±SD score of behavioral questions was 5.91±1.2 on a scale from 0 to 10. The mean±SD score of excellence questions was 4.94±1.7. It was 7.05±1.9 for ‘honor/integrity’, and 6.07±2.1 for ‘altruism/respect’ questions. There was a significant association between gender and excellence score (p=0.007. Conclusion: Medical students assessed their colleagues’ professional behavior as poor. They did not have proper information about professionalism. Medical students are future general practitioners and respecting medical ethics by them is very important in a perfect health system. Universities should emphasize the importance of teaching professionalism to medical students and faculty members, using innovative education methods.

  4. Wanted: role models - medical students’ perceptions of professionalism

    Byszewski Anna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transformation of medical students to become medical professionals is a core competency required for physicians in the 21st century. Role modeling was traditionally the key method of transmitting this skill. Medical schools are developing medical curricula which are explicit in ensuring students develop the professional competency and understand the values and attributes of this role. The purpose of this study was to determine student perception of professionalism at the University of Ottawa and gain insights for improvement in promotion of professionalism in undergraduate medical education. Methods Survey on student perception of professionalism in general, the curriculum and learning environment at the University of Ottawa, and the perception of student behaviors, was developed by faculty and students and sent electronically to all University of Ottawa medical students. The survey included both quantitative items including an adapted Pritzker list and qualitative responses to eight open ended questions on professionalism at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa. All analyses were performed using SAS version 9.1 (SAS Institute Inc. Cary, NC, USA. Chi-square and Fischer’s exact test (for cell count less than 5 were used to derive p-values for categorical variables by level of student learning. Results The response rate was 45.6% (255 of 559 students for all four years of the curriculum. 63% of the responses were from students in years 1 and 2 (preclerkship. Students identified role modeling as the single most important aspect of professionalism. The strongest curricular recommendations included faculty-led case scenario sessions, enhancing interprofessional interactions and the creation of special awards to staff and students to “celebrate” professionalism. Current evaluation systems were considered least effective. The importance of role modeling and information on how to report lapses and breaches was highlighted in the answers to the open ended questions. Conclusions Students identify the need for strong positive role models in their learning environment, and for effective evaluation of the professionalism of students and teachers. Medical school leaders must facilitate development of these components within the MD education and faculty development programs as well as in clinical milieus where student learning occurs.

  5. Using movies to teach professionalism to medical students

    Klemenc-Ketis Zalika

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Professionalism topics are usually not covered as a separate lesson within formal curriculum, but in subtler and less officially recognized educational activities, which makes them difficult to teach and assess. Interactive methods (e.g. movies could be efficient teaching methods but are rarely studied. The aims of this study were: 1 to test the relevance and usefulness of movies in teaching professionalism to fourth year medical students and, 2 to assess the impact of this teaching method on students' attitudes towards some professionalism topics. Method This was an education study with qualitative data analysis in a group of eleven fourth year medical students from the Medical School of University Maribor who attended an elective four month course on professionalism. There were 8 (66.7% female students in the group. The mean age of the students was 21.9 ± 0.9 years. The authors used students' written reports and oral presentations as the basis for qualitative analysis using thematic codes. Results Students recognised the following dimensions in the movie: communication, empathy, doctors' personal interests and palliative care. It also made them think about their attitudes towards life, death and dying. Conclusions The controlled environment of movies successfully enables students to explore their values, beliefs, and attitudes towards features of professionalism without feeling that their personal integrity had been threatened. Interactive teaching methods could become an indispensible aid in teaching professionalism to new generations.

  6. Recognition of Core Elements of Medical Professionalism among Medical Students and Faculty Members

    Jahan, Firdous; Siddiqui, Muhammad A; Al Zadjali, Najjat Mohammed; Qasim, Rizwan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Medical students and future physicians have chosen to pursue a profession that requires personal integrity, compassion and a constant awareness of the commitment made by them. Professionalism includes personal behaviors, knowledge, and competency. It includes the attitudes and values one holds and that run through the profession as a whole. Medical students learn professionalism during the course by either direct teaching or experiential learning. We conducted this study to estimate the self-reported level of practice of the core elements of professionalism by medical students and medical faculty and compared the two groups. Methods One-hundred and nine students and 83 faculty members of Oman Medical College completed a professionalism questionnaire. The survey questions related to core elements of professionalism and were grouped under professional knowledge, professional skills, professional attitude, and qualities essential for professionalism. Results The response rate was 65.6% (109 of 166) among students and 75.5% (83 of 110) from faculty members. Response to the questions on professional skills between the student and faculty group was significantly different (p communication skills (82.6%), and faculty staff identified up to date professional knowledge (62.7%) as the most important aspect of professionalism. Conclusions Both students and teaching faculty agreed that the top most professional elements are up to date knowledge, good communication skills, and teamwork. Hence, it is important that faculty members encourage their students to improve their professional skills and attitude.

  7. Medical Student Attitude toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help.

    Kligfeld, Marnin; Hoffman, Kaaren I.

    1979-01-01

    To explore the antecedents of emotional distress among physicians, the relationship between year in medical school and student attitude toward seeking professional psychological help was investigated using students at the University of Southern California. For women, no attitudinal changes were noted; an early, significant positive change was…

  8. Medical students as EMTs: skill building, confidence and professional formation

    Thomas Kwiatkowski; William Rennie; Alice Fornari; Salaahuddin Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The first course of the medical curriculum at the Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, From the Person to the Professional: Challenges, Privileges and Responsibilities, provides an innovative early clinical immersion. The course content specific to the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) curriculum was developed using the New York State Emergency Medical Technician curriculum. Students gain early legitimate clinical experience and practice clinical skills as team members in t...

  9. Medical students as EMTs: skill building, confidence and professional formation

    Kwiatkowski, Thomas; Rennie, William; Fornari, Alice; Akbar, Salaahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Objective The first course of the medical curriculum at the Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, From the Person to the Professional: Challenges, Privileges and Responsibilities, provides an innovative early clinical immersion. The course content specific to the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) curriculum was developed using the New York State Emergency Medical Technician curriculum. Students gain early legitimate clinical experience and practice clinical skills as team members in the pre-hospital environment. We hypothesized this novel curriculum would increase students’ confidence in their ability to perform patient care skills and enhance students’ comfort with team-building skills early in their training. Methods Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from first-year medical students (n=97) through a survey developed to assess students’ confidence in patient care and team-building skills. The survey was completed prior to medical school, during the final week of the course, and at the end of their first year. A paired-samples t-test was conducted to compare self-ratings on 12 patient care and 12 team-building skills before and after the course, and a theme analysis was conducted to examine open-ended responses. Results Following the course, student confidence in patient care skills showed a significant increase from baseline (p<0.05) for all identified skills. Student confidence in team-building skills showed a significant increase (p<0.05) in 4 of the 12 identified skills. By the end of the first year, 84% of the first-year students reported the EMT curriculum had ‘some impact’ to ‘great impact’ on their patient care skills, while 72% reported the EMT curriculum had ‘some impact’ to ‘great impact’ on their team-building skills. Conclusions The incorporation of EMT training early in a medical school curriculum provides students with meaningful clinical experiences that increase their self-reported level of confidence in the performance of patient care skills early in their medical education. PMID:25056855

  10. A study to enhance medical students’ professional decision-making, using teaching interventions on common medications

    Jane Wilcock

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To create sustained improvements in medical students’ critical thinking skills through short teaching interventions in pharmacology. Method: The ability to make professional decisions was assessed by providing year-4 medical students at a UK medical school with a novel medical scenario (antenatal pertussis vaccination. Forty-seven students in the 2012 cohort acted as a pretest group, answering a questionnaire on this novel scenario. To improve professional decision-making skills, 48 students from the 2013 cohort were introduced to three commonly used medications, through tutor-led 40-min teaching interventions, among six small groups using a structured presentation of evidence-based medicine and ethical considerations. Student members then volunteered to peer-teach on a further three medications. After a gap of 8 weeks, this cohort (post-test group was assessed for professional decision-making skills using the pretest questionnaire, and differences in the 2-year groups analysed. Results: Students enjoyed presenting on medications to their peers but had difficulty interpreting studies and discussing ethical dimensions; this was improved by contextualising information via patient scenarios. After 8 weeks, most students did not show enhanced clinical curiosity, a desire to understand evidence, or ethical questioning when presented with a novel medical scenario compared to the previous year group who had not had the intervention. Students expressed a high degree of trust in guidelines and expert tutors and felt that responsibility for their own actions lay with these bodies. Conclusion: Short teaching interventions in pharmacology did not lead to sustained improvements in their critical thinking skills in enhancing professional practice. It appears that students require earlier and more frequent exposure to these skills in their medical training.

  11. Medical students as EMTs: skill building, confidence and professional formation

    Thomas Kwiatkowski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The first course of the medical curriculum at the Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, From the Person to the Professional: Challenges, Privileges and Responsibilities, provides an innovative early clinical immersion. The course content specific to the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT curriculum was developed using the New York State Emergency Medical Technician curriculum. Students gain early legitimate clinical experience and practice clinical skills as team members in the pre-hospital environment. We hypothesized this novel curriculum would increase students’ confidence in their ability to perform patient care skills and enhance students’ comfort with team-building skills early in their training. Methods: Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from first-year medical students (n=97 through a survey developed to assess students’ confidence in patient care and team-building skills. The survey was completed prior to medical school, during the final week of the course, and at the end of their first year. A paired-samples t-test was conducted to compare self-ratings on 12 patient care and 12 team-building skills before and after the course, and a theme analysis was conducted to examine open-ended responses. Results: Following the course, student confidence in patient care skills showed a significant increase from baseline (p<0.05 for all identified skills. Student confidence in team-building skills showed a significant increase (p<0.05 in 4 of the 12 identified skills. By the end of the first year, 84% of the first-year students reported the EMT curriculum had ‘some impact’ to ‘great impact’ on their patient care skills, while 72% reported the EMT curriculum had ‘some impact’ to ‘great impact’ on their team-building skills. Conclusions: The incorporation of EMT training early in a medical school curriculum provides students with meaningful clinical experiences that increase their self-reported level of confidence in the performance of patient care skills early in their medical education.

  12. The training and professional expectations of medical students in Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique

    Ferrinho, Paulo; Sidat, Mohsin; Fresta, Mário Jorge; Rodrigues, Amabélia; Fronteira, Inês; da Silva, Florinda; Mercer, Hugo; Cabral, Jorge; Dussault, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the professional expectations of medical students during the 2007-2008 academic year at the public medical schools of Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique, and to identify their social and geographical origins, their professional expectations and difficulties relating to their education and professional future. Methods Data were collected through a standardised questionnaire applied to all medical students registered during the 2...

  13. The training and professional expectations of medical students in Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique

    Fronteira Inês; Rodrigues Amabélia; Fresta Mário; Sidat Mohsin; Ferrinho Paulo; da Silva Florinda; Mercer Hugo; Cabral Jorge; Dussault Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the professional expectations of medical students during the 2007-2008 academic year at the public medical schools of Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique, and to identify their social and geographical origins, their professional expectations and difficulties relating to their education and professional future. Methods Data were collected through a standardised questionnaire applied to all medical students registered dur...

  14. Social network utilization (Facebook) & e-Professionalism among medical students

    Jawaid, Masood; Khan, Muhammad Hassaan; Bhutto, Shahzadi Nisar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To find out the frequency and contents of online social networking (Facebook) among medical students of Dow University of Health Sciences. Methods: The sample of the study comprised of final year students of two medical colleges of Dow University of Health Sciences – Karachi. Systematic search for the face book profiles of the students was carried out with a new Facebook account. In the initial phase of search, it was determined whether each student had a Facebook account and the s...

  15. Professional development and exposure to geriatrics: medical student perspectives from narrative journals.

    Shield, Renée R; Farrell, Timothy W; Campbell, Susan E; Nanda, Aman; Wetle, Terrie

    2015-01-01

    Teaching professionalism is an important goal in American medical education. With the aging of the U.S. population, it is critical to understand how medical students develop professional behaviors when caring for older adults. Exposure to geriatrics and older patients can enhance students' professional development with patients of all ages and across different specialties. Medical students learn explicit and implicit messages during their education. In addition to helping to evaluate curricula, reflective journaling encourages individual development and helps in revealing how medical students become professionals. In this study, medical student volunteers described their responses to new geriatrics content in their curriculum, encounters with older patients in clinical settings, and their evolving physician identities. Multidisciplinary team analysis elicited 10 themes regarding: evaluation of geriatrics within the curriculum, recognition of geriatrics principles, and attitudes regarding aging and professional development over time. This article focuses on the impact of geriatrics exposure on students' professional development, revealing ways that students think about professionalism and older patients. Medical educators should consider journaling to help foster and gauge students' professional development. PMID:25152977

  16. Medical Student Attitudes: The Development of Concepts of Professional Distance.

    Margolies, Robert; And Others

    Medical school curricula are attempting to enhance positive attitudes toward a biopsychosocial model of illness and to correct prejudicial stereotypes toward various patient groups through affective education. To explore the evaluative attitudes of first and second year medical students in the areas of trends in predispositions toward different…

  17. Profile and professional expectations of medical students in Mozambique: a longitudinal study

    Fronteira Inês; Ferrinho Paulo; Sidat Mohsin; da Sousa Fernando; Dussault Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Introduction This paper compares the socioeconomic profile of medical students registered at the Faculty of Medicine of Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (FM-UEM), Maputo, for the years 1998/99 and 2007/08. Case study The objective is to describe the medical students' social and geographical origins, expectations and perceived difficulties regarding their education and professional future. Data were collected through questionnaires administered to all medical students. Discussion and eva...

  18. The Positive Role of Professionalism and Ethics Training in Medical Education: A Comparison of Medical Student and Resident Perspectives

    Roberts, Laura Weiss; Hammond, Katherine A. Green; Geppert, Cynthia M. A.; Warner, Teddy D.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the perspectives and preferences of medical students and residents regarding professionalism and ethics education. Methods: A new written survey with 124 items (scale: "strongly disagree" = 1, "strongly agree" = 9) was sent to all medical students (n = 308) and PGY 1-3 residents (n = 233) at one academic center. Results: Of…

  19. A schematic representation of the professional identity formation and socialization of medical students and residents: a guide for medical educators.

    Cruess, Richard L; Cruess, Sylvia R; Boudreau, J Donald; Snell, Linda; Steinert, Yvonne

    2015-06-01

    Recent calls to focus on identity formation in medicine propose that educators establish as a goal of medical education the support and guidance of students and residents as they develop their professional identity. Those entering medical school arrive with a personal identity formed since birth. As they proceed through the educational continuum, they successively develop the identity of a medical student, a resident, and a physician. Each individual's journey from layperson to skilled professional is unique and is affected by "who they are" at the beginning and "who they wish to become."Identity formation is a dynamic process achieved through socialization; it results in individuals joining the medical community of practice. Multiple factors within and outside of the educational system affect the formation of an individual's professional identity. Each learner reacts to different factors in her or his own fashion, with the anticipated outcome being the emergence of a professional identity. However, the inherent logic in the related processes of professional identity formation and socialization may be obscured by their complexity and the large number of factors involved.Drawing on the identity formation and socialization literature, as well as experience gained in teaching professionalism, the authors developed schematic representations of these processes. They adapted them to the medical context to guide educators as they initiate educational interventions, which aim to explicitly support professional identity formation and the ultimate goal of medical education-to ensure that medical students and residents come to "think, act, and feel like a physician." PMID:25785682

  20. Visible Facebook profiles and e-professionalism in undergraduate medical students in India

    Gupta, Setu; Singh, Satendra; Dhaliwal, Upreet

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to assess medical students’ presence on Facebook and the extent of their visible activity, with particular reference to online professionalism. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including all medical students enrolled in the University College of Medical Sciences, University of Delhi, India during the period of the study, which was conducted from 2011 to 2012. After approval by the Institutional Ethical Committee, the full names of all students were obtained ...

  1. Constructing physician's professional identity - explorations of students' critical experiences in medical education

    Ryynänen, K. (Katja)

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The formation of a physician's professional identity and conception of him/herself as a doctor is often taken for granted and considered a by-product of learning. During professional socialization, medical students internalize knowledge, skills, attitudes, behavioral models as well as ethical and moral values of medicine. However, certain critical experiences may trigger an active construction of professional identity. The aim of this research was to ...

  2. "It's Just a Clash of Cultures": Emotional Talk within Medical Students' Narratives of Professionalism Dilemmas

    Monrouxe, Lynn V.; Rees, Charlotte E.

    2012-01-01

    Recent investigations into the UK National Health Service revealed doctors' failures to act with compassion and professionalism towards patients. The British media asked questions about what happens to students during their learning that influences such behaviour as doctors. We listened to 200 medical students' narratives of professionalism…

  3. The becoming: students' reflections on the process of professional identity formation in medical education.

    Sharpless, Joanna; Baldwin, Nell; Cook, Robert; Kofman, Aaron; Morley-Fletcher, Alessio; Slotkin, Rebecca; Wald, Hedy S

    2015-06-01

    Professional identity formation (PIF) within medical education is the multifaceted, individualized process through which students develop new ways of being in becoming physicians. Personal backgrounds, values, expectations, interests, goals, relationships, and role models can all influence PIF and may account for diversity of both experience and the active constructive process of professional formation. Guided reflection, including reflective writing, has been used to enhance awareness and meaning making within the PIF process for both students and medical educators and to shed light on what aspects of medical education are most constructive for healthy PIF. Student voices about the PIF process now emerging in the literature are often considered and interpreted by medical educators within qualitative studies or in broad theoretical overviews of PIF.In this Commentary, the authors present a chorus of individual student voices from along the medical education trajectory. Medical students (years 1-4) and a first-year resident in pediatrics respond to a variety of questions based on prevalent PIF themes extracted from the literature to reflect on their personal experiences of PIF. Topics queried included pretending in medical education, role of relationships, impact of formal and informal curricula on PIF (valuable aspects as well as suggestions for change), and navigating and developing interprofessional relationships and identities. This work aims to vividly illustrate the diverse and personal forces at play in individual students' PIF processes and to encourage future pedagogic efforts supporting healthy, integrated PIF in medical education. PMID:25881650

  4. Does the inclusion of 'professional development' teaching improve medical students' communication skills?

    Kubacki Angela M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigated whether the introduction of professional development teaching in the first two years of a medical course improved students' observed communication skills with simulated patients. Students' observed communication skills were related to patient-centred attitudes, confidence in communicating with patients and performance in later clinical examinations. Methods Eighty-two medical students from two consecutive cohorts at a UK medical school completed two videoed consultations with a simulated patient: one at the beginning of year 1 and one at the end of year 2. Group 1 (n = 35 received a traditional pre-clinical curriculum. Group 2 (n = 47 received a curriculum that included communication skills training integrated into a 'professional development' vertical module. Videoed consultations were rated using the Evans Interview Rating Scale by communication skills tutors. A subset of 27% were double-coded. Inter-rater reliability is reported. Results Students who had received the professional development teaching achieved higher ratings for use of silence, not interrupting the patient, and keeping the discussion relevant compared to students receiving the traditional curriculum. Patient-centred attitudes were not related to observed communication. Students who were less nervous and felt they knew how to listen were rated as better communicators. Students receiving the traditional curriculum and who had been rated as better communicators when they entered medical school performed less well in the final year clinical examination. Conclusions Students receiving the professional development training showed significant improvements in certain communication skills, but students in both cohorts improved over time. The lack of a relationship between observed communication skills and patient-centred attitudes may be a reflection of students' inexperience in working with patients, resulting in 'patient-centredness' being an abstract concept. Students in the early years of their medical course may benefit from further opportunities to practise basic communication skills on a one-to-one basis with patients.

  5. [Medical education and professionalism].

    Martins e Silva, João

    2013-01-01

    Is briefly analyzed the evolution that the objectives, strategies and models of medical education have had since their presentation and subsequent implementation of the famous model of Abraham Flexner, is now 103 years. Although globally accepted in their original pedagogical principles and instruments, that model does not have avoided the continuing dissatisfaction by the medical community and students and, most markedly in recent decades, the demanding of a most efficient health care by society, in general, and by patients in particular. In response to these ambitions, the medical community felt that it was essential to review the traditional criteria of medical professionalism, adapting them to a new paradigm of society and an appropriate and more efficient model of medical education. In this respect, are analyzed strategies and methodologies, apparently more suitable proposals for the inclusion of the principles and responsibilities of medical professionalism since the early period of pre-graduated medical education. It is assumed that the emphasis in teaching and practice of reflection throughout the course will have positive and lasting repercussions during active working life. However, the author believes that the success of the measures to be introduced in medical education programs to a new model of professionalism continues to depend, above all, of the humanistic and cognitive attributes of the students to be chosen, and the pedagogical quality, professional and academic of their teachers. PMID:24016652

  6. Evaluating medical student communication/professionalism skills from a patient's perspective

    LarryE.Davis

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate medical student's communication and professionalism skills from the perspective of the ambulatory patient and later compare these skills in their first year of residency. Methods: Students in third year neurology clerkship clinics see patients alone followed by a revisit with an attending neurologist. The patient is then asked to complete a voluntary, anonymous, Likert scale questionnaire rating the student on friendliness, listening to the patient, respecting the patien...

  7. Medical Students and Abortion: Reconciling Personal Beliefs and Professional Roles at One Medical School.

    Dans, Peter E.

    1992-01-01

    Surveys of first- and fourth-year Johns Hopkins University (Maryland) medical students found little change in attitudes about abortion over four years. Attitudes correlated most strongly with personal beliefs about when a fetus is considered human life and somewhat with student gender. Results are used in a medical ethics course to illuminate…

  8. Medical Students and Abortion: Reconciling Personal Beliefs and Professional Roles at One Medical School.

    Dans, Peter E.

    1992-01-01

    Surveys of first- and fourth-year Johns Hopkins University (Maryland) medical students found little change in attitudes about abortion over four years. Attitudes correlated most strongly with personal beliefs about when a fetus is considered human life and somewhat with student gender. Results are used in a medical ethics course to illuminate…

  9. An Exploration of Emerging Professional Identity in Women Osteopathic Medical Students: Does Gender Matter?

    Dunatov, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this narrative inquiry study was to gain a richer understanding from the perspective of gender about how third and fourth year women osteopathic medical students at the University of Pikeville-Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine (KYCOM) constructed their developing professional identities as future osteopathic physicians. This…

  10. Interprofessional training for nursing and medical students in Norway: Exploring different professional perspectives.

    Aase, Ingunn; Hansen, Britt Sætre; Aase, Karina; Reeves, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an explorative case study focusing on interprofessional training for medical and nursing students in Norway. Based on interviews with, and observations of, multiple stakeholder groups-students, university faculty, and hospital staff-content analysis was applied to investigate their perspectives regarding the design of such educational training. The findings revealed a positive perspective amongst stakeholders while voicing some concerns related to how communication issues, collaboration, workflow, and professional role patterns should be reflected in such training. Based on our data analysis we derive three themes that must be considered for successful interprofessional training of nursing and medical students: clinical professionalism, team performance, and patient-centered perspective. These themes must be balanced contingent on the students' background and the learning objectives of future interprofessional training efforts. PMID:26709888

  11. The training and professional expectations of medical students in Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique

    Fronteira Inês

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the professional expectations of medical students during the 2007-2008 academic year at the public medical schools of Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique, and to identify their social and geographical origins, their professional expectations and difficulties relating to their education and professional future. Methods Data were collected through a standardised questionnaire applied to all medical students registered during the 2007-2008 academic year. Results Students decide to study medicine at an early age. Relatives and friends seem to have an especially important influence in encouraging, reinforcing and promoting the desire to be a doctor. The degree of feminization of the student population differs among the different countries. Although most medical students are from outside the capital cities, expectations of getting into medical school are already associated with migration from the periphery to the capital city, even before entering medical education. Academic performance is poor. This seems to be related to difficulties in accessing materials, finances and insufficient high school preparation. Medical students recognize the public sector demand but their expectations are to combine public sector practice with private work, in order to improve their earnings. Salary expectations of students vary between the three countries. Approximately 75% want to train as hospital specialists and to follow a hospital-based career. A significant proportion is unsure about their future area of specialization, which for many students is equated with migration to study abroad. Conclusions Medical education is an important national investment, but the returns obtained are not as efficient as expected. Investments in high-school preparation, tutoring, and infrastructure are likely to have a significant impact on the success rate of medical schools. Special attention should be given to the socialization of students and the role model status of their teachers. In countries with scarce medical resources, the hospital orientation of students' expectations is understandable, although it should be associated with the development of skills to coordinate hospital work with the network of peripheral facilities. Developing a local postgraduate training capacity for doctors might be an important strategy to help retain medical doctors in the home country.

  12. Evaluating Medical Student Communication/Professionalism Skills from a Patient’s Perspective

    Davis, Larry E.; King, Molly K.; Wayne, Sharon J.; Kalishman, Summers G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate medical students’ communication and professionalism skills from the perspective of the ambulatory patient and later compare these skills in their first year of residency. Methods: Students in third year neurology clerkship clinics see patients alone followed by a revisit with an attending neurologist. The patient is then asked to complete a voluntary, anonymous, Likert scale questionnaire rating the student on friendliness, listening to the patient, respecting the patient,...

  13. Validation of a Method for Measuring Medical Students' Critical Reflections on Professionalism in Gross Anatomy

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Pawlina, Wojciech; Drake, Richard L.; Szostek, Jason H.; Reed, Darcy A.; Lachman, Nirusha; McBride, Jennifer M.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Improving professional attitudes and behaviors requires critical self reflection. Research on reflection is necessary to understand professionalism among medical students. The aims of this prospective validation study at the Mayo Medical School and Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine were: (1) to develop and validate a new instrument for…

  14. Profile and professional expectations of medical students in Mozambique: a longitudinal study

    Fronteira Inês

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This paper compares the socioeconomic profile of medical students registered at the Faculty of Medicine of Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (FM-UEM, Maputo, for the years 1998/99 and 2007/08. Case study The objective is to describe the medical students' social and geographical origins, expectations and perceived difficulties regarding their education and professional future. Data were collected through questionnaires administered to all medical students. Discussion and evaluation The response rate in 1998/99 was 51% (227/441 and 50% in 2007/08 (484/968. The main results reflect a doubling of the number of students enrolled for medical studies at the FM-UEM, associated with improved student performance (as reflected by failure rates. Nevertheless, satisfaction with the training received remains low and, now as before, students still identify lack of access to books or learning technology and inadequate teacher preparedness as major problems. Conclusions There is a high level of commitment to public sector service. However, students, as future doctors, have very high salary expectations that will not be met by current public sector salary scales. This is reflected in an increasing degree of orientation to double sector employment after graduation.

  15. The Medical Migration: Experiences and Perspectives of Medical Students for the Professional Career

    Elena TOADER

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a short overview over the determinants and implications of medics’ international migration and to determine if the international migration of medics can be considered a predictable phenomenon, from the Romanian medical student’s perspective. The study has been conducted on a group of students from the University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Gr. T. Popa” from Iași, Romania. The research was conducted on an availability sample of 158 students from the 3rd to 6th year of study, which responded to an auto-administrated questionnaire. The results are in accordance with the results of other similar studies, namely that students are considering international migration to more developed countries as an option for their career development.

  16. Medical students' and facilitators' experiences of an Early Professional Contact course: Active and motivated students, strained facilitators

    Gunnarsson Ronny

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today, medical students are introduced to patient contact, communication skills, and clinical examination in the preclinical years of the curriculum with the purpose of gaining clinical experience. These courses are often evaluated from the student perspective. Reports with an additional emphasis on the facilitator perspective are scarce. According to constructive alignment, an influential concept from research in higher education, the learning climate between students and teachers is also of great importance. In this paper, we approach the learning climate by studying both students' and facilitators' course experiences. In 2001, a new "Early Professional Contact" longitudinal strand through term 1–4, was introduced at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. General practitioners and hospital specialists were facilitators. The aim of this study was to assess and analyse students' and clinical facilitators' experiences of the Early Professional Contact course and to illuminate facilitators' working conditions. Methods Inspired by a Swedish adaptation of the Course Experience Questionnaire, an Early Professional Contact Questionnaire was constructed. In 2003, on the completion of the first longitudinal strand, a student and facilitator version was distributed to 86 students and 21 facilitators. In the analysis, both Chi-square and the Mann-Whitney tests were used. Results Sixty students (70% and 15 facilitators (71% completed the questionnaire. Both students and facilitators were satisfied with the course. Students reported gaining iiration for their future work as doctors along with increased confidence in meeting patients. They also reported increased motivation for biomedical studies. Differences in attitudes between facilitators and students were found. Facilitators experienced a greater workload, less reasonable demands and less support, than students. Conclusion In this project, a new Early Professional Contact course was analysed from both student and facilitator perspectives. The students experienced the course as providing them with a valuable introduction to the physician's professional role in clinical practice. In contrast, course facilitators often experienced a heavy workload and lack of support, despite thorough preparatory education. A possible conflict between the clinical facilitator's task as educator and member of the workplace is suggested. More research is needed on how doctors combine their professional tasks with work as facilitators.

  17. MEDICAL ETHICS COURSE IMPROVES MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM: MEDICAL STUDENTS´ OPINIONS

    Abdolreza Sotoodeh Jahromi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Training physicians who are expert in many medical aspects is the most improtant mission of medical universities. One of these aspects, is professional behavior achievement. One of the important goals in training of ethics, is recognition of conflicts in different parts of ethics and having logical viewpoint for resolving and analyzing these conflicts. This descriptive and analytical study was done to evaluate the efficacy of medical ethics education in medical students´ professional attitudes improvement. One hundred and two medical students were selected randomly in different steps of education and were questioned and their opinions correlation with stage of education and gender were evaluated. There was a significant difference between female viewpoint (in roles of ethic course which is presented in preclinical step in professional attitude improvement (P = 0.009 and also a significant difference was seen in the viewpoint score between student stage with intern stage (P = 0.031. Medical students in educational student stage believe ethic course improve medical professionalism. Since there is no special course to train medical students in professionalism, some interventions are required in this field to improve this aspect of physicians' professional life.

  18. Psychological Health of First-Year Health Professional Students in a Medical University in the United Arab Emirates

    Gomathi, Kadayam G.; Soofia Ahmed; Jayadevan Sreedharan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the psychological health of first-year health professional students and to study sources of student stress. Methods: All first-year students (N = 125) of the Gulf Medical University (GMU) in Ajman, United Arab Emirates (UAE), were invited to participate in a voluntary, anonymous, self-administered, questionnaire-based survey in January 2011. Psychological health was assessed using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. A 24-item questionnaire...

  19. A comparison of changes in dental students' and medical students' approaches to learning during professional training.

    Lindemann, R; Duek, J L; Wilkerson, L

    2001-11-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to compare the learning approaches of dental students (DS) and medical students (MS) for the Class of 1998 at a single institution at admission and graduation and 2) to determine if their learning approaches changed over the course of their studies. An Approaches to Studying Inventory (ASI) was administered to DS and MS at two times: their first month in school and their last month in school. Means and standard deviations were calculated for three ASI orientations to studying: 'Meaning', 'Reproducing', and 'Achieving'. An additional domain referred to as 'Styles and Pathologies' identified learning problems. In comparison, DS and MS demonstrated a different pattern of learning approaches at matriculation; however, at graduation these differences were less apparent. Over time, DS reported a decreased use, and MS reported an increased use of the Reproducing orientation bringing them closer together. MS also demonstrated an increased use of the Achieving orientation. The Meaning orientation, which indicates a deep approach to learning, was equivalently used by both groups at entry and remained unaltered. PMID:11683893

  20. Professional medical education and genomics.

    Demmer, Laurie A; Waggoner, Darrel J

    2014-01-01

    Genomic medicine is a relatively new concept that involves using individual patients' genomic results in their clinical care. Genetic technology has advanced swiftly over the past decade, and most providers have been left behind without an understanding of this complex field. To realize its full potential, genomic medicine must be both understood and accepted by the greater medical community. The current state of professional medical education in genomics and genomic medicine is reviewed, including ongoing plans to expand educational efforts for medical students, clinical geneticists, and nongeneticist physicians. PMID:24635717

  1. How do medical educators design a curriculum that facilitates student learning about professionalism?

    Mason, Glenn; Wang, Shaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study analyses the ways in which curriculum reform facilitated student learning about professionalism. Methods Design-based research provided the structure for an iterative approach to curriculum change which we undertook over a 3 year period. The learning environment of the Personal and Professional Development Theme (PPD) was analysed through the sociocultural lens of Activity Theory. Lave and Wenger’s and Mezirow’s learning theories informed curriculum reform to support student development of a patient-centred and critically reflective professional identity. The renewed pedagogical outcomes were aligned with curriculum content, learning and teaching processes and assessment, and intense staff education was undertaken. We analysed qualitative data from tutor interviews and free-response student surveys to evaluate the impact of curriculum reform. Results Students’ and tutors’ reflections on learning in PPD converged on two principle themes - ‘Developing a philosophy of medicine’ and ‘Becoming an ethical doctor’- which corresponded to the overarching PPD theme aims of communicative learning. Students and tutors emphasised the importance of the unique learning environment of PPD tutorials for nurturing personal development and the positive impact of the renewed assessment programme on learning. Conclusions A theory-led approach to curriculum reform resulted in student engagement in the PPD curriculum and facilitated a change in student perspective about the epistemological foundation of medicine. PMID:26845777

  2. Can personal qualities of medical students predict in-course examination success and professional behaviour? An exploratory prospective cohort study

    Adam Jane

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over two-thirds of UK medical schools are augmenting their selection procedures for medical students by using the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT, which employs tests of cognitive and non-cognitive personal qualities, but clear evidence of the tests’ predictive validity is lacking. This study explores whether academic performance and professional behaviours that are important in a health professional context can be predicted by these measures, when taken before or very early in the medical course. Methods This prospective cohort study follows the progress of the entire student cohort who entered Hull York Medical School in September 2007, having taken the UKCAT cognitive tests in 2006 and the non-cognitive tests a year later. This paper reports on the students’ first and second academic years of study. The main outcome measures were regular, repeated tutor assessment of individual students’ interpersonal skills and professional behaviour, and annual examination performance in the three domains of recall and application of knowledge, evaluation of data, and communication and practical clinical skills. The relationships between non-cognitive test scores, cognitive test scores, tutor assessments and examination results were explored using the Pearson product–moment correlations for each group of data; the data for students obtaining the top and bottom 20% of the summative examination results were compared using Analysis of Variance. Results Personal qualities measured by non-cognitive tests showed a number of statistically significant relationships with ratings of behaviour made by tutors, with performance in each year’s objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs, and with themed written summative examination marks in each year. Cognitive ability scores were also significantly related to each year’s examination results, but seldom to professional behaviours. The top 20% of examination achievers could be differentiated from the bottom 20% on both non-cognitive and cognitive measures. Conclusions This study shows numerous significant relationships between both cognitive and non-cognitive test scores, academic examination scores and indicators of professional behaviours in medical students. This suggests that measurement of non-cognitive personal qualities in applicants to medical school could make a useful contribution to selection and admission decisions. Further research is required in larger representative groups, and with more refined predictor measures and behavioural assessment methods, to establish beyond doubt the incremental validity of such measures over conventional cognitive assessments.

  3. The development of vaccination perspectives among chiropractic, naturopathic and medical students: a case study of professional enculturation.

    McMurtry, Angus; Wilson, Kumanan; Clarkin, Chantalle; Walji, Rishma; Kilian, Brendan C; Kilian, Carney C; Lohfeld, Lynne; Alolabi, Bashar; Hagino, Carol; Busse, Jason W

    2015-12-01

    An important influence on parents' decisions about pediatric vaccination (children under 6 years of age) is the attitude of their health care providers, including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers. Very limited qualitative research exists, however, on how attitudes towards vaccination develop among healthcare professionals in-training. We explored perspective development among three groups of students: medical, chiropractic, and naturopathic. We conducted focus group sessions with participants from each year of study at three different healthcare training programs in Ontario, Canada. Semi-structured and open-ended questions were used to elicit dynamic interaction among participants and explore how they constructed their attitudes toward vaccination at the beginning and part way through their professional training. Analyses of verbatim transcripts of audiotaped interviews were conducted both inductively and deductively using questions structured by existing literature on learning, professional socialization and interprofessional relations. We found five major themes and each theme was illustrated with representative quotes. Numerous unexpected insights emerged within these themes, including students' general open-mindedness towards pediatric vaccination at the beginning of their training; the powerful influence of both formal education and informal socialization; uncritical acceptance of the vaccination views of senior or respected professionals; students' preference for multiple perspectives rather than one-sided, didactic instruction; the absence of explicit socio-cultural tensions among professions; and how divergences among professional students' perspectives result from differing emphases with respect to lifestyle, individual choice, public health and epidemiological factors-rather than disagreement concerning the biomedical evidence. This last finding implies that their different perspectives on pediatric vaccination may be complementary rather than irreconcilable. Our findings should be considered by developers of professional and interprofessional educational curricula and public health officials formulating policy on pediatric vaccination. PMID:25805358

  4. Evaluación de las actitudes hacia el profesionalismo en estudiantes de medicina / Evaluation of attitudes toward professionalism in medical students

    Eliseo, Bustamante; Álvaro, Sanabria.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. El profesionalismo es un área de interés en las facultades de medicina del mundo. El uso de un cuestionario puede ser útil para evaluar el profesionalismo en Colombia. El objetivo fue evaluarlo en estudiantes de medicina, mediante la escala de actitudes ante el profesionalismo de Penn [...] State University College of Medicine (PSCOM) y su cambio al pasar de los semestres básicos a los clínicos. Métodos. Se hizo un estudio de corte trasversal con 250 estudiantes de medicina, utilizando la escala PSCOM. Se determinaron variables socioeconómicas y académicas. Se midieron las actitudes hacia el profesionalismo. Los datos se reportan en frecuencia y se comparan entre los semestres básicos y los de clínicas. Resultados. Hubo una reorganización de prioridades dentro de cada dominio de la escala, en comparación con lo propuesto originalmente. La mayor frecuencia de respuesta negativa fue de 58 % en el dominio servicio. Varios ítems decayeron al pasar de los semestres básicos a los de clínicas. Conclusión. Las actitudes de los estudiantes ante los factores que caracterizan el profesionalismo médico, demuestran que existen debilidades importantes que son un desafío para la educación de pregrado y que requieren estrategias que permitan desarrollar las habilidades profesionales dentro del currículo. Abstract in english Introduction: Professionalism is a subject of interest in medical schools around the world. The use of a questionnaire could be useful to assess professionalism in Colombia. The aim was to assess The Penn State University College of Medicine (PSCOM) Professionalism Questionnaire in medical students [...] and its change from basic to clinical settings. Methods: We completed a cross-sectional survey of 250 medical students using the PSCOM scale. We assessed socioeconomic and academic variables. Attitudes toward professionalism were also measured. Data are reported in frequency and comparisons were made between the basic and the clinical semesters. Results: We found reorganization in the priorities within each original scale domain in comparison with the original order. The most negative answer was 58% in the service domain. Some items decreased when students went from basic to clinical semesters. Conclusion: Medical students' attitudes toward factors that define professionalism show important weaknesses. This is a challenge for graduate education and it makes it necessary to introduce strategies to develop professional skills into the curriculum.

  5. Turkish students’ perceptions of professionalism at the beginning and at the end of medical education: a cross-sectional qualitative study

    Mustafa Volkan Kavas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Medical students’ perceptions of professionalism might reflect the impact of the current educational processes on their professional identity development. This study focuses on Ankara University Faculty of Medicine students’ perceptions of ‘good doctor’ along with the factors effective on the formation of these perceptions. Method: Six focus groups with 59 medical students from Grade-1 and Grade-6 were held. The transcripts of discussions were analyzed thematically. Results: Results regarding ‘being a good physician’ mostly mirrored the findings of previous studies framing the medical professionalism concept. The thematic pattern of the discussions on the relation between professional development and medical education suggests that students suffer from a gradual erosion of perception during medical education. That the education cannot either change the person for the better or might downgrade the person instead of improving her/him were shared by participants from both grades. Students consider clinical practice and role models two main variables determining the person's qualification as a professional. Conclusions: The formal and hidden programs determine the quality and efficacy of the professional education together. Attempts to restructure medical education must recognize the reciprocal dynamics between these two components and, thus, should carefully work out the practical aspect of the educational processes.

  6. Students attitude towards professional development of radiographers in Medical College 'J. Filaretova', Sofia

    Full text: The purpose of the given study is to establish the attitude towards professional development of the students at the Medical College in Sofia. An anonymous survey was undertaken in April, 2015. the 71 students who participated were all x-ray technician students, who are either in 1st, 2nd or 3rd year of study. Documentary and sociological method and analysis were used in order to process the results. The results were illustrated and presented graphically in various tables and charts. The analysis displays that 91% of the participants have stated that the educational level in the Medical College in Sofia is effective, which aids their professional development. Despite the fact that 23.9 % of the participants are worried about working in an environment of ionizing radiation, 80.3% of the participants are determined that they will practice the given profession. The research shows that the 47.9% of the participants have stated that the economic status of the profession is “great”, and 26.8% have stated that it is “satisfactory”, which is one of the main reasons for a possible realization abroad (54.9% of the participants). only 11.3% have stated that, if possible, they would change their choice of profession, which is mainly because they would like to have the opportunity to build upon their bachelor's degree, but they are unable to do so. The choice of realization is pursuant with the professional training, skills and personal attributes of the individual. For our education, it is essential that key competencies and social skills are formed, as they are vital contributing factors in the individual realization in both educational and professional environments

  7. Medical students' and facilitators' experiences of an Early Professional Contact course: Active and motivated students, strained facilitators

    Gunnarsson Ronny; Rödjer Stig; Hellquist Gunilla; von Below Bernhard; Björkelund Cecilia; Wahlqvist Mats

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Today, medical students are introduced to patient contact, communication skills, and clinical examination in the preclinical years of the curriculum with the purpose of gaining clinical experience. These courses are often evaluated from the student perspective. Reports with an additional emphasis on the facilitator perspective are scarce. According to constructive alignment, an influential concept from research in higher education, the learning climate between students and...

  8. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology, and nursing education

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard, Kitt

    Background: Welfare technology is considered to be cost effective and to promote consistent quality in health care (1, 2). Due to the pervasive deployment of telemedicine and the political focus thereon, it is very important that health professional students gain an understanding of its benefits......-professional context. Aims: The purpose of the project was • to develop practice oriented competences related to telemedicine in an inter-professional and a cross-sectoral context among health professional students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology-, and nursing education. • to...... motivate and retain male students by the use of simulation training that involves technology. Methodology: The project was settled as a cross-professional telemedicine course on health educations. Nursing students (N=20) and physiotherapy students (N=34) participated actively and the scenarios were filmed...

  9. Emotional Intelligence and Medical Professionalism

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that IQ alone does not contribute to the professional success of medical professionals. Professionals who are trained to be clinically competent, but have inadequate social skills for practice have proved to be less successful in their profession. Emotional intelligence (EI), which has already proved to be a key attribute for…

  10. Learning Skills of Professionalism: a Student-Led Professionalism Curriculum

    Horlick, Margaret; Masterton, Deirdre; Kalet, Adina

    2009-01-01

    Background: Medical schools must address the fact that students embarking on careers in medicine are idealistic but have a vague understanding of the values and characteristics that define medical professionalism. Traditionally, we have relied primarily on unsystematic role modeling and lectures or seminars on related topics to teach professionalism. Methods: A committee of students and a faculty advisor created a curriculum, based on a needs assessment of the targeted learners, to raise stud...

  11. Psychological Health of First-Year Health Professional Students in a Medical University in the United Arab Emirates

    Kadayam G Gomathi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the psychological health of first-year health professional students and to study sources of student stress. Methods: All first-year students (N = 125 of the Gulf Medical University (GMU in Ajman, United Arab Emirates (UAE, were invited to participate in a voluntary, anonymous, self-administered, questionnaire-based survey in January 2011. Psychological health was assessed using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. A 24-item questionnaire, with items related to academic, psychosocial and health domains was used to identify sources of stress. Pearson’s chi-squared test and the Mann-Whitney U-test were used for testing the association between psychological morbidity and sources of stress. Results: A total of 112 students (89.6% completed the survey and the overall prevalence of psychological morbidity was found to be 33.6%. The main academic-related sources of stress were ‘frequency of exams’, ‘academic workload’, and ‘time management’. Major psychosocial stressors were ‘worries regarding future’, ‘high parental expectations’, ‘anxiety’, and ‘dealing with members of the opposite sex’. Health-related issues were ‘irregular eating habits’, ‘lack of exercise’, and ‘sleep-related problems’. Psychological morbidity was not significantly associated with any of the demographic factors studied. However, total stress scores and academics-related domain scores were significantly associated with psychological morbidity. Conclusion: Psychological morbidity was seen in one in three first-year students attending GMU. While worries regarding the future and parental expectations were sources of stress for many students, psychological morbidity was found to be significantly associated with only the total stress and the academic-related domain scores.

  12. Professional-cultural humanitarian values and psychology-pedagogical support of their development in medical students

    Veretelnikova Y.Y.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data of the experimental model of the psychology-pedagogical conditions providing the effectiveness of the professional-cultural humanitarian values' development in future doctors within the course of foreign language

  13. Building Research Capacity of Medical Students and Health Professionals in Rural Communities: Leveraging a Rural Clinical School's Resources to Conduct Research Skills Workshops

    Lasserre, Kaye E.; Moffatt, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    The paper reports on a project where the objective was for the Rural Clinical School, The University of Queensland, Australia, to design an acceptable model of research skills workshops for medical students and rural health professionals. Eight, interactive research skills workshops focused on skill development were conducted in rural Queensland,…

  14. Selecting a Medical Professional

    ... his/her questions since this is a very important part of the decision-making process. Resources Medical Resources Patient Surveys Related Links Clinical Trials.gov Health Care Insurance Toolkit Additional Resources Quick Menu What is an ...

  15. Willingness to work in rural areas and the role of intrinsic versus extrinsic professional motivations - a survey of medical students in Ghana

    Dzodzomenyo Mawuli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retaining health workers in rural areas is challenging for a number of reasons, ranging from personal preferences to difficult work conditions and low remuneration. This paper assesses the influence of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation on willingness to accept postings to deprived areas among medical students in Ghana. Methods A computer-based survey involving 302 fourth year medical students was conducted from May-August 2009. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between students' willingness to accept rural postings and their professional motivations, rural exposure and family parental professional and educational status (PPES. Results Over 85% of students were born in urban areas and 57% came from affluent backgrounds. Nearly two-thirds of students reported strong intrinsic motivation to study medicine. After controlling for demographic characteristics and rural exposure, motivational factors did not influence willingness to practice in rural areas. High family PPES was consistently associated with lower willingness to work in rural areas. Conclusions Although most Ghanaian medical students are motivated to study medicine by the desire to help others, this does not translate into willingness to work in rural areas. Efforts should be made to build on intrinsic motivation during medical training and in designing rural postings, as well as favour lower PPES students for admission.

  16. El profesionalismo médico Medical professionalism

    José Félix Patiño Restrepo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available La ética y el profesionalismo constituyen el fundamento de la actividad de la medicina, que es una empresa intensamente moral. El profesionalismo no es sólo la base del contrato social de la medicina, sino, principalmente, una fuerza estructuralmente estabilizadora y moralmente protectora de la sociedad. Un profesional es la persona que se ubica en una de las disciplinas eruditas y que actúa observando los estándares técnicos, éticos y deontológicos de una profesión. El concepto de profesionalismo incluye cuatro componentes fundamentales: 1 conocimiento especializado; 2 autonomía en la toma de decisiones; 3 compromiso de servicio a la sociedad; 4 autorregulación. La transformación corporativa de los sistemas de salud que ha ocurrido principalmente en Colombia y en los Estados Unidos constituye una amenaza de destrucción del profesionalismo médico. Es el fenómeno, ya declarado como una ominosa incipiente realidad, de la desprofesionalización de la medicina, que pasaría de ser una noble profesión a convertirse en un simple oficio al servicio de los intereses corporativos. Como reacción se ha conformado un movimiento médico global, el Medical Professionalism Project que pretende el fortalecimiento del profesionalismo en el nuevo milenio a través de la implementación de tres principios y diez responsabilidades profesionales fundamentales.Medicine is an intensely moral endeavor and its practice is based on ethics and professionalism. The social contract of medicine rests on professionalism, but, furthermore, professionalism is both a stablilizing and a morally protective force in society. A professional is the person that engages in one of the learned professions and is characterized by conforming to the technical and ethical standards of a profession. The concept of professionalism incorporates four components: 1 specialized knowledge; 2 autonomy for decision-making processes; 3 commitment of service to society; 4 auto-regulation. The corporate transformation of health care services that takes place mainly in Colombia and the USA, is threatening to destroy medical professionalism. There is a widespread accepted although incipient, ominous social phenomenon: the deprofessionalization of medicine, the transformation of a noble profession into a simple trade to serve corporate interests. But there is global reaction intending to strengthen medical professionalism in the new millennium, and the Medical Professionalism Project has been launched as an international effort with a charter consisting of three principles and 10 commitments.

  17. A descriptive study of prevalence, pattern and attitude of self-medication among second professional medical students in a tertiary care center

    Vineeta Sawhney

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Our study showed that self-medication is widely practiced among students, easy availability of medicine probably being the cause. Educating the students regarding advantages and disadvantages of self-medication is necessary to create awareness. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 542-546

  18. A study to enhance medical students’ professional decision-making, using teaching interventions on common medications

    Wilcock, Jane; Strivens, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To create sustained improvements in medical students’ critical thinking skills through short teaching interventions in pharmacology.Method: The ability to make professional decisions was assessed by providing year-4 medical students at a UK medical school with a novel medical scenario (antenatal pertussis vaccination). Forty-seven students in the 2012 cohort acted as a pretest group, answering a questionnaire on this novel scenario. To improve professional decision-making skills, 48 stud...

  19. Faculty and students' self-assessment of client communication skills and professional ethics in three veterinary medical schools.

    Fogelberg, Katherine; Farnsworth, Charles C

    2009-01-01

    Client communication skills and professional ethics are areas that have received much attention in veterinary education in recent years. The objectives of this study were to: i) establish the confidence level of faculty teaching in three veterinary schools with regard to their client communication skills, ii) establish a baseline of professional ethics indicators in the same faculty, and iii) compare veterinary students of all levels to faculty in both areas. Students and faculty received identical questionnaires, including statements addressing client communication skills and professional ethics. The results indicate that students are generally comfortable with their communication skills, except in the areas of visual and/or audio aid use, handling emotional clients, and discussing costs of care and payment. Faculty were more comfortable than students in all areas of client communication, although they also had low confidence when dealing with costs of care and payment. Ethically, students and faculty answered similarly. Faculty showed a stronger belief that people are basically honest and ethical, but both cohorts responded similarly when asked about reporting an ethical violation admitted to them by their best friend. Further research is needed to determine whether students are communicating as effectively as they believe they are, with particular attention paid to improving communications with emotional clients and the business aspects of veterinary medicine. Additional work is needed to ensure that veterinary students are learning how to cope with ethical issues objectively. This may begin by ensuring that faculty are teaching and, more importantly, modeling these behaviors during the clinical year(s). PMID:20054081

  20. Reframing medical education to support professional identity formation.

    Cruess, Richard L; Cruess, Sylvia R; Boudreau, J Donald; Snell, Linda; Steinert, Yvonne

    2014-11-01

    Teaching medical professionalism is a fundamental component of medical education. The objective is to ensure that students understand the nature of professionalism and its obligations and internalize the value system of the medical profession. The recent emergence of interest in the medical literature on professional identity formation gives reason to reexamine this objective. The unstated aim of teaching professionalism has been to ensure the development of practitioners who possess a professional identity. The teaching of medical professionalism therefore represents a means to an end.The principles of identity formation that have been articulated in educational psychology and other fields have recently been used to examine the process through which physicians acquire their professional identities. Socialization-with its complex networks of social interaction, role models and mentors, experiential learning, and explicit and tacit knowledge acquisition-influences each learner, causing them to gradually "think, act, and feel like a physician."The authors propose that a principal goal of medical education be the development of a professional identity and that educational strategies be developed to support this new objective. The explicit teaching of professionalism and emphasis on professional behaviors will remain important. However, expanding knowledge of identity formation in medicine and of socialization in the medical environment should lend greater logic and clarity to the educational activities devoted to ensuring that the medical practitioners of the future will possess and demonstrate the qualities of the "good physician." PMID:25054423

  1. Professionalism in Kurosawa's medical dramas.

    Nakayama, Don K

    2009-01-01

    Film director Akira Kurosawa (1918-1998) portrayed doctors and patients in 4 films that spanned the most productive phase in his career: Drunken Angel, The Quiet Duel, Ikiru, and Red Beard. Observing death and destruction during the Second World War and the social disintegration that followed it in Japan, Kurosawa viewed the world as a dispiriting, dangerous, and chaotic place. His response was an optimistic and humanist view that life's meaning lies in the service to others. Because his main characters are doctors and patients, the films have a connection to today's medical community trying to define a modern concept of professionalism and what it means to be a physician. PMID:20142142

  2. A suggested emergency medicine boot camp curriculum for medical students based on the mapping of Core Entrustable Professional Activities to Emergency Medicine Level 1 milestones

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Wilson, Bryan; Natal, Brenda; Nagurka, Roxanne; Anana, Michael; Sule, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background An increasing number of students rank Emergency Medicine (EM) as a top specialty choice, requiring medical schools to provide adequate exposure to EM. The Core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for Entering Residency by the Association of American Medical Colleges combined with the Milestone Project for EM residency training has attempted to standardize the undergraduate and graduate medical education goals. However, it remains unclear as to how the EPAs correlate to the milestones, and who owns the process of ensuring that an entering EM resident has competency at a certain minimum level. Recent trends establishing specialty-specific boot camps prepare students for residency and address the variability of skills of students coming from different medical schools. Objective Our project’s goal was therefore to perform a needs assessment to inform the design of an EM boot camp curriculum. Toward this goal, we 1) mapped the core EPAs for graduating medical students to the EM residency Level 1 milestones in order to identify the possible gaps/needs and 2) conducted a pilot procedure workshop that was designed to address some of the identified gaps/needs in procedural skills. Methods In order to inform the curriculum of an EM boot camp, we used a systematic approach to 1) identify gaps between the EPAs and EM milestones (Level 1) and 2) determine what essential and supplemental competencies/skills an incoming EM resident should ideally possess. We then piloted a 1-day, three-station advanced ABCs procedure workshop based on the identified needs. A pre-workshop test and survey assessed knowledge, preparedness, confidence, and perceived competence. A post-workshop survey evaluated the program, and a posttest combined with psychomotor skills test using three simulation cases assessed students’ skills. Results Students (n=9) reported increased confidence in the following procedures: intubation (1.5–2.1), thoracostomy (1.1–1.9), and central venous catheterization (1.3–2) (a three-point Likert-type scale, with 1= not yet confident/able to perform with supervision to 3= confident/able to perform without supervision). Psychomotor skills testing showed on average, 26% of students required verbal prompting with performance errors, 48% with minor performance errors, and 26% worked independently without performance errors. All participants reported: 1) increased knowledge and confidence in covered topics and 2) overall satisfaction with simulation experience. Conclusion Mapping the Core EPAs for Entering Residency to the EM milestones at Level 1 identifies educational gaps for graduating medical students seeking a career in EM. Educators designing EM boot camps for medical students should consider these identified gaps, procedures, and clinical conditions during the development of a core standardized curriculum. PMID:27042155

  3. COMPARISON OF THE TRADITIONAL CHALK AND BOARD LECTURE SYSTEM VERSUS POWER POINT PRESENTATION AS A TEACHING TECHNIQUE FOR TEACHING GROSS ANATOMY TO THE FIRST PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Nusrat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally and conventionally, gross anatomy is taught by lectures and cadaveric dissection and the lectures are taken with chalk and board (C&B or chalk and talk method in, India. But there is always a debate over the most effective method of lecture delivery. AIM : The aim of this study was to compare the role and effectiveness chalk and board method versus power point presentation ( S tudent’s perception as a lecture delivering method for teaching gross anatomy. METHODS: This was a questionnaire based study where 140 out of 150 first professional MBBS students of Medical College Jammu, were asked to fill anonymously a questionnaire about their perceptions of these two lecture delivery methods. The results were analyzed to see if there was any preference of students for any particular method. RESULTS: The majority of the medical students (90.7% preferred PPT presentations, while only 9.3% of students preferred the lectures using chalkboard method. CONCLUSION: Most of the students clearly preferred and accepted the use of PPT presentations, as compared to conventional board teaching for delivery method. So teaching gross anatomy should be carefully amalgamated with use of power point in lecture hall.

  4. Professional Medical Conduct Board Actions: Beginning 1990

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Professional Medical Conduct Board Actions data consist of all public actions taken against physicians, physician assistants, specialist assistants, and medical...

  5. Medical professionalism: an experimental look at physicians’ Facebook profiles

    Clyde, Joseph W.; Melanie M. Domenech Rodríguez; Geiser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Use of social networking services (SNS) is on the rise. While many users sign in for personal purposes, it is not uncommon for professionals to connect over SNSs with clients, students, and patients.Methods: The present study used an experimental approach to examine how medical doctors’ SNS profiles impacted potential patients’ impressions of professionalism. Participants (N=250 students) were randomly assigned to view one of six Facebook profiles. Profiles were populated with 1) ...

  6. Predictors of Professional Identity Development for Student Affairs Professionals

    Pittman, Edward C.; Foubert, John D.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether professional involvement, supervision style, and mentoring predicted the professional identity of graduate students and new professionals in student affairs. Results of the study show that all three independent variables predicted the professional identity development of graduate students. Supervision style of a…

  7. A suggested emergency medicine boot camp curriculum for medical students based on the mapping of Core Entrustable Professional Activities to Emergency Medicine Level 1 milestones

    Lamba S

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sangeeta Lamba, Bryan Wilson, Brenda Natal, Roxanne Nagurka, Michael Anana, Harsh Sule Department of Emergency Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA Background: An increasing number of students rank Emergency Medicine (EM as a top specialty choice, requiring medical schools to provide adequate exposure to EM. The Core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs for Entering Residency by the Association of American Medical Colleges combined with the Milestone Project for EM residency training has attempted to standardize the undergraduate and graduate medical education goals. However, it remains unclear as to how the EPAs correlate to the milestones, and who owns the process of ensuring that an entering EM resident has competency at a certain minimum level. Recent trends establishing specialty-specific boot camps prepare students for residency and address the variability of skills of students coming from different medical schools. Objective: Our project’s goal was therefore to perform a needs assessment to inform the design of an EM boot camp curriculum. Toward this goal, we 1 mapped the core EPAs for graduating medical students to the EM residency Level 1 milestones in order to identify the possible gaps/needs and 2 conducted a pilot procedure workshop that was designed to address some of the identified gaps/needs in procedural skills. Methods: In order to inform the curriculum of an EM boot camp, we used a systematic approach to 1 identify gaps between the EPAs and EM milestones (Level 1 and 2 determine what essential and supplemental competencies/skills an incoming EM resident should ideally possess. We then piloted a 1-day, three-station advanced ABCs procedure workshop based on the identified needs. A pre-workshop test and survey assessed knowledge, preparedness, confidence, and perceived competence. A post-workshop survey evaluated the program, and a posttest combined with psychomotor skills test using three simulation cases assessed students’ skills. Results: Students (n=9 reported increased confidence in the following procedures: intubation (1.5–2.1, thoracostomy (1.1–1.9, and central venous catheterization (1.3–2 (a three-point Likert-type scale, with 1= not yet confident/able to perform with supervision to 3= confident/able to perform without supervision. Psychomotor skills testing showed on average, 26% of students required verbal prompting with performance errors, 48% with minor performance errors, and 26% worked independently without performance errors. All participants reported: 1 increased knowledge and confidence in covered topics and 2 overall satisfaction with simulation experience. Conclusion: Mapping the Core EPAs for Entering Residency to the EM milestones at Level 1 identifies educational gaps for graduating medical students seeking a career in EM. Educators designing EM boot camps for medical students should consider these identified gaps, procedures, and clinical conditions during the development of a core standardized curriculum. Keywords: emergency medicine, clerkship, medical education, competency, EPA 10, milestones

  8. TO STUDY THE KNOWLEDGE ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF THE PHARMACOVIGILANCE AMONG THE SECOND PROFESSIONAL MBBS STUDENTS OF THE J. N . INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, IMPHAL

    Oinam Joychandra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim and object of the present study is to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of ADRs among the 2 nd professional MBBS students and also to find out the ways for implementation of Pharmacovigilance Programme of India (PvPi. MATERIAL AND METHOD : The material is the pretested questionnaire on knowledge, attitude , and practice on Pharmacovigila nce. The design of the study is cross sectional study. Percentage, proportions and means are used for descriptive statistics while the associations are calc ulated using corresponding tests for the associations . RESULTS: The knowledge of the students on Pharmacovig ilence in connection with Over t he Counter/self - medication (52%; minimum need of surveillance on marketing (74%; present surveillance on marketing as low as 60%; need of CME on ADRs along with Pharmacovigil a nce among student at least (64% as the ADRs on elderly (57%, children(58%, Pregnancy (64%. Similarly out of 24 questions on Attitude, only 7 questions on Reporting, Multi National Company, Dr ug Controller of India, Disability and Compensation are selected for statistical analysis. The percentage of the students who has heard and seen ADRs 64.5. CONCLUSION: Most of the ADRs are avoidable if there is good communication and reports which plays a pivotal role in minimizing the ADRs. Drugs must be prescribed rationally and polypharmacy should be avoided as much as possible. To avoid the iatrogenic diseases, Pharm acovigilance is a matter of great concern for the health care providers and for the general mass too.

  9. Medical professionalism: an experimental look at physicians’ Facebook profiles

    Clyde, Joseph W.; Rodríguez, Melanie M. Domenech; Geiser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of social networking services (SNS) is on the rise. While many users sign in for personal purposes, it is not uncommon for professionals to connect over SNSs with clients, students, and patients. Methods The present study used an experimental approach to examine how medical doctors’ SNS profiles impacted potential patients’ impressions of professionalism. Participants (N=250 students) were randomly assigned to view one of six Facebook profiles. Profiles were populated with 1) solely professional material, 2) personal material that was strictly healthy, or 3) personal material that included unhealthy behavior. Profiles portrayed a male or female physician resulting in a total of six experimental conditions. Medical professionalism was measured with the First Impressions of Medical Professionalism (FIMP) scale, specifically developed for this study. Results There was a large and statistically significant main effect for profile type, F(2, 250)=54.77, p<0.001, ηp2=0.31 Post hoc tests indicated that personal profiles that contained healthy behavior were rated as most professional followed by profiles with strictly professional content. Personal unhealthy profiles were rated as least professional. Additionally, female profiles consistently received higher professionalism ratings across all three profile types [F(1, 250)=5.04, p=0.026, ηp2=0.02]. Conclusion Our results suggest that a physician's SNS profile affects a patient's perception of that physician's medical professionalism. A personal, healthy profile may augment a patient's perception of that physician's character virtues if the profile content upholds the decorum of the medical field. PMID:24947922

  10. Medical professionalism: an experimental look at physicians’ Facebook profiles

    Joseph W. Clyde

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of social networking services (SNS is on the rise. While many users sign in for personal purposes, it is not uncommon for professionals to connect over SNSs with clients, students, and patients. Methods: The present study used an experimental approach to examine how medical doctors’ SNS profiles impacted potential patients’ impressions of professionalism. Participants (N=250 students were randomly assigned to view one of six Facebook profiles. Profiles were populated with 1 solely professional material, 2 personal material that was strictly healthy, or 3 personal material that included unhealthy behavior. Profiles portrayed a male or female physician resulting in a total of six experimental conditions. Medical professionalism was measured with the First Impressions of Medical Professionalism (FIMP scale, specifically developed for this study. Results: There was a large and statistically significant main effect for profile type, F(2, 250=54.77, p<0.001, ηp2=0.31. Post hoc tests indicated that personal profiles that contained healthy behavior were rated as most professional followed by profiles with strictly professional content. Personal unhealthy profiles were rated as least professional. Additionally, female profiles consistently received higher professionalism ratings across all three profile types [F(1, 250=5.04, p=0.026, ηp2=0.02]. Conclusion: Our results suggest that a physician's SNS profile affects a patient's perception of that physician's medical professionalism. A personal, healthy profile may augment a patient's perception of that physician's character virtues if the profile content upholds the decorum of the medical field.

  11. Expectativas de los estudiantes de medicina de la Universidad de Buenos Aires sobre su práctica profesional Medical students' attitudes regarding professional practice

    Raúl A. Borracci

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aunque la elección de la carrera de medicina por los jóvenes implica algún grado de conocimiento de las condiciones laborales actuales del médico, las expectativas de los estudiantes de medicina con respecto a su práctica profesional futura rara vez han sido estudiadas en la Argentina. El objetivo fue recabar información sobre las expectativas que tienen los estudiantes de medicina próximos a graduarse, con respecto a su práctica profesional futura. Entre septiembre y diciembre de 2008 se encuestaron 125 estudiantes que cursaban el Internado Anual Rotatorio. Por medio de una encuesta anónima se recolectó información sobre las expectativas que tenían con respecto a su futura práctica profesional. Respondieron la encuesta 82.4% (103/125 de los encuestados. El 98.0% (101/103 expresó que deseaba ingresar a un programa de residencias. Con respecto a la elección de la especialidad, pediatría y psiquiatría fueron preferentes entre las mujeres (27% vs. 8%, p = 0.029 y 27% vs. 3%, p = 0.004, mientras que traumatología fue preponderante entre los varones (18% vs. 2%, p = 0.019. La mediana de ingresos esperados a 5 años fue $4.000 (mínimo: $1.500, máximo: $10.000, a 10 años $7.000 (mínimo: $3,000, máximo: $20.000 y a 20 años $10.000 (mínimo: $3 000, máximo: $30.000, según valores ajustados a diciembre de 2008 ($3.0 = US$ 1.0. En conclusión, las especialidades elegidas parecen depender del proceso de feminización de la carrera; mientras que los ingresos esperados podrían exceder la verdadera renta actual de los médicos. Se destaca la intención de participar en la docencia y el escaso interés por la investigación.Although the choice to study medicine implies some knowledge of the current working situation of practitioners, medical students' expectations regarding their future professional practice have been rarely investigated in Argentina. The aim of this work was to collect data about the expectations of senior medical students regarding their future professional practice. One hundred and twenty-five senior medical students were surveyed between September and December 2008. By using an anonymous survey, information regarding the expectations about their future professional practice was collected. The survey was answered by 82.4% (103/125 of the students and 98.0% (101/103 expressed their desire to enter a residence programme. Regarding specialty, pediatrics and psychiatry were the most chosen by women (27% vs. 8%, p=0.029 and 27% vs. 3%, p=0.004, and orthopedic surgery was the predominant choice in men (18% vs. 2%, p=0.019. Median of expected income at 5 years post graduation was $ 4.000 (minimum: $1,500, maximum: $10.000, at 10 years $7.000 (minimum: $3.000, maximum: $ 20.000 and at 20 years $10.000 (minimum: $3.000, maximum: $30 000, according to money value adjusted to December 2008 ($3.0 = US$ 1.0. In conclusion, chosen specialties seem to be dependent on the increasing number of female students, the expected income would exceed the current remuneration of physicians. Noterworthy finding out the students' willingness to be involved in teaching and the less interest in research.

  12. Assessing professional behaviour: Overcoming teachers’ reluctance to fail students

    Mak–van der Vossen, Marianne; Peerdeman, Saskia; van Mook, Walther; Croiset, Gerda; Kusurkar, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    Background Developing professional behaviour is an important goal of medical education in which teachers play a significant part. Many teachers can be reluctant to fail students demonstrating unprofessional behaviour. We hypothesize that supporting teachers in teaching and assessing professional behaviour and involving them in remediation will reduce this reluctance. Findings In 2010, VUmc School of Medical Sciences Amsterdam introduced an educational theme on professional behaviour for the b...

  13. EMOTIVE EFFORT AMONG MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS IN PAKISTAN

    Kanwal Bilal

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between work complexity, emotive effort and its effects on job satisfaction and Emotion Management related stress among medical professionals; as in accordance with ‘The Managed Heart’ by Arlie Hochschild, it is asserted that emotive toil is carried out by medical professionals. Correspondence among work complexity, emotive toil and job satisfaction are ascertained by circulating questionnaires among medical personnel. This correspondence is investigated by the use of regression analysis. Conclusions drawn on the basis of analysis disclose that emotive struggle was considerably negatively associated to job satisfaction and work complexity. The research verdicts are only restricted to the medical professionals working in different hospitals in Lahore, Pakistan

  14. Medical professionalism: a tale of two doctors.

    Gorrindo, Tristan; Groves, James E

    2011-01-01

    The AMA's social media guidelines provide physicians with some basic rules for maintaining professional boundaries when engaging in online activities. Left unanswered are questions about how these guidelines are to be implemented by physicians of different generations. By examining the issues of privacy and technological skill through the eyes of digital natives and digital immigrants, the challenges associated with medical e-professionalism become clear. PMID:21837890

  15. Motivation in medical students

    Kusurkar, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The importance of motivation in learning behaviour and education is well-researched and proven in general education, but much less in medical education. There is sometimes focus on increasing the quantity of motivation, but the how and why need more evidence. The aims of this thesis were to gather insights and investigate medical students’ motivation, particularly the importance of quality of motivation, factors influencing and outcomes and to explore how these can be applied to ...

  16. Exploring first grade medical students’ professional identity using metaphors: implications for medical curricula

    Hunkar Korkmaz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although professional identity development is an important concept in medical education, the process has not been well-investigated from a student perspective. Purpose: This study examines the metaphorical images formulated by first grade medical students in Turkey to describe physicians in the context of establishing a professional identity, along with its limitations. Method: Participants (N=148 completed the prompt: A physician is like _____ because _____ to indicate their conceptualizations of physician. The data were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results: Altogether, 71 well-articulated metaphorical images were identified – comprising six conceptual themes. Conclusions: While subject to some limitations, the use of metaphors to formulate and describe professional identities can be helpful in reflecting the personal beliefs and values of matriculants to medical school, as well as providing some guidance and feedback to curriculum development efforts.

  17. Effective e-learning for health professional and medical students: the experience with SIAS-Intelligent Tutoring System.

    Muñoz, Diana C; Ortiz, Alexandra; González, Carolina; López, Diego M; Blobel, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Current e-learning systems are still inadequate to support the level of interaction, personalization and engagement demanded by clinicians, care givers, and the patient themselves. For effective e-learning to be delivered in the health context, collaboration between pedagogy and technology is required. Furthermore, e-learning systems should be flexible enough to be adapted to the students' needs, evaluated regularly, easy to use and maintain and provide students' feedback, guidelines and supporting material in different formats. This paper presents the implementation of an Intelligent Tutoring System (SIAS-ITS), and its evaluation compared to a traditional virtual learning platform (Moodle). The evaluation was carried out as a case study, in which the participants were separated in two groups, each group attending a virtual course on the WHO Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) strategy supported by one of the two e-learning platforms. The evaluation demonstrated that the participants' knowledge level, pedagogical strategies used, learning efficiency and systems' usability were improved using the Intelligent Tutoring System. PMID:20543344

  18. Medical student burnout: interdisciplinary exploration and analysis.

    Jennings, M L

    2009-12-01

    Burnout--a stress-related syndrome characterized by exhaustion, depersonalization, and a diminished sense of accomplishment--is a common phenomenon among medical students with significant potential consequences for student health, professionalism, and patient care. This essay proposes that the epidemic of medical student burnout can be attributed to a technocratic paradigm that fails to value medical students as persons with human needs and limitations. After briefly reviewing the literature on medical student burnout, the author uses two theories to elucidate potential causes: unsatisfactory aspects of the learning environment and a feeling one's efforts are meaningless or irrelevant. Cultural factors also facilitate burnout in medical students immersed in a clinical environment that cultivates excessive detachment from patient and self, impairing self-care, damaging a sense of self, and impeding the development of a mature, well-integrated professional identity. The ethical implications of medical student burnout are also addressed. Finally, this paper suggests possible preventive and remediative strategies such as optimizing the learning environment as well as narrative approaches that promise enhancement of both individual and institutional well-being. PMID:19865808

  19. Neurophobia among medical students

    Abulaban, Ahmad A.; Obeid, Tahir H.; Algahtani, Hussein A.; Kojan, Suleiman M.; Al-Khathaami, Ali M.; Abulaban, Abdulrhman A.; Bokhari, Maryam F.; Merdad, Anas A.; Radi, Suhaib A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the attitude of medical students and junior physicians toward neurology. Methods: A self-administered, previously validated, questionnaire was distributed among 422 students and junior physicians at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from September to December 2012. In this cross-sectional study, the questionnaire included demographic data and 12 statements to examine attitudes toward neurology using a Likert scale. Results: The response rate among participants was 70.3%. The mean age was 22.35 (SD+/-1.28) years. Males comprised 46.2%. While 31.3% of students had not decided regarding their future career, 11.8% selected neurology as their first possible choice. Whereas 29.6% of students were not satisfied with their neurology teaching experience, 84.4% found neurology difficult, and 42.7% of the whole group thought that their neuroscience knowledge was insufficient. Advanced clinical year students (namely, interns) were less likely to consider neurology as a career choice (p=0.001). Conclusion: Most of the students had an unfavorable attitude toward neurology on the Likert scale. New strategies are needed to change students’ attitude toward this demanding specialty. PMID:25630779

  20. A STUDY ON SELF MEDICATION PATTERNS AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS IN SANTHIRAM MEDICAL COLLEGE, NANDYAL

    Venkateswarlu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Self-medication can be defined as the use of drugs to treat self-diagnosed disorders or symptoms, or the intermittent or continued use of a prescribed drug for chronic or recurrent disease or symptoms. Self‐medication results in wastage of resources, increases resistance of pathogens and generally causes serious health hazards such as adverse drug reactions, prolonged suffering and drug dependence. This study was undertaken to determine the reasons for self‐medication and the pattern of self‐medication among medical students. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence and pattern of use of self-medication among medical students from first year to final year. METHODS: This cross‐sectional descriptive study was conducted at the Santhiram Medical College, Nandyal, during the period of Dec 10th 2013 to Jan 10th 2014. Medical students were selected through convenience sampling. The data was collected using a pre‐tested semi‐structured questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 150 students, 93 (62% male and 57 (38% female were included in the study of the medical students surveyed; self-medication was reported among 92%. The respondents who used self‐medication found it to be timesaving in providing relief from minor ailments. The most common ailments for which self‐medication were used were: the common cold (73%, fever (68% and headache (62%. The students consulted their textbooks (45% and seniors or classmates (39% for the medications. Antipyretics (78%, analgesics (72%, antihistamines (42% and antibiotics (38% were the most common self-medicated drugs. Of the respondents, 29% were unaware of the adverse effects of the medication. CONCLUSION: Self‐medication is becoming an increasingly important area within healthcare. The prevalence of self‐medication among medical students is high, facilitated by the easy availability of drugs and information from textbooks or seniors, due to high level of education and professional status are predictive factors for self‐medication.

  1. The training and expectations of medical students in Mozambique

    Gonçalves Luzia; Adam Yussuf; Schwalbach João; Sousa Fernando; Ferrinho Paulo

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background This paper describes the socio-economic profile of medical students in the 1998/99 academic year at the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (UEM) Medical Faculty in Maputo. It aims to identify their social and geographical origins in addition to their expectations and difficulties regarding their education and professional future. Methods The data were collected through a questionnaire administered to all medical students at the faculty. Results Although most medical students we...

  2. Virtues Education in Medical School: The Foundation for Professional Formation

    Seoane, Leonardo; Tompkins, Lisa M.; De Conciliis, Anthony; Boysen, Philip G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that medical students have high rates of burnout accompanied by a loss of empathy as they progress through their training. This article describes a course for medical students at The University of Queensland-Ochsner Clinical School in New Orleans, LA, that focuses on the development of virtues and character strengths necessary in the practice of medicine. Staff of the Ochsner Clinical School and of the Institute of Medicine, Education, and Spirituality at Ochsner, a research and consulting group of Ochsner Health System, developed the course. It is a curricular innovation designed to explicitly teach virtues and their associated prosocial behaviors as a means of promoting professional formation among medical students. Virtues are core to the development of prosocial behaviors that are essential for appropriate professional formation. Methods: Fourth-year medical students receive instruction in the virtues as part of the required Medicine in Society (MIS) course. The virtues instruction consists of five 3-hour sessions during orientation week of the MIS course and a wrapup session at the end of the 8-week rotation. Six virtues—courage, wisdom, temperance, humanity, transcendence, and justice—are taught in a clinical context, using personal narratives, experiential exercises, contemplative practices, and reflective practices. Results: As of July 2015, 30 medical students had completed and evaluated the virtues course. Ninety-seven percent of students felt the course was well structured. After completing the course, 100% of students felt they understood and could explain the character strengths that improve physician engagement and patient care, 100% of students reported understanding the importance of virtues in the practice of medicine, and 83% felt the course provided a guide to help them deal with the complexities of medical practice. Ninety-three percent of students stated they would use the character strengths for their own well-being, and 90% said they would change their approach to the practice of medicine as a result of this course. Overall, 92% of students rated the course as outstanding or good. Conclusion: We developed a course to teach virtues and their associated prosocial behaviors that are important for the practice of medicine. After completing the course, students self-reported improved understanding of the virtues and their importance to the practice of medicine. We plan further studies to determine if participation in the course leads to less burnout and improved resilience. PMID:27046405

  3. Mindfulness training for medical and psychology students

    2014-01-01

    Medical and clinical psychology students strive to be good professionals. In addition to acquiring academic knowledge and skills, they also need to build affective and inter-personal capacities. Doing so will help them to secure both their own health and well-being, and to improve their ability to help the patients they serve. Systematic reviews have shown, however, that a large proportion of such students suffer from mental distress and low quality of life: burnout increases towards the latt...

  4. Factors influencing the choice of a medical specialty among medical students

    Areeba Saif; Syed Askari Hasan; Tahrim Farrukh; Najla Khan; Hira Batool; Tooba Baqai

    2013-01-01

    Background: The choice of a medical specialty by a medical student is a complex process in which several factors play a contributory role, making the decision process an evolving one as the medical student undergoes different experiences in his/her professional journey. In our study, we attempted to identify factors that play a significant role in influencing medical students towards choosing a specialty and also to delineate the differences that exist amongst students’ priorities based on ge...

  5. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology, and nursing education

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard, Kitt

    2014-01-01

    Background: Welfare technology is considered to be cost effective and to promote consistent quality in health care (1, 2). Due to the pervasive deployment of telemedicine and the political focus thereon, it is very important that health professional students gain an understanding of its benefits and limitations and that they develop competences related to telemedicine practices. Because close interprofessional and intersectoral cooperation is required in the care and treatment of patients by ...

  6. Stress and mental health among medical students

    Backović Dušan V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medical studies bring many stressful activities to students. Prolonged stress can make adverse effects to mental health and lead to further professional burnout. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the association of stress impact and adverse effects of medical studies with psychological distress among medical students. Methods. The cross sectional study was conducted on 367 fourth­year medical students of the Faculty of Medicine in Belgrade, by means of the anonymous questionnaire, containing: socio­demographic data, self­reported health status and stressful influences of studying activities. Mental health status was estimated by General Health Questionnaire (GHQ­12. Results. More than 50% of students perceive frequent feeling of psychic tension, and one third has problems with insomnia. Nearly one­half of students assessed their general stress level as moderate or high. Exams were estimated as high stressor in 63.1% of all students. Stressful effects of communication with teaching staff were reported by one quarter of the examinees. The scores of GHQ­12 were above the threshold in 55.6 % of all students. Mental health problems among students were most significantly associated with stressful experience during exams and contacts with teaching staff. Conclusion. Academic stress makes great influence on mental health of medical students. Reduction of stress effects should be directed to optimization of the examination process and improvement of communication skills. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 175078

  7. Self-Medication Practices and Risk Factors for Self-Medication among Medical Students in Belgrade, Serbia

    Lukovic, Jasminka Adzic; Miletic, Vladimir; Pekmezovic, Tatjana; Trajkovic, Goran; Ratkovic, Nevena; Aleksic, Danijela; Grgurevic, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Self-medication among future health care professionals can represent a serious threat to professionalism in medicine and it has potential to put at risk public trust into this profession. The aim of this research was to investigate prevalence and risk factors for self-medication among population of medical students, because it was previously shown that their attitudes towards pharmacotherapy could affect the way they could prescribe medication in the future. Material and Methods ...

  8. Supporting medical students with learning disabilities in Asian medical schools

    Majumder, Md. Anwarul Azim; Rahman, Sayeeda; D’Souza, Urban JA; Elbeheri, Gad; Abdulrahman, Khalid Bin; Huq, M Muzaherul

    2010-01-01

    Learning disabilities (LDs) represent the largest group of disabilities in higher education (HE) institutes, including medical schools, and the numbers are continuing to rise. The worrying concern is that two-thirds to half of these students with LDs remain undiagnosed when they start their undergraduate education and may even graduate without having their disabilities diagnosed. These students struggle with their academic abilities, receive poor grades and, as a result, develop lower perceptions of their intellectual abilities than do those students without LDs. All these ultimately hamper their professional practice, employment, and career progression. Appropriate and adequate educational policies, provisions, and practices help students to progress satisfactorily. In Asian countries, public and professional awareness about LDs is low, supportive provisions are limited, legislations are inadequate, data are scarce, and equal-opportunity/widening-participation policies are not implemented effectively in the HE sector. This article discusses the issues related to LDs in medical education and draws policy, provision, and practice implications to identify, assess, and support students with LDs in medical schools, particularly in an Asian context. PMID:23745060

  9. The Relationship between Student Engagement and Professionalism in Pharmacy Students

    Flaherty, Anne Guerin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between student engagement (as measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement benchmarks) and pharmacy student professionalism (as measured by the Pharmacy Professionalism Domain instrument) in first and third year pharmacy students at seven different schools of pharmacy. Engagement provides the…

  10. Professional Schools: Information for Students and Advisors.

    Scheirer, C. James

    1983-01-01

    A professional school is a program, department, or school that trains students to deliver psychological services. The professional school movement as an alternative training model, the differences between Psy.D and Ph.D degrees, and the implications of accreditation for program quality are discussed. Professional schools are listed. (AM)

  11. Medical professionalism and the social contract.

    Reid, Lynette

    2011-01-01

    Conceptions of professionalism in medicine draw on social contract theory; its strengths and weaknesses play out in how we reason about professionalism. The social contract metaphor may be a heuristic device prompting reflection on social responsibility, and as such is appealing: it encourages reasoning about privilege and responsibility, the broader context and consequences of action, and diverse perspectives on medical practice. However, when this metaphor is elevated to the status of a theory, it has well-known limits: the assumed subject position of contractors engenders blind spots about privilege, not critical reflection; its tendency to dress up the status quo in the trappings of a theoretical agreement may limit social negotiation; its attempted reconciliation of social obligation and self-interest fosters the view that ethics and self-interest should coincide; it sets up false expectations by identifying appearance and reality in morality; and its construal of prima facie duties as conditional misdirects ethical attention in particular situations from current needs to supposed past agreements or reciprocities. Using philosophical ideas as heuristic devices in medical ethics is inevitable, but we should be conscious of their limitations. When they limit the ethical scope of debate, we should seek new metaphors. PMID:22019534

  12. Student Perceptions of the Professional Behavior of Faculty Physicians

    Szauter, Karen; Williams, Betty; Ainsworth, Michael A.; Callaway, Michael; Bulik, Robert; Camp, Martha G.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain a baseline understanding of the professional behav-ior of clinical faculty physicians from the medical students’ perspective. Students completed a professionalism evaluation of supervising faculty at the end of each required third-year clerkship over a one year period. Results were analyzed by specific behaviors and across clerkships. Dif-ferences were noted in the frequency of the types of problems seen, and varied by clerkship disci-pline. The most common ...

  13. Professional Competencies for Student Affairs Practice

    Munsch, Patty; Cortez, Lori

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to explore the integration of the ACPA/NASPA Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Practitioners (ACPA/NASPA, 2010) on community college campuses. The competencies provide specific skill sets for a broad range of student affairs practice areas that should be met by professionals throughout their careers.…

  14. Professional Self-Identification among Art Students.

    Adams, Murray C.; Kowalski, Gregory S.

    1980-01-01

    Sixty-four university art students identified themselves as "art student,""marginal," or "professional artist" and provided information on age, sex, art and academic experiences, and parental factors. Consistent with the professionalization model of occupational socialization, all these factors, except parents and years of formal art training,…

  15. WORK LIFE BALANCE OF MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS; AN EXPLORATORY STUDY: WORK LIFE BALANCE OF MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS

    Gitanjali Upadhaya

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to focus on the work life balance of medical practitioners. The present study tried to explore the factors responsible in maintaining work life balance for individuals associated with medical field. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine the latent factors. The findings from study revealed that significant relationship exists between the job stress and family life of an individual. This study concluded that in order to improve work life balance of medical professionals the restructuring of individual job is required.

  16. Supporting medical students with learning disabilities in Asian medical schools

    Md. Anwarul Azim Majumder

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Md. Anwarul Azim Majumder1, Sayeeda Rahman2, Urban JA D’Souza3, Gad Elbeheri4, Khalid Bin Abdulrahman5, M Muzaherul Huq61,2Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, Bradford, UK; 3School of Medicine, University Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia; 4Centre for Child Evaluation and Teaching, Kuwait; 5College of Medicine, Al-Imam University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 6Centre for Medical Education (CME, Mohakhali, Dhaka, BangladeshAbstract: Learning disabilities (LDs represent the largest group of disabilities in higher education (HE institutes, including medical schools, and the numbers are continuing to rise. The worrying concern is that two-thirds to half of these students with LDs remain undiagnosed when they start their undergraduate education and may even graduate without having their disabilities diagnosed. These students struggle with their academic abilities, receive poor grades and, as a result, develop lower perceptions of their intellectual abilities than do those students without LDs. All these ultimately hamper their professional practice, employment, and career progression. Appropriate and adequate educational policies, provisions, and practices help students to progress satisfactorily. In Asian countries, public and professional awareness about LDs is low, supportive provisions are limited, legislations are inadequate, data are scarce, and equal-opportunity/widening-participation policies are not implemented effectively in the HE sector. This article discusses the issues related to LDs in medical education and draws policy, provision, and practice implications to identify, assess, and support students with LDs in medical schools, particularly in an Asian context.Keywords: medical education, learning disabilities, dyslexia, Asia

  17. SELF-MEDICATION IN MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Anuj Jain

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-medication is consumption of medicinal products for treating diseases without a prescription resulting in wastage of resources, increased drug resistance and causes health hazards. Selfmedication, often without adult guidance, has been reported to be a common practice during adolescence. Similar to other preventable health-risk behaviors initiated in early adolescence, it has become a cause for concern universally. The main problem with self medication with antimicrobials is the emergence of pathogenic resistance. Antimicrobial resistance is an existing problem world-wide, mainly in developing countries. The aim and objective of this study was to evaluate the knowledge regarding self medication among medical students of Uttar Pradesh Rural Institute Of Medical Sciences and Research, Saifai. This was a questionnaire based study of 4 months duration.

  18. Exploring reflective 'critical incident' documentation of professionalism lapses in a medical undergraduate setting

    McLachlan John C

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measuring professionalism in undergraduate medical students is a difficult process, and no one method has currently emerged as the definitive means of assessment in this field. Student skills in reflection have been shown to be highly important in the development of professional behaviours. By studying student reflections on lapses in professional judgement, recorded as 'critical incidents', it is possible to explore themes which are significant for the development of professional behaviour in an undergraduate setting. Methods We examined critical incident reporting combined with optional written student reflection as a method for exploring professionalism in undergraduate medical students. 228 students split between Year 1 and 2 of one academic year of undergraduate medicine were studied retrospectively and a grounded theory approach to analysis was employed. Results This year generated 16 critical incident reports and corresponding student reflections, all of which were considered. In addition to identifying the nature of the critical incidents, 3 principal themes emerged. These were the impact and consequences of the report having been made, student reactions to the events (both positive and negative, and student responses regarding future actions. Conclusion This study indicates that unprofessional behaviour can be identified and challenged by both the faculty and the students involved, and suggests that positive behavioural changes might be made with the aim of preventing future occurrences. We provide a low cost approach of measuring and recording professional behaviour.

  19. Can Spiritual Intelligence Affect Professionalism in Medical Faculty Members?

    Hossein Karimi Moonaghi; Maryam Akbari Lakeh; Abbas Makarem; Habibolah Esmaeili

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Regarding to the importance of spiritual intelligence and professionalism in faculty development, this study aimed to determine the level of spiritual intelligence, the level of professional development and leadership, and performance of professional responsibilities as two components of professionalism, and the relationship between spiritual intelligence and professionalism.Methods: This is a correlation cross-sectional study with 160 medical faculty members as subjects, which ...

  20. Students friendly medical examination

    Rakesh Chandra Chaurasia

    2014-04-01

    always a burden. The professional exams of universities are the matter of their norms and regulation, but we have day-to-day assessment through-out duration; this is enough to moralize them and prepare before final professional examination. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 412-412

  1. Teaching and assessing professionalism in medical learners and practicing physicians.

    Mueller, Paul S

    2015-04-01

    Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement), good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional. Furthermore, professionalism is associated with better clinical outcomes. Hence, medical learners and practicing physicians should be taught and assessed for professionalism. A number of methods can be used to teach professionalism (e.g. didactic lectures, web-based modules, role modeling, reflection, interactive methods, etc.). Because of the nature of professionalism, no single tool for assessing it among medical learners and practicing physicians exists. Instead, multiple assessment tools must be used (e.g. multi-source feedback using 360-degree reviews, patient feedback, critical incident reports, etc.). Data should be gathered continuously throughout an individual's career. For the individual learner or practicing physician, data generated by these tools can be used to create a "professionalism portfolio," the totality of which represents a picture of the individual's professionalism. This portfolio in turn can be used for formative and summative feedback. Data from professionalism assessments can also be used for developing professionalism curricula and generating research hypotheses. Health care leaders should support teaching and assessing professionalism at all levels of learning and practice and promote learning environments and institutional cultures that are consistent with professionalism precepts. PMID:25973263

  2. Spanish adaptation of The Penn State College of Medicine Scale to assess professionalism in medical students / Adaptación al idioma español de la escala del Penn State College of Medicine para medición del profesionalismo en estudiantes de medicina

    Eliseo, Bustamante; Álvaro, Sanabria.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. El profesionalismo es un área de interés en las facultades de medicina del mundo. El uso de un cuestionario puede ser útil para evaluar el profesionalismo en Colombia. Objetivo. Adaptar la escala de profesionalismo para estudiantes de medicina del Penn State University College of Medic [...] ine al idioma español como instrumento válido para evaluarlo. Materiales y métodos. Se siguieron las guías para adaptación de instrumentos del proyecto IQOLA, realizando traducción y traducción inversa, así como una prueba piloto y una evaluación de las características psicométricas en 250 estudiantes. Se evaluó la correlación entre ítems y escala y la validez interna con el alfa de Chronbach y se hizo un análisis factorial de componentes principales. Resultados. El alfa de Cronbach global fue de 0,86, la medida de Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin fue de 0,83 y el test de esfericidad de Bartlett tuvo un valor de p>0,00001. Se encontraron seis factores que explicaron 93 % de la varianza total y cuatro nuevos factores que emergieron del análisis factorial. Ocho ítems tuvieron alta singularidad. Conclusión. La escala del Penn State University College of Medicine mide con buen nivel de confiabilidad las actitudes hacia el profesionalismo en los estudiantes de medicina. No obstante, la estructura de la escala mostró diferencias al ser validada en estudiantes latinoamericanos. Abstract in english Introduction: Professionalism is a subject of interest in medical schools around the world. The use of a questionnaire could be useful to assess professionalism in Colombia. Objective: To adapt The Penn State University College of Medicine Professionalism Questionnaire as a culturally valid instrume [...] nt in the Spanish language. Materials and methods: We followed recommendations from the IQOLA project and used forward and back translation with four independent translations, as well as a pilot evaluation and an evaluation of psychometric features with 250 students. We evaluated item-scale correlations and internal consistency with Chronbach´s alpha test and conducted a principal components factor analysis. Results: Global Cronbach´s alpha was 0.86, the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy was 0.83, and Bartlett´s test of sphericity had a p >0.00001. We found six factors that explained 93% of the total variance and four new factors emerged in the factor analysis, while eight items had high uniqueness. Conclusion: The Penn State University College of Medicine Scale measures professionalism attitudes in medical students with good reliability. However, the structure of the scale demonstrated differences when used in the Latin American medical student population.

  3. Glossary of technical terms for the medical technology professionals.

    Rafael Felipe García Rodríguez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current work is a glossary of technical terms in English language for Medical Health Professionals, has been prepared due to the lack of technical lexicon the students have during and after their university studies, that is, the students have a deficit of technical words which limits their professional competence and accountability. This shortage limits them and makes it a great laboring challenge if they have to work overseas in English-speaking countries. The glossary comprises the main and necessary words which are needed for this type of professional in their field of action. These graduates have a solid knowledge and comprehension of biological, biochemical and biophysical fundamentals in their mother tongue but they do not have the necessary elements in the target language to operate properly. It is a need that they can work appropriately in the spheres of prevention, promotion and health recovery to support a diagnosis, a treatment and a management not only in their mother tongue but in English for their future work.

  4. The Development of Student Teachers' Professional Identity

    Lamote, Carl; Engels, Nadine

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on student teachers' perceptions of their professional identity. The respondents are students enrolled in a three-year course in secondary education teaching at bachelor level. Questionnaires were filled out by first-year, second-year and third-year students from two colleges. The questionnaire included four scales: commitment…

  5. Student Values and Professional Self-Selection.

    Parsons, Patrick R.

    To investigate the fundamental cultural values and political attitudes of communications students at the beginning of their professional education, and to compare the differing attitudes of students in advertising, print and broadcast journalism, telecommunications, and public relations, a study surveyed journalism and communications students at…

  6. Management education for medical students.

    Radkowsky, A K; Couch, J B

    1989-01-01

    There is little doubt that the economics, management, and delivery of health care in the United States are currently in an unprecedented state of flux. Prospective payment, cost containment, and corporatization of health care delivery are rapidly replacing retrospective fee-for-service reimbursement and unmanaged provider practice patterns. Though ultimately certain to affect significantly physicians now in training, these changes have been afforded little attention in the undergraduate medical curriculum. At Hahnemann University, this is no longer the case. "Management Education for Medical Students" is an elective, intensive, eight-week experience for senior medical students. Following a thorough orientation to the workings of organizations through which health care is delivered, medical students receive both didactic and project-oriented instruction in university hospital administration during the first four weeks. During the course's second half, students are offered specialized training in the part of medical management that links the clinical and the financial aspects of health care management. PMID:10313120

  7. KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE OF FIRST YEAR ?MEDICAL STUDENTS ABOUT SMOKING

    Kye Mon Min Swe; Amit Bhardwaj

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Myanmar is one of South East Asian countries and tobacco consumption and ?exposure to environmental smoking in Myanmar youth is high from the report of Global Youth ?Tobacco Survey. Tobacco control experts and Global Health Professional Survey on youth ?reports have emphasized the importance of training medical students about tobacco smoking. ?This study examined cigarette smoking among a sample of newly intake medical students of ?famous medical university in Myanmar. The knowl...

  8. Medical Informatics For Medical Students And Medical Practitioners

    Jai MOHAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of incorporating medical (or healthinformatics into the education of medical students andmedical practitioners is being increasingly recognised.The advances in information and communicationtechnology and the pervasion of the Internet intoeveryday life have important implications forhealthcare services and medical education.Students and practitioners should learn to utilisebiomedical information for problem solving anddecision making based on evidence. The extensiveintroduction of electronic health information systemsinto hospitals and clinics and at the enterprise level inMalaysia and elsewhere is driving a demand for healthprofessionals who have at least basic skills in andappreciation of the use of these technologies.The essential clinical informatics skills have beenidentified and should be incorporated into theundergraduate medical curriculum. It is recommendedthat these be introduced in stages and integrated intoexisting programmes rather than taught as a separatemodule. At the same time, medical schools shouldsupport the integration of e-learning in the educationalprocess in view of the numerous potential benefits.

  9. Teaching recovery to medical students.

    Feeney, Larkin

    2013-03-01

    Community mental health services are evolving toward more holistic, patient-centered, recovery-based practices. This change necessitates an attitudinal shift from mental health workers, and training in recovery principles is helpful in achieving this change. Medical students often have narrow, doctor-centered concepts of mental health care. Traditional clinical placements in psychiatry do little to address this. We evaluated a recovery-focused teaching program for medical students in psychiatry.

  10. Motivation in medical students

    Kusurkar, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The importance of motivation in learning behaviour and education is well-researched and proven in general education, but much less in medical education. There is sometimes focus on increasing the quantity of motivation, but the how and why need more evidence. The aims of this thesis were to gather insights and investigate medical students’ motivation, particularly the importance of quality of motivation, factors influencing and outcomes and to explore how these can be applied to ...

  11. Professional identity formation in medical education: the convergence of multiple domains.

    Holden, Mark; Buck, Era; Clark, Mark; Szauter, Karen; Trumble, Julie

    2012-12-01

    There has been increasing emphasis on professionalism in medical education over the past several decades, initially focusing on bioethical principles, communication skills, and behaviors of medical students and practitioners. Authors have begun to discuss professional identity formation (PIF), distinguishing it as the foundational process one experiences during the transformation from lay person to physician. This integrative developmental process involves the establishment of core values, moral principles, and self-awareness. The literature has approached PIF from various paradigms-professionalism, psychological ego development, social interactions, and various learning theories. Similarities have been identified between the formation process of clergy and that of physicians. PIF reflects a very complex process, or series of processes, best understood by applying aspects of overlapping domains: professionalism, psychosocial identity development, and formation. In this study, the authors review essential elements of these three domains, identify features relevant to medical PIF, and describe strategies reported in the medical education literature that may influence PIF. PMID:23104548

  12. Share the Stage! Teaming Students with Professionals.

    Kleinman, Lynn

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the production of the opera, "The Mikado," a joint venture between a junior high school vocal department and a professional opera company. Explains funding, student casting, rehearsals, and other details of production. Concludes with the results of the performance, including the community response and student improvements in musical…

  13. Gendered Trends in Student Teachers' Professional Aspirations

    Smith, Joan

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports on a small-scale, exploratory study investigating the professional aspirations of a cohort of student teachers at a UK university. Questionnaires and interviews sought insights into the students' perceptions of leadership, future aspirations and self-perceptions as potential leaders. Whilst there was commonality in male and…

  14. Why Appoint Professionals? A Student Cataloguing Project

    Attar, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    Students have provided cheap successful labour for routine retrospective cataloguing projects. The current article examines a library project which went further, using university students with minimum training to catalogue its undergraduate stock from the book in hand to AACR2, level 2, allegedly to professional standard. The article discusses the…

  15. Rasch Analysis of Professional Behavior in Medical Education

    Lange, R.; Verhulst, S. J.; Roberts, N. K.; Dorsey, J. K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of students' "consumer feedback" to assess faculty behavior and improve the process of medical education is a significant challenge. We used quantitative Rasch measurement to analyze pre-categorized student comments listed by 385 graduating medical students. We found that students differed little with respect to the number of…

  16. Professional ideology of altruism of russian medical practitioners

    Valery Mansurov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Altruism has been seen as an important characteristic of professionals. In accordance with neo-Weberian critiques, our research does not deny the importance of the professional ideology of altruism: even though some medical practitioners’ actions may be self-enhancement, they are still providing a service for their patients or clients. In recent desk and qualitative research by Russian orthodox practitioners, professional ideology has been interpreted as a significant professional characteristic. The research pointed out the discrepancy between medical practitioners’ sense of reduced circumstances and their rather positive perception of their profession.

  17. The Differential Impact of Various Assessment Parameters on the Medical Students Performance in the Professional Anatomy Examination in a New Medical School El Impacto Diferencial de Varios Parámetros de Evaluación del Desempeño de Estudiantes de Medicina en el Examen Profesional de Anatomía en una Nueva Escuela de Medicina

    L. A. J. Shittu; Zachariah, M.P.; Izegbu, M.C.; O. A Adesanya; O. A. Ashiru

    2006-01-01

    There is a dearth of knowledge on the level of agreement between all the various assessment tasks on the same content area, in order to test this hypothesis we adopted the concept of convergent validity and also to isolate area of academic weakness among the students and to readjust the curriculum content to balance the weakness. A blinded cohort retrospective study was carried out on a total of sixty-six third year medical students who had sat for their first professional examination in anat...

  18. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Medical Learners and Practicing Physicians

    Paul S. Mueller

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement, good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional. Furthermore, professionalism is associated with better clinical outcomes. Hence, medical learners and practicing physicians should be taught and assessed for professionalism. A number of methods can be used to teach professionalism (e.g. didactic lectures, web-based modules, role modeling, reflection, interactive methods, etc.. Because of the nature of professionalism, no single tool for assessing it among medical learners and practicing physicians exists. Instead, multiple assessment tools must be used (e.g. multi-source feedback using 360-degree reviews, patient feedback, critical incident reports, etc.. Data should be gathered continuously throughout an individual’s career. For the individual learner or practicing physician, data generated by these tools can be used to create a “professionalism portfolio,” the totality of which represents a picture of the individual’s professionalism. This portfolio in turn can be used for formative and summative feedback. Data from professionalism assessments can also be used for developing professionalism curricula and generating research hypotheses. Health care leaders should support teaching and assessing professionalism at all levels of learning and practice and promote learning environments and institutional cultures that are consistent with professionalism precepts.

  19. Determining professionalism in Turkish students nurses

    Ayise Karadağ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of the nursing profession include educational standards, professional organizations, commitment, autonomy, continuing education, body of knowledge and competencies, social value, and a code of ethics. This study was carried out with the aim of determining the professional attitudes of nursing students in Turkey. It was a descriptive study. This study was conducted in 25 nursing schools that provide graduate level nursing education in Turkey. The sample of the study included 1412 final year nursing students who were selected by random sampling from nursing schools offering education at bachelor level. Data was collected using a questionnaire, which included demographic characteristics of students and an Inventory to Measure Professional Attitudes in Student Nurses (IPASN. The mean score of IPASN was 4.1 ± 0.5 and the areas the highest mean scores were for autonomy, competence and continuous education whilst lowest ones were for  cooperation, contribution to scientific knowledge, and participating in professional organizations. In conclusion, the overall mean scores of professional attitudes for nursing students were found to be satisfying and some recommendations were made to improve subgroups scores.

  20. Evaluating professionalism in medical undergraduates using selected response questions: findings from an item response modelling study

    McLachlan John C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Professionalism is a difficult construct to define in medical students but aspects of this concept may be important in predicting the risk of postgraduate misconduct. For this reason attempts are being made to evaluate medical students' professionalism. This study investigated the psychometric properties of Selected Response Questions (SRQs relating to the theme of professional conduct and ethics comparing them with two sets of control items: those testing pure knowledge of anatomy, and; items evaluating the ability to integrate and apply knowledge ("skills". The performance of students on the SRQs was also compared with two external measures estimating aspects of professionalism in students; peer ratings of professionalism and their Conscientiousness Index, an objective measure of behaviours at medical school. Methods Item Response Theory (IRT was used to analyse both question and student performance for SRQs relating to knowledge of professionalism, pure anatomy and skills. The relative difficulties, discrimination and 'guessabilities' of each theme of question were compared with each other using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Student performance on each topic was compared with the measures of conscientiousness and professionalism using parametric and non-parametric tests as appropriate. A post-hoc analysis of power for the IRT modelling was conducted using a Monte Carlo simulation. Results Professionalism items were less difficult compared to the anatomy and skills SRQs, poorer at discriminating between candidates and more erratically answered when compared to anatomy questions. Moreover professionalism item performance was uncorrelated with the standardised Conscientiousness Index scores (rho = 0.009, p = 0.90. In contrast there were modest but significant correlations between standardised Conscientiousness Index scores and performance at anatomy items (rho = 0.20, p = 0.006 though not skills (rho = .11, p = .1. Likewise, students with high peer ratings for professionalism had superior performance on anatomy SRQs but not professionalism themed questions. A trend of borderline significance (p = .07 was observed for performance on skills SRQs and professionalism nomination status. Conclusions SRQs related to professionalism are likely to have relatively poor psychometric properties and lack associations with other constructs associated with undergraduate professional behaviour. The findings suggest that such questions should not be included in undergraduate examinations and may raise issues with the introduction of Situational Judgement Tests into Foundation Years selection.

  1. Motivation towards Medical Career Choice and Future Career Plans of Polish Medical Students

    Gasiorowski, Jakub; Rudowicz, Elzbieta; Safranow, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study aimed at investigating Polish medical students' career choice motivation, factors influencing specialty choices, professional plans and expectations. The same cohort of students responded to the same questionnaire, at the end of Year 1 and Year 6. The Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U tests and logistic regression were used in…

  2. Student Affairs Capitalism and Early-Career Student Affairs Professionals

    Lee, Jenny J.; Helm, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This study explores student affairs capitalism as the alteration of professional practice towards the financial interests of institutions. Student affairs capitalism has the potential to create dynamics in which the interests of students become secondary to the institution's economic needs. This study examined this phenomenon from the…

  3. Developing Students' Professional Digital Identity

    Cochrane, Thomas; Antonczak, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the myth of the "Digital Native" and the ubiquity of Facebook use, we have found that students' digital identities are predominantly social with their online activity beyond Facebook limited to being social media consumers rather than producers. Within a global economy students need to learn new digital literacy skills to…

  4. Acciones metodológicas para incentivar el uso del inglés en estudiantes y profesionales de ciencias médicas / Methodological actions to incentivate the use of the English language in medical sciences students and professionals

    Adela, Quesada Lima; Elizabeth, Finalet Marrero; Uvaldo, Recino Pineda; Yagima, Fleites García.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento: la enseñanza del inglés ha enfatizado en la importancia de conocer este idioma desde diferentes perspectivas; su dominio es requisito indispensable para el éxito en diversos ámbitos profesionales y académicos. Objetivo: elaborar acciones metodológicas para incentivar el uso del idioma in [...] glés en estudiantes y profesionales de las ciencias médicas. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo transversal en la Filial Universitaria "Lidia Doce Sánchez" de Sagua la Grande, Villa Clara, en el curso escolar 2012-2013. Se utilizaron métodos teóricos: análisis-síntesis, inductivo-deductivo; empíricos: análisis documental y encuesta en forma de cuestionario a estudiantes y de entrevista a los profesionales y el criterio de especialistas para la valoración de la propuesta. Resultados: los instrumentos aplicados demostraron insuficiencias en el tratamiento metodológico y carencias de conocimientos del idioma en los profesores de las asignaturas participantes para lograr la adecuada implementación de la estrategia curricular de inglés en cada carrera, y la innegable afirmación de que este idioma constituye una necesidad en los profesionales de las ciencias médicas del territorio. Se elaboraron acciones metodológicas. Conclusión: las acciones metodológicas fueron valoradas por especialistas como pertinentes, son factibles de aplicar por la disponibilidad de recursos humanos y materiales para llevarlas a vías de hecho y tienen calidad científico pedagógica para su implementación. Abstract in english Background: the teaching of English has emphasized the importance of knowing this language from different perspectives; its command is an indispensable requirement for the success in diverse professional and academic environments. Objective: to elaborate methodological actions to motivate the use of [...] the English language in the medical sciences students and professionals. Methods: it was carried out a cross-sectional descriptive study in "Lidia Doce Sánchez University site from" Sagua la Grande, Villa Clara, in the academic year 2012-2013. Theoretical methods were used: analysis-synthesis, inductive-deductive; empiric ones: documental analysis and an interview in questionnaire form was applied to the students and the professionals were also interviewed and the specialists´ criteria for the valuation of the proposal. Results: the applied instruments demonstrated inadequacies in the methodological treatment and lack of knowledge of the language in the participant professors of the subjects, to achieve the appropriate implementation of the English language curricular strategy in each career, and the undeniable statement that this language constitutes a necessity for the medical sciences professionals of the territory. Methodological actions were elaborated. Conclusion: the methodological actions were valued by specialists as pertinent, they are feasible to be applied for the availability of human resources and materials to put them into practice and they have pedagogic and scientific quality for their implementation.

  5. Professional usage of smart phone applications in medical practice

    Hari Kishan Kumar Yadalla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional use of mobile computing and communication devices such as the smartphones are increasingly becoming popular. With the advent of downloadable applications related to health and medical sciences, these are fast becoming a part of healthcare professionals. This article highlights the popular smartphone applications used among the healthcare providers and its role in revolutionizing the future of healthcare delivery system.

  6. Patients’ assessment of professionalism and communication skills of medical graduates

    Abadel, Fatima T; Hattab, Abdulla S

    2014-01-01

    Background Professionalism and communication skills constitute important components of the integral formation of physicians which has repercussion on the quality of health care and medical education. The objective of this study was to assess medical graduates’ professionalism and communication skills from the patients’ perspective and to examine its association with patients’ socio-demographic variables. Methods This is a hospital based cross-sectional study. It involved 315 patients and 105 ...

  7. Association of Medical Students' Reports of Interactions with the Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Industries and Medical School Policies and Characteristics: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Yeh, James S.; Kirsten E Austad; Franklin, Jessica M; Chimonas, Susan; Campbell, Eric G; Avorn, Jerry; Aaron S Kesselheim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Professional societies use metrics to evaluate medical schools' policies regarding interactions of students and faculty with the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. We compared these metrics and determined which US medical schools' industry interaction policies were associated with student behaviors. Methods and Findings: Using survey responses from a national sample of 1,610 US medical students, we compared their reported industry interactions with their schools' Americ...

  8. EVALUATION OF PERSONALITY TYPE OF FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Neha S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Even though research in health professional education has confirmed that non - cognitive factors like personality has importance in selection , training and academic performance of the students. To prepare competent medical doctors , medical schools need to monitor and assess the students at regular intervals. Personality typing is a useful tool for counsell ing , motivation and guidance of the students and if considered while developing of course will enhance learning and improve the performance of the medical students. So it is necessary a blend of personality characteristics with the cognitive ability of learner during medical education to become a successful medical student. Aim of the present study was to assess the personality type using Myers - Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI among the first year medical students of J . N . Medical College Belgaum. METHODOLOG Y : One hundred and fifty students gave consent and enrolled in this study. Consented students were subjected to MBTI questionnaire to identify their personality type. RESULTS : MBTI questionnaire was used to identified personality type of the students , out of 150 students were 80 Extroverts (E , 70 Introverts (I , 90 Perceivers (P , 60 Judgers (J , 76 Filling , 57 sensing , 93 intuitive , 74 thinking type i e E>I , P>J , F>S and N>T. The most common personality type was ENFP (14% remaining types showed INFP (12% , INTP (9.3%. INFJ , ENFJ , ESFJ , ESFP were of equal percentage (6.7%. CONCLUSION : It has been seen that different type of personalities are found in different medical schools and health professionals and poor performance and drop out of the student occur from the course when the course structure , teaching format and personality type do not match. Hence there is a need to assess every individual’s personality type which helps in counseling and guidance to learners as a part of remedial measures especially for the low achievers to maximize the learning and students who are prone to drop out from the course in the medical school.

  9. The education and training of professionals. The perspective of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics (SEFM)

    The aim of this paper is twofold. First, to revise some European Communities' recommendations regarding qualification, education and training of professionals involved in ionisation radiation practices, to respond to the Directive 97/43 EURATOM. And then, as Medical Physicists are directly concerned with these practices, to describe how the Spanish Society of Medical Physics deals with the challenge of improving the competence of Medical Physicists in order to assure the best patient protection against ionisation radiation. Therefore, to achieve the first aim, the point of view of the European Federation of Organisations on Medical Physics (EFOMP) concerning the introduction of the 'Medical Physics Expert' and their guidelines for Continuous Professional Development are reviewed, as well as the point of view of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO) in professional education matters. Referring to the second aim, after succeeding in the recognition of the Medical Physics Speciality in Spain in 1997, the SEFM is now promoting the Continuous Education and Training of their specialists through its Education Committee (Comision de Docencia de la SEFM), so that they can cope with all new professional challenges. Moreover, a number of SEFM members are also involved in education matters to others professionals: Medicine students, nurses, Radiation Technologists, etc. In conclusion, the SEFM has always been aware of the importance of specialisation and continuous education of all professionals involved in radiation ionisation practices, as a way to contribute to guarantee the best radiation protection to the patients. (author)

  10. Bullying among medical students in a Saudi medical school

    Alzahrani Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Bullying and sexual harassment of medical students by their teachers appears to be widespread phenomenon. However, nothing is published about its prevalence in conservative countries such as Saudi Arabia. This survey aims to ascertain the extent of these mistreatments among students in a Saudi medical school. Findings A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on a group of 542 clinical years’ medical students in a Saudi medical school to explore students' percep...

  11. Exploring Health Literacy in Medical University Students of Chongqing, China: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Fan; HU Ping; Huang, Wenjie; Lu, Lu; Bai, Ruixue; Sharma, Manoj; ZHAO, YONG

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is important in public health and healthcare, particularly in effective communication between patients and health professionals. Although most medical students will eventually work as health professionals after graduation, research on health literacy of medical students is scarce. This study aimed to assess the health literacy level of medical students in Chongqing, China, and its influencing factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted and 1,275 participants (250 males and ...

  12. Professional identity formation: creating a longitudinal framework through TIME (Transformation in Medical Education).

    Holden, Mark D; Buck, Era; Luk, John; Ambriz, Frank; Boisaubin, Eugene V; Clark, Mark A; Mihalic, Angela P; Sadler, John Z; Sapire, Kenneth J; Spike, Jeffrey P; Vince, Alan; Dalrymple, John L

    2015-06-01

    The University of Texas System established the Transformation in Medical Education (TIME) initiative to reconfigure and shorten medical education from college matriculation through medical school graduation. One of the key changes proposed as part of the TIME initiative was to begin emphasizing professional identity formation (PIF) at the premedical level. The TIME Steering Committee appointed an interdisciplinary task force to explore the fundamentals of PIF and to formulate strategies that would help students develop their professional identity as they transform into physicians. In this article, the authors describe the task force's process for defining PIF and developing a framework, which includes 10 key aspects, 6 domains, and 30 subdomains to characterize the complexity of physician identity. The task force mapped this framework onto three developmental phases of medical education typified by the undergraduate student, the clerkship-level medical student, and the graduating medical student. The task force provided strategies for the promotion and assessment of PIF for each subdomain at each of the three phases, in addition to references and resources. Assessments were suggested for student feedback, curriculum evaluation, and theoretical development. The authors emphasize the importance of longitudinal, formative assessment using a combination of existing assessment methods. Though not unique to the medical profession, PIF is critical to the practice of exemplary medicine and the well-being of patients and physicians. PMID:25853688

  13. Readiness for interprofessional learning among healthcare professional students

    Fahs, Deborah B.; Kayingo, Gerald; Wong, Risa; Jeon, Sangchoon; Honan, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate attitudes toward interprofessional learning among first year medical, nursing, and physician associate students at an American university at the start of their training. Methods First year medical (n=101), nursing (n=81), and physician associate (n=35) students were invited to complete an anonymous online survey which included items related to demographic information and the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale. Scores were compared by the general linear model and Duncan’s multiple range test while controlling for demographic differences.  Results All three groups scored in the high range, indicating readiness for shared learning. Female students, those with advanced degrees, and those with healthcare experience prior to enrolment in health professional school had significantly higher scores than their counterparts. After controlling for differences in demographic factors, nursing students scored significantly higher than physician associate and medical students (F (2,162) = 6.22, 0.0025).  Conclusions Health professions students demonstrated readiness for interprofessional learning early in their academic programs, however important differences in baseline readiness emerged. These findings suggest that educators consider baseline attitudes of students when designing interprofessional education curricula, and use caution when extrapolating data from other geographies or cultures. PMID:27171559

  14. Study to assess the compensation and skills of medical library professionals relative to information technology professionals*

    Weise, Frieda O.; McMullen, Thomas D.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The study seeks to determine how medical library professionals performing information-technology (IT) roles are compensated and how their positions are designed compared to information technology staff in their institutions.

  15. Self‐medication patterns among medical students in South India

    Nitasha Bhat

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSelf-medication results in wastage of resources, increases resistance of pathogens and generally causes serious health hazards such as adverse drug reactions, prolonged suffering and drug dependence. This study was undertaken to determine the reasons for self-medication and the pattern of self-medication among medical students.MethodThis cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at the K.S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore. The participants were medical students from first to final year. Medical students were selected through convenience sampling. The data was collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire. The data was analysed using SPSS version 16 and the results expressed as proportions.ResultsA total of 200 students, 121 (60.5% female and 79 (39.5% male, were included in the study. Of the medical students surveyed, self-medication was reported among 92%. The respondents who used self-medication found it to be time-saving in providing relief from minor ailments. The most common ailments for which self-medication were used were: the common cold (69%, fever (63% and headache (60%. The students consulted their textbooks (39% and seniors or classmates (38% for the medications. Antipyretics (71%, analgesics (65%, antihistamines (37% and antibiotics (34% were the most common self-medicated drugs. Of the respondents, 33% were unaware of the adverse effects of the medication and 5% had experienced adverse reactions. The majority (64% of students advised medications to others, more often to family and friends.ConclusionThe prevalence of self-medication among medical students is high, facilitated by the easy availability of drugs and information from textbooks or seniors. A significant number of students are unaware of the adverse effects of the medication that they themselves take and suggest to others. Therefore, potential problems of self-medication should be emphasised to the students.

  16. Insightful Practice: a robust measure of medical students’ professional response to feedback on their performance

    Murphy, Douglas; Aitchison, Patricia; Hernandez Santiago, Virginia; Davey, Peter; Mires, Gary; Nathwani, Dilip

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare professionals need to show accountability, responsibility and appropriate response to audit feedback. Assessment of Insightful Practice (engagement, insight and appropriate action for improvement) has been shown to offer a robust system, in general practice, to identify concerns in doctors’ response to independent feedback. This study researched the system’s utility in medical undergraduates. Methods Setting and participants: 28 fourth year medical students reflected on ...

  17. Self-medication among medical and pharmacy students in Bangladesh

    Alam, Naznin; Saffoon, Nadia; Uddin, Riaz

    2015-01-01

    Background This cross-sectional survey examined the pattern of self-medication and factors associated with this practice among medical and pharmacy students in context to Bangladesh. Methods The study used a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 500; 250 medical and 250 pharmacy, students participated in the study. As it is a comparative analysis between the medical and pharmacy students, we used independent t test and Chi square test. Results The findings indicated that the impact of s...

  18. Self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students in a tertiary care medical college, West Bengal

    I Banerjee; Bhadury, T

    2012-01-01

    Background: Self-medication is a widely prevalent practice in India. It assumes a special significance among medical students as they are the future medical practitioners. Aim: To assess the pattern of self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students. Settings and Design: Tertiary care medical college in West Bengal, India. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted among the undergraduate medical students. Results: Out of 500 students of the ...

  19. [Medical insurance problems of professional athletes].

    Meine, J

    1994-04-01

    Like every working person employed in Switzerland, sports professionals are also required to be insured under the Accident Insurance Law--the mandatory social accident insurance in Switzerland. They can also take out supplementary private insurance contracts for cases in which the mandatory accident insurance does not cover the total injury claim. Often the limitations imposed by law on accident insurance do not meet the demanding individual requirements of sports professionals, or more precisely, those of their employers. A survey of private insurance companies showed some difficulties encountered with the regulations regarding the damages of sports professionals. The main differences concern the interpretation of the legal terms of the notions of accident, of lesions assimilated to an accident and of occupational disease, questions of causality, problems of economy of treatment, excesses of rehabilitation, discrepancy between the ability for any working and the ability for sport, certain career constraints, and finally, problems with the termination of the career brought about by an accumulation of a series of chronic injuries. PMID:8031631

  20. Selecting the right medical student

    Leinster, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Medical student selection is an important but difficult task. Three recent papers by McManus et al. in BMC Medicine have re-examined the role of tests of attainment of learning (A’ levels, GCSEs, SQA) and of aptitude (AH5, UKCAT), but on a much larger scale than previously attempted. They conclude that A’ levels are still the best predictor of future success at medical school and beyond. However, A’ levels account for only 65% of the variance in performance that is found. Therefore, more work...

  1. Homeopathy as elective in undergraduate medical education − an opportunity for teaching professional core skills

    Lehmann, Bianca; Krémer, Brigitte; Werwick, Katrin; Herrmann, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The evaluation of medical students' perceptions regarding an elective study course in Homeopathy in which small groups have participated annually for six years, at the Institute for General Practice and Family Medicine at the Otto Von Guericke University, Magdeburg. The course was assessed in terms of concept, delivery, and influence on students' professional development. Methodology: Since the autumn term of 2008/09, three group discussions have been conducted with thirty of the course ...

  2. Self medication practices among medical students of a private institute

    Arti A Kasulkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to evaluate various aspects of self-medication in medical students. A prospective, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was carried out among 488 medical students selected by simple random sampling from January 2013 to June 2013. Data was collected and analyzed for counts and percentage. Students reported self-medication in the preceding one year was 71.7 % and the prevalence was more in final year students. Fever and headache were the most frequently reported illnesses, commonly used drugs were antipyretics and analgesics, obtained information through reading material, and reasons quoted were minor ailments and quick relief. Majority students agreed that medical knowledge is necessary for administration of medicine by self. Self-medication is highly prevalent in medical students, which is quite alarming.

  3. Self-medication in health students from two Brazilian universities

    Delprina de G. Rocha de Carvalho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Self medication is a component of self care and it is considered as primary public health resource in health care system. It can be defined as use of non-prescription medicines by people on their own initiative. Dentists, together with doctors and veterinarians, comprise the professional classes that may and must prescribe medications for their patients. On the other hand, the nursing professionals are the ones who more administer drugs to patients in the ambulatory and hospital. Objective: This study was aimed to find out the frequency of self medication in selected university students, to find out the difference in the proportions of self medication between dentistry and nursing students, as well to evaluate the students’ knowledge of harmful effects of self medication and common problems of students that use the self medication. Material and methods: We were applied 209 questionnaires among dentistry students from the 3rd to 8th semesters at the Paulista University/Goiânia and 542 among nursing students from the 3rd to 8th semesters at the Estacio de Sa University of Goiás. Results and conclusion: In the present study was observed a high rate of self-medication among undergraduate students in the health area,particularly among the dentistry and nurse students. The result was alarming because the professional him/herself who should educate patients and dissuade them from this practice is a habitual user; it makes it more difficult to aspire to the future inhibition and reduction of this practice that is so harmful to health.

  4. Professional reading and the Medical Radiation Science Practitioner

    Purpose: Updating professional knowledge is a central tenet of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and professional reading is a common method health practitioners use to update their professional knowledge. This paper reports the level of professional reading by Medical Radiation Science (MRS) practitioners in Australia and examines organisational support for professional reading. Materials and Methods: Survey design was used to collect data from MRS practitioners. A questionnaire was sent to 1142 Australian practitioners, which allowed self-report data to be collected on the length of time practitioners engage in professional reading and the time workplaces allocate to practitioners for professional reading. Results: Of the 362 MRS practitioners who returned the survey, 93.9% engaged in professional reading on a weekly basis. In contrast, only 28.9% of respondents reported that their workplace allocates time for professional reading to practitioners. MRS practitioners employed in universities engaged in higher levels of reading than their colleagues employed in clinical workplaces (p < 0.01) and more university workplaces allocated time for professional reading to their employees than clinical workplaces (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences for clinical practitioners in level of reading across geographic, organisational and professional demographic factors. Significant differences in workplace allocation of time for professional reading in clinical workplaces were evident for health sector (p < 0.01); work environment (p < 0.01); geographic location (p < 0.01) and area of specialisation (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The vast majority of respondent MRS practitioners engage in professional reading to update their professional knowledge. This demonstrates an ongoing commitment at the individual practitioner level for updating professional knowledge. Updating professional knowledge is an organisational as well as an individual practitioner issue. Whilst the majority of organisations do not currently support MRS practitioners with time allocation for professional reading, there were organisations currently providing this form of support to their employees. Wider adoption of protected time for professional reading would provide much needed organisational support to practitioners and reduce the identified inequity that currently exists across the MRS profession.

  5. Professional reading and the Medical Radiation Science Practitioner

    Shanahan, Madeleine, E-mail: mshanahan@rmit.edu.a [School of Medical Science, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); Herrington, Anthony [Head, School of Regional, Remote and eLearning (RRE), Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Herrington, Jan [School of Education, Murdoch University, Perth (Australia)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Updating professional knowledge is a central tenet of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and professional reading is a common method health practitioners use to update their professional knowledge. This paper reports the level of professional reading by Medical Radiation Science (MRS) practitioners in Australia and examines organisational support for professional reading. Materials and Methods: Survey design was used to collect data from MRS practitioners. A questionnaire was sent to 1142 Australian practitioners, which allowed self-report data to be collected on the length of time practitioners engage in professional reading and the time workplaces allocate to practitioners for professional reading. Results: Of the 362 MRS practitioners who returned the survey, 93.9% engaged in professional reading on a weekly basis. In contrast, only 28.9% of respondents reported that their workplace allocates time for professional reading to practitioners. MRS practitioners employed in universities engaged in higher levels of reading than their colleagues employed in clinical workplaces (p < 0.01) and more university workplaces allocated time for professional reading to their employees than clinical workplaces (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences for clinical practitioners in level of reading across geographic, organisational and professional demographic factors. Significant differences in workplace allocation of time for professional reading in clinical workplaces were evident for health sector (p < 0.01); work environment (p < 0.01); geographic location (p < 0.01) and area of specialisation (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The vast majority of respondent MRS practitioners engage in professional reading to update their professional knowledge. This demonstrates an ongoing commitment at the individual practitioner level for updating professional knowledge. Updating professional knowledge is an organisational as well as an individual practitioner issue. Whilst the majority of organisations do not currently support MRS practitioners with time allocation for professional reading, there were organisations currently providing this form of support to their employees. Wider adoption of protected time for professional reading would provide much needed organisational support to practitioners and reduce the identified inequity that currently exists across the MRS profession.

  6. Hybrid manager-professionals' identity work:The maintenance and hybridization of medical professionalism in managerial contexts

    McGivern, Gerry; Currie, Graeme; Ferlie, Ewan; Fitzgerald, Louise; Waring, Justin

    2015-01-01

    We examine the 'identity work' of manager-professional 'hybrids', specifically medical professionals in managerial roles in the British National Health Service, to maintain and hybridize their professional identity and wider professionalism in organizational and policy contexts affected by managerialist ideas. Empirically, we differentiate between 'incidental hybrids', who represent and protect traditional institutionalized professionalism while temporarily in hybrid roles, and 'willing hybri...

  7. Great expectations: teaching ethics to medical students in South Africa.

    Behrens, Kevin Gary; Fellingham, Robyn

    2014-12-01

    Many academic philosophers and ethicists are appointed to teach ethics to medical students. We explore exactly what this task entails. In South Africa the Health Professions Council's curriculum for training medical practitioners requires not only that students be taught to apply ethical theory to issues and be made aware of the legal and regulatory requirements of their profession, it also expects moral formation and the inculcation of professional virtue in students. We explore whether such expectations are reasonable. We defend the claim that physicians ought to be persons of virtuous character, on the grounds of the social contract between society and the profession. We further argue that since the expectations of virtue of health care professionals are reasonable, it is also sound reasoning to expect ethics teachers to try to inculcate such virtues in their students, so far as this is possible. Furthermore, this requires of such teachers that they be suitable role models of ethical practice and virtue, themselves. We claim that this applies to ethics teachers who are themselves not members of the medical profession, too, even though they are not bound by the same social contract as doctors. We conclude that those who accept employment as teachers of ethics to medical students, where as part of their contractual obligation they are expected to inculcate moral values in their students, ought to be prepared to accept their responsibility to be professionally ethical, themselves. PMID:23409954

  8. Transforming medical professionalism to fit changing health needs

    Starfield Barbara

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The professional organization of medical work no longer reflects the changing health needs caused by the growing number of complex and chronically ill patients. Key stakeholders enforce coordination and remove power from the medical professions in order allow for these changes. However, it may also be necessary to initiate basic changes to way in which the medical professionals work in order to adapt to the changing health needs. Discussion Medical leaders, supported by health policy makers, can consciously activate the self-regulatory capacity of medical professionalism in order to transform the medical profession and the related professional processes of care so that it can adapt to the changing health needs. In doing so, they would open up additional routes to the improvement of the health services system and to health improvement. This involves three consecutive steps: (1 defining and categorizing the health needs of the population; (2 reorganizing the specialty domains around the needs of population groups; (3 reorganizing the specialty domains by eliminating work that could be done by less educated personnel or by the patients themselves. We suggest seven strategies that are required in order to achieve this transformation. Summary Changing medical professionalism to fit the changing health needs will not be easy. It will need strong leadership. But, if the medical world does not embark on this endeavour, good doctoring will become merely a bureaucratic and/or marketing exercise that obscures the ultimate goal of medicine which is to optimize the health of both individuals and the entire population.

  9. Homophobia in Medical Students of the University of Hong Kong

    Kan, R. W. M.; Au, K. P.; Chan, W. K.; Cheung, L. W. M.; Lam, C. Y. Y.; Liu, H. H. W.; Ng, L. Y.; Wong, M. Y.; Wong, W. C.

    2009-01-01

    Homosexuality is now accepted as a normal variant of human sexuality, but homophobia among healthcare professionals is well documented. Establishment of trustful doctor-patient relationships is impossible in the presence of homophobia. We were interested to examine the extent of homophobia among medical students, the future doctors. This article…

  10. Homophobia in Medical Students of the University of Hong Kong

    Kan, R. W. M.; Au, K. P.; Chan, W. K.; Cheung, L. W. M.; Lam, C. Y. Y.; Liu, H. H. W.; Ng, L. Y.; Wong, M. Y.; Wong, W. C.

    2009-01-01

    Homosexuality is now accepted as a normal variant of human sexuality, but homophobia among healthcare professionals is well documented. Establishment of trustful doctor-patient relationships is impossible in the presence of homophobia. We were interested to examine the extent of homophobia among medical students, the future doctors. This article…

  11. The experience of medical training and expectations regarding future medical practice of medical students in the Cuban-supported Medical School in Timor-Leste

    Ferrinho, Paulo; Valdes, Ana C; Cabral, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse the professional expectations and profile of medical students at the Cuban-supported School of General Medicine, in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the National University of Timor-Leste. Methods A piloted, standardized questionnaire, with closed- and open-ended questions, was distributed to registered medical students attending classes on the day of the survey. All data were analysed using SPSS. The statistical an...

  12. Student teachers' professional learning in teaching practicum

    Ma, Xiuli; 马秀丽

    2012-01-01

    This thesis reports on an ethnographic inquiry into student teachers’ professional learning and development in a four-month practicum, during which no mentor is present. The subject background is Teaching Chinese as a Second Language (TCSL) in mainland China. This study draws on a variety of theories, such as Wenger’s social learning theory, Brookfield’s significant personal learning theory, Fuller’s teacher concern theory and Ghaye’s reflection hierarchy model, to conceptualize a theoretica...

  13. Prevalence of Burnout in Senior Medical Students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2008

    Ahmadvand A.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Burnout is caused by high-stress jobs and could induce somatic, psychological disorders and negative attitude to professional actives so that this condition causes poor relationship with the patient. This study aimed at investigating burnout in senior medical students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences.Methods: This research was a cross sectional study carried out on all senior medical students (N=56 in 2008. Data were obtained by two questionnaires including demographic questionnaire and Maslach burnout Inventory. They were then analyzed using SPSS software and Chi square Test. Results: The findings showed that the majority of medical students (91.1% had burnout and only 8.9% of them had not burnout. Severe burnout was in 16% of students. There was not any significant relationship between burnout and sex, age, smoking, duration of education, interest in medical course and marital status P<0.05.Conclusion: The results of the study showed that burnout is common problem in senior medical students and need special consideration. Therefore medical students should be encouraged to seek help and adequate facilities by holding workshops of life-skill training and coping with stress. However, burnout should be paid special attention in medical students by counseling centers of University for prevention of consequences.

  14. Prevalence of Burnout in Senior Medical Students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2008

    G Akkasheh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Burnout is caused by high-stress jobs and could induce somatic, psychological disorders and negative attitude to professional actives so that this condition causes poor relationship with  the patient. This study aimed at investigating burnout in senior medical students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This research was a cross sectional study carried out on all senior medical students (N=56 in 2008. Data were obtained by two questionnaires including demographic questionnaire and Maslach burnout Inventory. They were then analyzed using SPSS software and Chi square Test. Results: The findings showed that the majority of medical students (91.1% had burnout and only 8.9% of them had not burnout. Severe burnout was in 16% of students. There was not any significant relationship between burnout and sex, age, smoking, duration of education, interest in medical course and marital status P<0.05. Conclusion: The results of the study showed that burnout is common problem in senior medical students and need special consideration. Therefore medical students  should be encouraged to seek help and adequate facilities by holding workshops of life-skill training and coping with stress. However, burnout should be paid special attention in medical students by counseling centers of University for prevention of consequences.

     

  15. Prevention of Hepatitis B; knowledge and practices among Medical students

    Anjali Singh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B is the major infectious disease of mankind. It is the most common cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepato-cellular carcinoma World wide. The health professionals are at the maximum risk. Vaccination against Hepatitis B can prevent this deadly disease. This survey was conducted to assess the knowledge and status of Hepatitis B vaccination among the medical students of B.J.Medical College, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

  16. Prevention of Hepatitis B; knowledge and practices among Medical students

    Anjali Singh; Shikha Jain

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B is the major infectious disease of mankind. It is the most common cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepato-cellular carcinoma World wide. The health professionals are at the maximum risk. Vaccination against Hepatitis B can prevent this deadly disease. This survey was conducted to assess the knowledge and status of Hepatitis B vaccination among the medical students of B.J.Medical College, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

  17. Self-Medication Practices and Risk Factors for Self-Medication among Medical Students in Belgrade, Serbia

    Lukovic, Jasminka Adzic; Miletic, Vladimir; Pekmezovic, Tatjana; Trajkovic, Goran; Ratkovic, Nevena; Aleksic, Danijela; Grgurevic, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Self-medication among future health care professionals can represent a serious threat to professionalism in medicine and it has potential to put at risk public trust into this profession. The aim of this research was to investigate prevalence and risk factors for self-medication among population of medical students, because it was previously shown that their attitudes towards pharmacotherapy could affect the way they could prescribe medication in the future. Material and Methods Research was performed as a cross-sectional study and it included 1296 (84.1%) 1st, 3rd and 6th year students of School of Medicine, University of Belgrade. Students filled out a demographic and self-medication questionnaire created for the purpose of this research and the Physical Health Questionnaire – 9 (PHQ-9). Questions about self-medication were related to the period of the previous year. Results Self-medication was reported by 79.9% students. The most frequently self-prescribed medications were analgesics (55.4%). Independent risk factors for self-medication were possession of home-pharmacies (OR?=?5.3, CI 95% 3.89–7.23), lower level of father's education (OR?=?1.6, CI 95% 1.18–2.25), consumption of alcoholic beverages (OR?=?1.5, CI 95% 1.13–2.08), less than 1 hour spent in physical activity per week (OR?=?1.4, CI 95% 1.00–2.02), female gender (OR?=?1.4, CI 95% 1.02–1.89), older age (OR?=?1.1, CI 95% 1.07–1.21) and higher PHQ-9 score (OR?=?1.09, CI 95% 1.05–1.12). Conclusions Self-medication is an important issue among population of medical students. Prevalence of self-medication could be controlled through regulatory authorities and further education. PMID:25503967

  18. Doctors in society. Medical professionalism in a changing world.

    2005-01-01

    Medicine bridges the gap between science and society. Indeed, the application of scientific knowledge to human health is a crucial aspect of clinical practice. Doctors are one important agent through which that scientific understanding is expressed. But medicine is more than the sum of our knowledge about disease. Medicine concerns the experiences, feelings, and interpretations of human beings in often extraordinary moments of fear, anxiety, and doubt. In this extremely vulnerable position, it is medical professionalism that underpins the trust the public has in doctors. This Working Party was established to define the nature and role of medical professionalism in modern society. Britain's health system is undergoing enormous change. The entry of multiple health providers, the wish for more equal engagement between patients and professionals, and the ever-greater contribution of science to advances in clinical practice all demand a clear statement of medicine's unifying purpose and doctors' common values. What is medical professionalism and does it matter to patients? Although evidence is lacking that more robust professionalism will inevitably lead to better health outcomes, patients certainly understand the meaning of poor professionalism and associate it with poor medical care. The public is well aware that an absence of professionalism is harmful to their interests. The Working Party's view, based on the evidence it has received, is that medical professionalism lies at the heart of being a good doctor. The values that doctors embrace set a standard for what patients expect from their medical practitioners. The practice of medicine is distinguished by the need for judgement in the face of uncertainty. Doctors take responsibility for these judgements and their consequences. A doctor's up-to-date knowledge and skill provide the explicit scientific and often tacit experiential basis for such judgements. But because so much of medicine's unpredictability calls for wisdom as well as technical ability, doctors are vulnerable to the charge that their decisions are neither transparent nor accountable. In an age where deference is dead and league tables are the norm, doctors must be clearer about what they do, and how and why they do it. We define medical professionalism as a set of values, behaviours, and relationships that underpin the trust the public has in doctors. We go on to describe what those values, behaviours, and relationships are, how they are changing, and why they matter. This is the core of our work. We have also identified six themes where our definition has further implications: leadership, teams, education, appraisal, careers, and research. The Working Party's definition and description of medical professionalism, and the recommendations arising from them, can be found in Section 5 of this report. If our recommendations are acted upon, we believe that professionalism could flourish and prosper to the benefit of patients and doctors alike. However, the exercise of medical professionalism is hampered by the political and cultural environment of health, which many doctors consider disabling. The conditions of medical practice are critical determinants for the future of professionalism. We argue that doctors have a responsibility to act according to the values we set out in this report. Equally, other members of the healthcare team--notably managers--have a reciprocal duty to help create an organisational infrastructure to support doctors in the exercise of their professional responsibilities. Just as the patient-doctor partnership is a pivotal therapeutic relationship in medicine, so the interaction between doctor and manager is central to the delivery of professional care. High-quality care depends on both effective health teams and efficient health organisations. Professionalism therefore implies multiple commitments--to the patient, to fellow professionals, and to the institution or system within which healthcare is provided, to the extent that the system supports patients collectively. A doctor's corporate responsibility, shared as it is with managers and others, is a frequently neglected aspect of modern practice. The audience for this report is, first and foremost, doctors. But we believe it should be of equal interest to patients, policy-makers, members of other health professions, and the media. All these groups have a vital part to play in discussing and advancing medical professionalism. This report is only the beginning of an effort by the Royal College of Physicians, together with others, to initiate a public dialogue about the role of the doctor in creating a healthier and fairer society. Medical professionalism has roots in almost every aspect of modern healthcare. This Working Party could not hope to solve all the issues and conflicts surrounding professionalism in practice today. But our collective and abiding wish is to put medical professionalism back onto the political map of health in the UK. PMID:16408403

  19. Teaching medical professionals to retrieve and manage medical information.

    Bader, S A; Martin, E R

    1988-01-01

    Popularity of the personal computer has prompted physician interest in direct access to the medical literature from sophisticated electronic data retrieval systems. This paper describes the educational programs developed by the library at the George Washington University Medical Center in response to this interest and growing national trend. As a result of these programs, the role of the librarian has changed permanently. Librarians are now perceived by faculty as educational specialists and information consultants. The evolution in libraries parallels the technological changes taking place in other biomedical communications units. The authors recommend the positive outcomes from adapting traditional roles to meet user's needs in a changing environment. PMID:3417631

  20. Teaching medicine of the person to medical students during the beginning of their clerkships.

    Verhoeven, Anita; Dekker, Hanke

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how medicine of the person is taught to 4th year medical students in Groningen, The Netherlands, as part of the teaching programme ‘Professional Development’. In that year, the students start with their clerkships. In this transitional phase from medical student to young doctor, issues of professional identity are raised. It is an intense period with feelings of uncertainty and overwhelming experiences. Therefore, parallel to the clerkships we have organised 28 meetings...

  1. Evolution of Professional Training Forms in Medical Institution of Higher Education

    Lebedeva M.N.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Training methodology of medical students has been a subject for profound reforms during the recent years. Revolutionary technological progress is one of the reasons for this process; another reason is a constant search for the most efficient educational ideology. The article presents a historical review of medical education systems in Russia and in Europe. Innovational methods of problem-oriented training, involving use of recent electronic and technical achievements significantly differs traditional scheme, described as a «tutor-student» system. The present work focuses particularly on scientific research as a part of medical training, and its role in preparation of modern medical practitioners. It is stated that doctor is a person who combines professional skills and personal qualities. Therefore complex of technocratic and humanitarian aspects in medical education assists in development of successful training system.

  2. Ethical challenges for medical professionals in middle manager positions

    Schnoor, Jörg; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Ghanem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Demographic changes increase the financing needs of all social services. This change also generates new and complex demands on the medical staff. Accordingly, medical professionals in middle management positions hold a characteristic sandwich position between top management and the operational core. This sandwich position often constitutes new challenges. In the industrial field, the growing importance of the middle management for the company’s success has already been recognized....

  3. Motivation towards medical career choice and future career plans of Polish medical students

    Gąsiorowski, Jakub; Rudowicz, Elżbieta; Safranow, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study aimed at investigating Polish medical students’ career choice motivation, factors influencing specialty choices, professional plans and expectations. The same cohort of students responded to the same questionnaire, at the end of Year 1 and Year 6. The Chi-square, Mann–Whitney U tests and logistic regression were used in analyses. The results showed that altruistic and scientific reasons were the main motives for choosing a medical career. The motives remained stable ov...

  4. Exposure of Medical Students to Pharmaceutical Marketing in Primary Care Settings: Frequent and Influential

    Sarikaya, Ozlem; Civaner, Murat; Vatansever, Kevser

    2009-01-01

    It is known that interaction between pharmaceutical companies and medical professionals may lead to corruption of professional values, irrational use of medicine, and negative effects on the patient-physician relationship. Medical students frequently interact with pharmaceutical company representatives and increasingly accept their gifts.…

  5. Career choices among medical students in Bangladesh

    Ahmed, SM Moslehuddin; Majumdar, Md Anwarul Azim; Karim, Rezina; Rahman, Sayeeda; Rahman, Nuzhat

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Information regarding career choices of medical students is important to plan human resources for health, design need-based educational programs, and ensure equitable and quality health care services in a country. Aim The aim of the study is to identify career choices, nature of career, intended practice locations, and reasons for career choices of Bangladesh medical students. Method First-, third-, and fifth-year students of Bangladesh Medical College and Uttara Adhunik Medical ...

  6. [Professional and ethical medical expert quality].

    Iveković, Renata

    2008-01-01

    The work of court experts, including those of medical profession, is ruled by Regulations on standing court experts. The Regulations determine requirements for performing the job of court expertise, rights and duties of court experts, awards and remuneration for their work. The ethical codex determines relation of experts to performance of expertise, to court and parties, to colleagues court experts and to the community. The expert must obey the rules on performance of the expertise, complete all his duties, protect respectability of all court experts, and justify trust of legal authorities. In relationship with the court, the expert must respond to court summons, give his finding and opinion, and come to hearing summons. PMID:19146190

  7. Perceptions of Medical Sciences Students Towards Probiotics

    Mohamad Asghari Jafar Abadi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regarding the importance of probiotics in prevention of different diseases, the knowledge ofpeople particularly health-related professionals about the beneficial effects and availability of probiotic productsis important. Considering the limited studies, the present study was conducted to assess the knowledge ofmedical sciences students as future provider of health information about probiotics in Tabriz, Iran.Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 296 medical sciences students from different facultymajors with mean age of 22 ± 4 years. The students completed two self-administered questionnaires; the onewas about the demographic characteristics and the other one with nine closed questions as for knowledge aswell as probiotics and their health effects and 2 questions related to availability of probiotic products. Scoringof 9 knowledge questions was divided to three sections 0-3, 4-6, 7-9 and classified as poor, acceptable andgood, respectively. The Chi-square test was used to examine the differences in knowledge of the studentsacross different gender, major and degree groups.Results: Six percent of students had poor, 43% acceptable, and 51% good knowledge. Total mean±(SD ofknowledge was 6.25 ±1.6 . Answers of students about the availability of probiotic products were 36.9% low,48.1% moderate, and 15% high. Comparison of knowledge result between different major and degree groupswas statistically significant (P<0.05.Conclusion: Although students had approximately acceptable level of knowledge about probiotics and theirhealth effects, their awareness about common available form of probiotic products was low. The use ofefficient co-educational materials such as teaching new findings for students may be beneficial.

  8. A Study of Stress among Students of Professional Colleges from an Urban area in India

    Waghachavare, Vivek B.; Girish B. Dhumale; Yugantara R. Kadam; Gore, Alka D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Various studies across the globe have emphasised that students undertaking professional courses, such as medical and dental studies, are subjected to higher stress. Excessive stress could lead to psychological problems like depression and anxiety. The objective of the current study was to assess stress among students of various professional colleges and its association with various academic, social and health-related factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from ...

  9. Internships of highly skilled medical professionals and ways of their professional development between Russia and Finland

    Gavrilina, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the collaboration possibilities between Russia and Finland in the field of professional training of highly-skilled medical professionals. With this objective in mind, the contemporary collaboration between Russia and Finland in medicine is being analyzed. As a result, it has been established that this collaboration is rather poorly organized today and is limited to separate internships and visits of Russian doctors to the Finnish hospitals. At the same ...

  10. Medical Teachers' Professional Development--Perceived Barriers and Opportunities

    Stenfors-Hayes, Terese; Weurlander, Maria; Dahlgren, Lars Owe; Hult, Hakan

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores medical teachers' perceived barriers and opportunities for educational and professional development. Data has been gathered through 19 semi-structured interviews with participants on a staff development course 1 year after their participation. The analysis shows that most perceived barriers are found on an organisational level,…

  11. Assessing and appraising nursing students' professional communication

    Diers, Jane E.

    The purpose of this research was to define professional communication in nursing and to develop a prototype to assess and appraise communication at a selected college. The research focused on verbal and nonverbal communication between the nurse and the client using a simulated environment. The first objective was to identify the major characteristics of professional communication in nursing. In this study, the characteristics of professional communication emerged from the constant comparison method of the results of research studies in the fields of healthcare and communication. These characteristics became the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions to assess and appraise verbal and nonverbal communication at the college of study. The second objective was to develop a template to assess verbal and nonverbal communication at a selected college. Using a two-fold process, the researcher used the results from the first objective to begin template construction. First, specialists in the fields of communication and nursing established the content validity of the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions. Second, the course educators determined the relevancy and importance of the elements, properties, and descriptive dimensions to the objectives of two courses at the college of study. The third objective was to develop a rubric to appraise nursing students' verbal and nonverbal communication in a videotaped communication review. An appraisal rubric was constructed from an extension of the template. This rubric was then tested by faculty at the selected college to appraise the communication of five students each in the junior and senior years of the nursing program.

  12. Students as Clients in a Professional/Client Relationship.

    Bailey, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    Proposes the metaphor of professional/client rather than student-as-customer to characterize the relationship between professors and students. Uses examples of fitness trainer, management consultant, accounting service, and mountain guide to illustrate faculty and student roles. (SK)

  13. Log analysis to understand medical professionals' image searching behaviour.

    Tsikrika, Theodora; Müller, Henning; Kahn, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the analysis of the query logs of a visual medical information retrieval system that provides access to radiology resources. Our analysis shows that, despite sharing similarities with general Web search and also with biomedical text search, query formulation and query modification when searching for visual biomedical information have unique characteristics that need to be taken into account in order to enhance the effectiveness of the search support offered by such systems. Typical information needs of medical professionals searching radiology resources are also identified with the goal to create realistic search tasks for a medical image retrieval evaluation benchmark. PMID:22874348

  14. The training and expectations of medical students in Mozambique

    Gonçalves Luzia

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the socio-economic profile of medical students in the 1998/99 academic year at the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (UEM Medical Faculty in Maputo. It aims to identify their social and geographical origins in addition to their expectations and difficulties regarding their education and professional future. Methods The data were collected through a questionnaire administered to all medical students at the faculty. Results Although most medical students were from outside Maputo City and Maputo Province, expectations of getting into medical school were already associated with a migration from the periphery to the capital city, even before entering medical education. This lays the basis for the concentration of physicians in the capital city once their term of compulsory rural employment as junior doctors is completed. The decision to become a doctor was taken at an early age. Close relatives, or family friends seem to have been an especially important variable in encouraging, reinforcing and promoting the desire to be a doctor. The academic performance of medical students was dismal. This seems to be related to several difficulties such as lack of library facilities, inadequate financial support, as well as poor high school preparation. Only one fifth of the students reported receiving financial support from the Mozambican government to subsidize their medical studies. Conclusion Medical students seem to know that they will be needed in the public sector, and that this represents an opportunity to contribute to the public's welfare. Nevertheless, their expectations are, already as medical students, to combine their public sector practice with private medical work in order to improve their earnings.

  15. Does personality predict medical students' attitudes to learning communication skills?

    Beatriz Molinuevo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine whether personality is related to medical students' attitudes towards learning communication skills and self-ratings on communication skills. Methods: 524 first- and 507 second-year medical students completed the Communications Skills Attitudes Scale and rated their own communication skills. First-year students answered the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and second-year students the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses, controlling for gender, were conducted to study the impact of personality on attitudes. Analysis of variance followed by post hoc Duncan test was used to compare differences in personality traits depending on students' self-ratings on communication skills. Results: After controlling for gender, personality traits predicted differences in attitudes and were significantly related to medical students' self-ratings. Medical students with higher scores on psychoticism or aggression-hostility showed worse attitudes. Students who tended to have a better self-image scored higher on extraversion, psychoticism, impulsive-sensation seeking, or aggression-hostility traits. Conclusions: Findings support the consideration of personality traits for better student career guidance and counselling. Some students could have more difficulties to internalize certain healthcare professional competencies and show more resistance to attitude change.

  16. Medical Students' Affirmation of Ethics Education

    Lehrmann, Jon A.; Hoop, Jinger; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Despite the acknowledged importance of ethics education in medical school, little empirical work has been done to assess the needs and preferences of medical students regarding ethics curricula. Methods: Eighty-three medical students at the University of New Mexico participated in a self-administered written survey including 41 scaled…

  17. Medical student fitness to practise committees at UK medical schools

    Aldridge Jocelyne

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to explore the structures for managing student fitness to practise hearings in medical schools in the UK. We surveyed by email the named fitness to practise leads of all full members of the UK Medical Schools Council with a medical undergraduate programme. We asked whether student fitness to practise cases were considered by a committee/panel dedicated to medicine, or by one which also considered other undergraduate health and social care students. Findings All 31 medical schools responded. 19 medical schools had a fitness to practise committee dealing with medical students only. Three had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and dentistry. One had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and veterinary medicine. Eight had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and two or more other programmes, such as dentistry, nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, dietetics, social work, pharmacy, psychology, audiology, speech therapy, operating department practice, veterinary medicine and education. Conclusion All 31 UK medical schools with undergraduate programmes have a fitness to practise committee to deal with students whose behaviour has given rise to concern about their fitness to practise. The variation in governance structures for student fitness to practise committees/panels can in part be explained by variations in University structures and the extent to which Universities co-manage undergraduate medicine with other courses.

  18. SELF-MEDICATION IN MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Anuj Jain; Chandni Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Self-medication is consumption of medicinal products for treating diseases without a prescription resulting in wastage of resources, increased drug resistance and causes health hazards. Selfmedication, often without adult guidance, has been reported to be a common practice during adolescence. Similar to other preventable health-risk behaviors initiated in early adolescence, it has become a cause for concern universally. The main problem with self medication with antimicrobials is ...

  19. Prevalence of smoking habits, attitudes, knowledge and beliefs among Health Professional School students: a cross-sectional study

    Margherita, Ferrante; Rosella, Saulle; Caterina, Ledda; Roberto, Pappalardo; Roberto, Fallico; Giuseppe, La Torre; Maria, Fiore.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine smoking prevalence, attitudes, knowledge and behaviours/beliefs among Health Professional School students according to the Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS) approach. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in Catania University Medical Schools. The GH [...] PSS questionnaires were self-administered. Logistic regression model was performed. The level of significance was p

  20. A Dissecting Competition for Medical Students

    Samalia, Latika; Stringer, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    After repeated requests from medical students for more cadaver dissection opportunities, a voluntary dissecting "competition" was initiated for the third year medical students in 2006. This has been held annually on five occasions since, offering up to 30 dissection stations and accommodating an average of 53 students (range 40-66) per year,…

  1. Professional dynamics and the changing nature of medical work.

    Hafferty, F W; Light, D W

    1995-01-01

    The organization and delivery of health care in the United States is undergoing significant social, organizational, economic, political, and cultural changes with important implications for the future of medicine as a profession. This essay will draw upon some of these changes and briefly review major sociological writings on the nature of medicine's professional status to examine the nature of professional dynamics in a changing environment. To this end, we focus on the nature of medical work and how this work impacts on and is impacted by medicine's own internal differentiation and the presence of contested domains at medicine's periphery. We trace this dynamic through a number of issues including the multidimensional nature of medical work, the role of elites in that work, and how changes in the terms and conditions of work can exert changes at medicine's technical core. We close with some thoughts on the relationship of public policy to medicine's professional status, the role health policy might take in shaping a new professional status, the role health policy might take in shaping a new professional ethnic for medicine, and the role sociologists might play in this process. PMID:7560845

  2. Bullying among medical students in a Saudi medical school

    Alzahrani Hasan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bullying and sexual harassment of medical students by their teachers appears to be widespread phenomenon. However, nothing is published about its prevalence in conservative countries such as Saudi Arabia. This survey aims to ascertain the extent of these mistreatments among students in a Saudi medical school. Findings A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on a group of 542 clinical years’ medical students in a Saudi medical school to explore students' perceptions of their educational environment including exposure to different kinds of bullying. Bullying was defined as “a “persistent behaviour against a medical student that is intimidating, degrading, offensive or malicious and undermines the confidence and self- esteem of the recipient”. Results revealed that more than one quarter (28.0% of the surveyed students reported exposure to some sort of bullying during their clinical. Ninety percent of the reported insults were verbal, 6% sexual and 4% physical. Males were more exposed but difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions Bullying among Saudi medical students is an existing problem. A policy against bullying and harassment should be adopted in all of medical colleges to monitor this phenomenon and support students who have been bullied.

  3. An evolving perspective on physical activity counselling by medical professionals

    McPhail Steven

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity is a modifiable risk factor for many chronic conditions and a leading cause of premature mortality. An increasing proportion of adults worldwide are not engaging in a level of physical activity sufficient to prevent or alleviate these adverse effects. Medical professionals have been identified as potentially powerful sources of influence for those who do not meet minimum physical activity guidelines. Health professionals are respected and expected sources of advice and they reach a large and relevant proportion of the population. Despite this potential, health professionals are not routinely practicing physical activity promotion. Discussion Medical professionals experience several known barriers to physical activity promotion including lack of time and lack of perceived efficacy in changing physical activity behaviour in patients. Furthermore, evidence for effective physical activity promotion by medical professionals is inconclusive. To address these problems, new approaches to physical activity promotion are being proposed. These include collaborating with community based physical activity behaviour change interventions, preparing patients for effective brief counselling during a consultation with the medical professional, and use of interactive behaviour change technology. Summary It is important that we recognise the latent risk of physical inactivity among patients presenting in clinical settings. Preparation for improving patient physical activity behaviours should commence before the consultation and may include physical activity screening. Medical professionals should also identify suitable community interventions to which they can refer physically inactive patients. Outsourcing the majority of a comprehensive physical activity intervention to community based interventions will reduce the required clinical consultation time for addressing the issue with each patient. Priorities for future research include investigating ways to promote successful referrals and subsequent engagement in comprehensive community support programs to increase physical activity levels of inactive patients. Additionally, future clinical trials of physical activity interventions should be evaluated in the context of a broader framework of outcomes to inform a systematic consideration of broad strengths and weaknesses regarding not only efficacy but cost-effectiveness and likelihood of successful translation of interventions to clinical contexts.

  4. Learning medical English: A prerequisite for successful academic and professional education

    Milosavljević Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present specificities of the English language teaching necessary for successful education and professional training of medical students. In contemporary globalized world the English language has become the basic language of communication in all scientific fields including the field of medical science. It is well established that Medical English teaching should primarily focus on stable linguistic competence in English that is created by means of content and context based curriculum, thus preparing students for active use of English upon graduation. In order to achieve this it is very important that English language teaching be based on specific real situations in which the language is to be used. In addition, students should be encouraged to adapt practical skills applicable in specific future professional setting. Medical English teaching represents constant challenge for teachers because they need to be flexible, open to new approaches and methods, make decisions and adapt themselves to constant changes. In addition, long-term learning is at the core of higher education, and being equal partners, both students and teachers should be aware that education is a two-way process.

  5. Characteristics of mentoring relationships formed by medical students and faculty

    Konstantinos Dimitriadis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Little is known about the characteristics of mentoring relationships formed between faculty and medical students. Individual mentoring relationships of clinical medical students at Munich Medical School were characterized quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods: All students signing up for the mentoring program responded to a questionnaire on their expectations (n = 534. Mentees were asked to give feedback after each of their one-on-one meetings (n = 203. A detailed analysis of the overall mentoring process and its characteristics was performed. For qualitative text analysis, free-text items were analyzed and categorized by two investigators. Quantitative analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon-test to assess differences in grades between students with and without mentors. Results: High-performing students were significantly more likely to participate in the mentoring program (p<0.001. Topics primarily discussed include the mentee's personal goals (65.5%, career planning (59.6%, and experiences abroad (57.6%. Mentees mostly perceived their mentors as counselors (88.9%, providers of ideas (85.0%, and role models (73.3%. Mentees emphasized the positive impact of the mentoring relationship on career planning (77.2% and research (75.0%. Conclusions: Medical students with strong academic performance as defined by their grades are more likely to participate in formal mentoring programs. Mentoring relationships between faculty and medical students are perceived as a mutually satisfying and effective instrument for key issues in medical students’ professional development. Practical implications: Mentoring relationships are a highly effective means of enhancing the bidirectional flow of information between faculty and medical students. A mentoring program can thus establish a feedback loop enabling the educational institution to swiftly identify and address issues of medical students.

  6. Preparing Students to Write a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper

    Stevens, Cheryl; Schneider, Paige P.; Johnson, Corey W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a process for guiding students through the writing of a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper and a one-page philosophy statement suitable for use in students' professional portfolios. The authors describe how the review of recreation education literature, scholarship on teaching and learning, and assessment of student…

  7. Choosing family medicine. What influences medical students?

    Jordan J; Brown JB; Russell G.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore factors that influence senior medical students to pursue careers in family medicine. DESIGN: Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. SETTING: University of Western Ontario (UWO) in London. PARTICIPANTS: Eleven of 29 graduating UWO medical students matched to Canadian family medicine residency programs beginning in July 2001. METHOD: Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted with a maximum variation sample of medical students. Interviews were transcribed ...

  8. Behaviour and burnout in medical students

    Cecil, Jo; McHale, Calum; Hart, Jo; Laidlaw, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Burnout is prevalent in doctors and can impact on job dissatisfaction and patient care. In medical students, burnout is associated with poorer self-rated health; however, it is unclear what factors influence its development. This study investigated whether health behaviours predict burnout in medical students.Methods: Medical students (n=356) at the Universities of St Andrews and Manchester completed an online questionnaire assessing: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation (...

  9. Smoke-free medical students' meetings

    Brown, Colin; Rudkjøbing, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Medical students of the world have signalled their commitment to health promotion by prohibiting smoking at the semiannual general assembly meetings of the International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA). Although initially adopted in 2000, the smoke-free bylaw took 5 years to...... come into force. This year finally saw compliance with the bylaw on March 1, 2005, at the IFMSA General Assembly in Antalya, Turkey, when medical students who wanted to smoke had to do so outside....

  10. Gender Differences in Relationships and Stress of Medical and Law Students.

    Clark, Elizabeth Johns; Rieker, Patricia Perri

    1986-01-01

    A comparative study of medical and law students was undertaken to examine the sources and consequences of stress during professional training and the impact of stress on personal relationships. Women reported significantly more stress than men. (Author/MLW)

  11. TA Professional Development: A Graduate Student's Perspective

    Alicea-Munoz, Emily

    Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) are essential for teaching large introductory physics classes. In such courses, undergraduates spend approximately half of their in-class contact time in instructional environments (e.g., labs and recitations) supervised by GTAs, which means GTAs can have a large impact on student learning. Therefore it is crucial to adequately prepare GTAs before they first enter the classroom, and to offer them continued support throughout. Since many of the skills required to become effective teachers will also be relevant to their future research careers, it is useful for a GTA preparation program to also include professional development strategies. But what exactly do GTAs get out of these programs? The School of Physics at Georgia Tech runs a preparation and mentoring program for GTAs that focuses on pedagogical knowledge, physics content, and professional development, as well as their intersections. Nearly seventy graduate students have gone through this program in the three years since it was established. Here we discuss the impact this program has had on our GTAs, from their own point of view: the program's effect on their teaching abilities, how it has influenced their attitudes towards teaching, what elements they have found useful, and what changes they have suggested to its curriculum. We find that, in general, GTAs are more receptive when the curriculum is more hands-on and they are presented with frequent opportunities for practice and feedback.

  12. Knowledge of and Adherence to Hygiene Guidelines among Medical Students in Austria

    Herbert, Verena G.; Paul Schlumm; Kessler, Harald H.; Andreas Frings

    2013-01-01

    Background. Adherence to hygiene guidelines is of utmost importance for healthcare professionals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge on and the adherence to hygiene guidelines among medical students in Austria. Additionally, a possible difference between female and male students was investigated. Methods. An open paper-based survey among third-year medical students at the Medical University of Graz was conducted. The questionnaire consisted of 20 single-choice questions cover...

  13. Medical school entrance and career plans of Malaysian medical students.

    Razali, S M

    1996-11-01

    This study investigates the reasons for entry to medicine and the career perspectives of phase III medical students of the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). The majority of the students were Malays from low socio-economic backgrounds who entered medical school after completing a 2-year matriculation course. An interest in medicine and helping people were the two main stated reasons for entry to medical school. A group of students wishing to work in private practice was identified. In comparison to the rest of the study body, students in the group were: not well prepared to enter medical school; dissatisfied with the course; and subject to family influences. A desire for monetary gain motivated their choice of medicine as a career. Overall, 13% of the students wished to change career because they were dissatisfied with their experience of medicine as undergraduates. The study did not find a significant difference in career intentions between female and male medical students. However, women were less likely to seek entrance into private practice or pursue formal postgraduate education. The choice of surgery as a career was confined to men. About 90% of the students had already decided on their future specialty. Four well-established specialties were their most popular choices. The gender of the students had no significant influences of the decision to continue into postgraduate education. The proportion of female students who wished to marry doctors was significantly higher than for male students. PMID:9217903

  14. Medical student participation in surface anatomy classes.

    Aggarwal, R; Brough, H; Ellis, H

    2006-10-01

    Surface anatomy is an integral part of medical education and enables medical students to learn skills for future medical practice. In the past decade, there has been a decline in the teaching of anatomy in the medical curriculum, and this study seeks to assess the attitudes of medical students to participation in surface anatomy classes. Consequently, all first year medical students at the Guy's, King's and St Thomas's Medical School, London, were asked to fill in an anonymous questionnaire at the end of their last surface anatomy session of the year. A total of 290 medical students completed the questionnaires, resulting in an 81.6% response rate. The students had a mean age of 19.6 years (range 18-32) and 104 (35.9%) of them were male. Seventy-six students (26.2%) were subjects in surface anatomy tutorials (60.5% male). Students generally volunteered because no one else did. Of the volunteers, 38.2% would rather not have been subjects, because of embarrassment, inability to make notes, or to see clearly the material being taught. Female medical students from ethnic minority groups were especially reluctant to volunteer to be subjects. Single-sex classes improved the volunteer rate to some extent, but not dramatically. Students appreciate the importance of surface anatomy to cadaveric study and to future clinical practice. Computer models, lectures, and videos are complementary but cannot be a substitute for peer group models, artists' models being the only alternative. PMID:16302232

  15. Measurement of professional identity in Chinese nursing students

    Yu-Fang Hao; Hui-Jun Niu; Li-Ping Li; Shu-Jin Yue; Xiao-Hong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Chinese nurses continue to display low professional identity. It is becoming an emergent issue in China how to help nurse students develop their positive professional identity. This paper is to develop the Professional Identity Scale for Nursing Students (PISNS). Methods: Literature review, and interviews with students and experts were adopted to develop initial item. Reliability and validity of the scale were respectively examined by computing internal consistency coefficient ...

  16. THE DEVELOPMENT OF INFORMATION COMPETENCES FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS

    S. I. Karas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is the analysis of information communication technologies using for professional competencies development for medical students. There are described two informational learning technologies: standard and developed in Tomsk.Virtual learning environment Moodle is open source software which is developed for on-line education and installed in more than a dozen thousands educational institutions around the world including Russia. The Moodle provides students with rapid access to professional-oriented learning information via Internet any time and through any gadget. Using the Moodle a teacher can present different types of digital information, organize learning course, student’s knowledge and skills evaluation after structuring teacher’s knowledge. Rating approach is implemented in the Moodle very easy. Developed and develo­ping resources for the Moodle are located at the server http://simcenter.ssmu.ru.Learning electronic health record (LEHR is developing by Tomsk professional team and it is the integration of an electronic health record and a program for clinical subject. There are additional functions besides usual for paper medical record, for example: learning about specialized software, electronic re­ference books, and medical standard documents. Information and clinical competences are forming in LEHR at the same time what is the undoubted advantage for students. Now LEHR on pediatrics and neurology are testing before trial exploitation in the learning. Software for LEHR and information about virtual patients are located at the server http://students.umssoft.com.The analysis and our experience have shown the possibilities of effective using the information communication technologies for development of informational and professional competencies of medical students in different subjects of educational program.

  17. Burnout syndrom as a mental health problem among medical students

    Backović Dušan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mental health problems of adolescents are among the prevailing problems of public health. While studying for their future medical profession, the students of medicine have to exchange emotions with the patients intensively, and the empathic relationship itself bears a risk of eventual ”emotional depletion”, which leads to ”professional lack of emotions”. The study was aimed at presenting burnout syndrome as a challenge for mental health of medical students, its importance for the future professional engagement of doctors and the possibilities of its prevention. Methods. The authors of this paper review and analyze data and conclusions of previous national and international studies from this field and suggest possibilities of overcoming the condition of burnout. Results. The frequency of burnout syndrome, which is the synonym for the above mentioned condition of emotional exhaustion, is twice as high in medical professionals, particularly young ones, as in other professions on average. Burnout syndrome is nowadays regarded as a psychological distress experienced during the educational process and it has been observed in as many as 50% of medical students. The most significant factors independently associated with student burnout are: personality traits, stressful personal life events and learning and training conditions at their faculties. Conclusions. It is of utmost importance to understand the causes and consequences of psychological distress in students, and the faculties should not only identify these problems, but also endeavor to promote health by developing strategies for improving personal well-being, which are important for future doctors to achieve professional success and develop resistance to stress.

  18. A Comparison of Medical Students' Attitudes Toward Women and Women Medical Students

    Gross, Wendy; Crovitz, Elaine

    1975-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of medical students at Duke University concerning attitudes about women medical students. The personality traits surveyed were: aggression, cognitive structure, endurance, desire for social recognition, achievement orientation, nurturance, understanding, and dominance. (Author/PG)

  19. Learning health professionalism at Makerere University: an exploratory study amongst undergraduate students

    Mafigiri David K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anecdotal evidence shows that unprofessional conduct is becoming a common occurrence amongst health workers in Uganda. The development of appropriate professional values, attitudes and behaviors is a continuum that starts when a student joins a health professional training institution and as such health professionals in training need to be exposed to the essence of professionalism. We sought to explore undergraduate health professions students' perceptions and experiences of learning professionalism as a preliminary step in addressing the problem of unprofessional conduct amongst health workers in Uganda. Methods Eight focus group discussions were conducted with 49 first to fifth year health professions undergraduate students of the 2008/2009 academic year at Makerere University College of Health Sciences. The focus group discussions were recorded and transcribed, and were analyzed using content analysis with emergent coding. Results The difference in the way first and fifth year students of Makerere University College of Health Sciences conceptualized professionalism was suggestive of the decline in attitude that occurs during medical education. The formal curriculum was described as being inadequate while the hidden and informal curricula were found to play a critical role in learning professionalism. Students identified role models as being essential to the development of professionalism and emphasized the need for appropriate role modeling. In our setting, resource constraints present an important, additional challenge to learning universal standards of health professionalism. Furthermore, students described practices that reflect the cultural concept of communalism, which conflicts with the universally accepted standard of individual medical confidentiality. The students questioned the universal applicability of internationally accepted standards of professionalism. Conclusions The findings call for a review of the formal professionalism curriculum at Makerere University College of Health Sciences to make it more comprehensive and to meet the needs expressed by the students. Role models need capacity building in professionalism as health professionals and as educators. In our setting, resource constraints present an additional challenge to learning universal standards of health professionalism. There is need for further research and discourse on education in health professionalism in the Sub-Saharan context of resource constraints and cultural challenges.

  20. Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective.

    Burgoyne, Louise N

    2010-01-01

    Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a) gauge students\\' awareness of research activities, (b) compare students\\' perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c) determine students\\' motivation for research and (d) obtain students\\' personal views on doing research.

  1. Medical students' learning from patient-led teaching

    Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how medical students perceive the experience of learning from patient instructors (patients with rheumatism who teach health professionals and students) in the context of coupled faculty-led and patient-led teaching session. This was an explorative study with a...... patient-centred approach, and acknowledged the importance of the PIs' individual perspectives and experiential knowledge. On the other hand, representing the scientific biomedical perspective and traditional step-by step teaching, students expressed unfamiliarity with the unstructured experiential...

  2. National Library of Medicine Web Resources for Student Health Professionals

    Womble, R.

    2010-04-02

    Familiarize students affiliated with the Student National Medical Association with the National Library of Medicine's online resources that address medical conditions, health disparities, and public health preparedness needs.

  3. Do students learn to be more conscientious at medical school?

    Chaytor Andrew T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Professionalism in medical students is not only difficult to define but difficult to teach and measure. As negative behaviour in medical students is associated with post-graduate disciplinary action it would be useful to have a model whereby unprofessional behaviour at the undergraduate level can easily be identified to permit appropriate intervention. We have previously developed a scalar measure of conscientiousness, the Conscientiousness Index (CI, which positively correlates to estimates of professional behaviour in undergraduate medical students. By comparing CI points awarded in year 1 and year 2 of study we were able to use the CI model to determine whether teaching and clinical exposure had any effect on students’ conscientiousness. Methods CI points were collected by administrative staff from 3 successive cohorts of students in years 1 and 2 of study. Points were awarded to students for activities such as submission of immunisation status and criminal record checks, submission of summative assignments by a specified date and attendance at compulsory teaching sessions. CI points were then converted to a percentage of maximal possible scores (CI % to permit direct comparison between years 1 and 2 of study. Results CI % scores were generally high with each year of study for each cohort showing negatively skewed normal distributions with peaks > 89%. There was a high degree of correlation of CI % scores between year 1 and year 2 of study for each cohort alone and when cohort data was combined. When the change in CI % from year 1 to year 2 for all students was compared there was no significant difference in conscientiousness observed. Conclusions We have provided evidence that use of a CI model in undergraduate medical students provides a reliable measure of conscientiousness that is easy to implement. Importantly this study shows that measurement of conscientiousness by the CI model in medical students does not change between years 1 and 2 study suggesting that it is a stable characteristic and not modified by teaching and clinical exposure.

  4. A study of professional competence for radiological technology department students in Taiwan area

    Recently, so many medical institutions established and the increasing use of the high technological medical imaging equipment, it makes radiological technology become the main instrument for the medical diagnostic and radiation therapy. However, the medical radiological technologies play the important role to operate all the related radiological machines. If they do not use the machines adequately, it will increase the patients' radiation absorbed dose. Then, the whole society health may be influenced. Therefore, constructing the professional competence of the medical radiological technologists is an important course. The purpose of this research are: (1) to construct the index of professional competence with radiological technology students, (2) to discuss the professional competence for the graduates from the department of radiological technology to be the reference for the Ministry of Examination for the license test of radiological technologists, (3) to provide the direction of the radiological technology department development. (author)

  5. The World Health Organization Multi-Professional Patient Safety Curriculum : implementation of key modules and its impact on patient safety knowledge, skills, and attitudes of medical students at the University of Algarve

    Fonseca, Jorge Manuel Gusmão da

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT - Objectives: We attempted to show how the implementation of the key elements of the World Health Organization Patient Safety Curriculum Guide Multi-professional Edition in an undergraduate curriculum affected the knowledge, skills, and attitudes towards patient safety in a graduate entry Portuguese Medical School. Methods: After receiving formal recognition by the WHO as a Complementary Test Site and approval of the organizational ethics committee , the validated pre-course quest...

  6. System of continuing education and professional development of medical radiation physicists in Russia

    Full text: The active process of technical equipment of radiation therapy, nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology departments requires increased staffing of qualified medical physicists in Russia. To work with the radiotherapy equipment, treatment and diagnostic procedures available in Russian clinics today, it is necessary to have 1,000 medical radiation physics, 30% of which should have a high degree of professional excellence. To achieve the required high technology equipment and procedure level it is essential to have 5,000 specialists. Today Russia has only 280 medical radiation physicists, 25 of which have high qualification - less than 10%. The efficient exploitation of modern radiation therapeutic diagnostic technologies and equipment demands highly qualified medical radiation physicists. However, in Russia the medical physicist responsibilities in the clinic are carried out by the specialists who do not have the basic radiation physics education and the necessary basis of physical and technical knowledge. Medical and clinical physics knowledge is acquired at random through various courses, by self education or empirically without quality and thoroughness control. It is natural that it adversely affects the physical and technical maintenance of radiation therapy and, in the end, the cancer patient treatment quality. Medical physicists are required in different areas, such as: 1. clinics together with the physician to deliver procedures in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology 2. scientific and engineering organizations involved in the new radiological equipment and technology development 3. universities and other educational institutions engaged in the system of continuing education and professional development of medical physicists and research activities 4. companies supplying medical radiological equipment 5. companies busy with the equipment maintenance, adjustment and certification 6. project organizations involved in scientific planning, design and development of the system equipment of radiation therapeutic and diagnostic centres. It is understood that the areas mentioned above demand specific knowledge and skills from the medical physicists and this should be taken into consideration when elaborating the educational programmes. There are several departments of 'medical physics' speciality in Russian universities. However, the approved student education programme does not meet the modern requirements. Practically, there are no qualified medical physics professors in universities. Therefore, as before, the majority of graduates and medical physicists in clinics do not fit the necessary qualification. The Association of Medical Physicists in Russia (AMPR) has developed and realized the programme on the system of continuing education and professional development of medical radiation physicists based on the cycle of special courses on different sections of radiation therapeutic and diagnostic physics. AMPR and the leading oncology centres in Russia regularly organize courses. The ESTRO teaching courses, supported by the IAEA, also contribute a lot to the professional education of Russian medical physicists. For the efficient organization of scientific and education activities, mainly in the field of the continuing education and professional development of medical physicists, AMPR has established a non-profit Institute of Medical Physics and Engineering (IMPE) which has united practically all leading scientists and professors in medical radiation physics. The group of highly skilled professors is chosen from the best Russian specialists and specially prepared for the training courses. Guidelines and recommendations are developed. Practical studies are conducted in the leading oncology centres. A viable education and training system allows to provide the necessary professional knowledge level, individual qualification control and certification of medical physicists. However, AMPR and IMPE are doing on their own without support from the government, sponsors and investors. AMPR and IMPE a re interested in the cooperation and support of their activities from the IAEA, ESTRO, IOMP, other international organizations and institutions. (author)

  7. Values of Communication Students and Professional Self-Selection.

    Parsons, Patrick R.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the fundamental cultural values and political attitudes of communications students at the beginning of their professional education. Compares profiles of students in advertising, print and broadcast journalism, telecommunications, and public relations. (MM)

  8. Problems of professional preparation of humanities college students

    Mun Alla Nikolaevna

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the psychological-pedagogical description of a modern student of a humanities college. The results of research into the professional orientation of humanities college students, in the structure of the adaptation process.

  9. Evaluation of a personal and professional development module in an undergraduate medical curriculum in India.

    Komattil, Ramnarayan; Hande, Shyamala Handattu; Mohammed, Ciraj Ali; Subramaniam, Barathi

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at evaluating the personal and professional development (PPD) module in the undergraduate medical curriculum in Melaka Manipal Medical College, India. PPD hours were incorporated in the curriculum. A team of faculty members and a faculty coordinator identified relevant topics and students were introduced to topics such as medical humanities, leadership skills, communication skills, ethics, professional behavior, and patient narratives. The module was evaluated using a prevalidated course feedback questionnaire which was administered to three consecutive batches of students from March 2011 to March 2013. To analyze faculty perspectives, one to one in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted by the coordinators with faculty members who conducted the PPD classes. Analysis of the course feedback form revealed that majority (80%) of students agreed that the module was well prepared and was "highly relevant" to the profession. Faculty found the topics new and interdisciplinary and there was a sense of sharing responsibility and workload by the faculty. PPD modules are necessary components of the curriculum and help to mould students while they are still acquiescent as they assume their roles as doctors of the future. PMID:26838576

  10. Mental Health of Dubai Medical College Students

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Galal Ahmed, Mohammed; Ali Bayoumi, Fatehia; Abdul Moneenum, Abeer; Alshawa, Haya

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Considering the association between medical school dropout and psychiatric distress, we aimed to assess the prevalence of psychiatric distress among medical students at Dubai Medical College. Methods: One hundred and three medical students were chosen randomly and were assessed by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Results: The mean age for the students was 18.85 year (Minimum: 17, Maximum: 22), and 90.3% were between 18 and 20 years old. The mean of GHQ score was 16.46. Of th...

  11. Teaching communication skills and medical ethics to undergraduate medical student

    SADIA AHSIN; AFSHAN SHAHID; GHULAM MURTAZA GONDAL

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to improve communication skills and knowledge of bioethics of last year medical students doing clerkship and to evaluate the effectiveness of using workshops for this purpose from students’ point of view, in order to continue such programs in future. Methods: After Ethical approval for the study a two-day workshop on teaching effective communication skills and principles of medical ethics was planned and conducted by the department...

  12. Effects of Reflection on Clinical Learning of Medical Students

    Abolgasem Amini; Nemat Bilan; Masumeh Ghasempour

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Reflection is considered as a critical characteristic in professional competitions. Despite propagation of reflection as an important educational issue and existence of several helpful patterns, instructions conducted by teachers to explaining and expanding of it, are very little. Studies related to this topic were mainly performed in the field of nursing. Therefore, we decided to evaluate the effects of reflection on medical students. Methods: In 2012, between July and December...

  13. Factors affecting the performance of undergraduate medical students: A perspective

    Ananya Mandal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Performance of medical students in developing nations like India is perceived to have largely declined. Aims: We attempted to assess the reasons behind such trends. Settings and Design: Students in their third year of medical study were given a predesigned, pretested structured and validated questionnaire that they filled in anonymously. The key areas assessed were concentration, interest and understanding of the subject and other perceived causes of poor performance. Tests for descriptive statistics were applied for evaluation. Results and Conclusions: One hundred and fifty students participated in the study. Fifty-five (36.66% students performed poorly. Male gender, inability to clear the previous professional examination at the first attempt, difficulty in understanding medium of instruction, self-assessed depression, sleep disorders and perceived parental and peer pressure and dissatisfaction with career choice were significantly linked with poor performance (P<0.05 for each factor. Socioeconomic status and regularity in class were not linked to academic performance.

  14. Factors Affecting the Performance of Undergraduate Medical Students: A Perspective

    Mandal, Ananya; Ghosh, Arijit; Sengupta, Gairik; Bera, Tapas; Das, Nina; Mukherjee, Subir

    2012-01-01

    Context: Performance of medical students in developing nations like India is perceived to have largely declined. Aims: We attempted to assess the reasons behind such trends. Settings and Design: Students in their third year of medical study were given a predesigned, pretested structured and validated questionnaire that they filled in anonymously. The key areas assessed were concentration, interest and understanding of the subject and other perceived causes of poor performance. Tests for descriptive statistics were applied for evaluation. Results and Conclusions: One hundred and fifty students participated in the study. Fifty-five (36.66%) students performed poorly. Male gender, inability to clear the previous professional examination at the first attempt, difficulty in understanding medium of instruction, self-assessed depression, sleep disorders and perceived parental and peer pressure and dissatisfaction with career choice were significantly linked with poor performance (P<0.05 for each factor). Socioeconomic status and regularity in class were not linked to academic performance. PMID:22654287

  15. Factors influencing the choice of a medical specialty among medical students

    Areeba Saif

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The choice of a medical specialty by a medical student is a complex process in which several factors play a contributory role, making the decision process an evolving one as the medical student undergoes different experiences in his/her professional journey. In our study, we attempted to identify factors that play a significant role in influencing medical students towards choosing a specialty and also to delineate the differences that exist amongst students’ priorities based on gender and year of study at a medical university.Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey conducted on the medical students enrolled at Dow Medical College. Students from all five years of the medicine program were randomly selected. A self-administered questionnaire based on 16 questions was designed. The first part comprised of bio-data and specification of the choice of career by the participants. The second part comprised 13 factors influencing students’ choices, that were to be rated by the students in the order of their importance. Mann Whitney test, Kruskal Wallis test and Tukey’s test was performed for comparison.Results: Out of 400 candidates that successfully completed the study, all except one planned to specialize in one of the three major fields. 233 (58.4% students wanted to pursue medicine, 156 (39.1% surgery and only 10 (2.5% wanted to adopt research as their career. Significant differences were found in working hours, duration of residency and influence during clinical rotations between the two specialties.Conclusion: These findings re-enforce the recently evolving idea that all disparities existing between different specialties should be resolved so as to ensure an equal spread of doctors in all fields. There is also a need to introduce more female friendly legislations and more incentives need to be offered to medical graduates to prompt more of them to choose a future career in research.

  16. Association of academic stress with sleeping difficulties in medical students of a Pakistani medical school: a cross sectional survey

    Ahmed Waqas; Spogmai Khan; Waqar Sharif; Uzma Khalid; Asad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Medicine is one of the most stressful fields of education because of its highly demanding professional and academic requirements. Psychological stress, anxiety, depression and sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in medical students. Methods. This cross-sectional study was undertaken at the Combined Military Hospital Lahore Medical College and the Institute of Dentistry in Lahore (CMH LMC), Pakistan. Students enrolled in all yearly courses for the Bachelor of Medicine and...

  17. Preparing Students to Write a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper

    Stevens, Cheryl; Schneider, Paige P.; Johnson, Corey W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a process for guiding students through the writing of a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper and a one-page philosophy statement suitable for use in students' professional portfolios. The authors describe how the review of recreation education literature, scholarship on teaching and learning, and assessment of student…

  18. Differential Attitudes of International Students toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help.

    Dadfar, Sohrab; Friedlander, Myran L.

    1982-01-01

    International students representing 75 countries (N=172) completed Fischer and Turner's scale of Attitudes Toward Seeking Professional Help. Analyses of results suggested that international students inexperienced with professional help perceive it as a nontrustworthy, inappropriate means for solving personal difficulties. (Author)

  19. Barriers to Chinese College Students Seeking Psychological Help from Professionals

    Wang, Haiping

    2013-01-01

    Chinese students were found less likely to seek professional help for psychological problems compared to their western counterparts. The purpose of the present research was to investigate the barriers to Chinese college students seeking psychological help from professionals. Quantitative data on Asian values, social supports, self-stigma,…

  20. Stress among Isfahan medical sciences students

    Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Marjani, Abdoljalal; Abdolrahman, Charkazi; Mostafa, Qorbani; Hossein, Shahnazi

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of psychological stress among Isfahan medical sciences students. Methods: Cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was carried out among the 387 medical sciences students (medicine, pharmacy, and dentistry) of Isfahan, Iran through census. In academic year 2010-2011, Kessler-10 questionnaire was given to the students a month before semester examinations. Scores ≥20 were considered as indicative of positive stress symptoms. R...

  1. Teaching communication skills and medical ethics to undergraduate medical student

    SADIA AHSIN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to improve communication skills and knowledge of bioethics of last year medical students doing clerkship and to evaluate the effectiveness of using workshops for this purpose from students’ point of view, in order to continue such programs in future. Methods: After Ethical approval for the study a two-day workshop on teaching effective communication skills and principles of medical ethics was planned and conducted by the department of Medical Education through multidisciplinary faculty of Foundation University Medical College, Pakistan. A total of 102 last year medical students participated in this workshop. The students were divided into 8 groups each containing 12 students. A team of pre trained facilitators for each group conducted the group activities. Teaching strategies including interactive discussions on basic principles of doctor-patient relationship, power point presentations, day to day case scenarios, video clips and presentations involving students in role plays were used. Pre and post workshop self evaluation proformas about knowledge and skills of communication and medical ethics were rated (0=none, 1=below average, 2=average, 3=above average, 4=very good, 5=excellent by the students. Results: 89 out of 102 participants returned the proformas. A significant percentage of students (%82 showed improvement in their knowledge and skills of appreciating bioethical issues like valid informed consent, patient confidentiality, end of life issues and breaking bad news by rating as “very good” after participation in the workshop. More than %70 students recommended this activity for other students. Conclusion: Teaching through interactive workshops was found to be an effective method as reflected by students’ feedback. Therefore, the program will be continued in future.

  2. Self-medication practices among dental, midwifery and nursing students

    Osarobo Ehigiator

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the pattern of self-medication among dental, midwifery and nursing students and to evaluate the factors associated with self-medication. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional of dental, nursing and midwifery students undergoing clinical training in University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria was conducted in 2010. The elicited data include demography, use of drug without doctor′s prescription, type of drug used (pain relievers, antibiotics, anti-malarial, cough medication and nutritional supplement, reasons for self-medication, factors that influenced the choice of drug and source of drug. Results: A total of 76.8% of the respondents indulged in self-medication practices. Of which, 33.0% used the medication inappropriately. The type of self-medication use was, pain relievers (60.5%, antibiotics (43.2%, anti-malarial (40.5%, cough medication (16.7% and nutritional supplement (16.0%. Previous experience with the illness and perceived minor nature of the illness were the predominant reasons for the self-medication practices among the respondents. The major factors that influenced their choice of medication were previous experience with similar symptoms (39.7%, advice of non-doctor health professional (33.5%. Pharmacy shop was the main source of the self-medicated drugs. Conclusion: Self-medication was a common practice among this studied group of health workers. The level of inappropriate drug use denotes self-medication as an unhealthy option, and it therefore, should be discouraged.

  3. Self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students in a tertiary care medical college, West Bengal

    I Banerjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-medication is a widely prevalent practice in India. It assumes a special significance among medical students as they are the future medical practitioners. Aim: To assess the pattern of self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students. Settings and Design: Tertiary care medical college in West Bengal, India. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted among the undergraduate medical students. Results: Out of 500 students of the institute, 482 consented for the study and filled in the supplied questionnaire. Fourteen incomplete questionnaires were excluded and the remaining 468 analyzed. It was found that 267 (57.05% respondents practiced self-medication. The principal morbidities for seeking self-medication included cough and common cold as reported by 94 students (35.21% followed by diarrhea (68 students (25.47%, fever (42 students (15.73%, headache (40 students (14.98% and pain abdomen due to heartburn/ peptic ulcer (23 students (8.61%. Drugs/ drug groups commonly used for self-medication included antibiotics (31.09% followed by analgesics (23.21%, antipyretics (17.98%, antiulcer agents (8.99%, cough suppressant (7.87%, multivitamins (6.37% and antihelminthics (4.49%. Among reasons for seeking self-medication, 126 students (47.19% felt that their illness was mild while 76 (28.46% preferred as it is time-saving. About 42 students (15.73% cited cost-effectiveness as the primary reason while 23 (8.62% preferred because of urgency. Conclusion: Our study shows that self-medication is widely practiced among students of the institute. In this situation, faculties should create awareness and educate their students regarding advantages and disadvantages of self-medication.

  4. Do you think it's a disease? a survey of medical students

    Erueti Chrissy; Glasziou Paul; Mar Chris; van Driel Mieke L

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The management of medical conditions is influenced by whether clinicians regard them as "disease" or "not a disease". The aim of the survey was to determine how medical students classify a range of conditions they might encounter in their professional lives and whether a different name for a condition would influence their decision in the categorisation of the condition as a 'disease' or 'not a disease'. Methods We surveyed 3 concurrent years of medical students to classif...

  5. Recording and podcasting of lectures for students of medical school.

    Brunet, Pierre; Cuggia, Marc; Le Beux, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) becomes an important way for the knowledge transmission, especially in the field of medicine. Podcasting (mobile broadcast content) has recently emerged as an efficient tool for distributing information towards professionals, especially for e-learning contents.The goal of this work is to implement software and hardware tools for collecting medical lectures at its source by direct recording (halls and classrooms) and provide the automatic delivery of these resources for students on different type of devices (computer, smartphone or videogames console). We describe the overall architecture and the methods used by medical students to master this technology in their daily activities. We highlight the benefits and the limits of the Podcast technologies for medical education. PMID:21893751

  6. Prevalence of Depression Among Medical Students of a Private Medical College in India

    Ajit Singh,

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical education can contribute to the development of depression in medical students which may have possible negative academic and professional consequences. The aims of this study were to explore the prevalence of depressive symptoms and their relationships to socio-demographic variables among a cross section of medical students of a private medical college in India. Methods: A cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire-based survey was conducted including all students from first to fourth year of a medical college in India. Beck depression inventory was used to assess the level of depression with a score of 12 or higher considered depressive. Additional questions regarding demographic variables were also included in the survey. Data analysis was done on Epi info version 6. Results: A total of 336 students participated giving a response rate of 88%. A total of 49.1% students reported depressive symptoms. It was significantly higher in 1st year (59.3% and 2nd year (65.6%, as compared to 3rd (34.4% and 4th year (37.2% students [p<0. 05]. Substance abuse(p<0.0001, first and second year of study, female sex and language of instruction other than English at 10+2 level were associated factors for the development of depressive symptoms [p<0.05]. A significant negative association was also found between regular exercise and depression (p<0.05. Conclusion: Depression may be a significant hidden problem in Indian medical students and mechanisms to identify and help students with mental health problems should be seriously considered.

  7. Medical professionalism from a socio-cultural perspective: Evaluating medical residents communicative attitudes during the medical encounter in Malaysia

    Ganasegeran, K.; SAR Al-Dubai

    2014-01-01

    Context: The practice of medicine requires good communication skills to foster excellent rapport in doctor patient relationship. Reports on communication skills learning attitude among medical professionals are key essentials toward improving patient safety and quality of care. Aims: We aimed to determine factors affecting communication skills learning attitudes among medical residents in Malaysia. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional survey, in a Malaysian public health hospital. Materials a...

  8. Study of Association of Psychological Stress and Depression among Undergraduate Medical Students in Pondicherry

    Devi Kittu, Rohan Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical education across the globe is perceived as being inherently stressful. Studies on psychological problems such as stress, depression and anxiety among medical students have found that these disorders are under diagnosed and under treated. In this background the present study was undertaken with the objectives to assess the magni-tude of depression and its association with stress among medical students. Methods: A Cross sectional study was undertaken among 235 medical students in a private medical college, Pondicherry. Tools similar to General Health Questionaire (GHQ-12 and Beck depression Inventory (BDI was used to screen psychological stress and depression respectively. Results: The prevalence of depression was 71% among medical students. Psychological stress was associated with depression. Conclusion: Emphasize should be laid on the importance of screening for depression of medical students on a regular basis for early detection and rendering appropriate intervention like group counseling, stress management training etc. to protect the future professionals.

  9. SELF MEDICATION PATTERN, INCIDENCE AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH IT, AMONG FIRST YEAR MBBS STUDENTS OF MEDICAL COLLEGE JAMMU

    Nusrat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Self - medication is quite common practice in general and particularly among medical students. Self - medication can be defined as obtaining and consuming medication without the advice of a clinician for treatment of an ailment. There can be many reasons for increased likelihood of self - medication among the medical students like easy access and senior medical student’s advice, easy access to physician’s samples, because of the white coat, from pharmacist / chemist shops. 1 However self - medication can be quite harmful and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It could lead to various complications and side effects like - habituation and addiction, poisoning, hyper vitaminosis, antibiotic resistance and incorrect and delayed diagnosis, over diagnosis or under diagnosis, at times really serious and fatal consequences can occur. It results in wastage of resources, increase resistance of pathogens and can causes serious hazards like adverse drug reaction, prolonged suffering and drug dependence. This study was performed to assess and evaluate the incidence and awareness of self - medications among the medical students of first professional MBBS in medical college Ja mmu. A study on one hundred medical students of Jammu medical college was conducted to assess and evaluates the pattern of self - medication among these students. This study was done to know the frequencies and reasons and the pattern of self - medication among young medical students of Jammu region. A detail questionnaire was prepared and each student was asked to fill up the Performa and then the data was analyzed. It was found that self - medication is very common (90 % and is comparable to studies from other parts of the world. For most of them the reason for self - medication was common cold . The result emphasizes the amount of problem in the society about self - medication and lack of awareness about side effects. Hence more strict regulations are needed to avoid more healthcare problems and have a responsible pattern of self - medication. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : To determine the prevalence and pattern of self - medication among medical students of Jammu. To assess and evaluate the reasons, factors and problems related to self - medications.

  10. The Key Role of a Transition Course in Preparing Medical Students for Internship

    Teo, Alan R.; Harleman, Elizabeth; O’Sullivan, Patricia S.; Maa, John

    2011-01-01

    Among the core transitions in medical education is the one from medical school to residency. Despite this challenging transition, the final year of medical school is known as lacking structure and clarity. The authors examine the preparation of medical students for the professional and personal challenges of internship in the context of transition courses. They first describe the development of a residency transition course, offered since 2001 at the University of California, San Francisco, S...

  11. Developmental life of the medical student: curriculum considerations.

    Lipsitt, Don R

    2015-02-01

    Few medical educators would dispute that the emotional development and well being of the medical student is of critical importance in the pathway to physicianhood. It has been suggested that failure to address this aspect of medical education may account for various health problems and levels of impairment during medical school and beyond. Some authors have suggested that the personal development and "professionalization" of the student occurs through modeling, the medical school "culture," and the "hidden curriculum." In recognition of the randomness, incompleteness, or inadequacy of this approach, a number of attempts have been made to address this important but difficult dimension of medical education. However, programs designed to foster self-reflection and appreciation of affect in the physician-patient relationship are often limited as electives or unsupported by faculty and staff and therefore fall short of their objective. The author proposes that a pedagogical framework based on an analogy of life cycle theory (a la Erikson or others) offers a schema within which to consider efforts being made in medical curricula to promote self-awareness, appreciation of affect in oneself and one's patients, and a context in which to minimize the risk of illness and impairment. PMID:25001431

  12. Ireland's medical brain drain: migration intentions of Irish medical students.

    Gouda, Pishoy

    2015-12-01

    To provide the optimum level of healthcare, it is important that the supply of well-trained doctors meets the demand. However, despite many initiatives, Ireland continues to have a shortfall of physicians, which has been projected to persist. Our study aimed to investigate the migration intentions of Irish medical students and identify the factors that influence their decisions in order to design appropriate interventions to sustain the supply of trained doctors in order to maintain a viable medical system.

  13. Emergency Medicine for medical students world wide!

    Perinpam, Larshan; Thi Huynh, Anh-Nhi

    2015-01-01

    A guest blog from Larshan Perinpam (President of ISAEM) and Anh-Nhi Thi Huynh (Vice president of external affairs, ISAEM) - http://blogs.bmj.com/emj/2015/04/17/emergency-medicine-for-medical-students-world-wide/......A guest blog from Larshan Perinpam (President of ISAEM) and Anh-Nhi Thi Huynh (Vice president of external affairs, ISAEM) - http://blogs.bmj.com/emj/2015/04/17/emergency-medicine-for-medical-students-world-wide/...

  14. Emotional intelligence and perceived stress in healthcare students: a multi-institutional, multi-professional survey

    McKendree Jean; Birks Yvonne; Watt Ian

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Emotional intelligence (EI) is increasingly discussed as having a potential role in medicine, nursing, and other healthcare disciplines, both for personal mental health and professional practice. Stress has been identified as being high for students in healthcare courses. This study investigated whether EI and stress differed among students in four health professions (dental, nursing, graduate mental health workers, medical) and whether there was evidence that EI might ser...

  15. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience

    Abdallah B

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bahia Abdallah,1 Jihad Irani,2 Silva Dakessian Sailian,1 Vicky George Gebran,1 Ursula Rizk1 1Nursing Program at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Balamand, 2Faculty of Medicine and Medical Sciences, University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon Abstract: Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students' performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties' expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students' skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. Keywords: cross-professional education, CPE, clinical skills, medical education, nursing faculty, clinical performance

  16. Teacher training program for medical students: improvements needed

    van Diggele, Christie; Burgess, Annette; Mellis, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Skills in peer teaching, assessment, and feedback are increasingly documented internationally as required graduate attributes in medicine. Yet these skills are rarely taught in medical schools. We sought to design and deliver a short but effective teacher training (TT) program for medical students that could be easily integrated into the professional development curriculum. This study sought to evaluate such a pilot program, based on student perception. Methods The study took place at a major metropolitan teaching hospital, where 38 medical students were invited to attend a voluntary, newly designed four-module TT program. In total, 23/38 (61%) of invited students attended. Mixed methods were used for evaluation. Questionnaires were completed by 21/23 (91%) of students, and 6/23 (26%) of students participated in a focus group. Results Students reported that as a result of the program they felt more confident to facilitate small group teaching activities and to provide feedback to peers using the suggested frameworks. Students would like the program to contain more in-depth educational theory and to allow a more time for small group learning activities. They would also like to see opportunities for participation across all clinical schools. Conclusion The TT program was successful in increasing student awareness of educational theory and practice, thereby improving their confidence in teaching and assessing their peers and making them feel better prepared for their careers as medical practitioners. Key improvements to the program are needed in terms of more in-depth theory and more time spent on small group learning. This might be achieved by complementing the course with e-learning. PMID:25878520

  17. Attitudes to cadaveric organ donation in Irish preclinical medical students.

    Cahill, Kevin C

    2011-06-01

    There is a worldwide shortage of organs for transplantation. It has been shown that the attitude of healthcare professionals can improve the rates of organ donation, and that educational programs aimed at improving both attitudes and knowledge base of professionals can have positive outcomes. Although there has been research carried out on this topic, there has been none in Ireland. Anatomy dissection can be a stressor to medical students-we investigate the attitudes of Irish students to organ donation and how they change with exposure to anatomy dissection. A questionnaire was administered to first year students in the School of Medicine in University College Dublin, Ireland, three times over a nine-week period at the commencement of classes in an academic year. The attitudes of the students were positive throughout regarding organ donation by a stranger, a family member, or themselves. There was, however, a significant decrease in support for the donation of a family member\\'s organs in a minority of students. Irish students\\' attitudes to postmortem organ donation are positive and are not changed by exposure to the dissecting room. There is support for the donation of organs, and willingness among students to donate their own organs and support donation by family members.

  18. "Without handicap": issues of medical schools and physically disabled students.

    Reichgott, M J

    1996-07-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 requires that access to education not be denied simply on the basis of disability. The law requires definition of "basic qualifications" required of all applicants, "essential elements" of the curriculum, and whether accommodation would alter the "fundamental nature" of the learning experience or impose "undue burden." Medical schools have a very low proportion of physically disabled students, which the author argues is largely a result of schools' conception of the "undifferentiated graduate" as being capable of performing the history, physical examination, and any medical procedure without an intermediary. But the author maintains that medical students need not be unblemished physically; medical educators' obligation is to educate those students who are qualified to become physicians by virtue of intelligence, professional attitude, and ability to effectively interact and communicate. With respect to clinical training, it is important to consider whether personal, hands-on experience is required for adequate learning to occur. Because most physicians limit the scopes of their practices and do not perform all procedures, because those physicians who develop physical disabilities are not precluded from continuing in some forms of medical practice, and because technologic advances allow for the substitution of imaging and diagnostic testing for the more conventional approach to the physical examination, the requirement for hands-on capability becomes less compelling. Yet not every physically disabled applicant should be admitted to medical school, and those admitted require coaching, guidance, and career advice in order to succeed with their physical limitations. The author suggests that one of the seminal concepts of medical education, "without handicap," should be seen not as referring to the pre-existing physical status of students but instead as the obligation of educators to provide all their students with the broadest possible learning experiences so that they will be without the handicap of inadequate education when they proceed to their chosen fields. PMID:9158339

  19. Advising adolescents on the use of psychotropic medication: attitudes among medical and psychology students

    Spitz Elisabeth

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that medical students are more aware of the benefits of psychotropic treatment than are members of the general public, and that the more knowledge students acquire about psychiatry and pharmacology, the more favorable their attitudes become towards psychotropic drugs and other treatments. Objectives This study among students investigates the relationship between certain aspects of personality and attitudes towards advising adolescents with psychosocial problems about the use of psychotropic medication. Methods Two groups of healthcare students were recruited from universities in Eastern France. 41 fourth-year medical students (MS who had completed their psychiatry course, and 76 third-year psychology students (PS in the faculty of human sciences. Respondents completed a self-administered instrument (20 brief case studies, and a personality inventory at the end of a lecture. Participation was voluntary and unpaid. Results MS would recommend psychotropic drugs in 40% of the 20 cases, PS in 27%. MS who would prescribe psychotropic medication differed in personality profile from PS. MS with a tendency to experience anger and related states such as frustration, and who did not see fulfilling moral obligations as important were more likely to prescribe psychotropic drugs. Also more likely to recommend psychotropic drugs, but for different reasons, were PS who were susceptible to stress but not shy or socially anxious, who showed friendliness but little interest in others, and who lacked distance in their decision-making. Conclusion Health promotion is not simply a matter of educating those young people who take psychotropic drugs – health professionals must also question the criteria that inform their decisions. It is as important to investigate the attitudes of the future health professionals (advisers or prescribers as it is to focus on consumer-related issues.

  20. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  1. Training Medical Students in Empathic Communication

    Bayne, Hannah Barnhill

    2011-01-01

    Empathy is an important component of the doctor-patient relationship, yet previous studies point to its steady decline in medical students as they progress through medical school and residency programs. Empathy training has thus been identified as a goal of instruction, yet it is unclear how this training can best be implemented within the medical…

  2. Learning from Fellow Engineering Students Who Have Current Professional Experience

    Davies, John W.; Rutherford, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of how experience-led content in an engineering degree can be strengthened by creating opportunities for engineering students to benefit from the knowledge, skills and resources of students with current professional experience. Students who study civil engineering part-time at Coventry University (while also…

  3. Teaching Research Methodologies to Professionally Oriented Honors Students

    Levinson, Julie; Mandel, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of encouraging undergraduate students to pursue independent research have been well documented (Craney; Guterman; Hathaway et al.; Ishiyama; Kremer and Bringle; Volkwein and Carbone). Introducing students to research processes and protocols is always a challenge, particularly for students enrolled in professionally oriented,…

  4. Helping Competencies of Student Affairs Professionals: A Delphi Study

    Reynolds, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather student affairs professionals' perceptions of the knowledge and skills needed to effectively help students. Using the Delphi method, 159 entry-level and mid-level student affairs administrators from institutions across the United States were surveyed regarding their perceptions of the helping skills they use…

  5. Career choices among medical students in Bangladesh

    SM Moslehuddin Ahmed

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available SM Moslehuddin Ahmed1, Md Anwarul Azim Majumdar2, Rezina Karim3, Sayeeda Rahman2, Nuzhat Rahman41Department of Community Medicine, Uttara Adhunik Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 2Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, Bradford, UK; 3Department of Microbiology, Uttara Adhunik Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 4Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAIntroduction: Information regarding career choices of medical students is important to plan human resources for health, design need-based educational programs, and ensure equitable and quality health care services in a country.Aim: The aim of the study is to identify career choices, nature of career, intended practice locations, and reasons for career choices of Bangladesh medical students.Method: First-, third-, and fifth-year students of Bangladesh Medical College and Uttara Adhunik Medical College completed a self-report questionnaire on career choices, nature of career, intended practice locations, and reasons for career choices. The students were requested to choose three long-term choices from the given specialties.Results: A total of 132 students responded (46 males and 86 females and response rate was 75%. The popular choices (first choice among males and females were medical specialty, surgical specialty, obstetrics and gynecology, and general practice. For first, second, and third choices altogether, male students chose surgical specialties and female students preferred medical specialties. The leading reasons for selecting a specialty were personal interest and wide job opportunity. More than 67% of respondents wanted to join private services and about 90% chose major cities as practice locations. About 43% of respondents expressed willingness to practice medicine in Bangladesh, whereas 51% of total respondents wanted to practice abroad.Discussion: Majority of students intended to specialize in established clinical specialties and subsequently practice in major cities, and more than half wanted to immigrate to other countries. Basic medical subjects and service-oriented (lifestyle-related and preventive/social medical specialties were found to be less attractive. If this pattern continues, Bangladesh will suffer a chronic shortage of health personnel in certain specialties and in rural areas.Conclusions: Reorientation of health care and medical education is needed along with policy settings to attract doctors to the scarcity and high-priority disciplines so that imbalances encountered would be minimal in future.Keywords: career choices, medical students, Bangladesh 

  6. Professional Activities, Needed Competencies and Training Needs of Medical Librarians in Pakistan

    Ullah, Midrar; Ameen, Kanwal; Bakhtar, Salman

    2011-01-01

    The study aims to explore the professional activities, needed competencies and education/training needs of medical librarians in Pakistan. The following questions guided the study: what are the current professional activities of medical librarians in Pakistan? What is their perception of the competencies needed of medical librarians? And what are…

  7. AWARENESS ABOUT TOBACCO USE AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS OF UTTARAKHAND

    Mohit Sharma

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide tobacco is the second most common cause of death. It is the biggest enemy of public health, still people smoke knowing well the consequences. In addition to the high public health costs of treating tobacco-caused diseases, tobacco kills people at the height of their productivity, depriving families of bread winners and nations of a healthy workforce. Tobacco addiction mostly starts at adolescence. Various reasons cited by adolescents being; peer pressure, stress or for fun. Research Question: What is the level of awareness regarding tobacco use among medical students? Objectives: To assess awareness about tobacco abuse among medical students of Uttarakhand. Study Design: Cross-Sectional epidemiological study. Settings and Participants: Medical and Dental students of all professionals excluding Interns of two Medical and two Dental colleges of Uttarakhand were selected for survey. Study Period: May 2008 to October 2008 Sample Size: 400 Medical and Dental students. Sampling Technique: Simple stratified random sampling. Study Variable: A predesigned, pretested, self-administered questionnaire was used for collecting information on Age, Sex, Socio-demographic profile, Knowledge and awareness regarding Tobacco use, etc.  Statistical Analysis: Standard statistical package i.e. SPSS, Microsoft Excel.  Results: Life time prevalence of tobacco use was found to be 31.75%, the most common reasons cited by students was peer pressure 33.7%. The level of awareness regarding the harmful effects of tobacco smoking was found to be 91.8%. Majority 68.3% of tobacco users think that media plays an important source for creating awareness about harmful effects of tobacco. 83.25% students are against tobacco advertisements and support ban, 84.75% on tobacco use in public place. 83.75% students surveyed believed that the preventive measures taken up by the Government are not sufficient.

  8. Medication therapy management clinic: perception of healthcare professionals in a University medical center setting

    Shah M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the overall perception and utilization of the pharmacist managed medication therapy management (MTM clinic services, by healthcare professionals in a large, urban, university medical care setting.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey sent to 195 healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Illinois Outpatient Care Center to determine their perception and utilization of the MTM clinic. The survey consisted of 12 questions and was delivered through a secure online application. Results: Sixty-two healthcare professionals (32% completed the survey. 82% were familiar with the MTM clinic, and 63% had referred patients to the clinic. Medication adherence and disease state management was the most common reason for referral. Lack of knowledge on the appropriate referral procedure was the prominent reason for not referring patients to the MTM clinic. Of the providers that were aware of MTM services, 44% rated care as ‘excellent’, 44% as ‘good’, 5% as ‘fair’, and 0% stated ‘poor’. Strengths of MTM clinic identified by healthcare providers included in-depth education to patients, close follow-up, and detailed medication reconciliation provided by MTM clinic pharmacists. Of those familiar with MTM clinic, recommendations included; increase marketing efforts to raise awareness of the MTM clinic service, create collaborative practice agreements between MTM pharmacists and physicians, and ensure that progress notes are more concise.Conclusion: In a large, urban, academic institution MTM clinic is perceived as a valuable resource to optimize patient care by providing patients with in-depth education as it relates to their prescribed medications and disease states. These identified benefits of MTM clinic lead to frequent patient referrals specifically for aid with medication adherence and disease state management.

  9. Impact of an Oncology Course on the Attitudes of Freshman Medical Students.

    Appel, Marilyn H.; And Others

    Previous attempts to change the prevailing negative attitudes of health professionals toward cancer and cancer patients have consisted mainly of elective courses for small groups of students at advanced levels of medical training. In order to develop more positive attitudes, the Cancer Coordinating Committee at the Medical College of Pennsylvania…

  10. Medical students' learning from patient-led teaching

    Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    qualitative approach based on focus group interviews. Analysis was based on a prior developed model of the characteristics of learning from patient instructors. The authors used this model as sensitizing concepts for the analysis of data while at the same time being open to new insights by constant comparison......The aim of this study was to explore how medical students perceive the experience of learning from patient instructors (patients with rheumatism who teach health professionals and students) in the context of coupled faculty-led and patient-led teaching session. This was an explorative study with a...... of old and new findings. Results showed a negotiation both between and within the students of the importance of patients' experiential knowledge versus scientific biomedical knowledge. On one hand students appreciated the experiential learning environment offered in the PI-led sessions representing a...

  11. Continuous mentoring of medical students provides space for reflection and awareness of their own development

    Susanne Kalén; Sari Ponzer; Astrid Seeberger; Anna Kiessling; Charlotte Silén

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to increase under-standing of the meaning of continuous group and individual mentoring for medical students´ personal and professional development. Methods: A qualitative approach with individual student interviews and directed content analysis was chosen to investigate and interpret the meaning of mentorship. Results: Five themes emerged: psychosocial support by the mentor, a relationship with a physician beneath the professional surface, space for someth...

  12. Knowledge, attitudes, and influenza vaccination of medical students in Warsaw, Strasbourg, and Teheran

    Machowicz, R; Wyszomirski, T; Ciechanska, J; Mahboobi, N; Wnekowicz, E; Obrowski, M; Zycinska, K; Zielonka, TM

    2010-01-01

    Objective Influenza vaccinations are recommended for health professionals by the WHO and the CDC. Medical students are important health professionals not only as future physicians, but also due to their frequent contact with patients during their education. The aim of this study was to compare the knowledge, attitudes, motivations and influenza vaccinations of medicine students in three different countries: Poland, France, and Iran. Material and methods 1045 self-reported questionnaires were ...

  13. Attitudes toward people with mental illness among medical students

    Vijayalakshmi Poreddi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Globally, people with mental illness frequently encounter stigma, prejudice, and discrimination by public and health care professionals. Research related to medical students′ attitudes toward people with mental illness is limited from India. Aim: The aim was to assess and compare the attitudes toward people with mental illness among medical students′. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study design was carried out among medical students, who were exposed (n = 115 and not exposed (n = 61 to psychiatry training using self-reporting questionnaire. Results: Our findings showed improvement in students′ attitudes after exposure to psychiatry in benevolent (t = 2.510, P < 0.013 and stigmatization (t = 2.656, P < 0.009 domains. Further, gender, residence, and contact with mental illness were the factors that found to be influencing students′ attitudes toward mental illness. Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that psychiatric education proved to be effective in changing the attitudes of medical students toward mental illness to a certain extent. However, there is an urgent need to review the current curriculum to prepare undergraduate medical students to provide holistic care to the people with mental health problems.

  14. Do medical students require education on issues related to plagiarism?

    Varghese, Joe; Jacob, Molly

    2015-01-01

    In the course of our professional experience, we have seen that many medical students plagiarise. We hypothesised that they do so out of ignorance and that they require formal education on the subject. With this objective in mind, we conducted a teaching session on issues related to plagiarism. As a part of this, we administered a quiz to assess their baseline knowledge on plagiarism and a questionnaire to determine their attitudes towards it. We followed this up with an interactive teaching session, in which we discussed various aspects of plagiarism. We subjected the data obtained from the quiz and questionnaire to bivariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 423 medical students participated in the study. Their average score for the quiz was 4.96±1.67 (out of 10). Age, gender and years in medical school were not significantly associated with knowledge regarding plagiarism. The knowledge scores were negatively correlated with permissive attitudes towards plagiarism and positively correlated with attitudes critical of the practice. Men had significantly higher scores on permissive attitudes compared to women . In conclusion, we found that the medical students' knowledge regarding plagiarism was limited. Those with low knowledge scores tended to have permissive attitudes towards plagiarism and were less critical of the practice. We recommend the inclusion of formal instruction on this subject in the medical curriculum, so that this form of academic misconduct can be tackled. PMID:25671582

  15. ‘A world of difference’: a qualitative study of medical students’ views on professionalism and the ‘good doctor’

    2014-01-01

    Background The importance of professional behaviour has been emphasized in medical school curricula. However, the lack of consensus on what constitutes professionalism poses a challenge to medical educators, who often resort to a negative model of assessment based on the identification of unacceptable behaviour. This paper presents results from a study exploring medical students’ views on professionalism, and reports on students’ constructs of the ‘good’ and the ‘professional’ doctor. Methods Data for this qualitative study were collected through focus groups conducted with medical students from one Western Australian university over a period of four years. Students were recruited through unit coordinators and invited to participate in a focus group. De-identified socio-demographic data were obtained through a brief questionnaire. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed and subjected to inductive thematic analysis. Results A total of 49 medical students took part in 13 focus groups. Differences between students’ understandings of the ‘good’ and ‘professional’ doctor were observed. Being competent, a good communicator and a good teacher were the main characteristics of the ‘good’ doctor. Professionalism was strongly associated with the adoption of a professional persona; following a code of practice and professional guidelines, and treating others with respect were also associated with the ‘professional’ doctor. Conclusions Students felt more connected to the notion of the ‘good’ doctor, and perceived professionalism as an external and imposed construct. When both constructs were seen as acting in opposition, students tended to forgo professionalism in favour of becoming a ‘good’ doctor. Results suggest that the teaching of professionalism should incorporate more formal reflection on the complexities of medical practice, allowing students and educators to openly explore and articulate any perceived tensions between what is formally taught and what is being observed in clinical practice. PMID:24725303

  16. "Star Power" for Teaching Professional Skills to Engineering Students

    Goh, Suk Meng

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential of a game called "Star Power" to teach professional skills to mechanical engineering undergraduates. The game was conducted as an activity in a final year Professional Practice unit. A survey in the form of a questionnaire was administered to participating students in the following…

  17. Professionalism in Student Online Social Networking: The Role of Educators

    Chester, A.; Kienhuis, M.; Pisani, H.; Shahwan-Akl, L.; White, K.

    2013-01-01

    Social media now form a common part of university students' experience. Both at university and after graduation, in their personal and professional lives, social media offer opportunities for connection previously unavailable. The ubiquitous nature of social networking has brought with it professional and ethical issues that need to be…

  18. Reconciling the Professional and Student Identities of Clinical Psychology Trainees

    McKenzie, Karen; Cossar, Jill A.; Fawns, Tim; Murray, Aja L.

    2013-01-01

    The study explored the ways in which qualified and trainee clinical psychologists perceived professional behaviour, as illustrated in a series of short vignettes, in student and clinical practice contexts. Comparisons were made to identify the extent to which ideas of professionalism differed across different learning contexts and between…

  19. Discourses of student orientation to medical education programs

    Rachel H. Ellaway

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although medical students’ initial orientation is an important point of transition in medical education, there is a paucity of literature on the subject and major variations in the ways that different institutions orient incoming medical students to their programs. Methods: We conducted a discourse analysis of medical education orientation in the literature and on data from a survey of peer institutions’ approaches to orientation. Results: These two discourses of orientation had clear similarities, in particular, the critical role of ceremony and symbols, and the focus on developing professionalism and physician identities. There were also differences between them, in particular, in the way that the discourse in the literature focused on the symbolic and professional aspects of orientation; something we have called ‘cultural orientation’. Meanwhile, those who were responsible for orientation in their own institutions tended to focus on the practical and social dimensions. Conclusion: By examining how orientation has been described and discussed, we identify three domains of orientation: cultural, social, and practical. These domains are relatively distinct in terms of the activities associated with them, and in terms of who is involved in organizing and running these activities. We also describe orientation as a liminal activity system on the threshold of medical school where incoming students initially cross into the profession. Interestingly, this state of ambiguity also extends to the scholarship of orientation with only some of its aspects attracting formal enquiry, even though there is a growing interest in transitions in medical education as a whole. We hope, therefore, that this study can help to legitimize enquiry into orientation in all its forms and that it can begin to situate the role of orientation more firmly within the firmament of medical education practice and research.

  20. Medical students' perception of dyad practice

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Rasmussen, Maria Birkvad; Bjørck, Sebastian; Gustafsson, Amandus; Ringsted, Charlotte V

    2014-01-01

    Training in pairs (dyad practice) has been shown to improve efficiency of clinical skills training compared with single practice but little is known about students' perception of dyad practice. The aim of this study was to explore the reactions and attitudes of medical students who were instructed...... to work in pairs during clinical skills training. A follow-up pilot survey consisting of four open-ended questions was administered to 24 fourth-year medical students, who completed four hours of dyad practice in managing patient encounters. The responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. The...

  1. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE PERPECTIVES OF THE UFSC ACCOUNTING SCIENCES STUDENTS

    Marcos Laffin; Caio Cezar Telles de Castro

    2015-01-01

    This goal of this study is to present the levels of importance and knowledge that students of the UFSC Undergraduate Program in Accounting Sciences identify for the exercise of the professional practice. The study was conducted through a survey that used two questionnaires (A and B) structured based on Likert scale. Questionnaire "A" sought to identify the importance of the course content to professional practice, and questionnaire "B" identified the level of perception that the students indi...

  2. Coping styles of women medical students.

    Davidson, V M

    1978-11-01

    As a student health psychiatrist in a medical school setting, the author has had experience in treating women students who present with various psychiatric complaints, ranging from mild depression and anxiety to psychosis. The concept of role strain will be illustrated as it occurs in the context of the presenting complaint and the subsequent treatment course. Issues of feminine sexuality and sex-role adjustment in single and married students will be discussed. Medical schools can increase their awareness of how sex bias and institutional sexism affect the mental health and well-being of women students and can take appropriate steps to lessen the detrimental effects for women in medical school. PMID:712786

  3. Medical student mandala making for holistic well-being.

    Potash, Jordan S; Chen, Julie Yun; Tsang, Joyce Pui Yan

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this qualitative research study was to discover how creating mandalas (art made in reference to a circle) might provide medical students with an opportunity for reflection on their current psychological state. As part of their year 3 family medicine rotation, medical students participated in an art-making workshop, during which, they created mandalas based on their current emotional state. Afterwards, they engaged in reflective writing and discussion. The responses of 180 students were analysed and coded according to the mandala classification framework 'Archetypal Stages of The Great Round of Mandala'. The results indicated that students were actively struggling in integrating conflicting perspectives as they were attempting to reconcile their professional identity as doctors. Additional results pertaining to psychosocial characteristics included navigating difficult emotions, requiring nurturance, handling endings, contemplating existential concerns and managing stress. The study has implications for making use of mandala making within a Jungian framework as means for medical students to reflect on their emotional state and achieve psychological balance. PMID:26341101

  4. Medical student mandala making for holistic well-being

    Potash, Jordan S; Chen, Julie Yun; Tsang, Joyce Pui Yan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this qualitative research study was to discover how creating mandalas (art made in reference to a circle) might provide medical students with an opportunity for reflection on their current psychological state. As part of their year 3 family medicine rotation, medical students participated in an art-making workshop, during which, they created mandalas based on their current emotional state. Afterwards, they engaged in reflective writing and discussion. The responses of 180 students were analysed and coded according to the mandala classification framework ‘Archetypal Stages of The Great Round of Mandala’. The results indicated that students were actively struggling in integrating conflicting perspectives as they were attempting to reconcile their professional identity as doctors. Additional results pertaining to psychosocial characteristics included navigating difficult emotions, requiring nurturance, handling endings, contemplating existential concerns and managing stress. The study has implications for making use of mandala making within a Jungian framework as means for medical students to reflect on their emotional state and achieve psychological balance. PMID:26341101

  5. Medical Students' Learning from Patient-Led Teaching: Experiential versus Biomedical Knowledge

    Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how medical students perceive the experience of learning from patient instructors (patients with rheumatism who teach health professionals and students) in the context of coupled faculty-led and patient-led teaching session. This was an explorative study with a qualitative approach based on focus group…

  6. PORTFOLIO INVOLVED INTO STUDENTS PERSONALLY-PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT MONITORING

    O. V. GREBENNIKOV; D. A. ROMANOV

    2016-01-01

    Modern evaluation activity in education is oriented to students personal achievements that’s may be reflected in different portfolio variants. In article we show the advantages of student personally-professional abilities and competencies assessment based on authentic representative portfolio. We show, that the portfolio if students competencies assessment method, students learning-vocational activity control technology and higher educational establishment informational - educational environm...

  7. THE TECHNOLOGY OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL STUDENT COMPETENCE

    Борис Петрович Яковлев

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents the stages and technology of professional student competence of students in higher vocational school.Method or the methodology of the work: Theoretical and methodological basis of the proposed technology of formation of professional student competence in higher education are: a synergetic approach, student-centered approach, social learning theory, the activity approach, the concept of humane education.Results: In the article the theoretical and methodological basis of the statement of technology, disclosed pedagogical conditions and principles of the technology of formation of professional student competence of higher educational institutions as a result of own personal readiness.Field of application of the results: the educational system of higher education institutions.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-1-23

  8. THE TECHNOLOGY OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL STUDENT COMPETENCE

    Yakovlev Boris Petrovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents the stages and technology of professional student competence of students in higher vocational school. Method or the methodology of the work: Theoretical and methodological basis of the proposed technology of formation of professional student competence in higher education are: a synergetic approach, student-centered approach, social learning theory, the activity approach, the concept of humane education. Results: In the article the theoretical and methodological basis of the statement of technology, disclosed pedagogical conditions and principles of the technology of formation of professional student competence of higher educational institutions as a result of own personal readiness. Field of application of the results: the educational system of higher education institutions.

  9. Innovative conditions of professionally applied training for maritime-students.

    Podlesny A.I.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The author considers organizational and methodological terms of implementation of professional and applied physical training for maritime students subject to their motivation to physical self-perfection. The purpose of the research is to define organizational and pedagogical terms for professional and applied physical training of maritime students to improve their physical condition and special physical attainment. The applied methods were: anthropometric metrology, functional probes, tonometry, pulsometry, motion tests and mathematical analysis. 70 students of 17-18 years participated in the research. It was determined that organizational and pedagogical terms directed on acceleration of making necessary for students to self-improve physically, positively impact on development of special physical state that are fundamental for professional activities of maritime students.

  10. Social Media Etiquette for the Modern Medical Student: A Narrative Review

    Brittany Harrison

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Most medical students worldwide are using some form of social media platform to supplement their learning via file sharing and to stay up-to-date on medical events. Often, social media may blur the line between socialization and educational use, so it is important to be aware of how one is utilizing social media and how to remain professional. Research has yielded some troublesome themes of misconduct: drunken behaviour, violations of confidentiality and defamation of institutions. Because there is no universal policy to monitor online professionalism, there exists the potential for indiscretions to occur. It has been reported that misdemeanours can affect future residency placements and employment for medical students. Accordingly, studies suggest that educators need to recognize this new era of professionalism and adapt policies and reprimands to meet modern outlets where professionalism may be violated.

  11. A proposal for clinical genetics (genetics in medicine) education for medical technologists and other health professionals in Japan.

    Kohzaki, Hidetsugu

    2014-01-01

    Since the completion of the Human Genome Project, technology has developed markedly in fields such as medical genetics and genetic counseling in the medical arena. In particular, this technology has advanced the discovery of and ways of understanding various genes responsible for genetic diseases, and genetic polymorphisms thought to be associated with disease. Some have been implicated as factors in common lifestyle diseases and have increased the significance of genetic testing. In Japan, doctors and other health professionals, such as nurse and medical technologists have been engaged in genetic testing and genetic disease treatment. Chromosomal and gene aberrations were detected mainly by medical technologists. However, due to the nature of medical technologists who have to provide various clinical tests, such as blood test, pre-medical technology students are required to cover tremendous knowledge of different academic fields to pass the national exam. Therefore, the time allowed for such students to study chromosomal and gene analysis is quite limited. Moreover, they are forced to enter the medical setting without receiving sufficient training. Among them, only few medical technologists specialize in chromosomal and gene analysis. However, with the advancement of clinical genetics and development of chromosomal and gene analysis, conducting clinical practice is becoming more and more difficult for medical technologists who just passed the national exam. Also, doctors and other health professionals have not been able to keep up with service demands either. This paper attempts to address knowledge and skills gaps (especially clinical genetics, English, and ICT literacy) of medical technologists and we propose educational methods to prepare medical genetics professionals in Japan to meet these gaps. PMID:25202688

  12. Medical students' perception of dyad practice

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Rasmussen, Maria Birkvad; Bjørck, Sebastian; Gustafsson, Amandus; Ringsted, Charlotte V

    2014-01-01

    Training in pairs (dyad practice) has been shown to improve efficiency of clinical skills training compared with single practice but little is known about students' perception of dyad practice. The aim of this study was to explore the reactions and attitudes of medical students who were instructed...... to work in pairs during clinical skills training. A follow-up pilot survey consisting of four open-ended questions was administered to 24 fourth-year medical students, who completed four hours of dyad practice in managing patient encounters. The responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. The...... about decreased hands-on practice and many students preferred to continue practising alone after completing the initial training. Dyad practice is well received by students during initial skills training and is associated with several benefits to learning through peer observation, feedback and cognitive...

  13. Chest radiograph interpretation by medical students

    AIM: To assess the ability of final year medical students to interpret conventional chest radiographs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten conventional chest radiographs were selected from a teaching hospital radiology department library that were good radiological examples of common conditions. All were conditions that a medical student should be expected to recognize by the end of their training. One normal radiograph was included. The radiographs were shown to 52 final year medical students who were asked to describe their findings. RESULTS: The median score achieved was 12.5 out of 20 (range 6-18). There was no difference between the median scores of male and female students (12.5 and 12.3, respectively, p=0.82) but male students were more likely to be certain of their answers than female students (median certainty scores 23.0 and 14.0, respectively). The overall degree of certainty was low. On no radiograph were more than 25% of students definite about their answer. Students had received little formal radiology teaching (2-42 h, median 21) and few expressed an interest in radiology as a career. Only two (3.8%) students thought they were good at interpreting chest radiographs, 17 (32.7%) thought they were bad or awful. CONCLUSION: Medical students reaching the end of their training do not perform well at interpreting simple chest radiographs. They lack confidence and have received little formal radiological tuition. Perhaps as a result, few are interested in radiology as a career, which is a matter for concern in view of the current shortage of radiologists in the UK

  14. Using medical drama to teach biomedical ethics to medical students.

    Arawi, Thalia

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, clinicians are faced with multifaceted ethical concerns, and it is often argued that students of medicine should be well trained in clinical ethics and have a minimum level of ethical sensitivity and critical analysis. Consequently, most medical colleges have introduced programs in biomedical ethics. It is often pointed out that there is a gap separating ethical theories from concrete moral dilemmas. This problem became less pervasive as case-studies started being used. Nevertheless, vignettes are mostly presented as an addendum to a unit and often engage the students only "temporarily." It is my contention that this can be remedied if students were given a venue that will allow them to appreciate as many particulars of the situation as possible, to engage in the case not merely as inactive spectators, rather to get entangled in the case just enough to be involved yet remain sufficiently detached to be able to exercise critical analysis. This is possible through medical drama which, I will argue, is a narrative genre that enhances emotional engagement, cognitive development, and moral imagination allowing for a more ethically sensitive student in training. To do that, reference will be made to the medical drama "House MD." PMID:20423246

  15. Homeopathy as elective in undergraduate medical education − an opportunity for teaching professional core skills

    Lehmann, Bianca; Krémer, Brigitte; Werwick, Katrin; Herrmann, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The evaluation of medical students' perceptions regarding an elective study course in Homeopathy in which small groups have participated annually for six years, at the Institute for General Practice and Family Medicine at the Otto Von Guericke University, Magdeburg. The course was assessed in terms of concept, delivery, and influence on students' professional development. Methodology: Since the autumn term of 2008/09, three group discussions have been conducted with thirty of the course participants (3 total electives). These discussions were semi-structured and guided by central topics; the analysis was qualitative and guided by content. Results: The overall concept and implementation of the course were very successful. The main learning themes, that is, an emphasis on a more holistic and individual view of patients and the importance of a cooperative partnership between doctor and patient, were positively rated, regardless of the students' attitudes towards homeopathy. Their assessment was based on their previous experience and a comparison with conventional medical education. Conclusion: Homeopathy as an elective subject is not only useful for acquiring specific knowledge in integrative medicine, but also important as a means of developing physicians' core skills that are often not well considered in conventional medical education. PMID:24575158

  16. [Depression and stress management in medical students. A comparative study between freshman and advanced medical students].

    Jurkat, H B; Richter, L; Cramer, M; Vetter, A; Bedau, S; Leweke, F; Milch, W

    2011-05-01

    International studies have indicated a high prevalence of depression and a lack of coping with stress in medical students. Freshman and advanced medical students were investigated using a specific questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) with a response rate of 100%. Of the subjects studied 81.1% did not have any depression, 13.1% slight and 5.8% clinically relevant symptoms of depression. The severity of symptoms was highly associated with subjective appraisal of stressors. Coping skills of first year students significantly influenced the depression symptoms calling for preventative measures even in freshman medical students. PMID:21165590

  17. Dental Topics for Medical Students

    Lorber, Mortimer

    1976-01-01

    As part of the required Introduction to Clinical Sciences course, second-year students at Georgetown University School of Medicine attend three one-hour lectures on dentistry: restorative dentistry, oral surgery, and various diseases. Contents of the lectures are summarized here. (JT)

  18. Sleep Disturbances among Medical Students: A Global Perspective

    Azad, Muhammad Chanchal; Fraser, Kristin; Rumana, Nahid; Abdullah, Ahmad Faris; Shahana, Nahid; Hanly, Patrick J.; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Medical students carry a large academic load which could potentially contribute to poor sleep quality above and beyond that already experienced by modern society. In this global literature review of the medical students' sleep experience, we find that poor sleep is not only common among medical students, but its prevalence is also higher than in non-medical students and the general population. Several factors including medical students' attitudes, knowledge of sleep, and academic demands have...

  19. Bullying of Medical Students in Pakistan: A Cross-Sectional Questionnaire Survey

    Ahmer, Syed; Yousafzai, Abdul Wahab; Bhutto, Naila; Alam, Sumira; Sarangzai, Amanullah Khan; Iqbal, Arshad

    2008-01-01

    Background Several studies from other countries have shown that bullying, harassment, abuse or belittlement are a regular phenomenon faced not only by medical students, but also junior doctors, doctors undertaking research and other healthcare professionals. While research has been carried out on bullying experienced by psychiatrists and psychiatry trainees in Pakistan no such research has been conducted on medical students in this country. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a cross-...

  20. 445 Inability of Medical Students to Use of Three Types of Inhaler

    Jeong, Jae-Won

    2012-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated that a significant percentage of health care professionals are deficient in both knowledge and skill regarding the inhalers. But no data is available about the assessment of inhaler technique and knowledge among medical students in Korea. The aim of this study was to evaluate the proficiency and knowledge of medical students in proper use of 3 kinds of inhalers (metered dose inhaler, turbuhaler, and diskus). Methods We enrolled 40 third-year medica...

  1. GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ACADEMIC STRESS AND BURNOUT AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS IN FINAL YEARS OF EDUCATION

    Backović, Dušan V.; Ilić Živojinović, Jelena; Maksimović, Jadranka; Maksimović, Miloš

    2012-01-01

    Background: The educational process brings a considerable amount of stress to medical students that can influence mental health status and contribute to further professional burnout. The authors assessed the academic stress influences, mental health status and burnout syndrome, with the intent to find different patterns in female and male medical students. Subjects and methods: The applied cross sectional study was in the form of an anonymous questionnaire which included: sociodemogr...

  2. Improving medical students' knowledge of genetic disease: a review of current and emerging pedagogical practices

    Wolyniak MJ; Bemis LT; Prunuske AJ

    2015-01-01

    Michael J Wolyniak,1 Lynne T Bemis,2 Amy J Prunuske2 1Department of Biology, Hampden-Sydney College, Hampden-Sydney, VA, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth, MN, USA Abstract: Genetics is an essential subject to be mastered by health professional students of all types. However, technological advances in genomics and recent pedagogical research have changed the way in which many medical training programs teach genetics to their students. These ad...

  3. Patients’ Perceptions Towards the Participation of Medical Students in their Care

    Mohammed Al Ghobain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Patient interaction is a vital part of healthcare training. This study aimed to investigate patients’ perceptions of the participation of medical students in their care. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted between October 2014 and March 2015 among 430 patients admitted to the medical and surgical wards at the King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. An Arabic questionnaire was designed to assess the demographic characteristics of the patients and their perceptions of students’ participation in their medical care. Results: A total of 416 patients completed the survey (response rate: 97%. Overall, 407 patients (98% acknowledged the educational benefit of involving medical students in their care. A total of 368 patients (88% had no objection to a medical student being involved in their care. Of these, 98% were willing to be asked about their medical history by medical students, 89% would permit physical examinations by medical students and 39% preferred that the gender of the medical student match their own. Education level (P <0.003, a positive prior experience with a medical student (P <0.001 and perception of the medical students’ attitudes (P <0.001 had a significant effect on patients’ acceptance of medical students participating in their care. Conclusion: In general, the patients had a positive perception of medical students, with most patients acknowledging the educational benefit of student participation in patient care. As patients’ perceptions of students’ professionalism, confidence and respect for privacy were significantly related to acceptance of care, education on these aspects should be a priority in medical curricula.

  4. Students of Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences

    Ghezelbash Sima

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social anxiety is an important factor in peoples’ mental health. Good mental health while studying in university makes students able to deal effectively with numerous stressors that they experience. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the social anxiety of nursing students in grades one to four of medical universities in Tehran. Methods: In this analytic cross-sectional study, 400 students from universities of medical sciences in Tehran were recruited by stratified sampling with proportional allocation. Data were collected during the first semester in 2010. Students completed a two-part questionnaire including the Liebowitz social anxiety questionnaire and a demographic information form. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics methods and an analytical test by SPSS statistical software. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the total scores of social anxiety of first- to fourth-year students. The mean score of the avoidance of social interaction dimension in fourth-year students was significantly lower than in first year students (p<0.05. Conclusion: In regard to the relationship between social anxiety and interpersonal communication as an associated part of nursing care, decrease of social anxiety of students could play an important role in their mental health. According to the results of this study, it seems that the placement of students in the nursing education system does not produce any changes in their social anxiety.

  5. The Future of Our Organizations: Students and Early Career Professionals

    Yakushko, Oksana; Wang, Sherry C.; Warrior, Anitra M.

    2012-01-01

    This response focuses on the significance of ethnic minority psychology organizations and other related membership structures to early career psychologists (ECPs) and counseling psychology students. We discuss not only reasons for why students and ECPs may not be joining professional organizations, but also strategies for recruiting, supporting,…

  6. Effects of Teacher Professional Learning Activities on Student Achievement Growth

    Akiba, Motoko; Liang, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of six types of teacher professional learning activities on student achievement growth over 4 years using statewide longitudinal survey data collected from 467 middle school mathematics teachers in 91 schools merged with 11,192 middle school students' mathematics scores in a standardized assessment in Missouri. The…

  7. Turkish High School Students' Attitudes towards Seeking Professional Psychological Help

    Sahin, Hulya; Uyar, Seyma Yuksel

    2011-01-01

    In this study, it is aimed to present whether or not Turkish high school students' attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help is effected by gender, whether or not having any prior psychological experience, perceived parental attitude and parents' education level. Research group is composed of total of 301 students, educated at high…

  8. ESL Students in the Disciplines: Negotiating the Professional Program Track

    Becket, Diana; Benander, Ruth; Kumar, Rita

    2007-01-01

    The authors report on three case studies of ESL students who are taking courses to enter professional programs. The goal of the study reported in this article is to examine ESL students' language and general academic performance in content-area classes at one open-access college of a large midwestern university. The authors were particularly…

  9. Assessment of Student Professional Outcomes for Continuous Improvement

    Keshavarz, Mohsen; Baghdarnia, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a method for the assessment of professional student outcomes (performance-type outcomes or soft skills). The method is based upon group activities, research on modern electrical engineering topics by individual students, classroom presentations on chosen research topics, final presentations, and technical report writing.…

  10. Enhancement and Advancement: Professional Development for Student Affairs Staff.

    Lawing, M. Anne; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Presents research results that illustrate demographic profiles of chief student affairs officers. Analyzed survey data to identify variables influencing student affairs officers' next professional move. Results indicated interest to leave the field was related to promotion, college teaching, and changes to the public or private sector. (RC)

  11. Higher Pedagogical Educational Institution Students' Planning of Their Professional Strategy

    Abasov, Z. A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the problem of the professional and life self-determination of students enrolled in higher pedagogical educational institutions, with Ulianovsk Pedagogical University serving as the base. The objectives were the following: (1) to study the reasons that the students in the different stages of their schooling (the first and fifth…

  12. Developing Professionals: Student Experiences of a Real-Client Project

    Fitch, Kate

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the learning potential of the student experience of working with real clients in a final-year undergraduate unit that aims to develop professional skills. Students, working in consultancy teams, developed communication strategies for a not-for-profit organisation. A teaching intervention was trialled late in semester to…

  13. Medical professionalism from a socio-cultural perspective: Evaluating medical residents communicative attitudes during the medical encounter in Malaysia

    K Ganasegeran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The practice of medicine requires good communication skills to foster excellent rapport in doctor patient relationship. Reports on communication skills learning attitude among medical professionals are key essentials toward improving patient safety and quality of care. Aims: We aimed to determine factors affecting communication skills learning attitudes among medical residents in Malaysia. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional survey, in a Malaysian public health hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 191 medical residents across medical and surgical based rotations were included. We assessed the validated communication skills attitude scale among medical residents from different rotations. Statistical Analysis: Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS® (version 16.0, IBM, Armonk, NY was used. Cronbach′s alpha was used to test the internal consistency of the scale. Descriptive analysis was conducted for all variables. Bivariate analysis was employed across the socio-demographic variables. Results: Majority of the residents believed that communication skills training should be made compulsory in Malaysia (78.5%. Medical residents agreed that acquiring good communication skills is essential to be a good doctor. However, the majority cited time pressures for not being able to learn communication skills. Significant differences in communication skills learning attitude scores were found between Malays and Chinese. Conclusion: The majority of medical residents had a positive attitude toward communication skills learning. Socio-demographic factors influenced communication skills learning attitude among medical residents. Incorporating communicative skills modules during hospital Continuous Medical Education for medical residents is essential to cultivate communicative skills attitudes for effective doctor-patient relationship during the routine medical encounters.

  14. Competency in ECG Interpretation Among Medical Students

    Kopeć, Grzegorz; Magoń, Wojciech; Hołda, Mateusz; Podolec, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Background Electrocardiogram (ECG) is commonly used in diagnosis of heart diseases, including many life-threatening disorders. We aimed to assess skills in ECG interpretation among Polish medical students and to analyze the determinants of these skills. Material/Methods Undergraduates from all Polish medical schools were asked to complete a web-based survey containing 18 ECG strips. Questions concerned primary ECG parameters (rate, rhythm, and axis), emergencies, and common ECG abnormalities....

  15. Biomedical research competencies for osteopathic medical students

    Cruser, des Anges; Dubin, Bruce; Brown, Sarah K.; Bakken, Lori L.; Licciardone, John C; Podawiltz, Alan L; Bulik, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Background Without systematic exposure to biomedical research concepts or applications, osteopathic medical students may be generally under-prepared to efficiently consume and effectively apply research and evidence-based medicine information in patient care. The academic literature suggests that although medical residents are increasingly expected to conduct research in their post graduate training specialties, they generally have limited understanding of research concepts. With grant suppor...

  16. Teaching pediatric communication skills to medical students

    Frost KA; Metcalf EP; Brooks R; Kinnersley P; Greenwood SR; Powell CVE

    2015-01-01

    Katherine A Frost,1,2 Elizabeth P Metcalf,3 Rachel Brooks,2,3 Paul Kinnersley,3 Stephen R Greenwood,3 Colin VE Powell1,2,4 1Noah’s Ark Children’s Hospital for Wales, 2Department of Pediatrics, 3Institute of Medical Education, 4Molecular and Experimental Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales Background: Delivering effective clinical pediatric communication skills training to undergraduate medical students is a distinct and important challenge. Pediatric-...

  17. Impacto social de la telemedicina en la formación profesional de los estudiantes de ciencias médicas Social impact of telemedicine on the professional training of the medical sciences students

    Nancy María Rodríguez Beltrán

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available La educación médica y la medicina son prácticas sociales cuyos fines y medios tienen que definirse históricamente, considerando las necesidades de cada país al respecto y la reorientación didáctica que exige su desarrollo científico para que puedan determinarse, con precisión, los conocimientos requeridos para afrontar situaciones sanitarias epidemiológica y socialmente prioritarias. En este artículo se analizan algunas de las consecuencias generales relacionadas con el empleo de las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones, particularmente en la educación superior, y cómo devienen retos que deben asumir las universidades, específicamente de ciencias médicas, en la formación de sus profesionales.Medical education and medical career are social practices whose aims and resources have to be historically defined, considering the needs of each country on this respect and the didactic reorientation that demands their scientific development so that the knowledge required to face epidemiologically and socially high-priority health situations can be accurately determined. Some of the general consequences related to the use of the information and communications technologies are analyzed in this work, particularly in the higher education, and how they become challenges that should be assumed by the universities, specifically of medical sciences, in the training of their professionals.

  18. A STUDY OF DEPRESSION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS OF PRIVATE MEDICAL COLLEGE IN SOUTH INDIA

    Jai; Arvinda Prabhu

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Medical Education in Private Medical Colleges is a great contributor to stress among the medical students & possibly even in developing syndromic depression among medical students which is an area of concern worldwide. The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms and its associate factors among medical students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross sectional survey was conducted among 400 medical students from first to fourth year in Pr...

  19. BIRTH ORDER AMONG NORTHERN INDIAN MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Vinay Agarwal; Sunil Kumar Garg; Megha Kulshreshtha Mishra; Lalita Chaudhary

    2011-01-01

    Background: Birth order is claimed to be linked with academic achievement. However, many scientists do not accept it. Objective: To assess the association of birth order in North Indian medical students with number of attempts to cross the competition bar. Study design: Cross sectional study. Setting and participation: M.B.B.S. 1st year students of L.L.R.M. Medical College, Meerut. Statistical analysis used: Chi Square test. Methods: Enquiry of Birth order and number of attempts to crack the ...

  20. Role modelling of clinical tutors: a focus group study among medical students

    Burgess, Annette; Goulston, Kerry; Oates, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Background Role modelling by clinicians assists in development of medical students’ professional competencies, values and attitudes. Three core characteristics of a positive role model include 1) clinical attributes, 2) teaching skills, and 3) personal qualities. This study was designed to explore medical students’ perceptions of their bedside clinical tutors as role models during the first year of a medical program. Methods The study was conducted with one cohort (n = 301) of students who ha...

  1. Occupational Therapy Students’ Perspectives of Professionalism: An Exploratory Study

    Theresa M. Sullivan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professionalism is a dynamic, socially constructed idea, rendering it difficult to comprehend. Though characterized by the demonstration of values and behaviors, its meaning has not been fully explored and remains tacit. To explore how first- and second-year master’s of occupational therapy students conceptualize professionalism. Method: This qualitative pilot study evolved from an interpretivist theoretical perspective. Convenience sampling yielded four first-year and seven second-year students from one entry-level master’s program to participate in two separate focus groups. Line-by-line constant comparison methods were used to analyze the data and identify categories. An audit trail, peer debriefing, and member checking were employed. Results: Data analysis of the first-year focus group generated three categories: Searching for explicit examples, Responsibility to the profession, and Building and fulfilling societal responsibility. Analysis of the second-year focus group yielded two categories: Professional values and behaviors and Professionalism as socially constructed. Conclusion: Professionalism is a dynamic concept requiring nuanced understandings specific to context. Students should be encouraged to develop reflective abilities allowing them to analyze and act in a way that is most appropriate for the situation. Understanding students’ conceptualizations of professionalism may better allow occupational therapy regulators, managers, and academic and fieldwork educators to identify teaching and research priorities.

  2. Ireland's medical brain drain: migration intentions of Irish medical students

    Gouda, Pishoy; Kitt, Kevin; Evans, David S.; Goggin, Deirdre; McGrath, Deirdre; Last, Jason; Hennessy, Martina; Arnett, Richard; O'Flynn, Siun; Dunne, Fidelma; O'Donovan, Diarmuid

    2015-01-01

    Background: To provide the optimum level of healthcare, it is important that the supply of well-trained doctors meets the demand. However, despite many initiatives, Ireland continues to have a shortfall of physicians, which has been projected to persist. Our study aimed to investigate the migration intentions of Irish medical students and identify the factors that influence their decisions in order to design appropriate interventions to sustain the supply of trained doctors in order to mainta...

  3. Current arrangements for teaching medical ethics to undergraduate medical students.

    Bicknell, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Those teachers in contact with medical students from pre-clinical days onwards will impart their ethical views by example and by precept, but such learning by 'osmosis' is insufficient. There is a knowledge base to be imparted which will enrich the understanding of ethical judgements on clinical problems seen during the undergraduate years. However, the learning process continues after qualification and in particular the doctor's capacity to make ethical clinical judgements will evolve with m...

  4. Headache among medical and psychology students

    João Eliezer Ferri-de-Barros; Mauricio José de Alencar; Luis Felipe Berchielli; Luis Carlos Castelhano Junior

    2011-01-01

    Headaches occur frequently and thus are a key component of sociocentric medical education. OBJECTIVE: To study headaches among students of medicine and psychology in a single university. METHOD: This was a questionnaire-based survey of a cohort of students of medicine and psychology. RESULTS: The overall lifetime prevalence of headache was 98% and over the last year, 91%. Tensional headache accounted for 59% and migraine 22% in medicine; and 48.5% and 32% respectively in psychology. Forty-fiv...

  5. Relationships between Drug Company Representatives and Medical Students: Medical School Policies and Attitudes of Student Affairs Deans and Third-Year Medical Students

    Sierles, Frederick; Brodkey, Amy; Cleary, Lynn; McCurdy, Frederick A.; Mintz, Matthew; Frank, Julia; Lynn, Deborah Joanne; Chao, Jason; Morgenstern, Bruce; Shore, William; Woodard, John

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The authors sought to ascertain the details of medical school policies about relationships between drug companies and medical students as well as student affairs deans' attitudes about these interactions. Methods: In 2005, the authors surveyed deans and student affairs deans at all U.S. medical schools and asked whether their schools…

  6. The physician charter on medical professionalism from the Chinese perspective: a comparative analysis.

    Jin, Pingyue

    2015-07-01

    The charter of medical professionalism in the new millennium (Charter) has been endorsed worldwide, including by the Chinese Medical Doctor Association from 2005. Six years later, the association drafted a Chinese version of medical professionalism based on the Charter, the Chinese Medical Doctor Declaration (Declaration). This Declaration encompasses six tenets, which have large areas of overlap with the Charter. Meanwhile, certain differences also exist between the universal professionalism that the Charter aims to disseminate and the ideal Chinese professionalism that the Declaration endeavours to bolster. In this paper, we explore the unique aspects of the Declaration in contrast with the Charter to gain a deeper understanding of professionalism in the particular context of China. The Declaration may omit some valuable commitments found in the Charter, but it includes longstanding Confucian and cultural traditions of China, as well as consideration of current social circumstances. The Declaration thus re-establishes the ideal of universal professionalism in light of the Chinese context. PMID:25341734

  7. Headache among medical and psychology students

    João Eliezer Ferri-de-Barros

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Headaches occur frequently and thus are a key component of sociocentric medical education. OBJECTIVE: To study headaches among students of medicine and psychology in a single university. METHOD: This was a questionnaire-based survey of a cohort of students of medicine and psychology. RESULTS: The overall lifetime prevalence of headache was 98% and over the last year, 91%. Tensional headache accounted for 59% and migraine 22% in medicine; and 48.5% and 32% respectively in psychology. Forty-five percent reported that headaches had a variable sporadic impact on their productivity. The self-medication rate was 77%. Thirty-six percent reported worsening since admission to the university. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of headaches was very high. Tension-type headaches predominated in males and migraine in females. Tension-type was more frequent among medical students than among psychology students; migraine was more frequent in psychology (more females than in medicine. Both kinds of students reported that headaches caused low interference with daily activities. The students reported that their symptoms had worsened since admission to the university.

  8. A dissecting competition for medical students.

    Samalia, Latika; Stringer, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    After repeated requests from medical students for more cadaver dissection opportunities, a voluntary dissecting "competition" was initiated for the third year medical students in 2006. This has been held annually on five occasions since, offering up to 30 dissection stations and accommodating an average of 53 students (range 40-66) per year, representing about 20-25% of the total class. Material is standardized to distal upper or lower limb specimens, each of which is dissected by one or two students during a single weekend day. Participants are required to complete their dissection in about six hours and present an appropriately labeled display together with a 300 word abstract, emphasizing clinical relevance. Dissections are judged on presentation, accuracy of identification and labeling, and relevance to the clinical abstract, taking into account the technical difficulty of the particular dissection. Judging from successive annual uptake of places and informal feedback, this is not only a popular event allowing students to focus creatively on producing a clinically relevant dissection in a relaxed learning environment but also of educational value. An unexpected outcome has been the production of many specimens suitable as prosections for future classes. A dissecting competition may be a useful method of stimulating learning for medical students interested in undertaking further dissection but it requires appropriate staff commitment and a supply of suitable cadaver specimens. PMID:22213677

  9. Writing about an experience of illness in medical students

    Hwang K

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Kun Hwang,1 Huan Fan,1 Se Won Hwang2 1Department of Plastic Surgery, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, Korea; 2Peninsula Medical School, Exeter, UK Abstract: Pathography is defined as “historical biography from a medical, psychological, and psychiatric viewpoint.” We thought that writing about an experience of illness might help students understand patients’ experience and in turn grow in terms of self-understanding. Participants included 151 medical students. Students wrote about their own experience of illness and were asked to answer questions from the Likert scale. Most students wrote about themselves (79.2%; however, some students (20.8% wrote about the illness of others. Among the 149 pathographies, ecopathography was most frequent (30.9%, followed by testimonial pathography (25.5%; angry pathography (13.4% and alternative pathography (12.1% were relatively less frequent. Eighty-eight pathographies (59.1% showed 120 expressions of family relationship. Among the 120 cases, worrying about family members was most frequent (47.5%, followed by reliance on a family member (32.5%. All students wrote about the enlightenment experienced on returning to daily life. The sense of belonging together was most frequent (38.3%, followed by gratitude for living (20.8%, resolution to be a good doctor (18.1%, and a will to live and be healthy (12.1%. Answers on the Likert scale (total 5 for pathography beneficence were very high in understanding desirable doctor image (4.46, attaining morals and personality as a health care professional (4.49, and understanding basic communication skills (4.46. Writing about an experience of illness allows students to better understand patients’ experience and to grow in self-understanding. Keywords: writing, disease, patients, narration, pathography

  10. Improvements in CanMEDS competencies for medical students in an interdisciplinary and voluntary setting

    Vildbrad MD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mads Dam Vildbrad, Johanne Marie Lyhne International Medical Cooperation Committee, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Background: To practice medicine, doctors must master leadership, communication, team management, and collaboration, in addition to medical knowledge. The CanMEDS framework describes seven roles of a doctor, but the six nonmedical expert roles are de-emphasized in the academic medical curriculum. Innovative opportunities are needed for medical students to develop as participants in a world of interdisciplinary health care. Methods: We founded a volunteer-based, interdisciplinary, student-run project called SUNDdag (HEALTHday with 60 students from 12 different educational backgrounds. To evaluate the learning outcomes of the project, we conducted a cross-sectional study using an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire. Results: Students joined the project due to it being health-promoting, volunteer-based, and interdisciplinary. The medical students reported a significant increase of skills in all seven roles except for “medical expert”. They reported an increased understanding of the non-health-related students' skills. Conclusion: In their future careers, medical students must collaborate with health care professionals in a team-based approach to patient care and with non-health-related professionals in administrative tasks. Interdisciplinary volunteer-based initiatives like SUNDdag are potential platforms for medical students to improve their CanMEDS competencies. We encourage students to initiate similar projects and we encourage faculties to support volunteer-based, interdisciplinary initiatives due to their favorable cost-benefit ratio. Keywords: medical education, voluntarism, interprofessional education, medical students

  11. Joint Curriculum Development of the Training Program for Five-Year, Rural-Oriented, Tuition-Waived Medical Students

    Che, Xiang-Xin; Niu, Li; Xia, Xiu-Long; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    To alleviate the shortage of competent undergraduate-level medical professionals in the central and western rural regions of China, from 2010 to 2012, the Chinese government mandated 100 medical colleges to recruit 30,000 rural-oriented, tuition-waived medical students (RTMS) for the township and village hospitals. But no educational curriculum is…

  12. Ethics in engineering: Student perceptions and their professional identity development

    Brad Stappenbelt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Professional ethics instruction in engineering is commonly conducted by examining case studies in light of the code of conduct of a suitable professional body. Although graphical presentations of spectacular failures, sobering stories of the repercussions and the solid framework provided by the tenets of a code of ethics may leave a lasting impression, students generally gain their professional identity from relatives and colleagues. Their professional ethics tend to be mostly an extension of their personal ethics. Instruction on ethics generally serves only to reinforce students’ inclination to act ethically and provides encouragement to act on these beliefs. In this study a survey based on previous investigations was conducted (n=1136 to examine the personal ethical perceptions of engineering students. The survey measured how engineering students perceive their own ethical beliefs and how they perceive the ethical beliefs and actions of their peers. As a learning exercise, students were then challenged by examining their personal ethical beliefs in light of the professional ethics requirements of the Institute of Engineers Australia (IEAust code of conduct. After familiarisation with the Engineers Australia code of ethics, students were also invited to comment regarding their beliefs regarding adherence to this code.

  13. Health professionals' use of documents obtained through the Regional Medical Library Network.

    Lovas, I.; Graham, E; Flack, V

    1991-01-01

    The Pacific Southwest Regional Medical Library Service (PSRMLS) studied how health professionals use documents obtained through the regional medical library (RML) network and how various factors, such as delivery time, affected that use. A random sample of libraries in Region 7 of the RML network was selected to survey health professionals who had received documents through the interlibrary loan (ILL) network. The survey provided data about the purposes for which health professionals requeste...

  14. [Quality of life and health promotion in students of professional education institutions].

    Shubochkina, E I; Molchanova, S S; Kulikova, A V

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of quality of life in adolescents attending professional education institutions revealed significant difference between their socio-medical characteristics and those of pupils in schools providing general education. The main risk factors in the two groups are identified. It is shown that social conditions, mode of teaching, and life style may contribute to the deterioration of health status and functional abilities of adolescents. The data obtained can be used in the elaboration of health protection programs for students of professional education institutions. PMID:19507352

  15. Integrative Virology for Senior Medical Students.

    Koment, Roger W.

    1991-01-01

    The article describes a senior elective in virology developed at the University of South Dakota School of Medicine. Students work independently through a series of course units, selecting 12 study topics from a catalog of 35 topics in medical virology and discussing their reading daily with the professor. (DB)

  16. EVALUATION OF THE PERSPECTIVES OF THE ACADEMIC MEDICAL STAFF AND RESIDENTS CONCERNING CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN A MEDICAL FACULTY

    Seyhan Hıdıroğlu; Muhammed Fatih Önsüz; Ahmet Topuzoğlu; Melda Karavuş

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the perspectives of the academic medical staff and residents concerning continuing professional development in a medical faculty.Method: This descriptive research was performed on 152 academic medical staff and residents who was accepted to participate in the study in a medical faculty in August 2007. Study data was collected through face to face interviews by a questionnaire made up of three parts and 40 questions.Results: Sixty-seven point eig...

  17. Selected physical characteristics of medical students

    Dr. Lajos Ángyán

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to measure selected anthropometrical characteris-tics, motor abilities and cardiorespiratory functions of medical students. Eighty-seven students were involved in this investigation. The students were categorized into five groups: (1 recreational, doing sport activities irregularly, (2 basketball and (3 handball players, having training at least two times per week, as well as men (4 and women (5 students entering medical school. In all groups the mean body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio were at the upper level of the normal range, while body fat percentage was similar to standards for sedentary subjects. Better motor per-formances were obtained from the basketball and handball players than from the other groups. Static strength for the sample was somewhat above the normal sedentary level. The resting blood pressure and heart rate for most subjects were in the normal. Cardiovascular risk factors were found in six students. Their systolic blood pressure was above 140 mm Hg. There were no sub-jects identified with low blood pressure. The heart rate was elevated for three students from the recreational group, and in the women. Bradycardia did not occur. The vital capacity and the ability to hold one?s breath was at the upper level of the normal range. The present results emphasis the need to improve the students` prevention oriented life style through participation in exercising.

  18. Mental health of Medical Students in Different Levels of Training

    Jafari, Najmeh; Loghmani, Amir; Montazeri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Medical education and training can directly contribute to the development of psychological distress in medical students. This can lead to catastrophic consequences such as impaired academic performance, impaired competency, medical errors and attrition from medical school. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of psychological morbidity among Iranian medical students. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Samples of medical students in different levels of training (basic ...

  19. Inter-professional Perinatal Simulation training: A valuable educational model to improve competencies amongst student midwives in Brussels, Belgium.

    Vermeulen, Joeri; Beeckman, Katrien; De Clercq, Gerlinde; Vandelannoote, Isabelle; Gucciardo, Léonardo; Laubach, Monika; Swinnen, Eva

    2016-02-01

    Simulation training is a powerful and evidence-based teaching method for students and healthcare professionals. The described educational model of Inter-professional Perinatal Simulation training is the result of a collaborative project with the Erasmus University College Brussels, the Medical School of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and the University Hospital Brussels. This model enhances student midwives to acquire competencies in all fields of midwifery according to national and European legislation and to the International Confederation of Midwives Global Standards for Midwifery Education. In our educational program, simulation training enhanced the achievement of decision-making and inter-professional communication competences. PMID:26719196

  20. The Differential Impact of Various Assessment Parameters on the Medical Students Performance in the Professional Anatomy Examination in a New Medical School El Impacto Diferencial de Varios Parámetros de Evaluación del Desempeño de Estudiantes de Medicina en el Examen Profesional de Anatomía en una Nueva Escuela de Medicina

    L. A. J. Shittu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a dearth of knowledge on the level of agreement between all the various assessment tasks on the same content area, in order to test this hypothesis we adopted the concept of convergent validity and also to isolate area of academic weakness among the students and to readjust the curriculum content to balance the weakness. A blinded cohort retrospective study was carried out on a total of sixty-six third year medical students who had sat for their first professional examination in anatomy in the new medical college of Lagos State University. Using records of their grades in the various assessments parameters- the average end-in course assessment, short essays question (SEQ, multiple-choice questions (MCQ, and practical (Steeple-chase. The mean + S.D. Pearson's correlation with students t-test (pExiste escasez de conocimiento sobre el nivel de concordancia entre todas las varias tareas de evalución sobre los contenidos de una misma área. En orden a evaluar esta hipótesis, adoptamos el concepto de validez convergente y también de área aislada, de falta de solidez académica entre los estudiantes y readecuar el contenido curricular para balancear esa falta de solidez. Se llevó a cabo un estudio retrospectivo al azar sobre un total de 66 alumnos de Medicina de Tercer Año, quienes tuvieron su primer examen profesional de Anatomía en la nueva Escuela de Medicina de la Universidad del Estado de Lagos, Nigeria. Usando registros de sus grados en varios parámetros de evaluación: promedio final de la evaluación del Curso, preguntas cortas de redacción, ítemes de selección múltiple y prácticas. La media + desviación estándar, correlación de Person con el t-test de Sudents (p< 0.05 fueron analizados con el programa SPSS 11 (SPSS inc. Chicago, Illinois. La parte práctica fue significativamente correlacionada con todo el rendimiento (r = 0.89, p< 0.01; con un valor del t-Students de 6.15 (p< 0.01. Aunque las preguntas cortas mostraron correlación significativa para la totalidad de lo hecho (r =0.72; p<0.01, el valor de t de 0,4 no fue significativo, pero estuvo dentro de un rango aceptable. La parte práctica, selección múltiple y preguntas cortas de redacción y final del curso, mostraron un orden de clasificación de relativo desempeño en las tareas de evaluación, lo que indica que, en general, la actividad de los estudiantes en el examen profesional fue mejor que en el examen del curso y de ahí, la necesidad de readecuar este patrón y enfatizar el rol de evaluación dentro del curso en el curriculum

  1. Teaching medical students on the ethical dimensions of human rights: meeting the challenge in South Africa.

    London, L.; MCCARTHY;, G.

    1998-01-01

    SETTING: Previous health policies in South Africa neglected the teaching of ethics and human rights to health professionals. In April 1995, a pilot course was run at the University of Cape Town in which the ethical dimensions of human rights issues in South Africa were explored. OBJECTIVES: To compare knowledge and attitudes of participating students with a group of control students. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SUBJECTS: Seventeen fourth-year medical students who participated in the c...

  2. Knowledge and Attitudes about Organ Donation Among Medical Students

    N. Bilgel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In almost every country, the organ supply for transplantation does not match the increasing demand; health professionals may play an important role in eliminating barriers and increasing organ donation. Therefore, assessing medical students’ knowledge and attitudes regarding organ donation is important for the future organ supply. Some 409 of 508 first- and second-year medical students answered an anonymous, multiple-choice questionnaire about demographic variables, knowledge about transplant issues, and willingness to donate organs. The mean age was 20.3±1.8 years (range: 17 to 29 years; 50.1% were male, 49.9% were female. Some 44.8% of the total respondents reported that they had sufficient knowledge about organ donation, and 40.1% reported knowledge about organ transplantation. The primary source of their knowledge was reported as the media (72.1%. Willingness to donate their own organs was 58.4% and willingness as to their relatives’ organs was 39.9%. The acceptance of live organ donation was higher (74.6% than cadaver donation. Only 1.2% had a organ donation card. Female students were more willing to donate their own and their relatives’ organs. Since medical students are prospective leaders of promoting organ donation action, these issues should be taught within the context of social medicine lessons, and desirable behavioral changes should be implemented.

  3. Elements to Reflect on Professional Ethics of Graduate Students

    Judith Pérez-Castro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, universities have been concerned about the ethical dimension in professional education. This, however, has meant new challenges for institutions in terms of syllabus design, teacher’s training and socialization of those values that underlie the professional activity. In this article, we discuss some of the problems that have been faced by universities when socializing professional values and ethics. Also, we present the partial results of a research focused on graduate students in the UJAT. This is an exploratory and descriptive research and the data we gathered during this process, show us that students are highly interested in learning ethical and affective-emotional competencies. On the other hand, cognitive and technical elements, while important, are placed sometimes in a second position. Finally, we found that there are significant differences between the values and attitudes held by students from different disciplines or fields of study.

  4. Introducing medical students to careers in medical education: the student track at an annual medical education conference.

    Blatt, Benjamin; Plack, Margaret; Suzuki, Mari; Arepalli, Sruthi; Schroth, Scott; Stagnaro-Green, Alex

    2013-08-01

    Few avenues exist to familiarize medical students with careers as clinician-educators, and the clinician-educator career pathway has not been well defined. In this article, the authors describe how they integrated a career-oriented student track into the 2011 Northeast Group on Educational Affairs (NEGEA) annual retreat to introduce students to careers in medical education. Annual education conferences are principal sources of educational scholarship, networking, collaboration, and information sharing; as such, they represent attractive venues for early exposure to the culture of medical education. The authors' goal in creating the NEGEA conference student track was to excite students about careers in medical education by providing them with an array of opportunities for active involvement in both student-specific and general conference activities.The authors draw from their experience to provide a guide for recruiting student participants to career-building student tracks. They also offer a guide for developing future student tracks, based on their experience and grounded in social cognitive career theory. Although their focus is on medical education, they believe these guides will be useful for educators planning a conference-based student track in any field. PMID:23807107

  5. A pilot feasibility study of a peer-led mindfulness program for medical students

    Danilewitz, Marlon; Bradwejn, Jacques; Koszycki, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Background Mindfulness meditation has gained momentum in medical circles for bolstering wellbeing and other facets of professionalism. This study evaluated the feasibility and benefits of a peer-led mindfulness meditation program (MMP) on medical student wellness and professionalism. Method Pre-clerkship students were recruited and randomized to the 8-week MMP or wait-list. Feasibility outcomes included ease of recruitment, program attendance and homework compliance. Other outcomes included self-reported psychological distress, empathy, self-compassion, mindfulness, altruism and program satisfaction. Results The MMP decreased levels of stress and enhanced mindfulness, self-compassion and altruism from baseline to post-study. Changes were not significant for the wait-list condition. Although satisfaction with the MMP was high compliance was suboptimal. Conclusions A peer-led MMP is feasible and may be a promising approach to enhance medical student wellbeing. Further research is needed to explore strategies to improve program compliance in this student population. PMID:27103950

  6. Professional Student Organizations and Experiential Learning Activities: What Drives Student Intentions to Participate?

    Munoz, Laura; Miller, Richard; Poole, Sonja Martin

    2016-01-01

    Experiential learning theory has been referenced as a possible method for attracting and retaining members in student organizations. In a survey, undergraduate students evaluated a variety of organizational features pertaining to their intention to participate in professional student organizations. The study found that students value activities…

  7. Medical students' perceptions in relation to ethnicity and gender: a qualitative study

    Seale Clive

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The British medical student population has undergone rapid diversification over the last decades. This study focuses on medical students' views about their experiences in relation to ethnicity and gender during their undergraduate training within the context of the hidden curriculum in one British medical school as part of a wider qualitative research project into undergraduate medical education. Method We interviewed 36 undergraduate medical students in one British Medical School, across all five years of training using a semi-structured interview schedule. We selected them by random and quota sampling, stratified by sex and ethnicity and used the whole medical school population as a sampling frame. Data analyses involved the identification of common themes, reported by means of illustrative quotations and simple counts. Results The students provided information about variations patterned by gender in their motivation and influences when deciding to study medicine. Issues in relation to ethnicity were: gaining independence from parents, perceived limitations to career prospects, incompatibility of some religious beliefs with some medical practices and acquired open-mindedness towards students and patients from different ethnic backgrounds. Despite claiming no experiences of gender difference during medical training, female and male students expressed gender stereotypes, e.g. that women bring particularly caring and sympathetic attitudes to medicine, or that surgery requires the physical strength and competitiveness stereotypically associated with men that are likely to support the continuation of gender differentiation in medical careers. Conclusion The key themes identified in this paper in relation to ethnicity and to gender have important implications for medical educators and for those concerned with professional development. The results suggest a need to open up aspects of these relatively covert elements of student culture to scrutiny and debate and to take an explicitly wider view of the influence of what has sometimes been called the hidden curriculum upon the training of medical professionals and the practice of medicine.

  8. Communicative competence in Medical Psycology Students: A proposal of indicators.

    Ana María Molina Gómez

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Communicative competence, defined as: psychological configuration that comprises cognitive and meta-cognitive abilities to comprehend and produce meaning, knowledge on linguistic discourse structures and skills and abilities to interact in various socio-cultural contexts, with different aims and purposes, is an essential condition that any professional must achieve these days, but for medical psychologists it is vital. In this paper, there is a proposal of communicative competence indicators to be trained in Medical Psychology students, defined from dimensions and indicators proposed in the cognitive, communicative and socio-cultural approach, which reveals the importance of the syntactic dimension of discourse in an indissoluble relation to the semantic and pragmatic dimensions, according to the comprehension and construction of utterances and therefore in the development of communicative competence.

  9. Dimensions of physical wellness among medical students of public and private medical colleges in Pakistan

    Khan, Rakhshaan; Rehman, Rehana; Baig, Mukhtiar; Hussain, Mehwish; Khan, Mariam; Syed, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine adherence to dimensions of physical wellness among medical students of public and private medical colleges in Pakistan. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out from January to July 2011 among 820 students of private and public medical colleges in Karachi, Pakistan. Results: Overall, medical students scored low in dimensions of physical wellness. Private medical colleges students were fond of vigorous activities such as aerobics and swimming, whereas public...

  10. Preparing for export? Medical and nursing student migration intentions post-qualification in South Africa

    Gavin George

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The migration of health professionals can have a profound impact on health systems around the globe. The International Organization for Migration’s (IOM Mobility of Health Professionals Research Project (MoHProf aimed to improve knowledge about the migration of healthcare professionals and understand migration intentions and factors influencing the migration of medical and nursing students.Objectives: The study aimed to determine the proportion of nursing and medical studentswho were intending to emigrate, their attitudes and beliefs about, and the factors influencing their decision to emigrate.Method: This study was conducted at three medical schools and one nursing school in SouthAfrica (n = 298 amongst 260 medical and 38 nursing students. One hundred and twenty-five students were in the final year of their studies and 143 were in their prefinal year. Thirty students did not indicate the year of their studies. Every student present on the day of data collection completed a questionnaire comprising psychometric and survey-based questions. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data.Results: More than a third (37% of the respondents intended to work or specialise abroad.The majority of medical (58.9% and nursing (66.6% students intended to leave SA within five years of completing their medical or nursing studies. The perception of poor working conditions within the health sector, such as long work hours, high patient loads, inadequate resources and occupational hazards, influenced medical students to consider emigrating from South Africa.Conclusion: The high number of medical and nursing students intending to emigrate requires a reassessment of effectiveness of retention strategies for doctors and nurses in the South African healthcare system and actions to improve working conditions in the public healthcare sector.

  11. Self-medication among students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences based on Health Belief Model

    Pirzadeh, Asiyeh; Mostafavi, Firoozeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of self-medication is high all over the world, especially in Iran. But there is a paucity of studies to explore self-medication activities among the university students. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine the self-medication among student in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, based on Health Belief Model (HBM). Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 197 medical students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences ...

  12. Personal characteristics of students entering higher medical school

    Akimova O.V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the structure of personal features of students decided to devote their life to medical profession, their personal readiness for a profession of a doctor. 241 students going to enter the Saratov Medical University in 2013 serve as an object of research. Methods of research included psychology tests on a self-assessment of a mental state, ability to empathy, a motivation orientation. Result. It was revealed that the majority of respondents low level of uneasiness, low level of frustration, the average level of aggression, the average level of a rigidity, and also high rates on an empathy scale. The types of the personality in relation to work are emotive and intuitive. Prevalence of motive of achievement of success or motive of avoiding of failures directly depends on specifics of a situation. Conclusion. Students possess qualities which are necessary in professional activity for doctors, namely high resistance to stress, absence of fear before difficulties, low level of rigidity, high level of empathy, the average level of aggression. Students are motivated on success, in situations when they are fully confident.

  13. Medical students-as-teachers: a systematic review of peer-assisted teaching during medical school

    Yu TC

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tzu-Chieh Yu¹, Nichola C Wilson², Primal P Singh¹, Daniel P Lemanu¹, Susan J Hawken³, Andrew G Hill¹¹South Auckland Clinical School, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; ²Department of Surgery, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; ³Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New ZealandIntroduction: International interest in peer-teaching and peer-assisted learning (PAL during undergraduate medical programs has grown in recent years, reflected both in literature and in practice. There, remains however, a distinct lack of objective clarity and consensus on the true effectiveness of peer-teaching and its short- and long-term impacts on learning outcomes and clinical practice.Objective: To summarize and critically appraise evidence presented on peer-teaching effectiveness and its impact on objective learning outcomes of medical students.Method: A literature search was conducted in four electronic databases. Titles and abstracts were screened and selection was based on strict eligibility criteria after examining full-texts. Two reviewers used a standard review and analysis framework to independently extract data from each study. Discrepancies in opinions were resolved by discussion in consultation with other reviewers. Adapted models of “Kirkpatrick’s Levels of Learning” were used to grade the impact size of study outcomes.Results: From 127 potential titles, 41 were obtained as full-texts, and 19 selected after close examination and group deliberation. Fifteen studies focused on student-learner outcomes and four on student-teacher learning outcomes. Ten studies utilized randomized allocation and the majority of study participants were self-selected volunteers. Written examinations and observed clinical evaluations were common study outcome assessments. Eleven studies provided student-teachers with formal teacher training. Overall, results suggest that peer-teaching, in highly selective contexts, achieves short-term learner outcomes that are comparable with those produced by faculty-based teaching. Furthermore, peer-teaching has beneficial effects on student-teacher learning outcomes.Conclusions: Peer-teaching in undergraduate medical programs is comparable to conventional teaching when utilized in selected contexts. There is evidence to suggest that participating student-teachers benefit academically and professionally. Long-term effects of peer-teaching during medical school remain poorly understood and future research should aim to address this.Keywords: peer-teaching, peer-assisted learning, near-peer teaching, medical student, medical school

  14. Medical students’ and residents’ use of online social networking tools: Implications for teaching professionalism in medical education

    Ferdig, Richard E.; Dawson, Kara; Erik W Black; Black, Nicole M. Paradise; Thompson, Lindsay A

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to determine if and how 501 medical students and 312 residents are using Facebook at a large university in the Southeastern United States. Results reveal that medical students and residents are using Facebook and about two-thirds of users maintain public profiles. While there is variation in the types of information provide within profiles, many medical students seem unaware of or unconcerned with the possible ramifications of sharing personal information in publicly-availab...

  15. Medical and surgical ward rounds in teaching hospitals of Kuwait University: students’ perceptions

    AlMutar S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sara AlMutar,1 Lulwa AlTourah,1 Hussain Sadeq,2 Jumanah Karim,2 Yousef Marwan3 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pediatrics, Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Al-Razi Orthopedic Hospital, Kuwait City, Kuwait Background: Teaching sessions for medical students during ward rounds are an essential component of bedside teaching, providing students with the opportunity to regard patients as actual people, and to observe their physical conditions directly, allowing a better understanding of illnesses to be developed. We aim to explore medical students’ perceptions regarding medical and surgical ward rounds within the Faculty of Medicine at Kuwait University, and to evaluate whether this teaching activity is meeting the expectation of learners. Methods: A pretested questionnaire was used to collect data from 141 medical students during the 2012–2013 academic year. They were asked to provide their current and expected ratings about competencies that were supposed to be gained during ward rounds, on a scale from 1 (lowest to 5 (highest. Mean scores were calculated, and the Student t-test was used to compare results. P < 0.05 was the cut-off level for significance. Results: Only 17 students (12.1% declined to participate in the study. The students' current competency scores (for competencies taught within both disciplines – medical and surgical were significantly lower than the scores indicating students’ expectations (P < 0.001. The best-taught competency was bedside examination, in both medical (mean: 3.45 and surgical (mean: 3.05 ward rounds. However, medical ward rounds were better than surgical rounds in covering some competencies, especially the teaching of professional attitude and approach towards patients (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Both medical and surgical ward rounds were deficient in meeting the students’ expectations. Medical educators should utilize the available literature to improve the bedside teaching experience for their students. Keywords: ward rounds, bedside teaching, undergraduate, medical students, medical education

  16. Exposing medical students to expanding populations

    Lindenthal JJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available JJ Lindenthal,1,2 JA DeLisa,3 GF Heinrich,4 WS Calderón Gerstein,5 1Department of Psychiatry, Institute for the Public Understanding of Health and Medicine, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, USA; 3Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of New Mexico Health Science Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA; 4Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, USA; 5Hospital Nacional Ramiro Prialé, EsSalud, Huancayo, Peru Abstract: Physicians are required to advocate for and counsel patients based on the best science and the interests of the individual while avoiding discrimination, ensuring equal access to health and mental services. Nonetheless, the communication gap between physician and patients has long been observed. To this end, the Institute for the Public Understanding of Health and Medicine of the Rutgers University New Jersey Medical School has expanded its efforts. This report describes two new programs: a legacy lecture series for medical students and an international “experience”, in Huancayo, Peru, for medical students and faculty. The MiniMed outreach program, now in its ninth year and first described in this journal in 2012, was designed to empower the powerless to communicate more effectively with clinicians, thus improving both the effectiveness of the physician–patient relationship and health care outcomes. The approach of the two new programs and their effects on patients, particularly the underserved, and medical students and faculty, are outlined in the following article. Keywords: MiniMed program, equal access, underserved populations, Newark Renaissance House, Kintock Group, role modeling 

  17. The Impact of Structured Inter-professional Education on Health Care Professional Students' Perceptions of Collaboration in a Clinical Setting

    Pinto, Alison; Sam LEE; Lombardo, Samantha; Salama, Mariam; Ellis, Sandi; Kay, Theresa; Davies, Robyn; Michel D Landry

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine how a structured inter-professional education (IPE) clinical placement influences health care professional (HCP) students' perceptions of inter-professional collaboration (IPC) relative to that of students in a traditional clinical placement. Methods: This study used a mixed-methods design. The Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) was administered to HCP students (n=36) in two Toronto hospitals before and after a structured 5-week IPE clinical placement to e...

  18. Writing about an experience of illness in medical students.

    Hwang, Kun; Fan, Huan; Hwang, Se Won

    2013-01-01

    Pathography is defined as "historical biography from a medical, psychological, and psychiatric viewpoint." We thought that writing about an experience of illness might help students understand patients' experience and in turn grow in terms of self-understanding. Participants included 151 medical students. Students wrote about their own experience of illness and were asked to answer questions from the Likert scale. Most students wrote about themselves (79.2%); however, some students (20.8%) wrote about the illness of others. Among the 149 pathographies, ecopathography was most frequent (30.9%), followed by testimonial pathography (25.5%); angry pathography (13.4%) and alternative pathography (12.1%) were relatively less frequent. Eighty-eight pathographies (59.1%) showed 120 expressions of family relationship. Among the 120 cases, worrying about family members was most frequent (47.5%), followed by reliance on a family member (32.5%). All students wrote about the enlightenment experienced on returning to daily life. The sense of belonging together was most frequent (38.3%), followed by gratitude for living (20.8%), resolution to be a good doctor (18.1%), and a will to live and be healthy (12.1%). Answers on the Likert scale (total 5) for pathography beneficence were very high in understanding desirable doctor image (4.46), attaining morals and personality as a health care professional (4.49), and understanding basic communication skills (4.46). Writing about an experience of illness allows students to better understand patients' experience and to grow in self-understanding. PMID:24062621

  19. Transforming educational accountability in medical ethics and humanities education toward professionalism.

    Doukas, David J; Kirch, Darrell G; Brigham, Timothy P; Barzansky, Barbara M; Wear, Stephen; Carrese, Joseph A; Fins, Joseph J; Lederer, Susan E

    2015-06-01

    Effectively developing professionalism requires a programmatic view on how medical ethics and humanities should be incorporated into an educational continuum that begins in premedical studies, stretches across medical school and residency, and is sustained throughout one's practice. The Project to Rebalance and Integrate Medical Education National Conference on Medical Ethics and Humanities in Medical Education (May 2012) invited representatives from the three major medical education and accreditation organizations to engage with an expert panel of nationally known medical educators in ethics, history, literature, and the visual arts. This article, based on the views of these representatives and their respondents, offers a future-tense account of how professionalism can be incorporated into medical education.The themes that are emphasized herein include the need to respond to four issues. The first theme highlights how ethics and humanities can provide a response to the dissonance that occurs in current health care delivery. The second theme focuses on how to facilitate preprofessional readiness for applicants through reform of the medical school admission process. The third theme emphasizes the importance of integrating ethics and humanities into the medical school administrative structure. The fourth theme underscores how outcomes-based assessment should reflect developmental milestones for professional attributes and conduct. The participants emphasized that ethics and humanities-based knowledge, skills, and conduct that promote professionalism should be taught with accountability, flexibility, and the premise that all these traits are essential to the formation of a modern professional physician. PMID:25539516

  20. [Medical doctors and nurses--a dialogue about their professional roles and competences].

    Pacovský, V; Jurásková, D; Horová, H

    2008-01-01

    Medical doctors and nurses represent the essential pillars of the clinical medicine. Nevertheless, they have different professional roles and competences. Dialogue between both professions is necessary and mutual understanding enables collective work. Nurses are better informed about the medical problems than doctors about nurses. That is why the presented informatorium can be beneficial when it is published in a medical specialized journal. PMID:18777804

  1. Motivation towards medical career choice and future career plans of Polish medical students.

    G?siorowski, Jakub; Rudowicz, El?bieta; Safranow, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    This longitudinal study aimed at investigating Polish medical students' career choice motivation, factors influencing specialty choices, professional plans and expectations. The same cohort of students responded to the same questionnaire, at the end of Year 1 and Year 6. The Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U tests and logistic regression were used in analyses. The results showed that altruistic and scientific reasons were the main motives for choosing a medical career. The motives remained stable over time. The effect of gender on altruistic motivation was stronger at the end of the study, with females' rating higher. The most favored career paths were associated with non-primary care specializations and work in a hospital. Results of the multivariate logistic regression showed that primary care specializations were more attractive to females, final year students, those from small agglomerations, and those less concerned about high earnings. Preferences regarding sector of work were formed at later stages of training. A preference shift was observed, between Year 1 and Year 6, towards favoring work in the public sector. Predictors of the desire to work in the public sector were: being a male and the final year student, paying less attention to high earnings, wanting certainty of finding work, having a stronger need for interesting and socially important work. A significant decline in the level of interest in seeking employment abroad was observed with the progress of studies. Our findings are likely to provide useful information for educators, policy planners and policy makers. PMID:25352498

  2. Computer Game Design Classes: The Students' and Professionals' Perspectives

    Jakub SWACHA; Adam SKRZYSZEWSKI; Wojciech A. SYSLO

    2010-01-01

    There are multiple reasons that justify teaching computer game design. Its multi-aspectual nature creates opportunity to develop, at the same time, creativity, technical skills and ability to work in team. Thinking of game design classes, one needs direction on what to focus on so that the students could benefit the most. In this paper, we present results of a survey on both the students' and working professionals' expectations from game design course and opinions on game designer job. Althou...

  3. Summer Students: getting professional at CERN

    2001-01-01

    The summer season at CERN is known for the traditional visit of Summer Students coming from Member and non-Member States. This time, a total of 176 future scientists are spending part of their summer with us, learning and working in the laboratory. Summer Students enjoying a lecture on particle physics by Ronald Kleiss. Now that summer has finally arrived, you'll have noticed some changes at CERN: longer queues at the bar, faces you don't recognise in the corridors, and a breath of fresh air, but where is it coming from? The answer is easy: the Summer Students are here! Aged between 20 and 27, this group of 176 future scientists has been selected from 600 candidates to spend their summer at the Laboratory. This year, there are 24 more 'Summies' than last following a recommendation in the 2000 5-yearly review to increase the number of students. The Summies mainly come from Member States, but this year there are also 11 Americans, two Mexicans, an Armenian, a Turk, a Pakistani and two South Africans. Judith N...

  4. LEARNING STYLES ADOPTED BY MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Chinmay Shah

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning results in gain of knowledge, skills and attitudes. Some like to learn by seeing, some by hearing and some by demonstration. Learning style influences the retention of information and depth of comprehension. Understanding their preferred learning styles as visual, auditory, read-write or kinesthetic learners will help improve the teaching methods adopted. Role of the educator necessitates making the most of each teaching opportunity by understanding the characteristics of the learning audience and incorporating demonstrated principles of adult educational design, with a focus on collaborative learning and variety in presentation techniques. The goal is to provide student oriented education, producing efficient doctors. A cross-sectional study among 92 medical students of the Govt. Medical College, Bhavnagar, conducted in 2009. VARK questionnaire was used to access their learning preference. Preference for different learning styles were, visual (V 1.08%, auditory (A 20.65%, reading/writing (R 2.17% and kinesthetic (K 17.39%. 41.30% of the total 92 students preferred a single mode of information presentation. Of the 92 students who preferred multiple modes of information presentation, some preferred two modes (bimodal, 31.52%, some preferred three modes (tri-modal, 27.13%, and only one student preferred quadri-modal.

  5. Computer Literacy Among Students of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences

    Hassan Robabi; Azizollah Arbabisarjou

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The need for medical students to be computer literate is vital. With the rapid integration of information technology (IT) in the health care field, equipping students of medical universities withcomputer competencies to effectively use are needed. The purpose of this study was to assess computer literacy (CL) needs of medical sciences students. METHODS: This is descriptive-analytic. The population of the study comprised all students at Zahedan University of Medical Sciences. 385...

  6. Radiation oncology: a primer for medical students.

    Berman, Abigail T; Plastaras, John P; Vapiwala, Neha

    2013-09-01

    Radiation oncology requires a complex understanding of cancer biology, radiation physics, and clinical care. This paper equips the medical student to understand the fundamentals of radiation oncology, first with an introduction to cancer treatment and the use of radiation therapy. Considerations during radiation oncology consultations are discussed extensively with an emphasis on how to formulate an assessment and plan including which treatment modality to use. The treatment planning aspects of radiation oncology are then discussed with a brief introduction to how radiation works, followed by a detailed explanation of the nuances of simulation, including different imaging modalities, immobilization, and accounting for motion. The medical student is then instructed on how to participate in contouring, plan generation and evaluation, and the delivery of radiation on the machine. Lastly, potential adverse effects of radiation are discussed with a particular focus on the on-treatment patient. PMID:23807599

  7. Reduction of Racial Prejudice in Student Affairs Professionals

    Choi-Pearson, Catherine; Castillo, Linda; Maples, Mary Finn

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the impact of gender, race, intergroup contact, and diversity training on racial prejudice of student affairs professionals. Diversity training and race of participants were statistically significant contributors to change in racial prejudice. Findings suggest that racial prejudice decreases as diversity training increases.…

  8. Burnout: Treatment and Prevention Strategies for College Student Affairs Professionals.

    Keener, Roger

    1990-01-01

    Presents possible prevention and treatment strategies for combating burnout among college student affairs professionals. Includes definition of burnout, review of symptoms of burnout, discussion of causes of burnout, and suggestions for treatment and prevention of burnout. Interventions discussed include personal counseling, using stress…

  9. Preparing health science students for interdisciplinary professional practice.

    Cleak, Helen; Williamson, Dianne

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, a number of lecturers from different clinical schools within the Faculty of Health Sciences at La Trobe University embarked on the development of a new interdisciplinary professional practice subject to be undertaken by all final-year undergraduate health science students. The subject was designed to better prepare students for their first professional appointment by introducing them to the concepts of interdisciplinary teamwork, the health care context, and the challenges and constraints that organizational contexts present. This report details the background of the project, the consultation and development that took place in the design of the subject, and implementation of the subject. The uniqueness of the project is explained by the number of disciplines involved, the online delivery, and the focus on a set of generic graduate attributes for health science students. It is hoped that students who have undertaken this subject will have a better understanding of the roles of other health professionals and the context in which they will be working by grappling with many real-life professional issues that they will face when they graduate and enter the workforce. PMID:17941408

  10. The Role of Emotions in Student Teachers' Professional Identity

    Timostsuk, Inge; Ugaste, Aino

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents findings of a qualitative interview study of the role of emotions in the professional identity of student teachers. Strong positive and negative emotions (mostly related to pupils and supervisors) were expressed about personal teaching experiences. The results confirm that emotions play an important role in social learning and,…

  11. The Civil Behavior of Students: A Survey of School Professionals

    Wilkins, Keely; Caldarella, Paul; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.; Young, K. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Many authors regard education as a way of increasing civility in society, and some have implemented interventions to improve civility in schools. However, very little empirical data exist on the extent and nature of students' civil behavior. The present study systematically gathered data from 251 school professionals regarding their perceptions of…

  12. The Role of Emotions in Student Teachers' Professional Identity

    Timostsuk, Inge; Ugaste, Aino

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents findings of a qualitative interview study of the role of emotions in the professional identity of student teachers. Strong positive and negative emotions (mostly related to pupils and supervisors) were expressed about personal teaching experiences. The results confirm that emotions play an important role in social learning and,…

  13. Learning Journeys: Student Teacher Stories of Professional Formation

    Tedder, Michael; Lawy, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe findings from a research project in the South West of England that enquired into the impact of the changing requirements of programmes leading to teaching qualifications in the FE sector. We utilise the metaphor of "learning journey" as a heuristic to discuss the professional formation of student teachers in…

  14. Creating a Framework for Medical Professionalism: An Initial Consensus Statement From an Arab Nation.

    Abdel-Razig, Sawsan; Ibrahim, Halah; Alameri, Hatem; Hamdy, Hossam; Haleeqa, Khaled Abu; Qayed, Khalil I; Obaid, Laila O; Al Fahim, Maha; Ezimokhai, Mutairu; Sulaiman, Nabil D; Fares, Saleh; Al Darei, Maitha Mohammed; Shahin, Nhayan Qassim; Al Shamsi, Noora Abdulla Omran; Alnooryani, Rashed Arif; Al Falahi, Salama Zayed

    2016-05-01

    Background Medical professionalism has received increased worldwide attention, yet there is limited information on the applicability and utility of established Western professionalism frameworks in non-Western nations. Objective We developed a locally derived consensus definition of medical professionalism for the United Arab Emirates (UAE), which reflects the cultural and social constructs of the UAE and the Middle East. Methods We used a purposive sample of 14 physicians working in the UAE as clinical and education leaders. This expert panel used qualitative methods, including the world café, nominal group technique, the Delphi method, and an interpretive thematic analysis to develop the consensus statement. Results The expert panel defined 9 attributes of medical professionalism. There was considerable overlap with accepted Western definitions, along with important differences in 3 aspects: (1) the primacy of social justice and societal rights; (2) the role of the physician's personal faith and spirituality in guiding professional practices; and (3) societal expectations for professional attributes of physicians that extend beyond the practice of medicine. Conclusions Professionalism is a social construct influenced by cultural and religious contexts. It is imperative that definitions of professionalism used in the education of physicians in training and in the assessment of practicing physicians be formulated locally and encompass specific competencies relevant to the local, social, and cultural context for medical practice. Our goal was to develop a secular consensus statement that encompasses culture and values relevant to professionalism for the UAE and the Arab region. PMID:27168882

  15. Hand Hygiene Practices among Medical Students

    Azzam al Kadi; Sajad Ahmad Salati

    2012-01-01

    Background. Hand hygiene is a cost-effective method in preventing infection transmission. Hand hygiene practices have been found to be faulty in most healthcare settings. We conducted a study to evaluate the awareness, and compliance of hand hygiene among undergraduate medical students during their clinical phase in Qassim College of Medicine, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A questionnaire based on World Health Organization's concept of “Five Moments for Hand Hygiene” was used to evaluate the awarene...

  16. New Immunology program for Cuban medical students

    Vivian González Aguilar; Marta Pernas Gómez; Emigdio León Toirat; Lisset Urquiza

    2015-01-01

    Background. The basic biomedical sciences, particularly Immunology, give the conceptual basis to the curriculum of Medicine and have an important relevance to medical students, to form de basis for a lifetime about de immune system and its potential for use in improving the human condition. The growing amount of information considered to be essential in basic and clinical disciplines obligates to integrate their knowledge and to advance to a new curricular program. In addition, it is necessar...

  17. Khmer dental and medical students' knowledge about the betel quid chewing habit in Cambodia.

    Reichart, P A; Schmidtberg, W; Scheifele, C

    1997-08-01

    95 of 144 questionnaires submitted by volunteer Khmer medical and dental students on the betel quid chewing habit in Cambodia were evaluated (58 medical, 37 dental). Questions related to the composition of the betel quid, the physiological and oral effects as well as traditional and sociological aspects. Statistical tests showed that there were differences between dental and medical students, particularly relating to the knowledge about oral effects. While 81.1% of dental students knew that betel quid chewing causes oral cancer, only 31.0% of the medical students were adequately informed. Similarly, 51.4% of the dental students knew about the relation between betel quid chewing and submucous fibrosis compared to 8.6% of the medical students (P chewing strengthens the gum, while 56.9% of the medical students believed that betel quid chewing would have this effect (P chewing habit was also indicated by the fact that while 5.3% of students had parents chewing betel quid, in contrast 40% of students reported grandparents with this habit. There are deficiencies of knowledge about the most important effects of betel quid chewing, particularly in medical students. Since both medical and dental students will in their future professional life have an enormous impact on health and health education, it seems justified that the dental and medical curricula should focus on these traditional habits. Proper health education starting in the dental and medical school is warranted in Cambodia and probably also in other South and Southeast Asian countries where the betel quid chewing habit is prevalent so as ultimately to improve public knowledge on the oral and other effects of this habit. PMID:9567917

  18. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences electronic health record and medical informatics training for undergraduate health professionals*

    Hart, Jan K; Bruce W. Newton; Boone, Steven E

    2010-01-01

    The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is planning interprofessional training in electronic health records (EHRs) and medical informatics. Training will be integrated throughout the curricula and will include seminars on broad concepts supplemented with online modules, didactic lectures, and hands-on experiences. Training will prepare future health professionals to use EHRs, evidence-based medicine, medical decision support, and point-of-care tools to reduce errors, improve st...

  19. Knowledge and practice of blood donation: a comparison between medical and non-medical Nepalese students.

    Mamatya, A; Prajapati, R; Yadav, R

    2012-12-01

    College students form a large and important group of population eligible for blood donation. Studies report that students do not donate much, and medical students' blood donation rate is less as compared to non-medical students. To assess and compare the knowledge, attitude, and practice of blood donation among medical and non-medical Nepalese students. A cross-sectional descriptive study using structured self-administered questionnaire was conducted in students of medical (MBBS) and non-medical programs of different colleges of Nepal. Total 456 students, 177 non-medical and 279 medical, participated; 28.5% students were donors. More medical students donated blood, more often, and were more knowledgeable in all aspects of blood and blood donation related knowledge (p values 0.01 or less). In both groups, proportionately more boys donated than girls. Common reasons for not donating included no request, medically unfit, no information about blood collection services, fear of weakness, and fear related to venepuncture. Moral satisfaction was the commonest reason to donate. Among Nepalese students, medical students donate more and are more knowledgeable than non-medical students. Lack of information and lack of direct requests are important causes of fewer donors in the non-medical group and girls. PMID:24579535

  20. When Patients Decline Medical Student Participation: The Preceptors' Perspective

    Tang, Tricia S.; Skye, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    Patients' receptivity towards medical student participation has been examined predominantly from the patient and/or the medical student perspective. Few studies have investigated the preceptor's perspective. The study examined preceptors' experience with patients declining medical student participation in clinical care and identified…

  1. Do medical students want to learn about global health?

    Anya Göpfert

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: One objective of the United Nations Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health relates to ensuring a sufficiently skilled workforce. To prepare future healthcare professionals for their role in the 21st century as members of this workforce, awareness of global health is essential, but few studies have explored student perspectives on such education. The main objectives of this study were to establish the views of medical students on learning about women's and children's health in low-income countries, to identify the nature and extent of learning already experienced, and to assess the demand for such learning. Design: A questionnaire survey was conducted at three meetings of the International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA. Questionnaires were distributed to 500 participants from 75 countries and 336 medical schools, and 492 usable questionnaires were returned. Data were analysed using SPSS Version 20 and statistical analysis was undertaken using Fisher's exact test. Results: There were 492 questionnaires included in the analysis. Forty-eight per cent of participants were from low–middle income countries and 52% were from high-income countries. Less than half (43% of the respondents had received some teaching on women's and children's health in low-income countries. Teaching received was primarily (96% through lectures in the second year of study. Ninety-one per cent of respondents thought such teaching would be important and stated that group work (66% would be the preferred method. In total, only 14% thought they had received sufficient teaching on global health and on women's and children's health in low-income countries. Conclusions: This study has revealed a high demand among medical students for global health teaching, particularly on women's and children's health in low-income countries. The timing and methods of existing teaching on these topics does not match that desired by medical students. To help address this gap, a collaborative approach is proposed which includes students’ views in the processes for revitalising medical curricula to meet the needs of the 21st century.

  2. Smoothing out transitions: how pedagogy influences medical students' achievement of self-regulated learning goals.

    White, Casey B

    2007-08-01

    Medical school is an academic and developmental path toward a professional life demanding self-regulation and self-education. Thus, many medical schools include in their goals for medical student education their graduates' ability to self-assess and self-regulate their education upon graduation and throughout their professional lives. This study explores links between medical students' use of self-regulated learning as it relates to motivation, autonomy, and control, and how these influenced their experiences in medical school. Subjects were medical students in two distinct medical school environments, "Problem-based learning" and "Traditional." PBL students described a rough transition into medical school, but once they felt comfortable with the autonomy and control PBL gave them, they embraced the independence and responsibility. They found themselves motivated to learning for learning's sake, and able to channel their motivation into effective transitions from the classrooms into the clerkships. Traditional students had a rougher transition from the classrooms to the clerkships. In the first two years they relied on faculty to direct and control learning, and they channeled their motivation toward achieving the highest grade. In the clerkships, they found faculty expected them to be more independent and self-directed than they felt prepared to be, and they struggled to assume responsibility for their learning. Self-regulated learning can help smooth out the transitions through medical school by preparing first and second year students for expectations in the third and fourth years, which can then maximize learning in the clinical milieu, and prepare medical students for a lifetime of learning. PMID:16767503

  3. Medical Students' Emotional Development in Early Clinical Experience: A Model

    Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Laan, Roland; Dornan, Tim; Koopmans, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Dealing with emotions is a critical feature of professional behaviour. There are no comprehensive theoretical models, however, explaining how medical students learn about emotions. We aimed to explore factors affecting their emotions and how they learn to deal with emotions in themselves and others. During a first-year nursing attachment in…

  4. Teaching Interpersonal Communication Competence to Medical Students through Theatre in Education

    Koponen, Jonna; Pyorala, Eeva; Isotalus, Pekka

    2010-01-01

    Effective communication skills are considered essential to a physician's professional competence. Thus, Finnish medical schools include communication skills training in their curricula. Today it is essential to ensure that students graduate with the interpersonal communication competence (ICC) necessary to succeed in their profession. Experiential…

  5. Exposure to Child and Adolescent Psychiatry for Medical Students: Are There Optimal "Teaching Perspectives"?

    Hunt, Jeffrey; Barrett, Rowland; Grapentine, W. Lex; Liguori, Gina; Trivedi, Harsh K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The ability to develop quality medical student exposures in child and adolescent psychiatry is critical to the professional development of these future physicians and to the growth of recruitment efforts into the field. This study identifies teaching perspectives among child and adolescent psychiatry faculty to determine whether there…

  6. Emotional intelligence scale for medical students

    Srivastava, Kalpana; Joshi, Saumya; Raichaudhuri, Arkojyoti; Ryali, VSSR; Bhat, P. S.; Shashikumar, R.; Prakash, J.; Basannar, D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Emotional Intelligence has been associated with positive outcome process in varied professions. There is paucity of Indian literature on the subject; especially involving medical undergraduates; and presently there is no scale available to measure the same in the Indian scenario. Objective: To develop a scale to measure Emotional Intelligence among medical undergraduates. Materials and Methods: Four domains of Emotional intelligence were selected, viz. Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social-Awareness & Social-Skills and these were included for the purpose of domains of the scale. On the basis of focused group discussions and in-depth deliberations with experts, undergraduate and postgraduate medical students a pool of 50 items was generated. The items were reduced to 27 based on expert consensus and on the basis of frequency of endorsement by expert reviews. It was followed by a pilot study of 50 undergraduates. This completed the preparation of the preliminary draft based on content analysis. The questionnaire was then administered in 480 students and the data was analyzed by appropriate statistical methods. For the purpose of concurrent validity, emotional intelligence scale developed by Dr. Ekta was used. Results: The Cronbach's Alpha for Internal Consistency Reliability was 0.68. The EIS had a significant correlation with social awareness domain of Emotional Intelligence Test (EIT) establishing Concurrent Validity. Conclusion: Emotional Intelligence Scale for medical undergraduates was constructed. Reliability and concurrent validity were also established for the same. PMID:22969179

  7. Emotional intelligence scale for medical students

    Kalpana Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotional Intelligence has been associated with positive outcome process in varied professions. There is paucity of Indian literature on the subject; especially involving medical undergraduates; and presently there is no scale available to measure the same in the Indian scenario. Objective: To develop a scale to measure Emotional Intelligence among medical undergraduates. Materials and Methods: Four domains of Emotional intelligence were selected, viz. Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social-Awareness & Social-Skills and these were included for the purpose of domains of the scale. On the basis of focused group discussions and in-depth deliberations with experts, undergraduate and postgraduate medical students a pool of 50 items was generated. The items were reduced to 27 based on expert consensus and on the basis of frequency of endorsement by expert reviews. It was followed by a pilot study of 50 undergraduates. This completed the preparation of the preliminary draft based on content analysis. The questionnaire was then administered in 480 students and the data was analyzed by appropriate statistical methods. For the purpose of concurrent validity, emotional intelligence scale developed by Dr. Ekta was used. Results: The Cronbach′s Alpha for Internal Consistency Reliability was 0.68. The EIS had a significant correlation with social awareness domain of Emotional Intelligence Test (EIT establishing Concurrent Validity. Conclusion: Emotional Intelligence Scale for medical undergraduates was constructed. Reliability and concurrent validity were also established for the same.

  8. EVALUATION OF THE PERSPECTIVES OF THE ACADEMIC MEDICAL STAFF AND RESIDENTS CONCERNING CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN A MEDICAL FACULTY

    Seyhan Hıdıroğlu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the perspectives of the academic medical staff and residents concerning continuing professional development in a medical faculty.Method: This descriptive research was performed on 152 academic medical staff and residents who was accepted to participate in the study in a medical faculty in August 2007. Study data was collected through face to face interviews by a questionnaire made up of three parts and 40 questions.Results: Sixty-seven point eight percent of the participants were informed about the continuing medical education and 7.9% of them were informed about continuing professional development. 45.4% participated in activities concerning continuing medical education. The factor negatively affecting participation in activities was lack of information (44.7%. Educational activities inside the department were found as the activities most frequented, 66.4% and courses in the congresses were found as the most effective educational activities (49.2%.Conclusion: The participants were well-informed about continuing medical education, while their knowledge about continuing professional development was low. Inducing and motivating doctors for participating in continuing professional development activities is critically important for both doctors and health care system.

  9. Medical students' attitudes towards group and self-regulated learning

    Antje L umma-Sellenthin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study is aimed at exploring the association between beginning students' attitudes towards group learning and their awareness of learning strategies, to demographic variables and their exposure to problem-based or mixed curricula. Methods: The descriptive cross-sectional design included students (N = 351 from two medical schools with lecture-based and two with problem-based curricula from Germany and Sweden. Gender, age, personal and parents' practice experience within health care were assessed. A questionnaire was designed for measuring attitudes towards group and individual learning, awareness of learning strategies was assessed with the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory. The t-test for independent groups was applied to compare dependent variables between personal factors, and multivariate statistics to compare medical schools. Results: Students' personal work experience correlated with self-regulation (t[sub](333[/sub] = -3.307; p = 0.001 and group learning experience (t[sub](341[/sub] = -2.971; p = 0.003. Students from the German problem-based curriculum reported most experience with group learning (largest mean difference compared to the German lecture-based curriculum = 1.45 on a Likert scale from 1 to 7; SE = 0.181; p < 0.001, and were better at regulating their learning strategies than students from the Swedish lecture-based school (mean difference 0.18; SE = 0.181; p = 0.034. Conclusions: Students' clinical experience seemed to benefit self-regulation skills. Problem-based teaching methods and early interprofessional education appear to be favorable learning conditions for the development of professional skills.

  10. Medical Humanitarianism Under Atmospheric Violence: Health Professionals in the 2013 Gezi Protests in Turkey.

    Aciksoz, Salih Can

    2016-06-01

    During the 2013 Gezi protests in Turkey, volunteering health professionals provided on-site medical assistance to protesters faced with police violence characterized by the extensive use of riot control agents. This led to a government crackdown on the medical community and the criminalization of "unauthorized" first aid amidst international criticisms over violations of medical neutrality. Drawing from ethnographic observations, in-depth interviews with health care professionals, and archival research, this article ethnographically analyzes the polarized encounter between the Turkish government and medical professionals aligned with social protest. I demonstrate how the context of "atmospheric violence"-the extensive use of riot control agents like tear gas-brings about new politico-ethical spaces and dilemmas for healthcare professionals. I then analyze how Turkish health professionals framed their provision of health services to protestors in the language of medical humanitarianism, and how the state dismissed their claims to humanitarian neutrality by criminalizing emergency care. Exploring the vexed role that health workers and medical organizations played in the Gezi protests and the consequent political contestations over doctors' ethical, professional, and political responsibilities, this article examines challenges to medical humanitarianism and neutrality at times of social protest in and beyond the Middle East. PMID:26246184

  11. Pharmacy Students’ Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Medical Marijuana

    Woods, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine pharmacy students’ knowledge of and attitudes toward medical marijuana and to determine if pharmacy students need additional education on the topic. Methods. Pharmacy students were asked to complete a survey on medical marijuana that assessed their knowledge of, medical uses of, adverse effects with, and attitudes toward medical marijuana through 23 Likert-scale questions. Results. Three hundred eleven students completed the survey. Fifty-eight percent of the students felt that medical marijuana should be legalized in all states. However, the majority of students did not feel comfortable answering consumers’ questions regarding efficacy, safety, or drug interactions related to the substance. Accurate responses for diseases or conditions for permitted medical marijuana use was low, with only cancer (91%) and glaucoma (57%) identified by more than half the students. Conclusion. With an increasing number of states adopting medical marijuana use, pharmacy schools need to evaluate the adequacy of medical marijuana education in their curriculum. PMID:26430272

  12. Prevalence of smoking habits, attitudes, knowledge and beliefs among Health Professional School students: a cross-sectional study

    Margherita Ferrante

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine smoking prevalence, attitudes, knowledge and behaviours/beliefs among Health Professional School students according to the Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS approach. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in Catania University Medical Schools. The GHPSS questionnaires were self-administered. Logistic regression model was performed. The level of significance was p < 0.05. RESULTS: 422 students answered to the questionnaire. Prevalence of current smokers was 38.2%. 94.3% of the total sample believe that health professionals should receive specific training to quit smoking, but only 21.3% of the sample received it during the study courses. CONCLUSIONS: Given the high prevalence of smokers among health professionals and their key role both as advisers and behavioral models, our results highlight the importance of focusing attention on smoking cessation training addressed to them.

  13. Medical professionalism: what the study of literature can contribute to the conversation.

    Shapiro, Johanna; Nixon, Lois L; Wear, Stephen E; Doukas, David J

    2015-01-01

    Medical school curricula, although traditionally and historically dominated by science, have generally accepted, appreciated, and welcomed the inclusion of literature over the past several decades. Recent concerns about medical professional formation have led to discussions about the specific role and contribution of literature and stories. In this article, we demonstrate how professionalism and the study of literature can be brought into relationship through critical and interrogative interactions based in the literary skill of close reading. Literature in medicine can question the meaning of "professionalism" itself (as well as its virtues), thereby resisting standardization in favor of diversity method and of outcome. Literature can also actively engage learners with questions about the human condition, providing a larger context within which to consider professional identity formation. Our fundamental contention is that, within a medical education framework, literature is highly suited to assist learners in questioning conventional thinking and assumptions about various dimensions of professionalism. PMID:26122270

  14. Emotional burnout, perceived sources of job stress, professional fulfillment, and engagement among medical residents in Malaysia.

    Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman; Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Perianayagam, Wilson; Rampal, Krishna Gopal

    2013-01-01

    This study was the first to explore factors associated with emotional burnout (EB) among medical residents in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a universal sample of 205 medical residents in a Malaysian general hospital. The self-administered questionnaire used consisted of questions on sociodemographics and work characteristics, sources of job stress, professional fulfillment, engagement, and EB. EB was measured using the emotional exhaustion subscale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Mean (±SD) age of the respondents was 26.5 (±1.6). The most common source of job stress was "fear of making mistakes." Most of the participants were dissatisfied with the increase of residentship period from one year to two years. A high level of EB was reported by 36.6% of the respondents. In multivariate analysis, the most important correlates of EB were sources of job stress, professional fulfillment, and engagement. A high prevalence of EB was found among medical residents. Sociodemographic characteristics, performance pressure, and satisfaction with policies were significantly associated with EB. Although this study was limited by its cross-sectional design, its findings posit a sufficient foundation to relevant authorities to construct, amend, and amalgamate existing and future policies. Nothing will sustain you more potently than the power to recognize in your humdrum routine, as perhaps it may be thought, the true poetry of life-the poetry of the common place, of the common man, of the plain, toil-worn woman, with their loves and their joys, their sorrows and their grief.SirWilliam Osler, Aphorisms from the Student Life (Aequanimitas, 1952). PMID:24367238

  15. Resilience of students and their readiness for professional functioning

    Pichurin V.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: in structure of specialist’s psychological readiness for professional functioning important place is taken by formation of the so-called professionally significant personality’s features. Person’s resilience shall be related to them as well. The purpose is to clear up the existing tendencies in respect to resilience and its components in students. Material and methods: in the research 130 students of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V.Lazaryan, participated. From them 73 were boys and 57 - girls. Their age was 17-20 years old. Diagnostic of resilience level and its components (commitment, control, challenge was conducted with the help of resilience questionnaire by S. Maddy, adapted by D. Leontyev and Ye. Rasskazova. Results: we determined indicators of resilience, characteristic for modern students. The received results permit to speak about psychological readiness of modern students for professional functioning by factor of resilience. Conclusions: 1 absolute majority of students have high indicators of resilience and indicators within standards; 2 boys and girls have statistically significant differences by factor “involvement”.

  16. Features of professionally applied physical preperation of med?cal students

    Gubka P.I.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It is defined the development and support of a certain level of important psychical and physical qualities from professional point. The experiment has been carried out by the participation of the students of the Medical Academy. Along with other physical exercises particular attention has been paid to special respiratory exercises. The ways of physical culture and sport that improve general and specific professional and physical capacity for work have been shown. The methods of combining correctly organized breathing and psychological tuning with as a result of a favorable influence on a person's organism are also considered. It has been proved that suggested exercises have promoted the improvement of important psychical and physical qualities from professional point, as well as raising the individual's capacity for work, freeing from nervous stress.

  17. Sleep quality in Zanjan university medical students

    Ghoreishi A

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep has a major role in daily cycles and reconstruction of physical and mental abilities. Regarding the importance of this feature, we decided to determine sleep quality in medical students.Methods: A questionnaire containing demographic data, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was prepared. We distributed the questionnaires using a census method to every student at the Zanjan Faculty of Medicine. The completed questionnaires were collected and the data was analyzed using SPSS.Results: A total of 224 students answered the questionnaire, with 133 (59.4% students evaluated to have good sleep quality and 91 (40.6% poor sleep quality. Of these 91 students, 38% were female and 44.8% were male (p=0.307. The prevalence of poor sleep quality according to the four stages of medical training was 24.6% of those in basic sciences, 42.9% of those in physiopathology, 41.7% of externs, and 53.5% of interns (p=0.008. According to residential status, the prevalence of poor sleep quality was 61.5% among students living with their spouse, 44.6% for students living in their own private homes, 37.6% among students living in the dormitory, and 20.8% for those living with their parents (p=0.024. According to marital status, 35.8% of singles and 64.9% of married students had poor sleep quality (p=0.001. According to financial status, 57.9%, 46.9%, and 33.9% of those from low, moderate and high economic classes, respectively, were sleep deprived (p=0.049. Among those with average grades of under 16 and over 16 out of 20, 47.5% and 32%, respectively, were suffering from poor sleep quality (p=0.047. There was no obvious relationship between sleep quality and BMI, sex, or history of depression or anxiety.Conclusion: Poor sleep quality was significantly associated with lower grades, economic status, living arrangement and type of training. A large number of students quality of life and work may suffer because sleep deprivation.

  18. Puzzle based teaching versus traditional instruction in electrocardiogram interpretation for medical students – a pilot study

    Dhoble Abhijeet; Rubinstein Jack; Ferenchick Gary

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Most medical professionals are expected to possess basic electrocardiogram (EKG) interpretation skills. But, published data suggests that residents' and physicians' EKG interpretation skills are suboptimal. Learning styles differ among medical students; individualization of teaching methods has been shown to be viable and may result in improved learning. Puzzles have been shown to facilitate learning in a relaxed environment. The objective of this study was to assess effic...

  19. Attitudes of Medical Graduate and Undergraduate Students toward the Learning and Application of Medical Statistics

    Wu, Yazhou; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Yanqi; Liu, Xiaoyu; Yi, Dong

    2015-01-01

    It is clear that the teaching of medical statistics needs to be improved, yet areas for priority are unclear as medical students' learning and application of statistics at different levels is not well known. Our goal is to assess the attitudes of medical students toward the learning and application of medical statistics, and discover their…

  20. Medical Student Attitudes about Mental Illness: Does Medical-School Education Reduce Stigma?

    Korszun, Ania; Dinos, Sokratis; Ahmed, Kamran; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reducing stigma associated with mental illness is an important aim of medical education, yet evidence indicates that medical students' attitudes toward patients with mental health problems deteriorate as they progress through medical school. Objectives: Authors examined medical students' attitudes to mental illness, as compared with…

  1. Perceptions of good medical practice in the NHS: a survey of senior health professionals

    Hutchinson, A.; Williams, M.; Meadows, K.; Barbour, R. S.; R. Jones

    1999-01-01

    Objectives - To categorise senior health professionals' experience with poor medical practice in hospitals and in general practice, to describe perceptions which senior NHS staff have of good medical practice, and to describe how problems of poor medical practice are currently managed. Design - A postal questionnaire survey. The questionnaire sought perceptions of good medical practice, asked participants to characterise deviations from good practice, and to describe e...

  2. Going beyond Conference Registration: Creating Intentional Professional Development for Student Affairs Educators

    Haley, Karen; Jaeger, Audrey; Hawes, Carrie; Johnson, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the professional growth and development of student affairs professionals is critical to the future of the profession. The purpose of this study was to examine professional development behaviors in student affairs professionals using claims about learning to better understand the context of the learner, what is being learned, and the…

  3. The Impact of Social Media on Medical Professionalism: A Systematic Qualitative Review of Challenges and Opportunities

    Gholami-Kordkheili, Fatemeh; Wild, Verina; Strech, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background: The rising impact of social media on the private and working lives of health care professionals has made researchers and health care institutions study and rethink the concept and content of medical professionalism in the digital age. In the last decade, several specific policies, original research studies, and comments have been published on the responsible use of social media by health care professionals. However, there is no systematic literature review that analyzes the full s...

  4. Medical Student Mistreatment Results in Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress

    Heru, Alison; Gagne, Gerard; Strong, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors assessed medical student attitudes regarding mistreatment and symptoms of posttraumatic stress in those students who reported exposure to mistreatment. Methods: Third- and fourth-year medical students (N = 71) responded to questions from a vignette in which a student is mistreated and then described any mistreatment they had…

  5. Professional adaptation of first-year students through involvement in research and creative activity

    Victoria Krysova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors deal with the involvement of first-year students in the scientific and creative activity, professional adaptation and role of tutors in professional adaptation of students.

  6. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE PERPECTIVES OF THE UFSC ACCOUNTING SCIENCES STUDENTS

    Marcos Laffin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This goal of this study is to present the levels of importance and knowledge that students of the UFSC Undergraduate Program in Accounting Sciences identify for the exercise of the professional practice. The study was conducted through a survey that used two questionnaires (A and B structured based on Likert scale. Questionnaire "A" sought to identify the importance of the course content to professional practice, and questionnaire "B" identified the level of perception that the students indicate to have of their ability for the professional practice. The contents of the two instruments were based on the dictionary of competencies developed by Cardoso (2006. Data were analyzed by means of national curriculum guidelines of Accounting Sciences, established by Resolution CNE / CES No 10/2004, which presents some caveats to the limits of the approach by competencies. The students in this study indicate how important it is to have knowledge on the language and orality inherent to the accounting practice, the state to have reasonable knowledge to work in the professional practice. Such data allow us to reflect and rethink the training organization model aimed at increasing more critical formative processes that will prioritize actions and knowledge in the articulation between accounting theory and practice.

  7. Modern aspects of Formation of Medical Students’ Professional Competencies at the department of microbiology

    Hamorak, H. P.

    2015-01-01

    The leading goal of any higher educational institution is professional education and training. Advances in medicine require constant improvement of the educational process taking into account the acquired experience, traditional teaching methods and the use of new medical technologies in order to provide professional development of graduates and enhance the competitiveness of higher educational institution. 

  8. How students perceive medical competences: a cross-cultural study between the Medical Course in Portugal and African Portuguese Speaking Countries

    Ismail Mamudo; Fresta Mário; Severo Milton; Barbosa Joselina; Ferreira Maria; Barros Henrique

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background A global effort has been made in the last years to establish a set of core competences that define the essential professional competence of a physician. Regardless of the environment, culture or medical education conditions, a set of core competences is required for medical practice worldwide. Evaluation of educational program is always needed to assure the best training for medical students and ultimately best care for patients. The aim of this study was to determine in w...

  9. Antibiotics Self-Medication among Southern Iranian University Students

    S. Sarahroodi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the knowledge and behavior toward antibiotic self-medication among medical and non-medical university students in Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 200 students randomly chosen from a medical and a non-medical university in Ahwaz, South of Iran in 2008. Data was collected using self administered questionnaires with open-ended and close-ended items. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS 14 and the results were presented as the percentage 97.5% of respondents filled and returned the questionnaire. Self-medication with antibiotics was reported by 42.2% of the medical and 48% of the non-medical students during the last 3 months. Respiratory problems such as sore throat and common cold was the main indication for self-medication with antibiotics (73.3% and amoxicillin was the most commonly used antibiotic in both groups. The choice of self-medication was based on medical knowledge among medical students (50% and on a previous suggestion by a physician (32.6% for the non-medical ones. The prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics among medical and non-medical students was high. Educational programs are needed to teach university students about the potential problems of self-medication with antibiotics.

  10. Emotional intelligence and perceived stress in healthcare students: a multi-institutional, multi-professional survey

    McKendree Jean

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emotional intelligence (EI is increasingly discussed as having a potential role in medicine, nursing, and other healthcare disciplines, both for personal mental health and professional practice. Stress has been identified as being high for students in healthcare courses. This study investigated whether EI and stress differed among students in four health professions (dental, nursing, graduate mental health workers, medical and whether there was evidence that EI might serve as a buffer for stress. Method The Schutte Emotional Intelligence and the Perceived Stress scale instruments were administered to four groups of healthcare students in their first year of study in both the autumn and summer terms of the 2005-6 academic year. The groups were undergraduate dental, nursing and medical students, and postgraduate mental health workers. Results No significant differences were found between males and females nor among professional groups for the EI measure. Dental students reported significantly higher stress than medical students. EI was found to be only moderately stable in test-retest scores. Some evidence was found for EI as a possible factor in mediating stress. Students in different health profession courses did not show significant differences in Emotional Intelligence. Conclusion While stress and EI showed a moderate relationship, results of this study do not allow the direction of relationship to be determined. The limitations and further research questions raised in this study are discussed along with the need for refinement of the EI construct and measures, particularly if Emotional Intelligence were to be considered as a possible selection criterion, as has been suggested by some authors.

  11. The nursing students' viewpoints on influential clinical instructor in Jahrom University of Medical Sciences

    Sedigheh Najafipour

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Clinical teachers have an important role in creating an environment for effective clinical teaching to students. In addition, the faculty has a significant impact on the students' feeling of success or failure in professional competence. This study was performed to determine the characteristics of an influential instructor according to the nursing students' viewpoints in Jahrom University of Medical Sciences.Material and Methods:In this cross-sectional survey, 75 nursing students of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences were selected by census sampling method. The data collection tool was a valid and reliable questionnaire consisting of 4 domains including professional competence, interpersonal relationship, personality characteristics, and teaching ability. The data were analyzed by SPSS.Results:The results showed that influential clinical teacher must be professionally competent (mean=4.4 ± 0.80, have interpersonal relationships (mean=4.2 ± 0.96 have good personality characteristics (mean=4.1 ± 0.95, and have high eaching ability (mean=4 ± 0.89. According to the students, the most important characteristics of an influential clinical instructor are having interest in patient care (98.4%, having sufficient professional knowledge (80%, explaining and demonstrating new nursing techniques (80%, performing nursing skills procedures (86.3%, being honest with the students and creating motivation in students (83%.Conclusion:The nursing students' viewpoints indicated that influential clinical instructor has an important role in promoting quality nursing experience and in getting knowledge, professional skills and attitude. Nursing faculty should plan for promoting professional competency in clinical instructors.

  12. Effect of personality development program for medical and nursing students: A pilot study

    Naresh Nebhinani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Personal development is an ongoing but complex process and it is crucial for the medical educator to recognize the trait and design the training for optimal development of students. Though importance of human personality is widely recognized for functional efficiency of an individual and organization, but its recognition is grossly missing from medical curriculum. Aim: To organize and evaluate the 'Personality Development Program' for medical and nursing students.Methods: First year medical and nursing students were recruited through total enumeration method. 'Personality development program' was conducted by a trained psychologist and it was evaluated through 'partially open ended anonymous structured feedback'.Results: Majority of the students found this program relevant, comprehensive and purposeful. Again majority had perceived some improvement in their confidence and level of communication, interpersonal relationships, planned time schedule, emotional confidence, and better stress management. They have also narrated shortcomings of the program along with some constructive suggestions.Conclusion: This preliminary attempt for personality development was highly appreciated by the students as well as their supervisors as a means to professional development. It further emphasizes the vital need of ongoing programs both for enhancing personality and professionalism.Key words: Personality development, enhancement, medical and nursing students

  13. Mindfulness training for stress management: a randomised controlled study of medical and psychology students

    de Vibe, Michael; Solhaug, Ida; Tyssen, Reidar; Friborg, Oddgeir; Jan H. Rosenvinge; Sørlie, Tore; Bjørndal, Arild

    2013-01-01

    Background Distress and burnout among medical and psychology professionals are commonly reported and have implications for the quality of patient care delivered. Already in the course of university studies, medicine and psychology students report mental distress and low life satisfaction. There is a need for interventions that promote better coping skills in students in order to prevent distress and future burnout. This study examines the effect of a seven-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduct...

  14. Mindfulness training for stress management: a randomised controlled study of medical and psychology students

    de Vibe, Michael; Solhaug, Ida; Tyssen, Reidar; Friborg, Oddgeir; Jan H. Rosenvinge; Sørlie, Tore; Bjørndal, Arild

    2013-01-01

    Background Distress and burnout among medical and psychology professionals are commonly reported and have implications for the quality of patient care delivered. Already in the course of university studies, medicine and psychology students report mental distress and low life satisfaction. There is a need for interventions that promote better coping skills in students in order to prevent distress and future burnout. This study examines the effect of a seven-week Mindfulness-...

  15. Exploring UK medical and social work students' legal literacy: comparisons, contrasts and implications.

    Preston-Shoot, Michael; McKimm, Judy

    2013-05-01

    To ensure acceptable practice standards both doctors and social workers should draw on relevant legal rules when reaching professional judgements concerning, for instance, children requiring protection, people with severe mental distress and adults at risk, information sharing, consent to intervention and service user involvement in their care and treatment. Many practitioners use the law to maintain high standards of professionalism. However, research has uncovered limited awareness of legal rules and poor standards of health and social care. Academic benchmarks and practice requirements for health and social care professions centrally position legal knowledge for secure decision-making. Model curricula exist. However, the outcomes of the taught curriculum on students' confidence in their legal knowledge and skills have been relatively overlooked. This article introduces the concept of legal literacy, a distillation of knowledge, understanding, skills and values that enables practitioners to connect relevant legal rules with their professional practice, to appreciate the roles and duties of other practitioners and to communicate effectively across organisational boundaries. It presents the outcomes for a 2006-2009 study of 1154 UK medical and 638 social work students of their law learning for practice, response rates of 46% and 68%. Significant differences were found between medical and social work students' attitudes towards the law, and in their self-ratings of legal knowledge and skills. Confidence levels were low and anxiety high, especially among medical students, although law teaching had some positive outcomes on knowledge and skill development. Social work and medical students associated different themes with the law, the latter especially foregrounding ethics, negligence and liability, which could affect inter-professional working. Students are not fully prepared for legally literate practice, with a consequent need to review the time allocated for, and the content of law learning and the subsequent availability of continuing professional development. PMID:23379906

  16. Attitudes Of Medical Students Towards Relationship With Pharmaceutical Company: Do We Need A Change?

    Dr. Shahu Ingole

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Promotion by pharmaceutical company often takes advantage of mental shortcuts. Significant deficiencies have been found in student’s knowledge about pharmaceutical marketing expenditures, professional ethics and accuracy of drug information. The purpose of study was to assess the attitudes of medical students towards relationship with pharmaceutical companies and drug promotion by them. Methods: To assess the attitudes, a prevalidated questionnaire consisting of 18 questions was designed. Questionnaire was istributed when a series of lectures were scheduled for the entire medical class (253 medical students. Completed questionnaires werecollected at the end of the session and analysis was done using statistical methods. Results: Overall 81% of the medical students were of the opinion that pharmaceutical companies should be allowed to interact with them at the college level. About 95% believe that the information given by MRs is reliable and confirmation of the claims is not required (75% students. Overall 68% students believe that drug promotional offers never compromise the decision making of the physicians. About 70% students think that physicians should be compensated with gifts by medical representatives whenever their drugs are prescribed. Conclusion: The medical students are generally not opposed to interact with MR at some point of time or receive gifts from them. Also many students may not be conscious potential subconscious expectations of give-and-take relationship. Perhaps, the insight gained from our study will be used to reinforce the existing teaching curriculum with added emphasis on this issue.

  17. Radioisotopes in the training of medical students

    The importance of the discovery of radioisotopes for the progress of science in general and that of biochemistry and physiology in particular has led us to provide experimental practice which enables medical students to become effectively acquainted with the properties and methods of use of radioisotopes, the measurement of their activity, and the possible risks involved in handling them. We have included in the exercises in quantitative determination for third-year medical students (the last pre-clinical year), practice in calibrating micropipettes using a 24Na solution prepared in the TRICO Centre's reactor by irradiating sodium carbonate with slow neutrons. The students make several GM-counter measurements of the activity of the stock solution over a period of time and of the activity of five samples taken with two different micropipettes. They then calculate, by measuring the decay in activity, the half-life of the isotope and relate their measurements to a reference time. In this way they calculate the volume of their micropipettes and the accuracy of the measurements. By means of a statistical analysis they compare the averages for the two pipettes and the accuracy of two operators. (author)

  18. The Informal Curriculum: A Case Study on Tutor Reflexivity, Corporate Agency and Medical Professionalism

    Kahn, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Professionalism is a focus for student learning in many disciplines. It is known, furthermore, that interpersonal interactions between staff and students constitute an informal curriculum that has a significant influence on students. But the origins of this informal curriculum are not fully apparent. This article offers a multiple case study that…

  19. A student-initiated and student-facilitated international health elective for preclinical medical students

    Nirali Vora

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Global health education is becoming more important for developing well-rounded physicians and may encourage students toward a career in primary care. Many medical schools, however, lack adequate and structured opportunities for students beginning the curriculum. Methods: Second-year medical students initiated, designed, and facilitated a pass–fail international health elective, providing a curricular framework for preclinical medical students wishing to gain exposure to the clinical and cultural practices of a developing country. Results: All course participants (N=30 completed a post-travel questionnaire within one week of sharing their experiences. Screening reflection essays for common themes that fulfill university core competencies yielded specific global health learning outcomes, including analysis of health care determinants. Conclusion: Medical students successfully implemented a sustainable global health curriculum for preclinical student peers. Financial constraints, language, and organizational burdens limit student participation. In future, long-term studies should analyze career impact and benefits to the host country.

  20. Stress in medical students: A cross sectional study

    Hiteshkumar Muktilal Chauhan; Shah, Hirendra R; Sumitraben Hiteshkumar Chauhan; Chaudhary, Sucheta M

    2014-01-01

    Background & Objectives: Stress occurs when pressure is greater than resources available. Medical education has many factors causing stress among the medical students. This study was conducted to find out the prevalence of stress among medical students and to know the factors causing stress in them.Methods: This is a cross sectional study, conducted on the Ist MBBS to III/IInd MBBS students of B. J. Medical College, Ahmedabad, using a semistructured self administered questionnaire, in Oct...

  1. The views of medical students about psychiatry clerkship education

    Varkal, Mihriban Dalkıran; Yüksek, Erhan; Demirel, Ömer Faruk; Çağlar, Nuran; Eliüşük, Nihan; Gökdoğan, Pınar; Özmansur, Elif Nurdan; Emül, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Psychiatry education in medical schools seems to be given little attention and has not been fully integrated into curriculum. In this study our purpose was to get feedback about all phases of psychiatry clerkship from medical students, who completed psychiatry clerkship. Methods: A 31 item questionnaire investigating the views of medical students about psychiatry clerkship and a socio-demographic survey were given to the medical students, who completed psychiatry clerkship and...

  2. Computer and Internet use among Undergraduate Medical Students in Iran

    Ayatollahi, Ali; Ayatollahi, Jamshid; Ayatollahi, Fatemeh; Ayatollahi, Reza; Shahcheraghi, Seyed Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Although computer technologies are now widely used in medicine, little is known about its use among medical students in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the competence and access to computer and internet among the medical students. Methods: In this descriptive study, medical students of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Science, Yazd, Iran from the fifth years were asked to answer a questionnaire during a time-tabled lecture slot. The chi-square test was used to com...

  3. Do students' attitudes toward women change during medical school?

    Phillips, S P; Ferguson, K E

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medical school has historically reinforced traditional views of women. This cohort study follows implementation of a revitalized curriculum and examines students' attitudes toward women on entry into an Ontario medical school, and 3 years later. METHODS: Of the 75 students entering first year at Queen's University medical school 70 completed the initial survey in September 1994 and 54 were resurveyed in May 1997. First-year students at 2 other Ontario medical schools were also sur...

  4. Can gynaecology teaching associates provide high quality effective training for medical students in the United Kingdom? Comparative study

    Pickard, Sally; Baraitser, Paula; Rymer, Janice; Piper, Johanna

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To train laywomen to become professional patients in order to teach medical students speculum and bimanual examination, to assess their effectiveness in this role, and to incorporate this method of teaching into the undergraduate curriculum of a medical school in the United Kingdom.

  5. A Multivariate Analysis of Personality, Values and Expectations as Correlates of Career Aspirations of Final Year Medical Students

    Rogers, Mary E.; Searle, Judy; Creed, Peter A.; Ng, Shu-Kay

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on the career intentions of 179 final year medical students who completed an online survey that included measures of personality, values, professional and lifestyle expectations, and well-being. Logistic regression analyses identified the determinants of preferred medical specialty, practice location and hours of work.…

  6. Comparison of the Perceived Quality of Life between Medical and Veterinary Students in Tehran.

    Labbafinejad, Yasser; Danesh, Hossein; Imanizade, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Medical and veterinary professional programs are demanding and may have an impact on a student's quality of life (QOL). The aim of this study was to compare the perceived QOL of these two groups. In this study, we used the SF-36 questionnaire in which higher scores mean a better perceived QOL. Only the students in the internship phase of their program were selected so that we could compare the two groups in a similar way. In total, 308 valid questionnaires were gathered. Apart from age and body mass index (BMI), the two groups were demographically similar. The scores of five domains (physical activity limitation due to health problems, usual role limitation due to emotional problems, vitality, general mental health, and general health perception) and also the total score were statistically higher in medical students. Only the score of one domain (social activity limitation due to physical or emotional problems) was statistically higher in veterinary students. BMI, physical activity limitation due to health problems, and vitality lost their significance after binomial logistic regression. We found that, in general, veterinary students have lower scores for the perceived QOL with social function being the only exception. It can be assumed that in medical students, interaction with human patients may have a negative impact in the score of this domain. Even though medical students have shown lower perceived QOL than the general population in previous studies, veterinary students appear to have slightly lower perceived QOL than medical students. PMID:26752021

  7. Using standardized patients to assess communication skills in medical and nursing Students

    Burgoyne Louise

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of recent developments in medical and nursing education have highlighted the importance of communication and consultation skills (CCS. Although such skills are taught in all medical and nursing undergraduate curriculums, there is no comprehensive screening or assessment programme of CCS using professionally trained Standardized Patients Educators (SPE's in Ireland. This study was designed to test the content, process and acceptability of a screening programme in CCS with Irish medical and nursing students using trained SPE's and a previously validated global rating scale for CCS. Methods Eight tutors from the Schools of Nursing and Medicine at University College Cork were trained in the use of a validated communication skills and attitudes holistic assessment tool. A total of forty six medical students (Year 2 of 5 and sixty four nursing students (Year 2/3 of 4 were selected to under go individual CCS assessment by the tutors via an SPE led scenario. Immediate formative feedback was provided by the SPE's for the students. Students who did not pass the assessment were referred for remediation CCS learning. Results Almost three quarters of medical students (33/46; 72% and 81% of nursing students (56/64 passed the CCS assessment in both communication and attitudes categories. All nursing students had English as their first language. Nine of thirteen medical students referred for enhanced learning in CCS did not have English as their first language. Conclusions A significant proportion of both medical and nursing students required referral for enhanced training in CCS. Medical students requiring enhanced training were more likely not to have English as a first language.

  8. Using standardized patients to assess communication skills in medical and nursing students

    Ryan, C Anthony

    2010-03-17

    Abstract Background A number of recent developments in medical and nursing education have highlighted the importance of communication and consultation skills (CCS). Although such skills are taught in all medical and nursing undergraduate curriculums, there is no comprehensive screening or assessment programme of CCS using professionally trained Standardized Patients Educators (SPE\\'s) in Ireland. This study was designed to test the content, process and acceptability of a screening programme in CCS with Irish medical and nursing students using trained SPE\\'s and a previously validated global rating scale for CCS. Methods Eight tutors from the Schools of Nursing and Medicine at University College Cork were trained in the use of a validated communication skills and attitudes holistic assessment tool. A total of forty six medical students (Year 2 of 5) and sixty four nursing students (Year 2\\/3 of 4) were selected to under go individual CCS assessment by the tutors via an SPE led scenario. Immediate formative feedback was provided by the SPE\\'s for the students. Students who did not pass the assessment were referred for remediation CCS learning. Results Almost three quarters of medical students (33\\/46; 72%) and 81% of nursing students (56\\/64) passed the CCS assessment in both communication and attitudes categories. All nursing students had English as their first language. Nine of thirteen medical students referred for enhanced learning in CCS did not have English as their first language. Conclusions A significant proportion of both medical and nursing students required referral for enhanced training in CCS. Medical students requiring enhanced training were more likely not to have English as a first language.

  9. The e-patient and medical students.

    Masters, Ken

    2016-03-01

    The recent publicity around the tragic case of Bronte Doyne has highlighted a pressing need in healthcare delivery: the need for doctors to know that their patients, "e-patients," know medicine. In turn, this requires our medical students to be trained in how best to utilise the potential of e-patients in healthcare delivery. "I can't begin to tell you how it feels to have to tell an oncologist they are wrong, it's a young person's cancer. I had to, I'm fed up of trusting them." - Bronte Doyne (Vize 2015). PMID:26618371

  10. Activities for education at work for Medical students

    Mirna León Acebo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: the growing demands of a health professional that combines study and work, school with life and teaching-learning in primary and secondary health care constitute a current social problem for the country.Objective: to design a set of activities for education at work for first year medical students, from the family doctor's office, to contribute to health promotion and disease prevention in the community, favoring the integral formation of future doctors.Methods: the program was designed in work areas for the integrated teaching of biomedical disciplines for contributing to health promotion and disease prevention in "Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima” polyclinic in Las Tunas. It carried out the historic and graphical analysis of the problem; students’,  professors’ and community members’ behaviors were observed; interviews and surveys were applied to explore knowledge and experiences of students and health professionals on the promotion of health education at work; workshops on critical opinion and collective elaboration were carried out and permitted to  socialize with other teachers and health professionals the proposed program for its redesign based on collective criticism.Results: the shortcomings caused by the fragmentation of subject contents and biomedical disciplines in education at work were characterized and the plan to help to eliminate the inadequacies that occur in education at work was designed by work areas and determined by the general guidelines for its implementation, without specific indications.Conclusions: the clinical method was applied its pedagogical dimension, allowing the coordination between the traditional methods of teaching-learning and for diagnosing, to contribute to eliminate the spontaneous character in the development of education in the workplace. The program of activities was designed by work areas.

  11. KNOWELDGE ON EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS IN BANGALORE, KARNATAKA

    Ramakrishna Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception (EC refers to methods that women can use to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse , method failure or incorrect use. Unwanted pregnancy followed by unsafe abortion can be avoided by using different contraceptive methods including emergency contraceptives. Inadequate awareness of EC leads to its misuse among the youth , as it may lead to avoidance of condoms which places them at risk for STIs/HIV. The objective of this study is to assess knowledge about emergency contraceptives among M.B.B.S. students. This is a cross - sectional stud y. Data was collected from Second year medical students of Bangalore Medical College & Research Institute , Bangalore using Pre - tested semi - structured self - administered questionnaire. The total number of participants was 86 out of this females were 48.8% (4 2. 97.6% (84 participants heard about EC , 50% (43 said their source of information about EC is health professionals and 58.2% (50 knew EC to be taken within 72 hours of unprotected sex. There is a lack of complete awareness about EC among studied popul ation. As they are the health care providers in future , their knowledge regarding EC will be useful in educating public especially youth.

  12. 77 FR 38838 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    2012-06-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care... primary medical care, mental health, and dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as of April 1... National Health Service Corps (NHSC) personnel to provide primary care, dental, or mental health......

  13. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices regarding Whole Body Donation among Medical Professionals in a Hospital in India

    Ballala, Kirthinath; Shetty, Avinash; Malpe, Surekha Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Voluntary body donation has become an important source of cadavers for anatomical study and education. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) regarding whole body donation among medical professionals in a medical institute in India. A cross sectional study was conducted at Kasturba Hospital, Manipal,…

  14. Knowledge and attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine among medical students in Turkey

    Akan Hulya

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study aims to examine knowledge and attitudes towards Complementary and Alternative Medicine among medical students in Turkey, and find out whether they want to be trained in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out between October and December 2010 among medical students. Data were collected from a total of seven medical schools. Findings The study included 943 medical students. The most well known methods among the students were herbal treatment (81.2 %, acupuncture (80.8 %, hypnosis (78.8 %, body-based practices including massage (77 % and meditation (65.2 %, respectively. Acupuncture, aromatherapy, herbal treatment and meditation were better known among female participants compared to males (p  Conclusions Majority of the medical students were familiar with the CAM methods widely used in Turkey, while most of them had positive attitudes towards CAM as well as willingness to receive training on the subject, and they were likely to recommend CAM methods to their patients in their future professional lives. With its gradual scientific development and increasing popularity, there appears a need for a coordinated policy in integrating CAM into the medical curriculum, by taking expectations of and feedback from medical students into consideration in setting educational standards.

  15. The essential role of medical ethics education in achieving professionalism: the Romanell Report.

    Carrese, Joseph A; Malek, Janet; Watson, Katie; Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani; Green, Michael J; McCullough, Laurence B; Geller, Gail; Braddock, Clarence H; Doukas, David J

    2015-06-01

    This article-the Romanell Report-offers an analysis of the current state of medical ethics education in the United States, focusing in particular on its essential role in cultivating professionalism among medical learners. Education in ethics has become an integral part of medical education and training over the past three decades and has received particular attention in recent years because of the increasing emphasis placed on professional formation by accrediting bodies such as the Liaison Committee on Medical Education and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Yet, despite the development of standards, milestones, and competencies related to professionalism, there is no consensus about the specific goals of medical ethics education, the essential knowledge and skills expected of learners, the best pedagogical methods and processes for implementation, and optimal strategies for assessment. Moreover, the quality, extent, and focus of medical ethics instruction vary, particularly at the graduate medical education level. Although variation in methods of instruction and assessment may be appropriate, ultimately medical ethics education must address the overarching articulated expectations of the major accrediting organizations. With the aim of aiding medical ethics educators in meeting these expectations, the Romanell Report describes current practices in ethics education and offers guidance in several areas: educational goals and objectives, teaching methods, assessment strategies, and other challenges and opportunities (including course structure and faculty development). The report concludes by proposing an agenda for future research. PMID:25881647

  16. Improving medical students' knowledge of genetic disease: a review of current and emerging pedagogical practices

    Wolyniak MJ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Wolyniak,1 Lynne T Bemis,2 Amy J Prunuske2 1Department of Biology, Hampden-Sydney College, Hampden-Sydney, VA, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth, MN, USA Abstract: Genetics is an essential subject to be mastered by health professional students of all types. However, technological advances in genomics and recent pedagogical research have changed the way in which many medical training programs teach genetics to their students. These advances favor a more experience-based education focused primarily on developing student's critical thinking skills. In this review, we examine the current state of genetics education at both the preclinical and clinical levels and the ways in which medical and pedagogical research have guided reforms to current and emerging teaching practices in genetics. We discover exciting trends taking place in which genetics is integrated with other scientific disciplines both horizontally and vertically across medical curricula to emphasize training in scientific critical thinking skills among students via the evaluation of clinical evidence and consultation of online databases. These trends will produce future health professionals with the skills and confidence necessary to embrace the new tools of medical practice that have emerged from scientific advances in genetics, genomics, and bioinformatics. Keywords: genetics education, medical genetics, pedagogical practice, active learning, problem-based learning

  17. Medical Student Volunteerism Addresses Patients' Social Needs: A Novel Approach to Patient-Centered Care

    Onyekere, Chinwe; Ross, Sandra; Namba, Alexa; Ross, Justin C.; Mann, Barry D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Healthcare providers must be equipped to recognize and address patients' psychosocial needs to improve overall health outcomes. To give future healthcare providers the tools and training necessary to identify and address psychosocial issues, Lankenau Medical Center in partnership with the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine designed the Medical Student Advocate (MSA) program. Methods: The MSA program places volunteer second-year osteopathic medical students in care coordination teams at Lankenau Medical Associates, a primary care practice serving a diverse patient population in the Philadelphia, PA, region. As active members of the team, MSAs are referred high-risk patients who have resource needs such as food, employment, child care, and transportation. MSAs work collaboratively with patients and the multidisciplinary team to address patients' nonmedical needs. Results: From August 2013 to August 2015, 31 osteopathic medical students volunteered for the MSA program and served 369 patients with 720 identified needs. Faculty and participating medical students report that the MSA program provided an enhanced understanding of the holistic nature of patient care and a comprehensive view of patient needs. Conclusion: The MSA program provides students with a unique educational opportunity that encompasses early exposure to patient interaction, social determinants of health, population health, and interdisciplinary collaboration. Students develop skills to help them build patient relationships, understand the psychosocial factors shaping health outcomes, and engage with other healthcare professionals. This work in the preclinical years provides students with the knowledge to help them perform more effectively in the changing healthcare environment.

  18. Study on self-medication among 2nd year medical students

    K. Jagadeesh

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions: Self-medication was widely practiced among the students. They had good knowledge of OTC drugs. The practice of self-medication was almost appropriate. In general self-medication must be accompanied by appropriate information. Educating benefits and risks of self-medication is very much needed for medical students and the public now a day. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(1.000: 164-167

  19. Study on self-medication among 2nd year medical students

    K. Jagadeesh; K. N. Chidananda; Sreenivas P. Revankar; Nagaraja S. Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-medication is use of medicines by individuals to treat self-recognized symptoms and illness. Self-medication is a common type of self-care behavior in the general public, but medical students differ in such practice, as they have knowledge about drugs and diseases. Methods: The present study involved 100 2nd year final term medical students in and ldquo;Shivamogga Institute of Medical Sciences, and rdquo; Shivamogga, Karnataka. Study was questionnaire based, and the resul...

  20. Students' Views on Factors Affecting Empathy in Medical Education

    Winseman, Jeffrey; Malik, Abid; Morison, Julie; Balkoski, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Empathy is a prominent goal of medical education that is too often underachieved. Using concept mapping, the authors constructed a student-generated conceptual model of factors viewed as affecting empathy during medical education. Methods: During the 2005-2006 academic year, 293 medical students and interns answered a brainstorming…

  1. Factors Associated with Undertreatment of Medical Student Depression.

    Tjia, Jennifer; Givens, Jane L.; Shea, Judy A.

    2005-01-01

    The authors measured factors associated with undertreatment of medical students' depression. They administered a cross-sectional Beck Depression Inventory and sociodemographic questionnaire to students at 1 medical school, defining their outcome measure as the use of counseling services or antidepressant medication. Of an estimated 450 available…

  2. Child Psychiatry: What Are We Teaching Medical Students?

    Dingle, Arden D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The author describes child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) undergraduate teaching in American and Canadian medical schools. Methods: A survey asking for information on CAP teaching, student interest in CAP, and opinions about the CAP importance was sent to the medical student psychiatry director at 142 accredited medical schools in the…

  3. Discrediting the Notion "Working with 'Crazies' Will Make You"Crazy"": Addressing Stigma and Enhancing Empathy in Medical Student Education

    Cutler, Janis L.; Harding, Kelli J.; Mozian, Sharon A.; Wright, Leslie L.; Pica, Adrienne G.; Masters, Scott R.; Graham, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    People with mental illness around the world continue to suffer from stigmatization and limited care. Previous studies utilizing self-report questionnaires indicate that many medical students regard clinical work with psychiatric patients as unappealing, while the professionalism literature has documented a general decline in students' capacity for…

  4. Awareness and Sources of Information About Osteoporosis Among Medical Students - Original Investigation

    Dilek Durmuş

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the knowledge of osteoporosis (OP and the sources of information about the disease among medical students and the effect of the medical training on their awareness about the OP. Material and Methods: Two hundred twenty seven students were asked if they knew OP. Two hundred fifteen students reported that they were familiar with OP. Statistical analysis was done among these 215 students. The questionnaire included 7 questions. Participants were divided into three groups: English preparatory year’s students (EP, first year’s students, second year’s students. Results: Most of the students (94.4%, n=203 thought that OP was serious health problem. Two hundred three students(94% believed that inadequate dietary calcium and vitamin D intake was the cause of OP. Bone densitometry was the mainly chosen (90.1% diagnostic method. As source of knowledge from television was reported by 63.7% of the students. Number of the students who knew, in which population OP was seen, correctly (p=0.035 and who reported the health professionals as the source of knowledge (p=0.001 were significantly increased in first and second classes when compared with EP class. Conclusions: We observed that medical student who had no lessons of OP, have knowledge about OP by means of television and newspaper. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2009;15:43-7

  5. Cardiac evaluation of collegiate student athletes: a medical and legal perspective.

    Paterick, Timothy E; Jan, M Fuad; Paterick, Zachary R; Umland, Matt M; Kramer, Christopher; Lake, Peter; Seward, James B; Tajik, A Jamil; Maron, Barry J

    2012-08-01

    Physicians participate in the screening, routine medical supervision, and disqualification process of collegiate student athletes today. Physicians and universities evaluating collegiate student athletes for athletic participation should understand the meticulous medical process necessary to make eligibility/disqualification decisions and the associated liability issues. It is the responsibility of a team physician to take the lead role in the college sports medical evaluation process. The first duty of a team physician and institution is to protect the health and well-being of their collegiate student athletes. The potential liability associated with the evaluation process requires institutions of higher education and physicians to develop sound and reasonable administrative strategies regarding college athletes and their participation in intercollegiate athletics. Reducing this liability risk requires an understanding of the evolving judicial framework and compliance with standard case law and available guidelines. As medical professional standards evolve, so will responsibilities under legal standards. PMID:22840661

  6. Patients' view on medical students in dermatology practice

    Seval Doğruk Kaçar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Practical training of medical students, especially in specialties such as dermatology, is performed in outpatient clinics where mostly outpatients are encountered. The aim of this study was to compare patients’ perspectives on medical students in two university hospitals (X–Y situated in different regions of Turkey. Materials and Methods: A total of 250 patients, who visited outpatient clinics of X (group 1 and Y (group 2 university hospitals during practical training for fifth year medical students, were included in this study. A questionnaire composed of 16 items was filled by all patients. The first eight questions were about patients’ consent and preferences on the presence of medical students during their interview and the remaining eight questions inquired patients’ overall thoughts on medical students. Results: The patients in both groups were willing to be a part of the educational programme of medical students (39.8%, 53.5%, respectively. The patients were aware that they had the right to refuse the presence of medical students (61.0%, 62.3% and majority wanted to be informed on the presence of medical students during the interview (72.4%, 80.7%. While patients in group 1 evaluated being with medical students as pleasurable (43.1%, patients in group 2 did not agree (44.7%. In addition, both groups were not bothered to share personal information with medical students (50.4%, 44.7% and stated that they would recommend their friends and relatives to have a physical examination done by medical students (51.2%, 41.2%. Conclusion: The active role of medical students during dermatology training is positively viewed by patients in both western and eastern parts of our country. The patients’ request on being informed for the presence of medical students during clinical examination reveals the requirement of oral and written informed consent.

  7. Using Sales Management Students to Manage Professional Selling Students in an Innovative Active Learning Project

    Young, Joyce A.; Hawes, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an application of active learning within two different courses: professional selling and sales management. Students assumed the roles of sales representatives and sales managers for an actual fund-raiser--a golf outing--sponsored by a student chapter of the American Marketing Association. The sales project encompassed an…

  8. Using Sales Management Students to Manage Professional Selling Students in an Innovative Active Learning Project

    Young, Joyce A.; Hawes, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an application of active learning within two different courses: professional selling and sales management. Students assumed the roles of sales representatives and sales managers for an actual fund-raiser--a golf outing--sponsored by a student chapter of the American Marketing Association. The sales project encompassed an…

  9. Medication management training for mental health professionals: a programme of research

    Bressington, D.

    2014-01-01

    Aim This research programme aimed to investigate issues relating to the management of patient non-adherence with antipsychotic medication. The findings from the patient-related studies and the systematic literature review informed the development of a medication management staff training programme; which was evaluated in terms of the effects on mental health professionals’ understanding and clinical practice in Hong Kong. Background Medication management interventions which are desi...

  10. Self-medication in health students from two Brazilian universities

    Delprina de G. Rocha de Carvalho; Felipe Eduardo Ferreira Valoz; Danilo Santos Carneiro; Patricia Freire Gasparetto; Vírginia Farias Alves; Cláudio Maranhão Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Self medication is a component of self care and it is considered as primary public health resource in health care system. It can be defined as use of non-prescription medicines by people on their own initiative. Dentists, together with doctors and veterinarians, comprise the professional classes that may and must prescribe medications for their patients. On the other hand, the nursing professionals are the ones who more administer drugs to patients in the ambulatory and hospital...

  11. Non-Medical Prescription Drug Use among University Students

    Vidourek, Rebecca A.; King, Keith A.; Knopf, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Non-medical prescription drug use is an increasing problem among university students. Purpose: The present study investigated university students' involvement in non-medical prescription drug (NMPD) use and associations between use and other risky behaviors. Methods: A sample of 363 university students completed a four page survey…

  12. Interns as teachers of medical students: a pilot programme.

    Dunne, B

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, rising numbers of medical students and an increasingly demanding clinical workload has put pressures on the educational systems for medical students in the hospital. Bedside teaching remains central to education, but tutorial delivery by registrars, tutors and consultants has proven to be increasingly difficult with the greater numbers of students now in the undergraduate system.

  13. The Effects of Training Medical Students in Motivational Interviewing

    Opheim, Arild; Andreasson, Sven; Eklund, Astri Brandell; Prescott, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of brief training in Motivational interviewing (MI) for medical students. Design: Video recordings of consultations between 113 final-year medical students and simulated patients were scored blind by two independent raters with the Motivational Interviewing Skill Code (MISC). Half of the students participated in a…

  14. Medical Students as Facilitators for Laparoscopic Simulator Training

    Vedel, Cathrine; Bjerrum, Flemming; Mahmood, Badar; Sørensen, Jette Led; Strandbygaard, Jeanett

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Teaching basic clinical skills to student peers and residents by medical students has previously been shown effective. This study examines if medical students can facilitate laparoscopic procedural tasks to residents using a virtual reality simulator. METHODS: This was a retrospective...... practicing on a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator....

  15. Explicating students’ personal professional theories in vocational education through multi-method triangulation

    Schaap, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304822914; de Bruijn, E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074460919; van der Schaaf, M.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073361917; Baartman, L.K.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/261829580; Kirschner, P.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/079457037

    2011-01-01

    Students in competence-based vocational education are expected to actively construct a personal professional theory, in which they integrate different types of knowledge and beliefs. Students’ personal professional theories are seen as an important learning outcome of competence-based vocational education. However, it is unknown how personal professional theories can be measured. This study focused on measuring the content and nature of students’ personal professional theories using a multi-m...

  16. Berlin's medical students' smoking habits, knowledge about smoking and attitudes toward smoking cessation counseling

    Kusma Bianca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diseases associated with smoking are a foremost cause of premature death in the world, both in developed and developing countries. Eliminating smoking can do more to improve health and prolong life than any other measure in the field of preventive medicine. Today's medical students will play a prominent role in future efforts to prevent and control tobacco use. Methods A cross-sectional, self-administered, anonymous survey of fifth-year medical students in Berlin, Germany was conducted in November 2007. The study explored the prevalence of smoking among medical students. We assessed their current knowledge regarding tobacco dependence and the effectiveness of smoking cessation methods. Students' perceived competence to counsel smokers and promote smoking cessation treatments was also explored. Analyses were based on responses from 258 students (86.6% response rate. Results One quarter of the medical students surveyed were current smokers. The smoking rate was 22.1% among women, 32.4% among men. Students underestimated smoking-related mortality and the negative effect of smoking on longevity. A considerable number of subjects erroneously assumed that nicotine causes coronary artery disease. Students' overall knowledge of the effectiveness of smoking cessation methods was inadequate. Only one third of the students indicated that they felt qualified to counsel patients about tobacco dependence. Conclusions This study reveals serious deficiencies in knowledge and counseling skills among medical students in our sample. The curriculum of every medical school should include a tobacco module. Thus, by providing comprehensive training in nicotine dependence interventions to medical students, smokers will have access to the professional expertise they need to quit smoking.

  17. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 5 - Criteria for Designation of Areas Having Shortages of Primary Medical Care Professional(s)

    2010-10-01

    ... demographic structure and/or a tradition of interaction or interdependency), have limited interaction with... use of the area's primary medical care providers. Such barriers may be economic, linguistic, cultural... Medical Care Professional(s) Part I—Geographic Areas A. Federal and State Correctional Institutions....

  18. Perceptions and Practices of Self-Medication among Medical Students in Coastal South India

    Kumar, Nithin; Kanchan, Tanuj; Unnikrishnan, Bhaskaran; T Rekha; Mithra, Prasanna; Kulkarni, Vaman; Papanna, Mohan Kumar; Holla, Ramesh; Uppal, Surabhi

    2013-01-01

    Self-medication is a common practice worldwide and the irrational use of drugs is a cause of concern. This study assessed the prevalence of self-medication among the medical students in South India. The data was analysed using SPSS version 11.5. A total of 440 students were included in the study. The prevalence of self-medication was 78.6%. A larger number of females were self-medicating (81.2%) than males (75.3%). The majority of the students self-medicated because of the illness being too t...

  19. Proximity morality in medical school – medical students forming physician morality "on the job": Grounded theory analysis of a student survey

    Sallin Karl

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The value of ethics education have been questioned. Therefore we did a student survey on attitudes about the teaching of ethics in Swedish medical schools. Methods Questionnaire survey on attitudes to ethics education with 409 Swedish medical students participating. We analyzed > 8000 words of open-ended responses and multiple-choice questions using classic grounded theory procedures. Results In this paper we suggest that medical students take a proximity morality stance towards their ethics education meaning that they want to form physician morality "on the job". This involves comprehensive ethics courses in which quality lectures provide "ethics grammar" and together with attitude exercises and vignette reflections nurture tutored group discussions. Goals of forming physician morality are to develop a professional identity, handling diversity of religious and existential worldviews, training students described as ethically naive, processing difficult clinical experiences, and desisting negative role modeling from physicians in clinical or teaching situations, some engaging in "ethics suppression" by controlling sensitive topic discussions and serving students politically correct attitudes. Conclusion We found that medical students have a proximity morality attitude towards ethics education. Rather than being taught ethics they want to form their own physician morality through tutored group discussions in comprehensive ethics courses.

  20. Vocabulary Learning Strategies of Medical Students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Seddigh, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the use of vocabulary learning strategies among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) in Iran as an EFL context. A questionnaire was administered to 120 medical students (53 males, 67 females) to identify; 1) the effective types of vocabulary learning strategies used by the learners and 2)…

  1. Students' attitudes towards the introduction of a Personal and Professional Development portfolio: potential barriers and facilitators

    Cleland Jennifer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Portfolios, widely used in undergraduate and postgraduate medicine, have variable purposes, formats and success. A recent systematic review summarised factors necessary for successful portfolio introduction but there are no studies investigating the views of students inexperienced in portfolio use towards portfolio learning. This study's aim was to survey student views about a prospective Professional and Personal Development (PPD portfolio. Methods This was a qualitative, focus group study. All focus groups were taped and transcribed verbatim, and anonymised. The transcripts were analysed inductively, using framework analysis. Results Four focus groups were carried out with 32 undergraduate medical students naïve in portfolio use. Three themes relevant to portfolio introduction emerged. The first theme was the need for clear information and support for portfolio introduction, and anxieties about how this could be supported effectively. The second was that students had negative views about reflective learning and whether this could be taught and assessed, believing formal assessment could foster socially acceptable content. The third was that participants revealed little understanding of reflective learning and its potential benefits. Rather portfolios were seen as useful for concrete purposes (e.g., job applications not intrinsic benefits. Conclusion Undergraduate medical students without experience of portfolios are anxious about portfolio introduction. They require support in developing reflective learning skills. Care must be taken to ensure students do not see portfolios as merely yet another assessment hurdle.

  2. Teaching strategies for coping with stress – the perceptions of medical students

    Pereira, Maria Amelia Dias; BARBOSA, Maria Alves

    2013-01-01

    Background The undergraduate medical course is a period full of stressors, which may contribute to the high prevalence of mental disorders among students and a decrease in life’s quality. Research shows that interventions during an undergraduate course can reduce stress levels. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the Strategies for Coping with Professional Stress class offered to medical students of the Federal University of Goiás, at Goiânia, Goiás, in Brazil. Methods Qualitative research, ...

  3. An art therapy in-service program model for medical students and residents.

    Miller, Rebecca Beers

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the author's experience implementing an art therapy in-service program into the training of medical students and residents in an urban hospital teaching facility. Emphasis is placed on specific aspects of planning and implementation, including formal and informal assessment, as well as methods of engaging medical students in art therapy experientials relevant to their experience as helping professionals. Benefits and challenges encountered throughout the process are also discussed. This paper is based on a presentation given at the 36th annual American Art Therapy Association conference. PMID:20539921

  4. Smoking Health Professional Student: An Attitudinal Challenge for Health Promotion?

    Daniel Cauchi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco is a major preventable cause of premature morbidity and mortality. Health professionals are uniquely positioned to provide targeted interventions and should be empowered to provide cessation counselling that influence patient smoking. A cross-sectional national survey was administered to all third year students in four disciplines at the University of Malta. The Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS questionnaire was distributed to collect standardised demographic, smoking prevalence, behavioural, and attitudinal data. 81.9% completed the questionnaire (n = 173/211. A positive significant association between tobacco smoke exposure at home and current smoking status was identified. Non-smokers regarded anti-tobacco policies more favourably than smokers, being more likely to agree with banning of tobacco sales to adolescents (OR 3.6; 95% CI: 2.5–5.3; p ≤ 0.001; and with a smoking ban in all public places (OR 8.9; 95% CI: 6.1–13.1; p ≤ 0.001. Non-smokers favoured a role for health professionals in promoting smoking cessation (OR 5.1; 95% CI: 3.1–8.5; p ≤ 0.001. Knowledge of antidepressants as tools for smoking cessation was also associated with a perceived role for skilled health professionals in cessation counselling (OR 4.9; 95% CI: 1.8–13.3; p = 0.002. Smoking negatively influences beliefs and attitudes of students toward tobacco control. There is a need to adopt a standard undergraduate curriculum containing comprehensive tobacco prevention and cessation training to improve their effectiveness as role models.

  5. Smoking health professional student: an attitudinal challenge for health promotion?

    Cauchi, Daniel; Mamo, Julian

    2012-07-01

    Tobacco is a major preventable cause of premature morbidity and mortality. Health professionals are uniquely positioned to provide targeted interventions and should be empowered to provide cessation counselling that influence patient smoking. A cross-sectional national survey was administered to all third year students in four disciplines at the University of Malta. The Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS) questionnaire was distributed to collect standardised demographic, smoking prevalence, behavioural, and attitudinal data. 81.9% completed the questionnaire (n = 173/211). A positive significant association between tobacco smoke exposure at home and current smoking status was identified. Non-smokers regarded anti-tobacco policies more favourably than smokers, being more likely to agree with banning of tobacco sales to adolescents (OR 3.6; 95% CI: 2.5-5.3; p ? 0.001); and with a smoking ban in all public places (OR 8.9; 95% CI: 6.1-13.1; p ? 0.001). Non-smokers favoured a role for health professionals in promoting smoking cessation (OR 5.1; 95% CI: 3.1-8.5; p ? 0.001). Knowledge of antidepressants as tools for smoking cessation was also associated with a perceived role for skilled health professionals in cessation counselling (OR 4.9; 95% CI: 1.8-13.3; p = 0.002). Smoking negatively influences beliefs and attitudes of students toward tobacco control. There is a need to adopt a standard undergraduate curriculum containing comprehensive tobacco prevention and cessation training to improve their effectiveness as role models. PMID:22851959

  6. Reliability of medical students' vaccination histories for immunisable diseases

    Gottschalk René

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical students come into contact with infectious diseases early on their career. Immunity against vaccine-preventable diseases is therefore vital for both medical students and the patients with whom they come into contact. Methods The purpose of this study was to compare the medical history and serological status of selected vaccine-preventable diseases of medical students in Germany. Results The overall correlation between self-reported medical history statements and serological findings among the 150 students studied was 86.7 %, 66.7 %, 78 % and 93.3 % for measles, mumps, rubella and varicella, conditional on sufficient immunity being achieved after one vaccination. Although 81.2 % of the students' medical history data correlated with serological findings, significant gaps in immunity were found. Conclusion Our findings indicate that medical history alone is not a reliable screening tool for immunity against the vaccine-preventable diseases studied.

  7. ASSESSMENT OF DIETARY HABITS AND LIFESTYLE OF THE MEDICAL STUDENTS OF AGARTALA GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE

    Shishir; Anjan

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION : Medical students represent a significant community inv estment and promoting their health preserves this investment. This study aims assessing the dietary habits and risky lifestyle behavior among the MBBS students. MATERIALS AND METHOD : A cross - sectional study was conducted among MBBS students of all four pro fessional years of Agartala Government Medical College, Tripura, selecting in total 200 students (50 students from each year) th...

  8. Approaches to increasing the effectiveness of the learning process and the future professional activity of students with disabilities.

    Makarova E.V.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The features of medical public welfare of students are in-process studied with disability. 2672 students took part in an inspection. The necessity of application is marked for individual rehabilitation programs. Resulted recommendation on application of psychological, pedagogical, physical, professional, labour, athletic, sporting, social, domestic rehabilitation. Directions professional adaptation of students are rotined to the future profession. The program of physical rehabilitation which has 3 stages is recommended: adaptation (1 course, correction-health-improvement (2-3 course, professionally-applied (4-6 course. It is set that computer-integrated and inclusive an educational environment is the optimum form of providing of young people with disability by terms for a self-expression, self-perfection, independent creation, and realization of equal rights and possibilities, forming of sense of the personal meaningfulness and full value.

  9. Nursing students and the supervision of medication administration.

    Reid-Seari, Kerry; Happell, Brenda; Burke, Karena J; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-01-01

    Up to one in five medication administrations in Australian hospitals involve an error. As registered nurses (RNs) are at the forefront of medication administration, they have been the focus of attempts to reduce errors. Given that nursing students have reported errors or experiences of near misses, their practices, as well as the supervision they receive from RNs, also deserves investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate student nurses' experiences of supervision while administering medications. Students (N= 45) completed a questionnaire on their supervision experiences while administering medications. The findings revealed that 88% of students agreed that they had been directly supervised during the entirety of administration procedures. Although 7% of students reported not receiving supervision throughout medication administration, higher percentages of students indicated that they received lower levels of supervision when wards were busy (66%), when they felt under pressure to comply with the wishes of RNs (40%), when students had been in clinical settings for extended periods of time (51%), and when the RNs trusted the student nurses (37%). Approximately one third (29%) of student nurses disagreed that RNs followed the six rights when administering medications. These findings suggest that student nurses are not always adequately supervised and are at times administering medications outside the parameters of the law. Healthcare organisations need to adapt their policies and practices to ensure that the legal requirements surrounding student nurse administration of medications are being met, as well as the educational and welfare needs of neophyte nurses. PMID:23898599

  10. The attitudes of medical students in Europe toward the clinical importance of embryology.

    Moxham, Bernard John; Emmanouil-Nikoloussi, Elpida; Standley, Henrietta; Brenner, Erich; Plaisant, Odile; Brichova, Hana; Pais, Diogo; Stabile, Isobel; Borg, Jordy; Chirculescu, Andy

    2016-03-01

    Although there have been many studies reporting the attitudes of medical students to the clinical importance of gross anatomy, little is known about their opinions concerning the clinical importance of embryology. Using Thurstone and Chave methods to assess attitudes, nearly 1,600 medical students across Europe in the early stages of their training provided responses to a survey that tested the hypothesis that they do not regard embryology as highly clinically relevant. Indeed, we further proposed that student attitudes to gross anatomy are much more positive than those toward embryology. Our findings show that our hypotheses hold, regardless of the university and country surveyed and regardless of the teaching methods employed for embryology. Clearly, embryology has a significant part to play in medical education in terms of understanding prenatal life, of appreciating how the organization of the mature human body has developed, and of providing essential information for general medical practice, obstetrics and pediatrics, and teratology. However, while newly recruited medical students understand the importance of gross anatomy in the development of professional competence, understanding the importance of embryology requires teachers, medical educationalists, and devisors of medical curricula to pay special attention to informing students of the significant role played by embryology in attaining clinical competence and achieving the knowledge and understanding of the biomedical sciences that underpins becoming a learned member of a health care profession. Clin. Anat. 29:144-150, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26538399

  11. Teaching pre-clinical medical students an integrated approach to medical interviewing: half-day workshops using actors.

    Fortin, Auguste H; Haeseler, Frederick D; Angoff, Nancy; Cariaga-Lo, Liza; Ellman, Matthew S; Vasquez, Luz; Bridger, Laurie

    2002-09-01

    Teaching medical students to integrate patient-centered skills into the medical interview is challenging. Longitudinal training requires significant curricular and faculty time. Unsupervised students risk harm if they uncover and inappropriately manage psychosocial issues in actual patients. They fear saying the wrong thing in emotionally charged situations. Two half-day workshops for pre-clinical students integrate patient- and physician-centered interviewing. The first occurs early in the first year. The second, late in the second year, presents interview challenges (e.g., breaking bad news). Ten professional actors portray standardized patients (SPs). Groups of 10 to 15 students interview an SP, each eliciting a part of the patient's story. Qualitative evaluation revealed that, for many students, SPs afford the opportunity to experiment without harming real patients. Students view the workshops as effective (mean score for first-year students, 6.6 [standard deviation (SD), 1.0], second-year students, 7.1 [SD, 0.7] on a Likert-type scale: 1 = not at all effective to 8 = very effective). PMID:12220367

  12. Rural Origin Medical Students: How Do They Cope with the Medical School Environment?

    Durkin, Shane R.; Bascomb, Angela; Turnbull, Deborah; Marley, John

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 163 senior medical students attending a South Australian medical school found that rural students were more likely than urban students to experience stress; be concerned about getting a provider number (license); feel that consultants had little time for them; have made the decision to study medicine without pressure from others; and…

  13. Evaluation of the acceptability of Peer Physical Examination (PPE) in medical and osteopathic students: a cross sectional survey

    Consorti, Fabrizio; Mancuso, Rosaria; Piccolo, Annalisa; Consorti, Giacomo; Zurlo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background Peer physical examination (PPE) is a method of training in medical and osteopathic curricula. The aim of this study was to compare the acceptability of PPE in two classes of medical and osteopathic students after their first experience, to obtain comparative information useful for an understanding of the different professional approaches. The leading hypothesis was that osteopathic students enter the curriculum with a more positive attitude to bodily contact. As a secondary aim, th...

  14. Do medical student attitudes towards patients with chronic low back pain improve during training? a cross-sectional study

    Morris Hayley; Ryan Cormac; Lauchlan Douglas; Field Max

    2012-01-01

    Background: Health care professionals with positive attitudes towards the functional abilities of patients with low back pain are more likely to encourage activity and avoidance of rest as per recommended guidelines. This study investigated whether medical student training fosters positive attitudes towards patients with back pain and their ability to function. Methods: First (n = 202) and final (n = 146) year medical students at the University of Glasgow completed the Health Care Profess...

  15. Emotional and Cognitive Empathy in First-Year Medical Students

    Matthias Siebeck; Norbert Müller; Anna Buchheim; Fabian Jacobs; Max Burger; Eva Reiß; Sebastian Meyer; Sarah Gasperi; Daniela Krause; Sandra Dehning

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Doctors' empathy towards their patients is considered important for treatment outcome. However, during medical school there might be a decline in empathy called “hardening of the heart.” This study evaluated the cognitive and emotional empathy in medical students and investigated the influence of a preference for a specialty and students attachment styles. Methods. 126 first-year medical students were included and completed the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test revised version (RM...

  16. Depression and type D personality among undergraduate medical students

    Gupta, Soma; Basak, Prosenjit

    2013-01-01

    Context: Academic pressure, though established, is an unavoidable cause of depression in medical students. Role of Type D personality as determinant of depression is a new approach to the problem. Aim: Determination of relationship between Type D personality and Depression among medical students. Setting and Design: Undergraduate students (both male and female, total 150) of Midnapore Medical College. Materials and Methods: Beck Depression Inventory for depression and DS 14 for type D persona...

  17. Residency Selection Criteria: What Medical Students Perceive as Important

    Brandenburg, Suzanne; Kruzick, Tracy; Lin, C T; ROBINSON, ANDREW; Adams, Lorraine J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about medical students’ perceptions of which criteria are important in residency selection. Student knowledge of this process may affect their education and their ability to obtain the residency of their choice. Objective: To determine the perceived importance among medical students of various selection criteria for residency. Design, Setting and Participants: Medical students at three institutions were asked to rate the importance of various residency selection cr...

  18. Illicit methylphenidate use among Iranian medical students: prevalence and knowledge

    Habibzadeh, Afshin; Alizadeh, Mahasti; Malek, Ayoub; Maghbooli, Leili; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Ghabili, Kamyar

    2011-01-01

    Background: Methylphenidate, a medication prescribed for individuals suffering from attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, is increasingly being misused by students. Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate the frequency of methylphenidate use among a group of Iranian medical students and to assess their knowledge of methylphenidate. Methods: Anonymous, self-administered questionnaires were completed by all medical students entering the university between 2000 and 2007. Results: ...

  19. The exam skills workshop as formative assessment for ?medical students

    Hashim Z?.; Miller A?.; Fahim N.?

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of medical students is a complicated process with medical schools ?making constant updates. This ensures that assessment is not only comprehensive and robust, but ?also standardised and fair. Nowadays, there is more stress laid upon the importance of formative ?assessment in medical schools.?Introduction: Some University of Nottingham students undertake their final year surgical ?placement at the Lincoln County Hospital. Each rotation has 6 students and runs over 9 ...

  20. Professional expectations of students of the oral health technician course

    José Ferreira Lima Junior

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the expectations of students enrolled in the oral health technician course conducted by the School of Public Health of Ceará, about their professional future. Methods:This work presents a quantitative, cross-sectional descriptive study held with students of seven classes in dental hygiene course conducted by the School of Public Health. Data collection was conducted between March and April 2011, through the application of a semistructured questionnaire, which addressed the professional profile of the participants, their expectations about the labor market and the profession. Statistical analysis was performedwith a degree of significance of 0.05. Results: 154 students were interviewed, of whom 96.1% were women, mean age of 32.9 (± 7.3 years. Most (93.8%, N = 120 graduated from high school and 71.1% (N = 108 were registered at the Regional Council of Dentistry. Regardingtheir insertion in the labor market, 42.9% believed it would be satisfactory and 58% that it would occur in public service. The biggest obstacle mentioned by the subjects about the insertion of oral health technicians in the labor market was the difficulty of hiring (45.5%. When asked to punctuate some actions that they would play as TSB, 82.2% cited clinical and collective actions. The majority (96% claimed to feel safe to act as TSB. Conclusion:The students’ expectations regarding their professional future are positive. However, it is necessary to develop further research in this area, so that the profession has a growing support within the labor market.

  1. A Longitudinal Study of Determinants of Career Satisfaction in Medical Students

    Virginia A. Reed, PhD

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Context: There is evidence of significant career dissatisfaction among practicing physicians and those considering medicine as a profession. Most research on career satisfaction has examined practicing physicians. This study was undertaken to look at determinants of satisfaction in those at the earliest stage of their medical careers – medical students. Methods: As part of a larger study, students comprising one class at the University of Washington School of Medicine were surveyed three times over the course of their medical education. For the present study we examined measures specifically related to determinants of career satisfaction. Findings: Over time, students’ sense of the importance of most measured determinants of satisfaction showed significant change, the majority of which were in the direction of decreased importance. However, most of the change was relative. That is, factors that students considered to be most important at the start of medical school continued to be most important throughout the educational experience and those factors students considered to be least important at Year 1 continued to be least important at Years 2 and 4. Discussion: These findings have implications for medical education, a time when students are forming expectations that will impact their career satisfaction. In addition to information on career satisfaction, students should understand the professional values of medicine, their own values and expectations, current practice patterns, economics, and the role of advocacy.

  2. Medication calculation skills of graduating nursing students in Finland.

    Grandell-Niemi, H; Hupli, M; Leino-Kilpi, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the basic mathematical proficiency and the medication calculation skills of graduating nursing students in Finland. A further concern was with how students experienced the teaching of medication calculation. We wanted to find out whether these experiences were associated with various background factors and the students' medication calculation skills. In spring 1997 the population of graduating nursing students in Finland numbered around 1280; the figure for the whole year was 2640. A convenience sample of 204 students completed a questionnaire specially developed for this study. The instrument included structured questions, statements and a medication calculation test. The response rate was 88%. Data analysis was based on descriptive statistics. The students found it hard to learn mathematics and medication calculation skills. Those who evaluated their mathematical and medication calculation skills as sufficient successfully solved the problems included in the questionnaire. It was felt that the introductory course on medication calculation was uninteresting and poorly organised. Overall the students' mathematical skills were inadequate. One-fifth of the students failed to pass the medication calculation test. A positive correlation was shown between the student's grade in mathematics (Sixth Form College) and her skills in medication calculation. PMID:11486137

  3. What Contributes to First-Year Student Teachers' Sense of Professional Agency in the Classroom?

    Soini, Tiina; Pietarinen, Janne; Toom, Auli; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    This study explores Finnish first-year primary teacher students' (N = 244) sense of professional agency in the classroom. In addition, the interrelation between student teachers' sense of professional agency and the perceptions of teacher education as a learning environment is explored. The sense of professional agency in the classroom…

  4. MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY IN VIH CONTAGION AFTER BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS

    R. Ortiz de Lejarazu Leonardo; Eiros Bouza JM; M. Domínguez-Gil González; Aitor M. Curiel López de Arcaute

    2005-01-01

    SUMMARYIn Spain a million and a half blood transfusions by year are carried out, that supposes between 2 and 10 cases of infection of VIH by year. The present state of science invites to do something more with tests to detect other virological and immunological markers, in order to identify seronegative carriers and thus avoid HIV transmission by them. We must consider the possibility to incur in professional responsibilities if we do not report adequate of this risk or if we do not provide p...

  5. Caring, Competence and Professional Identities in Medical Education

    MacLeod, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the multiple discourses that influence medical education with a focus on the discourses of competence and caring. Discourses of competence are largely constituted through, and related to, biomedical and clinical issues whereas discourses of caring generally focus on social concerns. These discourses are not necessarily equal…

  6. INTERNSHIP ROLES IN TRAINING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPEMENT OF STUDENTS

    Munteanu Anca-Ioana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Romanian specialist`s studies show a harsh reality: Romanian universities programs have only theoretical value, creating specialists but not for real life, but for a more abstract environment. Our university graduates are doing very well in a stable economic and institutional environment that offers relatively easy material and financial resources, with a set of skills and professional skills which fail to meet harsh reality of the labor market. An effective solution for professional skills development is the accumulation of work experience during college in the environment and on the job we have in view by following an internship program. As a form of practical education through work, internship meets young people, particularly students keen to gain experience through practical work in a job within a company or institution chosen, giving them the opportunity to translate theoretical knowledge into practice and to develop skills and experience of labor market activities that waits for them. This paper is an original applied research conducted in the West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration. It aims to identify whether there is a need for specialization Management students to acquire work experience before graduating, to what extent they are able to assess their skills and work in a company and especially the role of internship programs in professional and personal development of students. The results show that participation in an internship program is beneficial not only for students but also for employers. Leading to increased competences and to training and professional skills and personal development, internship becomes a more attractive alternative for young people because it gives them the opportunity to be “a ringer" of an employee on the position you have in view. Without being employed, students can gain practical experience in a certain position they sought in a company or institution on the labor market, practical experience they need so much and they can also learn what responsibilities and tasks the job entails and whether or not they are suitable for that position.

  7. Nurturing professionalism and humanism in the 21st century medical professional

    Vijay Rajput, MD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to redefine physician excellence through promoting professionalism with humanism to meet the needs of a diverse generational and cultural society. My goal is to bring together and advance concepts that cultivate emotional and social intelligence to complement the clinical skills required for the effective practice of medicine in the complex milieu of the 21st century

  8. Educational approaches aimed at preparing students for professional veterinary practice.

    Jaarsma, A D C; Dolmans, D H J M; Scherpbier, A J J A; van Beukelen, P

    2009-08-01

    Changes in society and dissatisfaction with current educational practices have led to changes in undergraduate veterinary curricula. New approaches that are thought to better prepare students for future professional veterinary practice are being introduced. One such change is a transition from conventional teacher-centred curricula to student-centred curricula. In student-centred curricula, students are actively involved in learning and teachers not only transmit knowledge but help students to obtain a deep understanding. Furthermore, learning within these curricula takes place in a multi-disciplinary context which is more relevant for the future of the profession. Another change is that more emphasis is put on training in academic skills, for instance, by establishing research internships. Finally, a new emphasis is being placed on training in more generic competencies, such as communication and business skills. These changes are assumed to better suit the profile of veterinary students today and in the future and to better prepare them for future veterinary practice. PMID:20128494

  9. A study of stress in medical students at Seth G.S. Medical College.

    Supe A

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is usually observed that medical students undergo tremendous stress during various stages of the MBBS course. There is a high rate of suicide among them. METHODS: To determine incidence of stress and factors controlling stress in medical students at various stages of MBBS course at Seth G S Medical college, 238 students (First year 98, Second 76, Third 64) were asked to complete a questionnaire on personal data (gender, stay at hostel, mode of travel, time spent in travel every...

  10. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    Kron Frederick W; Gjerde Craig L; Sen Ananda; Fetters Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of ...

  11. Quality of life of medical students in Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Mohammad Heidari; Reza Majdzadeh; Parvin Pasalar; Saharnaz Nedjat

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the quality of life (QOL) of Tehran University of Medical Sciences' (TUMS) medical students at different educational levels and specify the most important factors related to this quality. A sample of 242 medical students was selected randomly, given their number in three educational levels (basic sciences, physiopathology-stager and intern). The QOL was measured by WHOQOL-BREF. The students obtained average high score in two psychological and environmental healt...

  12. Student pharmacist initiated medication reconciliation in the outpatient setting

    Andrus MR

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Joint Commission continues to emphasize the importance of medication reconciliation in all practice settings. Pharmacists and student pharmacists are uniquely trained in this aspect of patient care, and can assist with keeping accurate and complete medication records through patient interview in the outpatient setting.Objective: The objective of this study was to quantify and describe medication reconciliation efforts by student pharmacists in an outpatient family medicine center.Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of all standard medication reconciliation forms completed by student pharmacists during patient interviews from April 2010 to July 2010. The number of reviews conducted was recorded, along with the frequency of each type of discrepancy. A discrepancy was defined as any lack of agreement between the medication list in the electronic health record (EHR and the patient-reported regimen and included any differences in dose or frequency of a medication, duplication of the same medication, medication no longer taken or omission of any medication.Results: A total of 213 standard medication forms from the 4 month period were reviewed. A total of 555 discrepancies were found, including medications no longer taken, prescription medications that needed to be added to the EHR, over-the-counter(OTC and herbal medications that needed to be added to the EHR, medications taken differently than recorded in the EHR, and medication allergies which needed to be updated. An average of 2.6 discrepancies was found per patient interviewed.Conclusion: Student pharmacist-initiated medication reconciliation in an outpatient family medicine center resulted in the resolution of numerous discrepancies in the medication lists of individual patients. Pharmacists and student pharmacists are uniquely trained in medication history taking and play a vital role in medication reconciliation in the outpatient setting.

  13. PORTFOLIO INVOLVED INTO STUDENTS PERSONALLY-PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT MONITORING

    O. V. GREBENNIKOV

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern evaluation activity in education is oriented to students personal achievements that’s may be reflected in different portfolio variants. In article we show the advantages of student personally-professional abilities and competencies assessment based on authentic representative portfolio. We show, that the portfolio if students competencies assessment method, students learning-vocational activity control technology and higher educational establishment informational - educational environment e-learning resources increasing factor. To accordance of author’s opinion, the portfolio using allowed to solve many didactical problems, as student competencies evaluation method and learning-vocational activity control technology. The most important is students support in personallyprofessional self-determination and sociallyprofessional competence regulative component formation, because this component is determined the students preparedness to skills and knowledge’s successful management, and to permanent personallyprofessional improving etc. The portfolio formation interrelated with learning-investigate, scientificinvestigate and scientific-practical students activity, because the students investigate activity integrated the creativity, analysis, self-control, independence, personal cognitive activity self-organization, skills of purposes and problems formation, generating of its solving methods. Its quantity evaluation is important scientific and applied problem. The students achievements in learning-investigate, scientific-investigate and scientific-practical students activity is practical criterion of his knowledge’s completeness, students investigate competence components and parameter if students individual achievements in investigate activity. The elaborated students’ evaluation method as creative independent self-controlled persona may be used in portfolio technology for individual educational results integrated evaluation. However, the portfolio technology is accorded to competence oriented approach requirements and may be used as education quality monitoring component, because its allowed the assessment of learning-vocational activity control efficiency and students support in personallyprofessional self-determination productivity.

  14. Comparison of self-medication practice for dysmenorrhoea in medical, nursing and dental students

    Jayanthi B.

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: Dysmenorrhoea is a common cause for self-medication among young females. Self-medication practice for dysmenorrhoea was seen more in medical students where as non-pharmacological remedies in nursing and dental female students. NSAIDS like mefenamic acid and paracetamol are the mainstay of self-medication for dysmenorrhoea. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(2.000: 269-273

  15. Teaching medical translation to non-medical students – a case study with some theoretical insights

    Gornicz, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    This article uses the example of a course in medical translation taught at the Institute of Anthropocentric Linguistics and Culturology, University of Warsaw, to make comments on differences in teaching English to medical students vs. teaching medical translation to nonmedical students and to propose ideas for more effective teaching of medical translation. It is argued that reconstructing the ontology of concepts found in a text is sufficient to provide a successful translation even if the t...

  16. SENIOR MEDICAL STUDENTS' ATTITUDE TOWARDS PSYCHIATRY : RELATIONSHIP WITH CAREER INTEREST

    Alexander, P. John; Kumaraswamy, N.

    1993-01-01

    Using the Senior Medical Student Questionnaire, the attitudes towards psychiatry and the career interest in psychiatry of 146 final year medical students were obtained. The results indicated that, on the overall merits of the field of psychiatry and role definition and functioning of psychiatrists, students had a favorable opinion. Many students considered that career and personal rewards in psychiatry are limited. Analysis of the relationship between career interest and attitudes showed that...

  17. Swedish medical students' expectations of their future life

    Saima Diderichsen; Jenny Andersson; Johansson, Eva. E.; Petra Verdonk; Antoine Lagro-Janssen; Katarina Hamberg

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate future life expectations among male and female medical students in their first and final year. Methods: The study was cross-sectional and conducted at a Swedish medical school. Out of 600 invited students, 507 (85%) answered an open-ended question about their future life, 298 (59%) first-year students and 209 (41%) last-year students. Women constituted 60% of the respondents. A mixed model design was applied; qualitative content analysis was utilized to create stati...

  18. Knowledge of Acne among Medical Students: Pretest and Posttest Assessment

    Kanakapura Nanjundaswamy Shivaswamy; Arakali Lakshminarayana Shyamprasad; Tharayil Kunneth Sumathy; Chandrashekaran Ranganathan; Shanmugan Praveen Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acne vulgaris is a disorder of sebaceous glands mainly affecting the adolescent population. There are some misconceptions about acne not only in the general population but also among the medical students. Methods. Second year medical undergraduate students attending dermatology postings for the first time were included in the study. A questionnaire (in yes or no answer format) with 20 questions on acne, each carrying one mark, was to be answered by the students. The students were ...

  19. SELF-MEDICATION AMONG DENTAL UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS: A GROWING CONCERN

    Suruchi Aditya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-medication is an important component of self-care. Though it is widely practiced globally, very few studies have evaluated its pattern and prevalence in dental students.Aim: The study was conducted to compare pattern of self-medication practices between junior and senior dental undergraduate students.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, anonymous, descriptive study with a six month illness recall that evaluated two groups of dental students- Group I: second year BDS students...

  20. Does personality predict medical students' attitudes to learning communication skills?

    Beatriz Molinuevo; Rafael Torrubia

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether personality is related to medical students' attitudes towards learning communication skills and self-ratings on communication skills. Methods: 524 first- and 507 second-year medical students completed the Communications Skills Attitudes Scale and rated their own communication skills. First-year students answered the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and second-year students the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses, control...

  1. Internet Access and Utilization among Medical Undergraduate and Post Graduate Students of a Medical College in Madhya Pradesh

    Neeraj Chhari, Swarupa Chakole

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "Background: Internet is a worldwide computer network allowing communication among millions of users and access to different resources.. Over the last several decades studies have shown that the use of computerized information systems by medical professionals can improve the quality of care, enhance the use of evidence-based treatment, and maintain and update knowledge. AIM: To evaluate the pattern of internet access and utilization by medical students in Ujjain. Methods: Cross sectional study conducted on all the undergraduate & post graduate. Open –ended semi-structured questionnaire was used. Results: A total of 507 UG & 127 PG students were approached and 386(76% UG,119(93% PG’s completed the questionnaires. Majority of the respondents (87.0% reported having knowledge of internet use. About 365(72% of the study subjects own computer, being significantly higher among PG’s(89%0 as compared to UG’s(67%.Main purpose of using internet as cited by UG’s was email/chatting(74%,where as dissertation work was main purpose among PG(66%.Slow speed of internet was the main problem faced by the subjects 299(595 while accessing the website. Conclusion: Majority of the medical students in this study had access to internet and were using it for both academic and personal reasons. Students should be trained to extract valuable information from the special medical web sites and should be encouraged to check the authenticity of information by correlating with existing evidences."

  2. Prevalence of Cardiovascular disease risk among Medical Students in South India

    Biswajit Paul

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are global epidemic and contribute to double burden in developing countries. Individual’s dietary habits and risk behavior influence the onset and progression of CVDs. Medical students are future role models of the society and their knowledge, habits and behavior can influence their practice in prevention of CVDs in general population. Aims & Objectives: To assess the prevalence of common cardiovascular risk factors among a sample of medical students. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among the medical students of the four professional years.  An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the prevalent cardiovascular risk factors, dietary habits and risk behavior among the medical students. Results: Family history of CVD, obesity and hypertension were highly prevalent among the medical students. Majority of them took <5 servings of fruit or vegetables per day (97.6%, ate junk foods (91.3% and had long sedentary activity (47.6%. Taking red meat intake (OR 4.79, junk foods (Odds Ratio, OR 2.59, and snacking habit (OR 1.73 was observed more among male students; no physical activity or sports was significantly more in females. Logistic regression analysis showed that a family history of CVD was strongly associated with hypertension and obesity among medical students while exercise was protective against hypertension. Conclusion: The medical students had very poor compliance to recommended dietary intake and physical activity. Generating awareness, incorporating healthy habits and introducing structured educational programs into medical curriculum will help in changing lifestyle.

  3. 'Workshops in healing' for senior medical students: a 5-year overview and appraisal.

    Kearsley, John H; Lobb, Elizabeth A

    2014-12-01

    We report upon the design, content and feedback from an interactive, experiential series of Workshops in Healing for senior medical students. Fifty-six final year medical students enrolled in 2×3 h workshops designed around the core themes of 'physician know thyself' (Workshop 1) and 'confronting suffering' (Workshop 2). Of the 56 students who initially enrolled, 48 students completed both workshops and provided a written open-ended reflection of their learning experience. The study, undertaken over a consecutive 5-year period (2008-2012), employed an emergent, qualitative design using thematic analysis of the reflective comments. We found that the design and content of both workshops promoted transformative learning for these final year medical students. Students identified the following benefits: (1) the opportunity to reaffirm their commitment to their chosen career path; (2) the value of listening to other students share their stories; (3) the importance of the timing of the workshops to occur after exams; (4) the use of various mediums such as art, poetry, music and contemporary/classic literature to present concepts of suffering and healing; and (5) the creation of a safe and confidential space. Students reported that these innovative workshops gave them a renewed sense of drive and enthusiasm for their chosen career. They highlighted the importance of addressing an aspect of medicine (healing) not covered in the traditional medical curriculum. Workshops in Healing helped them to rediscover a deeper meaning to medicine and their roles as future healthcare professionals. PMID:24473159

  4. ‘Workshops in healing’ for senior medical students: a 5-year overview and appraisal

    Kearsley, John H; Lobb, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    We report upon the design, content and feedback from an interactive, experiential series of Workshops in Healing for senior medical students. Fifty-six final year medical students enrolled in 2×3 h workshops designed around the core themes of ‘physician know thyself’ (Workshop 1) and ‘confronting suffering’ (Workshop 2). Of the 56 students who initially enrolled, 48 students completed both workshops and provided a written open-ended reflection of their learning experience. The study, undertaken over a consecutive 5-year period (2008–2012), employed an emergent, qualitative design using thematic analysis of the reflective comments. We found that the design and content of both workshops promoted transformative learning for these final year medical students. Students identified the following benefits: (1) the opportunity to reaffirm their commitment to their chosen career path; (2) the value of listening to other students share their stories; (3) the importance of the timing of the workshops to occur after exams; (4) the use of various mediums such as art, poetry, music and contemporary/classic literature to present concepts of suffering and healing; and (5) the creation of a safe and confidential space. Students reported that these innovative workshops gave them a renewed sense of drive and enthusiasm for their chosen career. They highlighted the importance of addressing an aspect of medicine (healing) not covered in the traditional medical curriculum. Workshops in Healing helped them to rediscover a deeper meaning to medicine and their roles as future healthcare professionals. PMID:24473159

  5. Professional preferences of students in physical education and sport sciences

    Jerónimo García Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The actual context has enhanced job opportunities in the field of sport in order to respond to the current market demand. Thus, Physical Education and Sport Science graduates who begin to do differents jobs to the traditional ones but relate to their study field. The aim of this study was to guess which are the job preferences of the students of Physical Education and Sport Science of Seville University by gender and age doing the second cycle of their college degree and determine if there are significant differences. A descriptive analysis was carried out, using a questionnaire based on several researches, it was related to professional opportunities in sport sciences. The sample was of 118 students which represented 40.7% of the overall registered students. Results shown that sport management is the most preferable professional opportunity for women and men of the total sample, following in second place by teaching in secondary school for people older than 25 years of both sexes and teaching in primary school for the younger than 25 years. These findings announce changes in occupational trends in sports, to be taken into account in the framework of the European higher education (Degree of Science in Sport and Physical Activity, own US Masters and Official, lifelong learning programs....

  6. [Professionalism in healthcare organizations--a unique model in the Assuta Medical Centers Network].

    Shemer, Joshua; Abadi-Korek, Ifat

    2015-04-01

    "Medical professionalism signifies a set of values, behaviors, and relationships that underpin the trust the public has in doctors". Healthcare organizations and medical schools are expected to ensure that their employees and graduates possess these values, behaviors and skills. The importance of maintaining professionalization within the organization led the Assuta Medical Centers Network to establish a School of Professionalism in January 2014. All of the employees within Assuta are scheduled to participate in a training program focused on Professionalism in Healthcare. Training includes a unique, interactive teaching initiative facilitated by leaders chosen from among Assuta employees. Each training class comprises heterogeneous sets of employees from all divisions within the organization (medical, administrative, support employees etc.). Until February 2015, a total of 1,225 workers participated in this program. This novel intervention initiative is being evaluated and assessed in order to understand how the trainees perceive professionalism before and after the interventions; to observe changes in their attitudes, behaviors and skills following the training; and to assess short and long-term outcomes as this program progresses over the years. PMID:26065223

  7. Sleep disturbances among medical students: a global perspective.

    Azad, Muhammad Chanchal; Fraser, Kristin; Rumana, Nahid; Abdullah, Ahmad Faris; Shahana, Nahid; Hanly, Patrick J; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury

    2015-01-15

    Medical students carry a large academic load which could potentially contribute to poor sleep quality above and beyond that already experienced by modern society. In this global literature review of the medical students' sleep experience, we find that poor sleep is not only common among medical students, but its prevalence is also higher than in non-medical students and the general population. Several factors including medical students' attitudes, knowledge of sleep, and academic demands have been identified as causative factors, but other potential mechanisms are incompletely understood. A better understanding about the etiology of sleep problems in medical trainees is essential if we hope to improve the overall quality of medical students' lives, including their academic performance. Sleep self-awareness and general knowledge appear insufficient in many studied cohorts, so increasing education for students might be one beneficial intervention. We conclude that there is ample evidence for a high prevalence of the problem, and research in this area should now expand towards initiatives to improve general sleep education for medical students, identify students at risk, and target them with programs to improve sleep. PMID:25515274

  8. The Relationship between Students' Interactions with Student Affairs Professionals and Cognitive Outcomes in the First Year of College

    Martin, Georgianna L.; Seifert, Tricia A.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the impact of students' interactions with student affairs professionals and growth on cognitive outcomes in the first year of college. Interactions with student affairs professionals were associated positively with growth on measures of need for cognition, attitude toward literacy, and academic motivation. A small, negative…

  9. Adaptation and reliability of the Readiness for Inter professional Learning Scale in a Danish student and health professional setting

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Draborg, Eva; Sørensen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Shared learning activities aim to enhance the collaborative skills of health students and professionals in relation to both colleagues and patients. The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale is used to assess such skills. The aim of this study was to validate a Danish four-subscale version of the RIPLS in a sample of 370 health-care students and 200 health professionals. Methods The questionnaire was translated following a two-step process, including forward and backward t...

  10. What do medical students think about their quality of life? A qualitative study

    Tempski Patricia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical education can affect medical students’ physical and mental health as well as their quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess medical students’ perceptions of their quality of life and its relationship with medical education. Methods First- to sixth-year students from six Brazilian medical schools were interviewed using focus groups to explore what medical student’s lives are like, factors related to increases and decreases of their quality of life during medical school, and how they deal with the difficulties in their training. Results Students reported a variety of difficulties and crises during medical school. Factors that were reported to decrease their quality of life included competition, unprepared teachers, excessive activities, and medical school schedules that demanded exclusive dedication. Contact with pain, death and suffering and harsh social realities influence their quality of life, as well as frustrations with the program and insecurity regarding their professional future. The scarcity of time for studying, leisure activities, relationships, and rest was considered the main factor of influence. Among factors that increase quality of life are good teachers, classes with good didactic approaches, active learning methodologies, contact with patients, and efficient time management. Students also reported that meaningful relationships with family members, friends, or teachers increase their quality of life. Conclusion Quality of teachers, curricula, healthy lifestyles related to eating habits, sleep, and physical activity modify medical students’ quality of life. Lack of time due to medical school obligations was a major impact factor. Students affirm their quality of life is influenced by their medical school experiences, but they also reframe their difficulties, herein represented by their poor quality of life, understood as necessary and inherent to the process of becoming doctors.

  11. The self-medication in elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing

    Cecília Nogueira Valença, Raimunda Medeiros Germano, Rejane Maria Paiva de Menezes

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the complex theme of self-medication in the elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing. Methodology: this is a theoretical essay based on a literature review of the narrative type. It was selected articles indexed in databases Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO and the Database of Nursing (BDENF, from 2003 to 2009, using as descriptors: self-medication, nursing and elderly people. It was also used books and manuals of the ministry of health. From the reading and qualitative synthesis of abstracts, were set up two axes of analysis and reflection: Aging and self: views on the issue and Medication in the elderly people: the role of health professionals and nursing. Results: the elderly people are the age group that uses more drugs. Self-medication is a practice that can generate serious health risks such as intoxication. The qualified professional should guide the public about the medicine to lessen the risk and effectively as possible. Conclusion: it was conclude that the use of knowledge of health professionals and nurses to help to reduce the risks associated with self-medication and problems related to use of medicines, contributing to the improvement of quality of life of older people.

  12. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and Medical Students: Letter from China

    Mengxue Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the knowledge of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS among Chinese medical students. Methods: A structured questionnaire on MERS was conducted among 214 medical students in China. Results: The average correction of the single question varied from 36.0% to 89.7%. There is a significant difference on MERS knowledge among different majors of medical students (p < 0.05. Management students scored significantly higher than students of other majors (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Chinese medical students had good knowledge of MERS. The MERS knowledge score varied among students of different majors. Education on disease control should be included in the school curriculum.

  13. A course on professional development for astronomy graduate students

    Friel, Eileen D.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasingly wide-spread recognition in astronomy that professional training must broaden beyond its traditional approaches to academic classes and research. Many recent community advisory reports, including the National Academy of Sciences Decadal survey, Astro2010, recommend that graduate education accommodate the variety of career paths taken by graduates, taking into account the wide range of activities scientists engage in and the skills necessary to succeed in career options both inside and outside academia and specific scientific disciplines. In response to this need, Indiana University has recently offered a new graduate seminar in astronomy to provide this broader perspective and to prepare students for a variety of career paths after graduate school. The course uses a mixture of class discussion on selected topics supplemented by short readings, activities that prepare students for seeking employment and practice some necessary skills, and discussions with astronomers who have followed a variety of career paths. An important part of the seminar is the practical preparation of complete applications for typical positions students are likely to pursue following graduation, and the revision of these applications to be appropriate for a non-traditional career path. The goal of the course is to make students aware of the many options for careers that will be available to them and the skills that will be important for their success, and to equip students with strategies for following a personally satisfying career path.

  14. The Sensitiveness and Fulfillment of Psychological Needs: Medical, Health Care and Students.

    Rakovec-Felser, Zlatka

    2015-09-01

    As health was defined as a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely an absence of disease or infirmity, the bio-psychosocial paradigm of health and illness attests that curing occurs when the science of medicine (the biomedical and pathos-physiological aspects of disease) and the art of medicine (the psychological, social, and interpersonal aspects of illness) merge into one unified holistic approach to patient care (Hojat, 2007). In this context the relationship between health care professionals and patients also become an indispensable tool in clinical situations to achieve better patient outcomes (Engel, 1990). In our pilot study in year 2009 we try to verify how are the medical students and students of health care (University of Maribor, Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Health Care) prepared for their sensitive professional relationship in their future. Testing together 211 students (N=157 women, N=57 men), we compared the level of emotional empathy, altruistic love, values, and behaviorof 40 medical students, 118 students of health care and the group of 53 students of economics. Because of their professional choice, we expected that the medical and health care students would have higher empathy and altruism scores than the students of economics. Following the self-determination behavioral theory and its concept of autonomy support (Deci, Ryan, 2000), we anticipated also that the fulfilment of basic psychological needs could be important factor in everyday health care clinical practice. As the fulfilment of needs of autonomy, competence and relatedness could lead to increased autonomy supportive orientation in interactions with other subjects, and can be useful factor that prepare doctors or nurses for active participation in relationship with patients, we verified and compared the included groups also in this way. PMID:26898048

  15. Female medical students are estimated to have a higher risk for developing eating disorders than male medical students

    Dissing, Nete; Bak, Nanna Hasle; Pedersen, Laura Erna Toftegaard; Petersson, Birgit H

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that university students are at risk for eating disorders. However, risk behaviour has not been studied among Danish medical students, nor have the gender differences in risk behaviour been described in a Danish context.......Studies show that university students are at risk for eating disorders. However, risk behaviour has not been studied among Danish medical students, nor have the gender differences in risk behaviour been described in a Danish context....

  16. The Effect of Stress on Medical Students in a Private Medical University in Malaysia

    Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

    2007-01-01

    Stress amongst medical students is oftenoverlooked. Intelligent students are not always the mostcomposed. This study aimed to look at both male andfemale students of three different ethnic groups and theeffects of stress in areas such as academic, social,financial and their everyday life. The Chinese studentsreported significantly less “academic stress” than theMalay students, and the Malay students reportedsignificantly less “financial stress” compared to theChinese and Indian students. Medi...

  17. Experienced nurses learning with medical students: a case study.

    Bowles, L; Jones, H M

    1999-05-01

    Although there are successful examples of interdisciplinary education this generally relates to pre-registration health-care professionals. Post-registration projects are usually confined to skills workshops or social science subjects, which rarely include medical staff. This project was unusual in its attempt to combine the needs of experienced practitioners with those of medical students. There are practical issues for this form of learning such as, the organization of modules into 'systems' when health-care professionals (as part of a parallel project) indicated their interests lay in courses that related to clinical practice organized around disease processes/conditions. This case study demonstrates that concerns related to the potential mismatch of clinical expertise, maturity and scientific background are not insurmountable problems, and that clear benefits can be gained. It could be argued that until pre- and post-graduate medical staff are integrated with other disciplines, the real benefits of shared understanding, enhanced team work and mutual respect will remain illusive. It is not anticipated that this form of learning would be suitable for the majority of practitioners, whose core needs are generally met by existing opportunities. However, there is a need for a greater depth of academic understanding particularly for those in senior positions or in specific specialized areas (also identified in the parallel study) and for those whose roles are expanding. These practitioners are more likely to have the ability to apply their new knowledge to clinical practice, using reflective techniques with minimal facilitation to enhance their established clinical expertise. For them this model of learning offers the opportunity to tailor education to the individual needs of the practitioner without the costly establishment of complete new programmes of learning. This case study proved particularly successful for the participants as they enhanced understanding and confidence in the knowledge underpinning their practice. This enabled them to better anticipate patients needs, to identify complications and initiate action at an earlier stage. Their appreciation of rationale underpinning medical treatment has enabled them to support junior medical staff, and to promote the continuity of appropriate care. They are more active in the education of patients, relatives and staff, and have identified specific developments which will be informed by the knowledge they have gained. It also proved beneficial to junior medical staff with whom interdisciplinary working has improved. Each organization involved in facilitating the initiative also benefited by gaining mutual understanding and appreciation of systems, constraints and opportunities. Equally, relationships among them have been strengthened and key issues with practical solutions have been identified to inform future joint ventures. Indications suggest that there would be value in using this case study to inform a structured pilot project involving other modules of learning and potentially other disciplines. If successful it could benefit all health-care professionals, particularly those senior staff who are expanding their roles and have educational needs unmet by existing provision. In addition to providing complementary opportunities this format provides a mechanism to enhance the mutual understanding essential to effective teamwork. PMID:10595060

  18. Computer Game Design Classes: The Students' and Professionals' Perspectives

    Jakub SWACHA

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available There are multiple reasons that justify teaching computer game design. Its multi-aspectual nature creates opportunity to develop, at the same time, creativity, technical skills and ability to work in team. Thinking of game design classes, one needs direction on what to focus on so that the students could benefit the most. In this paper, we present results of a survey on both the students' and working professionals' expectations from game design course and opinions on game designer job. Although sometimes consistent, the answers from the two groups often reveal significant discrepancies. We believe that the results presented in this paper can help improve the quality of computer game design courses and make their learning outcomes more compatible with the needs of the computer game industry.

  19. Medical student opinions on character development in medical education: a national survey

    Carey, George B; Curlin, Farr A.; Yoon, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently United States (US) medical schools have implemented curricular reforms to address issues of character in medical education. Very few studies have examined students’ opinions about the importance of character development in medical school. This cross-sectional study assessed US medical students’ opinions regarding character-focused education and their experiences receiving character feedback from educators. We mailed a questionnaire to 960 third year medical students from 2...

  20. Self-medication among medical student in King Abdul-Aziz University

    Mooataz Mohammed Aashi; Hisham Abdulhamid Alghanmi; Rabaa Hashim Alhibshi; Bashair Abdulrahim Alsaati; Naif Jeza Aljohani

    2016-01-01

    Background: A huge number of medications are used without prescriptions which make us face a real problem which is the overuse of medications. Medication overuse dose come with physical, mental and emotional abnormalities. The objective of the study was to investigate the irrational uses of these medications which are NSAIDS, paracetamol, antibiotic antihistamines, opioids, and anti-anxiety drugs among medical students in KAU. Methods: We conducted a descriptive cross sectional survey of 5...