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MEDICAL ETHICS COURSE IMPROVES MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM: MEDICAL STUDENTS´ OPINIONS  

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Full Text Available Training physicians who are expert in many medical aspects is the most improtant mission of medical universities. One of these aspects, is professional behavior achievement. One of the important goals in training of ethics, is recognition of conflicts in different parts of ethics and having logical viewpoint for resolving and analyzing these conflicts. This descriptive and analytical study was done to evaluate the efficacy of medical ethics education in medical students´ professional attitudes improvement. One hundred and two medical students were selected randomly in different steps of education and were questioned and their opinions correlation with stage of education and gender were evaluated. There was a significant difference between female viewpoint (in roles of ethic course which is presented in preclinical step in professional attitude improvement (P = 0.009 and also a significant difference was seen in the viewpoint score between student stage with intern stage (P = 0.031. Medical students in educational student stage believe ethic course improve medical professionalism. Since there is no special course to train medical students in professionalism, some interventions are required in this field to improve this aspect of physicians' professional life.

Abdolreza Sotoodeh Jahromi

2014-01-01

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Professional Decisions and Ethical Values in Medical and Law Students.  

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This project evaluated and compared the values used by medical and law students when dealing with ethical dilemmas in the practice of law and medicine. The Professional Decisions and Values Test was given to 77 medical students and 92 law students. Differences were noted on beneficence, professional responsibility, and harm avoidance. (MLW)

Rezler, Agnes G.; And Others

1990-01-01

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Professionalism and the Police: The Cop as Medical Student  

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This paper discusses attitudinal differences between highly professional police officers and those classified as low-professionals, and compares their attitudes toward animals" (problem people who put them in a can't-win" position) with the attitudes of medical students toward crocks." Five hypotheses about policemen's actions and attitudes are…

Walsh. James Leo

1970-01-01

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Wanted: role models - medical students’ perceptions of professionalism  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Transformation of medical students to become medical professionals is a core competency required for physicians in the 21st century. Role modeling was traditionally the key method of transmitting this skill. Medical schools are developing medical curricula which are explicit in ensuring students develop the professional competency and understand the values and attributes of this role. The purpose of this study was to determine student perception of professionalism at the University of Ottawa and gain insights for improvement in promotion of professionalism in undergraduate medical education. Methods Survey on student perception of professionalism in general, the curriculum and learning environment at the University of Ottawa, and the perception of student behaviors, was developed by faculty and students and sent electronically to all University of Ottawa medical students. The survey included both quantitative items including an adapted Pritzker list and qualitative responses to eight open ended questions on professionalism at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa. All analyses were performed using SAS version 9.1 (SAS Institute Inc. Cary, NC, USA. Chi-square and Fischer’s exact test (for cell count less than 5 were used to derive p-values for categorical variables by level of student learning. Results The response rate was 45.6% (255 of 559 students for all four years of the curriculum. 63% of the responses were from students in years 1 and 2 (preclerkship. Students identified role modeling as the single most important aspect of professionalism. The strongest curricular recommendations included faculty-led case scenario sessions, enhancing interprofessional interactions and the creation of special awards to staff and students to “celebrate” professionalism. Current evaluation systems were considered least effective. The importance of role modeling and information on how to report lapses and breaches was highlighted in the answers to the open ended questions. Conclusions Students identify the need for strong positive role models in their learning environment, and for effective evaluation of the professionalism of students and teachers. Medical school leaders must facilitate development of these components within the MD education and faculty development programs as well as in clinical milieus where student learning occurs.

Byszewski Anna

2012-11-01

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Medical professionalism on television: Student perceptions and pedagogical implications.  

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Previous research has pointed to the role television can play in informing health practices and beliefs. Within the academic setting in particular, some educators have raised concerns about the influence of medical dramas on students. Less research, however, draws on the perspectives of students, and this study therefore explores medical students' perceptions of medical practice and professionalism in popular medical television programmes. Qualitative data from surveys of Australian undergraduate medical students showed that students perceived professionalism in dichotomous ways, with three main themes: cure-care, where a doctor's skill is either technical or interpersonal; work-leisure, where a doctor is either dedicated to work or personal life; and clinical-administration, where work is either direct patient care or administration. There continue to be imagined divisions between curing and caring for students, who express concerns about balancing work and leisure, and expectations that doctors should have little administrative work. Given students were able to identify these important contemporary issues around professionalism on television, there is pedagogical value in using popular images of the medical world in medical education. PMID:24677335

Weaver, Roslyn; Wilson, Ian; Langendyk, Vicki

2014-11-01

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Pelvic examination teaching: linking medical student professionalism and clinical competence.  

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The Professional Patient teaching program is an essential part of assuring competency in the performance of the pelvic examination and professional behaviors. Through a series of integrated teaching sessions from the first year reproductive anatomy laboratory, the second year basic clinical pelvic examination teaching program, to the third year teaching program, students perform at an enhanced level of clinical competency and professional behavior. A Professional Patient commented: "We create a safe environment where medical students not only learn the clinical portion of the exam, but also focus on the patient as the primary source of information on patient comfort. Students receive immediate feedback from us and have ample opportunity to ask questions about aspects of the clinical pelvic examination or doctor/patient communication skills. We guide them, teach them, and help them prepare for examinations with other patients who will not be as open or in tune with their bodies as we are." PMID:14533349

Kamemoto, Lori E; Kane, Kathleen O; Frattarelli, LeighAnn C

2003-08-01

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Restoring medical professionalism.  

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The essence of medical professionalism is placing dedication to the welfare of patients above physicians' personal or proprietary interests. Medicine has become deprofessionalized as a consequence of socioeconomic factors leading to increasing commercialization and perverse financial incentives converting it into a business, the presence of unmanaged conflicts of interest, challenges to medical authority by insurance companies and the consumerism movement, and by gradual changes in the attitudes of physicians. Organized medicine has responded by making explicit its standards of professionalism and its dedication to preserving them. Medical educators have studied the means to develop professional attitudes and behaviors among medical students and residents. Modeling the characteristics of professional behavior by virtuous physicians remains the most effective method to instill professional behaviors in trainees. Restoring professionalism may be abetted by changes in physicians' financial incentives through innovative models of health care delivery, by physicians reducing their conflicts of interest, and by medical societies rejecting a guild identity. PMID:22915177

Bernat, James L

2012-08-21

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[Realities and professional expectations of medical students attending Guinea Bissau's medical school in 2007 school year].  

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In Guinea Bissau, the majority of university level professionals are still being trained abroad and most of them do not return to their country. This was a major incentive for creating Guinea Bissau's Medical School. An observational, cross-sectional, analytic study was conducted on the second trimester of 2007 to characterize the socio-demographic, familial and educational profile of medical students, their satisfaction levels, difficulties and expectations concerning the medicine course. A questionnaire was used and a response rate of 63% achieved (81 students). Data was analyzed using SPSS v.17 for descriptive statistics. Students are very committed to their education. They tend to decide to take the medicine course early in their lives and are influenced by their relatives. They choose to be medical doctors because they like it but also for altruistic reasons and the desire to save lives. Although many face financial and material difficulties, they tend to have success in their academic live. They live with their parents, do not have children and some have side jobs to provide for extra income to help with their education. They expect their education to make them good doctors in any part of the world and want to work simultaneously in the public (to serve their country and pay their debt to the State) and in the private sector (to enhance their income). The large majority wants to work in a hospital, in Bissau, and to be a pediatrician or obstetrician. They have unreasonably high expectations concerning their future income as medical doctors. PMID:22011598

Fronteira, Inês; Rodrigues, Amabélia; Pereira, Camilo; Silva, Augusto P; Mercer, Hugo; Dussault, Guilles; Ferrinho, Paulo

2011-01-01

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Survey of the Importance of Professional Behaviors among Medical Students, Residents, and Attending Physicians  

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Objective: The authors compared the importance of items related to professional behavior among medical students rotating through their psychiatry clerkship, psychiatry residents, and attending psychiatrists. Method: The authors sent an electronic survey with 43 items (rated on the scale 1: Not at All Important; to 5: Very Important) to medical

Morreale, Mary K.; Balon, Richard; Arfken, Cynthia L.

2011-01-01

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The training and professional expectations of medical students in Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the professional expectations of medical students during the 2007-2008 academic year at the public medical schools of Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique, and to identify their social and geographical origins, their professional expectations and difficulties relating to their education and professional future. Methods Data were collected through a standardised questionnaire applied to all medical students registered during the 2007-2008 academic year. Results Students decide to study medicine at an early age. Relatives and friends seem to have an especially important influence in encouraging, reinforcing and promoting the desire to be a doctor. The degree of feminization of the student population differs among the different countries. Although most medical students are from outside the capital cities, expectations of getting into medical school are already associated with migration from the periphery to the capital city, even before entering medical education. Academic performance is poor. This seems to be related to difficulties in accessing materials, finances and insufficient high school preparation. Medical students recognize the public sector demand but their expectations are to combine public sector practice with private work, in order to improve their earnings. Salary expectations of students vary between the three countries. Approximately 75% want to train as hospital specialists and to follow a hospital-based career. A significant proportion is unsure about their future area of specialization, which for many students is equated with migration to study abroad. Conclusions Medical education is an important national investment, but the returns obtained are not as efficient as expected. Investments in high-school preparation, tutoring, and infrastructure are likely to have a significant impact on the success rate of medical schools. Special attention should be given to the socialization of students and the role model status of their teachers. In countries with scarce medical resources, the hospital orientation of students' expectations is understandable, although it should be associated with the development of skills to coordinate hospital work with the network of peripheral facilities. Developing a local postgraduate training capacity for doctors might be an important strategy to help retain medical doctors in the home country.

Fronteira Inês

2011-04-01

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An analysis of the professional and academic interest of medical radiation science students  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This research analyses the interest that medical radiation science (MRS) students have about their academic and professional world when they are given the independence to freely choose a topic to research. The research setting includes students of three different MRS degrees who have had, up until the point that this research was carried out, more common learning than degree specific learning. To analyse student interest, a thematic analysis of the self selected topics to be researched for a group work project was undertaken. The results indicate that there are statistically significant differences in interest between students of the three MRS degrees, with students within a degree sharing a strong single unifying common interest in their academic or professional world.

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Early detection and evaluation of professionalism deficiencies in medical students: one school's approach.  

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Since 1995, the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine has monitored students' professional behaviors in their third and fourth years. The authors recognized that several students with professionalism deficiencies during their clerkships had manifested problematic behaviors earlier in medical school. They also observed behaviors of concern--such as inappropriate behavior in small groups--in some first- and second-year students who could have been helped by early remediation. The authors describe the modifications to the evaluation system to bring professionalism issues to a student's attention in a new, earlier, and heightened way. In this new system for first- and second-year students, the course director of a student who has professionalism deficiencies submits a Physicianship Evaluation Form to the associate dean for student affairs, who then meets with the student to identify the problematic issues, to counsel, and to remediate. The student's behavior is monitored throughout the academic years. If the student receives two or more forms during the first two years and a subsequent form in the third or fourth year, this indicates a persistent pattern of inappropriate behavior. Then the physicianship problem is described in the dean's letter of recommendation for residency and the student is placed on academic probation. The student may be eligible for academic dismissal from school even if he or she has passing grades in all courses. The authors describe their experience with this system, discuss lessons learned, and review future plans to expand the system to deal with residents' mistreatment of students. PMID:11704509

Papadakis, M A; Loeser, H; Healy, K

2001-11-01

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Medical students' and facilitators' experiences of an Early Professional Contact course: Active and motivated students, strained facilitators  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Today, medical students are introduced to patient contact, communication skills, and clinical examination in the preclinical years of the curriculum with the purpose of gaining clinical experience. These courses are often evaluated from the student perspective. Reports with an additional emphasis on the facilitator perspective are scarce. According to constructive alignment, an influential concept from research in higher education, the learning climate between students and teachers is also of great importance. In this paper, we approach the learning climate by studying both students' and facilitators' course experiences. In 2001, a new "Early Professional Contact" longitudinal strand through term 1–4, was introduced at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. General practitioners and hospital specialists were facilitators. The aim of this study was to assess and analyse students' and clinical facilitators' experiences of the Early Professional Contact course and to illuminate facilitators' working conditions. Methods Inspired by a Swedish adaptation of the Course Experience Questionnaire, an Early Professional Contact Questionnaire was constructed. In 2003, on the completion of the first longitudinal strand, a student and facilitator version was distributed to 86 students and 21 facilitators. In the analysis, both Chi-square and the Mann-Whitney tests were used. Results Sixty students (70% and 15 facilitators (71% completed the questionnaire. Both students and facilitators were satisfied with the course. Students reported gaining iiration for their future work as doctors along with increased confidence in meeting patients. They also reported increased motivation for biomedical studies. Differences in attitudes between facilitators and students were found. Facilitators experienced a greater workload, less reasonable demands and less support, than students. Conclusion In this project, a new Early Professional Contact course was analysed from both student and facilitator perspectives. The students experienced the course as providing them with a valuable introduction to the physician's professional role in clinical practice. In contrast, course facilitators often experienced a heavy workload and lack of support, despite thorough preparatory education. A possible conflict between the clinical facilitator's task as educator and member of the workplace is suggested. More research is needed on how doctors combine their professional tasks with work as facilitators.

Gunnarsson Ronny

2008-12-01

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Investigating the Reliability and Validity of Self and Peer Assessment to Measure Medical StudentsProfessional Competencies  

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Full Text Available The use of peer assessment through a multisource feedback process has gained recognition as a reliable and valid method to assess the characteristics of professionals and trainees. A total of 168 first-year medical students completed a 15-item questionnaire to self-assess their professional work habits and interpersonal abilities. Each student was expected to identify 8 first-year classmates to complete a corresponding 15-item peer assessment. Although the self and peer assessment questionnaires had strong reliability (Cronbach’s ? = 0.85 and 0.91, respectively, an exploratory factor analysis resulted in a 3- and 2- factor solution, respectively. The third factor was associated with items related to students’ personal attributes. Significantly lower mean score differences for the self-report assessment were found for all 15 items (Cohen’s d = 0.27 to 1.39, p gards to the construct validity and stability of measures between self and peer assessment measures. The need for self-awareness of students’ strengths and limitations, however, is recommended as part of their development in a profession that emphasizes self-regulation.

Tyrone Donnon

2013-06-01

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Percepções de alunos de medicina sobre marketing médico / Undergraduate medical student's perceptions regarding professional marketing  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese INTRODUÇÃO: Marketing médico é um assunto controverso, principalmente no que concerne a princípios éticos. Portanto, frente à competição acirrada de mercado, é necessário o preparo profissional. Conhecer a percepção dos alunos de Medicina pode auxiliar na estruturação de alternativas de capacitação. [...] METODOLOGIA: Inicialmente, identificaram-se crenças sobre marketing médico através de grupo focal composto por 12 alunos. Com base nesses dados, dez afirmações para avaliar atitudes foram aplicadas aos alunos de uma Faculdade de Medicina pública brasileira. RESULTADOS: Observou-se falta de clareza sobre o conceito de marketing, preocupação com princípios éticos e necessidade de marketing no mercado competitivo. Na fase de aplicação, foram obtidas 280 respostas de diversos estágios do curso. Apenas 16,8% admitiram contato com o tema. Houve clareza sobre ética em relação ao paciente, influenciada positivamente pela progressão no curso, mas houve divergência na ética entre profissionais. CONCLUSÕES: Marketing médico é uma área pouco compreendida e relegada ao currículo oculto, sendo influenciada por transposições inadequadas de métodos didáticos destinados à comunicação profissional para a população leiga. Novos métodos de ensino, como a educação tutorial, podem ser uma alternativa para lidar com essas situações. Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Professional marketing is a controversial topic, mainly regarding ethical principles. Therefore, increasing market competion turns professional capacitation mandatory. To know under graduation medical student's perceptions could help to develop educational alternatives to face this probl [...] em. METODOLOGY: First, professional marketing believes were identified through focus group methodology including twelve students. Based on these results, ten affirmatives were constructed to evaluate attitudes and applied to the students of a Brazilian public medicine school. RESULTS: It was observed lack of a clear definition of marketing, preoccupation regarding ethical principles and need to employ marketing strategies in a competitive market. At the survey stage, 280 answers from different stages of the course were obtained. Only 16.8% admitted to have had previous contact with the topic. Clear ethical standards for medical-patient relationship were determined, increasing with course progression. However inter-professional ethical principles was more subject to confusion. CONCLUSION: Professional marketing is poorly understood and it is relegated to the occult curricula, being influenced by didactic methods inadequately transposed for marketing strategies. Newer educational methods, like mentoring, could be an alternative to deal with these situations.Tutoria.

Fernando Henrique Canhoto, Alves; Fernanda Pedrosa, Torres; Hilda Satie, Suto; Lunia Sofia Lima, Azevedo; Marcell Maduro, Barbosa; Renato Martins, Pedro; Ana Carolina Delazia Albuquerque, Santana; Daniella, Rantin; Fábio Henrique Luiz, Leonardo; Marina Gomes de, Andrade; Natasha Nicos, Ferreira; Antonio, Pazin Filho.

2012-09-01

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Percepções de alunos de medicina sobre marketing médico / Undergraduate medical student's perceptions regarding professional marketing  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese INTRODUÇÃO: Marketing médico é um assunto controverso, principalmente no que concerne a princípios éticos. Portanto, frente à competição acirrada de mercado, é necessário o preparo profissional. Conhecer a percepção dos alunos de Medicina pode auxiliar na estruturação de alternativas de capacitação. [...] METODOLOGIA: Inicialmente, identificaram-se crenças sobre marketing médico através de grupo focal composto por 12 alunos. Com base nesses dados, dez afirmações para avaliar atitudes foram aplicadas aos alunos de uma Faculdade de Medicina pública brasileira. RESULTADOS: Observou-se falta de clareza sobre o conceito de marketing, preocupação com princípios éticos e necessidade de marketing no mercado competitivo. Na fase de aplicação, foram obtidas 280 respostas de diversos estágios do curso. Apenas 16,8% admitiram contato com o tema. Houve clareza sobre ética em relação ao paciente, influenciada positivamente pela progressão no curso, mas houve divergência na ética entre profissionais. CONCLUSÕES: Marketing médico é uma área pouco compreendida e relegada ao currículo oculto, sendo influenciada por transposições inadequadas de métodos didáticos destinados à comunicação profissional para a população leiga. Novos métodos de ensino, como a educação tutorial, podem ser uma alternativa para lidar com essas situações. Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Professional marketing is a controversial topic, mainly regarding ethical principles. Therefore, increasing market competion turns professional capacitation mandatory. To know under graduation medical student's perceptions could help to develop educational alternatives to face this probl [...] em. METODOLOGY: First, professional marketing believes were identified through focus group methodology including twelve students. Based on these results, ten affirmatives were constructed to evaluate attitudes and applied to the students of a Brazilian public medicine school. RESULTS: It was observed lack of a clear definition of marketing, preoccupation regarding ethical principles and need to employ marketing strategies in a competitive market. At the survey stage, 280 answers from different stages of the course were obtained. Only 16.8% admitted to have had previous contact with the topic. Clear ethical standards for medical-patient relationship were determined, increasing with course progression. However inter-professional ethical principles was more subject to confusion. CONCLUSION: Professional marketing is poorly understood and it is relegated to the occult curricula, being influenced by didactic methods inadequately transposed for marketing strategies. Newer educational methods, like mentoring, could be an alternative to deal with these situations.Tutoria.

Fernando Henrique Canhoto, Alves; Fernanda Pedrosa, Torres; Hilda Satie, Suto; Lunia Sofia Lima, Azevedo; Marcell Maduro, Barbosa; Renato Martins, Pedro; Ana Carolina Delazia Albuquerque, Santana; Daniella, Rantin; Fábio Henrique Luiz, Leonardo; Marina Gomes de, Andrade; Natasha Nicos, Ferreira; Antonio, Pazin Filho.

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Changes in Wellbeing and Professional Values among Medical Undergraduate Students: A Narrative Review of the Literature  

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Background: Educators are concerned by the high prevalence of emotional distress among medical students, and by the alleged decline in their humanitarian values. Objective To re-examine these concerns by reviewing studies of medical students' wellbeing and development. Method Narrative review of the literature. Main findings: (a) Medical

Benbassat, Jochanan

2014-01-01

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Changes in wellbeing and professional values among medical undergraduate students: a narrative review of the literature.  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Educators are concerned by the high prevalence of emotional distress among medical students, and by the alleged decline in their humanitarian values. Objective To re-examine these concerns by reviewing studies of medical students' wellbeing and development. Method Narrative review of the literature. Main findings (a) Medical students' emotional distress increases during their undergraduate training. However, although higher than in the general population, the prevalence of distress among medical students is similar to that among other university students. (b) Medical students' distress is independently related to endogenous factors (personality traits and life events) and to their perception of the medical learning environment. (c) Medical students do not display a measurable increase in moral reasoning, empathy and tolerance of uncertainty. (d) Students' wellbeing, moral development, reflectivity and tolerance of uncertainty have been shown to be interrelated, and associated with clinical performance. Conclusions The findings of this review endorse the concerns about the wellbeing and development of undergraduate medical students. The design of the reviewed studies does not permit inferences about causality. Yet, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that medical training causes emotional distress that delays students' development and affects their clinical performance. PMID:24615278

Benbassat, Jochanan

2014-10-01

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A comparison of changes in dental students' and medical students' approaches to learning during professional training.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purposes of this study were 1) to compare the learning approaches of dental students (DS) and medical students (MS) for the Class of 1998 at a single institution at admission and graduation and 2) to determine if their learning approaches changed over the course of their studies. An Approaches to Studying Inventory (ASI) was administered to DS and MS at two times: their first month in school and their last month in school. Means and standard deviations were calculated for three ASI orientations to studying: 'Meaning', 'Reproducing', and 'Achieving'. An additional domain referred to as 'Styles and Pathologies' identified learning problems. In comparison, DS and MS demonstrated a different pattern of learning approaches at matriculation; however, at graduation these differences were less apparent. Over time, DS reported a decreased use, and MS reported an increased use of the Reproducing orientation bringing them closer together. MS also demonstrated an increased use of the Achieving orientation. The Meaning orientation, which indicates a deep approach to learning, was equivalently used by both groups at entry and remained unaltered. PMID:11683893

Lindemann, R; Duek, J L; Wilkerson, L

2001-11-01

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Comparative Efficacy of Group and Individual Feedback in Gross Anatomy for Promoting medical student professionalism  

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This article describes a study evaluating the effectiveness of delivering feedback via two modes, one on one or group feedback on improving professional attitudes and behaviors. This study was conducted in a first year medical course. Methods and outcomes are discussed.

Christopher Camp (Mayo Medical School, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine); Jeremy Gregory (Mayo Medical School, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine); Laura P Chen (Mayo Medical School, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine); Justin Juskewitch (Mayo Medical School, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)

2010-03-08

 
 
 
 
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Comparison of peer-led versus professional-led training in basic life support for medical students  

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Full Text Available Takashi Fujiwara1, Mai Nishimura2, Ryoko Honda3, Takashi Nishiyama4, Masahiro Nomoto5, Naoto Kobayashi6, Masayuki Ikeda71Division of Educational Training, Kurashiki Central Hospital, Kurashiki, Japan, 2Sixth-year medical student, 3Department of Anaesthesiology and Resuscitology, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, 5Department of Therapeutics, 6Medical Education Center, Ehime University School of Medicine, Ehime, Japan, 7Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, JapanBackground: The effect of peer-led training in basic life support (BLS in the education of medical students has not been assessed.Subjects and methods: This study was a randomized controlled trial with a blinded outcome assessor. A total of 74 fourth-year medical students at Ehime University School of Medicine, Japan were randomly assigned to BLS training conducted by either a senior medical student (peer-led group or a health professional (professional-led group. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of chest compressions with adequate depth (38–51 mm by means of a training mannequin evaluated 20 weeks after BLS training. Secondary outcome measures were compression depth, compression rate, proportion of participants who could ensure adequate compression depth (38–51 mm and adequate compression rate (90–110/minute, and retention of BLS knowledge as assessed by 22-point questionnaire.Results: Percentage chest compressions with adequate depth (mean ± SD was 54.5% ± 31.8% in the peer-led group and 52.4% ± 35.6% in the professional-led group. The 95% confidence interval (CI of difference of the means was –18.7% to 22.8%. The proportion of participants who could ensure an adequate mean compression rate was 17/23 (73.9% in the peer-led group but only 8/22 (36.4% in the professional-led group (P = 0.011. On the 22-point questionnaire administered 20 weeks after training, the peer-led group scored 17.2 ± 2.3 whereas the professional-led group scored 17.8 ± 2.0. The 95% CI of difference of the means was –1.72 to 0.57.Conclusion: Peer-led training in BLS by medical students is feasible and as effective as health professional-led training.Keywords: basic life support, education, training, randomized controlled trial 

Fujiwara T

2011-07-01

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Can personal qualities of medical students predict in-course examination success and professional behaviour? An exploratory prospective cohort study  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Over two-thirds of UK medical schools are augmenting their selection procedures for medical students by using the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT, which employs tests of cognitive and non-cognitive personal qualities, but clear evidence of the tests’ predictive validity is lacking. This study explores whether academic performance and professional behaviours that are important in a health professional context can be predicted by these measures, when taken before or very early in the medical course. Methods This prospective cohort study follows the progress of the entire student cohort who entered Hull York Medical School in September 2007, having taken the UKCAT cognitive tests in 2006 and the non-cognitive tests a year later. This paper reports on the students’ first and second academic years of study. The main outcome measures were regular, repeated tutor assessment of individual students’ interpersonal skills and professional behaviour, and annual examination performance in the three domains of recall and application of knowledge, evaluation of data, and communication and practical clinical skills. The relationships between non-cognitive test scores, cognitive test scores, tutor assessments and examination results were explored using the Pearson product–moment correlations for each group of data; the data for students obtaining the top and bottom 20% of the summative examination results were compared using Analysis of Variance. Results Personal qualities measured by non-cognitive tests showed a number of statistically significant relationships with ratings of behaviour made by tutors, with performance in each year’s objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs, and with themed written summative examination marks in each year. Cognitive ability scores were also significantly related to each year’s examination results, but seldom to professional behaviours. The top 20% of examination achievers could be differentiated from the bottom 20% on both non-cognitive and cognitive measures. Conclusions This study shows numerous significant relationships between both cognitive and non-cognitive test scores, academic examination scores and indicators of professional behaviours in medical students. This suggests that measurement of non-cognitive personal qualities in applicants to medical school could make a useful contribution to selection and admission decisions. Further research is required in larger representative groups, and with more refined predictor measures and behavioural assessment methods, to establish beyond doubt the incremental validity of such measures over conventional cognitive assessments.

Adam Jane

2012-08-01

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Relationship of creative projects in anatomy to medical student professionalism, test performance and stress: an exploratory study  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The anatomy course offers important opportunities to develop professionalism at an early stage in medical education. It is an academically significant course that also engenders stress in some students. Methods Over a three-year period, 115 of 297 students completed creative projects. Thirty-four project completers and 47 non-completers consented to participate in the study. Projects were analyzed for professionalism themes using grounded theory. A subset of project completers and non-completers were interviewed to determine their views about the stress of anatomy and medical school, as well as the value of the creative projects. We also compared test performance of project completers and non-completers. Results Projects completed early in the course often expressed ambivalence about anatomy, whereas later projects showed more gratitude and sense of awe. Project completers tended to report greater stress than noncompleters, but stated that doing projects reduced stress and caused them to develop a richer appreciation for anatomy and medicine. Project completers performed significantly lower than non-completers on the first written exam (pre-project. Differences between groups on individual exams after both the first and second creative project were nonsignificant. Conclusion For some students, creative projects may offer a useful way of reflecting on various aspects of professionalism while helping them to manage stress.

Thai Trung M

2009-11-01

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Emotional Intelligence and Medical Professionalism  

Science.gov (United States)

Studies have shown that IQ alone does not contribute to the professional success of medical professionals. Professionals who are trained to be clinically competent, but have inadequate social skills for practice have proved to be less successful in their profession. Emotional intelligence (EI), which has already proved to be a key attribute for…

Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

2011-01-01

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Professional-cultural humanitarian values and psychology-pedagogical support of their development in medical students  

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Full Text Available The article presents the data of the experimental model of the psychology-pedagogical conditions providing the effectiveness of the professional-cultural humanitarian values' development in future doctors within the course of foreign language

Veretelnikova Y.Y.

2011-03-01

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Medical Students and Personal Smartphones in the Clinical Environment: The Impact on Confidentiality of Personal Health Information and Professionalism  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Smartphones are becoming ubiquitous in health care settings. The increased adoption of mobile technology such as smartphones may be attributed to their use as a point-of-care information source and to perceived improvements in clinical communication and efficiency. However, little is known about medical students’ use of personal smartphones for clinical work. Objective The intent of the study was to examine final-year medical students’ experience with and attitudes toward using personal mobile technology in the clinical environment, with respect to the perceived impact on patient confidentiality and provider professionalism. Methods Cross-sectional surveys were completed by final-year medical students at the University of Toronto. Respondents were asked about the type of personal mobile phone they use, security features on their personal phone, experiences using their personal phone during clinical rotations, and attitudes about using their personal phone for clinical work purposes. Results The overall response rate was 45.4% (99/218). Smartphone ownership was prevalent (98%, 97/99) with the majority (86%, 85/99) of participants using their personal phones for patient-related communication during clinical rotations. A total of 26% (26/99) of participants reported not having any type of security feature on their personal phone, 94% (90/96) of participants agreed that using their personal phone for clinical work makes them more efficient, and 86% (82/95) agreed that their personal phone allows them to provide better patient care. Although 68% (65/95) of participants believe that the use of personal phones for patient-related communication with colleagues poses a risk to the privacy and confidentiality of patient health information, 22% (21/96) of participants still use their personal phone to text or email identifiable patient data to colleagues. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the use of personal smartphones for clinical work by medical students is prevalent. There is a need to more fully address the threat to patient confidentiality posed by the use of unsecured communication devices such as smartphones. PMID:24855046

Morra, Dante; Lo, Vivian; Quan, Sherman D; Abrams, Howard; Wu, Robert C

2014-01-01

27

[The medical school and its training center at the District Institute of National Health in Nové Zámky from the viewpoint of medical students engaged in professional and social medicine summer practice].  

Science.gov (United States)

Within the framework of professional and social practice of medical students in the district institute of national health in Nové Zámky a questionnaire survey was made concerned with the attitudes and views of students as regards training at the medical faculties and as regards summer practice. The authors consider the information obtained from 37 students of different medical faculties in the SSR and CSR, ensuing from their first empirical experience in the field, a valuable feedback as regards the standard of training and shaping of the profile of the qualified doctor for practice. On the whole the students are satisfied with the conditions of practical work in Nové Zámky but have also some concrete concructive comments and suggestions for optimation and intensification of undergraduate training and therapeutic and preventive care. The participation of medical students in the above activities is a significant factor shaping their professional identity. PMID:2225200

Horský, A; Máthé, R; Borbély, L

1990-08-01

28

The clinical skills laboratory as a learning tool for medical students and health professionals.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Clinical skill laboratories CSL have become one of the essential facilities in an undergraduate medical curriculum. A wide range of training skills were recently introduced which includes clinical examination, diagnostic and therapeutic skills as well as communication skills. Although the educational value of the CSL is very well recognized, very little is written about it in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the skills laboratory integrated in an undergraduate medical curriculum, highlight the nature of this trend, look at the advantages and disadvantages and suggest some guidelines for implementation.

Nada H. Al-Yousuf

2004-05-01

29

Willingness to work in rural areas and the role of intrinsic versus extrinsic professional motivations - a survey of medical students in Ghana  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Retaining health workers in rural areas is challenging for a number of reasons, ranging from personal preferences to difficult work conditions and low remuneration. This paper assesses the influence of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation on willingness to accept postings to deprived areas among medical students in Ghana. Methods A computer-based survey involving 302 fourth year medical students was conducted from May-August 2009. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between students' willingness to accept rural postings and their professional motivations, rural exposure and family parental professional and educational status (PPES. Results Over 85% of students were born in urban areas and 57% came from affluent backgrounds. Nearly two-thirds of students reported strong intrinsic motivation to study medicine. After controlling for demographic characteristics and rural exposure, motivational factors did not influence willingness to practice in rural areas. High family PPES was consistently associated with lower willingness to work in rural areas. Conclusions Although most Ghanaian medical students are motivated to study medicine by the desire to help others, this does not translate into willingness to work in rural areas. Efforts should be made to build on intrinsic motivation during medical training and in designing rural postings, as well as favour lower PPES students for admission.

Dzodzomenyo Mawuli

2011-08-01

30

El profesionalismo médico / Medical professionalism  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish La ética y el profesionalismo constituyen el fundamento de la actividad de la medicina, que es una empresa intensamente moral. El profesionalismo no es sólo la base del contrato social de la medicina, sino, principalmente, una fuerza estructuralmente estabilizadora y moralmente protectora de la soci [...] edad. Un profesional es la persona que se ubica en una de las disciplinas eruditas y que actúa observando los estándares técnicos, éticos y deontológicos de una profesión. El concepto de profesionalismo incluye cuatro componentes fundamentales: 1) conocimiento especializado; 2) autonomía en la toma de decisiones; 3) compromiso de servicio a la sociedad; 4) autorregulación. La transformación corporativa de los sistemas de salud que ha ocurrido principalmente en Colombia y en los Estados Unidos constituye una amenaza de destrucción del profesionalismo médico. Es el fenómeno, ya declarado como una ominosa incipiente realidad, de la desprofesionalización de la medicina, que pasaría de ser una noble profesión a convertirse en un simple oficio al servicio de los intereses corporativos. Como reacción se ha conformado un movimiento médico global, el Medical Professionalism Project que pretende el fortalecimiento del profesionalismo en el nuevo milenio a través de la implementación de tres principios y diez responsabilidades profesionales fundamentales. Abstract in english Medicine is an intensely moral endeavor and its practice is based on ethics and professionalism. The social contract of medicine rests on professionalism, but, furthermore, professionalism is both a stablilizing and a morally protective force in society. A professional is the person that engages in [...] one of the learned professions and is characterized by conforming to the technical and ethical standards of a profession. The concept of professionalism incorporates four components: 1) specialized knowledge; 2) autonomy for decision-making processes; 3) commitment of service to society; 4) auto-regulation. The corporate transformation of health care services that takes place mainly in Colombia and the USA, is threatening to destroy medical professionalism. There is a widespread accepted although incipient, ominous social phenomenon: the deprofessionalization of medicine, the transformation of a noble profession into a simple trade to serve corporate interests. But there is global reaction intending to strengthen medical professionalism in the new millennium, and the Medical Professionalism Project has been launched as an international effort with a charter consisting of three principles and 10 commitments.

José Félix, Patiño Restrepo.

2004-09-01

31

Reframing medical education to support professional identity formation.  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching medical professionalism is a fundamental component of medical education. The objective is to ensure that students understand the nature of professionalism and its obligations and internalize the value system of the medical profession. The recent emergence of interest in the medical literature on professional identity formation gives reason to reexamine this objective. The unstated aim of teaching professionalism has been to ensure the development of practitioners who possess a professional identity. The teaching of medical professionalism therefore represents a means to an end.The principles of identity formation that have been articulated in educational psychology and other fields have recently been used to examine the process through which physicians acquire their professional identities. Socialization-with its complex networks of social interaction, role models and mentors, experiential learning, and explicit and tacit knowledge acquisition-influences each learner, causing them to gradually "think, act, and feel like a physician."The authors propose that a principal goal of medical education be the development of a professional identity and that educational strategies be developed to support this new objective. The explicit teaching of professionalism and emphasis on professional behaviors will remain important. However, expanding knowledge of identity formation in medicine and of socialization in the medical environment should lend greater logic and clarity to the educational activities devoted to ensuring that the medical practitioners of the future will possess and demonstrate the qualities of the "good physician." PMID:25054423

Cruess, Richard L; Cruess, Sylvia R; Boudreau, J Donald; Snell, Linda; Steinert, Yvonne

2014-11-01

32

Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology-, and nursing education  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Background: Welfare technology is considered to be cost effective and to promote consistent quality in health care (1, 2). Due to the pervasive deployment of telemedicine and the political focus thereon, it is very important that health professional students gain an understanding of its benefits and limitations and that they develop competences related to telemedicine practices. Because close interprofessional and intersectoral cooperation is required in the care and treatment of patients by the use of telemedicine, development of telemedicine competences must take place in an inter-professional context. Aims: The purpose of the project was • to develop practice oriented competences related to telemedicine in an inter-professional and a cross-sectoral context among health professional students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology-, and nursing education. • to motivate and retain male students by the use of simulation training that involves technology. Methodology:The project was settled as a cross-professional telemedicine course on health educations. Nursing students (N=20) and physiotherapy students (N=34) participated actively and the scenarios were filmed and enacted via Adobe Connect. Students were divided into groups, and some students acted health professionals, while others acted patients. Excerpts of the recordings were analyzed and discussed with a focus on successful telemedical care and treatments well as challenges and they were followed by evaluation and qualitative interviews. Recordings, field notes, memos and observations of students and lecturers were used as empirical material for follow-up research. Data were analyzed in order to categorize the theoretical perspectives relating to learning and motivation. Results: Evaluations and follow-up research showed that students developed competences equivalent to novice level through simulation training (3). The project gave rise to wide project on Occupational Therapy education and medical laboratory technology education too. Follow-up research concludes that the boys who participated in the project responded positively to simulation training, as many of the girls did. Further results and perspectives will be presented at the conference. References: 1. Accelerating innovation: the power of the crowd. Global lessons in e-Health implementation d Documents/e-health-implementation Case study: UK Department of Health: Whole System Demonstrator program 2. Danske Regioner, Kommunernes Landsforening, Ministeriet for Sundhed og Forebyggelse, Social- og Integrationsministeriet, Erhvervs- og Vækstministeriet, Økonomi- og Indenrigsministeriet & Finansministeriet (2012): National handlingsplan for udbredelse af telemedicin, Fonden for Velfærdsteknologi 3. Nortvig, Anne-Mette et. Eriksen, Kathrine Krageskov. Teknologistøttet simulationsundervisning som translokation for teoretisk viden og praktisk handlen. Læring & Medier (LOM) – nr. 11 – 2013. ISSN: 1903-248X 4. Murray C, Grant MJ, Howarth ML, Leigh J.The use of simulation as a teaching and learning approach to support practice learning. Nurse Education in Practice 2008;8[1]:5-8. 5. Watson K, Wright A, Morris N, McMeeken J, Rivett D, Blackstock F, et al. Can simulation replace part of clinical time? Two parallel randomised controlled trials. Med Educ 2012;46[7]:657-667 6. Dieckmann P, Friis SM, Lippert A, Østergaard D. Goals, Success Factors, and Barriers for Simulation-Based Learning A Qualitative Interview Study in Health Care. Simulation & Gaming 2012;43[5]:627-647. 7. Dreyfus, Stuart E.; Dreyfus, Hubert L. (February 1980). A Five-Stage Model of the Mental Activities Involved in Directed Skill Acquisition. Washington, DC: Storming Media. Retrieved June 13, 2010.

Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard, Kitt

33

A graduação médica e a prática profissional na perspectiva de discentes / Undergraduate medical education and professional practice from a student's perspective  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Estudo transversal quantitativo descritivo observacional, realizado com discentes do internato da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Goiás. OBJETIVOS: Conhecer a expectativa de prática profissional de discentes do internato e observar possíveis dissonâncias em relação ao perfil do disc [...] ente preconizado pelas Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais e projeto político-pedagógico da instituição. METODOLOGIA: Foi utilizado um questionário distribuído aos 222 discentes do internato da instituição no ano de 2012. A amostra consta de 190 discentes, que correspondem a 85% do universo de análise. A significância estatística foi calculada pelo Teste do Sinal. RESULTADOS: O perfil sociodemográfico caracteriza discentes com idade média de 23,8 anos, solteiros, sendo que 66% pertencem às classes sociais A e B. O ideal do perfil de prática profissional demonstra que 84% pretendem ser especialistas, 96% desejam cursar residência médica, sendo estatisticamente significante (p = 0,0001), e 70% não pretendem, a priori, trabalhar na Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF) (p = 0,005). CONCLUSÃO: O estudo demonstra discentes com perfil socioeconômico elevado, que pretendem ser especialistas, cursar residência médica e não veem a ESF como uma meta-fim. Abstract in english INTRODUCTION: The aim of this research is to identify, in terms of professional practice, the ideal internship students in the Medical School of the Federal University of Goiás (UFG) and to observe possible dissonances in relation to the graduate profile as advocated by the National Curriculum Guide [...] lines and by the Political Pedagogical Project of this institution. METHODS: In 2012, two hundred and twenty-two medical internship students of the institution received a survey questionnaire. The sample of this research consisted of one hundred and ninety research subjects, representing 85% of the sample universe. The statistical significance was calculated using the Sign Test. RESULTS: The socio-demographic profile characterizes the students with an average age of 23.8 years old, unmarried, 66% of whom belong to social classes A and B. The ideal profile of professional practice shows that 84% want to become specialists, whereas 96% want to engage in medical residency, which is statistically significant (p = 0.0001), and 70% do not intend to work with Family Health Strategy Programs (p = 0.005). CONCLUSION: This study shows that students with high socio-economic profile, who want to become specialists, undergo a medical residency program and do not see the Family Health Strategy as a professional goal.

Marcos Augusto, Filisbino; Vardeli Alves de, Moraes.

2013-12-01

34

A graduação médica e a prática profissional na perspectiva de discentes / Undergraduate medical education and professional practice from a student's perspective  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Estudo transversal quantitativo descritivo observacional, realizado com discentes do internato da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Goiás. OBJETIVOS: Conhecer a expectativa de prática profissional de discentes do internato e observar possíveis dissonâncias em relação ao perfil do disc [...] ente preconizado pelas Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais e projeto político-pedagógico da instituição. METODOLOGIA: Foi utilizado um questionário distribuído aos 222 discentes do internato da instituição no ano de 2012. A amostra consta de 190 discentes, que correspondem a 85% do universo de análise. A significância estatística foi calculada pelo Teste do Sinal. RESULTADOS: O perfil sociodemográfico caracteriza discentes com idade média de 23,8 anos, solteiros, sendo que 66% pertencem às classes sociais A e B. O ideal do perfil de prática profissional demonstra que 84% pretendem ser especialistas, 96% desejam cursar residência médica, sendo estatisticamente significante (p = 0,0001), e 70% não pretendem, a priori, trabalhar na Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF) (p = 0,005). CONCLUSÃO: O estudo demonstra discentes com perfil socioeconômico elevado, que pretendem ser especialistas, cursar residência médica e não veem a ESF como uma meta-fim. Abstract in english INTRODUCTION: The aim of this research is to identify, in terms of professional practice, the ideal internship students in the Medical School of the Federal University of Goiás (UFG) and to observe possible dissonances in relation to the graduate profile as advocated by the National Curriculum Guide [...] lines and by the Political Pedagogical Project of this institution. METHODS: In 2012, two hundred and twenty-two medical internship students of the institution received a survey questionnaire. The sample of this research consisted of one hundred and ninety research subjects, representing 85% of the sample universe. The statistical significance was calculated using the Sign Test. RESULTS: The socio-demographic profile characterizes the students with an average age of 23.8 years old, unmarried, 66% of whom belong to social classes A and B. The ideal profile of professional practice shows that 84% want to become specialists, whereas 96% want to engage in medical residency, which is statistically significant (p = 0.0001), and 70% do not intend to work with Family Health Strategy Programs (p = 0.005). CONCLUSION: This study shows that students with high socio-economic profile, who want to become specialists, undergo a medical residency program and do not see the Family Health Strategy as a professional goal.

Marcos Augusto, Filisbino; Vardeli Alves de, Moraes.

35

The professionalization of audiology students  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the development of audiology students' professional values, traits and attitudes employing a cross-sectional design. In addition, an exploratory component of this study investigated the following characteristics of audiology students: reasons for selecting audiology as a career, professional plans and ambitions for the future and satisfaction with career choice. The effects of gender, age, marital status and grade level on these factors were examin...

Neal, Leslie Elizabeth

1994-01-01

36

Improving student professionalism during experiential learning.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this paper is to serve as a tool for preceptors to aid in pharmacy students' development of professionalism. Specifically, the article defines professionalism, describes it in the context of contemporary pharmacy practice, discusses the professional socialization process of students, and suggests strategies for preceptors to facilitate improvement in professionalism among students during experiential training. While numerous suggestions are presented, positive role modeling is considered the most important means of improving professionalism among students. PMID:17136180

Hammer, Dana

2006-06-15

37

Career Orientations and Professional Development of Young Student Affairs Professionals.  

Science.gov (United States)

Explored the relation of career orientation and professional development to career continuance for student affairs professionals with master's degrees. Career orientations were found to be related to levels of professional development and differentiated between those who remain in the student affairs field and those who leave. (Author/MCF)

Wood, Linda; And Others

1985-01-01

38

Viewpoint: the elephant in medical professionalism's kitchen.  

Science.gov (United States)

The rise of the corporation within health care during the 1980s and early 1990s was met by organized medicine with a deluge of editorials, articles, and books that identified a singular enemy--commercialism--and depicted it as corrosive of, and antithetical to, medical professionalism. Medicine's ire proved prognostic as scores of highly publicized corporate-medical scandals began to crater the landscape of a rapidly emerging "medical marketplace." Medicine's main weapon in this counteroffensive was a renewed call to medical professionalism. Numerous organizations hosted conferences and underwrote initiatives to define, measure, and ultimately inculcate professionalism as a core medical competency. Nonetheless, an examination of medicine's overall response to the threat of commercialism reveals inconsistencies and schisms between these praiseworthy efforts and a parallel absence of action at the community practitioner and peer-review levels. The most recent salvo in this war on commercialism is a policy proposal by influential medical leaders who call for an end to the market incentives linking academic health centers and medical schools with industry. These forthright proposals nevertheless appear once again not to address the heartbeat of professional social control: community-based peer review, including a vigorous and proactive role by state medical boards. The author concludes by examining the implications of a professionalism bereft of peer review and explores the societal-level responsibilities of organized medicine to protect, nurture, and expand the role of the physician to maintain the values and ideals of professionalism against the countervailing social forces of the free market and bureaucracy. PMID:16985355

Hafferty, Fred

2006-10-01

39

Motivation in medical students  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Introduction The importance of motivation in learning behaviour and education is well-researched and proven in general education, but much less in medical education. There is sometimes focus on increasing the quantity of motivation, but the how and why need more evidence. The aims of this thesis were to gather insights and investigate medical students’ motivation, particularly the importance of quality of motivation, factors influencing and outcomes and to explore how these can be applied t...

Kusurkar, R. A.

2012-01-01

40

Bushido and medical professionalism in Japan.  

Science.gov (United States)

Medical professionalism has become a core topic in medical education. As it has been considered mostly from a Western perspective, there is a need to examine how the same or similar concepts are reflected in a wider range of cultural contexts. To gain insights into medical professionalism concepts in Japanese culture, the authors compare the tenets of a frequently referenced Western guide to professionalism (the physician charter proposed by the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation, American College of Physicians Foundation, and the European Federation of Internal Medicine) with the concepts of Bushido, a Japanese code of personal conduct originating from the ancient samurai warriors. The authors also present survey evidence about how a group of present-day Japanese doctors view the values of Bushido.Cultural scholars have demonstrated Bushido's continuing influence on Japanese people today. The authors explain the seven main virtues of Bushido (e.g., rectitude), describe the similarities and differences between Bushido and the physician charter, and speculate on factors that may account for the differences, including the influence of religion, how much the group versus the individual is emphasized in a culture, and what emphasis is given to virtue-based versus duty-based ethics.The authors suggest that for those who are teaching and practicing in Japan today, Bushido's virtues are applicable when considering medical professionalism and merit further study. They urge that there be a richer discussion, from the viewpoints of different cultures, on the meaning of professionalism in today's health care practice. PMID:24556758

Nishigori, Hiroshi; Harrison, Rebecca; Busari, Jamiu; Dornan, Tim

2014-04-01

 
 
 
 
41

Métodos y formas de organización en el proceso de formación profesional de los estudiantes de medicina / Methods and ways to organize the professional formation of medical students  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish En el presente artículo se realiza una valoración del papel que juegan los métodos problémicos en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de los estudiantes de la Carrera de Medicina y por tanto en el proceso de formación profesional estrechamente vinculados con los modos de actuación más generales que [...] deben asumir los egresados en el desempeño profesional. La necesidad de acercar cada vez más el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje a la realidad cotidiana y a la solución de los problemas reales que se presentan en la sociedad, convierten a este componente didáctico en una verdadera herramienta para desarrollar el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje, a través de formas organizativas acordes a la dinámica y recursos didácticos de los tiempos actuales. Abstract in english In this article an assessment of the role of problem-solving methods in the teaching-learning process for the academic formation of medical students was conducted. Its close relation to the general ways of behaviour, which should be assumed by the health professionals in their daily working performa [...] nce, is also analyzed. The need to make a day to day approach to the teaching-learning process with the reality and the solution of the real problems in the society, and the transformation of the didactic components into a tool to develop the teaching-learning process by means of organized ways, being in harmony with the dynamics and the didactic resources of the current times.

Norma, Santoyo Reina; Martha, Valladares Hernández; Ciro, Suárez Blanco; José G, Sanabria Negrín; Zoila C, Fernández Montequín.

42

Effective e-learning for health professional and medical students: the experience with SIAS-Intelligent Tutoring System.  

Science.gov (United States)

Current e-learning systems are still inadequate to support the level of interaction, personalization and engagement demanded by clinicians, care givers, and the patient themselves. For effective e-learning to be delivered in the health context, collaboration between pedagogy and technology is required. Furthermore, e-learning systems should be flexible enough to be adapted to the students' needs, evaluated regularly, easy to use and maintain and provide students' feedback, guidelines and supporting material in different formats. This paper presents the implementation of an Intelligent Tutoring System (SIAS-ITS), and its evaluation compared to a traditional virtual learning platform (Moodle). The evaluation was carried out as a case study, in which the participants were separated in two groups, each group attending a virtual course on the WHO Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) strategy supported by one of the two e-learning platforms. The evaluation demonstrated that the participants' knowledge level, pedagogical strategies used, learning efficiency and systems' usability were improved using the Intelligent Tutoring System. PMID:20543344

Muñoz, Diana C; Ortiz, Alexandra; González, Carolina; López, Diego M; Blobel, Bernd

2010-01-01

43

My Medicated Students  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, the author, director of Watauga College and residential learning communities at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina, shares her experience dealing with first year college students who are taking medication to manage depression, anxiety, or attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders. She stresses that this is a…

Williams, Lee Burdette

2005-01-01

44

Improving Student Professionalism During Experiential Learning  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The purpose of this paper is to serve as a tool for preceptors to aid in pharmacy students' development of professionalism. Specifically, the article defines professionalism, describes it in the context of contemporary pharmacy practice, discusses the professional socialization process of students, and suggests strategies for preceptors to facilitate improvement in professionalism among students during experiential training. While numerous suggestions are presented, positive role modeling is ...

Hammer, Dana

2006-01-01

45

The conscientiousness index : a novel tool to explore studentsprofessionalism.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Purpose: Measuring professional behavior is problematic not least because the concept of professionalism is difficult to define. The authors describe a measurement tool that does not rely on qualitative judgments from respondents but, nonetheless, clearly correlates with individuals' subjective views about what constitutes professional behavior. Method: The authors devised the Conscientiousness Index (CI) of medical students' performance in years 1 (n = 116) and 2 (n = 108) in 2006-2007. ...

2009-01-01

46

The physically disabled medical student.  

Science.gov (United States)

Previous literature on physically disabled medical students is reviewed, and its implications are examined. Although they encounter significant obstacles to their acceptance into medical school due to stereotyped attitudes, environmental barriers, and recent legal decisions, these students are nevertheless applying to and successfully completing medical school. Common coping strategies for students with mobility, visual, and hearing impairments are briefly outlined. PMID:2962981

Stiens, S

1987-01-01

47

Perspective: Medical education in medical ethics and humanities as the foundation for developing medical professionalism.  

Science.gov (United States)

Medical education accreditation organizations require medical ethics and humanities education to develop professionalism in medical learners, yet there has never been a comprehensive critical appraisal of medical education in ethics and humanities. The Project to Rebalance and Integrate Medical Education (PRIME) I Workshop, convened in May 2010, undertook the first critical appraisal of the definitions, goals, and objectives of medical ethics and humanities teaching. The authors describe assembling a national expert panel of educators representing the disciplines of ethics, history, literature, and the visual arts. This panel was tasked with describing the major pedagogical goals of art, ethics, history, and literature in medical education, how these disciplines should be integrated with one another in medical education, and how they could be best integrated into undergraduate and graduate medical education. The authors present the recommendations resulting from the PRIME I discussion, centered on three main themes. The major goal of medical education in ethics and humanities is to promote humanistic skills and professional conduct in physicians. Patient-centered skills enable learners to become medical professionals, whereas critical thinking skills assist learners to critically appraise the concept and implementation of medical professionalism. Implementation of a comprehensive medical ethics and humanities curriculum in medical school and residency requires clear direction and academic support and should be based on clear goals and objectives that can be reliably assessed. The PRIME expert panel concurred that medical ethics and humanities education is essential for professional development in medicine. PMID:22373629

Doukas, David J; McCullough, Laurence B; Wear, Stephen

2012-03-01

48

Stress and mental health among medical students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction. Medical studies bring many stressful activities to students. Prolonged stress can make adverse effects to mental health and lead to further professional burnout. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the association of stress impact and adverse effects of medical studies with psychological distress among medical students. Methods. The cross sectional study was conducted on 367 fourth­year medical students of the Faculty of Medicine in Belgrade, by means of the anonymous questionnaire, containing: socio­demographic data, self­reported health status and stressful influences of studying activities. Mental health status was estimated by General Health Questionnaire (GHQ­12. Results. More than 50% of students perceive frequent feeling of psychic tension, and one third has problems with insomnia. Nearly one­half of students assessed their general stress level as moderate or high. Exams were estimated as high stressor in 63.1% of all students. Stressful effects of communication with teaching staff were reported by one quarter of the examinees. The scores of GHQ­12 were above the threshold in 55.6 % of all students. Mental health problems among students were most significantly associated with stressful experience during exams and contacts with teaching staff. Conclusion. Academic stress makes great influence on mental health of medical students. Reduction of stress effects should be directed to optimization of the examination process and improvement of communication skills. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 175078

Backovi? Dušan V.

2013-01-01

49

Image processing workstations for medical professionals  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Along with the advances in such new image measuring apparatuses as X-ray CT, NMR imaging apparatus and digitalized X-ray apparatus, the need is arising for a medical image workstation as diagnosis support to medical professionals where there are provided the image processing techniques and functions. The workstation must also fulfill a role of the terminal in the hospital medical information network. To meet such requirements, an image processing workstation has been constructed in trial, which possesses the functions of high fineness image display, high-speed image processing, communication, etc. Functions of the workstation are described, and also various new image diagnosis apparatuses and the image processing and its hardware as diagnosis support are explained. The relation between future PACS (picture archiving and communication system) and the hospital information system is also described. (Mori, K.)

50

Professional Self-Identification among Art Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Sixty-four university art students identified themselves as "art student,""marginal," or "professional artist" and provided information on age, sex, art and academic experiences, and parental factors. Consistent with the professionalization model of occupational socialization, all these factors, except parents and years of formal art training,…

Adams, Murray C.; Kowalski, Gregory S.

1980-01-01

51

Nursing Schools: Students' Beacon to Professionalism?  

Science.gov (United States)

The Nurses Professional Orientation Scale was completed by 309 students and 23 faculty members in the baccalaureate nursing program at Fairleigh Dickinson University. Results indicate that the professional socialization process is in operation; the further students advanced in the program, the more closely their responses correlated with those of…

Cohen, Barbara J.; Jordet, Caroline P.

1988-01-01

52

Medical professionalism and the social contract.  

Science.gov (United States)

Conceptions of professionalism in medicine draw on social contract theory; its strengths and weaknesses play out in how we reason about professionalism. The social contract metaphor may be a heuristic device prompting reflection on social responsibility, and as such is appealing: it encourages reasoning about privilege and responsibility, the broader context and consequences of action, and diverse perspectives on medical practice. However, when this metaphor is elevated to the status of a theory, it has well-known limits: the assumed subject position of contractors engenders blind spots about privilege, not critical reflection; its tendency to dress up the status quo in the trappings of a theoretical agreement may limit social negotiation; its attempted reconciliation of social obligation and self-interest fosters the view that ethics and self-interest should coincide; it sets up false expectations by identifying appearance and reality in morality; and its construal of prima facie duties as conditional misdirects ethical attention in particular situations from current needs to supposed past agreements or reciprocities. Using philosophical ideas as heuristic devices in medical ethics is inevitable, but we should be conscious of their limitations. When they limit the ethical scope of debate, we should seek new metaphors. PMID:22019534

Reid, Lynette

2011-01-01

53

"Without Handicap": Issues of Medical Schools and Physically Disabled Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Legal requirements of medical schools to provide access for physically disabled students are reviewed, and considerations beyond physical accessibility are explored. It is argued that medical schools are obligated to educate students who are qualified to become physicians by virtue of intelligence, professional attitude, and ability to interact…

Reichgott, Michael J.

1996-01-01

54

Dynamics of Determining Motives in Choosing the Medical Profession by Medical Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to study motivation of students of medical schools in choice of profession of the doctor and dynamics of defining motives in educational space of university. Material and methods: 497 students of the 1 st course took part in comparative research (356 students of medical faculty and 141 students of pediatric faculty and 382 students of the 6th course (270 students of medical faculty and 112 students of pediatric faculty of Saratov state medical university n.a. V. I. Razumovsky. In research methods of questioning and statistical data processing have been used. Results: The comparative analysis of the maximum and minimum values of the main types of motivation in professional field choice allowed to determine leading motives in medical students, and also to reveal their dynamics connected with various stages of professionalizing in the course of receiving medical education. Conclusion: Professional self-determination of the student of medical school has a multi-vector focus of structure of motivation. Determination by internal motives is supplemented with influence of external motivation, both positive, and negative value. In students of the 6th course indicators of motives included «Prestige», «Opportunity to help people», «Possibility of use of professional skills out of work».

Kloktunova N.A.

2013-06-01

55

WORK LIFE BALANCE OF MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS; AN EXPLORATORY STUDY: WORK LIFE BALANCE OF MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to focus on the work life balance of medical practitioners. The present study tried to explore the factors responsible in maintaining work life balance for individuals associated with medical field. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine the latent factors. The findings from study revealed that significant relationship exists between the job stress and family life of an individual. This study concluded that in order to improve work life balance of medical professionals the restructuring of individual job is required.

Gitanjali Upadhaya

2014-11-01

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Impacto social de la telemedicina en la formación profesional de los estudiantes de ciencias médicas / Social impact of telemedicine on the professional training of the medical sciences students  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish La educación médica y la medicina son prácticas sociales cuyos fines y medios tienen que definirse históricamente, considerando las necesidades de cada país al respecto y la reorientación didáctica que exige su desarrollo científico para que puedan determinarse, con precisión, los conocimientos requ [...] eridos para afrontar situaciones sanitarias epidemiológica y socialmente prioritarias. En este artículo se analizan algunas de las consecuencias generales relacionadas con el empleo de las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones, particularmente en la educación superior, y cómo devienen retos que deben asumir las universidades, específicamente de ciencias médicas, en la formación de sus profesionales. Abstract in english Medical education and medical career are social practices whose aims and resources have to be historically defined, considering the needs of each country on this respect and the didactic reorientation that demands their scientific development so that the knowledge required to face epidemiologically [...] and socially high-priority health situations can be accurately determined. Some of the general consequences related to the use of the information and communications technologies are analyzed in this work, particularly in the higher education, and how they become challenges that should be assumed by the universities, specifically of medical sciences, in the training of their professionals.

Nancy María, Rodríguez Beltrán; María Elena, Pardo Gómez; José Manuel, Izquierdo Lao.

57

Supporting medical students with learning disabilities in Asian medical schools  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Md. Anwarul Azim Majumder1, Sayeeda Rahman2, Urban JA D’Souza3, Gad Elbeheri4, Khalid Bin Abdulrahman5, M Muzaherul Huq61,2Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, Bradford, UK; 3School of Medicine, University Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia; 4Centre for Child Evaluation and Teaching, Kuwait; 5College of Medicine, Al-Imam University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 6Centre for Medical Education (CME, Mohakhali, Dhaka, BangladeshAbstract: Learning disabilities (LDs represent the largest group of disabilities in higher education (HE institutes, including medical schools, and the numbers are continuing to rise. The worrying concern is that two-thirds to half of these students with LDs remain undiagnosed when they start their undergraduate education and may even graduate without having their disabilities diagnosed. These students struggle with their academic abilities, receive poor grades and, as a result, develop lower perceptions of their intellectual abilities than do those students without LDs. All these ultimately hamper their professional practice, employment, and career progression. Appropriate and adequate educational policies, provisions, and practices help students to progress satisfactorily. In Asian countries, public and professional awareness about LDs is low, supportive provisions are limited, legislations are inadequate, data are scarce, and equal-opportunity/widening-participation policies are not implemented effectively in the HE sector. This article discusses the issues related to LDs in medical education and draws policy, provision, and practice implications to identify, assess, and support students with LDs in medical schools, particularly in an Asian context.Keywords: medical education, learning disabilities, dyslexia, Asia

Md. Anwarul Azim Majumder

2010-10-01

58

Mentoring by design: integrating medical professional competencies into bioengineering and medical physics graduate training.  

Science.gov (United States)

Many students in bioengineering and medical physics doctoral programs plan careers in translational research. However, while such students generally have strong quantitative abilities, they often lack experience with the culture, communication norms, and practice of bedside medicine. This may limit students' ability to function as members of multidisciplinary translational research teams. To improve students' preparation for careers in cancer translational research, we developed and implemented a mentoring program that is integrated with students' doctoral studies and aims to promote competencies in communication, biomedical ethics, teamwork, altruism, multiculturalism, and accountability. Throughout the program, patient-centered approaches and professional competencies are presented as foundational to optimal clinical care and integral to translational research. Mentoring is conducted by senior biomedical faculty and administrators and includes didactic teaching, online learning, laboratory mini-courses, clinical practicums, and multidisciplinary patient planning conferences (year 1); student development and facilitation of problem-based patient cases (year 2); and individualized mentoring based on research problems and progress toward degree completion (years 3-5). Each phase includes formative and summative evaluations. Nineteen students entered the program from 2009 through 2011. On periodic anonymous surveys, the most recent in September 2013, students indicated that the program substantially improved their knowledge of cancer biology, cancer medicine, and academic medicine; that the mentors were knowledgeable, good teachers, and dedicated to students; and that the program motivated them to become well-rounded scientists and scholars. We believe this program can be modified and disseminated to other graduate research and professional health care programs. PMID:24585385

Woods, Kendra V; Peek, Kathryn E; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

2014-12-01

59

SELF-MEDICATION IN MEDICAL STUDENTS  

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Full Text Available Self-medication is consumption of medicinal products for treating diseases without a prescription resulting in wastage of resources, increased drug resistance and causes health hazards. Selfmedication, often without adult guidance, has been reported to be a common practice during adolescence. Similar to other preventable health-risk behaviors initiated in early adolescence, it has become a cause for concern universally. The main problem with self medication with antimicrobials is the emergence of pathogenic resistance. Antimicrobial resistance is an existing problem world-wide, mainly in developing countries. The aim and objective of this study was to evaluate the knowledge regarding self medication among medical students of Uttar Pradesh Rural Institute Of Medical Sciences and Research, Saifai. This was a questionnaire based study of 4 months duration.

Anuj Jain

2014-06-01

60

Students friendly medical examination  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

always a burden. The professional exams of universities are the matter of their norms and regulation, but we have day-to-day assessment through-out duration; this is enough to moralize them and prepare before final professional examination. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 412-412

Rakesh Chandra Chaurasia

2014-04-01

 
 
 
 
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Spanish adaptation of The Penn State College of Medicine Scale to assess professionalism in medical students / Adaptación al idioma español de la escala del Penn State College of Medicine para medición del profesionalismo en estudiantes de medicina  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish Introducción. El profesionalismo es un área de interés en las facultades de medicina del mundo. El uso de un cuestionario puede ser útil para evaluar el profesionalismo en Colombia. Objetivo. Adaptar la escala de profesionalismo para estudiantes de medicina del Penn State University College of Medic [...] ine al idioma español como instrumento válido para evaluarlo. Materiales y métodos. Se siguieron las guías para adaptación de instrumentos del proyecto IQOLA, realizando traducción y traducción inversa, así como una prueba piloto y una evaluación de las características psicométricas en 250 estudiantes. Se evaluó la correlación entre ítems y escala y la validez interna con el alfa de Chronbach y se hizo un análisis factorial de componentes principales. Resultados. El alfa de Cronbach global fue de 0,86, la medida de Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin fue de 0,83 y el test de esfericidad de Bartlett tuvo un valor de p>0,00001. Se encontraron seis factores que explicaron 93 % de la varianza total y cuatro nuevos factores que emergieron del análisis factorial. Ocho ítems tuvieron alta singularidad. Conclusión. La escala del Penn State University College of Medicine mide con buen nivel de confiabilidad las actitudes hacia el profesionalismo en los estudiantes de medicina. No obstante, la estructura de la escala mostró diferencias al ser validada en estudiantes latinoamericanos. Abstract in english Introduction: Professionalism is a subject of interest in medical schools around the world. The use of a questionnaire could be useful to assess professionalism in Colombia. Objective: To adapt The Penn State University College of Medicine Professionalism Questionnaire as a culturally valid instrume [...] nt in the Spanish language. Materials and methods: We followed recommendations from the IQOLA project and used forward and back translation with four independent translations, as well as a pilot evaluation and an evaluation of psychometric features with 250 students. We evaluated item-scale correlations and internal consistency with Chronbach´s alpha test and conducted a principal components factor analysis. Results: Global Cronbach´s alpha was 0.86, the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy was 0.83, and Bartlett´s test of sphericity had a p >0.00001. We found six factors that explained 93% of the total variance and four new factors emerged in the factor analysis, while eight items had high uniqueness. Conclusion: The Penn State University College of Medicine Scale measures professionalism attitudes in medical students with good reliability. However, the structure of the scale demonstrated differences when used in the Latin American medical student population.

Eliseo, Bustamante; Álvaro, Sanabria.

2014-06-01

62

Social media and medical professionalism: rethinking the debate and the way forward.  

Science.gov (United States)

This Perspective addresses the growing literature about online medical professionalism. Whereas some studies point to the positive potential of social media to enhance and extend medical practice, the dominant emphasis is on the risks and abuses of social media. Overall evidence regarding online medical professionalism is (as with any new area of practice) limited; however, simply accumulating more evidence, without critically checking the assumptions that frame the debate, risks reinforcing negativity toward social media. In this Perspective, the author argues that the medical community should step back and reconsider its assumptions regarding both professionalism and the digital world of social media. Toward this aim, she outlines three areas for critical rethinking by educators and students, administrators, professional associations, and researchers. First she raises some cautions regarding the current literature on using social media in medical practice, which sometimes leaps too quickly from description to prescription. Second, she discusses professionalism. Current debates about the changing nature and contexts of professionalism generally might be helpful in reconsidering notions of online medical professionalism specifically. Third, the author argues that the virtual world itself and its built-in codes deserve more critical scrutiny. She briefly summarizes new research from digital studies both to situate the wider trends more critically and to appreciate the evolving implications for medical practice. Next, the author revisits the potential benefits of social media, including their possibilities to signal new forms of professionalism. Finally, the Perspective ends with specific suggestions for further research that may help move the debate forward. PMID:25076200

Fenwick, Tara

2014-10-01

63

The attitudes of medical students to research  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english BACKGROUND: The workforce of 'physician-scientists' is ageing and decreasing in numbers. The responsibility to combat this trend rests on future generations of healthcare professionals and it is therefore valuable to evaluate medical students' attitudes towards research. OBJECTIVE: To establish the [...] attitudes of University of Cape Town (UCT) medical students towards research and to investigate the factors influencing these attitudes. METHODS: An anonymous, cross-sectional, self-administered questionnaire was administered to medical students from years 1 to 6 studying medicine at UCT in 2011. Questions were primarily closed-ended and consisted of Likert scales. RESULTS: Out of a population of 1 195 medical students, 733 were sampled (63%); 65% were female, 53% were preclinical students (years 1 - 3) and 47% were in their clinical years (year 4 - 6). Overall, 61% of students had a positive attitude towards research and 74% felt that participation in research was important to their medical school education; 22% had been involved in voluntarily extracurricular research, 4% had presented at a scientific meeting and 3% had published in peer-reviewed journals. A number of perceived barriers to student research were identified including a lack of adequate training, time and research opportunities. CONCLUSION: Students believed that research was important and had a positive attitude towards it. However, few had been involved in voluntary research and produced work worthy of presentation and/or publication. Addressing identified barriers and improving students' attitudes may begin to reverse the trend in declining numbers of physician-scientists.

D, Nel; R J, Burman; R, Hoffman; S, Randera-Rees.

64

The attitudes of medical students to research  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english BACKGROUND: The workforce of 'physician-scientists' is ageing and decreasing in numbers. The responsibility to combat this trend rests on future generations of healthcare professionals and it is therefore valuable to evaluate medical students' attitudes towards research. OBJECTIVE: To establish the [...] attitudes of University of Cape Town (UCT) medical students towards research and to investigate the factors influencing these attitudes. METHODS: An anonymous, cross-sectional, self-administered questionnaire was administered to medical students from years 1 to 6 studying medicine at UCT in 2011. Questions were primarily closed-ended and consisted of Likert scales. RESULTS: Out of a population of 1 195 medical students, 733 were sampled (63%); 65% were female, 53% were preclinical students (years 1 - 3) and 47% were in their clinical years (year 4 - 6). Overall, 61% of students had a positive attitude towards research and 74% felt that participation in research was important to their medical school education; 22% had been involved in voluntarily extracurricular research, 4% had presented at a scientific meeting and 3% had published in peer-reviewed journals. A number of perceived barriers to student research were identified including a lack of adequate training, time and research opportunities. CONCLUSION: Students believed that research was important and had a positive attitude towards it. However, few had been involved in voluntary research and produced work worthy of presentation and/or publication. Addressing identified barriers and improving students' attitudes may begin to reverse the trend in declining numbers of physician-scientists.

D, Nel; R J, Burman; R, Hoffman; S, Randera-Rees.

2014-01-01

65

Medical Student Health Promotion: The Increasing Role of Medical Schools  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: The author proposes courses of action for medical schools to increase positive health promotion among medical students. Method: This article will review the current literature on medical student health care. Strategies of action for medical schools are proposed for increasing student wellness. Results: Medical schools can positively…

Estabrook, Kristi

2008-01-01

66

Medication Use among University Students  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

AIM: This study has been carried out descriptively to determine the status of medication use among students of Erzincan University which is located in central Erzincan, Turkey. METHODS: The universe of the study comprised 4506 students and the sample involved 885 (19.6% of the universe) students who attended faculties, associate programs, and vocational schools of Erzincan University. Data were collected between April-May 2008 through a questionnaire form that included students’ identif...

Papatya Karakurt; Rabia Hacihasanoglu; Arzu Yildirim; Rabia Saglam

2010-01-01

67

Teaching recovery to medical students.  

LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

Community mental health services are evolving toward more holistic, patient-centered, recovery-based practices. This change necessitates an attitudinal shift from mental health workers, and training in recovery principles is helpful in achieving this change. Medical students often have narrow, doctor-centered concepts of mental health care. Traditional clinical placements in psychiatry do little to address this. We evaluated a recovery-focused teaching program for medical students in psychiatry.

Feeney, Larkin

2013-03-01

68

Die angestrebte oder befürchtete berufliche Zukunft von Wittener Medizinstudierenden [The aimed or feared professional future of medical students at the Univesity of Witten/Herdecke  

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Full Text Available [english] The current challenges of educational policy seem to be associated to changes of the health care system, to counteract concerns regarding the lack of physicians, supply shortage and migration of specialists. Therefore, expectations, wishes and concerns relevant to the anticipated everyday life as a physician of medical students at the Witten/Herdecke University (UWH were acquired with an online questionnaire. Useful for a direct comparison the results of the online survey ‘Medical Study and Future’ throughout Germany have been used. Findings from this survey are common characteristics regarding the choice of the profession and planning of an establishment as a general practitioner and clear differences in reflecting on future issues in the occupational field.[german] Die aktuellen bildungspolitischen Herausforderungen scheinen sich als direkte Reaktion auf Änderungen im Gesundheitssystem zu manifestieren, um den Befürchtungen von Ärztemangel, Versorgungsengpass und Abwanderung von qualifizierten Fachärzten entgegen zu wirken. Deshalb wurden mit einer Online-Befragung die Erwartungen, Wünsche und Befürchtungen von Wittener Medizinstudierenden bzgl. des antizipierten beruflichen Alltags als Ärztin oder Arzt erfasst. Zum direkten Vergleich standen die Ergebnisse einer bundesweiten Online-Umfrage zur Zukunft von Medizinstudierenden zur Verfügung. Dabei zeigen sich Gemeinsamkeiten zwischen den beiden Gruppen bzgl. der angestrebten Fachrichtung und der Planung einer Niederlassung, aber auch deutliche Unterschiede in der Einschätzung zukünftiger beruflicher Problemfelder.

Zupanic, Michaela

2011-05-01

69

Medical Informatics For Medical Students And Medical Practitioners  

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Full Text Available The importance of incorporating medical (or healthinformatics into the education of medical students andmedical practitioners is being increasingly recognised.The advances in information and communicationtechnology and the pervasion of the Internet intoeveryday life have important implications forhealthcare services and medical education.Students and practitioners should learn to utilisebiomedical information for problem solving anddecision making based on evidence. The extensiveintroduction of electronic health information systemsinto hospitals and clinics and at the enterprise level inMalaysia and elsewhere is driving a demand for healthprofessionals who have at least basic skills in andappreciation of the use of these technologies.The essential clinical informatics skills have beenidentified and should be incorporated into theundergraduate medical curriculum. It is recommendedthat these be introduced in stages and integrated intoexisting programmes rather than taught as a separatemodule. At the same time, medical schools shouldsupport the integration of e-learning in the educationalprocess in view of the numerous potential benefits.

Jai MOHAN

2010-06-01

70

Accounting Students’ Perception on Pursuing Professional Examination  

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Full Text Available  Prior studies indicate that people’s perception have an important influence on their career decisions. This study explores the accounting students’ perceptions on professional examination and the factors that influence their decisions to take the exam. Questionnaires were distributed to final year accounting students of a public university in Malaysia. About 103 questionnaires were completed and usable for the purpose of the study. Regression analysis was employed to analyse the data. The results indicate that about 70% of the respondents plan to work immediately after graduating, and only about 28% of the respondents really have the intention to pursue professional qualification. Among others, the findings reveal that the job security and stability, and opportunities for advancement as well as the students’ perception towards the profession are the three main variables found to be significant in influencing the accounting students’ decision to pursue professional examination. The results of the study appear to suggest that the educators and universities must play their role to positively influence and motivate the students to pursue professional examination. The favourable information about the profession may attract the potential students to take the challenge.

Mohammad Hasmawi Abu Hassan

2012-10-01

71

Facilitating the development of professional identity through peer assisted learning in medical education.  

Science.gov (United States)

Peer assisted learning (PAL) is well documented in the medical education literature. In this paper, the authors explored the role of PAL in a graduate entry medical program with respect to the development of professional identity. The paper draws on several publications of PAL from one medical school, but here uses the theoretical notion of legitimate peripheral participation in a medical school community of practice to shed light on learning through participation. As medical educators, the authors were particularly interested in the development of educational expertise in medical students, and the social constructs that facilitate this academic development. PMID:25378965

Burgess, Annette; Nestel, Debra

2014-01-01

72

Medication Use among University Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available AIM: This study has been carried out descriptively to determine the status of medication use among students of Erzincan University which is located in central Erzincan, Turkey. METHODS: The universe of the study comprised 4506 students and the sample involved 885 (19.6% of the universe students who attended faculties, associate programs, and vocational schools of Erzincan University. Data were collected between April-May 2008 through a questionnaire form that included students’ identifying characteristics and their status of medication use. For statistical analyses, percentage and chi-square test were used. RESULTS: It was found that 39.3% of participants were 2nd grade students, 59.8% were between 20-22 years, and 34.7% were attending the Faculty of Education. It was established that 64.6% of students used medication for headache and/or cold-influenza, 83.6% read the respective package insert before using a drug, 47.9% discontinued medicaten after cessation of complaints, 50.5% used a medication within the last couple of months and that 23.2% of them took these medications without prescription. It was also found that 70.3% of participants had used a medication without prescription whenever they had a headache; 61.5% of non-prescription medication used were analgesics; and 64.1% used a non-prescription drug due to prior use of the same drug. A significant difference was established between the gender of the students and their medication use within the last couple of months. It was also found that there is a statistically significant difference between students’ gender and the faculty they attend and rates of package insert reading. CONCLUSION: As a conclusion, it was determined that more than half of the students used a medication within the last one month and 23.2% of these medications were bought without prescription. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 505-512

Papatya Karakurt

2010-10-01

73

Peer Assessment among First Year Medical Students in Anatomy  

Science.gov (United States)

Peer assessment has been shown to be an effective tool to promote professionalism in medical students. Peer assessment may be particularly useful in anatomy dissection laboratory as the required close collaboration and long hours of anatomy laboratory provide students insights into their peers' work habits and interpersonal skills. The…

Spandorfer, John; Puklus, Tanya; Rose, Victoria; Vahedi, Mithaq; Collins, Lauren; Giordano, Carolyn; Schmidt, Richard; Braster, Chris

2014-01-01

74

Professional Portfolios for Student Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes how portfolios enrich teaching and learning for elementary credential students at one California university, explaining the context for teaching portfolios, functions of the teaching portfolios, the process of constructing portfolios, how the university uses portfolios, and future directions for the program's portfolio use. (SM)

Guillaume, Andrea M.; Yopp, Hallie Kay

1995-01-01

75

Student and resident perspectives on professionalism: beliefs, challenges, and suggested teaching strategies  

Science.gov (United States)

Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the views of medical students and residents regarding the practice of professionalism, their perceived challenges, and ideas for the development of a new curriculum in medical professionalism. Methods Data were collected from four focus groups comprised of 27 residents and medical students recruited from the University of South Florida Morsani School of Medicine and Residency Programs between January and March 2012. A questioning protocol was used to guide the focus group discussion. Data were transcribed for thematic analysis. Results Learners expressed beliefs regarding key attributes of professional behaviors, factors perceived to be associated with lapses of professional behavior, skills that need to be taught, and strategies to teach professionalism from the learners’ perspective. Learners perceived that the values of professionalism are often disconnected from the reality evidenced in clinical training due to a myriad of personal and contextual challenges. Conclusions Residents and students need help in negotiating some of the challenges to medical professionalism that are encountered in clinical settings. We recommend a learner’s centered model of curriculum development in medical professionalism that takes into consideration perceived challenges and strategies for modeling and reinforcing medical professionalism.

Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A.; Shaffer-Hudkins, Emily J.; Bradley-Klug, Kathy L.

2014-01-01

76

Specialty Preference Among Medical Students and Factors Affecting It  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: Medical education is one of the core part of educational system of any country. Medical education requires undergraduate students to study a wide range of medical specialties. It is often assumed that students do not make their career preferences until after they have graduated from medical school. So the reasons and factors responsible for preferences need to be found out among medical students. Material and Methods: It was a Cross sectional study on 180 medical students to assess preference for specialty and factors responsible. Results: Out of total 190 medical students more or less everyone (97.89% wanted to pursue specialization and majority of them (96.84% wanted to pursue the same in Medical Field(p>0.05. majority of male students were interested to pursue their specialization in the field of medicine (37.63%, surgery (23.65% and pediatrics (13.97%. On the other hand female students were more interested in medicine (24.17%, pediatrics (32.96% and obstetrics & gynecology (24.17%(p<0.05. Interest, by far was found to be most common factor (76.63% responsible for the preference of particular medical specialty among all four groups of students (1st professional-25.27%, 2nd professional-75.92%, final professional-89.47%, interns-68.42%.Conclusion: It is thus concluded there are many factors playing role in the specialty selection and preference among the medical students and should be equally justified and addressed.

Neeraj Gour

2011-07-01

77

Evaluating professionalism in medical undergraduates using selected response questions: findings from an item response modelling study  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Professionalism is a difficult construct to define in medical students but aspects of this concept may be important in predicting the risk of postgraduate misconduct. For this reason attempts are being made to evaluate medical students' professionalism. This study investigated the psychometric properties of Selected Response Questions (SRQs relating to the theme of professional conduct and ethics comparing them with two sets of control items: those testing pure knowledge of anatomy, and; items evaluating the ability to integrate and apply knowledge ("skills". The performance of students on the SRQs was also compared with two external measures estimating aspects of professionalism in students; peer ratings of professionalism and their Conscientiousness Index, an objective measure of behaviours at medical school. Methods Item Response Theory (IRT was used to analyse both question and student performance for SRQs relating to knowledge of professionalism, pure anatomy and skills. The relative difficulties, discrimination and 'guessabilities' of each theme of question were compared with each other using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Student performance on each topic was compared with the measures of conscientiousness and professionalism using parametric and non-parametric tests as appropriate. A post-hoc analysis of power for the IRT modelling was conducted using a Monte Carlo simulation. Results Professionalism items were less difficult compared to the anatomy and skills SRQs, poorer at discriminating between candidates and more erratically answered when compared to anatomy questions. Moreover professionalism item performance was uncorrelated with the standardised Conscientiousness Index scores (rho = 0.009, p = 0.90. In contrast there were modest but significant correlations between standardised Conscientiousness Index scores and performance at anatomy items (rho = 0.20, p = 0.006 though not skills (rho = .11, p = .1. Likewise, students with high peer ratings for professionalism had superior performance on anatomy SRQs but not professionalism themed questions. A trend of borderline significance (p = .07 was observed for performance on skills SRQs and professionalism nomination status. Conclusions SRQs related to professionalism are likely to have relatively poor psychometric properties and lack associations with other constructs associated with undergraduate professional behaviour. The findings suggest that such questions should not be included in undergraduate examinations and may raise issues with the introduction of Situational Judgement Tests into Foundation Years selection.

McLachlan John C

2011-06-01

78

[Good death: euthanasia in the eyes of medical students].  

Science.gov (United States)

Both in the general public and in the professional communities, very diverse notions of euthanasia can be found. At the same time determining of the precise semantics of euthanasia is one of the crucial prerequisites for subsequent meaningful ethical discussion of euthanasia. The paper analyzes an empirical study investigating the understanding of euthanasia by medical students. The aim of the conducted research was to identify the semantic definitions of euthanasia used by the first-year medical students. PMID:24968293

Ku?e, Josef; Va?harová, Michaela

2014-01-01

79

What Student Affairs Professionals Need to Know about Student Engagement  

Science.gov (United States)

In this paper, the author summarizes the role and contributions of the scholarship and institutional research about student engagement and its relevance for student development professionals and others committed to enhancing the quality of the undergraduate experience. The presentation is organized into four major sections. First, the author…

Kuh, George D.

2009-01-01

80

The education and training of professionals. The perspective of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics (SEFM)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The aim of this paper is twofold. First, to revise some European Communities' recommendations regarding qualification, education and training of professionals involved in ionisation radiation practices, to respond to the Directive 97/43 EURATOM. And then, as Medical Physicists are directly concerned with these practices, to describe how the Spanish Society of Medical Physics deals with the challenge of improving the competence of Medical Physicists in order to assure the best patient protection against ionisation radiation. Therefore, to achieve the first aim, the point of view of the European Federation of Organisations on Medical Physics (EFOMP) concerning the introduction of the 'Medical Physics Expert' and their guidelines for Continuous Professional Development are reviewed, as well as the point of view of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO) in professional education matters. Referring to the second aim, after succeeding in the recognition of the Medical Physics Speciality in Spain in 1997, the SEFM is now promoting the Continuous Education and Training of their specialists through its Education Committee (Comision de Docencia de la SEFM), so that they can cope with all new professional challenges. Moreover, a number of SEFM members are also involved in education matters to others professionals: Medicine students, nurses, Radiation Technologists, etc. In conclusion, the SEFM has always been aware of the importance of specialisation and conf the importance of specialisation and continuous education of all professionals involved in radiation ionisation practices, as a way to contribute to guarantee the best radiation protection to the patients. (author)

 
 
 
 
81

Advancing Student Achievement Through Professional Development  

Science.gov (United States)

Kindergarten through twelfth grade teacher competence, in both subject matter and pedagogy, is critical for advancing student achievement in science. The National Science Foundation (NSF 1996), however, has found that only about two-thirds of first- through eighth-grade teachers completed at least one college course in science and fewer than 30 percent said they feel well qualified to teach science. Additionally, Lowery (1998) points out that many educators see no need to change from a show-and-tell type of instruction to methods that help students understand science by constructing meaning for themselves through exploration and using prior knowledge. To help teachers raise student achievement levels, Schmoker (2002) proposes that schools design professional development that, by focusing on assessed standards and reviewing student achievement data, directly impacts student learning.

Holloway, John H.

2006-01-01

82

Medical Students' Attitudes toward Cancer.  

Science.gov (United States)

A study to determine whether attitudes of medical students toward cancer patients are as negative as their attitudes toward the chronically ill found significant difference between attitudes toward cancer patients and patients in general. Support was also found for the existence of negative attitudes in the treatment of cancer patients.…

Cooper, Sloan; And Others

1980-01-01

83

Self?medication patterns among medical students in South India  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available BackgroundSelf-medication results in wastage of resources, increases resistance of pathogens and generally causes serious health hazards such as adverse drug reactions, prolonged suffering and drug dependence. This study was undertaken to determine the reasons for self-medication and the pattern of self-medication among medical students.MethodThis cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at the K.S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore. The participants were medical students from first to final year. Medical students were selected through convenience sampling. The data was collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire. The data was analysed using SPSS version 16 and the results expressed as proportions.ResultsA total of 200 students, 121 (60.5% female and 79 (39.5% male, were included in the study. Of the medical students surveyed, self-medication was reported among 92%. The respondents who used self-medication found it to be time-saving in providing relief from minor ailments. The most common ailments for which self-medication were used were: the common cold (69%, fever (63% and headache (60%. The students consulted their textbooks (39% and seniors or classmates (38% for the medications. Antipyretics (71%, analgesics (65%, antihistamines (37% and antibiotics (34% were the most common self-medicated drugs. Of the respondents, 33% were unaware of the adverse effects of the medication and 5% had experienced adverse reactions. The majority (64% of students advised medications to others, more often to family and friends.ConclusionThe prevalence of self-medication among medical students is high, facilitated by the easy availability of drugs and information from textbooks or seniors. A significant number of students are unaware of the adverse effects of the medication that they themselves take and suggest to others. Therefore, potential problems of self-medication should be emphasised to the students.

Nitasha Bhat

2012-04-01

84

Doctors in society. Medical professionalism in a changing world.  

Science.gov (United States)

Medicine bridges the gap between science and society. Indeed, the application of scientific knowledge to human health is a crucial aspect of clinical practice. Doctors are one important agent through which that scientific understanding is expressed. But medicine is more than the sum of our knowledge about disease. Medicine concerns the experiences, feelings, and interpretations of human beings in often extraordinary moments of fear, anxiety, and doubt. In this extremely vulnerable position, it is medical professionalism that underpins the trust the public has in doctors. This Working Party was established to define the nature and role of medical professionalism in modern society. Britain's health system is undergoing enormous change. The entry of multiple health providers, the wish for more equal engagement between patients and professionals, and the ever-greater contribution of science to advances in clinical practice all demand a clear statement of medicine's unifying purpose and doctors' common values. What is medical professionalism and does it matter to patients? Although evidence is lacking that more robust professionalism will inevitably lead to better health outcomes, patients certainly understand the meaning of poor professionalism and associate it with poor medical care. The public is well aware that an absence of professionalism is harmful to their interests. The Working Party's view, based on the evidence it has received, is that medical professionalism lies at the heart of being a good doctor. The values that doctors embrace set a standard for what patients expect from their medical practitioners. The practice of medicine is distinguished by the need for judgement in the face of uncertainty. Doctors take responsibility for these judgements and their consequences. A doctor's up-to-date knowledge and skill provide the explicit scientific and often tacit experiential basis for such judgements. But because so much of medicine's unpredictability calls for wisdom as well as technical ability, doctors are vulnerable to the charge that their decisions are neither transparent nor accountable. In an age where deference is dead and league tables are the norm, doctors must be clearer about what they do, and how and why they do it. We define medical professionalism as a set of values, behaviours, and relationships that underpin the trust the public has in doctors. We go on to describe what those values, behaviours, and relationships are, how they are changing, and why they matter. This is the core of our work. We have also identified six themes where our definition has further implications: leadership, teams, education, appraisal, careers, and research. The Working Party's definition and description of medical professionalism, and the recommendations arising from them, can be found in Section 5 of this report. If our recommendations are acted upon, we believe that professionalism could flourish and prosper to the benefit of patients and doctors alike. However, the exercise of medical professionalism is hampered by the political and cultural environment of health, which many doctors consider disabling. The conditions of medical practice are critical determinants for the future of professionalism. We argue that doctors have a responsibility to act according to the values we set out in this report. Equally, other members of the healthcare team--notably managers--have a reciprocal duty to help create an organisational infrastructure to support doctors in the exercise of their professional responsibilities. Just as the patient-doctor partnership is a pivotal therapeutic relationship in medicine, so the interaction between doctor and manager is central to the delivery of professional care. High-quality care depends on both effective health teams and efficient health organisations. Professionalism therefore implies multiple commitments--to the patient, to fellow professionals, and to the institution or system within which healthcare is provided, to the extent that the system supports patients collectively. A doctor's corporate

2005-01-01

85

[The medical technologist as a key professional in medical care in the 21st century].  

Science.gov (United States)

The dynamic healthcare environment of Japan, including the rapidly aging population and the requirement of highly sophisticated and diverse medical care, induces strict financial conditions and increases the number of those seeking medical care. Therefore, medical professionals are now required to provide safe and effective medical care with limited medical resources. Recently, Japanese medical institutions have introduced the total quality management system, which was developed for better business management, to promote safe and effective management. However, there are two major drawbacks with the introduction of this system in the sector of medical care in Japan. First, the standardization of medical skills of medical professionals is greatly affected due to the presence of different education systems for the same medical profession except for medical doctors and pharmacologists. The education system for major medical professionals, such as nurses and medical and radiological technologists, must be standardized based on the university norms. Second, the knowledge-creating process among the medical professionals has been associated with many problems. The specialized fields are quite different among medical professionals. Therefore, common specialized fields must be established among major medical professions based on the specialization of medical doctors to promote their communication and better understanding. Considering the roles of medical professionals in medical care, medical doctors and nurses are the most responsible for monitoring, assessing, and guaranteeing the safety of medical care, and medical and radiological technologists are the most responsible for effective medical care. The current medical technologists are not only required to carry out clinical laboratory tests, but also be proactive and positive as well as have marked problem-solving abilities. They are expected to improve the diagnostic test systems in medical institutes for medical doctors and patients, resulting in the highest level of management efficiency. For the development of such medical technologists, university education, specialist capabilities in medical technology and clinical laboratory diagnostics, and a research capability are essential. Thus, it is crucial for clinical laboratory physicians and the Japanese medical care system of the 21st century to urgently develop such an education system. PMID:19068789

Iwatani, Yoshinori

2008-10-01

86

Facilitating the development of professional identity through peer assisted learning in medical education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Annette Burgess,1 Debra Nestel2 1Sydney Medical School – Central, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2School of Rural Health/HealthPEER, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing, and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Peer assisted learning (PAL is well documented in the medical education literature. In this paper, the authors explored the role of PAL in a graduate entry medical program with respect to the development of professional identity. The paper draws on several publications of PAL from one medical school, but here uses the theoretical notion of legitimate peripheral participation in a medical school community of practice to shed light on learning through participation. As medical educators, the authors were particularly interested in the development of educational expertise in medical students, and the social constructs that facilitate this academic development. Keywords: medical school, community of practice, peer assisted learning, development, educational expertise

Burgess A

2014-10-01

87

Keeping Dissection Alive for Medical Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes an experiential course with the goal of immersing medical students in a cadaver dissection course abroad. The course was developed because of a reduction in cadaver opportunities and a desire by medical students to gain dissection skills.

2009-11-01

88

The impact of social media and technology on professionalism in medical education.  

Science.gov (United States)

The use of social media is the norm among the digital native generation, with 75% of the Millennial Generation connected through Facebook. For students in medical education who struggle to distinguish between personal and professional boundaries, social media provides yet another challenge. Incidents of unprofessional conduct and academic dismissal have been reported. Administration, faculty, and students would benefit from clear policies and procedures, case scenarios of social media violations, and suggestions for using social media wisely. PMID:22308935

Essary, Alison C

2011-01-01

89

Self-medication in health students from two Brazilian universities  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: Self medication is a component of self care and it is considered as primary public health resource in health care system. It can be defined as use of non-prescription medicines by people on their own initiative. Dentists, together with doctors and veterinarians, comprise the professional classes that may and must prescribe medications for their patients. On the other hand, the nursing professionals are the ones who more administer drugs to patients in the ambulatory and hospital. Objective: This study was aimed to find out the frequency of self medication in selected university students, to find out the difference in the proportions of self medication between dentistry and nursing students, as well to evaluate the students’ knowledge of harmful effects of self medication and common problems of students that use the self medication. Material and methods: We were applied 209 questionnaires among dentistry students from the 3rd to 8th semesters at the Paulista University/Goiânia and 542 among nursing students from the 3rd to 8th semesters at the Estacio de Sa University of Goiás. Results and conclusion: In the present study was observed a high rate of self-medication among undergraduate students in the health area,particularly among the dentistry and nurse students. The result was alarming because the professional him/herself who should educate patients and dissuade them from this practice is a habitual user; it makes it more difficult to aspire to the future inhibition and reduction of this practice that is so harmful to health.

Delprina de G. Rocha de Carvalho

2012-12-01

90

14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

...false Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities...113 Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities...specimen test result. (c) Substance Abuse Professional (SAP)....

2010-01-01

91

Great expectations: teaching ethics to medical students in South Africa.  

Science.gov (United States)

Many academic philosophers and ethicists are appointed to teach ethics to medical students. We explore exactly what this task entails. In South Africa the Health Professions Council's curriculum for training medical practitioners requires not only that students be taught to apply ethical theory to issues and be made aware of the legal and regulatory requirements of their profession, it also expects moral formation and the inculcation of professional virtue in students. We explore whether such expectations are reasonable. We defend the claim that physicians ought to be persons of virtuous character, on the grounds of the social contract between society and the profession. We further argue that since the expectations of virtue of health care professionals are reasonable, it is also sound reasoning to expect ethics teachers to try to inculcate such virtues in their students, so far as this is possible. Furthermore, this requires of such teachers that they be suitable role models of ethical practice and virtue, themselves. We claim that this applies to ethics teachers who are themselves not members of the medical profession, too, even though they are not bound by the same social contract as doctors. We conclude that those who accept employment as teachers of ethics to medical students, where as part of their contractual obligation they are expected to inculcate moral values in their students, ought to be prepared to accept their responsibility to be professionally ethical, themselves. PMID:23409954

Behrens, Kevin Gary; Fellingham, Robyn

2014-12-01

92

Professional reading and the Medical Radiation Science Practitioner  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Purpose: Updating professional knowledge is a central tenet of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and professional reading is a common method health practitioners use to update their professional knowledge. This paper reports the level of professional reading by Medical Radiation Science (MRS) practitioners in Australia and examines organisational support for professional reading. Materials and Methods: Survey design was used to collect data from MRS practitioners. A questionnaire was sent to 1142 Australian practitioners, which allowed self-report data to be collected on the length of time practitioners engage in professional reading and the time workplaces allocate to practitioners for professional reading. Results: Of the 362 MRS practitioners who returned the survey, 93.9% engaged in professional reading on a weekly basis. In contrast, only 28.9% of respondents reported that their workplace allocates time for professional reading to practitioners. MRS practitioners employed in universities engaged in higher levels of reading than their colleagues employed in clinical workplaces (p < 0.01) and more university workplaces allocated time for professional reading to their employees than clinical workplaces (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences for clinical practitioners in level of reading across geographic, organisational and professional demographic factors. Significant differences in workplace allocation of time for professional reading in clinical workplaces were evident for health sector (p < 0.01); work environment (p < 0.01); geographic location (p < 0.01) and area of specialisation (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The vast majority of respondent MRS practitioners engage in professional reading to update their professional knowledge. This demonstrates an ongoing commitment at the individual practitioner level for updating professional knowledge. Updating professional knowledge is an organisational as well as an individual practitioner issue. Whilst the majority of organisations do not currently support MRS practitioners with time allocation for professional reading, there were organisations currently providing this form of support to their employees. Wider adoption of protected time for professional reading would provide much needed organisational support to practitioners and reduce the identified inequity that currently exists across the MRS profession.

Shanahan, Madeleine, E-mail: mshanahan@rmit.edu.a [School of Medical Science, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); Herrington, Anthony [Head, School of Regional, Remote and eLearning (RRE), Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Herrington, Jan [School of Education, Murdoch University, Perth (Australia)

2010-11-15

93

Assessing and appraising nursing students' professional communication  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this research was to define professional communication in nursing and to develop a prototype to assess and appraise communication at a selected college. The research focused on verbal and nonverbal communication between the nurse and the client using a simulated environment. The first objective was to identify the major characteristics of professional communication in nursing. In this study, the characteristics of professional communication emerged from the constant comparison method of the results of research studies in the fields of healthcare and communication. These characteristics became the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions to assess and appraise verbal and nonverbal communication at the college of study. The second objective was to develop a template to assess verbal and nonverbal communication at a selected college. Using a two-fold process, the researcher used the results from the first objective to begin template construction. First, specialists in the fields of communication and nursing established the content validity of the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions. Second, the course educators determined the relevancy and importance of the elements, properties, and descriptive dimensions to the objectives of two courses at the college of study. The third objective was to develop a rubric to appraise nursing students' verbal and nonverbal communication in a videotaped communication review. An appraisal rubric was constructed from an extension of the template. This rubric was then tested by faculty at the selected college to appraise the communication of five students each in the junior and senior years of the nursing program.

Diers, Jane E.

94

Homophobia in Medical Students of the University of Hong Kong  

Science.gov (United States)

Homosexuality is now accepted as a normal variant of human sexuality, but homophobia among healthcare professionals is well documented. Establishment of trustful doctor-patient relationships is impossible in the presence of homophobia. We were interested to examine the extent of homophobia among medical students, the future doctors. This article…

Kan, R. W. M.; Au, K. P.; Chan, W. K.; Cheung, L. W. M.; Lam, C. Y. Y.; Liu, H. H. W.; Ng, L. Y.; Wong, M. Y.; Wong, W. C.

2009-01-01

95

Are medical school students ready for e-readers?  

Science.gov (United States)

College textbook publishers are planning to make college and professional education textbooks available online to be downloaded to personal communication devices (e.g., smartphones), digital audio players (e.g., iPods), and digital readers (e.g., Kindles). The current literature on the attitudes of current students to this technological change, especially as it relates to medical school students is reviewed. A short survey attempted to determine how ready the first-year medical students at the University of Louisville are to accept this change in their study habits. PMID:23394419

Atlas, Michel C

2013-01-01

96

A Study of Stress among Students of Professional Colleges from an Urban area in India  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Objectives: Various studies across the globe have emphasised that students undertaking professional courses, such as medical and dental studies, are subjected to higher stress. Excessive stress could lead to psychological problems like depression and anxiety. The objective of the current study was to assess stress among students of various professional colleges and its association with various academic, social and health-related factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from ...

Waghachavare, Vivek B.; Dhumale, Girish B.; Kadam, Yugantara R.; Gore, Alka D.

2013-01-01

97

Prevalence of Burnout in Senior Medical Students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2008  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Burnout is caused by high-stress jobs and could induce somatic, psychological disorders and negative attitude to professional actives so that this condition causes poor relationship with the patient. This study aimed at investigating burnout in senior medical students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences.Methods: This research was a cross sectional study carried out on all senior medical students (N=56 in 2008. Data were obtained by two questionnaires including demographic questionnaire and Maslach burnout Inventory. They were then analyzed using SPSS software and Chi square Test. Results: The findings showed that the majority of medical students (91.1% had burnout and only 8.9% of them had not burnout. Severe burnout was in 16% of students. There was not any significant relationship between burnout and sex, age, smoking, duration of education, interest in medical course and marital status P<0.05.Conclusion: The results of the study showed that burnout is common problem in senior medical students and need special consideration. Therefore medical students should be encouraged to seek help and adequate facilities by holding workshops of life-skill training and coping with stress. However, burnout should be paid special attention in medical students by counseling centers of University for prevention of consequences.

Ahmadvand A.

2010-09-01

98

Prevalence of Burnout in Senior Medical Students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2008  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available

Background and Objectives: Burnout is caused by high-stress jobs and could induce somatic, psychological disorders and negative attitude to professional actives so that this condition causes poor relationship with  the patient. This study aimed at investigating burnout in senior medical students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This research was a cross sectional study carried out on all senior medical students (N=56 in 2008. Data were obtained by two questionnaires including demographic questionnaire and Maslach burnout Inventory. They were then analyzed using SPSS software and Chi square Test. Results: The findings showed that the majority of medical students (91.1% had burnout and only 8.9% of them had not burnout. Severe burnout was in 16% of students. There was not any significant relationship between burnout and sex, age, smoking, duration of education, interest in medical course and marital status P<0.05. Conclusion: The results of the study showed that burnout is common problem in senior medical students and need special consideration. Therefore medical students  should be encouraged to seek help and adequate facilities by holding workshops of life-skill training and coping with stress. However, burnout should be paid special attention in medical students by counseling centers of University for prevention of consequences.

 

G Akkasheh

2012-05-01

99

"Spanish for Medical Professionals" an interactive videodisc program.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

"Spanish for Medical Professionals" is an application authored using the IBM InfoWindow Presentation System (IWPS). It consists of a double-sided videodisc featuring four doctor/patient dialogues interrupted by comprehension quizzes, plus a large visual and audio data base for drill and practice of Spanish words and phrases in the following classifications: Medical History, Review of Systems, Anatomy Vocabulary, General Vocabulary and Pronunciation Guide. These five broad headings yield easy ...

Shmarak, A. D.

1991-01-01

100

[Experiences of medical professional liability insurers with medical malpractice].  

Science.gov (United States)

A doctor's third-party liability is one of the highest risk classes. This is not due to increasing claims expenditure only, but in particular to the issue of long-tail claims. This class imposes high demands on a third party liability insurer (underwriter), who must not only be well-versed in pricing and underwriting and highly competent in settling claims in both a professional and socially responsible manner, but has a duty to exhaust all possibilities of risk management. PMID:19213447

Weidinger, Patrick

2008-01-01

 
 
 
 
101

Exposure of Medical Students to Pharmaceutical Marketing in Primary Care Settings: Frequent and Influential  

Science.gov (United States)

It is known that interaction between pharmaceutical companies and medical professionals may lead to corruption of professional values, irrational use of medicine, and negative effects on the patient-physician relationship. Medical students frequently interact with pharmaceutical company representatives and increasingly accept their gifts.…

Sarikaya, Ozlem; Civaner, Murat; Vatansever, Kevser

2009-01-01

102

Selecting the right medical student.  

Science.gov (United States)

Medical student selection is an important but difficult task. Three recent papers by McManus et al. in BMC Medicine have re-examined the role of tests of attainment of learning (A' levels, GCSEs, SQA) and of aptitude (AH5, UKCAT), but on a much larger scale than previously attempted. They conclude that A' levels are still the best predictor of future success at medical school and beyond. However, A' levels account for only 65% of the variance in performance that is found. Therefore, more work is needed to establish relevant assessment of the other 35%. Please see related research articles http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/242, http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/243 and http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/244. PMID:24229397

Leinster, Sam

2013-01-01

103

[Professional and ethical medical expert quality].  

Science.gov (United States)

The work of court experts, including those of medical profession, is ruled by Regulations on standing court experts. The Regulations determine requirements for performing the job of court expertise, rights and duties of court experts, awards and remuneration for their work. The ethical codex determines relation of experts to performance of expertise, to court and parties, to colleagues court experts and to the community. The expert must obey the rules on performance of the expertise, complete all his duties, protect respectability of all court experts, and justify trust of legal authorities. In relationship with the court, the expert must respond to court summons, give his finding and opinion, and come to hearing summons. PMID:19146190

Ivekovi?, Renata

2008-01-01

104

Preparing Students to Write a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper describes a process for guiding students through the writing of a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper and a one-page philosophy statement suitable for use in students' professional portfolios. The authors describe how the review of recreation education literature, scholarship on teaching and learning, and assessment of student

Stevens, Cheryl; Schneider, Paige P.; Johnson, Corey W.

2012-01-01

105

Promoting medical student research productivity: the student perspective.  

Science.gov (United States)

One-third of medical students complete medical school without significant exposure to research. This gap in their medical education is significant: research not only exposes medical students to scientific methodology and academic writing, but also encourages them to multi-task, communicate, and critically analyze the scientific literature - valuable skills that will serve them well in their future medical careers. We report herein the proceedings from a student-led symposium that aimed to promote student involvement in research at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University by providing practical information on how to successfully complete a research project. PMID:24905376

Young, Benjamin K; Cai, Fei; Tandon, Vickram J; George, Paul; Greenberg, Paul B

2014-06-01

106

Does personality predict medical students' attitudes to learning communication skills?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objectives: To determine whether personality is related to medical students' attitudes towards learning communication skills and self-ratings on communication skills. Methods: 524 first- and 507 second-year medical students completed the Communications Skills Attitudes Scale and rated their own communication skills. First-year students answered the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and second-year students the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses, controlling for gender, were conducted to study the impact of personality on attitudes. Analysis of variance followed by post hoc Duncan test was used to compare differences in personality traits depending on students' self-ratings on communication skills. Results: After controlling for gender, personality traits predicted differences in attitudes and were significantly related to medical students' self-ratings. Medical students with higher scores on psychoticism or aggression-hostility showed worse attitudes. Students who tended to have a better self-image scored higher on extraversion, psychoticism, impulsive-sensation seeking, or aggression-hostility traits. Conclusions: Findings support the consideration of personality traits for better student career guidance and counselling. Some students could have more difficulties to internalize certain healthcare professional competencies and show more resistance to attitude change.

Beatriz Molinuevo

2013-08-01

107

Medical Students Can Help Avoid the Expert Bias in Medicine  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Applying the principles of Evidence Based Health Care (EBHC in an academic environment we became aware of important differences between medical students and the users of clinical research. The latter may be clinicians, educators, guideline developers, or industry managers. These users are adapted to the system and have some kind of conflict of interest: they are either biased by patients’ demands, by main stream thinking, by medical standards and/or by economic interests. All are under time pressure, want to avoid conflicts with their employer and the analysis of scientific reports may not really be their main focus. Medical students were not exposed to these confounders. Methods: Medical students under professional supervision completed critical assessments of more than 100 published studies. Their analyses were limited to identification of mistakes, bias and errors using a check list of potential weaknesses in design and conduct but included the feedback to the academic supervisors. Results: Medical students trained in Evidence Based Medicine are capable of identifying problems in clinical trials by the systematic application of an assessment checklist. Conclusion: In our approach we demonstrate that students can assist health care professionals and academic teachers with the assessment of clinical evidence. The premise of the approach is that the final appraisals, which involve consideration of clinical, practical and value issues, necessarily reside with the academic teachers, writers of guidelines or industry managers who constitute the active users of research.

Franz Porzsolt

2012-10-01

108

Medical negligence: Criminal prosecution of medical professionals, importance of medical evidence: Some guidelines for medical practitioners.  

Science.gov (United States)

The changing doctor-patient relationship and commercialization of modern medical practice has affected the practice of medicine. On the one hand, there can be unfavorable results of treatment and on the other hand the patient suspects negligence as a cause of their suffering. There is an increasing trend of medical litigation by unsatisfied patients. The Supreme Court has laid down guidelines for the criminal prosecution of a doctor. This has decreased the unnecessary harassment of doctors. As the medical profession has been brought under the provisions of the Consumer Protection Act, 1986, the patients have an easy method of litigation. There should be legal awareness among the doctors that will help them in the proper recording of medical management details. This will help them in defending their case during any allegation of medical negligence. PMID:19881135

Pandit, M S; Pandit, Shobha

2009-07-01

109

Enhancing entrepreneurship and professionalism in medical informatics instruction: a collaborative training model.  

Science.gov (United States)

This report describes an innovative training program designed to foster entrepreneurship and professionalism in students interested in the field of medical informatics. The course was developed through a private-public interinstitutional collaboration involving four academic institutions, one private firm specializing in health care information management systems, and a philanthropic organization. The program challenged students to serve in multiple roles on multidisciplinary teams and develop an innovative hand-held solution for drug information retrieval. Although the course was technically and behaviorally rigorous and required extensive hands-on experience in a nontraditional learning environment, both students and faculty responded positively. PMID:15064292

Carroll, Cathryn A; Rychlewski, Walt; Teat, Marty; Clawson, Darrin

2004-01-01

110

STUDENTS’ OPPINION ABOUT PROFESSIONAL ETHICS RELATION OF THE TEACHERS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Professional teacher’s ethics is a collection of moral codes of their professional work. It is significant that the teaching profession respects certain designated professional-ethical codes of conduct between the teachers and the students, with their colleagues and other people they professionally cooperate with.     This study is focused on analysis of the professional ethical relation of teachers towards students, seen from student’s point of view. These are the results of student’s reported opinion of the eighth graders from six primary schools in the region of the city of Skopje. The obtained results show that teachers mainly keep in line with the moral codes of conduct with the students, but not always all teachers respect them.

Vera Stojanovska

2013-12-01

111

National Library of Medicine Web Resources for Student Health Professionals  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Familiarize students affiliated with the Student National Medical Association with the National Library of Medicine's online resources that address medical conditions, health disparities, and public health preparedness needs.

Womble, R.

2010-04-02

112

Medical student fitness to practise committees at UK medical schools  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background The aim was to explore the structures for managing student fitness to practise hearings in medical schools in the UK. We surveyed by email the named fitness to practise leads of all full members of the UK Medical Schools Council with a medical undergraduate programme. We asked whether student fitness to practise cases were considered by a committee/panel dedicated to medicine, or by one which also considered other undergraduate health and social care stude...

2009-01-01

113

The teaching of medical ethics to medical students.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Teaching medical ethics to medical students in a pluralistic society is a challenging task. Teachers of ethics have obligations not just to teach the subject matter but to help create an academic environment in which well motivated students have reinforcement of their inherent good qualities. Emphasis should be placed on the ethical aspects of daily medical practice and not just on the dramatic dilemmas raised by modern technology. Interdisciplinary teaching should be encouraged and teaching ...

Glick, S. M.

1994-01-01

114

Emigration preferences and plans among medical students in Poland  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Migration and ethical recruitment of health care workers is receiving increased attention worldwide. Europe’s aging population is creating new opportunities for medical doctors for finding employment in other countries, particularly those of a better standard of living. Methods We conducted a survey among 1214 medical students in five out of eleven universities in Poland with medical schools in October 2008. A series of statistical tests was applied to analyse the characteristics of potential migrants. Projections were obtained using statistical analyses: descriptive, multifactorial logistic regression and other statistical methods . Results We can forecast that 26–36% of Polish medical students will emigrate over the next few years; 62% of respondents estimated the likelihood of emigration at 50%. Students in their penultimate year of study declared a stronger desire to migrate than those in the final year. At the same time, many students were optimistic about career opportunities in Poland. Also noted among students were: the decline in interest in leaving among final year students, their moderate elaboration of departure plans, and their generally optimistic views about the opportunities for professional development in Poland. Conclusions The majority of Polish students see the emigration as a serious alternative to the continuation of their professional training. This trend can pose a serious threat to the Polish health care system, however the observed decline of the interest in leaving among final year students, the moderate involvement in concrete departure plans and the optimistic views about the opportunities for professional development in Poland suggest that the actual scale of brain drain of young Polish doctors due to emigration will be more limited than previously feared.

Krajewski-Siuda Krzysztof

2012-04-01

115

BIRTH ORDER AMONG NORTHERN INDIAN MEDICAL STUDENTS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Birth order is claimed to be linked with academic achievement. However, many scientists do not accept it. Objective: To assess the association of birth order in North Indian medical students with number of attempts to cross the competition bar. Study design: Cross sectional study. Setting and participation: M.B.B.S. 1st year students of L.L.R.M. Medical College, Meerut. Statistical analysis used: Chi Square test. Methods: Enquiry of Birth order and number of attempts to crack the medical entrance examination from responded 360 medical students among 494 students admitted during 2005 – 2010. Results: The study revealed insignificant relationship between ages of entrance in medical college in both sexes. of 360 students responded 37% students were of first Birth order. Among those admitted in first attempt, 67% students were of first birth order and proportion of success in first attempt reduced with increasing birth order. Conclusion: Birth Order strongly influences academic achievements.

Vinay Agarwal

2011-12-01

116

Endotracheal intubation skill acquisition by medical students  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

During the course of their training, medical students may receive introductory experience with advanced resuscitation skills. Endotracheal intubation (ETI – the insertion of a breathing tube into the trachea) is an example of an important advanced resuscitation intervention. Only limited data characterize clinical ETI skill acquisition by medical students. We sought to characterize medical student acquisition of ETI procedural skill.11Presented as a poster discussion on 17 October 2007 at t...

Wang Md Ms, Henry E.; Singhal, Sara S.; Mangione Md, Michael P.; Tarasi Md, Paul G.

2011-01-01

117

Choosing family medicine. What influences medical students?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

OBJECTIVE: To explore factors that influence senior medical students to pursue careers in family medicine. DESIGN: Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. SETTING: University of Western Ontario (UWO) in London. PARTICIPANTS: Eleven of 29 graduating UWO medical students matched to Canadian family medicine residency programs beginning in July 2001. METHOD: Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted with a maximum variation sample of medical students. Interviews were transcribed ...

Jordan J; Jb, Brown; Russell G

2003-01-01

118

Benefits of professional organization membership and participation in national conferences: considerations for students and new professionals.  

Science.gov (United States)

The focus of this manuscript is on the next generation of health education professionals and is written by those who are part of that next generation. This manuscript serves as a good reminder to all health educators regarding the importance of professional association membership and attending professional conferences. The co-editors hope that established health education professionals-whether serving as faculty members teaching in professional preparation programs or those practitioners mentoring the next generation-will share this article with students and/ or colleagues regarding the benefits of attending professional conferences and joining professional organizations. Joining professional organizations like the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) and attending professional conferences can provide tremendous career development, skill-building, and professional networking opportunities. PMID:20689051

Mata, Holly; Latham, Teaniese P; Ransome, Yusuf

2010-07-01

119

An evolving perspective on physical activity counselling by medical professionals  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity is a modifiable risk factor for many chronic conditions and a leading cause of premature mortality. An increasing proportion of adults worldwide are not engaging in a level of physical activity sufficient to prevent or alleviate these adverse effects. Medical professionals have been identified as potentially powerful sources of influence for those who do not meet minimum physical activity guidelines. Health professionals are respected and expected sources of advice and they reach a large and relevant proportion of the population. Despite this potential, health professionals are not routinely practicing physical activity promotion. Discussion Medical professionals experience several known barriers to physical activity promotion including lack of time and lack of perceived efficacy in changing physical activity behaviour in patients. Furthermore, evidence for effective physical activity promotion by medical professionals is inconclusive. To address these problems, new approaches to physical activity promotion are being proposed. These include collaborating with community based physical activity behaviour change interventions, preparing patients for effective brief counselling during a consultation with the medical professional, and use of interactive behaviour change technology. Summary It is important that we recognise the latent risk of physical inactivity among patients presenting in clinical settings. Preparation for improving patient physical activity behaviours should commence before the consultation and may include physical activity screening. Medical professionals should also identify suitable community interventions to which they can refer physically inactive patients. Outsourcing the majority of a comprehensive physical activity intervention to community based interventions will reduce the required clinical consultation time for addressing the issue with each patient. Priorities for future research include investigating ways to promote successful referrals and subsequent engagement in comprehensive community support programs to increase physical activity levels of inactive patients. Additionally, future clinical trials of physical activity interventions should be evaluated in the context of a broader framework of outcomes to inform a systematic consideration of broad strengths and weaknesses regarding not only efficacy but cost-effectiveness and likelihood of successful translation of interventions to clinical contexts.

McPhail Steven

2012-04-01

120

A study of professional competence for radiological technology department students in Taiwan area  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Recently, so many medical institutions established and the increasing use of the high technological medical imaging equipment, it makes radiological technology become the main instrument for the medical diagnostic and radiation therapy. However, the medical radiological technologies play the important role to operate all the related radiological machines. If they do not use the machines adequately, it will increase the patients' radiation absorbed dose. Then, the whole society health may be influenced. Therefore, constructing the professional competence of the medical radiological technologists is an important course. The purpose of this research are: (1) to construct the index of professional competence with radiological technology students, (2) to discuss the professional competence for the graduates from the department of radiological technology to be the reference for the Ministry of Examination for the license test of radiological technologists, (3) to provide the direction of the radiological technology department development. (author)

 
 
 
 
121

Gender Differences in Relationships and Stress of Medical and Law Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

A comparative study of medical and law students was undertaken to examine the sources and consequences of stress during professional training and the impact of stress on personal relationships. Women reported significantly more stress than men. (Author/MLW)

Clark, Elizabeth Johns; Rieker, Patricia Perri

1986-01-01

122

System of continuing education and professional development of medical radiation physicists in Russia  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

o deliver procedures in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology 2. scientific and engineering organizations involved in the new radiological equipment and technology development 3. universities and other educational institutions engaged in the system of continuing education and professional development of medical physicists and research activities 4. companies supplying medical radiological equipment 5. companies busy with the equipment maintenance, adjustment and certification 6. project organizations involved in scientific planning, design and development of the system equipment of radiation therapeutic and diagnostic centres. It is understood that the areas mentioned above demand specific knowledge and skills from the medical physicists and this should be taken into consideration when elaborating the educational programmes. There are several departments of 'medical physics' speciality in Russian universities. However, the approved student education programme does not meet the modern requirements. Practically, there are no qualified medical physics professors in universities. Therefore, as before, the majority of graduates and medical physicists in clinics do not fit the necessary qualification. The Association of Medical Physicists in Russia (AMPR) has developed and realized the programme on the system of continuing education and professional development of medical radiation physicists based on the cycle of special courses on different sections of radiation therapeutic and diagnostic physics. AMPR and the leading oncology centres in Russia regularly organize courses. The ESTRO teaching courses, supported by the IAEA, also contribute a lot to the professional education of Russian medical physicists. For the efficient organization of scientific and education activities, mainly in the field of the continuing education and professional development of medical physicists, AMPR has established a non-profit Institute of Medical Physics and Engineering (IMPE) which has united practically all leading scientists and professors in medical radiation physics. The group of highly skilled professors is chosen from the best Russian specialists and specially prepared for the training courses. Guidelines and recommendations are developed. Practical studies are conducted in the leading oncology centres. A viable education and training system allows to provide the necessary professional knowledge level, individual qualification control and certification of medical physicists. However, AMPR and IMPE are doing on their own without support from the government, sponsors and investors. AMPR and IMPE a re interested in the cooperation and support of their activities from the IAEA, ESTRO, IOMP, other international organizations and institutions. (author)

123

Hearing the Voice of Medical Students Worldwide  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The Student Forum, a new section of PLoS Medicine, is a space where medical students from across the world can exchange ideas about the critical issues affecting health and health care from their unique perspective

Palmer, Brian A.; Wong, Amanda; Singla, Mohit

2005-01-01

124

Web-based SBIRT Skills Training for Health Professional Students and Primary Care Providers  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

We have developed and assessed two innovative, case-based, interactive training programs on substance abuse, one for health professional students on alcohol and one for primary care providers on SBIRT. Both programs build skills in substance abuse screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). Real-world effectiveness trials involving medical students (n=10); nursing students (n=60) were completed; trials involving primary care providers (n=65) are in progress during 2011. ...

Tanner, T. Bradley; Wilhelm, Susan E.; Rossie, Karen M.; Metcalf, Mary P.

2012-01-01

125

The Professional Reading Habits of Teachers: Implications for Student Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper investigates the literature pertaining to the professional reading habits of teachers. Particular attention is given to those teachers working with students with special education needs. The value of professional reading is considered along with the quantity of professional reading of teachers from Australia and overseas, the types of…

Rudland, Neale; Kemp, Coral

2004-01-01

126

Medical school entrance and career plans of Malaysian medical students.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigates the reasons for entry to medicine and the career perspectives of phase III medical students of the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). The majority of the students were Malays from low socio-economic backgrounds who entered medical school after completing a 2-year matriculation course. An interest in medicine and helping people were the two main stated reasons for entry to medical school. A group of students wishing to work in private practice was identified. In comparison to the rest of the study body, students in the group were: not well prepared to enter medical school; dissatisfied with the course; and subject to family influences. A desire for monetary gain motivated their choice of medicine as a career. Overall, 13% of the students wished to change career because they were dissatisfied with their experience of medicine as undergraduates. The study did not find a significant difference in career intentions between female and male medical students. However, women were less likely to seek entrance into private practice or pursue formal postgraduate education. The choice of surgery as a career was confined to men. About 90% of the students had already decided on their future specialty. Four well-established specialties were their most popular choices. The gender of the students had no significant influences of the decision to continue into postgraduate education. The proportion of female students who wished to marry doctors was significantly higher than for male students. PMID:9217903

Razali, S M

1996-11-01

127

Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective.  

LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a) gauge students\\' awareness of research activities, (b) compare students\\' perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c) determine students\\' motivation for research and (d) obtain students\\' personal views on doing research.

Burgoyne, Louise N

2010-01-01

128

Guiding role of typical cases in clinical training for ophthalmology professional degree graduate students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available With the change of the concept of graduate enrollment, the recruiting proportion of clinical medicine professional degree graduate students is more and more, and the training of professional degree graduate students is increasingly focusing on practical. In our experience in clinical training for ophthalmology professional degree graduate students, increasing the ward clinical practice time is important. For particular emphasis on the guiding role of the typical cases, each professional group combined their professional characteristics of the typical cases to instruct the graduate students, training their clinical diagnosis and treatment ability, training their microsurgical techniques. From clinical medical writing, record summary, literature review, professional degree graduate students could expand their knowledge structure, practice their thesis writing ability. Based on the typical cases, expansion of knowledge coverage, they could improve the ability of diagnosis and treatment for special disease cases. In this rigorous training system, professional degree graduate students can learn by analogy, and focus on typical cases to get the most intuitive panoramic understanding of the diseases, with a minimum of time to master the most clinical knowledge, to enrich clinical experience, and to lay the foundation for future work in the assessment.

Zhe Wang

2014-05-01

129

Burnout syndrom as a mental health problem among medical students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction. Mental health problems of adolescents are among the prevailing problems of public health. While studying for their future medical profession, the students of medicine have to exchange emotions with the patients intensively, and the empathic relationship itself bears a risk of eventual ”emotional depletion”, which leads to ”professional lack of emotions”. The study was aimed at presenting burnout syndrome as a challenge for mental health of medical students, its importance for the future professional engagement of doctors and the possibilities of its prevention. Methods. The authors of this paper review and analyze data and conclusions of previous national and international studies from this field and suggest possibilities of overcoming the condition of burnout. Results. The frequency of burnout syndrome, which is the synonym for the above mentioned condition of emotional exhaustion, is twice as high in medical professionals, particularly young ones, as in other professions on average. Burnout syndrome is nowadays regarded as a psychological distress experienced during the educational process and it has been observed in as many as 50% of medical students. The most significant factors independently associated with student burnout are: personality traits, stressful personal life events and learning and training conditions at their faculties. Conclusions. It is of utmost importance to understand the causes and consequences of psychological distress in students, and the faculties should not only identify these problems, but also endeavor to promote health by developing strategies for improving personal well-being, which are important for future doctors to achieve professional success and develop resistance to stress.

Backovi? Dušan

2012-01-01

130

Factors influencing the choice of a medical specialty among medical students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: The choice of a medical specialty by a medical student is a complex process in which several factors play a contributory role, making the decision process an evolving one as the medical student undergoes different experiences in his/her professional journey. In our study, we attempted to identify factors that play a significant role in influencing medical students towards choosing a specialty and also to delineate the differences that exist amongst students’ priorities based on gender and year of study at a medical university.Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey conducted on the medical students enrolled at Dow Medical College. Students from all five years of the medicine program were randomly selected. A self-administered questionnaire based on 16 questions was designed. The first part comprised of bio-data and specification of the choice of career by the participants. The second part comprised 13 factors influencing students’ choices, that were to be rated by the students in the order of their importance. Mann Whitney test, Kruskal Wallis test and Tukey’s test was performed for comparison.Results: Out of 400 candidates that successfully completed the study, all except one planned to specialize in one of the three major fields. 233 (58.4% students wanted to pursue medicine, 156 (39.1% surgery and only 10 (2.5% wanted to adopt research as their career. Significant differences were found in working hours, duration of residency and influence during clinical rotations between the two specialties.Conclusion: These findings re-enforce the recently evolving idea that all disparities existing between different specialties should be resolved so as to ensure an equal spread of doctors in all fields. There is also a need to introduce more female friendly legislations and more incentives need to be offered to medical graduates to prompt more of them to choose a future career in research.

Areeba Saif

2013-07-01

131

Medical students’ readiness to provide smoking cessation help  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Based on the Global Health Professions Student Survey questionnaire, 770 students of Kazan Medical University, third and fifth years were surveyed. About 90% responded that health professionals should be educated to provide smoking cessation help, while one in five reported to have acquired such skills. Students were more likely to consider quit advice effective if they got classes on smoking cessation and relevant medicines. Classes just on tobacco health impact were not associated with higher confidence that quit advice is effective. It is recommended to strengthen curricula with knowledge and skills regarding smoking cessation help. (Full text is in Russian

Andreeva, T.I.

2011-04-01

132

Relationship between Professional Development Expenditures and Student Achievement  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was based on convergence of two educational theories: 1) that professional development improves teacher quality and instructional practices and therefore positively affects student achievement and 2) allocation of school resources positively affects student achievement. It is a common educational belief that professional development…

Dalton, Elizabeth A.

2010-01-01

133

Teaching Teachers: Professional Development To Improve Student Achievement  

Science.gov (United States)

This monograph in AERA's Research Points series summarizes recent research on the effectiveness of teacher professional development activities with regard to student achievement. The main conclusions are that effective professional development focuses on any or all of these goals: boosting teacher content knowledge and their knowledge of how students learn, and linking activities to specific curriculum and classroom conditions.

Heather Hill, David C.

2005-01-01

134

Pharmacy Internship : Students’ Learning in a Professional Practice Setting  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The aim of this thesis was to explore Swedish pharmacist students’ learning during pharmacy internship. Internships are meant to introduce students to professional practice. Education programs have to reflect changes in the professional role, and take into account that learning in a professional practice setting differs from organized formal education. This thesis includes both quantitative and qualitative research approaches and applies workplace learning theories. A scheme for measuring p...

Wallman, Andy

2010-01-01

135

A Conceptual, Practice-orientated Biometrics Course for Medical Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

In many medical schools biometrics has traditionally been taught with an abstract, mathematical emphasis. Consequently, the medical student usually does not relate the course content to his future practice as a physician, learns only to a limited degree, and develops a distaste for research methods and statistics. This unfavourable early exposure often produces a physician with little or no skill in assessing the merits of his professional literature in terms of research and statistical credibility. I therefore designed a course which emphasized research and statistical concepts, avoided mathematical explanations, stressed the relationship of research and statistics to medical practice, and used effective teaching principles. The course was first offered in the autumn of 1982 to second-year medical students at the Wright State University School of Medicine. PMID:24476407

Markert, R J

1984-01-01

136

An Empirical Look at Professional Selling from a Student Perspective  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, the authors examined students' perceptions of professional selling. They found significant differences between the perceptions of students who had completed personal selling courses and students who had not. The authors observed differences in students' perceptions of personal selling as a career, the contribution of personal…

Bristow, Dennis N.; Amyx, Douglas; Slack, Jennifer; Gulati, Rajesh

2006-01-01

137

Training Medical Students in Empathic Communication  

Science.gov (United States)

Empathy is an important component of the doctor-patient relationship, yet previous studies point to its steady decline in medical students as they progress through medical school and residency programs. Empathy training has thus been identified as a goal of instruction, yet it is unclear how this training can best be implemented within the medical

Bayne, Hannah Barnhill

2011-01-01

138

Low back pain among medical students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Low back pain (LBP) is known to affect both older and younger adults. Medical schools tend to have time-consuming curricula, possibly perpetuating a sedentary lifestyle, and a high prevalence of LBP among medical students. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of sedentary lifestyle and the 12-month prevalence of LBP in a sample group of medical students in comparison to a random sample of physical education students. A retrospective study involving a questionnaire-based inquiry of 103 medical students showed that they were approximately 2.5 times less physically active than the 107 physical education students (p < 0.001) and spent 3 more hours per day sitting (p < 0.001). The 12-month prevalence of (sub)acute and chronic LBP in the sample group of medical students was 53.4% (95% CI: 43.8%-63.0%), as compared to 60.7% (95% CI: 51.4% -70.0%) in the sample group of physical education students, yielding no statistically significant difference (p = 0.329). These data reveal a high prevalence of low back pain among students, which is rather alarming considering their young age. Strangely, the prevalence of LBP was not higher in medical students than in physically more active students, in spite of their sedentary lifestyle. According to the literature, the sitting position is no longer considered as a risk factor for low back pain. PMID:21473452

Moroder, Philipp; Runer, Armin; Resch, Herbert; Tauber, Mark

2011-02-01

139

Comprehensive Healthcare module: medical and pharmacy students’ shared learning experiences  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduction The Comprehensive Healthcare (CHC) module was developed to introduce pre-clinical medical and pharmacy students to the concept of comprehensive healthcare. This study aims to explore their shared learning experiences within this module. Methodology During this module, medical and pharmacy students conducted visits to patients’ homes and to related community-based organisations in small groups. They were required to write a reflective journal on their experiences regarding working with other professions as part of their module assessment. Highly scored reflective journals written by students from the 2011/2012 academic session were selected for analysis. Their shared learning experiences were identified via thematic analysis. We also analysed students’ feedback regarding the module. Results Analysis of 25 selected reflective journals revealed several important themes: ‘Understanding of impact of illness and its relation to holistic care’, ‘Awareness of the role of various healthcare professions’ and ‘Generic or soft skills for inter-professional collaboration’. Although the primary objective of the module was to expose students to comprehensive healthcare, the students learnt skills required for future collaborative practice from their experiences. Discussion The CHC module provided early clinical exposure to community-based health issues and incorporated some elements of inter-professional education. The students learnt about the roles of other healthcare professions and acquired soft skills required for future collaborative practice during this module. PMID:25327980

Tan, Chai-Eng; Jaffar, Aida; Tong, Seng-Fah; Hamzah, Majmin Sheikh; Mohamad, Nabishah

2014-01-01

140

A Comparison of Medical Students from Medical and Nonmedical Families  

Science.gov (United States)

In a study of 1,195 medical students, those from medical families were insignificantly different from their classmates on premedical scholastic achievement and admission test scores, but were slightly younger and attended more prestigious undergraduate colleges. Academic and clinical performance was equivalent but specialty-choice differences were…

Gough, Harrison G.; Hall, Wallace B.

1977-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

Perceived stress amongst medical and dental students  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background: Reports in the last decade have shown that healthcare students face a high degree of stress. Cumulative stress leads to depression and suicidal behaviour in some of them.Aims: This study was designed to identify levels of perceived stress amongst medical and dental students in a private institution of South India.Methods: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey carried out on the first year undergraduate medical and dental students. Perceived stress was assessed using the Pe...

Harihar Chilukuri; Sowjanya Bachali; Nagaiah Jupalle Naidu; Ahmed Shaik Basha; Samuvel Verrapam Selvam

2012-01-01

142

The Differential Impact of Various Assessment Parameters on the Medical Students Performance in the Professional Anatomy Examination in a New Medical School / El Impacto Diferencial de Varios Parámetros de Evaluación del Desempeño de Estudiantes de Medicina en el Examen Profesional de Anatomía en una Nueva Escuela de Medicina  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in spanish Existe escasez de conocimiento sobre el nivel de concordancia entre todas las varias tareas de evalución sobre los contenidos de una misma área. En orden a evaluar esta hipótesis, adoptamos el concepto de validez convergente y también de área aislada, de falta de solidez académica entre los estudian [...] tes y readecuar el contenido curricular para balancear esa falta de solidez. Se llevó a cabo un estudio retrospectivo al azar sobre un total de 66 alumnos de Medicina de Tercer Año, quienes tuvieron su primer examen profesional de Anatomía en la nueva Escuela de Medicina de la Universidad del Estado de Lagos, Nigeria. Usando registros de sus grados en varios parámetros de evaluación: promedio final de la evaluación del Curso, preguntas cortas de redacción, ítemes de selección múltiple y prácticas. La media + desviación estándar, correlación de Person con el t-test de Sudents (p Abstract in english There is a dearth of knowledge on the level of agreement between all the various assessment tasks on the same content area, in order to test this hypothesis we adopted the concept of convergent validity and also to isolate area of academic weakness among the students and to readjust the curriculum c [...] ontent to balance the weakness. A blinded cohort retrospective study was carried out on a total of sixty-six third year medical students who had sat for their first professional examination in anatomy in the new medical college of Lagos State University. Using records of their grades in the various assessments parameters- the average end-in course assessment, short essays question (SEQ), multiple-choice questions (MCQ), and practical (Steeple-chase). The mean + S.D. Pearson's correlation with students t-test (p

L. A. J., Shittu; M. P., Zachariah; M. C., Izegbu; O. A., Adesanya; O. A., Ashiru.

143

The Differential Impact of Various Assessment Parameters on the Medical Students Performance in the Professional Anatomy Examination in a New Medical School / El Impacto Diferencial de Varios Parámetros de Evaluación del Desempeño de Estudiantes de Medicina en el Examen Profesional de Anatomía en una Nueva Escuela de Medicina  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in spanish Existe escasez de conocimiento sobre el nivel de concordancia entre todas las varias tareas de evalución sobre los contenidos de una misma área. En orden a evaluar esta hipótesis, adoptamos el concepto de validez convergente y también de área aislada, de falta de solidez académica entre los estudian [...] tes y readecuar el contenido curricular para balancear esa falta de solidez. Se llevó a cabo un estudio retrospectivo al azar sobre un total de 66 alumnos de Medicina de Tercer Año, quienes tuvieron su primer examen profesional de Anatomía en la nueva Escuela de Medicina de la Universidad del Estado de Lagos, Nigeria. Usando registros de sus grados en varios parámetros de evaluación: promedio final de la evaluación del Curso, preguntas cortas de redacción, ítemes de selección múltiple y prácticas. La media + desviación estándar, correlación de Person con el t-test de Sudents (p Abstract in english There is a dearth of knowledge on the level of agreement between all the various assessment tasks on the same content area, in order to test this hypothesis we adopted the concept of convergent validity and also to isolate area of academic weakness among the students and to readjust the curriculum c [...] ontent to balance the weakness. A blinded cohort retrospective study was carried out on a total of sixty-six third year medical students who had sat for their first professional examination in anatomy in the new medical college of Lagos State University. Using records of their grades in the various assessments parameters- the average end-in course assessment, short essays question (SEQ), multiple-choice questions (MCQ), and practical (Steeple-chase). The mean + S.D. Pearson's correlation with students t-test (p

L. A. J., Shittu; M. P., Zachariah; M. C., Izegbu; O. A., Adesanya; O. A., Ashiru.

2006-12-01

144

Implementation of a professional enrichment program to enhance medical school experience  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Medical students experience stress during medical education that can negatively impact performance. Typical curricula in U.S. medical schools are rigorously intense and provide little or no time off between courses in the first two years of training. This intensity contributes to increased stress for students accustomed to performing academically near the top of the class prior to matriculating in medical school. We describe an innovative new academic calendar that was modified to create a Professional Enrichment Program. Students can step back from the rigors of coursework and engage in several types of activities in order to decompress from recent studying and examinations. These activities include electives, service opportunities, independent study, and clinical experiences that are self-selected by students. Students and faculty complete surveys about the activities they completed and the usefulness of their choices. Results show broad approval of the program with the greatest results supporting an appreciation of time to decompress and an increase in time for family and personal activities.

Linda R. Adkison

2013-02-01

145

Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience  

Science.gov (United States)

Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students’ performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties’ expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students’ skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school.

Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

2014-01-01

146

Student nurses' attitudes towards professional containment methods used in psychiatric wards and perceptions of aggression.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to determine student nurses' attitudes towards professional containment methods used in psychiatric wards and its relation to their perception of aggression. We employed a cross-sectional descriptive design to evaluate nurses' attitudes. Participants included 120 student nurses who were enrolled in psychiatric nursing during their fourth (final) year of education. The 'Attitude to Containment Measures Questionnaire' and 'The Perception of Aggression Scale' were used for assessments. Student nurses exhibited positive attitudes toward 'intermittent observation', 'Pro re nata Medication' and 'Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit', respectively. The least approved method was 'net bed'. The data showed a negative correlation between approval of 'Intra-Muscular Medication' and 'mechanical restraint' with the perception that aggression was dysfunctional/unacceptable. Student nurses who believed that professional containment methods were effective also perceived aggression as less functional/acceptable. These results emphasize the importance of health care perceptions of aggression towards patients and their experience with containment measures. PMID:25157938

Ozcan, Neslihan Keser; Bilgin, Hülya; Bad?rgal? Boyac?o?lu, Nur Elçin; Kaya, Fadime

2014-08-01

147

Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective  

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Full Text Available Background: Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a gauge students’ awareness of research activities, (b compare students’ perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c determine students’ motivation for research and (d obtain students’ personal views on doing research. Methods: Undergraduate medical students (N=317 completed a research skills questionnaire developed by the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in Applied Undergraduate Research Skills (CETL-AURS at Reading University. The questionnaire assessed students’ transferable skills, research-specific skills (e.g., study design, data collection and data analysis, research experience and attitude and motivation towards doing research. Results: The majority of students are motivated to pursue research. Graduate entrants and male students appear to be the most confident regarding their research skills competencies. Although all students recognise the role of research in medical practice, many are unaware of the medical research activities or successes within their university. Of those who report no interest in a career incorporating research, a common perception was that researchers are isolated from patients and clinical practice. Discussion: Students have a narrow definition of research and what it entails. An explanation for why research competence does not align more closely with research motivation is derived from students’ lack of understanding of the concept of translational research, as well as a lack of awareness of the research activity being undertaken by their teachers and mentors. We plan to address this with specific research awareness initiatives.

Louise N. Burgoyne

2010-09-01

148

Analysis of test anxiety in medical students  

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Full Text Available Introduction. Most students experience some level of anxiety during the exam. However, when anxiety affects the exam performance, it represents a problem. Test anxiety is a special form of anxiety, which is characterized with somatic, cognitive and behavioral symptoms of anxiety in situations of preparing and performing tests and exams. Test anxiety turns into a problem when it becomes so high that it interferes with test preparation and performance. The objective of this study was to ascertain the presence of test anxiety in medical students and to analyze some aspects of test anxiety in medical students of different gender, at different years of studying and possibility of failing a year. Material and methods. The study sample consisted of 198 students of Belgrade University School of Medicine of all years. Test anxiety was assessed by the Test Anxiety Inventory. Results. The following results have been obtained in the study: 1. Medical students generally present moderate level of test anxiety; 2. female students have statistically significant more intense symptoms of test anxiety than male students; 3. the most intense symptoms are in the 3rd year and the least are in the 4th year of studies; 4. there is no statistically significant difference in the presence of symptoms of test anxiety among the students who have repeated one of the years of studies and regular students. Conclusion. There is a considerable number of medical students who have intense symptoms of test anxiety and these students require help and support.

Panti? Marina

2010-01-01

149

Developing research skills in medical students: AMEE Guide No. 69.  

Science.gov (United States)

This Guide has been written to provide guidance for individuals involved in curriculum design who wish to develop research skills and foster the attributes in medical undergraduates that help develop research. The Guide will provoke debate on an important subject, and although written specifically with undergraduate medical education in mind, we hope that it will be of interest to all those involved with other health professionals' education. Initially, the Guide describes why research skills and its related attributes are important to those pursuing a medical career. It also explores the reasons why research skills and an ethos of research should be instilled into professionals of the future. The Guide also tries to define what these skills and attributes should be for medical students and lays out the case for providing opportunities to develop research expertise in the undergraduate curriculum. Potential methods to encourage the development of research-related attributes are explored as are some suggestions as to how research skills could be taught and assessed within already busy curricula. This publication also discusses the real and potential barriers to developing research skills in undergraduate students, and suggests strategies to overcome or circumvent these. Whilst we anticipate that this Guide will appeal to all levels of expertise in terms of student research, we hope that, through the use of case studies, we will provide practical advice to those currently developing this area within their curriculum. PMID:22905661

Laidlaw, Anita; Aiton, Jim; Struthers, Julie; Guild, Simon

2012-01-01

150

Learning about medical student mistreatment from responses to the medical school graduation questionnaire.  

Science.gov (United States)

Although evidence of medical student mistreatment has accumulated for more than 20 years, only recently have professional organizations like the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the American Medical Association truly acknowledged it as an issue. Since 1991, the AAMC's annual Medical School Graduation Questionnaire (GQ) has included questions about mistreatment. Responses to the GQ have become the major source of evidence of the prevalence and types of mistreatment. This article reviews national mistreatment data, using responses to the GQ from 2000 through 2012; examines how students' experiences have changed over time; and highlights the implications of this information for the broader medical education system. The authors discuss what mistreatment is, including the changing definitions from the GQ; the prevalence, types, and sources of mistreatment; and evidence of students reporting incidents. In addition, they discuss next steps, including better defining mistreatment, specifically public humiliation and belittling, taking into account students' subjective evaluations; understanding and addressing the influence of institutional culture and what institutions can learn from current approaches at other institutions; and developing better systems to report and respond to reports of mistreatment. They conclude with a discussion of how mistreatment currently is conceptualized within the medical education system and the implications of that conceptualization for eradicating mistreatment in the future. PMID:24667505

Mavis, Brian; Sousa, Aron; Lipscomb, Wanda; Rappley, Marsha D

2014-05-01

151

Modern Professionalism in Libya: Attitudes of University Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses research which studies the attitudes of university students in Libya toward various aspects of occupational life. Findings include 1) that students have a limited enthusiasm for higher education and professional training, and 2) that female students have a high receptivity and readiness to venture into male dominated…

Al-Nouri, Qais N.

1975-01-01

152

The Stony Brook Student Affairs Professional Staff: Attitudes and Activities.  

Science.gov (United States)

This report is the third of three documents designed to provide information concerning the student at Stony Brook. The attitudes and activities of the Stony Brook Student Affairs Professional Staff is discussed in relation to background and preparation for student affairs work, orientation and adaptation to Stony Brook, educational policy and…

Bess, James L.; And Others

153

A student's perspective on medical ethics education.  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite many efforts to increase ethics education in US medical schools, barriers continue to arise that impede the production of morally driven physicians who practice medicine with ideal empathy. Research has shown that, particularly during the clinical years, medical students lose the ability both to recognize ethical dilemmas and to approach such situations with compassionate reasoning. This article summarizes the current status of ethics education in US medical schools, described through the eyes of and alongside the story of a graduating medical student. PMID:23793349

Terndrup, Christopher

2013-12-01

154

Recording and podcasting of lectures for students of medical school.  

Science.gov (United States)

Information and communication technology (ICT) becomes an important way for the knowledge transmission, especially in the field of medicine. Podcasting (mobile broadcast content) has recently emerged as an efficient tool for distributing information towards professionals, especially for e-learning contents.The goal of this work is to implement software and hardware tools for collecting medical lectures at its source by direct recording (halls and classrooms) and provide the automatic delivery of these resources for students on different type of devices (computer, smartphone or videogames console). We describe the overall architecture and the methods used by medical students to master this technology in their daily activities. We highlight the benefits and the limits of the Podcast technologies for medical education. PMID:21893751

Brunet, Pierre; Cuggia, Marc; Le Beux, Pierre

2011-01-01

155

Emotional intelligence and perceived stress in healthcare students: a multi-institutional, multi-professional survey  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background Emotional intelligence (EI) is increasingly discussed as having a potential role in medicine, nursing, and other healthcare disciplines, both for personal mental health and professional practice. Stress has been identified as being high for students in healthcare courses. This study investigated whether EI and stress differed among students in four health professions (dental, nursing, graduate mental health workers, medical) and whether there was evidence ...

McKendree Jean; Birks Yvonne; Watt Ian

2009-01-01

156

Debt crisis ahead for Irish medical students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Internationally medical student debt is a cause of concern. A survey of medical students in UCC (response rate of 191 representing 35% of the EU student cohort) reveals that 34 (26%) of direct entry medicine (DEM) students and 36 (61%) graduate entrants (GEM) have a loan with an anticipated average debt of Euro17,300 and Euro80,000 on graduation respectively. Fifty-three (90%) graduate entrants and 75 (57%) direct entrants revealed that they often worry about their current financial situation. Fifty-three (28%) of students have a part-time job and many were concerned about the degree to which this conflicted with their academic workload. 118 (89%) of school leavers and 48 (81%) graduates received financial assistance from their families to fund their college expenses. Student responses recommended the introduction of a government supported low interest rate loan and other incentives to help service high levels of debt associated with medical education. PMID:24988840

Haugh, C; Doyle, B; O'Flynn, S

2014-06-01

157

Are medical schools hesitant to teach undergraduate students teaching skills? A medical student's critical view  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Junior medical staff provides a large proportion of undergraduate student education. However, despite increasing numbers of resident-as-teacher training programs, junior doctors may still not be sufficiently prepared to teach medical students. Hence, medical schools should consider implementing formal teaching skills training into undergraduate curricula.

Lukas Peter Mileder

2013-11-01

158

Are medical schools hesitant to teach undergraduate students teaching skills? A medical student's critical view.  

Science.gov (United States)

Junior medical staff provides a large proportion of undergraduate student education. However, despite increasing numbers of resident-as-teacher training programs, junior doctors may still not be sufficiently prepared to teach medical students. Hence, medical schools should consider implementing formal teaching skills training into undergraduate curricula. PMID:24229730

Mileder, Lukas Peter

2013-01-01

159

Proximity morality in medical school – medical students forming physician morality "on the job": Grounded theory analysis of a student survey  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The value of ethics education have been questioned. Therefore we did a student survey on attitudes about the teaching of ethics in Swedish medical schools. Methods Questionnaire survey on attitudes to ethics education with 409 Swedish medical students participating. We analyzed > 8000 words of open-ended responses and multiple-choice questions using classic grounded theory procedures. Results In this paper we suggest that medical students take a proximity morality stance towards their ethics education meaning that they want to form physician morality "on the job". This involves comprehensive ethics courses in which quality lectures provide "ethics grammar" and together with attitude exercises and vignette reflections nurture tutored group discussions. Goals of forming physician morality are to develop a professional identity, handling diversity of religious and existential worldviews, training students described as ethically naive, processing difficult clinical experiences, and desisting negative role modeling from physicians in clinical or teaching situations, some engaging in "ethics suppression" by controlling sensitive topic discussions and serving students politically correct attitudes. Conclusion We found that medical students have a proximity morality attitude towards ethics education. Rather than being taught ethics they want to form their own physician morality through tutored group discussions in comprehensive ethics courses.

Sallin Karl

2007-08-01

160

Endotracheal intubation skill acquisition by medical students  

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Full Text Available During the course of their training, medical students may receive introductory experience with advanced resuscitation skills. Endotracheal intubation (ETI – the insertion of a breathing tube into the trachea is an example of an important advanced resuscitation intervention. Only limited data characterize clinical ETI skill acquisition by medical students. We sought to characterize medical student acquisition of ETI procedural skill.11Presented as a poster discussion on 17 October 2007 at the annual meeting of the American Society of Anesthesiologists in San Francisco, CA.The study included third-year medical students participating in a required anesthesiology clerkship. Students performed ETI on operating room patients under the supervision of attending anesthesiologists. Students reported clinical details of each ETI effort, including patient age, sex, Mallampati score, number of direct laryngoscopies and ETI success. Using mixed-effects regression, we characterized the adjusted association between ETI success and cumulative ETI experience.ETI was attempted by 178 students on 1,646 patients (range 1–23 patients per student; median 9 patients per student, IQR 6–12. Overall ETI success was 75.0% (95% CI 72.9–77.1%. Adjusted for patient age, sex, Mallampati score and number of laryngoscopies, the odds of ETI success improved with cumulative ETI encounters (odds ratio 1.09 per additional ETI encounter; 95% CI 1.04–1.14. Students required at least 17 ETI encounters to achieve 90% predicted ETI success.In this series medical student ETI proficiency was associated with cumulative clinical procedural experience. Clinical experience may provide a viable strategy for fostering medical student procedural skills.

Henry E. Wang MD MS

2011-08-01

 
 
 
 
161

Prevalence of Depression Among Medical Students of a Private Medical College in India  

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Full Text Available Background: Medical education can contribute to the development of depression in medical students which may have possible negative academic and professional consequences. The aims of this study were to explore the prevalence of depressive symptoms and their relationships to socio-demographic variables among a cross section of medical students of a private medical college in India. Methods: A cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire-based survey was conducted including all students from first to fourth year of a medical college in India. Beck depression inventory was used to assess the level of depression with a score of 12 or higher considered depressive. Additional questions regarding demographic variables were also included in the survey. Data analysis was done on Epi info version 6. Results: A total of 336 students participated giving a response rate of 88%. A total of 49.1% students reported depressive symptoms. It was significantly higher in 1st year (59.3% and 2nd year (65.6%, as compared to 3rd (34.4% and 4th year (37.2% students [p<0. 05]. Substance abuse(p<0.0001, first and second year of study, female sex and language of instruction other than English at 10+2 level were associated factors for the development of depressive symptoms [p<0.05]. A significant negative association was also found between regular exercise and depression (p<0.05. Conclusion: Depression may be a significant hidden problem in Indian medical students and mechanisms to identify and help students with mental health problems should be seriously considered.

Ajit Singh,

2011-01-01

162

Research knowledge in undergraduate school in Brazil: a comparison between medical and law students  

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Full Text Available Objective: Exposure to science education during college may affect a student’s profile, and research experience may be associated with better professional performance. We hypothesized that the impact of research experience obtained during graduate study differs among professional curricula and among graduate courses. Methods: A validated multiple-choice questionnaire concerning scientific concepts was given to students in the first and fourth years of medical and law school at a public Brazilian educational institution. Results: Medical students participated more frequently in introductory scientific programs than law students, and this trend increased from the first to the fourth years of study. In both curricula, fourth-year students displayed a higher percentage of correct answers than first-year students. A higher proportion of fourth-year students correctly defined the concepts of scientific hypothesis and scientific theory. In the areas of interpretation and writing of scientific papers, fourth-year students, in both curricula, felt more confident than first-year students. Although medical students felt less confident in planning and conducting research projects than law students, they were more involved in research activities. Conclusion: Medical graduation seems to favor the development of critical scientific maturity than law graduation. Specific policy in medical schools is a reasonable explanation for medical students’ participation in more scientific activities.

Bruno Bezerril Andrade

2010-09-01

163

Discourses of student orientation to medical education programs  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Although medical students’ initial orientation is an important point of transition in medical education, there is a paucity of literature on the subject and major variations in the ways that different institutions orient incoming medical students to their programs. Methods We conducted a discourse analysis of medical education orientation in the literature and on data from a survey of peer institutions’ approaches to orientation. Results These two discourses of orientation had clear similarities, in particular, the critical role of ceremony and symbols, and the focus on developing professionalism and physician identities. There were also differences between them, in particular, in the way that the discourse in the literature focused on the symbolic and professional aspects of orientation; something we have called ‘cultural orientation’. Meanwhile, those who were responsible for orientation in their own institutions tended to focus on the practical and social dimensions. Conclusion By examining how orientation has been described and discussed, we identify three domains of orientation: cultural, social, and practical. These domains are relatively distinct in terms of the activities associated with them, and in terms of who is involved in organizing and running these activities. We also describe orientation as a liminal activity system on the threshold of medical school where incoming students initially cross into the profession. Interestingly, this state of ambiguity also extends to the scholarship of orientation with only some of its aspects attracting formal enquiry, even though there is a growing interest in transitions in medical education as a whole. We hope, therefore, that this study can help to legitimize enquiry into orientation in all its forms and that it can begin to situate the role of orientation more firmly within the firmament of medical education practice and research. PMID:24646440

Ellaway, Rachel H.; Cooper, Gerry; Al-Idrissi, Tracy; Dube, Tim; Graves, Lisa

2014-01-01

164

Gender, Professional Orientation, and Student Achievement: Elements of School Culture  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored the relationships between professional orientation (defined as how the principal sees his or her role in the organization) and school culture, the influence of gender on professional orientation, and the relationship between school culture and the academic achievement of students. One hundred principals were surveyed. Two…

White, Teresa; Martin, Barbara N.; Johnson, Judy A.

2003-01-01

165

Reconciling the Professional and Student Identities of Clinical Psychology Trainees  

Science.gov (United States)

The study explored the ways in which qualified and trainee clinical psychologists perceived professional behaviour, as illustrated in a series of short vignettes, in student and clinical practice contexts. Comparisons were made to identify the extent to which ideas of professionalism differed across different learning contexts and between…

McKenzie, Karen; Cossar, Jill A.; Fawns, Tim; Murray, Aja L.

2013-01-01

166

Study of Association of Psychological Stress and Depression among Undergraduate Medical Students in Pondicherry  

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Full Text Available Background: Medical education across the globe is perceived as being inherently stressful. Studies on psychological problems such as stress, depression and anxiety among medical students have found that these disorders are under diagnosed and under treated. In this background the present study was undertaken with the objectives to assess the magni-tude of depression and its association with stress among medical students. Methods: A Cross sectional study was undertaken among 235 medical students in a private medical college, Pondicherry. Tools similar to General Health Questionaire (GHQ-12 and Beck depression Inventory (BDI was used to screen psychological stress and depression respectively. Results: The prevalence of depression was 71% among medical students. Psychological stress was associated with depression. Conclusion: Emphasize should be laid on the importance of screening for depression of medical students on a regular basis for early detection and rendering appropriate intervention like group counseling, stress management training etc. to protect the future professionals.

Devi Kittu, Rohan Patil

2013-01-01

167

The case in favour of educating medical students about sexual violence.  

Science.gov (United States)

Medical students should be educated about sexual assault and rape. There is a strong argument in favour of such an educational intervention in all medical schools. Sexual violence is a highly prevalent medical condition that has very significant personal health consequences. Sexual violence is an issue that is frequently misunderstood by the general public and by healthcare professionals. Routine inclusion of this topic on undergraduate medical curricula should improve care provided to victims of sexual violence. PMID:24559306

Kennedy, Kieran

2014-03-01

168

The Key Role of a Transition Course in Preparing Medical Students for Internship  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Among the core transitions in medical education is the one from medical school to residency. Despite this challenging transition, the final year of medical school is known as lacking structure and clarity. The authors examine the preparation of medical students for the professional and personal challenges of internship in the context of transition courses. They first describe the development of a residency transition course, offered since 2001 at the University of California, San Francisco, S...

Teo, Alan R.; Harleman, Elizabeth; O’sullivan, Patricia S.; Maa, John

2011-01-01

169

Medical education in Maharashtra: The student perspective  

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Full Text Available Background: There is hardly any structured study reporting the perspective of medical students, with regard to the medical education system in Maharashtra, which is facing challenges. Aim: A perception study of students was conducted to explore the situation, challenges, and consequent solutions of medical education in Maharashtra. Settings and Design: A descriptive perception study. Materials and Methods: A structured questionnaire was e-mailed to 92 students, and interviews with seven key-informants comprising of faculty, administrators, and policy makers were conducted, to gather qualitative insights. Results: Thirty-seven student replies were received and analyzed. The satisfaction level of student respondents for various factors was as follows: infrastructure 18/37 (48.6%, quality of teaching 14/37 (37.8%, patient population 22/37 (59.5%, and administration 8/37 (21.6%. Ninety-two percent (34/37 of the students stated that the fundamental problem was the inability of the system to attract good, quality teachers. The reasons stated were low salaries, low level of job satisfaction, high level of bureaucracy, and high work load. Conclusions: The medical education system in Maharashtra is viewed as being stagnant. The respondents emphasized an urgent need for educational reforms, which should include better compensation for teachers, sharing of facilities between government and private medical colleges, and improved efficiency of the Medical Council of India. In the long run a public-private mix with sharing of resources may be a plausible solution.

Hira R

2009-01-01

170

Behaviour and burnout in medical students  

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Full Text Available Background: Burnout is prevalent in doctors and can impact on job dissatisfaction and patient care. In medical students, burnout is associated with poorer self-rated health; however, it is unclear what factors influence its development. This study investigated whether health behaviours predict burnout in medical students. Methods: Medical students (n=356 at the Universities of St Andrews and Manchester completed an online questionnaire assessing: emotional exhaustion (EE, depersonalisation (DP, personal accomplishment (PA, alcohol use, physical activity, diet, and smoking. Results: Approximately 55% (54.8% of students reported high levels of EE, 34% reported high levels of DP, and 46.6% reported low levels of PA. Linear regression analysis revealed that year of study, physical activity, and smoking status significantly predicted EE whilst gender, year of study, and institution significantly predicted DP. PA was significantly predicted by alcohol binge score, year of study, gender, and physical activity. Conclusions: Burnout is present in undergraduate medical students in the United Kingdom, and health behaviours, particularly physical activity, predict components of burnout. Gender, year of study, and institution also appear to influence the prevalence of burnout. Encouraging medical students to make healthier lifestyle choices early in their medical training may reduce the likelihood of the development of burnout.

Jo Cecil

2014-08-01

171

Behaviour and burnout in medical students  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Burnout is prevalent in doctors and can impact on job dissatisfaction and patient care. In medical students, burnout is associated with poorer self-rated health; however, it is unclear what factors influence its development. This study investigated whether health behaviours predict burnout in medical students. Methods Medical students (n=356) at the Universities of St Andrews and Manchester completed an online questionnaire assessing: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation (DP), personal accomplishment (PA), alcohol use, physical activity, diet, and smoking. Results Approximately 55% (54.8%) of students reported high levels of EE, 34% reported high levels of DP, and 46.6% reported low levels of PA. Linear regression analysis revealed that year of study, physical activity, and smoking status significantly predicted EE whilst gender, year of study, and institution significantly predicted DP. PA was significantly predicted by alcohol binge score, year of study, gender, and physical activity. Conclusions Burnout is present in undergraduate medical students in the United Kingdom, and health behaviours, particularly physical activity, predict components of burnout. Gender, year of study, and institution also appear to influence the prevalence of burnout. Encouraging medical students to make healthier lifestyle choices early in their medical training may reduce the likelihood of the development of burnout. PMID:25160716

Cecil, Jo; McHale, Calum; Hart, Jo; Laidlaw, Anita

2014-01-01

172

Keeping Dissection Alive for Medical Students  

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Traditional dissection teaching is being reduced in a number of medical schools, particularly in the United Kingdom. In response to this, 12 medical students from Warwick University, UK, traveled to the Island of Grenada for an intensive extracurricular dissection course at St. George's University. This course not only benefited the host…

Chambers, James; Emlyn-Jones, Daniel

2009-01-01

173

Teaching Undergraduate Medical Students the Neurological Examination.  

Science.gov (United States)

The University of Arizona College of Medicine program described extends the role of practical instructor or programmed patient to that of evaluator and teacher of neurological examinations skills for preclinical medical students. The process may help improve the quality of medical education without increasing the size of clinical faculty. (LBH)

Laguna, Jose F.; Stillman, Paula L.

1978-01-01

174

Attitudes to cadaveric organ donation in Irish preclinical medical students.  

LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

There is a worldwide shortage of organs for transplantation. It has been shown that the attitude of healthcare professionals can improve the rates of organ donation, and that educational programs aimed at improving both attitudes and knowledge base of professionals can have positive outcomes. Although there has been research carried out on this topic, there has been none in Ireland. Anatomy dissection can be a stressor to medical students-we investigate the attitudes of Irish students to organ donation and how they change with exposure to anatomy dissection. A questionnaire was administered to first year students in the School of Medicine in University College Dublin, Ireland, three times over a nine-week period at the commencement of classes in an academic year. The attitudes of the students were positive throughout regarding organ donation by a stranger, a family member, or themselves. There was, however, a significant decrease in support for the donation of a family member\\'s organs in a minority of students. Irish students\\' attitudes to postmortem organ donation are positive and are not changed by exposure to the dissecting room. There is support for the donation of organs, and willingness among students to donate their own organs and support donation by family members.

Cahill, Kevin C

2011-06-01

175

Career choices among medical students in Bangladesh  

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Full Text Available SM Moslehuddin Ahmed1, Md Anwarul Azim Majumdar2, Rezina Karim3, Sayeeda Rahman2, Nuzhat Rahman41Department of Community Medicine, Uttara Adhunik Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 2Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, Bradford, UK; 3Department of Microbiology, Uttara Adhunik Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 4Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAIntroduction: Information regarding career choices of medical students is important to plan human resources for health, design need-based educational programs, and ensure equitable and quality health care services in a country.Aim: The aim of the study is to identify career choices, nature of career, intended practice locations, and reasons for career choices of Bangladesh medical students.Method: First-, third-, and fifth-year students of Bangladesh Medical College and Uttara Adhunik Medical College completed a self-report questionnaire on career choices, nature of career, intended practice locations, and reasons for career choices. The students were requested to choose three long-term choices from the given specialties.Results: A total of 132 students responded (46 males and 86 females and response rate was 75%. The popular choices (first choice among males and females were medical specialty, surgical specialty, obstetrics and gynecology, and general practice. For first, second, and third choices altogether, male students chose surgical specialties and female students preferred medical specialties. The leading reasons for selecting a specialty were personal interest and wide job opportunity. More than 67% of respondents wanted to join private services and about 90% chose major cities as practice locations. About 43% of respondents expressed willingness to practice medicine in Bangladesh, whereas 51% of total respondents wanted to practice abroad.Discussion: Majority of students intended to specialize in established clinical specialties and subsequently practice in major cities, and more than half wanted to immigrate to other countries. Basic medical subjects and service-oriented (lifestyle-related and preventive/social medical specialties were found to be less attractive. If this pattern continues, Bangladesh will suffer a chronic shortage of health personnel in certain specialties and in rural areas.Conclusions: Reorientation of health care and medical education is needed along with policy settings to attract doctors to the scarcity and high-priority disciplines so that imbalances encountered would be minimal in future.Keywords: career choices, medical students, Bangladesh 

SM Moslehuddin Ahmed

2011-02-01

176

Psychological Stress amongst Maltese Undergraduate ?Medical Students  

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Introduction: The undergraduate medical course is known to be a stressful course within the ?University structure but there are no national studies available to review this.?Objective: To compare the levels psychological stress between medical and non-medical students ?and to distinguish stress levels over the five years of undergraduate study of the Bachelor of ?Medicine and Surgery Honours degree at the University of Malta.?Method: Two separate depression and stress related questi...

Jonathan Mamo; Raphael Buttigieg; Diana Vassallo; Laura Azzopardi

2012-01-01

177

THE TECHNOLOGY OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL STUDENT COMPETENCE  

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Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents the stages and technology of professional student competence of students in higher vocational school.Method or the methodology of the work: Theoretical and methodological basis of the proposed technology of formation of professional student competence in higher education are: a synergetic approach, student-centered approach, social learning theory, the activity approach, the concept of humane education.Results: In the article the theoretical and methodological basis of the statement of technology, disclosed pedagogical conditions and principles of the technology of formation of professional student competence of higher educational institutions as a result of own personal readiness.Field of application of the results: the educational system of higher education institutions.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-1-23

????? ???????? ???????

2013-04-01

178

THE TECHNOLOGY OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL STUDENT COMPETENCE  

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Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents the stages and technology of professional student competence of students in higher vocational school. Method or the methodology of the work: Theoretical and methodological basis of the proposed technology of formation of professional student competence in higher education are: a synergetic approach, student-centered approach, social learning theory, the activity approach, the concept of humane education. Results: In the article the theoretical and methodological basis of the statement of technology, disclosed pedagogical conditions and principles of the technology of formation of professional student competence of higher educational institutions as a result of own personal readiness. Field of application of the results: the educational system of higher education institutions.

Yakovlev Boris Petrovich

2013-01-01

179

Computer awareness among medical students: a survey.  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of the study was to assess the attitude of Edinburgh University medical students towards computers and to evaluate the effects of changes in the curriculum and intercalated BSc towards computer knowledge. During March to November 1995 a questionnaire was distributed in lectures, seminars and tutorials to all Edinburgh University medical students. Overall, 65% of students returned the questionnaire, divided equally between both genders. Only 2% of students had not used a computer in the previous year. The most frequent application used was E-mail and the most frequent site, the Greenfield suite micro lab, within the medical school. The average score for self-perceived computer knowledge on a scale of 0-10 was 4.19. This score was significantly higher for the students who own a computer and who have an intercalated BSc honours degree as well as the pre-clinical students compared to the clinical students. There is also a strong correlation between computer use and doing a second year special option module. With regards to attitude towards computers, 86% of students agreed that computer skills will be beneficial to them in their future career and 62% of all students wanted a structured course in computer use as part of the MB ChB course. There has been a general increase in computer literacy amongst the medical students in Edinburgh. This is specially so for the pre-clinical students who have had the brunt of the changes in the curriculum. The tendency for both the lower knowledge and use by the clinical students can, in part, be due to the accessibility of computers to these students. PMID:9231143

Asgari-Jirhandeh, N; Haywood, J

1997-05-01

180

Advising adolescents on the use of psychotropic medication: attitudes among medical and psychology students  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that medical students are more aware of the benefits of psychotropic treatment than are members of the general public, and that the more knowledge students acquire about psychiatry and pharmacology, the more favorable their attitudes become towards psychotropic drugs and other treatments. Objectives This study among students investigates the relationship between certain aspects of personality and attitudes towards advising adolescents with psychosocial problems about the use of psychotropic medication. Methods Two groups of healthcare students were recruited from universities in Eastern France. 41 fourth-year medical students (MS who had completed their psychiatry course, and 76 third-year psychology students (PS in the faculty of human sciences. Respondents completed a self-administered instrument (20 brief case studies, and a personality inventory at the end of a lecture. Participation was voluntary and unpaid. Results MS would recommend psychotropic drugs in 40% of the 20 cases, PS in 27%. MS who would prescribe psychotropic medication differed in personality profile from PS. MS with a tendency to experience anger and related states such as frustration, and who did not see fulfilling moral obligations as important were more likely to prescribe psychotropic drugs. Also more likely to recommend psychotropic drugs, but for different reasons, were PS who were susceptible to stress but not shy or socially anxious, who showed friendliness but little interest in others, and who lacked distance in their decision-making. Conclusion Health promotion is not simply a matter of educating those young people who take psychotropic drugs – health professionals must also question the criteria that inform their decisions. It is as important to investigate the attitudes of the future health professionals (advisers or prescribers as it is to focus on consumer-related issues.

Spitz Elisabeth

2007-07-01

 
 
 
 
181

Professional Activities, Needed Competencies and Training Needs of Medical Librarians in Pakistan  

Science.gov (United States)

The study aims to explore the professional activities, needed competencies and education/training needs of medical librarians in Pakistan. The following questions guided the study: what are the current professional activities of medical librarians in Pakistan? What is their perception of the competencies needed of medical librarians? And what are…

Ullah, Midrar; Ameen, Kanwal; Bakhtar, Salman

2011-01-01

182

Training and Certification of Teachers and Trainers: The Professionalization of Medical Education.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reviews professionalization of medical education and elaborates on a conceptual framework for understanding reforms. Uses a concept map to demonstrate factors influencing professionalization. (Contains 74 references.) (Author/YDS)

Eitel, Florian; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Tesche, Arthur

2000-01-01

183

Medication therapy management clinic: perception of healthcare professionals in a University medical center setting  

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Full Text Available Objective: To determine the overall perception and utilization of the pharmacist managed medication therapy management (MTM clinic services, by healthcare professionals in a large, urban, university medical care setting.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey sent to 195 healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Illinois Outpatient Care Center to determine their perception and utilization of the MTM clinic. The survey consisted of 12 questions and was delivered through a secure online application. Results: Sixty-two healthcare professionals (32% completed the survey. 82% were familiar with the MTM clinic, and 63% had referred patients to the clinic. Medication adherence and disease state management was the most common reason for referral. Lack of knowledge on the appropriate referral procedure was the prominent reason for not referring patients to the MTM clinic. Of the providers that were aware of MTM services, 44% rated care as ‘excellent’, 44% as ‘good’, 5% as ‘fair’, and 0% stated ‘poor’. Strengths of MTM clinic identified by healthcare providers included in-depth education to patients, close follow-up, and detailed medication reconciliation provided by MTM clinic pharmacists. Of those familiar with MTM clinic, recommendations included; increase marketing efforts to raise awareness of the MTM clinic service, create collaborative practice agreements between MTM pharmacists and physicians, and ensure that progress notes are more concise.Conclusion: In a large, urban, academic institution MTM clinic is perceived as a valuable resource to optimize patient care by providing patients with in-depth education as it relates to their prescribed medications and disease states. These identified benefits of MTM clinic lead to frequent patient referrals specifically for aid with medication adherence and disease state management.

Shah M

2013-09-01

184

How Student Affairs Professionals Learn to Advocate: A Phenomenological Study  

Science.gov (United States)

This phenomenological study examined how student affairs professionals learn advocacy skills and what they learn in their education on this topic. Findings based on 22 interviews show participants felt underprepared by their graduate programs for the myriad challenges involved with advocating for students. Findings indicate participants found…

Harrison, Laura M.

2014-01-01

185

Developing Professionals: Student Experiences of a Real-Client Project  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated the learning potential of the student experience of working with real clients in a final-year undergraduate unit that aims to develop professional skills. Students, working in consultancy teams, developed communication strategies for a not-for-profit organisation. A teaching intervention was trialled late in semester to…

Fitch, Kate

2011-01-01

186

Medical Students' Learning from Patient-Led Teaching: Experiential versus Biomedical Knowledge  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to explore how medical students perceive the experience of learning from patient instructors (patients with rheumatism who teach health professionals and students) in the context of coupled faculty-led and patient-led teaching session. This was an explorative study with a qualitative approach based on focus group…

Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

2014-01-01

187

Features of professional self-identification in modern students  

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Full Text Available We analyze the results of a study conducted on a sample of students, the purpose of which was diagnostic of their future careers motives. The data obtained using modified and supplemented questionnaire by B.A. Grushin and V.V. Chikin, helps to understand the motives of future professional activities of the following four groups of respondents: students who will not work within their profession, students who have not decided yet, students who will work within profession, young professionals who are already working within specialty. In the article are presented the similarities and differences between these two groups in the structure of professional motivation, identified in the course of the study. The ways of further study of the problem are outlined.

O.V. Vaskova

2013-07-01

188

ATTITUDE TOWARDS CHEATING AMONG STUDENTS OF PROFESSIONALAND NON PROFESSIONAL COURSES  

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Full Text Available A study was done to compare the attitude towards cheating of the professional and nonprofessional course students. In this study the sample consisted of 20 professional and 20 nonprofessional course students, studying in DEI and University. For the measurement of Attitude towards Cheating, Attitude towards cheating scale by Sharma was administered on the sample. It consists of 35 statements which are either positive or negative. Responses were to be obtained on five point scale. t-test was used for statistical analysis. The finding of this study showed that the students of professional courses have more positive attitude towards cheating as compared to the students of nonprofessional course. The value of t=16.59** was found to be statistically significant at .01 level between the two group of subjects.

SHRAWAN SHINDE

2012-12-01

189

The Sound of Music: Transforming Medical Students into Reflective Practitioners  

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Full Text Available There is a growing focus on the introduction of courses in humanities in medical education. Music is not a widely-used tool in medical education. It has unique features that make it an excellent educational resource for the possibility to express emotions. Within minutes, topics of interest in learning medicine, such as loss, compassion, sorrow, and solidarity can be identified and used in pedagogical processes. Music—like other art forms—can deal with the emotional universe of the student. Promoting a reflective attitude within an academic discipline requires the creation of space to make it formal. The Public Health Department of Jundiai Medical School (Sao Paulo, Brazil offers a special course on family medicine core values, led by a SOBRAMFA Medical Education & Humanism faculty member. The process of understanding a student’s experience has allowed for the unveiling of a phenomenon that encompasses the student’s inner world as he/she attends to his/her medical training. The music is played on the outside resonates with the story and emotions of the student. Students realize that the pace imposed by the medical school does not allow them to reflect on either their own lives or their formation. The musical experience allows students to hear their feelings and share them with the professor and peers. They are surprised by memories and feelings that surface that they were unaware of or could not remember. These feelings are presented in themes that organize the affective experience of students, mobilized by the music. Several themes have emerged, such as the search for the self; family; vocational doubts; relationships with peers, professors, and patients. The findings of the experience of the music spectrum come in, offering numerous prospects for development in the context of medical education, as noted in the themes that emerged. As the basic experience we have of the world is emotional, the music—this form of human knowledge of affective tone—also becomes educational force, because the teaching process is not limited to transmission of content. Instead, more importantly, it implies that the teacher in development processes of meaning and significance enable the learner to reflect and transform the everyday practice, especially in medicine, where the interpersonal relationship is the basis for the full realization of future professional action.

Marco Aurelio Janaudis

2013-06-01

190

Professional Identity Development in Nursing Students: Eisner’s Evaluation Model  

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Full Text Available Introduction: Professional identity development is one of the main concerns of nursing education. This study aimed to evaluate effective educational components on nursing studentsprofessional identity using Eisner’s model of criticism and connoisseurship. Methods: Eisner’s Criticism and Connoisseurship Model were used for a qualitative evaluation of the nursing education system. This model includes four steps of descriptive, interpretative, evaluative and thematic evaluation. Data were collected by semi-structured interview and observation. Participants were 15 students and faculty members of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran, who were selected by purposive sampling. Data were analyzed by Eisner’s model. Results: Four major themes included student admission, educational system defects, reality shock, and self-esteem. These themes that emerged from educational evaluation are effective in developing the professional identity of Iranian nursing students. Conclusion: It seems that changing the admission process, presenting the nursing discipline to students as much as possible, creating a more realistic education, making an exclusive body of knowledge, and following successful role models are helpful in studentsprofessional identity development.

Laleh Hosseini Shahidi

2014-05-01

191

Chest radiograph interpretation by medical students  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

AIM: To assess the ability of final year medical students to interpret conventional chest radiographs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten conventional chest radiographs were selected from a teaching hospital radiology department library that were good radiological examples of common conditions. All were conditions that a medical student should be expected to recognize by the end of their training. One normal radiograph was included. The radiographs were shown to 52 final year medical students who were asked to describe their findings. RESULTS: The median score achieved was 12.5 out of 20 (range 6-18). There was no difference between the median scores of male and female students (12.5 and 12.3, respectively, p=0.82) but male students were more likely to be certain of their answers than female students (median certainty scores 23.0 and 14.0, respectively). The overall degree of certainty was low. On no radiograph were more than 25% of students definite about their answer. Students had received little formal radiology teaching (2-42 h, median 21) and few expressed an interest in radiology as a career. Only two (3.8%) students thought they were good at interpreting chest radiographs, 17 (32.7%) thought they were bad or awful. CONCLUSION: Medical students reaching the end of their training do not perform well at interpreting simple chest radiographs. They lack confidence and have received little formal radiological tuition. Perhaps as a result, few are interested in radiology as asult, few are interested in radiology as a career, which is a matter for concern in view of the current shortage of radiologists in the UK

192

A Proposal for Clinical Genetics (Genetics in Medicine) Education for Medical Technologists and Other Health Professionals in Japan  

Science.gov (United States)

Since the completion of the Human Genome Project, technology has developed markedly in fields such as medical genetics and genetic counseling in the medical arena. In particular, this technology has advanced the discovery of and ways of understanding various genes responsible for genetic diseases, and genetic polymorphisms thought to be associated with disease. Some have been implicated as factors in common lifestyle diseases and have increased the significance of genetic testing. In Japan, doctors and other health professionals, such as nurse and medical technologists have been engaged in genetic testing and genetic disease treatment. Chromosomal and gene aberrations were detected mainly by medical technologists. However, due to the nature of medical technologists who have to provide various clinical tests, such as blood test, pre-medical technology students are required to cover tremendous knowledge of different academic fields to pass the national exam. Therefore, the time allowed for such students to study chromosomal and gene analysis is quite limited. Moreover, they are forced to enter the medical setting without receiving sufficient training. Among them, only few medical technologists specialize in chromosomal and gene analysis. However, with the advancement of clinical genetics and development of chromosomal and gene analysis, conducting clinical practice is becoming more and more difficult for medical technologists who just passed the national exam. Also, doctors and other health professionals have not been able to keep up with service demands either. This paper attempts to address knowledge and skills gaps (especially clinical genetics, English, and ICT literacy) of medical technologists and we propose educational methods to prepare medical genetics professionals in Japan to meet these gaps.

Kohzaki, Hidetsugu

2014-01-01

193

Associations of Pass-Fail Outcomes with Psychological Health of First-Year Medical Students in a Malaysian Medical School  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Objectives: The demanding and intense environment of medical training can create excessive pressures on medical students that eventually lead to unfavorable consequences, either at a personal or professional level. These consequences can include poor academic performance and impaired cognitive ability. This study was designed to explore associations between pass-fail outcome and psychological health parameters (i.e. stress, anxiety, and depression symptoms). Methods: A cross-sectional study w...

Yusoff, Muhamad S. B.

2013-01-01

194

Professional Notes: Reaching All Students via Technology  

Science.gov (United States)

Music teachers are often the Pied Pipers of their schools, attracting the interest of students by the nature of the subject they teach. Their students who excel are often the best and brightest, since music reading and music production demand higher-level thinking skills, motor ability, and in the case of ensemble performance, social skills. As…

Nelson, Deborah

2013-01-01

195

Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices Regarding Whole Body Donation Among Medical Professionals in a Hospital in India  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes a survey conducted among medical practitioners in India. The study's objective was to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of whole body donation among medical professionals in India. Outcomes and results are discussed.

2011-05-05

196

[Family and religious traditions present in medical discourses by medical professionals about children with genetic diseases].  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explores the influences of cultural traditions rooted in the tone of medical discourse at the Instituto Fernandes Figueira/ Fundação Oswaldo Cruz by physicians regarding children with genetic diseases involving malformations and mental retardation, as well as reflections upon the professional care for these children. Data were collected using oral interviews (in the form of conversational narratives) and were submitted to semiotic analysis. The results pointed to four main cultural traditions present in medical discourse: the norm, the reason, the family and the Jewish-Christian religiosity. This article, however, focuses on the latter two, emphasizing how the notion of the family, mainly the mythification of the mother, can make the child with a genetic disease 'invisible,' in addition to contributing towards womanhood being underestimated when contrasted with motherhood. Such concepts overlap with those brought by the religious traditions and directly influence the medical perceptions towards patients and their families. PMID:22267048

Martins, Antilia Januária; Cardoso, Maria Helena Cabral de Almeida; Llerena, Juan Clinton; Moreira, Martha Cristina Nunes

2012-02-01

197

Homeopathy as elective in undergraduate medical education - an opportunity for teaching professional core skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Aim: The evaluation of medical students' perceptions regarding an elective study course in Homeopathy in which small groups have participated annually for six years, at the Institute for General Practice and Family Medicine at the Otto Von Guericke University, Magdeburg. The course was assessed in terms of concept, delivery, and influence on students' professional development. Methodology: Since the autumn term of 2008/09, three group discussions have been conducted with thirty of the course participants (3 total electives). These discussions were semi-structured and guided by central topics; the analysis was qualitative and guided by content. Results: The overall concept and implementation of the course were very successful. The main learning themes, that is, an emphasis on a more holistic and individual view of patients and the importance of a cooperative partnership between doctor and patient, were positively rated, regardless of the students' attitudes towards homeopathy. Their assessment was based on their previous experience and a comparison with conventional medical education. Conclusion: Homeopathy as an elective subject is not only useful for acquiring specific knowledge in integrative medicine, but also important as a means of developing physicians' core skills that are often not well considered in conventional medical education. PMID:24575158

Lehmann, Bianca; Kremer, Brigitte; Werwick, Katrin; Herrmann, Markus

2014-01-01

198

Faculty and students perceive common tenets associated with medical student curriculum reform  

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Full Text Available Objectives: Medical school faculty and students actively engaged in curriculum reform often experience angst. Change management literature emphasizes that grounding change in common values is critical to managing stakeholder angst and ultimately successful change. However the literature provides only limited descriptions of the shared underlying features as perceived by faculty and students associated with curriculum reform. This study sought to bridge this gap by identifying the underlying student and faculty beliefs associated with success in medical student education programs and reform. Methods: A qualitative study approach using an appreciative inquiry interview methodology was selected given its proven success as an inquiry technique for change management. To identify cross-cutting curriculum success tenets, a purposeful sample of 24 stakeholders participating in an established curriculum and/or new integrated curriculum were selected: 12 students and 12 faculty seven of whom were curriculum/college leaders. Two rounds of appreciative inquiry interviews focusing on successes associated with medical student education were conducted. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, coded, and then analyzed to delineate common themes and cross-cutting tenets using constant comparative methodology. Results: Analysis revealed six underlying themes associated with success for students and faculty: engagement of students and faculty in education, sense of community and collaboration, faculty/student relationships, active learning, faculty excitement/willingness to teach leads to impactful student learning, and identity/professional formation. Conclusions: The identified tenets associated with successful medical student education programs can be used to manage a critical element of curriculum form: stakeholder change angst.

Alexandria J. Bear

2013-09-01

199

Learning to be a Nurse. Professional Identity in Nursing Students  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The main aim of this article is to present particular aspects which have been referred to by research-based literature as being important to the understanding of how nursing students structure their professional identity. These elements have emerged from a theoretical research study, prior to the current investigation, (under the PhD in Education Sciences, in the specialized Adult Education area of the FPCE-UL) on the professional identity construction process experienced and described by nur...

Miguel Nunes Serra

2008-01-01

200

Physiological assessment of military professional adaptation and organism functional status of higher military schools resident students  

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Full Text Available The results of the study of organism functional status of resident students of military medical higher schools in different situations and modes of professional education (during their study day, round-the clock shifts in a clinic, duties, and an examination period in the process of military professional adaptation have been analyzed. The technique of functional body status optimization which takes into account both psycho-physiological specificity of military professional training as well as the regularities of psycho-physiologic reserve-capacity changes and military professional adaptation has been worked out. It constitutes the sum total of physiologically proved structural and functional components such as adaptation improvements, correction and recreation of functional body status

Kondrashov V.V.

2010-09-01

 
 
 
 
201

Knowledge and Attitudes about Organ Donation Among Medical Students  

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Full Text Available In almost every country, the organ supply for transplantation does not match the increasing demand; health professionals may play an important role in eliminating barriers and increasing organ donation. Therefore, assessing medical students’ knowledge and attitudes regarding organ donation is important for the future organ supply. Some 409 of 508 first- and second-year medical students answered an anonymous, multiple-choice questionnaire about demographic variables, knowledge about transplant issues, and willingness to donate organs. The mean age was 20.3±1.8 years (range: 17 to 29 years; 50.1% were male, 49.9% were female. Some 44.8% of the total respondents reported that they had sufficient knowledge about organ donation, and 40.1% reported knowledge about organ transplantation. The primary source of their knowledge was reported as the media (72.1%. Willingness to donate their own organs was 58.4% and willingness as to their relatives’ organs was 39.9%. The acceptance of live organ donation was higher (74.6% than cadaver donation. Only 1.2% had a organ donation card. Female students were more willing to donate their own and their relatives’ organs. Since medical students are prospective leaders of promoting organ donation action, these issues should be taught within the context of social medicine lessons, and desirable behavioral changes should be implemented.

N. Bilgel

2006-09-01

202

Introducing students to the medical literature.  

Science.gov (United States)

It is extremely difficut to determine if it really makes a difference to provide a medical journal to medical students. Does it alter their reading habits? Does it indeed form the basis for learning? In 1976 84% of the third year class and in 1972 69% (n=97), personally subscribed to a Journal designated. In the fourth year class, 75% (n=149) subscribed in 1976 and 58% (n=82) in 1972. The conclusion is that the New England Journal of Medicine Project can be viewed as an endeavour which meets the need of students. PMID:431422

Kennedy, W R; Warren, K; Biscup, R

1979-03-01

203

Learning to be a Nurse. Professional Identity in Nursing Students  

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Full Text Available The main aim of this article is to present particular aspects which have been referred to by research-based literature as being important to the understanding of how nursing students structure their professional identity. These elements have emerged from a theoretical research study, prior to the current investigation, (under the PhD in Education Sciences, in the specialized Adult Education area of the FPCE-UL on the professional identity construction process experienced and described by nursing students throughout their basic training. Up to now, three main theoretical dimensions have emerged: The professional identities of the nursing profession itself and its construction process from a historical perspective; the discourses and practices in the context of teaching nursing and the experience of the nursing students. Finally, some aspects related to the methodology and carrying out of the study have also been mentioned.

Miguel Nunes Serra

2008-01-01

204

Medical students’ anxiety on beginning clinical studies  

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Full Text Available Background: The switch to the hospital-based course represents a significant stressful change in medical students’ experience. Objective: To investigate the anxiety levels in students in various clinical situations. Method: A 40-item questionnaire based study was conducted to assess students’ anxieties about potential anxiety provoking clinical situations and respondent ratings were requested for each of the 40 items on the list. Results: ‘Getting diagnoses wrong’ was the biggest worry overall and of male students whereas female students were most anxious about ‘talking with dying patients’. The overall mean anxiety scores for males and females were not different. Females compared to males had statistically higher anxiety scores in only 2/40 situations. Conclusions: Pre-clinical students should have early introduction to clinical and community settings.

Syed Imran Ali Shah

2013-07-01

205

Writing about an experience of illness in medical students  

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Full Text Available Kun Hwang,1 Huan Fan,1 Se Won Hwang2 1Department of Plastic Surgery, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, Korea; 2Peninsula Medical School, Exeter, UK Abstract: Pathography is defined as “historical biography from a medical, psychological, and psychiatric viewpoint.” We thought that writing about an experience of illness might help students understand patients’ experience and in turn grow in terms of self-understanding. Participants included 151 medical students. Students wrote about their own experience of illness and were asked to answer questions from the Likert scale. Most students wrote about themselves (79.2%; however, some students (20.8% wrote about the illness of others. Among the 149 pathographies, ecopathography was most frequent (30.9%, followed by testimonial pathography (25.5%; angry pathography (13.4% and alternative pathography (12.1% were relatively less frequent. Eighty-eight pathographies (59.1% showed 120 expressions of family relationship. Among the 120 cases, worrying about family members was most frequent (47.5%, followed by reliance on a family member (32.5%. All students wrote about the enlightenment experienced on returning to daily life. The sense of belonging together was most frequent (38.3%, followed by gratitude for living (20.8%, resolution to be a good doctor (18.1%, and a will to live and be healthy (12.1%. Answers on the Likert scale (total 5 for pathography beneficence were very high in understanding desirable doctor image (4.46, attaining morals and personality as a health care professional (4.49, and understanding basic communication skills (4.46. Writing about an experience of illness allows students to better understand patients’ experience and to grow in self-understanding. Keywords: writing, disease, patients, narration, pathography

Hwang K

2013-08-01

206

Psychoactive drug use among practicing physicians and medical students.  

Science.gov (United States)

We surveyed random samples of 500 practicing physicians and 504 medical students in a New England state during 1984-1985; 70 percent of the physicians and 79 percent of the students responded. Fifty-nine percent of the physicians and 78 percent of the students reported that they had used psychoactive drugs at some time in their lives. In both groups, recreational use most often involved marijuana and cocaine, and self-treatment most often involved tranquilizers and opiates. In the previous year, 25 percent of the physicians had treated themselves with a psychoactive drug, and 10 percent had used one recreationally. Although most of the use was experimental or infrequent, 10 percent of the physicians reported current regular drug use (once a month or more often) and 3 percent had histories of drug dependence. More physicians and medical students had used psychoactive drugs at some time than had comparable samples of pharmacists and pharmacy students. The results suggest a need for renewed professional education about the risks of drug misuse. PMID:3748091

McAuliffe, W E; Rohman, M; Santangelo, S; Feldman, B; Magnuson, E; Sobol, A; Weissman, J

1986-09-25

207

EPORTFOLIO FOR THE PROFESSIONAL INSERTION OF STUDENTS  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This is a presentation of the online tool designed at Université de Bretagne Sud to help students define and manage their personal lifelong project through an e-portfolio that records personal information. This e-portfolio will follow the person throughout his/her career as it will be kept available even after his/her university studies. Along with the e-portfolio, a set of activities based on university curriculum will be developed to help the student build, as well as learn to manage, his/...

Perennes, Laurence; Duhaut, Dominique

2009-01-01

208

Factors Related to Medical Students' Research Activities  

Science.gov (United States)

The study reported assessed different aspects related to the research activities undertaken by students in medical school. An extensive questionnaire was administered to graduating seniors that covered degree of participation in research, length of time, circumstances, importance of pay, and level of resulting benefit. (Editor/PG)

Paiva, Rosalia E. A.; And Others

1975-01-01

209

Medical Student Enrolment in Canadian Universities.  

Science.gov (United States)

Statistical returns from the 12 Canadian medical schools revealed in 1962, for the fourth consecutive year, a larger first-year enrolment (946, 970, 1006 and 1057). This is attributed to an increase in qualified applicants and expansion in size of the first-year class in the face of a physician shortage. The proportion of women graduates increased from 5.2% in 1958 to 10.1% in 1962 (U.S.A., 5.6%). The academic calibre of entering students showed little change over five years, 1957-61. Recent impressions indicate an upward swing. Loss from withdrawals and dismissals was chiefly in first year (9.1%, 7.6% and 9.0%: 1959-60 to 1961-62), 40% being attributed to "nonacademic" causes. Foreign students now comprise 12.6% of the medical student body. A decrease in American and an increase in Commonwealth student numbers was noted. Recommendations include attention to drop-outs before and after registration and provision for stand-by applicants; the general adoption of some objective measure of qualification, e.g. the Medical College Admission Test; an on-going registry of applicants to Canadian medical schools for later retrospective studies and re-examination of admission policies for non-residents. PMID:20327471

Macleod, J W

1963-04-01

210

Trend of Internet use among medical students  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The internet has become the world's biggest library.The present cross-sectional study was conducted in the Government Medical College, Jammu to assess the trend of computer and internet use among undergraduate (UG)and postgraduate (PG) students.The reseults of the present study suggested that internet use among UGs AND PGs has incresed.

Sharma, R.; Verma, U.; Sawhney, V.; Arora, S.; Kapoor, V.

2006-01-01

211

Deficiencies of history taking among medical students.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

The history obtained by our medical students is deficient and they generally lack the basic skills of interviewing. Many factors contribute to this, (namely deficient training, lack of staff and deficit of teaching hospitals. The author discussed possible solutions to remedy the history taking deficiencies.

Awad M. Ahmed

2002-08-01

212

Summer Students: getting professional at CERN  

CERN Multimedia

The summer season at CERN is known for the traditional visit of Summer Students coming from Member and non-Member States. This time, a total of 176 future scientists are spending part of their summer with us, learning and working in the laboratory. Summer Students enjoying a lecture on particle physics by Ronald Kleiss. Now that summer has finally arrived, you'll have noticed some changes at CERN: longer queues at the bar, faces you don't recognise in the corridors, and a breath of fresh air, but where is it coming from? The answer is easy: the Summer Students are here! Aged between 20 and 27, this group of 176 future scientists has been selected from 600 candidates to spend their summer at the Laboratory. This year, there are 24 more 'Summies' than last following a recommendation in the 2000 5-yearly review to increase the number of students. The Summies mainly come from Member States, but this year there are also 11 Americans, two Mexicans, an Armenian, a Turk, a Pakistani and two South Africans. Judith N...

2001-01-01

213

Selected physical characteristics of medical students  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to measure selected anthropometrical characteris-tics, motor abilities and cardiorespiratory functions of medical students. Eighty-seven students were involved in this investigation. The students were categorized into five groups: (1 recreational, doing sport activities irregularly, (2 basketball and (3 handball players, having training at least two times per week, as well as men (4 and women (5 students entering medical school. In all groups the mean body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio were at the upper level of the normal range, while body fat percentage was similar to standards for sedentary subjects. Better motor per-formances were obtained from the basketball and handball players than from the other groups. Static strength for the sample was somewhat above the normal sedentary level. The resting blood pressure and heart rate for most subjects were in the normal. Cardiovascular risk factors were found in six students. Their systolic blood pressure was above 140 mm Hg. There were no sub-jects identified with low blood pressure. The heart rate was elevated for three students from the recreational group, and in the women. Bradycardia did not occur. The vital capacity and the ability to hold one?s breath was at the upper level of the normal range. The present results emphasis the need to improve the students` prevention oriented life style through participation in exercising.

Dr. Lajos Ángyán

2003-01-01

214

A STUDY OF SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND PARENTAL EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND OF FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS IN MEDICAL COLLEGE BHAVNGAR  

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Full Text Available Carrier selection is one of the important major question in student life. Various factors affects individual’s carrier selection. Among various factors socioeconomic status and parental educational background is most important, which affects student’s carrier selection. More than student’s interest in particular field for higher education he should be affordable for necessary money required as well he should have proper guidance and inspiration for higher education. Primary guidance of students starts at home so if parents are highly qualified in education, student can get good guidance and motivation at home. In present study we tried to evaluate Socio-economic and Parental educational background of Medical students. Study was conducted in first year medical students of Govt. Medical College, Bhavnagar. Students were given objective questionnaire regarding information like their native place whether in urban or rural area, income of their parents and educational level of their parents. Data was compiled and analyzed. It was observed that students from good socio-economical and high parental educational background have good chances to get admission in good professional courses. Schools in rural area should be upgraded and this students should provide necessary help and guidance to meet their needs.

Ghuntla Tejas P.

2012-09-01

215

Understanding of cardiovascular phenomena in medical students  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Undergraduate (UG) medical students of II Semester of different institutions were surveyed to determine the prevalence of 13 different misconceptions (conceptual difficulties) about cardiovascular physiology. The prevalence of these misconceptions ranged from 75.60% to 25.30%. Methods: A list of questionnaire was selected that were diagnostic for difficulties that can seriously interfere with students mastery of the topic. Diagnostic questions were generally of the form: 'If x increases, then will y increases/decrease/show no change'. Results: The result suggests that students have a number of underlying conceptual difficulties about cardio-vascular phenomena. Our possible source of some misconceptions is the students inability to apply simple general models to specific cardiovascular phenomena. Conclusion: UG students may understand less than they appear to 'know'. Some implications of these results for teachers of physiology and medicine are explained. (author)

216

Personality and performance of preclinical medical students.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study deals with personality variables of medical students in relation to their academic success in the preclinical stage. One hundred and one students completed the 16PF Questionnaire at the beginning of their medical course and the scores were analysed in relation to their marks obtained at the end of the 2-year preclinical stage. This study shows that the 16PF Questionnaire can be a useful instrument for identifying personality variables in candidates who are likely to have academic problems and those who are likely to do well in the preclinical stage of a medical course. Students of urban origin and the eldest in the family performed better in their preclinical years. Performance was not related to sex, ethnic group, family size of entrance qualification into medicine. Personality variables of being enthusiastic, venturesome, self-opinionated, imaginative, experimenting, resourceful and driven correlate positively with performance, whereas being self-assured has negative correlation. Problem students were more reserved, emotionally less stable and more apprehensive than non-problem students. PMID:8594392

Peng, R; Khaw, H H; Edariah, A B

1995-07-01

217

Being Professional : Students Struggling in School and Traineeship  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The paper discusses students' process of acquiring a feeling of being professionals within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on what seems to be a paradox within the programme: the future care helper being constructed within the overall term ‘the professional care helper’ in the school setting but the job being closely related to daily life's routine tasks; the paper points to difficulties for students in identifying the exact content of the term ‘professional’. Furthermore students seem to be uncertain about their ‘professionalism’ in relation to other health professionals, when they are in the work place setting. The analysis indicates that the care work programme still struggles to make a clear distinction between the former non-paid female domestic work and the current work carried out by the care workers. The analysis mobilises the concept ‘storyline’, c.f. Bronwyn Davies and the empirical material consists of observations and interviews in the theoretical periodsand in the traineeships.

Jensen, Anne Winther

218

Promoting well-being among veterinary medical students: protocol and preliminary findings.  

Science.gov (United States)

The veterinary medical profession has been the focus of increased concern as students and professionals have been found to be at risk of poor mental health outcomes. Two interventions were proposed as an attempt to improve student well-being individually and within romantic relationships. Preliminary results indicated that students who participated in the interventions experienced significant improvements in decreasing symptoms of depression and stress and relative improvements in relationship satisfaction with their partner. These noteworthy findings provide encouragement for the development of new interventions and future research focused on enhancing veterinary medical students' well-being. PMID:25000881

Siqueira Drake, Adryanna; Hafen, McArthur; Rush, Bonnie R

2014-01-01

219

"Walk with me…" : A journey of self-directed holistic cancer education by medical students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Cancer education offers an ideal opportunity to inspire and initiate medical students in life-long, self-directed learning. Early and innovative out-of-the-box learning experiences, tailored to appeal to a multi-media savvy generation of medical students, form the theme of these reflections. Students never fail to surprise teachers when the seed of an idea appeals and motivates their minds. 'Walk with me…' is the story of a journey together of students, mentors, patients, and the manifold professionals who manage breast cancer. PMID:23884546

Lakhtakia, Ritu; Al Badi, Majid; Al Obaidani, Athari; Al Jarrah, Adil

2014-03-01

220

The Impact of Structured Inter-professional Education on Health Care Professional Students' Perceptions of Collaboration in a Clinical Setting  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Purpose: To examine how a structured inter-professional education (IPE) clinical placement influences health care professional (HCP) students' perceptions of inter-professional collaboration (IPC) relative to that of students in a traditional clinical placement. Methods: This study used a mixed-methods design. The Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) was administered to HCP students (n=36) in two Toronto hospitals before and after a structured 5-week IPE clinical placement to e...

Pinto, Alison; Lee, Sam; Lombardo, Samantha; Salama, Mariam; Ellis, Sandi; Kay, Theresa; Davies, Robyn; Landry, Michel D.

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
221

Teaching medical students on the ethical dimensions of human rights: meeting the challenge in South Africa.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

SETTING: Previous health policies in South Africa neglected the teaching of ethics and human rights to health professionals. In April 1995, a pilot course was run at the University of Cape Town in which the ethical dimensions of human rights issues in South Africa were explored. OBJECTIVES: To compare knowledge and attitudes of participating students with a group of control students. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SUBJECTS: Seventeen fourth-year medical students who participated in the c...

London, L.; Mccarthy, G.

1998-01-01

222

A Study about Library Usage by Undergraduate Medical Students in a Medical College in North India  

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Full Text Available Background: Since no study has been done regarding use of library in medical students in North India and very few studies in whole of India that is why this study was conceived. Objective: To study the use of library by medical students in all the professional courses in Government Medical College, Chandigarh U.T. Material and Methods: 235 students were administered pre-structured and pre-tested proforma in classroom and guided filling of proforma was done by authors. Results: Maximum students (265 were in the age group of 18-25 years.122 students felt that their objectives were partially fulfilled in the library, 71 felt their objectives were fully fulfilled in the library, while 20 felt none of their objectives were fulfilled in the library. 64.5 % students were visiting library for updating their knowledge, 31.7% for retrieving literature, 18.7% for information on a specific disease, 12.6% for research purposes, 6.7% for diagnosis, 2.6% for publications, 2.2% for patient care. Among the IT services available 57% were using computer, 54.1% were utilising internet, 47.01% were using E mail, 32.5% were using E books, 31.3%were using CD ROM, and 28.3% were using telephone. Out of benefits available of using IT services 75.7% said it lead to better access to information, 51.8% said it provided quick information, 42.9% said it lead to contact with distant personnel, 44.75% believed it lead to improvement in quality of work, 22.7%said it lead to decrease in use of postal mail, 10.8% said it lead to decrease in use of telephone, 10.1% said it lead to decrease in use of print version. 34.3 %( 91 students opined that there was need for an orientation programme regarding the use of IT services in the library.

N K Goel, S S Sarpal, Abhiruchi Galhotra, Abhadeep

2012-01-01

223

Medical students' perceptions in relation to ethnicity and gender: a qualitative study  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The British medical student population has undergone rapid diversification over the last decades. This study focuses on medical students' views about their experiences in relation to ethnicity and gender during their undergraduate training within the context of the hidden curriculum in one British medical school as part of a wider qualitative research project into undergraduate medical education. Method We interviewed 36 undergraduate medical students in one British Medical School, across all five years of training using a semi-structured interview schedule. We selected them by random and quota sampling, stratified by sex and ethnicity and used the whole medical school population as a sampling frame. Data analyses involved the identification of common themes, reported by means of illustrative quotations and simple counts. Results The students provided information about variations patterned by gender in their motivation and influences when deciding to study medicine. Issues in relation to ethnicity were: gaining independence from parents, perceived limitations to career prospects, incompatibility of some religious beliefs with some medical practices and acquired open-mindedness towards students and patients from different ethnic backgrounds. Despite claiming no experiences of gender difference during medical training, female and male students expressed gender stereotypes, e.g. that women bring particularly caring and sympathetic attitudes to medicine, or that surgery requires the physical strength and competitiveness stereotypically associated with men that are likely to support the continuation of gender differentiation in medical careers. Conclusion The key themes identified in this paper in relation to ethnicity and to gender have important implications for medical educators and for those concerned with professional development. The results suggest a need to open up aspects of these relatively covert elements of student culture to scrutiny and debate and to take an explicitly wider view of the influence of what has sometimes been called the hidden curriculum upon the training of medical professionals and the practice of medicine.

Seale Clive

2006-03-01

224

Students Enrolment in Professional Education: A Study of Karnataka  

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Full Text Available India today has one of the largest educational systems in theworld. The total enrolment exceeds 70 million, there are two millionstudents in higher education, and the number engaged in research is about 10,000. Teachers total over two million. There has been a great upsurge in Indian education since independence, but it is only the beginning of an educational revolution crucial to the economic and social development of the country. Professional education has occupied a dominant position in independent India since it was perceived as a promoter of economic growth, technological development and also as an instrument of equal opportunity and upward social mobility. The present paper will discussvarious commissions and committees deliberated on its criticality to the social and economic development of the country. Further, the paper will find out, the gender parity of professional education, at Under Graduate Level in Karnataka particularly and analyze the student’s enrolment in different professional courses.

2009-12-01

225

Validated instruments used to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability: a systematic review  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Instruments to detect changes in attitudes towards people with disabilities are important for evaluation of training programs and for research. While we were interested in instruments specific for medical students, we aimed to systematically review the medical literature for validated survey instruments used to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability. Methods We electronically searched Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Health and Psychosocial Instruments. We included papers reporting on the development and/or validation of survey instruments to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability. We excluded papers in which the attitudes were not measured in a provider-patient context. Two reviewers carried out titles and abstracts screening, full texts screening, and data abstraction in a duplicate and independent manner using standardized and pilot tested forms. Results We identified seven validated survey instruments used for healthcare students and professionals. These instruments were originally developed for the following target populations: general population (n = 4; dental students (n = 1; nursing students (n = 1; and rehabilitation professionals (n = 1. The types of validity reported for these instruments were content validity (n = 3, criterion-related validity (n = 1, construct validity (n = 2, face validity (n = 1, discriminant validity (n = 1, and responsiveness (n = 1. The most widely validated and used tool (ATDP was developed in the late 1960s while the most recent instrument was developed in the early 1990s. Conclusion Of the seven identified validated instruments, less than half were specifically designed for healthcare students and professionals and none for medical students. There is a need to develop and validate a contemporary instrument specifically for medical students.

Symons Andrew B

2010-11-01

226

Preaching Our Practice: On Sharing Professional Work with Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes one teacher-author's classroom use of interview samples, editors' comments, and other materials from his own article-then-in-progress for the "New York Times Magazine." Describes how students, who were creating their own in-depth magazine articles, could see principles and techniques discussed in class applied on a professional level.…

Mandelbaum, Paul

1994-01-01

227

Reduction of Racial Prejudice in Student Affairs Professionals  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the impact of gender, race, intergroup contact, and diversity training on racial prejudice of student affairs professionals. Diversity training and race of participants were statistically significant contributors to change in racial prejudice. Findings suggest that racial prejudice decreases as diversity training increases.…

Choi-Pearson, Catherine; Castillo, Linda; Maples, Mary Finn

2004-01-01

228

Online Social Networking among Professional Students: Impact on Interpersonal Relationship  

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Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the correlation of online social network usage and quality of interpersonal relationship among 350 third students of four different year professional colleges of Manipal University. The study found that a weak negative correlation exist between online social network usage and perceived quality of interpersonal relationship.

Nevil Johnson Raju1 , Blessy Prabha Valsaraj 2 , Judith A Noronha3

2014-03-01

229

A Comparison of Graduate and Professional Students: Their Daily Stressors.  

Science.gov (United States)

The stressful effects of advanced academic training were examined in a comparison of six graduate and professional programs at Vanderbilt University. The focus was on the nonacademic, daily stressors and negative mood states of 152 students in medicine, business, divinity, graduate department of religion, and two graduate psychology departments.…

Smith, M. Shelton; And Others

230

The Role of Emotions in Student Teachers' Professional Identity  

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This paper presents findings of a qualitative interview study of the role of emotions in the professional identity of student teachers. Strong positive and negative emotions (mostly related to pupils and supervisors) were expressed about personal teaching experiences. The results confirm that emotions play an important role in social learning and,…

Timostsuk, Inge; Ugaste, Aino

2012-01-01

231

Professional development using student-led, community-based activities.  

Science.gov (United States)

As a community health education center affiliated with an academic institution, we recognize that by investing in the professional development of our students, we not only maximize our own outcomes but those of our students as well. Our project, Creating Community Connections, was developed to aid the work of our Center in characterizing the evolving community landscape following Hurricane Katrina while providing opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning. Students in the project could gain skills in program planning and community assessment, as well as leadership and communications. Twenty-three students worked on the project during its 2 years, developing data collection tools, organizing and conducting key informant interviews, facilitating focus groups and community forums, managing data, and summarizing project findings for community presentations. Participation in this project allowed our students to grow as public health leaders and researchers while gaining a greater appreciation for community collaboration. PMID:21617412

Martin, Ashley E; Cunningham, Stacey C; Magnus, Jeanette H

2011-01-01

232

Attitudes toward euthanasia among Swedish medical students.  

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Attitudes toward euthanasia differ between individuals and populations, and in many studies the medical profession is more reluctant than the general public. Our goal was to explore medical students' attitude toward euthanasia. A questionnaire containing open-ended questions was answered anonymously by 165 first- and fifth-year medical students. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis with no predetermined categories. The students' arguments opposing euthanasia were based on opinions of 1. euthanasia being morally wrong, 2. fear of possible negative effects on society, 3. euthanasia causing strain on physicians and 4. doubts about the true meaning of requests of euthanasia from patients. Arguments supporting euthanasia were based on 1. patients' autonomy and 2. the relief of suffering, which could be caused by severe illnesses, reduced integrity, hopelessness, social factors and old age. There are several contradictions in the students' arguments and the results indicate a possible need for education focusing on the possibility of symptom control in palliative care and patients' perceived quality of life. PMID:17942500

Karlsson, Marit; Strang, Peter; Milberg, Anna

2007-10-01

233

(Re-)reading medical trade catalogs: the uses of professional advertising in British medical practice, 1870-1914.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article explores how medical practitioners read, used, and experienced medical trade catalogs in late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Britain. Reader responses to the catalog, a book-like publication promoting medical tools, appliances, and pharmaceuticals, have been chronically understudied, as have professional reading practices within medicine more generally. Yet, evidence suggests that clinicians frequently used the catalog and did so in three main ways: to order medical products, to acquire new information about these products, and to display their own product endorsements and product designs. The seemingly widespread nature of these practices demonstrates an individual and collective professional desire to improve medical practice and highlights the importance of studying professional reading practices in the cultural history of medicine. PMID:23241910

Jones, Claire L

2012-01-01

234

Relación estudiante de medicina-enfermo: visión de los estudiantes Medical student - patient relationschip: the students' perspective  

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Full Text Available Background: The relationship between medical students and patients has special characteristics that require to be well understood to prepare both students and tutors. Aim: To learn about medical students' thoughts and experiences once they start working with patients, how do they solve difficulties or problems and their perceptions about professional roles and patient rights. Material and methods: Qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews applied to 30 volunteer third year medical students who were beginning their clinical practice. The answers to open questions were transcribed and then analized and grouped by topics and categories. Results: Helping others was the main motivation to go to medical school. Other reasons were scientific interest and social status. Students felt prepared to communicate with patients. However they felt anxious, stressful and fearful of not being competent or not being able to answer patients' questions. There were some differences between male and female students' feelings. Nevertheless students declared that they had rewarding experiences with patients. They all recognized that patients have the right to reject being treated by students. The answers also showed that the first clinical experiences led to significant changes in their views of the medical profession. Conclusions: Students are aware of their trainee condition, the benefits that they obtain being in contact with patients and of their limitations. Patients must voluntarily accept to be subject of the students' training program and informed consent procedures need to be developed

Juan Pablo Beca I

2007-12-01

235

Medical and surgical ward rounds in teaching hospitals of Kuwait University: students’ perceptions  

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Full Text Available Sara AlMutar,1 Lulwa AlTourah,1 Hussain Sadeq,2 Jumanah Karim,2 Yousef Marwan3 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pediatrics, Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Al-Razi Orthopedic Hospital, Kuwait City, Kuwait Background: Teaching sessions for medical students during ward rounds are an essential component of bedside teaching, providing students with the opportunity to regard patients as actual people, and to observe their physical conditions directly, allowing a better understanding of illnesses to be developed. We aim to explore medical students’ perceptions regarding medical and surgical ward rounds within the Faculty of Medicine at Kuwait University, and to evaluate whether this teaching activity is meeting the expectation of learners. Methods: A pretested questionnaire was used to collect data from 141 medical students during the 2012–2013 academic year. They were asked to provide their current and expected ratings about competencies that were supposed to be gained during ward rounds, on a scale from 1 (lowest to 5 (highest. Mean scores were calculated, and the Student t-test was used to compare results. P < 0.05 was the cut-off level for significance. Results: Only 17 students (12.1% declined to participate in the study. The students' current competency scores (for competencies taught within both disciplines – medical and surgical were significantly lower than the scores indicating students’ expectations (P < 0.001. The best-taught competency was bedside examination, in both medical (mean: 3.45 and surgical (mean: 3.05 ward rounds. However, medical ward rounds were better than surgical rounds in covering some competencies, especially the teaching of professional attitude and approach towards patients (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Both medical and surgical ward rounds were deficient in meeting the students’ expectations. Medical educators should utilize the available literature to improve the bedside teaching experience for their students. Keywords: ward rounds, bedside teaching, undergraduate, medical students, medical education

AlMutar S

2013-09-01

236

Do medical students want to learn about global health?  

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Full Text Available Background: One objective of the United Nations Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health relates to ensuring a sufficiently skilled workforce. To prepare future healthcare professionals for their role in the 21st century as members of this workforce, awareness of global health is essential, but few studies have explored student perspectives on such education. The main objectives of this study were to establish the views of medical students on learning about women's and children's health in low-income countries, to identify the nature and extent of learning already experienced, and to assess the demand for such learning. Design: A questionnaire survey was conducted at three meetings of the International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA. Questionnaires were distributed to 500 participants from 75 countries and 336 medical schools, and 492 usable questionnaires were returned. Data were analysed using SPSS Version 20 and statistical analysis was undertaken using Fisher's exact test. Results: There were 492 questionnaires included in the analysis. Forty-eight per cent of participants were from low–middle income countries and 52% were from high-income countries. Less than half (43% of the respondents had received some teaching on women's and children's health in low-income countries. Teaching received was primarily (96% through lectures in the second year of study. Ninety-one per cent of respondents thought such teaching would be important and stated that group work (66% would be the preferred method. In total, only 14% thought they had received sufficient teaching on global health and on women's and children's health in low-income countries. Conclusions: This study has revealed a high demand among medical students for global health teaching, particularly on women's and children's health in low-income countries. The timing and methods of existing teaching on these topics does not match that desired by medical students. To help address this gap, a collaborative approach is proposed which includes students’ views in the processes for revitalising medical curricula to meet the needs of the 21st century.

Anya Göpfert

2014-05-01

237

Medical students-as-teachers: a systematic review of peer-assisted teaching during medical school  

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Full Text Available Tzu-Chieh Yu¹, Nichola C Wilson², Primal P Singh¹, Daniel P Lemanu¹, Susan J Hawken³, Andrew G Hill¹¹South Auckland Clinical School, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; ²Department of Surgery, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; ³Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New ZealandIntroduction: International interest in peer-teaching and peer-assisted learning (PAL during undergraduate medical programs has grown in recent years, reflected both in literature and in practice. There, remains however, a distinct lack of objective clarity and consensus on the true effectiveness of peer-teaching and its short- and long-term impacts on learning outcomes and clinical practice.Objective: To summarize and critically appraise evidence presented on peer-teaching effectiveness and its impact on objective learning outcomes of medical students.Method: A literature search was conducted in four electronic databases. Titles and abstracts were screened and selection was based on strict eligibility criteria after examining full-texts. Two reviewers used a standard review and analysis framework to independently extract data from each study. Discrepancies in opinions were resolved by discussion in consultation with other reviewers. Adapted models of “Kirkpatrick’s Levels of Learning” were used to grade the impact size of study outcomes.Results: From 127 potential titles, 41 were obtained as full-texts, and 19 selected after close examination and group deliberation. Fifteen studies focused on student-learner outcomes and four on student-teacher learning outcomes. Ten studies utilized randomized allocation and the majority of study participants were self-selected volunteers. Written examinations and observed clinical evaluations were common study outcome assessments. Eleven studies provided student-teachers with formal teacher training. Overall, results suggest that peer-teaching, in highly selective contexts, achieves short-term learner outcomes that are comparable with those produced by faculty-based teaching. Furthermore, peer-teaching has beneficial effects on student-teacher learning outcomes.Conclusions: Peer-teaching in undergraduate medical programs is comparable to conventional teaching when utilized in selected contexts. There is evidence to suggest that participating student-teachers benefit academically and professionally. Long-term effects of peer-teaching during medical school remain poorly understood and future research should aim to address this.Keywords: peer-teaching, peer-assisted learning, near-peer teaching, medical student, medical school

Yu TC

2011-06-01

238

"I'm too used to it": a longitudinal qualitative study of third year female medical students' experiences of gendered encounters in medical education.  

Science.gov (United States)

Although the number of women entering medical school has been steadily rising in the U.S.A., female medical students continue to report instances of sexual harassment and gender discrimination. The full spectrum of such experiences and their effect on the professional identity formation of female students over time remains largely unknown. To investigate these experiences, we interviewed 12 third year female medical students at a private New England medical school over several points during the 2006-2007 academic year. Using theoretical frameworks of gender performance and the centrality of student-patient and student-supervisor relationships, we were better able to understand how female medical students interpret the role of 'woman doctor' and the effect of negative and positive gendered interactions on the evolution of their professional identity. We found that participants quickly learned how to confront and respond to inappropriate behavior from male patients and found interactions with female patients and supervisors particularly rewarding. However, they did not feel equipped to respond to the unprofessional behavior of male supervisors, resulting in feelings of guilt and resignation over time that such events would be a part of their professional identity. The rapid acculturation to unprofessional behavior and resignation described by participants has implications for not only professional identity formation of female students but specialty choices and issues of future physician workforce. PMID:22341202

Babaria, Palav; Abedin, Sakena; Berg, David; Nunez-Smith, Marcella

2012-04-01

239

Professional socialization of students in clinical nurse specialist programs.  

Science.gov (United States)

Graduate nursing programs facilitate the transition of RNs to advanced roles through a complex process of professional socialization. The purpose of this study was to explore the professional socialization of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) students. Two hundred twenty-five students, representing 73 CNS programs, responded to an online survey. Both preprogram variables and educational experiences contributed to an adequate level of CNS socialization. Students' self-concept was strong, and they felt prepared to practice in the role, which was highly correlated with their perceptions of how well the program prepared them academically and experientially. Having a CNS mentor was positively associated with readiness to practice. Outcomes did not vary with cohort status, and online instruction did not impede socialization. These findings provide implications for CNS program advisement and design. [J Nurs Educ. 2014;53(11):631-640.]. PMID:25350045

Ares, Terri L

2014-11-01

240

LEARNING STYLES ADOPTED BY MEDICAL STUDENTS  

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Full Text Available Learning results in gain of knowledge, skills and attitudes. Some like to learn by seeing, some by hearing and some by demonstration. Learning style influences the retention of information and depth of comprehension. Understanding their preferred learning styles as visual, auditory, read-write or kinesthetic learners will help improve the teaching methods adopted. Role of the educator necessitates making the most of each teaching opportunity by understanding the characteristics of the learning audience and incorporating demonstrated principles of adult educational design, with a focus on collaborative learning and variety in presentation techniques. The goal is to provide student oriented education, producing efficient doctors. A cross-sectional study among 92 medical students of the Govt. Medical College, Bhavnagar, conducted in 2009. VARK questionnaire was used to access their learning preference. Preference for different learning styles were, visual (V 1.08%, auditory (A 20.65%, reading/writing (R 2.17% and kinesthetic (K 17.39%. 41.30% of the total 92 students preferred a single mode of information presentation. Of the 92 students who preferred multiple modes of information presentation, some preferred two modes (bimodal, 31.52%, some preferred three modes (tri-modal, 27.13%, and only one student preferred quadri-modal.

Chinmay Shah

2011-12-01

 
 
 
 
241

[Contract learning: effects of professionalization on the student nurse].  

Science.gov (United States)

The reengineering of nurse training implies the implementation of self-development, empowering tools and a reshaping of the function of accompaniment during training which becomes a shared function. This work is part of a psycho-socio-educational approach of the accompaniment to self-directed learning and also in the field of practices of health and social work. This study contributes to the identification of the conditions of efficiency of contracting between student nurses, tutors and instructors. It aims to explore the interest of a triangular steering of the learning contract centered on the student's individual project and also the interest of meetings during training as triggers to a process of self-construction of competences. Moreover, the study aims to identify the effects of contract on professionalization. Our study reverts to the basic question of learning by contract as a pillar for the self-directed learning in an alternating training context. The empirical approach takes into account a qualitative study carried out with 15 people (tutors, managers, student nurses and instructors) in 3 health care structures and a quantitative study based on 78 first year students, 106 second year students, and 47 third year students at the same nursing education institute. The study shows that learning by contract is empowering and professionalizing, if the student is placed in favorable conditions of learning and contractual relationship. PMID:23671991

Jubin, Patricia

2013-03-01

242

Attitudes Of Medical Students Towards Relationship With Pharmaceutical Company: Do We Need A Change?  

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Full Text Available Purpose: Promotion by pharmaceutical company often takes advantage of mental shortcuts. Significant deficiencies have been found in student’s knowledge about pharmaceutical marketing expenditures, professional ethics and accuracy of drug information. The purpose of study was to assess the attitudes of medical students towards relationship with pharmaceutical companies and drug promotion by them. Methods: To assess the attitudes, a prevalidated questionnaire consisting of 18 questions was designed. Questionnaire was istributed when a series of lectures were scheduled for the entire medical class (253 medical students. Completed questionnaires werecollected at the end of the session and analysis was done using statistical methods. Results: Overall 81% of the medical students were of the opinion that pharmaceutical companies should be allowed to interact with them at the college level. About 95% believe that the information given by MRs is reliable and confirmation of the claims is not required (75% students. Overall 68% students believe that drug promotional offers never compromise the decision making of the physicians. About 70% students think that physicians should be compensated with gifts by medical representatives whenever their drugs are prescribed. Conclusion: The medical students are generally not opposed to interact with MR at some point of time or receive gifts from them. Also many students may not be conscious potential subconscious expectations of give-and-take relationship. Perhaps, the insight gained from our study will be used to reinforce the existing teaching curriculum with added emphasis on this issue.

Dr. Shahu Ingole

2011-02-01

243

An investigation into medical students' approaches to anatomy learning in a systems-based prosection course.  

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Students' approaches to learning anatomy are driven by many factors and perceptions, e.g., the curriculum, assessment, previous educational experience, and the influence of staff and fellow students. However, there has been remarkably little research into characterizing how students approach their anatomy learning. What is known, based on a sample of 243 students, is that students studying medicine at the University of Southampton adopt primarily a "deep" approach to learning. Medical students at Southampton learn anatomy in a systems-based curriculum through prosections. Analysis of data from an Approaches to Study Inventory (ASSIST) revealed that students preferred using a deep approach over a strategic or surface approach (P approach as they moved through the medical curriculum. There was a relationship between anatomy examination results and approach to learning. Students who adopted a strategic approach performed better (R = 0.266, P learning in preparation for professional practice. PMID:17708560

Smith, Claire France; Mathias, Haydn

2007-10-01

244

Features of professionally applied physical preperation of med?cal students  

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Full Text Available It is defined the development and support of a certain level of important psychical and physical qualities from professional point. The experiment has been carried out by the participation of the students of the Medical Academy. Along with other physical exercises particular attention has been paid to special respiratory exercises. The ways of physical culture and sport that improve general and specific professional and physical capacity for work have been shown. The methods of combining correctly organized breathing and psychological tuning with as a result of a favorable influence on a person's organism are also considered. It has been proved that suggested exercises have promoted the improvement of important psychical and physical qualities from professional point, as well as raising the individual's capacity for work, freeing from nervous stress.

Gubka P.I.

2011-02-01

245

Study Motives and Career Choices of Iranian Medical and Dental Students  

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Full Text Available To compare the study motives and career choices of senior undergraduate medical and dental students in Iran. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey study involving final year medical and dental students from 4 dental and medical schools was conducted in 2010. The questionnaire was designed in three sections (Demographic details, motivational items and career choice items and after confirming the validity and reliability of the questions, it was distributed among the students. Data were entered into SPSS; statistical analysis included logistic regression and multiple linear regression. The response rate was 62% (n=219 for medical and 64% (n=300 for dental students. The factor analysis identified six motivational items: "Social and professional status", "Health care and people", "Others recommendation", "personal interest and nature of occupation", "Occupational experience" and "Personal life". Medical students were more influenced by "Playing a role in community health" and "Personal interest". "Work independence" and "Social factors" however were two major influential factors among dental students. There were significant differences in important influences by age (Social and professional status, Others' recommendation, Parents education (Social and professional status, Health care and people, Personal life and marital status (single >married: Occupational experience, married > single: Personal life. Engaging in postgraduate studies was the first career preference among 90.9% and 89.8% of dental and medical students respectively. Medical and dental students report a wide range of motivational factors in studying medicine/dentistry and future career plans which is affected by age, parents' education and marital status.

Elahe Vahid Dastjerdi

2012-06-01

246

What do medical students think about their quality of life? A qualitative study  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical education can affect medical students’ physical and mental health as well as their quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess medical students’ perceptions of their quality of life and its relationship with medical education. Methods First- to sixth-year students from six Brazilian medical schools were interviewed using focus groups to explore what medical student’s lives are like, factors related to increases and decreases of their quality of life during medical school, and how they deal with the difficulties in their training. Results Students reported a variety of difficulties and crises during medical school. Factors that were reported to decrease their quality of life included competition, unprepared teachers, excessive activities, and medical school schedules that demanded exclusive dedication. Contact with pain, death and suffering and harsh social realities influence their quality of life, as well as frustrations with the program and insecurity regarding their professional future. The scarcity of time for studying, leisure activities, relationships, and rest was considered the main factor of influence. Among factors that increase quality of life are good teachers, classes with good didactic approaches, active learning methodologies, contact with patients, and efficient time management. Students also reported that meaningful relationships with family members, friends, or teachers increase their quality of life. Conclusion Quality of teachers, curricula, healthy lifestyles related to eating habits, sleep, and physical activity modify medical students’ quality of life. Lack of time due to medical school obligations was a major impact factor. Students affirm their quality of life is influenced by their medical school experiences, but they also reframe their difficulties, herein represented by their poor quality of life, understood as necessary and inherent to the process of becoming doctors.

Tempski Patricia

2012-11-01

247

Evaluation of self-medication amongst university students in Abbottabad, Pakistan; prevalence, attitude and causes.  

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Self-medication is a serious issue in most parts of the world. This study aims to evaluate self-medication among university students of Abbottabad, Pakistan. This cross-sectional survey study was carried out in COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Abbottabad during December 1 - December 31,2011. A sample of 275 students was selected for the study using convenience method of sampling. Data were managed and analyzed via SPSS version 16.0. Inferences were drawn using Z-test Out of 268 respondents (male = 61.6%, female = 38.6%), 138 were non-health professional students whereas 130 were health professional students. The prevalence of self-medication was 95.5%. Most common factor (45.7%) responsible for self-medication was "low severity of disease". Most common symptom (50.8%) that caused self-medication and stocking of medicines was "storage of medicines for multi purposes". Some respondents (22.7%) got addicted due to self-medication. Most of the students trust in allopathic medicines system. High prevalence of self-medication can be controlled through regulatory authorities, mass education and availability of health facilities. PMID:24147372

Ullah, Hanif; Khan, Shujaat A; Ali, Sayyad; Karim, Sabiha; Baseer, Abdul; Chohan, Ossam; Hassan, Syed M F; Khan, Kashif M; Murtaza, Ghulam

2013-01-01

248

Emotional intelligence and perceived stress in healthcare students: a multi-institutional, multi-professional survey  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Emotional intelligence (EI is increasingly discussed as having a potential role in medicine, nursing, and other healthcare disciplines, both for personal mental health and professional practice. Stress has been identified as being high for students in healthcare courses. This study investigated whether EI and stress differed among students in four health professions (dental, nursing, graduate mental health workers, medical and whether there was evidence that EI might serve as a buffer for stress. Method The Schutte Emotional Intelligence and the Perceived Stress scale instruments were administered to four groups of healthcare students in their first year of study in both the autumn and summer terms of the 2005-6 academic year. The groups were undergraduate dental, nursing and medical students, and postgraduate mental health workers. Results No significant differences were found between males and females nor among professional groups for the EI measure. Dental students reported significantly higher stress than medical students. EI was found to be only moderately stable in test-retest scores. Some evidence was found for EI as a possible factor in mediating stress. Students in different health profession courses did not show significant differences in Emotional Intelligence. Conclusion While stress and EI showed a moderate relationship, results of this study do not allow the direction of relationship to be determined. The limitations and further research questions raised in this study are discussed along with the need for refinement of the EI construct and measures, particularly if Emotional Intelligence were to be considered as a possible selection criterion, as has been suggested by some authors.

McKendree Jean

2009-09-01

249

Specialty preferences among medical students in a Kenyan university  

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Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although in the recent years gender distribution in medical schools has changed, with the proportion of female medical students drastically increasing, medical specialties continue to have gender disparities. This study aimed at determining gender differences in career choices among medical students in Kenya.

Philip Maseghe Mwachaka

2010-06-01

250

More than a list of values and desired behaviors: a foundational understanding of medical professionalism.  

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The term "professionalism" has been used in a variety of ways. In 2012, the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) Standing Committee on Ethics and Professionalism undertook to develop an operational definition of professionalism that would speak to the variety of certification and maintenance-of-certification activities undertaken by ABMS and its 24 member boards. In the course of this work, the authors reviewed prior definitions of professions and professionalism and found them to be largely descriptive, or built around lists of proposed professional attributes, values, and behaviors. The authors argue that while making lists of desirable professional characteristics is necessary and useful for teaching and assessment, it is not, by itself, sufficient either to fully define professionalism or to capture its social functions. Thus, the authors sought to extend earlier work by articulating a definition that explains professionalism as the motivating force for an occupational group to come together and create, publicly profess, and develop reliable mechanisms to enforce shared promises-all with the purpose of ensuring that practitioners are worthy of patients' and the public's trust.Using this framework, the authors argue that medical professionalism is a normative belief system about how best to organize and deliver health care. Believing in professionalism means accepting the premise that health professionals must come together to continually define, debate, declare, distribute, and enforce the shared competency standards and ethical values that govern their work. The authors identify three key implications of this new definition for individual clinicians and their professional organizations. PMID:24667515

Wynia, Matthew K; Papadakis, Maxine A; Sullivan, William M; Hafferty, Frederic W

2014-05-01

251

Risk Management and the Student Affairs Professional. Monograph Series, Volume 2.  

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The seven chapters in this monograph were written to provide the student affairs professional with one professional resource among the many that are necessary to understand the legal aspects of professional responsibility in this area. "Risk Management and Professional Responsibility" (Hilda F. Owens) identifies some elements of professional

Owens, Hilda F., Ed.

252

Can achievement goal theory provide a useful motivational perspective for explaining psychosocial attributes of medical students?  

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Abstract Background Psychosocial competence and frustration tolerance are important characteristics of skilled medical professionals. In the present study we explored the usefulness of applying a comprehensive motivational theory (Goal orientations), for this purpose. According to goal orientation theory, learning motivation is defined as the general goals students pursue during learning (either mastery goals - gaining new knowledge; or performance goals - gaining a ...

Madjar Nir; Bachner Yaacov G; Kushnir Talma

2012-01-01

253

Teaching Interpersonal Communication Competence to Medical Students through Theatre in Education  

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Effective communication skills are considered essential to a physician's professional competence. Thus, Finnish medical schools include communication skills training in their curricula. Today it is essential to ensure that students graduate with the interpersonal communication competence (ICC) necessary to succeed in their profession. Experiential…

Koponen, Jonna; Pyorala, Eeva; Isotalus, Pekka

2010-01-01

254

Medical Students' Emotional Development in Early Clinical Experience: A Model  

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Dealing with emotions is a critical feature of professional behaviour. There are no comprehensive theoretical models, however, explaining how medical students learn about emotions. We aimed to explore factors affecting their emotions and how they learn to deal with emotions in themselves and others. During a first-year nursing attachment in…

Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Laan, Roland; Dornan, Tim; Koopmans, Raymond

2014-01-01

255

Cigarette Smoking among Medical Students in China and Modifiable Risk Factors for Smoking Prevention  

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Purpose: The reduction of tobacco use among medical students is a potentially powerful strategy to reduce tobacco use among future health professionals, who in turn, can have significant impact on tobacco use among patients as well as the general population in China. The goal of this study is to update information on the prevalence of cigarette…

Chen, Xinguang; Tang, Xiaolan; Stanton, Bonita; Li, Hanwu; Chen, Weiqing

2012-01-01

256

Medical students’ attitudes toward gay men  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare providers’ attitudes toward sexual minorities influence patient comfort and outcomes. This study characterized medical student attitudes toward gay men, focusing on behavior, personhood, gay civil rights, and male toughness. Methods A cross-sectional web-based anonymous survey was sent to medical students enrolled at the University of California, Davis (N?=?371 with a response rate of 68%. Results Few respondents expressed negative attitudes toward gay men or would deny them civil rights. More negative responses were seen with respect to aspects of intimate behavior and homosexuality as a natural form of sexual expression. Men and students younger than 25?years old were more likely to endorse negative attitudes toward behavior as well as more traditional views on male toughness. Conclusions We show that an important minority of students express discomfort with the behavior of gay men and hold to a narrow construction of male identity. These findings suggest that competency training must move beyond conceptual discussions and address attitudes toward behaviors through new pedagogical approaches.

Matharu Kabir

2012-08-01

257

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences electronic health record and medical informatics training for undergraduate health professionals*  

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The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is planning interprofessional training in electronic health records (EHRs) and medical informatics. Training will be integrated throughout the curricula and will include seminars on broad concepts supplemented with online modules, didactic lectures, and hands-on experiences. Training will prepare future health professionals to use EHRs, evidence-based medicine, medical decision support, and point-of-care tools to reduce errors, improve st...

Hart, Jan K.; Newton, Bruce W.; Boone, Steven E.

2010-01-01

258

Predictors of black medical student success.  

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This study identifies those variables, cognitive and noncognitive, that relate significantly to the successful completion of the combined BA/MD degree program. The study sample included 69 black students who entered at year one, directly from high school, between 1972 and 1981. The Student's t-test identified statistically significant differences in the means of selection variables of successful and nonsuccessful black students. Single order correlations between predictor variables and the criterion of graduation were determined. This was followed by a stepwise regression procedure. The same predictor variables were correlated with grade point average (GPA) at the end of year one, and a further analysis added year one GPA to the predictors of graduation in a stepwise regression procedure. The same statistical analyses were carried out on a stratified sample of 69 nonminority students. Predictors of graduation for black students were parents' level of education, admission test score, self-evaluation, and council index (average vote of all committee members on an applicant). Year one GPA was a strong predictor of success for both cohorts of students. This study supports the inclusion of noncognitive information when considering black applicants for medical school. In particular, parents' levels of education and applicants' self-appraisals, along with admission test scores, showed a significant relationship to graduation 6 years later with the MD degree. PMID:1578500

Calkins, E V; Willoughby, T L

1992-03-01

259

Sleep quality in Zanjan university medical students  

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Full Text Available Background: Sleep has a major role in daily cycles and reconstruction of physical and mental abilities. Regarding the importance of this feature, we decided to determine sleep quality in medical students.Methods: A questionnaire containing demographic data, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was prepared. We distributed the questionnaires using a census method to every student at the Zanjan Faculty of Medicine. The completed questionnaires were collected and the data was analyzed using SPSS.Results: A total of 224 students answered the questionnaire, with 133 (59.4% students evaluated to have good sleep quality and 91 (40.6% poor sleep quality. Of these 91 students, 38% were female and 44.8% were male (p=0.307. The prevalence of poor sleep quality according to the four stages of medical training was 24.6% of those in basic sciences, 42.9% of those in physiopathology, 41.7% of externs, and 53.5% of interns (p=0.008. According to residential status, the prevalence of poor sleep quality was 61.5% among students living with their spouse, 44.6% for students living in their own private homes, 37.6% among students living in the dormitory, and 20.8% for those living with their parents (p=0.024. According to marital status, 35.8% of singles and 64.9% of married students had poor sleep quality (p=0.001. According to financial status, 57.9%, 46.9%, and 33.9% of those from low, moderate and high economic classes, respectively, were sleep deprived (p=0.049. Among those with average grades of under 16 and over 16 out of 20, 47.5% and 32%, respectively, were suffering from poor sleep quality (p=0.047. There was no obvious relationship between sleep quality and BMI, sex, or history of depression or anxiety.Conclusion: Poor sleep quality was significantly associated with lower grades, economic status, living arrangement and type of training. A large number of students quality of life and work may suffer because sleep deprivation.

Ghoreishi A

2008-06-01

260

EVALUATION OF THE PERSPECTIVES OF THE ACADEMIC MEDICAL STAFF AND RESIDENTS CONCERNING CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN A MEDICAL FACULTY  

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Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the perspectives of the academic medical staff and residents concerning continuing professional development in a medical faculty.Method: This descriptive research was performed on 152 academic medical staff and residents who was accepted to participate in the study in a medical faculty in August 2007. Study data was collected through face to face interviews by a questionnaire made up of three parts and 40 questions.Results: Sixty-seven point eight percent of the participants were informed about the continuing medical education and 7.9% of them were informed about continuing professional development. 45.4% participated in activities concerning continuing medical education. The factor negatively affecting participation in activities was lack of information (44.7%. Educational activities inside the department were found as the activities most frequented, 66.4% and courses in the congresses were found as the most effective educational activities (49.2%.Conclusion: The participants were well-informed about continuing medical education, while their knowledge about continuing professional development was low. Inducing and motivating doctors for participating in continuing professional development activities is critically important for both doctors and health care system.

Seyhan H?d?ro?lu

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

Medical Student Mistreatment Results in Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress  

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Objective: The authors assessed medical student attitudes regarding mistreatment and symptoms of posttraumatic stress in those students who reported exposure to mistreatment. Methods: Third- and fourth-year medical students (N = 71) responded to questions from a vignette in which a student is mistreated and then described any mistreatment they had…

Heru, Alison; Gagne, Gerard; Strong, David

2009-01-01

262

Emotional Burnout, Perceived Sources of Job Stress, Professional Fulfillment, and Engagement among Medical Residents in Malaysia  

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This study was the first to explore factors associated with emotional burnout (EB) among medical residents in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a universal sample of 205 medical residents in a Malaysian general hospital. The self-administered questionnaire used consisted of questions on sociodemographics and work characteristics, sources of job stress, professional fulfillment, engagement, and EB. EB was measured using the emotional exhaustion subscale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Mean (±SD) age of the respondents was 26.5 (±1.6). The most common source of job stress was “fear of making mistakes.” Most of the participants were dissatisfied with the increase of residentship period from one year to two years. A high level of EB was reported by 36.6% of the respondents. In multivariate analysis, the most important correlates of EB were sources of job stress, professional fulfillment, and engagement. A high prevalence of EB was found among medical residents. Sociodemographic characteristics, performance pressure, and satisfaction with policies were significantly associated with EB. Although this study was limited by its cross-sectional design, its findings posit a sufficient foundation to relevant authorities to construct, amend, and amalgamate existing and future policies. Nothing will sustain you more potently than the power to recognize in your humdrum routine, as perhaps it may be thought, the true poetry of life—the poetry of the common place, of the common man, of the plain, toil-worn woman, with their loves and their joys, their sorrows and their grief. SirWilliam Osler, Aphorisms from the Student Life (Aequanimitas, 1952) PMID:24367238

Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman; Perianayagam, Wilson; Rampal, Krishna Gopal

2013-01-01

263

Medical Student Attitudes about Mental Illness: Does Medical-School Education Reduce Stigma?  

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Background: Reducing stigma associated with mental illness is an important aim of medical education, yet evidence indicates that medical students' attitudes toward patients with mental health problems deteriorate as they progress through medical school. Objectives: Authors examined medical students' attitudes to mental illness, as compared with…

Korszun, Ania; Dinos, Sokratis; Ahmed, Kamran; Bhui, Kamaldeep

2012-01-01

264

Learning Disabilities, Professionalism, and the Practice of Medical Education.  

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Examines arguments by Little in the preceding article that a successful legal suit for accommodations on a state bar exam is generalizable to learning disabilities and medical education. Explores the legitimacy accorded to academic accommodations in medical education. Asserts that medical schools have a social responsibility to shift their…

Hafferty, Frederic W.; Gibson, Gary G.

2003-01-01

265

Antibiotics Self-Medication among Southern Iranian University Students  

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Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the knowledge and behavior toward antibiotic self-medication among medical and non-medical university students in Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 200 students randomly chosen from a medical and a non-medical university in Ahwaz, South of Iran in 2008. Data was collected using self administered questionnaires with open-ended and close-ended items. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS 14 and the results were presented as the percentage 97.5% of respondents filled and returned the questionnaire. Self-medication with antibiotics was reported by 42.2% of the medical and 48% of the non-medical students during the last 3 months. Respiratory problems such as sore throat and common cold was the main indication for self-medication with antibiotics (73.3% and amoxicillin was the most commonly used antibiotic in both groups. The choice of self-medication was based on medical knowledge among medical students (50% and on a previous suggestion by a physician (32.6% for the non-medical ones. The prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics among medical and non-medical students was high. Educational programs are needed to teach university students about the potential problems of self-medication with antibiotics.

S. Sarahroodi

2010-01-01

266

A student-initiated and student-facilitated international health elective for preclinical medical students  

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Full Text Available Introduction: Global health education is becoming more important for developing well-rounded physicians and may encourage students toward a career in primary care. Many medical schools, however, lack adequate and structured opportunities for students beginning the curriculum. Methods: Second-year medical students initiated, designed, and facilitated a pass–fail international health elective, providing a curricular framework for preclinical medical students wishing to gain exposure to the clinical and cultural practices of a developing country. Results: All course participants (N=30 completed a post-travel questionnaire within one week of sharing their experiences. Screening reflection essays for common themes that fulfill university core competencies yielded specific global health learning outcomes, including analysis of health care determinants. Conclusion: Medical students successfully implemented a sustainable global health curriculum for preclinical student peers. Financial constraints, language, and organizational burdens limit student participation. In future, long-term studies should analyze career impact and benefits to the host country.

Nirali Vora

2010-02-01

267

Blueprint for establishing an effective Postbaccalaureate medical school pre-entry program for educationally disadvantaged students.  

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The purpose of this article is to provide public and private medical schools with a pragmatic blueprint for the development and implementation of an effective medical school pre-entry program that increases the pool of students interested in returning to health care shortage areas. An ancillary benefit of this program is an increase in the number of underrepresented minority students to medical schools. The structure, experiences, and results of the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine's Postbaccalaureate Reapplicant Program are used as a case study to construct the blueprint for returning 85-90% of program participants to shortage areas while increasing minority student admissions. The UC Davis program has been in place since 1991 and post-program acceptance rates have varied from 57% to 100% with an overall acceptance rate of 90.4% through 1999-00. Of 115 participating students who had previously been rejected by medical schools, 104 were accepted to health professional programs: 95 students were accepted to major U.S. medical schools and nine were accepted to masters in public health programs, physician's assistant programs, and one international medical school. This success rate has been achieved through a combination of intense assistance in study skills and test-taking skills, academic course work, and academic and pre-professional counseling. PMID:12742777

Blakely, Alan W; Broussard, Larry G

2003-05-01

268

ATTITUDES OF MEDICAL STUDENTS, CLINICIANS AND SPORTS SCIENTISTS TOWARDS EXERCISE COUNSELLING  

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Full Text Available We compared the amount of exercise undertaken by medical students, clinicians, and sport scientists with the National Australian Physical Activity (NAPA Guidelines. A second aim was to compare attitudes to exercise counselling as preventive medicine between university- and clinic-based professionals. The research setting was a university medical school and a sports science sports medicine centre. A 20-item questionnaire was completed by 216 individuals (131 medical students, 43 clinicians and 37 sports scientists. Self-reported physical activity habits, exercise counselling practices and attitudes towards preventive medicine were assessed. The physical activity undertaken by most respondents (70% met NAPA Guidelines. General practitioners had significantly lower compliance rates with NAPA Guidelines than other professionals. More than half of clinicians and medical students (54% were less active now compared with levels of activity undertaken prior to graduate training. Most physicians (68% reported they sometimes discuss physical activity with patients. In contrast, the majority of non-medically qualified respondents (60% said they never discuss physical activity with their doctor. Most respondents (70% had positive attitudes to exercise counselling. Sports scientists and respondents who were highly active in childhood had more positive attitudes to exercise counselling than others. Health professionals in this study were more active than the general population, however healthy exercise habits tend to deteriorate after the commencement of medical training. Despite the important role of doctors in health promotion, the degree of exercise counselling to patients is low

Abbyrhamy Gnanendran

2011-09-01

269

The contribution and challenges of electives in the development of social accountability in medical students.  

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Overseas electives are a key feature of western medical schools, with a high proportion of senior students taking the opportunity to travel to poorly resourced countries. Development of enhanced clinical skills is the focus of most electives; however, they provide a valuable opportunity to enhance medical students' sense of social accountability. Medical schools have a responsibility to ensure adequate preparation by the students, including close liaison and negotiation with host institutions to ensure maximal benefit for both student and the host communities. Anticipating intended and unintentional learning outcomes, which relate not only to global health knowledge and clinical skills but incorporate explicit expectations of a range of generic, professional and social responsibility outcomes, will help to ensure maximum benefit. Incorporating reflective accounts and host feedback into elective assessments will contribute to students' development, and ensure viability and sustainability of this valuable learning opportunity. PMID:21774651

Murdoch-Eaton, Deborah; Green, Andrew

2011-01-01

270

The nursing students' viewpoints on influential clinical instructor in Jahrom University of Medical Sciences  

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Full Text Available Introduction:Clinical teachers have an important role in creating an environment for effective clinical teaching to students. In addition, the faculty has a significant impact on the students' feeling of success or failure in professional competence. This study was performed to determine the characteristics of an influential instructor according to the nursing students' viewpoints in Jahrom University of Medical Sciences.Material and Methods:In this cross-sectional survey, 75 nursing students of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences were selected by census sampling method. The data collection tool was a valid and reliable questionnaire consisting of 4 domains including professional competence, interpersonal relationship, personality characteristics, and teaching ability. The data were analyzed by SPSS.Results:The results showed that influential clinical teacher must be professionally competent (mean=4.4 ± 0.80, have interpersonal relationships (mean=4.2 ± 0.96 have good personality characteristics (mean=4.1 ± 0.95, and have high eaching ability (mean=4 ± 0.89. According to the students, the most important characteristics of an influential clinical instructor are having interest in patient care (98.4%, having sufficient professional knowledge (80%, explaining and demonstrating new nursing techniques (80%, performing nursing skills procedures (86.3%, being honest with the students and creating motivation in students (83%.Conclusion:The nursing students' viewpoints indicated that influential clinical instructor has an important role in promoting quality nursing experience and in getting knowledge, professional skills and attitude. Nursing faculty should plan for promoting professional competency in clinical instructors.

Sedigheh Najafipour

2011-09-01

271

Screening for College Student Problem Drinkers: The Role of the Student Affairs Professional  

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Heavy drinking continues to be a nationally recognized problem on college campuses. This article describes how student affairs professionals play a pivotal role in identifying and referring these students for relevant services. A five-step model for alcohol screening, advising, and referral is described using motivational enhancement strategies.

Gintner, Gary G.; Choate, Laura Hensley

2006-01-01

272

Using Sales Management Students to Manage Professional Selling Students in an Innovative Active Learning Project  

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This paper describes an application of active learning within two different courses: professional selling and sales management. Students assumed the roles of sales representatives and sales managers for an actual fund-raiser--a golf outing--sponsored by a student chapter of the American Marketing Association. The sales project encompassed an…

Young, Joyce A.; Hawes, Jon M.

2013-01-01

273

Internet Behaviour Pattern in Undergraduate Medical Students in Mangalore  

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Considering the explosive growth in internet use among medical students in India, this study aimed to determine the prevalence of internet addiction in undergraduate medical students.This cross-sectional study involved 90 subjects (18-20 years of age) selected by random sampling from the first year undergraduate medical student population at Kasturba Medical College Mangalore. Young’s Internet addiction test questionnaire was administered. Based on the scoring, subjects were classified into...

VIDYAMAVILA CHATHOTH; BHAGYALAKSHMI KODAVANJI; NAYANATARA ARUNKUMAR; SHEILA RAMESH PAI

2013-01-01

274

An advisory program for first- and second-year medical students: the Weill Cornell experience  

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Full Text Available Purpose: First-year students negotiate new professional culture with a certain amount of excitement and anxiety. There are different approaches for offering guidance. In this study, the authors present Weill Cornell Medical College's experience with an advising program for first- and second-year students. Methods: Fifty faculty advisors were each assigned 1–3 first-year students who they would follow for 2 years. The responsibilities were outlined to both faculty and students. The program was evaluated using an anonymous questionnaire. Results: For the two classes surveyed (2011 and 2012, most students met their advisors once. For both classes, the most frequently discussed issues were general adjustment to medical school, academic life, and the professional life of the advisor. Summer research and career opportunities were also discussed. Most students were satisfied with the advising program. Satisfaction increased with an increase in visits. Most students who did not meet their advisors established an advisor relationship on their own. Conclusions: An advising program was established at Weill Cornell Medical College that satisfied most of the students. It is important to evaluate its format regularly, from both student and advisor perspectives, in order to ensure its continued success.

Lewis M. Drusin

2013-11-01

275

A Qualitative Analysis of Medical Students Views of Their First Psychiatry Rotation  

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Full Text Available Objective: The importance of student’s perspectives in informing curricula and pedagogy has long been recognised. However, student’s perspectives are rarely reported in the academic literature. Therefore this study explores and reports on medical student’s perspectives of their first psychiatry clinical rotation in a ‘new’ era medical school in Australia. Method: Seventy-three graduate entry medical students completed a semi-structured questionnaire about their experiences during a mental health rotation. The responses were analysed and coded into thematic categories. Results: The following thematic categories were evident; staff, breadth of experience, attitudes towards mental health, course materials and structure, and professional development. Conclusion: The results are discussed in the context of the current academic recommendations for the teaching of psychiatry and behavioural science to medical students. Although the use of student feedback is recommended by the literature, pragmatically it is rarely utilised and if it is utilised it is not reported in the academic literature. It is recommended that educators embrace the use of student’s perspectives to evaluate and inform their teaching.

Nagesh B. Pai

2012-07-01

276

Attitudes of medical students, clinicians and sports scientists towards exercise counselling.  

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We compared the amount of exercise undertaken by medical students, clinicians, and sport scientists with the National Australian Physical Activity (NAPA) Guidelines. A second aim was to compare attitudes to exercise counselling as preventive medicine between university- and clinic-based professionals. The research setting was a university medical school and a sports science sports medicine centre. A 20-item questionnaire was completed by 216 individuals (131 medical students, 43 clinicians and 37 sports scientists). Self-reported physical activity habits, exercise counselling practices and attitudes towards preventive medicine were assessed. The physical activity undertaken by most respondents (70%) met NAPA Guidelines. General practitioners had significantly lower compliance rates with NAPA Guidelines than other professionals. More than half of clinicians and medical students (54%) were less active now compared with levels of activity undertaken prior to graduate training. Most physicians (68%) reported they sometimes discuss physical activity with patients. In contrast, the majority of non-medically qualified respondents (60%) said they never discuss physical activity with their doctor. Most respondents (70%) had positive attitudes to exercise counselling. Sports scientists and respondents who were highly active in childhood had more positive attitudes to exercise counselling than others. Health professionals in this study were more active than the general population, however healthy exercise habits tend to deteriorate after the commencement of medical training. Despite the important role of doctors in health promotion, the degree of exercise counselling to patients is low. Key pointsThe rate of exercise counselling by doctors to patients is lowSports physicians and scientists have substantially more positive attitudes to exercise counselling than clinicians and medical studentsMedical schools have a responsibility to promote physical activity of students and improve training in exercise counselling. PMID:24150613

Gnanendran, Abbyrhamy; Pyne, David B; Fallon, Kieran E; Fricker, Peter A

2011-01-01

277

Medical and surgical ward rounds in teaching hospitals of Kuwait University: students’ perceptions  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Teaching sessions for medical students during ward rounds are an essential component of bedside teaching, providing students with the opportunity to regard patients as actual people, and to observe their physical conditions directly, allowing a better understanding of illnesses to be developed. We aim to explore medical students’ perceptions regarding medical and surgical ward rounds within the Faculty of Medicine at Kuwait University, and to evaluate whether this teaching activity is meeting the expectation of learners. Methods A pretested questionnaire was used to collect data from 141 medical students during the 2012–2013 academic year. They were asked to provide their current and expected ratings about competencies that were supposed to be gained during ward rounds, on a scale from 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest). Mean scores were calculated, and the Student t-test was used to compare results. P < 0.05 was the cut-off level for significance. Results Only 17 students (12.1%) declined to participate in the study. The students’ current competency scores (for competencies taught within both disciplines – medical and surgical) were significantly lower than the scores indicating students’ expectations (P < 0.001). The best-taught competency was bedside examination, in both medical (mean: 3.45) and surgical (mean: 3.05) ward rounds. However, medical ward rounds were better than surgical rounds in covering some competencies, especially the teaching of professional attitude and approach towards patients (P < 0.001). Conclusion Both medical and surgical ward rounds were deficient in meeting the students’ expectations. Medical educators should utilize the available literature to improve the bedside teaching experience for their students. PMID:24101889

AlMutar, Sara; AlTourah, Lulwa; Sadeq, Hussain; Karim, Jumanah; Marwan, Yousef

2013-01-01

278

Study on Influencing Factors Relationship between Teacher and Student in View of Students of Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences  

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Full Text Available Background and Objective: Scientific and personal characteristics of teachers are important factors in StudentTeacher relationship. In this study the objective to determine the Factors that influence the relationship between teachers and students regarding the opinion of the students of Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences. Subjects and Methods: This study is descriptive-analytic. The population of the research Includes all students of Ahvaz University of medical sciences. The data was gathered by questionnaire. The criteria for assessment of questions were Likert scale. Results: In this study, The effect of personal, ethical and professional characters of teachers was assessed as high by 63.8 percent of students and very high by 23.4 percent.. In between Of all these characters, “ethic” and “h umility” and also, “heartiness” of teachers have been the most effects regarding the students’ views. The effect of professional and scientific factors was assessed as inefctive by 18.8 percent, as low by 1.8, high by 48.7, and very high by 30.7 percent of the students. The effect of physical environment was considered as ineffective by 42.4 percent, very low by 4.7, low by 13.8, high by 25.3 and very high by 13.8 percent of the students.. Conclusion: This study and other researches show that of different factors, ethical and personal characters of teacher are more effective in student- teacher Relationship.

Amin Torabi

2012-12-01

279

?439???????????????? An Investigation and Analysis on the Medical Ethics Personality Traits in 439 Medical Students  

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Full Text Available ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????(NEO-PI-R??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????1 ????????????????????????????????????????2 ?????????????????????????????????????3 ?????????????????????????????????????????????(p ?4 ????????????????????????????????????????????????(p ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Objective: To find out the medical ethics personality tendency among medical students, and provide reference for consummation medical ethics education. Methods: The study is based on a survey of 439 medical students in Gansu, who are assessed with the NEO-PI-R and the medical ethics personality questionnaire which is compiled, the significant difference and the related factors are analyzed. Results: It is agreeableness, conscientious, tender-mindedness, dutifulness, trust, warmth, and altruism that constitute the main factors of the personality traits. Ethic cognition, emotions, will, faith, and behaviour are the main factors of the medical ethics personality. In addition to medical ethics cognition and openness, medical ethics faith and neuroticism, the score of medical students in personality traits and medical ethics personality have significant difference (p . Conscientiousness, altruism, warmth, impulsiveness, depression, achievement striving, values and feelings, these factors can predict the medical ethics personality tendency of medical students (p . Conclusion: The major goal of ethics education is to cultivate the medical ethics personality in medical colleges and universities, we should guide the formation of medical students to dedicate to the cause of medical solid psychological traits and good behavior habits, by the cultivation of medical students’ kindheartedness, rigorous, modest, honest, honest good personality quality, and the increase of the teaching research and reform.

???

2013-05-01

280

Smoking Health Professional Student: An Attitudinal Challenge for Health Promotion?  

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Full Text Available Tobacco is a major preventable cause of premature morbidity and mortality. Health professionals are uniquely positioned to provide targeted interventions and should be empowered to provide cessation counselling that influence patient smoking. A cross-sectional national survey was administered to all third year students in four disciplines at the University of Malta. The Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS questionnaire was distributed to collect standardised demographic, smoking prevalence, behavioural, and attitudinal data. 81.9% completed the questionnaire (n = 173/211. A positive significant association between tobacco smoke exposure at home and current smoking status was identified. Non-smokers regarded anti-tobacco policies more favourably than smokers, being more likely to agree with banning of tobacco sales to adolescents (OR 3.6; 95% CI: 2.5–5.3; p ? 0.001; and with a smoking ban in all public places (OR 8.9; 95% CI: 6.1–13.1; p ? 0.001. Non-smokers favoured a role for health professionals in promoting smoking cessation (OR 5.1; 95% CI: 3.1–8.5; p ? 0.001. Knowledge of antidepressants as tools for smoking cessation was also associated with a perceived role for skilled health professionals in cessation counselling (OR 4.9; 95% CI: 1.8–13.3; p = 0.002. Smoking negatively influences beliefs and attitudes of students toward tobacco control. There is a need to adopt a standard undergraduate curriculum containing comprehensive tobacco prevention and cessation training to improve their effectiveness as role models.

Daniel Cauchi

2012-07-01

 
 
 
 
281

A Multivariate Analysis of Personality, Values and Expectations as Correlates of Career Aspirations of Final Year Medical Students  

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This study reports on the career intentions of 179 final year medical students who completed an online survey that included measures of personality, values, professional and lifestyle expectations, and well-being. Logistic regression analyses identified the determinants of preferred medical specialty, practice location and hours of work.…

Rogers, Mary E.; Searle, Judy; Creed, Peter A.; Ng, Shu-Kay

2010-01-01

282

Using standardized patients to assess communication skills in medical and nursing students  

LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

Abstract Background A number of recent developments in medical and nursing education have highlighted the importance of communication and consultation skills (CCS). Although such skills are taught in all medical and nursing undergraduate curriculums, there is no comprehensive screening or assessment programme of CCS using professionally trained Standardized Patients Educators (SPE\\'s) in Ireland. This study was designed to test the content, process and acceptability of a screening programme in CCS with Irish medical and nursing students using trained SPE\\'s and a previously validated global rating scale for CCS. Methods Eight tutors from the Schools of Nursing and Medicine at University College Cork were trained in the use of a validated communication skills and attitudes holistic assessment tool. A total of forty six medical students (Year 2 of 5) and sixty four nursing students (Year 2\\/3 of 4) were selected to under go individual CCS assessment by the tutors via an SPE led scenario. Immediate formative feedback was provided by the SPE\\'s for the students. Students who did not pass the assessment were referred for remediation CCS learning. Results Almost three quarters of medical students (33\\/46; 72%) and 81% of nursing students (56\\/64) passed the CCS assessment in both communication and attitudes categories. All nursing students had English as their first language. Nine of thirteen medical students referred for enhanced learning in CCS did not have English as their first language. Conclusions A significant proportion of both medical and nursing students required referral for enhanced training in CCS. Medical students requiring enhanced training were more likely not to have English as a first language.

Ryan, C Anthony

2010-03-17

283

Using standardized patients to assess communication skills in medical and nursing Students  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of recent developments in medical and nursing education have highlighted the importance of communication and consultation skills (CCS. Although such skills are taught in all medical and nursing undergraduate curriculums, there is no comprehensive screening or assessment programme of CCS using professionally trained Standardized Patients Educators (SPE's in Ireland. This study was designed to test the content, process and acceptability of a screening programme in CCS with Irish medical and nursing students using trained SPE's and a previously validated global rating scale for CCS. Methods Eight tutors from the Schools of Nursing and Medicine at University College Cork were trained in the use of a validated communication skills and attitudes holistic assessment tool. A total of forty six medical students (Year 2 of 5 and sixty four nursing students (Year 2/3 of 4 were selected to under go individual CCS assessment by the tutors via an SPE led scenario. Immediate formative feedback was provided by the SPE's for the students. Students who did not pass the assessment were referred for remediation CCS learning. Results Almost three quarters of medical students (33/46; 72% and 81% of nursing students (56/64 passed the CCS assessment in both communication and attitudes categories. All nursing students had English as their first language. Nine of thirteen medical students referred for enhanced learning in CCS did not have English as their first language. Conclusions A significant proportion of both medical and nursing students required referral for enhanced training in CCS. Medical students requiring enhanced training were more likely not to have English as a first language.

Burgoyne Louise

2010-03-01

284

Students' attitudes towards the introduction of a Personal and Professional Development portfolio: potential barriers and facilitators  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Portfolios, widely used in undergraduate and postgraduate medicine, have variable purposes, formats and success. A recent systematic review summarised factors necessary for successful portfolio introduction but there are no studies investigating the views of students inexperienced in portfolio use towards portfolio learning. This study's aim was to survey student views about a prospective Professional and Personal Development (PPD portfolio. Methods This was a qualitative, focus group study. All focus groups were taped and transcribed verbatim, and anonymised. The transcripts were analysed inductively, using framework analysis. Results Four focus groups were carried out with 32 undergraduate medical students naïve in portfolio use. Three themes relevant to portfolio introduction emerged. The first theme was the need for clear information and support for portfolio introduction, and anxieties about how this could be supported effectively. The second was that students had negative views about reflective learning and whether this could be taught and assessed, believing formal assessment could foster socially acceptable content. The third was that participants revealed little understanding of reflective learning and its potential benefits. Rather portfolios were seen as useful for concrete purposes (e.g., job applications not intrinsic benefits. Conclusion Undergraduate medical students without experience of portfolios are anxious about portfolio introduction. They require support in developing reflective learning skills. Care must be taken to ensure students do not see portfolios as merely yet another assessment hurdle.

Cleland Jennifer

2009-12-01

285

Clinical placements for medical students: factors affecting patients' involvement in medical education.  

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Many medical students now have contact with patients from the very beginning of their course and the increasing numbers of medical students means that more and more patients will be exposed to students during their medical treatment. This paper presents the attitudes of 281 patients towards medical students encountered in a primary or secondary care setting. Particular attention is paid to consent, types of procedures undertaken and the title given to the medical student. The study showed that the likelihood of patients agreeing to be involved in medical education depended on the patient, the student and the procedure being undertaken. Recommendations have been made to the university on the basis of the results with the aim of maximizing patient involvement and satisfaction in order to further medical student education. PMID:15203518

Chipp, Elizabeth; Stoneley, Sarah; Cooper, Kate

2004-03-01

286

Lesotho's students' achievement in mathematics and their teachers' background and professional development  

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The study sought to obtain information on the relationship, if any, between students' achievement and teacher background as well as between students’ achievement and professional development. The respective correlation coefficient showed that there was a significant relationship between students’ achievement and teacher background and an insignificant relationship between students’ achievement and the extent of professional development. Of the three components of teacher background (viz...

David Mogari; Jeanne Kriek2; Gerrit Stols; Iheanachor, Ogbonnaya U.

2011-01-01

287

Lesotho’s students’ achievement in mathematics and their teachers’ background and professional development  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The study sought to obtain information on the relationship, if any, between students’ achievement and teacher background as well as between students’ achievement and professional development. The respective correlation coefficient showed that there was a significant relationship between students’ achievement and teacher background and an insignificant relationship between students’ achievement and the extent of professional development. Of the three components of teache...

Mogari, David; Kriek, Jeanne; Stols, Gerrit H.; Iheanachor, Ogbonnaya Ugorji

2009-01-01

288

Knowledge and attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine among medical students in Turkey  

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Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study aims to examine knowledge and attitudes towards Complementary and Alternative Medicine among medical students in Turkey, and find out whether they want to be trained in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out between October and December 2010 among medical students. Data were collected from a total of seven medical schools. Findings The study included 943 medical students. The most well known methods among the students were herbal treatment (81.2?%, acupuncture (80.8?%, hypnosis (78.8?%, body-based practices including massage (77?% and meditation (65.2?%, respectively. Acupuncture, aromatherapy, herbal treatment and meditation were better known among female participants compared to males (p? Conclusions Majority of the medical students were familiar with the CAM methods widely used in Turkey, while most of them had positive attitudes towards CAM as well as willingness to receive training on the subject, and they were likely to recommend CAM methods to their patients in their future professional lives. With its gradual scientific development and increasing popularity, there appears a need for a coordinated policy in integrating CAM into the medical curriculum, by taking expectations of and feedback from medical students into consideration in setting educational standards.

Akan Hulya

2012-08-01

289

Career and parenting satisfaction among medical students, residents and physician teachers at a Canadian medical school  

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BACKGROUND: Studies of career and parenting satisfaction have focused separately on medical students, residents and practising physicians. The objective of this study was to compare satisfaction across a spectrum of stages of medical career. METHODS: A survey of incoming medical students, current medical students, residents and physician teachers at the University of Saskatchewan was conducted in the spring of 1997. Response rates were 77% (43/56), 81% (177/218), 65% (134/206) and 39% (215/55...

Cujec, B.; Oancia, T.; Bohm, C.; Johnson, D.

2000-01-01

290

Students' Views on Factors Affecting Empathy in Medical Education  

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Objective: Empathy is a prominent goal of medical education that is too often underachieved. Using concept mapping, the authors constructed a student-generated conceptual model of factors viewed as affecting empathy during medical education. Methods: During the 2005-2006 academic year, 293 medical students and interns answered a brainstorming…

Winseman, Jeffrey; Malik, Abid; Morison, Julie; Balkoski, Victoria

2009-01-01

291

Approaches to increasing the effectiveness of the learning process and the future professional activity of students with disabilities.  

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Full Text Available The features of medical public welfare of students are in-process studied with disability. 2672 students took part in an inspection. The necessity of application is marked for individual rehabilitation programs. Resulted recommendation on application of psychological, pedagogical, physical, professional, labour, athletic, sporting, social, domestic rehabilitation. Directions professional adaptation of students are rotined to the future profession. The program of physical rehabilitation which has 3 stages is recommended: adaptation (1 course, correction-health-improvement (2-3 course, professionally-applied (4-6 course. It is set that computer-integrated and inclusive an educational environment is the optimum form of providing of young people with disability by terms for a self-expression, self-perfection, independent creation, and realization of equal rights and possibilities, forming of sense of the personal meaningfulness and full value.

Makarova E.V.

2012-09-01

292

Discrediting the Notion "Working with 'Crazies' Will Make You"Crazy"": Addressing Stigma and Enhancing Empathy in Medical Student Education  

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People with mental illness around the world continue to suffer from stigmatization and limited care. Previous studies utilizing self-report questionnaires indicate that many medical students regard clinical work with psychiatric patients as unappealing, while the professionalism literature has documented a general decline in students' capacity for…

Cutler, Janis L.; Harding, Kelli J.; Mozian, Sharon A.; Wright, Leslie L.; Pica, Adrienne G.; Masters, Scott R.; Graham, Mark J.

2009-01-01

293

Hepatitis B prophylaxis practice among medical students : An overview  

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Full Text Available Healthcare personnel, especially medical students, represent a high risk population for Hepatitis B Virus (HBV infection. Hepatitis B is the most important infectious occupational hazard which Indian medical students and healthcare workers (HCWs encounter. The medical students and HCWs all over the world do not practice universal precautions on a routine basis and there exists the widely prevalent problem of under reporting of percutaneous and mucocutaneous exposures and a lack of awareness about the disease transmission, its consequences and the importance of adhering to universal precautions at all times. This further compounds the issue of safety of student HCWs. This article highlights the dismal scenario vis-?-vis awareness about these risks and HBV prophylaxis amongst medical students from a student?s perspective and suggests how to tackle the situation to protect the unfortunate medical students from an unwarranted predicament.

Chouhan Swati

2008-01-01

294

Professional Socialization of Graduate Students: A give-and-take process.  

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Full Text Available Professional socialization of graduate students is a give-and-take process due to its complexity and dynamism. This paper, which falls under organizational behavior focuses on the three approaches to socialization of graduate students—functionalist, interpretive and critical. The author views professional socialization from the standpoint of interpretive approach, which argues that a student plays a significant role in the professional socialization process. While the department puts the student through the socialization process, the student makes a decision and chooses how to behave through the socialization process. Thus, the student influences socialization process just as the socialization process influences the student’s professional preparation. The paper focuses on graduate students because of the assumption that graduate study plays a fundamental role in socializing and preparing students for work and developing an early professional identity.

Orpha Kemunto Ongiti

2012-04-01

295

Cardiac evaluation of collegiate student athletes: a medical and legal perspective.  

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Physicians participate in the screening, routine medical supervision, and disqualification process of collegiate student athletes today. Physicians and universities evaluating collegiate student athletes for athletic participation should understand the meticulous medical process necessary to make eligibility/disqualification decisions and the associated liability issues. It is the responsibility of a team physician to take the lead role in the college sports medical evaluation process. The first duty of a team physician and institution is to protect the health and well-being of their collegiate student athletes. The potential liability associated with the evaluation process requires institutions of higher education and physicians to develop sound and reasonable administrative strategies regarding college athletes and their participation in intercollegiate athletics. Reducing this liability risk requires an understanding of the evolving judicial framework and compliance with standard case law and available guidelines. As medical professional standards evolve, so will responsibilities under legal standards. PMID:22840661

Paterick, Timothy E; Jan, M Fuad; Paterick, Zachary R; Umland, Matt M; Kramer, Christopher; Lake, Peter; Seward, James B; Tajik, A Jamil; Maron, Barry J

2012-08-01

296

Attitudes towards statistics of graduate entry medical students: the role of prior learning experiences  

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Background While statistics is increasingly taught as part of the medical curriculum, it can be an unpopular subject and feedback from students indicates that some find it more difficult than other subjects. Understanding attitudes towards statistics on entry to graduate entry medical programmes is particularly important, given that many students may have been exposed to quantitative courses in their previous degree and hence bring preconceptions of their ability and interest to their medical education programme. The aim of this study therefore is to explore, for the first time, attitudes towards statistics of graduate entry medical students from a variety of backgrounds and focus on understanding the role of prior learning experiences. Methods 121 first year graduate entry medical students completed the Survey of Attitudes toward Statistics instrument together with information on demographics and prior learning experiences. Results Students tended to appreciate the relevance of statistics in their professional life and be prepared to put effort into learning statistics. They had neutral to positive attitudes about their interest in statistics and their intellectual knowledge and skills when applied to it. Their feelings towards statistics were slightly less positive e.g. feelings of insecurity, stress, fear and frustration and they tended to view statistics as difficult. Even though 85% of students had taken a quantitative course in the past, only 24% of students described it as likely that they would take any course in statistics if the choice was theirs. How well students felt they had performed in mathematics in the past was a strong predictor of many of the components of attitudes. Conclusion The teaching of statistics to medical students should start with addressing the association between students’ past experiences in mathematics and their attitudes towards statistics and encouraging students to recognise the difference between the two disciplines. Addressing these issues may reduce students’ anxiety and perception of difficulty at the start of their learning experience and encourage students to engage with statistics in their future careers. PMID:24708762

2014-01-01

297

INTERNSHIP ROLES IN TRAINING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPEMENT OF STUDENTS  

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Full Text Available Romanian specialist`s studies show a harsh reality: Romanian universities programs have only theoretical value, creating specialists but not for real life, but for a more abstract environment. Our university graduates are doing very well in a stable economic and institutional environment that offers relatively easy material and financial resources, with a set of skills and professional skills which fail to meet harsh reality of the labor market. An effective solution for professional skills development is the accumulation of work experience during college in the environment and on the job we have in view by following an internship program. As a form of practical education through work, internship meets young people, particularly students keen to gain experience through practical work in a job within a company or institution chosen, giving them the opportunity to translate theoretical knowledge into practice and to develop skills and experience of labor market activities that waits for them. This paper is an original applied research conducted in the West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration. It aims to identify whether there is a need for specialization Management students to acquire work experience before graduating, to what extent they are able to assess their skills and work in a company and especially the role of internship programs in professional and personal development of students. The results show that participation in an internship program is beneficial not only for students but also for employers. Leading to increased competences and to training and professional skills and personal development, internship becomes a more attractive alternative for young people because it gives them the opportunity to be “a ringer" of an employee on the position you have in view. Without being employed, students can gain practical experience in a certain position they sought in a company or institution on the labor market, practical experience they need so much and they can also learn what responsibilities and tasks the job entails and whether or not they are suitable for that position.

Munteanu Anca-Ioana

2012-07-01

298

The Effect of Stress on Medical Students in a Private Medical University in Malaysia  

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Full Text Available Stress amongst medical students is oftenoverlooked. Intelligent students are not always the mostcomposed. This study aimed to look at both male andfemale students of three different ethnic groups and theeffects of stress in areas such as academic, social,financial and their everyday life. The Chinese studentsreported significantly less “academic stress” than theMalay students, and the Malay students reportedsignificantly less “financial stress” compared to theChinese and Indian students. Medical education can bea health hazard for medical students

Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

2007-06-01

299

The Effects of Training Medical Students in Motivational Interviewing  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: To explore the effects of brief training in Motivational interviewing (MI) for medical students. Design: Video recordings of consultations between 113 final-year medical students and simulated patients were scored blind by two independent raters with the Motivational Interviewing Skill Code (MISC). Half of the students participated in a…

Opheim, Arild; Andreasson, Sven; Eklund, Astri Brandell; Prescott, Peter

2009-01-01

300

Student Perceptions of the First Year of Veterinary Medical School.  

Science.gov (United States)

A brief survey was conducted of nearly 900 first-year students in 14 U.S. veterinary medical schools in order to gather impressions of the first year of veterinary medical education. Although some students reported that conditions were stressful, the majority did not feel that they were inordinately so. Overall, most students were quite positive…

Powers, Donald E.

2002-01-01

 
 
 
 
301

Non-Medical Prescription Drug Use among University Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Non-medical prescription drug use is an increasing problem among university students. Purpose: The present study investigated university students' involvement in non-medical prescription drug (NMPD) use and associations between use and other risky behaviors. Methods: A sample of 363 university students completed a four page survey…

Vidourek, Rebecca A.; King, Keith A.; Knopf, Ellen E.

2010-01-01

302

Interns as teachers of medical students: a pilot programme.  

LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

In recent years, rising numbers of medical students and an increasingly demanding clinical workload has put pressures on the educational systems for medical students in the hospital. Bedside teaching remains central to education, but tutorial delivery by registrars, tutors and consultants has proven to be increasingly difficult with the greater numbers of students now in the undergraduate system.

Dunne, B

2011-03-01

303

AMEE 2010 symposium: medical student education in the twenty-first century - a new Flexnerian era?  

Science.gov (United States)

As we mark the 100th anniversary of the Flexner report which revolutionized the process of medical education, there is again concern that we face a critical need for change in the process of medical education in order to meet the needs of learners, teachers, and patients. In this symposium, panelists shared perspectives on medical education reform from throughout the world, including The Future of Medical Education in Canada, the role of regulators in contributing to reform, the evolution of accreditation standards, the current state of medical education in Southeast Asia, and the perspectives of a medical student on medical education reform. In the "Audience discussion" section, themes emerged surrounding medical education as a social good, the need for governmental support of medical education, the cost of medical education and the rise of for-profit medical schools, and embracing a broader view of health professional education. There remain remarkable parallels in calls for reform in medical education at the turn of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries but education which is patient-centered and actively involves the voices of our patients and our students is likely to be a hallmark. PMID:21696279

Hemmer, Paul A; Busing, Nick; Boulet, John R; Burdick, William P; McKillop, James; Irby, David; Ann Farmer, Elizabeth; Duvivier, Robbert

2011-01-01

304

Urticaria and angioedema in Siriraj medical students.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study aimed to investigate the current prevalence of urticaria with or without angioedema among Siriraj medical students, the possible causative agent(s), the association between a history of atopy, behavior of patients seeking treatment and natural course. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 428 Siriraj medical students, Mahidol University in October, 2001. The study showed the prevalence of urticaria and angioedema to be 51.6 per cent and 19.6 per cent respectively, coexisting in 13.6 per cent but urticaria alone occurred in 38 per cent and angioedema alone in 6 per cent. There was an equal sex distribution. Acute urticaria (93.2%) was more prevalent than chronic urticaria (5.4%), and the acute intermittent type was the most common. Heat, inhalants, and contactants were more often suspected causes than food or drug allergy identified in both forms. More than half the urticaria subjects treated themselves by buying over-the-counter drugs (66%) and the remainder waited for spontaneous remission (49%) with a low percentage seeking medical advice (24% from a general practitioner, 14% from a dermatologist). An atopic history was not a major underlying factor for urticaria. Most patients with acute urticaria were free of symptoms after 3 weeks. Cases with chronic urticaria who were completely healed had a mean disease duration of 14.2 weeks. However, cases with chronic urticaria who had never had a long hive free period since the onset of the disease until the time of the study had a mean disease duration of 6 years. These findings may be useful to help educate affected persons and improve public awareness in order to prevent and manage this disease. PMID:12678142

Jiamton, Sukhum; Swad-Ampiraks, Prasomsri; Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Suthipinittharm, Puan

2003-01-01

305

Evaluation of internet access and utilization by medical students in Lahore, Pakistan  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The internet is increasingly being used worldwide in imparting medical education and improving its delivery. It has become an important tool for healthcare professionals training but the data on its use by medical students in developing countries is lacking with no study on the subject from Pakistan. This study was, therefore, carried out with an aim to evaluate the pattern of internet access and utilization by medical students in Pakistan. Methods A structured pre-tested questionnaire was administered to a group of 750 medical students in clinical years studying at various public and private medical colleges in Lahore. The questions were related to patterns of internet access, purpose of use and self reported confidence in performing various internet related tasks, use of health related websites to supplement learning and the problems faced by students in using internet at the institution. Results A total of 532 medical students (70.9% returned the questionnaire. The mean age of study participants was 21.04 years (SD 1.96 years. Majority of the respondents (84.0% reported experience with internet use. About half of the students (42.1% were using internet occasionally with 23.1%, 20.9% and 13.9% doing so frequently, regularly and rarely respectively. About two third of the students (61.0% stated that they use internet for both academic and professional activities. Most of the participants preferred to use internet at home (70.5%. Self reported ability to search for required article from PubMed and PakMedinet was reported by only 34.0% of the entire sample. Students were moderately confident in performing various internet related tasks including downloading medical books from internet, searching internet for classification of diseases and downloading full text article. Health related websites were being accessed by 55.1% students to supplement their learning process. Lack of time, inadequate number of available computers and lack of support from staff were cited as the most common problems faced by students while accessing internet in the institution premises. There were significant differences among male and female students with respect to the place of internet use (p = 0.001 and the ability to search online databases for required articles (p = 0.014. Conclusions Majority of the medical students in this study had access to internet and were using it for both academic and personal reasons. Nevertheless, it was seen that there is under utilization of the potential of internet resources to augment learning. Increase in awareness, availability of requisite facilities and training in computing skills are required to enable better utilization of digital resources of digital resources by medical students.

Raza Ali

2011-05-01

306

Smoking among male medical sciences students in Semnan, Islamic Republic of Iran.  

Science.gov (United States)

We determined the prevalence of smoking among 320 male medical sciences students (174 studying for a medical degree, 95 a bachelor degree and 51 a associate degree) in Semnan, Islamic Republic of Iran. A self-administrated, anonymous questionnaire was used. The prevalence of smoking was 14.4%; 45.6% of the smokers started smoking between the ages of 18 and 20 years, 43.5% starting at university. There was no significant difference in the prevalence between students undertaking different college degrees and also those having different types of accommodation. However the smoking behaviour of friends and family was significantly correlated with smoking in the students. Smoking amongst medical sciences students, who will become the health professionals of the future, needs to be addressed. PMID:20799567

Nazary, A A; Ahmadi, F; Vaismoradi, M; Kaviani, K; Arezomandi, M; Faghihzadeh, S

2010-02-01

307

First Year Medical Students? AIDS Knowledge and Attitude  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Research Question: What is the level of knowledge, sexual practices and attitude of medical students towards AIDS/ HIV. Objective: To assess the knowledge, sexual practices and attitudes of medical students in relation to HIV/AIDS. Study Design: Cross- sectional. Participants: 409 first year medical students. Study variables: Sex knowledge, sexual practices, Attitudes, Risk perception. Results: 92% of the students had heard about AIDS predominantly through mass media. Many students had misconception about transmission of HIV infection should not be allowed to work in the clinic or hospital. 36% of male and 9% of female students admitted indulging in safe sexual practices mostly with their friends.

Amalraj Edwin R

1995-01-01

308

Quality Science Teacher Professional Development and Student Achievement  

Science.gov (United States)

Studies show that socio-economic background and parental education accounts for 50-60 percent of a child's achievement in school. School, and other influences, account for the remaining 40-50 percent. In contrast to most other professions, schools require no real apprenticeship training of science teachers. Overall, only 38 percent of United States teachers have had any on-the-job training in their first teaching position, and in some cases this consisted of a few meetings over the course of a year between the beginning teacher and the assigned mentor or master teacher. Since individual teachers determine the bulk of a student's school experiences, interventions focused on teachers have the greatest likelihood of affecting students. To address this deficiency, partnerships between scientists and K-12 teachers are increasingly recognized as an excellent method for improving teacher preparedness and the quality of science education. Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers' (founded in 1990) basic premise is simple: teachers cannot effectively teach science if they have no firsthand experience doing science, hence the Program's motto, "Practice what you teach." Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers provides strong evidence that a teacher research program is a very effective form of professional development for secondary school science teachers and has a direct correlation to increased student achievement in science. The author will present the methodology of the program's evaluation citing statistically significant data. The author will also show the economic benefits of teacher participation in this form of professional development.

Dubner, J.

2007-12-01

309

Berlin's medical students' smoking habits, knowledge about smoking and attitudes toward smoking cessation counseling  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Diseases associated with smoking are a foremost cause of premature death in the world, both in developed and developing countries. Eliminating smoking can do more to improve health and prolong life than any other measure in the field of preventive medicine. Today's medical students will play a prominent role in future efforts to prevent and control tobacco use. Methods A cross-sectional, self-administered, anonymous survey of fifth-year medical students in Berlin, Germany was conducted in November 2007. The study explored the prevalence of smoking among medical students. We assessed their current knowledge regarding tobacco dependence and the effectiveness of smoking cessation methods. Students' perceived competence to counsel smokers and promote smoking cessation treatments was also explored. Analyses were based on responses from 258 students (86.6% response rate. Results One quarter of the medical students surveyed were current smokers. The smoking rate was 22.1% among women, 32.4% among men. Students underestimated smoking-related mortality and the negative effect of smoking on longevity. A considerable number of subjects erroneously assumed that nicotine causes coronary artery disease. Students' overall knowledge of the effectiveness of smoking cessation methods was inadequate. Only one third of the students indicated that they felt qualified to counsel patients about tobacco dependence. Conclusions This study reveals serious deficiencies in knowledge and counseling skills among medical students in our sample. The curriculum of every medical school should include a tobacco module. Thus, by providing comprehensive training in nicotine dependence interventions to medical students, smokers will have access to the professional expertise they need to quit smoking.

Kusma Bianca

2010-04-01

310

Reliability of medical students' vaccination histories for immunisable diseases  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical students come into contact with infectious diseases early on their career. Immunity against vaccine-preventable diseases is therefore vital for both medical students and the patients with whom they come into contact. Methods The purpose of this study was to compare the medical history and serological status of selected vaccine-preventable diseases of medical students in Germany. Results The overall correlation between self-reported medical history statements and serological findings among the 150 students studied was 86.7 %, 66.7 %, 78 % and 93.3 % for measles, mumps, rubella and varicella, conditional on sufficient immunity being achieved after one vaccination. Although 81.2 % of the students' medical history data correlated with serological findings, significant gaps in immunity were found. Conclusion Our findings indicate that medical history alone is not a reliable screening tool for immunity against the vaccine-preventable diseases studied.

Gottschalk René

2008-04-01

311

The ethical imperative to think about thinking - diagnostics, metacognition, and medical professionalism.  

Science.gov (United States)

While the medical ethics literature has well explored the harm to patients, families, and the integrity of the profession in failing to disclose medical errors once they occur, less often addressed are the moral and professional obligations to take all available steps to prevent errors and harm in the first instance. As an expanding body of scholarship further elucidates the causes of medical error, including the considerable extent to which medical errors, particularly in diagnostics, may be attributable to cognitive sources, insufficient progress in systematically evaluating and implementing suggested strategies for improving critical thinking skills and medical judgment is of mounting concern. Continued failure to address pervasive thinking errors in medical decisionmaking imperils patient safety and professionalism, as well as beneficence and nonmaleficence, fairness and justice. We maintain that self-reflective and metacognitive refinement of critical thinking should not be construed as optional but rather should be considered an integral part of medical education, a codified tenet of professionalism, and by extension, a moral and professional duty. PMID:25033249

Stark, Meredith; Fins, Joseph J

2014-10-01

312

Moral judgment competence of medical students: a transcultural study.  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors conducted a cross-sectional short-term study using Lind's Moral Judgment Test (MJT) to compare moral judgment competence (C-score) among students from a medical school in the Northeast region of Brazil and a medical school in the Northern region of Portugal. This study compares the C-scores of groups in the first and eighth semesters of study within each medical school and groups from corresponding semesters between the two medical schools. This study also evaluates the influence of such factors as age and gender on moral competence. A regression of moral judgment competence among the students in their eighth semester versus the students in the first semester of Brazilian medical school (p moral competence among students in their eighth semester versus the first semester students in the Portuguese medical school (p = 0.06) were observed. For both the first semester and eighth semester groups, the students in the Portuguese medical school had higher C-scores than the students in the Brazilian medical school. In the analysis of the students' performances in terms of MJT dilemmas, the phenomenon of "moral segmentation" was observed in all of the groups, and the students performed better on the worker's dilemma than on the doctor's dilemma. Among students in the same semester of study, older students had lower C-scores. There was generally no significant difference between men's and women's C-scores. PMID:23463178

Neves Feitosa, Helvécio; Rego, Sergio; Unger Raphael Bataglia, Patricia; Castelo Branco Sancho, Karlos Frederico; Rego, Guilhermina; Nunes, Rui

2013-12-01

313

Students' Conceptions of Underlying Principles in Medical Physiology: An Interview Study of Medical Students' Understanding in a PBL Curriculum  

Science.gov (United States)

Medical physiology is known to be a complex area where students develop significant errors in conceptual understanding. Students' knowledge is often bound to situational descriptions rather than underlying principles. This study explores how medical students discern and process underlying principles in physiology. Indepth interviews, where…

Fyrenius, Anna; Silen, Charlotte; Wirell, Staffan

2007-01-01

314

Gadget Dependency among Medical College Students in Delhi  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background: Gadget holds the great importance in everyday life. Mobile phone and internet usage have become universal practice especially among the student community. Gadgets usage has both pros and cons. Objective: To assess the magnitude of gadget utilization among medical college students in Delhi and to estimate the burden of gadget dependency. Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted in three medical colleges. The participants were 957 medical students selected by systematic ra...

Gupta, N.; Krishnamurthy, V.; Majhi, J.; Gupta, S.

2014-01-01

315

Prospective survey of performance of medical students during preclinical years.  

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The performance during the preclinical course of 517 students who had applied to this medical school for admission in 1981 and who had been accepted by the school or by another British medical school was analysed in relation to variables measured at the time of application to find factors that predicted success in the preclinical course, whether students chose to take an intercalated degree, and the class achieved in the intercalated degree. Thirty one of the 507 students who entered medical ...

Mcmanus, I. C.; Richards, P.

1986-01-01

316

The Relationship between Students' Interactions with Student Affairs Professionals and Cognitive Outcomes in the First Year of College  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored the impact of students' interactions with student affairs professionals and growth on cognitive outcomes in the first year of college. Interactions with student affairs professionals were associated positively with growth on measures of need for cognition, attitude toward literacy, and academic motivation. A small, negative…

Martin, Georgianna L.; Seifert, Tricia A.

2011-01-01

317

Rural Origin Medical Students: How Do They Cope with the Medical School Environment?  

Science.gov (United States)

A survey of 163 senior medical students attending a South Australian medical school found that rural students were more likely than urban students to experience stress; be concerned about getting a provider number (license); feel that consultants had little time for them; have made the decision to study medicine without pressure from others; and…

Durkin, Shane R.; Bascomb, Angela; Turnbull, Deborah; Marley, John

2003-01-01

318

Making sense of how physician preceptors interact with medical students: discourses of dialogue, good medical practice, and relationship trajectories.  

Science.gov (United States)

Work based learning and teaching in health care settings are complex and dynamic. Sociocultural theory addresses this complexity by focusing on interaction between learners, teachers, and their environment as learners develop their professional identity. Although social interaction between doctors and students plays a crucial role in this developmental process, socio-cultural research from the perspective of doctors is scarce. We performed discourse analysis on seven general practitioners' audio diaries during a 10-week general practice clerkship to study how they gave shape to their interaction with their students. Examination of 61 diary-entries revealed trajectories of developing relationships. These trajectories were initiated by the way respondents established a point of departure, based on their first impression of the students. It continued through the development of dialogue with their student and through conceptualizations of good medical practice. Such conceptualizations about what was normal in medical and educational practice enabled respondents to recognize qualities in the student and to indirectly determine students' desired learning trajectory. Towards the end, discursive turns in respondents' narratives signaled development within the relationship. This became evident in division of roles and positions in the context of daily practice. Although respondents held power in the relationships, we found that their actions depended strongly on what the students afforded them socially. Our findings address a gap in literature and could further inform theory and practice, for example by finding out how to foster constructive dialogue between doctors and students, or by exploring different discourses among learners and teachers in other contexts. PMID:23771397

van der Zwet, J; Dornan, T; Teunissen, P W; de Jonge, L P J W M; Scherpbier, A J J A

2014-03-01

319

Evaluation of a Danish pharmacist student-physician medication review collaboration model  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Background Interprofessional collaboration between pharmacists and physicians to conduct joint home medication reviews (HMR) is important for optimizing the medical treatment of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. However, collaboration has proved difficult to achieve. The HMR programme "Medisam" was launched in 2009 at the University of Copenhagen with the aim of "developing, implementing and evaluating a collaboration model for HMRs and medicine reconciliations in Denmark". The Medisam programme involves patients, pharmacy internship students, the (pharmacist) supervisor of the pharmacy students and physicians. Objective To explore if it was possible through the Medisam programme to obtain a fruitful HMR collaboration between pharmacy internship students and physicians as a means to develop HMR collaboration between trained pharmacists and physicians further. Setting Ten matching pairs of student-physician collaboration were studied across Denmark. Method Semi-structured interviews about existing collaboration were conducted with pharmacy internship students in the HMR programme, their supervisors and physicians partners. The theoretical framework forming the analyses was derived especially from works of Bradley et al. (Res Soc Adm Pharm 8:36-46, 2012), and Snyder et al. (Res Soc Adm Pharm 6:307-23, 2010) on pharmacists/physician collaboration. Main outcome measure The development of inter-professional collaboration between students and physicians according to the three collaboration drivers: trustworthiness, role specification and professional interaction. Results Full collaboration was not achieved. Physicians found collaboration satisfactory, students however expressed the need of more interaction with physicians. The written collaboration contracts did not ensure a possible need of students to re-negotiate roles and tasks, and did therefore not entirely ensure role specification. Developing mutual professional interdependence through students being recognized by physicians to contribute to improved patient outcomes was also limited. Conclusion Some challenges to fruitful collaboration were identified. Solutions to these challenges include students and their pharmacist supervisors to find ways to present their collaborative needs to physicians and for students to illustrate more explicitly the benefits patient achieve if physicians implement the recommendations of students.

Kaae, Susanne; SØrensen, Ellen Westh

2014-01-01

320

Oral cancer awareness of undergraduate medical and dental students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of oral cancer is increasing in the United Kingdom. Early detection of oral cancers makes them more amenable to treatment and allows the greatest chance of cure. Delay in presentation and/or referral has a significant effect on the associated morbidity and mortality. Lack of general medical practitioner and general dental practitioner oral cancer knowledge has been shown to contribute to delays in referral and treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the oral cancer awareness of future general medical and general dental practitioners by assessing undergraduate medical and dental students' knowledge of prevention and early detection of oral cancer. Method Questionnaires were delivered to undergraduate medical and dental students at the University of Dundee, assessing oral examination habits, delivery of advice on oral cancer risk factors, knowledge of oral cancer risk factors and clinical appearance, preferred point of referral and requests for further information. Results Undergraduate medical students were less likely to examine patients' oral mucosa routinely and less likely to advise patients about risk factors for oral cancer. Medical students identified fewer oral cancer risk factors. In particular alcohol use was identified poorly. Medical students also identified fewer oral changes associated with oral cancer. Erythroplakia and erythroleukoplakia were identified poorly. Medical students felt less well informed regarding oral cancer. 86% and 92% of undergraduate medical and dental students respectively requested further information about oral cancer. Conclusion This study highlights the need for improved education of undergraduate medical and dental students regarding oral cancer.

Ogden Graham R

2007-11-01

 
 
 
 
321

The medical student as a patient: attitudes towards involvement in the quality and safety of health care.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

BACKGROUND: In recent years, factors that affect patients' willingness and ability to participate in safety-relevant behaviours have been investigated. However, how trained healthcare professionals or medical students would feel participating in safety-relevant behaviours as a patient in hospital remains largely unexplored. OBJECTIVES: To investigate medical students' willingness to participate in behaviours related to the quality and safety of their health care. DESIGN: A cross-sectional exp...

Davis, Re; Joshi, D.; Patel, K.; Briggs, M.; Vincent, Ca

2013-01-01

322

A Longitudinal Study of Determinants of Career Satisfaction in Medical Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract: Context: There is evidence of significant career dissatisfaction among practicing physicians and those considering medicine as a profession. Most research on career satisfaction has examined practicing physicians. This study was undertaken to look at determinants of satisfaction in those at the earliest stage of their medical careers ? medical students. Methods: As part of a larger study, students comprising one class at the University of Washington School of Medicine were surveyed three times over the course of their medical education. For the present study we examined measures specifically related to determinants of career satisfaction. Findings: Over time, students? sense of the importance of most measured determinants of satisfaction showed significant change, the majority of which were in the direction of decreased importance. However, most of the change was relative. That is, factors that students considered to be most important at the start of medical school continued to be most important throughout the educational experience and those factors students considered to be least important at Year 1 continued to be least important at Years 2 and 4. Discussion: These findings have implications for medical education, a time when students are forming expectations that will impact their career satisfaction. In addition to information on career satisfaction, students should understand the professional values of medicine, their own values and expectations, current practice patterns, economics, and the role of advocacy.

Virginia A. Reed, PhD

2004-07-01

323

What are college students saying about psychiatric medication?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The number of college students who take psychiatric medication has dramatically increased. These students may be at risk for negative mental health outcomes because research shows that mental illness can delay the attainment of developmental milestones critical to adulthood. This article explores college students’ experience with psychiatric medication and how it impacts functioning and stigma. Perceptions of medication treatment could be crucial to understanding the factors that enable college students with mental illness to thrive in a university setting. Seventeen undergraduate college students in a private, Midwestern university who had a psychiatric illness and were taking prescribed psychiatric medication, were enrolled. A semi-structured interview queried college students about their perceptions of taking psychiatric medications and how the use of medication influences their functioning. Authors conducted thematic analysis by using the constant comparative method for coding data and sorting in-vivo codes by shared theme. Respondents generally reported positive attitudes toward medication and minimal stigma. Particular themes included: higher functioning; mitigation of symptoms; willingness to disclose; and positive long-term outlook regarding the use of medication. Students were empowered by their treatment because it positively impacted functioning and integration into the college setting. However, in contrast to the majority of study participants, one minority student reported experiencing significant external and internal stigma due to her use of psychiatric medication. Although the study’s qualitative nature, small sample size,and lack of ethnic diversity of respondents limit generalizability, important preliminary findings indicate that some college students are benefiting from the use of psychiatric medication with minimal stigma. More research is needed on college students’ experience of psychiatric medication, particularly the experience of minority students, since extant literature indicates their reluctance to utilize psychiatric medications, and a tendency toward negative perceptions of help-seeking for mental illness.

Eileen P. Anderson-Fye

2013-03-01

324

Professional values, self-esteem, and ethical confidence of baccalaureate nursing students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Professional identity and competent ethical behaviors of nursing students are commonly developed through curricular inclusion of professional nursing values education. Despite the enactment of this approach, nursing students continue to express difficulty in managing ethical conflicts encountered in their practice. This descriptive correlational study explores the relationships between professional nursing values, self-esteem, and ethical decision making among senior baccalaureate nursing students. A convenience sample of 47 senior nursing students from the United States were surveyed for their level of internalized professional nursing values (Revised Professional Nursing Values Scale), level of self-esteem (Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale), and perceived level of confidence in ethical decision making. A significant positive relationship (p students' professional nursing values and levels of self-esteem. The results of this study can be useful to nursing educators whose efforts are focused on promoting professional identity development and competent ethical behaviors of future nurses. PMID:23166146

Iacobucci, Trisha A; Daly, Barbara J; Lindell, Debbie; Griffin, Mary Quinn

2013-06-01

325

Program to improve the effectiveness of education and professional activities of college students  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

We describe a training program on “Psychology of effective professional activity”, realized on the basis of the Ural College of the Beauty Industry. The purpose of this discipline is to improve the effectiveness of education and professional activities of college students acquiring professions of “Human-Human” type. To improve effectiveness of education and professional activities, this program provides formation of professionally important qualities of students. The results of the pr...

Vlaskina, I. V.

2013-01-01

326

Student pharmacist initiated medication reconciliation in the outpatient setting  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The Joint Commission continues to emphasize the importance of medication reconciliation in all practice settings. Pharmacists and student pharmacists are uniquely trained in this aspect of patient care, and can assist with keeping accurate and complete medication records through patient interview in the outpatient setting.Objective: The objective of this study was to quantify and describe medication reconciliation efforts by student pharmacists in an outpatient family medicine center.Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of all standard medication reconciliation forms completed by student pharmacists during patient interviews from April 2010 to July 2010. The number of reviews conducted was recorded, along with the frequency of each type of discrepancy. A discrepancy was defined as any lack of agreement between the medication list in the electronic health record (EHR and the patient-reported regimen and included any differences in dose or frequency of a medication, duplication of the same medication, medication no longer taken or omission of any medication.Results: A total of 213 standard medication forms from the 4 month period were reviewed. A total of 555 discrepancies were found, including medications no longer taken, prescription medications that needed to be added to the EHR, over-the-counter(OTC and herbal medications that needed to be added to the EHR, medications taken differently than recorded in the EHR, and medication allergies which needed to be updated. An average of 2.6 discrepancies was found per patient interviewed.Conclusion: Student pharmacist-initiated medication reconciliation in an outpatient family medicine center resulted in the resolution of numerous discrepancies in the medication lists of individual patients. Pharmacists and student pharmacists are uniquely trained in medication history taking and play a vital role in medication reconciliation in the outpatient setting.

Andrus MR

2012-06-01

327

Swedish medical students' expectations of their future life  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Objectives: To investigate future life expectations among male and female medical students in their first and final year. Methods: The study was cross-sectional and conducted at a Swedish medical school. Out of 600 invited students, 507 (85%) answered an open-ended question about their future life, 298 (59%) first-year students and 209 (41%) last-year students. Women constituted 60% of the respondents. A mixed model design was applied; qualitative content analysis was utilized to create stati...

Saima Diderichsen; Jenny Andersson; Johansson, Eva E.; Petra Verdonk; Antoine Lagro-Janssen; Katarina Hamberg

2011-01-01

328

AWARENESS ABOUT PSYCHIATRY IN UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL STUDENTS IN NEPAL  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Undergraduate medical students in developing countries have a number of misnotions and misconceptions about psychiatry. Carefully planned teaching programmes providing more interactions of students with faculty during a short span may be helpful in increasing students? awareness and positive attitude towards psychiatry. This study was conducted to assess the impact of a two weeks training programme on the awareness of medical students about psychiatry, its scope and treatment modalities. Th...

Chadda, R. K.; Singh, Meghachandra M.

1999-01-01

329

Teaching medical students basic neurotransmitter pharmacology using primary research resources.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We designed a seminar where small groups of students worked on different neurotransmitters before contributing information to a plenary session. Student ...

Halliday, Ac; Devonshire, Im; Greenfield, Sa; Dommett, Ej

2010-01-01

330

Early identification of future medical students using initial undergraduate grades.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study assessed whether overall academic performance in undergraduate medical coursework can be predicted with reasonable accuracy by using grades from initial college-level courses rather than total premedical grade point averages (GPAs). Initial college grades from four areas, MCAT scores, and NBME I and II scores were recorded for students admitted to the University of Washington Medical School, for students admitted to other medical schools, and for students not admitted to any medical school. The results documented a high relationship between cumulative GPAs and initial grades, with differences found between those students admitted to medical school and those not admitted. The importance of this study is the documentation that little predictive utility is gained by waiting for overall college GPAs from medical school applicants. Initial GPAs are available 2 years earlier than overall GPAs and provide virtually the same information. Exploratory suggestions for medical school admission policies are made. PMID:3205189

Scott, C S; Greig, L M; Brock, D M; Hunt, D D; Shaad, D C; Carline, J D

1988-09-01

331

Technology Skill Assessment of Construction Students and Professional Workers  

Science.gov (United States)

In recent years, technology has been introduced to the construction job sites at an increasingly rapid pace. As a result, there is a pressing need to increase the technology awareness and skill level of these practitioners and of those who are in academia. This new focus on technology education has to be incorporated first of all in the general curriculum and specific pedagogy of civil engineering programs at the university level as these are the source of next generations of leaders for the industry. In order to address this issue, we were awarded a NSF-funded project with two objectives: to identify the student and workforce learning characteristics in general, and to conduct an assessment of the current technology skills and knowledge of construction and engineering students and professional workers. These baseline data are being used to identify the needs of technology education for the construction workforce. More importantly, these findings are guiding the design and testing of prototypical technology-enhanced learning. This paper presents our initial findings from engineering students in our on-going research on effective pedagogy for technology-based construction education. In the paper, we will describe the design of the baseline data collection instruments that assess student technology skills and use of the learning module prototype, the most important findings from the data collected, as well as a discussion on the learning modules designed as a validation tool for our framework.

Nguyen, Thuy; O'Brien, William; Schmidt, Kathy

2009-09-15

332

A study of stress in medical students at Seth G.S. Medical College.  

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BACKGROUND: It is usually observed that medical students undergo tremendous stress during various stages of the MBBS course. There is a high rate of suicide among them. METHODS: To determine incidence of stress and factors controlling stress in medical students at various stages of MBBS course at Seth G S Medical college, 238 students (First year 98, Second 76, Third 64) were asked to complete a questionnaire on personal data (gender, stay at hostel, mode of travel, time spent in travel every...

Supe A

1998-01-01

333

Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant th...

Kron Frederick W; Gjerde Craig L; Sen Ananda; Fetters Michael D

2010-01-01

334

Revolution, Reform, and Reticent Voices: The Effects of Nicaragua's Dynamic Health System on Medical Professionals  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The views of health professionals are an important and often overlooked aspect of changes in health policy. This paper examines the impact of healthcare reform on the medical professionals of Nicaragua over the last 40 years. First, the historical context of Nicaraguan healthcare is discussed. This history is presented as both an outgrowth of and a reaction to Nicaragua’s changing political environment. The changes in health policy over this time period are then examined through the lens of...

Gardner, James E.

2014-01-01

335

Changes of empathy in medical college and medical school students: 1-year follow up study  

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Abstract Background This study aims to determine the correlation between medical education systems, medical college (MC) and medical school (MS), and empathy by investigating the changes in empathy among students with each additional year of medical education. Methods The subjects were MC and MS students who had participated in the same study the previous year. All participants completed the same self-report instruments: a questionnaire on sociodemographic chara...

Hong Minha; Lee Won; Park Jae; Yoon Tai; Moon Duk; Lee Sang; Bahn Geon

2012-01-01

336

Medical students as sexual health peer educators: who benefits more?  

Science.gov (United States)

Background A prospective study was conducted to evaluate the impact of an educational reproductive health program on medical student peer educators and the secondary school pupils whom they taught. Methods The Marseille School of Medicine and ten public secondary schools participated in the study. Medical students were recruited and trained as peer educators to promote sexual health in the secondary schools. The medical students and secondary school pupils were evaluated before and after education program. The main outcome measure was the sexual health knowledge score on a 20-item questionnaire (maximum score 20). Results A total of 3350 students attended the peer-led course conducted by 107 medical students. The medical students’ score increased significantly before and after the course (from 15.2?±?1.8 to 18.3?±?0.9; p?score of the pupils increased (from 7.8?±?4 to 13.5?±?4.4; p?score was significantly higher than the boys’ score after the course, but not before (14.5?±?3.3 vs 12.5?±?4.6; p?score among the female medical students was significantly higher than that of the males. The overall knowledge increase was not significantly different between medical students and secondary school pupils (mean 3.1?±?1 and 5.7?±?4 respectively; p?>?0.05). Conclusions The program was effective in increasing the knowledge of medical students as well as secondary school pupils. Male sexual health knowledge should be reinforced. PMID:25099947

2014-01-01

337

Students' perceptions of assessment practices in a traditional medical curriculum.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines advanced medical students' perceptions of assessment practices and their ways of studying for examinations as related to their approaches to learning. This study further validates a cluster model obtained in a previous study through medical students' interviews. In this cluster model students were divided into four groups on the basis of their approaches to learning. The subjects (N = 35) were advanced medical students who volunteered to be interviewed. The interviews focused on learning strategies, study behaviour and perceptions of the learning environment. The results indicated that there were no differences in students' perceptions of the examination procedures. Students in all four groups criticised quite similarly the examination practices. However, the results showed that students in the four groups reported different ways of preparing for examinations and, furthermore, had different views of the most functional ways to study for them. This study brought into light problems that arise in a traditional medical curriculum, particularly concerning traditional assessment practices. PMID:11435763

Lindblom-Ylänne, S; Lonka, K

2001-01-01

338

Erro médico: a perspectiva de estudantes de medicina e direito / Medical error from the perspective of medical students and law students  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Nas últimas décadas, houve um crescimento das implicações em sociedade do erro médico, assunto em que se entrelaçam Medicina e Direito. Este estudo procurou conhecer a percepção de estudantes de Medicina e Direito sobre erro médico, avaliando nível de interesse e informação, e a necessidade de abord [...] ar o tema na graduação e como ela ocorre para cada área, na sua ótica. Estudo observacional descritivo transversal foi realizado na Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (MG) em 2008 com 185 alunos de Medicina e 119 de Direito. 88,7% dos alunos de Medicina (MED) e 92,4% de Direito (DIR) referiram conhecimento sobre erro médico. O interesse se dá por ser um tema muito discutido atualmente. Os alunos consideram necessária sua abordagem na graduação (97,8% MED e 94,9% DIR). É importante discutir um tema tão atual na graduação de Medicina e de Direito pela contribuição que pode ser oferecida para diminuir o ciclo vicioso de erros, iatrogenias e processos jurídicos, além de possibilitar uma reflexão acerca do papel da educação médica na construção ética de novos profissionais. Abstract in english Recent decades have witnessed an increase in the societal implications of medical error, a subject in which Medicine and Law intertwine. This study focused on medical error from the perspective of medical students and law students, assessing their level of interest and information and the need to di [...] scuss the topic during undergraduate education and how it occurs in each field, in their view. A cross-sectional, descriptive, observational study was conducted at the Federal University in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais State, in 2008 with 185 medical students and 119 law students. 88.7% of the medical students and 92.4% of the law students reported knowledge of medical error. The interest was due to the fact that medical error is currently a widely discussed issue. The students thought the issue should be addressed in their undergraduate education (97.8% of medical students and 94.9% of law students). It is important to discuss such a current issue in undergraduate education in both medicine and law, because of the potential for decreasing the vicious circle of errors, iatrogenesis, and law suits, in addition to fostering reflection on the role of medical education in the ethical training of young professionals.

José Antônio, Chehuen Neto; Mauro Toledo, Sirimarco; Nathália Stela Visoná de, Figueiredo; Tatiane Neto, Barbosa; Thiago Gonçalves da, Silveira.

339

The American medical liability system: An alliance between legal and medical professionals can promote patient safety and be cost effective  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this paper is to evaluate a hypothesis premised on the idea that if medical leaders in the United States support an unfettered access for patients injured by medical error to the American civil justice system, that approach would improve patient safety and be cost effective. Method: An analysis of the relevant legal and medical literature. Results: Medical liability in the American civil justice system derived from traditional tort law is based on accountability. Reforms applied to medical liability cases urged by healthcare providers limit and in some cases eliminate legal rights of patients injured by healthcare error which rights exist for all others in non-medical cases. Yet medical liability cases have promoted a culture of safety. Information learned from medical liability cases has been used to make care safer with a reduced incidence of adverse outcomes and lower costs. A just culture of safety can limit provider emotional stress. Using the external pressures to reduce the incidence of law suits and promoting ethical mandates to be safer and disclose the truth can promote provider satisfaction. Conclusions: An alliance between legal and medical professionals on the common ground of respect for the due process legal rights of patients in the American system of justice and the need for accountability can make care safer and can be cost effective.

Steven E. Pegalis

2013-02-01

340

The self-medication in elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing  

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Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the complex theme of self-medication in the elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing. Methodology: this is a theoretical essay based on a literature review of the narrative type. It was selected articles indexed in databases Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO and the Database of Nursing (BDENF, from 2003 to 2009, using as descriptors: self-medication, nursing and elderly people. It was also used books and manuals of the ministry of health. From the reading and qualitative synthesis of abstracts, were set up two axes of analysis and reflection: Aging and self: views on the issue and Medication in the elderly people: the role of health professionals and nursing. Results: the elderly people are the age group that uses more drugs. Self-medication is a practice that can generate serious health risks such as intoxication. The qualified professional should guide the public about the medicine to lessen the risk and effectively as possible. Conclusion: it was conclude that the use of knowledge of health professionals and nurses to help to reduce the risks associated with self-medication and problems related to use of medicines, contributing to the improvement of quality of life of older people.

Cecília Nogueira Valença, Raimunda Medeiros Germano, Rejane Maria Paiva de Menezes

2010-05-01

 
 
 
 
341

Program to improve the effectiveness of education and professional activities of college students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We describe a training program on “Psychology of effective professional activity”, realized on the basis of the Ural College of the Beauty Industry. The purpose of this discipline is to improve the effectiveness of education and professional activities of college students acquiring professions of “Human-Human” type. To improve effectiveness of education and professional activities, this program provides formation of professionally important qualities of students. The results of the program can be: students’ acquisition of knowledge required for the effective performance of professional activities (ways to prevent burnout, increase self-confidence, etc.; mastery of professional skills (planning, simulation, etc.; formation of professionally important qualities (stress, tolerance, etc.; increasing the efficiency of their professional activities.

I.V. Vlaskina

2013-04-01

342

Recruitment and Professional Image of Students at One of the Regional Universities in Hungary  

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Full Text Available In this article we study the social recruitment and professional image of students at the University of Debrecen. Social recruitment shows significant differences between the faculties and the branches. The students in the high prestige faculties come from highmiddle class and middle class families. The students of the faculties that were judged having average prestige are from the middle class and the rate of low-middle class students is significantly greater in branches with lower prestige. Important differences were found in the professional image of the students with an education major and not education majors and also in case of the „ideal professional” and the „practical, necessary knowledge”. Both are partly formed by the professional socialization of the students and partly by the stereotypes. As a consequence there are also big differences between the professional image and the future expectations of the students with an education major and with other majors attending the same faculty.

Tímea Ceglédi

2011-07-01

343

Medical Students' Attitudes toward AIDS and Homosexual Patients.  

Science.gov (United States)

Using multivariate and univariate analyses of variance of medical student reactions to four patient vignettes, researchers found negative and prejudiced attitudes toward both AIDS and homosexual patients. It is suggested that educators should promote greater sensitivity, knowledge, and understanding among medical students. (Author/LB)

Kelly, Jeffrey A.; And Others

1987-01-01

344

Graduating Medical Students' Ratings of Stresses, Pleasures, and Coping Strategies.  

Science.gov (United States)

Data on the stress and coping of medical students was gathered in order to design a health promotion and wellness program. A questionnaire was completed by graduating students. Examinations, classwork, and financial responsibilities were considered the three most stressful aspects of medical education. (Author/MLW)

Wolf, Thomas M.; And Others

1988-01-01

345

Genetic Engineering of Animals for Medical Research: Students' Views.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reports on the results of a survey meant to ascertain the views of 16- to 18-year-old students (n=778) on using animals in medical research. Suggests that students have no greater objection to the use of genetically engineered animals over naturally bred animals in medical research. Contains 16 references. (Author/WRM)

Hill, Ruaraidh; Stanisstreet, Martin; O'Sullivan, Helen; Boyes, Edward

1999-01-01

346

Predictors of Nonmedical ADHD Medication Use by College Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: To identify the predictors of nonmedical ADHD medication use by college students. Participants: A total of 843 undergraduates attending one public or one private university in southeastern United States. Method: Students completed a Web-based survey inquiring about ADHD medication use during the first semester freshman of their year and…

Rabiner, David L.; Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Costello, E. Jane; Hoyle, Rick H.; Swartzwelder, H. Scott

2010-01-01

347

Therapy 101: A Psychotherapy Curriculum for Medical Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: This pilot project, designed and taught by a resident, created a curriculum to introduce medical students to the practice of psychotherapy. Medical students who are knowledgeable about psychotherapy can become physicians who are able to refer patients to psychotherapeutic treatments. A search of the literature did not identify a…

Aboul-Fotouh, Frieda; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

2010-01-01

348

Medical Student Views of Substance Abuse Treatment, Policy and Training  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: This study examined the impact of medical education on students' views of substance abuse treatment, public policy options and training. Method: A longitudinal survey was conducted on a single-class cohort of 101 students in a major American, urban medical school. The survey was administered in the Spring semesters of the first to third…

Agrawal, Shantanu; Everett, Worth W.; Sharma, Sonali

2010-01-01

349

Teaching Medical Students Basic Neurotransmitter Pharmacology Using Primary Research Resources  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We…

Halliday, Amy C.; Devonshire, Ian M.; Greenfield, Susan A.; Dommett, Eleanor J.

2010-01-01

350

Perceived Stress in Medical, Law, and Graduate Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

A survey of medical, law, and chemistry and psychology graduate students' perceived stresses (academic activities, personal relationships, time pressures, and financial concerns) contradicted the expectation that medical students' stress level would be highest. Time restrictions and economic and academic issues produced the highest stress. (MSE)

Heins, Marilyn; And Others

1984-01-01

351

Training Medical Students about Hazardous Drinking Using Simple Assessment Techniques  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: To examine the ability of medical students to identify hazardous drinkers using screening tools recommended in clinical practice. Design: Observational cross-sectional study. Setting: Faculty of Medicine of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. Method: The medical students learnt to use Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and…

Hidalgo, Jesús López-Torres; Pretel, Fernando Andrés; Bravo, Beatriz Navarro; Rabadan, Francisco Escobar; Serrano Selva, Juan Pedro; Latorre Postigo, Jose Miguel; Martínez, Ignacio Párraga

2014-01-01

352

Do you think it's a disease? a survey of medical students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of medical conditions is influenced by whether clinicians regard them as "disease" or "not a disease". The aim of the survey was to determine how medical students classify a range of conditions they might encounter in their professional lives and whether a different name for a condition would influence their decision in the categorisation of the condition as a 'disease' or 'not a disease'. Methods We surveyed 3 concurrent years of medical students to classify 36 candidate conditions into "disease" and "non-disease". The conditions were given a 'medical' label and a (lay label and positioned where possible in alternate columns of the survey. Results The response rate was 96% (183 of 190 students attending a lecture: 80% of students concurred on 16 conditions as "disease" (eg diabetes, tuberculosis, and 4 as "non-disease" (eg baldness, menopause, fractured skull and heat stroke. The remaining 16 conditions (with 21-79% agreement were more contentious (especially obesity, infertility, hay fever, alcoholism, and restless leg syndrome. Three pairs of conditions had both a more, and a less, medical label: the more medical labels (myalgic encephalomyelitis, hypertension, and erectile dysfunction were more frequently classified as 'disease' than the less medical (chronic fatigue syndrome, high blood pressure, and impotence, respectively, significantly different for the first two pairs. Conclusions Some conditions excluded from the classification of "disease" were unexpected (eg fractured skull and heat stroke. Students were mostly concordant on what conditions should be classified as "disease". They were more likely to classify synonyms as 'disease' if the label was medical. The findings indicate there is still a problem 30 years on in the concept of 'what is a disease'. Our findings suggest that we should be addressing such concepts to medical students.

Erueti Chrissy

2012-04-01

353

Students' attitudes to ethics in the medical school curriculum.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A survey of 106 medical students assessing their interest in and attitudes to medical ethics in the curriculum is reported by the authors. Results indicate that 64 per cent of the students rated the importance of medical ethics to good medical care as high or critical and 66 per cent desired to learn more about the topic. However, in reports of patient encounters identifying ethical issues, less than six per cent of the students reported a frequency of more than one such patient encounter per...

Shelp, E. E.; Russell, M. L.; Grose, N. P.

1981-01-01

354

Knowledge, attitude and practice of tobacco smoking by medical students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Tobacco consumption is associated with considerable negative impact on health. Health professionals, including future doctors, should have a leading role in combating smoking in the community. Objectives: The aims of the study were to assess the prevalence of smoking among medical students of newly established medical colleges in Riyadh city, the capital of Saudi Arabia, as well as to assess students? attitude, practice and their knowledge on the risk factors of tobacco consumption. Methods: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study of students from two medical colleges in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia was carried out. The questionnaire used was anonymous, self-administered and developed mainly from Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS. Results: A total of 215 students participated in this study. Forty students (19% indicated that they smoke tobacco at the time of the study. All of them were males, which raise the prevalence among male students to 24%. Tobacco smoking was practiced by males more than females (P value < 0.0001 and by senior more than junior students (< 0.0001. About 94% of the study sample indicated that smoking could cause serious illnesses. About 90% of the students indicated that they would advice their patients to quit smoking in the future and 88% thought that smoking should be banned in public areas. Forty-four students (20% thought that smoking has some beneficial effects, mainly as a coping strategy for stress alleviation. Conclusion: Despite good knowledge about the hazards of tobacco consumption, about 25% of the medical students in this study continue to smoke. The main reported reasons should be addressed urgently by policy-makers. Special efforts should be taken to educate medical students on the effective strategies in managing stress during their study as they thought that tobacco smoking could be used as a coping strategy to face such a stress.

Al-Haqwi Ali

2010-01-01

355

Usage of emergency contraception between medical related and non-medical related students.  

LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

Teenagers and young adultshave the most risk of unplanned pregnancy, due to lack of awareness to see a family planning provider after unprotected sexual intercourse. In addition, nearly one in five physicians is reluctant to provide information regarding Emergency Contraception (EC) to women and this may contribute to their lack of awareness. This study was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding the use of EC between medical related students compared to non-medical related students. Data collection was done using questionnaires distributed among students in University College Cork (UCC). 93% of medically related students were aware of EC compared to only 73.5% of non-medically related students. Medical related students also were more aware about the mechanism of action and detailed knowledge of EC compared to the non-medical students. This study has proven that medically related students have more detailed knowledge regarding EC compared to non-medical related students. However, there was no significant difference noted regarding the attitude and practice between the two groups.

Khalid, A K

2009-04-01

356

Smartphone use and acceptability among clinical medical students: a questionnaire-based study.  

Science.gov (United States)

Smartphones are becoming increasingly common in both personal and professional spheres. These devices have many features which can be successfully harnessed in healthcare, including rapid access to information, instant communication and improved organisation. In particular, the smartphone's potential as an educational tool is an area which is starting to gain recognition, with a number of institutions providing the device to medical students. However, before more universities follow suit, a better understanding of students' ownership, usage and attitudes relating to smartphones is required. We therefore distributed a questionnaire to clinical medical students at the University of Birmingham, UK, which aimed to fill these gaps in knowledge. Data were obtained from 361 participants, representing a response rate of 32%. Fifty-nine per cent of students owned a smartphone; 37% of these reported using the device to support their learning. Generally students were positive towards the concept of smartphones as future educational aids, with 84% believing the devices would be useful or very useful. However, 64% thought smartphones would be too costly to implement and 62% felt such technology was not in the medical school's interest. Themes which emerged upon analysis of free text supported general findings, with students also mentioning issues such as potential for unprofessional behaviour and dependence upon smartphones. In conclusion, it appears most medical students believe a smartphone would be a useful addition to their education, although financial barriers must be overcome before the device is more universally accepted. PMID:23526127

Robinson, Tim; Cronin, Thomas; Ibrahim, Haider; Jinks, Mark; Molitor, Timothy; Newman, Joshua; Shapiro, Jonathan

2013-06-01

357

International students in United States’ medical schools: does the medical community know they exist?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Matriculation of international students to United States’ (US medical schools has not mirrored the remarkable influx of these students to other US institutions of higher education. Methods: While these students’ numbers are on the rise, the visibility for their unique issues remains largely ignored in the medical literature. Results: These students are disadvantaged in the medical school admissions process due to financial and immigration-related concerns, and academic standards for admittance also continue to be significantly higher compared with their US-citizen peers. Furthermore, it is simply beyond the mission of many medical schools – both public and private – to support international students’ education, especially since federal, state-allocated or institutional funds are limited and these institutions have a commitment to fulfill the healthcare education needs of qualified domestic candidates. In spite of these obstacles, a select group of international students do gain admission to US medical schools and, upon graduation, are credentialed equally as their US-citizen counterparts by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME. However, owing to their foreign citizenship, these students have visa requirements for post-graduate training that may adversely impact their candidacy for residency placement. Conclusion: By raising such issues, this article aims to increase the awareness of considerations pertinent to this unique population of medical students. The argument is also made to support continued recruitment of international students to US medical schools in spite of these impediments. In our experience, these students are not only qualified to tackle the rigors of a US medical education, but also enrich the cultural diversity of the medical student body. Moreover, these graduates could effectively complement the efforts to augment US physician workforce diversity while contributing to healthcare disparity eradication, minority health issues, and service in medically underserved areas.

Jashodeep Datta

2012-06-01

358

Countries of origin and languages of Australian medical students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Monash University medical students were surveyed to determine whether they represented the cultural diversity of their community. A total of 878 students completed self reports which showed they originated from forty countries and spoke forty-one languages. The medical school academic intake procedure had selected students from many ethnic groups reflecting the cultural diversity of the community. All had passed the Higher School Certificate English Examination or equivalent to enter the course. A total of 21% reported fluency in a language other than English, and 62% reported having a usable other language in which they were not fluent. The number of fluent languages spoken was constant over the medical course while the number of languages in which students were not fluent decreased significantly. Findings refuted the stereotype that Australian medical students were all monolingual Anglo-Saxons. Training in use of interpreters, and positive discrimination for medical school entry were considered. PMID:6503752

Tiller, J W; Jones, K V

1984-11-01

359

Does psychosocial stress influence menstrual abnormalities in medical students?  

Science.gov (United States)

A cross-sectional study was conducted among 164 students in a medical school in Pondicherry, India, by administering a questionnaire consisting of anthropometric data, menstrual history and psychosocial stress. Psychosocial stress was assessed using Perceived Stress Scale (PSS10). We observed that out of the 164 students who answered the questionnaire, students who reported premenstrual symptoms, irregular cycles and dysmenorrhoea severe enough to take medication had significantly higher mean PSS scores (p = 0.000, 0.025, 0.035, respectively). High stress (fourth quartile PSS score) was significantly associated with occurrence of premenstrual symptoms and dysmenorrhoea severe enough to take medication. Stress in medical students is associated with severe dysmenorrhoea, irregular cycles and premenstrual syndrome. This implies that interventions to reduce the stress can improve the menstrual health of medical students, thereby reducing future health risks and improving the quality of life. PMID:23815203

Kollipaka, R; Arounassalame, B; Lakshminarayanan, S

2013-07-01

360

Structure and state of the university of physical culture studentsprofessional-pedagogical motivation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The state and dynamics of the university of physical culture students’ motivation was determined. The complex of diagnostic methods was used to determine the level of professional-pedagogical motivation, which was directed on outlining motivation components and its development levels determination. The research involved 232 students. It was found that for the 1 st year students the first place was obtained by the professional-cognitive interest, second by achievement motive and third by professional intention. For the 4 th year students, the first place is possessed by professional cognitive interest, then followed by motives referred to professional and then – motives of achievement. The diagnostics have outlined absence of certain professional intentions. Also from first to fourth year of studies the tendency of increasing the amount of students interest of which is not connected either to physical culture, sports nor to pedagogical activity is followed.

Stepanchenko N. I.

2013-03-01

 
 
 
 
361

Using Theater to Increase Empathy Training in Medical Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Abstract: Developing and nurturing empathy in medical trainees has been recognized as an essential element of medical education. Theater may be a unique instructional modality to increase empathy training. Methods: A multi-disciplinary team developed a theater workshop for first year medical students. Through the use of theater games, art images…

Reilly, Jo Marie; Trial, Janet; Piver, Debra E.; Schaff, Pamela B.

2012-01-01

362

Social Learning: Medical Student Perceptions of Geriatric House Calls  

Science.gov (United States)

Bandura's social learning theory provides a useful conceptual framework to understand medical students' perceptions of a house calls experience at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine. Social learning and role modeling reflect Liaison Committee on Medical Education guidelines for "Medical schools (to) ensure that the learning…

Abbey, Linda; Willett, Rita; Selby-Penczak, Rachel; McKnight, Roberta

2010-01-01

363

Consumption of alcohol, cigarettes and illegal substances among physicians and medical students in Brandenburg and Saxony (Germany  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients regard health care professionals as role models for leading a healthy lifestyle. Health care professionals' own behaviour and attitudes concerning healthy lifestyle have an influence in counselling patients. The aim of this study was to assess consumption of alcohol, cigarettes and illegal substances among physicians and medical students in two German states: Brandenburg and Saxony. Methods Socio-demographic data and individual risk behaviour was collected by an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. Physicians were approached via mail and students were recruited during tutorials or lectures. Results 41.6% of physicians and 60.9% of medical students responded to the questionnaire; more than 50% of the respondents in both groups were females. The majority of respondents consumed alcohol at least once per week; median daily alcohol consumption ranged from 3.88 g/d (female medical students to 12.6 g/d (male physicians. A significantly higher percentage of men (p Conclusion More than one third of the medical students and health care professionals showed problematic alcohol-drinking behaviour. Although the proportion of non-smokers in the investigated sample was higher than in the general population, when compared to the general population, medical students between 18-24 reported higher consumption of illegal substances. These results indicate that methods for educating and promoting healthy lifestyle, particularly with respect to excessive alcohol consumption, tobacco use and abuse of illegal drugs should be considered.

Kugler Joachim

2009-12-01

364

Measurement of psychosocial health in medical students: Validation of the Jefferson Medical College's Questionnaire in Mexico  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Argentina | Language: English Abstract in spanish Como la literatura consigna, los estudiantes y profesionales de la Medicina en comparación con la población general y de otras carreras conforman una población que resulta vulnerable frente a los trastornos de salud psicosocial. En la investigación psicosocial de la educación médica un punto clave c [...] orresponde a la identificación de medidas relevantes con cualidades psicométricas. En el presente trabajo se analiza la validez y confiabilidad de un conjunto de escalas psicosociales aplicadas a 3.603 alumnos de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (México). Las escalas administradas fueron: Soledad, Ansiedad ante los exámenes, Ansiedad general, Autoestima, Extroversión, Locus de control externo, Neuroticismo, Depresión, Eventos estresantes en la vida, Percepción de relaciones tempranas con los padres y amigos y Percepción de estado de salud general. Estas escalas fueron propuestas por investigadores de la Escuela de Medicina de Jefferson (Estados Unidos). Se confirmó la unidimensionalidad y la validez de constructo de las mediciones de Soledad, Ansiedad ante los exámenes, Ansiedad general, Autoestima y Extroversión. Así también, la magnitud y dirección de las correlaciones interescalas apoyaron la validez convergente y discriminante, con excepción de Locus de control externo y Neuroticismo. Los resultados confirman las propiedades psicométricas de las escalas, las cuales son útiles para proveer información a los educadores médicos y a profesionales de la salud mental en la detección temprana de problemas psicosociales quienes en conjunto pueden coadyuvar en la optimización de la salud mental de los estudiantes de escuelas de Medicina a través de programas académicos acordes a sus necesidades. Abstract in english The greater the psychosocial health, the greater is the well-being and the capacity for adaptation and overcoming problems and common life frustrations in family, relationships, and work. Medical students and practicing physicians, in comparison with the general population and that of other professi [...] ons, are exposed to academic and professional stress and therefore are vulnerable to psychosocial health problems and certain specific dysfunctions that may compromise their physical, mental, and social health. In the field of psychosocial research in medical education, the key issue is to find relevant and psychometrically sound measures. The Jefferson Medical College's Psychosocial Questionnaire contains abridged versions of nine personality tests, as well as questions about respondents' relationships with parents in the first five years of life and with classmates in the early schooling. The scales in the questionnaire have shown satisfactory internal consistency reliability and construct validity through factor analysis. To our knowledge, in Mexico, there is not a specific questionnaire that measures psychosocial profile in a non-clinical population such as medical students. The present study adapted and translated the questionnaire from English to Spanish in order to evaluate its validity and reliability in Mexican medical students, to further learn its predictive validity of academic performance. In this study, we compared the factor structure in Mexico to the results obtained in the United States research. Implications for predicting academic and clinical performance of medical students and physicians were discussed. Study participants consisted of 3,603 matriculates at the Escuela de Medicina de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (Mexico). Psychosocial measures included Loneliness, Test anxiety, General anxiety, Self-esteem, Extroversion, External locus of control, Neuroticism, Depression, Stressful life events, Perceptions of early relationships with mother and father, Peer relationships and Perception of health, used by researchers at Jefferson Medical College in the United States. The items were translated into Spanish and back translated from Spanish to Engli

Adelina, Alcorta; Jesús, Ancer; Donato, Saldívar; Santos, Guzmán; María V., Bermúdez; Juan, Montes; Juan F., González; Silvia, Tavitas; Francisco J., Rodríguez; Marco V., Gómez; Ana M., Salinas; Mohammadreza, Hojat; Stefan M., Fernández Zambrano.

365

Measurement of psychosocial health in medical students: Validation of the Jefferson Medical College's Questionnaire in Mexico  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Argentina | Language: English Abstract in spanish Como la literatura consigna, los estudiantes y profesionales de la Medicina en comparación con la población general y de otras carreras conforman una población que resulta vulnerable frente a los trastornos de salud psicosocial. En la investigación psicosocial de la educación médica un punto clave c [...] orresponde a la identificación de medidas relevantes con cualidades psicométricas. En el presente trabajo se analiza la validez y confiabilidad de un conjunto de escalas psicosociales aplicadas a 3.603 alumnos de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (México). Las escalas administradas fueron: Soledad, Ansiedad ante los exámenes, Ansiedad general, Autoestima, Extroversión, Locus de control externo, Neuroticismo, Depresión, Eventos estresantes en la vida, Percepción de relaciones tempranas con los padres y amigos y Percepción de estado de salud general. Estas escalas fueron propuestas por investigadores de la Escuela de Medicina de Jefferson (Estados Unidos). Se confirmó la unidimensionalidad y la validez de constructo de las mediciones de Soledad, Ansiedad ante los exámenes, Ansiedad general, Autoestima y Extroversión. Así también, la magnitud y dirección de las correlaciones interescalas apoyaron la validez convergente y discriminante, con excepción de Locus de control externo y Neuroticismo. Los resultados confirman las propiedades psicométricas de las escalas, las cuales son útiles para proveer información a los educadores médicos y a profesionales de la salud mental en la detección temprana de problemas psicosociales quienes en conjunto pueden coadyuvar en la optimización de la salud mental de los estudiantes de escuelas de Medicina a través de programas académicos acordes a sus necesidades. Abstract in english The greater the psychosocial health, the greater is the well-being and the capacity for adaptation and overcoming problems and common life frustrations in family, relationships, and work. Medical students and practicing physicians, in comparison with the general population and that of other professi [...] ons, are exposed to academic and professional stress and therefore are vulnerable to psychosocial health problems and certain specific dysfunctions that may compromise their physical, mental, and social health. In the field of psychosocial research in medical education, the key issue is to find relevant and psychometrically sound measures. The Jefferson Medical College's Psychosocial Questionnaire contains abridged versions of nine personality tests, as well as questions about respondents' relationships with parents in the first five years of life and with classmates in the early schooling. The scales in the questionnaire have shown satisfactory internal consistency reliability and construct validity through factor analysis. To our knowledge, in Mexico, there is not a specific questionnaire that measures psychosocial profile in a non-clinical population such as medical students. The present study adapted and translated the questionnaire from English to Spanish in order to evaluate its validity and reliability in Mexican medical students, to further learn its predictive validity of academic performance. In this study, we compared the factor structure in Mexico to the results obtained in the United States research. Implications for predicting academic and clinical performance of medical students and physicians were discussed. Study participants consisted of 3,603 matriculates at the Escuela de Medicina de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (Mexico). Psychosocial measures included Loneliness, Test anxiety, General anxiety, Self-esteem, Extroversion, External locus of control, Neuroticism, Depression, Stressful life events, Perceptions of early relationships with mother and father, Peer relationships and Perception of health, used by researchers at Jefferson Medical College in the United States. The items were translated into Spanish and back translated from Spanish to Engli

Adelina, Alcorta; Jesús, Ancer; Donato, Saldívar; Santos, Guzmán; María V., Bermúdez; Juan, Montes; Juan F., González; Silvia, Tavitas; Francisco J., Rodríguez; Marco V., Gómez; Ana M., Salinas; Mohammadreza, Hojat; Stefan M., Fernández Zambrano.

2008-07-01

366

Suicidal ideation and attempt among South African medical students  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english International data reveal that medical students are at higher risk of attempting suicide than the general population. We aimed to determine the prevalence of suicidal ideation and attempt among South African medical students from three universities and identify key predisposing risk factors. Data we [...] re collected via a questionnaire to medical students on demographics, mental health history, depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation and attempt. A total of 874 medical students from three universities were enrolled. We found a high prevalence of suicidal ideation (32.3%) and suicidal attempt (6.9%), which is three times higher than the general age-appropriate South African population. Simple screening questionnaires can identify such students, enabling universities to provide targeted and improved support for at-risk students

L, van Niekerk; L, Scribante; P J, Raubenheimer.

367

Suicidal ideation and attempt among South African medical students.  

Science.gov (United States)

International data reveal that medical students are at higher risk of attempting suicide than the general population. We aimed to determine the prevalence of suicidal ideation and attempt among South African medical students from three universities and identify key predisposing risk factors. Data were collected via a questionnaire to medical students on demographics, mental health history, depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation and attempt. A total of 874 medical students from three universities were enrolled. We found a high prevalence of suicidal ideation (32.3%) and suicidal attempt (6.9%), which is three times higher than the general age-appropriate South African population. Simple screening questionnaires can identify such students, enabling universities to provide targeted and improved support for at-risk students. PMID:22668910

Van Niekerk, L; Scribante, L; Raubenheimer, P J

2012-06-01

368

Interns as teachers of medical students: a pilot programme.  

LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

BACKGROUND: In recent years, rising numbers of medical students and an increasingly demanding clinical workload has put pressures on the educational systems for medical students in the hospital. Bedside teaching remains central to education, but tutorial delivery by registrars, tutors and consultants has proven to be increasingly difficult with the greater numbers of students now in the undergraduate system. AIMS: We have performed a pilot study to determine the feasibility of developing a Junior Tutor Progr