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Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act as ... stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

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MAPping Los Angeles County: Taking an Evidence-Informed Model of Mental Health Care to Scale.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

We describe the scaling up of an evidence-informed model of care, Managing and Adapting Practice (MAP) in Los Angeles County, California. MAP complemented an array of evidence-based programs selected by the county as part of a large system reform effort designed to improve care for children and adolescents. In addition, we discuss the MAP model for training therapists and present data both on how the training model performed and on the outcomes of youths treated by therapists trained in MAP. We examined the success of two different training pathways for MAP therapists: (a) national training model and (b) MAP agency supervisor model (i.e., train the trainer). We also examined utilization of MAP and outcomes of clients served by MAP. Both the national training and MAP agency supervisor model were successful in producing MAP therapists in a timely fashion and with acceptable competency scores. Furthermore, a large number of clients were receiving MAP services. Finally, outcomes for youth treated with MAP were strong, with effect sizes ranging from .59 to .80 on the Youth Outcome Questionnaire. These data support the notion that scaling up a mental health services approach in a system can be achieved through a strong and broad partnership among relevant stakeholders, can involve a train-the-trainer model, and can result in strong outcomes for clients.

Southam-Gerow MA; Daleiden EL; Chorpita BF; Bae C; Mitchell C; Faye M; Alba M

2013-09-01

3

What Is Mental Health?  

Science.gov (United States)

... Myths and Facts Recovery is Possible What Is Mental Health? Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social ... mental health problems and where to find help . Mental Health and Wellness Positive mental health allows people to: ...

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A concept mapping exploration of social workers' and mental health nurses' understanding of the role of the Approved Mental Health Professional.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study uses concept mapping and participant interviews to explore how differing professional viewpoints and levels of knowledge held by social workers and mental health nurses affect perceptions of the Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) role during an interprofessional training programme. The results suggest that social workers entering the programme had a greater understanding of the role in comparison to mental health nurses; however, on completion of the programme, both professional groups demonstrated similar levels of learning. The study challenges assumptions that nurses may be inherently disadvantaged by their professional background in terms of learning about a role that is traditionally associated with social work practice. Study participants valued the concept mapping process and felt that the approach may be a valuable tool for clinical supervision.

Bressington DT; Wells H; Graham M

2011-08-01

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Adolescent Mental Health Facts  

Science.gov (United States)

... Forms & References Current Grantees Other Federal Funding Opportunities Mental Health Adolescent Health Topics Mental Health States Adolescent Mental Health Facts Click a state below to see its ...

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Good Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

... Health This information in Spanish ( en español ) Good mental health Nutrition and mental health Exercise and mental health ... work to keep your mind healthy. Nutrition and mental health Visit choosemyplate.gov to help find personalized eating ...

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Menopause and Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

... Menopause > Menopause and mental health Menopause Menopause and mental health Related information Mental health Depression fact sheet Anxiety ... Return to top More information on Menopause and mental health Explore other publications and websites A Guide to ...

8

Mental Health Conditions  

Science.gov (United States)

... Home Illness & disability Types of illnesses and disabilities Mental health conditions Most teens have a lot to deal ... Taking care of your mental health What are mental health disorders? top Mental health disorders are a group ...

9

Women and Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

Home > Health & Education > Mental Health Information Women and Mental Health Mental illnesses affect women and men differently — some ... olearyk@mail.nih.gov Science News About Women's Mental Health Bundling HIV Prevention with Prenatal Care Reduces Risky ...

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Children's Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

Children's Mental Health Why Is Children's Mental Health Important? Mental health — an essential part of children's overall health — has a complex interactive relationship with their physical health and their ability ...

11

Mental health in men.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental and physical health are intrinsically linked to a person's ability to maintain good physical health determined, in part, by his or her mental wellbeing. Similarly, poor physical health can lead to mental health problems.

Morrow A

2013-09-01

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Mental Health Medications  

Science.gov (United States)

... NIMH News About Us Home > Health & Education > Publications Mental Health Medications Introduction: Mental Health Medications What are psychiatric ... Citations For More Information on Medications PDF Introduction: Mental Health Medications Medications are used to treat the symptoms ...

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Mental Health for Men  

Science.gov (United States)

... Men's Health This information in Spanish ( en español ) Mental health for men More information on mental health for ... extremely effective. Return to top More information on Mental health for men Explore other publications and websites Attention ...

14

Mental health in men.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mental and physical health are intrinsically linked to a person's ability to maintain good physical health determined, in part, by his or her mental wellbeing. Similarly, poor physical health can lead to mental health problems. PMID:24063488

Morrow, Abby

2013-09-25

15

Teen Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

... worthless could be warning signs of a mental health problem. Mental health problems are real, painful, and sometimes severe. You ... things that could harm you or others Mental health problems can be treated. To find help, talk ...

16

Mental Health Screening Center  

Science.gov (United States)

Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not a substitute for consultation with a health professional. ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression This screening form was developed from ...

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Women's Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

Women’s Mental Health What it means to you. About this booklet “Women’s mental health is critical to their overall health and to ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Good mental health is important to everyone. And because it is ...

18

Mental Health: Military  

Science.gov (United States)

Home > Mental Health > People > Military Let's Talk Facts Brochures Healthy Minds, Healthy Lives Blog Key Topics Finding help Depression Suicide ... Parity Healthy Minds TV What is a psychiatrist Mental Health Check-up Coping with Disasters Links for more ...

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Teens and Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

... teen's life. Research shows that if left untreated, mental health problems can become worse over time, affecting a teen's school performance, social and emotional life. However, mental health treatment can be effective for teens and the ...

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Child Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

... your child has a fever. A child's mental health problem may be harder to identify, but you ... or hurting or destroying things. Some common mental health problems in children are Depression Anxiety Behavior disorders ...

 
 
 
 
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Women Veterans and Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

... and mental health Mental Health Women veterans and mental health Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and women veterans ... to top More information on Women veterans and mental health Explore other publications and websites Depression (Copyright © AfterDeployment. ...

22

YOGA FOR MENTAL HEALTH  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Mental Health is a concept that refers to the psychological and emotional well being of a person. Being mentally healthy generally means that you are able to use your emotional capabilities to function well in society and go through everyday life with little or no difficulty. Some factors that can affect your mental health are your family life, social life, and life at work. Mental Health disorders are on the rise throughout the world. This result is anxieties, fears, depression, inferiority and similar emotions. Therefore, leaving the management of negative mental health is a most for all of us.

SHOBHA PRAMOD SHINDE

2013-01-01

23

Mental Health Frequently Asked Questions  

Science.gov (United States)

... This Guide Home > Topics & States > Topics > Mental Health Mental Health Frequently Asked Questions How can I find and ... health statistics? How can I find and access mental health treatments and services? Your family doctor, social service ...

24

Child and Adolescent Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

... Health & Education > Mental Health Information Child and Adolescent Mental Health Publications Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents (Fact ... For more than twenty years, National Institute of Mental Health neuroscientist Dr. Jay Giedd has studied the development ...

25

Mental Health Education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available THE goal of mental health today calls for more than an alleviation of mental illness. The days of custodial care in institutions, segregated from the community, belong in the history books. We must look even further than the treatment or even the prevention of mental illness to the ideal of maximum physical, mental and social efficiency for the individual, his family and the community. Mental Health Education is a behavioural science which aims to change behaviour and attitudes which militate against the achievement of these goals.

C.I. Röscher

1979-01-01

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'Mind the gap'--mapping services for young people with ADHD transitioning from child to adult mental health services.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Once considered to be a disorder restricted to childhood, Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is now recognised to persist into adult life. However, service provision for adults with ADHD is limited. Additionally, there is little guidance or research on how best to transition young people with ADHD from child to adult services. METHOD: We report the findings of a survey of 96 healthcare professionals working in children's (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services and Community Paediatrics) and adult services across five NHS Trusts within the East Midlands region of England to gain a better understanding of the current provision of services for young people with ADHD transitioning into adult mental health services. RESULTS: Our findings indicate a lack of structured guidelines on transitioning and little communication between child and adult services. Child and adult services had differing opinions on what they felt adult services should provide for ADHD cases. Adult services reported feeling ill-prepared to deal with ADHD patients, with clinicians in these services citing a lack of specific knowledge of ADHD and a paucity of resources to deal with such cases. CONCLUSIONS: We discuss suggestions for further research, including the need to map the national provision of services for adults with ADHD, and provide recommendations for commissioned adult ADHD services. We specifically advocate an increase in ADHD-specific training for clinicians in adult services, the development of specialist adult ADHD clinics and greater involvement of Primary Care to support the work of generic adult mental health services in adult ADHD management.

Hall CL; Newell K; Taylor J; Sayal K; Swift KD; Hollis C

2013-01-01

27

Children's Mental Health Surveillance  

Science.gov (United States)

Children’s Mental Health Surveillance National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities Division of Human Development and Disability What are ... gov CDC issues first comprehensive report on children’s mental health in the United States A new report from ...

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Community Mental Health  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The distinctive feature of a community mental health program is the comprehensive responsibility assumed for the mental health as well as the psychiatric needs of a particular area. Not only must programs provide psychiatric services but, in addition, they are concerned with assessing the community'...

Harris, M. Robert

29

Disasters and Mental Health Research  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available September 14, 2011 Disasters and Mental Health Research Dr. Sandro Galea, a National Institute of Mental Health grantee, talks about disasters and mental health research. Download this video. ...

30

Disasters and Mental Health Research  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available September 14, 2011 Disasters and Mental Health Research Dr. Sandro Galea, a National Institute of Mental Health grantee, talks about disasters and mental health research. Download this video. Watch on YouTube. ...

31

COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Twenty to twenty-five years ago, the Community Mental Health Center (CHMC), had scarcely been heard of. Today, it is indeed a movement, and apparently widespread. A total of ten services considered to be necessary to provide adequate mental health services: (1) in patient, (2) out-patient, (3) partial hospitalization, (4) emergency, (5) consultation, (6) diagn1ostic, (7) rehabilitative, (8) precare and aftercare, (9) training, (10) research and evaluation services. This Concept of Community Mental Health would include as many community agents as possible in co-operative efforts. To the average educated layman, and, unfortunately to most mental health practitioners the community mental health care has become synonymous with the provision of mere psycho-therapy. The community mental health center has not succeeded in becoming inductor of catalytic agent in the growth of its patients, nor has it become significantly involved with the community as a scrcla1 system. These are grim facts. But new hope has begun to appear. It is contained in four revolutions now under way – revolutions in understanding, in research, in nu1ternal and child care and in education for mental health.

M.H. Saheb-Zamani

1972-01-01

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Promoting mental health in men.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Health promotion is essential to improve the health status and quality of life of individuals. Promoting mental health at an individual, community and policy level is central to reducing the incidence of mental health problems, including self-harm and suicide. Men may be particularly vulnerable to mental health problems, in part because they are less likely to seek help from healthcare professionals. Although this article discusses mental health promotion and related strategies in general, the focus is on men's mental health.

Haddad M

2013-03-01

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Promoting nurses mental health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this article obstacles that influence nurses mental health are described as well as ways to address the obstacles to promote mental health. Opsomming In hierdie artikel word struikelblokke wat verpleegkundiges se geestesgesondheid beinvloed beskryf asook wyses hoe om die struikelblokke aan te spreek om sodoende geestesgesondheid te bevorder. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

Marie Poggenpoel

1996-01-01

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Mental Health Matters  

Science.gov (United States)

Mental Health Matters is a collection of various mental health articles which cover topics such as psychological disorders and treatments for mental illnesses. The site is easy to navigate and users can choose from disorders, symptoms, medications, and treatments. Once a visitor chooses a subfield from the homepage, they are provided with another set of choices which contain more specific information on the various main topics. The site is also designed so that users can search by disorder or category to find the appropriate information to answer their queries.

2007-08-13

35

Resilience and mental health.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The relationship between disease and good health has received relatively little attention in mental health. Resilience can be viewed as a defence mechanism, which enables people to thrive in the face of adversity and improving resilience may be an important target for treatment and prophylaxis. Thou...

Davydov, Dmitry; Stewart, Robert; Ritchie, Karen; Chaudieu, Isabelle

36

Atheism and mental health.  

Science.gov (United States)

The exploration of the impact of religiosity on mental health is an enduring, if somewhat quiet, tradition. There has been virtually no exploration, however, of the influence of atheism on mental health. Though not a "religion," atheism can be an orienting worldview that is often consciously chosen by its adherents, who firmly believe in the "truth" of atheism-a phenomenon known as "positive atheism." Atheism, especially positive atheism, is currently enjoying something of a renaissance in the Western liberal democracies-a trend often referred to as the "new atheism." I argue that atheism, especially positive atheism, should be treated as a meaningful sociocultural variable in the study of mental health. I argue that atheism (just like theism) is an appropriate domain of study for social and cultural psychiatrists (and allied social scientists) interested in exploring socio-environmental stressors and buffers relating to mental health. Specifically, I argue that (1) atheism needs to be accurately measured as an individual-level exposure variable, with the aim of relating that variable to psychiatric outcomes, (2) there needs to be greater systematic investigation into the influence of atheism on psychiatry as an institution, and (3) the relation of atheism to mental health needs to be explored by examining atheistic theory and its practical application, especially as it relates to the human condition, suffering, and concepts of personhood. PMID:20415634

Whitley, Rob

37

Atheism and mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The exploration of the impact of religiosity on mental health is an enduring, if somewhat quiet, tradition. There has been virtually no exploration, however, of the influence of atheism on mental health. Though not a "religion," atheism can be an orienting worldview that is often consciously chosen by its adherents, who firmly believe in the "truth" of atheism-a phenomenon known as "positive atheism." Atheism, especially positive atheism, is currently enjoying something of a renaissance in the Western liberal democracies-a trend often referred to as the "new atheism." I argue that atheism, especially positive atheism, should be treated as a meaningful sociocultural variable in the study of mental health. I argue that atheism (just like theism) is an appropriate domain of study for social and cultural psychiatrists (and allied social scientists) interested in exploring socio-environmental stressors and buffers relating to mental health. Specifically, I argue that (1) atheism needs to be accurately measured as an individual-level exposure variable, with the aim of relating that variable to psychiatric outcomes, (2) there needs to be greater systematic investigation into the influence of atheism on psychiatry as an institution, and (3) the relation of atheism to mental health needs to be explored by examining atheistic theory and its practical application, especially as it relates to the human condition, suffering, and concepts of personhood.

Whitley R

2010-05-01

38

Religiosity and mental health.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mental health is not considered only as absence of mental disorders, but rather as the achievement of higher standards of available psychical potentials. True devotion and obedience to The God give the one a huge and incredible strength, constant source of spiritual emotional and moral energy, which is of help in resisting destructive and slavery attacks of the environment and its materialistic-consuming tendencies, as well as social and mental disruption. According to the opinion of numerous worldwide recognized mental health experts, humankind of today is confronted with a number of problems, which are the consequence of spiritual and moral-ethical degradation of human being. Therefore, religiosity became the field of interest of mental health researchers. The results of new studies undoubtedly indicate beneficial effects of religion on life and mental health in humans. Religiosity reduces tendencies for risky behaviour, impulsive reactions and aggression; it corrects tendencies towards psychopathic and paranoid behaviour, reduces converse, depressive and schizoid tendency, and provides successful overcome of emotional conflicts. In comparison to low-religious adolescents, the factors such as inner conflicts, frustration, fear, anxiety, psychological trauma, low self-esteem, unbalance of psychical homeostasis, emotional instability, and negative psychical energy are less present in highly religious adolescents and neutralized in a healthier and more efficient way. Beneficial impact of religion on mental health derives from precise cognitive-behavioural patterns, which provide a clear life orientation, solid basis and safe frames for personality development, assuring human to be continually on the way to achieve its own generic essence and reach its own maturity and self-actualization. PMID:16395848

Pajevi?, Izet; Sinanovi?, Osman; Hasanovi?, Mevludin

2005-06-01

39

Correlates of Child Mental Health and Mental Health Services Use.  

Science.gov (United States)

This project was designed to present a method of identifying children (ages less than 21) with mental health conditions in the United States and to use those definitions to understand the utilization and expenditure patterns of children with mental health...

M. L. Ganz

2004-01-01

40

Older Adults and Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

... Health & Education > Mental Health Information Older Adults and Mental Health Depression Depression is not a normal part of aging. Yet depression is a ... Research Clinical Trials: Current Studies on Older Adults Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General/Older Adults ...

 
 
 
 
41

Lifestyle and Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

|Mental health professionals have significantly underestimated the importance of lifestyle factors (a) as contributors to and treatments for multiple psychopathologies, (b) for fostering individual and social well-being, and (c) for preserving and optimizing cognitive function. Consequently, therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) are underutilized…

Walsh, Roger

2011-01-01

42

Mental health and childbirth.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Because of the potential impact that all mental health problems in the antenatal and postnatal periods may have on the mother and her child, the NICE guideline should be read by all midwives. Those in management positions must help implement and disseminate the guideline. In the last article in this...

Taylor, C; Richens, Y; Burbeck, R

43

Mental Health Among Nomads  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Nomads mean “a member of a group of people who have no fixed home and move according to the seasons from place to place in search of food, water, and grazing land” The aim of the present investigation has been to know about “mental health among Nomads. Sample: The sample comprised of total Three hundred (N=300) Nomads from different places from Mysore district, out of which Hundred from sillekyatha (n=100) Dombidas Hundred (n=100) and hundred from Korma (100) out of Three hundred male (n=150) female (150). Tool: Mental Health Inventory by Dr. Jagadish and Dr. A.K, Srivastava (1983).This mental health inventory consist of 54 items, with six dimensions. Statistical method: Statistical method has been applied but greater reliance has been placed on statistical methods. These regarded as we used the test-mean, SD, t-test, ANOVA.Result: As a result it is found that there is significant difference in their mental health

Chandrakant Jamadar

2012-01-01

44

Mental health recovery.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

North Carolina has new opportunities for orienting its mental health care system toward client recovery as the system shifts to managed care with the possibility of offering more innovative services. Ways of accomplishing this reorientation are explored and instances of progress are noted.

Dihoff DG; Weaver M

2012-05-01

45

National Institute of Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

... other NIMH grantees honored for “outstanding achievements in mental health research.” Read More Three NIH Scientists Elected into ... at TEDxCaltech NIMH on the National Dialogue on Mental Health Program Announcements (PA) Requests for Applications (RFA) Research ...

46

Mental Health Treatment Program Locator  

Science.gov (United States)

... County or Zip By Name Other Links State Mental Health Agencies Frequently Asked Questions Links Comments or Questions ... a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health treatment programs nearest you, find your State on ...

47

Mental Health and Asian Americans  

Science.gov (United States)

Mental Health and Asian Americans Suicide was the 10th leading cause of death for Asian Americans, and also ... found that 70% of Southeast Asian refugees receiving mental health care were diagnosed with PTSD. 3 For Asian ...

48

Disasters and Mental Health Research  

Science.gov (United States)

... 14, 2011 Disasters and Mental Health Research Dr. Sandro Galea, a National Institute of Mental Health grantee, ... learned in the wake of such trauma? Dr. Sandro Galea is an NIMH funded researcher at New ...

49

Disasters and Mental Health Research  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... 14, 2011 Disasters and Mental Health Research Dr. Sandro Galea, a National Institute of Mental Health grantee, ... learned in the wake of such trauma? Dr. Sandro Galea is an NIMH funded researcher at New ...

50

Domestic violence and mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

There are clear gender differences in the experience of domestic violence and associated mental health outcomes. There is also increasing evidence of chronic, severe and often long-term adverse mental health effects for victims. This paper explores these gender differences and the evidence on how mental health care services should respond to domestic violence. The authors argue that any strategy to reduce the burden of women's mental health problems should include efforts to identify, prevent or reduce violence against women.

Howard LM; Trevillion K; Agnew-Davies R

2010-01-01

51

Comparative Healthcare: Mental health.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available AbstractIn the fourth in this series of ‘comparative healthcare’ medical practitioners explore the approach to mentalillness in Bangladesh and the UK respectively. Differences and similarities in treatment regimens are illustratedwith reference to patients with varying degrees of mental illness. Mental illness poses the greatest challenge inhealth care as national investment in services often reflects cultural attitudes and norms. While the authorsdescribe very similar approaches to the diagnosis and management of severe psychotic illness there are strikingdifferences in the availability of support services for people with substance abuse and those with relapsingconditions. The involvement and co-operation of the family is particularly important in Bangladesh wherecomprehensive access to mental health services is very limited. Private alcohol and drug detoxification centresare available although many are expensive and such treatment may effectively be denied to all but the wealthiestpeople. In the UK all people with serious and enduring mental illness are entered onto a register and thereforeflagged for follow up at least once a year. General Practitioners, working within the nationally funded healthservice have been remunerated since 2003 for maintaining the register. In contrast in the absence of a casemanagementbased psychiatric follow-up framework in Bangladesh, a general practitioner and treatingpsychiatrist would need to formulate a management plan involving recognition of clinical warning signs by thefamily. Indeed the co-operation and support of the patient’s family is of paramount importance in maintainingoutpatient appointments when supporting people with mental health problems in Bangladesh. Finally weemphasise that the views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect health policy orpractice in their respective countries. Nonetheless we believe they offer a valuable perspective on mental healthissues and commend the article to our readers.

Dr. Elizabeth Cottrell; Dr. Ahmed Munib

2009-01-01

52

Mental Health: Overcoming the Stigma of Mental Illness  

Science.gov (United States)

... may be reprinted for personal, noncommercial use only. Mental health: Overcoming the stigma of mental illness By Mayo ... not share your e-mail address Sign up Mental health: Overcoming the stigma of mental illness False beliefs ...

53

Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity  

Science.gov (United States)

... to serve you better? Give your feedback today. Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity The Mental Health Parity ... for behavioral health treatment and services. How the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act Works The Mental ...

54

School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use  

Science.gov (United States)

|Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

2013-01-01

55

School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

2013-01-01

56

Mental Health and Stress  

Science.gov (United States)

This project collects resources for studying mental health and stress issues with middle schoolers. Teens and stress Science NetLinks: The Laughing Brain 2: A Good Laugh Dealing with anger Stress-o-meter Look at each of the above sites. Choose one and read the content. Write a one-paragraph summary. Play interactive games and take quizzes. Keep a log of what you do. Tell which site you liked best and why. ...

Falconer, Mrs.

2007-03-18

57

[Mental Health and relationships].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

After acknowledging that the diversity of cultural, historical and theoretical perspectives has given place to multiple definitions of mental health, the author circumscribes the goal of this article to reflecting on mental health from the viewpoint of human relationships in intersubjective milieux. The basic assumption that guides this paper is that the subject's psychic structure is constituted and developed in a relational matrix. Conceptualized in a relational context, the individual's mental health needs to take into account each member's developmental stage and asymmetrical position in a relationship. In the theoretical and therapeutic approach proposed here, drive renunciation, negative pacts, and intersubjective work are described as basic concepts in the analysis of relational links. Drive renunciation is defined as the operation that excludes certain drives derivatives from explicit relational interchange in order to maintain the structure and stability of the relationship. Negative pacts are defined as the configurations of reciprocal libidinal investments that give form to drive renunciation. The concept of intersubjective work places the emphasis on the interaction of the poles of the relationship, on how what one does influences the other's response. Thus, in the therapeutic context, intersubjective work accounts for each member's processes of symbolization and working through in the interchange and reciprocal impact of each member on the transformation of the relationship. Finally, the complexities around the formulation of therapeutic goals are emphasized and the occasional need of an interdisciplinary therapeutic plan is highlighted.

Spivacow MA

2012-01-01

58

Lifestyle and mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental health professionals have significantly underestimated the importance of lifestyle factors (a) as contributors to and treatments for multiple psychopathologies, (b) for fostering individual and social well-being, and (c) for preserving and optimizing cognitive function. Consequently, therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) are underutilized despite considerable evidence of their effectiveness in both clinical and normal populations. TLCs are sometimes as effective as either psychotherapy or pharmacotherapy and can offer significant therapeutic advantages. Important TLCs include exercise, nutrition and diet, time in nature, relationships, recreation, relaxation and stress management, religious or spiritual involvement, and service to others. This article reviews research on their effects and effectiveness; the principles, advantages, and challenges involved in implementing them; and the forces (economic, institutional, and professional) hindering their use. Where possible, therapeutic recommendations are distilled into easily communicable principles, because such ease of communication strongly influences whether therapists recommend and patients adopt interventions. Finally, the article explores the many implications of contemporary lifestyles and TLCs for individuals, society, and health professionals. In the 21st century, therapeutic lifestyles may need to be a central focus of mental, medical, and public health.

Walsh R

2011-10-01

59

Health Promotion Intervention in Mental Health Services  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The aim of this thesis was to define and develop the concept of health promotion in mental health services as well as to develop a questionnaire to measure patients? subjective experiences of health promotion intervention in mental health services. The samples consisted of 12 patients in study I and...

Svedberg, Petra

60

The Mental Health Aspects of Health Planning.  

Science.gov (United States)

There is need for both the staff persons and governing body members of the health planning agencies and the staff persons and board members of local and state mental health agencies to have a clearer notion of the mental health aspects of health planning ...

1977-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

The use of concept mapping to identify community-driven intervention strategies for physical and mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Research that partners with youth and community stakeholders increases contextual relevance and community buy-in and therefore maximizes the chance for intervention success. Concept mapping is a mixed-method participatory research process that accesses the input of the community in a collaborative manner. After a school-wide health needs assessment at a low-income, minority/immigrant K-8 school identified bullying and obesity as the most important health issues, concept mapping was used to identify and prioritize specific strategies to address these two areas. Stakeholders including 160 K-8 students, 33 college students working in the school, 35 parents, 20 academic partners, and 22 teachers/staff brainstormed strategies to reduce and prevent obesity and bullying. A smaller group of stakeholders worked individually to complete an unstructured sorting of these strategies into groups of similar ideas, once for obesity and again for bullying. Multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis was applied to the sorting data to produce a series of maps that illustrated the stakeholders' conceptual thinking about obesity and bullying prevention strategies. The maps for both obesity and bullying organized specific strategies into themes that included education, parental role, teacher/school supervision, youth role, expert/professional role, and school structure/support.

Vaughn LM; Jacquez F; McLinden D

2013-09-01

62

The use of concept mapping to identify community-driven intervention strategies for physical and mental health.  

Science.gov (United States)

Research that partners with youth and community stakeholders increases contextual relevance and community buy-in and therefore maximizes the chance for intervention success. Concept mapping is a mixed-method participatory research process that accesses the input of the community in a collaborative manner. After a school-wide health needs assessment at a low-income, minority/immigrant K-8 school identified bullying and obesity as the most important health issues, concept mapping was used to identify and prioritize specific strategies to address these two areas. Stakeholders including 160 K-8 students, 33 college students working in the school, 35 parents, 20 academic partners, and 22 teachers/staff brainstormed strategies to reduce and prevent obesity and bullying. A smaller group of stakeholders worked individually to complete an unstructured sorting of these strategies into groups of similar ideas, once for obesity and again for bullying. Multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis was applied to the sorting data to produce a series of maps that illustrated the stakeholders' conceptual thinking about obesity and bullying prevention strategies. The maps for both obesity and bullying organized specific strategies into themes that included education, parental role, teacher/school supervision, youth role, expert/professional role, and school structure/support. PMID:23099661

Vaughn, Lisa M; Jacquez, Farrah; McLinden, Daniel

2012-10-24

63

Hospitalized mental health patients and oral health.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this review of the literature is to present a contemporary perspective related to the nursing care of hospitalized mental health patients who have risk of developing oral health issues. Mental illness is a major health concern worldwide. Compounding this health issue, mental health patients/clients demonstrate avoidant behaviours related to oral health, and the symptoms of mental illness can be a compounding factor. Oral health and oral inflammatory disease are the result of lifestyle and behaviour and mental disorders affect both lifestyle and behaviour. The search used the search terms oral health AND nursing AND mental illness AND Published Date 2005 to 2010. For those who experience mental illness oral health assessment is not routinely practised by clinicians. The importance of special attention to dental problems for people with mental disorders has also been stressed by researchers since the lifespan of people with serious mental disorders is shortened compared to the general population. Oral health care is an important part of treatment. Routine oral care for hospitalized patients is imperative, and this is usually the responsibility of nurses without sufficient knowledge in oral care or comprehensive protocols to follow. PMID:22070464

Edward, K-L; Felstead, B; Mahoney, A-M

2011-10-27

64

Hospitalized mental health patients and oral health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this review of the literature is to present a contemporary perspective related to the nursing care of hospitalized mental health patients who have risk of developing oral health issues. Mental illness is a major health concern worldwide. Compounding this health issue, mental health patients/clients demonstrate avoidant behaviours related to oral health, and the symptoms of mental illness can be a compounding factor. Oral health and oral inflammatory disease are the result of lifestyle and behaviour and mental disorders affect both lifestyle and behaviour. The search used the search terms oral health AND nursing AND mental illness AND Published Date 2005 to 2010. For those who experience mental illness oral health assessment is not routinely practised by clinicians. The importance of special attention to dental problems for people with mental disorders has also been stressed by researchers since the lifespan of people with serious mental disorders is shortened compared to the general population. Oral health care is an important part of treatment. Routine oral care for hospitalized patients is imperative, and this is usually the responsibility of nurses without sufficient knowledge in oral care or comprehensive protocols to follow.

Edward KL; Felstead B; Mahoney AM

2012-06-01

65

Mental Health and African Americans  

Science.gov (United States)

Poverty level affects mental health status. African Americans living below the poverty level, as compared to those over twice the poverty level, are 3 ... compared to 120% of Non-Hispanic Whites. 1 MENTAL HEALTH STATUS: Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

66

Environment and mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Environments seen as the physical, chemical, and biological conditions to which organisms are subjected, define the ways we obtain various resources, their quantity and their quality. In interplay with our organisms, environments determine how 'fit' we are. An aspect of that fitness is the quality of mental functioning. Although there is a traditional view that there is something like an 'objective environment' and an 'effective environment', a part of the objective environment that actually affects the organism, the dividing line between the two is rather obscure. Environment in general cannot be defined without taking into account the behaviour of the organism, and it is especially challenging to define what environment means to humans, given the enormous variation and scope of human behaviours; what it is that we require and tolerate. Simultaneously, that physical environment is the broader context of what we usually term 'social environment'. This paper outlines the conceptual problems in determining and evaluating the relationship between environmental conditions and more proximal determinants of mental health, at the same time reviewing the assumptions of some of the well-known examples of that relationship.

Loga S; Šoši? B

2012-10-01

67

Mental Health Providers: Tips on Finding One  

Science.gov (United States)

... may be reprinted for personal, noncommercial use only. Mental health providers: Tips on finding one By Mayo Clinic ... not share your e-mail address Sign up Mental health providers: Tips on finding one Mental health providers: ...

68

Mental Health: What's Normal, What's Not?  

Science.gov (United States)

... may be reprinted for personal, noncommercial use only. Mental health: What's normal, what's not By Mayo Clinic staff ... sleep with these tips see all in Sleep Mental health (11) Mental health: What's normal, what's not Empty ...

69

Juvenile justice mental health services.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

As the second century of partnership begins, child psychiatry and juvenile justice face continuing challenges in meeting the mental health needs of delinquents. The modern juvenile justice system is marked by a significantly higher volume of cases, with increasingly complicated multiproblem youths and families with comorbid medical, psychiatric, substance abuse disorders, multiple family and psychosocial adversities, and shrinking community resources and alternatives to confinement. The family court is faced with shrinking financial resources to support court-ordered placement and treatment programs in efforts to treat and rehabilitate youths. The recognition of high rates of mental disorders for incarcerated youth has prompted several recommendations for improvement and calls for reform [56,57]. In their 2000 annual report, the Coalition for Juvenile Justice advocated increased access to mental health services that provide a continuum of care tailored to the specific problems of incarcerated youth [58]. The specific recommendations of the report for mental health providers include the need for wraparound services, improved planning and coordination between agencies, and further research. The Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has set three priorities in dealing with the mental health needs of delinquents: further research on the prevalence of mental illness among juvenile offenders, development of mental health screening assessment protocols, and improved mental health services [59]. Other programs have called for earlier detection and diversion of troubled youth from juvenile justice to mental health systems [31,56]. Most recently, many juvenile and family courts have developed innovative programs to address specific problems such as truancy or substance use and diversionary or alternative sentencing programs to deal with first-time or nonviolent delinquents. All youths who come in contact with the juvenile justice system should be screened and, when necessary, assessed for mental health and substance abuse disorders. The screening should occur at the youth's earliest point of contact with the juvenile justice system and should be available at all stages of juvenile justice processing. Whenever possible, youth with serious mental health disorders should be diverted from the juvenile justice system [58]. If delinquent youths do not receive the necessary evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation, they face the real prospect of further incarceration in adult correctional facilities. Improved screening and treatment require better interagency collaboration, established standards of care, and continuing research on the mental health needs of youth in the juvenile justice system. Better mental health care for youth in the juvenile justice system supports the goal of rehabilitation. Mental health professionals should support these efforts as the appropriate response to meet the challenges of the new century.

Thomas CR; Penn JV

2002-10-01

70

Mental health system in Saudi Arabia: an overview.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: There is evidence that mapping mental health systems (MHSs) helps in planning and developing mental health care services for users, families, and other caregivers. The General Administration of Mental Health and Social Services of the Ministry of Health over the past 4 years has sought to streamline the delivery of mental health care services to health consumers in Saudi Arabia. OBJECTIVE: We overview here the outcome of a survey that assessed the Saudi MHS and suggest strategic steps for its further improvement. METHOD: The World Health Organization Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems was used systematically to collect information on the Saudi MHS in 2009-2010, 4 years after a baseline assessment. RESULTS: Several mental health care milestones, especially provision of inpatient mental health services supported by a ratified Mental Health Act, were achieved during this period. However, community mental health care services are needed to match international trends evident in developed countries. Similarly, a larger well-trained mental health workforce is needed at all levels to meet the ever-increasing demand of Saudi society. CONCLUSION: This updated MHS information, discussed in light of international data, will help guide further development of the MHS in Saudi Arabia in the future, and other countries in the Eastern Mediterranean region may also benefit from Saudi experience.

Qureshi NA; Al-Habeeb AA; Koenig HG

2013-01-01

71

Mental health system in Saudi Arabia: an overview  

Science.gov (United States)

Background There is evidence that mapping mental health systems (MHSs) helps in planning and developing mental health care services for users, families, and other caregivers. The General Administration of Mental Health and Social Services of the Ministry of Health over the past 4 years has sought to streamline the delivery of mental health care services to health consumers in Saudi Arabia. Objective We overview here the outcome of a survey that assessed the Saudi MHS and suggest strategic steps for its further improvement. Method The World Health Organization Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems was used systematically to collect information on the Saudi MHS in 2009–2010, 4 years after a baseline assessment. Results Several mental health care milestones, especially provision of inpatient mental health services supported by a ratified Mental Health Act, were achieved during this period. However, community mental health care services are needed to match international trends evident in developed countries. Similarly, a larger well-trained mental health workforce is needed at all levels to meet the ever-increasing demand of Saudi society. Conclusion This updated MHS information, discussed in light of international data, will help guide further development of the MHS in Saudi Arabia in the future, and other countries in the Eastern Mediterranean region may also benefit from Saudi experience.

Qureshi, Naseem Akhtar; Al-Habeeb, Abdulhameed Abdullah; Koenig, Harold G

2013-01-01

72

Mental Health in the Hispanic / Latino Community  

Science.gov (United States)

Latino Mental Health Video: English View the Video in Spanish Cultural Issues Many Hispanics/ Latinos rely on their extended family, ... Latinos with mental illness often go without professional mental health treatment. At-Risk Groups Studies have shown that ...

73

Disasters and Mental Health Research  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... lives together again. More Information about: NIMH More Video and Audio about: Mental Health Services Research NIMH Subscribe to RSS Feeds NIMH Video NIMH Audio Director’s Blog Recent Updates Bookmark & Share ...

74

Disasters and Mental Health Research  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... again. More Information about: NIMH More Video and Audio about: Mental Health Services Research NIMH Subscribe to RSS Feeds NIMH Video NIMH Audio Director’s Blog Recent Updates Bookmark & Share External Link: ...

75

Mental health aspects of disasters.  

Science.gov (United States)

Disaster preparations and responses are incomplete without addressing the mental health aspects of disasters. Unpleasant mental states can be a natural and even adaptive human response following a disaster; however, disasters also can contribute to the development of mental illnesses and substance use disorders or exacerbate existing disorders for disaster survivors, response personnel, and even families and close contacts of survivors and responders. Disaster-related psychopathology can mimic or negatively affect other disaster-related illnesses and can impair health professionals and others who must respond to catastrophic events; however, disasters also can encourage tremendous human coping, perseverance, and resilience and can even enhance personal and collective feelings of purpose, connection, and meaning. Integrating mental health promotion and care into disaster planning and response has the potential to mitigate psychiatric and medical consequences of a disaster and may preserve the mission readiness of disaster response personnel and promote healing among communities traumatized by disaster. PMID:23263326

Oldham, Robert L

2013-01-01

76

Mental health aspects of disasters.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Disaster preparations and responses are incomplete without addressing the mental health aspects of disasters. Unpleasant mental states can be a natural and even adaptive human response following a disaster; however, disasters also can contribute to the development of mental illnesses and substance use disorders or exacerbate existing disorders for disaster survivors, response personnel, and even families and close contacts of survivors and responders. Disaster-related psychopathology can mimic or negatively affect other disaster-related illnesses and can impair health professionals and others who must respond to catastrophic events; however, disasters also can encourage tremendous human coping, perseverance, and resilience and can even enhance personal and collective feelings of purpose, connection, and meaning. Integrating mental health promotion and care into disaster planning and response has the potential to mitigate psychiatric and medical consequences of a disaster and may preserve the mission readiness of disaster response personnel and promote healing among communities traumatized by disaster.

Oldham RL

2013-01-01

77

Nations for Mental Health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available La Organización Mundial de la Salud ha establecido un programa especial denominado "Naciones unidas para la salud mental" con el fin de fomentar la salud mental en poblaciones subatendidas, con particular énfasis en las mujeres, los niños, los adolescentes, los refugiados y los pueblos indígenas. Uno de los objetivos del programa es crear una mayor conciencia entre el público y los gobiernos acerca del costo social y económico de los trastornos mentales y del abuso de sustancias. Un segundo objetivo es identificar y promover estrategias de colaboración para mejorar la salud mental que se puedan poner en práctica por medio de proyectos de cooperación técnica de nivel nacional dirigidos por las organizaciones del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, en colaboración con otras organizaciones internacionales gubernamentales y no gubernamentales. Ya están en marcha varios proyectos de demostración y otros se están planificando.

1997-01-01

78

The Nevada mental health courts.  

Science.gov (United States)

The deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill which started in the 1960s greatly contributed to the overcrowding of judicial systems throughout the world. In the ensuing years, the actors involved in the adversarial system present in United States courts, a system that is primarily interested in assessing the culpability of the offender, have come to realize that the system is lacking therapeutic and reintegrative approaches to offenders, especially those who are mentally ill. Therapeutic jurisprudence, an interdisciplinary science, addresses this problematic situation of the mentally ill. It offers a fresh insight into the potentially beneficial and detrimental effects of legal decisions and views one of the roles of law as that of a healing agent. At present, many states have instituted mental health courts based on these concepts, incorporating previous drug court experiences. Their goal is to avoid the criminalization of the mentally ill and their recidivism through the creation of special programs. This article describes the mental health court programs of Washoe County and Clark County, Nevada, their organization, their therapeutic goals, and their success in keeping mentally ill offenders out of the correctional system, while improving their mental condition. In so doing, the program has lightened the load of the overburdened courts and has greatly diminished the financial burden incurred for court trials and jail and prison stays. PMID:20655596

Palermo, George B

2010-07-23

79

The Nevada mental health courts.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill which started in the 1960s greatly contributed to the overcrowding of judicial systems throughout the world. In the ensuing years, the actors involved in the adversarial system present in United States courts, a system that is primarily interested in assessing the culpability of the offender, have come to realize that the system is lacking therapeutic and reintegrative approaches to offenders, especially those who are mentally ill. Therapeutic jurisprudence, an interdisciplinary science, addresses this problematic situation of the mentally ill. It offers a fresh insight into the potentially beneficial and detrimental effects of legal decisions and views one of the roles of law as that of a healing agent. At present, many states have instituted mental health courts based on these concepts, incorporating previous drug court experiences. Their goal is to avoid the criminalization of the mentally ill and their recidivism through the creation of special programs. This article describes the mental health court programs of Washoe County and Clark County, Nevada, their organization, their therapeutic goals, and their success in keeping mentally ill offenders out of the correctional system, while improving their mental condition. In so doing, the program has lightened the load of the overburdened courts and has greatly diminished the financial burden incurred for court trials and jail and prison stays.

Palermo GB

2010-09-01

80

FastStats: Mental Health Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

... Data Related Links Accessibility NCHS Home FastStats Home Mental Health (Data are for the U.S.) Morbidity Percent of ... Health, United States trend tables with data on mental health Identifying Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Children Aged ...

 
 
 
 
81

Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act  

Science.gov (United States)

... learn more about the Affordable Care Act and Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act. Health Reform Basics ... learn more about the Affordable Care Act and Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act. Who We Are ...

82

Strengthening Children's Mental Health.  

Science.gov (United States)

Noting that the physical and mental growth of children are influenced by many environmental and familial factors, this paper explores improving the well being of children. The first part of the paper discusses child rearing, emphasizing three fundamental themes: creating an environment where children are born healthy and wanted; helping children…

Albee, George W.

83

Participación y redes de cuidado entre usuarios de servicios de salud mental en el nordeste brasileño: mapeando dispositivos de reinserción social/ Participation and networks of care among users of mental health services in northeast Brazil: mapping arrangements social reintegration  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish Esta investigación tiene como objetivo mapear estrategias de soporte social y de organización político-social involucrando a usuarios, familiares y profesionales de servicios de salud mental en la región nordeste del Brasil. Realizamos una búsqueda activa de líderes y profesionales, además de una investigación bibliográfica y consulta de documentos. Identificamos 8 asociaciones, las cuales fueron caracterizadas en cuanto a su composición, tiempo de fundación, f (more) uentes de financiación, actividades desarrolladas, nivel de formalización y relación con las propuestas de la reforma. El estudio deja en evidencia que estas iniciativas son una estrategia importante de participación política, que han contribuido para ampliar el debate sobre la reforma psiquiátrica y que enfrentan dificultades financieras y de organización, como también de la adhesión de nuevos participantes. Abstract in english This research aimed to map out strategies to support social and political-social organization involving users, families and professionals of mental health services in the region northeast Brazil. We conducted an active search for leaders and professionals as well as bibliographic research, consultation documents and publicity material. We identified 08 associations located in cities large and medium-sized, which were characterized as to its composition, time of foundation (more) , sources of financial support, activities, level of formalization and relationship with the proposals for reform. The study shows that these initiatives are an important strategy of political participation and have contributed to widening the debate on the reform of psychiatry, but face financial, organizational and accession of new participants.

Dimenstein, Magda; Arraes Amorim, Ana Karenina; de Carvalho Araújo, Allana; Leite de Figueiredo Sales, André Luis; Vieira de Almeida, Clarisse; Siqueira de Almeida, Kamila

2012-12-01

84

Physiotherapy students’ mental health assessment  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: Educational environment has a serious impact on students’ mental health. Few data are available on mental health of Physiotherapy students. Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the mental heath of students in a tertiary Physiotherapy Department during the 3rd years of studies. Material and methods: 80 males and females physiotherapy students of the 5th and 6th semester of a tertiary Physiotherapy Department filled in the GHQ-28 questionnaire. Comparisons between groups were performed using the non parametric Mann-Whitney-U test at significance level of p=0.05. Results: Physiotherapy students’ mean age was 21.77±2.42 years old. The majority of the sample were women (47 participants, 58.7%). 50% of students had a total GHQ -28 score >5, indicating high levels of distress, with anxiety and insomnia being major problems. No statistically significant differences were traced between men and women, although women had a higher total score in comparison with men (median values: 5 vs 3 respectively). Conclusions: Physiotherapy students’ mental health and especially female physiotherapy students’ mental health appears substantially burdened. Anxiety and insomnia are major problem for students of Physiotherapy.

Gesouli-Voltyraki –E.; Charisi E.; Papastergiou D.; ?ostopoulou S.; Borou A.; Alverti V.; Avlakiotis K.; Spanos S.

2012-01-01

85

Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care  

Science.gov (United States)

KidsHealth > Teens > Mind > Mental Health > Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care Print A A A Text Size What's in this article? (click to view) ... a lot of stress or dealing with a mental health issue and you don't have the money ...

86

Mental Health Service Delivery Systems and Perceived Qualifications of Mental Health Service Providers in School Settings  

Science.gov (United States)

|Latest research on the mental health status of children indicates that schools are key providers of mental health services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003). The push for school mental health services has only increased as stakeholders have begun to recognize the significance of sound mental health as an essential part of…

Dixon, Decia Nicole

2009-01-01

87

Stigmatization and mental health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Stigmatizasyon represent a chronic negative interaction with the environment that most of people with a of diagnosis mental disorders. Different types of stigma may have harmful effects. Poor psychological well being, poor quality of life and poor self esteem are related stigmatization. In this article, definition and mechanism of stigmatization, influenced factors and consequences of stigmatization are reviewed. Stigmatization is a modifiable environmental risk factor. Integrating approaches against stigma in treatment may represent cost-effective way to reduce the risk of relapse and poor outcome occasioned by chronic exposure to stigma. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000): 239-251

Gulsum Ozge Doganavsargil Baysal

2013-01-01

88

Media and mental health in Uganda.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: The media is largely regarded as an important stakeholder in health service delivery, with a great influence on public attitudes. However, little is known about its interest in mental health and the guiding factors that influence media coverage of mental health issues. This article describes the importance accorded to mental health by the media and the factors that influence media coverage of mental health issues in Uganda. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were held with representatives from six prominent media houses as part of the situational analysis of the mental health system in Uganda. Data was analyzed using Nvivo 7 qualitative data analysis software. RESULTS: The media was found to be interested and actively involved in health initiatives, but with little attention devoted to mental health. Coverage and interest in mental health was noted to be mainly dependent on the individual journalists' interests, and mostly for personal reasons. Low interest was largely attributed to mental health being perceived as a non-priority area, and the fact that mental illness is not a major contributor to mortality. Media coverage and reporting is guided by prioritization of the Health Department. CONCLUSION: The media in Uganda is an important stakeholder in the health care system with a key role of advocacy, publicity and mass education. Media houses however are less interested in mental health as evidenced by low coverage of mental health issues. This calls for advocacy and sensitization as a way of persuading media for more involvement in mental health initiatives.

Kigozi F; Ssebunnya J; Kizza D; Ndyanabangi S

2010-05-01

89

Mental health. Cold comfort farm.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Community mental health teams have been criticised for stagnation and failing to engage with users. A Healthcare Commission review was particularly damning, judging access to talking therapies to be poor. The situation is made even more difficult by disagreement over which talking therapies should be used.

Gould M

2007-03-01

90

Globalization, Conflict and Mental Health  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Violent conflict for political ends, including war and civil war, is a major cause of mental ill health and although there are different approaches and ways to understand this relationship some consensus is emerging on the psychological, social and cross sector responses to post con...

91

Globalization, Conflict and Mental Health  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Violent conflict for political ends, including war and civil war, is a major cause of mental ill health and although there are different approaches and ways to understand this relationship some consensus is emerging on the psychological, social and cross sector responses to post conflict situations....

Piachaud, Jack

92

Mental Health Challenges for Returning Military Veterans  

Science.gov (United States)

... of those returning veterans come home with unique mental health challenges: a topic of discussion between NIMH Director ... Sergeant Bowers sat down with National Institute of Mental Health Director Doctor Thomas Insel to talk about struggles ...

93

Globalization: Mental Health and Social Economic Factors  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Several factors associated with globalization have mental health consequences. This article reviews the literature on mental health and inequality, occupational patterns and identity shifts before considering the role of globalization as an acculturative stressor. We argue that a re...

94

Mental Health Challenges for Returning Military Veterans  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... of those returning veterans come home with unique mental health challenges: a topic of discussion between NIMH Director ... Sergeant Bowers sat down with National Institute of Mental Health Director Doctor Thomas Insel to talk about struggles ...

95

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration  

Science.gov (United States)

Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Text Size: S M L Search SAMHSA Home Grants Publications Data Newsroom Topics ... your options. Slide 4 Find Help Prevention of Substance Abuse & Mental Illness Military Families Health IT Data, Outcomes & ...

96

Hepatitis C: Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

... Entire Lesson Overview If you are diagnosed with hepatitis C, your physical health is not the only issue ... including a person's mood, emotions, and behavior.) Having hepatitis C can have an impact on several areas of ...

97

Young People's Experiences of Mental Health Care  

Science.gov (United States)

|Fifteen in-depth interviews were conducted to explore young people's experiences of mental health care in Australia with the aim of informing the headspace National Youth Mental Health Foundation. The interviews revealed that significant numbers of respondents had been aware of their mental health problems for several years before seeking help…

Cohen, Anjalee; Medlow, Sharon; Kelk, Norm; Hickie, Ian; Whitwell, Bradley

2009-01-01

98

Young People's Experiences of Mental Health Care  

Science.gov (United States)

Fifteen in-depth interviews were conducted to explore young people's experiences of mental health care in Australia with the aim of informing the headspace National Youth Mental Health Foundation. The interviews revealed that significant numbers of respondents had been aware of their mental health problems for several years before seeking help and…

Cohen, Anjalee; Medlow, Sharon; Kelk, Norm; Hickie, Ian; Whitwell, Bradley

2009-01-01

99

Perceived Age Discrimination and Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

Although perceived discrimination (especially due to race-ethnicity) decreases mental health, the influence of perceived discrimination due to other reasons on mental health needs to be explored. This study examines the relationship between perceived age discrimination and mental health and determines whether psychosocial resources explain or…

Yuan, Anastasia S. Vogt

2007-01-01

100

Crime, fear of crime, environment, and mental health and wellbeing: mapping review of theories and causal pathways.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This paper presents the findings from a review of the theoretical and empirical literature on the links between crime and fear of crime, the social and built environment, and health and wellbeing. A pragmatic approach was employed, with iterative stages of searching and synthesis. This produced a holistic causal framework of pathways to guide future research. The framework emphasises that crime and fear of crime may have substantial impacts on wellbeing, but the pathways are often highly indirect, mediated by environmental factors, difficult to disentangle and not always in the expected direction. The built environment, for example, may affect health via its impacts on health behaviours; via its effects on crime and fear of crime; or via the social environment. The framework also helps to identify unexpected factors which may affect intervention success, such as the risk of adverse effects from crime prevention interventions as a result of raising awareness of crime.

Lorenc T; Clayton S; Neary D; Whitehead M; Petticrew M; Thomson H; Cummins S; Sowden A; Renton A

2012-07-01

 
 
 
 
101

[Occupational stress and mental health].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

One fifth of workers reports experiencing stress in the work environment in Europe.A number of studies show that psychosocial stressors in the workplace are associated with adverse physical and mental health outcomes, including symptoms of anxiety and depression. The present paper: briefly describes the characteristics of occupational stress and the main psychosocial stressful risk factors in the work environment; reports the main results of studies on psychosocial risk factors in the work environment as risk factor for common mental disorders; presents findings from an Italian study aimed at assessing prevalence of common mental disorders and workplace psychosocial stressors in a sample of hospital employees; provides the "Working conditions Questionnaire", a validated self-administered instrument to assess perceived stress in the workplace; this questionnaire includes the assessment of organizational justice.

Gigantesco A; Lega I

2013-01-01

102

[Service structure and cooperation in mental health care].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: This study assesses exemplarily the regional structure of mental health services and the practice of cooperation of mental health service providers. The aim is to identify starting points for improving mental health care. METHOD: (1) Mapping of mental health services in four exemplary regions (urban/rural, East/West Germany) using the European Service Mapping Schedule. (2) Analysis of the practice of cooperation in mental health care using focus groups and a postal survey of psychiatrists and psychotherapists working in private practice. RESULTS: All surveyed regions have a well-developed and complex service system available. Cooperation in mental health care takes place in flexible networks rather than in fixed relationships. An explicit concept of cooperation does not exist. Time and resources promote cooperation. Psychiatrists and psychotherapists working in outpatient care mainly cooperate among themselves and rarely on an interdisciplinary basis. In particular psychotherapists are usually not part of cooperation networks. CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in mental health care are more likely to be achieved through improving cooperation rather than just developing additional services. Starting points for improvements include-beyond the increase of resources for cooperation - the training of medical students and psychiatrists in cooperation practice, reimbursement of cooperation and coordination and the implementation of systematic coordination of service networks.

Ungewitter C; Böttger D; El-Jurdi J; Kilian R; Losert C; Ludwig K; Steinkohl V; Bramesfeld A

2013-03-01

103

Programa de saúde mental Programme in mental health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available É apresentado o programa de Saúde Mental decorrente de convênio estabelecido pela Secretaria da Saúde do Estado de São Paulo com a Universidade de São Paulo, através da Faculdade de Saúde Pública. Este convênio tem por finalidade a realização de estudos na área de Saúde Mental, tais como assistência psiquiátrica preventiva e pesquisas visando a medir transtornos mentais através de casos de óbito e na população da cidade e de cursos e atividades curriculares e extra-curriculares.The School of Public Health is conducting a project, sponsored by the Health Department of the State of S. Paulo Government, aiming at: studying the integration of a team of mental health workers in a polivalent community health center; carrying out two large surveys on the incidence and prevalence of mental disorders and some of their characteristics; promoting courses and seminars on Mental Health for the personnel of Community Health Centers.

Cid Guimarães; Eunice P. Castro Silva; Francisco Bernardini Trancredi; José Maria Pacheco de Souza; Maria Helena Silveira; Ruy Laurenti; Sabina Lea Gotlieb

1975-01-01

104

Mental health among students of pedagogical universities  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article deals with questions of mental health among students of pedagogical universities. There were analysed differences in the level of mental health among sporting and non-sporting students. Two methods were used in the inquiry. Stepanov's questionnaire was used to estimate the level of mental health, Gundarov's questionnaire was used to evaluate psychical satisfaction. The sample consisted of 263 sporting students (athletes) and 288 non-sporting students. Results have shown that the level of mental health among sporting students was higher than the level of mental health among non-sporting students.

Malinauskas R.; Dumciene A.

2010-01-01

105

Television and the promotion of mental health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Current media campaigns, realized within national campaigns and actions on mental health prevention and promotion, are considered in this paper, in the context of expert public relation, as well as the whole society, towards mental health. Mental health promotion is determined as a range of activities by which individuals, community and society are being enabled to take control over mental health determinants and to improve it, but also as an action for improvement of mental health position on individual and social value scale. Characteristics and approach to mental health protection of citizens in Serbia are introduced in the paper, with reference to high incidence and prevalence of mental health disorders, as well as actual challenges to mental health of individuals, but also to modern society. Outcomes of the Survey: „Radio and television and prevention of addictive diseases“, realized by the Radio-television of Serbia for the purpose of establishing informative-educational role of electronic media in the field of health, are also considered. Project „Mental Capital and Wellbeing“ and TV campaign for mental health promotion, realized in England, are quoted as an illustration of necessary strategic and multidisciplinary approach to mental health promotion, in which media represent an important complementary strategy.

Miloševi? Ljiljana

2011-01-01

106

Mental Health Services in General Health Care. Volume 2. Coordinated Mental Health Care in Neighborhood Health Centers.  

Science.gov (United States)

Advantages of providing primary health and mental health services in the same location are argued from a standpoint of the author's experience and a review of the relevant literature. Alternatives to current national mental health policy are suggested to ...

J. F. Borus B. J. Burns A. M. Jacobson L. B. Macht R. G. Morrill

1979-01-01

107

Public Health Surveillance for Mental Health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Public health systems have relied on public health surveillance to plan health programs, and extensive surveillance systems exist for health behaviors and chronic disease. Mental health has used a separate data collection system that emphasizes measurement of disease prevalence and health care use. In recent years, efforts to integrate these systems have included adding chronic disease measures to the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys and depression measures to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; other data collection systems have been similarly enhanced. Ongoing challenges to integration include variations in interview protocols, use of different measures of behavior and disease, different interval reference periods, inclusion of substance abuse disorders, dichotomous vs continuous variables, and approaches to data collection. Future directions can address linking surveillance efforts more closely to the needs of state programs, increasing child health measurements in surveys, and improving knowledge dissemination from survey analyses.

Elsie J. Freeman, MD, MPH; Lisa J. Colpe, PhD, MPH; Tara W. Strine, MPH; Satvinder Dhingra; Lisa C. McGuire, PhD; Laurie D. Elam-Evans, PhD, MPH; Geraldine S. Perry, DrPH, RD

2010-01-01

108

Dual-Factor Model of Mental Health: Surpass the Traditional Mental Health Model  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Aiming at the limitations of traditional mental health model, the dual-factor model of mental health (DFM) was proposed as a new idea under the background of positive psychology trend. According to the DFM, mental health is a complete state; subjective well-being should be included into the mental h...

Xinqiang Wang; Dajun Zhang; Jinliang Wang

109

[Pain, mental health and adolescence].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The treatment of pain is a patient's right. Pain management committees in healthcare institutions organise and promote pain control programmes.The diversity of care services requires caregivers to use new skills, as shown by the example of mental health and the specific case of the teenager. To relieve pain, innovative nursing practices as well as the use of non-drug based methods would seem to open up new perspectives for the future.

Amini M

2013-01-01

110

Why focus on mental health systems?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract The global situation for people with mental illness – in developing and developed countries – is dire. Legislative and human rights protections are frequently lacking. Mental health budgets are inadequate. There are insufficient numbers of skilled policy makers, managers and clinicians. Communities are poorly informed about mental health and illness and not well organised for purposes of advocacy. In most of the world, mental health services are inaccessible or of poor quality. Most people who would benefit from psychiatric treatment and rehabilitation do not have affordable access to such services. Leadership – at all levels – for mental health system development needs to be greatly strengthened. While mental health research attention and funds are devoted predominantly to neuroscience and clinical research, we believe that the highest global mental health research priority is mental health systems research. There is an urgent need to focus on the development of effective, appropriate, affordable mental health services. The evidence base for such development is currently weak. The International Journal of Mental Health Systems aims to stimulate greater attention to the central importance of building functioning mental health systems. Rapid publication and global reach through open access will make this journal a resource for all those who wish to contribute to such development.

Minas Harry; Cohen Alex

2007-01-01

111

Mental Health under National Health Care Reform: The Empirical Foundations.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reviews research pertinent to mental health services under health care reform proposals. Examines redistributional impact of inclusion of outpatient mental health benefits, optimal benefit packages, and findings that mental health services lower medical utilization costs. Argues that extending minimalist model of time-limited benefits to national…

Hudson, Christopher G.; DeVito, Jo Anne

1994-01-01

112

INDIGENOUS MEDICINE AND MENTAL HEALTH  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The different medical alternatives used today by humanity enrich the prophylaxis as well as the diagnoses and the treatment of diseases when these are tackled within a multicausal framework. In this paper two of these alternatives are considered: Western medicine and indigenous medicine. It focuses on the concept of health developed by these two approaches, emphasizes the need to reassess indigenous medicine, and examines in general how mental health disorders are regarded from the point of view of indigenous medicine. The author stresses that in order to understand this conception it is necessary to get acquainted with the cosmogony and cosmology characteristics of indigenous people

Vallejo Samudio, Álvaro Roberto

2006-01-01

113

Contemporary perspectives on spirituality and mental health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The paper strives to elucidate the complex yet intimate relation between spirituality and mental health from contemporary perspectives. The diverse and constantly evolving views that spiritualists and mental health professionals have held toward each other over last century are discussed with special accent on the transpersonal spiritual framework within psychology. The role of spirituality in promoting mental health and alleviating mental illness is highlighted. The paper is concluded with an increasing need to integrate spirituality within the mental health field albeit there are several impediments in achieving the same, which need to be worked through circumspectly.

Sharma Pulkit; Charak Ruby; Sharma Vibha

2009-01-01

114

Reflections on psychiatry and international mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This paper reflects on the needs for close interaction between psychiatry and all partners in international mental health for the improvement of mental health and advancement of the profession, with a particular view to the relationships between mental health, development and human rights. The World Health Organisation identifies strong links between mental health status and development for individuals, communities and countries. In order to improve population mental health, countries need effective and accessible treatment, prevention, and promotion programmes. Achieving adequate support for mental health in any country requires a unified approach. Strong links between psychiatrists, community leaders and patients and families that are based on negotiation and respect, are vital for progress. When strong partnerships exist, they can contribute to community understanding and advancement of psychiatry. This is the first step towards scaling up good quality care for those living with mental illnesses, preventing illnesses in those at risk, and promoting mental health through work with other community sectors. Partnerships are needed to support education and research in psychiatry, and improvements in quality of care wherever psychiatry is practiced, including primary health and community mental health services, hospitals and private practice. There are important roles for psychiatry in building the strength of organisations that champion the advocacy and support roles of service users and family carers, and encouraging partnerships for mental health promotion in the community.

Herrman H

2013-01-01

115

Why focus on mental health systems?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The global situation for people with mental illness – in developing and developed countries – is dire. Legislative and human rights protections are frequently lacking. Mental health budgets are inadequate. There are insufficient numbers of skilled policy makers, managers and clinicians. Communities ...

Minas, Harry; Cohen, Alex

116

Why focus on mental health systems?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract The global situation for people with mental illness – in developing and developed countries – is dire. Legislative and human rights protections are frequently lacking. Mental health budgets are inadequate. There are insufficient numbers of skilled policy makers, managers and clini...

Minas Harry; Cohen Alex

117

Deconstructing stigma in mental health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In most articles about Stigma in Mental Health Stigma is oftenoverlooked role of professionals and stigmatizing process known as therapeutic protocol. These processes governed by institutional logics end resulting in most cases the chief cause in stigma, enthroned as the patients in a double role and identity as chronically ill patient; object of study, ultimately undermining the capacity of subjects to reconstruct their identity outside of that sick double identity. From the living experience as a person diagnosed to have suffered the vagaries of madness and perversion in a health system that has come to industrialize mental suffering, this article seeks to deconstruct the main dynamics that build social and institutional image of people with Mental problems. In contrast, using the example of the Socio-cultural Association Radio Nicosia and its ability to generate instances when possibilities for being, being and saying out of all clinical scope in what is on many occasions the identity and re-structuring of the discourse itself through constant work in media and artistic-political interventions, collectively engaged with and from the community, in the most ordinary common-vindicate community another way to understand suffering, naturalizing in the public sphere.

Raúl Velasco

2013-01-01

118

[Mental Health courts: therapeutic jurisprudence in action].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In Québec, as elsewhere in North America, psychiatric deinstitutionalization, lack of community mental health resources as well as legislative changes to civil and criminal codes have led to an increased probability that individuals with a mental illness come into contact with the criminal justice system. Based on the principle of therapeutic jurisprudence, mental health courts constitute emerging diversion programs, taking place within the court, implemented to offer an alternative to incarceration for individuals with a mental illness. This article offers a critical synthesis of the scientific literature on the topic. The authors first present the context in which mental health courts were developed ; describe their objectives and functioning ; and introduce the Montreal Mental Health Court pilot project, renamed PAJ-SM (Plan d'Accompagnement Justice et Santé) the first of its kind in Québec. The paper examines the research on mental health courts and tackles some of the stakes of diversion programs. The challenges and limits inherent to specialized courts are discussed as well as methodological obstacles related to the study of these complex intervention programs. The authors conclude that mental health courts offer promising intervention venues, but that they do not constitute a panacea to resolving all issues related to the contact of mentally ill individuals with the justice system. Mental health courts must be accompanied by other intervention strategies for persons with mental health problems at all stages of the criminal justice process.

Jaimes A; Crocker A; Bédard E; Ambrosini DL

2009-01-01

119

[Mental Health courts: therapeutic jurisprudence in action].  

Science.gov (United States)

In Québec, as elsewhere in North America, psychiatric deinstitutionalization, lack of community mental health resources as well as legislative changes to civil and criminal codes have led to an increased probability that individuals with a mental illness come into contact with the criminal justice system. Based on the principle of therapeutic jurisprudence, mental health courts constitute emerging diversion programs, taking place within the court, implemented to offer an alternative to incarceration for individuals with a mental illness. This article offers a critical synthesis of the scientific literature on the topic. The authors first present the context in which mental health courts were developed ; describe their objectives and functioning ; and introduce the Montreal Mental Health Court pilot project, renamed PAJ-SM (Plan d'Accompagnement Justice et Santé) the first of its kind in Québec. The paper examines the research on mental health courts and tackles some of the stakes of diversion programs. The challenges and limits inherent to specialized courts are discussed as well as methodological obstacles related to the study of these complex intervention programs. The authors conclude that mental health courts offer promising intervention venues, but that they do not constitute a panacea to resolving all issues related to the contact of mentally ill individuals with the justice system. Mental health courts must be accompanied by other intervention strategies for persons with mental health problems at all stages of the criminal justice process. PMID:20361114

Jaimes, Annie; Crocker, Anne; Bédard, Evelyne; Ambrosini, Daniel L

2009-01-01

120

Research priorities in mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Over the last decade, Australia has seen an increase in investment in mental health services, primarily through the funding of headspace and Better Access to Mental Health Outcomes programs. Concurrently there has been a policy focus on prevention and early intervention, suicide reduction and 'hard-to-target' groups such as Indigenous groups. It is not clear, however, whether research funding targeting health services or prevention or promotion has been prioritized, or whether funding priorities in general have shifted over the last decade. METHODS: A total of 1008 Australian-authored research publications and 126 competitive research grants in 2008 were coded in terms of their target of research, research goal setting and target group. These characteristics were compared with the research priorities of 570 stakeholders, burden of disease estimates and similar data collected 10 years earlier. RESULTS: The proportion of research funding for affective disorders, dementia and psychosis has increased, but not for anxiety disorders or suicide. Funding for childhood disorders has decreased. Funding for prevention and promotion is low and decreasing. With respect to research publications, substance abuse was associated with the most publications, followed by affective disorders, anxiety disorders and psychosis. When publications and funding are compared to stakeholder priorities and the burden of disease, the areas of suicide and self-harm, personality disorders, anxiety disorders, childhood conditions and dementia are all insufficiently funded. CONCLUSION: Despite mental health policy reforms through the last decade, there has been little change in the focus of research funding or publication output. There is modest evidence for a shift in support towards affective disorders as a major focus for research. However, the remaining gaps were very similar to those identified 10 years earlier showing that suicide, personality disorders and anxiety disorders are under-researched.

Christensen H; Batterham PJ; Griffiths KM; Gosling J; Hehir KK

2013-04-01

 
 
 
 
121

Pilot mental health: expert working group recommendations.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Following a March 27, 2012, incident in which a pilot of a major commercial airline experienced a serious disturbance in his mental health, the Aerospace Medical Association formed an Ad Hoc Working Group on Pilot Mental Health. The working group met several times and analyzed current medical standards for evaluating pilot mental health. The result of the working group was a letter sent to the FAA and other organizations worldwide interested in medical standards. The Committee found that it is neither productive nor cost effective to perform extensive psychiatric evaluations as part of the routine pilot aeromedical assessment. However it did recommend greater attention be given to mental health issues by aeromedical examiners, especially to the more common and detectable mental health conditions and life stressors that can affect pilots and flight performance. They encouraged this through increased education and global recognition of the importance of mental health in aviation safety.

2012-12-01

122

Stakeholder views of a mental health court.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

To reduce criminal justice involvement of persons with mental disorders, many communities have created mental health courts. Early mental health courts were restricted to persons charged with nonviolent misdemeanors. Recently mental health courts have begun to accept persons charged with felonies and violent crimes. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the process and outcomes of a mental health court that accepts persons charged with more serious offenses from the perspective of stakeholders in the court. Data come from semi-structured interviews with 43 professionals involved with the mental health court, including judges, attorneys, probation officers, case managers, mental health professionals, and agency administrators. The stakeholders endorsed mental health court compared to traditional court for reducing criminal justice involvement of individuals with mental disorders with a history of repeated arrests. The observations of stakeholders revealed important themes to consider in research evaluating mental health courts, including selection mechanisms, supervision processes, treatment access, use of sanctions, competency, indicators of effectiveness, participant characteristics associated with better or worse outcomes, and mechanisms of change.

McNiel DE; Binder RL

2010-09-01

123

Childhood and Adolescence: Challenges in Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

Mental health is an integral and essential component of health. The World Health Organization (WHO) constitution states: “Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” More than 450 million people suffer from mental disorders worldwide. In India, mental health services, especially for children and adolescents, are limited both in terms of number of facilities as well as trained professionals. The majority of mental health services are restricted to urban areas, that is, medical colleges or regional mental health institutes. Mere presence of a treatment facility does not guarantee that all children/adolescents suffering from mental illness will utilize such services. In fact, most of the time there is a significant delay from the patient side in accessing mental health services either because of lack of awareness or associated stigma. It is high time to promote positive mental health in children, adolescents and their parents through health education. Parental counseling is of utmost importance in order to avoid the delay in treatment seeking.

Shrivastava, Saurabh RamBiharilal; Shrivastava, Prateek Saurabh; Ramasamy, Jegadeesh

2013-01-01

124

Childhood and adolescence: challenges in mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental health is an integral and essential component of health. The World Health Organization (WHO) constitution states: "Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity." More than 450 million people suffer from mental disorders worldwide. In India, mental health services, especially for children and adolescents, are limited both in terms of number of facilities as well as trained professionals. The majority of mental health services are restricted to urban areas, that is, medical colleges or regional mental health institutes. Mere presence of a treatment facility does not guarantee that all children/adolescents suffering from mental illness will utilize such services. In fact, most of the time there is a significant delay from the patient side in accessing mental health services either because of lack of awareness or associated stigma. It is high time to promote positive mental health in children, adolescents and their parents through health education. Parental counseling is of utmost importance in order to avoid the delay in treatment seeking.

Shrivastava SR; Shrivastava PS; Ramasamy J

2013-05-01

125

The challenge of auditing mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A changing environment which includes increased competition and changing philosophies of providing mental health services reflect an increased need for an information gathering instrument to provide the foundation for developing strategic plans in mental health organizations. The initial step in the planning process is collecting and systematizing the data necessary to the organization's functioning. A marketing audit specifically designed to encompass the special problems encountered in the mental health organization is presented in this paper.

Hill CJ

1989-01-01

126

The challenge of auditing mental health.  

Science.gov (United States)

A changing environment which includes increased competition and changing philosophies of providing mental health services reflect an increased need for an information gathering instrument to provide the foundation for developing strategic plans in mental health organizations. The initial step in the planning process is collecting and systematizing the data necessary to the organization's functioning. A marketing audit specifically designed to encompass the special problems encountered in the mental health organization is presented in this paper. PMID:10303626

Hill, C J

1989-01-01

127

"Naciones unidas para la salud mental" Nations for Mental Health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The World Health Organization has established a special program called Nations for Mental Health to promote mental health in underserved populations, with special emphasis on women, children, adolescents, refugees, and indigenous populations. One of the program's objectives is to stimulate greater public and governmental awareness of the social and economic cost of mental illness and substance abuse. A second objective is to identify and promote collaborative strategies for improving mental health that can be implemented through country-level technical cooperation projects by organizations of the United Nations system, in cooperation with other international governmental and nongovernmental organizations. A number of demonstration projects are already under way and others are planned.

1997-01-01

128

Family community integration and maternal mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

While the majority of women with mental health problems (MHPs) are mothers, little is known about the community integration (CI) of these women and their children. Given that poorer mental health status has been linked with lower CI, CI has become a long standing goal of mental health policy. Data from a national survey examined the association of maternal mental health status with the physical, social, and psychological integration of families. After adjusting for sociodemographics, mothers with MHPs reported similar physical integration but less social and psychological integration. Interventions focused on improving social networks, scarce resources, and neighborhood safety are needed for families impacted by maternal MHPs.

Cullen SW; Solomon PL

2013-03-01

129

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND MENTAL HEALTH IN ADOLESCENTS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The major aim of the present study was to assess the Emotional intelligence and mental health in adolescents. The sample of 100 (50 Boys and 50 Girls) students was chosen from Gulbarga district on whom the Emotional intelligence and Mental Health Scales were administered. After scoring, the data were subjected to t – test. The results revealed that there is significant difference in Mental Health of the sample subgroups. The study also revealed significant gender differences in the amount of mental health.

MALLIKARJUN H.KRISHNAKAR; SHIVAKUMAR S. CHENGTI

2012-01-01

130

Mental Health among Pre- University College Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The major aim of the present study was to study the mental health among preuniversitycollege students. The sample consists of 200 (100 Boys and females) preuniversitycollege students chosen from Gulbarga district Karnataka on whom the Mentalhealth inventory was administered. After scoring the data were subjected to t-test. Theresults revealed that there is significant difference in mental health between the Rural andUrban college students and there is significant difference in mental health between thescience and arts college students. The study also revealed significant gender differencesin the mental health.

MALLIKARJUN H.KRISHNAKAR; SHIVAKUMAR S.CHENGTI

2013-01-01

131

International Observatory on Mental Health Systems: a mental health research and development network  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background While the mental health situation for most people in low and middle-income countries is unsatisfactory, there is a renewed commitment to focus attention on the mental health of populations and on the scaling up of mental health services that have the capacity to ...

Minas Harry

132

General Practitioners' opinions on their practice in mental health and their collaboration with mental health professionals.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

BACKGROUND: Common mental health problems are mainly treated in primary care settings and collaboration with mental health services is needed. Prior to re-organisation of the mental health care offer in a geographical area, a study was organized: 1) to evaluate GPs' opinions on their day-to-day prac...

Younes, Nadia; Gasquet, Isabelle; Gaudebout, Pierre; Chaillet, Marie-Pierre; Kovess, Viviane; Falissard, Bruno

133

Mental health services in the health accounts: the Czech Republic.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Policy makers as well as health services researchers lack information on financial flows within national mental health systems. The studies that are available use different methodologies and hence it is difficult to make any comparisons. The aim of this study was to modify the existing health accounting framework and apply it to describe and analyse the financial flows within a national mental health system. METHODS: Mental health expenditures are classified by the three-dimensional methodology of OECD health accounts that is extended by two other dimensions for the purpose of the study. RESULTS: The framework of five-dimensional mental health accounts is introduced and applied to mental health expenditure in the Czech Republic, 2006. Mental health expenditure is estimated to be 4.14% of the total health expenditure. Mental health expenditure is classified based on its source of financing, provider industry, health-care function, cost category and diagnostic group. CONCLUSIONS: Health expenditure estimates present the most detailed information on resource allocation in the mental health system of the Czech Republic. The application of the standardized framework in other countries can improve the quality of international comparisons. On the national level, especially if the time series are available, mental health accounts can serve as a useful tool for strategic resource allocation decisions. This is particularly useful for the countries that plan changes in resource allocation directed from institutional to community-based care.

Dlouhy M

2011-06-01

134

Refugee children: mental health and effective interventions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The mental health consequences of war and other forms of organized violence for children represent a serious global public health issue. Much of the research on the mental health of war-affected civilians has focused on refugees who have sought asylum in high-income countries and face the dual stress of a traumatic past and resettlement. This review will focus on the mental health of refugee children who have fled war as well as interventions to both prevent and treat adverse mental health outcomes. While war can have devastating mental health consequences, children raised in the midst of armed conflict also display resilience. Effective interventions for refugee children will be discussed both in terms of prevention and treatment of psychopathology, with a focus on recent developments in the field.

Pacione L; Measham T; Rousseau C

2013-02-01

135

Malaysia's social policies on mental health: a critical theory.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article aims to review the social policies on mental health and mental illness in Malaysia. Using critical theory, major policy issues pertaining to mental health and mental illness such as mental health legislation, prevalence rates and quality of services available to the people with mental health problems are discussed in detail. Implications of these issues on persons with mental health problems are critically evaluated. The paper highlights that the other countries in ASEAN region also require similar review by policy literature.

Mubarak AR

2003-01-01

136

Promoting School-Wide Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

|Although schools are not traditionally designed to provide intensive mental health services to children, they are in a position to create systems that foster mental health. By creating school-wide systems in which students are academically, behaviorally and socially successful, schools can integrate those essential protective factors shown to…

Trussell, Robert P.

2008-01-01

137

Globalization: Mental Health and Social Economic Factors  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Several factors associated with globalization have mental health consequences. This article reviews the literature on mental health and inequality, occupational patterns and identity shifts before considering the role of globalization as an acculturative stressor. We argue that a re-evaluation of me...

Bhavsar, Vishal; Bhugra, Dinesh

138

Alternative interventions for young men's mental health  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The main aim of this thesis was to explore the effectiveness and acceptability of alternative interventions for facilitating help-seeking and improving the mental health of young adult males. Based on recommendations for innovative ways to develop interventions that facilitate mental health help-se...

McGale, Nadine

139

A Search for Mental Health Output Measures  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper is a summary of our initial efforts to identify mental health output measures: (1) for estimating change in mental health status (incidence and prevalence) in a given population, (2) for use in monitoring, planning, evaluating and/or assessing quality of programs; and (3) possibly for use...

Black, Gordon C.; Saveanu, Traian I.

140

Team management in community mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The community mental health team is now the established model for mental health service delivery in the community. Managing CMHTs requires a diverse range of managerial skills, role clarity and authority. More research needs to be undertaken on the role and effectiveness of the CMHT manager.

McGuinness M

2000-02-01

 
 
 
 
141

College Mental Health at the Cutting Edge?  

Science.gov (United States)

As someone who has been involved in college mental health in three different roles, the author would say those who work in this field inhabit a strange space. College mental health centers are generally seen as somewhat peripheral to the core mission of universities by upper administration. Counseling centers do not reside within academic…

Schwartz, Victor

2013-01-01

142

Migrant Farmworker Stress: Mental Health Implications  

Science.gov (United States)

Context: The number of Latinos in rural regions of the United States is increasing. Little is known about factors that undermine the mental health of this segment of the rural population. Purpose: The goal of this study is to determine which stressors inherent in farmwork and the farmworker lifestyle contribute to poor mental health. Methods: An…

Hiott, Ann E.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Davis, Stephen W.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

2008-01-01

143

Unemployment Impairs Mental Health: Meta-Analyses  

Science.gov (United States)

The effect of unemployment on mental health was examined with meta-analytic methods across 237 cross-sectional and 87 longitudinal studies. The average overall effect size was d = 0.51 with unemployed persons showing more distress than employed persons. A significant difference was found for several indicator variables of mental health (mixed…

Paul, Karsten I.; Moser, Klaus

2009-01-01

144

A Call to Arms: Children's Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

|The author, a superintendent of schools, discusses a rising tide of social and emotional needs among school children as educators struggle with the issue of whether to deal with students' mental health issues. Readers are asked to consider this statement from "Children's Mental Health: Developing a National Action Agenda," a report prepared by…

Sherman, Morton

2008-01-01

145

[The sainsbury centre for mental health: forensic mental health services in England and wales].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health (SCMH) is a charity founded in 1985 by Gatsby Charitable Foundation. The SCMH works to improve the quality of life for people with mental health problems by influencing policy and practice in mental health and related services. Working to improve the quality of mental health care for people in prison is one of SCMH main work theme. This paper describes some epidemiological aspects of mental health situation of prisoners in England and Wales and the available forensic facilities to manage this kind of patients in prison.

Rutherford M; Duggan S

2008-06-01

146

Mental health and mental hygiene between two millenniums  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A century has passed since Klifford Beers published his work "A mind that found Itself". This paper has inspired the shift of mental hygiene towards the prevention of mental disorders and health improvements. At the beginning of this millenium, with much improved scientific knowledge, experience and possibilities, but confronted with new challenges we are observing the tempestuous historical features which have influenced the development of mental health care. Mental health is crucial for the welfare of a society and its individuals, since such disorders are not only the cause of emotional suffering, but they also deteriorate the quality of life, cause alienation and discrimination of an individual. At the same time, they are a great economic burden to the society as they require long-term therapy and often result in poor productivity. In order to decrease the burden of mental disorders it is required to stimulate prevention and improvement of mental health of the population within the framework of national policies, legislation and financing.

Backovi? Dušan

2010-01-01

147

78 FR 26221 - National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2013  

Science.gov (United States)

...8969 of April 30, 2013 National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2013 By the...are living with the burden of a mental health problem. They shoulder conditions...children and adults with diagnosable mental health problems receive treatment....

2013-05-03

148

[Mental health support for nurses].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Burnout specific to human service workers has been reported in the U.S. in the 1970s. Since then, such burnout has become widely known and the mental health of nurses has attracted attention. Stressors in the work environment and complexity have increased with advancement in increasingly complicated medical care. One of the major roles of a psychiatric liaison nurse is to provide support to improve the mental health of nurses. In our hospital, a psychiatric liaison nurse has a staff position under the direct supervision of the director of the nursing department but operates outside the chain of command. A psychiatric liaison nurse is not involved in the performance review of nurses. Thus, the nursing staff and the nursing manager can discuss their problems with the psychiatric liaison nurse without risks. Psychiatric liaison nurses provide support as counselors through individual and group interviews so that nurses can become re-energized about their work. In addition, psychiatric liaison nurses provide consultations and education. They perform coordination function to organize an environment to promote consultations regarding nurse support to the staff nurses and the nursing manager and to promote support by supervisors. For support after reinstatement of a nurse following a medical leave, it is particularly important to work with not only the individual nurse but also the entire nursing team. In our hospital, newly graduated nurses are given the GHQ-28 after one month of employment to assess the support they might need. In our study, nurses with high risks were divided into a group with a score of at least 6 points but less than 10 points and a group with a score of at least 10 points. The group with at least 10 points had significantly higher rates of leave of absence and resignation. Thus, early intervention was thought to be necessary in newly graduated nurses with a score of at least 10 points in the GHQ.

Fukushima Y

2012-01-01

149

Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students  

Science.gov (United States)

|Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions…

Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

2010-01-01

150

Health promotion in mental health care: perceptions from patients and mental health nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To gain insight into the factors influencing the integration of physical activity and healthy eating into the daily care of individuals with mental disorders (MD) living in sheltered housing and to increase the understanding of the relationships between and complexities of these factors. BACKGROUND: Growing attention is given to the implementation of health promotion activities in mental health care. By improving the understanding of perceptions of patients and mental health nurses, health promotion programmes targeting physical activity and healthy eating can be developed that better meet the patients' needs. DESIGN: A descriptive qualitative study. METHODS: Based on a purposive sampling strategy, three focus groups including 17 mental health nurses and individual interviews with 15 patients were conducted. RESULTS: Although physical and mental health benefits of physical activity and healthy eating were identified, several barriers to integrate healthy lifestyles into the daily life of patients were reported. Important barriers identified by the patients consisted of lack of energy and motivation as a result of the MD, side effects of psychotropic drug use, and hospitalisation. Lack of time and personal views and attitudes towards health promotion were reported by the mental health nurses as important elements influencing the way in which they integrate health promotion in the care provided. Support from the mental health nurse was considered important by the patients in changing their unhealthy lifestyle behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study provide insight into important factors influencing the integration of health promotion activities targeting physical activity and healthy eating in individuals with MD living in sheltered housing. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The information derived from this study is useful and relevant in the design and implementation of health promotion interventions targeting physical activity and healthy eating in people with MD living in sheltered housing.

Verhaeghe N; De Maeseneer J; Maes L; Van Heeringen C; Annemans L

2013-06-01

151

Priority-setting for mental health services.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Economic evaluation of individual interventions can have limited usefulness due to the potential for methodological confounding, particularly for those decision contexts where strategies involving multiple interventions are required. AIMS: To introduce readers to different approaches of priority-setting, with a focus on economics-based examples of priority-setting in mental health. Method: A selective review of the priority-setting literature, with particular attention given to the mental health context and economics-based approaches. RESULTS: Six priority-setting approaches in mental health are described and assessed. CONCLUSIONS: Priority-setting approaches that incorporate methodological rigour, due process for involving stakeholders and broad-based notions of "benefit", are likely to be of most use to mental healthcare decision-makers. Challenges, both in relation to data bases and method remain, but are within the capacity of the mental health research community to resolve.

Mihalopoulos C; Carter R; Pirkis J; Vos T

2013-04-01

152

Mental health. Stars in their eyes.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In 2004, Worcestershire Mental Health Partnership trust got zero stars and a damning report from the then Commission for Health Improvement. The resultant improvement strategy focused on promoting group ownership of organisational performance and ensuring that high-calibre leaders were in place to drive changes. In the final round of star-ratings, Worcestershire became the only mental health trust in the country to go from zero to three stars.

Forrest E

2005-10-01

153

Relationship between mental health and marital satisfaction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Marital satisfaction is an important component of the marriage. Mental health as a component of the personal characteristic also related with marital satisfaction. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between mental health and marital satisfaction of couples.Methods: Three hundred couples from high-risk area of Gorgan – North of Iran were selected. Association between men's and women’s mental health level was measured using General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28). Marital satisfaction measured by Enrich Marital Satisfaction Questionnaire among married couples. Data was analyzed using multiple regression and analysis of variance modelling.Results: Results indicated that marital satisfaction was predicted by the person’s mental health level. Findings also showed that depression and anxiety were significantly associated with marital satisfaction. 52.5% of studied individuals had mental disorders at the clinical level (p?0/05). Marital satisfaction in this population was 51.7%. Conclusions: The study confirmed that mental health is an important predictor of marital satisfaction. Improving mental health may lead to improve marital satisfaction.

Abdolsattar Shahi; Ibrahim Ghaffari; Khalil Ghasemi

2011-01-01

154

International Observatory on Mental Health Systems: a mental health research and development network  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background While the mental health situation for most people in low and middle-income countries is unsatisfactory, there is a renewed commitment to focus attention on the mental health of populations and on the scaling up of mental health services that have the capacity to respond to mental health service needs. There is general agreement that scaling up activities must be evidence-based and that the effectiveness of such activities must be evaluated. If these requirements are to be realised it will be essential to strengthen capacity in countries to conduct rigorous monitoring and evaluation of system development projects and to demonstrate sustained benefit to populations. The Observatory The International Observatory on Mental Health Systems (IOMHS) will build capacity to measure and to track mental health system performance in participating countries at national and sub-national (provincial and district) levels. The work of IOMHS will depend on the establishment of robust partnerships among the key stakeholder groups. The Observatory will build the capability of partner organisations and networks to provide evidence-based advice to policy makers, service planners and implementers, and will monitor the progress of mental health service scaling up activities. Summary The International Observatory on Mental Health Systems will be a mental health research and development network that will monitor and evaluate mental health system performance in low and middle-income countries.

Minas Harry

2009-01-01

155

Integrating mental health services: the Finnish experience  

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Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to give a short description of the most important developments of mental health services in Finland during the 1990s, examine their influences on the organisation and provision of services, and describe shortly some national efforts to handle the new situation. The Finnish mental health service system experienced profound changes in the beginning of the 1990s. These included the integration of mental health services, being earlier under own separate administration, with other specialised health services, decentralisation of the financing of health services, and de-institutionalisation of the services. The same time Finland underwent the deepest economic recession in Western Europe, which resulted in cut-offs especially in the mental health budgets. Conducting extensive national research and development programmes in the field of mental health has been one typically Finnish way of supporting the mental health service development. The first of these national programmes was the Schizophrenia Project 1981–97, whose main aims were to decrease the incidence of new long-term patients and the prevalence of old long-stay patients by developing an integrated treatment model. The Suicide Prevention Project 1986–96 aimed at raising awareness of this special problem and decreasing by 20% the proportionally high suicide rate in Finland. The National Depression Programme 1994–98 focused at this clearly increasing public health concern by several research and development project targeted both to the general population and specifically to children, primary care and specialised services. The latest, still on-going Meaningful Life Programme 1998–2003 which main aim is, by multi-sectoral co-operation, to improve the quality of life for people suffering from or living with the threat of mental disorders. Furthermore, the government launched in 1999 a new Goal and Action Programme for Social Welfare and Health Care 2000–2003, in which mental health has been chosen as one of the eight priority areas.

Ville Lehtinen; Vappu Taipale

2001-01-01

156

Role of the police in linking individuals experiencing mental health crises with mental health services.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The police are considered frontline professionals in managing individuals experiencing mental health crises. This study examines the extent to which these individuals are disconnected from mental health services, and whether the police response has an influence on re-establishing contact. METHODS: Police records were searched for calls regarding individuals with acute mental health needs and police handling of these calls. Mental healthcare contact data were retrieved from a Psychiatric Case Register. RESULTS: The police were called upon for mental health crisis situations 492 times within the study year, involving 336 individuals (i.e. 1.7 per 1000 inhabitants per year). Half of these individuals (N=162) were disengaged from mental health services, lacking regular care contact in the year prior to the crisis (apart from contact for crisis intervention). In the month following the crisis, 21% of those who were previously disengaged from services had regular care contact, and this was more frequent (49%) if the police had contacted the mental health services during the crisis. The influence of police referral to the services was still present the following year. However, for the majority (58%) of disengaged individuals police did not contact the mental health services at the time of crisis. CONCLUSIONS: The police deal with a substantial number of individuals experiencing a mental health crisis, half of whom are out of contact with mental health services, and police play an important role in linking these individuals to services. Training police officers to recognise and handle mental health crises, and implementing practical models of cooperation between the police and mental health services in dealing with such crises may further improve police referral of individuals disengaged from mental health services.

van den Brink RH; Broer J; Tholen AJ; Winthorst WH; Visser E; Wiersma D

2012-01-01

157

Role of the police in linking individuals experiencing mental health crises with mental health services  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The police are considered frontline professionals in managing individuals experiencing mental health crises. This study examines the extent to which these individuals are disconnected from mental health services, and whether the police response has an influence on re-establishing contact. Methods Police records were searched for calls regarding individuals with acute mental health needs and police handling of these calls. Mental healthcare contact data were retrieved from a Psychiatric Case Register. Results The police were called upon for mental health crisis situations 492 times within the study year, involving 336 individuals (i.e. 1.7 per 1000 inhabitants per year). Half of these individuals (N=162) were disengaged from mental health services, lacking regular care contact in the year prior to the crisis (apart from contact for crisis intervention). In the month following the crisis, 21% of those who were previously disengaged from services had regular care contact, and this was more frequent (49%) if the police had contacted the mental health services during the crisis. The influence of police referral to the services was still present the following year. However, for the majority (58%) of disengaged individuals police did not contact the mental health services at the time of crisis. Conclusions The police deal with a substantial number of individuals experiencing a mental health crisis, half of whom are out of contact with mental health services, and police play an important role in linking these individuals to services. Training police officers to recognise and handle mental health crises, and implementing practical models of cooperation between the police and mental health services in dealing with such crises may further improve police referral of individuals disengaged from mental health services.

van den Brink Rob HS; Broer Jan; Tholen Alfons J; Winthorst Wim H; Visser Ellen; Wiersma Durk

2012-01-01

158

Health Problems of Mentally Disabled Individuals  

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Full Text Available Mentally disabled individuals are at risk of health problems. In fact, health problems are more frequent in mentally disabled individuals than in the general population and mentally disabled individuals less frequently use health care facilities. It has been shown that mentally disabled individuals frequently have nutritional problems. They may suffer from low weight, malnutrition, high weight, pica, iron and zinc deficiencies and absorption and eating disorders. Activities can be limited due to motor disability and restricted movements. Depending on insufficient liquid intake and dietary fiber, constipation can be frequent. Another problem is sleep disorders such as irregular sleep hours, short sleep, waking up at night and daytime sleepiness. Visual-hearing losses, epilepsy, motor disability, hepatitis A infection and poor oral hygiene are more frequent in mentally disabled children than in the general population. The mentally disabled have limited health care facilities, poorer health status than the general population and difficulties in demanding for health care and expressing health problems. Therefore, they should be provided with more health promotion services. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(2.000): 145-150

Hatice Yildirim Sari

2010-01-01

159

Mental health and welfare in Australian anaesthetists.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This survey was designed to evaluate the factors affecting mental health and welfare in Australian anaesthetists and to investigate current sources of support. An electronic survey was sent to 500 randomly selected Fellows and trainees of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. Questions were related to: anxiety, stress, depression, substance misuse, self-medication, suicide, reporting illness, and help-seeking. Current psychological wellbeing was assessed using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). A total of 191 completed surveys were received (a response rate of 38%): 26% had attended their general practitioner for mental health issues, of whom half had been diagnosed with a mental illness; 7% of all respondents were currently prescribed medication for this; 25% had previously self-prescribed psychoactive medication; 17% admitted to using alcohol to deal with stress, anxiety or depression; and 8% responded that mental illness had at some point impaired clinical care. Sixteen percent of all respondents reported previous suicidal ideation. Despite a low response rate, and the possibility of responder bias, the mental health of Australian anaesthetists would appear to be subject to common and persistent risk factors, many of which are well described in previous studies. We identify general practitioners as particularly valuable in targeting initiatives for improvements in mental health and welfare. The significant prevalence of suicidal ideation and reluctance to approach senior colleagues with concerns about mental health or welfare issues are specific causes for concern and suggest that further investigation, education and a potential review of support networks is required.

McDonnell Nj; Kaye R; Hood S; Shrivastava P; Khursandi D

2013-09-01

160

Service network analysis for agricultural mental health  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Farmers represent a subgroup of rural and remote communities at higher risk of suicide attributed to insecure economic futures, self-reliant cultures and poor access to health services. Early intervention models are required that tap into existing farming networks. This study describes service networks in rural shires that relate to the mental health needs of farming families. This serves as a baseline to inform service network improvements. Methods A network survey of mental health related links between agricultural support, health and other human services in four drought declared shires in comparable districts in rural New South Wales, Australia. Mental health links covered information exchange, referral recommendations and program development. Results 87 agencies from 111 (78%) completed a survey. 79% indicated that two thirds of their clients needed assistance for mental health related problems. The highest mean number of interagency links concerned information exchange and the frequency of these links between sectors was monthly to three monthly. The effectiveness of agricultural support and health sector links were rated as less effective by the agricultural support sector than by the health sector (p Conclusion Aligning with agricultural agencies is important to build effective mental health service pathways to address the needs of farming populations. Work is required to ensure that these agricultural support agencies have operational and effective links to primary mental health care services. Network analysis provides a baseline to inform this work. With interventions such as local mental health training and joint service planning to promote network development we would expect to see over time an increase in the mean number of links, the frequency in which these links are used and the rated effectiveness of these links.

Fuller Jeffrey D; Kelly Brian; Law Susan; Pollard Georgia; Fragar Lyn

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

Community-based mental health care in Africa: mental health workers’ views  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The World Health Organization (WHO) has for long proposed the development of community-based mental health services worldwide. However, the progress toward community mental health care in most African countries is still hampered by a lack of resources, with specialist psychiatric care essentially ba...

ALEM, ATALAY; JACOBSSON, LARS; HANLON, CHARLOTTE

162

Assessment of head nurses’ mental health  

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Full Text Available Aim: To investigate mental health of head nurses in internal medicine and surgery departments of Athens and province. Material and methods: 79 head nurses and nurse supervisors in internal medicine and surgery departments of secondary health care hospitals in Athens and one provincial town filled in the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-28. Results: Mean age of the sample was 40.19±5.30 years old.10% of head nurses and nurse supervisors exhibited considerable mental health burden, while no differences were observed between men and women. Conclusions: Head nurses and nurse supervisors generally exhibit lower mental burden than other nurses. However, in a considerable percentage of them, mental heal problems are still significant, without differentiation between men and women.

Gesouli-Voltyraki E.; Marneras Ch.; Charisi E.; Kostopoulou S.; Alverti V.; Chatzitheodorou S.; Mantzorou M.

2012-01-01

163

Effect of globalisation on children's mental health  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Globalisation is resulting in inappropriate domination of the Western view of mental health as well as of economic approaches. Western child psychiatrists have much to learn from child rearing practices in other countries

Timimi, Sami

164

Mental Health Challenges for Returning Military Veterans  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... warfare. And some of those returning veterans come home with unique mental health challenges: a topic of ... but in particular, those veterans who have come home to challenges as straightforward as finding work in ...

165

Religion, Spirituality and Your Mental Health Care  

Science.gov (United States)

Religion, Spirituality and Your Mental Health Care Quick Links Facts for Families - Numerical List Facts for Families ... and print a PDF version of this document . Religion and spirituality can be important in the lives ...

166

Mental health nurses' views on therapeutic optimism.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Registered nurses (RN) coordinate acute mental health units on a 24-hour basis and it behoves researchers to actually ask these nurses what they think contributes to their ability to work with patients in optimistic ways. In this study, 40 RN working in acute mental health settings were asked a series of questions to explore positive aspects of nursing work, which includes therapeutic optimism. Three themes were identified: (i) different ways nurses foster therapeutic optimism; (ii) perceptions of how an optimistic environment is fostered, and (iii) improvement of ward culture. Findings show the pivotal role mental health nurses have in improving teamwork, good communication, sharing, and collaboration, in addition to preceptoring and supervision. Furthermore, effective clinical management is essential to therapeutic optimism and, in this research, is considered to be the aspect of acute mental health nursing most relevant to improving the ward culture.

Cleary M; Horsfall J; O'Hara-Aarons M; Hunt GE

2012-12-01

167

A rural mental health delivery system.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The Four Corners Community Mental Health Center, located in southeastern Utah, was established in March 1972 to begin the difficult task of bringing comprehensive community mental health services to a vast, sparsely populated multiethnic region whose residents had no previous experience with mental health programs. The staff, facing obstacles such as long distances between patients' home, cultural barriers, and a mistrust of mental health programs, set up a diverse delivery system using two central offices, nine satellite clinics, and a psychiatric wing at a general hospital in Price. In 1973 the center applied for and received a construction grant to build a five-bed psychiatric wing at the hospital. Outreach workers and indigenous volunteers help bridge the cultural barriers and take the services to the people.

1975-10-01

168

Mental health challenges of LGBT forced migrants  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Many LGBT forced migrants have significant and sometimesincapacitating psychological scars. Mental health providers can assistin documenting the psychological impact of anti-LGBT persecutionand its impact on the ability to secure refugee status.

Ariel Shidlo; Joanne Ahola

2013-01-01

169

Mental health literacy and the anxiety disorders  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Context: This study set out to investigate the mental health literacy (MHL) about eight anxiety disorders (ADs), using vignette methodology. Methods: In all 317 British Adult participants completed a questionnaire wi...

Adrian Furnham; Chiara Lousley

170

Study of Factors Affecting Mental Health  

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Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the simple and multiple relationships between role ambiguity, role conflict, role overload and mental health considering the moderating role of type A personality and sense of coherence. To this end correlation and regression analysis is utilized. Research sample includes 196 personnel working in Ahvaz Pipe-production factory during year 2007. Research results revealed that there is a significant relation between role ambiguity and mental health deficiency, but no one was found between role conflict and role overload and mental health deficiency; nevertheless, higher correlation level between role stressors and mental Health deficiency in low-level sense of coherence in comparison with high-level sense of coherence personnel was found. Also, a higher multiple correlations between role stressors and MH deficiency in personnel having further type A personality in comparison with personnel having not as much of mentioned group’s type A personality was observed.

Abdul-Kazem Naisi; Ali Moazami-Goodarzi; Maryam Zarra-Nezhad

2009-01-01

171

Mental Health Challenges for Returning Military Veterans  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... a topic of discussion between NIMH Director Dr. Thomas Insel and Sergeant Todd Bowers of the organization ... with National Institute of Mental Health Director Doctor Thomas Insel to talk about struggles faced by many ...

172

Enhanced Mental Image Mapping in Autism  

Science.gov (United States)

The formation and manipulation of mental images represents a key ability for successfully solving visuospatial tasks like Wechsler's Block Design or visual reasoning problems, tasks where autistics perform at higher levels than predicted by their Wechsler IQ. Visual imagery can be used to compare two mental images, allowing judgment of their…

Soulieres, I.; Zeffiro, T. A.; Girard, M. L.; Mottron, L.

2011-01-01

173

Strategic market positions for mental health services.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Faced with a rapidly changing market, increased legislation and intense competition, mental health service providers must be sophisticated planners and position themselves advantageously in the marketplace. They can effectively position themselves to be profitable and sustaining through market segmentation and sensitivity. The following article will address one concept of marketing that has received less attention but is of critical importance: positioning. As the market environment becomes increasingly competitive, positioning will be the key to success for mental health programs and institutions.

Ambrose DM; Lennox L

1988-01-01

174

Strategic market positions for mental health services.  

Science.gov (United States)

Faced with a rapidly changing market, increased legislation and intense competition, mental health service providers must be sophisticated planners and position themselves advantageously in the marketplace. They can effectively position themselves to be profitable and sustaining through market segmentation and sensitivity. The following article will address one concept of marketing that has received less attention but is of critical importance: positioning. As the market environment becomes increasingly competitive, positioning will be the key to success for mental health programs and institutions. PMID:10302552

Ambrose, D M; Lennox, L

1988-01-01

175

Toxoplasma gondii, Mental Health and Shizophrenia  

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Protecting and promoting of mental health is one of the major application areas of public health. In particular, Toxoplasma gondii, which is a protozoal zoonosis common in Turkey, it is closely related to veterinary public health. In recent years, T.gondii can induce behavioral changes, may play a r...

Sibel Cevizci; Ulken Tunga Babaoglu; Demet Gulec Oyekcin

176

Positive mental health: is there a cross-cultural definition?  

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Seven models for conceptualizing positive mental health are reviewed: mental health as above normal, epitomized by a DSM-IV’s Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score of over 80; mental health as the presence of multiple human strengths rather than the absence of weaknesses; mental health concep...

VAILLANT, GEORGE E.

177

Child psychiatry in Bombay: the school mental health clinic.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The school mental health clinic is an unusual amalgamation of the mental health and education sectors in Bombay. It aims to detect emotional problems in schoolchildren, increase mental health awareness in teachers and other professionals and determine any risk or causal factors in schoolchildren suffering from mental health problems. It also offers cross-cultural research opportunities.

Vaidya G; Dhavale HS

2000-06-01

178

Mental health assessment in rehabilitation research  

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Full Text Available Assessment in mental health research has evolved from focusing on symptoms and diagnosis to addressing a broad range of change, including psychosocial functioning. This is consistent with developments in the areas of psychosocial rehabilitation and the increase in recovery-oriented intervention models for mental disorders. We reviewed the status of assessment in mental health research, providing an overview of symptom and diagnostic assessment that is the cornerstone of most mental health research assessment. We then focused on measurement that can be applied across diagnostic groups and on functioning as a key mental health outcome. We reviewed the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health and its implications for improvements in assessment. We provided an example of a new assessment, the Inventory of Psychosocial Functioning, which highlights key issues in the measurement of functioning. We then addressed improving research assessment, including issues of assessment in diverse populations and the need to capitalize on new data sources and new assessment technologies to advance assessment in mental health research. Finally, we reviewed and discussed areas for research and quality improvement, drawing on examples from the Department of Veterans Affairs to illustrate potential opportunities.

John R. McQuaid, PhD; Brian P. Marx, PhD; Marc I. Rosen, MD; Lynn F. Bufka, PhD; Wendy Tenhula, PhD; Helene Cook, MA; erence M. Keane, PhD

2012-01-01

179

Parenthood, Life Course Expectations, and Mental Health.  

Science.gov (United States)

Although past research indicates that early and premarital childbearing negatively affect mental health, little is known about the role of individual expectations in shaping these associations. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we consider how individual expectations, measured prior to the entry into parenthood, shape mental health outcomes associated with premarital childbearing and birth timing, and consider gender and race/ethnic variations. Results indicate that expecting children before marriage ameliorates the negative mental health consequences of premarital first births and that subsequently deviating from expected birth timing, either early or late, results in increased distress at all birth ages. In both cases, however, the degree and manner in which expectations matter differ by gender and race/ethnicity. Results indicate that expectations for premarital childbearing matter only for African-Americans' mental health and although later than expected births are associated with decreased mental health for all groups, earlier than expected births are only associated with decreased mental health for women, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic whites. PMID:22229115

Carlson, Daniel; Williams, Kristi

2011-03-01

180

Parenthood, Life Course Expectations, and Mental Health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Although past research indicates that early and premarital childbearing negatively affect mental health, little is known about the role of individual expectations in shaping these associations. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we consider how individual expectations, measured prior to the entry into parenthood, shape mental health outcomes associated with premarital childbearing and birth timing, and consider gender and race/ethnic variations. Results indicate that expecting children before marriage ameliorates the negative mental health consequences of premarital first births and that subsequently deviating from expected birth timing, either early or late, results in increased distress at all birth ages. In both cases, however, the degree and manner in which expectations matter differ by gender and race/ethnicity. Results indicate that expectations for premarital childbearing matter only for African-Americans' mental health and although later than expected births are associated with decreased mental health for all groups, earlier than expected births are only associated with decreased mental health for women, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic whites.

Carlson D; Williams K

2011-03-01

 
 
 
 
181

Mental Health in High-Tech System  

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Full Text Available Stress and mental health at the place of work have received great attention by researchers. In spite of technology improvement in high-tech systems, the operators face new problems, which can affect mental health. There is hardly any published research about stress or mental health in such workplaces in developing countries. This paper presents the application of the self-rating scale General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) to study mental health of 160 controllers working in a part of Air Traffic Control (ATC) as a high-tech system in Iran. Logistic regression analysis showed that demographic variables did not exhibit a statistically significant effect on scores of the test. In order to compare mental health of these operators with general population, an exposure / non-exposure study was designed. Three age groups (less than 29 years, 30 through 39 y, and more than 40 y) were compared in exposed and non-exposed groups. The results of Fisher’s exact test showed that mental distress symptoms were significantly higher in the exposed group. There were significant job effects on somatization, anxiety and depression as well as on the total score of GHQ-28 for the two first age groups (P<.05). No significant effects of the job were found on social dysfunction symptoms in any age groups. The risk ratio of expressing depression and anxiety symptoms were more than three times greater in these operators than general population.

Sh Arghami; J Nasl Seraji; K Mohammad; Gh Zamani; A Farhangi; W Van Vuuren

2005-01-01

182

The mental health of university students  

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Full Text Available The main purpose of the research is to observe the mental health of university students in the Faculty of Education University of Nigde .By using descriptive method, the research is made on 518 students (258 women, 260 men)As a result of this study the following discoveries have been reached;1. When the mental health of the students and the sex changeable are compared, the difference of the level having these symptoms was found meaningful 2. From the point of view of education forms, the level of having the depressive and anxiety forming the mental health was found meaningful3. By the form of life, the level o f the mental health of the students living in the government hostels is lower than the students living in the private hostels.4. No difference was found. Between the living place and mental health5. The difference between the level of mental health and the level of the success is P>0.05 so that it’s not meaningful.

Mustafa Koç; Ümit Polat

2006-01-01

183

Religiousness and mental health: a review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The relationship between religiosity and mental health has been a perennial source of controversy. This paper reviews the scientific evidence available for the relationship between religion and mental health. METHOD: The authors present the main studies and conclusions of a larger systematic review of 850 studies on the religion-mental health relationship published during the 20th Century identified through several databases. The present paper also includes an update on the papers published since 2000, including researches performed in Brazil and a brief historical and methodological background. DISCUSSION: The majority of well-conducted studies found that higher levels of religious involvement are positively associated with indicators of psychological well-being (life satisfaction, happiness, positive affect, and higher morale) and with less depression, suicidal thoughts and behavior, drug/alcohol use/abuse. Usually the positive impact of religious involvement on mental health is more robust among people under stressful circumstances (the elderly, and those with disability and medical illness). Theoretical pathways of the religiousness-mental health connection and clinical implications of these findings are also discussed. CONCLUSIONS: There is evidence that religious involvement is usually associated with better mental health. We need to improve our understanding of the mediating factors of this association and its use in clinical practice.

Moreira-Almeida Alexander; Lotufo Neto Francisco; Koenig Harold G

2006-01-01

184

BIOÉTICA, SALUD MENTAL Y GÉNERO BIOÉTICA, SAÚDE MENTAL E GÊNERO BIOETHICS, MENTAL HEALTH CARE AND GENDER  

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Full Text Available Este artículo enfoca el desarrollo de tres importantes conceptos, propios de nuestra era, cuya definición y alcance inicial han cambiado en los últimos años: bioética, salud mental y género. Analiza su interrelación, utilizando datos del estudio epidemiológico hecho en Lima, Perú, por el Instituto Nacional de Salud Mental en "mujeres unidas"Este artigo enfoca o desenvolvimento de três importantes conceitos, próprios de nosso tempo, cuja definição e alcance inicial mudaram nos últimos anos: bioética, saúde mental e gênero. Analisa sua inter-relação, utilizando dados do estudo epidemiológico feito em Lima, Perú, pelo Instituto Ncional de Saúde MentalThis paper focuses on the development of three main concepts, representing our time, whose definition and initial impact has changed in the last years: bioethics, mental health care and gender. It analyzes their interrelationship using data from the epidemiological research carried out in Lima, Peru, by the National Institute of Mental Health Care of Woman in "united women"

Carmen Bravo de Rueda Ortega

2006-01-01

185

Supporting positive dimensions of health, challenges in mental health care  

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Full Text Available This paper will explore two contrasting paradigms in mental health care and their relationship to evidence-based practice. The biomedical perspective of pathogenesis and the health perspective of salotogenesis are two major diverse views in mental health care. Positive dimensions of health are traditionally viewed as software not suitable for statistical analysis, while absence of symptoms of disease are regarded as measurable and suitable for statistical analysis and appropriate as a foundation of evidence-based practice. If the main goal of mental health care is to enhance subjectively experienced health among patients, it will not be sufficient to evaluate absence of symptoms of disease as a measure of quality of care. The discussion focuses on the paradox of evidence-based absence of illness and disease versus subjectively experienced health and well-being as criterions of quality of care in mental health care.

Henrika Jormfeldt

2011-01-01

186

Pediatric mental health emergencies and special health care needs.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Children with mental health problems are increasingly being evaluated and treated by both pediatric primary care and pediatric emergency physicians. This article focuses on the epidemiology, evaluation, and management of the 2 most common pediatric mental health emergencies, suicidal and homicidal/aggressive patients, as well as the equally challenging population of children with autism or other developmental disabilities.

Chun TH; Katz ER; Duffy SJ

2013-10-01

187

Pediatric Mental Health Emergencies and Special Health Care Needs.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Children with mental health problems are increasingly being evaluated and treated by both pediatric primary care and pediatric emergency physicians. This article focuses on the epidemiology, evaluation, and management of the 2 most common pediatric mental health emergencies, suicidal and homicidal/aggressive patients, as well as the equally challenging population of children with autism or other developmental disabilities.

Chun TH; Katz ER; Duffy SJ

2013-10-01

188

Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program: Facilitating physical health care for people with mental illness?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

People with serious mental illness have increased rates of physical ill-health and reduced contact with primary care services. In Australia, the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) was developed to facilitate access to mental health services. However, as a primary care service, the contribution to physical health care is worthy of consideration. Thirty-eight nurses who were part of the MHNIP participated in a national survey of nurses working in mental health about physical health care. The survey invited nurses to report their views on the physical health of consumers and the regularity of physical health care they provide. Physical health-care provision in collaboration with general practitioners (GPs) and other health-care professionals was reported as common. The findings suggest that the MHNIP provides integrated care, where nurses and GPs work in collaboration, allowing enough time to discuss physical health or share physical health activities. Consumers of this service appeared to have good access to physical and mental health services, and nurses had access to primary care professionals to discuss consumers' physical health and develop their clinical skills in the physical domain. The MHNIP has an important role in addressing physical health concerns, in addition to the mental health issues of people accessing this service.

Happell B; Platania-Phung C; Scott D

2013-10-01

189

Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program: Facilitating physical health care for people with mental illness?  

Science.gov (United States)

People with serious mental illness have increased rates of physical ill-health and reduced contact with primary care services. In Australia, the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) was developed to facilitate access to mental health services. However, as a primary care service, the contribution to physical health care is worthy of consideration. Thirty-eight nurses who were part of the MHNIP participated in a national survey of nurses working in mental health about physical health care. The survey invited nurses to report their views on the physical health of consumers and the regularity of physical health care they provide. Physical health-care provision in collaboration with general practitioners (GPs) and other health-care professionals was reported as common. The findings suggest that the MHNIP provides integrated care, where nurses and GPs work in collaboration, allowing enough time to discuss physical health or share physical health activities. Consumers of this service appeared to have good access to physical and mental health services, and nurses had access to primary care professionals to discuss consumers' physical health and develop their clinical skills in the physical domain. The MHNIP has an important role in addressing physical health concerns, in addition to the mental health issues of people accessing this service. PMID:23279365

Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Scott, David

2012-12-24

190

Mental health of those directly exposed to the World Trade Center disaster: unmet mental health care need, mental health treatment service use, and quality of life.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental health service utilization several years following a man-made or natural disaster can be lower than expected, despite a high prevalence of mental health disorders among those exposed. This study focused on factors associated with subjective unmet mental health care need (UMHCN) and its relationship to a combination of diagnostic history and current mental health symptoms, 5-6 years after the 9-11-01 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster in New York City, USA. Two survey waves of the WTC Health Registry, after exclusions, provided a sample of 36,625 enrollees for this analysis. Important differences were found among enrollees who were categorized according to the presence or absence of a self-reported mental health diagnosis and symptoms indicative of post-traumatic stress disorder or serious psychological distress. Persons with diagnoses and symptoms had the highest levels of UMHCN, poor mental health days, and mental health service use. Those with symptoms only were a vulnerable group much less likely to use mental health services yet reporting UMHCN and poor mental health days. Implications for delivering mental health services include recognizing that many persons with undiagnosed but symptomatic mental health symptoms are not using mental health services, despite having perceived need for mental health care.

Brackbill RM; Stellman SD; Perlman SE; Walker DJ; Farfel MR

2013-03-01

191

Mental health of those directly exposed to the World Trade Center disaster: unmet mental health care need, mental health treatment service use, and quality of life.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mental health service utilization several years following a man-made or natural disaster can be lower than expected, despite a high prevalence of mental health disorders among those exposed. This study focused on factors associated with subjective unmet mental health care need (UMHCN) and its relationship to a combination of diagnostic history and current mental health symptoms, 5-6 years after the 9-11-01 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster in New York City, USA. Two survey waves of the WTC Health Registry, after exclusions, provided a sample of 36,625 enrollees for this analysis. Important differences were found among enrollees who were categorized according to the presence or absence of a self-reported mental health diagnosis and symptoms indicative of post-traumatic stress disorder or serious psychological distress. Persons with diagnoses and symptoms had the highest levels of UMHCN, poor mental health days, and mental health service use. Those with symptoms only were a vulnerable group much less likely to use mental health services yet reporting UMHCN and poor mental health days. Implications for delivering mental health services include recognizing that many persons with undiagnosed but symptomatic mental health symptoms are not using mental health services, despite having perceived need for mental health care. PMID:23337833

Brackbill, Robert M; Stellman, Steven D; Perlman, Sharon E; Walker, Deborah J; Farfel, Mark R

2013-01-03

192

Disasters and Mental Health Research  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... had symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder and depression. And that the symptoms resolved in a large ... people who are isolated- socially isolated- are at great risk of mental illness after these events. We ...

193

Intermarriages, children of mixed parentage & mental health  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This paper presents some aspects of the ongoing project about the persons in cross border intimate partnerships and their children. Researchers, health-care professionals and policy-makers are increasingly recognising the challenge presented by the increasing ethnic diversity in the Nordic countries, among others the increased challenges and risks involved in the increasing partnerships formation across the ethnic borders to health systems. To help meet this challenge, this project has two objectives. The objective in the first is to gain insights about the dynamics of intermarriage in relation to mental health of the couples in the Denmark and Norway. Mental health is conceptualised as the self understandings as well as the salient relationships at various levels. The second objective is to improve the accessibility of and further develop psychosocial services available for intermarried couples experiencing mental health problems. The theoretical framework of the project is interdisciplinary, combining transnationalism, narrative approach and life-course perspectives. Some statistical data pertaining to phenomenon of intermarriage in Denmark will also be presented. The investigation through qualitative research interviews will involve a number of couples, primarily Asians including those from the South Asian diaspora, currently / earlier married to native Danes. The focus is on their experiences and concerns related to mental health, in which their children will have a central place. To the extent feasible, for intermarried couples with mental health problems, the experiences and suggestions regarding psychosocial services for professional intervention will also be delineated.

Singla, Rashmi

194

Psychedelics and mental health: a population study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The classical serotonergic psychedelics LSD, psilocybin, mescaline are not known to cause brain damage and are regarded as non-addictive. Clinical studies do not suggest that psychedelics cause long-term mental health problems. Psychedelics have been used in the Americas for thousands of years. Over 30 million people currently living in the US have used LSD, psilocybin, or mescaline. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between the lifetime use of psychedelics and current mental health in the adult population. METHOD: Data drawn from years 2001 to 2004 of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health consisted of 130,152 respondents, randomly selected to be representative of the adult population in the United States. Standardized screening measures for past year mental health included serious psychological distress (K6 scale), mental health treatment (inpatient, outpatient, medication, needed but did not receive), symptoms of eight psychiatric disorders (panic disorder, major depressive episode, mania, social phobia, general anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and non-affective psychosis), and seven specific symptoms of non-affective psychosis. We calculated weighted odds ratios by multivariate logistic regression controlling for a range of sociodemographic variables, use of illicit drugs, risk taking behavior, and exposure to traumatic events. RESULTS: 21,967 respondents (13.4% weighted) reported lifetime psychedelic use. There were no significant associations between lifetime use of any psychedelics, lifetime use of specific psychedelics (LSD, psilocybin, mescaline, peyote), or past year use of LSD and increased rate of any of the mental health outcomes. Rather, in several cases psychedelic use was associated with lower rate of mental health problems. CONCLUSION: We did not find use of psychedelics to be an independent risk factor for mental health problems.

Krebs TS; Johansen PØ

2013-01-01

195

Psychedelics and Mental Health: A Population Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Background The classical serotonergic psychedelics LSD, psilocybin, mescaline are not known to cause brain damage and are regarded as non-addictive. Clinical studies do not suggest that psychedelics cause long-term mental health problems. Psychedelics have been used in the Americas for thousands of years. Over 30 million people currently living in the US have used LSD, psilocybin, or mescaline. Objective To evaluate the association between the lifetime use of psychedelics and current mental health in the adult population. Method Data drawn from years 2001 to 2004 of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health consisted of 130,152 respondents, randomly selected to be representative of the adult population in the United States. Standardized screening measures for past year mental health included serious psychological distress (K6 scale), mental health treatment (inpatient, outpatient, medication, needed but did not receive), symptoms of eight psychiatric disorders (panic disorder, major depressive episode, mania, social phobia, general anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and non-affective psychosis), and seven specific symptoms of non-affective psychosis. We calculated weighted odds ratios by multivariate logistic regression controlling for a range of sociodemographic variables, use of illicit drugs, risk taking behavior, and exposure to traumatic events. Results 21,967 respondents (13.4% weighted) reported lifetime psychedelic use. There were no significant associations between lifetime use of any psychedelics, lifetime use of specific psychedelics (LSD, psilocybin, mescaline, peyote), or past year use of LSD and increased rate of any of the mental health outcomes. Rather, in several cases psychedelic use was associated with lower rate of mental health problems. Conclusion We did not find use of psychedelics to be an independent risk factor for mental health problems.

Krebs, Teri S.; Johansen, Pal-?rjan

2013-01-01

196

Mental health literacy: empowering the community to take action for better mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

For major physical diseases, it is widely accepted that members of the public will benefit by knowing what actions they can take for prevention, early intervention, and treatment. However, this type of public knowledge about mental disorders (mental health literacy) has received much less attention. There is evidence from surveys in several countries for deficiencies in (a) the public's knowledge of how to prevent mental disorders, (b) recognition of when a disorder is developing, (c) knowledge of help-seeking options and treatments available, (d) knowledge of effective self-help strategies for milder problems, and (e) first aid skills to support others affected by mental health problems. Nevertheless, there is evidence that a range of interventions can improve mental health literacy, including whole-of-community campaigns, interventions in educational settings, Mental Health First Aid training, and information websites. There is also evidence for historical improvements in mental health literacy in some countries. Increasing the community's mental health literacy needs to be a focus for national policy and population monitoring so that the whole community is empowered to take action for better mental health.

Jorm AF

2012-04-01

197

Medio laboral y salud mental/ Work environment and mental health  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish Se revisan las formas predominantes de experimentar el trabajo y el medio laboral en el mundo occidental desde la revolución industrial analizando el sur-gimiento de diferentes funciones, como: medio de subsistencia, generador de derechos, jerarquizador en el entramado social, fuente de significado personal y entorno privilegiado de relaciones interpersonales significativas. Se discute el papel que la actividad productiva puede tener en el sistema de significados que con (more) figura a los individuos como miembros de una sociedad concreta, y, por tanto, en su salud mental. En base a ello se discute el papel del sistema de atención a la salud mental en este terreno. Abstract in english We review the main ways of experiencing work and work environment in Occident since the industrial revolution. We describe the emergence of different functions as: subsistence means, source of rights, source of social hierarchies, source of personal meanings and scene of personal relationships. We discuss the role of productive activity in the meaning system that constitute individuals as member of a concrete society and, therefore, their mental health. On this basis, we discuss the role of the mental health care system in this field.

Fernández Liria, Alberto; García Álvarez, Mª Jesús

2004-06-01

198

Caregiver Mental Health, Neighborhood, and Social Network Influences on Mental Health Needs among African American Children  

Science.gov (United States)

|In this study, the authors examined the combined effects of caregiver mental health, alcohol use, and social network support/satisfaction on child mental health needs among African American caregiver-child dyads at risk of maltreatment. The sample included 514 eight-year-old African American children and their caregivers who participated in the…

Lindsey, Michael A.; Browne, Dorothy C.; Thompson, Richard; Hawley, Kristin M.; Graham, Christopher J.; Weisbart, Cindy; Harrington, Donna; Kotch, Jonathan B.

2008-01-01

199

Do State Mental Health Plans Address the New Freedom Commission's Goals for Children's Mental Health?  

Science.gov (United States)

The latest initiative to address mental health needs of the nation, including those of children and youth, is the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health (NFC). The NFC formulated a benchmark of six goals and related recommendations toward which the U.S. should strive, including the recommendation that each state develop a…

Gould, Sara R.; Roberts, Michael C.; Beals, Sarah E.

2009-01-01

200

Mental health services at selected private schools.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Private schools educate a significant percentage of US children and adolescents. Private schools, particularly where students reside during the academic year, assume responsibility for the health and well-being of their students. Children and adolescents experience mental health problems at a predictable rate, and private schools need a mechanism for addressing their students' mental health needs. Understanding that need requires data to guide the services and programs a school may put in place. Having data helps inform those services, and comparative data from other schools provides feedback and perspective. This project surveyed type and frequency of mental health problems experienced by students who received a formal evaluation at 11 private schools in Connecticut during academic year 2001-2002.

Van Hoof TJ; Sherwin TE; Baggish RC; Tacy PB; Meehan TP

2004-04-01

 
 
 
 
201

Attitudes toward community mental health care: the contact paradox revisited.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Contact with people with mental illness is considered to be a promising strategy to change stigmatizing attitudes. This study examines the underlying mechanisms of the association between contact and attitudes toward community mental health care. Data are derived from the 2009 survey "Stigma in a Global Context-Belgian Mental Health Study", using the Community Mental Health Ideology-scale. Results show that people who received mental health treatment themselves or have a family member who has been treated for mental health problems report more tolerant attitudes toward community mental health care than people with public contact with people with mental illness. Besides, the perception of the effectiveness of the treatment seems to matter too. Furthermore, emotions arising from public contact are associated with attitudes toward community mental health care. The degree of intimacy and the characteristics of the contact relationship clarify the association between contact and attitudes toward community mental health care.

Pattyn E; Verhaeghe M; Bracke P

2013-06-01

202

One Hundred Years of College Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

|Although the first student health service is credited to Amherst College in 1861, almost 50 years passed before Princeton University established the first mental health service in 1910. At that time, a psychiatrist was hired to help with student personality development. Although other schools subsequently established such services, the first 50…

Kraft, David P.

2011-01-01

203

Dual-Factor Model of Mental Health: Surpass the Traditional Mental Health Model  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Aiming at the limitations of traditional mental health model, the dual-factor model of mental health (DFM) was proposed as a new idea under the background of positive psychology trend. According to the DFM, mental health is a complete state; subjective well-being should be included into the mental health evaluation system as a positive indictor; in terms of prevention and intervention, the DFM asserted that the decrease of symptoms is only the first step of intervention, and the improvement of subjective well-being should be followed, in order to achieve the complete mental health states and reduce the recurrence of illness. Finally, this paper put forward evaluation on DFM and its future research directions.

Xinqiang Wang; Dajun Zhang; Jinliang Wang

2011-01-01

204

Experience in family care in mental health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: To understand how it impacts the problem of mental disorder in the lives of family members and carers of users of PACs Acopiara-Ceará. Methods: Exploratory-descriptive qualitative study that used semi structured interviews as a tool for data collection. Results: the data reeled that the woman is still socially responsible for supplying the affection demands and caring of family members, including the ones that suffer from mental illness. Difficulties were indicated in the role of caregivers for the care promotion. Final consideration: knowing and understanding the familiar dynamic constitute a strong strategy for improving mental health assistance and promotion of life quality of the users.

Samantha de Almeida Nóbrega; Maria Wanderleya de Lavor Coriolano

2011-01-01

205

Identity Theft in Community Mental Health Patients  

Science.gov (United States)

Identity theft is a serious problem in the United States, and persons with enduring mental illnesses may be particularly vulnerable to becoming victims of this crime. Victims of identity theft experience a variety of consequences that include financial loss and serious emotional distress. Little is known about the impact of identity theft on individuals with mental illnesses. The two cases from a community mental health center presented in this article demonstrate many of the facets that may be associated with an increased risk for becoming the victim of identity theft. A summary of preventive steps as well as steps involved in resolving the crime once one has become a victim are presented.

Klopp, Jonathon; Konrad, Shane; Yanofski, Jason

2007-01-01

206

Defendants with intellectual disabilities and mental health diagnoses: faring in a mental health court.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Begun in the late 1990s, mental health courts are specialty criminal courts developed to address the needs of persons with mental illness. METHODS: As many persons with intellectual disabilities (IDs) may overlap in the mental health court system, we used mental health court records to examine the phenomenology and outcomes of 224 defendants with and without co-occurring IDs in the mental health court. This study had two goals: (1) to examine the prevalence of defendants with IDs in the court and (2) to compare defendants with dual diagnoses with defendants with lone mental health disorders. RESULTS: Approximately 11% of defendants in the mental health court also had IDs. Compared with individuals with mental health disorders alone, individuals with dual diagnoses were more likely to be younger, male, African-American and less well-educated; these defendants were also more likely to show externalising, 'turning-against-others' symptoms, less likely to show internalising, 'turning-against-self' symptoms. Defendants with IDs (vs. those without) more often received behavioural, vocational rehabilitation and other services, although the two groups did not differ on most outcome variables. CONCLUSION: Directions for future research are discussed.

Burke MM; Griggs M; Dykens EM; Hodapp RM

2012-03-01

207

Mental Health Promotion among Nursing Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Problem statement: In the literature, there is no consensus over what constitutes an appropriate model for mental health promotion among nursing students in Thailand. Approach: This quasi-experimental research was conducted to evaluate the effects of mental health promotion intervention. Several activities in this intervention were created for promoting sense of coherence which focused on the manipulation of both internal and external factors that effect mental health. Results: The results revealed that prior to the implementation of mental health promotion intervention, both experimental and control groups demonstrated that there were no significant differences on the mean score of all styles of defense mechanisms and sense of coherence either in total or individual dimensions. After intervention were implemented, however, there were significantly differences between groups using mature defense mechanisms (t = -3.486, pConclusion: These findings reflect the effectiveness of mental health promotion intervention. In order to prepare student nurses most effectively, nursing schools should apply this appropriate interventions with their students.

Choochart Deeromram; Amorn Suwannimitr; Suwadee Jundeekrayom

2010-01-01

208

International survey of military mental health professionals.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This paper reports on data from a survey of international military mental health professionals. In a series of open-ended questions, respondents were asked to describe their country in terms of the field of military psychology, the role of mental health professionals on deployment, the degree to which the field of mental health is accepted in the military, and their contact with their international counterparts. The survey was mailed to 44 different countries from July 1995 through July 1996. The data are based on 30 individual responses from 23 different countries. Cultural differences included the role of psychologists in the military and on deployment, the degree of professional isolation, and specific services provided by psychologists. Cultural similarities included the ambivalent response to the mental health field by military leaders, the use of psychology as a prevention tool, and the degree of interest in international contact and exchange. The discussion focuses on three obstacles to the acceptance of the mental health field and possible avenues for greater exchange of information among military professionals working in psychology-related fields.

Adler AB; Bartone PT

1999-11-01

209

International survey of military mental health professionals.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reports on data from a survey of international military mental health professionals. In a series of open-ended questions, respondents were asked to describe their country in terms of the field of military psychology, the role of mental health professionals on deployment, the degree to which the field of mental health is accepted in the military, and their contact with their international counterparts. The survey was mailed to 44 different countries from July 1995 through July 1996. The data are based on 30 individual responses from 23 different countries. Cultural differences included the role of psychologists in the military and on deployment, the degree of professional isolation, and specific services provided by psychologists. Cultural similarities included the ambivalent response to the mental health field by military leaders, the use of psychology as a prevention tool, and the degree of interest in international contact and exchange. The discussion focuses on three obstacles to the acceptance of the mental health field and possible avenues for greater exchange of information among military professionals working in psychology-related fields. PMID:10578590

Adler, A B; Bartone, P T

1999-11-01

210

Mental health and welfare in Australian anaesthetists.  

Science.gov (United States)

This survey was designed to evaluate the factors affecting mental health and welfare in Australian anaesthetists and to investigate current sources of support. An electronic survey was sent to 500 randomly selected Fellows and trainees of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. Questions were related to: anxiety, stress, depression, substance misuse, self-medication, suicide, reporting illness, and help-seeking. Current psychological wellbeing was assessed using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). A total of 191 completed surveys were received (a response rate of 38%): 26% had attended their general practitioner for mental health issues, of whom half had been diagnosed with a mental illness; 7% of all respondents were currently prescribed medication for this; 25% had previously self-prescribed psychoactive medication; 17% admitted to using alcohol to deal with stress, anxiety or depression; and 8% responded that mental illness had at some point impaired clinical care. Sixteen percent of all respondents reported previous suicidal ideation. Despite a low response rate, and the possibility of responder bias, the mental health of Australian anaesthetists would appear to be subject to common and persistent risk factors, many of which are well described in previous studies. We identify general practitioners as particularly valuable in targeting initiatives for improvements in mental health and welfare. The significant prevalence of suicidal ideation and reluctance to approach senior colleagues with concerns about mental health or welfare issues are specific causes for concern and suggest that further investigation, education and a potential review of support networks is required. PMID:23977916

McDonnell, Nj; Kaye, Rm; Hood, S; Shrivastava, P; Khursandi, Dcs

2013-09-01

211

Mental Health Disorders. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2013-1  

Science.gov (United States)

Mental disorders are diagnosable conditions characterized by changes in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination of these) that can cause a person to feel stressed out and impair his or her ability to function. These disorders are common in adolescence. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents the warning signs of mental disorders;…

Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte

2013-01-01

212

WPA guidance on mental health and mental health care in migrants.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this guidance is to review currently available evidence on mental health problems in migrants and to present advice to clinicians and policy makers on how to provide migrants with appropriate and accessible mental health services. The three phases of the process of migration and the relevant implications for mental health are outlined, as well as the specific problems of groups such as women, children and adolescents, the elderly, refugees and asylum seekers, and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. The concepts of cultural bereavement, cultural identity and cultural congruity are discussed. The epidemiology of mental disorders in migrants is described. A series of recommendations to policy makers, service providers and clinicians aimed to improve mental health care in migrants are provided, covering the special needs of migrants concerning pharmacotherapies and psychotherapies. PMID:21379345

Bhugra, Dinesh; Gupta, Susham; Bhui, Kamaldeep; Craig, Tom; Dogra, Nisha; Ingleby, J David; Kirkbride, James; Moussaoui, Driss; Nazroo, James; Qureshi, Adil; Stompe, Thomas; Tribe, Rachel

2011-02-01

213

WPA guidance on mental health and mental health care in migrants.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this guidance is to review currently available evidence on mental health problems in migrants and to present advice to clinicians and policy makers on how to provide migrants with appropriate and accessible mental health services. The three phases of the process of migration and the relevant implications for mental health are outlined, as well as the specific problems of groups such as women, children and adolescents, the elderly, refugees and asylum seekers, and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. The concepts of cultural bereavement, cultural identity and cultural congruity are discussed. The epidemiology of mental disorders in migrants is described. A series of recommendations to policy makers, service providers and clinicians aimed to improve mental health care in migrants are provided, covering the special needs of migrants concerning pharmacotherapies and psychotherapies.

Bhugra D; Gupta S; Bhui K; Craig T; Dogra N; Ingleby JD; Kirkbride J; Moussaoui D; Nazroo J; Qureshi A; Stompe T; Tribe R

2011-02-01

214

MENTAL HEALTH AND PERSONALITY OF WIDOWS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The objective of present research was to study the various aspects of mental health and personality of widows [women]. Sample consists of 100 widows in rural areas at Satara district of Maharashtra state. The duration of widowhood was above 1 month. Thesample selection methodwas used as purposive sampling technique. Result shows that duration of widowhood of widows' had significant effect on mental health and personality.The duration of 1 to 12 months of widowhood women was more alienation, emotionally unstable and social non conformity than above one year duration of widowhood women. The widow women were introvert but not neurotic on the personality test.Mental health and personality was positively correlated at low level.

GAIKWAD SANTOSH BHIKAJI

2012-01-01

215

Mental health characteristics of sexual minority veterans.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examines the mental health characteristics of sexual minority (lesbian, gay, and bisexual, or LGB) veterans, compared these characteristics to those of an existing Veterans Affairs (VA) sample, and examined the relationship between mental health and anxiety around concealment of LGB identity while in the military. Data regarding LGB veterans' (n = 409) military experiences and current mental health were collected via an online survey; comparison data (n = 15,000) were retrieved from a VA data warehouse. LGB veterans were more likely to screen positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and alcohol problems than the comparison sample. Anxiety around concealment of one's sexual orientation while in the service was related to current depression and PTSD symptoms.

Cochran BN; Balsam K; Flentje A; Malte CA; Simpson T

2013-01-01

216

Mental health policy and psychotropic drugs.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The pace of innovation in psychotropic drugs has been rapid over the past 15 years. There also have been unprecedented increases in spending on prescription drugs generally and psychotropic medications specifically. Psychotropic medications are playing a more central role in treatment. They also are receiving close scrutiny from health insurers, state budget makers, and ordinary citizens. Public policy actions regarding prescription drugs have the potential to significantly affect clinical care for mental disorders, the costs of this care to individuals and society at large, and the prospects for future scientific advances. This article outlines the policy issues related to psychotropic drugs with respect to their role in determining access to mental health treatment and the cost and quality of mental health care.

Frank RG; Conti RM; Goldman HH

2005-01-01

217

How community mental health centers are coping.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Many community mental health centers have had to operate with less funding in the past several years, especially since the advent of block grant funding. Evidence is now accumulating that some centers have had to decrease their overall level of services and staffing. Others have attempted to adjust by increasing their clinician caseloads, closing their satellite facilities, and de-emphasizing services that fail to generate adequate fees and third-party reimbursements, such as consultation and education, partial hospitalization, and programs for children and the elderly. In contrast, and partly as a result of the increased authority of the states over the community mental health centers program, services for the severely and chronically mentally ill appear to be receiving higher priority. This development will require that centers improve their access to the general health care sector, maintain and improve their relationships with academic institutions, and increase the number, responsibilities, and rewards of the psychiatrists they employ.

Okin RL

1984-11-01

218

[Diagnostic concordance between paediatric and mental health  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: To analyse the diagnostic concordance between the paediatric and mental health (MH) services. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and seven patients from 0 to 16 years referred from paediatrics to the Estella Mental Health Centre during 2006 and 2007. Concordance between global Kappa Index and specific diagnosis was calculated with Epidat 3.1. An analysis was made for each diagnostic category of the percentage of cases where the diagnosis made in paediatrics was confirmed in Mental Health. RESULTS: The global diagnostic concordance between both medical care levels has a Kappa Index of 0.58. There is a wide variability in the concordance between the different diagnoses. The concordance is weak (0.2-0.4) for specific developmental disorder, affective disorders and adaptative disorders. A moderate concordance (0.41-0.6) is obtained for mental retardation, pervasive developmental disorder, z diagnostics, and sibling rivalry disorder. Concordance is good for attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity, anxiety disorder and conduct disorder. Finally, the diagnostic concordance is very good for enuresis and encopresis and for eating disorders. CONCLUSIONS: The diagnostic concordance obtained between paediatric services and the mental health centre is moderate. A wide variability is obtained in the concordance between different diagnoses.

Landa González N; Goñi A; García de Jalón E; López-Goñi JJ

2009-05-01

219

Age differences in mental health literacy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The community's knowledge and beliefs about mental health problems, their risk factors, treatments and sources of help may vary as a function of age. Methods Data were taken from an epidemiological survey conducted during 2003–2004 with a national clustered sample of Australian adults aged 18 years and over. Following the presentation of a vignette describing depression (n = 1001) or schizophrenia (n = 997), respondents were asked a series of questions relating to their knowledge and recognition of the disorder, beliefs about the helpfulness of treating professionals and medical, psychological and lifestyle treatments, and likely causes. Results Participant age was coded into five categories and cross-tabulated with mental health literacy variables. Comparisons between age groups revealed that although older adults (70+ years) were poorer than younger age groups at correctly recognising depression and schizophrenia, young adults (18–24 years) were more likely to misidentify schizophrenia as depression. Differences were also observed between younger and older age groups in terms of beliefs about the helpfulness of certain treating professionals and medical and lifestyle treatments for depression and schizophrenia, and older respondents were more likely to believe that schizophrenia could be caused by character weakness. Conclusion Differences in mental health literacy across the adult lifespan suggest that more specific, age appropriate messages about mental health are required for younger and older age groups. The tendency for young adults to 'over-identify' depression signals the need for awareness campaigns to focus on differentiation between mental disorders.

Farrer Louise; Leach Liana; Griffiths Kathleen M; Christensen Helen; Jorm Anthony F

2008-01-01

220

Developing a culturally appropriate mental health care service for Samoa.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental Health Care Services are part of the National Health Services for Samoa. Their function is to provide mental health care services to the population of Samoa, which numbers 180,000 people. However, like many other countries in the Pacific region, mental health is considered a low priority. The mental health budget allocation barely covers the operation of mental health care services. More broadly, there is a lack of political awareness about mental health care services and mental health rarely becomes an issue of deliberation in the political arena. This article outlines the recent development of mental health care services in Samoa, including the Mental Health Policy 2006 and Mental Health Act 2007. It tells the story of the successful integration of aiga (family) as an active partner in the provision of care, and the development of the Aiga model utilizing Samoan cultural values to promote culturally appropriate family-focused community mental health care for Samoa. Mental Health Care Services today encompass both clinical and family-focused community mental health care services. The work is largely nurse-led. Much has been achieved over the past 25 years. Increased recognition by government and increased resourcing are necessary to meet the future health care needs of the Samoan people.

Enoka MI; Tenari A; Sili T; Peteru L; Tago P; Blignault I

2013-06-01

 
 
 
 
221

Mental health and substance abuse coverage under health reform.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

President Clinton's health care reform proposal articulates a complete vision for the mental health and substance abuse care system that includes a place for those traditionally served by both the public and the private sectors. Mental health and substance abuse services are to be fully integrated into health alliances under the president's proposal. If this is to occur, we must come to grips with both the history and the insurance-related problems of financing mental health/substance abuse care: (1) the ability of health plans to manage the benefit so as to alter patterns of use; (2) a payment system for health plans that addresses biased selection; and (3) preservation of the existing public investment while accommodating in a fair manner differences in funding across the fifty states.

Arons BS; Frank RG; Goldman HH; McGuire TG; Stephens S

1994-01-01

222

Organizational change management in mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To discuss change management as applicable to mental health. CONCLUSIONS: As mental health care grows increasingly complex, and the network of accountability widens, change is both inevitable and necessary. Strategies to introduce change effectively are essential. Resistance by medical staff to change often has a sound basis and must be acknowledged and explored. Change in clinical systems and practice is facilitated by careful planning and preparation, and by engaging clinicians in all phases of the change process; change will fail if this is not achieved. A number of management models facilitate the understanding and process of change.

Callaly T; Arya D

2005-06-01

223

Toxoplasma gondii, Mental Health and Shizophrenia  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Protecting and promoting of mental health is one of the major application areas of public health. In particular, Toxoplasma gondii, which is a protozoal zoonosis common in Turkey, it is closely related to veterinary public health. In recent years, T.gondii can induce behavioral changes, may play a role in schizophrenia as an etiologic factor. Results of the recently performed studies shows that T.gondii may be a potential factor for some neuropathological changes in brain and suicide attemption. The purpose of this review is to present the data on recent epidemiology of T.gondii, mental health effects (changes in behavior, suicide, etc.), the relationship between T.gondii and schizophrenia and offer some recommendations for protecting of public health. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(2.000): 199-208

Sibel Cevizci; Ulken Tunga Babaoglu; Demet Gulec Oyekcin

2013-01-01

224

National Guard families after combat: mental health, use of mental health services, and perceived treatment barriers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: National Guard forces have deployed in large numbers to Iraq and Afghanistan since September 11, 2001. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess mental health symptoms, utilization of mental health services, and perceived barriers to service use among National Guard members and their significant others (including spouses and others with whom they share a committed relationship) from a Midwestern state. METHODS: Participants were recruited for the study at military-sponsored reintegration workshops, which took place 45-90 days after service members' return from deployment. A sample of 332 National Guard members and 212 significant others volunteered to complete a survey that assessed mental health symptoms, service utilization, and barriers to treatment. RESULTS: Forty percent of National Guard members and 34% of significant others met the screening criteria for one or more mental health problems. Of those meeting the criteria, 53% reported seeking help of some kind (50% of soldiers; 61% of significant others). Stigma associated with mental health care and concerns about service utilization appearing on military records ranked high as barriers among service members. Concerns about the influence of mental health issues on career advancement were of note. For significant others, barriers included the costs of mental health care, trouble with scheduling appointments, difficulty in getting time off work, and not knowing where to get help. CONCLUSIONS: The mental health effects of combat on the soldier and his or her significant other remain a challenge for National Guard families, who often reside in communities that show little understanding of the psychological costs of war. Barriers remain for mental health service utilization.

Gorman LA; Blow AJ; Ames BD; Reed PL

2011-01-01

225

45 CFR 1304.24 - Child mental health.  

Science.gov (United States)

...2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false Child mental health. 1304.24 Section 1304.24 Public Welfare...Development and Health Services § 1304.24 Child mental health. (a) Mental health services. (1) Grantee and delegate...

2009-10-01

226

[The local mental health council, a concrete tool for networking].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental health needs are expressed well beyond the doors of the psychiatric hospital. The health and social sectors are also confronted with situations of psychological suffering. The local mental health council offers solutions to professionals faced with this issue. The creation of the local mental health council and the collaborative way of working which it promotes give rise to projects aimed at improving mental health care.

Le Tulle E

2013-07-01

227

Improving responses to depression and related disorders: evaluation of a innovative, general, mental health care workers training program  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Australian General Practitioners have been beneficiaries of extensive training in mental health care delivery over the last few years but less so other workers who support those with mental illness. Training is needed as it is widely recognised that the most effective interventions to prevent and treat mental disorders are often not readily available. The Mental Health Aptitudes into Practice (MAP) training package is a broad, innovative, interdisciplinary, general mental health training aimed at improving responses to individuals with depression and related disorders. The modular structure of this training program meant that such training could be targeted at those with varied backgrounds. Two hundred and seventy one days of free MAP training was delivered across Victoria in 2004/2005. The evaluation reported here assessed whether changes occurred in the trainees' confidence, mental health literacy, attitudes towards effective treatments, mental health knowledge and skills and community mental health ideology following training. Methods These elements were assessed using pen and paper tests prior, immediately following, 6 months after and then 12 months after the training. Trainees' confidence, mental health literacy and social distance were measured using scales that have been used in evaluations of Mental Health First Aid Training. Community mental health ideology was measured using a sub-scale of the Community Attitudes to the Mentally Ill (CAMI) scale. The trainees' knowledge and skills were accessed using instrumentation specifically designed for this evaluation. Results Following training, participants had more confidence in their ability to work with those who have mental health issues and less desire for social distance from them. Participants' knowledge and skills in relation to the treatment of mental disorders increased. These changes were observed immediately after training. The limited existing evidence suggests these changes were sustained six and twelve months later. Conclusions MAP training can be used to develop the capacity and capabilities of mental health workers.

Graham Annette L; Julian John; Meadows Graham

2010-01-01

228

Perinatal depression: implications for child mental health  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Perinatal depression is common and primary care holds a crucial role for detecting, treating or, if necessary, providing referrals to mental health care for affected women. Family doctors should be aware of risk factors for peripartum depression, including previous history of depression, life events...

Muzik, Maria; Borovska, Stefana

229

Mental health issues in unaccompanied refugee minors  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Previous studies about unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) showed that they are a highly vulnerable group who have greater psychiatric morbidity than the general population. This review focuses on mental health issues among URMs. Articles in databases PsycINFO, Medline and PubMed ...

Huemer Julia; Karnik Niranjan S; Voelkl-Kernstock Sabine; Granditsch Elisabeth; Dervic Kanita; Friedrich Max H

230

Strengthening "School" in School Mental Health Promotion  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight new and existing research on school characteristics that are essential elements in building the capacity of school communities to implement whole school approaches to mental health promotion. Design/methodology/approach: Through an overview of recent research and writing the need for a…

Rowling, Louise

2009-01-01

231

Parental violence and adolescent mental health  

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Being the target of parental violent acts decreases child adjustment and increases the likelihood of mental health problems in childhood and adolescence. Our study analyses how different types of parental violence ranging from verbal threats and swearing to hitting and kicking a child, are associate...

Peltonen, Kirsi; Ellonen, Noora; Larsen, Helmer B.; Helweg-Larsen, Karin

232

Abortion and Mental Health: Evaluating the Evidence  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors evaluated empirical research addressing the relationship between induced abortion and women's mental health. Two issues were addressed: (a) the relative risks associated with abortion compared with the risks associated with its alternatives and (b) sources of variability in women's responses following abortion. This article reflects…

Major, Brenda; Appelbaum, Mark; Beckman, Linda; Dutton, Mary Ann; Russo, Nancy Felipe; West, Carolyn

2009-01-01

233

Study of Factors Affecting Mental Health  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The aim of this study is to investigate the simple and multiple relationships between role ambiguity, role conflict, role overload and mental health considering the moderating role of type A personality and sense of coherence. To this end correlation and regression analysis is utilized. Research sam...

Abdul-Kazem Naisi; Ali Moazami-Goodarzi; Maryam Zarra-Nezhad

234

The mental health clinic: a new model  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The role of psychiatrists into public mental health clinics has been hampered by a perceived restriction of the psychiatrist's role to prescribing and sign-ing forms, limiting opportunities to engage in the kind of integrated care that attracted many physicians to this specialty. We propose a revisi...

FAVA, GIOVANNI A.; PARK, SEUGN K.; DUBOVSKY, STEVEN

235

Mental health needs of federal female offenders.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental health problems are increasingly being recognized as one of the greatest challenges faced by correctional systems in the effective management of their populations. Over the past decade, the number of federally sentenced female offenders in Canada presenting with mental health problems has risen significantly, from 13% in 1996/1997 to 29% in 2008/2009 (Correctional Service of Canada, 2009a). This research used the screener version of the Computerized Diagnostic Interview Schedule (C-DIS-IV; n = 88) to outline the mental health needs of federally sentenced females in Canada. Results provide evidence for extremely elevated rates for certain diagnoses and confirm substance dependence as a significant area of need in this sample. Moreover, alcohol dependence emerged as an area of particular concern for Aboriginal women. Furthermore, all individuals experiencing a lifetime substance dependence disorder have also suffered from an additional psychiatric diagnosis at some point in their lives; thereby highlighting the possible levels of concurrent disorders among this population. This research highlights the critical importance of comprehensive and ongoing mental health assessment, and treatment, for the successful management and reintegration of female offenders.

Derkzen D; Booth L; Taylor K; McConnell A

2013-02-01

236

Age differences in mental health literacy  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background The community's knowledge and beliefs about mental health problems, their risk factors, treatments and sources of help may vary as a function of age. Methods Data were taken from an epidemiological survey conducted during 2003–2004 with a national c...

Farrer Louise; Leach Liana; Griffiths Kathleen M; Christensen Helen; Jorm Anthony F

237

Tabaquismo y salud mental Tobacco smoking and mental health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Smoking continues to be one of the most important health burdens worldwide. Aim: To describe smoking habits and associated risk factors in the population of Santiago, Chile. Material and methods: A cross sectional study of a representative sample of the population, from 16 to 64 years old, residents of Santiago, Chile (total population: 3,237,286). A structured interview that included questions about use of tobacco, the CIS-R interviews, used for common mental disorders, were applied. Results: From the sample of 4,693 households, 3,870 people were interviewed (52.2% women, 47.8% men) and 10% refused. Forty percent of the population currently smoked (52.5% men, 47.8% women). «Being a current smoker» was associated with being younger than 55, male sex, and having a common mental disorder. Discussion: Smoking is highly prevalent in Chile, as compared with developed countries and with some developing countries. Gender differences in use of tobacco have decreased. A higher risk of smoking for people with mental disorders is confirmed (Rev Méd Chile 2003; 131: 873-80)

Graciela Rojas C; Jorge Gaete O; Isabel González R; Marcela Ortega A; Alicia Figueroa M; Rosemarie Fritsch M; Ricardo Araya B

2003-01-01

238

Mental Health and Teens: Watch for Danger Signs  

Science.gov (United States)

... Teens: Watch for Danger Signs Ages & Stages Listen Mental Health and Teens: Watch for Danger Signs Article Body ... alone; nor are their anxieties unique. Understand That Mental Health Disorders Are Treatable Arm yourself with information about ...

239

Mental Health in American Indians and Alaska Natives  

Science.gov (United States)

Home > Mental Health > People > American Indians Let's Talk Facts Brochures Healthy Minds, Healthy Lives Blog Key Topics Finding help Depression ... Parity Healthy Minds TV What is a psychiatrist Mental Health Check-up Coping with Disasters Links for more ...

240

Mental Health in Asian American and Pacific Islanders  

Science.gov (United States)

... Americans and Pacific Islanders. However, researchers have examined mental-health problems by measuring the prevalence of symptoms. In ... studies have indicated that Asian Americans who use mental-health services are more severely ill than other groups. ...

 
 
 
 
241

Identifying the core competencies of mental health telephone triage.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Aims and objectives.? The primary aim of this study was to identify the core competencies of mental health telephone triage, including key role tasks, skills, knowledge and responsibilities, in which clinicians are required to be competent to perform safe and effective triage. Background.? Recent global trends indicate an increased reliance on telephone-based health services to facilitate access to health care across large populations. The trend towards telephone-based health services has also extended to mental health settings, evidenced by the growing number of mental health telephone triage services providing 24-hour access to specialist mental health assessment and treatment. Mental health telephone triage services are critical to the early identification of mental health problems and the provision of timely, appropriate interventions. In spite of the rapid growth in mental health telephone triage and the important role these services play in the assessment and management of mental illness and related risks, there has been very little research investigating this area of practice. Design.? An observational design was employed to address the research aims. Methods.? Structured observations (using dual wireless headphones) were undertaken on 197 occasions of mental health telephone triage over a three-month period from January to March 2011. Results.? The research identified seven core areas of mental health telephone triage practice in which clinicians are required to be competent in to perform effective mental health telephone triage, including opening the call; performing mental status examination; risk assessment; planning and action; termination of call; referral and reporting; and documentation. Conclusions.? The findings of this research contribute to the evidence base for mental health telephone triage by articulating the core competencies for practice. Relevance to clinical practice.? The mental health telephone triage competencies identified in this research may be used to define an evidence-based framework for mental health telephone triage practice that aims to improve the quality, consistency and accuracy of telephone-based mental health triage assessment.

Sands N; Elsom S; Gerdtz M; Henderson K; Keppich-Arnold S; Droste N; Prematunga RK; Wereta ZW

2013-11-01

242

Identifying the core competencies of mental health telephone triage.  

Science.gov (United States)

Aims and objectives.? The primary aim of this study was to identify the core competencies of mental health telephone triage, including key role tasks, skills, knowledge and responsibilities, in which clinicians are required to be competent to perform safe and effective triage. Background.? Recent global trends indicate an increased reliance on telephone-based health services to facilitate access to health care across large populations. The trend towards telephone-based health services has also extended to mental health settings, evidenced by the growing number of mental health telephone triage services providing 24-hour access to specialist mental health assessment and treatment. Mental health telephone triage services are critical to the early identification of mental health problems and the provision of timely, appropriate interventions. In spite of the rapid growth in mental health telephone triage and the important role these services play in the assessment and management of mental illness and related risks, there has been very little research investigating this area of practice. Design.? An observational design was employed to address the research aims. Methods.? Structured observations (using dual wireless headphones) were undertaken on 197 occasions of mental health telephone triage over a three-month period from January to March 2011. Results.? The research identified seven core areas of mental health telephone triage practice in which clinicians are required to be competent in to perform effective mental health telephone triage, including opening the call; performing mental status examination; risk assessment; planning and action; termination of call; referral and reporting; and documentation. Conclusions.? The findings of this research contribute to the evidence base for mental health telephone triage by articulating the core competencies for practice. Relevance to clinical practice.? The mental health telephone triage competencies identified in this research may be used to define an evidence-based framework for mental health telephone triage practice that aims to improve the quality, consistency and accuracy of telephone-based mental health triage assessment. PMID:22860919

Sands, Natisha; Elsom, Stephen; Gerdtz, Marie; Henderson, Kathryn; Keppich-Arnold, Sandra; Droste, Nicolas; Prematunga, Roshani K; Wereta, Zewdu W

2012-08-02

243

Family physicians are essential for mental health care delivery.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

As the largest and most widely distributed of primary care physicians, family physicians have an important role in providing mental health care, especially in rural and underserved areas. However, the proportion of family physicians who report providing mental health care is low. Policy barriers such as payment for mental health services should be explored to ensure access to mental health care for patients across the urban to rural continuum.

Xierali IM; Tong ST; Petterson SM; Puffer JC; Phillips RL Jr; Bazemore AW

2013-03-01

244

Do mental health professionals enquire about childhood sexual abuse during routine mental health assessment in acute mental health settings? A substantive literature review.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This literature review examines the extent to which mental health professionals enquire about childhood sexual abuse during routine mental health assessments in acute mental health settings. Five electronic databases were searched for papers which explored the nature of enquiry about childhood sexual abuse by mental health professionals. The literature was searched between December 2008 and March 2010, with an update in October 2011. Of the 332 papers identified, 54 papers were selected as potentially relevant and data extraction was performed. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Eleven studies were identified that either examined the prevalence of childhood sexual abuse enquiry documented in medical records, or directly asked mental health professionals about their own practice in relation to this subject. The studies found that while many professionals acknowledged the importance of enquiry, there was little evidence of widespread routine enquiry during mental health assessments in acute settings. Mental health professionals do not routinely enquire about childhood sexual abuse during mental health assessment in acute mental health settings. Service providers may have to consider incorporating mandatory enquiry into mental health assessments.

Hepworth I; McGowan L

2013-08-01

245

Socioeconomic and Demographic Determinants of Mental Health across Canadian Communities  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background Many factors contribute to health. This study uses community level data to estimate the impact of socioeconomic and demographic factors as well as physical health on community mental health outcomes. Method Multiple regression analysis was used to estimate the impact of determinants on community mental health outcomes for men and women using community level data from up to 113 health regions covering almost the entire population in Canada. Results Study findings indicate that communities with higher proportions of aboriginal people have greater mental illness hospitalization. Minorities have poorer perceived mental health but better objective measures of less mental illness hospitalization and self injury hospitalization. Also, communities with higher proportion of low income persons show poorer results for many objective mental health outcomes. Higher prevalence of lone parents in a community is associated with greater perceived life stress and greater mental illness hospitalizations for men. Poor physical health is also a predictor of poor mental health. Conclusion Improving the living conditions of aboriginal people and other low income people could reduce mental illness hospitalizations in a community, helping minorities the majority of whom are immigrants with their settlements in their host communities could improve perceived mental health and life stress, and helping lone parents who are men with counseling services to better cope with their situations could reduce their perceived life stress and mental illness hospitalization. Also, improving the physical health of individuals across communities could have a positive impact on mental health outcomes across communities.

Jalil Safaei

2012-01-01

246

Aviation Disaster Intervention: A Mental Health Volunteer's Experience.  

Science.gov (United States)

The goals of this presentation were to help mental health professionals learn more about intervening in aviation disasters, learn about the uniqueness of disaster mental health, and share the presenter's mental health disaster experiences as they relate to aviation disasters. Survivors' emotional phases during the disaster recovery process are…

Tramonte, Michael R.

247

BIOÉTICA, SALUD MENTAL Y GÉNERO/ BIOETHICS, MENTAL HEALTH CARE AND GENDER/ BIOÉTICA, SAÚDE MENTAL E GÊNERO  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Este artigo enfoca o desenvolvimento de três importantes conceitos, próprios de nosso tempo, cuja definição e alcance inicial mudaram nos últimos anos: bioética, saúde mental e gênero. Analisa sua inter-relação, utilizando dados do estudo epidemiológico feito em Lima, Perú, pelo Instituto Ncional de Saúde Mental Abstract in spanish Este artículo enfoca el desarrollo de tres importantes conceptos, propios de nuestra era, cuya definición y alcance inicial han cambiado en los últimos años: bioética, salud mental y género. Analiza su interrelación, utilizando datos del estudio epidemiológico hecho en Lima, Perú, por el Instituto Nacional de Salud Mental en "mujeres unidas" Abstract in english This paper focuses on the development of three main concepts, representing our time, whose definition and initial impact has changed in the last years: bioethics, mental health care and gender. It analyzes their interrelationship using data from the epidemiological research carried out in Lima, Peru, by the National Institute of Mental Health Care of Woman in "united women"

Bravo de Rueda Ortega, Carmen

2006-01-01

248

Metal music and mental health in France.  

Science.gov (United States)

Although numerous authors have associated metal music with social problems such as suicide, self-destruction and Satanism, few studies have been undertaken to examine the mental health of fans of heavy metal music. This study attempts to determine if there is a link between mental health and the enjoyment of this type of music in France. The researchers surveyed 333 fans of metal music. Their mental health was evaluated by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), a widely used instrument that measures anxiety and depression. The scores of the sample of metal music fans were then compared to the scores that reveal possible, probable, or severe mental disorders. Qualifying variables included age, gender, status, education, motivation and participation in metal music culture. The results indicated that fans of metal music are mainly young adults (median age = 22.67, SD = 5.29) and tend to be male (87.85 percent). As a whole, metal music fans have levels of anxiety and depression that are similar to and lower than levels in the general population. Specifically, lyrics, that consumed alcohol and that engaged in the body modification practice of scarification. This study suggests that opponents of metal music should re-examine the basis for their criticism. More scholarly research is needed to better understand the effects of metal music on fans and on society. PMID:19521752

Recours, Robin; Aussaguel, François; Trujillo, Nick

2009-09-01

249

Education in mental health promotion and its impact on the participants' attitudes and perceived mental health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the promotion of mental health (MHP) through education and training is widely accepted, there is scarce evidence for its effectiveness in the literature from outcome studies worldwide. The present study aimed to assess the effect of a three-semester MHP educational program on the recipients' opinions towards mental illness and on their own self-assessed health. Methods Respondents were 78 attendees who completed the assessment battery at the first (baseline) and the last session (end) of the training course. They were primary care physicians or other professionals, or key community agents, working in the greater Athens area. The course consisted of 44 sessions (4 h each), over a 3-semester period, focusing on the principles and methods of mental health promotion, the main aspects of major psychiatric disorders, and on relevant to health skills. Assessment instruments included the Opinion about Mental Illness (OMI) scale and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). Results The mean scores of three OMI factors, that is, social discrimination, social restriction and social integration, and the two GHQ-28 subscales, that is, anxiety/insomnia and social dysfunction, were significantly improved by the end of the training course. Conclusions The results of this study provide evidence, with limitations, for the short-term effectiveness of the implemented educational MHP program on an adult group of recipients-key agents in their community. Because interventions for strengthening positive opinions about mental illness and enhancing self-assessed health constitute priority aims of mental health promotion, it would be beneficial to further investigate the sustainability of the observed positive changes. In addition it would be useful to examine (a) the possible interplay between the two outcome measures, that is, the effect of opinions of recipients about mental health on their perceived health, and (b) the applicability of this intervention in individuals with different sociodemographic profiles.

Tomaras Vlassis D; Ginieri-Coccossis Maria; Vassiliadou Maria; Malliori Melpomeni; Ferentinos Spyros; Soldatos Constantin R; Tylee Andre

2011-01-01

250

Mental health economics: insights from Brazil.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: As the responsibility and demand on health care grows and resources do not increase at the same pace, the healthcare system has been forced to reconsider the benefits and costs of their actions, to ensure a rational and effective decision-making process regarding the adoption of interventions and allocation of resources. Cost-effectiveness (CE) studies represent one of the basic tools to achieve this goal. AIMS: To present the current state of Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and health economics in mental health in Brazil and its importance to the decision-making process. METHODOLOGY: Descriptive paper on HTA and health economics in Brazil. Databases from government and universities as well as some scientific databases to assess the information are presented. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Economic analysis to evaluate interventions in mental health care is a relatively recent addition to the field of health economics; in Brazil, it is also considered a topic within Epidemiology research area. There have been an increased number of studies developed in high-income countries. However, there are fewer CE studies in low- and middle-income ones. Psychiatric disorders represent a significant burden in developing countries, where resources devoted to health care are even scarcer.

Cruz L; Lima AF; Graeff-Martins A; Maia CR; Ziegelmann P; Miguel S; Fleck M; Polanczyk C

2013-04-01

251

Mental health in a Canadian Old Order Mennonite community  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a 2010 survey exploring the determinants of rural mental health in two farming groups in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada: Old Order Mennonites (OOMs) and non-OOM farmers. Comparing these two groups reduces the likely impact of many contextual features impacting both groups, such as local economic conditions. We explore a comprehensive list of health determinants to assess their relative importance and thus enable policy action to focus on those having the greatest impact. The mental component summary (MCS) of the short- form health survey (SF-12) was used to measure mental health. We compare mental health in the two populations and use multiple regression to determine the relative importance of the determinants in explaining mental health. The results show that OOMs experience better mental health than non-OOMs, in part due to the strong mental health of OOM women. Coping, stress and social interaction shape mental health in both groups, reflecting the broader determinants literature and suggesting these are important across many populations with different life circumstances. Other determinants are important for one group but not the other, underscoring the diversity of rural populations. For example, different social capital measures shape mental health in the two groups, and sense-of-place is associated with mental health in only one group (OOMs). The results are discussed in terms of their implications for future health determinants research and policy action to address rural mental health.

Kathryn Fisher; K. Bruce Newbold; John Eyles; Susan Elliott

2013-01-01

252

78 FR 38718 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...  

Science.gov (United States)

...Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage Areas AGENCY...primary medical care, mental health, and dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs...provide primary care, [[Page 38719

2013-06-27

253

Stepped Care for Maternal Mental Health: A Case Study of the Perinatal Mental Health Project in South Africa  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

As one article in a series on Global Mental Health Practice, Simone Honikman and colleagues from South Africa provide a case study of the Perinatal Mental Health Project, which delivered mental health care to pregnant women in a collaborative, step-wise manner, making use of existing resources in pr...

Honikman, Simone; van Heyningen, Thandi; Field, Sally; Baron, Emily; Tomlinson, Mark

254

Stepped care for maternal mental health: a case study of the perinatal mental health project in South Africa.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

As one article in a series on Global Mental Health Practice, Simone Honikman and colleagues from South Africa provide a case study of the Perinatal Mental Health Project, which delivered mental health care to pregnant women in a collaborative, step-wise manner, making use of existing resources in primary care.

Honikman S; van Heyningen T; Field S; Baron E; Tomlinson M

2012-01-01

255

Family impact in intellectual disability, severe mental health disorders and mental health disorders in ID. A comparison  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Family impact (or family burden) is a concept born in the field of mental health that has successfully been exported to the ambit of intellectual disability (ID). However, differences in family impact associated with severe mental health disorders (schizophrenia), to ID or to mental health problems ...

Martorell, Almudena; Gutiérrez-Recacha, Pedro; Irazábal, Marcia; Marsà, Ferrán; García, Mercedes

256

Quality improvement of forensic mental health evaluations and reports of youth in the Netherlands.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Quality improvement of forensic mental health evaluations and reports is needed, but little information is available on how this can be attained, and relatively little conceptual analysis has been undertaken. The STAR, a standardized evaluation instrument of the quality of forensic mental health reports of youth, is developed on the basis of concept mapping to clarify the different perspectives on usability of these reports. Psychometric data are provided, demonstrating the reliability and supporting the validity of the STAR. The Dutch forensic context is described to better understand the development and psychometric properties of this standardized instrument. Quality improvement possibilities of forensic mental health evaluations and reports are discussed.

Duits N; van der Hoorn S; Wiznitzer M; Wettstein RM; de Beurs E

2012-09-01

257

Quality improvement of forensic mental health evaluations and reports of youth in the Netherlands.  

Science.gov (United States)

Quality improvement of forensic mental health evaluations and reports is needed, but little information is available on how this can be attained, and relatively little conceptual analysis has been undertaken. The STAR, a standardized evaluation instrument of the quality of forensic mental health reports of youth, is developed on the basis of concept mapping to clarify the different perspectives on usability of these reports. Psychometric data are provided, demonstrating the reliability and supporting the validity of the STAR. The Dutch forensic context is described to better understand the development and psychometric properties of this standardized instrument. Quality improvement possibilities of forensic mental health evaluations and reports are discussed. PMID:23040679

Duits, Nils; van der Hoorn, Steven; Wiznitzer, Martin; Wettstein, Robert M; de Beurs, Edwin

2012-10-05

258

Economic recession and mental health: an overview.  

Science.gov (United States)

Effects of the current global economic downturn on population mental health will emerge in the years ahead. Judging from earlier experience of financial crises in various parts of the world, stresses associated with rising unemployment, poverty and social insecurity will lead to upward trends in many national suicide rates, as well as to less readily charted increase in the prevalence of psychiatric illness, alcohol-related disorders and illicit drug use. At the same time, mental health services are being cut back as part of government austerity programs. Budget cuts will thus affect psychiatric services adversely just when economic stressors are raising the levels of need and demand in affected populations. Proactive fiscal and social policies could, however, help to mitigate the health consequences of recession. Evidence- based preventive measures include active labor market and family support programs, regulation of alcohol prices and availability, community care for known high-risk groups, and debt relief projects. Economic mental health care could best be achieved, not by decimating services but by planning and deploying these to meet the needs of defined area populations. PMID:21968374

Cooper, Brian

2011-01-01

259

Economic recession and mental health: an overview.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Effects of the current global economic downturn on population mental health will emerge in the years ahead. Judging from earlier experience of financial crises in various parts of the world, stresses associated with rising unemployment, poverty and social insecurity will lead to upward trends in many national suicide rates, as well as to less readily charted increase in the prevalence of psychiatric illness, alcohol-related disorders and illicit drug use. At the same time, mental health services are being cut back as part of government austerity programs. Budget cuts will thus affect psychiatric services adversely just when economic stressors are raising the levels of need and demand in affected populations. Proactive fiscal and social policies could, however, help to mitigate the health consequences of recession. Evidence- based preventive measures include active labor market and family support programs, regulation of alcohol prices and availability, community care for known high-risk groups, and debt relief projects. Economic mental health care could best be achieved, not by decimating services but by planning and deploying these to meet the needs of defined area populations.

Cooper B

2011-01-01

260

Mental health research, ethics and multiculturalism.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this paper we examine ethical issues relevant to conducting mental health research with refugees and immigrant communities that have cultural orientations and social organisation that are substantially different to those of the broader Australian community, and we relate these issues to NH&MRC Guidelines. We describe the development and conduct of a mental health research project carried out recently in Melbourne with the Somali community, focusing on ethical principles involved, and relating these to the NH&MRC National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans, and the NH&MRC document Values and Ethics: Guidelines for Ethical Conduct in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research. The experience of conducting mental health research with the Somali community highlights the fact that the principles of inclusion and benefit enunciated in the NH&MRC document Values and Ethics are particularly pertinent when conducting research with refugees and immigrant communities that are culturally distant to those of the broader Australian community. These principles inform issues of research design and consent, as well as guiding respectful engagement with the participating community and communication of the research findings. PMID:16832945

Bailes, Marion J; Minas, I Harry; Klimidis, Steven

2006-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

Improving communication between health visitors and primary mental health workers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This audit aimed to open and improve communication between health visitors in Kirklees and the primary mental health workers in the child and adolescent mental health services at Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust. This was deemed to be important for the establishment of best working practices and the need for multidisciplinary, multi-agency collaboration in the interests and wellbeing of the children, young people and families who use this service. It was hoped the audit would establish health visitors' knowledge of the local primary mental health worker service so that its effectiveness and relevance could be determined. In essence, the audit was intended to find out if the service provided what the service users needed and wanted. The audit demonstrated that about half of the health visitors were satisfied with the service provided and believed that their concerns or queries were dealt with appropriately. Two thirds of respondents, however, believed that they had insufficient knowledge about the role of the primary mental health worker.

Hodgson N

2009-09-01

262

Comprehensive community mental health center- business community relationship: a reexamination.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In this paper the belief that nonprofit service organizations and profit-motivated organizations should function separately from each other is questioned. Several of the advantages inherent from a cooperative relationship between comprehensive community mental health centers and the business community for the worker, mental health professional, comprehensive community mental health center, and business are discussed. Possible negative emotional responses against this new alliance are presented and dispelled. A joint effort between comprehensive community mental health centers and the business community is anticipated to develop with the common goal being the promotion of mental health.

Jackson ED

1977-01-01

263

Challenges in mental health care in the Family Health Strategy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the practice of mental health care performed by healthcare professionals from the Family Health Strategy in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Methods: This is a critical and reflective study conducted in six Basic Health Units in Fortaleza-Ce. The study subjects were 12 health workers of the following professions: doctor, nurse, community health agents and technical and/or nursing assistant. Semi-structured interviews, systematic observationand questionnaire were used for data collection. The empirical analysis was based on an understanding of the discourses through critical hermeneutics. Results: It was evident that the mental health services are developed by some health workers in the ESF, such as, matrix support, relational technologies, home visits and community group therapy. However, there is still deficiency in training/coaching by most professionals in primary care, due to anenduring model of pathological or curative health care. Conclusion: Mental health care is still occasionally held by some workers in primary care. However, some progresses are already present as matrix support, relational technologies in health care, home visits andcommunity therapy.

Cinthia Mendonça Cavalcante; Diego Muniz Pinto; Ana Zaiz Teixeira de Carvalho; Maria Salete Bessa Jorge; Consuelo Helena Aires de Freitas

2011-01-01

264

Changing attitude to mental illness among community mental health volunteers in south-western Nigeria.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Community-based mental health services may be impaired by stigmatization and social distance towards persons with mental illness. Little is known about the impact of education on the attitude of volunteers for mental health programmes. This study aimed to examine the effect of an educational programme on the attitude of community volunteers towards mental illness. METHODS: Thirty-one volunteers for a community mental health programme completed the Familiarity with Mental Illness Questionnaire and a modified version of the Bogardus Social Distance Scale (Bogardus, 1925) before and after an educational programme. RESULTS: At the end of the educational session, perceived dangerousness was significantly reduced and attitude (social distance) towards persons with mental illness showed significant improvement. CONCLUSION: Attitudes of community volunteers towards persons with mental illness improve with educational programmes. This may lead to improved treatment and care of individuals who are mentally ill.

Abayomi O; Adelufosi A; Olajide A

2013-09-01

265

Mental health promotion: concepts and strategies for reaching the population.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

There have been many attempts to define mental health promotion. To date, there is no consensus in the field as to what it entails. While some understand it as a holistic concept including intervening at structural, societal and political levels to positively influence mental health, others conceptualise it basically as strategies with an individual focus to improve personal competencies. Many of these differences are related to the distinct understanding of the concepts of mental well-being and positive mental health. The lack of clarity on the boundaries of mental health promotion has divided professionals and is a missed opportunity, as momentum is moving mental health promotion on to political agendas. In Europe, two important milestones for mental health, the WHO Ministerial Conference and the EC Green Paper on Mental Health, have moved mental health promotion into the political landscape, recognising positive mental health and mental well-being as fundamental to the quality of life and productivity of Europeans and a contributor to sustainable development. Although proven efficacious, ad hoc implementation of mental health promotion programs alone is not sufficient to ensure improvement of the population's mental health. Co-ordinated action that includes efficient ways to deliver such interventions in a sustainable way is essential. Two such delivery mechanisms in the search for efficiency are discussed in this paper: a) identifying co-occurrence of mental and physical health problems in order to include mental health promotion components into existing health promotion interventions; and, b) supporting the inclusion of mental health indicators into sound public policy options in order to prove that efficacious policies in labour, education, environment, etc, also bring about positive mental health outcomes. To support the current interest to bring about positive mental health it is essential that evaluation of existing initiatives is put in place, as well as exploring more efficient ways for program delivery. Clearer concepts and understanding of mental health promotion's scope among practitioners would support the development of the field and the inclusion of mental health action across sectors.

Jané-Llopis E

2007-12-01

266

A Logic Model for the Integration of Mental Health Into Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Mental illnesses such as depression or anxiety affect an individual’s ability to undertake health-promoting behaviors. Chronic diseases can have a profound impact on an individual’s mental health; in turn, mental health status affects an individual’s ability to participate in treatment and recovery. A group of mental health and public health professionals convened to develop a logic model for addressing mental health as it relates to chronic disease prevention and health promotion. The model provides details on inputs, activities, and desired outcomes, and the designers of the model welcome input from other mental health and public health practitioners.

James Lando, MD, MPH; Sheree Marshall Williams, PhD, MSc; Branalyn Williams, MPH; Stephanie Sturgis

2006-01-01

267

The cost of healthcare for children with mental health difficulties.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Childhood mental health difficulties affect one in every seven children in Australia, posing a potential financial burden to society. This paper reports on the early lifetime individual and population non-hospital healthcare costs to the Australian Federal Government for children experiencing mental health difficulties. It also reports on the use and cost of particular categories of service use, including the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) mental health items introduced in 2006. METHOD: Data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) were used to calculate total Medicare costs (government subsidised healthcare attendances and prescription medications) from birth to the 8th birthday associated with childhood mental health difficulties measured to 8-9 years of age. RESULTS: Costs were higher among children with mental health difficulties than those without difficulties. While individual costs increased with the persistence of difficulties, population-level costs were highest for those with transient mental health difficulties. Although attenuated, these patterns persisted after child, parent and family characteristics were taken into account. Use of the MBS-reimbursed mental health services among children with a mental health difficulty was very low (around 2%). CONCLUSIONS: Australian healthcare costs for young children with mental health difficulties are substantial and provide further justification for early intervention and prevention. The current provision of Medicare-rebated mental health services does not appear to be reaching young children with mental health difficulties.

Lucas N; Bayer JK; Gold L; Mensah FK; Canterford L; Wake M; Westrupp EM; Nicholson JM

2013-09-01

268

Mental health triage: towards a model for nursing practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental health triage/duty services play a pivotal role in the current framework for mental health service delivery in Victoria and other states of Australia. Australia is not alone in its increasing reliance on mental health triage as a model of psychiatric service provision; at a global level, there appears to be an emerging trend to utilize mental health triage services staffed by nurses as a cost-effective means of providing mental health care to large populations. At present, nurses comprise the greater proportion of the mental health triage workforce in Victoria and, as such, are performing the majority of point-of-entry mental health assessment across the state. Although mental health triage/duty services have been operational for nearly a decade in some regional healthcare sectors of Victoria, there is little local or international research on the topic, and therefore a paucity of established theory to inform and guide mental health triage practice and professional development. The discussion in this paper draws on the findings and recommendations of PhD research into mental health triage nursing in Victoria, to raise discussion on the need to develop theoretical models to inform and guide nursing practice. The paper concludes by presenting a provisional model for mental health triage nursing practice.

Sands N

2007-05-01

269

Mental health research in Brazil: policies, infrastructure, financing and human resources.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The objective of this descriptive study was to map mental health research in Brazil, providing an overview of infrastructure, financing and policies mental health research. As part of the Atlas-Research Project, a WHO initiative to map mental health research in selected low and middle-income countries, this study was carried out between 1998 and 2002. Data collection strategies included evaluation of governmental documents and sites and questionnaires sent to key professionals for providing information about the Brazilian mental health research infrastructure. In the year 2002, the total budget for Health Research was USD 101 million, of which USD 3.4 million (3.4) was available for Mental Health Research. The main funding sources for mental health research were found to be the São Paulo State Funding Agency (FAPESP, 53.2%) and the Ministry of Education (CAPES, 30.2%). The rate of doctors is 1.7 per 1,000 inhabitants, and the rate of psychiatrists is 2.7 per 100,000 inhabitants estimated 2000 census. In 2002, there were 53 postgraduate courses directed to mental health training in Brazil (43 in psychology, six in psychiatry, three in psychobiology and one in psychiatric nursing), with 1,775 students being trained in Brazil and 67 overseas. There were nine programs including psychiatry, neuropsychiatry, psychobiology and mental health, seven of them implemented in Southern states. During the five-year period, 186 students got a doctoral degree (37 per year) and 637 articles were published in Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)-indexed journals. The investment channeled towards postgraduate and human resource education programs, by means of grants and other forms of research support, has secured the country a modest but continuous insertion in the international knowledge production in the mental health area.

Mari Jde J; Bressan RA; Almeida-Filho N; Gerolin J; Sharan P; Saxena S

2006-02-01

270

Community mental health agency views of research.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

We examined community mental health center staff perceptions of ongoing research within their agency. We interviewed upper management and conducted focus groups with medical staff, non-medical clinicians, and administrative staff. Participants were asked about (1) their attitudes towards research in general, agency research and towards the principal academic institution doing research with clients, (2) their perceptions of the value of research and (3) ideas for improving the collaboration. We identified 5 overarching themes: inter-agency communication, shared goals and equality in research, researchers adding knowledge to the agency, improving attitudes toward research, and agency involvement in research. Under these domains, specific suggestions are made for how to improve the collaboration across all stakeholder groups. Lack of shared values and inadequate communication processes can negatively impact community-based research collaborations. However, clear strategies, and adequate resources have great potential to improve community mental health collaborations.

Gonzalez JM; Cortés DE; Reeves T; Whitley R; Lopez L; Bond GR; Velligan DI; Miller AL

2012-04-01

271

National Institute of Mental Health: Publications  

Science.gov (United States)

For people who are living with a mental health condition, it can be most helpful to have access to high-quality and authoritative information. The National Institute of Mental Health provides such information on the publications area of their website, and visitors can make their way through fact sheets, booklets, and Spanish-language versions of these documents here. First-time users may wish to begin by looking at the drop-down tab which covers everything from autism to social anxiety disorder. The fact sheets are quite good, and they include titles such as "Suicide in the U.S.: Statistics and Prevention" and "Depression: A Treatable Illness". Moving on, the "Booklets" area includes "Eating Disorders", "Depression", and ten other offerings. Finally, the right-hand side of the site includes news about recent research findings from the Institute.

2008-02-14

272

Determinants of mental health service use in the national mental health survey of the elderly in Singapore  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite high prevalence of mental health problems, only a minority of elderly people seek treatment. Although need-for-care factors are primary determinants of mental health service use, personal predisposing or enabling factors including health beliefs are important but are not well studied. Method In the National Mental Health Survey of Elderly in Singapore, 2003, 1092 older adults aged 60 and above were interviewed for diagnosis of mental disorders (using Geriatric Mental State) and treatment, and their health beliefs about the curability of mental illness, embarrassment and stigma, easiness discussing mental problems, effectiveness and safety of treatment and trust in professionals. Results The prevalence of mental disorders was 13%, but only a third of mentally ill respondents had sought treatment. Increased likelihood of seeking treatment was significantly associated with the presence of a mental disorder (OR = 5.27), disability from mental illness (OR = 79.9), and poor or fair self-rated mental health (OR = 2.63), female gender (OR = 2.25), and formal education (OR = 2.40). The likelihood of treatment seeking was lower in those reporting financial limitations for medical care (OR = 0.38), but also higher household income (OR = 0.31). Negative beliefs showed no meaningful associations, but the positive belief that 'to a great extent mental illness can be cured' was associated with increased mental health service use (OR = 6.89). The availability of family caregiver showed a negative association (OR = 0.20). Conclusion The determinants of mental health service use in the elderly included primary need factors, and female gender and socioeconomic factors. There was little evidence of influences by negative health beliefs, but a positive health belief that 'mental illness can be cured' is a strongly positive determinant The influence of family members and care-givers on senior's use of mental health service should be further explored.

Nyunt Ma; Chiam Peak; Kua Ee; Ng Tze

2009-01-01

273

Meeting spiritual needs in mental health care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Belief in Recovery is a project introduced into Northumberland, Tyne and Wear Foundation Trust between 2010 and 2012 to develop nursing staff members' confidence and skills in meeting the spiritual, religious and cultural needs of patients in mental health recovery. This article describes how we assessed and understood their training needs and developed a training programme, and how this led to positive outcomes for staff.

Ledger P; Bowler D

2013-03-01

274

Mental health of people with retinitis pigmentosa.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the mental health of patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with that of the general population of Korea. METHODS: Online surveys were completed by patients registered with the KRPS (Korean Retinitis Pigmentosa Society), an online organization that promotes research on RP and provides advocacy and online and offline support and information for patients with RP. Control population was selected from the fourth round of the KNHANES (Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). One hundred eighty-seven patients with RP were matched with the control population using the propensity-score method to optimize comparative analysis. RESULTS: Stress was reported in 51.9% of RP patients and 29.4% of controls (p < 0.001). Depressive mood of at least 2 weeks' duration in the previous year was reported by 34.8 and 17.1% of patients and controls, respectively (p < 0.001). Suicidal thoughts were reported by 38.5 and 12.9% of patients and controls, respectively (p < 0.001), although there was no significant difference in the number of suicide attempts between the groups (2.1 vs. 1.6%, p = 0.703). In multivariate analysis, disability rating was significantly associated with stress (adjusted odds ratio, 0.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.24 to 0.88). CONCLUSIONS: People with RP had poorer mental health than the general population. Further investigations are warranted on the mental health of RP patients, and appropriate welfare services are needed to decrease the impact of mental illness in this population.

Kim S; Shin DW; An AR; Lee CH; Park JH; Park JH; Oh MK; Hwang SH; Kim Y; Cho B; Lee HK

2013-05-01

275

Implementing video conferencing in mental health practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the evidence base regarding the use of video conferencing (VC), implementation issues, policies, procedures, technical requirements and VC etiquette. The paper is based on a literature review of VC within the mental health sector and the authors' experience in implementing VC. Six themes emerged from the literature review: applications of VC, VC assessments, treatment, training and supervision, practitioner anxiety, and VC administrative processes. The results of the review support the use of VC in mental health services. Guidelines for the implementation of VC are discussed, including the importance of staff and service user consultations, training in the use of VC, clear guidance for staff with regards to usage, confidentiality and data protection policies, and VC etiquette. Challenges that can arise when implementing VC in a mental health context are also discussed. Arguably, it is not the technology, but the cultural change it represents to staff which seems to be the most important factor regarding successful implementation.

DE Weger E; Macinnes D; Enser J; Francis SJ; Jones FW

2013-04-01

276

Advocacy in the mental health services field.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

UNLABELLED: Advocacy in the mental health services field is gaining importance since the traditional role of mental health hospitals is changing, particularly in North America and in Western Europe. This review will define advocacy, its goals and fundamental principles. It will then delineate the skills and strategies needed for any intervention on behalf of a patient or a group of patients. It will also deal with the issues and approaches most frequently raised and used, and finally, with the limits of advocacy. METHOD: The method used for this review was mainly a recension of the literature concerning advocacy throughout North America and Europe, having in view to see emerging the principal stakes and concerns related to this process. RESULTS: Advocacy has a significant impact on patients' awareness of their rights and their capacity to exercise them. It also prevents potential abuse of patients. On the other hand, some patients have an increased opportunity to cease treatment, and this could lead to serious medical consequences. There is also the possibility of retaliation from staff, as a result of being involved with an advocate. The combination of high quality care and effective advocacy is the best guarantee that a mental health patient will get the care he wants and needs with human dignity.

Fontaine N; Allard E

1997-01-01

277

[Conscience, psychic phenomenons and mental health.].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The position of the mental health practitioner remains fundamentally uncomfortable confronted with a testimony of experienced facts which contredict or surpass our understanding of common sense. Neither scientific rationalism, institutional religion, orthodox freudian psychiatry, or orthodox behaviourism permits one to openly receive this type of experience without its being subject to excessive deformation by their analytical or reading-based framewords. Recent work in the psychology of consciousness, based on psychophysiological, neuro psychological and psychobiological approaches reconstitute the limits of ordinary consciousness and the consensual perception of sensory reality. They also identify the physiological substrata and the cognitive mechanisms which ally themselves to another, equally as valuable, apprehension of reality. According to this latter, psi phenomena become exceptional, but normal, experiences. It is a question from then on not to discredit but to recognize their place in personal experience, and to assist, if need be, their harmonization. Having said this, much remains to be done to soundly evaluate these experiences and to attempt to understand their real physical substrata. This does not negate the need for mental health professionals to have the courage not to abuse psychopathological frameworks or pharmacological treatment, and to give ourselves perspectives founded truly on human development and mental health.

Leduc F

1982-01-01

278

[Conscience, psychic phenomenons and mental health.].  

Science.gov (United States)

The position of the mental health practitioner remains fundamentally uncomfortable confronted with a testimony of experienced facts which contredict or surpass our understanding of common sense. Neither scientific rationalism, institutional religion, orthodox freudian psychiatry, or orthodox behaviourism permits one to openly receive this type of experience without its being subject to excessive deformation by their analytical or reading-based framewords. Recent work in the psychology of consciousness, based on psychophysiological, neuro psychological and psychobiological approaches reconstitute the limits of ordinary consciousness and the consensual perception of sensory reality. They also identify the physiological substrata and the cognitive mechanisms which ally themselves to another, equally as valuable, apprehension of reality. According to this latter, psi phenomena become exceptional, but normal, experiences. It is a question from then on not to discredit but to recognize their place in personal experience, and to assist, if need be, their harmonization. Having said this, much remains to be done to soundly evaluate these experiences and to attempt to understand their real physical substrata. This does not negate the need for mental health professionals to have the courage not to abuse psychopathological frameworks or pharmacological treatment, and to give ourselves perspectives founded truly on human development and mental health. PMID:17093752

Leduc, F

1982-01-01

279

Implementing mental health parity: the challenge for health plans.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

By design, the new mental health parity law should work harmoniously with innovations that have helped slow down growth in mental health and substance abuse (MH/SA) treatment costs and improve their quality. The main purpose of the new law is to put coverage of MH/SA benefits on an equal footing with general medical benefits. But some unique features of care for MH/SA disorders will pose challenges in aligning benefits with general medical care. Successful navigation of these challenges will require, as in the passage of the parity law itself, cooperation from all stakeholder groups.

Dixon K

2009-05-01

280

Community mental health in India: A rethink  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Community care of the chronic mentally ill has always been prevalent in India, largely due to family involvement and unavailability of institutions. In the 80s, a few mental health clinics became operational in some parts of the country. The Schizophrenia Research Foundation (SCARF), an NGO in Chennai had established a community clinic in 1989 in Thiruporur, which was functional till 1999. During this period various programmes such as training of the primary health center staff, setting up a referral system, setting up of a Citizen's Group, and self-employment schemes were initiated. It was decided to begin a follow up in 2005 to determine the present status of the schemes as well as the current status of the patients registered at the clinic. This we believed would lead to pointers to help evolve future community based programmes. Methods One hundred and eighty five patients with chronic mental illness were followed up and their present treatment status determined using a modified version of the Psychiatric and Personal History Schedule (PPHS). The resources created earlier were assessed and qualitative information was gathered during interviews with patient and families and other stakeholders to identify the reasons behind the sustenance or failure of these initiatives. Results Of the 185 patients followed up, 15% had continued treatment, 35% had stopped treatment, 21% had died, 12% had wandered away from home and 17% were untraceable. Of the patients who had discontinued treatment 25% were asymptomatic while 75% were acutely psychotic. The referral service was used by only 15% of the patients and mental health services provided by the PHC stopped within a year. The Citizen's group was functional for only a year and apart from chicken rearing, all other self-employment schemes were discontinued within a period of 6 months to 3 years. There were multiple factors contributing to the failure, the primary reasons being the limited access and associated expenses entailed in seeking treatment, inadequate knowledge about the illness, lack of support from the family and community and continued dependence by the family on the service provider to provide solutions. Conclusion Community based initiatives in the management of mental disorders however well intentioned will not be sustainable unless the family and the community are involved in the intervention program with support being provided regularly by mental health professionals.

Thara Rangawsamy; Padmavati Ramachandran; Aynkran Jothy R; John Sujit

2008-01-01

 
 
 
 
281

Powhiri process in mental health research.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Within the health research context, indigenous people globally have a commitment to provide their own solutions. M?ori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa (New Zealand) value the traditional P?whiri process of engagement and participation in mental health research. The practices and protocols within the P?whiri process (use in the Doctorate of Philosophy (2010) and Auckland University) are premised on the notion of respect and positive relationships between the tangata whenua (hosts or research participants) and manuwhiri (guests or researchers). This paper briefly describes the P?whiri process, which may be a model applicable to research with other indigenous cultures.

McClintock K; Mellsop G; Moeke-Maxwell T; Merry S

2012-01-01

282

Federal disaster mental health response and compliance with best practices.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study investigated the comprehensiveness of disaster mental health state plans and their adherence to published best practices in three states that experienced post-9/11 federally-declared disasters. There were 59 disaster mental health best practices used in this study to assess each state disaster mental plan's compliance with best practices; the states demonstrated a range of adherence to the best practices. This research may serve as a guide for those developing disaster mental health plans and encourage further considerations in disaster mental health response.

McIntyre J; Nelson Goff BS

2012-12-01

283

Mental health care policy environment in Rivers State: experiences of mental health nurses providing mental health care services in neuro-psychiatric hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Mental health services for Rivers State and surrounding States in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria are provided only at the neuropsychiatric Rumuigbo Hospital in Port Harcourt City, Rivers State, Nigeria. The study explored mental health nurses' experiences of providing mental health services at the hospital in an attempt to understand policy implications, identify difficulties and challenges of delivering mental health care services. METHODS: A qualitative study using in-depth interview was conducted among 20 mental health nurses working at the neuropsychiatric Rumuigbo Hospital. This was reviewed within the Townsend mental health policy template of context and resources domains. RESULTS: A lack of political support and senior position in the Ministry of Health hinders service delivery, the prevalence of institutionalized stigma, a lack of training, and system failure to provide services at all levels of care is hampering service delivery. The inadequate allocation of resources for hospital renovations and equipment is preventing appropriate client care, as does the lack of funding for drugs, the cost of which makes them unaffordable, affecting clients staying on treatment. CONCLUSION: Education and training of mental health care professionals should be given priority to remedy human resource shortage, provide incentives to motivate health professionals for psychiatric practice, and move toward decentralization of care into general health care services. Information should be provided at all levels to overcome the myths surrounding the causes of mental illnesses, to reduce stigma and discrimination of the affected and their families.

Jack-Ide IO; Uys LR; Middleton LE

2013-01-01

284

Community mental health services in The Netherlands: Quo Vadis?  

Science.gov (United States)

Short description of the workshop The workshop leaders will present a panoramic view of the community mental health care in Holland: some figures of psychiatric disorders, organizational features of mental health care, treatment of depression and anxiety disorders in primary health care, treatment and care of the severe mentally ill and public mental health solutions. They will show examples of community mental health care and indicate innovations and future trends. Discussion Advantages and disadvantages of the system will be discussed and compared with arrangements of community mental healthcare in other countries. In an interactive way participants will be invited to indicate their community mental health care so that the workshop gives the opportunity to compare and weigh current community-based care for psychiatric patients and new directions.

van Splunteren, Peter; van de Lindt, Simone

2010-01-01

285

Metal music and mental health in France.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Although numerous authors have associated metal music with social problems such as suicide, self-destruction and Satanism, few studies have been undertaken to examine the mental health of fans of heavy metal music. This study attempts to determine if there is a link between mental health and the enjoyment of this type of music in France. The researchers surveyed 333 fans of metal music. Their mental health was evaluated by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), a widely used instrument that measures anxiety and depression. The scores of the sample of metal music fans were then compared to the scores that reveal possible, probable, or severe mental disorders. Qualifying variables included age, gender, status, education, motivation and participation in metal music culture. The results indicated that fans of metal music are mainly young adults (median age = 22.67, SD = 5.29) and tend to be male (87.85 percent). As a whole, metal music fans have levels of anxiety and depression that are similar to and lower than levels in the general population. Specifically, <5 percent of metal music fans surveyed showed pathological symptoms. Subjects that scored higher levels of anxiety and depression were those that had literary and/or arts backgrounds rather than scientific backgrounds, that wrote metal music lyrics, that consumed alcohol and that engaged in the body modification practice of scarification. This study suggests that opponents of metal music should re-examine the basis for their criticism. More scholarly research is needed to better understand the effects of metal music on fans and on society.

Recours R; Aussaguel F; Trujillo N

2009-09-01

286

Grupos de saúde mental na atenção primária à saúde/ Mental health groups in primary health care  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Trata-se de uma pesquisa qualitativa, do tipo pesquisa-intervenção, realizada em duas equipes de Atenção Primária à Saúde que objetivou analisar as práticas de cuidado desenvolvidas nos grupos de saúde mental e a sua correspondência com os processos de desinstitucionalização da loucura, inscritos na reforma psiquiátrica brasileira. Utilizou como métodos de investigação: intervenções nos grupos de saúde mental, entrevistas semiestruturadas, oficinas com (more) os profissionais das equipes e diário de campo. Os resultados apontaram para uma compreensão do grupo de saúde mental como dispositivo desinstitucionalizante quando este se constitui em um espaço de cuidado psicossocial, utiliza-se da rede de saúde, dos recursos do território, da ampliação dos laços sociais e permite aos participantes perceberem-se sujeitos protagonistas de suas vidas. Também indicaram a coexistência dos modos de atenção asilar e psicossocial nas práticas dos profissionais. Como estratégias para o fortalecimento da atenção psicossocial foram indicadas a educação permanente e as trocas multiprofissionais. Abstract in english This is a qualitative intervention-research carried out in two teams of Primary Health Care which aimed to analyze the practices of care developed by mental health groups, as well as their correlation with the process of deinstitutionalization of madness embedded in the Brazilian psychiatric reform. The research used the following as investigation methods: interventions in the mental health groups, semi-structured interviews, workshops with professionals from the mental h (more) ealth groups and daily field reports. The results led to the understanding of the mental health groups as deinstitutionalizing devices, when they provide psychosocial care, use the health network and the territorial resources, foster the expansion of social ties and allow participants to be recognized as protagonists of their own lives. The outcomes also indicated the coexistence of the forms of sheltering and psychosocial care in professionals? practices. Continuing education and multidisciplinary exchanges were pointed out as strategies to strengthen psychosocial care.

Minozzo, Fabiane; Kammzetser, Christiane Silveira; Debastiani, Cinara; Fait, Cláudia Sedano; Paulon, Simone Mainieri

2012-08-01

287

Mental Health, Binge Drinking, and Antihypertension Medication Adherence  

Science.gov (United States)

Objectives: To evaluate the relationship between self-reported mental health and binge drinking, as well as health status, sociodemographic, social support, economic resource, and health care access indicators to antihypertension medication adherence. Method: Analysis of 2003 California Health Interview Survey data. Results: Having poor mental

Banta, Jim E.; Haskard, Kelly B.; Haviland, Mark G.; Williams, Summer L.; Werner, Leonard S.; Anderson, Donald L.; DiMatteo, M. Robin

2009-01-01

288

Emerging applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in community and local mental health research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Medical geography or the use of geography to study disease traces back to ancient times (Meade and Earickson 2005). After the late 17th-century, medical geography became more formalized with developments in cartography and the introduction of maps of disease distribution (Koch 2005). By the 20th-century, medical geographers developed sophisticated statistical methods of geographical epidemiology to create maps allowing the spatial analysis of health-related issues (Elliott et al. 1997). For example, in mental health research, spatial analysis of geographic patterns of mental disorders led to the correlation of urban environments with increased risk for severe mental disorders (Freeman 1984). During recent years, technological innovation in computer mapping referred to as geographic information systems (GIS) significantly enhanced the analysis of health questions in small local areas such as census blocks and neighborhoods. GIS analyses have shown superiority to classical geographic techniques in these small areas that eluded accurate investigation in the past.

James S. Brown

2013-01-01

289

Salud mental versus inestabilidad laboral Work instability versus mental health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available El presente trabajo forma parte de una investigación sobre orientación y empleo en La Plata , Pcia. de Bs. As. (Argentina), llevada a cabo en forma conjunta con las cátedras de Psicología Preventiva y Orientación Vocacional, de la Carrera de Psicología de la Universidad Nacional de La Plata. Esta investigación se apoya en cuatro ejes: Educación-Trabajo-Políticas Sociales y Salud. Esta presentación estará referida al eje salud, que carece de servicios de ubicación y empleo y que actualmente viene desarrollando algunas experiencias de orientación vocacional no sistemáticas desde los servicios de Adolescencia y Salud Mental. La investigación advierte la existencia de nuevas demandas de tratamiento psicológico de una población ("los nuevos pobres") que teme perder el empleo o que está desempleada y que antes no concurría a los hospitales públicos. En la casuística estudiada aparecen con mayores complejidades psicosomáticas las personas que temen perder el empleo. Se realiza el análisis en la población local y se lo relaciona con diferentes investigaciones nacionales e internacionales.This contribution is part of a research on guidance and employment in La Plata , province of Buenos Aires (Argentina) undertaken jointly by the Chairs of Preventive Psychology and Vocational Guidance, both pertaining to the course of studies for Psychology at the National University of La Plata. This research is based on four axes, namely, education-work-social policies-health. This paper shall focus around the health axis, which is not provided with placement and employment services. Some unsystematical guidance experiences from the services of Adolescence and Mental Health are currently under way in the area. Research points to the existence of new demands of psychological treatment from a population ("the new poor") afraid of losing their jobs -or even unemployed- who was not in the habit of going to the public hospital. In the casuistry explored here, people afraid of losing their jobs present more psychosomatic complexities. Local population is also analysed and the said analysis is linked with several national and international research projects.

Mirta Gavilán; Karina Ferrer; Rosana Ibarra

2002-01-01

290

[Schizophrenic disorders in primary care mental health].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in a mental health unit (MHU) closely connected to primary health care. DESIGN: Retrospective longitudinal study of the register of all patients with psychiatric illnesses detected in a specific geo-demographic and health care area. SETTING: Five basic health care areas of Barcelona (103 615 inhabitants). PARTICIPANTS: MHU patients who had attended clinics due to mental health disorders during the period from 1982-2000 (N=21 236). Strict health and diagnostic criteria based on the DSM-4 classification were applied. All cases were validated using clinical history review and concensus. MEASUREMENTS: Incidence (in the last 3 years) and prevalence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in the whole period of study, both in the general population and in the risk population age group (15-54 years). RESULTS: In total, 838 patients complied with the diagnosis of suffering from schizophrenia (N=476) or other psychoses (N=362). The incidence of schizophrenia was 3.47/10,000 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-4.6) in the general population and 5.09/10,000, 95% CI, 3.2-6.9) in the population at risk, and the prevalence of schizophrenia was 54.9/10,000 (95% CI, 41.8-50.1) in the general population and 80.7/10,000 (95% CI, 73.5-88) in the population at risk. CONCLUSIONS: The MHU-primary health care interface can be a good place to detect and study schizophrenic syndromes and other psychoses, as long as they comply with the agreed health and research criteria.

Tizón JL; Ferrando J; Parés A; Artigué J; Parra B; Pérez C

2007-03-01

291

Negative emotions impact on mental physical health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Fear, sadness, anger and disgust are considered affective states, that when they become frequent and intense, adversely affect the quality of life. Consequently, negative emotions are regarded as one of the key risk factors in physical and mental illness. Firstly, this article aims to define precisely concepts and key features of each emotion. The second objective of this paper is to show a synthesis of scientific findings supporting the influence of emotional factors, especially classic negative emotions in the process of health and disease. These psychophysiological phenomena have been associated with mental and physical illness as influencing variables in its initiation, development and maintenance. Therefore, the paper reviews some of the links between these four negative emotions and mental disorders. It also reviews the evidence supporting the influence of negative emotions in the development of risk behaviors to physical health. Finally, we describe some data supporting the impact of psychophysiological activation of emotions in organic systems, such as, for instance, immunity, tumor processes and so on

Piqueras, José Antonio; Ramos, Victoriano; Martínez, Agustín Ernesto; Oblitas, Luis Armando

2009-01-01

292

Mental health care and resistance to fascism.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mental health nurses have a critical stake in resisting the right-wing ideology of British fascism. Particularly concerning is the contemporary effort of the British National Party (BNP) to gain credibility and electoral support by the strategic re-packaging of a racist and divisive political manifesto. Evidence that some public sector workers are affiliated with the BNP has relevance for nursing at a series of levels, not least the incompatibility of party membership with a requirement of the Professional Code to avoid discrimination. Progressive advances, though, need to account for deep rooted institutionalized racism in the discourse and practice of healthcare services. The anomalous treatment of black people within mental health services, alongside racial abuse experienced by ethnic minority staff, is discussed in relation to the concept of race as a powerful social category and construction. The murder of the mentally ill and learning disabled in Nazi Germany, as an adjunct of racial genocide, is presented as an extreme example where professional ethics was undermined by dominant political ideology. Finally, the complicity of medical and nursing staff in the state sanctioned, bureaucratic, killing that characterized the Holocaust is revisited in the context of ethical repositioning for contemporary practice and praxis. PMID:20465761

McKeown, M; Mercer, D

2010-03-01

293

Mental health care and resistance to fascism.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental health nurses have a critical stake in resisting the right-wing ideology of British fascism. Particularly concerning is the contemporary effort of the British National Party (BNP) to gain credibility and electoral support by the strategic re-packaging of a racist and divisive political manifesto. Evidence that some public sector workers are affiliated with the BNP has relevance for nursing at a series of levels, not least the incompatibility of party membership with a requirement of the Professional Code to avoid discrimination. Progressive advances, though, need to account for deep rooted institutionalized racism in the discourse and practice of healthcare services. The anomalous treatment of black people within mental health services, alongside racial abuse experienced by ethnic minority staff, is discussed in relation to the concept of race as a powerful social category and construction. The murder of the mentally ill and learning disabled in Nazi Germany, as an adjunct of racial genocide, is presented as an extreme example where professional ethics was undermined by dominant political ideology. Finally, the complicity of medical and nursing staff in the state sanctioned, bureaucratic, killing that characterized the Holocaust is revisited in the context of ethical repositioning for contemporary practice and praxis.

McKeown M; Mercer D

2010-03-01

294

Mental Health and Fasting in Ramadan  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available AbstractObjectives: The study was conducted to evaluate the correlation between fasting in the month of Ramadan and mental health.?Method: 75 seemingly healthy Moslem men intending to fast in Ramadan 1418 lunar calendar (1376 solar calendar, 1997 Christian calendar) as they had in the previous years were studied in a two-month period. The subjects’ mental health was assessed through SCL-90-R at three stages, once in the beginning of Ramadan, then at the end of Ramadan, finally a month later. The data were analyzed through t-tests.?Findings: The average scores of the subjects who fasted in Ramadan showed significant difference across all scales at the end of Ramdan as well as a month later. Fasting in Ramadan only significantly reduced the average score on the scale paranoia. The reduction was still significant at the follow up, a month after Ramadan. The study demonstrated that the scores obtained by the married subjects on obsession, compulsion, and paranoia scales were higher after Ramadan  as compared to single subjects the reduction of paranoia and the overall coefficient of symptoms were greater among the employed fasting subjects than their unemployed counterparts. Results: Fasting in Ramadan reduces some mental disturbances, but such reduction are not significant in most cases. There is a need for  more controlled studies. 

Sh. Sardarpour Goudarzi; A. Sultani Zarandi

2002-01-01

295

Mental health nurses in primary care: Qualitative outcomes of the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) is a government-funded programme, which, since 2007, has enabled mental health nurses to work in primary care settings in Australia in collaboration with general practitioners (GPs) or private psychiatrists. To date, small-scale qualitative studies have explored outcomes of the programme from the point of view of nurses, consumers, and the perceptions of GPs. This study reports on an on-line survey of credentialed mental health nurses perceptions of outcomes of the MHNIP. Two hundred and twenty five nurses who worked in MHNIP provided detailed narrative responses that were examined using thematic content analysis. The most commonly-cited outcomes were reductions in symptoms or improved coping, improved relationships, and enhanced community participation. Other reported outcomes included reduced hospitalization or use of state-funded mental health services, better use of health services, the continuation or establishment of meaningful occupation, improved physical health and medication management, less use of coercive interventions, and greater independence. PMID:23528187

Lakeman, Richard

2013-03-26

296

What to do to promote mental health of the society.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: According to the last existing documents, the prevalence rate of mental disorders is about 20% which is considered to be 14% of all country's burden of disease. In the fifth economical, social, and cultural development plan of the country in accordance with the 20 year vision, "healthy human being" and "comprehensive health" approaches and also improving of mental health indicators are emphasized. Aim of study was preparing national policy and interventions for promoting mental health. METHODS: Using secondary data, analytical review of country's mental health programs, recommendations of WHO, descriptive situation of mental health and its trend during the last decade were drafted and a group of experts and stakeholders was formed following a sound stakeholder's analysis. After three Focus Group Discussions (FGDs), main points of the meetings, influencing factors of present situation, and oncoming strategies were agreed upon. RESULTS: Based on different studies and the experts' opinions, the prevalence of mental disorders in the last decade has increased. Coverage of mental health programs in two last decades in the best could be equal to rural population. Urban areas have been deprived of these services. Analysis of mental health system of the country shows that internal environment is weak and the external one is concede to be in threat. Eight principal challenges in country's mental health are considered. CONCLUSION: Improving current situation requires increasing internal capacity of mental health system and developing inter-sectoral cooperation. During next five years, the Ministry of Health, Iran should mainly focus on improving mental health services particularly in urban and peri-urban areas, promoting mental health literacy of different groups and minimizing mental health risk factors.

Hajebi A; Damari B; Vosoogh Moghaddam A; Nasehi A; Nikfarjam A; Bolhari J

2013-01-01

297

What to Do To Promote Mental Health of the Society  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: : According to the last existing documents, the prevalence rate of mental disorders is about 20% which is considered to be 14% of all country’s burden of disease. In the fifth economical, social, and cultural development plan of the country in accordance with the 20 year vision, “healthy human being” and “comprehensive health” approaches and also improving of mental health indicators are emphasized. Aim of study was preparing national policy and interventions for promoting mental health.Methods: Using secondary data, analytical review of country’s mental health programs, recommendations of WHO, descriptive situation of mental health and its trend during the last decade were drafted and a group of experts and stakeholders was formed following a sound stakeholder’s analysis. After three Focus Group Discussions (FGDs), main points of the meetings, influencing factors of present situation, and oncoming strategies were agreed upon.Results: Based on different studies and the experts’ opinions, the prevalence of mental disorders in the last decade has increased. Coverage of mental health programs in two last decades in the best could be equal to rural population. Urban areas have been deprived of these services. Analysis of mental health system of the country shows that internal environment is weak and the external one is concede to be in threat. Eight principal challenges in country’s mental health are considered.Conclusion: Improving current situation requires increasing internal capacity of mental health system and developing inter-sectoral cooperation. During next five years, the Ministry of Health, Iran should mainly focus on improving mental health services particularly in urban and peri-urban areas, promoting mental health literacy of different groups and minimizing mental health risk factors.

A Hajebi; B Damari; A Vosoogh Moghaddam; A Nasehi; A Nikfarjam; J Bolhari

2013-01-01

298

Postpartum Mental Health among Young Women  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: A number of studies have highlighted the physical health problems associated with adolescent pregnancy in Saudi Arabia , However there were few studies dealing with the postpartum psychiatric disorders .The study aims to determine the prevalence of postpartum psychological distress and to evaluate the associated risk factors in a sample of primigravid young women in Al Ahsa region, Saudi Arabia. Methods: We assessed the prevalence of postnatal mental health in 190 young mothers attending the maternity hospital using general health questionnaire. We also assessed the relationship between socio-demographic, psychiatric and obstetric risk factors and the mental health. Results: The percent of women with psychological distress was 35.2%. Significant risk of psychological distress was associated with several socio-demographic, psychiatric and obstetric risk factors. Only four items were found to be significant predictors of postpartum psychological distress; low family income, poor husband support, birth of female baby and gestational diabetes. Conclusions: These results highlighted importance of screening for psychological distress and its associated risk factors in the implementation of proper perinatal care for the pregnant Saudi adolescents.

Amr MA; Balaha M; Al Moghannum M

2012-01-01

299

Child maltreatment, child protection and mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes advances in our understanding of child maltreatment and the implications thereof for physical, psychological and social development, with special emphasis on mental health aspects. RECENT FINDINGS: Methodological problems persist. These may be related in part to an over-emphasis on type of maltreatment, to the detriment of consideration of degree and extent of maltreatment. They may also be related to inadequate application of a comprehensive model of maltreatment and its consequences. Recent studies underline the inter-relatedness and cross-over between different types of child maltreatment and family violence. Research also underlines the extent to which child maltreatment is a major public health crisis internationally. Effects are seen on physical health and development as well as mental health, and it is becoming increasingly evident that these outcomes are inextricably linked to one another. There are encouraging signs that certain interventions are effective. SUMMARY: There is a need for a more sophisticated model of child maltreatment that includes not only degree but also the extent to which basic developmental needs are overridden when children are maltreated, and that includes children's responses to maltreatment as a mediating influence. More studies are needed of samples of children who have been maltreated in order to gain a better understanding of how maltreatment distorts the trajectory of normal development. Crucially, we need more research on intervention, including both case management and psychological treatment approaches.

Paz I; Jones D; Byrne G

2005-07-01

300

Financing global mental health services and the role of WHO.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A concrete indicator of a government's commitment to mental health services is the amount of financial resources it allocates. To encourage the government to increase mental health funding, it would require additional research and dissemination findings on the economic consequences of mental health disorders, cost-effectiveness benefits of alternatives treatment, and alternative methods of financing for mental health illnesses. In addition, an organized consumer group can be an effective means in informing legislative and government policy makers. Public financing alone is not sufficient for treating mental illness. Private financing may supplement public funding. It would be important to combine both public and private funding to deliver adequate services for mental illness patients. WHO has been very effective in global tobacco control and SARS epidemic. The new administration should use this successful momentum to initiate a global funding campaign for mental health disorder as a top priority.

Hu TW

2003-09-01

 
 
 
 
301

Development of integrated mental health care: Critical workforce competencies.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In integrated care, a person will have his or her medical and behavioral health needs addressed within one health care system. Support for integrated models has grown with the increasing awareness of how the medical comorbidities of individuals with serious mental illness contribute to their morbidity and mortality, the prevalence of mental health problems in the general population, and the mental health issues among those with chronic medical problems. The enactment of effective integrated care will demand developing clinicians who are trained to work with mental health needs at various levels of intensity, who are capable of addressing complex comorbidities, and who operate from a person-centered approach to care. In this light we argue that given their unique skill set and clinical training, Psychiatric-Mental Health Advanced Practice Nurses could play a critical role in integrated care and present policy recommendations which support the development of the Psychiatric-Mental Health Advanced Practice Nurses role in such models.

Delaney KR; Robinson KM; Chafetz L

2013-05-01

302

Mental health policy--stumbling in the dark?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Over the past 15 years, governments have agreed to a series of National Mental Health Plans. These national strategies and plans have set goals and discussed the importance of monitoring and evaluation. Despite this ongoing national collaborative framework, Australia's mental health policy lacks real accountability and relies largely on limited mental health service systems data. The lack of outcome data represents a critical gap in knowledge for mental health policy, planning and practice. Resistance from current stakeholders and a lack of investment in research and monitoring capacity are preventing more rigorous ongoing monitoring of mental health policy. The new Rudd Government appears to be shifting the emphasis towards measuring the outcomes of national policy in health, housing and employment. Measuring such outcomes will guide government decision making and ultimately improve mental health services.

Crosbie DW

2009-02-01

303

Evaluating the WHO Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems by comparing mental health policies in four countries.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental health is a low priority in most countries around the world. Minimal research and resources have been invested in mental health at the national level. As a result, WHO has developed the Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems (WHO-AIMS) to encourage countries to gather data and to re-evaluate their national mental health policy. This paper demonstrates the utility and limitations of WHO-AIMS by applying the model to four countries with different cultures, political histories and public health policies: Iraq, Japan, the Philippines and The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. WHO-AIMS provides a useful model for analysing six domains: policy and legislative framework; mental health services; mental health in primary care; human resources; education of the public at large; and monitoring and research. This is especially important since most countries do not have experts in mental health policy or resources to design their own evaluation tools for mental health systems. Furthermore, WHO-AIMS provides a standardized database for cross-country comparisons. However, limitations of the instrument include the neglect of the politics of mental health policy development, underestimation of the role of culture in mental health care utilization, and questionable measurement validity.

Hamid H; Abanilla K; Bauta B; Huang KY

2008-06-01

304

Garnering Partnerships to Bridge Gaps Among Mental Health, Health Care, and Public Health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Integrating mental health and public health chronic disease programs requires partnerships at all government levels. Four examples illustrate this approach: 1) a federal partnership to implement mental health and mental illness modules in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; 2) a state partnership to improve diabetes health outcomes for people with mental illness; 3) a community-level example of a partnership with local aging and disability agencies to modify a home health service to reduce depression and improve quality of life among isolated, chronically ill seniors; and 4) a second community-level example of a partnership to promote depression screening and management and secure coverage in primary care settings. Integration of mental health and chronic disease public health programs is a challenging but essential and achievable task in protecting Americans’ health.

Elsie Freeman, MD, MPH; Letitia Presley-Cantrell, PhD, MEd; Valerie J. Edwards, PhD; Sharrice White-Cooper, MPH; Kenneth S. Thompson, MD; Stephanie Sturgis, MPH; Janet B. Croft, PhD

2010-01-01

305

Garnering partnerships to bridge gaps among mental health, health care, and public health.  

Science.gov (United States)

Integrating mental health and public health chronic disease programs requires partnerships at all government levels. Four examples illustrate this approach: 1) a federal partnership to implement mental health and mental illness modules in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; 2) a state partnership to improve diabetes health outcomes for people with mental illness; 3) a community-level example of a partnership with local aging and disability agencies to modify a home health service to reduce depression and improve quality of life among isolated, chronically ill seniors; and 4) a second community-level example of a partnership to promote depression screening and management and secure coverage in primary care settings. Integration of mental health and chronic disease public health programs is a challenging but essential and achievable task in protecting Americans' health. PMID:20040236

Freeman, Elsie; Presley-Cantrell, Letitia; Edwards, Valerie J; White-Cooper, Sharrice; Thompson, Kenneth S; Sturgis, Stephanie; Croft, Janet B

2009-12-15

306

Integrating mental health and addictions services to improve client outcomes.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Substance use disorders are highly prevalent among adults with mental health disorders. In many health service delivery areas, mental health and addictions services are delivered separately. However, current best practices indicate that integration of mental health and addictions services can lead to better outcomes for clients with co-occurring disorders, including fewer hospitalizations. Service integration in the community can occur in many ways, including full or partial program integration. While the delivery of mental health and addictions services must be responsive to the needs of the local community, fully integrated programs have the strongest evidence base for positive client outcomes.

Peterson AL

2013-10-01

307

Building mental health literacy: opportunities and resources for clinicians.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Youth mental health is increasingly recognized as a key concern with significant impact on youth and society. School is the one setting where professionals are consistently available to monitor how children are functioning and learning and intervene and support. School psychiatry has expanded beyond individual mental health problems to school-wide and community issues including school violence, sexual harassment, bullying, substance abuse, discrimination, and discipline. This article describes the importance of mental health literacy in health outcomes and research in school-based mental health programs to better position the clinician to advocate at the individual and/or system level.

Bagnell AL; Santor DA

2012-01-01

308

Integrating mental health and addictions services to improve client outcomes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Substance use disorders are highly prevalent among adults with mental health disorders. In many health service delivery areas, mental health and addictions services are delivered separately. However, current best practices indicate that integration of mental health and addictions services can lead to better outcomes for clients with co-occurring disorders, including fewer hospitalizations. Service integration in the community can occur in many ways, including full or partial program integration. While the delivery of mental health and addictions services must be responsive to the needs of the local community, fully integrated programs have the strongest evidence base for positive client outcomes. PMID:24066651

Peterson, Ashley L

2013-10-01

309

Indigenizing mental health services: New Zealand experience.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental health services in New Zealand have been significantly altered by M?ori cultural values. Since 1980, a monocultural approach has given way to the incorporation of M?ori language, M?ori health perspectives, and M?ori psychological frameworks in the assessment, treatment, and care of patients. M?ori provider organizations, an expanded M?ori health workforce, and M?ori leadership have been crucial catalysts for the transformation. The shifts have paralleled similar changes in other sectors, reflecting a broader societal movement within which indigeneity has received greater acknowledgement. The author's bicultural background, psychiatric training, and inclusion in M?ori networks were important for promoting the transformation.

Durie M

2011-04-01

310

The influence of state mental health perceptions and spending on an individual's use of mental health services.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: To explore the possible contextual effects of state-level mental health perceptions and public spending for mental health treatment on an individual's use of mental health services, independent of the individual's own perceptions. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used. A total of 216,514 participants from 35 states and the District of Columbia were included in the study. Logistic regression and multilevel modeling were used to estimate the effects of individual-level characteristics and three state-level factors-per capita spending on community mental health services, aggregated perceptions of the effectiveness of mental health treatment and the stigma of mental illness-on the individual's current use of mental health services. RESULTS: Adjusting for the individual's perceptions and characteristics, state-level perception of treatment effectiveness was positively associated with the use of mental health services [odds ratio (OR) for 5 % increase in the percentage perceiving effectiveness = 1.08; 95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.01, 1.16]. This association was strongest for individuals who experienced 1-4 days of mental distress in the past 30 days (OR = 1.17; 95 % CI 1.06, 1.29). State-level public spending on community mental health services was also positively associated with an individual's use of mental health services (OR for a $40 increase in spending = 1.09; 95 % CI 1.01, 1.17); however, state-level perceptions of mental-illness stigma was not. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest there may be contextual effects of state-level perceptions of treatment effectiveness and state spending on community mental health services on the use of mental health services.

Richardson J; Morgenstern H; Crider R; Gonzalez O

2013-04-01

311

Cognitive styles and mental rotation ability in map learning.  

Science.gov (United States)

In inspecting, learning and reproducing a map, a wide range of abilities is potentially involved. This study examined the role of mental rotation (MR) and verbal ability, together with that of cognitive styles in map learning. As regards cognitive styles, the traditional distinction between verbalizers and visualizers has been taken into account, together with a more recent distinction between two styles of visualization: spatial and object. One hundred and seven participants filled in two questionnaires on cognitive styles: the Verbalizer-Visualizer Questionnaire (Richardson in J Ment Imag 1:109-125, 1977) and the Object-Spatial Imagery Questionnaire (Blajenkova et al. in Appl Cogn Psych 20:239-263, 2006), performed MR and verbal tests, learned two maps, and were then tested for their recall. It was found that MR ability and cognitive styles played a role in predicting map learning, with some distinctions within cognitive styles: verbal style favoured learning of one of the two maps (the one rich in verbal labels), which in turn was disadvantaged by the adoption of spatial style. Conversely, spatial style predicted learning of the other map, rich in visual features. The discussion focuses on implications for cognitive psychology and everyday cognition. PMID:23771207

Pazzaglia, Francesca; Moè, Angelica

2013-06-15

312

Mental health courts and the complex issue of mentally ill offenders.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mental health courts are emerging in communities across the country to address the growing number of individuals with serious mental illness in jails and the complex issues they present to the courts. Based on concepts of therapeutic jurisprudence and patterned after drug courts, mental health courts attempt to prevent criminalization and recidivism by providing critical mental health services. The authors describe mental health courts in Broward County, Florida; King County, Washington; Anchorage, Alaska; and Marion County, Indiana. Each of these courts is designed to meet the specific needs and resources of its jurisdiction. The courts' experiences suggest that involving all players from the beginning is essential. The authors discuss the issues of due process, availability of services, and control of resources, which must be addressed before mental health courts are widely implemented. PMID:11274492

Watson, A; Hanrahan, P; Luchins, D; Lurigio, A

2001-04-01

313

Mental health courts and the complex issue of mentally ill offenders.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental health courts are emerging in communities across the country to address the growing number of individuals with serious mental illness in jails and the complex issues they present to the courts. Based on concepts of therapeutic jurisprudence and patterned after drug courts, mental health courts attempt to prevent criminalization and recidivism by providing critical mental health services. The authors describe mental health courts in Broward County, Florida; King County, Washington; Anchorage, Alaska; and Marion County, Indiana. Each of these courts is designed to meet the specific needs and resources of its jurisdiction. The courts' experiences suggest that involving all players from the beginning is essential. The authors discuss the issues of due process, availability of services, and control of resources, which must be addressed before mental health courts are widely implemented.

Watson A; Hanrahan P; Luchins D; Lurigio A

2001-04-01

314

Getting mental health care where it is needed.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

There has been a powerful call for better funding for mental health services in the United States. The effort to build capacity in mental health centers is much needed. We need more and better-trained staff, funding that can reduce barriers, and shorten waiting times. The movement to integrate mental health clinicians as part of the care team in primary care will be much more likely to find and engage people who are very troubled but are not seeking mental health care. To increase the likelihood of getting care to troubled people earlier and engaging them in care more effectively, any effort to improve funding for mental health should include a clear focus on improving the integration of mental health into primary care. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

Blount A

2013-06-01

315

Mental health services in rural India: challenges and prospects  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Mental health services in India are neglected area which needs immediate attention from the government, policymakers, and civil society organizations. Despite, National Mental Health Programme since 1982 and National Rural Health Mission, there has been a very little effort so far to provide mental health services in rural areas. With increase in population, changing life-style, unemployment, lack of social support and increasing insecurity, it is predicted that there would be a substantial increase in the number of people suffering from mental illness in rural areas. Considering the mental health needs of the rural community and the treatment gap, the paper is an attempt to remind and advocate for rural mental health services and suggest a model to reduce the treatment gap.

Anant Kumar

2011-01-01

316

Religious Involvement Effects on Mental Health in Chinese Americans  

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Full Text Available Faith has been shown to serve a protective role in the mental health of African Americans and European Americans. However, little research has examined whether any association exists in Asian Americans. Using the National Latino and Asian American Study dataset, we examined the effect of religious attendance on the mental health of Asian Americans in the United States. The present study focused on Chinese Americans because they are the largest Asian American group. The results revealed that almost 80% of the respondents were foreign-born and that their English proficiency had a positive association with their self-rated mental health. Being male correlated significantly to higher levels of mental health self-rating. After controlling for known predictive variables, such as demographics, cultural and immigration variables, more frequent religious attendance significantly predicted higher self-rating of mental health. These findings suggest that faith may have a unique protective role in Chinese Americans’ mental health.

Bu Huang; Hoa B. Appel; Amy L. Ai; Chyongchiou Jeng Lin

2012-01-01

317

Fatty acid status and maternal mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Maternal mental health (MMH) problems are a major public health concern with adverse consequences for women, their offspring and families. Intake of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially the n-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid, which are found predominantly in cold water fish, has been associated with a range of mental health outcomes and may improve MMH. The demands for these fatty acids are increased during pregnancy and lactation, and may influence MMH as they are integral parts of cell membranes especially in the brain and play a role in physiological processes such as membrane fluidity and neurotransmitter function. Observational studies and intervention trials that have examined the role of fatty acids and MMH disorders especially post-partum depression (PPD) were identified using Pubmed and have been reviewed. Only three well-designed large prospective studies were identified; these studies examined the relationship between dietary intakes of n-3 fatty acids and fish during pregnancy, and found limited evidence of an association with PPD. Several intervention trials (n=8) have been done but generally suffer from small sample size and vary in terms of the study subject characteristics and timing, duration and dosage of the intervention. The results are mixed, but one recently completed large trial found no evidence of benefit among women who received DHA during pregnancy. Few studies have been conducted in developing countries, and gaps remain on the influence of other nutrient deficiencies, genetic polymorphisms that influence n-3 fatty acid synthesis and total fatty acid intake.

Ramakrishnan U

2011-04-01

318

Mental health literacy in higher education students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: With approximately 50% of young people aged 18-24 in tertiary education, these are potential settings for programmes to improve mental health literacy. A survey was carried out with students and staff of a tertiary education institution to investigate recognition of depression, help-seeking intentions, beliefs about interventions and stigmatizing attitudes. METHODS: Students of an Australian metropolitan university (with staff as a comparison group) participated in a telephone interview. They answered questions relating to mental health literacy. RESULTS: Of the completed interviews, 774 (65%) were students and 422 (35%) were staff. Over 70% of students and staff were able to recognize depression in a vignette, with greater likelihood of recognition in students associated with older age, female gender, being born in Australia and a higher level of education. Over 80% of respondents said they would seek help if they had a problem similar to that of the vignette. However, rates of specific help-seeking intentions for students were relatively low, with only 26% nominating a general practitioner and only 10% nominating a student counsellor. Factors associated with stigmatizing attitudes included male gender, younger age, lower level of education, being born outside Australia and lack of recognition of depression. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for mental health literacy interventions targeted at students, particularly those who are younger, male, born outside Australia and of a lower level of education. As rates of specific help-seeking intentions for students were relatively low, there is a need for further exploration of the barriers to help seeking from professional sources.

Reavley NJ; McCann TV; Jorm AF

2012-02-01

319

Cultural competence in correctional mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Cultural competence is an essential aspect of competence as a mental health professional. In this article, the framework of cultural competence developed in general psychiatry-acquiring knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to understand the interaction between culture and the individual-is applied to the prison setting. Race and ethnicity, extremes of age, gender, and religion are highlighted and examined as elements of the overall culture of prisons. The model of the cultural formulation from the DSM-IV is then adapted for use by clinicians in the correctional setting, with particular emphasis on the interaction between the inmate's culture of origin and the unique culture of the prison environment.

Kapoor R; Dike C; Burns C; Carvalho V; Griffith EE

2013-05-01

320

Mental health policy and development in Egypt - integrating mental health into health sector reforms 2001-9  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Following a situation appraisal in 2001, a six year mental health reform programme (Egymen) 2002-7 was initiated by an Egyptian-Finnish bilateral aid project at the request of a former Egyptian minister of health, and the work was incorporated directly into the Ministry of Health and Population from 2007 onwards. This paper describes the aims, methodology and implementation of the mental health reforms and mental health policy in Egypt 2002-2009. Methods A multi-faceted and comprehensive programme which combined situation appraisal to inform planning; establishment of a health sector system for coordination, supervision and training of each level (national, governorate, district and primary care); development workshops; production of toolkits, development of guidelines and standards; encouragement of intersectoral liaison at each level; integration of mental health into health management systems; and dedicated efforts to improve forensic services, rehabilitation services, and child psychiatry services. Results The project has achieved detailed situation appraisal, epidemiological needs assessment, inclusion of mental health into the health sector reform plans, and into the National Package of Essential Health Interventions, mental health masterplan (policy guidelines) to accompany the general health policy, updated Egyptian mental health legislation, Code of Practice, adaptation of the WHO primary care guidelines, primary care training, construction of a quality system of roles and responsibilities, availability of medicines at primary care level, public education about mental health, and a research programme to inform future developments. Intersectoral liaison with education, social welfare, police and prisons at national level is underway, but has not yet been established for governorate and district levels, nor mental health training for police, prison staff and teachers. Conclusions The bilateral collaboration programme initiated a reform programme which has been sustained beyond the end of the funding. The project has demonstrated the importance of using a multi-faceted and comprehensive programme to promote sustainable system change, key elements of which include a focus on the use of rapid appropriate treatment at primary care level, strengthening the referral system, interministerial and intersectoral liaison, rehabilitation, and media work to mobilize community engagement.

Jenkins Rachel; Heshmat Ahmed; Loza Nasser; Siekkonen Inkeri; Sorour Eman

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
321

Panel Urges Awareness of Student-Athlete Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

... enable JavaScript. Panel urges awareness of student-athlete mental health (*this news item will not be available after ... September 25, 2013 Related MedlinePlus Pages College Health Mental Health Sports Safety By Genevra Pittman NEW YORK (Reuters ...

322

Abortion in Young Women and Subsequent Mental Health  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: The extent to which abortion has harmful consequences for mental health remains controversial. We aimed to examine the linkages between having an abortion and mental health outcomes over the interval from age 15-25 years. Methods: Data were gathered as part of the Christchurch Health and Development Study, a 25-year longitudinal study…

Fergusson, David M.; Horwood, L. John; Ridder, Elizabeth M.

2006-01-01

323

SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND MENTAL HEALTH DATA ARCHIVE (SAMHDA)  

Science.gov (United States)

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (SAMHDA) is an initiative of the Office of Applied Studies, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The goal of the archive is to provide re...

324

Culture and mental health - A Southern African view  

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Full Text Available This is a long awaited text within the field of mental health in South Africa, as there is very little written about culture and mental health within the specific context of South Africa. This book is very useful for students in any field of mental health like psychology, nursing, social work and medicine. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

Leslie Swartz

1999-01-01

325

Homozygosity mapping in outbred families with mental retardation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Autosomal recessive mental retardation (AR-MR) may account for up to 25% of genetic mental retardation (MR). So far, mapping of AR-MR genes in consanguineous families has resulted in six nonsyndromic genes, whereas more than 2000 genes might contribute to AR-MR. We propose to use outbred families with multiple affected siblings for AR-MR gene identification. Homozygosity mapping in ten outbred families with affected brother-sister pairs using a 250 K single nucleotide polymorphism array revealed on average 57 homozygous regions over 1 Mb in size per affected individual (range 20-74). Of these, 21 homozygous regions were shared between siblings on average (range 8-36). None of the shared regions of homozygosity (SROHs) overlapped with the nonsyndromic genes. A total of 13 SROHs had an overlap with previously reported loci for AR-MR, namely with MRT8, MRT9, MRT10 and MRT11. Among these was the longest observed SROH of 11.0 Mb in family ARMR1 on chromosome 19q13, which had 2.9 Mb (98 genes) in common with the 5.4 Mb MRT11 locus (195 genes). These data support that homozygosity mapping in outbred families may contribute to identification of novel AR-MR genes.

Schuurs-Hoeijmakers JH; Hehir-Kwa JY; Pfundt R; van Bon BW; de Leeuw N; Kleefstra T; Willemsen MA; van Kessel AG; Brunner HG; Veltman JA; van Bokhoven H; de Brouwer AP; de Vries BB

2011-05-01

326

Homozygosity mapping in outbred families with mental retardation.  

Science.gov (United States)

Autosomal recessive mental retardation (AR-MR) may account for up to 25% of genetic mental retardation (MR). So far, mapping of AR-MR genes in consanguineous families has resulted in six nonsyndromic genes, whereas more than 2000 genes might contribute to AR-MR. We propose to use outbred families with multiple affected siblings for AR-MR gene identification. Homozygosity mapping in ten outbred families with affected brother-sister pairs using a 250 K single nucleotide polymorphism array revealed on average 57 homozygous regions over 1 Mb in size per affected individual (range 20-74). Of these, 21 homozygous regions were shared between siblings on average (range 8-36). None of the shared regions of homozygosity (SROHs) overlapped with the nonsyndromic genes. A total of 13 SROHs had an overlap with previously reported loci for AR-MR, namely with MRT8, MRT9, MRT10 and MRT11. Among these was the longest observed SROH of 11.0 Mb in family ARMR1 on chromosome 19q13, which had 2.9 Mb (98 genes) in common with the 5.4 Mb MRT11 locus (195 genes). These data support that homozygosity mapping in outbred families may contribute to identification of novel AR-MR genes. PMID:21248743

Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke H M; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Pfundt, Rolph; van Bon, Bregje W M; de Leeuw, Nicole; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Willemsen, Michèl A; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Brunner, Han G; Veltman, Joris A; van Bokhoven, Hans; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; de Vries, Bert B A

2011-01-19

327

Integrating mental health into primary health care in Zambia: a care provider's perspective  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the 1991 reforms of the health system in Zambia, mental health is still given low priority. This is evident from the fragmented manner in which mental health services are provided in the country and the limited budget allocations, with mental health services receiving 0.4% of the total health budget. Most of the mental health services provided are curative in nature and based in tertiary health institutions. At primary health care level, there is either absence of, or fragmented health services. Aims The aim of this paper was to explore health providers' views about mental health integration into primary health care. Methods A mixed methods, structured survey was conducted of 111 health service providers in primary health care centres, drawn from one urban setting (Lusaka) and one rural setting (Mumbwa). Results There is strong support for integrating mental health into primary health care from care providers, as a way of facilitating early detection and intervention for mental health problems. Participants believed that this would contribute to the reduction of stigma and the promotion of human rights for people with mental health problems. However, health providers felt they require basic training in order to enhance their knowledge and skills in providing health care to people with mental health problems. Recommendations It is recommended that health care providers should be provided with basic training in mental health in order to enhance their knowledge and skills to enable them provide mental health care to patients seeking help at primary health care level. Conclusion Integrating mental health services into primary health care is critical to improving and promoting the mental health of the population in Zambia.

Mwape Lonia; Sikwese Alice; Kapungwe Augustus; Mwanza Jason; Flisher Alan; Lund Crick; Cooper Sara

2010-01-01

328

Triagem em saúde mental infantil Child's mental health triage  

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Full Text Available Este estudo foi conduzido para comparar os resultados de um procedimento grupal aberto e um procedimento individual estruturado para avaliação do comportamento da criança conforme o relato materno. Participaram deste estudo 29 mães que buscavam atendimento para seus filhos em uma unidade de saúde mental infanto-juvenil. As primeiras 15 mães que procuraram o serviço foram entrevistadas individualmente conforme um roteiro estruturado desenvolvido a partir do CBCL e depois foram entrevistadas em grupo, em formato aberto. As outras 14 mães participaram da entrevista grupal aberta e em seguida participaram da entrevista individual estruturada. Os resultados das entrevistas foram comparados tomando como referência as 67 categorias comportamentais identificadas a partir do roteiro individual e quatro variáveis contextuais relatadas nos dois procedimentos. Os resultados mostram que um número substancialmente maior de comportamentos-problema foi identificado através de entrevista individual estruturada do que através de entrevista grupal aberta realizada com os mesmos informantes. É possível que o uso de um roteiro estruturado em entrevistas grupais possa oferecer mais informações com otimização do tempo de avaliação.This study was aimed at comparing the results of a group open procedure and a structured individual procedure to evaluate child behavior according to the mother's report. Participants were 29 mothers who searched attendance for their children at a mental health unit for children and youngsters. The first 15 mothers to enroll in the study underwent an individual, structured interview, developed from the CBCL items, and then they underwent a group open interview. The next 14 mother to enroll underwent the open group interview and then the individual structured interview. The results obtained were compared taking into consideration the 67 behavioral categories identified from the individual report and four contextual variables from the two procedures. The results show that a substantially higher number of problematic behaviors was identified through the structured individual interview than through the open group interview held with the same informants. It is possible that the use of a structured report in group interviews may offer more information with the optimization of the evaluation time.

Fabiana Vieira Gauy; Suely Sales Guimarães

2006-01-01

329

78 FR 4424 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meeting  

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...of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Counselors, National Institute of Mental Health. The meeting will be closed to...conducted by the National Institute of Mental Health, including consideration of...

2013-01-22

330

78 FR 64228 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings  

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...of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel; NRSA...Activities, National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Neuroscience...

2013-10-28

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77 FR 67825 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings  

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...of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel; Services...Activities, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of...

2012-11-14

332

78 FR 13358 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings  

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...of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel, Innovative...Activities, National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Neuroscience...

2013-02-27

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78 FR 34662 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings  

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...of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel Fellowships...Activities, National Institute of Mental Health, NIH Neuroscience Center,...

2013-06-10

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78 FR 28599 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings  

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...of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Initial Review Group; Interventions...Activities, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of...

2013-05-15

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78 FR 54477 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings  

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...of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Initial Review Group Interventions...Activities, National Institute of Mental Health National Institutes of...

2013-09-04

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78 FR 39299 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings  

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...of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel; NIH Summer...Activities, National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Neuroscience...

2013-07-01

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78 FR 38067 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings  

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...of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel; Therapeutic...Activities, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of...

2013-06-25

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78 FR 59944 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings  

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...of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel; P30 Centers...Program for Research on HIV/AIDS & Mental Health. Date: October 25, 2013....

2013-09-30

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78 FR 2414 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings  

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...Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section...Name of Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Initial Review Group Mental Health Services Research Committee. Date:...

2013-01-11

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78 FR 64227 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings  

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...of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel, NIMH...Activities, National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Neuroscience...

2013-10-28

 
 
 
 
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78 FR 9404 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings  

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...of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant...Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel; Fellowships...Activities, National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Neuroscience...

2013-02-08

342

78 FR 26643 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meeting  

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...of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant...Counselors, National Institute of Mental Health. The meeting will be closed to...conducted by the National Institute of Mental Health, including consideration of...

2013-05-07

343

The roots of the concept of mental health  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper reviews the origins of the current concept of mental health, starting from the mental hygiene movement, initiated in 1908 by consumers of psychiatric services and professionals interested in improving the conditions and the quality of treatment of people with mental disorders. The paper a...

BERTOLOTE, JOSÉ

344

Why we must end insurance discrimination against mental health care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In this Policy Essay, Representative Patrick Kennedy argues that insurance discrimination against those suffering from mental illness constitutes a serious and often overlooked deficiency of the modern American health care system. While the Mental Health Parity Act of 1996 was an important step toward resolutions of this issue, many loopholes remain that allow insurance companies to deny much-needed coverage to those suffering from such illnesses. This Essay details how improving access to health insurance for the mentally ill is not only socially beneficial, but also economically sound; the cost of instituting mental health parity is far outweighed by the costs that employers bear because of the reduced productivity of untreated mental illness sufferers. Representative Kennedy recommends that these problems may be addressed by additional mental health policy legislation--specifically, the proposed Paul Wellstone Act.

Kennedy PJ

2004-01-01

345

Health maintenance organizations and persons with severe mental illness.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Many if not most scenarios for reform of the U.S. health care system imply that health maintenance organizations (HMOs) will continue their rapid growth. Some advocates argue that a comprehensive health care system should offer services to the severely mentally ill on the same basis as the physically ill. Others note that severe mental illness has traditionally been addressed by a separate, social service system which, for all its deficiencies, has at least provided some level of care. Still others contend that allowing severely mentally ill persons "barrier free" access to health care would be prohibitively expensive. Inspired by this debate the author reviews our knowledge about HMOs and persons with severe mental illness. It is argued that workers in community mental health programs need to understand HMOs and their potential contribution to providing services for persons with severe mental illness.

McFarland BH

1994-06-01

346

Taming mental-health-focused popular literature: a crazy idea?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Providing tailored and easily accessible health information for mental health clinicians and patients can be enabled through Information Technology and Communications (ITC). The literature is mixed regarding the quality, utility and accessibility of health information in the popular press for this purpose. However, there is consensus that mental health information in the popular press is readily available, easily comprehended by patients, and is continually updated. We report the process by which mental-health-focused articles in the popular press are identified, screened, and disseminated to a large network of doctoral level psychologists (the PsyUSA network). We analyze 4-year article distribution and access data, and conclude that the distribution of mental-health-related popular press articles prompted article access. We leverage this experience to formulate a model for direct access to clinician-vetted mental-health-related popular press through a curated web based archive.

Zozus RT Jr; Bricker A; Lunblad R; Elias D; Nahm M

2013-01-01

347

Adolescent mental health: Challenges with maternal noncompliance  

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Full Text Available Vicki A Nejtek, Sarah Hardy, Scott WinterUniversity of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USAAbstract: The leading cause of suicide ideation, attempts, and completion in adolescents is persistent and unresolved parental conflict. National statistics show extremely high rates of childhood neglect and abuse are perpetrated most often by single mothers. Psychiatric disorders arising from maternal–child dysfunction are well-documented. However, resources to prevent offspring victimization are lacking. Here, we report maternal neglect of a 15-year-old male brought to the psychiatric emergency room for suicidal ideation. An inpatient treatment plan including pharmacotherapy, family therapy and psychological testing was initiated. The patient’s mother failed to attend clinic appointments or family therapy sessions. Clinician attempts to engage the mother in the treatment plan was met with verbal assaults, aggression, and threatening behavior. The patient decompensated in relation to the mother’s actions. Child Protective Services were contacted and a follow-up assessment with the patient and mother is pending. Psychiatric treatment of the mother may be a necessary intervention and prevention regimen for both the adolescent and the mother. Without consistent Child Protective Services oversight, medical and psychosocial follow-up, the prognosis and quality of life for this adolescent is considered very poor. Stringent mental health law and institutional policies are needed to adequately intercede and protect adolescents with mental illness.Keywords: adolescent, suicide, maternal treatment noncompliance, maternal neglect

Vicki A Nejtek; Sarah Hardy; Scott Winter

2010-01-01

348

Religion's Effect on Mental Health in Schizophrenia.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

While a growing body of research suggests that religion offers mental health benefits for individuals with schizophrenia, few studies have examined the mechanisms underlying this effect. The present study investigated two potential mediators (seeking social support and meaning-making coping) that may elucidate the nature of this relationship. The sample included 112 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Structural equation modeling was used to test whether religion was related to symptom severity and quality of life (QoL) and whether seeking social support and meaning-making coping mediated these effects. As expected, meaning-making coping significantly mediated the effect of intrinsic religion (use of religion as a framework to understand life) on QoL. While extrinsic religion (use of religion as a social convention) was associated with seeking social support, it did not relate to either outcome variable. Findings offer insight into the ways in which religion may improve the mental health of patients with schizophrenia. Results suggest that the adaptive elements of intrinsic religion seen in prior research may be explained by the meaning that religion offers. Clinical interventions that encourage patients to find meaning amidst adversity may improve QoL in this population. Future research would benefit from further investigation of the meaning-making process in individuals with schizophrenia.

Tuchman N; Weisman AG

2013-02-01

349

Determinants of mental health service use in the national mental health survey of the elderly in Singapore  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background Despite high prevalence of mental health problems, only a minority of elderly people seek treatment. Although need-for-care factors are primary determinants of mental health service use, personal predisposing or enabling factors including health beliefs are impor...

Nyunt Ma; Chiam Peak; Kua Ee; Ng Tze

350

Mental health and psychosocial support in crisis and conflict: report of the Mental Health Working Group.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: The Working Group on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support was convened as part of the 2009 Harvard Humanitarian Action Summit. The Working Group chose to focus on ethical issues in mental health and psychosocial research and programming in humanitarian settings. The Working Group built on previous work and recommendations, such as the Inter-Agency Standing Committee's Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this working group was to address one of the factors contributing to the deficiency of research and the need to develop the evidence base on mental health and psychosocial support interventions during complex emergencies by proposing ethical research guidelines. Outcomes research is vital for effective program development in emergency settings, but to date, no comprehensive ethical guidelines exist for guiding such research efforts. METHODS: Working Group members conducted literature reviews which included peer-reviewed publications, agency reports, and relevant guidelines on the following topics: general ethical principles in research, cross-cultural issues, research in resource-poor countries, and specific populations such as trauma and torture survivors, refugees, minorities, children and youth, and the mentally ill. Working Group members also shared key points regarding ethical issues encountered in their own research and fieldwork. RESULTS: The group adapted a broad definition of the term "research", which encompasses needs assessments and data gathering, as well as monitoring and evaluation. The guidelines are conceptualized as applying to formal and informal processes of assessment and evaluation in which researchers as well as most service providers engage. The group reached consensus that it would be unethical not to conduct research and evaluate outcomes of mental health and psychosocial interventions in emergency settings, given that there currently is very little good evidence base for such interventions. Overarching themes and issues generated by the group for further study and articulation included: purpose and benefits of research, issues of validity, neutrality, risk, subject selection and participation, confidentiality, consent, and dissemination of results. CONCLUSIONS: The group outlined several key topics and recommendations that address ethical issues in conducting mental health and psychosocial research in humanitarian settings. The group views this set of recommendations as a living document to be further developed and refined based on input from colleagues representing different regions of the globe with an emphasis on input from colleagues from low-resource countries.

Allden K; Jones L; Weissbecker I; Wessells M; Bolton P; Betancourt TS; Hijazi Z; Galappatti A; Yamout R; Patel P; Sumathipala A

2009-07-01

351

[Dangerous states and mental health disorders: perceptions and reality].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Image of Madness was always strongly linked with the notion of "dangerousness", provoking fear and social exclusion, despite the evolution of psychiatric practices and organisation, and the emphasis on user's rights respect. Mediatization and politicization of this issue through news item combining crime and mental illness, reinforce and spread out this perception. This paper presents a review of the litterature on social perceptions associating "dangerousness", "Insanity" and "mental illness", available data about the link between "dangerous states" and "psychiatric disorders", as well as the notion of "dangerousness" and the assessment of "dangerous state" of people suffering or not from psychiatric disorders. MAPPING OF SOCIAL REPRESENTATIONS: The French Survey "Mental Health in General Population: Images and Realities (MHGP)" was carried out between 1999 and 2003, on a representative sample of 36.000 individuals over 18 years old. It aims at describing the social representations of the population about "insanity/insane" and "mental illness/mentally ill". The results show that about 75% of the people interviewed link "insanity" or "mental illness" with "criminal or violent acts". Young people and those with a high level of education more frequently categorize violent and dangerous behaviours in the field of Mental illness rather than in that of madness. CORRELATION BETWEEN DANGEROUS STATE AND PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS: in the scientific literature, all experts reject the hypothesis of a direct link between violence and mental disorder. Besides, 2 tendencies appear in their conclusions: on one hand, some studies establish a significative link between violence and severe mental illness, compared with the general population. On the other hand, results show that 87 to 97% of des aggressors are not mentally ills. Therefore, the absence of scientific consensus feeds the confusion and reinforce the link of causality between psychiatric disorders and violence. OFFICIAL FIGURES BY THE MINISTRY OF JUSTICE: according to the French Ministry of Justice, there is a lack of significative data in general population, that would allow the accurate evaluation of the proportion of authors of crimes and offences presenting a "dangerous state", either of criminological order or related to a psychiatric disorder. FROM "DANGEROUSNESS" TO "DANGEROUS STATE": the vagueness of the notion of "dangerousness" aggravates the confusion and reinforce the negative social representations attached to subjects labelled as "mentally ills". A way to alleviate this stigmatisation would be to stop using the word "dangerous", and rather use those of "dangerous states". Assessment of dangerous states is complex and needs to take into account several heterogeneous factors (circumstances of acting, social and family environment...). Besides, it is not a linear process for a given individual. Those risk factors of "dangerous state" lead to the construction of evaluation or prediction scales, which limits lay in the biaises of over or under predictive value. The overestimation of dangerousness is harmful, not only to individuals wrongly considered as "dangerous", but also to the society which, driven by safety concerns, agrees on the implementation of inaccurate measures. A FEW TRACKS FOR REMEDIATION: the representations linking "mental illness" and "dangerousness" are the major vectors of stigma, and deeply anchored in the collective popular imagination. They are shared by all population categories, with no distinction of age, gender, professional status or level of education. To overcome those prejudices, one has to carefully study their basis, their criteria, document them with statistical data, look for consistency and scientific rigour, in the terminology as well as in the methodology. Moreover, one has to encourage ex

Tassone-Monchicourt C; Daumerie N; Caria A; Benradia I; Roelandt JL

2010-01-01

352

Risk Assessment in Mental Health: Introducing a Traffic Light System in a Community Mental Health Team  

Science.gov (United States)

Aims: To reports a study in which action research approach was utilised to introduce a new system of risk assessment, based on traffic lights, into a community mental health team. Background: Risk management is a serious concern in community mental healthcare where there is less direct, real-time supervision of clients than in other settings, and because inadequate management of risk can have fatal consequences when service users are a risk to themselves and/or others. Design: An action research design was undertaken, using three phases of Look, Think and Act. Methods: Data were collected between January and March of 2012. In the action research phases, qualitative data were collected in focus groups with the team’s multi-disciplinary mental health professionals. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically, which involved agreement of themes and interpretations by two researchers. The Look, Think and Act phases guided the development of the project; team members worked collaboratively on the traffic light system, implemented and evaluated it. Findings: Themes were constructed that were discussed across the focus groups. These themes were: Ease of use; Risk identification and management; Legal status; Different teams’ views of risk; Post-implementation evaluation. Conclusion: Action research has been used to implement change in mental health risk management. Others internationally would benefit from considering a Traffic Light System, and in using action research to implement it.

Croucher, S; Williamson, Graham R

2013-01-01

353

Risk assessment in mental health: introducing a traffic light system in a community mental health team.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS: To reports a study in which action research approach was utilised to introduce a new system of risk assessment, based on traffic lights, into a community mental health team. BACKGROUND: Risk management is a serious concern in community mental healthcare where there is less direct, real-time supervision of clients than in other settings, and because inadequate management of risk can have fatal consequences when service users are a risk to themselves and/or others. DESIGN: An action research design was undertaken, using three phases of Look, Think and Act. METHODS: Data were collected between January and March of 2012. In the action research phases, qualitative data were collected in focus groups with the team's multi-disciplinary mental health professionals. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically, which involved agreement of themes and interpretations by two researchers. The Look, Think and Act phases guided the development of the project; team members worked collaboratively on the traffic light system, implemented and evaluated it. FINDINGS: Themes were constructed that were discussed across the focus groups. These themes were: Ease of use; Risk identification and management; Legal status; Different teams' views of risk; Post-implementation evaluation. CONCLUSION: Action research has been used to implement change in mental health risk management. Others internationally would benefit from considering a Traffic Light System, and in using action research to implement it.

Croucher S; Williamson GR

2013-01-01

354

Patient health outcomes in psychiatric mental health nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This integrative literature review examined evidence concerning the relationship between psychiatric mental health nursing interventions and patient-focused outcomes. Empirical studies, published between 1997 and 2007, were identified and gathered by searching relevant databases and specific data sources. Although 156 articles were critically appraised, only 25 of them met the inclusion criteria. Findings from this review showed that the most frequently used outcome instruments assessed psychiatric symptom severity. Most of the instruments targeted two symptom categories: altered thoughts/perceptions and altered mood. Other outcome instruments were categorized in the following domains: self-care, functioning, quality of life and satisfaction. The most important finding of this review is the lack of consistently strong evidence to support decisions concerning which outcome instrument or combination of instruments to recommend for routine use in practice. Based on this review, additional research to conceptualize, measure and examine the feasibility of outcome instruments sensitive to psychiatric mental health nursing interventions is recommended.

Montgomery P; Rose D; Carter L

2009-02-01

355

Financing Mental Health Care in Spain: Context and critical issues  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Financing and the way in which funds are then allocated are key issues in health policy. They can act as an incentive or barrier to system reform , can prioritise certain types or sectors of care and have long term consequences for the planning and delivery of services. The way in which these issues can impact on the funding of mental health services across Europe has been a key task of the Mental Health Economics European Network. (MHEEN) This paper draws on (more) information prepared for MHEEN and provides an analysis of the context and the main issues related to mental health financing in Spain. METHODS: A structured questionnaire developed by the MHEEN group was used to assess the pattern of financing, eligibility and coverage for mental healthcare. In Spain contacts were made with the Mental Health agencies of the 17 Autonomous Communities (ACs), and available mental health plans and annual reports were reviewed. A direct collaboration was set up with four ACs (Madrid, Navarre, Andalusia, Catalonia). RESULTS: In Spain, like many other European countries mental healthcare is an integral part of the general healthcare with universal coverage funded by taxation. Total health expenditure accounted for 7.7% of GDP in 2003 (public health expenditure was 5.6% of GDP). Although the actual percentage expended in mental care is not known and estimates are unreliable, approximately 5% of total health expenditure can be attributed to mental health. Moreover what is often overlooked is that many services have been shifted from the health to the social care sector as part of the reform process. Social care is discretionary, and provides only limited coverage. This level of expenditure also appears low by European standards, accounting for just 0.6% of GDP. COMMENTS: In spite of its policy implications, little is known about mental healthcare financing in Spain. Comparisons of expenditure for mental health across the ACs are problematic, making it difficult to assess inequalities in access to services across the country. The limited data available on mental healthcare expenditure suggests that level of funding for mental health is low compared with many of the EU-15 countries. This may indicate inefficient and inequitable funding given the significant contribution of mental disorders to the overall burden of ill health. Attention needs to be directed to redressing both the information deficit and also in using a range of financing mechanisms to promote greater investment in mental health.

Salvador-Carulla, L.; Garrido, M.; McDaid, D.; Haro, J.M.

2006-03-01

356

Nations for Mental Health Naciones unidas para la salud mental  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available La Organización Mundial de la Salud ha establecido un programa especial denominado "Naciones unidas para la salud mental" con el fin de fomentar la salud mental en poblaciones subatendidas, con particular énfasis en las mujeres, los niños, los adolescentes, los refugiados y los pueblos indígenas. Uno de los objetivos del programa es crear una mayor conciencia entre el público y los gobiernos acerca del costo social y económico de los trastornos mentales y del abuso de sustancias. Un segundo objetivo es identificar y promover estrategias de colaboración para mejorar la salud mental que se puedan poner en práctica por medio de proyectos de cooperación técnica de nivel nacional dirigidos por las organizaciones del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, en colaboración con otras organizaciones internacionales gubernamentales y no gubernamentales. Ya están en marcha varios proyectos de demostración y otros se están planificando.

1997-01-01

357

The Carter Center Mental Health Program: Addressing the Public Health Crisis in the Field of Mental Health Through Policy Change and Stigma Reduction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Some of the most pervasive and debilitating illnesses are mental illnesses, according to World Health Organization’s The World Health Report 2001 — Mental Health: New Understanding, New Hope. Neuropsychiatric conditions account for four of the top five leading causes of years of life lived with disability in people aged 15 to 44 in the Western world. Many barriers prevent people with mental illnesses from seeking care, such as prohibitive costs, lack of insurance, and the stigma and discrimination associated with mental illnesses. The Carter Center Mental Health Program, established in 1991, focuses on mental health policy issues within the United States and internationally. This article examines the public health crisis in the field of mental health and focuses on The Carter Center Mental Health Program’s initiatives, which work to increase public knowledge of and decrease the stigma associated with mental illnesses through their four strategic goals: reducing stigma and discrimination against people with mental illnesses; achieving equity of mental health care comparable with other health services; advancing early promotion, prevention, and early intervention services for children and their families; and increasing public awareness about mental illnesses and mental health issues.

Rebecca G. Palpant, MS; Rachael Steimnitz; Thomas H. Bornemann, EdD; Katie Hawkins

2006-01-01

358

Role of occupational physician for workers' mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In this paper, I briefly review the history of occupational mental health as well as administrative trends in Japan, and summarized how occupational physicians should get involved in these activities. As for mental health in the workplace, occupational physicians are required to participate in a large number of wide-ranging activities, including the management of mental illness. On the other hand, approving the occupational physician who is in charge of mental health affairs only has some important ramifications which cannot be disregarded. Careful consideration should be given to this matter.

Hiro H

2013-01-01

359

Mental health affects future employment as job loss affects mental health: findings from a longitudinal population study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Workforce participation is a key feature of public mental health and social inclusion policies across the globe, and often a therapeutic goal in treatment settings. Understanding the reciprocal relationship between participation and mental health has been limited by inadequate research methods. This is the first study to simultaneously examine and contrast the relative effects of unemployment on mental health and mental health on employment status in a single general population sample. METHOD: Data were from working-age respondents (20 to 55 years at baseline) who completed nine waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey (N=7176). Cross-lagged path analyses were used to test the lagged and concurrent associations between unemployment and mental health over time, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. RESULTS: Mental health was shown to be both a consequence of and risk factor for unemployment. Thus, the poorer mental health observed amongst people who are not working is attributable to both the impact of unemployment and existing mental health problems. While the strength of these two effects was similar for women, the results for men suggested that the effect of unemployment on subsequent mental health was weaker than the effect of mental health on subsequent risk of unemployment. CONCLUSION: Disentangling the reciprocal links between mental health and workforce participation is central to the development and success of clinical goals and health and social policies that aim to promote either aspect. This study demonstrates that both effects are important and supports concurrent responses to prevent a cycle of disadvantage and entrenched social exclusion.

Olesen SC; Butterworth P; Leach LS; Kelaher M; Pirkis J

2013-01-01

360

Mental health affects future employment as job loss affects mental health: findings from a longitudinal population study  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Workforce participation is a key feature of public mental health and social inclusion policies across the globe, and often a therapeutic goal in treatment settings. Understanding the reciprocal relationship between participation and mental health has been limited by inadequate research methods. This is the first study to simultaneously examine and contrast the relative effects of unemployment on mental health and mental health on employment status in a single general population sample. Method Data were from working-age respondents (20 to 55 years at baseline) who completed nine waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey (N=7176). Cross-lagged path analyses were used to test the lagged and concurrent associations between unemployment and mental health over time, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. Results Mental health was shown to be both a consequence of and risk factor for unemployment. Thus, the poorer mental health observed amongst people who are not working is attributable to both the impact of unemployment and existing mental health problems. While the strength of these two effects was similar for women, the results for men suggested that the effect of unemployment on subsequent mental health was weaker than the effect of mental health on subsequent risk of unemployment. Conclusion Disentangling the reciprocal links between mental health and workforce participation is central to the development and success of clinical goals and health and social policies that aim to promote either aspect. This study demonstrates that both effects are important and supports concurrent responses to prevent a cycle of disadvantage and entrenched social exclusion.

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
361

[Mental health care based on the psychosocial model: reports of relatives and persons with mental disorders].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study was performed in 2009 in Curitiba, using the thematic oral history technique. The participants were eight individuals from three different families who had one relative suffering from a mental disorder. The objective of the study was to describe the perception of relatives and persons with mental disorders regarding mental healthcare based on the psychosocial model. The data were obtained through semi-structured interviews, which were then analyzed and organized descriptively. The participants opined that extra-hospital services such as the Psychosocial Care Center and mental health outpatient clinics are innovative strategies. They described receiving assistance from a multidisciplinary team, the mediation of family conflicts, and the principle of territoriality. They highlighted that the individual with a mental disorder is followed by the Basic Health Unit and emphasized the importance of mental health network connections. They believe that including the family in the treatment regime improves family relationships and their acceptance of the disease.

Borba Lde O; Guimarães AN; Mazza Vde A; Maftum MA

2012-12-01

362

Mental health nurses' beliefs about smoking by mental health facility inpatients.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examined beliefs of mental health nurses about smoking by clients, nurses, and visitors in inpatient facilities and identified the influence of years of experience, smoke-free status, and workplace on these beliefs. Data were collected by a survey, distributed via a nursing newsletter with approximately 600 members. Descriptive statistics and cross-tabulations explored the data. A total of 104 responses were received. Smoke-free status made significant differences to nurses' beliefs relating to prohibition of smoking for clients, staff, and visitors; concern about the effects of passive smoking; the role of smoking in the development of therapeutic relationships; smoking as a source of patient pleasure; and the role of smoking in symptom management. That half of the nurses who responded believe that smoking is helpful in the creation of therapeutic relationships is of concern. The nurse plays an important role model in promoting smoke-free lifestyles amongst clients, and the effects of positive role modelling could be lost if nurses continue to smoke with clients. The negative impacts of smoking on the physical health of mental health inpatients is considerable and well documented, and the creation of smoke-free inpatient mental health services can help to address these.

Connolly M; Floyd S; Forrest R; Marshall B

2013-08-01

363

Mental health advisory teams: a proactive examination of mental health during combat deployments.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental health advisory teams (MHATs) conduct comprehensive mental health surveillance of US service members in combat environments. Since 2003, six teams have deployed to Iraq and four have deployed to Afghanistan, and results have played a key role influencing behavioural health policy. The repeated deployments of the teams have provided opportunities for processes to be refined, and this refinement has led to a scientifically rigorous and replicable approach. In this article we focus on two themes. The first theme is how changes in sampling have influenced the nature of the inferences drawn from the survey-based surveillance data. The second theme is how the ability to utilize different forms of data has served to strengthen the programme. Focusing on these two themes provides a way to discuss key findings, recommendations and limitations while also interspersing practical observations intended to help inform the design of broad-scale, in-theatre mental health surveillance efforts. We believe that future surveillance efforts should build on the lessons of the MHATs and attempt to replicate the more rigorous sampling methods; nonetheless, we also strive to convey that large surveillance efforts are valuable even if they cannot be executed with random sampling.

Bliese PD; Thomas JL; McGurk D; McBride S; Castro CA

2011-04-01

364

Mental health advisory teams: a proactive examination of mental health during combat deployments.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mental health advisory teams (MHATs) conduct comprehensive mental health surveillance of US service members in combat environments. Since 2003, six teams have deployed to Iraq and four have deployed to Afghanistan, and results have played a key role influencing behavioural health policy. The repeated deployments of the teams have provided opportunities for processes to be refined, and this refinement has led to a scientifically rigorous and replicable approach. In this article we focus on two themes. The first theme is how changes in sampling have influenced the nature of the inferences drawn from the survey-based surveillance data. The second theme is how the ability to utilize different forms of data has served to strengthen the programme. Focusing on these two themes provides a way to discuss key findings, recommendations and limitations while also interspersing practical observations intended to help inform the design of broad-scale, in-theatre mental health surveillance efforts. We believe that future surveillance efforts should build on the lessons of the MHATs and attempt to replicate the more rigorous sampling methods; nonetheless, we also strive to convey that large surveillance efforts are valuable even if they cannot be executed with random sampling. PMID:21521081

Bliese, Paul D; Thomas, Jeffrey L; McGurk, Dennis; McBride, Sharon; Castro, Carl A

2011-04-01

365

The Mental Health Counselor's Role in Hurricane Andrew.  

Science.gov (United States)

|Discusses the effects of Hurricane Andrew on disaster workers, followed by some reported experiences of workers as well as victims. Background on natural disasters in general is given, along with information about crisis intervention. Discusses mental health interventions and various skills needed by disaster mental health counselors. (Author/KW)|

Dingman, Robert L.

1995-01-01

366

Maternal Mental Health: an ethical base for best practice  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This chapter provides an ethical basis for how mental health professionals should approach maternal mental health practice. It argues that a pure autonomy focus is too narrow, and that practitioners should also give some weight to the interests of the family as a unit.

Gopfert, M; McLelland, N; Wilson, JGS

367

Mental-Health Aid for Immigrant Children Lags  

Science.gov (United States)

As educators and experts assess the quality of student mental-health services in light of the deadly shootings last April 16, the Virginia Tech gunman's immigrant background is focusing attention on what immigration workers say is a lack of services tailored to such groups. Mental-health professionals say that, in general, even school districts…

Zehr, Mary Ann

2007-01-01

368

Racial Discrimination and Asian Mental Health: A Meta-Analysis  

Science.gov (United States)

Although research on racial discrimination and mental health has proliferated, findings are varied and dispersed. This study explored the critical question of how Asians, in particular, deal with discrimination and how this relates to Asian mental health. With 99 correlations from 23 independent studies, the overall relationship between racial…

Lee, Debbiesiu L.; Ahn, Soyeon

2011-01-01

369

Human Trafficking: A Review for Mental Health Professionals  

Science.gov (United States)

This article provides a review of current research on human trafficking for mental health practitioners and scholars. In addition to an overview of definitions, causes and processes of trafficking, the article highlights mental health consequences of trafficking along with suggestions for treatment of survivors. Directions for counseling services,…

Yakushko, Oksana

2009-01-01

370

Correlates of Mental Health among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine primary and context-specific stressors of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. Methods: Structured interview data were obtained…

Crain, Rebecca; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Schwantes, Melody; Isom, Scott; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

2012-01-01

371

Mental Health Literacy among Family Caregivers of Schizophrenia Patients  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The benefits of public knowledge towards physical health are widely accepted but the area of mental health literacy remains undervalued and relatively neglected. The study aimed to identify caregivers’ mental health literacy in Malaysia. There were 154 family caregivers participated in the face-to-face semi-structured interview regarding their personal caring experiences. This study found that majority of the caregivers was women aged less than 60 years. Most of the caregivers have some understanding about their relatives’ mental illness. More than half of the participants found that the doctors were considered as their primary source of information about mental health. Consistent with previous literature in Malaysia, most of the caregivers used religious and traditional coping mechanism in their help-seeking processes. Each ethnic group had their own strong cultural beliefs about mental illness. The implications for mental health services are that many of the caregivers need help to educate their family members about mental illness. While this study emphasized on the family members who should be targeted to improve mental health literacy it also become significant to the public to reduce stigma towards the person with mental illness and their family.

Mohamad M. S.; Zabidah P.; Fauziah I.; Sarnon N.

2012-01-01

372

International observatory on mental health systems: structure and operation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Sustained cooperative action is required to improve the mental health of populations, particularly in low and middle-income countries where meagre mental health investment and insufficient human and other resources result in poorly performing mental health systems. The Observatory The International Observatory on Mental Health Systems is a mental health systems research, education and development network that will contribute to the development of high quality mental health systems in low and middle-income countries. The work of the Observatory will be done by mental health systems research, education and development groups that are located in and managed by collaborating organisations. These groups will be supported by the IOMHS Secretariat, the International IOMHS Steering Group and a Technical Reference Group. Summary The International Observatory on Mental Health Systems is: 1) the mental health systems research, education and development groups; 2) the IOMHS Steering Group; 3) the IOMHS Technical Reference Group; and 4) the IOMHS Secretariat. The work of the Observatory will depend on free and open collaboration, sharing of knowledge and skills, and governance arrangements that are inclusive and that put the needs and interests of people with mental illness and their families at the centre of decision-making. We welcome contact from individuals and institutions that wish to contribute to achieving the goals of the Observatory. Now is the time to make it happen where it matters, by turning scientific knowledge into effective action for people's health. (J.W. Lee, in his acceptance speech on his appointment as the Director-General of the World Health Organization) 1.

Minas Harry

2009-01-01

373

Mental health service utilization in the U.S. Army.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: U.S. Army personnel experience significant burden from mental disorders, particularly during times of war and with multiple deployments. This study identified the rates and predictors of mental health service use by Army soldiers and examined the association of daily functioning with the various types of mental health service use. METHODS: This study used the U.S. Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel, which sampled 10,400 Army soldiers, representing 508,088 soldiers. Mental health service utilization over a 12-month period included receiving counseling or therapy from a general medical doctor, receiving counseling or therapy from a mental health professional, and being prescribed medications for depression, anxiety, or sleep. Current functioning was assessed with the Health-Related Quality of Life-4 instrument. RESULTS: Of the active U.S. Army, 21% had used mental health services in the previous 12 months, and 48% of them had used two or more services. About 7% of soldiers saw a mental health specialist and were prescribed medication. Women (incidence rate ratio [IRR]=1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.19-1.63) and enlisted soldiers (IRR=1.93, CI=1.49-2.50) were more likely than others to use a greater number of services. Soldiers with higher versus lower levels of impaired functioning were 7.82 times more likely (CI=6.03-10.14) to use mental health services, 4.40 times more likely (CI=3.83-5.05) to use more services, and 3.18 times more likely (CI=1.85-5.49) to see a mental health specialist and to be prescribed medication. CONCLUSIONS: A substantial proportion of the Army accesses mental health services. Soldiers using the highest levels of care had the greatest impairment.

McKibben JB; Fullerton CS; Gray CL; Kessler RC; Stein MB; Ursano RJ

2013-04-01

374

Mental health literacy and attitudes in a Swedish community sample – Investigating the role of personal experience of mental health care  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental ill health is a common condition in the general population, yet only about half of those with a mental disorder have treatment contact. Personal experience may affect attitudes, which in turn influence the help-seeking process. This study investigated differences in mental health literacy and attitudes among mentally healthy persons and in persons with symptoms of mental illness with and without treatment contact. Method A postal screening questionnaire was sent to a random sample of the general population aged 20–64 in the county of Skaraborg, Sweden in order to ascertain mental health status and history of treatment contact; 3538 responded (49%). Face-to-face interviews were carried out in random sub samples of mentally healthy persons (n = 128) and in mentally ill persons with (n = 125) and without (n = 105) mental health care contact. Mental health literacy and attitudes to treatment were assessed using questions based on a vignette depicting a person with depression. Past month mental disorder was diagnosed according to the Schedule for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN). Results Two thirds failed to recognize depression in a vignette; recognition was equally poor in mentally healthy persons and in persons with symptoms of mental illness with and without treatment contact. In response to an open-ended question concerning appropriate interventions, one third suggested counselling and only one percent proposed antidepressant treatment. Again, proportions were similar in all groups. Persons with a history of mental health contact more often suggested that a GP would provide the best form of help. When presented with a list of possible interventions, those with a history of mental health contact were more positive to medical interventions such as antidepressants, hypnotics, and inpatient psychiatric treatment. When asked about the prognosis for the condition described in the vignette, persons with treatment contact were less likely to believe in full recovery without intervention; mentally ill without treatment contact were more optimistic. Conclusion Mental health literacy, specially concerning attitudes towards interventions is associated with personal history of mental health care.

Dahlberg Karin M; Waern Margda; Runeson Bo

2008-01-01

375

Mental health care reforms in Asia: the regional health care strategic plan: the growing impact of mental disorders in Japan.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In April 2013 Japan designated mental disorders as the fifth "priority disease" for national medical services, after cancer, stroke, acute myocardial infarction, and diabetes. All prefectures will be required to assess local mental health needs and develop necessary service components. This column provides an overview of the Regional Health Care Strategic Plan in the context of mental health and welfare reforms. The goals of the plan are to alter the balance between institutional and community-based care for patients with severe and persistent mental disorders, integrate general medical and mental health care, and support greater independence for people with mental disorders. It is a political challenge for Japan to reallocate resources to rebalance care services while maintaining free access to care.

Ito H; Frank RG; Nakatani Y; Fukuda Y

2013-07-01

376

Correlates of Mental Health Among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Purpose: Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine primary and context-specific stressors of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. Methods: Structured interview data were obtained from farmworkers (N = 69) in 6 counties in eastern and western North Carolina. Findings: Results indicated that a substantial number of farmworkers have poor mental health, as indicated by elevated depressive symptoms (52.2%) and anxiety (16.4%). Results also indicated that each mental health outcome had different predictors. Conclusion: Addressing the mental health issues of farmworkers requires a comprehensive, multifaceted approach.

Crain, R.; Grzywacz, J.G.

2012-01-01

377

Risk factors for post-injury mental health problems.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Serious nonfatal physical injuries and burns are common occurrences that can have substantial implications for personal, social, and occupational functioning. Such injuries are frequently associated with significant mental health issues, and compromised quality of life and well-being. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current literature on physical, psychological, and social risk factors for mental health issues post-injury and to contextualize findings using Engel's biopsychosocial framework. We distinguish between pre-injury, injury-related, and post-injury risk factors for mental health problems. Female sex, history of mental health problems or trauma, type of injury, and level of pain are among the strong risk factors for mental health problems post-injury. We highlight inconsistent findings in the literature, identify directions for future research, and explore the implications of the risk factors identified for treatment and prevention.

Sareen J; Erickson J; Medved MI; Asmundson GJ; Enns MW; Stein M; Leslie W; Doupe M; Logsetty S

2013-04-01

378

College students' responses to mental health status updates on Facebook.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Facebook is widely used by the college population, and previous research has shown that mental health references on Facebook are common. Focus groups of college students were held to determine their views of mental health references seen in their peers' Facebook profiles. Students' views of mental health references varied from being serious calls for help, to being jokes or attention-seeking behavior. Responses to mental health references depended on the participants' offline relationship with the poster. Students would contact close friends through a phone call or in-person conversation, but would not approach acquaintances. The prevalence of mental health references on Facebook, and the awareness of these references by college students, may present opportunities for future peer intervention efforts.

Egan KG; Koff RN; Moreno MA

2013-01-01

379

Making activity-based funding work for mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The implementation of activity-based funding (ABF) in mental health from 1 July 2013 has significant risks and benefits. It is critical that the process of implementation is consistent with Australia's cherished goal of establishing a genuine and effective model of community-based mental health care. The infrastructure to support the application of ABF to mental health is currently weak and requires considerable development. States and territories are struggling to meet existing demand for largely hospital-based acute mental health care. There is a risk that valuable ABF-driven Commonwealth growth funds may be used to prop up these systems rather than drive the emergence of new models of community-based care. Some of these new models exist now and this article provides a short description. The aim is to help the Independent Hospital Pricing Authority better understand the landscape of mental health into which it now seeks to deploy ABF.

Rosenberg SP; Hickie IB

2013-06-01

380

JOB SATISFACTION AND MENTAL HEALTH OF SCHOOL TEACHERS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study is intended to gain knowledge about Job Satisfaction and Mental Health of 600 Male and Female teachers working in government and private aided primary schools of Belgaum and Dharwad districts of Karnataka State. The Job Satisfaction and Mental Health Scales were administered on the selected sample to know their level of Job Satisfaction and Mental Health. Statistical 't' test and correlation was applied to analyse the data. It was found that there is no significant difference in the Job Satisfaction of male and female teachers. It was also found that there is no significant difference in the Mental Health of teachers. There is a significant and positive correlation found in Job Satisfaction and Mental Health of teachers.

S.G. JADHAV

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
381

Correlates of mental health among Latino farmworkers in North Carolina.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine primary and context-specific stressors of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. METHODS: Structured interview data were obtained from farmworkers (N = 69) in 6 counties in eastern and western North Carolina. FINDINGS: Results indicated that a substantial number of farmworkers have poor mental health, as indicated by elevated depressive symptoms (52.2%) and anxiety (16.4%). Results also indicated that each mental health outcome had different predictors. CONCLUSION: Addressing the mental health issues of farmworkers requires a comprehensive, multifaceted approach.

Crain R; Grzywacz JG; Schwantes M; Isom S; Quandt SA; Arcury TA

2012-01-01

382

College students' responses to mental health status updates on Facebook.  

Science.gov (United States)

Facebook is widely used by the college population, and previous research has shown that mental health references on Facebook are common. Focus groups of college students were held to determine their views of mental health references seen in their peers' Facebook profiles. Students' views of mental health references varied from being serious calls for help, to being jokes or attention-seeking behavior. Responses to mental health references depended on the participants' offline relationship with the poster. Students would contact close friends through a phone call or in-person conversation, but would not approach acquaintances. The prevalence of mental health references on Facebook, and the awareness of these references by college students, may present opportunities for future peer intervention efforts. PMID:23301569

Egan, Katie G; Koff, Rosalind N; Moreno, Megan A

2013-01-01

383

Transforming mental health care for children and their families.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In April 2002, the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health was created by executive order to study the mental health care delivery system in our nation and to make recommendations for improvements so that individuals with serious mental disorders can live, work, learn, and fully participate in their homes and communities. In its report, "Achieving the Promise: Transforming Mental Health Care in America," the commission provided strategies to address critical infrastructure, practice, and research issues. This article focuses on the work of the commission's Subcommittee on Children and Families, describing its vision for mental health service delivery for children and providing suggestions for strengthening community-based care for youths with or at risk of behavioral health disorders. Training, research, practice, and policy implications for psychologists are discussed.

Huang L; Stroul B; Friedman R; Mrazek P; Friesen B; Pires S; Mayberg S

2005-09-01

384

Impact of organisational change on mental health: a systematic review.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Although limited evidence is available, organisational change is often cited as the cause of mental health problems. This paper provides an overview of the current literature regarding the impact of organisational change on mental health. A systematic search in PUBMED, PsychInfo and Web of Knowledge combining MeSH search terms for exposure and outcome. The criterion for inclusion was original data on exposure to organisational change with mental health problems as outcome. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were included. We found in 11 out of 17 studies, an association between organisational change and elevated risk of mental health problems was observed, with a less provident association in the longitudinal studies. Based on the current research, this review cannot provide sufficient evidence of an association between organisational change and elevated risk of mental health problems. More studies of long-term effects are required including relevant analyses of confounders.

Bamberger SG; Vinding AL; Larsen A; Nielsen P; Fonager K; Nielsen RN; Ryom P; Omland Ø

2012-08-01

385

Recovery, place and community mental health services.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: While some studies have examined recovery in relation to specific contexts (e.g. housing and work), few have looked in detail at the social and environmental conditions in which recovery occurs. AIMS: To explore the relationship between the recovery of people receiving community mental health services and the places in which they live; to generate knowledge concerning aspects of locality which impact on recovery. METHOD: Grounded theory methodology was employed as a framework for collecting and analysing qualitative data. The study incorporated aspects of Photovoice ( Lopez et al., 2005 ) and ethnography. RESULTS: Four overlapping theoretical accounts are presented. These are: housing, space and agency; representations of social identity; natural environments; and replacement communities. CONCLUSIONS: Recovery can be understood as a variety of interacting ecological processes occurring in the context of the social, economic and physical environment. This offers new ways of thinking about recovery-orientated services.

Yates I; Holmes G; Priest H

2012-04-01

386

Citizenship and Mental Health Policy in Europe  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The problems confronted by people who experience mental disorders are often conceptualised in terms of health and illness. However, these problems extend far beyond the healthcare system, into all areas of human life. Having a psychiatric diagnosis may have a negative impact on every aspect of the individual’s life, leading to the deprivation or limitation of rights in relation to housing, employment, and family life. In this article, some of these problems are discussed within the theoretical framework of debates on citizenship and on human rights. As the context is Europe, reference is made to the recent policy initiatives with the EU, to national and European level consumer organisations and to cases brought before the European Court of Human Rights.

Prior, Pauline

2007-01-01

387

Mental health issues in unaccompanied refugee minors  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Previous studies about unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) showed that they are a highly vulnerable group who have greater psychiatric morbidity than the general population. This review focuses on mental health issues among URMs. Articles in databases PsycINFO, Medline and PubMed from 1998 to 2008 addressing this topic were reviewed. The literature had a considerable emphasis on the assessment of PTSD symptoms. Results revealed higher levels of PTSD symptoms in comparison to the norm populations and accompanied refugee minors. In several studies, age and female gender predicted or influenced PTSD symptoms. The existing literature only permits limited conclusions on this very hard to reach population. Future research should include the analysis of long-term outcomes, stress management and a more thorough analysis of the whole range of psychopathology. Additionally, the development of culturally sensitive norms and standardized measures for diverse ethnic groups is of great importance.

Huemer Julia; Karnik Niranjan S; Voelkl-Kernstock Sabine; Granditsch Elisabeth; Dervic Kanita; Friedrich Max H; Steiner Hans

2009-01-01

388

78 FR 64603 - Medicare Program: Conditions of Participation (CoPs) for Community Mental Health Centers  

Science.gov (United States)

...Participation (CoPs) for Community Mental Health Centers; Final Rule Federal Register...Participation (CoPs) for Community Mental Health Centers AGENCY: Centers for Medicare...participation (CoPs) that community mental health centers (CMHCs) must meet...

2013-10-29

389

The paradox of mental health: over-treatment and under-recognition.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The PLOS Medicine editors discuss the paradox of mental health, where over-diagnosis and treatment of some mental health issues exists alongside profound under-recognition of mental health conditions in the developing world.

2013-01-01

390

Are nurses in mental health services providing physical health care for people with serious mental illness? An Australian perspective.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

People with serious mental illness are at high-risk for physical illnesses and premature death, and nurses can contribute to ensuring mental health services address these risks. There is very little research examining the role of nurses in mental health who provide physical health care. To identify the levels of participation in physical health care of people with serious mental illness (SMI), a national Internet-based survey of nurses working in mental health in Australia was conducted (n = 643). The survey included an adapted version of the Robson and Haddad Physical Health Attitude Scale. Data were analysed through comparison of frequencies, correlations, principal components analysis, and Mann-Whitney tests. Nurses reported regular physical health care in 12 of the 17 tasks presented to them. The three most common self-reported physical health care activities were inquiring about consumers' contact with GPs, doing physical assessments, and providing information on drug use and lifestyle. Although some practices were less common (e.g., contraceptive advice) nurses who provided one type of care tended to do other types as well. In addition, credentialing in mental health nursing was associated with slightly more regular engagement in all practice domains except screening and assessments. Nurses in mental health in Australia may be engaged in improving physical health of consumers with SMI more than is assumed.

Happell B; Platania-Phung C; Scott D

2013-03-01

391

Vicarious traumatization: implications for the mental health of health workers?  

Science.gov (United States)

It has been suggested that a unique feature of some mental heath practitioners' work is exposure through their role as therapists to clients' descriptions of and reactions to trauma, and that these experiences may actually indirectly cause distress and traumatization to the therapist. This proposed phenomenon has been termed "vicarious traumatization" (VT) and is the focus of the current review. The concept of VT, together with other related concepts such as "burnout," "compassion fatigue," "secondary traumatic stress" (STS), and "work stress" are appraised. Psychological mechanisms that might be theoretically involved in VT are considered. The measurement of VT is reviewed alongside the limited research evidence supporting its existence. Factors such as direct trauma exposure and the personal attributes of mental health workers, which have been suggested to be associated with VT, are also assessed. It is concluded that the evidence to support the existence of VT is meager and inconsistent. Future research needs to be directed at distinguishing VT from other sources of distress arising within the workplace. Finally, the organizational relevance of VT and its possible implications for the management of mental health workers are critically appraised. PMID:12729680

Sabin-Farrell, Rachel; Turpin, Graham

2003-05-01

392

Vicarious traumatization: implications for the mental health of health workers?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

It has been suggested that a unique feature of some mental heath practitioners' work is exposure through their role as therapists to clients' descriptions of and reactions to trauma, and that these experiences may actually indirectly cause distress and traumatization to the therapist. This proposed phenomenon has been termed "vicarious traumatization" (VT) and is the focus of the current review. The concept of VT, together with other related concepts such as "burnout," "compassion fatigue," "secondary traumatic stress" (STS), and "work stress" are appraised. Psychological mechanisms that might be theoretically involved in VT are considered. The measurement of VT is reviewed alongside the limited research evidence supporting its existence. Factors such as direct trauma exposure and the personal attributes of mental health workers, which have been suggested to be associated with VT, are also assessed. It is concluded that the evidence to support the existence of VT is meager and inconsistent. Future research needs to be directed at distinguishing VT from other sources of distress arising within the workplace. Finally, the organizational relevance of VT and its possible implications for the management of mental health workers are critically appraised.

Sabin-Farrell R; Turpin G

2003-05-01

393

Saúde mental: reconstruindo saberes em enfermagem Salud mental: reconstruyendo saberes en enfermería Mental health : rebuilding the knowledge in nursing  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available O manicômio, apesar de criticado, reformado ou mesmo negado, ainda é uma prática preponderante no cuidado às pessoas com transtornos mentais. Tal prática tem como princípio básico o isolamento do doente mental, contrariando todas as possibilidades de assistência centrada num humanismo ético. Este ensaio procura interpretar a institucionalização do asilo, da psiquiatria, da doença mental e o processo da reforma psiquiátrica, buscando contribuir para as reflexões acerca da desinstitucionalização e dos saberes e práticas de enfermagem em saúde mental.El manicomio a pesar de criticado, reformado o incluso negado, todavía sigue siendo una práctica preponderante en el cuidado a las personas con trastornos mentales. Tal práctica lleva como principio básico el aislamiento del enfermo mental, contradiciendo todas las posibilidades de asistencia centrada en un humanismo ético. Este ensayo procura interpretar la institucionalización del asilo, de la psiquiatría, de enfermedad mental, y el proceso de reforma psiquiátrica, intentando contribuir con las reflexiones acerca de la desinstitucionalización y de los saberes prácticos de enfermería en salud mental.The insane asylum, in spite of being criticized, reformed or even denied, is still a predominant habit in taking care of people with mental disturbances. That habit has as its basic principle the isolation of the mental sick, contradicting all the possibilities of assistance centered in an ethical humanism. This essay tries to interpret the institutionalization of the asylum, psychiatry, mental sickness and also the process of psychiatry reform, searching to contribute to all the reflections about uninstitutionalization, nursing knowledge and practice in mental health.

Francisca Bezerra de Oliveira; Maria Lucinete Fortunato

2003-01-01

394

[Mental health, work and retirement: a focus on mental allienation].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

It is an exploratory-descriptive study that aimed to analyze the disability retirement of employees of the UFRN for mental and behavioral disorders in the period 2000-2005. The sample was obtained from records of the DAS/PRH/UFRN. Of 43 retirees, 58% were men, 41% retire between 41-50 years and 35% between 51-60 years, 44% occupied position/function for the high school level and 28% for the elementary level. The mood disorders lead to 61% of the retirements by mental alienation, followed by thought disorders (19%), organic mental disorders and personality disorder (4%). We found that they lived with intense psychological distress creating an indirect burden on their lives and on their family's life facing lost opportunities of life and to the adjusted years of disability affecting their work.

de Miranda FA; de Carvalho GR; Fernandes RL; Silva MB; Sabino Md

2009-09-01

395

Mental Health Status of Hospitals Staff in Iran  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Public well being is a perquisite for sustaining, community job and educational performance of the society which is achievable through physical mental health programs. One of important dimension of sustainable development includes health sectors which has direct influence of human health. This is possible only through healthy and motivated human resources health sector. Thereby, this study was conducted aiming in assessing the mental health status of human resources of shiraz hospitals and community performance it also studies the occupational risk factors, in relation human resources health and relationship between migraine -TTH and their mental health status. The sample size includes 1023 Shiraz hospital staff. The subjects were selected using categorical random sampling method. Data was collected using a questionnaire, which included demographic, occupational and health status of staff. The health status was assessed using GHQ 28 standards. The diagnostic criteria of type of headache were done by using international headache society standards and interview and medical examination by a neurologist (466 individuals). 45.6% of staff had poor mental health, prevalence among male and female were 27.6(16 cases) and 54.3 (380 cases), respectively. Their average score in physical health, anxiety, social functions, depression and general mental health statue were 6.72, 6.67, 6.48, 3.28 and 23.2% respectively. Mental health status had a meaningful relationship with steep pattern, physical activity and job satisfaction. Females had more odds to disorder and results show that headache has a profound effect on mental health status and these two are not independent of each other. Findings indicate that mental health disorders have a high prevalence; thereby authorities and researchers need to pay more attention to this issue, through identifying influential factors and developing intervention programs to improve the situation. To improve the sleep pattern and make facilities available for physical activities, are essential for staff satisfaction. High co morbidity between headache and GHQ requires specific strategy and intervention development.

Leila Sahebi; Rezagholi Vahidi; S.M. Taghi Ayatollahi

2007-01-01

396

Economics of disaster risk, social vulnerability, and mental health resilience.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

We investigate the relationship between exposure to Hurricanes Katrina and/or Rita and mental health resilience by vulnerability status, with particular focus on the mental health outcomes of single mothers versus the general public. We advance a measurable notion of mental health resilience to disaster events. We also calculate the economic costs of poor mental health days added by natural disaster exposure. Negative binomial analyses show that hurricane exposure increases the expected count of poor mental health days for all persons by 18.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.44-31.14%), and by 71.88% (95% CI, 39.48-211.82%) for single females with children. Monthly time-series show that single mothers have lower event resilience, experiencing higher added mental stress. Results also show that the count of poor mental health days is sensitive to hurricane intensity, increasing by a factor of 1.06 (95% CI, 1.02-1.10) for every billion (U.S.$) dollars of damage added for all exposed persons, and by a factor of 1.08 (95% CI, 1.03-1.14) for single mothers. We estimate that single mothers, as a group, suffered over $130 million in productivity loss from added postdisaster stress and disability. Results illustrate the measurability of mental health resilience as a two-dimensional concept of resistance capacity and recovery time. Overall, we show that natural disasters regressively tax disadvantaged population strata.

Zahran S; Peek L; Snodgrass JG; Weiler S; Hempel L

2011-07-01

397

Does cultural integration explain a mental health advantage for adolescents?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: A mental health advantage has been observed among adolescents in urban areas. This prospective study tests whether cultural integration measured by cross-cultural friendships explains a mental health advantage for adolescents. METHODS: A prospective cohort of adolescents was recruited from 51 secondary schools in 10 London boroughs. Cultural identity was assessed by friendship choices within and across ethnic groups. Cultural integration is one of four categories of cultural identity. Using gender-specific linear-mixed models we tested whether cultural integration explained a mental health advantage, and whether gender and age were influential. Demographic and other relevant factors, such as ethnic group, socio-economic status, family structure, parenting styles and perceived racism were also measured and entered into the models. Mental health was measured by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire as a 'total difficulties score' and by classification as a 'probable clinical case'. RESULTS: A total of 6643 pupils in first and second years of secondary school (ages 11-13 years) took part in the baseline survey (2003/04) and 4785 took part in the follow-up survey in 2005-06. Overall mental health improved with age, more so in male rather than female students. Cultural integration (friendships with own and other ethnic groups) was associated with the lowest levels of mental health problems especially among male students. This effect was sustained irrespective of age, ethnicity and other potential explanatory variables. There was a mental health advantage among specific ethnic groups: Black Caribbean and Black African male students (Nigerian/Ghanaian origin) and female Indian students. This was not fully explained by cultural integration, although cultural integration was independently associated with better mental health. CONCLUSIONS: Cultural integration was associated with better mental health, independent of the mental health advantage found among specific ethnic groups: Black Caribbean and some Black African male students and female Indian students.

Bhui KS; Lenguerrand E; Maynard MJ; Stansfeld SA; Harding S

2012-06-01

398

Rural professionals' perceptions of interprofessional continuing education in mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

We describe the impact of an interprofessional education programme in mental health for professionals in six rural Canadian communities. The 10-session programme, offered primarily via videoconference, focussed on eight domains of mental health practice. One hundred and twenty-five professionals, representing 15 professions, attended at least some sessions, although attendance was variable. Data were collected between September 2006 and December 2007. The programme was evaluated using a mixed methods approach. Participants reported high levels of satisfaction for all topics and all aspects of the presentations: they were most satisfied with the opportunity to interact with other professionals and least satisfied with the videoconference technology. Professionals' confidence (n = 49) with mental health interventions, issues and populations was measured pre- and post-programme. There was a significant increase in confidence for seven of the eight mental health interventions and four of the six mental health issues that had been taught in the programme. Participants reported developing a more reflective mental health practice, becoming more aware of mental health issues, integrating new knowledge and skills into their work and they expressed a desire for further mental health training. They noted that interprofessional referrals, inter-agency linkages and collaborations had increased. Conditions that appeared to underpin the programme's success included: scheduling the programme over an extended time period, a positive relationship between the facilitator and participants, experiential learning format and community co-ordinators as liaisons. Participants' dissatisfaction with the videoconference technology was mitigated by the strong connection between the facilitator and participants. One challenge was designing a curriculum that met the needs of professionals with varied expertise and work demands. The programme seemed to benefit most of those professionals who had a mental health background. This programme has the potential to be of use in rural communities where professionals often do not have access to professional development in mental health.

Church EA; Heath OJ; Curran VR; Bethune C; Callanan TS; Cornish PA

2010-07-01

399

Impact of a mental health teaching programme on adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Child and adolescent mental health disorders are present in around 10% of the population. Research indicates that many young people possess negative attitudes towards mental health difficulties among peers. AIMS: To assess the impact of a mental health teaching programme on adolescent pupils' understanding. METHOD: Two-group pre-test-post-test control group study in two English secondary schools. Experimental classes (School E) received a six-lesson teaching intervention on mental health; control classes (School C) did not. Participants were 14- and 15-year-old pupils. The intervention consisted of six lessons on mental health issues common to young people: stress; depression; suicide/self-harm; eating disorders; being bullied; and intellectual disability. School C was given access to these lesson plans and materials on completion of the study. Understanding was measured at two time points, Time 1 (T(1)) and Time 2 (T(2)), 8 months apart, by a Mental Health Questionnaire. Behavioural, emotional and relationship strengths and difficulties were measured by the self-rated Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) with five subscales: hyperactivity, emotional symptoms, conduct problems, peer problems and prosocial behaviour. RESULTS: At T(2), pupils in School E compared with those in School C showed significantly more sensitivity and empathy towards people with mental health difficulties. They also used significantly fewer pejorative expressions to describe mental health difficulties. There was a significant reduction in SDQ scores on conduct problems and a significant increase on prosocial behaviour among School E pupils compared with controls. Pupils valued the intervention highly, in particular the lessons on suicide/self-harm. CONCLUSIONS: Teaching 14- and 15-year-olds about mental health difficulties helps to reduce stigma by increasing knowledge and promoting positive attitudes. The intervention also reduced self-reported conduct problems and increased prosocial behaviour. Generally, participating pupils were positive about the importance of lessons on mental health, and said that they had learnt much about the lesson topics.

Naylor PB; Cowie HA; Walters SJ; Talamelli L; Dawkins J

2009-04-01

400

Planning estimates for the mental health community support sector.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To describe the approach undertaken to derive planning estimates for the mental health community support sector in Queensland, Australia. METHODS: We quantified the needs for services by calculating the prevalence of mental illness in Queensland and by stratifying mental illness by severity. A taxonomy of services in the mental health community support sector was developed and target groups for services identified. Resource targets were set based on a review of the academic and grey literature, expert opinion and consultation with the funding body. RESULTS: To provide adequate supported accommodation, 88 beds per 100,000 population are required, with 33.6 full-time equivalents (FTEs) per 100,000 population of attached personalised support. An additional 12.7 FTEs per 100,000 population of personalised support is required for individuals living independently in the community. We estimated that 6.9 FTEs per 100,000 population would be required for the provision of group support services. We estimated that a target of 1.6% of total mental health community support sector budget should be allocated to mutual support and self-help and 5% to community development. CONCLUSIONS: The mental health community support sector is now a major provider of services for people with mental illness, and is likely to continue to grow. When compared to public sector clinical mental health services, the mental health community support sector has lacked clarity surrounding what services are provided, and the quantity of resources required to provide these services. In the absence of other planning information for the community mental health support sector, the estimates described here provide a first step to guide governments and policymakers. Further research and testing in the real world by mental health community support sector practitioners is required to increase the evidence base and refine resource targets.

Siskind D; Harris M; Buckingham B; Pirkis J; Whiteford H

2012-06-01

 
 
 
 
401

Intimate partner violence and mental health in Bolivia.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Latin America has among the highest rates of intimate partner violence. While there is increasing evidence that intimate partner violence is associated with mental health problems, there is little such research for developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between Bolivian women's experiences with physical, psychological, and sexual intimate partner violence and mental health outcomes. METHODS: This study analyzes data from the 2008 Bolivia Demographic and Health Survey. 10,119 married or cohabiting women ages 15-49 are included in the analysis. Probit regression models are used to assess the association between intimate partner violence and mental health, after controlling for other demographic factors and partner characteristics. The questionnaire uses selected questions from the SRQ-20 to measure symptoms of mental health problems. RESULTS: Intimate partner violence is common in Bolivia, with 47% of women experiencing some type of spousal abuse in the 12 months before the survey. Women exposed to physical spousal violence in the past year are more likely to experience symptoms of depression, anxiety, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and psychotic disorders, after controlling for other demographic and partner characteristics. Women who experienced sexual abuse by a partner are most likely to suffer from all mental health issues. Psychological abuse is also associated with an increased risk of experiencing symptoms of depression, anxiety, and psychogenic seizures. Women who experienced only psychological abuse report mental health problems similar to those who were physically abused. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates an urgent need for research on the prevalence and health consequences of psychological abuse in developing countries. Our findings highlight the need for mental health services for victims of intimate partner violence. Because physical and psychological violence are often experienced concurrently, it is recommended that health providers who are treating victims of physical intimate partner violence also screen them for symptoms of potential mental health problems and refer them to appropriate mental health services.

Meekers D; Pallin SC; Hutchinson P

2013-01-01

402

[The organization of mental health care in community].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Integration of the psychiatry in primary care is beneficial for the early detection of mental disorder, better outcome of mental disorder and reduction of stigma. Psychiatry is a leading profession in organisation of mental health services. General practitioners (GPs) in Europe deal with mental disorders in their everyday practice, so the same is expected in Croatia. Graduate and postgraduate education of our GPs is insufficient for this new role. The paper compares actual situation in Croatia with forthcoming needs. The paper suggests that community psychiatry, anti-stigma program, continuing medical education of GPs and network of consultant psychiatrists give the best results in the early detection and treatment of mental disorder.

Ivezi? SS; Juki? V; Hotujac L; Juki? MK; Tikvica A

2010-01-01

403

School Mental Health: Role of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and Factors Affecting Service Provision.  

Science.gov (United States)

The U.S. Surgeon General reported in 1999 that about one in five children in the United States suffers from a mental health problem that could impair their ability to function at school or in the community. Yet many children receive no mental health servi...

2007-01-01

404

Economics of mental health: Part II- Investing in and planning for mental health services -the evidence  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background : The economic costs and proportion of disease burden attributable to mental, emotional and behavioural disorders (MEBs) is enormous. This emphasizes on the need for treating the MEBs. Choosing the most cost effective intervention is the key aspect in planning mental health services.Objective: The aim of the present article is to review the studies on cost-effective interventions for MEBs.Methodology: A review of various studies on the above subject was done using Google Scholar and PubMed.Results: Most of these studies are from developed countries. Many of them are conducted by World Health Organization (WHO). There is paucity of data on cost-effectiveness of interventions in the developing world. There are cost-effective interventions available for most of the MEBs.Conclusions: There are cost-effective interventions for MEBs. The available cost-effective strategies need to be incorporated with necessary modifications to tailor to the local needs. Proper planning is crucial for successful approach to mental health. Prevention is the most cost-effective strategy.

Srinivasa SRR Yerramilli; Rajshekhar Bipeta

2012-01-01

405

Mental Health and PTSD in Female North Korean Refugees.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study was conducted to identify mental health status, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and psychophysiological change in female North Korean refugees. Data were collected using questionnaires and symptom checklists that measured PTSD and the psychosomatic state of the subjects. As many as 97 subjects, who had settled in and around Seoul, South Korea, were selected by snowball sampling. Mental health and PTSD levels of the participants were above a moderate level. We conclude that health care professionals need to provide female North Korean defectors with services to improve mental health and make the sociocultural transition successfully.

Shin G; Lee SJ

2013-08-01

406