WorldWideScience

Sample records for mapping mental health

  1. Mental Health

    Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act ... handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

  2. Mental Health

    World Bank (WB)

    2003-01-01

    The response on why to address mental health, lies on the fact that neuropsychiatric disorders account for an eleven percent of the global burden of disease; that four, of the top ten causes of disability were due to mental disorders; and, that depression is projected to rank second among neurological disorders. Thus, the catastrophic costs of mental disorders for individuals, and families...

  3. Children's Mental Health Surveillance

    Children’s Mental Health Surveillance What are childhood mental disorders? The term childhood mental disorder means all mental disorders that can ... is the impact of mental disorders in children? Mental health is important to overall health. Mental disorders are ...

  4. What Is Mental Health?

    ... Myths and Facts Recovery is Possible What Is Mental Health? Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social ... mental health problems and where to find help . Mental Health and Wellness Positive mental health allows people to: ...

  5. What Is Mental Health?

    ... Myths and Facts Recovery is Possible What Is Mental Health? Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and ... mental health problems and where to find help . Mental Health and Wellness Positive mental health allows people ...

  6. Women and Mental Health

    ... Home > Health & Education > Mental Health Information Women and Mental Health Mental illnesses affect women and men differently — some ... mail.nih.gov Share Science News About Women’s Mental Health Soldiers at High Suicide Risk after Hospitalization NIMH ...

  7. Children's Mental Health

    ... to Other Websites Information For... Media Policy Makers Children's Mental Health Language: English Espaol (Spanish) Recommend on ... What is the impact of mental disorders in children? Mental health is important to overall health. Mental ...

  8. Mental Health for Men

    ... Men's Health This information in Spanish ( en español ) Mental health for men More information on mental health for ... extremely effective. Return to top More information on Mental health for men Explore other publications and websites Attention ...

  9. Teen Mental Health

    ... or worthless could be warning signs of a mental health problem. Mental health problems are real, painful, and sometimes severe. You ... reckless things that could harm you or others Mental health problems can be treated. To find help, talk ...

  10. Mapping interventions that promote mental health in the general population: A scoping review of reviews.

    Enns, Jennifer; Holmqvist, Maxine; Wener, Pamela; Halas, Gayle; Rothney, Janet; Schultz, Annette; Goertzen, Leah; Katz, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Health policies and programs promoting mental health or preventing mental illness in the general public are under-recognized facets of primary prevention. Increasing awareness and adoption of such strategies could reduce the burden of mental illness in individuals, families, communities, and society as whole. We conducted a scoping review of reviews of interventions to promote mental health or prevent mental illness. We searched PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL and ERIC from 2004 to 2014. Reviews were included if the authors indicated a systematic approach in their literature searches, and if they comprised interventions in Westernized countries targeting the general population. We identified 39 reviews that met the inclusion criteria. Mental health intervention approaches and outcomes varied across age groups and settings, and included functional, social, and cognitive measures. Most interventions aimed to prevent a specific mental illness or symptoms (depression, anxiety, burnout, or stress). Cognitive-behavioral therapy and educational components were common. School-based programs focused on outcomes involving social and academic development. Interventions for families, especially for young or disadvantaged parents, taught parenting skills to help improve the well-being of children and their care-givers. In the workplace, the focus was on managing stress, while programs for the elderly emphasized quality of life determinants. This review summarizes a wide variety of interventions to promote mental health or prevent mental illness, but the literature is primarily focused on the individual or family unit. More information is required about interventions at the community and societal levels. PMID:26896634

  11. MAPPING OF GOVERNMENTAL AND NON-GOVERNMENTAL MENTAL HEALTH ASSISTANCE IN A CITY IN RIO GRANDE DO SUL.

    Vagner Dos Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades Brazil started to transform its mental health service system. This reform includes the implementation of new services. Objective: To map and characterize the performance of government institutions and non-governmental organizations involved in mental health care in a metropolitan area of southern Brazil. Method: This quantitative research was dived in three phases, 1th previous survey, 2nd mapping and 3rd detailing. In the first phase Internet search was made to collect data on mental health services, in the second phase the municipality mental health system was mapped through snowball methodology, in which any institution visited indicated others and finally, detailing included specifics questions on financial resources and routines. Results: A total of 113 institutions were found in different areas of the municipality (being 56 governmental and 57 nongovernmental. In the third phase of our research we lost much of our data, as many institution directors declined our invitation to participate. However, those that answered revealed that institution establish intersectorial articulations. Additionally, the institutions counted with a team of 11 professionals, in average, and a director that usually hold undergraduate degree.

  12. Mental Health Screening Center

    ... Research Find Research Studies Peer Support Research WeSearchTogether Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression This screening form was developed from ...

  13. Chronic Illness & Mental Health

    ... is present. For More Information Share Chronic Illness & Mental Health Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... For more information, see the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) booklet on Depression at http://www.nimh. ...

  14. Cartografia das pesquisas avaliativas de servios de sade mental no Brasil (2004-2013) / Mapping of inquiries in mental health care in Brazil (2004-2013)

    Clarissa de Rosalmeida, Dantas; Ana Maria Galdini Raimundo, Oda.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem como objetivo mapear as pesquisas avaliativas de servios de sade mental, produzidas no Brasil nos ltimos dez anos, a partir de levantamento em bases de dados de dissertaes e teses acadmicas e de artigos cientficos. Foram analisadas 68 dissertaes e teses e 103 artigos. A pr [...] oduo das dissertaes e teses se concentra em instituies nos estados de So Paulo e do Rio de Janeiro, e estas se originam principalmente de programas de ps-graduao em Sade Coletiva e em Enfermagem. Os artigos se referem a servios localizados em nmero restrito de municpios das regies Sul e Sudeste do pas, principalmente do Rio Grande do Sul e de So Paulo, havendo poucos estudos de abrangncia nacional. No conjunto da produo, os servios mais avaliados so os Centros de Ateno Psicossocial, seguidos pela Ateno Bsica em Sade. Os sujeitos de pesquisa mais frequentes so os trabalhadores de sade mental, e em segundo lugar, os usurios. A maioria dos trabalhos usa metodologia qualitativa. Conclui-se que as pesquisas avaliativas vm se concentrando em abordagens pouco diversificadas do processo da reforma da sade mental, e que estas no tm abrangncia suficiente para fornecer, proximamente, elementos para prover indicadores bsicos nacionais de sade mental. Abstract in english This work aims to map the research on public mental health services evaluation carried out in Brazil in the last 10 years. We searched electronic databases for dissertations, theses and academic papers. We selected 68 dissertations and theses, and 103 articles. Most of dissertations and theses were [...] produced by Public Health and Nursing graduate programs in the states of So Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. The articles refer to services located in a restricted number of municipalities in the South and Southeast regions of the country, mainly in Rio Grande do Sul and So Paulo, with few nationwide studies. Throughout the production, the Psychosocial Community Centers, followed by Primary Health Care, are the most frequently evaluated services. Mental health workers, followed by service-users were the main source of information in the studies. Most work uses qualitative methodology. We conclude that, taken as a whole, evaluative researches in Brazil have focused on a few approaches to the process of mental health care reform, and that they are not comprehensive enough to provide information on national mental health indicators.

  15. Mental Health and African Americans

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Mental Health Mental Health and African Americans Poverty level affects mental health ... compared to 120% of Non-Hispanic Whites. 1 MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  16. YOGA FOR MENTAL HEALTH

    SHOBHA PRAMOD SHINDE

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mental Health is a concept that refers to the psychological and emotional well being of a person. Being mentally healthy generally means that you are able to use your emotional capabilities to function well in society and go through everyday life with little or no difficulty. Some factors that can affect your mental health are your family life, social life, and life at work. Mental Health disorders are on the rise throughout the world. This result is anxieties, fears, depression, inferiority and similar emotions. Therefore, leaving the management of negative mental health is a most for all of us.

  17. Developing a tool for mapping adult mental health care provision in Europe: the REMAST research protocol and its contribution to better integrated care

    Luis Salvador-Carulla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mental health care is a critical area to better understand integrated care and to pilot the different components of the integrated care model. However, there is an urgent need for better tools to compare and understand the context of integrated mental health care in Europe.Method: The REMAST tool (REFINEMENT MApping Services Tool combines a series of standardised health service research instruments and geographical information systems (GIS to develop local atlases of mental health care from the perspective of horizontal and vertical integrated care. It contains five main sections: (a Population Data; (b the Verona Socio-economic Status (SES Index; (c the Mental Health System Checklist; (d the Mental Health Services Inventory using the DESDE-LTC instrument; and (e Geographical Data.Expected results: The REMAST tool facilitates context analysis in mental health by providing the comparative rates of mental health service provision according to the availability of main types of care; care placement capacity; workforce capacity; and geographical accessibility to services in the local areas in eight study areas in Austria, England, Finland, France, Italy, Norway, Romania and Spain.Discussion: The outcomes of this project will facilitate cooperative work and knowledge transfer on mental health care to the different agencies involved in mental health planning and provision. This project would improve the information to users and society on the available resources for mental health care and system thinking at the local level by the different stakeholders. The techniques used in this project and the knowledge generated could eventually be transferred to the mapping of other fields of integrated care.

  18. Disaster mental health

    Henderson, Silja; Berliner, Peter; Elsass, Peter

    In this chapter we focus on disaster mental health, particularly theoretical and research-based implications for intervention. The field of disaster mental health research is vast and impossible to cover in a single chapter, but we will visit central research, concepts, and understandings within...... disaster mental health and intervention, and refer to further literature where meaningful. We conclude the chapter with recommendations for further research....

  19. Ayurveda And Mental Health

    Balaji Deekshitulu P.V

    2014-01-01

    The review article explains Ayurveda has its own identity as most ancient and traditional System of Medicine in India. Ayurveda is perfect balance of mind, body and soul as complete health in human beings. Ayurveda aims at preservation and promotion of heath, and prevention and cure of diseases through the concepts of positive physical and mental health. Ayurveda is good Management of mental health.

  20. Women Veterans and Mental Health

    ... Health > Women veterans and mental health Mental Health Women veterans and mental health Post-traumatic stress disorder ( ... hurt you. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and women veterans PTSD can occur after you have been ...

  1. Sleep and Mental Health

    ... Size Email Print Share Sleep Tips for Children's Mental Health Page Content ​​​Sleep has become a casualty of ... MPH, FAAP Last Updated 5/23/2016 Source Mental Health, Naturally: The Family Guide to Holistic Care for ...

  2. Mental Health and Conflict

    Baingana, Florence

    2003-01-01

    Addressing mental health is gradually being recognized as an important development issue, especially in the case of conflict-affected countries. Although mental health issues have received increased attention in post-conflict settings, there has been a tendency to implicitly assume that the impact of trauma caused by mass violence (i) may be transitory and non-disabling, and (ii) that inte...

  3. Rural Mental Health

    ... Health Services Administration National Strategy for Suicide Prevention: Goals and Objectives for Action , Surgeon General In addition ... prevention program, which includes a comprehensive set of interventions, such as: Gatekeeper training Screening for mental health ...

  4. Mental Health and Asian Americans

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Mental Health Mental Health and Asian Americans Suicide was the 10th leading ... Americans is half that of the White population. MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  5. Looking after your mental health

    Public Health Agency

    2010-01-01

    This leaflet outlines the signs of poor mental health and suggests steps that people can take to promote good mental health. It advises people to talk to someone if they feel that they may have a mental health problem.

  6. Mental Health and HIV

    ... Arts Festival Golden Age Games Summer Sports Clinic Training - Exposure - Experience (TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter ... Coping with HIV/AIDS: Mental Health HIV/AIDS Menu Menu HIV/AIDS HIV/ ...

  7. Elderly Mental Health: Needs*

    Shubhangi R Parkar

    2015-01-01

    This paper highlights the mental health needs of the elderly. It tackles the issues of their institutionalisation and community care. Rapid urbanisation in Indian society throws up special problems in elderly care. There is great evidence of a raise in morbidity, mortality, hospitalisation and loss of functional status related to common mental disorders in the elderly patients. Overlap of depression and anxiety is very common with up to almost half of the elderly patients reporting significan...

  8. Atheism and mental health.

    Whitley, Rob

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of the impact of religiosity on mental health is an enduring, if somewhat quiet, tradition. There has been virtually no exploration, however, of the influence of atheism on mental health. Though not a "religion," atheism can be an orienting worldview that is often consciously chosen by its adherents, who firmly believe in the "truth" of atheism-a phenomenon known as "positive atheism." Atheism, especially positive atheism, is currently enjoying something of a renaissance in the Western liberal democracies-a trend often referred to as the "new atheism." I argue that atheism, especially positive atheism, should be treated as a meaningful sociocultural variable in the study of mental health. I argue that atheism (just like theism) is an appropriate domain of study for social and cultural psychiatrists (and allied social scientists) interested in exploring socio-environmental stressors and buffers relating to mental health. Specifically, I argue that (1) atheism needs to be accurately measured as an individual-level exposure variable, with the aim of relating that variable to psychiatric outcomes, (2) there needs to be greater systematic investigation into the influence of atheism on psychiatry as an institution, and (3) the relation of atheism to mental health needs to be explored by examining atheistic theory and its practical application, especially as it relates to the human condition, suffering, and concepts of personhood. PMID:20415634

  9. Religiosity and mental health.

    Pajević, Izet; Sinanović, Osman; Hasanović, Mevludin

    2005-06-01

    Mental health is not considered only as absence of mental disorders, but rather as the achievement of higher standards of available psychical potentials. True devotion and obedience to The God give the one a huge and incredible strength, constant source of spiritual emotional and moral energy, which is of help in resisting destructive and slavery attacks of the environment and its materialistic-consuming tendencies, as well as social and mental disruption. According to the opinion of numerous worldwide recognized mental health experts, humankind of today is confronted with a number of problems, which are the consequence of spiritual and moral-ethical degradation of human being. Therefore, religiosity became the field of interest of mental health researchers. The results of new studies undoubtedly indicate beneficial effects of religion on life and mental health in humans. Religiosity reduces tendencies for risky behaviour, impulsive reactions and aggression; it corrects tendencies towards psychopathic and paranoid behaviour, reduces converse, depressive and schizoid tendency, and provides successful overcome of emotional conflicts. In comparison to low-religious adolescents, the factors such as inner conflicts, frustration, fear, anxiety, psychological trauma, low self-esteem, unbalance of psychical homeostasis, emotional instability, and negative psychical energy are less present in highly religious adolescents and neutralized in a healthier and more efficient way. Beneficial impact of religion on mental health derives from precise cognitive-behavioural patterns, which provide a clear life orientation, solid basis and safe frames for personality development, assuring human to be continually on the way to achieve its own generic essence and reach its own maturity and self-actualization. PMID:16395848

  10. FastStats: Mental Health

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Mental Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Health, United States trend tables with data on mental health Identifying Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Children Aged ...

  11. Mental Health Treatement Facilities Locator

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — An online resource for locating mental health treatment facilities and programs supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)....

  12. Mental health informatics

    Song, Insu; Yellowlees, Peter; Diederich, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces approaches that have the potential to transform the daily practice of psychiatrists and psychologists. This includes the asynchronous communication between mental health care providers and clients as well as the automation of assessment and therapy. Speech and language are particularly interesting from the viewpoint of psychological assessment. For instance, depression may change the characteristics of voice in individuals and these changes can be detected by a special form of speech analysis. Computational screening methods that utilise speech and language can detect subtle changes and alert clinicians as well as individuals and caregivers. The use of online technologies in mental health, however, poses ethical problems that will occupy concerned individuals, governments and the wider public for some time. Assuming that these ethical problems can be solved, it should be possible to diagnose and treat mental health disorders online (excluding the use of medication).

  13. Mental Health Treatment Program Locator

    ... County or Zip By Name Other Links State Mental Health Agencies Frequently Asked Questions Links Comments or Questions ... a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health treatment programs nearest you, find your State on ...

  14. Dystonia: Emotional and Mental Health

    ... Support Frequently Asked Questions Faces of Dystonia Emotional & Mental Health Although dystonia is a movement disorder that impacts ... emotion as well as muscle movement. For years, mental health professionals have recognized that coping with a chronic ...

  15. Cannabis use and mental health

    Gastel, W. van

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis use has been implicated as a risk factor for mental health problems, (subclinical) psychotic symptoms in particular. If cannabis use was a cause of these problems, cessation would lead to improved public mental health. If cannabis use was a mere consequence of a predisposition for mental health problems, cessation would not result in less problems. Prevention and intervention strategies aimed at a better public mental health would then do better to incorporate cannabis use in screeni...

  16. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to

  17. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

  18. What Is Infant Mental Health?

    Osofsky, Joy D.; Thomas, Kandace

    2012-01-01

    Unfortunately, the term "infant mental health" can be confusing for some people because it may be understood as translating into "mental illness." Others may not appreciate that babies and toddlers have the capacity to experience complex emotions. The Guest Editors of this issue of the Journal explore the meaning of infant mental health.

  19. Mind the gap - mapping services for young people with ADHD transitioning from child to adult mental health services

    Newell, Karen; Taylor, John; Sayal, Kapil; Swift, Katie D.; Hollis, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Background: Once considered to be a disorder restricted to childhood, Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is now recognised to persist into adult life. However, service provision for adults with ADHD is limited. Additionally, there is little guidance or research on how best to transition young people with ADHD from child to adult services. Method: We report the findings of a survey of 96 healthcare professionals working in childrens (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Servic...

  20. Mental health, poverty and development

    Funk, Michelle; Drew, Natalie; Knapp, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – This paper, which builds on the findings of WHO's Report on Mental Health and Development, aims to highlight the health, social, economic, and human rights effects of unaddressed mental disorders in low and middle income countries (LMICs) and to propose effective strategies to address mental disorders and their impacts as part of an overall development strategy. Design/methodology/approach – The paper first reviews the findings of relevant research on mental disorders and povert...

  1. Immigrant Mental Health and Unemployment

    Steven Kennedy

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this research is to assess whether stress associated with the transition to a new country combined with additional stress arising from unemployment affects the mental health of immigrants. I use the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Australia (LSIA) to examine the effect of labour force status on the mental health of immigrants. By using a rich longitudinal data set, I am able to control for individual immigrant differences whilst examining whether changes in mental health...

  2. Mental health of deaf people.

    Fellinger, Johannes; Holzinger, Daniel; Pollard, Robert

    2012-03-17

    Deafness is a heterogeneous condition with far-reaching effects on social, emotional, and cognitive development. Onset before language has been established happens in about seven per 10,000 people. Increased rates of mental health problems are reported in deaf people. Many regard themselves as members of a cultural minority who use sign language. In this Review, we describe discrepancies between a high burden of common mental health disorders and barriers to health care. About a quarter of deaf individuals have additional disabilities and a high probability of complex mental health needs. Research into factors affecting mental health of deaf children shows that early access to effective communication with family members and peers is desirable. Improved access to health and mental health care can be achieved by provision of specialist services with professionals trained to directly communicate with deaf people and with sign-language interpreters. PMID:22423884

  3. Observation of influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals

    Jiang, Shu-Qiang; Zhang, Jian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals. Method: 2878 professionals for physical examination were selected and randomly divided into treatment group and control group, with 1443 professionals and 1435 professionals, respectively. Then, the difference of mental health status before and after mental intervention between two groups was compared. Results: In treatment group, the proportion of people with healthy mental and modest pressure after mental intervention was higher than that before mental intervention and that in control group after mental intervention (Pmental intervention was significantly lower than that before mental intervention and that in control group after mental intervention (Pdifference in mental health status in control group before and after mental intervention (P>0.05). Mental health consciousness, health status, self pressure-relief capability, job satisfaction, and happiness index of professionals were up to 63.3%~78.8%. Conclusions: Mental health promotion and mental intervention may significantly improve mental health status of professionals. PMID:26221385

  4. Substance Abuse and Mental Health

    ... and Alcohol Tobacco Learn More Substance Abuse and Mental Health Drugs and Alcohol Did you know that addiction ... Plus – also en Español Treatment Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA): SAMHSA’s National Helpline: 1-800-662- ...

  5. Mental Health Care: Who's Who

    ... Living Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Mental Health Care: Who's Who Page Content Article Body Psychiatrist: ... degree in psychology, counseling or a related field. Mental Health Counselor: Master’s degree and several years of supervised ...

  6. International Students and Mental Health

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Sawyer, Anne-Maree

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, reports of increased rates of mental ill health among young people worldwide have received much attention. Several studies indicate a greater incidence of mental health problems among tertiary students, compared with the general population, and higher levels of anxiety, in particular, among international students compared…

  7. Plans for mental health discharge.

    2016-03-23

    People being discharged from inpatient mental health settings should be given a recovery plan that provides information on support networks and crisis management, according to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. PMID:27008118

  8. Observation of influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals

    Jiang, Shu-Qiang; Zhang, Jian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals. Method: 2878 professionals for physical examination were selected and randomly divided into treatment group and control group, with 1443 professionals and 1435 professionals, respectively. Then, the difference of mental health status before and after mental intervention between two groups was compared. Results: In treatment group, the proportion of people with heal...

  9. Disaster management: Mental health perspective

    Suresh Bada Math

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Disaster mental health is based on the principles of ′preventive medicine′ This principle has necessitated a paradigm shift from relief centered post-disaster management to a holistic, multi-dimensional integrated community approach of health promotion, disaster prevention, preparedness and mitigation. This has ignited the paradigm shift from curative to preventive aspects of disaster management. This can be understood on the basis of six ′R′s such as Readiness (Preparedness, Response (Immediate action, Relief (Sustained rescue work, Rehabilitation (Long term remedial measures using community resources, Recovery (Returning to normalcy and Resilience (Fostering. Prevalence of mental health problems in disaster affected population is found to be higher by two to three times than that of the general population. Along with the diagnosable mental disorders, affected community also harbours large number of sub-syndromal symptoms. Majority of the acute phase reactions and disorders are self-limiting, whereas long-term phase disorders require assistance from mental health professionals. Role of psychotropic medication is very limited in preventing mental health morbidity. The role of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT in mitigating the mental health morbidity appears to be promising. Role of Psychological First Aid (PFA and debriefing is not well-established. Disaster management is a continuous and integrated cyclical process of planning, organising, coordinating and implementing measures to prevent and to manage disaster effectively. Thus, now it is time to integrate public health principles into disaster mental health.

  10. Disaster Management: Mental Health Perspective.

    Math, Suresh Bada; Nirmala, Maria Christine; Moirangthem, Sydney; Kumar, Naveen C

    2015-01-01

    Disaster mental health is based on the principles of 'preventive medicine' This principle has necessitated a paradigm shift from relief centered post-disaster management to a holistic, multi-dimensional integrated community approach of health promotion, disaster prevention, preparedness and mitigation. This has ignited the paradigm shift from curative to preventive aspects of disaster management. This can be understood on the basis of six 'R's such as Readiness (Preparedness), Response (Immediate action), Relief (Sustained rescue work), Rehabilitation (Long term remedial measures using community resources), Recovery (Returning to normalcy) and Resilience (Fostering). Prevalence of mental health problems in disaster affected population is found to be higher by two to three times than that of the general population. Along with the diagnosable mental disorders, affected community also harbours large number of sub-syndromal symptoms. Majority of the acute phase reactions and disorders are self-limiting, whereas long-term phase disorders require assistance from mental health professionals. Role of psychotropic medication is very limited in preventing mental health morbidity. The role of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in mitigating the mental health morbidity appears to be promising. Role of Psychological First Aid (PFA) and debriefing is not well-established. Disaster management is a continuous and integrated cyclical process of planning, organising, coordinating and implementing measures to prevent and to manage disaster effectively. Thus, now it is time to integrate public health principles into disaster mental health. PMID:26664073

  11. Refugees and mental health interventions

    Guribye, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    This thesis focuses on refugees and mental health interventions. A literature review and 24 months of participant observation among Tamil refugee parents in Norway form the basis of the findings presented here. The first study is concerned with refugees and public mental health services in Norway. Many refugees may have difficulties trusting professional helpers within the bureaucratically organized public health care system, replacing these services with relationships to other refugees from ...

  12. [Mental health services in Australia].

    Kisely, Steve; Lesage, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Canada is 1.5 times the size of Australia. Australia's population of 20 million is located principally on the east coast. Like Canada, the Australia has a federal system of Government with 5 States and two territories. Each State and territory has its own legislation on mental health. The federal (Commonwealth) Government is responsible for health care planning. In addition, the federal Government subsidizes an insurance program (Medicare) that covers visits to specialists and family physicians, while provincial governments are involved in the provision of hospital care and community mental health services. The Commonwealth government also subsidises the cost of medication through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. These funds are supplemented by private health insurance. Mental health costs account for 6.5 per cent of all health care costs. Primary care treats the majority of common psychological disorders such as anxiety or depression, while specialist mental health services concentrate on those with severe mental illness. There have been 4 national mental health plans since 1992 with the long term aims of promoting mental health, increasing the quality and responsiveness of services, and creating a consistent approach to mental health service system reform among Australian states and territories. These systematic cycles of planning have first allowed a shift from psychiatric hospitals to community services, from reliance on psychiatric hospitals as pivotal to psychiatric care system. Community care budgets have increased, but overall have decreased with money not following patients; but recent deployment of federally funded through Medicare access to psychotherapy by psychologists for common mental disorders in primary care have increased overall budget. Concerns remain that shift to youth first onset psychosis clinics may come from older long-term psychotic patients, a form of discrimination whilst evidence amount of excess mortality by cardio-vascular diseases and cancers, and due to poverty, poor health prevention and primary health care for these patients. From a system perspective, Australia has been inspired by Canada and created in 2012 its own mental health commission with a similar leading role for patients and families, aboriginal people representatives, but also a surveillance of the system with its own yearly report, like the Quebec Health Commissioner 2012 mental health system performance report. PMID:25120122

  13. [Mental health care today].

    Cardoso, Lucilene; Galera, Sueli Aparecida Frari

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the sociodemographic characteristics of caregivers to people who have been discharged from psychiatric hospitalization. A quantitative exploratory study was performed at an outpatient clinic of a mental health service. The sample consisted of patients who had been discharged and their caregivers. A questionnaire was used, and the study was approved by the local research ethics committee. Of the 48 discharged patients, 21 had a caregiver. All the identified caregivers were relatives of the patients, and their average age was 46.6 years. In 38% of cases, the patient's mother was the caregiver. In terms of marital status, 61.9% of the caregivers were married or living in common-law relationships, and only one caregiver did not have children. The main source of income for 28.6% of the participants was temporary keeping eventual jobs. By knowing who is the caregiver of a patient discharged from psychiatric hospitalization it is possible to identify the characteristics that may help to determine the best treatment and professional support for that population. PMID:21710076

  14. The mental health of veterans.

    Murphy, D; Iversen, A; Greenberg, N

    2008-06-01

    For the majority service in the Armed Forces is beneficial and, in the main, military veterans have successful lives. However, a minority have a bleaker outlook as a result of on-going ill health and social exclusion. Whilst the media focuses on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, in reality the most frequent mental health problems for veterans are alcohol problems, depression and anxiety disorders. These difficulties are difficult to manage as veterans, particularly those who are unwell, demonstrate a reticence to seek help for mental health problems. Another issue is that many veterans are now reserve personnel who have been found to be at greater risk of developing mental health problems than their regular counterparts. Steps to improve the knowledge and expertise of primary care services about veteran's mental health issues and increasing the availability of treatment options are important and are underway. PMID:19043996

  15. Drawing Road Networks with Mental Maps.

    Lin, Shih-Syun; Lin, Chao-Hung; Hu, Yan-Jhang; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2014-09-01

    Tourist and destination maps are thematic maps designed to represent specific themes in maps. The road network topologies in these maps are generally more important than the geometric accuracy of roads. A road network warping method is proposed to facilitate map generation and improve theme representation in maps. The basic idea is deforming a road network to meet a user-specified mental map while an optimization process is performed to propagate distortions originating from road network warping. To generate a map, the proposed method includes algorithms for estimating road significance and for deforming a road network according to various geometric and aesthetic constraints. The proposed method can produce an iconic mark of a theme from a road network and meet a user-specified mental map. Therefore, the resulting map can serve as a tourist or destination map that not only provides visual aids for route planning and navigation tasks, but also visually emphasizes the presentation of a theme in a map for the purpose of advertising. In the experiments, the demonstrations of map generations show that our method enables map generation systems to generate deformed tourist and destination maps efficiently. PMID:26357374

  16. Decalogue of Positive Mental Health

    Lluch Canut, Ma. Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The document is a decalogue that includes recommendations to enhance mental health from the positive side or promotion. Includes basic bibliography that the author has generated on this topic. It is written in three languages: English, Spanish and Catalan.

  17. Social ties and mental health

    Kawachi, Ichiro; Berkman, Lisa F.

    2001-01-01

    It is generally agreed that social ties play a beneficial role in the maintenance of psychological well-being. In this targeted review, we highlight four sets of insights that emerge from the literature on social ties and mental health outcomes (defined as stress reactions, psychological well-being, and psychological distress, including depressive symptoms and anxiety). First, the pathways by which social networks and social supports influence mental health can be described by two alternative...

  18. Nations for Mental Health

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available La Organizacin Mundial de la Salud ha establecido un programa especial denominado "Naciones unidas para la salud mental" con el fin de fomentar la salud mental en poblaciones subatendidas, con particular nfasis en las mujeres, los nios, los adolescentes, los refugiados y los pueblos indgenas. Uno de los objetivos del programa es crear una mayor conciencia entre el pblico y los gobiernos acerca del costo social y econmico de los trastornos mentales y del abuso de sustancias. Un segundo objetivo es identificar y promover estrategias de colaboracin para mejorar la salud mental que se puedan poner en prctica por medio de proyectos de cooperacin tcnica de nivel nacional dirigidos por las organizaciones del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, en colaboracin con otras organizaciones internacionales gubernamentales y no gubernamentales. Ya estn en marcha varios proyectos de demostracin y otros se estn planificando.

  19. Malaysia mental health country profile.

    Parameshvara Deva, M

    2004-01-01

    Malaysia is a tropical country in the heart of south east Asia with a population of 24 million people of diverse ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds living in harmony in 330,000 km(2) of land on the Asian mainland and Borneo. Malaysia, which lies on the crossroads of trade between east and west Asia, has an ancient history as a centre of trading attracting commerce between Europe, west Asia, India and China. It has had influences from major powers that dominated the region throughout its history. Today the country, after independence in 1957, has embarked on an ambitious development project to make it a developed country by 2020. In this effort the economy has changed from one producing raw material to one manufacturing consumer goods and services and the colonial health system has been overhauled and social systems strengthened to provide better services for its people. The per capita income, which was under 1,000 US dollars at independence, has now passed 4,000 US dollars and continues to grow, with the economy largely based on strong exports that amount to over 100 billion US dollars. The mental health system that was based on institutional care in four mental hospitals at independence from British colonial rule in 1957 with no Malaysian psychiatrists is today largely based on over 30 general hospital psychiatric units spread throughout the country. With three local postgraduate training programmes in psychiatry and 12 undergraduate departments of psychiatry in the country--all started after independence--there is now a healthy development of mental health services. This is being supplemented by a newly established primary care mental health service that covers community mental health by integrating mental health into primary health care. Mental health care at the level of psychiatrists rests with about 140 psychiatrists most of whom had undertaken a four-year masters course in postgraduate psychiatry in Malaysia since 1973. However, there continues to be severe shortages of other professionals such as clinical psychologists and social workers in mental health services. There are a few specialists, and specialized services in child, adolescent, forensic, rehabilitative, liaison or research fields of mental health. In the area of services for women and children, as well as the disabled in the community, there are strong efforts to improve the care and provide services that are in keeping with a caring society. New legislation on these are being passed every year and the setting up of a Ministry for Women's Affairs is one such move in recent years. Mental health in Malaysia has been slow in developing but has in the past decade seen important strides to bring it on par with other branches of medicine. PMID:15276949

  20. Indices of Community Mental Health. A Proposal.

    Chen, Martin K.

    One of the major problems in measuring community mental health status is the lack of consensus among mental health workers in psychiatry, psychology, sociology, and epidemiology as to what constitutes mental illness. Additionally, changing social mores preclude a definition of mental illness in behavioral terms. An operational definition of mental

  1. Mental health problems in health professionals

    Koinis Ar.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For the vast majority of nurses and doctors, the choice of their profession, represents a successful career, even though this isnt a fact for everyone. For some of them reflects a journey into despair. A significant number of doctors and nurses, suffers from serious mental illness.Materials and Methods: It is conducted literature review of published journals from scientific databases such as Medline, Pub Med, Scholar Google, for the period 1985-2010, using keywords and combination of them: "health professionals", "psychiatric morbidity", "effects of stress on mental health "," mental disorders " Literature Review: There are researches in population health professionals, more often to doctors and nurses / only three, referred to mental illnesses mainly burnout, depression, anxiety disorders, alcoholism, and suicide and the effect thereof on the quality of life. Total of 215 studies were found and 48 of the were reviewed for this study.Conclusions: It is obvious from the literature, that mental health problems of the health professionals are not treated promptly or with the appropriate efficiency. The reasons associated with the stigma of mental illness by illness, the subsequent denial, the misconceived professional solidarity, culture of " medical omnipotence " for physicians. ?he timeless trend of occupational health and diagnoses to self treated their health problems , even if the knowledge on specific issues are almost non-existent.

  2. Development of Mental Health Indicators in Korea

    Han, Hyeree; Ahn, Dong Hyun; Song, Jinhee; Hwang, Tae Yeon; Roh, Sungwon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Promoting mental health and preventing mental health problems are important tasks for international organizations and nations. Such goals entail the establishment of active information networks and effective systems and indicators to assess the mental health of populations. This being said, there is a need in Korea develop ways to measure the state of mental health in Korea. Methods: This paper reviews the mental health indicator development policies and practices of seven organiza...

  3. Institutions, Politics, and Mental Health Parity

    Hernandez, Elaine M.; Uggen, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Mental health parity laws require insurers to extend comparable benefits for mental and physical health care. Proponents argue that by placing mental health services alongside physical health services, such laws can help ensure needed treatment and destigmatize mental illness. Opponents counter that such mandates are costly or unnecessary. The authors offer a sociological account of the diffusion and spatial distribution of state mental health parity laws. An event history analysis identifies...

  4. Integrating physical and mental health promotion strategies

    Palma, Jessica Anne

    2010-01-01

    While health is defined as ‘a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being’, physical and mental health have traditionally been separated. This paper explores the question: How can physical and mental health promotion strategies be integrated and addressed simultaneously? A literature review on why physical and mental health are separated and why these two areas need to be integrated was conducted. A conceptual framework for how to integrate physical and mental health promotion st...

  5. Mental health emergencies.

    Skinner, Anita

    I gained experience of psychiatric assessment in previous roles when working in a secure psychiatric ward and within the prison service. Although I have often performed mental state assessments and assessments of suicidal intent as part of my work, I read the CPD article to refresh my knowledge in this area. PMID:24593111

  6. Zambia mental health country profile.

    Mayeya, John; Chazulwa, Roy; Mayeya, Petronella Ntambo; Mbewe, Edward; Magolo, Lonia Mwape; Kasisi, Friday; Bowa, Annel Chishimba

    2004-01-01

    This country profile for Zambia was compiled between 1998 and 2002. The objectives of the exercise were to first of all avail policymakers, other key decision makers and leaders in Zambia, information about mental health in Zambia in order to assist policy and services development. Secondly, to facilitate comparative analyses of mental health services between countries. The work involved formation of a core group of experts who coordinated the collection of information from the various organizations in Zambia. The information was later shared to a broad spectrum of stakeholders for consensus. A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) supplemented the information collected. There are various factors that contribute to mental health in Zambia. It is clear from the Zambian perspective that social, demographic, economic, political, environmental, cultural and religious influences affect the mental health of the people. With a population of 10.3 million and annual growth rate of 2.9%, Zambia is one of the most urbanized countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Poverty levels stood at 72.9% in 1998. In terms of unemployment, the most urbanized provinces, Lusaka (the capital city), and the copper-belt are the most affected. The gross domestic product (GDP) is US$3.09 billion dollars while per capita income is US$300. The total budget allocation for health in the year 2002 was 15% while the proportion of the GDP per capita expenditure for health was 5.6%. The HIV/AIDS prevalence rates stand at 20% among the reproductive age group 15-49 years. Political instability and wars in neighbouring states has resulted in an influx of refugees. Environmental factors affecting the country include natural and man-made disasters such as floods and drought, mine accidents, and deforestation. To a large extent in Zambia, people who are mentally ill are stigmatized, feared, scorned at, humiliated and condemned. However, caring for mental ill health in old age is positively perceived. It is traditionally the duty and responsibility of the extended family to look after the aged. Gender based violence (GBV) is another issue. Women, who are totally dependent on their spouses economically, are forced by circumstances to continue living in abusive relationships to the detriment of their mental well-being. In Zambia, the family is considered sacrosanct and the affairs of the family members, private. It is within this context that GBV is regarded as a family affair and therefore a private affair, yet spouse beating has led to depression and in some cases death. In terms of psychiatric services, there are close to 560 beds for psychiatric patients across the country. Common mental disorders found in Zambia are acute psychotic episodes, schizophrenia, affective disorders, alcohol related problems and organic brain syndromes. About 70-80% of people with mental health problems consult traditional health practitioners before they seek help from conventional health practitioners. Over time the number of frontline mental health workers and professional staff has been declining. This is due to the 'brain drain', retirement, death and low output from training institutions. For practicing psychiatrists, only one is available for the whole country. Other key mental health workers such as psychologists, social workers and occupational therapists are also in short supply. All in all, the mental health services situation in Zambia could be described as critical, requiring urgent attention. PMID:15276939

  7. Mental health system in Saudi Arabia: an overview

    Qureshi NA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Naseem Akhtar Qureshi,1 Abdulhameed Abdullah Al-Habeeb,2 Harold G Koenig3 1General Administration for Research and Studies, 2Mental Health and Social Services, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Background: There is evidence that mapping mental health systems (MHSs helps in planning and developing mental health care services for users, families, and other caregivers. The General Administration of Mental Health and Social Services of the Ministry of Health over the past 4 years has sought to streamline the delivery of mental health care services to health consumers in Saudi Arabia. Objective: We overview here the outcome of a survey that assessed the Saudi MHS and suggest strategic steps for its further improvement. Method: The World Health Organization Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems was used systematically to collect information on the Saudi MHS in 20092010, 4 years after a baseline assessment. Results: Several mental health care milestones, especially provision of inpatient mental health services supported by a ratified Mental Health Act, were achieved during this period. However, community mental health care services are needed to match international trends evident in developed countries. Similarly, a larger well-trained mental health workforce is needed at all levels to meet the ever-increasing demand of Saudi society. Conclusion: This updated MHS information, discussed in light of international data, will help guide further development of the MHS in Saudi Arabia in the future, and other countries in the Eastern Mediterranean region may also benefit from Saudi experience. Keywords: Saudi Arabia, mental health system, organization, legal issues, research, training

  8. Leadership and mental health nursing.

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Deacon, Maureen; Jackson, Debra

    2011-01-01

    This discussion paper argues for the critical importance of successful leadership for effective mental health nursing, observing that nursing leadership has long been regarded problematically by the profession. Using empirical and theoretical evidence we debate what leadership styles and strategies are most likely to result in effective, recovery-orientated mental health nursing. Models of transformational and distributed leadership are found to be highly congruent with mental health nursing values, yet the literature suggests it is a type of leadership more often desired than experienced. We note how the scholarly literature tends to ignore the "elephant in the room" that is organizational power, and we question whether transformational leadership pursued within a specific clinical context can influence beyond those confines. Nevertheless it is within these contexts that consumers experience nursing, effective or otherwise, thus we should advocate what is known about effective leadership wherever it is required. PMID:21932925

  9. Mental Health of Young Refugees.

    McGuinness, Teena M; Durand, Simone C

    2015-12-01

    Children and adolescents exposed to violence and upheaval of war and relocation are at high risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Rates of PTSD among refugee children may exceed 50%. Additional stressors encountered while adjusting to host cultures add another layer of difficulty. Most refugee children struggling with symptoms of PTSD or depression are never linked with appropriate mental health care resources. Psychiatric nurses can serve a critical function in the identification and treatment of refugee children experiencing PTSD and depression. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(12), 16-18.]. PMID:26653091

  10. Culture and urban mental health.

    Caracci, G; Mezzich, J E

    2001-09-01

    The previous panoramic view provides sufficient evidence that cultural understanding of urban realities and expressions of their impact on mental health are necessary for a successful approach to mental health in cities. The issues go beyond understanding how urban realties and cultural issues differ in New York from Jakarta; every city has a variety of unwritten cultural norms that permeate every aspect of its mental health. Unless these norms are understood within the dynamic structure of city living, any attempt to intervene on mental health programs will be doomed to failure. Understanding the cultural blueprint of a city, however, is only the first step, as we need to shed our cultural assumptions while we consider contextual socioeconomic and political factors for each city. Finally we need to adapt our western view of cultural values and how citizens function or do not function within the urban environments. Because each city in is its own culturally specific entity, the three steps outlined previously can help create an accurate portrait of what is needed to implement culturally sensitive changes. A paradigm shift, laid on a bicurcated foundation, on the one hand a locally attuned awareness of urban cultural dimensions and on the other educational programs based on extensive knowledge of worldwide problems such as stigma, gender-specific issues, disability, and the plight of vulnerable populations can potentially have far reaching implications on mental health policy changes addressing the cultural needs of cities. Urban mental health is poised to be one of the central issues for the next few decades, because of the size of the world urban population and because of the protean nature of its problems. Cultural factors interplay with urban dynamics in a unique, at times creative, other times destructive, fashion. Under conditions of socioeconomic disadvantage vulnerable individuals who lack adaptive mechanisms may become mentally ill or experience an exacerbation of their mental illness. Understanding how cultural dynamics articulate with adaptation to urban life may greatly enhance our ability to properly assess and treat mental disorders in cities. In the assessment and treatment of patients living in urban areas contextual cultural factors rather than being merely complementary assume a preeminent if not crucial role. PMID:11593865

  11. Stigmatization and mental health

    Gulsum Ozge Doganavsargil Baysal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stigmatizasyon represent a chronic negative interaction with the environment that most of people with a of diagnosis mental disorders. Different types of stigma may have harmful effects. Poor psychological well being, poor quality of life and poor self esteem are related stigmatization. In this article, definition and mechanism of stigmatization, influenced factors and consequences of stigmatization are reviewed. Stigmatization is a modifiable environmental risk factor. Integrating approaches against stigma in treatment may represent cost-effective way to reduce the risk of relapse and poor outcome occasioned by chronic exposure to stigma. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 239-251

  12. Mental health priorities in Vietnam: a mixed-methods analysis

    Niemi Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mental Health Country Profile is a tool that was generated by the International Mental Health Policy and Services Project to inform policy makers, professionals and other key stakeholders about important issues which need to be considered in mental health policy development. The Mental Health Country Profile contains four domains, which include the mental health context, resources, provision and outcomes. We have aimed to generate a Mental Health Country Profile for Vietnam, in order to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the Vietnamese mental health situation, in order to inform future reform efforts and decision-making. Methods This study used snowball sampling to identify informants for generating a Mental Health Country Profile for Vietnam, and the data gathering was done through semi-structured interviews and collection of relevant reports and documents. The material from the interviews and documents was analysed according to qualitative content analysis. Results Marked strengths of the Vietnam mental health system are the aims to move toward community management and detection of mental illness, and the active involvement of several multilateral organizations and NGOs. However, there are a number of shortages still found, including the lack of treatment interventions apart from medications, the high proportion of treatments to be paid out-of-pocket, prominence of large tertiary psychiatric hospitals, and a lack of preventative measures or mental health information to the public. Conclusions At the end of this decade, mental health care in Vietnam is still characterised by unclear policy and poor critical mass especially within the governmental sector. This initial attempt to map the mental health situation of Vietnam suffers from a number of limitations and should be seen as a first step towards a comprehensive profile.

  13. What is mental illness?: social representations of mental illness among British and French mental health professionals

    Morant, Nicola

    1995-01-01

    Mental health professionals are important actors in implementing public mental health policies and in shaping lay representations of mental illness. The research reported in this paper focuses on the social representations of mental illness held by these professionals in Britain and France. In interviews conducted with sixty mental health workers from a range of professional backgrounds the definition of mental illness emerged as a key concern. Evidence for two social representations of menta...

  14. Children's Mental Health. Beginnings Workshop.

    Plattner, Ilse Elisabeth; Haugen, Kirsten; Cohen, Alan; Levin, Diane E.

    2003-01-01

    Presents four articles discussing mental health issues that pertain to early childhood education: "Granting Children Their Emotions" (Ilse Elisabeth Plattner); "Double Vision: Parent and Professional Perspectives on Our Family's Year in Crisis" (Kirsten Haugen); "Coping with Stress and Surviving Challenging Times" (Alan Cohen); and "When the World…

  15. Poverty and Women's Mental Health.

    Belle, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the prevalence and rise of poverty in the United States, which is found particularly among women, children, and those from minority groups. Discusses the positive association between poverty and mental health problems. Describes the impact of poverty on women, and the need for research to discover the psychological impact of poverty. (JS)

  16. Mental Health Mobile Apps: From Infusion to Diffusion in the Mental Health Social System

    East, Marlene Lynette; Havard, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    The roles of mental health educators and professionals in the diffusion of mental health mobile apps are addressed in this viewpoint article. Mental health mobile apps are emerging technologies that fit under the broad heading of mobile health (mHealth). mHealth, encompassed within electronic health (eHealth), reflects the use of mobile devices for the practice of public health. Well-designed mental health mobile apps that present content in interactive, engaging, and stimulating ways can pro...

  17. Disaster management: Mental health perspective

    Suresh Bada Math; Maria Christine Nirmala; Sydney Moirangthem; Naveen C Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Disaster mental health is based on the principles of ‘preventive medicine’ This principle has necessitated a paradigm shift from relief centered post-disaster management to a holistic, multi-dimensional integrated community approach of health promotion, disaster prevention, preparedness and mitigation. This has ignited the paradigm shift from curative to preventive aspects of disaster management. This can be understood on the basis of six ‘R’s such as Readiness (Preparedness), Response (Immed...

  18. Cannabis Use and Mental Health Problems

    Jan C. van Ours & Jenny Williams

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates whether cannabis use leads to worse mental health. To do so, we account for common unobserved factors aecting mental health and cannabis consumption by modeling mental health jointly with the dynamics of cannabis use. Our main nding is that using cannabis increases the likelihood of mental health problems, with current use having a larger eect than past use. The estimates suggest a dose response relationship between the frequency of recent cannabis use and the probabil...

  19. Cannabis Use and Mental Health Problems

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates whether cannabis use leads to worse mental health. To do so, we account for common unobserved factors affecting mental health and cannabis consumption by modeling mental health jointly with the dynamics of cannabis use. Our main finding is that using cannabis increases the likelihood of mental health problems, with current use having a larger effect than past use. The estimates suggest a dose response relationship between the frequency of recent cannabis use and the pr...

  20. A Search for Mental Health Output Measures

    Black, Gordon C.; Saveanu, Traian I.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a summary of our initial efforts to identify mental health output measures: (1) for estimating change in mental health status (incidence and prevalence) in a given population, (2) for use in monitoring, planning, evaluating and/or assessing quality of programs; and (3) possibly for use in controlling mental health costs. This preliminary work is centered on the concept that routinely generated operational data can be used to develop output measures of mental health service progr...

  1. Promoting Teen Mothers' Mental Health.

    Freed, Patricia; SmithBattle, Lee

    2016-01-01

    In this second article in a two-part series, we call for the integration of strengths-based and trauma-informed care into services for teen mothers. Nurses working with teen mothers in health clinics, schools and home visiting programs can play a pivotal role in promoting their mental health. Many teen mothers have high levels of psychological distress and histories of adverse experiences that cannot be ignored, and cannot solely be addressed by referral to mental health services. Nurses must be prepared to assess for trauma and be open to listening to teen mothers' experiences. Principles of strengths-based and trauma-informed care are complementary and can be integrated in clinical services so that teen mothers' distress is addressed and their strengths and aspirations are supported. Potential screening tools, interviewing skills and basic strategies to alleviate teen mothers' distress are discussed. PMID:26909721

  2. The ABCs of Children's Mental Health.

    Whelley, Pete; Cash, Gene; Bryson, Dixie

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Surgeon General's 2000 Report on Children's Mental Health estimates that one in five children and adolescents will experience a significant mental-health problem during their school years. While the family is the primary source of support for a child's mental health, the increased stress and fracturing of today's life make it imperative

  3. TOXMAP®: Environmental Health Maps

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — TOXMAP® is a Geographic Information System (GIS) that uses maps of the United States and Canada to help users visually explore data primarily from the EPA's Toxics...

  4. Is Seniors' Dental Health Tied to Mental Health?

    ... 158104.html Is Seniors' Dental Health Tied to Mental Health? Declines in one seem to mirror declines in ... seems to be a link between poor oral health and age-related mental decline, researchers say. However, the researchers emphasized there ...

  5. Organizational mental map and conative competences

    Bertoncelj, Andrej; Kovač, Darko

    2015-01-01

    Employees with their knowledge, skills, behavior and personal traits impact the organizational learning. The concept of organizational mental map and conative competences, as inborn underlying characteristic that is influenced by employees being involved as well as endogenous and exogenous factors, is presented. Three Slovene small to mid-sized companies were studied in respect to the individual factors, especially conative competences, of their employees. The study suggests that conative sid...

  6. Community-based mental health care in Africa:Mental health workers' views

    ALEM, ATALAY; Jacobsson, Lars; HANLON, CHARLOTTE

    2008-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has for long proposed the development of community-based mental health services worldwide. However, the progress toward community mental health care in most African countries is still hampered by a lack of resources, with specialist psychiatric care essentially based in large, centrally located mental hospitals. It is again time to reconsider the direction of mental health care in Africa. Based on a small inquiry to a number of experienced mental health pro...

  7. Mental health among students of pedagogical universities

    Malinauskas R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with questions of mental health among students of pedagogical universities. There were analysed differences in the level of mental health among sporting and non-sporting students. Two methods were used in the inquiry. Stepanov's questionnaire was used to estimate the level of mental health, Gundarov's questionnaire was used to evaluate psychical satisfaction. The sample consisted of 263 sporting students (athletes and 288 non-sporting students. Results have shown that the level of mental health among sporting students was higher than the level of mental health among non-sporting students.

  8. Rural mental health: neither romanticism nor despair.

    Wainer, J; Chesters, J

    2000-06-01

    This paper explores the relationship between rural places and mental health. It begins with a definition of mental health and an outline of the data that have led to the current concern with promoting positive mental health. We then consider aspects of rural life and place that contribute to positive mental health or increase the likelihood of mental health problems. Issues identified include environment, place, gender identity, violence and dispossession and the influence of the effects of structural changes in rural communities. The paper concludes with a discussion of some of the determinants of resilience in rural places, including social connectedness, valuing diversity and economic participation. PMID:11249401

  9. Tsunami and mental health in Thailand.

    Visanuyothin, Taweesin; Somchai Chakrabhand, M L; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2006-06-01

    Over 5000 people lost their lives when the Asian tsunami hit the Andaman coast of southern Thailand. The delivery of services was complicated because a large number of tourists were in the area. The setting up of the Mental Health Centre for the Thai Tsunami disaster within the Department of Mental Health produced prompt mental health response. Regular contact using a variety of means provided supervision and mentoring. The Thai response built on the existing volunteer network. A Mobile Mental Health Team provided on the spot needs assessment and help. Thai experience provides a culturally acceptable way of delivering mental health services and normalization was the most appropriate response. PMID:16753665

  10. Positive mental health: is there a cross-cultural definition?

    Vaillant, George E.

    2012-01-01

    Seven models for conceptualizing positive mental health are reviewed: mental health as above normal, epitomized by a DSM-IV’s Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score of over 80; mental health as the presence of multiple human strengths rather than the absence of weaknesses; mental health conceptualized as maturity; mental health as the dominance of positive emotions; mental health as high socio-emotional intelligence; mental health as subjective well-being; mental health as resilience. S...

  11. Issues in consumer mental health information.

    Angier, J J

    1984-01-01

    Consumer health information as applied to mental health includes areas such as the diagnosis, management, and treatment of mental illness, as well as self-help, emotional wellness, and the relationship between life events, stress, and disease. This paper presents issues specific to the provision of mental health information to the layperson, e.g., confidentiality, literacy, competence, the social stigma of mental illness, the state of the art in psychiatry, popular psychology, and treatment f...

  12. Mental health literacy among residents in Shanghai

    Wang, Jingyi; He, YanLing; Jiang, Qing; CAI, Jun; Wang, Weiling; Zeng, Qingzhi; Miao, Juming; Qi, Xuejun; Chen, Jianxin; Bian, Qian; Cai, Chun; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Ziqing; Zhang, Mingyuan

    2013-01-01

    Background The recent adoption of China's new national mental health law provides a good opportunity to obtain baseline information about community mental health literacy in the country. Aim Assess knowledge and attitudes about mental disorders among residents in Shanghai. Methods A total of 1953 residents aged 15 or above selected from all 19 districts in Shanghai completed two self-report questionnaires – the Mental Health Knowledge Questionnaire (MHKQ) and the Case Assessment Questionnaire...

  13. Women's mental health in Pakistan

    NIAZ, UNAIZA

    2004-01-01

    In Pakistan, societal attitudes and norms, as well as cultural practices (Karo Kari, exchange marriages, dowry, etc.), play a vital role in women's mental health. The religious and ethnic conflicts, along with the dehumanizing attitudes towards women, the extended family system, role of in-laws in daily lives of women, represent major issues and stressors. Such practices in Pakistan have created the extreme marginalisation of women in numerous spheres of life, which has had ...

  14. Care management and mental health.

    Thornicroft, G.; Ward, P.; S. James

    1993-01-01

    The community care reforms will produce a new kind of key worker who will organise and budget for packages of care: the care manager. Care management goes live in April 1993 but is still poorly rehearsed and its performance may yet disappoint. This overview sets out the origins of case management, its transformation into care management, and the principles guiding its practice. To spell out how the concept works, plans for care management in Southwark's mental health services are described.

  15. Mental health promotion and mental illness prevention: the economic case

    Knapp, Martin; McDaid, David; Parsonage, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mental ill health is the largest single cause of disability in the UK, contributing almost 23% of the overall burden of disease compared to about 16% each for cancer and cardiovascular disease. The economic and social costs of mental health problems in England are estimated at around £105 billion each year.

  16. Public Health Surveillance for Mental Health

    Elsie J. Freeman, MD, MPH

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Public health systems have relied on public health surveillance to plan health programs, and extensive surveillance systems exist for health behaviors and chronic disease. Mental health has used a separate data collection system that emphasizes measurement of disease prevalence and health care use. In recent years, efforts to integrate these systems have included adding chronic disease measures to the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys and depression measures to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; other data collection systems have been similarly enhanced. Ongoing challenges to integration include variations in interview protocols, use of different measures of behavior and disease, different interval reference periods, inclusion of substance abuse disorders, dichotomous vs continuous variables, and approaches to data collection. Future directions can address linking surveillance efforts more closely to the needs of state programs, increasing child health measurements in surveys, and improving knowledge dissemination from survey analyses.

  17. Television and the promotion of mental health

    Milošević Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Current media campaigns, realized within national campaigns and actions on mental health prevention and promotion, are considered in this paper, in the context of expert public relation, as well as the whole society, towards mental health. Mental health promotion is determined as a range of activities by which individuals, community and society are being enabled to take control over mental health determinants and to improve it, but also as an action for improvement of mental health position on individual and social value scale. Characteristics and approach to mental health protection of citizens in Serbia are introduced in the paper, with reference to high incidence and prevalence of mental health disorders, as well as actual challenges to mental health of individuals, but also to modern society. Outcomes of the Survey: „Radio and television and prevention of addictive diseases“, realized by the Radio-television of Serbia for the purpose of establishing informative-educational role of electronic media in the field of health, are also considered. Project „Mental Capital and Wellbeing“ and TV campaign for mental health promotion, realized in England, are quoted as an illustration of necessary strategic and multidisciplinary approach to mental health promotion, in which media represent an important complementary strategy.

  18. Defendants with Intellectual Disabilities and Mental Health Diagnoses: Faring in a Mental Health Court

    Burke, M. M.; Griggs, M.; Dykens, E. M.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Begun in the late 1990s, mental health courts are specialty criminal courts developed to address the needs of persons with mental illness. Methods: As many persons with intellectual disabilities (IDs) may overlap in the mental health court system, we used mental health court records to examine the phenomenology and outcomes of 224…

  19. States Pass Diverse Slate of Mental Health Legislation in 2013. Mental Health: 2013 Legislative Session

    Thomsen, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Recent violence in schools and on college campuses has brought into sharp focus the need to address mental health issues in educational settings. Getting students with mental health problems the help they need, without stigmatizing mental illness, may help prevent future tragedies. Children with mental health problems face a host of challenges,…

  20. Unemployment and Mental Health in French Canada.

    King, Suzanne

    1989-01-01

    Reviews two articles contained in December 1987 issue of "Sante Mentale au Quebec" on the subject of mental health and unemployment. Articles reviewed present results of a qualitative study of the problems experienced and the mental health practices used by unemployed people. Claims articles reveal complexity of the issue while organizing it. (ABL)

  1. Mental Health Mobile Apps: From Infusion to Diffusion in the Mental Health Social System.

    East, Marlene Lynette; Havard, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    The roles of mental health educators and professionals in the diffusion of mental health mobile apps are addressed in this viewpoint article. Mental health mobile apps are emerging technologies that fit under the broad heading of mobile health (mHealth). mHealth, encompassed within electronic health (eHealth), reflects the use of mobile devices for the practice of public health. Well-designed mental health mobile apps that present content in interactive, engaging, and stimulating ways can promote cognitive learning, personal growth, and mental health enhancement. As key influencers in the mental health social system, counselor educators and professional associations may either help or hinder diffusion of beneficial mHealth technologies. As mental health mobile apps move towards ubiquity, research will continue to be conducted. The studies published thus far, combined with the potential of mental health mobile apps for learning and personal growth, offer enough evidence to compel mental health professionals to infuse these technologies into education and practice. Counselor educators and professional associations must use their influential leadership roles to train students and practitioners in how to research, evaluate, and integrate mental health mobile apps into practice. The objectives of this article are to (1) increase awareness of mHealth and mental health mobile apps, (2) demonstrate the potential for continued growth in mental health mobile apps based on technology use and acceptance theory, mHealth organizational initiatives, and evidence about how humans learn, (3) discuss evidence-based benefits of mental health mobile apps, (4) examine the current state of mHealth diffusion in the mental health profession, and (5) offer solutions for impelling innovation diffusion by infusing mental health mobile apps into education, training, and clinical settings. This discussion has implications for counselor educators, mental health practitioners, associations, continuing education providers, and app developers. PMID:26543907

  2. Mental Health in Developing Countries: Challenges and Opportunities in Introducing Western Mental Health System in Uganda

    Janice Katherine Kopinak, MHSc, MSc., RN

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite decades of disagreement among mental health practitioners and researchers in the Western world pertaining to the causation, classification and treatment of mental disorders there is an ongoing push to implement western mental health models in developing countries. Little information exists on the adaptability of western mental health models in developing countries. Method: This paper presents a review of the attempt to implement a western-oriented mental health system ...

  3. Costs of the police service and mental healthcare pathways experienced by individuals with enduring mental health needs

    Heslin, Margaret; Callaghan, Lynne; Barrett, Barbara Michelle; Lea, Susan; Eick, Susan; Morgan, John; Bolt, Mark; Thornicroft, Graham J; Rose, Diana Susan; Healey, Andrew; Patel, Anita Kanji

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundSubstantial policy, communication and operational gaps exist between mental health services and the police for individuals with enduring mental health needs.AimsTo map and cost pathways through mental health and police services, and to model the cost impact of implementing key policy recommendations.MethodWithin a case-linkage study, we estimated 1-year individual-level healthcare and policing costs. Using decision modelling, we then estimated the potential impact on costs of three ...

  4. What characterizes persons with poor mental health?

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Davidsen, Michael; Kjller, Mette; Juel, Knud

    2014-01-01

    CHARACTERIZE MEN AND WOMEN WITH POOR MENTAL HEALTH THE PRESENT FINDINGS SUPPORT THE NOTION THAT BOTH SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHICS AND LIFESTYLE FACTORS ARE INDEPENDENTLY RELATED WITH POOR MENTAL HEALTH WE SUGGEST TAKING INTO ACCOUNT ALL THESE AREAS OF LIFE WHEN PLANNING ACTIVITIES TO PREVENT POOR MENTAL HEALTH AND WHEN......Background: The aim of the study was to identify and characterize groups with poor mental health defined by the SF-12 Mental Component Summary (MCS-12) scale. Methods: The study is based on the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2005 and includes 10,082 participants (16 years or older). Data were...... analysed by means of logistic regression models. Results: Men and women with poor mental health are characterized by being single, having a long-term illness, not being able to rely on help from others in case of illness and by feeling that family and friends demand too much of them. Men with poor mental...

  5. American Christian Engagement With Mental Health and Mental Illness.

    Kinghorn, Warren A

    2016-01-01

    Although religious belief and practice are relevant to mental health outcomes, many clinicians lack knowledge of particular religious traditions required to make informed judgments about referral to and collaboration with faith-based organizations and clinicians. This Open Forum examines five diverse American Christian approaches to mental health and mental illness-pastoral care and counseling, biblical counseling, integrationism, Christian psychology, and the work of the Institute for the Psychological Sciences--that are relevant for contemporary mental health service delivery. Each of these movements is briefly described and placed in historical, conceptual, and organizational context. Knowledge of the diverse and varied terrain of American Christian engagement with mental health care can inform clinicians' interactions with faith-based providers, clarify opportunities for responsible collaboration, and provide important insight into religious subcultures with faith-based concerns about contemporary psychiatric care. PMID:26369885

  6. Diversion of offenders with mental disorders: Mental health courts

    Ryan, Sarah; Whelan, Darius

    2012-01-01

    At present, if people with mental disorders appear before the criminal courts in Ireland, unless they are unfit for trial or not guilty by reason of insanity, the system governing their case will be the general one which applies to all criminal cases. In recent decades, a number of other common law jurisdictions have begun to set up mental health courts as a means of diverting some people with mental disorders from the criminal justice system and into more appropriate treatment. This article ...

  7. The promotion of mental health and the prevention of mental health problems in child and adolescent

    sunmi cho; yunmi shin

    2013-01-01

    Improving mental health and reducing the burden of mental illness are complementary strategies which, along with the treatment and rehabilitation of people with mental disorders, significantly improve population health and well-being. A Institute of Medicine report describes a range of interventions for mental disorders that included treatment and maintenance, reserving the term “prevention” for efforts that occur before onset of a diagnosable disorder. Mental health problems affect 10&am...

  8. What characterizes persons with poor mental health?

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Davidsen, Michael; Kjøller, Mette; Juel, Knud

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to identify and characterize groups with poor mental health defined by the SF-12 Mental Component Summary (MCS-12) scale. Methods: The study is based on the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2005 and includes 10,082 participants (16 years or older). Data were...... analysed by means of logistic regression models. Results: Men and women with poor mental health are characterized by being single, having a long-term illness, not being able to rely on help from others in case of illness and by feeling that family and friends demand too much of them. Men with poor mental...... health were further characterized by being a heavy smoker, and having a BMI below 25. Women with poor mental health were further characterized by being 16-44 years old and sedentary in leisure time. CONCLUSIONS THE PREVALENCE OF POOR MENTAL HEALTH IS HIGHER AMONG WOMEN THAN MEN, AND DIFFERENT FACTORS...

  9. New Developments in Mental Health and Community

    Isabel Fazenda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The community mental health model implies a bio‐psycho‐social perspective of mental health/illness issues, as well as a set of values that advocate equity in service access, community treatment, respect for human rights, a recovery vision, promotion of independent living, social integration and user and family participation. In accordance with the priorities set by the European Union, mental health services must guarantee that these principles are applied in the prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and promotion of mental health. Inter‐sector cooperation is an essential part of developing transversal policies that ensure society’s involvement in mental health promotion. Advances in community mental health in‐ dicate the relevance of considering human rights both in policy development and in practice, of the recovery perspective and of the need to promote the participation of user and carer organizations.

  10. The nature of mental health nurses' knowledge

    Barker, Janet H.

    2002-01-01

    There is a need to develop a clear understanding of the knowledge used by mental health nurses in day to day practice. Knowledge relating to holistic/therapeutic activities form the basis of mental health nurse education, however various studies have consistently shown the majority of mental health nurses activity relates to administrative and routine tasks and containment. This disparity between the knowledge bases prescribed, those described and the inability of education reforms to resolve...

  11. Religiousness and mental health: a review

    Moreira-Almeida Alexander; Lotufo Neto Francisco; Koenig Harold G

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relationship between religiosity and mental health has been a perennial source of controversy. This paper reviews the scientific evidence available for the relationship between religion and mental health. METHOD: The authors present the main studies and conclusions of a larger systematic review of 850 studies on the religion-mental health relationship published during the 20th Century identified through several databases. The present paper also includes an update on the papers ...

  12. Globalization: Mental Health and Social Economic Factors

    Bhavsar, Vishal; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Several factors associated with globalization have mental health consequences. This article reviews the literature on mental health and inequality, occupational patterns and identity shifts before considering the role of globalization as an acculturative stressor. We argue that a re-evaluation of mental health policy in light of globalization must look further than current studies of migrants to consider indigenous communities where models of social experience and behaviou...

  13. Integrating mental health services: the Finnish experience

    Ville Lehtinen; Vappu Taipale

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this paper is to give a short description of the most important developments of mental health services in Finland during the 1990s, examine their influences on the organisation and provision of services, and describe shortly some national efforts to handle the new situation. The Finnish mental health service system experienced profound changes in the beginning of the 1990s. These included the integration of mental health services, being earlier under own separate administr...

  14. Robotics Technology in Mental Health Care

    Riek, Laurel D.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the existing and future use of robotics and intelligent sensing technology in mental health care. While the use of this technology is nascent in mental health care, it represents a potentially useful tool in the practitioner's toolbox. The goal of this chapter is to provide a brief overview of the field, discuss the recent use of robotics technology in mental health care practice, explore some of the design issues and ethical issues of using robots in this space, and fi...

  15. Challenges in mental health nursing: current opinion

    Sabella D.; Fay-Hillier T

    2014-01-01

    Donna Sabella, Theresa Fay-Hillier College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: The current mental health care system in the US continues to struggle with providing adequate care and services to all that require it due to limited resources, biases from both other professions and the public, and the complexities of treatment of many of those individuals or populations that suffer from mental illness. Mental health nurses, also referred to as ps...

  16. Mental health training program for community mental health staff in Guangzhou, China: effects on knowledge of mental illness and stigma

    Li, Jie; Li, Juan; Huang, Yuanguang; Thornicroft, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to reduce the huge treatment gap in mental health, WHO has called for integrating mental health into primary care. The purposes of this study are to provide a training course to improve the community mental health staff’s knowledge of mental health and reduce stigma related to mental illness, as well as to evaluate the impact of this training on knowledge and stigma. Methods The training intervention was a one day course for community mental health staff in Guangzhou, Chin...

  17. The Movement for Global Mental Health

    Patel, Vikram; Collins, Pamela Y.; Copeland, John; Kakuma, Ritsuko; KATONTOKA, SYLVESTER; Lamichhane, Jagannath; Naik, Smita; Skeen, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The Movement for Global Mental Health is a coalition of individuals and institutions committed to collective actions that aim to close the treatment gap for people living with mental disorders worldwide, based on two fundamental principles: evidence on effective treatments and the human rights of people with mental disorders.

  18. Mental Health: An Interdisciplinary and International Perspective.

    Klineberg, Otto

    The World Federation for Mental Health was founded as an international apolitical organization concerned with quality of life rather than merely the absence or prevention of mental illness. An examination of the manner and extent to which mental problems arise in different cultural settings can provide data needed to understand the relationship

  19. ANXIETY AND MENTAL HEALTH OF EMPLOYEES

    Neeta N. G

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study is an attempt is made to study the Anxiety and Mental Health ofEmployees of different Professions selected from Gulbarga District. The sample consists of 200 (of different professions, and gender employees. The sample was administered with Anxiety and Mental Health Inventory. And the data were subjected the t-test. The results revealed that anxiety produces differences in mental health of employees and there is a significant difference in Mental Health between the male and female sample.

  20. Mental health expectancy--the European perspective

    Jagger, C; Ritchie, K; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Deeg, D; Gispert, R; Grimley Evans, J; Hibbett, M; Lawlor, B; Perenboom, R; Polge, C; Van Oyen, H

    1998-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy observed over the last decade has particular relevance for mental health conditions of old age, such as dementia. Although mental disorders have been estimated to be responsible for 60% of all disabilities, until recently population health indicators such as health...... expectancies have concentrated on calculating disability-free life expectancy based on physical functioning. In 1994, a European Network for the Calculation of Health Expectancies (Euro-REVES) was established, one of its aims being the development and promotion of mental health expectancies. Such indicators...... may have an important role in monitoring future changes in the mental health of populations and predicting service needs. This article summarizes the proceedings and recommendations of the first European Conference on Mental Health Expectancy....

  1. International Observatory on Mental Health Systems: a mental health research and development network

    Minas Harry

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background While the mental health situation for most people in low and middle-income countries is unsatisfactory, there is a renewed commitment to focus attention on the mental health of populations and on the scaling up of mental health services that have the capacity to respond to mental health service needs. There is general agreement that scaling up activities must be evidence-based and that the effectiveness of such activities must be evaluated. If these requirements are to be ...

  2. Holistic health: does it really include mental health?

    McClanahan, Kimberly K; Huff, Marlene B; Omar, Hatim A

    2006-01-01

    Holistic health, incorporating mind and body as equally important and unified components of health, is a concept utilized in some health care arenas in the United States (U.S.) over the past 30 years. However, in the U.S., mental health is not seen as conceptually integral to physical health and, thus, holistic health cannot be realized until the historical concept of mind-body dualism, continuing stigma regarding mental illness, lack of mental health parity in insurance, and inaccurate public perceptions regarding mental illness are adequately addressed and resolved. Until then, mental and physical health will continue to be viewed as disparate entities rather than parts of a unified whole. We conclude that the U.S. currently does not generally incorporate the tenets of holistic health in its view of the mental and physical health of its citizens, and provide some suggestions for changing that viewpoint. PMID:17370005

  3. Indicators of Mental Health in Various Iranian Populations

    Mohamadi, Khosro; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Fathi Ashtiani, Ali; Azad Fallah, Parviz; Ebadi, Abbas; Yahaghi, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Promoting mental health and preventing mental disorders are of the main concerns for every country. Achieving these goals requires effective indexes for evaluating mental health. Therefore, to develop mental health enhancement programs in Iran, there is a need to measure the state of mental health in Iran. Objectives: This study aimed to select a set of mental health indicators that can be used to monitor the status of mental health in Iran. Materials and Methods: This research wo...

  4. Cultural change and mental health in Greenland

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Curtis, Tine; Greenland, Population Study

    2002-01-01

    In Greenland, the rapid sociocultural change of the last 50 years has been paralleled by an epidemiological transition characterized by a reduction in infectious diseases, an increase in cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and an increased prevalence of mental health problems. During 1993-94 and...... 1997-98, two health interview surveys were conducted among Inuit in Greenland and Inuit migrants in Denmark. The response rates were 71 and 55%. Information on mental health was obtained from 1388 and 1769 adults. As indicators of mental health, the prevalence of potential psychiatric cases according...... is in itself a cause of poor mental health: as a result of successful integration into the modern Greenlandic society, some population groups have better mental health compared to other groups....

  5. Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services - first annual report 2008

    2009-10-01

    This Annual Report provides the first comprehensive survey carried out on community CAMHS teams and includes preliminary data collected by The Health Research Board on the admission of young people under the age of 18 years to inpatient mental health facilities. As many measures in this report do not have historic comparators it provides a baseline foundation that will be built upon in subsequent years providing an indication of trends that cannot yet be drawn on the basis of this report. The next report will include day hospital, liaison and inpatient services. Subsequent reports will further extend the mapping of mental health services for young people.

  6. Integrating Children's Mental Health into Primary Care.

    Wissow, Lawrence S; van Ginneken, Nadja; Chandna, Jaya; Rahman, Atif

    2016-02-01

    Children's mental health problems are among global health advocates' highest priorities. Nearly three-quarters of adult disorders have their onset or origins during childhood, becoming progressively harder to treat over time. Integrating mental health with primary care and other more widely available health services has the potential to increase treatment access during childhood, but requires re-design of currently-available evidence-based practices to fit the context of primary care and place a greater emphasis on promoting positive mental health. While some of this re-design has yet to be accomplished, several components are currently well-defined and show promise of effectiveness and practicality. PMID:26613691

  7. Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers

    Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

  8. Mental Health of Students. Position Statement. Revised

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that mental health is as critical to academic success as physical well-being. School nurses play a vital role in the school community by promoting positive mental health development in students through school/community-based programs and curricula. As members of…

  9. Young People's Perceptions of Mental Health.

    Armstrong, Claire; Hill, Malcolm; Secker, Jenny

    2000-01-01

    Examined 12- to 14-year-olds' understanding of mental health and illness, responses to negative feelings, and perceived differences between themselves and adults. Found that the term "mental health" was little understood. Relationships with family and friends were considered a positive influence. Youth, especially boys, reported unsophisticated…

  10. Mental health systems research is urgently needed

    Saraceno Benedetto

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent developments, including experience related to the development of WHO's World Health Report 2001, the WHO Atlas and the DCP Project related to Mental, Neurological, Developmental and Substance Abuse Disorders, indicate why advancing the interests of mental health is now so compelling. In order to deliver a high standard of mental health treatment and care WHO emphasizes the adoption of an integrated system of service delivery to address comprehensively the psychosocial needs of people with mental disorders. Even though the burden is large and increasing, the capacity to reach those in need is poor. This gap cannot be filled just by seeking more funding for mental health, more human resources, or more training. Of course, these aspects are key ingredients but what is often neglected is the need to conceive service delivery rationally. Mental health professionals' attention should be channeled towards mental health systems and service organization which obviously has consequences in their training which should include more public health knowledge. We need to know how to plan and organize services and improve the use of scarce financial and human resources in order to reach out to the mental health needs of the general population and to provide effective and humane services to those who need care.

  11. Unemployment Impairs Mental Health: Meta-Analyses

    Paul, Karsten I.; Moser, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The effect of unemployment on mental health was examined with meta-analytic methods across 237 cross-sectional and 87 longitudinal studies. The average overall effect size was d = 0.51 with unemployed persons showing more distress than employed persons. A significant difference was found for several indicator variables of mental health (mixed…

  12. Effect of Dynamic Meditation on Mental Health.

    Iqbal, Naved; Singh, Archana; Aleem, Sheema

    2016-02-01

    Although traditional meditation has been found to be effective in improving physical and mental health of subjects, there was a paucity of research of the effect of active or dynamic meditation on these variables. Therefore, the present study was aimed at studying the effect of dynamic meditation on mental health of the subjects. Total sample of the present study comprised 60 subjects, 30 each in experimental and control group. Subjects in experimental group were given 21-day training in dynamic meditation. Mental health of the experimental and control group subjects was measured in pre- and post-condition with the help of Mental Health Inventory developed by Jagadish and Srivastava (Mental Health inventory, Manovaigyanik Parikshan Sansthan, Varanasi, 1983). Obtained data were analyzed with the help of ANCOVA. In post-condition, experimental group scored better than control group on integration of personality, autonomy and environmental mastery. Effect sizes of dynamic meditation on these dimensions of mental health were large. However, experimental group and control group did not differ significantly on positive self-evaluation, perception of reality and group-oriented attitude dimensions of mental health in post-condition. Overall, dynamic meditation training was effective in improving mental health of the subjects. PMID:26179581

  13. Marketing and Community Mental Health Centers.

    Ferniany, Isaac W.; Garove, William E.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that a marketing approach can be applied to community mental health centers. Marketing is a management orientation of providing services for, not to, patients in a systematic manner, which can help mental health centers improve services, strengthen community image, achieve financial independence and aid in staff recruitment. (Author)

  14. Migrant Farmworker Stress: Mental Health Implications

    Hiott, Ann E.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Davis, Stephen W.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The number of Latinos in rural regions of the United States is increasing. Little is known about factors that undermine the mental health of this segment of the rural population. Purpose: The goal of this study is to determine which stressors inherent in farmwork and the farmworker lifestyle contribute to poor mental health. Methods: An

  15. Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers

    Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and

  16. Community Mental Health Clinic Cost Reports

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Healthcare Cost Report Information System (HCRIS) Dataset - Community Mental Health Center (CMHC). This data was reported on form CMS-2088-92. The data in this...

  17. Community Mental Health Clinic Cost Reports

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Healthcare Cost Report Information System (HCRIS) Dataset - Community Mental Health Center (CMHC). This data was reported on form CMS-2088-92. The data in this...

  18. Role of the police in linking individuals experiencing mental health crises with mental health services

    van den Brink Rob HS; Broer Jan; Tholen Alfons J; Winthorst Wim H; Visser Ellen; Wiersma Durk

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The police are considered frontline professionals in managing individuals experiencing mental health crises. This study examines the extent to which these individuals are disconnected from mental health services, and whether the police response has an influence on re-establishing contact. Methods Police records were searched for calls regarding individuals with acute mental health needs and police handling of these calls. Mental healthcare contact data were retrieved from ...

  19. Impact of organisational change on mental health

    Bamberger, Simon Grandjean; Vinding, Anker Lund; Larsen, Anelia; Nielsen, Peter; Fonager, Kirsten; Nielsen, René Nesgaard; Ryom, Pia; Omland, Øyvind

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge combining MeSH search terms for exposure and outcome. The criterion for inclusion was original data on exposure to organisational change with mental health problems as outcome. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were included. We found in 11 out of 17 studies, an association between......Although limited evidence is available, organisational change is often cited as the cause of mental health problems. This paper provides an overview of the current literature regarding the impact of organisational change on mental health. A systematic search in PUBMED, PsychInfo and Web of...... organisational change and elevated risk of mental health problems was observed, with a less provident association in the longitudinal studies. Based on the current research, this review cannot provide sufficient evidence of an association between organisational change and elevated risk of mental health problems...

  20. Reflections on psychiatry and international mental health

    Helen Herrman

    2013-01-01

    Achieving adequate support for mental health in any country requires a unified approach. Strong links between psychiatrists, community leaders and patients and families that are based on negotiation and respect, are vital for progress. When strong partnerships exist, they can contribute to community understanding and advancement of psychiatry. This is the first step towards scaling up good quality care for those living with mental illnesses, preventing illnesses in those at risk, and promoting mental health through work with other community sectors. Partnerships are needed to support education and research in psychiatry, and improvements in quality of care wherever psychiatry is practiced, including primary health and community mental health services, hospitals and private practice. There are important roles for psychiatry in building the strength of organisations that champion the advocacy and support roles of service users and family carers, and encouraging partnerships for mental health promotion in the community.

  1. A preliminary taxonomy and a standard knowledge base for mental-health system indicators in Spain

    Gibert Karina; Roca Miquel; Grané Mont-serrat; Martín Manuel; Salinas-Pérez José; Salvador-Carulla Luis; Bulbena Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background There are many sources of information for mental health indicators but we lack a comprehensive classification and hierarchy to improve their use in mental health planning. This study aims at developing a preliminary taxonomy and its related knowledge base of mental health indicators usable in Spain. Methods A qualitative method with two experts panels was used to develop a framing document, a preliminary taxonomy with a conceptual map of health indicators, and a knowledge ...

  2. Psychometric properties of a Mental Health Team Development Audit Tool.

    Roncalli, Silvia

    2013-02-01

    To assist in improving team working in Community Mental Health Teams (CMHTs), the Mental Health Commission formulated a user-friendly but yet-to-be validated 25-item Mental Health Team Development Audit Tool (MHDAT).

  3. Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students

    Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions

  4. Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students

    Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions…

  5. New directions for community mental health centers.

    Kipp, M F

    1987-01-01

    Community Mental Health Centers and other quasi-public authorities are operating within a larger health market characterized by the rapid unfolding of a number of key trends in consumer behavior, provider supply, and financing. Each of these trends, though not readily apparent, is strongly reflected in the specialty mental health sector. Mental health managers are faced with fundamental choices about the direction of their respective organizations and the adequacy of their resources to proceed. Mr. Kipp outlines the market dynamics at issue, describes three basic alternatives, and offers some guidelines for management in charting a course. PMID:10287206

  6. Predictors of mental health in female teachers

    Reingard Seibt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Teaching profession is characterised by an above-average rate of psychosomatic and mental health impairment due to work-related stress. The aim of the study was to identify predictors of mental health in female teachers. Material and Methods: A sample of 630 female teachers (average age 477 years participated in a screening diagnostic inventory. Mental health was surveyed with the General Health Questionnaire GHQ-12. The following parameters were measured: specific work conditions (teacher-specific occupational history, scales of the Effort-Reward-Imbalance (ERI Questionnaire as well as cardiovascular risk factors, physical complaints (BFB and personal factors such as inability to recover (FABA, sense of coherence (SOC and health behaviour. Results: First, mentally fit (MH+ and mentally impaired teachers (MH- were differentiated based on the GHQ-12 sum score (MH+: < 5; MH-: ? 5; 18% of the teachers showed evidence of mental impairment. There were no differences concerning work-related and cardiovascular risk factors as well as health behaviour between MH+ and MH-. Binary logistic regressions identified 4 predictors that showed a significant effect on mental health. The effort-reward-ratio proved to be the most relevant predictor, while physical complaints as well as inability to recover and sense of coherence were identified as advanced predictors (explanation of variance: 23%. Conclusion: Contrary to the expectations, classic work-related factors can hardly contribute to the explanation of mental health. Additionally, cardiovascular risk factors and health behaviour have no relevant influence. However, effort-reward-ratio, physical complaints and personal factors are of considerable influence on mental health in teachers. These relevant predictors should become a part of preventive arrangements for the conservation of teachers' health in the future.

  7. The Centre for International Mental Health approach to mental health system development.

    Minas, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Although mental disorders are a major public health problem, the development of mental health services has been a low priority everywhere, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Recent years have seen a growing understanding of the importance of population mental health and increased attention to the need to develop mental health systems for responding to population mental health service needs. In countries and regions where mental health services are all but nonexistent, and in postconflict and postdisaster settings, there are many impediments to establishing or scaling up mental health services. It is frequently necessary to act simultaneously on multiple fronts: generating local evidence that will inform decision makers; developing a policy framework; securing investment; determining the most appropriate service model for the context; training and supporting mental health workers; establishing or expanding existing services; putting in place systems for monitoring and evaluation; and strengthening leadership and governance capabilities. This article presents the approach of the Centre for International Mental Health in the Melbourne School of Population Health to mental health system development, and illustrates the way in which the elements of the program are integrated by giving a brief case example from Sri Lanka. PMID:22335181

  8. Relationship between mental health and marital satisfaction

    Abdolsattar Shahi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Marital satisfaction is an important component of the marriage. Mental health as a component of the personal characteristic also related with marital satisfaction. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between mental health and marital satisfaction of couples.Methods: Three hundred couples from high-risk area of Gorgan North of Iran were selected. Association between men's and womens mental health level was measured using General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28. Marital satisfaction measured by Enrich Marital Satisfaction Questionnaire among married couples. Data was analyzed using multiple regression and analysis of variance modelling.Results: Results indicated that marital satisfaction was predicted by the persons mental health level. Findings also showed that depression and anxiety were significantly associated with marital satisfaction. 52.5% of studied individuals had mental disorders at the clinical level (p?0/05. Marital satisfaction in this population was 51.7%. Conclusions: The study confirmed that mental health is an important predictor of marital satisfaction. Improving mental health may lead to improve marital satisfaction.

  9. Workplace culture and mental health are interwoven.

    Service, John

    2004-01-01

    Workplace health is a serious issue. Illness and injury take a significant toll on employers, employees and the bottom line. Research has focused primarily on the physical health and injury side of the workplace health equation, with much less attention being paid to the mental health factors that affect employers, employees, families, productivity, efficiency, quality, creativity and innovation. PMID:15829767

  10. Public perception of mental health in Iraq

    Al-Hasoon Saad; Bradley Marie; Sadik Sabah; Jenkins Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background People who suffer from mental illness, the professionals who treat them, and indeed the actual concept of mental illness are all stigmatised in public perception and often receive very negative publicity. This paper looks at Iraq, which has a population of 30 million who are mainly Moslem. Mental health services and professionals have historically been sparse in Iraq with 1 psychiatrist per 300,000 before 2003 falling to 1 per million until recently and 1 primary care cent...

  11. International Observatory on Mental Health Systems: a mental health research and development network

    Minas Harry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the mental health situation for most people in low and middle-income countries is unsatisfactory, there is a renewed commitment to focus attention on the mental health of populations and on the scaling up of mental health services that have the capacity to respond to mental health service needs. There is general agreement that scaling up activities must be evidence-based and that the effectiveness of such activities must be evaluated. If these requirements are to be realised it will be essential to strengthen capacity in countries to conduct rigorous monitoring and evaluation of system development projects and to demonstrate sustained benefit to populations. The Observatory The International Observatory on Mental Health Systems (IOMHS will build capacity to measure and to track mental health system performance in participating countries at national and sub-national (provincial and district levels. The work of IOMHS will depend on the establishment of robust partnerships among the key stakeholder groups. The Observatory will build the capability of partner organisations and networks to provide evidence-based advice to policy makers, service planners and implementers, and will monitor the progress of mental health service scaling up activities. Summary The International Observatory on Mental Health Systems will be a mental health research and development network that will monitor and evaluate mental health system performance in low and middle-income countries.

  12. Public school teachers perceptions about mental health

    Soares, Amanda Gonalves Simes; Estanislau, Gustavo; Brietzke, Elisa; Lefvre, Fernando; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine public school teachers perceptions about general health and mental health, and the way in which they obtained this information. METHODS Qualitative research was conducted with 31 primary and secondary school teachers at a state school in the municipality of Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010. The teachers responded to a questionnaire containing open-ended questions about mental health and general health. The following aspects were evaluated: Teachers understanding of the terms health and mental health, the relevance of the need for information on the subject, the method preferred for obtaining information, their experience with different media regarding such matters, and perceptions about the extent to which this available information is sufficient to support their practice. The data were processed using the Qualiquantisoft software and analyzed according to the Discourse of the Collective Subject technique. RESULTS From the teachers perspective, general health is defined as the proper physiological functioning of the body and mental health is related to the balance between mind and body, as a requirement for happiness. Most of the teachers (80.6%) showed great interest in acquiring knowledge about mental health and receiving educational materials on the subject. For these teachers, the lack of information creates insecurity and complicates the management of everyday situations involving mental disorders. For 61.3% of the teachers, television is the medium that provides the most information on the topic. CONCLUSIONS The data indicate that there is little information available on mental health for teachers, showing that strategies need to be developed to promote mental health in schools. PMID:26039397

  13. Public school teachers’ perceptions about mental health

    Amanda Gonçalves Simões Soares

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To examine public school teachers’ perceptions about general health and mental health, and the way in which they obtained this information. METHODS Qualitative research was conducted with 31 primary and secondary school teachers at a state school in the municipality of Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010. The teachers responded to a questionnaire containing open-ended questions about mental health and general health. The following aspects were evaluated: Teachers’ understanding of the terms “health and “mental health,” the relevance of the need for information on the subject, the method preferred for obtaining information, their experience with different media regarding such matters, and perceptions about the extent to which this available information is sufficient to support their practice. The data were processed using the Qualiquantisoft software and analyzed according to the Discourse of the Collective Subject technique. RESULTS From the teachers’ perspective, general health is defined as the proper physiological functioning of the body and mental health is related to the balance between mind and body, as a requirement for happiness. Most of the teachers (80.6% showed great interest in acquiring knowledge about mental health and receiving educational materials on the subject. For these teachers, the lack of information creates insecurity and complicates the management of everyday situations involving mental disorders. For 61.3% of the teachers, television is the medium that provides the most information on the topic. CONCLUSIONS The data indicate that there is little information available on mental health for teachers, showing that strategies need to be developed to promote mental health in schools.

  14. Integrating mental health services: the Finnish experience

    Ville Lehtinen

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to give a short description of the most important developments of mental health services in Finland during the 1990s, examine their influences on the organisation and provision of services, and describe shortly some national efforts to handle the new situation. The Finnish mental health service system experienced profound changes in the beginning of the 1990s. These included the integration of mental health services, being earlier under own separate administration, with other specialised health services, decentralisation of the financing of health services, and de-institutionalisation of the services. The same time Finland underwent the deepest economic recession in Western Europe, which resulted in cut-offs especially in the mental health budgets. Conducting extensive national research and development programmes in the field of mental health has been one typically Finnish way of supporting the mental health service development. The first of these national programmes was the Schizophrenia Project 1981–97, whose main aims were to decrease the incidence of new long-term patients and the prevalence of old long-stay patients by developing an integrated treatment model. The Suicide Prevention Project 1986–96 aimed at raising awareness of this special problem and decreasing by 20% the proportionally high suicide rate in Finland. The National Depression Programme 1994–98 focused at this clearly increasing public health concern by several research and development project targeted both to the general population and specifically to children, primary care and specialised services. The latest, still on-going Meaningful Life Programme 1998–2003 which main aim is, by multi-sectoral co-operation, to improve the quality of life for people suffering from or living with the threat of mental disorders. Furthermore, the government launched in 1999 a new Goal and Action Programme for Social Welfare and Health Care 2000–2003, in which mental health has been chosen as one of the eight priority areas.

  15. Discourses of aggression in forensic mental health

    Berring, Lene L; Pedersen, Liselotte; Buus, Niels

    2015-01-01

    aggression is communicated in forensic mental health nursing records. The aim of the study was to gain insight into the discursive practices used by forensic mental health nursing staff when they record observed aggressive incidents. Textual accounts were extracted from the Staff Observation Aggression Scale......Managing aggression in mental health hospitals is an important and challenging task for clinical nursing staff. A majority of studies focus on the perspective of clinicians, and research mainly depicts aggression by referring to patient-related factors. This qualitative study investigates how...

  16. Sport and physical activity for mental health

    Carless, David

    2010-01-01

    With approximately 1 in 6 adults likely to experience a significant mental health problem at any one time (Office for National Statistics), research into effective interventions has never been more important. During the past decade there has been an increasing interest in the role that sport and physical activity can play in the treatment of mental health problems, and in mental health promotion. The benefits resulting from physiological changes during exercise are well documented, including improvement in mood and control of anxiety and depression. Research also suggests that socio-cultural a

  17. Women, catastrophe and mental health.

    Raphael, Beverley; Taylor, Mel; McAndrew, Virginia

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of catastrophic experience, its relationship to the range of acute and prolonged stressors to which women may be exposed and the broad impacts on their mental health and well-being. It identifies catastrophe in terms of multiple accumulated stresses including death, loss, victimization, demoralization, shame, stigmatization, helplessness and identity. Catastrophic experiences include personal violence in domestic circumstances of intimate partner abuse, sexual assault and child physical and sexual abuse. Women's experiences of loss through the violent deaths of children and loved ones may also have such enduring impacts. Terrorism victimizes men and women in this way, with the enduring impacts for women in terms of threat of ongoing attacks as well as acute effects and their aftermath. The catastrophes of war, conflict, genocide, sexual exploitation and refugee status differentially affect large numbers of women, directly and through their concerns for the care of their children and loved ones. Ultimate catastrophes such as Hiroshima and the Holocaust are discussed but with recognition of the very large numbers of women currently experiencing catastrophe in ongoing ways that may be silent and unrecognized. This is significant for clinical care and population impacts, and in the losses for women across such contexts. PMID:18058439

  18. Public perception of mental health in Iraq

    Al-Hasoon Saad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People who suffer from mental illness, the professionals who treat them, and indeed the actual concept of mental illness are all stigmatised in public perception and often receive very negative publicity. This paper looks at Iraq, which has a population of 30 million who are mainly Moslem. Mental health services and professionals have historically been sparse in Iraq with 1 psychiatrist per 300,000 before 2003 falling to 1 per million until recently and 1 primary care centre (40 Healthcare Workers including 4 General Practitioners to 35,000 population, compared with 1 GP per 1700 population in the UK. Methods We aimed to assess public attitudes and perceptions to mental illness. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire (additional file 1, which was designed specifically for Iraqi contexts and was made available in 2 languages. The survey was carried out in 500 participants' homes across 2 districts of Baghdad. Additional file 1 Public Perception of Mental Illness Questionnaire. Click here for file Results The response rate of the survey was 86.4%. The paper shows respondents views on the aetiology of mental illness, perceptions of people with mental illness and attitudes towards care and treatment of people with mental illness. Conclusions This survey of public attitudes towards mental illness in Iraq has shown that community opinion about the aetiology of mental illness is broadly compatible with scientific evidence, but understanding of the nature of mental illness, its implications for social participation and management remains negative in general.

  19. Environmental Quality Index and Childhood Mental Health

    Childhood mental disorders affect between 13%-20% of children in the United States (US) annually and impact the child, family, and community. Literature suggests associations exist between environmental and children’s mental health such as air pollution with autism and ADHD...

  20. Environmental Quality Index and Childhood Mental Health

    Childhood mental disorders affect between 13%-20% of children in the United States (US) annually and impact the child, family, and community. Literature suggests associations exist between environmental and childrens mental health such as air pollution with autism and ADHD...

  1. Taking mental health into the community

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Czech Republic’s plan to pilot community-based mental health services is a welcome development for people with both mild and severe forms of mental illness. Petr Třešňák reports.

  2. The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law

    Carty, Lee; Burley, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law is the nation's leading legal advocate for the rights of adults and children with mental disabilities. The Center uses a coordinated strategy of federal policy advocacy, legal support for a nationwide network of advocates, and creation of educational materials to help families, professionals,…

  3. Integrating mental health into primary health care in Iraq

    Sadik, Sabah; Abdulrahman, Saad; Bradley, Marie; Jenkins, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Health in Iraq is undertaking a systematic programme to integrate mental health into primary care in order to increase population access to mental health care. This paper reports the evaluation of the delivery of a ten day interactive training programme to 20% of primary care centres across Iraq. The multistage evaluation included a pre- and post-test questionnaire to assess knowledge, attitudes and practice in health workers drawn from 143 health centres, a course evaluation ...

  4. Dimensions of Health among Patients in Mental Health Services

    Jormfeldt, Henrika

    2007-01-01

    Empirical studies focusing on the subjective experience of health among patients in contact with the mental health services are rare and most questionnaires are based on a medical model that emphasizes objectively observed disease-oriented health indicators. In studies I and II perceptions of the concept of health among patients and nurses in mental health services were explored and described using a phenomenographic approach. The perceptions and description categories that emerged from these...

  5. Using Mental Map Principles to Interpret American Indian Cartography

    Mitchell, Martin D.

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of maps drawn or significantly influenced by American Indians fosters critical thinking, cultural diversity, and awareness of a much-neglected topic in cartography. Line styles, scale depiction, and the sizing of individual entities are discussed in the context of applying principles from mental maps to American Indian maps and…

  6. Service network analysis for agricultural mental health

    Fuller Jeffrey D

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Farmers represent a subgroup of rural and remote communities at higher risk of suicide attributed to insecure economic futures, self-reliant cultures and poor access to health services. Early intervention models are required that tap into existing farming networks. This study describes service networks in rural shires that relate to the mental health needs of farming families. This serves as a baseline to inform service network improvements. Methods A network survey of mental health related links between agricultural support, health and other human services in four drought declared shires in comparable districts in rural New South Wales, Australia. Mental health links covered information exchange, referral recommendations and program development. Results 87 agencies from 111 (78% completed a survey. 79% indicated that two thirds of their clients needed assistance for mental health related problems. The highest mean number of interagency links concerned information exchange and the frequency of these links between sectors was monthly to three monthly. The effectiveness of agricultural support and health sector links were rated as less effective by the agricultural support sector than by the health sector (p Conclusion Aligning with agricultural agencies is important to build effective mental health service pathways to address the needs of farming populations. Work is required to ensure that these agricultural support agencies have operational and effective links to primary mental health care services. Network analysis provides a baseline to inform this work. With interventions such as local mental health training and joint service planning to promote network development we would expect to see over time an increase in the mean number of links, the frequency in which these links are used and the rated effectiveness of these links.

  7. Intermarriages, children of mixed parentage & mental health

    Singla, Rashmi

    relation to mental health of the couples in the Denmark and Norway. Mental health is conceptualised as the self understandings as well as the salient relationships at various levels. The second objective is to improve the accessibility of and further develop psychosocial services available for intermarried...... couples experiencing mental health problems. The theoretical framework of the project is interdisciplinary, combining transnationalism, narrative approach and life-course perspectives. Some statistical data pertaining to phenomenon of intermarriage in Denmark will also be presented. The investigation...... through qualitative research interviews will involve a number of couples, primarily Asians including those from the South Asian diaspora, currently / earlier married to native Danes. The focus is on their experiences and concerns related to mental health, in which their children will have a central place...

  8. Suicide: A Major, Preventable Mental Health Problem

    ... Suicide Prevention (2 items) Treatments (4 items) Share Suicide: A Major, Preventable Mental Health Problem Download PDF ... free hardcopy Some common questions and answers about suicide: Q: How common is suicide in children and ...

  9. Unnecessary work tasks and mental health

    Madsen, Ida E H; Tripathi, Manisha; Borritz, Marianne; Rugulies, Reiner

    2014-01-01

    association is modified by sex, age, occupational position, and baseline mental health status. METHODS: The data were obtained from self-administered questionnaires from 1351 Danish human service workers in three waves of data-collection during 1999-2005. We measured unnecessary work tasks by a single item......, and assessed mental health using the 5-item mental health inventory from the Short form 36 questionnaire. We analyzed data using multi-level modeling, adjusting for potential confounding by sex, age, cohabitation, occupational position, and baseline mental health. RESULTS: Unnecessary work tasks were......OBJECTIVES: According to the "stress-as-offense-to-self" perspective, work tasks that are considered unnecessary or unreasonable - so-called "illegitimate work tasks" - are likely to elicit stress-reactions. Previous studies, mostly cross-sectional, have shown that illegitimate tasks are associated...

  10. Effect of globalisation on children's mental health

    Timimi, Sami

    2005-01-01

    Globalisation is resulting in inappropriate domination of the Western view of mental health as well as of economic approaches. Western child psychiatrists have much to learn from child rearing practices in other countries

  11. Mental health challenges of LGBT forced migrants

    Ariel Shidlo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Many LGBT forced migrants have significant and sometimesincapacitating psychological scars. Mental health providers can assistin documenting the psychological impact of anti-LGBT persecutionand its impact on the ability to secure refugee status.

  12. Mental health and growing up factsheet. Cannabis and mental health: information for young people.

    Royal College of Psychiatrists

    2012-01-01

    About this leaflet This is one in a series of leaflets for parents, teachers and young people entitled Mental Health and Growing Up. These leaflets aim to provide practical, up-to-date information about mental health problems (emotional, behavioural and psychiatric disorders) that can affect children and young people. This leaflet gives you some basic facts about cannabis and also how it might affect your mental health. Introduction Lots of young people want to know about drugs. Often, people...

  13. Supporting Student Mental Health: The Role of the School Nurse in Coordinated School Mental Health Care

    Bohnenkamp, Jill H.; Stephan, Sharon H.; Bobo, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    School nurses play a critical role in the provision of mental health services in the school environment and are valuable members of the coordinated student mental health team. They possess expertise to navigate in today's complicated educational and health care systems, and it is estimated that school nurses spend 33% of their time addressing…

  14. Supporting Student Mental Health: The Role of the School Nurse in Coordinated School Mental Health Care

    Bohnenkamp, Jill H.; Stephan, Sharon H.; Bobo, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    School nurses play a critical role in the provision of mental health services in the school environment and are valuable members of the coordinated student mental health team. They possess expertise to navigate in today's complicated educational and health care systems, and it is estimated that school nurses spend 33% of their time addressing

  15. Mental Health and Academic Success in College

    Eisenberg Daniel; Golberstein Ezra; Hunt Justin B

    2009-01-01

    Mental health problems represent a potentially important but relatively unexplored factor in explaining human capital accumulation during college. We conduct the first study, to our knowledge, of how mental health predicts academic success during college in a random longitudinal sample of students. We find that depression is a significant predictor of lower GPA and higher probability of dropping out, particularly among students who also have a positive screen for an anxiety disorder. In withi...

  16. Qualitative Methods in Mental Health Services Research

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative and mixed methods play a prominent role in mental health services research. However, the standards for their use are not always evident, especially for those not trained in such methods. This paper reviews the rationale and common approaches to using qualitative and mixed methods in mental health services and implementation research based on a review of the papers included in this special series along with representative examples from the literature. Qualitative methods are used t...

  17. Computer Applications in Mental Health Management

    Hedlund, James L.; Wurster, Cecil R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of computer applications in mental health management. It makes a distinction between general (omnibus) mental health information systems and management information systems, between administrative and clinical computer applications, and summarizes the trend toward efficient, well-defined minimal-data-base management systems, with smaller, less expensive hardware. It also comments briefly on other current trends, including the move from central batch processing o...

  18. Mental Health in High-Tech System

    Sh Arghami

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress and mental health at the place of work have received great attention by researchers. In spite of technology improvement in high-tech systems, the operators face new problems, which can affect mental health. There is hardly any published research about stress or mental health in such workplaces in developing countries. This paper presents the application of the self-rating scale General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 to study mental health of 160 controllers working in a part of Air Traffic Control (ATC as a high-tech system in Iran. Logistic regression analysis showed that demographic variables did not exhibit a statistically significant effect on scores of the test. In order to compare mental health of these operators with general population, an exposure / non-exposure study was designed. Three age groups (less than 29 years, 30 through 39 y, and more than 40 y were compared in exposed and non-exposed groups. The results of Fishers exact test showed that mental distress symptoms were significantly higher in the exposed group. There were significant job effects on somatization, anxiety and depression as well as on the total score of GHQ-28 for the two first age groups (P<.05. No significant effects of the job were found on social dysfunction symptoms in any age groups. The risk ratio of expressing depression and anxiety symptoms were more than three times greater in these operators than general population.

  19. Religiousness and mental health: a review

    Moreira-Almeida Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The relationship between religiosity and mental health has been a perennial source of controversy. This paper reviews the scientific evidence available for the relationship between religion and mental health. METHOD: The authors present the main studies and conclusions of a larger systematic review of 850 studies on the religion-mental health relationship published during the 20th Century identified through several databases. The present paper also includes an update on the papers published since 2000, including researches performed in Brazil and a brief historical and methodological background. DISCUSSION: The majority of well-conducted studies found that higher levels of religious involvement are positively associated with indicators of psychological well-being (life satisfaction, happiness, positive affect, and higher morale and with less depression, suicidal thoughts and behavior, drug/alcohol use/abuse. Usually the positive impact of religious involvement on mental health is more robust among people under stressful circumstances (the elderly, and those with disability and medical illness. Theoretical pathways of the religiousness-mental health connection and clinical implications of these findings are also discussed. CONCLUSIONS: There is evidence that religious involvement is usually associated with better mental health. We need to improve our understanding of the mediating factors of this association and its use in clinical practice.

  20. Mental Health Promotion and Illness Prevention: A Challenge for Psychiatrists

    Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, Chang-Uk; Lee, Chul

    2013-01-01

    Mental health is essential for individual and public health. To improve mental health, promotion, prevention, and the treatment of disease are required. These three kinds of interventions are interrelated but independent from one another. Although separate efforts for mental health promotion and prevention are needed as well as the public need of mental health promotion and well-being, psychiatrists usually are not accustomed to mental health promotion and prevention. This review introduces a...

  1. Pediatric Mental Health Emergencies and Special Health Care Needs

    Chun, Thomas H.; Katz, Emily R.; Duffy, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Children with mental health problems are increasingly being evaluated and treated by both pediatric primary care and pediatric emergency physicians. This article focuses on the epidemiology, evaluation, and management of the two most common pediatric mental health emergencies, suicidal and homicidal/aggressive patients, as well as the equally challenging population of children with autism or other developmental disabilities.

  2. Mental health stigma and primary health care decisions.

    Corrigan, Patrick W; Mittal, Dinesh; Reaves, Christina M; Haynes, Tiffany F; Han, Xiaotong; Morris, Scott; Sullivan, Greer

    2014-08-15

    People with serious mental illness have higher rates of mortality and morbidity due to physical illness. In part, this occurs because primary care and other health providers sometimes make decisions contrary to typical care standards. This might occur because providers endorse mental illness stigma, which seems inversely related to prior personal experience with mental illness and mental health care. In this study, 166 health care providers (42.2% primary care, 57.8% mental health practice) from the Veteran׳s Affairs (VA) medical system completed measures of stigma characteristics, expected adherence, and subsequent health decisions (referral to a specialist and refill pain prescription) about a male patient with schizophrenia who was seeking help for low back pain due to arthritis. Research participants reported comfort with previous mental health interventions. Path analyses showed participants who endorsed stigmatizing characteristics of the patient were more likely to believe he would not adhere to treatment and hence, less likely to refer to a specialist or refill his prescription. Endorsement of stigmatizing characteristics was inversely related to comfort with one׳s previous mental health care. Implications of these findings will inform a program meant to enhance VA provider attitudes about people with mental illness, as well as their health decisions. PMID:24774076

  3. [Psychiatry and mental health in Morocco].

    Moussaoui, Driss

    2007-01-01

    Morocco has a population of some thirty million inhabitants, a very large proportion of whom are young. Mental health and psychiatry are dealt with jointly by the university, public, private, and military sectors. Despite significant progress in the last twenty years, there are still no more than 350 psychiatrists in Morocco (thirty years ago there were fewer than ten...), plus about 60 clinical psychologists, about 400 nurses specializing in psychiatry, and social workers. There are about 1900 psychiatric beds in both specialized hospitals and general hospital psychiatry units located in the main cities. In the teaching sector there are currently four university psychiatry departments, with a total of five full professors, six associate professors and five assistant professors. The National Mental Health Program, launched in 1974 and revised in 1994, was not properly implemented. Several NGOs also work in psychiatry and mental health, including the League for Mental Health and five patient associations. A national survey of the prevalence of mental disorders, completed in 2003 but only made public in 2007, represented a watershed for psychiatry in Morocco: 48.9% of a sample of 5600 persons representative of the general population were found to have a mental disorder, and 26.5% of respondents were depressed. This survey is an invaluable reference for years to come, helping to match mental healthcare provision with real needs. Research activity has also progressed since the early 1980s, as reflected by the number and quality of publications in the different fields, including epidemiology, biological psychiatry, social psychiatry, psychopharmacology and clinical psychopathology. Cultural aspects are a special research focus (suicide and religion, cannabis use, traditional treatments, etc.). International university collaboration has been especially important for Moroccan research. However, despite major progress over the last three decades in the fields of psychiatry and mental health, much remains to be done, notably to bolster child and adolescent psychiatry, and to manage mental illness in small towns and villages, including in the remotest regions. PMID:18225431

  4. Capacity Building in Rural Mental Health in Western Australia.

    Aoun, Samar; Johnson, Lyn

    2002-01-01

    A distance education program in mental health was delivered to 31 rural health professionals in Western Australia who dealt with mentally ill patients at the primary level. Evaluation on completion and 4 months postprogram indicated that participants learned mental health management regimes, developed mental health assessment skills, improved

  5. Mixed methods research in mental health nursing.

    Kettles, A M; Creswell, J W; Zhang, W

    2011-08-01

    Mixed methods research is becoming more widely used in order to answer research questions and to investigate research problems in mental health and psychiatric nursing. However, two separate literature searches, one in Scotland and one in the USA, revealed that few mental health nursing studies identified mixed methods research in their titles. Many studies used the term 'embedded' but few studies identified in the literature were mixed methods embedded studies. The history, philosophical underpinnings, definition, types of mixed methods research and associated pragmatism are discussed, as well as the need for mixed methods research. Examples of mental health nursing mixed methods research are used to illustrate the different types of mixed methods: convergent parallel, embedded, explanatory and exploratory in their sequential and concurrent combinations. Implementing mixed methods research is also discussed briefly and the problem of identifying mixed methods research in mental and psychiatric nursing are discussed with some possible solutions to the problem proposed. PMID:21749560

  6. Becoming a mental health nurse; A three year longitudinal study

    Harvey Wells

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This longitudinal case series study explores how students’ conceptions of ‘mental health nursing’ changed whilst on a three-year pre-registration Mental Health Nursing programme. The study was carried out in two university nursing schools in the South East of England and this paper reports a detailed analysis of 6 individual case studies. The researchers utilised Novak’s approach to concept mapping to elicit students’ personal knowledge structures, which were explored further using semi-structured individual qualitative interviews. The maps were analysed by looking at their gross morphology to interpret changes over time into types of learning achieved and the associated interview data were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results from analysis of the map structures suggest that whilst four of the selected students learned deeply, one participant learned superficially and one appeared not to learn at all. The associated interview data provides an interesting insight into the students’ reflective narratives on the process of learning. The findings also demonstrate further evidence of the practicability of using Novakian concept maps to self-prompt qualitative research interviews. Implications for the professional education of Mental Health Nurses are discussed.

  7. [Burn injuries and mental health].

    Palmu, Raimo; Vuola, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    Currently a large proportion of patients with severe burn injuries survive. This gives increasing challenges also for psychological recovery after the trauma. More than half of burn patients have mental disorders already before the burn injury but also patients who previously had no mental disorders may suffer from them. Some of the hospitalize burn patients have injuries due to suicidal attempts. Only a small proportion of burn patients receive appropriate psychiatric care although psychosocial interventions specifically planned for burn victims exist. More frequent screening of symtoms of mental disorders and psychiatric consultation, also after acute care in hospital, could lead to better management of post-burn psychiatric care as well as better management of the burn treatment and rehabilitation itself. PMID:27089616

  8. Declaration on mental health in Africa: moving to implementation

    Abdallah S. Daar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Urgent action is needed to address mental health issues globally. In Africa, where mental health disorders account for a huge burden of disease and disability, and where in general less than 1% of the already small health budgets are spent on these disorders, the need for action is acute and urgent. Members of the World Health Organization, including African countries, have adopted a Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan. Africa now has an historic opportunity to improve the mental health and wellbeing of its citizens, beginning with provision of basic mental health services and development of national mental health strategic plans (roadmaps. There is need to integrate mental health into primary health care and address stigma and violations of human rights. We advocate for inclusion of mental health into the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals, and for the convening of a special UN General Assembly High Level Meeting on Mental Health within three years.

  9. Economics of mental health: Part I - Economic consequences of neglecting mental health - an Indian perspective

    Srinivasa SRR Yerramilli; Rajshekhar Bipeta

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mental health is not a priority area for policy makers even today.Objective: The objective of the present review is to sensitize policy makers regarding the importance of investing in mental health. Appraising the policy makers about the costs of mental illness and the negative economic consequences of poor investment in mental health on the society are the aims.Methodology: A review of various studies on the above subject was done using Google Scholar and PubMed.Results: Most of ...

  10. Global Mental Health: concepts, conflicts and controversies.

    Whitley, Rob

    2015-08-01

    This paper introduces, describes and analyses the emerging concept of Global Mental Health (GMH). The birth of GMH can be traced to London, 2007, with the publication of a series of high-profile papers in The Lancet. Since then, GMH has developed into a movement with proponents, adherents, opponents, an ideology and core activities. The stated aims of the Movement for GMH are 'to improve services for people living with mental health problems and psychosocial disabilities worldwide, especially in low- and middle-income countries where effective services are often scarce'. GMH could be considered an attempt to right a historic wrong. During the colonial and post-colonial eras, the mental health of subject populations was accorded a very low priority. This was fuelled by scientific racism, which alleged that mental illness was uncommon in places such as Africa. As developing nations have made the epidemiological transition, the burden of mental illness has proportionately increased, with research suggesting a massive 'treatment gap' between those in need and those actually receiving formal mental health care. As such, much GMH research and action has been devoted to: (i) the identification and scale-up of cost-effective evidence-supported interventions that could be made more widely available; (ii) task-shifting of such intervention delivery to mental-health trained non-specialist Lay Health Workers. GMH has come under sustained critique. Critics suggest that GMH is colonial medicine come full circle, involving the top-down imposition of Western psychiatric models and solutions by Western-educated elites. These critiques suggest that GMH ignores the various indigenous modalities of healing present in non-Western cultures, which may be psychologically adaptive and curative. Relatedly, critics argue that GMH could be an unwitting Trojan horse for the mass medicalisation of people in developing countries, paving the way for exploitation by Big Pharma, while ignoring social determinants of health. PMID:26027857

  11. Setting priorities for global mental health research

    Mark Tomlinson

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To set investment priorities in global mental health research and to propose a more rational use of funds in this under-resourced and under-investigated area. METHODS: Members of the Lancet Mental Health Group systematically listed and scored research investment options on four broad classes of disorders: schizophrenia and other major psychotic disorders, major depressive disorder and other common mental disorders, alcohol abuse and other substance abuse disorders, and the broad class of child and adolescent mental disorders. Using the priority-setting approach of the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative, the group listed various research questions and evaluated them using the criteria of answerability, effectiveness, deliverability, equity and potential impact on persisting burden of mental health disorders. Scores were then weighted according to the system of values expressed by a larger group of stakeholders. FINDINGS: The research questions that scored highest were related to health policy and systems research, where and how to deliver existing cost-effective interventions in a low-resource context, and epidemiological research on the broad categories of child and adolescent mental disorders or those pertaining to alcohol and drug abuse questions. The questions that scored lowest related to the development of new interventions and new drugs or pharmacological agents, vaccines or other technologies. CONCLUSION: In the context of global mental health and with a time frame of the next 10 years, it would be best to fill critical knowledge gaps by investing in research into health policy and systems, epidemiology and improved delivery of cost-effective interventions.

  12. Collaboration in the provision of mental health care services

    Jaruseviciene, L.; Valius, L.; Lazarus, J.V.; Zemaitiene, N.; Jarusevicius, G.

    2012-01-01

    Background. General practitioners (GPs) often become the first point of care for mental health issues. Improved collaboration between GPs and mental health teams can make a GP's mental health services more efficient. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the collaboration between GPs and...... mental health care for patients as well as GPs' collaboration with metal health teams. Results. The response rate was 52.2%. GPs collaborated closest with psychiatrists: 30.7% of them reported that they discuss the mental health care of their patients with psychiatrists. Predictors of greater...... collaboration with mental health teams were a lack of GPs'confidence in their communication skills and ability to diagnose the most frequent mental disorders, prompt referral to mental health team specialists, low estimation of the prevalence of non-managed mental disorders, and location of mental health team...

  13. Do State Mental Health Plans Address the New Freedom Commission's Goals for Children's Mental Health?

    Gould, Sara R.; Roberts, Michael C.; Beals, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    The latest initiative to address mental health needs of the nation, including those of children and youth, is the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health (NFC). The NFC formulated a benchmark of six goals and related recommendations toward which the U.S. should strive, including the recommendation that each state develop a…

  14. Mental health policy and development in Egypt - integrating mental health into health sector reforms 2001-9

    Siekkonen Inkeri; Loza Nasser; Heshmat Ahmed; Jenkins Rachel; Sorour Eman

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Following a situation appraisal in 2001, a six year mental health reform programme (Egymen) 2002-7 was initiated by an Egyptian-Finnish bilateral aid project at the request of a former Egyptian minister of health, and the work was incorporated directly into the Ministry of Health and Population from 2007 onwards. This paper describes the aims, methodology and implementation of the mental health reforms and mental health policy in Egypt 2002-2009. Methods A multi-faceted an...

  15. MARRIAGE AND MENTAL HEALTH AMONG YOUNG ADULTS

    Uecker, Jeremy E.

    2012-01-01

    Marriage is widely thought to confer mental health benefits, but little is known about how this relationship may vary across the life course. Early marriage—which is non-normative—could have no, or even negative, mental health consequences for young adults. Using survey data from Waves 1 and 3 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 11,743), I find that married young adults exhibit similar levels of psychological distress as young adults who are in any kind of romantic re...

  16. One Hundred Years of College Mental Health

    Kraft, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Although the first student health service is credited to Amherst College in 1861, almost 50 years passed before Princeton University established the first mental health service in 1910. At that time, a psychiatrist was hired to help with student personality development. Although other schools subsequently established such services, the first 50…

  17. One Hundred Years of College Mental Health

    Kraft, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Although the first student health service is credited to Amherst College in 1861, almost 50 years passed before Princeton University established the first mental health service in 1910. At that time, a psychiatrist was hired to help with student personality development. Although other schools subsequently established such services, the first 50

  18. Mental health in Palestinian camps in Lebanon

    Fabio Forgione

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Health agencies in refugee camps face the dual challenge of, firstly,convincing both camp populations and the international communitythat mental health disorders deserve treatment as much as any otherillness and, secondly, building enough trust to encourage people toseek that treatment.

  19. Mental health concerns of gay and bisexual men seeking mental health services.

    Berg, Michael B; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Safren, Steven A

    2008-01-01

    Little data exist about the mental health needs of gay and bisexual men. This is due to limitations of existing studies such as small and nonrepresentative samples, failure to assess sexual orientation, and concerns about stigmatization, possibly causing sexual minority individuals to be reluctant to disclose their sexual orientation to researchers. Fenway Community Health is a large urban health center that serves the LGBT community. The large number of gay and bisexual men who present for mental health treatment allows for a unique opportunity to gain insight into mental health, prevention, and intervention needs for this group. The current study is a review of the mental health information from all of the gay and bisexual men who reported that they were HIV-negative during their mental health intake over a six-month period at Fenway Community Health (January to June 2000; N = 92). The most frequent presenting problems were depression, anxiety, and relationship issues. Additionally, presenting problems included current or past abuse, substance abuse, finance and employment, recent loss, and family issues. The most frequent diagnoses were depression, anxiety disorders, and adjustment disorders. These findings support the notion that presenting problems and mental health concerns among gay and bisexual men are similar to those frequently reported by individuals in other mental health facilities, however, specific psychosocial stressors are unique to this population. PMID:18825866

  20. Mental health literacy in secondary schools: a Canadian approach.

    Kutcher, Stan; Bagnell, Alexa; Wei, Yifeng

    2015-04-01

    "Mental health literacy is an integral component of health literacy and has been gaining increasing attention as an important focus globally for mental health interventions. In Canada, youth mental health is increasingly recognized as a key national health concern and has received more focused attention than ever before within our health system. This article outlines 2 unique homegrown initiatives to address youth mental health literacy within Canadian secondary schools." PMID:25773321

  1. Psychedelics and Mental Health: A Population Study

    Krebs, Teri S; Johansen, Pål-Ørjan

    2013-01-01

    Background The classical serotonergic psychedelics LSD, psilocybin, mescaline are not known to cause brain damage and are regarded as non-addictive. Clinical studies do not suggest that psychedelics cause long-term mental health problems. Psychedelics have been used in the Americas for thousands of years. Over 30 million people currently living in the US have used LSD, psilocybin, or mescaline. Objective To evaluate the association between the lifetime use of psychedelics and current mental h...

  2. Adjustment and mental health problem in prisoners

    Sudhinta Sinha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : "Crime" is increasing day by day in our society not only in India but also all over the world. In turn, the number of prisoners is also increasing at the same rate. They remain imprisoned for a long duration or in some cases for the whole life. Living in a prison for long time becomes difficult for all inmates. So they often face adjustment and mental health problems. Recent findings suggest that mental illness rate in prison is three times higher than in the general population. Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the adjustment and the mental health problem and its relation in the prisoners. Materials and Methods : In the present study, 37 male prisoners of district jail of Dhanbad District of Jharkhand were selected on purposive sampling basis. Each prisoner was given specially designed Performa - Personal Data Sheet, General Health Questionnaire-12 and Bell Adjustment Inventory. Appropriate statistical tools were used to analyze the data. Results: The results obtained showed poor adjustment in social and emotional areas on the adjustment scale. The study also revealed a significant association between adjustment and mental health problem in the prisoners. Conclusion: The prisoners were found to have poor social and emotional adjustment which has strong association with their mental health.

  3. Mental health in the foreclosure crisis.

    Houle, Jason N

    2014-10-01

    Current evidence suggests that the rise in home foreclosures that began in 2007 created feelings of stress, vulnerability, and sapped communities of social and economic resources. Minority and low SES communities were more likely to be exposed to predatory lending and hold subprime mortgages, and were the hardest hit by the foreclosure crisis. Little research has examined whether and how the foreclosure crisis has undermined population mental health. I use data from 2245 counties in 50 U.S. states to examine whether living in high foreclosure areas is associated with residents' mental health and whether the foreclosure crisis has the potential to exacerbate existing disparities in mental health during the recessionary period. I use county-level data from RealtyTrac and other data sources, and individual-level data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey from 2006 to 2011. I find that - net of time invariant unobserved between-county differences, national time trends, and observed confounders - a rise in a county's foreclosure rate is associated with a decline in residents' mental health. This association is especially pronounced in counties with a high concentration of low SES and minority residents, which supports the perspective that the foreclosure crisis has the potential to exacerbate existing social disparities in mental health. PMID:25084488

  4. Public Mental Health – Using the Mental Health Gap Action Program to Put all Hands to the Pumps

    Uwakwe, Richard; Otakpor, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Although mental ill health constitutes a huge portion of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD), the majority of people with mental health problems do not receive any treatment, a scenario much worse in developing countries where mental health personnel are in gross short supply. The mhGAP was launched to address this gap, especially by training non-mental health professionals to deliver effective services for selected priority mental health problems. Especially in developing countries, many peop...

  5. Mental Health Awareness Month & Speak Up for Kids

    Cowan, Katherine C.

    2012-01-01

    May is National Mental Health Awareness Month. This is a great time to highlight the importance of mental wellness and school-based mental health services to children's positive learning and development. There is heightened urgency to the imperative to advance school-based mental health and school psychologists' expertise as essential to the…

  6. Music Regions and Mental Maps: Teaching Cultural Geography

    Shobe, Hunter; Banis, David

    2010-01-01

    Music informs understandings of place and is an excellent vehicle for teaching cultural geography. A study was developed of geography students' perception of where music genres predominate in the United States. Its approach, involving mental map exercises, reveals the usefulness and importance of maps as an iterative process in teaching cultural…

  7. Mental health care policy environment in Rivers State: experiences of mental health nurses providing mental health care services in neuro-psychiatric hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

    Jack-Ide, Izibeloko Omi; Uys, Leana R; Middleton, Lyn E

    2013-01-01

    Background Mental health services for Rivers State and surrounding States in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria are provided only at the neuropsychiatric Rumuigbo Hospital in Port Harcourt City, Rivers State, Nigeria. The study explored mental health nurses’ experiences of providing mental health services at the hospital in an attempt to understand policy implications, identify difficulties and challenges of delivering mental health care services. Methods A qualitative study using in-depth int...

  8. [Mental health support for disaster relief personnel].

    Takahashi, Sho

    2014-01-01

    The Tohoku-Pacific Ocean Earthquake, which occurred on March 11, 2011, caused serious damage and resulted in numerous fatalities and almost 20,000 missing persons. Furthermore, a major accident accompanied by exudation of radioactive material occurred in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. A statement regarding the victims' mental health was issued by the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology on May 21, 2011, which established the Department of Disaster Psychiatry for the provision and assurance of long-term mental care support for the victims. The Department of Disaster Psychiatry was consequently reformed in April 2012, focusing on the following objectives: to verify the validity of current mental support methods; to ensure disaster psychiatry and medical care in Japan; and to promote human resource development that can respond to future large-scale disasters. Mental health support for disaster victims is of highest priority. However, the mental health of relief personnel, who act as front liners during disasters (i. e., police officers, fire fighters, Self-Defense Forces, and health care workers), has often been neglected. Therefore, countermeasures for the problems faced by relief personnel are indispensable for a more effective reconstruction. Volunteers are also important members of the disaster relief team and they have witnessed the actual tragedy, and some have experienced burnout. Thus, they require sufficient mental health support, as do relief personnel. We thought that the mental health of disaster relief personnel is an important issue; thus, we report their mental health needs, the systematic correspondence to disaster stress, and our works for relief assistance. As first responders, relief personnel even without prior disaster education proceed to the area of disaster and may get injured. We therefore suggest that prior to the occurrence of any disaster, networking, education, and disaster awareness should be advocated among relief personnel and volunteers to safeguard their mental health. However, programs on these subjects remain insufficient. We extend our utmost respect and appreciation to the disaster relief workforce for doing their best to save lives. We hope that this aids in the reconstruction process of such affected areas. PMID:24783446

  9. Obesity Surgery Patients May Often Have Mental Health Disorders

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_156653.html Obesity Surgery Patients May Often Have Mental Health Disorders ... HealthDay News) -- Many people having surgery for severe obesity also have mental health conditions, particularly depression and ...

  10. National Mental Health Services Survey (N-MHSS), 2010

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Mental Health Services Survey (N-MHSS) is designed to collect information from all specialty mental health facilities in the United States, both public...

  11. Mental Health and Emergency Medicine: A Research Agenda

    Larkin, Gregory Luke; Beautrais, Annette L.; Spirito, Anthony; Kirrane, Barbara M.; Lippmann, Melanie J.; Milzman, David P.

    2009-01-01

    The burden of mental illness is profound and growing. Coupled with large gaps in extant psychiatric services, this mental health burden has often forced emergency departments (EDs) to become the de facto primary and acute care provider of mental health care in the United States. An expanded emergency medical and mental health research agenda is required to meet the need for improved education, screening, surveillance, and ED-initiated interventions for mental health problems. As an increasing...

  12. Mental Health Disorders. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2013-1

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders are diagnosable conditions characterized by changes in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination of these) that can cause a person to feel stressed out and impair his or her ability to function. These disorders are common in adolescence. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents the warning signs of mental disorders;

  13. Mental Health Disorders. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2013-1

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders are diagnosable conditions characterized by changes in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination of these) that can cause a person to feel stressed out and impair his or her ability to function. These disorders are common in adolescence. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents the warning signs of mental disorders;…

  14. Mental health consequences of the Chernobyl disaster

    The psychosocial consequences of disasters have been studied for more than 100 years. The most common mental health consequences are depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, medically unexplained somatic symptoms, and stigma. The excess morbidity rate of psychiatric disorders in the first year after a disaster is in the order of 20%. Disasters involving radiation are particularly pernicious because the exposure is invisible and universally dreaded, and can pose a long-term threat to health. After the Chernobyl disaster, studies of clean-up workers (liquidators) and adults from contaminated areas found a two-fold increase in post-traumatic stress and other mood and anxiety disorders and significantly poorer subjective ratings of health. Among liquidators, the most important risk factor was severity of exposure. In general population samples, the major risk factor was perceived exposure to harmful levels of radiation. These findings are consistent with results from A-bomb survivors and populations studied after the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident. With regard to children, apart from findings from ecological studies that lack direct data on radiation or other teratologic exposures and local studies in Kiev, the epidemiologic evidence suggests that neither radiation exposure nor the stress of growing up in the shadow of the accident was associated with emotional disorders, cognitive dysfunction, or impaired academic performance. Thus, based on the studies of adults, the Chernobyl Forum concluded that mental health was the largest public health problem unleashed by the accident. Since mental health is a leading cause of disability, physical morbidity, and mortality, health monitoring after radiation accidents like Fukushima should include standard measures of well-being. Moreover, given the comorbidity of mental and physical health, the findings support the value of training non-psychiatrist physicians in recognizing and treating common mental health problems like depression in Fukushima patients. (note)

  15. Discourses of aggression in forensic mental health

    Berring, Lene L; Pedersen, Liselotte; Buus, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Managing aggression in mental health hospitals is an important and challenging task for clinical nursing staff. A majority of studies focus on the perspective of clinicians, and research mainly depicts aggression by referring to patient-related factors. This qualitative study investigates how...... aggression is communicated in forensic mental health nursing records. The aim of the study was to gain insight into the discursive practices used by forensic mental health nursing staff when they record observed aggressive incidents. Textual accounts were extracted from the Staff Observation Aggression Scale....... These antecedents, combined with the aggression incident itself, created stereotyping representations of forensic psychiatric patients as deviant, unpredictable and dangerous. Patient and staff identities were continually (re)produced by an automatic response from the staff that was solely focused on...

  16. Management of patients with mental health needs.

    Goode, Debbie; Melby, Vidar; Ryan, Assumpta

    2014-09-01

    This article presents findings from the first phase of a two-part study that examined the knowledge and experience of emergency department (ED) staff who work with people with mental health needs. In the first part of the study, 19 semi-structured interviews were conducted with multidisciplinary team (MDT) members and the results were analysed. The interviews covered the ED environment, participants' attitudes towards, ability to communicate with, and knowledge and experience of patients with mental health needs. One of the study's main findings was that MDT members require more appropriate training to raise their awareness of issues related to mental health. The findings informed the development of a questionnaire, which was distributed to a large cohort of ED staff and social workers. PMID:25185925

  17. Age differences in mental health literacy

    Christensen Helen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The community's knowledge and beliefs about mental health problems, their risk factors, treatments and sources of help may vary as a function of age. Methods Data were taken from an epidemiological survey conducted during 2003–2004 with a national clustered sample of Australian adults aged 18 years and over. Following the presentation of a vignette describing depression (n = 1001 or schizophrenia (n = 997, respondents were asked a series of questions relating to their knowledge and recognition of the disorder, beliefs about the helpfulness of treating professionals and medical, psychological and lifestyle treatments, and likely causes. Results Participant age was coded into five categories and cross-tabulated with mental health literacy variables. Comparisons between age groups revealed that although older adults (70+ years were poorer than younger age groups at correctly recognising depression and schizophrenia, young adults (18–24 years were more likely to misidentify schizophrenia as depression. Differences were also observed between younger and older age groups in terms of beliefs about the helpfulness of certain treating professionals and medical and lifestyle treatments for depression and schizophrenia, and older respondents were more likely to believe that schizophrenia could be caused by character weakness. Conclusion Differences in mental health literacy across the adult lifespan suggest that more specific, age appropriate messages about mental health are required for younger and older age groups. The tendency for young adults to 'over-identify' depression signals the need for awareness campaigns to focus on differentiation between mental disorders.

  18. Educator Mental Health Literacy: A Programme Evaluation of the Teacher Training Education on the Mental Health & High School Curriculum Guide

    Kutcher, S.; Wei, Y.; McLuckie, A.; Bullock, L.

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders make up close to one-third of the global burden of disease experienced during adolescence. Schools can play an important role in the promotion of positive mental health as well as an integral role in the pathways into mental health care for adolescents. In order for schools to effectively address the mental health problems of…

  19. Stress and mental health among medical students

    Backović Dušan V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medical studies bring many stressful activities to students. Prolonged stress can make adverse effects to mental health and lead to further professional burnout. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the association of stress impact and adverse effects of medical studies with psychological distress among medical students. Methods. The cross sectional study was conducted on 367 fourth­year medical students of the Faculty of Medicine in Belgrade, by means of the anonymous questionnaire, containing: socio­demographic data, self­reported health status and stressful influences of studying activities. Mental health status was estimated by General Health Questionnaire (GHQ­12. Results. More than 50% of students perceive frequent feeling of psychic tension, and one third has problems with insomnia. Nearly one­half of students assessed their general stress level as moderate or high. Exams were estimated as high stressor in 63.1% of all students. Stressful effects of communication with teaching staff were reported by one quarter of the examinees. The scores of GHQ­12 were above the threshold in 55.6 % of all students. Mental health problems among students were most significantly associated with stressful experience during exams and contacts with teaching staff. Conclusion. Academic stress makes great influence on mental health of medical students. Reduction of stress effects should be directed to optimization of the examination process and improvement of communication skills. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 175078

  20. Enlightened Travelers and Their Mental Maps

    Nikolay Aretov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Enlightened Travelers and Their Mental MapsThe issue of mental mapping of Eastern Europe (Wolff, posed during the Enlightenment, and the similar problem of the image of the Balkans (Todorova, are both multifaceted. This paper deals with three aspects of these processes and seeks to analyse them through the prism of the Orientalism-Occidentalism opposition.The article opens with a very general description of the Oriental mental maps on the part of 19th-century Bulgarian revolutionaries and modernisers. Most characteristic in this respect are the diaries of those convicted to exile in the Diarbekir fortress. I then turn my attention to texts by influential foreigners who arrived in Bulgaria immediately after 1878, including especially the publications by the Czech historian and Slavonic scholar Constantine Jireček and some of the reactions they provoked.The article reveals common elements in both the foreign perspective on the inhabitants of the Orient/the Balkans/Bulgaria and the Bulgarian perspective on the Occident/Western Europe. A hypothesis is proposed that what the analysed texts portray is not a general clash between traditionalism (patriarchal culture and modernity but rather a very particular conflict over which group should perform the role of the “civiliser” of Bulgarian society. Both sides of the conflict made instrumental use of existing discourses, be it modernist or patriarchal, Orientalist or Occidentalist.Oświeceni podróżnicy i ich mapy mentalneProblem mentalnego kartografowania Europy Wschodniej (L. Wolff, jak też Bałkanów (M. Todorowa, od czasów oświecenia jest wieloaspektowy. Artykuł charakteryzuje trzy spośród tych aspektów i poszukuje związków pomiędzy nimi, poprzez analizę opozycji orientalizm – okcydentalizm.Na początku prezentuję najogólniej mapy mentalne bułgarskich rewolucjonistów i przedstawicieli nowoczesności z XIX wieku na Bałkanach (Orient. Najbardziej charakterystyczne pod tym względem są dzienniki skazańców z twierdzy tureckiej w Diar-Bekir. Następnie moja uwaga skupia się na tekstach wpływowych cudzoziemców, którzy znaleźli się w Bułgarii bezpośrednio po 1878 roku, a wśród nich w centrum mojego zainteresowania znajdują się niektóre publikacje Czecha Konstantina Irečka i reakcje na nie.Artykuł jest próbą zarysu punktu widzenia cudzoziemca w stosunku do przedstawicieli Orientu /Bałkanów/Bułgarii i bułgarskiego dystansu w odniesieniu do Okcydentu /Zachodu/ Europy. Materiał analizowany skłania ku hipotezie, że nie o zderzenie między tradycjonalizmem (patriarchalną kulturą i nowoczesnością idzie, ale o konkretną walkę o odegranie roli "cywilizatora" bułgarskiego społeczeństwa. W tej walce oponenci wykorzystują instrumentalnie dostępne dyskursy, modernistyczne, czy też patriarchalne, orientalne, czy okcydentalne. Просветени пътешественици и техните ментални картиПроблемът за менталното картографиране на Източна Европа (Л. Улф от Просвещението, както и сродния му проблем за отношението към Балканите (М. Тодорова имат многобройни аспекти. Статията очертава три от тях и търси връзките им, видени през опозицията ориентализъм – оксидентализъм. В началото са представени най-общо менталните карти на българите революционери и модернизатори от ХІХ в. на Ориента. Те са особено характерни за мемоарите на заточениците в Диарбекир. След това вниманието се насочва към текстовете на влиятелни чужденци, попаднали в България непосредствено след 1878 г., на първо място някои публикации на чеха Константин Иречек и някои реакции към тях. Разкрити са общите елементи в ориенталистката гледна точка на чужденеца и оксиденталистките възражения на българина. Изказва се хипотезата, че в случая не се наблюдава сблъсък между традиционно (патриархално и модерно, а конкурентна борба за ролята на "цивилизатора" на българското общество. В тази борба опонентите използват инструментално наличните дискурси, били те модернистки или патриархални, ориенталистки или оксиденталистки.

  1. Mental health/illness and prisons as place: frontline clinicians’ perspectives of mental health work in a penal setting

    Wright, Nicola; Jordan, Melanie; Kane, Eddie

    2014-01-01

    This article takes mental health and prisons as its two foci. It explores the links between social and structural aspects of the penal setting, the provision of mental healthcare in prisons, and mental health work in this environment. This analysis utilises qualitative interview data from prison-based fieldwork undertaken in Her Majesty׳s Prison Service, England. Two themes are discussed: (1) the desire and practicalities of doing mental health work and (2) prison staff as mental health work ...

  2. Mental Health Status and Use of Mental Health Services by California Adults

    Grant, David; Kravitz-Wirtz, Nicole; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Sribney, William M.; Aydin, May; Brown, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    This policy brief, based on data from the 2005 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS 2005), presents a comprehensive overview of mental health status and service use in California, and highlights differences by age, gender, race/ethnicity, income and insurance status. The authors find that nearly one in five adults in California, about 4.9 million persons, said they needed help for a mental or emotional health problem. Approximately one in 25, or over one million Californians, reported sym...

  3. Toxoplasma gondii, Mental Health and Shizophrenia

    Sibel Cevizci

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Protecting and promoting of mental health is one of the major application areas of public health. In particular, Toxoplasma gondii, which is a protozoal zoonosis common in Turkey, it is closely related to veterinary public health. In recent years, T.gondii can induce behavioral changes, may play a role in schizophrenia as an etiologic factor. Results of the recently performed studies shows that T.gondii may be a potential factor for some neuropathological changes in brain and suicide attemption. The purpose of this review is to present the data on recent epidemiology of T.gondii, mental health effects (changes in behavior, suicide, etc., the relationship between T.gondii and schizophrenia and offer some recommendations for protecting of public health. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(2.000: 199-208

  4. Police and mental health clinician partnership in response to mental health crisis: A qualitative study.

    McKenna, Brian; Furness, Trentham; Oakes, Jane; Brown, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Police officers as first responders to acute mental health crisis in the community, commonly transport people in mental health crisis to a hospital emergency department. However, emergency departments are not the optimal environments to provide assessment and care to those experiencing mental health crises. In 2012, the Northern Police and Clinician Emergency Response (NPACER) team combining police and mental health clinicians was created to reduce behavioural escalation and provide better outcomes for people with mental health needs through diversion to appropriate mental health and community services. The aim of this study was to describe the perceptions of major stakeholders on the ability of the team to reduce behavioural escalation and improve the service utilization of people in mental health crisis. Responses of a purposive sample of 17 people (carer or consumer advisors, mental health or emergency department staff, and police or ambulance officers) who had knowledge of, or had interfaced with, the NPACER were thematically analyzed after one-to-one semistructured interviews. Themes emerged about the challenge created by a stand-alone police response, with the collaborative strengths of the NPACER (communication, information sharing, and knowledge/skill development) seen as the solution. Themes on improvements in service utilization were revealed at the point of community contact, in police stations, transition through the emergency department, and admission to acute inpatient units. The NPACER enabled emergency department diversion, direct access to inpatient mental health services, reduced police officer 'down-time', improved interagency collaboration and knowledge transfer, and improvements in service utilization and transition. PMID:26040444

  5. Mental disorders among health workers in Brazil

    Berenice Scaletzky Knuth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe scope of this article is to deter mine the prevalence of common mental disorders (CMD and Depression among Community Health Agents (CHA and employees of Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS. It is a cross-sectional descriptive study involving the target population of Community Health Workers and Psychosocial Care Center workers, linked to the Municipal Health Department of Pelotas in the Brazilian State of Rio Grande do Sul. The presence of common mental disorders was considered when the Self Report Questionnaire (SRQ was > 7 and the occurrence of depression when BDI > 12. In total, 257 professionals participated in the study. Among mental health professionals (n = 119, the prevalence of CMDs was 25.2% and depression was 23.5%, while the prevalence of CMDs was 48.6% and depression was 29% among CHA (n = 138. The ratio of CMDs between the two groups of professionals was statistically different (p < 0.001. In this study, it was observed that the CAPS professionals are more adapted to work issues, with less perceived health problems arising from work and with a lower prevalence of mental disorders compared to CHA.

  6. Mental disorders among health workers in Brazil.

    Knuth, Berenice Scaletzky; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo; Oses, Jean Pierre; Radtke, Vinicius Augusto; Cocco, Rafaela Abreu; Jansen, Karen

    2015-08-01

    The scope of this article is to deter mine the prevalence of common mental disorders (CMD) and Depression among Community Health Agents (CHA) and employees of Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS). It is a cross-sectional descriptive study involving the target population of Community Health Workers and Psychosocial Care Center workers, linked to the Municipal Health Department of Pelotas in the Brazilian State of Rio Grande do Sul. The presence of common mental disorders was considered when the Self Report Questionnaire (SRQ) was > 7 and the occurrence of depression when BDI > 12. In total, 257 professionals participated in the study. Among mental health professionals (n = 119), the prevalence of CMDs was 25.2% and depression was 23.5%, while the prevalence of CMDs was 48.6% and depression was 29% among CHA (n = 138). The ratio of CMDs between the two groups of professionals was statistically different (p < 0.001). In this study, it was observed that the CAPS professionals are more adapted to work issues, with less perceived health problems arising from work and with a lower prevalence of mental disorders compared to CHA. PMID:26221813

  7. Tricks of the trade in community mental health research: working with mental health services and clients.

    Dadich, Ann; Muir, Kristy

    2009-03-01

    The complexities of research in the community mental health sector are seldom acknowledged in existing literature; this article attempts to address this void. It presents the methodological challenges experienced in the longitudinal evaluation of the Housing and Accommodation Support Initiative-a program that supports people with chronic mental illness toward long-term recovery. The evaluation provides a case study for understanding methodological problems in community mental health research, which include working with organizations that experience high staff turnover; staff members who have large caseloads; and clients who have chronic mental illness. Although not applicable to all research designs, the suggested strategies highlight the importance of innovation, flexibility, and balance between research theory and practical limitations when conducting community mental health research. PMID:19116228

  8. How Iranian Women Conceptualize Mental Health: An Explanatory Model

    Arash Mirabzadeh; Ameneh Setareh Forouzan; Farahnaz Mohammadi; Masoumeh Dejman; Monir Baradaran Eftekhari

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background In Iran, more than 25% of women suffer from mental disorders. Mental disorders and subclinical problems are associated with socioeconomic problem. At the community level, mental health promotion can reduce social damage. The aim of this study as a part of community based mental health promotion intervention was to explore how mental health in Iranian women is viewed. Methods According to a qualitative method in 2012, participants were selected by purposeful sampling from m...

  9. 45 CFR 1304.24 - Child mental health.

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Child mental health. 1304.24 Section 1304.24... AGENCIES Early Childhood Development and Health Services § 1304.24 Child mental health. (a) Mental health services. (1) Grantee and delegate agencies must work collaboratively with parents (see 45 CFR...

  10. Social Workers' Role in the Canadian Mental Health Care System

    Towns, Ashley M.; Schwartz, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Using Canadian survey data this research provides social workers in Canada with a better understanding of their role in the Canadian mental health care system. Methods: By analyzing data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 1.2 Mental Health and Well-being, the role of social workers in the Canadian mental health system was

  11. Social Workers' Role in the Canadian Mental Health Care System

    Towns, Ashley M.; Schwartz, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Using Canadian survey data this research provides social workers in Canada with a better understanding of their role in the Canadian mental health care system. Methods: By analyzing data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 1.2 Mental Health and Well-being, the role of social workers in the Canadian mental health system was…

  12. Mental health: The new frontier for labour economics

    Layard, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This lecture argues that mental health is a major factor of production. It is the biggest single influence on life satisfaction, with mental health eight years earlier a more powerful explanatory factor than current income. Mental health also affects earnings and educational success. But, most strikingly, it affects employment and physical health. In advanced countries mental health problems are the main illness of working age – amounting to 40% of all illness under 65. They account for over ...

  13. Mental Health Literacy: Empowering the Community to Take Action for Better Mental Health

    Jorm, Anthony F.

    2012-01-01

    For major physical diseases, it is widely accepted that members of the public will benefit by knowing what actions they can take for prevention, early intervention, and treatment. However, this type of public knowledge about mental disorders ("mental health literacy") has received much less attention. There is evidence from surveys in several…

  14. Mental Health Literacy: Empowering the Community to Take Action for Better Mental Health

    Jorm, Anthony F.

    2012-01-01

    For major physical diseases, it is widely accepted that members of the public will benefit by knowing what actions they can take for prevention, early intervention, and treatment. However, this type of public knowledge about mental disorders ("mental health literacy") has received much less attention. There is evidence from surveys in several

  15. Tabaquismo y salud mental Tobacco smoking and mental health

    Graciela Rojas C

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Smoking continues to be one of the most important health burdens worldwide. Aim: To describe smoking habits and associated risk factors in the population of Santiago, Chile. Material and methods: A cross sectional study of a representative sample of the population, from 16 to 64 years old, residents of Santiago, Chile (total population: 3,237,286. A structured interview that included questions about use of tobacco, the CIS-R interviews, used for common mental disorders, were applied. Results: From the sample of 4,693 households, 3,870 people were interviewed (52.2% women, 47.8% men and 10% refused. Forty percent of the population currently smoked (52.5% men, 47.8% women. Being a current smoker was associated with being younger than 55, male sex, and having a common mental disorder. Discussion: Smoking is highly prevalent in Chile, as compared with developed countries and with some developing countries. Gender differences in use of tobacco have decreased. A higher risk of smoking for people with mental disorders is confirmed (Rev Md Chile 2003; 131: 873-80

  16. Mental health telemedicine programmes in Australia.

    Lessing, K; Blignault, I

    2001-01-01

    A national survey of mental health telemedicine programmes was conducted and data collected on their catchment areas, organizational structure, equipment, clinical and non-clinical activity, and use by populations who traditionally have been poorly served by mental health services in Australia. Of 25 programmes surveyed, information was obtained for 23. Sixteen programmes had dealt with a total of 526 clients during the preceding three months. Of these, 397 (75%) were resident in rural or remote locations at the time of consultation. Thirty-seven (7%) were Aboriginals or Torres Strait Islanders. Only 19 (4%) were migrants from non-English-speaking backgrounds. The programmes provided both direct clinical and secondary support services. Overall, the number of videoconferencing sessions devoted to clinical activity was low, the average being 123 sessions of direct clinical care per programme per year. Videoconferencing was also used for professional education, peer support, professional supervision, administration and linking families. The results of the study suggest that telehealth can increase access to mental health services for people in rural and remote areas, particularly those who have hitherto been poorly served by mental health services in Australia. PMID:11747632

  17. Abortion and Mental Health: Evaluating the Evidence

    Major, Brenda; Appelbaum, Mark; Beckman, Linda; Dutton, Mary Ann; Russo, Nancy Felipe; West, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    The authors evaluated empirical research addressing the relationship between induced abortion and women's mental health. Two issues were addressed: (a) the relative risks associated with abortion compared with the risks associated with its alternatives and (b) sources of variability in women's responses following abortion. This article reflects…

  18. Students' Mental Health: Personal and University Determinants

    Khodarahimi, Siamak; Rasti, Ali; Khajehie, Malihe; Sattar, Rea

    2009-01-01

    The present study was to examine the effects of personal and university bounded factors in students mental health in north of Fars province, Iran. The effects of these factors on university students' psychopathology within a survey design were investigated among 300 participants--94 males and 206 females, who were selected through random sampling…

  19. Prevention Programs for Refugee Mental Health.

    Williams, Carolyn L.

    Refugee movements impose tremendous psychological and physical trauma on survivors, making refugees a high risk group for psychopathology and psychosocial adjustment problems. This paper explores the traditional impediments to developing prevention programs for refugees and describes public mental health strategies that could be used for different…

  20. Community Mental Health Centers and Insurance Reimbursements.

    Nissim-Sabat, Denis; And Others

    The economic solvency of Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) is a problem that needs immediate attention. In order to study the shift in funding sources for the 40 Community Services Boards (CSBs) which administer the 114 CMHCs in Virginia, the funding sources of CMHCs, and the fee collections of the CSBs, were examined. Data revealed that…

  1. Concepts of State Mental Health Manpower Development.

    McCullough, Paul M.

    The purpose of this publication is to review manpower issues in the field of mental health, identifying their importance and initiating discussion about their resolution. Directed to an audience of manpower development specialists, several types of material are presented beginning with a brief background including a synthesis of recent literature…

  2. Disaster mental health preparedness plan in Indonesia.

    Setiawan, G Pandu; Viora, Eka

    2006-12-01

    The tsunami brought into focus many issues related to mental health and psychosocial distress. A prompt response to the disaster relies on existing disaster management plans so that appropriate interventions can be put in place in order to meet the needs of the affected populations. The response must involve both physical and psychological aspects of care. The Indonesian experience was unique in a number of ways and it allowed us to explore the lessons in order to develop strategies to maximize the resources in order to ensure that the whole affected population was cared for. Massive destruction of the physical structures and the work force made the task particularly difficult. Existing policies did not include psychosocial efforts in the plan. However, mental health and psychosocial relief efforts are now being integrated into the disaster preparedness plan of Indonesia. To further implement the plan, a strong community mental health system is being developed. This system will be able to deliver mental health and psychosocial interventions on a routine basis and could be scaled up in times of disasters. PMID:17162698

  3. Strengthening "School" in School Mental Health Promotion

    Rowling, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight new and existing research on school characteristics that are essential elements in building the capacity of school communities to implement whole school approaches to mental health promotion. Design/methodology/approach: Through an overview of recent research and writing the need for a…

  4. Abortion and Mental Health: Evaluating the Evidence

    Major, Brenda; Appelbaum, Mark; Beckman, Linda; Dutton, Mary Ann; Russo, Nancy Felipe; West, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    The authors evaluated empirical research addressing the relationship between induced abortion and women's mental health. Two issues were addressed: (a) the relative risks associated with abortion compared with the risks associated with its alternatives and (b) sources of variability in women's responses following abortion. This article reflects

  5. Let's Strengthen The Mental & Social Health

    Shikare Suvarna; Shingate Chandan

    2013-01-01

    'Sound mind in a Sound body.' It is a very famous maxim which tells us the importance of health in an individual's development. Education is the process which requires not only the intellectual ability but also physical, mental & social strength. They should go hand in hand.

  6. Disparities in Mental Health Treatment Following the World Trade Center Disaster: Implications for Mental Health Care and Health Services Research

    Boscarino, Joseph A.; Adams, Richard E.; Stuber, Jennifer; Galea, Sandro

    2005-01-01

    To assess disparities in mental health treatment in New York City (NYC) after the World Trade Center Disaster (WTCD) reported previously related to care access, we conducted analyses among a cross-sectional survey of adults who had posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or major depression (N = 473) one year after the event. The dependent variables examined were use of mental health services, in general, and use of mental health services related to the WTCD. Similar dependent variables were dev...

  7. [Improving Mental Health Literacy and Mental Illness Stigma in the Population of Hamburg].

    Lambert, Martin; Hrter, Martin; Arnold, Detlef; Dirmaier, Jrg; Tlach, Lisa; Liebherz, Sarah; Snger, Sylvia; Karow, Anne; Brandes, Andreas; Sielaff, Gyngyver; Bock, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Evidence shows that poor mental health literacy and stigmatization have negative consequences on mental health. However, studies on interventions to improve both are often heterogenic in methodology and results. The psychenet-campaign in Hamburg was developed and implemented in collaboration with patients and relatives and comprised multidimensional interventions focusing on education and contact to patients. The main goals were the improvement of mental health literacy and destigmatization and the long-term implementation within Hamburg's mental health care system. PMID:26135289

  8. Older Adults and Mental Health

    ... such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, and Parkinson's disease. Because many older adults face these illnesses as well as various social and economic difficulties, health care professionals may mistakenly conclude that depression is a ...

  9. Cyberbullying and adolescent mental health: systematic review

    Sara Mota Borges Bottino; Cássio M.C. Bottino; Caroline Gomez Regina; Aline Villa Lobo Correia; Wagner Silva Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a new form of violence that is expressed through electronic media and has given rise to concern for parents, educators and researchers. In this paper, an association between cyberbullying and adolescent mental health will be assessed through a systematic review of two databases: PubMed and Virtual Health Library (BVS). The prevalence of cyberbullying ranged from 6.5% to 35.4%. Previous or current experiences of traditional bullying were associated with victims and perpetrator...

  10. Service network analysis for agricultural mental health

    Fuller Jeffrey D; Kelly Brian; Law Susan; Pollard Georgia; Fragar Lyn

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Farmers represent a subgroup of rural and remote communities at higher risk of suicide attributed to insecure economic futures, self-reliant cultures and poor access to health services. Early intervention models are required that tap into existing farming networks. This study describes service networks in rural shires that relate to the mental health needs of farming families. This serves as a baseline to inform service network improvements. Methods A network survey of men...

  11. Mental health in women experiencing preterm birth

    Misund, Aud R.; Nerdrum, Per; Diseth, Trond H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to explore the degree of psychological distress, anxiety, and trauma related stress reactions in mothers who experience preterm birth. Secondarily, we wanted to identify possible predictors of maternal mental health problems. Methods: Twenty-nine mothers of 35 premature children born before 33rd week of pregnancy were assessed within two weeks after given birth. The standardized psychometric methods; Impact of Event Scale (IES), General Health Questionna...

  12. Need for a realistic mental health programme in India

    Barua Ankur

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available India, with a population of a billion, has very limited numbers of mental health facilities and professionals in providing mental health care to all the people. The disability associated with mental or brain disorders stops people from working and engaging in other creative activities. Gradual implementation of district mental health programme in a phased manner with support of adequate managerial and financial inputs is the need of the day. Trained mental health care personnel, treatment, care, and rehabilitation facilities should be made available and accessible to the masses. The voluntary organizations should be encouraged to participate in mental health care programme.

  13. [Community Health Agents' perceptions and practice in mental health].

    Waidman, Maria Angélica Pagliarini; da Costa, Bruna; Paiano, Marcelle

    2012-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to identity the perceptions of community health agents regarding health and mental disorders, and to verify the preparation these agents receive to work in this field. This qualitative study was performed using semi-structured interviews for data collection and utilizing content analysis to interpret the data. Interviews were performed with 45 community health agents working in the Family Health Strategy, who reported to 21 basic health units in the city of Maringá, PR. Results show the prejudice that these workers have regarding mental disorders. They recognize the importance of working with the patient and the family but do not feel prepared to provide adequate care. Because they share the same social context and have a close experience with the community dynamics, we see them as important facilitators of mental healthcare. PMID:23223734

  14. Impact of falls on mental health outcomes for older adult mental health patients: An Australian study.

    Heslop, Karen Ruth; Wynaden, Dianne Gaye

    2016-02-01

    Sustaining a fall during hospitalization reduces a patient's ability to return home following discharge. It is well accepted that factors, such as alteration in balance, functional mobility, muscle strength, and fear of falling, are all factors that impact on the quality of life of elderly people following a fall. However, the impact that falls have on mental health outcomes in older adult mental health patients remains unexplored. The present study reports Health of the Nation Outcome Scale scores for people over the age of 65 (HoNOS65+), which were examined in a cohort of 65 patients who sustained a fall and 73 non-fallers admitted to an older adult mental health service (OAMHS). Results were compared with state and national HoNOS65+ data recorded in Australian National Outcome Casemix Collection data to explore the effect that sustaining a fall while hospitalized has on mental health outcomes. Australian state and national HoNOS65+ data indicate that older adults generally experience improved HoNOS65+ scores from admission to discharge. Mental health outcomes for patients who sustained a fall while admitted to an OAMHS did not follow this trend. Sustaining a fall while admitted to an OAMHS negatively affects discharge mental health outcomes. PMID:26603350

  15. Public mental health: the time is ripe for translation of evidence into practice

    Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Public mental health deals with mental health promotion, prevention of mental disorders and suicide, reducing mental health inequalities, and governance and organization of mental health service provision. The full impact of mental health is largely unrecognized within the public health sphere, despite the increasing burden of disease attributable to mental and behavioral disorders. Modern public mental health policies aim at improving psychosocial health by addressing determinants of mental ...

  16. 42 CFR 431.620 - Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions.

    2010-10-01

    ... 1902(a)(20) (B) and (C).) (b) Definition. For purposes of this section, an “institution for mental... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions. 431.620 Section 431.620 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...

  17. The mental health status of ethnocultural minorities in Ontario and their mental health care

    Grace, Sherry L; Tan, Yongyao; Cribbie, Robert A.; Nguyen, Han; Ritvo, Paul; Irvine, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Mental disorders are a leading cause of disability and early mortality. The objective of this study was to describe and compare psychosocial indicators and mental health service use among ethnoculturally-diverse Ontarians. Methods This is a cross-sectional analysis of the Ontario Health Study pilot investigation. Residents were mailed an invitation to one of 3 assessment centres (urban, rural and northern sites) from March 2009 to July 2010. Participants had an interview with a nur...

  18. Mental Health Priorities in Iranian Women: Overview of Social Determinants of Mental Health

    Monir Baradaran Eftekhari; Ameneh Setareh Forouzan; Arash Mirabzadeh; Homeira Sajadi; Masoumeh Dejman; Hasan Rafiee; Mohammad Mahdi Golmakan

    2014-01-01

    Mental health is an essential component for positive adaptation that enables people to cope with adversity to achieve their full potential and humanity. In this study, using a community based approach, the social determinants of mental health in Iranian women were extracted; and in addition, priority setting for interventional programs according to analytical framework of WHO was implemented.This study was a community based participatory research (CBPR) in district 22 of Tehran (Iran). The ta...

  19. DEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS INFLUENCES ON MENTAL HEALTH OF COLLEGE STUDENTS

    Ramanathan, G.; P. VENKATAMMAL

    2013-01-01

    Students mental health is a public issues, public health policy makes at the international level, are very well concerned about this issue become of the increasing rate of suicide, among students their amenity, depression and involvement in high risk behavior .The aim of the study was to understand the influences of demographic variables on mental health of college students. The mental health scale (MHS) constructed and standardized by Kamlesh Sharma (2002) was used to measure the mental heal...

  20. Improving responses to depression and related disorders: evaluation of a innovative, general, mental health care workers training program

    Graham Annette L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Australian General Practitioners have been beneficiaries of extensive training in mental health care delivery over the last few years but less so other workers who support those with mental illness. Training is needed as it is widely recognised that the most effective interventions to prevent and treat mental disorders are often not readily available. The Mental Health Aptitudes into Practice (MAP training package is a broad, innovative, interdisciplinary, general mental health training aimed at improving responses to individuals with depression and related disorders. The modular structure of this training program meant that such training could be targeted at those with varied backgrounds. Two hundred and seventy one days of free MAP training was delivered across Victoria in 2004/2005. The evaluation reported here assessed whether changes occurred in the trainees' confidence, mental health literacy, attitudes towards effective treatments, mental health knowledge and skills and community mental health ideology following training. Methods These elements were assessed using pen and paper tests prior, immediately following, 6 months after and then 12 months after the training. Trainees' confidence, mental health literacy and social distance were measured using scales that have been used in evaluations of Mental Health First Aid Training. Community mental health ideology was measured using a sub-scale of the Community Attitudes to the Mentally Ill (CAMI scale. The trainees' knowledge and skills were accessed using instrumentation specifically designed for this evaluation. Results Following training, participants had more confidence in their ability to work with those who have mental health issues and less desire for social distance from them. Participants' knowledge and skills in relation to the treatment of mental disorders increased. These changes were observed immediately after training. The limited existing evidence suggests these changes were sustained six and twelve months later. Conclusions MAP training can be used to develop the capacity and capabilities of mental health workers.

  1. Mental Health and Teens: Watch for Danger Signs

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Mental Health and Teens: Watch for Danger Signs Page Content ... be strong indicators of serious mental health issues. Mental Health “Red Flags” Parents Should Be Alert For: Excessive ...

  2. 76 FR 80741 - TRICARE: Certified Mental Health Counselors

    2011-12-27

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 199 TRICARE: Certified Mental Health Counselors AGENCY: Office of the... accordance with Section 717 of the NDAA 2008, that would allow licensed or certified mental health counselors... services. Under current TRICARE requirements, mental health counselors (MHCs) are authorized to...

  3. 38 CFR 17.98 - Mental health services.

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mental health services... Outpatient Treatment § 17.98 Mental health services. (a) Following the death of a veteran, bereavement... mental health services in connection with treatment of the veteran under 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1712,...

  4. Patterns of Self-Disclosure among Mental Health Nursing Students.

    Banks, David; Ashmore, Russell

    2001-01-01

    Sample of nursing students in mental health (n=173) completed a self-disclosure questionnaire; results were compared with earlier samples (n=50, 25). The mental health group would disclose significantly fewer items to patients than to parents or friends. Results have implications for the care of mental health patients. (Contains 53 references.)

  5. No Child Overlooked: Mental Health Triage in the Schools

    Wilson, F. Robert; Tang, Mei; Schiller, Kelly; Sebera, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    Mental health problems among children in schools are on the increase. To exercise due diligence in their responsibility to monitor and promote mental health among our nation's children, school counselors may learn from triage systems employed in hospitals, clinics, and mental health centers. The School Counselor's Triage Model provides school…

  6. Occupational Mental Health, Labor Accidents and Occupational Diseases

    Naveillan, F. Pedro

    1973-01-01

    The article discusses the relationship between mental health and labor accidents as it pertains to accident prevention, treatment of accident victims, and their rehabilitation. It also comments briefly on mental health and occupational diseases and the scope of the field of occupational mental health from a Chilean perspective. (AG)

  7. Children's Mental Health: Problems and Services. Background Paper.

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This background paper on children's mental health indicates that less than one-third of the children who have mental health problems receive treatment. Types of mental health problems are discussed, including intellectual, developmental, behavior, emotional, psychophysiological, and adjustment disorders. Enviromental risk factors of poverty and

  8. Stigma and Student Mental Health in Higher Education

    Martin, Jennifer Marie

    2010-01-01

    Stigma is a powerful force in preventing university students with mental health difficulties from gaining access to appropriate support. This paper reports on an exploratory study of university students with mental health difficulties that found most students did not disclose their mental health problems to staff at university. This was primarily…

  9. Mental Health Issues and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    DeLoach, Kendra P.; Dvorsky, Melissa; Miller, Elaine; Paget, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral challenges are significantly impacted by mental health issues. Teachers and other school staff need mental health knowledge to work more effectively with these students. Collaboration with mental health professionals and sharing of information is essential. [For complete volume, see ED539318.

  10. Infusing Early Childhood Mental Health into Early Intervention Services

    Grabert, John C.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the process of enhancing early childhood mental health awareness and skills in non-mental health staff. The author describes a pilot training model, conducted the U.S. Army's Early Intervention Services, that involved: (a) increasing early childhood mental health knowledge through reflective readings, (b) enhancing…

  11. 42 CFR 410.155 - Outpatient mental health treatment limitation.

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient mental health treatment limitation. 410... § 410.155 Outpatient mental health treatment limitation. (a) Limitation. For services subject to the... connection with the treatment of a mental, psychoneurotic, or personality disorder (that is, any...

  12. Aviation Disaster Intervention: A Mental Health Volunteer's Experience.

    Tramonte, Michael R.

    The goals of this presentation were to help mental health professionals learn more about intervening in aviation disasters, learn about the uniqueness of disaster mental health, and share the presenter's mental health disaster experiences as they relate to aviation disasters. Survivors' emotional phases during the disaster recovery process are…

  13. Juvenile Offenders with Mental Health Needs: Reducing Recidivism Using Wraparound

    Pullmann, Michael D.; Kerbs, Jodi; Koroloff, Nancy; Veach-White, Ernie; Gaylor, Rita; Sieler, Dede

    2006-01-01

    The rate of youth with mental health needs is disproportionately high in juvenile justice. Wraparound planning involves families and providers in coordinating juvenile justice, mental health, and other services and supports. This study compares data from two groups of juvenile offenders with mental health problems: 106 youth in a juvenile justice

  14. Education in mental health promotion and its impact on the participants' attitudes and perceived mental health

    Tomaras Vlassis D

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the promotion of mental health (MHP through education and training is widely accepted, there is scarce evidence for its effectiveness in the literature from outcome studies worldwide. The present study aimed to assess the effect of a three-semester MHP educational program on the recipients' opinions towards mental illness and on their own self-assessed health. Methods Respondents were 78 attendees who completed the assessment battery at the first (baseline and the last session (end of the training course. They were primary care physicians or other professionals, or key community agents, working in the greater Athens area. The course consisted of 44 sessions (4 h each, over a 3-semester period, focusing on the principles and methods of mental health promotion, the main aspects of major psychiatric disorders, and on relevant to health skills. Assessment instruments included the Opinion about Mental Illness (OMI scale and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28. Results The mean scores of three OMI factors, that is, social discrimination, social restriction and social integration, and the two GHQ-28 subscales, that is, anxiety/insomnia and social dysfunction, were significantly improved by the end of the training course. Conclusions The results of this study provide evidence, with limitations, for the short-term effectiveness of the implemented educational MHP program on an adult group of recipients-key agents in their community. Because interventions for strengthening positive opinions about mental illness and enhancing self-assessed health constitute priority aims of mental health promotion, it would be beneficial to further investigate the sustainability of the observed positive changes. In addition it would be useful to examine (a the possible interplay between the two outcome measures, that is, the effect of opinions of recipients about mental health on their perceived health, and (b the applicability of this intervention in individuals with different sociodemographic profiles.

  15. Facilitating participatory multilevel decision-making by using interactive mental maps

    Constanze Pfeiffer

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Participation of citizens in political, economic or social decisions is increasingly recognized as a precondition to foster sustainable development processes. Since spatial information is often important during planning and decisionmaking, participatory mapping gains in popularity. However, little attention has been paid to the fact that information must be presented in a useful way to reach city planners and policy makers. Above all, the importance of visualisation tools to support collaboration, analytical reasoning, problem solving and decision-making in analysing and planning processes has been underestimated. In this paper, we describe how an interactive mental map tool has been developed in a highly interdisciplinary disaster management project in Chennai, India. We moved from a hand drawn mental maps approach to an interactive mental map tool. This was achieved by merging socio-economic and geospatial data on infrastructure, local perceptions, coping and adaptation strategies with remote sensing data and modern technology of map making. This newly developed interactive mapping tool allowed for insights into different locally-constructed realities and facilitated the communication of results to the wider public and respective policy makers. It proved to be useful in visualising information and promoting participatory decision-making processes. We argue that the tool bears potential also for health research projects. The interactive mental map can be used to spatially and temporally assess key health themes such as availability of, and accessibility to, existing health care services, breeding sites of disease vectors, collection and storage of water, waste disposal, location of public toilets or defecation sites.

  16. Youth engagement in eMental health literacy

    Charlene King; Michelle Cianfrone; Kimberley Korf-Uzan; Aazadeh Madani

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the important role that eHealth Literacy strategies play in promoting mental health among youth populations. At the same time, youth engagement in mental health literacy initiatives is increasingly seen as a promising practice for improving health literacy and reducing stigma. The Health Literacy Team at BC Children’s Hospital uses a variety of strategies to engage youth in the development, implementation and dissemination of eMental Health Literacy resources. ...

  17. Global mental health: transformative capacity building in Nicaragua

    Sapag, Jaime C.; Herrera, Andrés; Trainor, Ruth; Caldera, Trinidad; Khenti, Akwatu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mental health is increasingly recognised as integral to good public health, but this area continues to lack sufficient planning, resources, and global strategy. It is a pressing concern in Latin America, where social determinants of health aggravate existing inequities in access to health services. Nicaragua faces serious mental health needs and challenges. One key strategy for addressing gaps in mental health services is building capacity at the primary healthcare and system leve...

  18. How do mental health professionals who are also or have been mental health service users construct their identities?

    Holttum, S.; Richards, Jenna; Springham, N.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health professionals are increasingly speaking out about their own experiences of using mental health services. However, research suggests that they face identity-related dilemmas because social conventions tend to assume two distinct identities: professionals as relatively socially powerful and patients as comparatively powerless. The aim of this study was, through discourse analysis, to explore how mental health professionals with mental health service user experience cons...

  19. Mental Health Care in Nepal : Current Situation and Challenges for Development of a District Mental Health Care Plan

    Luitel, N.P., Jordans, M.J.D., Adhikari, Al, Upadhaya, N.P., Hanlon, C., Lund, C. & Komproe, I.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Globally mental health problems are a serious public health concern. Currently four out of five people with severe mental illness in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC) receive no effective treatment. There is an urgent need to address this enormous treatment gap. Changing the focus of specialist mental health workers (psychiatrists and psychologists) from only service delivery to also designing and managing mental health services; building clinical capacity of the primary healt...

  20. Determinants of mental health service use in the national mental health survey of the elderly in Singapore

    Kua Ee; Chiam Peak; Nyunt Ma; Ng Tze

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite high prevalence of mental health problems, only a minority of elderly people seek treatment. Although need-for-care factors are primary determinants of mental health service use, personal predisposing or enabling factors including health beliefs are important but are not well studied. Method In the National Mental Health Survey of Elderly in Singapore, 2003, 1092 older adults aged 60 and above were interviewed for diagnosis of mental disorders (using Geriatric Ment...

  1. Integrating Mental Health Services into Priority Health Care Platforms: addressing a Grand Challenge in Global Mental Health

    Ngo, Victoria K.; Rubinstein, Adolfo; Ganju, Vijay; Kanellis, Pamela; Loza, Nasser; Rabadan-Diehl, Cristina; Daar, Abdallah S.

    2013-01-01

    In the third article of a five-part series providing a global perspective on integrating mental health, Victoria Ngo and colleagues discuss the benefits and requirements of collaborative care models, where non-communicable disease and mental health care are integrated and provided in the primary care setting. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

  2. Integrating Mental Health Services into Priority Health Care Platforms: Addressing a Grand Challenge in Global Mental Health

    Kaaya, Sylvia; Eustache, Eddy; Lapidos-Salaiz, Ilana; Musisi, Seggane; Psaros, Christina; Wissow, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    In the fourth article of a five-part series providing a global perspective on integrating mental health, Sylvia Kaaya and colleagues discuss the importance of integrating mental health interventions into HIV prevention and treatment platforms. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  3. Mental Illness and Mental Health: The Two Continua Model Across the Lifespan.

    Westerhof, Gerben J; Keyes, Corey L M

    2010-06-01

    Mental health has long been defined as the absence of psychopathologies, such as depression and anxiety. The absence of mental illness, however, is a minimal outcome from a psychological perspective on lifespan development. This article therefore focuses on mental illness as well as on three core components of positive mental health: feelings of happiness and satisfaction with life (emotional well-being), positive individual functioning in terms of self-realization (psychological well-being), and positive societal functioning in terms of being of social value (social well-being). The two continua model holds that mental illness and mental health are related but distinct dimensions. This model was studied on the basis of a cross-sectional representative internet survey of Dutch adults (N = 1,340; 18-87 years). Mental illness was measured with the Brief Symptom Inventory and mental health with the Mental Health Continuum Short Form. It was found that older adults, except for the oldest-old, scored lower on psychopathological symptoms and were less likely to be mentally ill than younger adults. Although there were fewer age differences for mental health, older adults experienced more emotional, similar social and slightly lower psychological well-being. In sum, today's older adults have fewer mental illness problems, but they are not in a better positive mental health than today's younger adults. These findings support the validity of the two continua model in adult development. PMID:20502508

  4. Preparation of Mental Health Clinicians to Work with Children with Co-Occurring Autism Spectrum Disorders and Mental Health Needs

    Williams, Marian E.; Haranin, Emily C.

    2016-01-01

    Up to 70% of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have a co-occurring mental health disorder; however, many clinicians feel unprepared to serve children with complex co-occurring conditions. This study surveyed 64 mental health clinicians working in 21 publically-funded mental health agencies in a large urban setting to explore their…

  5. Mental Health Issues Facing a Diverse Sample of College Students: Results from the College Student Mental Health Survey

    Soet, Johanna; Sevig, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been increased attention given to mental health issues on college and university campuses across the country. However, few research efforts have been conducted to systematically investigate the mental health of college students. The College Student Mental Health Survey was undertaken as a first step towards gaining…

  6. Mental health research: developing priorities and promoting its utilization to inform policies and services.

    Regan, M; Gater, R; Rahman, A; Patel, V

    2015-07-01

    Investment in research on the prevention and treatment of mental health disorders is disproportionately low in the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) relative to the disease burden. Scaling-up mental health research in the EMR could generate enormous returns in terms of reducing disability, improving outcomes and preventing premature death, through early diagnosis, better management and community-based rehabilitation. EMR countries must therefore work to identify research priorities, mobilize resources, develop human and infrastructure capacities and institutionalize use of research findings to guide development of policies and service delivery models. Several key strategic interventions for EMR Member States are recommended: adopt a prioritized national mental health research agenda; systematically map national and international research funding to identify and secure resources to support the implementation of the agenda; strengthen national capacity to undertake prioritized research; periodically map research output in mental health; and foster dialogue between researchers and policy-makers/programme managers. PMID:26442893

  7. Transformational leadership and the mental health team.

    Corrigan, Patrick W; Diwan, Sarah; Campion, John; Rashid, Fadwa

    2002-11-01

    Bass's (1990) multifactor model contrasts transformational and transactional styles of leadership with an essentially ineffective style: laissez-faire leadership. This study examines the relationship between these leadership styles and measures of organizational culture and staff burnout in mental health services teams. There were 236 leaders and 620 subordinates from 54 mental health teams who provided their perceptions of leadership style, organizational culture, and burnout in their program. Results show transformational leadership to be positively associated with a cohesive organizational culture and negatively associated with burnout. Moreover, leaders and subordinates differ in their ratings of transformational leadership-leaders viewed themselves more positively. These findings are helpful for understanding the central role of leaders in the organizational structure of teams. PMID:12680615

  8. Mental health consumers and employment opportunities

    Kang, Daljit

    2005-01-01

    Mental health consumers experience significantly high rates of unemployment compared with the general population. A qualitative study was conducted to identify the key barriers hindering employment opportunities. Evidence from this research suggests many barriers to employment, including stigma, lack of social support networks, low-levels of educational attainment and vocational experience, lack of meaningful employment opportunities, lack of vocational training and overall lack of awareness ...

  9. Sleep Characteristics, Mental Health, and Diabetes Risk

    Boyko, Edward J; Seelig, Amber D.; Jacobson, Isabel G.; Tomoko I Hooper; Smith, Besa; Smith, Tyler C; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.; .. .

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Research has suggested that a higher risk of type 2 diabetes associated with sleep characteristics exists. However, studies have not thoroughly assessed the potential confounding effects of mental health conditions associated with alterations in sleep. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We prospectively assessed the association between sleep characteristics and self-reported incident diabetes among Millennium Cohort Study participants prospectively followed over a 6-year time period. Surve...

  10. The treatment gap in mental health care.

    Robert Kohn; Shekhar Saxena; Itzhak Levav; Benedetto Saraceno

    2004-01-01

    Mental disorders are highly prevalent and cause considerable suffering and disease burden. To compound this public health problem, many individuals with psychiatric disorders remain untreated although effective treatments exist. We examine the extent of this treatment gap. We reviewed community-based psychiatric epidemiology studies that used standardized diagnostic instruments and included data on the percentage of individuals receiving care for schizophrenia and other non-affective psychoti...

  11. Assessing Quality in Mental Health Care

    Ian Shaw

    1997-01-01

    Quality assessment in mental health services is undergoing change in the United Kingdom following the introduction of market reforms. Traditionally, service quality was monitored by professional practitioners with reference to user satisfaction. This became formalized, and the two main forms of quality assurance currently used are outlined. However, the government is concerned that this may be inadequate for the monitoring of quality standards, specified in contracts between service purchaser...

  12. Patience and Mental Health in Iranian Students

    Aghababaei, Naser; Tabik, Mohammad Taghi

    2015-01-01

    Background: While the role of some personality traits has been comprehensively explored, scientific study of others, such as patience has been neglected. Psychologists have paid scant attention to patience as a personality trait, character strength or virtue. Objectives: The current study examined the relationship between patience and life satisfaction, mental health, and personality. Materials and Methods: A sample of 252 Iranian college students (129 females and 123 males) completed the 3-f...

  13. Age differences in mental health literacy

    Christensen Helen; Griffiths Kathleen M; Leach Liana; Farrer Louise; Jorm Anthony F

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The community's knowledge and beliefs about mental health problems, their risk factors, treatments and sources of help may vary as a function of age. Methods Data were taken from an epidemiological survey conducted during 2003–2004 with a national clustered sample of Australian adults aged 18 years and over. Following the presentation of a vignette describing depression (n = 1001) or schizophrenia (n = 997), respondents were asked a series of questions relating to their kn...

  14. The issue of mental health in occupational health surveillance

    Luís Henrique da Costa Leão

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the issue of mental health in the Occupational Health Surveillance (VISAT context. It seeks to present theoretical aspects and institutional policies contributing to the incorporation of mental health dimensions into the VISAT process, in view of the pressing need to attend to this demand that is becoming increasingly important in the occupational health area, especially within the scope of the National Comprehensive Occupational Healthcare Network (RENAST. Some theoretical approaches and practical experiences in mental health and work are systematically presented and discussed in this essay. A survey is also conducted of potential strategies to integrate mental health into VISAT actions. It is our view that the origins of illnesses and ensuing harm are closely linked to the elements involved in work organization and management. Consequently, surveillance practices should include and identify generating components of these negative aspects. The diversity of illnesses caused by work processes and conditions calls for major investment to ascertain and change the situations that give rise to such illnesses.

  15. Mental health and psychosocial aspects of disaster preparedness in Thailand.

    Panyayong, B; Pengjuntr, W

    2006-12-01

    After the Asian tsunami, the Department of Mental Health, Thailand developed a national guideline for mental health interventions in disasters based on the lessons learnt from the mental health and psychosocial relief efforts launched. We advocate the integration of social interventions for the affected community into the general mental healthcare, which in turn should be available in the general healthcare setting. This set-up of the mental healthcare delivery system, can provide the daily needs of the community and can be rapidly scaled up in times of a disaster. The organization of the delivery of mental healthcare is discussed in the paper. PMID:17162705

  16. Coping focus counselling in mental health nursing.

    Shanley, Eamon; Jubb-Shanley, Maureen

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe a newly-developed system of mental health nurse counselling (coping focus counselling (CFC)) for people with serious and complex mental health needs. The system is based on the recovery alliance theory (RAT) of mental health nursing. The paper identifies shortcomings in current practices in psychotherapy and counselling in the exclusive use of techniques from a single approach, for example, cognitive behaviour therapy, client-centred therapy, attachment theory, or Gestalt theory. It also discusses the opposite dangers of the use of many techniques from different approaches, without a clear rationale for their selection. CFC was developed to avoid these practices. It accommodates the selective use of techniques from different approaches. Techniques selected are viewed as deriving their meanings from the theoretical framework into which they are assimilated, namely RAT, and no longer take the same meaning from the theory from which they originated. Central to this integrative process is the use of the concept of coping. Other distinguishing features of CFC are the use of everyday language in using the system and the reaffirmation of the nurse-client relationship within a working alliance as the basis in which the CFC operates. PMID:22640173

  17. Size Matters Determinants of Modern, Community-Oriented Mental Health Services

    Taina Ala-Nikkola; Sami Pirkola; Raija Kontio; Grigori Joffe; Maiju Pankakoski; Maili Malin; Minna Sadeniemi; Minna Kaila; Kristian Wahlbeck

    2014-01-01

    Governances, structures and contents of mental health services are being reformed across countries. There is a need for data to support those changes. The aim of this study was to explore the quality, i.e., diversity and community orientation, and quantity, i.e., personnel resources, of mental health and substance abuse services (MHS) and evaluate correlation between population needs and quality and quantity of MHS. The European Service Mapping ScheduleRevised (ESMS-R) was used to classify m...

  18. Mental health research in Brazil: policies, infrastructure, financing and human resources A pesquisa em saúde mental no Brasil: políticas, infra-estrutura, financiamento e recursos humanos

    Jair de Jesus Mari; Rodrigo A. Bressan; Naomar Almeida-Filho; Jerônimo Gerolin; Pratap Sharan; Shekhar Saxena

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this descriptive study was to map mental health research in Brazil, providing an overview of infrastructure, financing and policies mental health research. As part of the Atlas-Research Project, a WHO initiative to map mental health research in selected low and middle-income countries, this study was carried out between 1998 and 2002. Data collection strategies included evaluation of governmental documents and sites and questionnaires sent to key professionals for providing i...

  19. Determinants of mental health service use in the national mental health survey of the elderly in Singapore

    Kua Ee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite high prevalence of mental health problems, only a minority of elderly people seek treatment. Although need-for-care factors are primary determinants of mental health service use, personal predisposing or enabling factors including health beliefs are important but are not well studied. Method In the National Mental Health Survey of Elderly in Singapore, 2003, 1092 older adults aged 60 and above were interviewed for diagnosis of mental disorders (using Geriatric Mental State and treatment, and their health beliefs about the curability of mental illness, embarrassment and stigma, easiness discussing mental problems, effectiveness and safety of treatment and trust in professionals. Results The prevalence of mental disorders was 13%, but only a third of mentally ill respondents had sought treatment. Increased likelihood of seeking treatment was significantly associated with the presence of a mental disorder (OR = 5.27, disability from mental illness (OR = 79.9, and poor or fair self-rated mental health (OR = 2.63, female gender (OR = 2.25, and formal education (OR = 2.40. The likelihood of treatment seeking was lower in those reporting financial limitations for medical care (OR = 0.38, but also higher household income (OR = 0.31. Negative beliefs showed no meaningful associations, but the positive belief that 'to a great extent mental illness can be cured' was associated with increased mental health service use (OR = 6.89. The availability of family caregiver showed a negative association (OR = 0.20. Conclusion The determinants of mental health service use in the elderly included primary need factors, and female gender and socioeconomic factors. There was little evidence of influences by negative health beliefs, but a positive health belief that 'mental illness can be cured' is a strongly positive determinant The influence of family members and care-givers on senior's use of mental health service should be further explored.

  20. Outcomes of Nordic mental health systems: life expectancy of patients with mental disorders

    Wahlbeck, Kristian; Westman, Jeanette; Nordentoft, Merete; Gissler, Mika; Laursen, Thomas Munk

    2011-01-01

    People with mental disorders evince excess mortality due to natural and unnatural deaths. The relative life expectancy of people with mental disorders is a proxy measure of effectiveness of social policy and health service provision....

  1. A Logic Model for the Integration of Mental Health Into Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

    James Lando, MD, MPH

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Mental illnesses such as depression or anxiety affect an individual’s ability to undertake health-promoting behaviors. Chronic diseases can have a profound impact on an individual’s mental health; in turn, mental health status affects an individual’s ability to participate in treatment and recovery. A group of mental health and public health professionals convened to develop a logic model for addressing mental health as it relates to chronic disease prevention and health promotion. The model provides details on inputs, activities, and desired outcomes, and the designers of the model welcome input from other mental health and public health practitioners.

  2. Environmental and health risks mapped

    A brief overview is given of what has been discussed during the international conference RISK97 in Amsterdam, Netherlands, the end of October 1997. The main subject was the use of risk maps to discuss and control environmental and health risks

  3. Community factors supporting child mental Health.

    Earls, F

    2001-10-01

    A principal purpose of this article has been to examine the gap between research and practice in relation to community factors in child mental health. Two caveats were introduced in preparation for this assessment. First, it was pointed out that the definition of communities has been expanded by considering the organizing properties of social aggregates that are not simply a function of the race, ethnicity, or social class of individuals who compose them. Having these definitions grounded in theory substantially advances the needs of research and the design and goals of community-level interventions. The second caveat relates to the boundaries of the disciplines that cater to the needs of children. During the same era when child psychiatry is largely occupied with placing psychotropic medications at the center of clinical approaches, there is an important effort in child psychology and sociology to cut across their disciplinary confines to form more comprehensive designs that are sensitive to experiences and circumstances that emerge from specific aspects of community context. Research from the PHDCN was used as an example of this new interdisciplinary approach. Several community-based research projects were selected for review based on their clear implications to improve context-sensitive assessment of child mental health and design effective community-based interventions to improve child mental health. The Healthy Start and CATCH programs indicate that involving child professionals at the grassroots of community life requires skill and patience but that the effort is satisfying and potentially effective. Other examples, exemplified by North Carolina's Smart Start initiative and the program of developmental assets from the Search Institute, demonstrate coherent approaches that provide a foundation for long-term capacity building in assessment, local decision making, and the design and evaluation of interventions. Three conclusions are warranted from this discussion. The first conclusion suggests that research in child development generally, and child mental health specifically, does not incorporate the social ecology of the child is seriously flawed. There is a broad recognition within most sectors of society that the quality of civic engagement is of critical importance to community efforts to improve the health and well-being of children. This is true for all communities and families, regardless of their levels of material wealth and educational achievement. It is also well understood that poverty undermines the well-being and life chances of children. For this reason, the third conclusion requires that intensive, sustained efforts be made to eradicate poverty and reverse the current economic trend toward growing economic disparity. The implications of this knowledge for the practice of child psychiatry are not new ones. In many ways, they advocate for a re-examination of the historical roots of the field as it defined approaches to juvenile justice, school counseling, and early intellectual enrichment for economically disadvantaged preschool children. All these efforts were sensitive to children's social environment, and child psychiatrists viewed their success in taking on the challenges of changing schools, courts, and community and family environments. These challenges hardly have been overcome. The requirements of understanding and evaluating community supports for children are a fundamental component in the training and practice of child psychiatry. To quote the U.S. Surgeon General in a preamble to the recent Report on Child Mental Health: One way to ensure that our health system meets children's mental health needs is to move toward a community based health system that balances health promotion, disease prevention, early detection and universal access. PMID:11588798

  4. Mental Illness and Mental Health: The Two Continua Model Across the Lifespan

    2009-01-01

    Mental health has long been defined as the absence of psychopathologies, such as depression and anxiety. The absence of mental illness, however, is a minimal outcome from a psychological perspective on lifespan development. This article therefore focuses on mental illness as well as on three core components of positive mental health: feelings of happiness and satisfaction with life (emotional well-being), positive individual functioning in terms of self-realization (psychological well-being),...

  5. Outcomes of Nordic mental health systems: life expectancy of patients with mental disorders

    Wahlbeck, Kristian; Westman, Jeanette; Nordentoft, Merete; Gissler, Mika; Laursen, Thomas Munk

    2011-01-01

    People with mental disorders evince excess mortality due to natural and unnatural deaths. The relative life expectancy of people with mental disorders is a proxy measure of effectiveness of social policy and health service provision.......People with mental disorders evince excess mortality due to natural and unnatural deaths. The relative life expectancy of people with mental disorders is a proxy measure of effectiveness of social policy and health service provision....

  6. Symposium on Economic Change, Scarcity and Mental Health Administration.

    Feldman, Saul, ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses challenges to the mental health field as a result of severe economic change. The six articles deal with reindustrialization, the effect of the labor market on mental hospital and prison use, retrenchment strategies, mental health problems in energy boomtowns, and economic issues of public policy. (JAC)

  7. Hope Thinking and Past Trauma Mediate the Relationships of Body Mass Index with Perceived Mental Health Treatment Need and Mental Health Treatment Use

    Hendricks, Andrea N.; Dhurandhar, Emily J.; Fontaine, Kevin R.; Hendricks, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Greater body mass is associated with a greater risk of mental health conditions and more frequent mental health treatment use. However, factors that might influence perceived mental health treatment need and mental health treatment use among those of greater weight, including hope thinking, trauma history, and perceived mental health treatment stigma, are not well understood.

  8. Mental health research in Brazil: policies, infrastructure, financing and human resources

    Jair de Jesus Mari

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this descriptive study was to map mental health research in Brazil, providing an overview of infrastructure, financing and policies mental health research. As part of the Atlas-Research Project, a WHO initiative to map mental health research in selected low and middle-income countries, this study was carried out between 1998 and 2002. Data collection strategies included evaluation of governmental documents and sites and questionnaires sent to key professionals for providing information about the Brazilian mental health research infrastructure. In the year 2002, the total budget for Health Research was US$101 million, of which US$3.4 million (3.4 was available for Mental Health Research. The main funding sources for mental health research were found to be the São Paulo State Funding Agency (Fapesp, 53.2% and the Ministry of Education (CAPES, 30.2%. The rate of doctors is 1.7 per 1,000 inhabitants, and the rate of psychiatrists is 2.7 per 100,000 inhabitants estimated 2000 census. In 2002, there were 53 postgraduate courses directed to mental health training in Brazil (43 in psychology, six in psychiatry, three in psychobiology and one in psychiatric nursing, with 1,775 students being trained in Brazil and 67 overseas. There were nine programs including psychiatry, neuropsychiatry, psychobiology and mental health, seven of them implemented in Southern states. During the five-year period, 186 students got a doctoral degree (37 per year and 637 articles were published in Institute for Scientic Information (ISI-indexed journals. The investment channeled towards postgraduate and human resource education programs, by means of grants and other forms of research support, has secured the country a modest but continuous insertion in the international knowledge production in the mental health area.

  9. Mental health research in Brazil: policies, infrastructure, financing and human resources

    Mari Jair de Jesus

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this descriptive study was to map mental health research in Brazil, providing an overview of infrastructure, financing and policies mental health research. As part of the Atlas-Research Project, a WHO initiative to map mental health research in selected low and middle-income countries, this study was carried out between 1998 and 2002. Data collection strategies included evaluation of governmental documents and sites and questionnaires sent to key professionals for providing information about the Brazilian mental health research infrastructure. In the year 2002, the total budget for Health Research was US$101 million, of which US$3.4 million (3.4 was available for Mental Health Research. The main funding sources for mental health research were found to be the São Paulo State Funding Agency (Fapesp, 53.2% and the Ministry of Education (CAPES, 30.2%. The rate of doctors is 1.7 per 1,000 inhabitants, and the rate of psychiatrists is 2.7 per 100,000 inhabitants estimated 2000 census. In 2002, there were 53 postgraduate courses directed to mental health training in Brazil (43 in psychology, six in psychiatry, three in psychobiology and one in psychiatric nursing, with 1,775 students being trained in Brazil and 67 overseas. There were nine programs including psychiatry, neuropsychiatry, psychobiology and mental health, seven of them implemented in Southern states. During the five-year period, 186 students got a doctoral degree (37 per year and 637 articles were published in Institute for Scientic Information (ISI-indexed journals. The investment channeled towards postgraduate and human resource education programs, by means of grants and other forms of research support, has secured the country a modest but continuous insertion in the international knowledge production in the mental health area.

  10. Mental maps and travel behaviour: meanings and models

    Hannes, Els; Kusumastuti, Diana; Espinosa, Maikel León; Janssens, Davy; Vanhoof, Koen; Wets, Geert

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, the " mental map" concept is positioned with regard to individual travel behaviour to start with. Based on Ogden and Richards' triangle of meaning (The meaning of meaning: a study of the influence of language upon thought and of the science of symbolism. International library of psychology, philosophy and scientific method. Routledge and Kegan Paul, London, 1966) distinct thoughts, referents and symbols originating from different scientific disciplines are identified and explained in order to clear up the notion's fuzziness. Next, the use of this concept in two major areas of research relevant to travel demand modelling is indicated and discussed in detail: spatial cognition and decision-making. The relevance of these constructs to understand and model individual travel behaviour is explained and current research efforts to implement these concepts in travel demand models are addressed. Furthermore, these mental map notions are specified in two types of computational models, i.e. a Bayesian Inference Network (BIN) and a Fuzzy Cognitive Map (FCM). Both models are explained, and a numerical and a real-life example are provided. Both approaches yield a detailed quantitative representation of the mental map of decision-making problems in travel behaviour.

  11. Why Can’t Canada Spend More on Mental Health?

    Steve Lurie

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) notes that mental illness accounts for 13% of the world’s disease burden, yet most countries under invest despite the social and economic costs of mental illness. It has been suggested that this lack of investment may be a result of stigma. A number of high income countries invest 10% or more in their mental health services. Although Canada is a high income country, its mental health spending is 7.2% according to the WHO Mental Health Atlas. This article wi...

  12. Mental health service users' experiences of mental health care: an integrative literature review.

    Newman, D; O'Reilly, P; Lee, S H; Kennedy, C

    2015-04-01

    A number of studies have highlighted issues around the relationship between service users and providers. The recovery model is predominant in mental health as is the recognition of the importance of person-centred practice. The authors completed an in-depth search of the literature to answer the question: What are service users' experiences of the mental health service? Three key themes emerged: acknowledging a mental health problem and seeking help; building relationships through participation in care; and working towards continuity of care. The review adds to the current body of knowledge by providing greater detail into the importance of relationships between service users and providers and how these may impact on the delivery of care in the mental health service. The overarching theme that emerged was the importance of the relationship between the service user and provider as a basis for interaction and support. This review has specific implications for mental health nursing. Despite the recognition made in policy documents for change, issues with stigma, poor attitudes and communication persist. There is a need for a fundamental shift in the provider-service user relationship to facilitate true service-user engagement in their care. The aim of this integrative literature review was to identify mental health service users' experiences of services. The rationale for this review was based on the growing emphasis and requirements for health services to deliver care and support, which recognizes the preferences of individuals. Contemporary models of mental health care strive to promote inclusion and empowerment. This review seeks to add to our current understanding of how service users experience care and support in order to determine to what extent the principles of contemporary models of mental health care are embedded in practice. A robust search of Web of Science, the Cochrane Database, Science Direct, EBSCO host (Academic Search Complete, MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus Full-Text), PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, Social Sciences Full Text and the United Kingdom and Ireland Reference Centre for data published between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2012 was completed. The initial search retrieved 272 609 papers. The authors used a staged approach and the application of predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria, thus the numbers of papers for inclusion were reduced to 34. Data extraction, quality assessment and thematic analysis were completed for the included studies. Satisfaction with the mental health service was moderately good. However, accessing services could be difficult because of a lack of knowledge and the stigma surrounding mental health. Large surveys document moderate satisfaction ratings; however, feelings of fear regarding how services function and the lack of treatment choice remain. The main finding from this review is while people may express satisfaction with mental health services, there are still issues around three main themes: acknowledging a mental health problem and seeking help; building relationship through participation and care; and working towards continuity of care. Elements of the recovery model appear to be lacking in relation to user involvement, empowerment and decision making. There is a need for a fundamental shift in the context of the provider-service user relationship to fully facilitate service users' engagement in their care. PMID:25707898

  13. Global mental health: perspectives from Ethiopia

    Abebaw Fekadu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Global mental health (GMH advocates for access to and the equitable provision of mental health care. Although the treatment gap is a useful construct to measure access and equitability of care, it fails to communicate the real-life consequences of the treatment gap and the urgent need to address care disparities. Objective: The aim of this article is to present a perspective on the practical application of the principles of GMH to understand the real-life impact of the treatment gap and the approaches taken to improve treatment coverage in Ethiopia. Design: A case study method is used. Results: Multiple international collaborations undertaken in Ethiopia and facilitated by GMH to improve care, capacity, and the evidence base for increased treatment coverage are described briefly. A series of steps taken at the local and national levels to address the treatment gap are highlighted. The stories of two patients are also presented to illustrate the real-life consequences of the treatment gap and the potential transformational impact of addressing the treatment gap on patients, families, and communities. Conclusions: GMH has a key role to play in addressing the treatment gap, which improves the life of people with mental disorders, their families, and their communities. However, national-level policy support and coordination are essential for any realistic improvement in treatment coverage. The reflections offered through the case examples may have utility in similar low-income settings.

  14. Mental Health Stigma: Where do We Stand?

    Salomé Xavier

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mental illness stigma has been the focus of increasing attention in the past few years, with an exponential increase in scientific publications on the subject. This phenomenon is a source of suffering for the patient undermining the achievement of personal goals and full social integration. In this article, the authors present a selective review of the literature on mental illness stigma, going through its definition, origins, repercussions, patients’ subjective experiences and strategies to challenge stigma. The literature presents stigma as being a complex phenomenon, whose definitions derive from different epis- temological roots (sociology, psychology and psychiatry. Its impact on the lives of people with a mental illness is well acknowledged and seems to translate into decreased opportunities, loss of self-esteem and self-concept, decreased quality of life, social support and empowerment, thus limiting the adoption or performance of regular social roles. Stigma has also been shown to compromise access to health care, not only psychiatric treatment but also general medical care, thus increasing the morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable population. A considerable amount of effort has been put into the comprehension of this phenomenon and to designing strategies for fighting stigma, which also include promoting health-care professionals’ awareness of the topic in order to improve clinical practice and global quality of care.

  15. Negative emotions impact on mental physical health

    Oblitas, Luis Armando

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fear, sadness, anger and disgust are considered affective states, that when they become frequent and intense, adversely affect the quality of life. Consequently, negative emotions are regarded as one of the key risk factors in physical and mental illness. Firstly, this article aims to define precisely concepts and key features of each emotion. The second objective of this paper is to show a synthesis of scientific findings supporting the influence of emotional factors, especially classic negative emotions in the process of health and disease. These psychophysiological phenomena have been associated with mental and physical illness as influencing variables in its initiation, development and maintenance. Therefore, the paper reviews some of the links between these four negative emotions and mental disorders. It also reviews the evidence supporting the influence of negative emotions in the development of risk behaviors to physical health. Finally, we describe some data supporting the impact of psychophysiological activation of emotions in organic systems, such as, for instance, immunity, tumor processes and so on

  16. Mental health and poverty in developing countries: revisiting the relationship.

    Das, Jishnu; Do, Quy-Toan; Friedman, Jed; McKenzie, David; Scott, Kinnon

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between poverty and mental health has received considerable attention in the recent literature. However, the associations presented in existing studies typically rely on limited samples of individuals and on proxy indicators for poverty such as education, the lack of tap water, or being unemployed. We revisit the relationship between poverty and mental health using data from nationally representative household surveys in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Indonesia and Mexico, along with special surveys from India and Tonga. As in previous studies, we find that individuals who are older, female, widowed, and in poor health are more likely to report worse mental health outcomes. Individuals living with others with poor mental health are significantly more likely to report worse mental health themselves. The size of the coefficients and their significance are comparable across the five countries. In contrast to previous studies, the relationship between higher education and better mental health is weak or non-existent. Furthermore, there is no consistent association between consumption poverty and mental health - in two countries mental health measures are marginally worse for the poor; in two countries there is no association; and in one country mental health measures are better for the poor compared to the non-poor. Moreover, the sizes of the coefficients for both education and consumption poverty are small compared to other factors considered here. While the lack of an association between consumption poverty and mental health implies that poor mental health is not a "disease of affluence", neither is it a disease of poverty. Changes in life circumstances brought on, for instance, by illness may have a greater impact on mental health than levels of poverty. Effective public health policy for mental health should focus on protecting individuals and households from adverse events and on targeted interventions following such adverse changes. PMID:17462803

  17. Using mental mapping to unpack perceived cycling risk.

    Manton, Richard; Rau, Henrike; Fahy, Frances; Sheahan, Jerome; Clifford, Eoghan

    2016-03-01

    Cycling is the most energy-efficient mode of transport and can bring extensive environmental, social and economic benefits. Research has highlighted negative perceptions of safety as a major barrier to the growth of cycling. Understanding these perceptions through the application of novel place-sensitive methodological tools such as mental mapping could inform measures to increase cyclist numbers and consequently improve cyclist safety. Key steps to achieving this include: (a) the design of infrastructure to reduce actual risks and (b) targeted work on improving safety perceptions among current and future cyclists. This study combines mental mapping, a stated-preference survey and a transport infrastructure inventory to unpack perceptions of cycling risk and to reveal both overlaps and discrepancies between perceived and actual characteristics of the physical environment. Participants translate mentally mapped cycle routes onto hard-copy base-maps, colour-coding road sections according to risk, while a transport infrastructure inventory captures the objective cycling environment. These qualitative and quantitative data are matched using Geographic Information Systems and exported to statistical analysis software to model the individual and (infra)structural determinants of perceived cycling risk. This method was applied to cycling conditions in Galway City (Ireland). Participants' (n=104) mental maps delivered data-rich perceived safety observations (n=484) and initial comparison with locations of cycling collisions suggests some alignment between perception and reality, particularly relating to danger at roundabouts. Attributing individual and (infra)structural characteristics to each observation, a Generalised Linear Mixed Model statistical analysis identified segregated infrastructure, road width, the number of vehicles as well as gender and cycling experience as significant, and interactions were found between individual and infrastructural variables. The paper concludes that mental mapping is a highly useful tool for assessing perceptions of cycling risk with a strong visual aspect and significant potential for public participation. This distinguishes it from more traditional cycling safety assessment tools that focus solely on the technical assessment of cycling infrastructure. Further development of online mapping tools is recommended as part of bicycle suitability measures to engage cyclists and the general public and to inform 'soft' and 'hard' cycling policy responses. PMID:26760689

  18. Online Social Networking and Mental Health

    2014-01-01

    Abstract During the past decade, online social networking has caused profound changes in the way people communicate and interact. It is unclear, however, whether some of these changes may affect certain normal aspects of human behavior and cause psychiatric disorders. Several studies have indicated that the prolonged use of social networking sites (SNS), such as Facebook, may be related to signs and symptoms of depression. In addition, some authors have indicated that certain SNS activities might be associated with low self-esteem, especially in children and adolescents. Other studies have presented opposite results in terms of positive impact of social networking on self-esteem. The relationship between SNS use and mental problems to this day remains controversial, and research on this issue is faced with numerous challenges. This concise review focuses on the recent findings regarding the suggested connection between SNS and mental health issues such as depressive symptoms, changes in self-esteem, and Internet addiction. PMID:25192305

  19. Online social networking and mental health.

    Pantic, Igor

    2014-10-01

    During the past decade, online social networking has caused profound changes in the way people communicate and interact. It is unclear, however, whether some of these changes may affect certain normal aspects of human behavior and cause psychiatric disorders. Several studies have indicated that the prolonged use of social networking sites (SNS), such as Facebook, may be related to signs and symptoms of depression. In addition, some authors have indicated that certain SNS activities might be associated with low self-esteem, especially in children and adolescents. Other studies have presented opposite results in terms of positive impact of social networking on self-esteem. The relationship between SNS use and mental problems to this day remains controversial, and research on this issue is faced with numerous challenges. This concise review focuses on the recent findings regarding the suggested connection between SNS and mental health issues such as depressive symptoms, changes in self-esteem, and Internet addiction. PMID:25192305

  20. Mental Health, Binge Drinking, and Antihypertension Medication Adherence

    Banta, Jim E.; Haskard, Kelly B.; Haviland, Mark G.; Williams, Summer L.; Werner, Leonard S.; Anderson, Donald L.; DiMatteo, M. Robin

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the relationship between self-reported mental health and binge drinking, as well as health status, sociodemographic, social support, economic resource, and health care access indicators to antihypertension medication adherence. Method: Analysis of 2003 California Health Interview Survey data. Results: Having poor mental

  1. Cyberbullying and adolescent mental health: systematic review

    Sara Mota Borges Bottino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyberbullying is a new form of violence that is expressed through electronic media and has given rise to concern for parents, educators and researchers. In this paper, an association between cyberbullying and adolescent mental health will be assessed through a systematic review of two databases: PubMed and Virtual Health Library (BVS. The prevalence of cyberbullying ranged from 6.5% to 35.4%. Previous or current experiences of traditional bullying were associated with victims and perpetrators of cyberbullying. Daily use of three or more hours of Internet, web camera, text messages, posting personal information and harassing others online were associated with cyberbullying. Cybervictims and cyberbullies had more emotional and psychosomatic problems, social difficulties and did not feel safe and cared for in school. Cyberbullying was associated with moderate to severe depressive symptoms, substance use, ideation and suicide attempts. Health professionals should be aware of the violent nature of interactions occurring in the virtual environment and its harm to the mental health of adolescents.

  2. Cyberbullying and adolescent mental health: systematic review.

    Bottino, Sara Mota Borges; Bottino, Cássio M C; Regina, Caroline Gomez; Correia, Aline Villa Lobo; Ribeiro, Wagner Silva

    2015-03-01

    Cyberbullying is a new form of violence that is expressed through electronic media and has given rise to concern for parents, educators and researchers. In this paper, an association between cyberbullying and adolescent mental health will be assessed through a systematic review of two databases: PubMed and Virtual Health Library (BVS). The prevalence of cyberbullying ranged from 6.5% to 35.4%. Previous or current experiences of traditional bullying were associated with victims and perpetrators of cyberbullying. Daily use of three or more hours of Internet, web camera, text messages, posting personal information and harassing others online were associated with cyberbullying. Cybervictims and cyberbullies had more emotional and psychosomatic problems, social difficulties and did not feel safe and cared for in school. Cyberbullying was associated with moderate to severe depressive symptoms, substance use, ideation and suicide attempts. Health professionals should be aware of the violent nature of interactions occurring in the virtual environment and its harm to the mental health of adolescents. PMID:25859714

  3. Mental health literacy among caregivers of persons with mental illness: A descriptive survey

    Vijayalakshmi Poreddi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite of growing evidence of mental disorders in developing countries, research on mental health literacy is limited from India. Aim: To examine mental health literacy among caregivers of persons with mental illness Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive survey was carried out among 161 randomly selected caregivers of persons with mental illness at outpatient department of a tertiary care centre. Data was collected through face to face interview using a structured questionnaire. Results: Regarding the causes of mental illness, a majority agreed that genetic inheritance (69%, substance abuse (64% and brain disease (59.6% are main factors for developing mental illness. Although more than two-thirds agreed that anyone could suffer from mental illness, 61.5% also agreed that people with mental health problems are largely to blame for their condition. The majority of the participants also agreed that mentally ill are not able to maintain friendships (45.9%, are dangerous (54%, and not capable to work (59.1%. Just over half (55.9% of the participants would not want people to know if they had a mental illness and nearly half of them also expressed that they would feel ashamed if a family member had a mental illness. Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study researchers suggest that there is an urgent need to educate and change the attitudes of caregivers through mental health literacy programs specifically designed for them.

  4. Research utilization among children's mental health providers

    Ferguson H Bruce

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with emotional and behavioural disorders should be able to count on receiving care that meets their needs and is based on the best scientific evidence available, however, many do not receive these services. Implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP relies, in part, on the research utilization practices of mental health care providers. This study reports on a survey of research utilization practices among 80 children's mental health (CMH service provider organizations in Ontario, Canada. Methods A web-based survey was distributed to 80 CMH service provider organizations, to which 51 executive directors and 483 children's mental health practitioners responded. Research utilization was assessed using questions with Likert-type responses based on the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation's Four-A's approach: access, assess, adapt, apply. Results There was general agreement among executive directors and practitioners regarding the capacity of their organizations to use access, assess, adapt, and apply research evidence. Overall, both groups rated their organizations as using research information 'somewhat well.' The low response rate to the practitioner survey should be noted. Conclusion These findings provide a useful benchmark from which changes in reported research utilization in the Ontario CMH sector can be tracked over time, as a function of EBP training and implementation initiatives, for instance. The need to improve access to research evidence should be addressed because it relates to the eventual implementation and uptake of evidence-based practices. Communities of practice are recommended as a strategy that would enable practitioners to build capacity in their adaptation and application of research evidence.

  5. Mental Health Technologies: Designing With Consumers.

    Orlowski, Simone; Matthews, Ben; Bidargaddi, Niranjan; Jones, Gabrielle; Lawn, Sharon; Venning, Anthony; Collin, Philippa

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the promise of e-mental and well-being interventions, little supporting literature exists to guide their design and the evaluation of their effectiveness. Both participatory design (PD) and design thinking (DT) have emerged as approaches that hold significant potential for supporting design in this space. Each approach is difficult to definitively circumscribe, and as such has been enacted as a process, a mind-set, specific practices/techniques, or a combination thereof. At its core, however, PD is a design research tradition that emphasizes egalitarian partnerships with end users. In contrast, DT is in the process of becoming a management concept tied to innovation with strong roots in business and education. From a health researcher viewpoint, while PD can be reduced to a number of replicable stages that involve particular methods, techniques, and outputs, projects often take vastly different forms and effective PD projects and practice have traditionally required technology-specific (eg, computer science) and domain-specific (eg, an application domain, such as patient support services) knowledge. In contrast, DT offers a practical off-the-shelf toolkit of approaches that at face value have more potential to have a quick impact and be successfully applied by novice practitioners (and those looking to include a more human-centered focus in their work). Via 2 case studies we explore the continuum of similarities and differences between PD and DT in order to provide an initial recommendation for what health researchers might reasonably expect from each in terms of process and outcome in the design of e-mental health interventions. We suggest that the sensibilities that DT shares with PD (ie, deep engagement and collaboration with end users and an inclusive and multidisciplinary practice) are precisely the aspects of DT that must be emphasized in any application to mental health provision and that any technology development process must prioritize empathy and understanding over innovation for the successful uptake of technology in this space. PMID:27026210

  6. Mental disorders, health inequalities and ethics: A global perspective

    NGUI, EMMANUEL M.; KHASAKHALA, LINCOLN; NDETEI, DAVID; ROBERTS, LAURA WEISS

    2010-01-01

    The global burden of neuropsychiatry diseases and related mental health conditions is enormous, underappreciated and under resourced, particularly in the developing nations. The absence of adequate and quality mental health infrastructure and workforce is increasingly recognized. The ethical implications of inequalities in mental health for people and nations are profound and must be addressed in efforts to fulfil key bioethics principles of medicine and public health: respect for individuals...

  7. Mental health services in rural India: challenges and prospects

    Anant Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Mental health services in India are neglected area which needs immediate attention from the government, policymakers, and civil society organizations. Despite, National Mental Health Programme since 1982 and National Rural Health Mission, there has been a very little effort so far to provide mental health services in rural areas. With increase in population, changing life-style, unemployment, lack of social support and increasing insecurity, it is predicted that there would be a substantial i...

  8. Problem based learning in mental health nursing : the students experience.

    Cooper, Carol; Carver, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) is well established within the field of health-care education for professionals worldwide, although little has been done to explore the experiences of students undertaking a PBL course in mental health nursing. Without firm evidence of the benefits of PBL, educationalists in mental health might be reluctant to view it as an option in curricula design. This UK study examined the experiences of pre-registration post-graduate mental health student nurses undertaking ...

  9. Multiple Roles and Women's Mental Health in Canada

    Ansara Donna; Glynn Keva; Maclean Heather

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Health Issue Research on the relationship between women's social roles and mental health has been equivocal. Although a greater number of roles often protect mental health, certain combinations can lead to strain. Our study explored the moderating affects of different role combinations on women's mental health by examining associations with socioeconomic status and differences in women's distress (depressive symptoms, personal stress (role strain) and chronic stress (role strain plus...

  10. Global Mental Health Policy Diffusion, Institutionalization, and Innovation

    Shen, Gordon Chit-Nga

    2013-01-01

    Mental health is an integral part of health and well-being. Mental health enables people to realize their potential, cope with the stressors of everyday life, and make contributions to society. Mental, neurological and substance use (MNS) disorders constitute 13% of the global burden of disease. And yet, across all countries, public investment in preventing and treating this cluster of disorders is disproportionately low relative to this disease burden. Health systems have not adequately or s...

  11. The roots of the concept of mental health

    BERTOLOTE, JOSÉ

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the origins of the current concept of mental health, starting from the mental hygiene movement, initiated in 1908 by consumers of psychiatric services and professionals interested in improving the conditions and the quality of treatment of people with mental disorders. The paper argues that, more than a scientific discipline, mental health is a political and ideological movement involving diverse segments of society, interested in the promotion of the human rights of people...

  12. Making Room for Mental Health in the Medical Home

    Hogan, Michael F.; Sederer, Lloyd I; SMITH, THOMAS E.; Nossel, Ilana R.

    2010-01-01

    Discussions of health care reform emphasize the need for coordinated care, and evidence supports the effectiveness of medical home and integrated delivery system models. However, mental health often is left out of the discussion. Early intervention approaches for children and adolescents in primary care are important given the increased rates of detection of mental illness in youth. Most adults also receive treatment for mental illness from nonspecialists, underscoring the role for mental hea...

  13. Mapas mentales y servicios de inteligencia empresarial Mental mapping and business intelligence services

    Ramón Antonio Rodríguez Piña

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se exponen los fundamentos y resultados de la aplicación técnica de mapas mentales en ejercicios grupales para el diseño de servicios de inteligencia empresarial, ejecutados estos por profesionales de la consultoría. Se describen y fundamentan las ventajas del uso de los mapas para desarrollar el trabajo grupal como herramientas que estimulan la participación e interacción entre sus miembros. Se describe el universo cosmológico de los mapas mentales, enfoques neurológicos y físicos, ventajas, beneficios y algoritmos de ejecución. Se presentan ejemplos de casos específicos, siempre orientados a servicios de inteligencia empresarial.An exposition is made of the bases and results of the application of mental map techniques in group exercises for the design of business intelligence services, executed by professional consultants. The advantages of the use of maps to develop group work as tools that stimulate the participation and interaction among their members are described and supported. The cosmologic universe of mental maps is described from physical and neurological points of view, as well as its advantages, benefits and execution algorithms. Examples of specific cases are presented, always oriented to business intelligence services.

  14. How Iranian women conceptualize mental health: an explanatory model.

    Arash Mirabzadeh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In Iran, more than 25% of women suffer from mental disorders. Mental disorders and subclinical problems are associated with socioeconomic problem. At the community level, mental health promotion can reduce social damage. The aim of this study as a part of community based mental health promotion intervention was to explore how mental health in Iranian women is viewed.According to a qualitative method in 2012, participants were selected by purposeful sampling from married women 18 to 65 years who are residents in Tehran. Fifteen in depth individual interviews were conducted with regard to the concept of mental health, causal pathway and help-seeking behavior according to explanatory model.Mental health was perceived as the same of emotional well-being. It conceptualized not only lack of mental disorder but also sense of satisfaction and healthy functioning. According to participant's view, the causal pathway of mental health problems were classified to individual, familial and social factors. Physical and behavioral problems were related to individual factor, Lack of marital adjustment was one of the most important issues in familial item and in social factor, cultural context and socio-economic problems were extracted. In help seeking process, all of the participants believed that the religion has important effect in mental health.Marital adjustment is an important stage in process of mental health in women.

  15. What to Do To Promote Mental Health of the Society

    A Nikfarjam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: : According to the last existing documents, the prevalence rate of mental disorders is about 20% which is considered to be 14% of all countrys burden of disease. In the fifth economical, social, and cultural development plan of the country in accordance with the 20 year vision, healthy human being and comprehensive health approaches and also improving of mental health indicators are emphasized. Aim of study was preparing national policy and interventions for promoting mental health.Methods: Using secondary data, analytical review of countrys mental health programs, recommendations of WHO, descriptive situation of mental health and its trend during the last decade were drafted and a group of experts and stakeholders was formed following a sound stakeholders analysis. After three Focus Group Discussions (FGDs, main points of the meetings, influencing factors of present situation, and oncoming strategies were agreed upon.Results: Based on different studies and the experts opinions, the prevalence of mental disorders in the last decade has increased. Coverage of mental health programs in two last decades in the best could be equal to rural population. Urban areas have been deprived of these services. Analysis of mental health system of the country shows that internal environment is weak and the external one is concede to be in threat. Eight principal challenges in countrys mental health are considered.Conclusion: Improving current situation requires increasing internal capacity of mental health system and developing inter-sectoral cooperation. During next five years, the Ministry of Health, Iran should mainly focus on improving mental health services particularly in urban and peri-urban areas, promoting mental health literacy of different groups and minimizing mental health risk factors.

  16. Mental disability and active citizenship: The challenge of a new legislation of mental health for Chile

    Rubén Alejandro Nilo Pérez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the disability approach is a perspective that proposes a way to deal with the incorporation of social dimension in mental health understanding. Its hegemony in Chile turns visible considering the design of mental health laws and public policies over the past 20 years. However, this approach to mental health as well as the legislations and policies developed and related to it, hardly take over the situation of justice and citizenship of this group of people. These difficulties are particularly relevant when the exercise of active citizenship is required, since citizenship has been proved to show a therapeutic effect on the deficiencies or mental disorders. The urgent need of a mental health law for Chile demands the challenge of designing a law which recognizes the particularities of mental disability, but it also offers the historical possibility to effectively include the perspective of people with mental disabilities and their families in the discussion for a new law.

  17. Mental Health Beliefs Amongst Emirati Female College Students.

    Al-Darmaki, Fatima; Thomas, Justin; Yaaqeib, Saad

    2016-02-01

    Recent epidemiological data from Arabian Gulf nations suggest that mental health problems such as depression and anxiety have a relatively high prevalence, particularly amongst women. However, despite the widespread morbidity, treatment seeking for mental health problems is low. Mental health beliefs amongst female Emirati college students were explored. A questionnaire exploring perceptions about the causes, consequences and best forms of intervention for mental health problems was administered to 70 participants. Data revealed that social and environmental factors were given the most weight in terms of etiology. Social stigma was the most frequently identified barrier to help seeking. Religious practices were commonly reported as an approach to cope with mental health problems and to maintain good psychological health. Most participants reported willingness to seek help from a healthcare professional. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for improving the quality and accessibility of mental health services in the gulf region. PMID:26286081

  18. Mental health policy--stumbling in the dark?

    Crosbie, David W

    2009-02-16

    Over the past 15 years, governments have agreed to a series of National Mental Health Plans. These national strategies and plans have set goals and discussed the importance of monitoring and evaluation. Despite this ongoing national collaborative framework, Australia's mental health policy lacks real accountability and relies largely on limited mental health service systems data. The lack of outcome data represents a critical gap in knowledge for mental health policy, planning and practice. Resistance from current stakeholders and a lack of investment in research and monitoring capacity are preventing more rigorous ongoing monitoring of mental health policy. The new Rudd Government appears to be shifting the emphasis towards measuring the outcomes of national policy in health, housing and employment. Measuring such outcomes will guide government decision making and ultimately improve mental health services. PMID:19220174

  19. Evaluating the WHO Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems by comparing mental health policies in four countries

    Hamada Hamid

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mental health is a low priority in most countries around the world. Minimal research and resources have been invested in mental health at the national level. As a result, WHO has developed the Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems (WHO-AIMS to encourage countries to gather data and to re-evaluate their national mental health policy. This paper demonstrates the utility and limitations of WHO-AIMS by applying the model to four countries with different cultures, political histories and public health policies: Iraq, Japan, the Philippines and The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. WHO-AIMS provides a useful model for analysing six domains: policy and legislative framework; mental health services; mental health in primary care; human resources; education of the public at large; and monitoring and research. This is especially important since most countries do not have experts in mental health policy or resources to design their own evaluation tools for mental health systems. Furthermore, WHO-AIMS provides a standardized database for cross-country comparisons. However, limitations of the instrument include the neglect of the politics of mental health policy development, underestimation of the role of culture in mental health care utilization, and questionable measurement validity.

  20. Barriers to Mental Health Treatment: Results from the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys

    Andrade, L. H.; Alonso, J.; Mneimneh, Z.; Wells, J. E.; Al-Hamzawi, A.; Borges, G.; Bromet, E.; Bruffaerts, R.; de Girolamo, G.; de Graaf, R.; Florescu, S.; Gureje, O.; Hinkov, H. R.; Hu, C.; Huang, Y.; Hwang, I.; Jin, R.; Karam, E. G.; Kovess-Masfety, V.; Levinson, D.; Matschinger, H.; O’Neill, S.; Posada-Villa, J.; Sagar, R.; Sampson, N. A.; Sasu, C.; Stein, D.; Takeshima, T.; Viana, M. C.; Xavier, M.; Kessler, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background To examine barriers to initiation and continuation of mental health treatment among individuals with common mental disorders. Methods Data are from the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys. Representative household samples were interviewed face-to-face in 24 countries. Reasons to initiate and continue treatment were examined in a subsample (n= 63,678) and analyzed at different levels of clinical severity. Results Among those with a DSM-IV disorder in the past twelve months, low perceived need was the most common reason for not initiating treatment and more common among moderate and mild than severe cases. Women and younger people with disorders were more likely to recognize a need for treatment. Desire to handle the problem on one’s own was the most common barrier among respondents with a disorder who perceived a need for treatment (63.8%). Attitudinal barriers were much more important than structural barriers both to initiating and continuing treatment. However, attitudinal barriers dominated for mild-moderate cases and structural barriers for severe cases. Perceived ineffectiveness of treatment was the most commonly reported reason for treatment dropout (39.3%) followed by negative experiences with treatment providers (26.9% of respondents with severe disorders). Conclusions Low perceived need and attitudinal barriers are the major barriers to seeking and staying in treatment among individuals with common mental disorders worldwide. Apart from targeting structural barriers, mainly in countries with poor resources, increasing population mental health literacy is an important endeavor worldwide. PMID:23931656

  1. Poverty, inequality and a political economy of mental health.

    Burns, J K

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between poverty and mental health is indisputable. However, to have an influence on the next set of sustainable global development goals, we need to understand the causal relationships between social determinants such as poverty, inequality, lack of education and unemployment; thereby clarifying which aspects of poverty are the key drivers of mental illness. Some of the major challenges identified by Lund (2014) in understanding the poverty-mental health relationship are discussed including: the need for appropriate poverty indicators; extending this research agenda to a broader range of mental health outcomes; the need to engage with theoretical concepts such as Amartya Sen's capability framework; and the need to integrate the concept of income/economic inequality into studies of poverty and mental health. Although income inequality is a powerful driver of poor physical and mental health outcomes, it features rarely in research and discourse on social determinants of mental health. This paper interrogates in detail the relationships between poverty, income inequality and mental health, specifically: the role of income inequality as a mediator of the poverty-mental health relationship; the relative utility of commonly used income inequality metrics; and the likely mechanisms underlying the impact of inequality on mental health, including direct stress due to the setting up of social comparisons as well as the erosion of social capital leading to social fragmentation. Finally, we need to interrogate the upstream political, social and economic causes of inequality itself, since these should also become potential targets in efforts to promote sustainable development goals and improve population (mental) health. In particular, neoliberal (market-oriented) political doctrines lead to both increased income inequality and reduced social cohesion. In conclusion, understanding the relationships between politics, poverty, inequality and mental health outcomes requires us to develop a robust, evidence-based 'political economy of mental health.' PMID:25746820

  2. Support System for Mental Health Professionals

    Ajit Dandekar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper talks of support systems for mental health professionals wherein the Bombay Psychiatric Society (BPS should devote some meetings exclusively to problems pertaining to the profession, e.g., long and odd working hours leading to potentially hazardous practice schedules, unhealthy competitive attitudes and culture. A crash course in self-defence against potentially psychotic patients and drug addicts is advocated as also awareness of the potential hazards in dealing with the litigious paranoid patients, erotomaniacs and some of the difficult hysterical patients. Potential medicolegal problems arise in treating an uncooperative patient without his knowledge and consent on an outpatient department basis, admitting such an uncooperative patient to a nursing home or a hospital, administering electroconvulsive therapies, maintaining detailed clinical records of patients, and legal issues involving smaller psychiatric private nursing homes. This paper stresses on the use of Yoga as a recognised psycho-physiological therapy. Furthermore, it suggests on the need for BPS, as a professional body, to have a cell to guide and help aspiring young professionals in setting up private practice. It points out the need to evolve some concrete programmes that in the long run should help alleviate stresses and strains and promote positive comprehensive health amongst mental health professionals.

  3. Mental map: A reliable definition of choice or a distorted recognition of space?

    ZHANG, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Mental map is considered as an individuals mental representation of his/her spatial cognition. People learn from the environment and add information to their personal mental map. It becomes important when we try to understand the relationships between ones travel decision processes and their choice sets. The aim of this paper is to study the relationship between individuals activity travel patterns and their mental map by exploring peoples spatial cognition, their activity space and relat...

  4. A decade with the mental health act, 1987.

    Antony, J T

    2000-10-01

    The Mental Health Act, 1987 came into force in 1993. Mental Health Authorities that were created by this Act are useful, but the present situation of not having Government Mental Hospitals under the scrutiny of these authorities is a shortcoming. The high capital needed for upgradation of Government mental hospitals; is likely to be found, only with the intervention of Mental Health Authorities Creation of a funding agency of Government of India is also needed Denying profoundly retarded persons access to a psychiatric hospital is a hard situation. Psychiatric patients in general hospitals' having to face the hassles of mental hospital admission is against the spirit of the act and needs to be remedied Courts' directly determining the presence of psychiatric illness in persons is not serving the end of justice. They should do this on the basis of evidence Several avoidable hardships that may be caused by having the act in the present form has to be corrected This could be done by amendment of the act in certain cases by approaching the High Court in certain others and by thoughtfully framing the State Mental Health Rules in a quite a few other situations. The success of Mental Health Act, 1987 is in its effectiveness to ensure basic human rights of mental patients. A set of Mental Health Rules, that incorporates adequate provisions to protect human rights of patients, in all respects, can go a long way to strengthen the Mental Health Act. PMID:21407970

  5. Studies on mental health in Kurdistan - Iran

    Mofidi, Naser

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to carry out an epidemiological study on mental health related issues in the Kurdish population of Iran. This part of Iran suffered directly during the Iran-Iraq war 1980-1988. Iran is an Islamic republic with strict adherence to Islamic traditions, which has implications for the way of life and gender issues. Suicide is prohibited according to Islamic teaching, but still there is a rather high suicide incidence especially among young women, who burn themselves to d...

  6. Rape: Legal issues in mental health perspective

    Jiloha, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    Rape of women by men has occurred throughout recorded history and across cultures and religions. It is a crime against basic human right and a most common crime against women in India. In this article, rape is discussed from legal and mental health perspective. In India ‘rape laws’ began with enactment of Indian Penal Code in 1860. There have been subsequent amendments and the main issue of focus remained the definition of ‘rape and inclusion of ‘marital rape’ in the ambit of rape. Law Commis...

  7. Mental Health, Public Policies and Primary Health Care in Colombia

    Andrés Cubillos Novella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years it has become apparent emphasis promoted by the Pan American Health Organization-PAHO / WHO-mental health, trying to transcend disease and policy development in this line. This article discusses the progress made since the national level, in order to take responsibility of the State through the delivery of public policies for vulnerable groups or as life cycle, some with the intention of intersectoral, trying to make it possible to guarantee rights contribute directly or indirectly to mental health. Advances in policy, due to the weakness in the implementation of these at times, lack of assessment or other fragmentation and difficulty intersectoral linkages, unfortunately do not get the best results. 

  8. Racial Disparities in Mental Health Outcomes after Psychiatric Hospital Discharge among Individuals with Severe Mental Illness

    Eack, Shaun M.; Newhill, Christina E.

    2012-01-01

    Racial disparities in mental health outcomes have been widely documented in noninstitutionalized community psychiatric samples, but few studies have specifically examined the effects of race among individuals with the most severe mental illnesses. A sample of 925 individuals hospitalized for severe mental illness was followed for a year after

  9. Stakeholder perceptions of mental health stigma and poverty in Uganda

    Kizza Dorothy

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background World wide, there is plentiful evidence regarding the role of stigma in mental illness, as well as the association between poverty and mental illness. The experiences of stigma catalyzed by poverty revolve around experiences of devaluation, exclusion, and disadvantage. Although the relationship between poverty, stigma and mental illness has been documented in high income countries, little has been written on this relationship in low and middle income countries. The paper describes the opinions of a range of mental health stakeholders regarding poverty, stigma, mental illness and their relationship in the Ugandan context, as part of a wider study, aimed at exploring policy interventions required to address the vicious cycle of mental ill-health and poverty. Methods Semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions (FGDs were conducted with purposefully selected mental health stakeholders from various sectors. The interviews and FGDs were audio-recorded, and transcriptions were coded on the basis of a pre-determined coding frame. Thematic analysis of the data was conducted using NVivo7, adopting a framework analysis approach. Results Most participants identified a reciprocal relationship between poverty and mental illness. The stigma attached to mental illness was perceived as a common phenomenon, mostly associated with local belief systems regarding the causes of mental illness. Stigma associated with both poverty and mental illness serves to reinforce the vicious cycle of poverty and mental ill-health. Most participants emphasized a relationship between poverty and internalized stigma among people with mental illness in Uganda. Conclusion According to a range of mental health stakeholders in Uganda, there is a strong interrelationship between poverty, stigma and mental illness. These findings re-affirm the need to recognize material resources as a central element in the fight against stigma of mental illness, and the importance of stigma reduction programmes in protecting the mentally ill from social isolation, particularly in conditions of poverty.

  10. Understanding the acceptability of e-mental health - attitudes and expectations towards computerised self-help treatments for mental health problems

    Musiat, Peter; Goldstone, Philip; Tarrier, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Background E-mental health and m-mental health include the use of technology in the prevention, treatment and aftercare of mental health problems. With the economical pressure on mental health services increasing, e-mental health and m-mental health could bridge treatment gaps, reduce waiting times for patients and deliver interventions at lower costs. However, despite the existence of numerous effective interventions, the transition of computerised interventions into care is slow. The aim of...

  11. Research priorities for public mental health in Europe

    Forsman, Anna K; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Aarø, Leif Edvard; Alonso, Jordi; Barry, Margaret M; Brunn, Matthias; Cardoso, Graça; Cattan, Mima; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Eberhard-Gran, Malin; Evans-Lacko, Sara; Fiorillo, Andrea; Hansson, Lars; Haro, Josep Maria; Hazo, Jean-Baptiste; Hegerl, Ulrich; Katschnig, Heinz; Knappe, Susanne; Luciano, Mario; Miret, Marta; Nordentoft, Merete; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Pilgrim, David; Ruud, Torleif; Salize, Hans Joachim; Stewart-Brown, Sarah L; Tómasson, Kristinn; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; Ventus, Daniel B J; Vuori, Jukka; Värnik, Airi

    2015-01-01

    experts were involved in the priority setting process. RESULTS: Twenty priorities for public mental health research were identified through the consensus process. The research priorities were divided into summary principles-encompassing overall recommendations for future public mental health research in...... Europe-and thematic research priorities, including area-specific top priorities on research topics and methods. The priorities represent three overarching goals mirroring societal challenges, that is, to identify causes, risk and protective factors for mental health across the lifespan; to advance the...... implementation of effective public mental health interventions and to reduce disparities in mental health. CONCLUSIONS: The importance of strengthening research on the implementation and dissemination of promotion, prevention and service delivery interventions in the mental health field needs to be emphasized...

  12. [Mental health in primary health care: practices of the family health team].

    Correia, Valmir Rycheta; Barros, Sônia; Colvero, Luciana de Almeida

    2011-12-01

    The inclusion of mental health care actions in the context of the Brazilian Public Health System (SUS; Sistema Único de Saúde) contributes to the consolidation of the Brazilian Psychiatric reform and demands redirecting the practices of family health teams with users with mental health needs. The objective of this study is to identify and analyze the scientific production and actions developed by family health team professionals in mental health care. Systematic analysis originated the following themes: home visits to mentally ill patients and their relatives; attachment and welcoming; referrals; therapeutic workshops. In conclusion, the mental health actions developed in primary care are not performed consistently and depend on the professional or on the political decision of the administrator, which shows that professionals should use new practices to develop comprehensive care, and, therefore, there is a need to invest in improving the qualification of the professionals. PMID:22241213

  13. Mobile mental health: a challenging research agenda

    Olff, Miranda

    2015-01-01

    The field of mobile health (m-Health) is evolving rapidly and there is an explosive growth of psychological tools on the market. Exciting high-tech developments may identify symptoms, help individuals manage their own mental health, encourage help seeking, and provide both preventive and therapeutic interventions. This development has the potential to be an efficient cost-effective approach reducing waiting lists and serving a considerable portion of people globally (g-Health). However, few of the mobile applications (apps) have been rigorously evaluated. There is little information on how valid screening and assessment tools are, which of the mobile intervention apps are effective, or how well mobile apps compare to face-to-face treatments. But how feasible is rigorous scientific evaluation with the rising demands from policy makers, business partners, and users for their quick release? In this paper, developments in m-Health toolstargeting screening, assessment, prevention, and treatmentare reviewed with examples from the field of trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder. The academic challenges in developing and evaluating m-Health tools are being addressed. Evidence-based guidance is needed on appropriate research designs that may overcome some of the public and ethical challenges (e.g., equity, availability) and the market-driven wish to have mobile apps in the App Store yesterday rather than tomorrow. PMID:25994025

  14. The city, territoriality and networks in mental health policies

    Luciana Assis Costa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of territory, made evident by a decentralized, local based, and non-institutionalized mental health model, is a fundamental element in building a renewed network. The objective of this essay is to understand how mental health policies gradually favor local actions, organized in terms of territories, to develop strategies of care that support the new model of mental health. From this perspective, the aim of this research is to reflect on the possibilities of establishing new social relations that can, in fact, widen the sense of community belonging in the daily living of those presenting mental health conditions. This study draws from theoretical concepts and frameworks of the social sciences, describing the diverse positions held by the main schools of urban sociology with regards to the understanding of territories. The multiple conceptions of territories and their relations to mental health are analyzed. Historical data about mental health in Brazil show a heterogeneous development of mental health policies in different areas of the country. Finally, social inclusion in the cities depends on an effective expansion of territory-based mental health services, as well as an amplification of the access to consumer goods and services not necessarily connected to health care, but to basic social and civil rights. Hopefully, new rules of social interaction will not be restricted to the mental health universe, but will promote new encounters in the urban space, with respect for differences and appreciation of diversity.

  15. Mental health policy and development in Egypt - integrating mental health into health sector reforms 2001-9

    Siekkonen Inkeri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following a situation appraisal in 2001, a six year mental health reform programme (Egymen 2002-7 was initiated by an Egyptian-Finnish bilateral aid project at the request of a former Egyptian minister of health, and the work was incorporated directly into the Ministry of Health and Population from 2007 onwards. This paper describes the aims, methodology and implementation of the mental health reforms and mental health policy in Egypt 2002-2009. Methods A multi-faceted and comprehensive programme which combined situation appraisal to inform planning; establishment of a health sector system for coordination, supervision and training of each level (national, governorate, district and primary care; development workshops; production of toolkits, development of guidelines and standards; encouragement of intersectoral liaison at each level; integration of mental health into health management systems; and dedicated efforts to improve forensic services, rehabilitation services, and child psychiatry services. Results The project has achieved detailed situation appraisal, epidemiological needs assessment, inclusion of mental health into the health sector reform plans, and into the National Package of Essential Health Interventions, mental health masterplan (policy guidelines to accompany the general health policy, updated Egyptian mental health legislation, Code of Practice, adaptation of the WHO primary care guidelines, primary care training, construction of a quality system of roles and responsibilities, availability of medicines at primary care level, public education about mental health, and a research programme to inform future developments. Intersectoral liaison with education, social welfare, police and prisons at national level is underway, but has not yet been established for governorate and district levels, nor mental health training for police, prison staff and teachers. Conclusions The bilateral collaboration programme initiated a reform programme which has been sustained beyond the end of the funding. The project has demonstrated the importance of using a multi-faceted and comprehensive programme to promote sustainable system change, key elements of which include a focus on the use of rapid appropriate treatment at primary care level, strengthening the referral system, interministerial and intersectoral liaison, rehabilitation, and media work to mobilize community engagement.

  16. The Mental Health Literacy Scale (MHLS): A new scale-based measure of mental health literacy.

    O'Connor, Matt; Casey, Leanne

    2015-09-30

    Although Mental Health Literacy (MHL) has been a topic of substantial interest, measurement of this concept using a scale-based measure has been limited, including a lack of psychometric and methodologically robust scale-based measures of MHL. This study developed a new scale-based measure of MHL, the Mental Health Literacy Scale (MHLS), which assesses all attributes of MHL. Construction of the MHLS was done over three key stages, including measure development, pilot testing and assessment of psychometrics and methodological quality. The resulting measure is a 35 item, univariate scale that is easily administered and scored. Results showed significant differences in scores between mental health professionals and a community sample, as well as individuals with greater experience with mental health, and a significant positive relationship with help-seeking intentions. The MHLS also demonstrated good internal and test-retest reliability. Evaluation of the methodological quality of the MHLS indicated that it has substantial methodological advantages in comparison to existing scale-based measures of MHL. The MHLS can be used in assessing individual and population level differences in MHL and in determining the impact of programmes designed to improve MHL. PMID:26228163

  17. Speeding the growth of primary mental health prevention

    Wissow, Lawrence S

    2015-01-01

    While there is a strong case for primary prevention of mental health problems, relatively little mental health scholarship has been devoted to it in the last decade. Efforts to accelerate prevention scholarship could potentially benefit from strengthening pathways for interdisciplinary research; developing new training and working models for mental health professionals; developing a common language for public, policy, and scientific discussion of prevention; learning how to measure the common...

  18. Mental Health Nurse Prescribing: Challenges in Theory and Practice

    Evans, David

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the historical context of mental health nursing and its relationship to nurse prescribing.; examines some of the theoretical and philosophical forces that have molded modern mental health nursing, discussing the tensions between the medical model and the psychosocial models favoured by many mental health nurse academics and practitioners over the last forty years; and finally discusses the issues and challenges around commencing prescribing in practice, especially when ...

  19. Culture and mental health - A Southern African view

    Leslie Swartz

    1999-01-01

    This is a long awaited text within the field of mental health in South Africa, as there is very little written about culture and mental health within the specific context of South Africa. This book is very useful for students in any field of mental health like psychology, nursing, social work and medicine. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  20. Advocacy for youth mental health in Europe: a policy analysis

    Gonçalves, M.; Farcas, D.; Cook, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: According to both the WHO Europe and the European Commission, youth mental health is a key area of concern in Europe. Fifty-two European countries signed a declaration and action plan for mental health at the Helsinki Conference in January 2005, with youth mental health a top priority. Methods: This paper reviews the theory, research, and practice on the topic in the WHO European Region and presents important implications for policy, research, and practice. It states problems rela...

  1. Students' benefits and barriers to mental health help-seeking

    Vidourek, Rebecca A.; King, Keith A.; Laura A Nabors; Merianos, Ashley L.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma is recognized as a potential barrier to seeking help for a mental health disorder. The present study assessed college students' perceived benefits and barriers to obtaining mental health treatment and stigma-related attitudes via a four-page survey. A total of 682 students at one Midwestern university participated in the study. Findings indicated that females perceived a greater number of benefits to having participated in mental health services and held significantly lower stigma-rela...

  2. Social integration and the mental health of Black adolescents

    Rose, Theda; Joe, Sean; Shields, Joseph; Caldwell, Cleopatra Howard

    2014-01-01

    The influence of family, school, and religious social contexts on the mental health of Black adolescents has been understudied. This study used Durkheim’s Social Integration Theory to examine these associations in a nationally representative sample of 1,170 Black adolescents, ages 13-17. Mental health was represented by positive and negative psychosocial well-being indicators. Results showed that adolescents’ integration into family and school were related to better mental health. Additionall...

  3. IMPACT OF INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC ON MENTAL HEALTH OF ADOLESCENTS

    DINESH P. NAIK

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that music training causes improvements in several aspects of Mental Health. The researcher tested this hypothesis using a “pre-post” intervention study design, in which researcher measured adolescent's Mental Health. Initially 588 students from Senior College were selected for the present study. All were nineteen-to-twenty one year old. Pre testing sessions were conducted on several small groups. By using the Mithila Mental Health Statu...

  4. Engagement in mental health treatment among veterans returning from Iraq

    Stecker, Tracy; Fortney, John; Hamilton, Francis; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Ajzen, Icek

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Many veterans return from combat experiencing a variety of mental health concerns. Previous research has documented a stigma associated with seeking treatment that interferes with the decision to seek treatment. This study, conceptualized using the theory of planned behavior, assessed beliefs about mental health treatment in order to understand mental health treatment seeking behavior among a group of returning National Guard soldiers who served in the war in Iraq. Methods: Partic...

  5. Family support programs and adolescent mental health: review of evidence

    Kuhn ES; Laird RD

    2014-01-01

    Emily S Kuhn, Robert D Laird Department of Psychology, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Family support programs aim to improve parent wellbeing and parenting as well as adolescent mental and behavioral health by addressing the needs of parents of adolescents experiencing or at risk for mental health problems. Family support programs can be part of the treatment for adolescents diagnosed with mental or behavioral health problems, or family support programs can be deli...

  6. The city, territoriality and networks in mental health policies

    Luciana Assis Costa; Flávia Duque Brasil

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of territory, made evident by a decentralized, local based, and non-institutionalized mental health model, is a fundamental element in building a renewed network. The objective of this essay is to understand how mental health policies gradually favor local actions, organized in terms of territories, to develop strategies of care that support the new model of mental health. From this perspective, the aim of this research is to reflect on the possibilities of establishing n...

  7. The Relationship Between Exercise Motivation, Exercise Adherence and Mental Health

    Kahaerjiang Abula; Zhongkai He

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the relationship among college students` exercise motivation, exercise adherence and the level of their mental health. 217 undergraduate college students participated in this research. College Students` Mental Health Scale (CSMHS) and a scale created by authors were applied to investigate college students` mental health condition on six dimensions as well as exercise adherence, exercise motivation and exercise barriers .The results show that: (1) individu...

  8. Mental health and the crisis: Evidence from share

    Ferreira, Carla Adriana dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Mental health constitutes a significant share of the global burden of disease. It is shaped to a great extent by socioeconomic factors and is vulnerable to external shocks. The recent financial crisis brought about stressors prone to trigger and aggravate mental illnesses. This project presents a micro analysis of the effect of the economic crisis on mental health in eleven European countries, through the estimation of individual health production functions accounting for socioeconomic contro...

  9. Shared geriatric mental health care in a rural community

    Sullivan, MP; Parenteau, P; Dolansky, D; Leon, S.; Le Clair, JK

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: A pilot project in shared mental health care was initiated to explore opportunities to increase the capacity of the rural primary care system as a resource for older people with mental health needs. This was done within a framework for the delivery of best practices in geriatric mental health outreach. Methods: Shared-care strategies combining education and clinical consultation between mentor psychiatrists and family physicians were implemented and then evaluated after one year...

  10. Palestinian mothers' perceptions of child mental health problems and services

    THABET, ABDEL AZIZ; EL GAMMAL, HOSSAM; Vostanis, Panos

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore Palestinian mothers' perceptions of child mental health problems and their understanding of their causes; to determine Palestinian mothers' awareness of existing services and sources of help and support; to identify professionals in the community whom Palestinian mothers would consult if their child had mental health problems; and to establish their views on ways of increasing awareness of child mental health issues and services. Checklis...

  11. Mental Health of Parents Having Children with Physical Disabilities

    Yi-Chien Chiang; Jen-Wen Hung; Yee-Hwa Wu; Wen-Chi Wu; Chao-Hsing Yeh

    2010-01-01

    Background: Parents of children with disabilities play an essential role in the successfulrehabilitation of their children. However, the high level of care required mayaffect the mental health of the parents and consequently contribute to anunfavorable rehabilitation outcome in their children. The aims of this studyare to investigate the mental health of parents of children with physical disabilitiesand to elucidate the factors affecting parental mental health.Method: This was a cross-section...

  12. Correlates of Mental Health among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina

    Crain, Rebecca; GRZYWACZ, JOSEPH G.; Schwantes, Melody; ISOM, SCOTT; QUANDT, SARA A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine personal and situational correlates of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. Structured interview data were obtained from farmworkers (N=69) in six counties in eastern and western North Carolina. Results indicated that a substantial number of farmworkers have poor mental health, as indic...

  13. The forest as a classroom: preparing for mental health practice

    Eklund, Marthe Lyngås; Ruud, Ireen; Grov, Ellen Karine

    2016-01-01

    Background Positive effects of physical activity, health promotion and disease prevention, in treatment of mental illnesses are well documented. Mental health practice for nursing students highlights the important connection between physical activities and mental health. This study aims to examine the outcome from nursing students’ participation using The forest as a classroom. Students’ collaboration by problem solving, theoretical discussions and performance of activities in the forest serv...

  14. Assessing Bisexual Stigma and Mental Health Status: A Brief Report

    Bostwick, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Bisexual women often report higher rates of depression and mental health problems than their heterosexual and lesbian counterparts. These disparities likely occur, in part, as a result of the unique stigma that bisexual women face and experience. Such stigma can in turn operate as a stressor, thereby contributing to poor mental health status. The current pilot study tested a new measure of bisexual stigma and its association with mental health. Results suggest a moderate positive correlation ...

  15. Intermarried couples, mental health and psychosocial well-being

    Singla, Rashmi; Holm, Dagny

    2012-01-01

    Intermarried couples in Denmark face a range of psychosocial challenges in the context of dominant discourses of homogeneity coexisting with ethnic diversity. This article deals with the couples’ managing of everyday life, mental health, well-being and implications for health promotion and...... mental health and well-being over the life course....

  16. Integration of mental health into primary care in Sri Lanka

    Jenkins, Rachel; Mendis, Jayan; Cooray, Sherva; Cooray, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sri Lanka has one of the highest suicide rates in the world, with recent protracted conflict and the tsunami aggravating mental health needs. This paper describes a project to establish a systematic train the trainers programme to integrate mental health into primary care in Sri Lanka's public health system and private sector.

  17. Information and Communication. Technologies applied to Mental Health

    Paniagua Paniagua, Patricia; García Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2012-01-01

    This book compiles the contributions presented during the 1st Workshop on ICT applied to Mental Health, where researchers from the Help4Mood and OPTIMI projects were joined to share and discuss their experience and vision about the development, use and business models of Personal Health Systems applied to Mental Health in a multidisciplinary forum.

  18. Abortion in Young Women and Subsequent Mental Health

    Fergusson, David M.; Horwood, L. John; Ridder, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The extent to which abortion has harmful consequences for mental health remains controversial. We aimed to examine the linkages between having an abortion and mental health outcomes over the interval from age 15-25 years. Methods: Data were gathered as part of the Christchurch Health and Development Study, a 25-year longitudinal study…

  19. SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND MENTAL HEALTH DATA ARCHIVE (SAMHDA)

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (SAMHDA) is an initiative of the Office of Applied Studies, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The goal of the archive is to provide re...

  20. Comparing Mental Health Issues among Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Wyatt, Tammy; Oswalt, Sara B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stress and other mental health issues can negatively impact the health and academic performance of college students. Purpose: Examine relationships among stress, mental health, and academic classification in a national sample of college students. Methods: Analyses utilized secondary data from 27 387 college students responding to the…

  1. 78 FR 26221 - National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2013

    2013-05-03

    ... health problems receive treatment. During National Mental Health Awareness Month, we shine a light on... States of America the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-10749 Filed 5-2...;#0; ] Proclamation 8969 of April 30, 2013 National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2013 By...

  2. Abortion in Young Women and Subsequent Mental Health

    Fergusson, David M.; Horwood, L. John; Ridder, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The extent to which abortion has harmful consequences for mental health remains controversial. We aimed to examine the linkages between having an abortion and mental health outcomes over the interval from age 15-25 years. Methods: Data were gathered as part of the Christchurch Health and Development Study, a 25-year longitudinal study

  3. Mental Health Stigma: Society, Individuals, and the Profession

    Ahmedani, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    Mental health stigma operates in society, is internalized by individuals, and is attributed by health professionals. This ethics-laden issue acts as a barrier to individuals who may seek or engage in treatment services. The dimensions, theory, and epistemology of mental health stigma have several implications for the social work profession.

  4. Comparing Mental Health Issues among Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Wyatt, Tammy; Oswalt, Sara B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stress and other mental health issues can negatively impact the health and academic performance of college students. Purpose: Examine relationships among stress, mental health, and academic classification in a national sample of college students. Methods: Analyses utilized secondary data from 27 387 college students responding to the

  5. Clinical and Management Requirements for Computerized Mental Health Information Systems

    Levinton, Paula H.; Dunning, Tessa F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Information requirements of mental health providers are sufficiently different from those of other health care managers to warrant a different approach to the development of management information systems (MIS). Advances in computer technology and increased demands for fiscal accountability have led to developing integrated mental health information systems (MHIS) that support clinical and management requirements.

  6. Greek adolescents' views of people with mental illness through drawings: mental health education's impact.

    Sakellari, Evanthia; Lehtonen, Kimmo; Sourander, Andre; Kalokerinou-Anagnostopoulou, Athena; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2014-09-01

    People with mental illness are among the most stigmatized and discriminated against as a result of lack of knowledge among the public. Our study explored adolescents' perceptions of people with mental illness through drawings, described these perceptions, and tested the possible changes in perceptions after an educational mental health intervention. Drawings were collected before and after an educational mental health intervention from 59 Greek secondary school students. One group of participants served as the experimental group and received the educational mental health intervention. Content analysis of the drawings was used to analyze data. The drawings provided a clear understanding of adolescents' perceptions towards people with mental illness. After the educational mental health intervention the negative elements presenting the people with mental illness were less among the experimental group, while the drawings among the comparison group did not change. The findings support that educational mental health intervention can have a positive impact on adolescents' perceptions towards people with mental illness. Health professionals can use the findings of our study in order to develop and implement similar interventions. PMID:24382318

  7. The Mental Health of Older LGBT Adults.

    Yarns, Brandon C; Abrams, Janet M; Meeks, Thomas W; Sewell, Daniel D

    2016-06-01

    There are approximately one million older lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adults in the USA. Their mental health issues result from interactions between genetic factors and stress associated with membership in a sexual minority group. Although advancements in acceptance and equal treatment of LGBT individuals have been occurring, sexual minority status remains associated with risks to physical and mental well-being. Older LGBT adults are more likely to have experienced mistreatment and discrimination due to living a majority of their lives prior to recent advancements in acceptance and equal treatment. All LGBT adults experience one common developmental challenge: deciding if, when, and how to reveal to others their gender identity and/or sexual orientation. LGBT individuals have higher rates of anxiety, depression, and substance use disorders and also are at increased risk for certain medical conditions like obesity, breast cancer, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Improved education and training of clinicians, coupled with clinical research efforts, holds the promise of improved overall health and life quality for older LGBT adults. PMID:27142205

  8. University students' mental health: Aksaray University example

    Rezzan Gündoğdu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether mental health scores of the university students differ based on gender, whether they study in their ideal majors, whether they are contended with their majors, economic condition perceived and perceptions on employment opportunity after graduation. The sample group of the study constituted 3492 students comprising 2037 female students and 1455 male students attending Faculty of Education (634, Engineering Faculty (1582, Economic and Administrative Sciences Faculty (1097, Faculty of Science and Letters (762, Medical Vocational College (540, Physical Training and Sports College (443 and Aksaray Vocational College (1452 of Aksaray University in 2010-2011 Academic Year. Symptom Checklist (SCL 90-R developed by Deragotis, (1983; eg Öner, 1997 has been used to collect data on mental health level of the students involved in the study. Statistical analysis of the data collected has been carried out using t Test, One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Significant differences have been found in students in terms of independent variants according to the general symptom average score and numerous sub-scale scores.

  9. Effects of Migration on Women Mental Health

    Ayla Tuzcu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available People leave their habitats and go to different regions of the world due to various reasons, which is defined as migration. One of the most important changes that have been experienced in migration in the last half century is the increase in women's migration. Women are among the risk groups that are affected by the process of migration at most. A particular attention is attracted to the special requirements of women among groups that are obliged to migrate due to the crisis in their countries. Different lifestyles in the migrated social environment, difficult economic and working conditions, language barrier and relevant adaptation problems all negatively affect the mental health of these women. In order to protect and develop the mental health of migrant women from different cultural groups, it is important to approach these groups as primary risk groups and start multi-directional interventions aimed at their areas required. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(1: 56-67

  10. Adolescent mental health: Challenges with maternal noncompliance

    Vicki A Nejtek

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Vicki A Nejtek, Sarah Hardy, Scott WinterUniversity of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USAAbstract: The leading cause of suicide ideation, attempts, and completion in adolescents is persistent and unresolved parental conflict. National statistics show extremely high rates of childhood neglect and abuse are perpetrated most often by single mothers. Psychiatric disorders arising from maternal–child dysfunction are well-documented. However, resources to prevent offspring victimization are lacking. Here, we report maternal neglect of a 15-year-old male brought to the psychiatric emergency room for suicidal ideation. An inpatient treatment plan including pharmacotherapy, family therapy and psychological testing was initiated. The patient’s mother failed to attend clinic appointments or family therapy sessions. Clinician attempts to engage the mother in the treatment plan was met with verbal assaults, aggression, and threatening behavior. The patient decompensated in relation to the mother’s actions. Child Protective Services were contacted and a follow-up assessment with the patient and mother is pending. Psychiatric treatment of the mother may be a necessary intervention and prevention regimen for both the adolescent and the mother. Without consistent Child Protective Services oversight, medical and psychosocial follow-up, the prognosis and quality of life for this adolescent is considered very poor. Stringent mental health law and institutional policies are needed to adequately intercede and protect adolescents with mental illness.Keywords: adolescent, suicide, maternal treatment noncompliance, maternal neglect

  11. Community-oriented integrated mental health services.

    Brophy, Chris; Morris, David

    2014-01-01

    Unprecedented levels of cost containment in NHS and social care organisations - together with integration as a policy priority - make this a key moment for fresh ways of thinking about how to commission and provide community-based integrated services that meet the challenge of local accountability and citizen participation. This is nowhere more important than in mental health. Primary care with its local orientation is properly at the heart of this agenda, but there is a need for new forms of leadership for collaboration in the sector. In this context, the contribution of general practitioner (GP) networks is likely to be fundamental. This paper is a brief discussion of some of the issues associated with GP networks and mental health, set in the context of a round table discussion with three sets of participants at a 2014 London Journal of Primary Care/Royal College of General Practitioners conference. The conference provided a forum for capturing a diversity of experience and knowledge and for turning this into a force for critical transformation. This paper describes a contribution to the day. PMID:25949738

  12. The Mental Health of University Students in the United Kingdom

    Macaskill, Ann

    2013-01-01

    There are increasing concerns globally about the mental health of students. In the UK, the actual incidence of mental disturbance is unknown, although university counselling services report increased referrals. This study assesses the levels of mental illness in undergraduate students to examine whether widening participation in education has…

  13. Does school social capital modify socioeconomic inequality in mental health?

    Nielsen, Line; Koushede, Vibeke; Vinther-Larsen, Mathilde; Bendtsen, Pernille; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Due, Pernille; Holstein, Bjørn E

    It seems that social capital in the neighbourhood has the potential to reduce socioeconomic differences in mental health among adolescents. Whether school social capital is a buffer in the association between socioeconomic position and mental health among adolescents remains uncertain. The aim of...... school classes characterised by high and moderate trust, there were no statistically significant differences in emotional symptoms between high and low socioeconomic groups. Although further studies are needed, this cross-sectional study suggests that school social capital may reduce mental health...... problems and diminish socioeconomic inequality in mental health among adolescents....

  14. A STUDY ON SOCIAL SUPPORTAND MENTAL HEALTH OF EMPLOYEES

    Neeta N.G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to examine the Influence of Social Support on Mental Health of Employees selected from Gulbarga District. The Sample consists of 200 (of different occupations and gender employees. The sample was administered with Social support questionnaire and Mental Health Inventory. And the data were subjected the t-test. The results revealed that social support produces differences in mental health of employees and there is a significant difference in Mental Health between the male and female sample.

  15. Managed care in mental health: the ethical issues.

    Boyle, P J; Callahan, D

    1995-01-01

    Praise and blame of managed mental health care are on the rise on many fronts, including allegations that it could adversely affect quality of care, access to care, the physician/patient relationship, and informed patient choice. Given the heterogeneity among managed mental health care organizations--each with differing practices--it is difficult to sift the ethically defensible concerns from the indefensible ones. In this paper we identify and examine the different moral concerns about managed mental health care and mark which problems have been addressed or are in need of resolution. We also identify which problems are unique to managed mental health care. PMID:7498905

  16. Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers: Systematic Review

    Bains, Ranbir Mangat; Diallo, Ana F.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health issues affect 20-25% of children and adolescents, of which few receive services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to mental health services to children and adolescents within their schools. A systematic review of literature was undertaken to review evidence on the effectiveness of delivery of mental health services…

  17. Health Care "as Usual": The Insertion of Positive Psychology in Canadian Mental Health Discourse

    Jhangiani, Surita Jassal; Vadeboncoeur, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    The recent shift to a "positive psychological" approach that emphasizes a "health model," rather than a "disease model," in mental health discourses is intended both to reduce the stigma around mental health issues and to enable people to play a role in monitoring their own mental health. As a component of a larger study on access to and…

  18. Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers: Systematic Review

    Bains, Ranbir Mangat; Diallo, Ana F.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health issues affect 20-25% of children and adolescents, of which few receive services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to mental health services to children and adolescents within their schools. A systematic review of literature was undertaken to review evidence on the effectiveness of delivery of mental health services

  19. The Fountain of Health: Bringing Seniors’ Mental Health Promotion into Clinical Practice

    Thoo, Vanessa; Freer, Janya; Cassidy, Keri-Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Background The Fountain of Health (FoH) initiative offers valuable evidence-based mental health knowledge and provides clinicians with evaluated tools for translating knowledge into practice, in order to reduce seniors’ risks of mental disorders, including dementia. Methods A presentation on mental health promotion and educational materials were disseminated to mental health clinicians including physicians and other allied health professionals either in-person or via tele-education through a ...

  20. Medicalization of global health 2: the medicalization of global mental health

    Jocalyn Clark

    2014-01-01

    Once an orphan field, global mental health now has wide acknowledgement and prominence on the global health agenda. Increased recognition draws needed attention to individual suffering and the population impacts, but medicalizing global mental health produces a narrow view of the problems and solutions. Early framing by advocates of the global mental health problem emphasised biological disease, linked psychiatry with neurology, and reinforced categories of mental health disorders. Universa...

  1. Integrating mental health into primary health care in Zambia: a care provider's perspective

    Mwanza Jason

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the 1991 reforms of the health system in Zambia, mental health is still given low priority. This is evident from the fragmented manner in which mental health services are provided in the country and the limited budget allocations, with mental health services receiving 0.4% of the total health budget. Most of the mental health services provided are curative in nature and based in tertiary health institutions. At primary health care level, there is either absence of, or fragmented health services. Aims The aim of this paper was to explore health providers' views about mental health integration into primary health care. Methods A mixed methods, structured survey was conducted of 111 health service providers in primary health care centres, drawn from one urban setting (Lusaka and one rural setting (Mumbwa. Results There is strong support for integrating mental health into primary health care from care providers, as a way of facilitating early detection and intervention for mental health problems. Participants believed that this would contribute to the reduction of stigma and the promotion of human rights for people with mental health problems. However, health providers felt they require basic training in order to enhance their knowledge and skills in providing health care to people with mental health problems. Recommendations It is recommended that health care providers should be provided with basic training in mental health in order to enhance their knowledge and skills to enable them provide mental health care to patients seeking help at primary health care level. Conclusion Integrating mental health services into primary health care is critical to improving and promoting the mental health of the population in Zambia.

  2. The need for a behavioural science focus in research on mental health and mental disorders

    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Knappe, Susanne; Andersson, Gerhard; Araya, Ricardo; Banos Rivera, Rosa M; Barkham, Michael; Bech, Per; Beckers, Tom; Berger, Thomas; Berking, Matthias; Berrocal, Carmen; Botella, Christina; Carlbring, Per; Chouinard, Guy; Colom, Francesc; Csillag, Claudio; Cujipers, Pim; David, Daniel; Emmelkamp, Paul M G; Essau, Cecilia A; Fava, Giovanni A; Goschke, Thomas; Hermans, Dirk; Hofmann, Stefan G; Lutz, Wolfgang; Muris, Peter; Ollendick, Thomas H; Raes, Filip; Rief, Winfried; Riper, Heleen; Tossani, Eliana; van der Oord, Saskia; Vervliet, Bram; Haro, Josep M; Schumann, Gunter

    -longitudinal studies. This model provides a conceptual framework to identify how individual vulnerabilities interact with environment over time, and promote critical behaviours that might act as proximal risk factors for ill-health and mental disorders. Within the models framework, such improved knowledge is also......Psychology as a science offers an enormous diversity of theories, principles, and methodological approaches to understand mental health, abnormal functions and behaviours and mental disorders. A selected overview of the scope, current topics as well as strength and gaps in Psychological Science may...... help to depict the advances needed to inform future research agendas specifically on mental health and mental disorders. From an integrative psychological perspective, most maladaptive health behaviours and mental disorders can be conceptualized as the result of developmental dysfunctions of...

  3. STUDY OF HEALTH STATUS AND ETIOLOGICAL FACTORS OF MENTALLY CHALLENGED CHILDREN IN SCHOOL FOR MENTALLY CHALLENGED

    Nadeem Ahmad; D.B.Phalke

    2009-01-01

    The mental health of the child affects his physical health and the learning process. The present study was conducted to study the health status and etiological factors among 58 mentally challenged children in school for mentally challenged at Sangamner. Majority of mentally challenged children (68.0%) were in 5-9 years age group. Most of them had moderate retardation. (43.0%) In majority of children (70.68%)no clinical syndrome was present. Most common clinical syndrome was Downs syndrome (1...

  4. [Dangerous states and mental health disorders: perceptions and reality].

    Tassone-Monchicourt, C; Daumerie, N; Caria, A; Benradia, I; Roelandt, J-L

    2010-01-01

    Image of Madness was always strongly linked with the notion of "dangerousness", provoking fear and social exclusion, despite the evolution of psychiatric practices and organisation, and the emphasis on user's rights respect. Mediatization and politicization of this issue through news item combining crime and mental illness, reinforce and spread out this perception. This paper presents a review of the litterature on social perceptions associating "dangerousness", "Insanity" and "mental illness", available data about the link between "dangerous states" and "psychiatric disorders", as well as the notion of "dangerousness" and the assessment of "dangerous state" of people suffering or not from psychiatric disorders. MAPPING OF SOCIAL REPRESENTATIONS: The French Survey "Mental Health in General Population: Images and Realities (MHGP)" was carried out between 1999 and 2003, on a representative sample of 36.000 individuals over 18 years old. It aims at describing the social representations of the population about "insanity/insane" and "mental illness/mentally ill". The results show that about 75% of the people interviewed link "insanity" or "mental illness" with "criminal or violent acts". Young people and those with a high level of education more frequently categorize violent and dangerous behaviours in the field of Mental illness rather than in that of madness. CORRELATION BETWEEN DANGEROUS STATE AND PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS: in the scientific literature, all experts reject the hypothesis of a direct link between violence and mental disorder. Besides, 2 tendencies appear in their conclusions: on one hand, some studies establish a significative link between violence and severe mental illness, compared with the general population. On the other hand, results show that 87 to 97% of des aggressors are not mentally ills. Therefore, the absence of scientific consensus feeds the confusion and reinforce the link of causality between psychiatric disorders and violence. OFFICIAL FIGURES BY THE MINISTRY OF JUSTICE: according to the French Ministry of Justice, there is a lack of significative data in general population, that would allow the accurate evaluation of the proportion of authors of crimes and offences presenting a "dangerous state", either of criminological order or related to a psychiatric disorder. FROM "DANGEROUSNESS" TO "DANGEROUS STATE": the vagueness of the notion of "dangerousness" aggravates the confusion and reinforce the negative social representations attached to subjects labelled as "mentally ills". A way to alleviate this stigmatisation would be to stop using the word "dangerous", and rather use those of "dangerous states". Assessment of dangerous states is complex and needs to take into account several heterogeneous factors (circumstances of acting, social and family environment...). Besides, it is not a linear process for a given individual. Those risk factors of "dangerous state" lead to the construction of evaluation or prediction scales, which limits lay in the biaises of over or under predictive value. The overestimation of dangerousness is harmful, not only to individuals wrongly considered as "dangerous", but also to the society which, driven by safety concerns, agrees on the implementation of inaccurate measures. A FEW TRACKS FOR REMEDIATION: the representations linking "mental illness" and "dangerousness" are the major vectors of stigma, and deeply anchored in the collective popular imagination. They are shared by all population categories, with no distinction of age, gender, professional status or level of education. To overcome those prejudices, one has to carefully study their basis, their criteria, document them with statistical data, look for consistency and scientific rigour, in the terminology as well as in the methodology. Moreover, one has to encourage ex

  5. 75 FR 8372 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meeting

    2010-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel, HIV AIDS Training. Date... Extramural Activities, National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Neuroscience Center, 6001...

  6. 76 FR 4122 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings

    2011-01-24

    ... of Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel; Adolescent OCD Treatment... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed... Extramural Activities, National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive...

  7. 76 FR 2401 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings

    2011-01-13

    ... Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel. Treatment Development for Eating... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel. Mentoring Networks...

  8. 78 FR 54478 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meeting

    2013-09-04

    ... of Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel; Innovative Treatment... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed... Officer, Division of Extramural Activities, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes...

  9. 77 FR 8890 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings

    2012-02-15

    ... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel; Innovations in Treatment... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel; Conflicts and...

  10. Predictors of Healthcare Service Utilization for Mental Health Reasons

    Marie-Josée Fleury

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify: (1 predictors of 12-month healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons, framed by the Andersen model, among a population cohort in an epidemiological catchment area; and (2 correlates associated with healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons among individuals with and without mental disorders respectively. Analyses comprised univariate, bivariate, and multiple regression analyses. Being male, having poor quality of life, possessing better self-perception of physical health, and suffering from major depressive episodes, panic disorder, social phobia, and emotional problems predicted healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons. Among individuals with mental disorders, needs factors (psychological distress, impulsiveness, emotional problems, victim of violence, and aggressive behavior and visits to healthcare professionals were associated with healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons. Among individuals without mental disorders, healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons is strongly associated with enabling factors such as social support, income, environmental variables, and self-perception of the neighborhood. Interventions facilitating social cohesion and social solidarity in neighborhood settings may reduce the need to seek help among individuals without mental disorders. Furthermore, in their capacity as frontline professionals, general practitioners should be more sensitive in preventing, detecting, and treating mental disorders in routine primary care.

  11. Bilingual Glossary of Professional Mental Health Terms = Glosario Bilingue de Terminos Profesionales de Salud Mental.

    Cherry, Ralph, Comp.

    Designed to acquaint social workers and other professionals in the mental health field with the basic terms necessary for professional discussions, paper presentations, and international correspondence, the English/Spanish-Spanish/English glossary lists 130 selected mental health terms. The glossary includes two sections: English to Spanish and

  12. Bilingual Glossary of Professional Mental Health Terms = Glosario Bilingue de Terminos Profesionales de Salud Mental.

    Cherry, Ralph, Comp.

    Designed to acquaint social workers and other professionals in the mental health field with the basic terms necessary for professional discussions, paper presentations, and international correspondence, the English/Spanish-Spanish/English glossary lists 130 selected mental health terms. The glossary includes two sections: English to Spanish and…

  13. Mobile mental health: a challenging research agenda

    Miranda Olff

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The field of mobile health (“m-Health” is evolving rapidly and there is an explosive growth of psychological tools on the market. Exciting high-tech developments may identify symptoms, help individuals manage their own mental health, encourage help seeking, and provide both preventive and therapeutic interventions. This development has the potential to be an efficient cost-effective approach reducing waiting lists and serving a considerable portion of people globally (“g-Health”. However, few of the mobile applications (apps have been rigorously evaluated. There is little information on how valid screening and assessment tools are, which of the mobile intervention apps are effective, or how well mobile apps compare to face-to-face treatments. But how feasible is rigorous scientific evaluation with the rising demands from policy makers, business partners, and users for their quick release? In this paper, developments in m-Health tools—targeting screening, assessment, prevention, and treatment—are reviewed with examples from the field of trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder. The academic challenges in developing and evaluating m-Health tools are being addressed. Evidence-based guidance is needed on appropriate research designs that may overcome some of the public and ethical challenges (e.g., equity, availability and the market-driven wish to have mobile apps in the “App Store” yesterday rather than tomorrow.

  14. Linking Obesity Prevention and Mental Health Promotion to Address Health Disparities.

    Claydon, Elizabeth; Austin, Anna; Smith, Megan V

    2016-05-01

    Considerable racial health disparities exist, especially in mental health and obesity. However, few approaches exist to address obesity and mental health simultaneously in minority groups. An intervention to address mental health in a low-income, minority group of urban mothers was designed using results from a needs assessment. Participating women were asked to rank their top health concerns and personal goals. Along with mental health concerns and basic needs, the majority of mothers desired assistance with improving their physical well-being. These results are surprising, but lend credence to creating interventions that aim to address both mental health and obesity concerns simultaneously. PMID:26303902

  15. Financing Mental Health Care in Spain: Context and critical issues

    L. Salvador-Carulla

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Financing and the way in which funds are then allocated are key issues in health policy. They can act as an incentive or barrier to system reform , can prioritise certain types or sectors of care and have long term consequences for the planning and delivery of services. The way in which these issues can impact on the funding of mental health services across Europe has been a key task of the Mental Health Economics European Network. (MHEEN This paper draws on information prepared for MHEEN and provides an analysis of the context and the main issues related to mental health financing in Spain. METHODS: A structured questionnaire developed by the MHEEN group was used to assess the pattern of financing, eligibility and coverage for mental healthcare. In Spain contacts were made with the Mental Health agencies of the 17 Autonomous Communities (ACs, and available mental health plans and annual reports were reviewed. A direct collaboration was set up with four ACs (Madrid, Navarre, Andalusia, Catalonia. RESULTS: In Spain, like many other European countries mental healthcare is an integral part of the general healthcare with universal coverage funded by taxation. Total health expenditure accounted for 7.7% of GDP in 2003 (public health expenditure was 5.6% of GDP. Although the actual percentage expended in mental care is not known and estimates are unreliable, approximately 5% of total health expenditure can be attributed to mental health. Moreover what is often overlooked is that many services have been shifted from the health to the social care sector as part of the reform process. Social care is discretionary, and provides only limited coverage. This level of expenditure also appears low by European standards, accounting for just 0.6% of GDP. COMMENTS: In spite of its policy implications, little is known about mental healthcare financing in Spain. Comparisons of expenditure for mental health across the ACs are problematic, making it difficult to assess inequalities in access to services across the country. The limited data available on mental healthcare expenditure suggests that level of funding for mental health is low compared with many of the EU-15 countries. This may indicate inefficient and inequitable funding given the significant contribution of mental disorders to the overall burden of ill health. Attention needs to be directed to redressing both the information deficit and also in using a range of financing mechanisms to promote greater investment in mental health.

  16. Mental health care management in the Brazilian National Health System.

    Barros, Sônia; Salles, Mariana

    2011-12-01

    This article puts in context and evaluates the historical and political process of the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform. The goal is to provide a brief retrospective and analysis of the management mechanisms that have permitted the Psychiatric Reform to advance. This historic process is divided into three periods: the implementation of deinstitutionalization, the expansion of the psychosocial support network, and the consolidation of the reformist hegemony. It is verified that the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform advances as management mechanisms are created to increase the service network. Nonetheless, consolidating the territorial support network and increasing the resources of the annual mental health care budget of the national health system remain a challenge. PMID:22569672

  17. Mental health, pregnancy and self-rated health in antenatal women attending primary health clinics.

    Sonkusare, S; Adinegara; Hebbar, S

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the determinants of self rated health in the low-risk pregnant women of Melaka Tengah in Malaysia. A total of 387 subjects were analysed. The role of mental health, psychosocial stressors, support from husband, coping skills, socio-economic status and pregnancy characteristics in determining self- rated health were studied. Health items were taken from the Duke Health Profile. Bad obstetric history, poor mental health, stress from the family were found to be significantly associated with poor self - rated health whereas good support from the husband was related to good self - rated health. PMID:18705476

  18. Gaming well: links between videogames and flourishing mental health.

    Jones, Christian M; Scholes, Laura; Johnson, Daniel; Katsikitis, Mary; Carras, Michelle C

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a review of the state of play of research linking videogaming and flourishing, and explores the role of videogames and technology to improve mental health and well-being. Its purpose is to develop understandings about the positive intersection of gaming and well-being, to document evidence regarding links between videogames and positive mental health, and to provide guidelines for use by other researchers as they design and use tools and games to improve mental health and well-being. Using Huppert's (Huppert and So, 2013) proposition that to flourish is more than the absence of mental disorder but rather a combination of feeling good and functioning effectively, resulting in high levels of mental well-being, and Seligman's (Seligman, 2011) PERMA theory of well-being, the paper identifies strengths in existing games that generate positive affect, positive functioning, and positive social functioning, contributing to, and supporting mental health and well-being. PMID:24744743

  19. Migration and mental health: An interface.

    Virupaksha, H G; Kumar, Ashok; Nirmala, Bergai Parthsarathy

    2014-07-01

    Migration is a universal phenomenon, which existed with the subsistence of the human beings on earth. People migrate from one place to another for several reasons, but the goal or main reason behind changing the residence would be improving their living conditions or to escape from debts and poverty. Migration is also a social phenomenon which influences human life and the environment around. Hence, migration has a great impact on any geographical area and it is known as one of the three basic components of population growth of any particular region (the other two are, mortality and fertility). Migration involves certain phases to go through; hence, it is a process. Many times, lack of preparedness, difficulties in adjusting to the new environment, the complexity of the local system, language difficulties, cultural disparities and adverse experiences would cause distress to the migrants. Moreover subsequently it has a negative impact on mental well-being of such population. Due to globalization, modernization, improved technologies and developments in all the sectors, the migration and its impact on human well-being is a contemporary issue; hence, here is an attempt to understand the migration and its impact on the mental health of the migrants based on the studies conducted around. PMID:25097389

  20. DEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS INFLUENCES ON MENTAL HEALTH OF COLLEGE STUDENTS

    G. RAMANATHAN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Students mental health is a public issues, public health policy makes at the international level, are very well concerned about this issue become of the increasing rate of suicide, among students their amenity, depression and involvement in high risk behavior .The aim of the study was to understand the influences of demographic variables on mental health of college students. The mental health scale (MHS constructed and standardized by Kamlesh Sharma (2002 was used to measure the mental health. 500 samples were taken based on Purposive sampling method .Statistical method such as t- test, and correlation analysis was used in the present study to test the hypothesis and interpret the data. The findings of the study were there is an influence of demographic variables on mental health of college students

  1. Patient-professional interactions in mental health institutions in Denmark

    Ringer, Agnes

    Although qualitative research within the field of mental health is growing, few studies of everyday communication between service users and multidisciplinary professionals within mental health institutions exist. This study examines the everyday interactions between mental health professionals and...... by discursive and narrative approaches, the aim of the study is to shed light on how the professionals and users construct patient identities. How are the users and the professionals positioned in their interactions? How are concepts such as psychiatric diagnosis and mental illness negotiated within...

  2. Mental Health Promotion in College Student based on Positive Psychology

    Zhang Xiuxia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze the status of mental health promotion in college student and the role of positive psychology in promoting mental health in college student. Mental disorders account for a large proportion of the disease burden in college student in all societies. Positive psychology is the study of such competencies and resources, or what is right about people-their positive attributes, psychological assets and strengths. The research results proved that positive psychology was useful for mental health promotion in college student.

  3. Child and adolescent mental health emergency services in Macedonia.

    Releva, M; Boskovska, M; Apceva, A; Polazarevska, M; Novotni, A; Bonevski, D; Sargent, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of child and adolescent mental health emergency services in Macedonia since 1993. The evolution of services through the Mental Crisis Centre for Children and Adolescents, funded by the Open Society Institute, and located in six cities is outlined. The paper also defines traditional services, the nature of child mental health emergencies, the evaluation process, follow-up care and training and supervision. It concludes with concern that the mental health emergency system is not sufficient to meet the needs of the child and adolescent population, particularly in the face of the Kosovar refugee crisis. Recommendations for the future are made. PMID:11508566

  4. STUDY OF HEALTH STATUS AND ETIOLOGICAL FACTORS OF MENTALLY CHALLENGED CHILDREN IN SCHOOL FOR MENTALLY CHALLENGED

    Nadeem Ahmad

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The mental health of the child affects his physical health and the learning process. The present study was conducted to study the health status and etiological factors among 58 mentally challenged children in school for mentally challenged at Sangamner. Majority of mentally challenged children (68.0% were in 5-9 years age group. Most of them had moderate retardation. (43.0% In majority of children (70.68%no clinical syndrome was present. Most common clinical syndrome was Down’s syndrome (17.23%,followed by Fragile X syndrome (6.89%. More than sixty percent children were off springs of consanguineous marriages. Idiopathic causes (63.8% followed by genetic causes (29.31% were common etiological factor responsible for mental retardation. Mental handicap can be prevented by genetic counseling.

  5. The Carter Center Mental Health Program: Addressing the Public Health Crisis in the Field of Mental Health Through Policy Change and Stigma Reduction

    Rebecca G. Palpant, MS

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most pervasive and debilitating illnesses are mental illnesses, according to World Health Organization’s The World Health Report 2001 — Mental Health: New Understanding, New Hope. Neuropsychiatric conditions account for four of the top five leading causes of years of life lived with disability in people aged 15 to 44 in the Western world. Many barriers prevent people with mental illnesses from seeking care, such as prohibitive costs, lack of insurance, and the stigma and discrimination associated with mental illnesses. The Carter Center Mental Health Program, established in 1991, focuses on mental health policy issues within the United States and internationally. This article examines the public health crisis in the field of mental health and focuses on The Carter Center Mental Health Program’s initiatives, which work to increase public knowledge of and decrease the stigma associated with mental illnesses through their four strategic goals: reducing stigma and discrimination against people with mental illnesses; achieving equity of mental health care comparable with other health services; advancing early promotion, prevention, and early intervention services for children and their families; and increasing public awareness about mental illnesses and mental health issues.

  6. Heritability Maps May Hold Clues to Delayed Onset of Mental Disorders

    ... Adults (15 items) Women’s Mental Health (15 items) Research BRAIN Initiative (4 items) Basic Research (221 items) Clinical ... Adults (15 items) Women’s Mental Health (15 items) Research BRAIN Initiative (4 items) Basic Research (221 items) Clinical ...

  7. Socioeconomic status and mental health in children and adolescents

    Bøe, Tormod

    2013-01-01

    Socioeconomic disadvantage in childhood is related to both immediate and persisting impairments in mental health and well-being. Findings from epidemiological studies suggest that children who grow up in families with a lower socioeconomic status (SES) have more symptoms of mental health problems, compared to those raised in more affluent families.

    The overall aim of the current thesis was to expand the knowledge of the socioeconomic distribution of childhood mental healt...

  8. Mental Health Promotion in College Student based on Positive Psychology

    Zhang Xiuxia; Du Junfang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the status of mental health promotion in college student and the role of positive psychology in promoting mental health in college student. Mental disorders account for a large proportion of the disease burden in college student in all societies. Positive psychology is the study of such competencies and resources, or what is “right” about people-their positive attributes, psychological assets and strengths. The research results proved that positive psycholo...

  9. Dual diagnosis in mental health inpatient and day hospital settings.

    United Kingdom. Department of Health

    2006-01-01

    Many mental health patients also have substance misuse problems, so mental health service staff need to be skilled to provide simple prevention and treatment interventions, assisted by drug and alcohol specialists. This guidance covers the assessment and clinical management of patients with mental illness being cared for in psychiatric inpatient or day care settings who also use or misuse alcohol and/or illicit or other drugs*. It also covers organisational and management issues to help menta...

  10. Medical students' self-report of mental health conditions

    Strous, Rael D.; Netta Shoenfeld; Avi Lehman; Aharon Wolf; Leah Snyder; Ori Barzilai

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the subjective presence of a range of subsyndromal and syndromal mental health conditions in medical students, and to compare the presence of these conditions between preclinical and clinical training. Methods: A cross sectional study was used among first-and fifth-year medical students. Student reported their mental health conditions using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria, the fourth version (DSM-IV). Data analysis was based on 110...

  11. Medical students' self-report of mental health conditions

    Strous, Rael D.; Shoenfeld, Netta; Lehman, Avi; Wolf, Aharon; Snyder, Leah; Barzilai, Ori

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the subjective presenceof a range of subsyndromal and syndromal mental health conditions in medical students, and to compare the presence of these conditions between preclinical and clinical training. Methods A cross sectional study was used among first-and fifth-year medical students. Student reported their mental health conditions using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria, the fourth version (DSM-IV). Data analysis was based on 110 qu...

  12. Home care assistants’ perspectives on detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health among community-dwelling seniors with multimorbidity

    Grundberg Å

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Åke Grundberg,1,2 Anna Hansson,2 Dorota Religa,1 Pernilla Hillerås1,2 1Division of Neurogeriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, 2Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden Introduction: Elderly people with multiple chronic conditions, or multimorbidity, are at risk of developing poor mental health. These seniors often remain in their homes with support from home care assistants (HCAs. Mental health promotion by HCAs needs to be studied further because they may be among the first to observe changes in clients’ mental health status. Aim: To describe HCAs’ perspectives on detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health among homebound seniors with multimorbidity. Methods: We applied a descriptive qualitative study design using semi-structured interviews. Content analyses were performed on five focus group interviews conducted in 2014 with 26 HCAs. Results: Most HCAs stated that they were experienced in caring for clients with mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, sleep problems, and high alcohol consumption. The HCAs mentioned as causes, or risk factors, multiple chronic conditions, feelings of loneliness, and social isolation. The findings reveal that continuity of care and seniors’ own thoughts and perceptions were essential to detecting mental health problems. Observation, collaboration, and social support emerged as important means of detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health. Conclusion: The HCAs had knowledge of risk factors, but they seemed insecure about which health professionals had the primary responsibility for mental health. They also seemed to have detected early signs of mental health problems, even though good personal knowledge of the client and continuity in home visits were crucial to do so. When it came to mental health promotion, the suggestions related to the aim of ending social isolation, decreasing feelings of loneliness, and increasing physical activity. The results indicate that the HCAs seemed dependent on supervision by district nurses and on care managers’ decisions to support the needed care, to schedule assignments related to the detection of mental health problems, and to promote mental health. Keywords: home care assistants, mental health promotion, municipal care, older people, Sweden

  13. Citizenship and Mental Health Policy in Europe

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The problems confronted by people who experience mental disorders are often conceptualised in terms of health and illness. However, these problems extend far beyond the healthcare system, into all areas of human life. Having a psychiatric diagnosis may have a negative impact on every aspect of the individual’s life, leading to the deprivation or limitation of rights in relation to housing, employment, and family life. In this article, some of these problems are discussed within the theoretical framework of debates on citizenship and on human rights. As the context is Europe, reference is made to the recent policy initiatives with the EU, to national and European level consumer organisations and to cases brought before the European Court of Human Rights.

  14. Mental health issues in unaccompanied refugee minors

    Huemer Julia

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous studies about unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs showed that they are a highly vulnerable group who have greater psychiatric morbidity than the general population. This review focuses on mental health issues among URMs. Articles in databases PsycINFO, Medline and PubMed from 1998 to 2008 addressing this topic were reviewed. The literature had a considerable emphasis on the assessment of PTSD symptoms. Results revealed higher levels of PTSD symptoms in comparison to the norm populations and accompanied refugee minors. In several studies, age and female gender predicted or influenced PTSD symptoms. The existing literature only permits limited conclusions on this very hard to reach population. Future research should include the analysis of long-term outcomes, stress management and a more thorough analysis of the whole range of psychopathology. Additionally, the development of culturally sensitive norms and standardized measures for diverse ethnic groups is of great importance.

  15. The treatment gap in mental health care

    Robert Kohn

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Mental disorders are highly prevalent and cause considerable suffering and disease burden. To compound this public health problem, many individuals with psychiatric disorders remain untreated although effective treatments exist. We examine the extent of this treatment gap. We reviewed community-based psychiatric epidemiology studies that used standardized diagnostic instruments and included data on the percentage of individuals receiving care for schizophrenia and other non-affective psychotic disorders, major depression, dysthymia, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, and alcohol abuse or dependence. The median rates of untreated cases of these disorders were calculated across the studies. Examples of the estimation of the treatment gap for WHO regions are also presented. Thirty-seven studies had information on service utilization. The median treatment gap for schizophrenia, including other non-affective psychosis, was 32.2%. For other disorders the gap was: depression, 56.3%; dysthymia, 56.0%; bipolar disorder, 50.2%; panic disorder, 55.9%; GAD, 57.5%; and OCD, 57.3%. Alcohol abuse and dependence had the widest treatment gap at 78.1%. The treatment gap for mental disorders is universally large, though it varies across regions. It is likely that the gap reported here is an underestimate due to the unavailability of community-based data from developing countries where services are scarcer. To address this major public health challenge, WHO has adopted in 2002 a global action programme that has been endorsed by the Member States.

  16. Quality indicators for international benchmarking of mental health care

    Hermann, Richard C; Mattke, Soeren; Somekh, David; Silfverhielm, Helena; Goldner, Elliot; Glover, Gyles; Pirkis, Jane; Mainz, Jan; Chan, Jeffrey A

    To identify quality measures for international benchmarking of mental health care that assess important processes and outcomes of care, are scientifically sound, and are feasible to construct from preexisting data.......To identify quality measures for international benchmarking of mental health care that assess important processes and outcomes of care, are scientifically sound, and are feasible to construct from preexisting data....

  17. Correlates of Mental Health among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina

    Crain, Rebecca; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Schwantes, Melody; Isom, Scott; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine primary and context-specific stressors of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. Methods: Structured interview data were obtained…

  18. Mental Health and Students with Disabilities: A Review of Literature

    McMillan, Julie M.; Jarvis, Jane M.

    2013-01-01

    Students with disabilities are at increased risk of experiencing mental health difficulties, but may not be recognised as an at-risk population in the design of school-based prevention and intervention efforts. Understanding the link between disability and mental health is important for school psychologists and guidance counsellors, teachers, and

  19. Human Trafficking: A Review for Mental Health Professionals

    Yakushko, Oksana

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a review of current research on human trafficking for mental health practitioners and scholars. In addition to an overview of definitions, causes and processes of trafficking, the article highlights mental health consequences of trafficking along with suggestions for treatment of survivors. Directions for counseling services,…

  20. Mental Health Service Providers: College Student Perceptions of Helper Effectiveness

    Ackerman, Ashley M.; Wantz, Richard A.; Firmin, Michael W; Poindexter, Dawn C.; Pujara, Amita L.

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate perceptions of the overall effectiveness of six types of mental health service providers (MHSPs) were obtained with a survey. Although many mental health services are available to consumers in the United States, research has indicated that these services are underutilized. Perceptions have been linked to therapeutic outcomes and may…

  1. Reframing the Conversation on College Student Mental Health

    Rosenbaum, Philip J.; Liebert, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The expression "mental health" has become ubiquitous when discussing college students' lived experiences. While effective, this expression has not, problematically, been deconstructed. In this article, we explore what "mental health" means. Through doing so we identify three unintended effects embedded within its usage: (a)…

  2. California Colleges and Universities Collaborate to Support Student Mental Health

    Woodbridge, Michelle W.; Goldweber, Asha; Yu, Jennifer; Golan, Shari; Stein, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    One key objective of California's Prevention and Early Intervention (PEI) Student Mental Health (SMH) initiative funded under Proposition 63 is to establish a formal process for ongoing collaboration between higher education systems and county mental health, as well as to increase collaboration among higher education campuses to improve student…

  3. Mental Health and Students with Disabilities: A Review of Literature

    McMillan, Julie M.; Jarvis, Jane M.

    2013-01-01

    Students with disabilities are at increased risk of experiencing mental health difficulties, but may not be recognised as an at-risk population in the design of school-based prevention and intervention efforts. Understanding the link between disability and mental health is important for school psychologists and guidance counsellors, teachers, and…

  4. Flourishing: Exploring Predictors of Mental Health within the College Environment

    Fink, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the predictive factors of student mental health within the college environment. Participants: Students enrolled at 7 unique universities during years 2008 (n = 1,161) and 2009 (n = 1,459). Methods: Participants completed survey measures of mental health, consequences of alcohol use, and engagement in the college environment.…

  5. Quantum Physics and Mental Health Counseling: The Time Is...!

    Gerstein, Lawrence H.; Bennett, Matt

    1999-01-01

    Introduces a new framework of mental health counseling based on quantum physics. The framework stresses systemic thinking and intervention, interdependence, and the importance of adopting a novel perspective about time, space, reality, and change. This framework has the potential of modifying mental health counseling practice and training. Offers…

  6. Wilderness Therapy: Ethical Considerations for Mental Health Professionals

    Becker, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Wilderness therapy is a growing treatment modality for adolescents presenting with a variety of clinical concerns, and wilderness therapy clinicians and referring mental health professionals must carefully consider the ethical issues that are unique to this modality. Following an overview of wilderness therapy as a mental health treatment,…

  7. What Motivates Public Support for Legally Mandated Mental Health Treatment?

    Watson, Amy C.; Corrigan, Patrick W.; Angell, Beth

    2005-01-01

    The use of legal coercion to compel individuals to participate in mental health treatment is expanding despite a lack of empirical support for many of its forms. Policies supporting mandated treatment are made by legislators and judges, often based on perceptions of public concern. Using data from the MacArthur Mental Health Module contained in…

  8. Social Integration and the Mental Health of Black Adolescents

    Rose, Theda; Joe, Sean; Shields, Joseph; Caldwell, Cleopatra H.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of family, school, and religious social contexts on the mental health of Black adolescents has been understudied. This study used Durkheim's social integration theory to examine these associations in a nationally representative sample of 1,170 Black adolescents, ages 13-17. Mental health was represented by positive and negative…

  9. Privileged communication: psychiatric/mental health nurses and the law.

    Smith, J

    1990-01-01

    This article examines the issues of confidentiality and privileged communication as they relate to psychiatric/mental health nursing practice. It includes a discussion of statutory and case law, arguments for and against privileged communication, and several examples of how these issues effect psychiatric/mental health nurses and their practice. PMID:2274409

  10. Identification and Referral for Mental Health Services in Juvenile Detention.

    Rogers, Kenneth M.; Pumariega, Andres J.; Cuffe, Steven P.

    This report discusses the outcomes of a study that examined the mental health referral patterns of youth referred to a public sector mental health system as the result of a judicial consent decree. The study included two samples of youth ages 13-17 from the entire state of South Carolina. The first group included incarcerated youth recruited from

  11. The Impact of Economic Stress on Community Mental Health Services.

    Hagan, Brian J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Warns that community mental health services are threatened by reductions in federal support and increased numbers of clients. Reviews literature on the effect of adverse economic events on mental health. Identifies issues and answers for managing this dilemma including planning, financial diversification, and inter-agency cooperation. (Author/JAC)

  12. Assessing the Strengths of Mental Health Consumers: A Systematic Review

    Bird, Victoria J.; Le Boutillier, Clair; Leamy, Mary; Larsen, John; Oades, Lindsay G.; Williams, Julie; Slade, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Strengths assessments focus on the individual's talents, abilities, resources, and strengths. No systematic review of strengths assessments for use within mental health populations has been published. The aims of this study were to describe and evaluate strengths assessments for use within mental health services. A systematic review identified 12…

  13. Self versus Others' Perception of Youths' Mental Health

    Viviano, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Data was analyzed in the National Longitudinal Survey Study from 1997 specifically relating to questions regarding depression in youth. In the analysis it was found that how the respondent defined their own depression and poor mental health was different than the perceptions about their mental health from those that live with them in the same…

  14. Flourishing: Exploring Predictors of Mental Health within the College Environment

    Fink, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the predictive factors of student mental health within the college environment. Participants: Students enrolled at 7 unique universities during years 2008 (n = 1,161) and 2009 (n = 1,459). Methods: Participants completed survey measures of mental health, consequences of alcohol use, and engagement in the college environment.

  15. Quantum Physics and Mental Health Counseling: The Time Is...!

    Gerstein, Lawrence H.; Bennett, Matt

    1999-01-01

    Introduces a new framework of mental health counseling based on quantum physics. The framework stresses systemic thinking and intervention, interdependence, and the importance of adopting a novel perspective about time, space, reality, and change. This framework has the potential of modifying mental health counseling practice and training. Offers

  16. Correlates of Mental Health among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina

    Crain, Rebecca; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Schwantes, Melody; Isom, Scott; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine primary and context-specific stressors of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. Methods: Structured interview data were obtained

  17. Assessing the Strengths of Mental Health Consumers: A Systematic Review

    Bird, Victoria J.; Le Boutillier, Clair; Leamy, Mary; Larsen, John; Oades, Lindsay G.; Williams, Julie; Slade, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Strengths assessments focus on the individual's talents, abilities, resources, and strengths. No systematic review of strengths assessments for use within mental health populations has been published. The aims of this study were to describe and evaluate strengths assessments for use within mental health services. A systematic review identified 12

  18. Mental Health and Education Decisions. CEE DP 136

    Cornaglia, Francesca; Crivellaro, Elena; McNally, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Mental health problems--and depression in particular--have been rising internationally. The link between poor mental health and poor educational outcomes is particularly interesting in the case of the UK which has a low international ranking both on measures of child wellbeing and the probability of early drop-out from the labour market and…

  19. Human Trafficking: A Review for Mental Health Professionals

    Yakushko, Oksana

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a review of current research on human trafficking for mental health practitioners and scholars. In addition to an overview of definitions, causes and processes of trafficking, the article highlights mental health consequences of trafficking along with suggestions for treatment of survivors. Directions for counseling services,

  20. Mental Health Literacy among Family Caregivers of Schizophrenia Patients

    Mohamad M. S.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of public knowledge towards physical health are widely accepted but the area of mental health literacy remains undervalued and relatively neglected. The study aimed to identify caregivers’ mental health literacy in Malaysia. There were 154 family caregivers participated in the face-to-face semi-structured interview regarding their personal caring experiences. This study found that majority of the caregivers was women aged less than 60 years. Most of the caregivers have some understanding about their relatives’ mental illness. More than half of the participants found that the doctors were considered as their primary source of information about mental health. Consistent with previous literature in Malaysia, most of the caregivers used religious and traditional coping mechanism in their help-seeking processes. Each ethnic group had their own strong cultural beliefs about mental illness. The implications for mental health services are that many of the caregivers need help to educate their family members about mental illness. While this study emphasized on the family members who should be targeted to improve mental health literacy it also become significant to the public to reduce stigma towards the person with mental illness and their family.

  1. Workaholism and mental health among Polish academic workers.

    Bartczak, Monika; Ogińska-Bulik, Nina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between workaholism and mental health among 126 Polish academic workers. The participants' mean age was 45.9 years, 51.6% of them were women. The participants completed 2 questionnaires: the work addiction risk test and the general health questionnaire. Even though 66% of the subjects were classified in the group of moderate-to-high risk of workaholism, the overall state of mental health was categorized as average. The results revealed that workaholism was associated with poorer mental health. Employees with higher levels of workaholism had worse state of health, i.e., more somatic symptoms, higher levels of anxiety, insomnia, social dysfunction and symptoms of depression. Emotional arousal/perfectionism was the strongest predictor of the state of general health and was mostly responsible for harmful effects on mental health. However, the general effect of workaholism on health was not as strong as expected. PMID:22429525

  2. The public sector and mental health parity: time for inclusion.

    Hogan, Michael F.

    1998-12-01

    BACKGROUND: In the United States, there is an uneasy division of responsibility for financing mental health care. For most illnesses, employer-sponsored health insurance and the large federal health insurance programs (Medicare, Medicaid) cover the costs of care. However, most employer-sponsored plans and Medicare provide only limited coverage for treatment of mental illness. A possible cause and result of this limited coverage in mental health is that states, and in some cases local (county) governments, finance a separate system of mental health care. This separate "public mental health system" provides a "safety net" of care for indigent individuals needing mental health care. However, there are potential negative consequences of maintaining separate systems. Continuity of treatment between systems may be impaired, and costs may be higher due to duplicate administrative costs. Maintaining a separate system managed by government may exacerbate the stigma associated with mental illness treatment. Most significantly, since eligibility for care may be linked to poverty status, and since having a serious mental illness may preclude regaining private coverage, maintaining a separate system may contribute to the poverty rate among persons with mental illnesses. AIMS OF THE PAPER: These potential problems have not been widely considered, perhaps because other problems and controversies in mental health care have captured our attention. In particular, controversies over deinstitutionalization in mental health have dominated the policy debate, especially when linked to related problems. These have included conflicts over authority and financial responsibility among federal, state and local governments, sensationalized media coverage of incidents involving people with mental illness, problems with siting community facilities, concern about mental illness among prisoners and the like. However, with the substantial reform of public mental health care in some states and localities, it is now possible to consider the implications of public and private integration. This paper considers such an approach. METHODS: This paper addresses the question of public and private integration, considering the state of Ohio as a case study. Ohio is a large state (population 11.2 million) and shares demographic, cultural and political characteristics with many other states. Ohio's successful experience implementing community mental health reform makes it a good candidate to use in evaluating issues in the potential integration of insurance-paid and public mental health care. RESULTS: The analysis indicates that the resources now used in Ohio's public system may be sufficient to support insurance financing of inpatient and ambulatory mental health treatment (the types of health care usually paid by insurance) while maintaining supportive services (e.g. housing, crisis care) as a residual safety net. DISCUSSION: At the current time, these resources are in state and local mental health budgets, and in the Medicaid program that finances health care for low income and disabled individuals. The analysis indicates that the aggregate level of resources expended on inpatient and ambulatory mental health treatment are substantially greater than expenditures for such care in an insurance plan for Ohio State employees. A substantial limitation of the analysis is that it is not possible to compare the need for care in a relatively healthy employed population versus a poor and disabled population. CONCLUSION: The paper concludes that there are substantial structural, economic and social problems associated with the "two-tiered" system of commercial/employer-paid insurance and public mental health care in the United States. Examining data from one state's public system, the paper further concludes that it might be feasible to finance a single system of acute and ambulatory mental health benefits, if public resources were redeployed and private contributions were continued. IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY AND RESEARCH: Given the substantial pr

  3. Safety, risk and mental health: decision-making processes prescribed by Australian mental health legislation.

    Smith-Merry, Jennifer; Caple, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Adverse events in mental health care occur frequently and cause significant distress for those who experience them, derailing treatment and sometimes leading to death. These events are clustered around particular aspects of care and treatment and are therefore avoidable if practices in these areas are strengthened. The research reported in this article takes as its starting point coronial recommendations made in relation to mental health. We report on those points and processes in treatment and discharge where coronial recommendations are most frequently made. We then examine the legislative requirements around these points and processes in three Australian States. We find that the key areas that need to be strengthened to avoid adverse events are assessment processes, communication and information transfer, documentation, planning and training. We make recommendations for improvements in these key areas. PMID:24804534

  4. International observatory on mental health systems: structure and operation

    Minas Harry

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Sustained cooperative action is required to improve the mental health of populations, particularly in low and middle-income countries where meagre mental health investment and insufficient human and other resources result in poorly performing mental health systems. The Observatory The International Observatory on Mental Health Systems is a mental health systems research, education and development network that will contribute to the development of high quality mental health systems in low and middle-income countries. The work of the Observatory will be done by mental health systems research, education and development groups that are located in and managed by collaborating organisations. These groups will be supported by the IOMHS Secretariat, the International IOMHS Steering Group and a Technical Reference Group. Summary The International Observatory on Mental Health Systems is: 1 the mental health systems research, education and development groups; 2 the IOMHS Steering Group; 3 the IOMHS Technical Reference Group; and 4 the IOMHS Secretariat. The work of the Observatory will depend on free and open collaboration, sharing of knowledge and skills, and governance arrangements that are inclusive and that put the needs and interests of people with mental illness and their families at the centre of decision-making. We welcome contact from individuals and institutions that wish to contribute to achieving the goals of the Observatory. Now is the time to make it happen where it matters, by turning scientific knowledge into effective action for people's health. (J.W. Lee, in his acceptance speech on his appointment as the Director-General of the World Health Organization 1.

  5. Medicalization of global health 2: the medicalization of global mental health

    Jocalyn Clark

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Once an orphan field, global mental health now has wide acknowledgement and prominence on the global health agenda. Increased recognition draws needed attention to individual suffering and the population impacts, but medicalizing global mental health produces a narrow view of the problems and solutions. Early framing by advocates of the global mental health problem emphasised biological disease, linked psychiatry with neurology, and reinforced categories of mental health disorders. Universality of biomedical concepts across culture is assumed in the globalisation of mental health but is strongly disputed by transcultural psychiatrists and anthropologists. Global mental health movement priorities take an individualised view, emphasising treatment and scale-up and neglecting social and structural determinants of health. To meet international targets and address the problem's broad social and cultural dimensions, the global mental health movement and advocates must develop more comprehensive strategies and include more diverse perspectives.

  6. Mental health/illness and prisons as place: frontline clinicians׳ perspectives of mental health work in a penal setting.

    Wright, Nicola; Jordan, Melanie; Kane, Eddie

    2014-09-01

    This article takes mental health and prisons as its two foci. It explores the links between social and structural aspects of the penal setting, the provision of mental healthcare in prisons, and mental health work in this environment. This analysis utilises qualitative interview data from prison-based fieldwork undertaken in Her Majesty׳s Prison Service, England. Two themes are discussed: (1) the desire and practicalities of doing mental health work and (2) prison staff as mental health work allies. Concepts covered include equivalence, training, ownership, informal communication, mental health knowledge, service gatekeepers, case identification, and unmet need. Implications for practice are (1) the mental health knowledge and understanding of prison wing staff could be appraised and developed to improve mental healthcare and address unmet need. Their role as observers and gatekeepers could be considered. (2) The realities of frontline mental health work for clinicians in the penal environment should be embraced and used to produce and implement improved policy and practice guidance, which is in better accord with the actuality of the context - both socially and structurally. PMID:25124166

  7. Sharing State Mental Health Data for Research: Building Toward Ongoing Learning in Mental Health Care Systems.

    Chambers, David A; Rupp, Agnes

    2015-09-01

    With the rise of "big data," the opportunities to use administrative and clinical data to evaluate impact of state level program initiatives are greatly expanded. The National Institute of Mental Health has in recent years supported research studies pooling data across states to address state-relevant questions. This commentary summarizes these activities and describes future platforms that may enhance ongoing work in this area. PMID:25583270

  8. Correlates of Mental Health Among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina

    Crain, R.; Grzywacz, J.G.; Swantes, Melody; Isom, S.; Quandt, S.A.; Arcury, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine primary and context-specific stressors of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers....... Methods: Structured interview data were obtained from farmworkers (N = 69) in 6 counties in eastern and western North Carolina. Findings: Results indicated that a substantial number of farmworkers have poor mental health, as indicated by elevated depressive symptoms (52.2%) and anxiety (16.4%). Results...... also indicated that each mental health outcome had different predictors. Conclusion: Addressing the mental health issues of farmworkers requires a comprehensive, multifaceted approach....

  9. Childhood Abuse and Mental Health Problems: Does Gender Matter?

    Chen, Gila; Gueta, Keren

    2016-03-01

    Gender differences in the relationship between mental health problems and childhood abuse have long been of interest to researchers. The purpose of the present study was to examine gender differences in the relationship between childhood abuse and mental health problems among 110 Israeli inmates (50 women and 60 men). The findings indicated that female inmates reported higher prevalence of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse and were more likely to suffer from mental health problems, compared with the male inmates. Additionally, the findings revealed that more female than male inmates had parents with mental health problems. Female inmates who reported mental health problems in their families also reported higher rates of child abuse relative to male inmates with a similar family history. PMID:25999267

  10. MENTAL HEALTH OF WORKING AND NON-WORKING WIDOWS

    Vanisri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to study the mental health of working and nonworking widows. The objectives of the study were 1 to examine the significant difference in mental health of working and non-working widows, 2 to examine the significant difference in mental health between rural and urban sample. The sample consisted of 120 (60 working and 60 non-working selected from Gulbarga District in Karnataka state. The sample is matched for the type category of widows and domicile. The sample was administered with mental health inventory. And the data were subjected the t-test. The results revealed that there is a significant difference in mental health between working and non-working widows.

  11. College students' responses to mental health status updates on Facebook.

    Egan, Katie G; Koff, Rosalind N; Moreno, Megan A

    2013-01-01

    Facebook is widely used by the college population, and previous research has shown that mental health references on Facebook are common. Focus groups of college students were held to determine their views of mental health references seen in their peers' Facebook profiles. Students' views of mental health references varied from being serious calls for help, to being jokes or attention-seeking behavior. Responses to mental health references depended on the participants' offline relationship with the poster. Students would contact close friends through a phone call or in-person conversation, but would not approach acquaintances. The prevalence of mental health references on Facebook, and the awareness of these references by college students, may present opportunities for future peer intervention efforts. PMID:23301569

  12. Access of rural AFDC Medicaid beneficiaries to mental health services.

    Lambert, D; Agger, M S

    1995-01-01

    This article examines geographic differences in the use of mental health services among Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC)-eligible Medicaid beneficiaries in Maine. Findings indicate that rural AFDC beneficiaries have significantly lower utilization of mental health services than urban beneficiaries. Specialty mental health providers account for the majority of ambulatory visits for both rural and urban beneficiaries. However, rural beneficiaries rely more on primary-care providers than do urban beneficiaries. Differences in use are largely explained by variations in the supply of specialty mental health providers. This finding supports the long-held assumption that lower supply is a barrier to access to mental health services in rural areas. PMID:10153467

  13. Pilot Mental Health: Expert Working Group Recommendations - Revised 2015.

    2016-05-01

    In September 2012, the Aerospace Medical Association published and distributed recommendations from its Pilot Mental Health Working Group to improve awareness and identification of pilot mental health issues during the aeromedical assessment of pilots. Following the crash of Germanwings Flight 9525 in March 2015 with pilot suicide as the probable cause, the Pilot Mental Health Working Group reconvened to review their recommendations. As a result, the working group revised the recommendations which are provided here and which were distributed worldwide. The Working Group continues to emphasize the importance of assessing and optimizing pilot mental health, while providing additional recommendations on building trust and rapport between the aeromedical examiner and the pilot, on utilizing aviation mental health and aeromedical specialists, and on the balance between medical confidentiality and risk to public safety. The working group encourages all organizations involved in flight safety to review and consider implementing these recommendations within their usual operations. PMID:27099091

  14. Developing mental health mobile apps: Exploring adolescents' perspectives.

    Kenny, Rachel; Dooley, Barbara; Fitzgerald, Amanda

    2016-06-01

    Mobile applications or 'apps' have significant potential for use in mental health interventions with adolescents. However, there is a lack of research exploring end users' needs from such technologies. The aim of this study was to explore adolescents' needs and concerns in relation to mental health mobile apps. Five focus groups were conducted with young people aged 15-16 years (N = 34, 60% male). Participants were asked about their views in relation to the use of mental health mobile technologies and were asked to give their responses to a mental health app prototype. Participants identified (1) safety, (2) engagement, (3) functionality, (4) social interaction, (5) awareness, (6) accessibility, (7) gender and (8) young people in control as important factors. Understanding end users' needs and concerns in relation to this topic will inform the future development of youth-oriented mental health apps that are acceptable to young people. PMID:25385165

  15. How Should Community Mental Health of Intellectual Disability Services Evolve?

    Colin Hemmings

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Services for people with Intellectual Disability (ID and coexisting mental health problems remain undeveloped; research into their effectiveness has been lacking. Three linked recent studies in the UK have provided evidence on essential service provision from staff, service users and carers. Interfaces with mainstream mental health services were seen as problematic: the area of crisis response was seen as a particular problem. Further services research is needed, focusing on service components rather than whole service configurations. There was not support for establishing more intensive mental health services for people with ID only. The way forward is in developing new ways of co-working with staff in mainstream mental health services. Mental health of ID staff might often be best situated directly within these services.

  16. Health Literacy Among People with Serious Mental Illness.

    Clausen, Whitney; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Bill Baerentzen, M; Britigan, Denise H

    2016-05-01

    People diagnosed with a mental illness are at higher risk of developing preventable chronic diseases; thus, health literacy improvements may have great potential to impact health outcomes for this typically underserved population. However, there is a dearth of research on health literacy of persons with severe mental illness. The purpose of this research was to investigate aspects of health literacy and identify factors associated with low literacy among adults with severe mental illness using three literacy assessment tools. Seventy-one adults with serious mental illness were assessed and a high proportion had limited literacy levels: 42 % with the Single Item Literacy Screener, 50 % with the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine-Short Form, and 67 % with the Newest Vital Sign. Findings suggest that individuals with certain mental illnesses and lower functioning may have more difficulty understanding health information and have limited numerical literacy. PMID:26443671

  17. Economics of disaster risk, social vulnerability, and mental health resilience.

    Zahran, Sammy; Peek, Lori; Snodgrass, Jeffrey G; Weiler, Stephan; Hempel, Lynn

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the relationship between exposure to Hurricanes Katrina and/or Rita and mental health resilience by vulnerability status, with particular focus on the mental health outcomes of single mothers versus the general public. We advance a measurable notion of mental health resilience to disaster events. We also calculate the economic costs of poor mental health days added by natural disaster exposure. Negative binomial analyses show that hurricane exposure increases the expected count of poor mental health days for all persons by 18.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.44-31.14%), and by 71.88% (95% CI, 39.48-211.82%) for single females with children. Monthly time-series show that single mothers have lower event resilience, experiencing higher added mental stress. Results also show that the count of poor mental health days is sensitive to hurricane intensity, increasing by a factor of 1.06 (95% CI, 1.02-1.10) for every billion (U.S.$) dollars of damage added for all exposed persons, and by a factor of 1.08 (95% CI, 1.03-1.14) for single mothers. We estimate that single mothers, as a group, suffered over $130 million in productivity loss from added postdisaster stress and disability. Results illustrate the measurability of mental health resilience as a two-dimensional concept of resistance capacity and recovery time. Overall, we show that natural disasters regressively tax disadvantaged population strata. PMID:21303401

  18. Size Matters Determinants of Modern, Community-Oriented Mental Health Services

    Taina Ala-Nikkola

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Governances, structures and contents of mental health services are being reformed across countries. There is a need for data to support those changes. The aim of this study was to explore the quality, i.e., diversity and community orientation, and quantity, i.e., personnel resources, of mental health and substance abuse services (MHS and evaluate correlation between population needs and quality and quantity of MHS. The European Service Mapping ScheduleRevised (ESMS-R was used to classify mental health and substance abuse services in southern Finland. Municipal-level aggregate data, local data on unemployment rate, length of education, age of retirement, proportion of single households, alcohol sales and a composite mental health index were used as indicators of population mental health needs. Population size correlated strongly with service diversity, explaining 84% of the variance. Personnel resources did not associate with diversity or community orientation. The indicators of mental health services need did not have the expected association with quality and quantity of services. In terms of service organization, the results may support larger population bases, at least 150,000 adult inhabitants, when aiming for higher diversity.

  19. Size matters - determinants of modern, community-oriented mental health services.

    Ala-Nikkola, Taina; Pirkola, Sami; Kontio, Raija; Joffe, Grigori; Pankakoski, Maiju; Malin, Maili; Sadeniemi, Minna; Kaila, Minna; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2014-08-01

    Governances, structures and contents of mental health services are being reformed across countries. There is a need for data to support those changes. The aim of this study was to explore the quality, i.e., diversity and community orientation, and quantity, i.e., personnel resources, of mental health and substance abuse services (MHS) and evaluate correlation between population needs and quality and quantity of MHS. The European Service Mapping Schedule-Revised (ESMS-R) was used to classify mental health and substance abuse services in southern Finland. Municipal-level aggregate data, local data on unemployment rate, length of education, age of retirement, proportion of single households, alcohol sales and a composite mental health index were used as indicators of population mental health needs. Population size correlated strongly with service diversity, explaining 84% of the variance. Personnel resources did not associate with diversity or community orientation. The indicators of mental health services need did not have the expected association with quality and quantity of services. In terms of service organization, the results may support larger population bases, at least 150,000 adult inhabitants, when aiming for higher diversity. PMID:25153471

  20. New Architecture for Mental Health; New York State Health and Mental Hygiene Facilities Improvement Corporation - Report to the Governor, 1969.

    New York State Health and Mental Hygiene Facilities Improvement Corp., Albany.

    The accomplishments of The Health and Mental Hygiene Facilities Improvement Corporation during the past years in creating needed hospitals and health centers for the mentally disabled is documented. The new facilities show awareness of architectural trends and new objectives in design in order to better serve the needs of the patient. Pictures and…

  1. A legal "right" to mental health care? Impediments to a global vision of mental health care access.

    Glover-Thomas, N; Chima, S C

    2015-12-01

    Mental health law across many jurisdictions provides a legal framework for the compulsory detention and, where appropriate, treatment in hospital of people with mental health problems. Latent within many of these "systems" of mental health provision is the concern that the quality of care people receive does not always meet legal and ethical norms. For many, there remains the very serious recognition that access to mental health care in its entirety remains elusive. International human rights discourse has influenced the shaping of modern mental health laws in many developed countries. In 2008, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) entered into force. For many countries, such as South Africa, the CRPD provides a human rights instrument with the scope to establish a worldwide means of bolstering human rights. This paper examines both the UK and the broader African position with regard to the extent redress can be sought if and when an individual does not receive the care and treatment needed. Within this, consideration will be given to one of the paradoxes of mental health care which bedevil mental health systems: How do legal frameworks for detaining and treating people without their consent work when there is no corresponding enforceable right that appropriate treatment or suitable conditions of detention must be provided. The focus of this paper is the question of whether there is indeed a legal "right" to mental health care. PMID:26620626

  2. Mental Health of International Students: Prevalence and Predictors for Mental Disorders and Symptom Severity

    Grez Buchling, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of international university students has dramatically increased during the last decades, being Germany one of the major host countries. Although it has been suggested that international students may be at higher risk for the development of mental disorders compared to domestic students, only few studies have examined the mental health of this population. Therefore, the present study aimed to estimate the prevalence rates of mental disorders [major depressive disorder (M...

  3. Considerations in the design of mental health benefits under National Health Insurance.

    Mechanic, D

    1978-01-01

    The existing insurance coverage for mental health benefits provides incentives for hospital as compared with community care and reinforces a medical approach to psychological disability. Moreover, the structure of benefits favors the affluent as compared with the disadvantaged and provides little assistance for the community integration of the chronic mental patient. In considering mental health benefits under National Health Insurance we must be careful to avoid reinforcing these patterns. It is suggested that NHI include a mental health resource development fund intended for building a stronger network of community mental health care and that the pattern of insurance benefits under NHI be consistent with developing psychiatric services on a capitation basis. PMID:645997

  4. Job stress and mental health among nonregular workers in Korea: What dimensions of job stress are associated with mental health?

    Park, Soo Kyung; Rhee, Min-Kyoung; Barak, Michàlle Mor

    2016-03-01

    Although nonregular workers experience higher job stress, poorer mental health, and different job stress dimensions relative to regular workers, little is known about which job stress dimensions are associated with poor mental health among nonregular workers. This study investigated the association between job stress dimensions and mental health among Korean nonregular workers. Data were collected from 333 nonregular workers in Seoul and Gyeonggi Province, and logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results of the study indicated that high job insecurity and lack of rewards had stronger associations with poor mental health than other dimensions of job stress when controlling for sociodemographic and psychosocial variables. It is important for the government and organizations to improve job security and reward systems to reduce job stress among nonregular workers and ultimately alleviate their mental health issues. PMID:25513849

  5. Child and adolescent mental health in South Africa.

    Flisher, Alan J; Dawes, Andrew; Kafaar, Zuhayr; Lund, Crick; Sorsdahl, Katherine; Myers, Bronwyn; Thom, Rita; Seedat, Soraya

    2012-10-01

    Mental health problems in childhood and adolescence pose a major threat to public health. Epidemiological studies in high, middle and low income countries indicate that approximately one in five children and adolescents suffer from a mental disorder. In many instances these persist into adulthood. In South Africa, HIV infection, substance use, and exposure to violence increase vulnerability to mental disorders. Child and adolescent mental health services play a key role in reducing the burden of mental disorders in childhood and later in adulthood. This paper focuses on service needs for children and adolescents in South Africa. It commences with a discussion of the prevalence of child and adolescent psychiatric disorders after which the legal and policy context of child and adolescent psychiatric services is described. A framework for child and adolescent mental health service provision is presented, following which steps for reducing the extent of unmet service need are considered. The paper concludes with a call to scale up child and adolescent mental health services in South Africa, based on the stark realities of unmet need and the constitutional rights of children and adolescents to appropriate mental health care. PMID:25860182

  6. 77 FR 38838 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    2012-06-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care... primary medical care, mental health, and dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as of April 1... National Health Service Corps (NHSC) personnel to provide primary care, dental, or mental health......

  7. Integrating mental health into primary care in Nigeria: report of a demonstration project using the mental health gap action programme intervention guide

    Gureje, Oye; Abdulmalik, Jibril; Kola, Lola; Musa, Emmanuel; Yasamy, Mohammad Taghi; Adebayo, Kazeem

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Mental Health Surveys conducted by the World Health Organization (WHO) have shown that huge treatment gaps for severe mental disorders exist in both developed and developing countries. This gap is greatest in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Efforts to scale up mental health services in LMICs have to contend with the paucity of mental health professionals and health facilities providing specialist services for mental, neurological and substance use (MNS) disorders...

  8. Translating Disparities Research to Policy: A Qualitative Study of State Mental Health Policymakers' Perceptions of Mental Health Care Disparities Report Cards

    Valentine, Anne; DeAngelo, Darcie; Alegría, Margarita; Cook, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Report cards have been used to increase accountability and quality of care in health care settings, and to improve state infrastructure for providing quality mental health care services. However, to date, report cards have not been used to compare states on racial/ethnic disparities in mental health care. This qualitative study examines reactions of mental health care policymakers to a proposed mental health care disparities report card generated from population-based survey data of mental he...

  9. "A constant struggle to receive mental health care" : health care professionals' acquired experience of barriers to mental health care services in Rwanda.

    Rugema, Lawrence; Krantz, Gunilla; Mogren, Ingrid; Ntaganira, Joseph; Persson, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Rwanda, many people are still mentally affected by the consequences of the genocide and yet mental health care facilities are scarce. While available literature explains the prevalence and consequences of mental disorders, there is lack of knowledge from low-income countries on health care seeking behavior due to common mental disorders. Therefore, this study sought to explore health care professionals' acquired experiences of barriers and facilitators that people with common m...

  10. Mental health provider perspectives regarding integrated medical care for patients with serious mental illness.

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Greenwald, Devra E; Bauer, Mark S; Charns, Martin P; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2012-11-01

    Integrated care for medical conditions is essential for persons with serious mental illness (SMI). This qualitative study describes mental health provider perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators of integrated care for patients with SMI. We interviewed providers from a national sample of Veterans Health Administration facilities that scored in the top or bottom percentile in medical care quality. Providers from high-performing sites reported substantial in-person contacts with general medical providers, while providers from low-performing sites reported stigma and limited communication with medical providers as major concerns. Interventions to improve mental health and medical provider communication may facilitate integrated care for persons with SMI. PMID:21735302

  11. Enhancing early engagement with mental health services by young people

    Burns J

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Jane Burns, Emma Birrell Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre, Abbotsford, VIC, Australia Abstract: International studies have shown that the prevalence of mental illness, and the fundamental contribution it make to the overall disease burden, is greatest in children and young people. Despite this high burden, adolescents and young adults are the least likely population group to seek help or to access professional care for mental health problems. This issue is particularly problematic given that untreated, or poorly treated, mental disorders are associated with both short- and long-term functional impairment, including poorer education and employment opportunities, potential comorbidity, including drug and alcohol problems, and a greater risk for antisocial behavior, including violence and aggression. This cycle of poor mental health creates a significant burden for the young person, their family and friends, and society as a whole. Australia is enviably positioned to substantially enhance the well-being of young people, to improve their engagement with mental health services, and – ultimately – to improve mental health. High prevalence but potentially debilitating disorders, such as depression and anxiety, are targeted by the specialized youth mental health service, headspace: the National Youth Mental Health Foundation and a series of Early Psychosis Prevention and Intervention Centres, will provide early intervention specialist services for low prevalence, complex illnesses. Online services, such as ReachOut.com by Inspire Foundation, Youthbeyondblue, Kids Helpline, and Lifeline Australia, and evidence-based online interventions, such as MoodGYM, are also freely available, yet a major challenge still exists in ensuring that young people receive effective evidence-based care at the right time. This article describes Australian innovation in shaping a comprehensive youth mental health system, which is informed by an evidence-based approach, dedicated advocacy and, critically, the inclusion of young people in service design, development, and ongoing evaluation to ensure that services can be continuously improved. Keywords: young people, mental health, technology, participation, well-being, help-seeking

  12. Health care models guiding mental health policy in Kenya 1965 - 1997

    Jenkins Rachel; Muga Florence A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Mental health policy is needed to set the strategy and direction for the provision of mental health services in a country. Policy formulation does not occur in a vacuum, however, but is influenced by local and international factors in the health sector and other sectors. Methods This study was carried out in 1997 to examine the evolution of mental health policy in Kenya between 1965 and 1997 in the context of changing international concepts of health and development. Quali...

  13. [Conceptions concerning mental health held by professionals working within the family health strategy].

    Veloso, Tatiana Maria Coelho; de Mello E Souza, Maria Conceição Bernardo

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze what professionals from a team within the Family Health Strategy (FHS) understand mental health to be. This descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach was conducted with 16 professionals from a FHS team in the city of Guaiúba, CE, Brazil. Data were collected during January and February 2011 through focal groups in which the dialogues were recorded and later transcribed for analysis. The following categories emerged from content analysis: "Talking about mental health vs. Thinking about mental disorder" and "Understanding mental health more broadly". Some professionals revealed restricted mental disorder-centered conceptions, while others understood mental health more broadly, recognizing the dynamics of the health-disease continuum and identifying aspects that influence one's mental health. PMID:23781727

  14. Mental Health Stigma about Serious Mental Illness among MSW Students: Social Contact and Attitude

    Covarrubias, Irene; Han, Meekyung

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the attitudes toward and beliefs about serious mental illness (SMI) held by a group of graduate social work students in the northwestern United States were examined. Mental health stigma was examined with relation to the following factors: participants' level of social contact with SMI populations, adherence to stereotypes about SMI…

  15. Insomnia and Its Impact on Physical and Mental Health

    Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to the association of insomnia with mental health, its association with physical health has remained largely unexplored until recently. Based on findings that insomnia with objective short sleep duration is associated with activation of both limbs of the stress system and other indices of physiological hyperarousal, which should affect adversely physical and mental health, we have recently demonstrated that this insomnia phenotype is associated with a significant risk of cardiomet...

  16. Mental Health in ACOs: Missed Opportunities and Low Hanging Fruit

    O’Donnell, Allison N.; Williams, Brent C; Eisenberg, Daniel; Kilbourne, Amy M.

    2013-01-01

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) have potential to improve care for chronic conditions through incentives for better performance and bundled payments that promote care coordination. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is a framework for providing health services for chronic conditions in primary care settings consistent with the organizational and financial goals of ACOs. Integrated mental health care – collaborative care by mental health and primary care providers for selected patients – impro...

  17. NIMH Prototype Management Information System for Community Mental Health Centers

    Wurster, Cecil R.; Goodman, John D.

    1980-01-01

    Various approaches to centralized support of computer applications in health care are described. The NIMH project to develop a prototype Management Information System (MIS) for community mental health centers is presented and discussed as a centralized development of an automated data processing system for multiple user organizations. The NIMH program is summarized, the prototype MIS is characterized, and steps taken to provide for the differing needs of the mental health centers are highligh...

  18. Mental Health Literacy among Family Caregivers of Schizophrenia Patients

    Mohamad M. S.; Zabidah P.; Fauziah I.; Sarnon N.

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of public knowledge towards physical health are widely accepted but the area of mental health literacy remains undervalued and relatively neglected. The study aimed to identify caregivers’ mental health literacy in Malaysia. There were 154 family caregivers participated in the face-to-face semi-structured interview regarding their personal caring experiences. This study found that majority of the caregivers was women aged less than 60 years. Most of the caregivers have some under...

  19. Mental health in Asia: social improvements and challenges.

    Tseng, W S; Ebata, K; Kim, K I; Krahl, W; Kua, E H; Lu, Q; Shen, Y; Tan, E S; Yang, M J

    2001-01-01

    Remarkable improvements in economic conditions and a considerable upgrade in the quality of life have been observed in many parts of Asia during the past several decades. At the same time, many mental health challenges face the people of Asia. Various social mental health indexes are reviewed here, with available data from China, Japan, Korea, Singapore, Malaysia, and other Asian societies. The data are compared with data from the United States, Australia in the Pacific Rim, and some other Western countries to examine patterns of similarity or difference between East and West in the process of modernization. Common trends in mental health issues associated with rapid sociocultural change observed in different Asian societies are discussed, as well as the relative shortage of mental health personnel available in many Asian societies. It is emphasized that, in addition to expanding psychiatric services, there is an even more urgent need to promote mental health knowledge and concern through education in the general population. Mental health needs to be cultivated and maintained by social forces and cultural strengths. It is stressed that there is a challenge for Asian people to advance mental health beyond economic development in the 21st century. PMID:11322408

  20. Epistemic reflections on Occupational Therapy in Mental Health

    Luciana Assis Costa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapy, along with other professions, is provoked to think its performance in the area of mental health in light of the new perspectives of assistance to people with mental distress. Considering the psychiatric reform as a backdrop, the aim of this paper is to discuss the theoretical conceptions that supported the interventions of occupational therapy in this field, and the new demands presented to professionals.To this end, a study of narrative review, whose search was conducted in the Lilacs, Medline and SciELO databases , with the descriptors Occupational Therapy, Mental Health and Health Care, between 1990 and 2012. One hundred sixteen indexed articles were found: 109 in LILACS and seven in SciELO, and 25 articles were analyzed. The results reveal the approaches that have underpinned occupational therapy, from the asylum model to the care model in mental health, indicating the challenges to be faced by the profession in the transition process to the current model of mental health. We conclude that the occupational therapist should be the one responsible to mediate the reinvention of the mental health users interaction with their multifaceted everyday activities/actions in order to contribute to the process of mental health care transformation, producing new ways of thinking and practicing occupational therapy