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Sample records for late pleistocene stratigraphy

  1. The sedimentary sequence recovered from the Voka outcrops, northeastern Estonia: implications for late Pleistocene stratigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miidel, Avo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available New palaeoenvironmental and geological data, which may be integrated with the results from the neighbouring regions, were collected from two well-exposed continuous outcrops in the vicinity of Voka village, northeastern Estonia. These outcrops, situated in a klint depression – klint bay –, show an about 22 m thick stacked sequence of sandy to clayey subaqueous deposits. This succession of water-lain sediments documents the response to climate change during the late Pleistocene. On the basis of grain size characteristics, sedimentological structures, and luminescence chronostratigraphical data, the sequence is subdivided into two main units – A and B. Optical dating of 18 samples from the upper unit A shows that the unit is of middle Järva (= middle Weichselian age (marine isotope stage (MIS 3. Representative pollen spectra derived from 45 samples from the pollen-bearing part of unit A provide convincing evidence of noticeable changes in vegetation and climate in NE Estonia during the time period from 39 to 33 kyr BP, within which two intervals of severe climate and two relatively milder ones have been recognized. Preliminary data from the underlying unit B indicate that deposits of the last interglacial sensu lato and those of early pleniglacial age correlating with MIS 5 and MIS 4, respectively, occur here as well. Thus, the data obtained during the present study show unambiguously that in contrast with the expectations, the greater part of the late Pleistocene sequence is represented in the Voka section. No evidence was found for glacial activity during the late Pleistocene period predating the last glacial maximum. The use of the Voka event stratigraphy as a template facilitates search for correlative horizons in the neighbouring regions.

  2. Glacial stratigraphy of the Bulkley River region: A depositional framework for the late Pleistocene in central British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, A.J.; Broster, B.E.; Levson, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    A depositional framework for late Pleistocene sediments in central British Columbia was developed from the composite stratigraphy of glacial sediments found in the Bulkley River region. Nonglacial deposits correlated to the Olympia Nonglacial Interval, are overlain in succession by sub-till, ice-advance sediments, Late Wisconsinan (Fraser Glaciation) till, and late-glacial sediments. Due to local erosion and depositional variability, some of the units are not continuous throughout the region and differ locally in their thickness and complexity. At the onset of the Fraser Glaciation, ice advance was marked by rising base levels in rivers, lake ponding, and ice marginal sub-aqueous deposition. Physiography and glacier dynamics influenced the position of drainage outlets, direction of water flow, and ponding. The region was completely ice covered during this glaciation and ice-flow directions were variable, being dominantly influenced by the migrating position of ice divides. Deglaciation was marked by the widespread deposition of fine-grained sediments in proglacial lakes and glaciofluvial sands and gravels at locations with unrestricted drainage.

  3. Sedimentology and Stratigraphy Architecture of the late Pleistocene-Holocene Succession of the Gargaresh Formation, Subratah Basin, NW Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlal, Osama; Bennur, Sami

    2014-05-01

    Gargaresh Formation outcrops is comprises the outcrops between the Misurata (N32o22'18'' E15o12'03'') to the Tripoli(N32o 51'10'' E13o 03'22'') areas is represented by prominent carbonate aeolianite exposed in extensive outcrops along the NW Libyan shoreline. Gargaresh Formation outcrops comprises two Members an upper Kaam Member of Aeolian origin and a lower Karrot Member of marine origin. The study of the Gargaresh Formation can provide useful information on reconstructions of Late Pleistocene-Holocene history of NW Libya and new insights on palaeogeography. It is forming low ridges and cliffs along the coastline of NW Libya and occurs as cliffs continuously attached to the sea tide, and occasionally interrupted by broad wadis or deep-cut embayment. The Gargaresh Formation sediments are dominated by calcarenites with skeletal marine fauna and non-skeletal grains of lithoclasts, aggregate, with oolites. In addition, these rocks are characterized by very well aeolian controlling factors represented by wind blown sediments such as large scale cross lamination (aeolianite) . The majority of palaeocurrent direction was to SE, on the other hand the dune migration was SE also. The sediments of Gargaresh Formation outcrops from Misurata to Tripoli NW Libya mostly allochthonous except the paleosols red-brown unit. Most of its fossils are thanatoconoses. Gargaresh Formation sediments shows that the original aragonite composition of pelecypoda and gastropods fragments are mostly preserved, but partly transformed into granular calcite as pendulous (meniscus) cement texture in response to meteoric fresh-water. Keywords: Sedimentology; Stratigraphic architecture; Aeolian origin; marine origin; Calcarenites; Late Pleistocene-Holocene

  4. Late Pleistocene glacial stratigraphy of the Kumara-Moana region, West Coast of South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Timothy T.; Almond, Peter; Rose, Robert; Keith Fifield, L.; Mills, Stephanie C.; Tims, Stephen G.

    2013-08-01

    On the South Island of New Zealand, large piedmont glaciers descended from an ice cap on the Southern Alps onto the coastal plain of the West Coast during the late Pleistocene. The series of moraine belts and outwash plains left by the Taramakau glacier are used as a type section for interpreting the glacial geology and timing of major climatic events of New Zealand and also as a benchmark for comparison with the wider Southern Hemisphere. In this paper we review the chronology of advances by the Taramakau glacier during the last or Otira Glaciation using a combination of exposure dating using the cosmogenic nuclides 10Be and 36Cl, and tephrochronology. We document three distinct glacial maxima, represented by the Loopline, Larrikins and Moana Formations, separated by brief interstadials. We find that the Loopline Formation, originally attributed to Oxygen Isotope Chronozone 4, is much younger than previously thought, with an advance culminating around 24,900 800 yr. The widespread late Pleistocene Kawakawa/Oruanui tephra stratigraphically lies immediately above it. This Formation has the same age previously attributed to the older part of the Larrikins Formation. Dating of the Larrikins Formation demonstrates there is no longer a basis for subdividing it into older and younger phases with an advance lasting about 1000 years between 20,800 500 to 20,000 400 yr. The Moana Formation represents the deposits of the last major advance of ice at 17,300 500 yr and is younger than expected based on limited previous dating. The timing of major piedmont glaciation is restricted to between 25,000 and 17,000 yr and this interval corresponds to a time of regionally cold sea surface temperatures, expansion of grasslands at the expense of forest on South Island, and hemisphere wide glaciation.

  5. Late Pleistocene sea-level history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the U-series techniques for dating fossil corals is traced and case studies where dating and stratigraphy have provided a consistent picture of a region are presented. Finally a global curve of eustatic sea-level will be developed for the late Pleistocene and the implications of this curve for current theories of glaciations will be discussed. (author)

  6. Late Pleistocene Alberca de Guadalupe maar volcano (Zacapu basin, Michoacán): Stratigraphy, tectonic setting, and paleo-hydrogeological environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, Pooja; Siebe, Claus; Guilbaud, Marie Noëlle; Salinas, Sergio; Layer, Paul W.

    2015-10-01

    The Late Pleistocene (~ 21,000 yr BP) Alberca de Guadalupe maar is one of the few phreatomagmatic volcanoes occurring within the scoria-cone dominated Plio-Quaternary Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field. The scarcity of this type of volcano implies that conditions favoring their formation are rarely met in this region. We identify these factors by implementing current methods of investigation with emphasis on hydrogeological conditions. We present the stratigraphy (including a set of 40Ar/39Ar and 14C dates) of the SE margin of the Zacapu intermontane tectonic basin, where the maar just forms a hole (~ 1 km in diameter, ~ 150 m deep, bearing a ~ 9 m deep lake) in the otherwise planar topography of the underlying early Pleistocene lava flows of the Cerro Pelón scoria cone. The maar is composed of typical phreatomagmatic surge deposits that are poorly sorted and rich in accidental lithics (> 60 wt.% of the deposit) with few juveniles (basaltic andesite, SiO2 = 54-58 wt.%). The entire structure is cut by an ENE-WSW trending normal fault and is underlain by andesite lavas and silicic ignimbrites (partly inferred from xenoliths encountered in the maar deposits) that are Miocene to Early Pleistocene in age. The crater is at the center of a N-S elongated drainage basin surrounded by topographic highlands that channel water with high hydraulic pressure from most directions towards the location of the maar. This geometric configuration was already in existence at the time of the maar-forming eruption, but the climate was different. Colder and more humid conditions during the Last Glacial Maximum (Cw2-climate type, annual precipitation of > 1000 mm) favored the saturation of the fractured shallow aquifer system (hydraulic conductivity of 10- 8 to 10- 7 m/s) that supplied sufficient groundwater at a high flow rate directed towards the center of the basin. Upon contact near surface ( 150 m deep crater with steep inner walls and an underlying shallow diatreme (< 300 m). Since then, partial collapse of the walls along listric ring-fractures has reduced crater steepness. The present climate is much drier (Cw1 climate conditions with annual precipitation of 697.5-874.8 mm) and it seems unlikely that a maar would form if these conditions persist. Nonetheless, precipitation is still high enough to sustain a ~ 9-m-deep lake in the crater with insignificant seasonal water table fluctuations. These findings lend further support to the notion that maars can be used as paleoclimate indicators in central Mexico.

  7. Pleistocene pollen stratigraphy from borehole 81/34, devil's hole area, central north sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Sten R.

    1998-09-01

    Twelve pollen assemblage zones are identified in a 229 m deep borehole (BH 81/34) from the Devil's Hole area in the central North Sea (British sector). The sediment from this borehole is Early to Late Pleistocene in age and the observation of massulae from Azolla filiculoides in sediment with reversed polarity indicates an age younger than the Olduvai geomagnetic event for the entire sequence. The Early Pleistocene sediments were at least partly deposited in the vicinity of a river outlet and can be correlated either with the Eburonian or the Menapian cold stage and with the Bavel interglacial and the Linge glacial within the Bavelian stage in the Dutch stratigraphy. The Middle Pleistocene sequence contains an interval rich in Abies, Picea and Pinus, probably deposited during the end of either Cromerian Complex interglacial IV (Noordbergum) or possibly the Holsteinian. The uppermost 80 m of the core contains high frequencies of pre-Quaternary and deteriorated palynomorphs indicating extensive glacial or glaciofluvially reworked sediment.

  8. Magnetic polarity stratigraphy of the middle Pleistocene (Ensenadan) Tarija Formation of southern Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFadden, Bruce J.; Siles, Oscar; Zeitler, Peter; Johnson, Noye M.; Campbell, Kenneth E.

    1983-03-01

    The Tarija Formation of southern Bolivia, which is well known for its classic vertebrate faunas, is of prime importance in understanding of the chronology of the Ensenadan Land Mammal Age. This formation consists of well-exposed and relatively fossiliferous sections of clays, clayey silts, sands, gravels, and tuffs which were deposited in a predominately fluviatile regime in a Pleistocene structural basin. Four stratigraphic sections, each measuring 110 m or less, were studied to establish a magnetic polarity stratigraphy. Paleomagnetic samples were collected from the finer-grained sediments at 100 sites spaced at stratigraphic intervals of 5 m or less. All paleomagnetic specimens were demagnetized in alternating fields of least 250 oersteds (oe). Some specimens were also thermally demagnetized at 200°C or more. Of the 100 sites, 77 were ultimately used to determine the magnetic polarity zonation. Based on the four sections sampled, the Tarija Formation spans a time interval from about 1 my to about 0.7 my B.P. or perhaps younger. The lower half of the composite section is of reversed polarity punctuated by a short normal event. This sequence probably represents the late Matuyama chron with the Jaramillo subchron. The upper part of the section is of normal polarity and represents early Brunhes time. A tuffaceous unit 43 m above the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary yielded a fission track (zircon) age of 0.7 ± 0.2 by B.P. These data indicate that the classic Tarija fauna is middle Pleistocene Ensendan in age.

  9. K-Ar age of the late Pleistocene eruption of Toba, North Sumatra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is stated that the late Pleistocene eruption of Toba is the largest magnitude explosive eruption documented from the Quaternary. K-Ar dating of the uppermost unit of the Toba Tuff gives an age of approximately 75,000 yr. A chemically and petrographically equivalent ash layer in deep-sea cores helps calibrate the Stage 4-5 boundary of the standard oxygen isotope stratigraphy. A similar ash in Malaya that overlies finds of Tampan Palaeolithic tools indicates that they are older than 75,000 yr. (author)

  10. Paleobiogeography of the late Pleistocene pampatheres of South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scillato-Yané, G. J.; Carlini, A. A.; Tonni, E. P.; Noriega, J. I.

    2005-10-01

    This paper deals mainly with the paleobiogeography of the South American Pampatheriidae of the late Pleistocene. Through analysis, we conclude that (1) the species of Quaternary pampatheres may be distinguished clearly by their carapace scutes and craniodental characters; (2) there are two pampathere genera in the South American Quaternary, Pampatherium and Holmesina; (3) no more than one species of each genus occurs in association at a single locality or site; (4) Holmesina differentiated in North America, entered South America during the Late Pleistocene, and later experienced speciation probably related to Late Pleistocene and Holocene climate changes; (5) Pampatherium differentiated in South America, and its speciation process produced a second immigration of pampatheres to North America; and (6) the use of contrasting environments may be observed among the Quaternary pampatheres.

  11. Geomorphic history and Pleistocene stratigraphy of the Pecatonica River valley, Wisconsin and Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittecar G.R. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The Pecatonica River valley in southwestern Wisconsin and northwestern Illinois lies in both driftless and glaciated terrain. Therefore the stratigraphy of Pleistocene sediments in the valley is a complex of alluvial, colluvial, and lacustrine material, glacial till, loess, and weathered bedrock residuum. In the middle reaches of the stream system, the bedrock valley is incised 30 to 60 m below the ridge tops and is nearly half-filled with Pleistocene sediments that now have a stepped topography due to erosion surfaces and terraces. The oldest known sediments are preserved in erosional remnants protected in abandoned valley meanders. The sediment units recognized in the erosional remnants include pre-glacial alluvium, fine-grained lake deposits (Silveria Silt-Clay), and the Sinslow, and Ogle tills. They were deposited as glacial ice dammed the valley drainage from the east and south and advanced to the margin of the Driftless Area. Three bodies of sand found in the Driftless Area might be shoreline deposits formed by the Illinoian age lake at 860-870 feet elevation. Surrounding the silty erosional remnants are high-level terraces containing thick beds of poorly-sorted stony silt. These layers of diamicton are interpreted as solifluction deposits, possibly formed during intense periglacial conditions during early Wisconsinan time. Sandy alluvium (Blanchardville Sand), in places younger than the erosion surfaces, formed broad terraces throughout the driftless and glaciated portions of the valley. Isolated low dunes and sheets of eolian sand of Holocene age are also present in the valley.

  12. Depositional architecture and sequence stratigraphy of Pleistocene coarse-grained deltas along the Ligurian coast (Italy)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Ciampalini; M Firpo

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to develop a better understanding of the stratigraphy of the southern side of the Maritime Alps and of the Ligurian Sea during the Plio-Pleistocene. Five stratigraphic sections were measured and studied in the Segno River valley (Liguria, Italy). These sections are composed of Lower to Middle Pleistocene marine and continental deposits. Based on detailed mapping and sedimentological analysis, 12 marine and deltaic facies were identified. These facies were grouped into facies associations. Two allostratigraphic units were recognized, namely U1 and U2 from oldest to youngest. The lower unit (U1) represents the evolution of a coarse-grained delta developed in a valley or embayment. Within the deltaic sequence, transgressive and highstand systems tracts were recognized. The coarsening/shallowing upward trend observed within the sections suggests that the delta prograded rapidly in the landward portion of the canyon adjacent to the paleo-river outlet. The upper boundary of U1 is represented by a subaerial unconformity overlain by U2, which is composed of sediments deposited by several alluvial fan systems.

  13. BISON ANTIQUUS OCCURRENCE AND PLEISTOCENE-HOLOCENE STRATIGRAPHY, CANADA DEL BUEY, PAJARITO PLATEAU, NEW MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RENEAU, STEVEN L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; DRAKOS, PAUL G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MORGAN, GARY S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-12

    A Bison. (probable Bison antiguus) distal humerus fragment was found within a Pleistocene colluvial deposit on a hillslope above Canada del Buey near White Rock, New Mexico. The Bison fossil is preserved within a buried soil with an inferred age of ca. 50-100 ka, based on soil properties and on stratigraphic position below a deposit of ca. 50-60 ka EI Cajete pumice. This represents the second oldest dated Bison in New Mexico, and one of the few occurrences of this genus in the northern mountains of the state. It is also only the second record of a Pleistocene vertebrate from Los Alamos County, and is a rare occurrence of a pre-25 ka Bison fossil in good stratigraphic context. Hillslopes in the study area are underlain by a sequence of truncated Pleistocene and Holocene soils that are inferred to represent colluvial deposition and soil formation followed by erosion in the mid Pleistocene (buried soil 'b3'), the late Pleistocene (buried soil 'b2'), and the mid-to-late Holocene (buried soil 'b1'). The surface soil is developed in depOSits that overlie 600-800 year-old Ancestral Puebloan sites. Colluvium is dominated by relatively fine-grained (fine to very fine sand) slopewash colluvium deposited by overland flow, but also includes rocky colluvium on hillslopes below mesas. The fine-grained colluvium is likely derived mainly from reworking of eolian deposits. Episodic colluvial deposition appears to, at least in part, accompany and follow episodic eolian events, with intervening periods dominated by erosion and the development of truncated soils.

  14. Late Pleistocene floras from Earith, Huntingdonshire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, F G

    1970-07-23

    A pit in fluviatile gravel of the River Ouse at the western edge of the East Anglian fenland has exposed several richly organic beds of Last-glacial age. A radiocarbon date of 42 000 years from one bed confirms the terrace stratigraphy in placing the beds in a fairly early part of the Weichselian. The organic beds are succeeded by cryoturbation phenomena and ice wedge casts, indicating a severely cold climate with permafrost. The beds represent former pools on the flood-plain into which plant detritus was washed from the surroundings, chiefly by melt water in the spring. Pollen is sparse, but the macroscopic plant remains indicate a vegetation dominated by dwarf willows, accompanied by many herbs of base-rich, open habitats. Identification of the macrofossils is discussed and comments are made on the ecology and taxonomy of important species. The flora contains a mixture of northern and southern distributional types, the southern including species requiring a July mean temperature approaching 16 C. Halophytes are frequent, and four species are considered to be obligate halophytes and to demonstrate the presence of salt in the substrate. The plant mixtures are explained as a result of the peculiarly open habitats of the glacial landscape and of the climate, which appears to have had warm summers and very cold winters, with a mean annual temperature slightly below 0 C, resulting in discontinuous permafrost. PMID:22408832

  15. Obliquity Pacing of the Late Pleistocene Glacial Terminations

    OpenAIRE

    Huybers, Peter John; Wunsch, Carl

    2005-01-01

    The 100,000-year timescale in the glacial/interglacial cycles of the late Pleistocene epoch (the past ,700,000 years) is commonly attributed to control by variations in the Earth’s orbit. This hypothesis has inspired models that depend on the Earth’s obliquity (,40,000 yr; ,40 kyr), orbital eccentricity (,100 kyr) and precessional (,20 kyr) fluctuations, with the emphasis usually on eccentricity and precessional forcing. According to a contrasting hypothesis, the glacial cycles arise primaril...

  16. Obliquity pacing of the late Pleistocene glacial terminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybers, Peter; Wunsch, Carl

    2005-03-01

    The 100,000-year timescale in the glacial/interglacial cycles of the late Pleistocene epoch (the past ~700,000 years) is commonly attributed to control by variations in the Earth's orbit. This hypothesis has inspired models that depend on the Earth's obliquity (~ 40,000yr ~40kyr), orbital eccentricity (~ 100kyr) and precessional (~ 20kyr) fluctuations, with the emphasis usually on eccentricity and precessional forcing. According to a contrasting hypothesis, the glacial cycles arise primarily because of random internal climate variability. Taking these two perspectives together, there are currently more than thirty different models of the seven late-Pleistocene glacial cycles. Here we present a statistical test of the orbital forcing hypothesis, focusing on the rapid deglaciation events known as terminations. According to our analysis, the null hypothesis that glacial terminations are independent of obliquity can be rejected at the 5% significance level, whereas the corresponding null hypotheses for eccentricity and precession cannot be rejected. The simplest inference consistent with the test results is that the ice sheets terminated every second or third obliquity cycle at times of high obliquity, similar to the original proposal by Milankovitch. We also present simple stochastic and deterministic models that describe the timing of the late-Pleistocene glacial terminations purely in terms of obliquity forcing.

  17. Late Pleistocene pion pines in the Chihuahuan Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanner, Ronald M.; Van Devender, Thomas R.

    1981-05-01

    Examination of late Pleistocene packrat middens from the northern and central Chihuahuan Desert disclosed macrofossils of Colorado pion ( Pinus edulis) and Texas pion ( P. remota). Radiocarbon dating indicates that Texas pion was widespread in Trans-Pecos Texas and northeastern Mexico between 30,000 and 11,000 yr B.P. Today it is found in small refugia east of its former range. In the late Pleistocene Colorado pion occurred at lower elevations on the northern edge of the Chihuahuan Desert. Both species occurred in the Hueco Mountains, near El Paso, Texas. No clear evidence was found of the presence of Mexican pion ( P. cembroides), though today it is abundant in the Davis and Chisos Mountains. A paleoclimate is postulated that had the following characteristics: increased winter precipitation from Pacific frontal sources, reduced summer temperatures and precipitation, and milder winter temperatures due to a reduced frequency of Arctic airmass incursion. Winter precipitation appears to have decreased from north to south, while winter temperatures, and, possibly, summer precipitation, increased from north to south. During the late Pleistocene, the northern Chihuahuan Desert was dominated by woodlands of pion pines, junipers, and oaks. The desert-scrub communities that characterize the area today are a Holocene phenomenon.

  18. Late Pleistocene geomagnetic excursion in Icelandic lavas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1980 Kristjansson and Gudmundsson reported a late glacial geomagnetic excursion in three hills in the Reykjanes peninsula, Iceland, with shallow negative inclinations and westerly declinations. They named it the Skalamaelifell excursion. More extensive field work has identified the same excursional paleomagnetic direction (declination = 258deg, inclination = -15deg) at four additional outcrops in a 10x10 km area in the Reykjanes peninsula. The excursion lavas are olivine tholeiites with similar petrography and chemical compositions. Paleointensity determinations by the Thellier method average 4.20.2 ?T for 8 samples, more than an order of magnitude weaker than the present geomagnetic field in Iceland. Together, these results suggest extrusion of the excursion lavas in a very brief span of time, probably less than a few hundred years. K-Ar dating of the excursion lavas gives a mean age for 19 determinations of 42.97.8 ka (2?). Compilation of thirty K-Ar ages of the Laschamp and Olby flows by three laboratories yield a new age for the Laschamp excursion in France of 46.62.4 ka (2?). The age of the excursion in southwestern Iceland is statistically indistinguishable from the Laschamp excursion at the 95% confidence level, and both have very low paleointensities. Therefore, we suggest that the Laschamp and Olby flows in France and the Skalamaelifell units of Iceland recorded essentially the same geomagnetic excursion. Differences in the virtual paleomagnetic poles (VGPs) of these excursions may be due to (1) the probable non-dipole character of the geomagnetic field during the excursion, (2) rapid geomagnetic secular variation and possible small age differences of the extrusive rocks in France and Iceland, and/or (3) crustal magnetic anomalies which might dominate the local geomagnetic field during the excursion at either or both locations. (orig.)

  19. The Pliocene and Pleistocene of Pampean region (Argentina): systematic aspects on taphonomy and bio stratigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canids in South America were first recorded in the Vorohuean (Middle Pliocene) at southeast marine cliff of Pampean region. These records were assigned to Dusicyon cultridens. D. gymnocercus has it oldest record in the Ensenadan (Early to Middle Pleistocene) of the Pampean Region (Argentina) and Tarija (Bolivia). Remains of this species are frequents in the Bonaerian and Lujanian (Middle to Late Pleistocene) of the Buenos Aires and Entre Rios provinces. Outside Argentina D. gymnocercus was recorded in the Lujanian of Brazil and Uruguay. Two new records of Dusicyon from Punta San Andres (Buenos Aires province) are presented here. The first one (MLP 07-V-2-1) comes from Arroyo Seco Formation(Bonaerian, Middle Pleistocene) and is assigned here to D. gymnocercus. MLP 07-V-2-1 constitutes the first record of this species at Arroyo Seco Formation. The other one (MLP 07-V-2-2) was exhumed from a paleocave excavated in San Andres Formationsediments (Sanandresian, Late Pliocene) and filled with sanandresian sediments. Also, rodent remains (Ctenomys chapadmalalensis and cavids) were collected inside of the paleocave. Although, the study carried out prevents the assignation of MLP 07-V-2-2 to any of the Dusicyon species, this remain shows some affinity with D. gymnocercus. If this is confirmed in the future MLP 07-V-2-2 could be the oldest record of D. gymnocercus. In addition we discuss some litoestratigraphic and bioestratigraphic aspects of Punta San Andres and taphonomic implications related with the paleocave were MLP 07-V-2-2 was founded.(author)

  20. Constraining Late Pleistocene Pluvial Lake Chronologies in Northeastern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, J. S.; Laabs, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    The presence of lakes in closed basins of the northern Great Basin during pluvial episodes of the Pleistocene has been recognized for over a century. Some of these lakes, such as Bonneville in western Utah and Lahontan in western Nevada, were large, and their histories are well constrained by field mapping, stratigraphic investigations, and geochronology. Dozens of other lakes with smaller dimensions are known to have existed, however with few exceptions their histories are virtually unknown. This situation is unfortunate because smaller, hydrologically closed lakes should be particularly sensitive to climatic changes that shifted the balance of precipitation and evaporation. Records of their fluctuations, therefore, could provide important information about atmospheric reorganization during the last glacial-interglacial transition. Ongoing work in northeastern Nevada is aimed at developing these records through detailed mapping, investigation of natural exposures and artificial excavations, and radiocarbon dating. Gastropod shells recovered from two sites along a beach ridge in the northeast Independence Valley indicate that Lake Clover reached its late Pleistocene highstand between 14,400 and 14,200 14C years BP (~17.5 cal. ka BP). Similarly, radiocarbon dating of gastropod shells from a beach ridge in the Ruby Valley indicates that Lake Franklin was near its late Pleistocene highstand at 13,400 14C years BP (~16.4 cal. ka BP). These ages are essentially synchronous with the highstands of Lakes Newark and Jakes ~150 km to the south, overlap with the hydrologic maximum of Lake Bonneville, and appear to predate the highstand of Lake Lahontan. Additional radiocarbon dating will refine these age relationships and attempt to constrain the timing of stillstands during the overall regression of these lakes in the latest Pleistocene.

  1. Late Pleistocene oscillations of Lake Owens, eastern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, A.J. (California State Univ., Northridge, CA (United States). Dept. of Geography); Orme, A.R. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Geography)

    1993-04-01

    Just before diversion of the Owens River drainage to Los Angeles in 1912--13, Owens Lake had a maximum depth of 14m and covered 290 km[sup 2] at a water-surface elevation of 1,095m. Indeed throughout most of Holocene time, the lake formed the sump for the Owens River drainage, its level fluctuating in response to variable inflow and evaporation. In late Pleistocene time, however, Lake Owens' spilled south towards Lake Searles' on reaching an elevation of 1,145m, at which level the lake was 64m deep and covered 694 km[sup 2]. Aided by radiometric dating, stratigraphic and sedimentological analyses of beach ridges and associated deposits around its northeast margin reveal complex oscillations of Lake Owens between 13,000 and 9,000 years B.P.. Following an earlier high stand, lake level fell until around 13,000 B.P. it rose again to at least 1138m, probably linked to late Wisconsinan glacier melt in the Sierra Nevada. Across the Pleistocene/Holocene transition, lake level fell to around 1100m and then rose to about 1,120m around 9,600 B.P., before falling away during Holocene time. This pattern is consistent with fluctuations in glacier budgets and meltwater regimes, and with late Pleistocene-early Holocene climatic oscillations postulated elsewhere in the region. Correlation with lake-level fluctuations observed at other localities around Owens Lake is complicated by tectonism, but the above sequence invites comparison with the detailed record obtained from Searles Lake farther south.

  2. Late Quaternary seismic sequence stratigraphy of the Gulf of Kachchh, northwest of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Michael, L.; Rao, D.G.; Krishna, K.S.; Vora, K.H.

    the late Pleistocene- Holocene period and neotectonics. But the relative role of neotectonics and the sea level changes is still unresolved and possibly could be better explained with authenticity from more geological information. Further, understanding...

  3. Late Pleistocene and Holocene mammal extinctions on continental Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, J. Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cause of late Quaternary mammal extinctions is the subject of intense debate spanning the fields of archeology and paleontology. In the global context, the losses on continental Africa have received little attention and are poorly understood. This study aims to inspire new discussion of African extinctions through a review of the extinct species and the chronology and possible causes of those extinctions. There are at least 24 large mammal (> 5 kg) species known to have disappeared from continental Africa during the late Pleistocene or Holocene, indicating a much greater taxonomic breadth than previously recognized. Among the better sampled taxa, these losses are restricted to the terminal Pleistocene and early Holocene, between 13,000 and 6000 yrs ago. The African extinctions preferentially affected species that are grazers or prefer grasslands. Where good terrestrial paleoenvironmental records are present, extinctions are associated with changes in the availability, productivity, or structure of grassland habitats, suggesting that environmental changes played a decisive role in the losses. In the broader evolutionary context, these extinctions represent recent examples of selective taxonomic winnowing characterized by the loss of grassland specialists and the establishment of large mammal communities composed of more ecologically flexible taxa over the last million years. There is little reason to believe that humans played an important role in African extinctions.

  4. THE MIDDLE PLEISTOCENE DEPOSITS OF THE ROMAN BASIN (LATIUM, ITALY:AN INTEGRATED APPROACH OF MAMMAL BIOCHRONOLOGY AND SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SALVATORE MILLI

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The biochronological setting proposed for the Plio-Pleistocene large mammal faunas of the Italian peninsula is based on the definition of faunal units (FUs and mammal ages (MAs. Many evidences suggest that a multidisciplinary approach could enable us to better understand the actual meaning of a given faunal assemblage taking into account sedimentological and physical stratigraphic studies of the sedimentary successions in which local mammal faunas occur. The Pleistocene deposits of the Roman Basin can be considered a significant model to test this integrated approach. The detailed study of this sedimentary succession, in terms of facies analysis and sequence stratigraphy, sets some physical and temporal constrains to the occurrence of faunal complexes because the allocyclic control (climate and eustatic variations on both landscape and stratigraphical evolution can affect the association type of mammal faunas. A correlation scheme between the Roman Pleistocene sequence-stratigraphic units and the mammal biochrons has been proposed; this approach constitutes a first tentative to connect the mammal fauna remains to the sedimentary processes which are responsible of their transport, stock and potential preservation in the depositional environments and to collocate this fauna in the systems tracts of the fourth-order depositional sequences recognised in the local Roman Basin Pleistocene succession.

  5. Seismic stratigraphy of the Bering Trough, Gulf of Alaska: Late Quaternary history of Bering Glacier dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelli, A.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Worthington, L. L.; Mix, A. C.; Zellers, S.; Jaeger, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Sedimentary architecture of the cross-shelf Bering Trough is studied using 5 high resolution seismic profiles integrated with the drilling data acquired during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 341. The objectives of this work are to constrain the number of advance-retreat cycles that have occurred through the Late Quaternary, examine the impact of the Bering Glacier on the continental shelf and slope, and reconstruct Bering Glacier dynamics. By tying these sequences with δ18O stratigraphy, we can test the Bering Glacier's relation to global ice sheet evolution and better understand the degree to which the glacial advance-retreat cycles were in phase with global events. Our results show that: (1) Identification of erosional surfaces and glacigenic landforms that record positions of stillstand events and diagnose the style of retreat allow us to distinguish nine phases of glacial advances and subsequent retreats. (2) Mapping shows that glacier pathways and flow directions through time are influenced by the occurrence of thick grounding-zone deposits and shifting foci of erosion. (3) Continuous buildup of glacigenic sediment fills tectonically created accommodation space and allows the glacier to advance seaward for the last three advances. Discovery of systematic, prominent deposition of glacial diamict and ice-rafted debris (IRD) during phases of glacial retreat is supported by the drilling data and suggests reconsideration of IRD impact on slope sedimentation. (4) The trough mouth fan started its development during marine isotope stage (MIS) 6, progressively advancing to the position of present shelf edge during the subsequent MIS 4 and MIS 2 and is recognized by evidence of extensive deposition of glacigenic debris flows on the slope. (5) Sedimentation rates in the depocenter are exceptionally high and are estimated to be 1-2 m/k.y. through the middle Pleistocene on the shelf and 4-5 m/k.y. average through MIS 6 on the slope.

  6. Nile behaviour and Late Palaeolithic humans in Upper Egypt during the Late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Pierre M.; Van Neer, Wim

    2015-12-01

    The reconstruction of the environment and the human population history of the Nile Valley during the Late Pleistocene have received a lot of attention in the literature thus far. There seems to be a consensus that during MIS2 extreme dry conditions prevailed over north-eastern Africa, which was apparently not occupied by humans. The Nile Valley seems to be an exception; numerous field data have been collected suggesting an important population density in Upper Egypt during MIS2. The occupation remains are often stratified in, or at least related to, aeolian and Nile deposits at some elevation above the present-day floodplain. They are rich in lithics and animal bones, mainly fish, illustrating the exploitation of the Nile Valley by the Late Palaeolithic inhabitants. The fluvial processes active during that period have traditionally been interpreted as a continuously rising highly braided river. In this paper we summarize the evidence thus far available for the Late Pleistocene on the population densities in the Nile Valley, and on the models of Nilotic behaviour. In the discussion we include data on the environmental conditions in Eastern Africa, on the aeolian processes in the Western Desert of Egypt derived from satellite images, 14C and OSL dates, in order to formulate a new model that explains the observed high remnants of aeolian and Nilotic deposits and the related Late Palaeolithic sites. This model hypothesizes that, during the Late Pleistocene, and especially the LGM, dunes from the Western Desert invaded the Nile Valley at several places in Upper Egypt. The much reduced activity of the White Nile and the Blue Nile was unable to evacuate incoming aeolian sand and, as a consequence, several dams were created in the Upper Egyptian Nile Valley. Behind such dams the created lakes offered ideal conditions for human subsistence. This model explains the occurrence of Late Palaeolithic hunter-fisher-gatherers in a very arid environment with very low Nile flows, even in late summer.

  7. Late Pleistocene-Holocene cataclysmic eruptions at Nevado de Toluca and Jocotitlan volcanoes, central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, J.L.; Garcia, P.A.; Arce, J.L.; Siebe, C.; Espindola, J.M.; Komorowski, J.C.; Scott, K.

    1997-01-01

    This field guide describes a five day trip to examine deposits of Late Pleistocene-Holocene cataclysmic eruptions at Nevado de Toluca and Jocotitlan volcanoes in central Mexico. We will discuss the stratigraphy, petrology, and sedimentological characteristics of these deposits which provide insights into the eruptive history, type of volcanic activity, and transport and emplacement mechanisms of pyroclastic materials. These parameters will allow us to discuss the kinds of hazards and the risk that they pose to populations around these volcanoes. The area to be visited is tectonically complex thus we will also discuss the location of the volcanoes with respect to the tectonic environment. The first four days of the field trip will be dedicated to Nevado de Toluca Volcano (19 degrees 09'N; 99 degrees 45'W) located at 23 km. southwest of the City of Toluca, and is the fourth highest peak in the country, reaching an elevation of 4,680 meters above sea level (m.a.s.l.). Nevado de Toluca is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano, composed of a central vent excavated upon the remains of older craters destroyed by former events. Bloomfield and Valastro, (1974, 1977) concluded that the last cycle of activity occurred nearly equal 11,600 yr. ago. For this reason Nevado de Toluca has been considered an extinct volcano. Our studies, however, indicate that Nevado de Toluca has had at least two episodes of cone destruction by sector collapse as well as several explosive episodes including plinian eruptions and dome-destruction events. These eruptions occurred during the Pleistocene but a very young eruption characterized by surge and ash flows occurred ca. 3,300 yr. BP. This new knowledge of the volcano's eruptive history makes the evaluation of its present state of activity and the geological hazards necessary. This is important because the area is densely populated and large cities such as Toluca and Mexico are located in its proximity.

  8. Ages of late pleistocene terrace deposits in the Kuromatsunai lowland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuromatsunai lowland which lies at the neck of Oshima Peninsula extends from Oshamambe to Suttsu, and is considered as a remarkable neo-tectonic zone. In this region, the data for determining the age of terraces and pyroclastic material which is related to the terraces are short. The determination of the age of lower fluvial terraces was attempted using the wood piece specimens collected from three localities in Kuromatsunai town. The determination of the 14C age of three specimens was conducted, and the obtained values were about 26 x 103 yBP, about 30 x 103 yBP and 37 x 103 yBP, respectively. The consideration on the conditions of the existence of specimens and the results of geologival observation of the localities where the specimens were collected, led to the conclusion as follows. 1. The age of the aeolian deposit of volcanic ash is earlier than about 30 x 103 yBP. 2. In Kuromatsunai lowland, the lower fluvial terrace, which is not overlain by the volcanic ash of Pleistocene can be roughly divided into two levels. The age of one level is about 30 x 103 yBP, and another is later than 26 x 103 yBP, which are corresponding to late Pleistocene. The age of the Neppu pyroclastic flow deposit, which is related to the formation of those terraces, was determined as 0.13+-0.03 MaBP by fission track method. Further studies seem to be necessary because some disagreement with the data of other researchers remains. (Ishimitsu, A.)

  9. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2) in Colbert County, Alabama, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquemin, Stephen J.; Ebersole, Jun A.; Dickinson, William C.; Ciampaglio, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (∼10,000 to 30,000 years B.P.) lead...

  10. Radiocarbon chronology of Late Pleistocene large mammal faunas from the Pannonian basin (Hungary).

    OpenAIRE

    Kovács J

    2012-01-01

    Geochronological data from the mammal fauna of the Pannonian basin during the Late Pleistocene are compiled. Thirty-four megafaunal samples (including both fossil bone and associated materials such as charcoal), previously radiocarbon dated by accelerator mass spectrometry and conventional methods, range from 43 to 10.3 14C ka BP (47-13 ka cal BP). Thus, most samples date within Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 and 2 of the Late Pleistocene, and indicate that the mammoth st...

  11. Late Pleistocene and Holocene environments in the Nile basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martin A. J.

    2009-10-01

    Owing to the very gently sloping nature of the flood plain in the lower White Nile valley, which is underlain by a former lake-bed, the depositional record in that area is unusually well preserved. In Egypt and along the Blue Nile phases of erosion have destroyed segments of the sedimentary record, but the White Nile sequence is a good proxy for both the main Nile and the Blue Nile. During the last 15 ka, at least, times of high flow in the Blue Nile and main Nile were synchronous with those in the White Nile. Not all the White Nile flood deposits have been preserved but calibrated radiocarbon dates obtained on fossil freshwater and amphibious Pila shells and fish bones indicate that White Nile levels were high around 14.7-13.1 ka, 9.7-9.0 ka, 7.9-7.6 ka, 6.3 ka and 3.2-2.8 ka. The Blue Nile record is more fragmentary and that of the main Nile even more so except for the Holocene Nile delta. Calibrated radiocarbon ages for high Blue Nile flows indicate very high flood levels towards 13.9-13.2 ka, 8.6 ka, 7.7 ka and 6.3 ka. Incision by the Blue Nile and main Nile has caused progressive incision in the White Nile amounting to at least 4 m since the terminal Pleistocene ˜ 15 ka ago and at least 2 m over the past 9 ka. The Blue Nile seems to have cut down at least 10 m since ˜ 15 ka and at least 4 m since 9 ka. The time-transgressive and relatively late inception of plant domestication in the Nile valley may partly reflect this history of incision. Nile incision would propagate upstream into the White Nile valley, draining previously swampy areas along the valley floor, which would then become accessible to cultivation.

  12. Canyon Creek: A late Pleistocene vertebrate locality in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, F.R.; Hamilton, T.D.; Hopkins, D.M.; Repenning, C.A.; Haas, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Canyon Creek vertebrate-fossil locality is an extensive road cut near Fairbanks that exposes sediments that range in age from early Wisconsin to late Holocene. Tanana River gravel at the base of the section evidently formed during the Delta Glaciation of the north-central Alaska Range. Younger layers and lenses of fluvial sand are interbedded with arkosic gravel from Canyon Creek that contains tephra as well as fossil bones of an interstadial fauna about 40,000 years old. Solifluction deposits containing ventifacts, wedge casts, and rodent burrows formed during a subsequent period of periglacial activity that took place during the maximum phase of Donnelly Glaciation about 25,000-17,000 years ago. Overlying sheets of eolian sand are separated by a 9500-year-old paleosol that may correlate with a phase of early Holocene spruce expansion through central Alaska. The Pleistocene fauna from Canyon Creek consists of rodents (indicated by burrows), Mammuthus primigenius (woolly mammoth), Equus lambei (Yukon wild ass), Camelops hesternus (western camel), Bison sp. cf. B. crassicornis (large-horned bison), Ovis sp. cf. O. dalli (mountain sheep), Canis sp. cf. C. lupus (wolf), Lepus sp. cf. L. othus or L. arcticus (tundra hare), and Rangifer sp. (caribou). This assemblage suggests an open landscape in which trees and tall shrubs were either absent or confined to sheltered and moist sites. Camelops evidently was present in eastern Beringia during the middle Wisconsin interstadial interval but may have disappeared during the following glacial episode. The stratigraphic section at Canyon Creek appears to demonstrate that the Delta Glaciation of the north-central Alaska Range is at least in part of early Wisconsin age and was separated from the succeeding Donnelly Glaciation by an interstadial rather than interglacial episode. ?? 1981.

  13. CANIS LUPUS (MAMMALIA, CANIDAE FROM THE LATE PLEISTOCENE DEPOSIT OF AVETRANA (TARANTO, SOUTHERN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAVIDE F.BERTÈ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we described the remains of Canis lupus from the bed 8 of Avetrana karst filling (Late Pleistocene; Taranto, Southern Italy. The studied specimens are larger than those collected from the early Late Pleistocene Apulian localities and those referred to the recent Italian wolf. Moreover, the remains from Avetrana are morphometrically close to Canis lupus maximus from France and to C. lupus collected from Central and Northern Italian localities, chronologically related to MIS 2 and MIS 3. Morphologically, the studied specimens slightly differ from both C. l. maximus and other Pleistocene Apulian wolves. The dimensional differences between the Avetrana wolves and those collected from the other early Late Pleistocene Apulian localities could be explained through a spread of a large-sized morphotype from the Northern Italy.

  14. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2) in Colbert County, Alabama, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemin, Stephen J; Ebersole, Jun A; Dickinson, William C; Ciampaglio, Charles N

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (∼10,000 to 30,000 years B.P.) leading to modern Holocene fish diversity patterns. The objective of this study was to describe the fish assemblages of the Tennessee River Basin from the late Pleistocene using a series of faunas from locales throughout the basin documented from published literature, unpublished reports, and an undocumented fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2, Colbert County, AL). Herein we discuss 41 unequivocal taxa from 10 late Pleistocene localities within the basin and include a systematic discussion of 11 families, 19 genera, and 24 identifiable species (28 unequivocal taxa) specific to the Bell Cave locality. Among the described fauna are several extirpated (e.g., Northern Pike Esox lucius, Northern Madtom Noturus stigmosus) and a single extinct (Harelip Sucker Moxostoma lacerum) taxa that suggest a combination of late Pleistocene displacement events coupled with more recent changes in habitat that have resulted in modern basin diversity patterns. The Bell Cave locality represents one of the most intact Pleistocene freshwater fish deposits anywhere in North America. Significant preservational, taphonomic, sampling, and identification biases preclude the identification of additional taxa. Overall, this study provides a detailed look into paleo-river ecology, as well as freshwater fish diversity and distribution leading up to the contemporary biodiversity patterns of the Tennessee River Basin and Mississippi River Basin as a whole. PMID:26855876

  15. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2) in Colbert County, Alabama, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersole, Jun A.; Dickinson, William C.; Ciampaglio, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (∼10,000 to 30,000 years B.P.) leading to modern Holocene fish diversity patterns. The objective of this study was to describe the fish assemblages of the Tennessee River Basin from the late Pleistocene using a series of faunas from locales throughout the basin documented from published literature, unpublished reports, and an undocumented fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2, Colbert County, AL). Herein we discuss 41 unequivocal taxa from 10 late Pleistocene localities within the basin and include a systematic discussion of 11 families, 19 genera, and 24 identifiable species (28 unequivocal taxa) specific to the Bell Cave locality. Among the described fauna are several extirpated (e.g., Northern Pike Esox lucius, Northern Madtom Noturus stigmosus) and a single extinct (Harelip Sucker Moxostoma lacerum) taxa that suggest a combination of late Pleistocene displacement events coupled with more recent changes in habitat that have resulted in modern basin diversity patterns. The Bell Cave locality represents one of the most intact Pleistocene freshwater fish deposits anywhere in North America. Significant preservational, taphonomic, sampling, and identification biases preclude the identification of additional taxa. Overall, this study provides a detailed look into paleo-river ecology, as well as freshwater fish diversity and distribution leading up to the contemporary biodiversity patterns of the Tennessee River Basin and Mississippi River Basin as a whole. PMID:26855876

  16. Late Pleistocene and Holocene Fire History of the California Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A. C.; Hardiman, M.; Pinter, N.; Anderson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Charcoal has been recovered from a range of late Pleistocene and Holocene sites on Santa Cruz Island and Santa Rosa Island, both islands part of California's Northern Channel Islands, U.S.A. Sediments have been dated using radiocarbon measurements based on wood charcoal, fungal sclerotia, glassy carbon and fecal pellets and are given as calendar years BP. This charcoal has been used to interpret the fire history of the Islands. Charcoal assemblages from samples dating from 24,690 to 12,900 years are dominated by coniferous wood charcoal. Little angiosperm charcoal was recovered in any of the samples. Fungal sclerotia are frequent in a number of samples from a range of ages both on Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa. Fecal pellets are common in most samples and abundant in others. Some of the fecal pellets have hexagonal sides and are likely to represent termite frass. The sediments are fluvial in origin and the distribution of charcoal is irregular making interpretation of fire return intervals and fire frequency difficult. The charcoal indicates a significant record of fire before the earliest documented human arrival on the islands. Charcoal reflectance data shows the occurrence of predominantly low temperature charcoals suggesting common surface fires in the coniferous forest. Soledad Pond sediments from Santa Rosa Island (Anderson et al., 2010) dating from 11,800 cal years BP show a distinctively different vegetation dominated by angiosperms and showing a very different fire history. Pinus stands, coastal sage scrub dominated by Baccharis sp. and grassland replaced the conifer forest as the climate warmed. The early Holocene became increasingly drier, particularly after ca. 9150 cal yr BP. By ca. 6900 cal yr BP grasslands recovered. Introduction of non-native species by ranchers occurred subsequent to AD 1850. Charcoal influx is high early in the Soledad Pond record, but declines during the early Holocene when minimal biomass suggests extended drought. A general increase occurs after ca. 7000 cal yr BP, and especially after ca. 4500 cal yr BP. The Holocene pattern closely resembles population levels constructed from the archaeological record, and suggests a potential influence by humans on the fire regime of the islands, particularly during the late Holocene. Reference: ANDERSON, R.S., STARRATT, S., JASS, R.M.B.,PINTER, N., 2010. Fire and vegetation history on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands, and long-term environmental change in southern California. Journal of Quaternary Science 25, 782-797.

  17. Late quaternary stratigraphy and sedimentology of the central North Atlantic: A progress report

    OpenAIRE

    Troelstra, S. R.; Ganssen, G.M.; Sennema, E.J.; Klaver, G.Th.; Anderliesten, C.; Borg, K.; de Jong, A.F.M.

    1987-01-01

    The marine geological research program of the Department of Sedimentary Geology at the Free University of Amsterdam focuses on three areas: Banda Sea, central North Atlantic and the Mediterranean. Late Quaternary deep-sea cores taken in these areas are analysed in order to reconstruct changes in paleoceanography as reflected in the sedimentary record. Radiocarbon datings through the cores provide the necessary stratigraphie framework. The Utrecht tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) all...

  18. Final Pleistocene and Early Holocene at Sitio do Meio, Piau, Brazil: Stratigraphy and comparison with Pedra Furada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Aimola

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available English:Sitio do Meio, in southern Piaui, Brazil, is the second rock shelter presenting fully Pleistocene dates and artefacts after Pedra Furada. Despite the anthropogenic origin of Pedra Furada artefacts has been questioned, SDM has better chances to be accepted by the scientific community because of the absence of the most relevant stone breaking agents in this kind of site, i.e. waterfalls. This paper presents a critical revision of the history of excavations (1980-2000, stratigraphy, chronology, and the archaeological content of the site (sector 2. At least 98 stone tools have been identified and described, all of them being older than 12,500 BP, i.e. belonging to the Upper Pleistocenic phase of Pedra Furada 3, as defined in the close reference site. The lithic industry of Serra Talhada phase (lower Holocene is also presented and compared with paleoindian sites of North-Eastern and Central Brazil.French:Le Sitio do meio, dans le Piaui mridional (Brsil est le deuxime abri sous roche de la rgion ayant livr des dates plistocnes en dehors du site de la Pedra Furada. L'article prsente une rvision critique des fouilles (1980-2000, la chronostratigraphie et le contenu archologique du secteur 2. Une centaine d'outils lithiques sont dcrits, ils sont plus anciens de 12,5 ka BP et correspondent la phase Plistocne Pedra Furada 3 dfinie dans le site ponyme de rfrence. On prsente aussi l' industrie lithique de la phase Serra Talhada (Holocne ancien en la comparant aux industries paloindiennes du Nord-Est et du centre du Brsil.

  19. Environmental reconstruction and biostratigraphy of late Middle Pleistocene lakeshore deposits at Schöningen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Brigitte; Bigga, Gerlinde

    2015-12-01

    The Pleistocene sequence of Schöningen provides a key link between unglaciated and glaciated areas in western Central Europe and is an important point of reference for the subdivision of the glaciated late Middle Pleistocene. This locality yields paleoecological and geological evidence of at least four interglacial periods prior to the Holocene and younger than the Elsterian glaciation. The Pleistocene deposits at Schöningen are valuable archives of climate, landscape, and human evolution, containing outstanding information on past environmental changes and human adaptation. This paper presents paleoenvironmental and biostratigraphical results from the Middle Pleistocene archaeological lakeshore site of Schöningen, focusing on the so-called reference profile Schöningen 13 II of 2003. We discuss the lithological, palynological, and macrobotanical evidence and present a revised subdivision and reinterpretation of late phases of the Reinsdorf Interglacial. PMID:26638875

  20. Late cretaceous and cenozoic stratigraphy of the Baikal Rift sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mats, V. D.

    2013-11-01

    The data obtained from long-term field studies in the Baikal Rift area are summarized. A new stratigraphic scheme is developed on the basis of previous stratigraphic research of N.A. Logachev. The new elements of the scheme are (1) the use of regional correlation horizons; (2) recognition of pre-Tankhoi (pre-Late Oligocene) sediments correlated with the Maastrichtian-Early Oligocene deposits of the Baikal Fore-deep; (3) elimination from the scheme of the Khalagai and Anosovka formations and distinction on their basis of the Tagai, Sasa, Osinovka, and Shankhaikha formations; (4) recognition of several weathering crust beds and Neogene paleosols. The "lower Eopleistocene (Upper Pliocene)" red-rock formation of Logachev is subdivided into the following stratigraphic units: the Cretaceous-Paleogene unit characterized by a few finds of Early Oligocene fossils, the Upper Miocene-Lower Pliocene red clay bearing numerous fossil remains, and the Upper Pliocene reddish clay with abundant localities of fossils. The sections examined in the land portion of the Baikal Rift are correlated with bottom sediments of the Baikal depression and are subdivided into three instead of the two commonly accepted large tectonic-lithological-stratigraphic complexes. Stratigraphic studies provide a new insight into the history of the Baikal Rift and into some general questions of the continental rift formation.

  1. Late Cenozoic structure and stratigraphy of south-central Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural framework of the Columbia Basin began developing before Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) volcanism. Prior to 17.5 Ma, the eastern part of the basin was a relatively stable area, with a basement of Paleozoic and older crystalline rock. The western part was an area of subsidence in which large volumes of sediment and volcanic rocks accumulated. Concurrent with eruption of the CRBG, anticlinal ridges of the Yakima Fold Belt (YFB) were growing under north-south compression. Topographic expression of these features was later masked by the large volume of CRBG basalt flowing west from fissures in the eastern Columbia Basin. The folds continued to develop after cessation of volcanism, leading to as much as 1,000 m of structural relief in the past 10 million years. Post-CRBG evolution of the Columbia Basin is recorded principally in folding and faulting in the YFB and sediments deposited in the basins. The accompanying tectonism resulted in lateral migration of major depositional systems into subsiding structural lows. Although known late Cenozoic faults are on anticlinal ridges, earthquake focal mechanisms and contemporary strain measurements indicate most stress release is occurring in the synclinal areas under north-south compression. There is no obvious correlation between focal mechanisms for earthquakes whose foci are in the CRBG and the location of known faults. High in situ stress values help to explain the occurrence of microseismicity in the Columbia Basin but not the pattern. Microseismicity appears to occur in unaltered fresh basalt. Faulted basalt associated with the YFB is highly brecciated and commonly altered to clay. The high stress, abundance of ground water in confined aquifers of the CRBG, and altered basalt in fault zones suggest that the frontal faults on the anticlinal ridges probably have some aseismic deformation. 85 refs

  2. The Late Pleistocene geology of the Labrador Shelf

    OpenAIRE

    Josenhans, Heiner; Zevenhuizen, John

    1987-01-01

    The Quaternary stratigraphic sequence on the Labrador Shelf records evidence of several glacial cycles and major climatic/ environmental changes. This summary describes the major depositional episodes preserved on the Labrador Shelf and assigns ages and depositional interpretations to the last deglacial sequence. For a more detailed description of the seismic stratigraphy and sample analysis used to interpret this summary, the reader is referred to Josenhans et al. (1986).

  3. Metagenomic analyses of the late Pleistocene permafrost - additional tools for reconstruction of environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkina, Elizaveta; Petrovskaya, Lada; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Krivushin, Kirill; Shmakova, Lyubov; Tutukina, Maria; Meyers, Arthur; Kondrashov, Fyodor

    2016-04-01

    A comparative analysis of the metagenomes from two 30 000-year-old permafrost samples, one of lake-alluvial origin and the other from late Pleistocene Ice Complex sediments, revealed significant differences within microbial communities. The late Pleistocene Ice Complex sediments (which have been characterized by the absence of methane with lower values of redox potential and Fe2+ content) showed a low abundance of methanogenic archaea and enzymes from both the carbon and nitrogen cycles, but a higher abundance of enzymes associated with the sulfur cycle. The metagenomic and geochemical analyses described in the paper provide evidence that the formation of the sampled late Pleistocene Ice Complex sediments likely took place under much more aerobic conditions than lake-alluvial sediments.

  4. Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene productivity in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzuka, Alfred N. N.; Macko, Stephen A.

    1995-04-01

    The stable isotopic compositions of organic C and N and the organic carbon (OC) content of the Oman Margin (ODP Site 724) sediments, ranging from Pliocene to Early Pleistocene in age, are used to infer palaeoproductivity in the area. At the boundary between the Pliocene and the Pleistocene, the amount of organic matter preserved is low compared to other periods before and after this transition period. This low OC content is associated with depleted N and C isotope values. This may indicate low primary productivity as a result of a diminished supply of nutrients caused by weak coastal upwelling. Higher amounts of OC, in conjunction with enrichment in the isotopic compositions of both organic C and N before and after the Pliocene-Pleistocene transition period, are likely to be a consequence of an increase in primary productivity, which resulted from a higher nutrient supply. However, a higher amount of OC may have resulted from enhanced preservation. The enhanced preservation may have resulted from an intrusion of highly saline waters from the Res Sea and Persian Gulf and/or restricted circulation.

  5. REINTERPRETATION OF THE LATE PLEISTOCENE INGARANO CAVE DEPOSIT BASED ON THE FOSSIL BIRD ASSOCIATION (APULIA, SOUTH-EASTERN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA BEDETTI

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of Late Pleistocene fossil bird remains from Ingarano (Apulia, SE Italy, based on the revision of previously published material and the study of unpublished fossils bones. New field observations make it possible to simplify the stratigraphy of the deposit compared to previous work. The systematic study of the fossil bird bones revealed the presence of 15 taxa, including two hypothetical ones: Circus aeruginosus, Buteo rufinus, Aquila chrysaëtos, Falco columbarius, Falco cherrug, Alectoris graeca, Perdix perdix, Columba livia, Otus scops, Nyctea scandiaca, Nyctea scandiaca vel Bubo bubo, Athene noctua, Pyrrhocorax graculus, Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax, Corvus corone, Corvus corone vel Corvus frugilegus, Corvus corax. Our detailed study also helps improve the taphonomical interpretation of the deposit: the remains from the lower layers were accumulated after mammalian predator activity and were transported over short distances, while the ones from the upper layers show sings of intense transport, such as fractures and surface abrasion. Two different bird assemblages were recognized, respectively from the lowermost and the upper layers of the clastic succession exposed in the Ingarano deposit; this difference is also confirmed by the fossil mammal remains. The systematic study makes it possible to make palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic reconstructions: both assemblages indicate open environments, and the taxa of the lower layers indicate the presence of woods and wetlands with colder characteristics, while birds of the upper layers indicate drier and warmer conditions. This analysis, and the dating established through geochemical analyses and study of lithic artefacts, lead us to date the formation of the Ingarano deposit to the Late Pleistocene, in particular to the MIS 3. The presence of a layer dated to the MIS 2 at the base of the succession indicated in previous works cannot be confirmed. 

  6. Iwo Eleru's place among Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene populations of North and East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanowski, Christopher M

    2014-10-01

    The Iwo Eleru site in Nigeria preserves the only terminal Pleistocene fossil from tropical West Africa. The peoples of this region contributed to significant population movements throughout the continent during the Holocene. As such, characterizing the phenotype of Late Pleistocene West African populations is critical for disentangling the evolutionary signatures of a highly complex African population history and structure. Previous research approached the calvaria's morphology from a paleoanthropological perspective, noting its mosaic of archaic and modern neurocranial features and distinctiveness from Pleistocene fossil taxa and contemporary modern human samples. In this paper, I compare Iwo Eleru with contemporary Late Pleistocene Africans and also consider the specimen's affinities with Holocene populations of the central and western Sahara, Nile Valley, and East Africa. Craniometric data were recorded for 22 neurocranial dimensions and subjected to principal components analysis and Mahalanobis distance estimation. Multidimensional scaling of distances indicated that Iwo Eleru fell outside the observed range of variation of other terminal Pleistocene supra-equatorial African populations, confirming previous results that documented its divergence from Neanderthals, Upper Paleolithic Europeans, and modern Africans. The calvaria was also distinct from Holocene Saharan, Nile Valley, and East African populations, which suggests limited West African input into the Sahara during the African Humid Period. Results presented here bolster previous research that suggested Iwo Eleru's anatomy reflected either admixture with archaic humans or the long-term survival of populations with more archaic neurocranial anatomy until the end of the Pleistocene. PMID:25065342

  7. Arsenic in Groundwater: The Deep Late Pleistocene Aquifers of the Western Bengal Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, J M; Ghosal, U; Sikdar, P K; Ball, J D

    2016-04-01

    in groundwaters from 145 wells across central West Bengal, India, those from Pleistocene aquifers at depths >70 m beneath paleo-interfluves contain polluted groundwater in overlying aquifers. We postulate that the As was liberated in situ by reduction of minimal iron oxyhydroxides in the gray Pleistocene sands by organic matter infiltrating from riverbeds during late Pleistocene or earliest Holocene times. Mitigation of the widespread As-pollution in shallow aquifers through exploitation of deep Pleistocene aquifers would improve if guided by an understanding of the distribution of buried paleo-channels and paleo-interfluves and the knowledge that As may be present naturally in groundwater at depths >150 m beneath deep paleo-channels. PMID:27010474

  8. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Woolford, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ˜1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ˜17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ˜17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ˜35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  9. Late Pleistocene-early Holocene karst features, Laguna Madre, south Texas: A record of climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prouty, J.S. [Texas A& M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1996-09-01

    A Pleistocene coquina bordering Laguna Madre, south Texas, contains well-developed late Pleistocene-early Holocene karst features (solution pipes and caliche crusts) unknown elsewhere from coastal Texas. The coquina accumulated in a localized zone of converging longshore Gulf currents along a Gulf beach. The crusts yield {sup 14}C dates of 16,660 to 7630 B.P., with dates of individual crust horizons becoming younger upwards. The karst features provide evidence of regional late Pleistocene-early Holocene climate changes. Following the latest Wisconsinan lowstand 18,000 B.P. the regional climate was more humid and promoted karst weathering. Partial dissolution and reprecipitation of the coquina formed initial caliche crust horizons; the crust later thickened through accretion of additional carbonate laminae. With the commencement of the Holocene approximately 11,000 B.P. the regional climate became more arid. This inhibited karstification of the coquina, and caliche crust formation finally ceased about 7000 B.P.

  10. New records of temperate mollusks in two Late Pleistocene terrestrial localities from northeastern Oaxaca, Southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Arenas, Rosala; Jimnez-Hidalgo, Eduardo; Garca-Barrera, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    The Mixteca Alta Oaxaquea is in the state of Oaxaca, southern Mexico. This region is characterized by numerous Pleistocene fossiliferous localities. The objective of this study is to describe a diverse assemblage of Late Pleistocene freshwater and terrestrial mollusks in two localities from northeastern Oaxaca, Coixtlahuaca District. We identified 10 taxa of gastropods and one of bivalves. By the sedimentological characteristics and the mollusks assemblage, it is possible to relate the first locality with meandriform river deposits, without vegetation. The second locality was associated with a floodplain with short-lived associated vegetation. Five identified species constitute the most austral records of these taxa in Neartic Realm. In all the taxa, the Late Pleistocene occurrences constitute the last records of the identified mollusks in the study zone.

  11. Late quaternary stratigraphy and sedimentology of the inner part of southwest Joseph Bonaparte Gulf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph Bonaparte Gulf is a large embayment on the northwestern continental margin of Australia. It is approximately 300 km east-west and 120 km north-south with a broad continental shelf to seaward. Maximum width from the southernmost shore of Joseph Bonaparte Gulf to the edge of the continental shelf is 560 km. Several large rivers enter the gulf along its shores. The climate is monsoonal. sub-humid, and cyclone-prone during the December-March wet season. A bedrock high (Sahul Rise) rims the shelf margin. The sediments within the gulf are carbonates to seaward, grading into clastics inshore. A seaward-thinning wedge of highstand muds dominates the sediments of the inner shelf of Joseph Bonaparte Gulf. Mud banks up to 15m thick have developed inshore. Coarse-grained sand ridges up to 15m high are found off the mouth of the Ord River. These overlie an Upper Pleistocene transgressive lag of mixed carbonate and gravelly siliciclastic sand. Four drowned strandlines are present on the inner shelf at depths of 20, 25, 28 and 30 m below datum. These are interpreted as having formed during stillstands in the Late Pleistocene transgression. Older strandlines at great depths are inferred as having formed during the fall in sea-level following the last highstand. For the most part the Upper Pleistocene-Holocene marine sediments overlie an erosion surface cut into older Pleistocene sediments. Incised valleys cut into this erosion surface are up to 5 km wide and have a relief of at least 20 m. The largest valley is that cut by the Ord River. Upper Pleistocene sediments deposited in the incised valleys include interpreted lowstand fluvial gravels, early transgressive channel sands and floodplain silts, and late transgressive estuarine sands and gravels. Spot samples were collected and subjected to 14C dating, x-ray diffraction and palynological studies. Older Pleistocene sediments are inferred to have been deposited before and during the 120 ka highstand (isotope stage 5). They consist of sandy calcarenites deposited in high-energy tide-dominated shelf environments. Still older shelf and valley-fill sediments underlie these. The contrast between the Holocene muddy clastic sediments and the sandy carbonates deposited by the 120 ka highstand suggests that either the climate was more arid in the past, with less fluvial transport. or that mud was more effectively trapped in estuaries, allowing development of carbonate depositional environments inshore. Copyright (2000) Geological Society of Australia

  12. Stratigraphy and evolution of emerged Pleistocene reefs at the Red Sea coast of Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Basher; Bussert, Robert; Dominik, Wilhelm

    2016-02-01

    Emerged Pleistocene coral reefs constitute a prominent landform along the Red Sea coast of Sudan. They are well exposed with a thickness of up to 12 m and extend over a width of about 3 km parallel to the coastline. Four major reef units that represent different reef zones are distinguished. Unit 1 is located directly at the coastline and is assigned to the rock-reef rim, while unit 2 represents the reef-front zone. Unit 3 is attributed to the reef-flat zone and unit 4 to the back-reef zone. The stratigraphic position and age of the four units respectively the facies zones are based on field relationships and δ18O analysis. Results of δ18O analysis of coral, gastropod and bivalve samples were correlated to previous age dating of correlative reefs in Sudan and other parts of the Red Sea region. Estimation of reef ages was mainly based on δ18O values of the reef-front zone (unit 2) and the observed sedimentary succession of the reefs. δ18O values of two Porites coral samples from the reef-front zone strongly suggest equivalent ages of 120 and 122 ka that correspond to marine isotope stage MIS 5.5. Based on δ18O values and the field relationship to the reef-front zone, ages of reef-flat zone (unit 3) and back-reef zone (unit 4) could be assigned to MIS 9 and MIS 7 respectively. MIS 5.1 is suggested for the reef-rock rim (unit 1). The relationship of the reef zones to individual MIS might be explained by the predominance of a specific zone during a certain stage, while other facies were less well developed and/or later eroded by wave action. The reef unit most distal from the recent coastline formed during interglacial stage MIS 7, while former studies assign this unit to interglacial stage MIS 9. Unique flourishing, high diversity and excellent preservation of corals in the back-reef unit of MIS 7 reflect growth in troughs landward of the oldest reef-flat formed during previous interglacial stage MIS 9.

  13. Radiocarbon dates and late-Quaternary stratigraphy from Mamontova Gora, unglaciated central Yakutia, Siberia, U.S.S.R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewe, T.L.; Journaux, A.; Stuckenrath, R.

    1977-01-01

    A fine exposure of perennially frozen ice-rich silt and associated flora and vertebrate fauna of late-Quaternary age exists at Mamontova Gora along the Aldan River in central Yakutia, Siberia, U.S.S.R. The silt deposit caps a 50-m-high terrace and consists of three units. An upper layer 1-2 m thick overlies a 10-15-m-thick brownish to black silt layer. The lower silt layer is greenish to gray and about 15 m thick. All the silt is well sorted with 60% of the particles falling between 0.005 and 0.5 mm in diameter and is generally chemically and mineralogically homogeneous. The middle unit contains may extinct vertebrate mammal remains and ice wedges. The lower unit contains little vegetation and no ice wedges. The silt is widespread and exists as a loamy blanket on terraces at various elevations on both sides of the lower Aldan River. The origin of the silt blanket of late-Quaternary age in central Yakutia has long been controversial. Various hypotheses have been suggested, including lacustrine and alluvial, as well as frost-action origins. It is sometimes referred to as loess-like loam. Pe??we?? believes the silt at Mamontova Gora is loess, some of which has been retransported very short distances by water. The silt probably was blown from wide, braided, unvegetated flood plains of rivers draining nearby glaciers. The silt deposits are late Quaternary in age and probably associated with the Maximum glaciation (Samarov) and Sartan and Syryan glaciations of Wisconsinan age. On the basis of biostratigraphy, 10 radiocarbon dates, and their relation to the nearby glacial record, it is felt that the upper unit at Mamontova Gora is Holocene and the middle unit is Wisconsinan. The youngest date available from the middle unit at this particular location is 26,000 years. Dates greater than 56,000 years were obtained in the lower part of the middle unit. The lower unit is definitely beyond the range of radiocarbon dating and probably is older than the last interglacial. The sediment, fauna, ice wedges, stratigraphy, and age of perennially frozen slit deposits in central Alaska are remarkably similar to those of the deposits exposed in central Yakutia. Both areas consist of unglaciated rolling lowlands and river terraces surrounded by high mountains that were extensively glaciated in Pleistocene time. The glaciers extended from the high mountains to the edges of the ranges. In both regions, extensively braided, silt-charged rivers drained the mountains and flowed through the lowlands on their way to the sea. It follows that there should be a similar late-Quaternary history. ?? 1977.

  14. Late Quaternary stratigraphy and geochronology of the western Killpecker Dunes, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, J.H.; Mahan, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    New stratigraphic and geochronologic data from the Killpecker Dunes in southwestern Wyoming facilitate a more precise understanding of the dune field's history. Prior investigations suggested that evidence for late Pleistocene eolian activity in the dune field was lacking. However, luminescence ages from eolian sand of ???15,000 yr, as well as Folsom (12,950-11,950 cal yr B.P.) and Agate Basin (12,600-10,700 cal yr) artifacts overlying eolian sand, indicate the dune field existed at least during the latest Pleistocene, with initial eolian sedimentation probably occurring under a dry periglacial climate. The period between ???13,000 and 8900 cal yr B.P. was characterized by relatively slow eolian sedimentation concomitant with soil formation. Erosion occurred between ???8182 and 6600 cal yr B.P. on the upwind region of the dune field, followed by relative stability and soil formation between ???5900 and 2700 cal yr B.P. The first of at least two latest Holocene episodes of eolian sedimentation occurred between ???2000 and 1500 yr, followed by a brief (???500 yr) episode of soil formation; a second episode of sedimentation, occurring by at least ???700 yr, may coincide with a hypothesized Medieval warm period. Recent stabilization of the western Killpecker Dunes likely occurred during the Little Ice Age (???350-100 yr B.P.). The eolian chronology of the western Killpecker Dunes correlates reasonably well with those of other major dune fields in the Wyoming Basin, suggesting that dune field reactivation resulted primarily due to departures toward aridity during the late Quaternary. Similar to dune fields on the central Great Plains, dune fields in the Wyoming Basin have been active under a periglacial climate during the late Pleistocene, as well as under near-modern conditions during the latest Holocene. ?? 2003 University of Washington. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiocarbon chronology of Late Pleistocene large mammal faunas from the Pannonian basin (Hungary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovács J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Geochronological data from the mammal fauna of the Pannonian basin during the Late Pleistocene are compiled. Thirty-four megafaunal samples (including both fossil bone and associated materials such as charcoal, previously radiocarbon dated by accelerator mass spectrometry and conventional methods, range from 43 to 10.3 14C ka BP (47-13 ka cal BP. Thus, most samples date within Marine Isotope Stage (MIS 3 and 2 of the Late Pleistocene, and indicate that the mammoth steppe fauna was able to colonize this region during a period of rapid environmental change. The radiocarbon evidence fits well into the known colonization pattern of the mammoth steppe and shows a continuous distribution in the Late Weichselian grassland areas of East Central Europe.

  16. The late Middle Pleistocene hominin fossil record of eastern Asia: synthesis and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, Middle Pleistocene hominin fossils that cannot be allocated to Homo erectus sensu lato or modern H. sapiens have been assigned to different specific taxa. For example, in eastern Asia, these hominin fossils have been classified as archaic, early, or premodern H. sapiens. An increasing number of Middle Pleistocene hominin fossils are currently being assigned to H. heidelbergensis. This is particularly the case for the African and European Middle Pleistocene hominin fossil record. There have been suggestions that perhaps the eastern Asian late Middle Pleistocene hominins can also be allocated to the H. heidelbergensis hypodigm. In this article, I review the current state of the late Middle Pleistocene hominin fossil record from eastern Asia and examine the various arguments for assigning these hominins to the different specific taxa. The two primary conclusions drawn from this review are as follows: 1) little evidence currently exists in the eastern Asian Middle Pleistocene hominin fossil record to support their assignment to H. heidelbergensis; and 2) rather than add to the growing list of hominin fossil taxa by using taxonomic names like H. daliensis for northeast Asian fossils and H. mabaensis for Southeast Asian fossils, it is better to err on the side of caution and continue to use the term archaic H. sapiens to represent all of these hominin fossils. What should be evident from this review is the need for an increase in the quality and quantity of the eastern Asian hominin fossil data set. Fortunately, with the increasing number of large-scale multidisciplinary paleoanthropological field and laboratory research projects in eastern Asia, the record is quickly becoming better understood. PMID:21086528

  17. Cougars' key to survival through the Late Pleistocene extinction: insights from dental microwear texture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desantis, Larisa R G; Haupt, Ryan J

    2014-01-01

    Cougars (Puma concolor) are one of only two large cats in North America to have survived the Late Pleistocene extinction (LPE), yet the specific key(s) to their relative success remains unknown. Here, we compare the dental microwear textures of Pleistocene cougars with sympatric felids from the La Brea Tar Pits in southern California that went extinct at the LPE (Panthera atrox and Smilodon fatalis), to clarify potential dietary factors that led to the cougar's persistence through the LPE. We further assess whether the physical properties of food consumed have changed over time when compared with modern cougars in southern California. Using dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA), which quantifies surface features in three dimensions, we find that modern and Pleistocene cougars are not significantly different from modern African lions in any DMTA attributes, suggesting moderate durophagy (i.e. bone processing). Pleistocene cougars from La Brea have significantly greater complexity and textural fill volume than Panthera atrox (inferred to have primarily consumed flesh from fresh kills) and significantly greater variance in complexity values than S. fatalis. Ultimately, these results suggest that cougars already used or adopted a more generalized dietary strategy during the Pleistocene that may have been key to their subsequent success. PMID:24759373

  18. Cougars key to survival through the Late Pleistocene extinction: insights from dental microwear texture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Larisa R. G.; Haupt, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Cougars (Puma concolor) are one of only two large cats in North America to have survived the Late Pleistocene extinction (LPE), yet the specific key(s) to their relative success remains unknown. Here, we compare the dental microwear textures of Pleistocene cougars with sympatric felids from the La Brea Tar Pits in southern California that went extinct at the LPE (Panthera atrox and Smilodon fatalis), to clarify potential dietary factors that led to the cougar's persistence through the LPE. We further assess whether the physical properties of food consumed have changed over time when compared with modern cougars in southern California. Using dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA), which quantifies surface features in three dimensions, we find that modern and Pleistocene cougars are not significantly different from modern African lions in any DMTA attributes, suggesting moderate durophagy (i.e. bone processing). Pleistocene cougars from La Brea have significantly greater complexity and textural fill volume than Panthera atrox (inferred to have primarily consumed flesh from fresh kills) and significantly greater variance in complexity values than S. fatalis. Ultimately, these results suggest that cougars already used or adopted a more generalized dietary strategy during the Pleistocene that may have been key to their subsequent success. PMID:24759373

  19. Mid-Late Pleistocene OSL chronology in western Amazonia and implications for the transcontinental Amazon pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Dilce F.; Cohen, Marcelo C. L.; Tatumi, Sonia H.; Sawakuchi, André O.; Cremon, Édipo H.; Mittani, Juan C. R.; Bertani, Thiago C.; Munita, Casimiro J. A. S.; Tudela, Diego R. G.; Yee, Márcio; Moya, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    The origin of the transcontinental Amazon drainage system remains unrevealed. Sedimentary deposits formed from the Neogene in the Amazonas and Solimões Basins constitute natural archives for reconstructing this event in space and time. However, paleoenvironmental and chronological analyses focusing on these deposits, or even their basic mapping, are still scarce to allow such investigation. In this context, primary interests are fluvial strata related to the lithostratigraphic Içá Formation, mapped over a widespread area in western Amazonian lowlands. Although long regarded as Plio-Pleistocene in age, this unit has not yet been dated and its overall depositional setting remains largely undescribed. The main goal of the present work is to contribute for improving facies analysis and chronology of these deposits, approaching an area in southwestern Amazonia and another in northern Amazonia, which are located more than 1000 km apart. Despite this great distance, the sedimentological and chronological characteristics of deposits from these two areas are analogous. Hence, facies analysis revealed paleoenvironments including active channel, abandoned channel, point bar, crevasse splay and floodplain, which are altogether compatible with meandering fluvial systems. Similarly, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating revealed thirty three ages ranging from 65.4 ± 16.9 to 219.6 ± 25.1 ky (in addition to three outliners of 54.0 ± 7.6, 337.3 ± 36.9 and 346.6 ± 48.6 ky), and nine 97.1 ± 9.9 to 254.8 ± 23.8 ky for the areas in southwestern and northern Amazonia, respectively. These data lead to establish that deposits mapped as Içá Formation over a vast area of western Brazilian Amazonia have a Mid-Late Pleistocene age, rather than the previously inferred Plio-Pleistocene age. It follows that if Plio-Pleistocene deposits exist in this region they remain to be dated and must be restricted to a narrow belt in western Amazonia, as well as isolated occurrences underlying the Mid-Late Pleistocene strata characterized herein. The combination of data from this work with previously published provenance studies supports main Andean sediment sources only in the Mid-Late Pleistocene. It is proposed that before this time, the Amazon River was restricted to eastern Amazonia, being separated from western Amazonian drainage basins due to the presence of the Purus Arch. Erosion and/or subsidence of this geological feature would have promoted the connection of these drainage systems, ultimately with the expressive record of the transcontinental Amazon pathway into the Atlantic Ocean in the Mid-Late Pleistocene.

  20. New insights into mid-late Pleistocene fossil hominin paranasal sinus morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollikofer, Christoph P E; Ponce De León, Marcia S; Schmitz, Ralf W; Stringer, Christopher B

    2008-11-01

    Mid-late Pleistocene fossil hominins such as Homo neanderthalensis and H. heidelbergensis are often described as having extensively pneumatized crania compared with modern humans. However, the significance of pneumatization in recognizing patterns of phyletic diversification and/or functional specialization has remained controversial. Here, we test the null hypothesis that the paranasal sinuses of fossil and extant humans and great apes can be understood as biological spandrels, i.e., their morphology reflects evolutionary, developmental, and functional constraints imposed onto the surrounding bones. Morphological description of well-preserved mid-late Pleistocene hominin specimens are contrasted with our comparative sample of modern humans and great apes. Results from a geometric morphometric analysis of the correlation between paranasal sinus and cranial dimensions show that the spandrel hypothesis cannot be refuted. However, visualizing specific features of the paranasal sinus system with methods of biomedical imaging and computer graphics reveals new aspects of patterns of growth and development of fossil hominins. PMID:18951483

  1. Large Late Pleistocene landslides from the marginal slope of the Flysch Carpathians

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pánek, T.; Hartvich, Filip; Jankovská, Vlasta; Klimeš, Jan; Tábořík, Petr; Bubík, M.; Smolková, V.; Hradecký, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 6 (2014), s. 981-992. ISSN 1612-510X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:67985939 Keywords : fossil landslide * radiocarbon dating * electrical resistivity tomography * pollen analysis * Late Pleistocene * Flysch Carpathians * Marine Isotope Stage 3 Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography; EF - Botanics (BU-J) Impact factor: 2.870, year: 2014

  2. Late Pleistocene Desiccation of Lake Victoria and Rapid Evolution of Cichlid Fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas C.; Scholz, Christopher A.; Talbot, Michael R.; Kelts, Kerry; Ricketts, R. D.; Ngobi, Gideon; Beuning, Kristina; Ssemmanda, Immacculate; McGill, J. W.

    1996-08-01

    Lake Victoria is the largest lake in Africa and harbors more than 300 endemic species of haplochromine cichlid fish. Seismic reflection profiles and piston cores show that the lake not only was at a low stand but dried up completely during the Late Pleistocene, before 12,400 carbon-14 years before the present. These results imply that the rate of speciation of cichlid fish in this tropical lake has been extremely rapid.

  3. Distribution of late Pleistocene ice-rich syngenetic permafrost of the Yedoma Suite in east and central Siberia, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Guido; Robinson, Joel E.; Bryant, Robin; Taylor, Maxwell D.; Harper, William; DeMasi, Amy; Kyker-Snowman, Emily; Veremeeva, Alexandra; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Harden, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This digital database is the product of collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks; the Los Altos Hills Foothill College GeoSpatial Technology Certificate Program; the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany; and the Institute of Physical Chemical and Biological Problems in Soil Science of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The primary goal for creating this digital database is to enhance current estimates of soil organic carbon stored in deep permafrost, in particular the late Pleistocene syngenetic ice-rich permafrost deposits of the Yedoma Suite. Previous studies estimated that Yedoma deposits cover about 1 million square kilometers of a large region in central and eastern Siberia, but these estimates generally are based on maps with scales smaller than 1:10,000,000. Taking into account this large area, it was estimated that Yedoma may store as much as 500 petagrams of soil organic carbon, a large part of which is vulnerable to thaw and mobilization from thermokarst and erosion. To refine assessments of the spatial distribution of Yedoma deposits, we digitized 11 Russian Quaternary geologic maps. Our study focused on extracting geologic units interpreted by us as late Pleistocene ice-rich syngenetic Yedoma deposits based on lithology, ground ice conditions, stratigraphy, and geomorphological and spatial association. These Yedoma units then were merged into a single data layer across map tiles. The spatial database provides a useful update of the spatial distribution of this deposit for an approximately 2.32 million square kilometers land area in Siberia that will (1) serve as a core database for future refinements of Yedoma distribution in additional regions, and (2) provide a starting point to revise the size of deep but thaw-vulnerable permafrost carbon pools in the Arctic based on surface geology and the distribution of cryolithofacies types at high spatial resolution. However, we recognize that the extent of Yedoma deposits presented in this database is not complete for a global assessment, because Yedoma deposits also occur in the Taymyr lowlands and Chukotka, and in parts of Alaska and northwestern Canada.

  4. Late Pleistocene mammoth remains from Coastal Maine, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, B.G.; Fisher, D.C.; Borns, H.W., Jr.; Churchill-Dickson, L. L.; Dorion, C.C.; Weddle, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    Remains identified as those of a woolly mammoth ( Mammuthus primigenius ) dated at 12,200 ?? 55 14C yr B.P. were recovered while excavating in a complex sequence of glaciomarine sediments in Scarborough, Maine, USA. The mammoth was found in the top meter of a fossiliferous unit of mud and sand laminites. These sediments were deposited during a marine regressive phase following the transgression that accompanied northward retreat of the margin of the Laurentide ice sheet. A Portlandia arctica valve from the underlying transgressive unit provides a minimum age of 14,820 ?? 105 14C yr B.P. for local deglaciation. The mammoth, an adult female, died in midwinter with no evidence of human involvement. Tusk growth rates and oxygen-isotope variation over the last few years of life record low seasonality. The mammoth was transported to the site as a partial carcass by the late-glacial proto-Saco River. It sank in a near-shore setting, was subjected to additional disarticulation and scattering of elements, and was finally buried in sediments reworked by the shallowing sea. ?? 2004 University of Washington. All rights reserved.

  5. Deciphering Late-Pleistocence landscape evolution: linking proxies by combining pedo-stratigraphy and luminescence dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Sebastian; Meszner, Sascha; Faust, Dominik; Fuchs, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Interpreting former landscape evolution asks for understanding the processes that sculpt such landforms by means of deciphering complex systems. For reconstructing terrestrial Quaternary environments based on loess archives this might be considered, at least, as a three step process: (1) Identifying valuable records in appropriate morphological positions in a previously defined research area, (2) analysing the profiles by field work and laboratory methods and finally (3) linking the previously considered pseudo-isolated systems to set up a comprehensive picture. Especially the first and the last step might bring some pitfalls, as it is tempting to specify single records as pseudo-isolated, closed systems. They might be, with regard to their preservation in their specific morphological position, but in fact they are part of a complex, open system. Between 2008 and 2013, Late-Pleistocene loess archives in Saxony have been intensively investigated by field and laboratory methods. Linking pedo- and luminescence dating based chronostratigraphies, a composite profile for the entire Saxonian Loess Region has been established. With this, at least, two-fold approach we tried to avoid misinterpretations that might appear when focussing on one standard profile in an open morphological system. Our contribution focuses on this multi-proxy approach to decipher the Late-Pleistocene landscape evolution in the Saxonian Loess Region. Highlighting the challenges and advantages of combining different methods, we believe that (1) this multi-proxy approach is without alternative, (2) the combination of different profiles may simplify the more complex reality, but it may be a useful generalisation to understand and reveal the stratigraphical significance of the landscape evolution in this region.

  6. Increased late Pleistocene erosion rates during fluvial aggradation in the Garhwal Himalaya, northern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherler, Dirk; Bookhagen, Bodo; Wulf, Hendrik; Preusser, Frank; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2015-10-01

    The response of surface processes to climatic forcing is fundamental for understanding the impacts of climate change on landscape evolution. In the Himalaya, most large rivers feature prominent fill terraces that record an imbalance between sediment supply and transport capacity, presumably due to past fluctuations in monsoon precipitation and/or effects of glaciation at high elevation. Here, we present volume estimates, chronological constraints, and 10Be-derived paleo-erosion rates from a prominent valley fill in the Yamuna catchment, Garhwal Himalaya, to elucidate the coupled response of rivers and hillslopes to Pleistocene climate change. Although precise age control is complicated due to methodological problems, the new data support formation of the valley fill during the late Pleistocene and its incision during the Holocene. We interpret this timing to indicate that changes in discharge and river-transport capacity were major controls. Compared to the present day, late Pleistocene hillslope erosion rates were higher by a factor of ∼2-4, but appear to have decreased during valley aggradation. The higher late Pleistocene erosion rates are largely unrelated to glacial erosion and could be explained by enhanced sediment production on steep hillslopes due to increased periglacial activity that declined as temperatures increased. Alternatively, erosion rates that decrease during valley aggradation are also consistent with reduced landsliding from threshold hillslopes as a result of rising base levels. In that case, the similarity of paleo-erosion rates near the end of the aggradation period with modern erosion rates might imply that channels and hillslopes are not yet fully coupled everywhere and that present-day hillslope erosion rates may underrepresent long-term incision rates.

  7. Late Pleistocene glaciolacustrine sedimentation and paleogeography of southeastern Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    The geomorphic, stratigraphic and sedimentological characteristics of glaciolacustrine sediments in the metropolitan Detroit, Michigan area were studied to determine environments of deposition and make paleogeographic reconstructions. Nine lithofacies were identified and paleoenvironments interpreted based on their morphostratigraphic relationships with relict landforms. The sediments studied are found southeast of the Defiance and Birmingham moraines lying beneath a lowland characterized by a low morainal swell (Detroit moraine) and a series of lacustrine terraces that descend progressively in elevation southeastward. The glaciolacustrine sediments were deposited approximately 14.3-12.4 kA BP during the Port Bruce and Port Huron glacial phases of late Wisconsinan time, and are related to proglacial paleolakes Maumee, Arkona, Whittlesey, Warren, Wayne, Grassmere, Lundy and Rouge. The glaciolacustrine section is typically 2-4 m thick and consists of a basal unit of wavy-bedded clayey diamicton overlain by a surficial deposit of stratified and cross-stratified sand and gravel. The basal unit is comprised of subaqueous debris flow deposits that accumulated as subaqueous moraine in paleolake Maumee along the retreating front of the Huron lobe. The surficial deposits of sand and gravel were formed by traction, resulting from lacustrine wave activity and fluvial processes, in lakebed plain, beach ridge and deltaic depositional settings. Much of the lake-margin sand and gravel was derived from clayey diamicton by lacustrine wave action and winnowing, and that associated with paleolakes of the Port Huron phase is largely reworked Port Bruce sediment. Paleogeographic reconstructions show that the Defiance, Birmingham and Detroit moraines, Defiance and Rochester channels, and the Rochester delta, were deposited penecontemporaneously as paleolake Maumee expanded northward across the map area. A unique type of wavy bedform is characteristic of clayey diamicton deposited by subaqueous mass flow in the study area that is useful for differentiating sediment: 1) deposited by mass flow in subaqueous vs. subaerial settings, and 2) deposited by subaqueous mass flow vs. basal till. These bedforms are a useful tool for identifying subglacial meltwater deposits, and facilitate the mapping and correlation of glacial sediments based on till sheets. The map area provides a continental record of ice sheet dynamics along the southern margin of the Laurentide ice sheet during Heinrich event H-1. The record reveals rapid glacial retreat (˜ 0.8 km/yr) contemporaneous with the discharge of a large volume of meltwater. Evidence in the study area for subglacial meltwater is problematic, but indications that periglacial conditions persisted in the map area until ˜ 12.7 kA BP, and extended for 200 km or more south of the ice front suggest that a frozen substrate may have contributed to instability of the LIS.

  8. THE MIDDLE PLEISTOCENE DEPOSITS OF THE ROMAN BASIN (LATIUM, ITALY):AN INTEGRATED APPROACH OF MAMMAL BIOCHRONOLOGY AND SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY

    OpenAIRE

    SALVATORE MILLI; MARIA RITA PALOMBO; CARMELO PETRONIO; RAFFAELE SARDELLA

    2004-01-01

    The biochronological setting proposed for the Plio-Pleistocene large mammal faunas of the Italian peninsula is based on the definition of faunal units (FUs) and mammal ages (MAs). Many evidences suggest that a multidisciplinary approach could enable us to better understand the actual meaning of a given faunal assemblage taking into account sedimentological and physical stratigraphic studies of the sedimentary successions in which local mammal faunas occur. The Pleistocene deposits of the Roma...

  9. Late Pleistocene to Holocene environmental changes from δ13C determinations in soils at Teotihuacan, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vallejo Gómez

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Stable carbon isotopic signature (δ13C of soil organic matter (SOM is used as a high-spatial resolution tool to infer environmental changes during late Pleistocene to Present in the Teotihuacan valley, Mexico. Interpretation was based on climatic preferences of C3, CAM and C4 plant groups. δ13C values of modern plant types are clearly distinguished. C3 plants display values around –27‰, while C4 and CAM plants have values around––13‰. Data from soil profiles range from -25.7 to -15.5 ‰. Cerro Gordo site δ13C varyies around -20‰, indicating long-term, time-stable co-existence between C3 and C4 or CAM plants. The more depleted signatures (-23 ± 2 ‰ are, dominated by carbon from C3 vegetation of late Pleistocene swamp paleosols in the Tepexpan profile of the Lake Texcoco. Younger paleosols from lower valley sites, have less depleted values (-17 ± 1 ‰, dominated by C4 and CAM carbon. Late Holocene and modern soils present slightly more negative values (1-2 ‰ with respect to δ13C of underlying soils. Our results show 1 an increase of 10-70 % depending on the site, during the transition from the late Pleistocene to early Holocene, and 2 a dominance of C4 vegetation, up to 84%, in valley environment during the middle Holocene. These data support a climatic change from cold and wet conditions in the Last Glacial Maximum and late Pleistocene, to warm and dry conditions in middle Holocene. A slight rise in moisture availability during late Holocene is inferred based on the 4-10% increase in C3 plant carbon in soils from the valley. Conditions remained generally warm and dry, much as they are at present, favouring the development of agriculture in the valley. Our interpretation agrees with results of paleoenvironmental studies at Texcoco Lake based on diatom and pollen analyses in lake.

  10. Argon geochronology of late Pleistocene to Holocene Westdahl volcano, Unimak Island, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Andrew T.; Moore, Richard B.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    High-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of selected lavas from Westdahl Volcano places time constraints on several key prehistoric eruptive phases of this large active volcano. A dike cutting old pyroclastic-flow and associated lahar deposits from a precursor volcano yields an age of 1,654+/-11 k.y., dating this precursor volcano as older than early Pleistocene. A total of 11 geographically distributed lavas with ages ranging from 47+/-14 to 127+/-2 k.y. date construction of the Westdahl volcanic center. Lava flows cut by an apparent caldera-rim structure yielded ages of 81+/-5 and 121+/-8 k.y., placing a maximum date of 81 ka on caldera formation. Late Pleistocene and Holocene lavas fill the caldera, but most of them are obscured by the large summit icecap.

  11. People of the ancient rainforest: late Pleistocene foragers at the Batadomba-lena rockshelter, Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Nimal; Kourampas, Nikos; Simpson, Ian A; Deraniyagala, Siran U; Bulbeck, David; Kamminga, Johan; Perera, Jude; Fuller, Dorian Q; Szabó, Katherine; Oliveira, Nuno V

    2011-09-01

    Batadomba-lena, a rockshelter in the rainforest of southwestern Sri Lanka, has yielded some of the earliest evidence of Homo sapiens in South Asia. H. sapiens foragers were present at Batadomba-lena from ca. 36,000 cal BP to the terminal Pleistocene and Holocene. Human occupation was sporadic before the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Batadomba-lena's Late Pleistocene inhabitants foraged for a broad spectrum of plant and mainly arboreal animal resources (monkeys, squirrels and abundant rainforest snails), derived from a landscape that retained equatorial rainforest cover through periods of pronounced regional aridity during the LGM. Juxtaposed hearths, palaeofloors with habitation debris, postholes, excavated pits, and animal and plant remains, including abundant Canarium nutshells, reflect intensive habitation of the rockshelter in times of monsoon intensification and biome reorganisation after ca. 16,000 cal BP. This period corresponds with further broadening of the economic spectrum, evidenced though increased contribution of squirrels, freshwater snails and Canarium nuts in the diet of the rockshelter occupants. Microliths are more abundant and morphologically diverse in the earliest, pre-LGM layer and decline markedly during intensified rockshelter use on the wane of the LGM. We propose that changing toolkits and subsistence base reflect changing foraging practices, from shorter-lived visits of highly mobile foraging bands in the period before the LGM, to intensified use of Batadomba-lena and intense foraging for diverse resources around the site during and, especially, following the LGM. Traces of ochre, marine shell beads and other objects from an 80 km-distant shore, and, possibly burials reflect symbolic practices from the outset of human presence at the rockshelter. Evidence for differentiated use of space (individual hearths, possible habitation structures) is present in LGM and terminal Pleistocene layers. The record of Batadomba-lena demonstrates that Late Pleistocene pathways to (aspects of) behavioural 'modernity' (composite tools, practice of symbolism and ritual, broad spectrum economy) were diverse and ecologically contingent. PMID:21777951

  12. Progress in integrated Late Triassic carbon isotopic stratigraphy of the Northern Calcareous Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richoz, Sylvain; Krystyn, Leopold; Lein, Richard

    2015-04-01

    During the Late Triassic, despite new important originations a general decline in biodiversity was marked by a series of steps between the Carnian and the Rhaetian, with the T-J boundary event as final strike. The Reingraben Event and the Julian-Tuvalian boundary are two first massive turnovers; the Carnian-Norian boundary records a major vertebrate turnover, the early to middle Norian boundary comes up with a turnover in both the reefal and pelagic fauna and the most dramatic loss (70%) in biodiversity among Late Triassic molluscs. Around the Norian-Rhaetian boundary, the pelagic fauna of higher trophic level starts declining, whereas the reefs experience a blooming time. A refined stratigraphy and a construction of a well-calibrated carbon isotope reference curve are necessary to decipher between gradual environmental changes and abrupt or even catastrophic events during the Late Triassic. Improvement in the Upper Triassic d13Ccarb curve shows that after a gentle increase until the base of the Carnian, the early Carnian records three negative excursions of 2 to 3‰ amplitude. The two first excursions rebound to previous values, whereas the third negative excursion, at the Julian-Tuvalian boundary, is followed by a positive excursion up to +5‰. The remaining Upper Carnian displays stabile values around 2‰. The Carnian-Norian boundary interval is marked by a minor increase of less than 1‰. The Early to Middle Norian crisis is marked by a turning point from Early Norian slowly increasing carbon isotope values (up to 3.5‰) to gradually decreasing ones until 1.8‰ at the base of the Rhaetian. This Norian decrease display two accelerated steps, one in the middle Norian and the other one just after the Norian-Rhaetian Boundary. This last 1‰ decrease corresponds however to an important change in lithology. The values show then a small increase during the early Rhaetian, with a maximum in the middle Rhaetian (at 2.4‰). The isotopic record remains constant until the top of the Rhaetian with its significant negative shift identified in a number of marine sections in close proximity to the extinction event. The general stability of the curve even through the Norian-Rhaetian boundary crisis event describes a stable oceanic structure prior the mass extinction. From an isotopic point of view, only the two Lower Carnian excursions, the Early Late-Upper Carnian Boundary and the Triassic-Jurassic Boundary can be interpreted as events, whereas other biotic crises of the Late Triassic seem to have occurred during periods of gradual changes in the carbon isotopic composition of seawater.

  13. Synchronous genetic turnovers across Western Eurasia in Late Pleistocene collared lemmings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palkopoulou, Eleftheria; Baca, Mateusz; Abramson, Natalia I; Sablin, Mikhail; Socha, Paweł; Nadachowski, Adam; Prost, Stefan; Germonpré, Mietje; Kosintsev, Pavel; Smirnov, Nickolay G; Vartanyan, Sergey; Ponomarev, Dmitry; Nyström, Johanna; Nikolskiy, Pavel; Jass, Christopher N; Litvinov, Yuriy N; Kalthoff, Daniela C; Grigoriev, Semyon; Fadeeva, Tatyana; Douka, Aikaterini; Higham, Thomas F G; Ersmark, Erik; Pitulko, Vladimir; Pavlova, Elena; Stewart, John R; Węgleński, Piotr; Stankovic, Anna; Dalén, Love

    2016-05-01

    Recent palaeogenetic studies indicate a highly dynamic history in collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx spp.), with several demographical changes linked to climatic fluctuations that took place during the last glaciation. At the western range margin of D. torquatus, these changes were characterized by a series of local extinctions and recolonizations. However, it is unclear whether this pattern represents a local phenomenon, possibly driven by ecological edge effects, or a global phenomenon that took place across large geographical scales. To address this, we explored the palaeogenetic history of the collared lemming using a next-generation sequencing approach for pooled mitochondrial DNA amplicons. Sequences were obtained from over 300 fossil remains sampled across Eurasia and two sites in North America. We identified five mitochondrial lineages of D. torquatus that succeeded each other through time across Europe and western Russia, indicating a history of repeated population extinctions and recolonizations, most likely from eastern Russia, during the last 50 000 years. The observation of repeated extinctions across such a vast geographical range indicates large-scale changes in the steppe-tundra environment in western Eurasia during the last glaciation. All Holocene samples, from across the species' entire range, belonged to only one of the five mitochondrial lineages. Thus, extant D. torquatus populations only harbour a small fraction of the total genetic diversity that existed across different stages of the Late Pleistocene. In North American samples, haplotypes belonging to both D. groenlandicus and D. richardsoni were recovered from a Late Pleistocene site in south-western Canada. This suggests that D. groenlandicus had a more southern and D. richardsoni a more northern glacial distribution than previously thought. This study provides significant insights into the population dynamics of a small mammal at a large geographical scale and reveals a rather complex demographical history, which could have had bottom-up effects in the Late Pleistocene steppe-tundra ecosystem. PMID:26919067

  14. Response of methanogenic archaea to Late Pleistocene and Holocene climate changes in the Siberian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Juliane; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Gattinger, Andreas; Schloter, Michael; Kurchatova, Anna N.; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Wagner, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    order to investigate the link between the methane dynamics in permafrost deposits and climate changes in the past, we studied the abundance, composition, and methane production of methanogenic communities in Late Pleistocene and Holocene sediments of the Siberian Arctic. We detected intervals of increased methane concentrations in Late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits along a 42 ka old permafrost sequence from Kurungnakh Island in the Lena Delta (northeast Siberia). Increased amounts of archaeal life markers (intact phospholipid ethers) and a high variety in genetic fingerprints detected by 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene analyses of methanogenic archaea suggest presently living and presumably active methanogenic archaea in distinct layers predominantly in Holocene deposits, but also in deep frozen ground at 17 m depth. Potential methanogenic activity was confirmed by incubation experiments. By comparing methane concentrations, microbial incubation experiments, gene analysis of methanogens, and microbial life markers (intact phospholipid esters and ethers) to already partly degraded membrane lipids, such as archaeol and isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers, we demonstrated that archaeol likely represents a signal of past methanogenic archaea. The archaeol signal was used to reconstruct the response of methanogenic communities to past temperature changes in the Siberian Arctic, and the data suggest higher methane emissions occurred during warm periods, particularly during an interval in the Late Pleistocene and during the Holocene. This new data on present and past methanogenic communities in the Siberian terrestrial permafrost imply that these microorganisms will respond to the predicted future temperature rise in the Arctic with increasing methane production, as demonstrated in previous warmer periods.

  15. Human influence on distribution and extinctions of the late Pleistocene Eurasian megafauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkina, Diana; Raia, Pasquale

    2008-06-01

    Late Pleistocene extinctions are of interest to paleontological and anthropological research. In North America and Australia, human occupation occurred during a short period of time and overexploitation may have led to the extinction of mammalian megafauna. In northern Eurasia megafaunal extinctions are believed to have occurred over a relatively longer period of time, perhaps as a result of changing environmental conditions, but the picture is much less clear. To consider megafaunal extinction in Eurasia, we compare differences in the geographical distribution and commonness of extinct and extant species between paleontological and archaeological localities from the late middle Pleistocene to Holocene. Purely paleontological localities, as well as most extinct species, were distributed north of archaeological sites and of the extant species, suggesting that apart from possible differences in adaptations between humans and other species, humans could also have a detrimental effect on large mammal distribution. However, evidence for human overexploitation applies only to the extinct steppe bison Bison priscus. Other human-preferred species survive into the Holocene, including Rangifer tarandus, Equus ferus, Capreolus capreolus, Cervus elaphus, Equus hemionus, Saiga tatarica, and Sus scrofa. Mammuthus primigenius and Megaloceros giganteus were rare in archaeological sites. Carnivores appear little influenced by human presence, although they become rarer in Holocene archaeological sites. Overall, the data are consistent with the conclusion that humans acted as efficient hunters selecting for the most abundant species. Our study supports the idea that the late Pleistocene extinctions were environmentally driven by climatic changes that triggered habitat fragmentation, species range reduction, and population decrease, after which human interference either by direct hunting or via indirect activities probably became critical. PMID:18199470

  16. Testing the correlation of fragmented pollen records of the middle and late Pleistocene temperate stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuneš, Petr; Odgaard, Bent Vad

    Europe provide good chronologies and thus enable a biostratigraphic definition of at least younger MIS. In Northern Europe, however, the fragmentary character of the records and the weaknesses of absolute dating prevent good age estimates. Therefore, age-determination of the majority of fragmentary...... records depends on site-to-site correlations. This comparison has often been performed on a visual basis, lacking clearly defined protocols and statements of underlying assumptions. Here I test the correlation of well and poorly known pollen records of the middle- and late-Pleistocene temperate stages...

  17. AMS-dating of Late Pleistocene and Holocene syngenetic ice-wedges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the 14C dating (both conventional and AMS) of Siberian permafrost sediments and ice-wedge ice. Direct dating of Late Pleistocene and Holocene syngenetic ice-wedges was done on organic material included in the ice. The time of ice formation (in 14C years) is 21,000-14,000 BP for Seyaha, and 7100 BP for Shchuch'ya. The AMS dates show that the ice-wedges stratification is normal, i.e., the older ice is located below the younger. The 14C dates yield for the first time a timescale (in 14C years) for paleoclimatic indicators (oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios from the ice)

  18. The late Pleistocene glacial sequence in the middle Maruia valley, southeast Nelson, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glacial and fluvioglacial landforms and deposits preserved in the middle reaches of the Maruia valley, southeast Nelson, New Zealand, record the activity of the Maruia glacier during the late Pleistocene Otira Glaciation. Five advances are recognised, from oldest to youngest: Creighton 1, 2, 3, and the Reid Stream 1, 2 advances. There was an interstadial interval between the Creighton 3 and Reid Stream 1 advances. The Reid Stream 1 advance occurred shortly after 14 800 years B.P. (NZ536, old T/sub 0.5/). (auths)

  19. LATE PLEISTOCENE RODENTS (MAMMALIA: RODENTIA FROM THE BARANICA CAVE NEAR KNJAZEVAC (EASTERN SERBIA: SYSTEMATICS AND PALAEOECOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KATARINA BOGICEVIC

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Baranica is a cave in the Balkan mountain range in the eastern part of Serbia. It contains four layers of sediments of Quaternary age. The Upper Pleistocene deposits (layers 2-4 have yielded a rich and diverse assemblage of vertebrate fauna, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and small and large mammals. In this work, preliminary results of a study of the rodent fauna from the Upper Pleistocene deposits of the Baranica Cave (Knjazevac, eastern Serbia are presented. The fossil material comes from the 1995 archaeological excavation. The remains of 10 rodent species are described herein: Spermophilus cf. citelloides, Castor fiber, Sicista subtilis, Cricetulus migratorius, Cricetus cricetus, Mesocricetus newtoni, Apodemus ex gr. sylvaticus-flavicollis, Spalax leucodon, Dryomys nitedula, and Muscardinus avellanarius. Along with eight vole species, this makes altogether 18 species of rodents found in this locality. Both layers 2 and 4 (layer 3 is very poor in fossils have yielded a rodent fauna typical for the cold periods of the Late Pleistocene on the Balkan Peninsula, with a prevalence of open and steppe inhabitants, but some forest dwellers were also present. The assemblages from these layers are similar, but there are some differences in the composition of the fauna, which may indicate a slight shift towards drier conditions. They have also been compared to rodent associations from some Serbian and Bulgarian localities of the same age and their similarities and differences are discussed. SHORT NOTE-NOTA BREVE

  20. Ancient DNA analyses exclude humans as the driving force behind late Pleistocene musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) population dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Paula F; Willerslev, Eske; Sher, Andrei; Orlando, Ludovic; Axelsson, Erik; Tikhonov, Alexei; Aaris-Sørensen, Kim; Greenwood, Alex D.; Kahlke, Ralf-Dietrich; Kosintsev, Pavel; Krakhmalnaya, Tatiana; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Lemey, Philippe; MacPhee, Ross; Norris, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    The causes of the late Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions are poorly understood. Different lines of evidence point to climate change, the arrival of humans, or a combination of these events as the trigger. Although many species went extinct, others, such as caribou and bison, survived to the present. The musk ox has an intermediate story: relatively abundant during the Pleistocene, it is now restricted to Greenland and the Arctic Archipelago. In this study, we use ancient DNA sequences, tempo...

  1. Phylogeography of the Alcippe morrisonia (Aves: Timaliidae: long population history beyond late Pleistocene glaciations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shouhsien

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of Pleistocene glacial oscillations in current biodiversity and distribution patterns varies with latitude, physical topology and population life history and has long been a topic of discussion. However, there had been little phylogeographical research in south China, where the geophysical complexity is associated with great biodiversity. A bird endemic in Southeast Asia, the Grey-cheeked Fulvetta, Alcippe morrisonia, has been reported to show deep genetic divergences among its seven subspecies. In the present study, we investigated the phylogeography of A. morrisonia to explore its population structure and evolutionary history, in order to gain insight into the effect of geological events on the speciation and diversity of birds endemic in south China. Results Mitochondrial genes cytochrome b (Cytb and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI were represented by 1236 nucleotide sites from 151 individuals from 29 localities. Phylogenetic analysis showed seven monophyletic clades congruent with the geographically separated groups, which were identified as major sources of molecular variance (90.92% by AMOVA. TCS analysis revealed four disconnected networks, and that no haplotype was shared among the geographical groups. The common ancestor of these populations was dated to 11.6 Mya and several divergence events were estimated along the population evolutionary history. Isolation by distance was inferred by NCPA to be responsible for the current intra-population genetic pattern and gene flow among geographical groups was interrupted. A late Pleistocene demographic expansion was detected in the eastern geographical groups, while the expansion time (0.20.4 Mya was earlier than the Last Glacial Maximum. Conclusion It is proposed that the complicated topology preserves high genetic diversity and ancient lineages for geographical groups of A. morrisonia in China mainland and its two major islands, and restricts gene exchange during climate oscillations. Isolation by distance seems to be an important factor of genetic structure formation within geographical populations. Although glacial influence to population fluctuation was observed in late Pleistocene, it seems that populations in eastern China were more susceptible to climate change, and all geographical groups were growing stably through the Last Glacial Maximum. Coalescence analysis suggested that the ancestor of A. morrisonia might be traced back to the late Miocene, and the current phylogeographical structure of A. morrisonia is more likely to be attributable to a series geological events than to Pleistocene glacial cycles.

  2. A chronology of Late-Pleistocene permafrost events in southern New Jersey, eastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, H.M.; Demitroff, M.; Forman, S.L.; Newell, W.L.

    2007-01-01

    Frost fissures, filled with wind-abraded sand and mineral soil, and numerous small-scale non-diastrophic deformations, occur in the near-surface sediments of the Pine Barrens of southern New Jersey. The fissures are the result of thermal-contraction cracking and indicate the previous existence of either permafrost or seasonally-frozen ground. The deformations reflect thermokarst activity that occurred when permafrost degraded, icy layers melted and density-controlled mass displacements occurred in water-saturated sediments. Slopes and surficial materials of the area reflect these cold-climate conditions. Optically-stimulated luminescence permits construction of a tentative Late-Pleistocene permafrost chronology. This indicates Illinoian, Early-Wisconsinan and Late-Wisconsinan episodes of permafrost and/or deep seasonal frost and a Middle-Wisconsinan thermokarst event. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Extraordinary incidence of cervical ribs indicates vulnerable condition in Late Pleistocene mammoths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumer, Jelle W F; Ten Broek, Clara M A; Galis, Frietson

    2014-01-01

    The number of cervical vertebrae in mammals is highly conserved at seven. We have shown that changes of this number are selected against due to a coupling with major congenital abnormalities (pleiotropic effects). Here we show that the incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in Late Pleistocene mammoths from the North Sea is high (33.3%) and approximately 10 times higher than that of extant elephants (3.6%). Abnormal numbers were due to the presence of large cervical ribs on the seventh vertebra, which we deduced from the presence of rib articulation facets on sixth (posterior side) and seventh (anterior side) cervical vertebrae. The incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in mammoths appears to be much higher than in other mammalian species, apart from exceptional sloths, manatees and dugongs and indicates a vulnerable condition. We argue that the increased incidence of cervical ribs in mammoths is probably caused by inbreeding and adverse conditions that impact early pregnancies in declining populations close to extinction in the Late Pleistocene. PMID:24711969

  4. Extraordinary incidence of cervical ribs indicates vulnerable condition in Late Pleistocene mammoths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle W.F. Reumer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The number of cervical vertebrae in mammals is highly conserved at seven. We have shown that changes of this number are selected against due to a coupling with major congenital abnormalities (pleiotropic effects. Here we show that the incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in Late Pleistocene mammoths from the North Sea is high (33.3% and approximately 10 times higher than that of extant elephants (3.6%. Abnormal numbers were due to the presence of large cervical ribs on the seventh vertebra, which we deduced from the presence of rib articulation facets on sixth (posterior side and seventh (anterior side cervical vertebrae. The incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in mammoths appears to be much higher than in other mammalian species, apart from exceptional sloths, manatees and dugongs and indicates a vulnerable condition. We argue that the increased incidence of cervical ribs in mammoths is probably caused by inbreeding and adverse conditions that impact early pregnancies in declining populations close to extinction in the Late Pleistocene.

  5. Mastodon herbivory in mid-latitude late-Pleistocene boreal forests of eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teale, Chelsea L.; Miller, Norton G.

    2012-07-01

    Skeletal remains of the extinct American mastodon have often been found with deposits of short, decorticated twigs intermixed with plant fragments presumed to be gastrointestinal or fecal material. If such deposits are digesta, paleobotanical evidence may be used to analyze mastodon foraging strategy, with implications for assessing habitat selection, ecological roles, and response to environmental change. To identify components of mastodon diet in mid-latitude late-Pleistocene boreall forests of eastern North America, plant macrofossils and pollen from a molar socket (Hyde Park site, New York) were compared with dispersed deposits associated with skeletal remains (Hiscock and Chemung sites, New York). Similar macrofossil condition and twig morphology among samples, but difference from a modern boreal fen analog, confirmed the deposits were digesta. Comparison of twigs with material from other paleontological sites and modern elephants suggested dimensions generally indicative of digesta. Picea formed the bulk of each sample but Pinus may have been locally important. Wintertime browsing of Salix and Populus, and springtime consumption of Alnus, were indicated. Evidence for Cyperaceae, Gramineae, and Compositae was ambiguous. If conifers, broadleaf trees, shrubs, and herbs were necessary to fulfill dietary requirements, mastodons would have been nutritionally stressed by rapid late-Pleistocene decrease in vegetational diversity.

  6. A Pathological Late Pleistocene canid from San Sidero (Italy): implications for social- and feeding-behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurino, Dawid Adam; Fico, Rosario; Petrucci, Mauro; Sardella, Raffaele

    2013-03-01

    Evidence of diseases on vertebrate fossil bones can provide detailed information on many aspects of extinct animals. This study focused on pathological craniodental remains (left maxilla and dentary) referred to the canid Cuon alpinus unearthed from a Late Pleistocene karst filling deposit at San Sidero (Apulia, southern Italy). These fossils show clear evidence of a chronic periodontitis that caused the animal's death. Clinical diagnosis of the disease and the timing of its development have been defined on the basis of a veterinary odontostomatology approach, in addition to radiographic and tomographic techniques. From the initiation of the infection until death, a time span of at least 6 months occurred, and three main steps have been defined: (1) the bacterial infections of the buccal cavity turning into severe periodontitis, (2) the fracture of the lower carnassial and (3) the loss of teeth due to the worsening infection that deformed and/or eroded maxillary and mandibular bones and enlarged alveoli. The analysis of the palaeopathology also provides information about the biomechanics of the bite, on the feeding behaviour and on the relationships of injured members in a pack of Late Pleistocene canids.

  7. Rodent burrows in late Pleistocene paleosols at Korean Palaeolithic sites and their implications for paleoclimate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H.; Park, S.; Lee, J.; Lee, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Rodent burrows are commonly found at many Paleolithic archaeological sites in Korea. They are nearly straight in horizontal view and gently inclined in lateral view. Burrow diameters are mostly 7 - 10cm, and burrow length may reach a few meters. Vertical penetration depths are generally about 1 m from the surface, and the thickness of the burrow-bearing layer is about 1-2 m. Although no remains (bones, teeth, claws, and coprolites) were found within burrows, they are interpreted to have been produced by rodent-like mammals (probably ground squirrels) based on the size and architecture. According to the previous study, the age of these burrows was constrained to be between ca. 40,000 and 25,000 yr BP by tephrochronology, radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence dating results (Lim et al., 2007). However, little is known about the reason why these burrows have disappeared after late Pleistocene time. For this question, two explanations can be considered: extinction or migration. Since same kinds of burrows are still found in the high-latitude regions, such as Mongolia and North America, the possibility of extinction can be ruled out. Therefore, migration seems to be the most likely explanation. Our results show that the destruction of habitat caused by climate change during this period is the main reason for the northward migration of burrowing animals. This study suggests that rodent burrows found in the late Pleistocene paleosols can provide useful information on paleoclimate and paleoenvironmental changes.

  8. Utility of radiocarbon-dated stratigraphy in determining late Holocene earthquake recurrence intervals, upper Cook Inlet region, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Schmoll, H.R.

    1992-01-01

    During the great 1964 earthquake, parts of coastal southern Alaska subsided tectonically as much as 2 m, and this led to burial of high-intertidal organic-rich marshes by low-intertidal and tidal silt. In the tectonically active parts of upper Cook Inlet, the presence of stratigraphic sections containing numerous prehistoric interbedded layers of peat and silt suggests that such stratigraphy resulted when marshes and forests were similarly inundated and buried by intertidal and tidal sediment as a result of great, prehistoric earthquakes. This study tests the feasibility of using buried, radiocarbon-dated, late Holocene peat layers that are exposed in the intertidal zone of upper Cook Inlet to determine earthquake recurrence intervals. Because of problems associated with conventional radiocarbon dating, the complex stratigraphy of the study area, the tectonic setting, and regional changes in sea level, conclusions from the study do not permit precise identification of the timing and recurrence of paleoseismic events. -from Authors

  9. A history of glacial stratigraphy in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbyshire, Edward

    Glacial stratigraphy had a late start in China, and it fell to Li Szeguang, an outstanding geologist with a little experience of the European Alps, to inject a systematic approach into the study of Chinese Pleistocene glacial stratigraphy starting in the early 1920s. Several diamictons in low latitude mountains of E. China were attributed to glaciation. A formal stratigraphy had to await his detailed and long term studies of the Lushan (2930'N) on which he based a three-fold sequence of Poyang (Gunz correlate), Da Gu (= Mindel) and Lushan (Riss). A Dali (Wrm) glaciation was added on the basis of evidence from Yunnan Province. Based on much morphological and erosional evidence as well as an assumption of glacial provenance for the widespread bouldery clays, and despite early critical reviews, this work became the dominant hypothesis in Chinese glacial stratigraphy for over 50 years. Echoes of it still remain in the literature, despite mounting sedimentological evidence that the diamictons are weathered debris flow and alluvial accumulations (with some thin, high-level solifluction earths). Increasingly, glacial stratigraphy is now being based on the glaciated west of China from Yunnan to western Xinjiang and it is here that the definitive glacial stratigraphy will be established. At least four glaciations arealready authenticated in many localities in this vast region, although the resolution of this stratigraphy may never match that of the classic loess stratigraphy of Shaanxi and the yet-to-be studied stratigraphy of the thick lacustrine successions in the high desert basins of the west.

  10. Paleosoils and pedogenic calcretes formations in Fray Bentos (Oligocene - early miocene) Raigon (late pliocene and middle pleistocene) and Libertad (early - middle pleistocene)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fray Bentos formation is composed by loessic deposits based on paleosoils and pedogenic calcretes (Oligocene - early miocene). In this deposits are tubular and lamellar formations which would have been formed in arid climates.The fluvial origen of Raigon Formation, (late pliocene and middle pleistocene) presents a paleosoil roof which is generated under a subhumid climate.The Libertad Formation during the glacial intervals consisted of loess deposits

  11. A late Pleistocene steppe bison ( Bison priscus) partial carcass from Tsiigehtchic, Northwest Territories, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazula, Grant D.; MacKay, Glen; Andrews, Thomas D.; Shapiro, Beth; Letts, Brandon; Brock, Fiona

    2009-12-01

    A partial steppe bison ( Bison priscus) carcass was recovered at Tsiigehtchic, near the confluence of the Arctic Red and Mackenzie Rivers, Northwest Territories, Canada in September of 2007. The carcass includes a complete cranium with horn cores and sheaths, several complete post-cranial elements (many of which have some mummified soft tissue), intestines and a large piece of hide. A piece of metacarpal bone was subsampled and yielded an AMS radiocarbon age of 11,830 ± 45 14C yr BP (OxA-18549). Mitochondrial DNA sequenced from a hair sample confirms that Tsiigehtchic steppe bison ( Bison priscus) did not belong to the lineage that eventually gave rise to modern bison ( Bison bison). This is the first radiocarbon dated Bison priscus in the Mackenzie River valley, and to our knowledge, the first reported Pleistocene mammal soft tissue remains from the glaciated regions of northern Canada. Investigation of the recovery site indicates that the steppe bison was released from the permafrost during a landslide within unconsolidated glacial outwash gravel. These data indicate that the lower Mackenzie River valley was ice free and inhabited by steppe bison by ˜11,800 14C years ago. This date is important for the deglacial chronology of the Laurentide Ice Sheet and the opening of the northern portal to the Ice Free Corridor. The presence of steppe bison raises further potential for the discovery of more late Pleistocene fauna, and possibly archaeological evidence, in the region.

  12. Environmentally controlled succession in a late Pleistocene coral reef (Sinai, Egypt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewis, H.; Kiessling, W.

    2013-03-01

    The concept of ecological succession has been frequently applied in the study of ancient reefs. Whereas Paleozoic and Mesozoic reefs are commonly thought to reveal an autogenic primaryclimax zonation, patterns in Neogene and Quaternary reefs are much more diverse. Here, we describe a well-preserved late Pleistocene coral reef from Dahab on Sinai Peninsula (Egypt), which shows a distinct zonation that resembles an ecological succession. In contrast to classical examples of ecological successions, species composition, paleoenvironmental conditions, and coral biodiversity of the Dahab reef indicate an allogenic, sea-level controlled community change, from marginal marine to reef slope and back reef. A review of the literature confirms that autogenic, short-term successions are virtually absent in Quaternary reefs. We predict that long generation times of corals make it unlikely that classical autogenic successions develop in reefs at all, unless environmental conditions are unusually stable.

  13. Late Pleistocene and Holocene environmental history of the Iguala Valley, Central Balsas Watershed of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperno, D R; Moreno, J E; Iriarte, J; Holst, I; Lachniet, M; Jones, J G; Ranere, A J; Castanzo, R

    2007-07-17

    The origin of agriculture was a signal development in human affairs and as such has occupied the attention of scholars from the natural and social sciences for well over a century. Historical studies of climate and vegetation are closely associated with crop plant evolution because they can reveal the ecological contexts of plant domestication together with the antiquity and effects of agricultural practices on the environment. In this article, we present paleoecological evidence from three lakes and a swamp located in the Central Balsas watershed of tropical southwestern Mexico that date from 14,000 B.P. to the modern era. [Dates expressed in B.P. years are radiocarbon ages. Calibrated (calendar) ages, expressed as cal B.P., are provided for dates in the text.] Previous molecular studies suggest that maize (Zea mays L.) and other important crops such as squashes (Cucurbita spp.) were domesticated in the region. Our combined pollen, phytolith, charcoal, and sedimentary studies indicate that during the late glacial period (14,000-10,000 B.P.), lake beds were dry, the climate was cooler and drier, and open vegetational communities were more widespread than after the Pleistocene ended. Zea was a continuous part of the vegetation since at least the terminal Pleistocene. During the Holocene, lakes became important foci of human activity, and cultural interference with a species-diverse tropical forest is indicated. Maize and squash were grown at lake edges starting between 10,000 and 5,000 B.P., most likely sometime during the first half of that period. Significant episodes of climatic drying evidenced between 1,800 B.P. and 900 B.P. appear to be coeval with those documented in the Classic Maya region and elsewhere, showing widespread instability in the late Holocene climate. PMID:17537917

  14. Ages and inferred causes of late Pleistocene glaciations on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigati, J.S.; Zreda, M.; Zweck, C.; Almasi, P.F.; Elmore, D.; Sharp, W.D.

    2008-01-01

    Glacial landforms on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i, show that the summit area of the volcano was covered intermittently by ice caps during the Late Pleistocene. Cosmogen 36Cl dating of terminal moraines and other glacial landforms indicates that the last two ice caps, called Older Makanaka and Younger Makanaka, retreated from their maximum positions approximately 23ka and 13ka, respectively. The margins and equilibrium line altitudes of these ice caps on the remote, tropical Pacific island were nearly identical, which would seem to imply the same mechanism for ice growth. But modelling of glacier mass balance, combined with palaeotemperature proxy data from the subtropical North Pacific, suggests that the causes of the two glacial expansions may have been different. Older Makanaka airatop Mauna Kea was likely wetter than today and cold, whereas Younger Makanaka times were slightly warmer but significantly wetter than the previous glaciation. The modelled increase in precipitation rates atop Mauna Kea during the Late Pleistocene is consistent with that near sea level inferred from pollen data, which suggests that the additional precipitation was due to more frequent and/ or intense tropical storms associated with eastward-moving cold fronts. These conditions were similar to modern La Ni??a (weak ENSO) conditions, but persisted for millennia rather than years. Increased precipitation rates and the resulting steeper temperature lapse rates created glacial conditions atop Mauna Kea in the absence of sufficient cooling at sea level, suggesting that if similar correlations existed elsewhere in the tropics, the precipitation-dependent lapse rates could reconcile the apparent difference between glacial-time cooling of the tropics at low and high altitudes. Copyright ?? 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Late Pleistocene lithostratigraphy and sequences in the southwestern Mesopotamia (Argentina): Evidences of the last interglacial stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernesto, Brunetto; Soledad, Ferrero Brenda; Ignacio, Noriega Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to show the stratigraphic record of the Late Pleistocene corresponding to the distal region of the Paraná River basin. It displays sedimentological, paleontological and geochronological evidences that characterise the last interglacial-glacial cycle. In particular, strong environmental records are shown for the Last Interglacial Stage (LIS). Salto Ander Egg Formation (SAEF) is defined as a new lithostratigraphic unit representative of the Late Pleistocene in southwestern Mesopotamia. This unit is formed of complex fluvial deposits, which contains a heterogeneous collection of sub-environments, of ages ranging from 120 to 60 ky BP. The clast-supported gravel facies containing sparse boulders indicate high flow during a humid climate. The large and middle-scale architectures of fluvial sedimentary bodies evidence the relationship between the sediment accommodation and the sea level oscillations. Three sub-sequences identified in the succession suggest a transgressive trend during the MIS5e, a highstand stage in MIS5c, and a minor transgressive cycle during MIS3. A Brazilian faunal association collected at the bottom of the sequence and sedimentological interpretations display wet and warm climatic conditions, typical of tropical or subtropical environments. Such environmental conditions are characteristic of the maximum of the last interglacial stage (MIS5e) and show a signal stronger than the signal of the current interglacial stage. All these data show a direct correlation between the increases of paleodischarges and the elevation of the sea level. The whole sequence is completed with transitional swampy deposits, accumulated probably during the MIS3/MIS2 transition, and the typical loess of the Tezanos Pinto Formation, mantled during the Last Maximum Glacial.

  16. Relationship between Late Pleistocene sea-level variations, carbonate platform morphology and aragonite production (Maldives, Indian Ocean)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, A.; Reijmer, J.J.G.; Frstenau, J.; Kinkel, Hanno; Betzler, C.

    2012-01-01

    A piston core from the Maldives carbonate platform was investigated for carbonate mineralogy, grain-size distributions, calcium carbonate content and organic carbon. The sedimentary record was linked to Late Pleistocene sea-level variations, using an age model based on oxygen isotopes obtained from...

  17. Late Silurian and Early Devonian conodont stratigraphy in the Prague Synform and correlation of bioevents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slavík, Ladislav

    Buenos Aires : Asociación Paleontológica Argentina , 2013 - (Albanesi, G.; Ortega, G.). s. 149-149 [Conodonts from the Andes : International Conodont Symposium /3./. 15.07.2013-19.07.2013, Mendoza] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : conodonts * stratigraphy * Silurian * Devonian Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  18. Relic Late Pleistocene fluvial forms as geomorphic archives indicating periods of high climatic runoff over the East European Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, Andrei; Belyaev, Yury; Eremenko, Ekaterina; Sidorchuk, Alexei

    2014-05-01

    In water balance estimations within palaeoenvironmental studies river runoff is estimated as the difference between precipitation and evapotranspiration. The other technique is numerical modeling using general circulation models. Both approaches fail to recognize epochs of extremely high surface runoff characteristic for the Pleistocene cold epochs and recorded in geomorphic outcomes of this runoff. We have studied two kinds of such archives that have wide spatial coverage over the East European Plain (EEP). 1. Post-LGM large palaeochannels (macromeanders) in river valleys with channel width and meander wavelength 5-15 times as great as that of modern rivers. Massive measurements of their parameters and application of specially constructed transfer function provided estimations of palaeo-runoff from large river basins: in the Black Sea and Caspian Sea catchments it carried from 2.2 (Kama River) to 3.1 (Don, Dnieper Rivers) times as great as modern runoff. High runoff lasted long enough to provide formation of 2-3 generations of macromeanders characteristic for many valleys. Macromeanders were radiocarbon dated at 6 sites over EEP in the range 13-19 cal ka BP, but it is not clear whether high runoff was characteristic for the entire period or it performed during short isolated epochs within this interval. Therefore, it is not clear to what exact time palaeohydrological estimations should be attributed. 2. Dendritic and parallel systems of gentle hollows clearly designated in vegetation-free areas south from 55-57ºN. Distinctive spatial patterns and full integration into water transportation through modern fluvial landscapes provides interpretation of these hollow systems as partially or totally buried networks of small dry valleys (balkas). It is supported by revelation of buried incisions up to 10 m deep by coring and trenching across hollows. Ancient erosion network demonstrates erosion density much higher and Horton's "belt of no erosion" much narrower and therefore exhibits much abundant surface runoff than those at present. Dating of buried balkas has until recent times been based either on pollen spectra from peat deposits (in central EEP), or on stratigraphy of paleosoils found in the bottom of paleoforms (in southern EEP). Both markers point at Eemian (MIS 5e) age of their stabilization and therefore pre-Eemian (late MIS 6?) age of incision. However first attempt of OSL dating gave the contradictory result of filling of a 6-m deep balka by slopewash sediments during 80-70 ka BP. Questionable is the >30-ka delay between the soil formation in the balka bottom and start of its filling. It may mean either post-Eemian age of the soil, which would be unfortunate for the regional soil stratigraphy, or insufficient sensitivity of local quartz at ages close to Eemian. The conclusion is that geomorphic evidences make unique palaeohydrological archives that document changes not recorded in other types of palaeoenvironmental data, but they suffer from uncertainties and low resolution of dating. This presentation contributes to RFBR Projects 14-05-00119 and 14-05-00146.

  19. Carbon cycle instability as a cause of the late Pleistocene ice age oscillations - Modeling the asymmetric response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Barry; Maasch, Kirk A.

    1988-01-01

    A dynamical model of the Pleistocene ice ages is presented, which incorporates many of the qualitative ideas advanced recently regarding the possible role of ocean circulation, chemistry, temperature, and productivity in regulating long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide variations. This model involves one additional term (and free parameter) beyond that included in a previous model (Saltzman and Sutera, 1987), providing the capacity for an asymmetric response. It is shown that many of the main features exhibited by the delta(O-18)-derived ice record and the Vostok core/delta(C-13)-derived carbon dioxide record in the late Pleistocene can be deduced as a free oscillatory solution of the model.

  20. Late Pleistocene deglaciation in the upper Gállego Valley, central Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, David; de Andrés, Nuria; López-Moreno, Juan I.; García-Ruiz, José M.

    2015-05-01

    Deglaciation processes in the upper Gállego Valley, central-southern Pyrenees, were studied using geomorphological mapping and 36Cl cosmogenic dating of moraine and rock glacier boulders, as well as polished bedrock. Although the precise position of the Gállego Glacier during the global last glacial maximum is not known, there is evidence that ice tongues retreated to the headwaters, which caused subdivision of the main glacier into a number of individual glaciers prior to 17 ka. A range of ages (16 to 11 ka) was found among three tributary valleys within the general trend of deglaciation. The retreat rate to cirque was estimated to be relatively rapid (approximately 5 km per ka). The mapped glacial sedimentology and geomorphology appears to support the occurrence of multiple minor advances and retreats, or periods of stasis during the late deglaciation. Geomorphological and geological differences among the tributary valleys, and error estimates associated with the results obtained, prevented unambiguous correlations of the advances with the late Pleistocene cold periods. During the latter advances, small glaciers and rock glaciers developed close to the cirque headwalls, and co-occurred under the same climatic conditions. No evidence for Holocene re-advance was found for any of the three tributary valleys.

  1. Major controls on architecture, sequence stratigraphy and paleosols of middle Pleistocene continental sediments ("Qc Unit"), eastern central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Celma, Claudio; Pieruccini, Pierluigi; Farabollini, Piero

    2015-05-01

    Middle Pleistocene continental sediments in central Italy ("Qc Unit") record the oldest fluvial accumulation along the uplifting margin of the Peri-Adriatic basin. The architecture of the sediment body can be divided into two unconformity-bounded, fining-upward cycles interpreted as genetically related depositional sequences. These sequences highlight the systematic adjustment of the fluvial system to changes in the ratio between accommodation space and sediment supply (A/S ratio) and, from base to top, comprise the following surfaces and stratal components: (i) a regionally correlative sequence boundary resulting from an A/S ratio ? 0; (ii) a low-accommodation systems tract characterized by conglomerate-rich, amalgamated channel fills and recording an A/S ratio 1; and (v) a mature red argillic paleosol. To constrain the climatic signal for paleosols formation, the two sequence-capping mature paleosols have been investigated. The results of these studies suggest that they were developed under humid and warm climatic conditions associated with interglacial phases, which have been correlatively attributed to Marine Oxygen Isotope Stages 11 and 9.

  2. Modern human cranial diversity in the Late Pleistocene of Africa and Eurasia: evidence from Nazlet Khater, Peştera cu Oase, and Hofmeyr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Rougier, Hélène; Grine, Frederick; Froment, Alain

    2009-10-01

    The origin and evolutionary history of modern humans is of considerable interest to paleoanthropologists and geneticists alike. Paleontological evidence suggests that recent humans originated and expanded from an African lineage that may have undergone demographic crises in the Late Pleistocene according to archaeological and genetic data. This would suggest that extant human populations derive from, and perhaps sample a restricted part of the genetic and morphological variation that was present in the Late Pleistocene. Crania that date to Marine Isotope Stage 3 should yield information pertaining to the level of Late Pleistocene human phenotypic diversity and its evolution in modern humans. The Nazlet Khater (NK) and Hofmeyr (HOF) crania from Egypt and South Africa, together with penecontemporaneous specimens from the Peştera cu Oase in Romania, permit preliminary assessment of variation among modern humans from geographically disparate regions at this time. Morphometric and morphological comparisons with other Late Pleistocene modern human specimens, and with 23 recent human population samples, reveal that elevated levels of variation are present throughout the Late Pleistocene. Comparison of Holocene and Late Pleistocene craniometric variation through resampling analyses supports hypotheses derived from genetic data suggesting that present phenotypic variation may represent only a restricted part of Late Pleistocene human diversity. The Nazlet Khater, Hofmeyr, and Oase specimens provide a unique glimpse of that diversity. PMID:19425102

  3. Lineage-specific late pleistocene expansion of an endemic subtropical gossamer-wing damselfly, Euphaea formosa, in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jen-Pan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pleistocene glacial oscillations have significantly affected the historical population dynamics of temperate taxa. However, the general effects of recent climatic changes on the evolutionary history and genetic structure of extant subtropical species remain poorly understood. In the present study, phylogeographic and historical demographic analyses based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences were used. The aim was to investigate whether Pleistocene climatic cycles, paleo-drainages or mountain vicariance of Taiwan shaped the evolutionary diversification of a subtropical gossamer-wing damselfly, Euphaea formosa. Results E. formosa populations originated in the middle Pleistocene period (0.3 Mya and consisted of two evolutionarily independent lineages. It is likely that they derived from the Pleistocene paleo-drainages of northern and southern Minjiang, or alternatively by divergence within Taiwan. The ancestral North-central lineage colonized northwestern Taiwan first and maintained a slowly growing population throughout much of the early to middle Pleistocene period. The ancestral widespread lineage reached central-southern Taiwan and experienced a spatial and demographic expansion into eastern Taiwan. This expansion began approximately 30,000 years ago in the Holocene interglacial period. The ancestral southern expansion into eastern Taiwan indicates that the central mountain range (CMR formed a barrier to east-west expansion. However, E. formosa populations in the three major biogeographic regions (East, South, and North-Central exhibit no significant genetic partitions, suggesting that river drainages and mountains did not form strong geographical barriers against gene flow among extant populations. Conclusions The present study implies that the antiquity of E. formosa's colonization is associated with its high dispersal ability and larval tolerance to the late Pleistocene dry grasslands. The effect of late Pleistocene climatic changes on the subtropical damselfly's historical demography is lineage-specific, depending predominantly on its colonization history and geography. It is proposed that the Riss and Würm glaciations in the late Pleistocene period had a greater impact on the evolutionary diversification of subtropical insular species than the last glacial maximum (LGM.

  4. Reconstructing the climate states of the Late Pleistocene with the MIROC climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wing-Le; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; O'ishi, Ryouta; Takahashi, Kunio

    2014-05-01

    The Late Pleistocene was a period which lasted from the Eemian interglacial period to the start of the warm Holocene and was characterized mostly by widespread glacial ice. It was also a period which saw modern humans spread throughout the world and other species of the same genus, like the Neanderthals, become extinct. Various hypotheses have been put forward to explain the extinction of Neanderthals, about 30,000 years ago. Among these is one which involves changes in past climate and the inability of Neanderthals to adapt to such changes. The last traces of Neanderthals coincide with the end of Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3) which was marked by large fluctuations in temperature and so-called Heinrich events, as suggested by geochemical records from ice cores. It is thought that melting sea ice or icebergs originating from the Laurentide ice sheet led to a large discharge of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean during the Heinrich events and severely weakened the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, with important environmental ramifications across parts of Europe such as sharp decreases in temperature and reduction in forest cover. In order to assess the effects of past climate change on past hominin migration and on the extinction of certain species, it is first important to have a good understanding of the past climate itself. In this study, we have used three variants of MIROC (The Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate), a global climate model, for a time slice experiment within the Late Pleistocene: two mid-resolution models (an atmosphere model and a coupled atmosphere-ocean model) and a high-resolution atmosphere model. To obtain a fuller picture, we also look at a cool stadial state as obtained from a 'freshwater hosing' coupled-model experiment, designed to mimic the effects of freshwater discharge in the North Atlantic. We next use the sea surface temperature response from this experiment to drive the atmosphere models. We discuss the general features of the model-simulated climates and how model resolution can affect these results. We also compare our results with some available proxy data to elucidate where model simulations show good agreement.

  5. Late Pliocene to Pleistocene sensitivity of the Greenland Ice Sheet in response to external forcing and internal feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Sebastian J.; DeConto, Robert M. [University of Massachusetts, Department of Geosciences, Amherst, MA (United States); Pollard, David [Pennsylvania State University, Earth and Environmental Systems Institute, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The timing and nature of ice sheet variations on Greenland over the last {proportional_to}5 million years remain largely uncertain. Here, we use a coupled climate-vegetation-ice sheet model to determine the climatic sensitivity of Greenland to combined sets of external forcings and internal feedbacks operating on glacial-interglacial timescales. In particular, we assess the role of atmospheric pCO{sub 2}, orbital forcing, and vegetation dynamics in modifying thresholds for the onset of glaciation in late Pliocene and Pleistocene. The response of circum-Arctic vegetation to declining levels of pCO{sub 2} (from 400 to 200 ppmv) and decreasing summer insolation includes a shift from boreal forest to tundra biomes, with implications for the surface energy balance. The expansion of tundra amplifies summer surface cooling and heat loss from the ground, leading to an expanded summer snow cover over Greenland. Atmospheric and land surface fields respond to forcing most prominently in late spring-summer and are more sensitive at lower Pleistocene-like levels of pCO{sub 2}. We find cold boreal summer orbits produce favorable conditions for ice sheet growth, however simulated ice sheet extents are highly dependent on both background pCO{sub 2} levels and land-surface characteristics. As a result, late Pliocene ice sheet configurations on Greenland differ considerably from late Pleistocene, with smaller ice caps on high elevations of southern and eastern Greenland, even when orbital forcing is favorable for ice sheet growth. (orig.)

  6. Identifying climate change signals in the late Quaternary gravel-bed, braided river stratigraphy of the Canterbury Plains, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. A.; Rowan, A. V.; Covey-Crump, S. J.; Brocklehurst, S. H.; Roberts, H. M.; Duller, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    The gravel-bed, braided river stratigraphy of the Canterbury Plains, central South Island, New Zealand, was deposited over several Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles and so potentially offers an important insight into fluvial responses to climate change. The uppermost 20 m of the section which is exposed along the east coast has yielded a radiocarbon age at the base of the coastal cliffs of ~33 ka cal BP and is capped by a Holocene loess sheet, implying that it includes New Zealands Last Glacial Maximum (22-18 ka). This part of the section contains several laterally-continuous surfaces representing periods of low aggradation or non-deposition, and it is tempting to link these hiatuses to one or more periods of glacial advance, still-stand or retreat. However, this requires a reliable chronology with which to tie the stratigraphy to the excellent high-resolution climate history established for the region. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of quartz grains from sand bodies within the gravel stratigraphy provides the potential to develop this chronology. However, there is a perception that quartz from this area is a difficult candidate for luminescence dating for reasons connected with the short sediment transport distances and limited number of erosion-transport cycles which together reduce opportunities for sensitization of the luminescence signal and give low signal intensities. Recent advances in OSL dating techniques provide the opportunity to revisit this issue. In this study, nine samples from the Canterbury coastal stratigraphy were dated using OSL. The samples were collected from large sand channel fills and bar margins, five of them in vertical succession at one locality. A Single Aliquot Regenerative (SAR) dose protocol was used to generate equivalent dose (De) values from coarse-grained quartz. Standard screening criteria were applied to the SAR data prior to statistical analysis of the De distributions. The relative intensity and behaviour of the fast and medium components in the OSL signal used for dating was evaluated using signal deconvolution. The ages generated are in chronostratigraphic order and have uncertainties of about 2-3 ka (12%). We will discuss the methods used to verify the robustness of these ages and their implications for the late Quaternary depositional history of the Canterbury Plains.

  7. Gruta Nova da Columbeira, Gruta das Salemas and Gruta da Figueira Brava : stratigraphy, and chronology of the pleistocene deposits

    OpenAIRE

    M.T. Antunes; Cardoso, João Luís

    2000-01-01

    The evidence concerning the most recent Neanderthals in Portugal and maybe in the world, comes from there basic sites: Gruta das Salemas and Gruta da Figueira Brava. For Gruta Nova da Columbeira, two human occupation lewvels were 14C dated: c. 7, 26400 ± 750 BP and c. 8, 28900 ± 950 BP. The industries (denticulates, rich in levallois facies scrapers) are exclusively late Mousterian; this , as well as the fauna and a neanderthalian tooth make this cave one of the reference Mousterian sites in...

  8. Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene environments inferred from the Lake El'gygytgyn pollen record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Andrei; Wennrich, Volker; Tarasov, Pavel; Raschke (Morozova), Elena; Brigham-Grette, Julie; Nowaczyk, Norbert; Melles, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The Arctic is known to play a crucial role within the global climate system. The mid-Pliocene (3-3.5 Ma) is considered to be the most probable scenario of the future climate changes. However, reliable climate projections are hampered by the complexity of the underlying natural variability and feedback mechanisms. An important prerequisite for the validation and improvement of the future projections is a better understanding of the long-term environmental history of the Arctic. Unfortunately, formation of continuous paleoenvironmental records in the Arctic was widely restricted due to repeated glaciations. Continuous sequences that penetrate the entire Quaternary and further into the Pliocene are highly desired and would enable to validate the temperature rise during the mid-Pliocene that was proposed by former studies. Such a record has now become available from Lake El'gygytgyn (6730'N, 17205E') located in a meteorite impact crater in north-eastern Siberia. The impact nearly 3.6 Ma ago formed an 18 km wide hole in the ground that then filled with water. The retrieved lake sediments have trapped pollen from a several thousand square-kilometer source area providing reliable insights into regional and over-regional millennial-scale vegetation and climate changes of the Arctic since the Pliocene. The ''El'gygytgyn Drilling Project" of ICDP has completed three holes in the center of the lake, penetrating about 318 m thick lake sediments and about 200 m of the impact rocks below. Because of its unusual origin and high-latitude setting in western Beringia, scientific drilling at Lake El'gygytgyn offered unique opportunities for paleoclimate research, allowing time-continuous climatic and environmental reconstructions back into the Pliocene. Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene pollen assemblages can be subdivided into 55 pollen zones, which reflect the main environmental fluctuations in the region 3.55-2.15 Ma BP. Pollen-based climate reconstructions show that conditions in the study area were the warmest about 3.55-3.4 Ma BP when spruce-pine-fir-hemlock-larch-Pseudotsuga forests dominated in nowadays tundra area. After ca 3.4 Ma BP dark coniferous taxa gradually disappeared from the vegetation. Very pronounced environmental changes are revealed about ca 3.35-3.275 Ma BP when treeless tundra and steppe habitats dominated. Treeless and shrubby environments are also indicative after ca 2.6 Ma. Dry and cold climate conditions were similar to those during the Late Pleistocene. The Early Pleistocene sediments contain pollen assemblages reflecting alternation of treeless intervals with cold and dry climate and warmer intervals when larch forests with stone pines, shrub alders and birches were also common in the region. Very dry environments are revealed after ca 2.175 Ma BP. High amounts of green algae colonies (Botryococcus) in the studied sediments point to shallow-water conditions ca 2.55, 2.45, and ca 2.175 Ma BP. Thus, pollen studies show that sediments accumulated in Lake El'gygytgyn are an excellent archive of environmental changes since 3.55 Myr BP. The record well reflects main regional paleoenvironmental fluctuations. The further high-resolution palynological study of the core will reveal climate fluctuations inside the main glacial/interglacial intervals and will give the first continuous and detailed scheme of environmental changes for a whole Arctic.

  9. Correlation of the Late Pleistocene Usselo Horizon (Europe) and the Clovis Layer (North America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, J. B.

    2007-05-01

    In 1940, a dark charcoal-rich layer, 10 to 15cm thick, was found within the Late Pleistocene Coversands of the Netherlands, and named the Usselo Layer (de Laag van Usselo) by its discoverer, archaeologist CCJW Hijszeler (1902-1982). Usselo is a village near Enschedé, a few kilometres from the Dutch-German border. Research started after the war, and publications, both scientific and popular, came forth in the 1950s. By pollen content, the layer was dated to the Alleröd, the last interstadial of the Würm (Wisconsin) glaciation; radiocarbon dating indicated (pre-AMS) dates of about 11,200 14C BP. Identification of the layer at other localities was visual, and it was found in Belgium, France, Germany, Poland, and Belarus; it was also found in the UK and in Denmark, in which countries, however, no correlation was made with the other occurrences. Hijszeler had found the layer all over the Netherlands and abroad from Ostende to Hamburg, and he hypothesized the cause as a general wildfire provoked by the eruption of an Eiffel volcano. The European geologists and archaeologists, however, did not adopt his views and interpreted the layer as a paleosol, vitiating the chronology by representing the layer as the result of a long development, instead of as an eolian sediment laid down perhaps in a day or even less that provides us with a sharp marker horizon. The prehistoric Clovis culture of North America was found in the 1930s and dated to the Twocreekan, the last interstadial of the Wisconsin glaciation. The Clovis layer was especially investigated by archaeologist C.Vance Haynes Jr. Visually, the layer is easily identifiable with the Usselo Horizon of Europe. Its stratigraphic position is coincident with the end of the Clovis culture and with the disappearance of the Pleistocene megafauna. In Europe, there is a clear correlation with the sudden demise of the Magdalenian culture, best known for the Franco-Cantabrian cave paintings, and with megafaunal extinctions such as those of the Irish elk, the cave bear, and cave lion. Recently, Richard Firestone and Allen West in North America have carried out an intensive field and laboratory investigation, suspecting an extraterrestrial cause for the extinctions and the cultural discontinuity, with the Clovis layer as the extinction layer, an all-important witness to the catastrophe. They achieved positive results, the most spectacular one perhaps being the iridium content, because that element became well-known in the 1980s as an impact indicator in the K-T boundary layer. Other results include the presence of glass-like carbon, magnetic microspherules, and high levels of potassium-40. Being aware of the similarities in the Late Pleistocene stratigraphical records of Europe and North America, I contacted Firestone and West in 2005, and early in 2006 I sent them samples of the Usselo Horizon from Lommel, Belgium. The analyses they carried out yielded high levels of impact indicators, including magnetic grains, metallic spherules, carbon glass, charcoal, and in the magnetic fraction, high iridium content. These findings largely confirm the identity of the two ET impact layers on either side of the Atlantic Ocean. Hijszeler(1957) Geol.Mijnb.NS 19: 288-302. Haynes and Hemmings (1968) Science 159: 186-7. Wolbach, et al. (1985) Science 230: 167-170. Kloosterman (1999) Symp. New Scenarios of Solar System Evolution, Univ.Bergamo. (Abstract 2002). Kloosterman (2000) De Laag van Usselo, de Wereldbrand en de Verdwijntruc. Bres 201: 63-74. Kloosterman (2006) "De Komeetinslag van 13.000 jaar geleden." Frontier Mag. 12/1: 44- 45. Firestone, et al. (2006) The Cycle of Cosmic Catastrophes. Bear and Co., Rochester, Vermont.

  10. Late Pleistocene Interstadial Environment on Faddeyevskiy Island, East-Siberian Sea, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Andrei A.; Peteet, Dorothy M.; Romanenko, Fedor A.; Filimonova, Ludmila V.; Sulerzhitsky, Leopold D.; Tarasov, Pavel E.

    1999-01-01

    Pollen, plant macrofossil, LOI and radiocarbon analyses of a 1.4-m section from Faddeyevskiy Island, Novosibirskie Ostrova archipelago (75 deg 20 min N, 143 deg 50 min E, 30m elevation) provide new information on the Late Pleistocene interstadial environmental history of this high Arctic region. Bulk radiocarbon dates of 25,700 +/- 1000, 32,780 +/- 500, 35,200 +/- 650 and two AMS dates of 29,950 +/- 660 and 42,990 +/- 1280 indicate that the deposits accumulated during the Kargian (Boutellier) interval. Numerous mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) remains collected in the vicinity of the site were radiocarbon dated to 36,700-18,500 yr. BP. Rare bison (Bison priscus) bones were dated to 32,200 +/- 600 and 33,100 +/- 320. Poaceae, Cyperaceae, and Artemisia pollen dominate the pollen spectra with some Ranunculaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Rosaceae, and Compositae. These pollen spectra reflect a tundra-steppe vegetation which probably was dominant on the exposed shelf of the Arctic Ocean. The presence of Carex macrofossils infer a summer climate two degrees warmer than today. The productivity of this local vegetation during the Kargian interstadial was apparently high enough to feed the grass-eater herds.

  11. Characteristics of the active Luoshan Fault since Late Pleistocene, North Central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fengying

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The Luoshan Fault located at the northeastern margin of Tibet plateau strikes roughly N-S, and is composed of six left-stepping sections with a total length of 60 km. Much evidence suggests that the Luoshan Fault is a reverse right-lateral strike-slip fault. The largest right-lateral strike-slip displacement and the most abundant dextral offset phenomena are located along the central section. Based on the right-lateral strike-slip offsets of the oldest alluvial fan, and of a gully and on the average displacement of the same order of gullies, the minimum slip-rate has been 2.15 ± 0.2 mm/yr since Late Pleistocene. Many surface rupture phenomena, such as fault scarps with fresh free-face, ground fissures, displacements of very young gullies, imply that a recent earthquake occurred along this fault. Combining the historical catalogue and our results, we believe that the 1561 A.D. earthquake was produced by the Luoshan Fault. Three paleoearthquakes were determined by means of paleoseismic studies along the Luoshan Fault: they occurred after 8200 ± 600 years BP, between 3130 ± 240 years BP and 4150 ± ± 120 years C.BP, and before 2230 ± 170 years BP, respectively.

  12. Paleoecological and climatic implications of stable isotope results from late Pleistocene bone collagen, Ziegeleigrube Coenen, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiing, Christoph; Matzerath, Simon; Turner, Elaine; Bocherens, Herv

    2015-07-01

    Climatic and ecological conditions during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 are complex and the impact of cold spells on the ecosystems in Central Europe still needs to be investigated thoroughly. Ziegeleigrube Coenen (ZC) is a late Pleistocene MIS 3 locality in the Lower Rhine Embayment of Germany, radiocarbon-dated to > 34 14C ka BP. The site yielded a broad spectrum of mammal species. We investigated the carbon (?13C), nitrogen (?15N) and sulfur (?34S) isotope signatures of bone collagen, since these are valuable tools in characterizing ecological niches, environmental conditions and aspects of climate and mobility. By comparison with pre- and post-Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) sites in Central Europe we show that ZC belongs in a cold event of MIS 3 and was climatically more similar to post-LGM sites than to pre-LGM sites. However, the trophic structure resembled that of typical pre-LGM sites in Belgium. This cold event in MIS 3 changed the bottom of the foodweb, but do not seem to have had a direct impact on the occurrence of the mammalian species and their ecological distribution. Apparently the (mega-) faunal community could adapt also to harsher environmental conditions during MIS 3.

  13. Radiolarian Indices of Paleoproductivity Variation in the late Pleistocene Benguela Upwelling System, ODP Site 1084

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittniok, B. B.; Lazarus, D. B.; Diester-Haass, L.; Billups, K.; Meyers, P.

    2006-12-01

    Changes in export productivity play a significant role in ocean carbon budgets and global climate change. Proxies for export productivity can be difficult to interpret: benthic foraminifera accumulation rates (BFAR) can be affected by carbonate dissolution in organic-carbon rich sediments; bulk opal can be affected by silica limitation of source waters. Recent work (Lazarus et al. 2006; Mar. Micropal.) has shown that a new index based on radiolarian faunal changes (WADE ratio) correlates well to total organic carbon (TOC) values from the same samples over the long term (latest Miocene-Recent) history of productivity in the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS). We present new data on variation in export productivity proxies (WADE, TOC, carbonate, radiolarian opal, BFAR) for the last glacial-interglacial cycle from ODP Site 1084, located just offshore from the main coastal upwelling cells of the BUS. Our age model, from mean Quaternary sedimentation rates (Leg 175 Scientific Results), is in accordance with cyclic variation in other climate sensitive parameters (carbonate and color reflectance). Although opal content and radiolarian preservation is only moderate in our samples, WADE values vary significantly and suggest higher productivity during the last glacial, in accordance with current interpretations of BUS history. Radiolarian opal accumulation is also higher during the last glacial, suggesting that silica limitation (opal paradox) conditions did not dominate over this time period. Similar results for bulk opal have been reported from late Quaternary piston cores from the more northerly Congo upwelling region (Schneider et al, 1997; Paleoc.). We conclude that WADE ratios are a useful proxy for late Pleistocene productivity in the BUS at glacial- interglacial time scales.

  14. The role of cryptotephra in refining the chronology of Late Pleistocene human evolution and cultural change in North Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, RNE; Lane, CS; Albert, PG; White, D.; Collcutt, SN; Bouzouggar, A; Ditchfield, P; Farr, L; Oh, A; Ottolini, L.

    2015-01-01

    Sites in North Africa hold key information for dating the presence of Homo sapiens and the distribution of Middle Stone Age (MSA), Middle Palaeolithic (MP) and Later Stone Age (LSA) cultural activity in the Late Pleistocene. Here we present new and review recently published tephrochronological evidence for five cave sites in North Africa with long MSA/MP and LSA cultural sequences. Four tephra horizons have been identified at the Haua Fteah (Cyrenaica, Libya). They include cryptotephra eviden...

  15. Late Pleistocene deglaciation chronology in the NW of the Iberian Peninsula using cosmic-ray produced 21Ne in quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Late Pleistocene glaciations in the NW Iberian Peninsula over Serra de Queixa and Serra de Xures, all with granite substrata, were studied by mass spectrometry using cosmogenic 21Ne. Rock cores were drilled in glacial polished surfaces and push-moraine boulders, and were analyzed to determine their integral exposure time to cosmic rays. First results, which are consistent with the relative geomorphologic model estimates, allow the identification of at least three different glacial stages, with the latest terminating about 15 ka BP

  16. Late Pleistocene age and archaeological context for the hominin calvaria from GvJm-22 (Lukenya Hill, Kenya).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, Christian A; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Faith, J Tyler; Ekshtain, Ravid; Nivens, Joelle; Patterson, David; Mbua, Emma N; Spoor, Fred

    2015-03-01

    Kenya National Museums Lukenya Hill Hominid 1 (KNM-LH 1) is a Homo sapiens partial calvaria from site GvJm-22 at Lukenya Hill, Kenya, associated with Later Stone Age (LSA) archaeological deposits. KNM-LH 1 is securely dated to the Late Pleistocene, and samples a time and region important for understanding the origins of modern human diversity. A revised chronology based on 26 accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates on ostrich eggshells indicates an age range of 23,576-22,887 y B.P. for KNM-LH 1, confirming prior attribution to the Last Glacial Maximum. Additional dates extend the maximum age for archaeological deposits at GvJm-22 to >46,000 y B.P. (>46 kya). These dates are consistent with new analyses identifying both Middle Stone Age and LSA lithic technologies at the site, making GvJm-22 a rare eastern African record of major human behavioral shifts during the Late Pleistocene. Comparative morphometric analyses of the KNM-LH 1 cranium document the temporal and spatial complexity of early modern human morphological variability. Features of cranial shape distinguish KNM-LH 1 and other Middle and Late Pleistocene African fossils from crania of recent Africans and samples from Holocene LSA and European Upper Paleolithic sites. PMID:25730861

  17. Tanque Loma, a new late-Pleistocene megafaunal tar seep locality from southwest Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Emily L.; Lopez R., Eric X.

    2015-01-01

    Fossil deposits in the petroleum-rich sediments of the Santa Elena Peninsula in southwestern Ecuador contain some of the largest and best-preserved assemblages of Pleistocene megafaunal remains known from the neotropics, and thus represent an opportunity to greatly expand our knowledge of Pleistocene paleoecology and the extinction of Quaternary megafauna in this region. This paper reports data from excavations at Tanque Loma, a late-Pleistocene locality on the Santa Elena Peninsula that preserves a dense assemblage of megafaunal remains in hydrocarbon-saturated sediments along with microfaunal and paleobotanical material. The megafauna bones are concentrated in and just above a ˜0.5 m thick asphaltic layer, but occur sparsely and with poorer preservation up to 1 m above this deposit. Several meters of presumed-Holocene sediments overlying the megafauna-bearing strata are rich in bones of microvertebrates including birds, squamates, and rodents. These are interpreted as raptor assemblages. While over 1000 megafaunal bones have been identified from the Pleistocene strata at Tanque Loma, more than 85% of these remains pertain to a single species, the giant ground sloth Eremotherium laurillardi. Only five other megafauna taxa have been identified from this site, including Glossotherium cf. tropicorum, Holmesina occidentalis, cf. Notiomastodon platensis, Equus (Amerhippus) c.f. santaeelenae, and a cervid tentatively assigned to cf. Odocoileus salinae based on body size and geography. No carnivores have yet been identified from Tanque Loma, and microvertebrate remains are extremely rare in the Pleistocene deposits, although terrestrial snail shells and fragmented remains of marine invertebrates are occasionally encountered. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon dates on Eremotherium and cf. Notiomaston bones from within and just above the asphaltic layer yielded dates of ˜17,000 - 23,500 radiocarbon years BP. Taken together, the taxonomic composition, taphonomy, geologic context, and sedimentology of Tanque Loma suggest that this site represents a bone bed assemblage in a heavily vegetated, low-energy riparian environment with secondary infiltration of asphalt that helped to preserve the bones. The predominance of Eremotherium fossils at this site indicate that it may have been an area where these animals congregated, suggesting possible gregarious behavior in this taxon. The radiocarbon dates so far obtained on extinct taxa at Tanque Loma are consistent with a model positing earlier extinctions of megafauna in tropical South America than of related taxa further south on the continent, although this pattern may be an artifact of low sampling in the region. xml:lang="es" Aunque más de 1.000 huesos de megafauna han sido identificados en los estratos del Pleistoceno en Tanque Loma, más del 85% de esos mismos pertenecen a una sola especie, el perezoso gigante Eremotherium laurillardi. Sin embargo, otros cinco taxones de megafauna han sido recuperados de este sitio, los cuales son: Glossotherium cf. G. tropicorum, Holmesina occidentalis, cf. Notiomastodon platensis, Equus (Amerhippus) c.f. santaelenae y un cérvido identificado tentativamente en base a tamaño y geografía como cf. Odocoileus salinae. Ningún carnívoro ha sido identificado aún en Tanque Loma, y los restos de microvertebrados son muy raros en los estratos del Pleistoceno, aunque las conchas de caracol terrestre y los restos fragmentados de invertebrados marinos son encontrados ocasionalmente dentro de esas capas. Los fechados de radiocarbono por espectrómetro de acelerador de masas (AMS) en huesos de Eremotherium y cf. Notiomastodon de la capa de asfalto y por encima de esta resultaron en ˜17,000-23,500 años radiocarbónicos AP. En conjunto, la tafonomía, la composición taxonómica, el contexto geológico, y la sedimentolgía del sitio Tanque Loma surgieren que esta localidad representa un yacimiento depositado en un ambiente ribereño con bajo flujo y vegetación densa, con infiltraciones secundarias de asfalto lo que ayudó a preservar los huesos. El predominio de fósiles de Eremotherium indican que esta podría haber sido una área donde estos animales se congregaban, sugiriendo un posible comportamiento gregario de este taxón. Las fechas radiocarbónicas obtenidas hasta ahora en taxones extinguidos de Tanque Loma son consistente con el modelo postulado sobre la extinción de la megafauna, la cual habría sido más temprana en las regiones tropicales de Sudamérica que al sur del continente. Sin embargo, este patrón podría ser un artefacto del bajo muestreo en la región.

  18. Late-Pleistocene avifaunas from Cape Wanbrow, Otago, South Island, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossil avifaunas from the Hillgrove Formation at Boatmans Harbour, Ruby Gully, and Old Rifle Butts, all on Cape Wanbrow, Oamaru, north-east Otago, are listed. The marine beach sands and gravels at Old Rifle Butts that form the lowest part of the Hillgrove Formation and overlie the palaeo-wave platform were deposited during the last interglacial ∼ 130-110 kyr BP (Oxygen Isotope Stage 5). There are a few small avifaunas (totalling 11 spp.) from these beach sediments (J41/f8710, f8214, f8227). The colluvial, valley-fill deposits in Ruby Gully and at its mouth are the youngest in the sequence. Radiocarbon dating indicates their emplacement between 27 and 34 kyr BP, or the later part of Oxygen Isotope Stage 3. If these ages are representative of the true age of the samples and not the limitations of radiocarbon technology, they indicate that these deposits in Ruby Gully are much younger than the beach deposits. Radiocarbon ages on a pitfall fauna from a small cave 3-4 m above the base of the Hillgrove Formation indicate that the cave fauna has a similar age as that in Ruby Gully. The dune and interdune waterlaid deposits at Old Rifle Butts (>2 m above the wave platform) may date from an unknown time between 100 and 35 kyr BP or be coeval with those in Ruby Gully. Fifty-three species of bird (32 land and freshwater taxa) are represented in the combined avifaunas making this the richest Pleistocene avifauna known from New Zealand. All bird taxa are known from Late Holocene avifaunas in the eastern South Island. Key taxa (Pachyornis elephantopus, Emeus crassus, Euryapteryx geranoides, Coturnix, Chenonetta, Cnemiornis, Harpagornis, Fulica, Porphyrio, Gallinula) indicate that the habitat was mainly grassland and shrubland. Tuatara, indeterminate skinks, and seals are also present. (author). 57 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  19. The Balitx landslide (Mallorca, Spain) and its possible seismic origin: active spreading since the Late Pleistocene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Balitx landslide, located on the steep coastal side of the Tramuntana range on the island of Mallorca, is a large translational rock landslide in which the failure surface coincides with the reactivation of an earlier normal fault. The dating of calcite striae on the fault plane with U/Th techniques reveals that the last movement was over 400 kyr ago, which falls outside of the range of this method. The volume of the landslide is estimated to be over 700 million cubic metres, with a north-westward displacement of 300 m. Active extensional cracks as well as block spreads have been identified along the main scarp, together with displacement and toppling of blocks, the beginning of which coincides with oxygen isotope stage OIS 5a (Late Pleistocene = 83 kyr), a wetter and warmer period than the present. Currently active decametre-long cracks up to 50 m wide can be seen to affect the displaced materials. They reveal the rupture of the displaced block into several units at different speeds. A retrospective analysis of slope stability has been carried out, taking into account different scenarios according to three critical sea stands. All the scenarios are stable, with a safety factor of over 1.35. These results support the thesis that the Balitx landslide could have been triggered by seismicity. A study of the Balitx landslide under dynamic conditions reveals that the landslide could have been triggered by a moderate-to-high-magnitude earthquake (Mw=6.0) located close to the landslide (10-30 km) and probably related to some of the active faults identified in Majorca, such as the Palma Fault. (Author) 58 refs.

  20. The late Pleistocene ground surface temperature and corrected heat flow density for northern part of Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, J.; Gientka, D.

    2003-04-01

    Paleoclimatic ground surface temperature (GST) changes in last 100 ka years are a major factor causing vertical variation of terrestrial heat flow density (HFD). The value of this parameter important for thermal and rheological modelling may be considerably influenced by paleoclimatic factor and should be corrected for this reason. Very important criteria for studying paleoclimatic events on boreholes is the knowledge of depth distribution of thermal conductivity. However, core samples from majority of deep boreholes are hardly available and laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity are very scarce and sometimes not confident. We used a method of estimating the thermal conductivity from well logging data interpretation. The thermal conductivity was calculated using volumetric model of rock with mean geometric formula. The synthetic temperature logs (T_s) based on this data are an "active" method of investigation of vertical variation of HFD and GST determination. For a majority of deep boreholes in Polish Lowlands in uppermost part (GST in the Late Pleistocene for the representative data for 59 deep boreholes for the N of Poland. The GST was -5.17 +/- 5.45^oC. The observed big scatter of presented results seems to be consequence of unstable thermal conditions and bad calibration of old temperature logs. The amplitude of post glacial warming (ΔGST) is not less then +13.1^oC. The history of climate for the last 500 ka years shows that this time was spent mainly in ice age and this is "normal" state of HFD. The presented method of investigations seems to be very effective for determination of HFD for this condition.

  1. Variation in the nasal cavity of baboon hybrids with implications for late Pleistocene hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichel, Kaleigh Anne; Ackermann, Rebecca Rogers

    2016-05-01

    Hybridization is increasingly proving to be an important force shaping human evolution. Comparisons of both ancient and modern genomes have provided support for a complex evolutionary scenario over the past million years, with evidence for multiple incidents of gene exchange. However, to date, genetic evidence is still limited in its ability to pinpoint the precise time and place of ancient admixture. For that we must rely on evidence of admixture from the skeleton. The research presented here builds on previous work on the crania of baboon hybrids, focusing on the nasal cavity of olive baboons, yellow baboons, and first generation (F1) hybrids. The nasal cavity is a particularly important anatomical region for study, given the clear differentiation of this feature in Neanderthals relative to their contemporaries, and therefore it is a feature that will likely differ in a distinctive manner in hybrids of these taxa. Metric data consist of 45 linear, area, and volume measurements taken from CT scans of known-pedigree baboon crania. Results indicate that there is clear evidence for differences among the nasal cavities of the parental taxa and their F1 hybrids, including a greater degree of sexual dimorphism in the hybrids. There is also some evidence for transgressive phenotypes in individual F1 animals. The greatest amount of shape variation occurs in the anterior bony cavity, the choana, and the mid-nasopharynx. Extrapolating our results to the fossil record, we would expect F1 hybrid fossils to have larger nasal cavities, on average, than either parental taxon, with overall nasal cavity shape showing the most profound changes in regions that are distinct between the parental taxa (e.g., anterior nasal cavity). We also expect size and shape differences to be more pronounced in male F1 hybrids than in females. Because of pronounced anterior nasal cavity differences between Neanderthals and their contemporaries, we suggest that this model might be effective for examining the fossil record of late Pleistocene contact. PMID:27178465

  2. Mitochondrial phylogeography of moose (Alces alces): late pleistocene divergence and population expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundertmark, Kris J; Shields, Gerald F; Udina, Irina G; Bowyer, R Terry; Danilkin, Alexei A; Schwartz, Charles C

    2002-03-01

    We examined phylogeographic relationships of moose (Alces alces) worldwide to test the proposed existence of two geographic races and to infer the timing and extent of demographic processes underpinning the expansion of this species across the Northern Hemisphere in the late Pleistocene. Sequence variation within the left hypervariable domain of the control region occurred at low or moderate levels worldwide and was structured geographically. Partitioning of genetic variance among regions indicated that isolation by distance was the primary agent for differentiation of moose populations but does not support the existence of distinct eastern and western races. Levels of genetic variation and structure of phylogenetic trees identify Asia as the origin of all extant mitochondrial lineages. A recent coalescence is indicated, with the most recent common ancestor dating to the last ice age. Moose have undergone two episodes of population expansion, likely corresponding to the final interstade of the most recent ice age and the onset of the current interglacial. Timing of expansion for the population in the Yakutia--Manchuria region of eastern Asia indicates that it is one of the oldest populations of moose and may represent the source of founders of extant populations in North America, which were colonized within the last 15,000 years. Our data suggest an extended period of low population size or a severe bottleneck prior to the divergence and expansion of extant lineages and a recent, less-severe bottleneck among European lineages. Climate change during the last ice age, acting through contraction and expansion of moose habitat and the flooding of the Bering land bridge, undoubtedly was a key factor influencing the divergence and expansion of moose populations. PMID:11884162

  3. Stable isotope paleoecology of Late Pleistocene Middle Stone Age humans from the Lake Victoria basin, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Nicole D; Fox, David L; McNulty, Kieran P; Faith, J Tyler; Peppe, Daniel J; Van Plantinga, Alex; Tryon, Christian A

    2015-05-01

    Paleoanthropologists have long argued that environmental pressures played a key role in human evolution. However, our understanding of how these pressures mediated the behavioral and biological diversity of early modern humans and their migration patterns within and out of Africa is limited by a lack of archaeological evidence associated with detailed paleoenvironmental data. Here, we present the first stable isotopic data from paleosols and fauna associated with Middle Stone Age (MSA) sites in East Africa. Late Pleistocene (∼100-45 ka, thousands of years ago) sediments on Rusinga and Mfangano Islands in eastern Lake Victoria (Kenya) preserve a taxonomically diverse, non-analog faunal community associated with MSA artifacts. We analyzed the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of paleosol carbonate and organic matter and fossil mammalian tooth enamel, including the first analyses for several extinct bovids such as Rusingoryx atopocranion, Damaliscus hypsodon, and an unnamed impala species. Both paleosol carbonate and organic matter data suggest that local habitats associated with human activities were primarily riverine woodland ecosystems. However, mammalian tooth enamel data indicate that most large-bodied mammals consumed a predominantly C4 diet, suggesting an extensive C4 grassland surrounding these riverine woodlands in the region at the time. These data are consistent with other lines of paleoenvironmental evidence that imply a substantially reduced Lake Victoria at this time, and demonstrate that C4 grasslands were significantly expanded into equatorial Africa compared with their present distribution, which could have facilitated dispersal of human populations and other biotic communities. Our results indicate that early populations of Homo sapiens from the Lake Victoria region exploited locally wooded and well-watered habitats within a larger grassland ecosystem. PMID:25805041

  4. Sedimentary architecture and chronostratigraphy of a late Quaternary incised-valley fill: A case study of the late Middle and Late Pleistocene Rhine system in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, J.; Busschers, F. S.; Stouthamer, E.; Bosch, J. H. A.; Van den Berg, M. W.; Wallinga, J.; Versendaal, A. J.; Bunnik, F. P. M.; Middelkoop, H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the sedimentary architecture, chronostratigraphy and palaeogeography of the late Middle and Late Pleistocene (Marine Isotope Stage/MIS 6-2) incised Rhine-valley fill in the central Netherlands based on six geological transects, luminescence dating, biostratigraphical data and a 3D geological model. The incised-valley fill consists of a ca. 50 m thick and 10-20 km wide sand-dominated succession and includes a well-developed sequence dating from the Last Interglacial: known as the Eemian in northwest Europe. The lower part of the valley fill contains coarse-grained fluvio-glacial and fluvial Rhine sediments that were deposited under Late Saalian (MIS 6) cold-climatic periglacial conditions and during the transition into the warm Eemian interglacial (MIS 5e-d). This unit is overlain by fine-grained fresh-water flood-basin deposits, which are transgressed by a fine-grained estuarine unit that formed during marine high-stand. This ca. 10 m thick sequence reflects gradual drowning of the Eemian interglacial fluvial Rhine system and transformation into an estuary due to relative sea-level rise. The chronological data suggests a delay in timing of regional Eemian interglacial transgression and sea-level high-stand of several thousand years, when compared to eustatic sea-level. As a result of this glacio-isostatic controlled delay, formation of the interglacial lower deltaic system took only place for a relative short period of time: progradation was therefore limited. During the cooler Weichselian Early Glacial period (MIS 5d-a) deposition of deltaic sediments continued and extensive westward progradation of the Rhine system occurred. Major parts of the Eemian and Weichselian Early Glacial deposits were eroded and buried as a result of sea-level lowering and climate cooling during the early Middle Weichselian (MIS 4-3). Near complete sedimentary preservation occurred along the margins of the incised valley allowing the detailed reconstruction presented here.

  5. The circumboreal tundra-taiga interface: late Pleistocene and Holocene changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payette, S; Eronen, M; Jasinski, J J P

    2002-08-01

    Creating a global perspective on past treeline changes is problematic due to the varying methods and definitions used. A general lack of a detailed description of the modern treeline position and vegetation complicates any comparative analysis of the magnitude of the most important changes. However, one seemingly common factor in most regions was an extremely rapid dispersal of trees when climate warmed drastically from full glacial conditions. Most Arctic treelines reached their northernmost positions in the early Holocene and receded to present positions starting at about 5.8 ka. The early occupation of the northernmost sites in ice-free and early deglaciated areas was possible because of the close proximity of invading trees in nearby glacial refugia, particularly in Fennoscandia and northern Russia. In Canada, the Northwest Territories and Quebec-Labrador were out of phase with this general trend due to their late deglaciation. However, even here colonization was rapid, indicating that the tree species were present adjacent to the glaciers. Following this trend and based on the present evidence, we propose a scenario of a continuous but modest occupation of eastern Beringia by spruce during the late-Pleistocene instead of an exceptionally rapid spread of conifers from the glacial refugium south of the Laurentide ice sheet (2000 to 3000 km in about 200 years), which typically has been assumed. Macrofossil evidence of scattered occurrences of "exotic species" (for instance Siberian larch in central Sweden) far from their natural range limits in the early Holocene highlight the disparity between pollen and macrofossil analyses. It questions the validity of assigned pollen percentages to indicate the presence of a species within a region as these species were not observed in the pollen record. Thus, it is likely that trees were present at any given site well before the rise in pollen abundance. There is still a large potential to improve our knowledge about the environmental history of the circumboreal treeline areas. In particular, future research should concentrate not only on patterns of species displacement, but on finding the factors, apart from climate, which cause treeline shifts. PMID:12374054

  6. Assessing the impact of late Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions on global vegetation and climate

    OpenAIRE

    M.-O. Brault; Mysak, L. A.; Matthews , H. D.; C. T. Simmons

    2013-01-01

    The end of the Pleistocene was a turning point for the Earth system as climate gradually emerged from millennia of severe glaciation in the Northern Hemisphere. The deglacial climate change coincided with an unprecedented decline in many species of Pleistocene megafauna, including the near-total eradication of the woolly mammoth. Due to an herbivorous diet that presumably involved large-scale tree grazing, the mammoth extinction has been associated with the rapid expansion o...

  7. Relationship between Late Pleistocene sea-level variations, carbonate platform morphology and aragonite production (Maldives, Indian Ocean)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, A.; Reijmer, J.J.G.; Fürstenau, J.; Kinkel, Hanno; Betzler, C.

    2012-01-01

    A piston core from the Maldives carbonate platform was investigated for carbonate mineralogy, grain-size distributions, calcium carbonate content and organic carbon. The sedimentary record was linked to Late Pleistocene sea-level variations, using an age model based on oxygen isotopes obtained from...... the atolls of the Maldives carbonate platform. Platform flooding events were characterized by strongly increased deposition of aragonite and mud within the Inner Sea of the Maldives. Exposure events, in contrast, can be recognized by rapid decreases in the values of both proxy records. The results...... show that sediments on the Maldives carbonate platform contain a continuous record of Pleistocene sea-level variations. These sediments may, therefore, contribute to a better understanding of regional and even global sea-level changes, and yield new insights into the interplay between ocean currents...

  8. The Obłazowa 1 early modern human pollical phalanx and Late Pleistocene distal thumb proportions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkaus, E; Haduch, E; Valde-Nowak, P W; Wojtal, P

    2014-02-01

    The human distal thumb phalanx from the earlier Upper Paleolithic of Obłazowa Cave, southern Poland, exhibits features of its palmar surface that align it morphologically principally with early modern humans. These aspects include the configurations of the proximal palmar fossa, the flexor pollicis longus tendon insertion, the proximal margin of the palmar apical tuft, and especially its low ulnar deviation angle. If it is assumed that it possessed the pollical phalangeal length proportions of an early modern human, it would exhibit modest base and tuft breadths. However, given Late Pleistocene archaic-modern contrasts in relative pollical phalanx lengths, the isolated nature of the phalanx prevents secure assessment of its radioulnar interphalangeal articular and apicaltuft hypertrophy. Similar constraints apply to the assessment of other Pleistocene Homo pollical phalanges. PMID:24616929

  9. Ancient DNA analyses exclude humans as the driving force behind late Pleistocene musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Paula F; Willerslev, Eske; Sher, Andrei; Orlando, Ludovic; Axelsson, Erik; Tikhonov, Alexei; Aaris-Sørensen, Kim; Greenwood, Alex D; Kahlke, Ralf-Dietrich; Kosintsev, Pavel; Krakhmalnaya, Tatiana; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Lemey, Philippe; MacPhee, Ross; Norris, Christopher A; Shepherd, Kieran; Suchard, Marc A; Zazula, Grant D; Shapiro, Beth; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2010-03-23

    The causes of the late Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions are poorly understood. Different lines of evidence point to climate change, the arrival of humans, or a combination of these events as the trigger. Although many species went extinct, others, such as caribou and bison, survived to the present. The musk ox has an intermediate story: relatively abundant during the Pleistocene, it is now restricted to Greenland and the Arctic Archipelago. In this study, we use ancient DNA sequences, temporally unbiased summary statistics, and Bayesian analytical techniques to infer musk ox population dynamics throughout the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Our results reveal that musk ox genetic diversity was much higher during the Pleistocene than at present, and has undergone several expansions and contractions over the past 60,000 years. Northeast Siberia was of key importance, as it was the geographic origin of all samples studied and held a large diverse population until local extinction at approximately 45,000 radiocarbon years before present ((14)C YBP). Subsequently, musk ox genetic diversity reincreased at ca. 30,000 (14)C YBP, recontracted at ca. 18,000 (14)C YBP, and finally recovered in the middle Holocene. The arrival of humans into relevant areas of the musk ox range did not affect their mitochondrial diversity, and both musk ox and humans expanded into Greenland concomitantly. Thus, their population dynamics are better explained by a nonanthropogenic cause (for example, environmental change), a hypothesis supported by historic observations on the sensitivity of the species to both climatic warming and fluctuations. PMID:20212118

  10. Late Pleistocene glacial chronology of the Retezat Mts, Southern Carpathians, using 10Be exposure ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszkiczay-Rüdiger, Zsófia; Kern, Zoltán; Urdea, Petru; Braucher, Régis; Madarász, Balázs; Schimmelpfennig, Irene

    2015-04-01

    Our knowledge on the timing of glacial advances in the Southern Carpathians is limited. Recently, some attempts have been made to develop an improved temporal framework for the glaciations of the region using cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating. However, glacial chronology of the Romanian Carpathians remains contradictory. E.g. the timing of the maximum ice advance appears to be asynchronous within the area and also with other dated glacial events in Europe. Main objective of our study is to utilize cosmogenic in situ produced 10Be dating to disentangle the contradictions of the Southern Carpathian Late Pleistocene glacial chronology. Firstly, previously published 10Be data are recalculated in accordance with the new half-life, standardization and production rate of 10Be. The recalculated 10Be exposure ages of the second largest (M2) moraines in the Retezat Mts. appear to be ca. 19-24% older than exposure ages calculated by Reuther et al. (2007, Quat. Int. 164-165, 151-169). This contradicts the earlier conclusions suggesting post LGM age of M2 glacial advance and suggests that M2 moraines can be connected to the end of the LGM with final stabilization possibly at the beginning of the Late Glacial. We emphasize that it is ambiguous to correlate directly the exposure-dated glacier chronologies with millennial scale climate changes due to uncertainties in sample collection and in computation of exposure ages from measured nuclide concentrations. New 10Be samples were collected in order to determine the 10Be exposure age of moraines outside the most prominent generation (M2) including the largest and oldest moraine (M1) and the landforms connected to the smallest ice advances (M4), which remained undated so far. The new exposure ages of M2 moraines are well in harmony with the recalculated ages of Reuther at al. (2007). 10Be exposure age of boulders on the smallest moraine suggest that the last glaciers disappeared in the area during the Late Glacial, indicating no glaciation during the Younger Dryas and Holocene. Previous works, based on geomorphologic analogies and pedological properties suggested that the M1 ice advance was older than LGM, and possibly occurred during the MIS4. Our 10Be exposure dating provided LGM ages for boulders on the M1 side moraine. It is question of further research whether these ages show the time when the glacier abandoned the moraine or they only indicate an LGM erosional event affecting an older moraine. If we accept the LGM age of maximum ice extent (M1), our 10Be exposure age data enables the calculation of a mean glacier retreat rate of 1.3 m/a for the period between M1 and M4 (21.4 to 13.6ka). Alternatively, considering only the oldest 10Be exposure age of the M2 moraine, the M2 to M4 (20.2-13.6ka) glacier retreat rate was slightly lower: 1.1 m/a. Our research was supported by the OTKA PD83610, by the MTA-CNRS cooperation (NKM-96/2014), by the Bolyai Scholarship, and by the 'Lendület' program of the HAS (LP2012-27/2012). The 10Be measurements were performed at the ASTER AMS national facility (CEREGE, Aix en Provence, France).

  11. Late Triassic - Early Jurassic successions of the Atuel depocenter: sequence stratigraphy and tectonic controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Lans

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Biostratigraphic correlations of the Late Triassic - Early Jurassic successions of the Atuel depocenter allowed determining the accommodation changes and the possible tectonic controls on sedimentation. The Rhaetian - late Early Sinemurian deposits contain facies of slope-type fan deltas, braided fluvial systems and low sinuosity rivers with alternate bars deposited during a synrift phase. The late Early Sinemurian - Toarcian series host facies of intermediate (Gilbert to shelf type fan deltas, braided and low sinuosity fluvial systems, wave-dominated estuaries, transgressive storm-dominated and turbidite-influenced marine shelves which record the sag phase. According to different criteria two stratigraphic schemes are proposed, the first one considering tectosedimentary units (TSU and the second one using "Exxon-like" sequences. In the first scheme the synrift TSU matches the actual Precuyo Mesosequence and the sag TSU is partly equivalent to the Cuyo Mesosequence, mainly keeping the current mesosequence scheme for the Neuqun basin but assigning the fandeltaic deposits to the Precuyo Mesosequence. The second sequence scheme considers the whole Late Triassic - Early Jurassic succession as a part of the Cuyo Mesosequence, where the synrift deposits composes the detached lowstand system tract (LST and most of the sag deposits makes the transgressive system tract (TST. The basal sequence boundary does not crop out, the flooding surface at the TST base and the maximum flooding surface at the TST top are respectively marked by the lowest estuarine levels and by black shales with suboxic-compatible bivalves (Bositra sp..

  12. A review and synthesis of late Pleistocene extinction modeling: progress delayed by mismatches between ecological realism, interpretation, and methodological transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Jeffrey V; Fournier, Robert J; Jensen, Christopher X J; Yang, Jinyan

    2014-06-01

    Late Pleistocene extinctions occurred globally over a period of about 50,000 years, primarily affecting mammals of > or = 44 kg body mass (i.e., megafauna) first in Australia, continuing in Eurasia and, finally, in the Americas. Polarized debate about the cause(s) of the extinctions centers on the role of climate change and anthropogenic factors (especially hunting). Since the late 1960s, investigators have developed mathematical models to simulate the ecological interactions that might have contributed to the extinctions. Here, we provide an overview of the various methodologies used and conclusions reached in the modeling literature, addressing both the strengths and weaknesses of modeling as an explanatory tool. Although late Pleistocene extinction models now provide a solid foundation for viable future work, we conclude, first, that single models offer less compelling support for their respective explanatory hypotheses than many realize; second, that disparities in methodology (both in terms of model parameterization and design) prevent meaningful comparison between models and, more generally, progress from model to model in increasing our understanding of these extinctions; and third, that recent models have been presented and possibly developed without sufficient regard for the transparency of design that facilitates scientific progress. PMID:24984323

  13. Late Pleistocene desiccation of Lake Tana, source of the Blue Nile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Henry F.; Bates, C. Richard; Coombes, Paul V.; Marshall, Michael H.; Umer, Mohammed; Davies, Sarah J.; Dejen, Eshete

    2007-02-01

    High-resolution seismic data from Lake Tana, the source of the Blue Nile in northern Ethiopia, reveal a deep sedimentary sequence divided by four strong reflectors. Data from nearshore cores show that the uppermost strong reflector represents a stiff silt unit, interpreted as a desiccation surface. Channel cuts in this surface, bordered by levee-like structures, are apparent in the seismic data from near the lake margin, suggesting fluvial downcutting and over-bank deposition during seasonal flood events. Periphytic diatoms and peat at the base of a core from the deepest part of the lake overlie compacted sediments, indicating that desiccation was followed by development of shallow-water environments and papyrus swamp in the central basin between 16,700 and 15,100 cal BP. As the lake level rose, open-water evaporation from the closed lake caused it to become slightly saline, as indicated by halophytic diatoms. An abrupt return to freshwater conditions occurred at 14,750 cal BP, when the lake overflowed into the Blue Nile. Further reflection surfaces with downcut structures are identifiable in seismic images of the overlying sediments, suggesting at least two lesser lake-level falls, tentatively dated to about 12,000 and 8000 cal BP. Since Lake Victoria, the source of the White Nile, was also dry until 15,000 cal BP, and did not reach overflow until 14,500 cal BP, the entire Nile system must have been reduced to intermittent seasonal flow until about 14,500 cal BP, when baseflow was re-established with almost simultaneous overflow of the headwater lakes of both the White and Blue Nile rivers. Desiccation of the Nile sources coincides with Heinrich event 1, when cessation of northward heat transport from the tropical Atlantic disrupted the Atlantic monsoon, causing drought in north tropical Africa. The strong reflectors at deeper levels in the seismic sequence of Lake Tana may represent earlier desiccation events, possibly contemporaneous with previous Late Pleistocene Heinrich events.

  14. Differential resilience of ancient sister lakes Ohrid and Prespa to environmental disturbances during the Late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovska, Elena; Cvetkoska, Aleksandra; Hauffe, Torsten; Levkov, Zlatko; Wagner, Bernd; Sulpizio, Roberto; Francke, Alexander; Albrecht, Christian; Wilke, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Ancient lakes, such as lakes Ohrid and Prespa on the Balkan Peninsula, have become model systems for studying the link between geological and biotic evolution. Recently, the scientific deep-drilling project Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO) was initiated to better understand the environmental, climatic, and limnological evolution of the lake. It revealed that Lake Ohrid experienced a number of environmental disturbances during its ca. 2.0 million year long history. These are comprised of disturbances that lasted over longer periods of time ("press events") such as glacial-interglacial cycles and Heinrich events, as well as sudden and short disturbances ("pulse events") like the deposition of landslides, earthquakes, and volcanic ash depositions. The latter includes one of the most severe volcanic episodes during the Late Pleistocene: the eruption of the Campanian Ignimbrite (known as Y-5 marine tephra layer) from the Campi Flegrei caldera, dated to 39.6 ± 0.1 thousand years ago. The event is recorded by the deposition of a ca. 15 cm thick tephra layer in sediment cores of lakes Ohrid (DEEP-5045-1) and Prespa (Co1204). Coincidently, this pulse event is superimposed by the Heinrich H4 event, 40.4-38.4 thousand years ago. In the current paper, diatoms were used as proxies to compare the responses of these lakes to the Y-5 (pulse) and the H4 (press) disturbances. Based on stratigraphically constrained incremental sum of squares cluster (CONISS) and unconstrained Partitioning Around Medoids (PAM) analyses, we found little evidence that diatom community compositions in either lake responded to the H4 event. However, the Y-5 influx caused clear and rapid diatom community changes. After the initial response, community compositions in Lake Ohrid and, to a lesser extent, in Lake Prespa slowly returned to their quasi pre-disturbance state. Moreover, there is no evidence for disturbance-related extinction events. The combined evidence from these findings suggests that lakes Ohrid and Prespa likely did not experience regime shifts. It is therefore concluded that both lakes show resilience to environmental disturbance. However, it seems that Lake Ohrid is more resilient than Lake Prespa, as the recovery of diatom communities is more pronounced and its estimated recovery time is only ca. 1100 years vs. ca. 4000 years in Lake Prespa. The reasons for the differential responses remain largely unknown, but differences in geology, lake age, limnology, and intrinsic parameters of the diatom proxies may play an important role.

  15. Late Pleistocene and Holocene Hydroclimate Variability in the Tropical Andes from Alpine Lake Sediments, Cordillera de Mrida, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, D. J.; Abbott, M. B.; Polissar, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The tropics play a major role in the global hydrologic cycle and changes to tropical rainfall patterns have critical implications for water resources and ecosystem dynamics over large geographic scales. In tropical South America, late Pleistocene and Holocene precipitation variability has been documented in geologic records and associated with numerous external and internal variables, including changes in summer insolation, South American summer monsoon strength, Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures, continental moisture recycling, and other climate processes. However, there are few records from the northern hemisphere tropical Americas, a key region for understanding interhemispheric linkages and the drivers of tropical hydroclimate variability. Here, we present a ~13 ka record of coupled hydroclimate and environmental changes from Laguna Brava, a small (~0.07 km2), hydrologically closed lake basin situated at 2400 m asl in the Cordillera de Mrida, Venezuela. Sediment cores collected from varying water depths and proximity to shore are placed in a chronologic framework using radiocarbon ages from terrestrial macrofossils, and analyzed for a suite of physical, bulk geochemical, and stable isotopic parameters. Compound specific hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of terrestrial plant waxes (long-chain n-alkanes) show a sharp increase in the late Pleistocene, followed by a long-term trend toward more negative values that suggest a ~20 decrease in the D/H ratios of South American tropical precipitation during the Holocene. This pattern is consistent in sign and magnitude to other South American precipitation reconstructions from both hemispheres, indicating interhemispheric similarities in tropical hydroclimate variability. Superimposed on this continent-scale trend are changes in moisture balance and environmental conditions in the Venezuelan Andes. We reconstruct these parameters at Laguna Brava at multidecadal and centennial resolution and evaluate this record within the context of late Pleistocene and Holocene South American tropical hydroclimate variability and global climate changes.

  16. The late Pleistocene environment of the Eastern West Beringia based on the principal section at the Main River, Chukotka

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzmina, Svetlana A.; Sher, Andrei V.; Edwards, Mary E.; Haile, James Seymour; Yan, Evgeny V.; Kotov, Anatoly V.; Willerslev, Eske

    yet the most critical to understanding migrations between the Old and New Worlds. The insect fauna of the Main River Ledovy Obryv (Ice Bluff) section, which is late Pleistocene in age (MIS 3-2), is markedly different from coeval faunas of areas further to the west, as it is characterized by very few...... indicate that a barrier associated with the environments of the land bridge restricted trans-Beringian migrations, particularly the more thermophilous and xeric-adapted elements of the Beringian biota, supporting the hypothesis of a cool but moist land-bridge filter inferred from evidence from several...

  17. Ancient DNA analyses exclude humans as the driving force behind late Pleistocene musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) population dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campos, Paula F; Willerslev, Eske; Sher, Andrei; Orlando, Ludovic; Axelsson, Erik; Tikhonov, Alexei; Aaris-Sørensen, Kim; Greenwood, Alex D; Kahlke, Ralf-Dietrich; Kosintsev, Pavel; Krakhmalnaya, Tatiana; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Lemey, Philippe; MacPhee, Ross; Norris, Christopher A; Shepherd, Kieran; Suchard, Marc A; Zazula, Grant D; Shapiro, Beth; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    The causes of the late Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions are poorly understood. Different lines of evidence point to climate change, the arrival of humans, or a combination of these events as the trigger. Although many species went extinct, others, such as caribou and bison, survived to the...... geographic origin of all samples studied and held a large diverse population until local extinction at approximately 45,000 radiocarbon years before present ((14)C YBP). Subsequently, musk ox genetic diversity reincreased at ca. 30,000 (14)C YBP, recontracted at ca. 18,000 (14)C YBP, and finally recovered in...

  18. Drainage system inversion in the Guadalentin Depression during the Late Pleistocene-Holocene (Murcia, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the results of studies conducted in the central sector of Guadalentin depression (Murcia) for the abnormal accumulation (more than 17 m) of Pleistocene and Holocene deposits upstream of Romeral tectonic threshold (Librilla). 14C dating. ruins and archaeological sites, together with its stratigraphic analysis show that the three sequences that constitute the Holocene detrital filling of the Depression, prograded are superimposed on the upper Pleistocene travertine upstream from the confluence of the River Guadalentin the Rambla de Librilla. Between Librilla and threshold Romeral Holocene deposits only appear along the left bank (15-17m). By contrast the right side shows significant lifting of the Pleistocene travertine up area Romeral threshold, where the substrate allora Neogene. (Author) 11 refs.

  19. Stratigraphy, landsnail faunas, and paleoenvironmental history of Late Holocene coastal dunes, Tauroa Peninsula, northern New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The post -700 years BP depositional history of the Holocene coastal dunebelt on northwestern Tauroa Peninsula involved an initial progradational phase, then a subsequent predominantly stable phase that began some time after 650 years BP, followed by a highly unstable phase from late prehistoric time to the present-day. Fossil landsnail faunas indicate that sandfield and prostrate shrubland have been the main vegetation types on the dunefield since at least 700 years BP, but that taller shrubland established locally during the later part of the prehistoric period of dunefield stability. Five species of landsnails became extinct on the dunefield in late prehistoric-historic time, probably as a result of vegetation disturbance caused by widespread dune mobilisation and erosion. (author). 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. Late Paleocene–early Eocene carbon isotope stratigraphy from a near-terrestrial tropical section and antiquity of Indian mammals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Samanta; A Sarkar; M K Bera; Jyotsana Rai; S S Rathore

    2013-02-01

    Late Paleocene to early Eocene (∼56 to 51 Ma) interval is characterized by five distinct transient warming (hyperthermal) events (Paleocene–Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), H1/ETM2/ELMO, H2, I1 and I2) in a super greenhouse globe associated with negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs). Although well-documented marine records exist at different latitudes, terrestrial PETM sections are rare. In particular, almost no terrestrial records of either the PETM or early Eocene hyperthermals (EEHs) are yet available from the tropics. Further, evolution of modern order of mammals near the PETM has been recorded in many northern continents; however, the response of mammals in the tropics to these warming events is unknown. A tropical terrestrial record of these hyperthermal/CIE events, encompassing the earliest modern order mammal bearing horizon from India, can therefore be vital in understanding climatic and biotic evolution during the earliest Cenozoic time. Here, for the first time, we report high resolution carbon isotope (13C) stratigraphy, nannofossil, and Sr isotope ratio of marine fossil carbonate from the Cambay Shale Formation of Western India. The record shows complete preservation of all the above CIE events, including the PETM, hitherto unknown from the equatorial terrestrial records. 13C chemostratigraphy further suggests that at least the present early Eocene mammal-bearing horizon, recently discovered at Vastan, does not support the ‘out of India’ hypothesis of earliest appearance of modern mammals and subsequent dispersal to the Holarctic continents.

  1. Late Paleocene-early Eocene carbon isotope stratigraphy from a near-terrestrial tropical section and antiquity of Indian mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, A.; Sarkar, A.; Bera, M. K.; Rai, Jyotsana; Rathore, S. S.

    2013-02-01

    Late Paleocene to early Eocene (~56 to 51 Ma) interval is characterized by five distinct transient warming (hyperthermal) events (Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), H1/ETM2/ELMO, H2, I1 and I2) in a super greenhouse globe associated with negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs). Although well-documented marine records exist at different latitudes, terrestrial PETM sections are rare. In particular, almost no terrestrial records of either the PETM or early Eocene hyperthermals (EEHs) are yet available from the tropics. Further, evolution of modern order of mammals near the PETM has been recorded in many northern continents; however, the response of mammals in the tropics to these warming events is unknown. A tropical terrestrial record of these hyperthermal/CIE events, encompassing the earliest modern order mammal bearing horizon from India, can therefore be vital in understanding climatic and biotic evolution during the earliest Cenozoic time. Here, for the first time, we report high resolution carbon isotope ( δ 13C) stratigraphy, nannofossil, and Sr isotope ratio of marine fossil carbonate from the Cambay Shale Formation of Western India. The record shows complete preservation of all the above CIE events, including the PETM, hitherto unknown from the equatorial terrestrial records. δ 13C chemostratigraphy further suggests that at least the present early Eocene mammal-bearing horizon, recently discovered at Vastan, does not support the `out of India' hypothesis of earliest appearance of modern mammals and subsequent dispersal to the Holarctic continents.

  2. BODY SIZE REDUCTION AND TOOTH AGENESIS IN LATE PLEISTOCENE MELES MELES (CARNIVORA, MAMMALIA FROM INGARANO (SOUTHERN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAWID ADAM IURINO

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In mammals combined factors such as body size reduction and loss of peripheral teeth are often associated with endemism phenomena. This condition is particularly evident in insular contexts where is a complete geographic isolation. During the Pleistocene there have been several glacial stages, which changed the physiognomy of the Italian peninsula strongly influencing the distribution and morphology of mammalian faunas. Several genetic studies have shown that some Southern Italian areas have particular endemic species of small and medium size mammals. During Pleistocene these areas have been characterized by particular climatic/environmental conditions, and are generally called "glacial refugia". They represent geographically isolated areas over time, where the origin of faunas with peculiar features is favoured. In this study, the occurrence of Meles meles from the Late Pleistocene site of Ingarano (Apulia, Southern Italy is documented for the first time. This taxon is represented only by a partial skull (splancnocranum that, despite the relative completeness, includes peculiar and well-preserved dental features that could be related to a partial endemic condition. The fossil shows a reduced body size and the agenesis of peripheral teeth, both conditions that are typical of the extant badgers from Crete, Rhodes and Japan. To test this hypothesis, tomographic analysis have been provided to establish the dental agenesis, and, in order to understand the magnitude of the body size reduction, biometric analyses have been carried on. The obtained data have been compared to measures of the extant Eurasian badgers.SHORT NOTE

  3. Aeolian stratigraphy and thermoluminescence dating of sediments of late Holocene age from Sola, southwest Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescence age determinations were performed on four aeolian sand samples of late Holocene sediments from Stavanger airport, Sola, in southwest Norway. The locality is well suited for testing thermoluminescence dating because of a good agreement between radiocarbon ages and age information based on archaeological typology and sea level changes. The conclusion from a comparison of thermoluminescence and radiocarbon dates is that it is possible to date well bleached sediments as young as 1600 years with thermoluminescence. 57 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Genetic consequences of population expansions and contractions in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) since the Late Pleistocene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoffel, Céline; Dufresnes, Christophe; Okello, John B A; Noirard, Christian; Joly, Pierre; Nyakaana, Silvester; Muwanika, Vincent B; Alcala, Nicolas; Vuilleumier, Séverine; Siegismund, Hans Redlef; Fumagalli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, an increasing amount of phylogeographic work has substantially improved our understanding of African biogeography, in particular the role played by Pleistocene pluvial-drought cycles on terrestrial vertebrates. However, still little is known on the evolutionary history of...... semi-aquatic animals, which faced tremendous challenges imposed by unpredictable availability of water resources. In this study, we investigate the Late Pleistocene history of the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence variation and range...

  5. Submarine glacial landforms record Late Pleistocene ice-sheet dynamics, Inner Hebrides, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Dayton; Arosio, Riccardo; Finlayson, Andrew; Bradwell, Tom; Howe, John A.

    2015-09-01

    We use ˜7000 km2 of high-resolution swath bathymetry data to describe and map the submarine glacial geomorphology, and reconstruct Late Pleistocene ice sheet flow configurations and retreat dynamics within the Inner Hebrides, western Scotland. Frequently dominated by outcrops of structurally complex bedrock, the seabed also comprises numerous assemblages of well-preserved glacigenic landforms typical of grounded ice sheet flow and punctuated ice-margin retreat. The occurrence and character of the glacially streamlined landforms is controlled in part by the shallow geology and topography, however these factors alone cannot account for the location, orientation, and configuration of the observed landforms. We attribute the distribution of these elongate streamlined landforms to the onset zone of the former Hebrides Ice Stream (HIS) - part of a major ice stream system that drained 5-10% of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS). We suggest this geomorphic signature represents the transition from slow 'sheet flow' to 'streaming flow' as ice accelerated out from an environment characterized by numerous bedrock obstacles (e.g. islands, headlands), towards the smooth, sediment dominated shelf. The majority of streamlined landforms associated with the HIS indicate ice sheet flow to the southwest, with regional-scale topography clearly playing a major role in governing the configuration of flow. During maximal glacial conditions (˜29-23 ka) we infer that the HIS merged with the North Channel-Malin Shelf Ice Stream to form a composite ice stream system that ultimately reached the continental shelf edge at the Barra-Donegal Trough-Mouth Fan. Taken collectively however, the pattern of landforms now preserved at seabed (e.g. convergent flow indicators, cross-cutting flow sets) is more indicative of a thinning ice mass, undergoing reorganization during overall ice sheet retreat (during latter stages of Late Weischselian glaciation). Suites of moraines overprinting the streamlined landforms suggest partial stabilization of the HIS prior to the ice sheet retreating to more isolated, topographically confined troughs and basins. Retreat from the shelf towards, and back into the Inner Hebrides may have been rapid due the prevalence of overdeepened troughs. Within the near-shore fjord-like troughs and deeps, basin-aligned streamlined landforms indicate the subsequent flow of thinner topographically partitioned ice masses, and overprinted moraines record further ice margin retreat, potentially along tide-water margins. This work provides the first geomorphological constraints for this large marine-influenced sector of the former BIIS. We also shed new light on the glacial geomorphic record found at the transition from terrestrial to marine continental-shelf settings, and examine the interplay between substrate geology, bed topography/bathymetry, and grounding-line positions - relationships which are important for characterizing contemporary marine ice sheet margins.

  6. New insights into Late Pleistocene explosive volcanic activity and caldera formation on Ischia (southern Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    ?Brown, R. J.; ?Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol,; Orsi, G; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; De Vita, S; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia

    2008-01-01

    ?Abstract A new pyroclastic stratigraphy is presented for the island of Ischia, Italy, for the period ?7550 ka BP. The data indicate that this period bore witness to the largest eruptions recorded on the island and that it was consider- ably more volcanically active than previously thought. Numerous vents were probably active during this period. The deposits of at least 10 explosive phonolite to basaltic- trachyandesite eruptions are described and inte...

  7. Small mammal diversity loss in response to late-Pleistocene climatic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Jessica L; McGuire, Jenny L; Hadly, Elizabeth A

    2010-06-10

    Communities have been shaped in numerous ways by past climatic change; this process continues today. At the end of the Pleistocene epoch about 11,700 years ago, North American communities were substantially altered by the interplay of two events. The climate shifted from the cold, arid Last Glacial Maximum to the warm, mesic Holocene interglacial, causing many mammal species to shift their geographic distributions substantially. Populations were further stressed as humans arrived on the continent. The resulting megafaunal extinction event, in which 70 of the roughly 220 largest mammals in North America (32%) became extinct, has received much attention. However, responses of small mammals to events at the end of the Pleistocene have been much less studied, despite the sensitivity of these animals to current and future environmental change. Here we examine community changes in small mammals in northern California during the last 'natural' global warming event at the Pleistocene-Holocene transition and show that even though no small mammals in the local community became extinct, species losses and gains, combined with changes in abundance, caused declines in both the evenness and richness of communities. Modern mammalian communities are thus depauperate not only as a result of megafaunal extinctions at the end of the Pleistocene but also because of diversity loss among small mammals. Our results suggest that across future landscapes there will be some unanticipated effects of global change on diversity: restructuring of small mammal communities, significant loss of richness, and perhaps the rising dominance of native 'weedy' species. PMID:20495547

  8. An Arctic perspective on dating Mid-Late Pleistocene environmental history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexanderson, Helena; Backman, Jan; Cronin, T.M.; Funder, Svend Visby; Ingólfsson, Ó; Jakobsson, Martin; Landvik, Jon Ytterbø; Löwemark, Ludwig; Mangerud, Jan; März, Christian; Möller, Per; O'Regan, Matt; Spielhagen, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand Pleistocene climatic changes in the Arctic, integrated palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic signals from a variety of marine and terrestrial geological records as well as geochronologic age control are required, not least for correlation to extra-Arctic records. In this pap...

  9. Multi-proxy evidence for Late Pleistocene-Holocene climatic and environmental changes in Lop-Nur, Xinjiang, Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, C.; Yang, D.; Peng, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Weiguo, L.; He, J.; Zhou, C.

    2008-01-01

    A 10.35-m-long sediment core from the Luobei depression in Lop-Nur, Xinjiang, Northwest China, provides detailed information about environmental changes during the Late Pleistocene. The samples taken every 5 cm of the core were analyzed for 10 environmental proxies, including magnetic susceptibility, granularity, chroma, carbonate and loss on ignition (LOI), and pH value. The chronology data are provided by the uranium/thorium disequilibrium dates. The sediments of the section were deposited during the last 32000 years. The results of analysis of 10 proxies were examined using multivariate statistical analysis, and the principal components were calculated. According to the results, the Late Pleistocene sequence contains four climatic and environmental stages appearing in the cycles of cold-wet and warm-dry changes. During 10-9 ka BP, it was the earliest warm episode in the Holocene. Environmental changes in this district were restricted by global change, as suggested by the analysis of glacial-interglacial cycles. But it was different from the mutative trend of a monsoon region in East China because of its own characteristics, which was the situation of cold-wet and warm-dry climate-environment change. The candidate reason may be the uplift of the Tibet Plateau and the westerly wind circulation. ?? Science Press, Institute of Geochemistry, CAS and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2008.

  10. First record of fossil wood and phytolith assemblages of the Late Pleistocene in El Palmar National Park (Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucol, A. F.; Brea, M.; Scopel, A.

    2005-10-01

    Two paleoxylologic assemblages and two phytolith assemblages were recovered from Late Pleistocene sediments of El Palmar Formation. These deposits are found in outcrops along the western margin of the Uruguay River. The spectra of taxa obtained in both sets by different methods is complementary. The fossil remains are characterized in terms of floristic composition and paleoclimate. Seven families are recognized: Podostemaceae, Myrtaceae, Anacardiaceae, Mimosoideae, Arecaceae, Poaceace, and Cyperaceae. Sponge siliceous spicules also have been found in these assemblages. The state of preservation of the phytoliths and their weathering degree is analyzed. These studies can be used as a potential paleoecological tool for alluvial sediments. The comparison of fossil assemblages with modern analogs clarifies the paleoecological requirements and composition of two paleocommunities, one dominated by woody forests and the other by palms. The climatic conditions inferred from the reconstructed vegetation and sedimentary deposits indicate a temperate-warm, humid climate. The results constitute the first evidence of the floral diversity of the vegetation in El Palmar National Park during the Late Pleistocene.

  11. Late Pleistocene and Holocene palaeoflood events recorded by slackwater deposits in the upper Hanjiang River valley, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Huang, Chun Chang; Pang, Jiangli; Zha, Xiaochun; Zhou, Yali; Zhang, Yuzhu; Ji, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Slackwater palaeoflood deposits (SWDs) were identified in a bedrock gorge in the upper reaches of the Hanjiang River of central China. The Hanjiang River is the longest tributary of the Yangtze River, one of the most flood-prone rivers in China, and the main source of water for the South-to-North Water Transfer Project (SNWTP). Three main loess-soil profiles with late Pleistocene and Holocene palaeoflood SWD bedsets were found. Palaeoflood SWDs identified interbedded in the loess-soil sequence of late Pleistocene and Holocene age within the cliff riverbanks were studied by field observations and laboratory analysis, including particle-size distribution and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating. At least eight extreme flood events documented by palaeoflood SWDs occurred in the Wufeng reaches of the upper Hanjiang River. The discharge estimation associated with palaeoflood SWDs, indicates that the minimum flood peak discharges of these flood episodes range from 42,220 to 63,400 m3/s. The SWDs were OSL dated to between 12,600-12,400, 4200-4000, 3200-2800 and 1900-1700 a BP and these dates were corroborated with pottery remains retrieved from the profiles and dated by archaeological methods. These periods of increased flood magnitude coincide with contemporaneous global climatic events dated to 12,500, 4200, 3100 and 1900 a BP worldwide. These findings are of great significance in understanding the interactions between hydrological systems and climatic change in monsoonal zones.

  12. Late Pleistocene and Holocene uplift history of Cyprus: implications for active tectonics along the southern margin of the Anatolian microplate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R.W.; Tsiolakis, E.; Stone, B.D.; Lord, A.; McGeehin, J.P.; Mahan, S.A.; Chirico, P.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the southern margin of the Anatolian microplate during the Neogene is complex, controversial and fundamental in understanding active plate-margin tectonics and natural hazards in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Our investigation provides new insights into the Late Pleistocene uplift history of Cyprus and the Troodos Ophiolite. We provide isotopic (14C) and radiogenic (luminescence) dates of outcropping marine sediments in eastern Cyprus that identify periods of deposition during marine isotope stages (MIS) 3, 4, 5 and 6. Past sea-levels indicated by these deposits are c. 9525 m higher in elevation than estimates of worldwide eustatic sea-level. An uplift rate of c. 1.8 mm/year and possibly as much as c. 4.1 mm/year in the past c. 2640 ka is indicated. Holocene marine deposits also occur at elevations higher than those expected for past SL and suggest uplift rates of c. 1.22.1 mm/year. MIS-3 marine deposits that crop out in southern and western Cyprus indicate uniform island-wide uplift. We propose a model of tectonic wedging at a plate-bounding restraining bend as a mechanism for Late Pleistocene to Holocene uplift of Cyprus; uplift is accommodated by deformation and seismicity along the margins of the Troodos Ophiolite and re-activation of its low-angle, basal shear zone.

  13. Tocuila Mammoths, Basin of Mexico: Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene stratigraphy and the geological context of the bone accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Silvia; Huddart, David; Israde-Alcntara, Isabel; Dominguez-Vazquez, Gabriela; Bischoff, James

    2014-07-01

    We report new stratigraphic, tephrochronology and dating results from the Tocuila Mammoth site in the Basin of Mexico. At the site there is evidence for a thin meteorite airburst layer dated between 10,878 and 10,707 cal BC at the onset of the Younger Dryas (YD) cool period. The Upper Toluca Pumice (UTP) tephra marker, caused by a Plinian eruption of the Nevado de Toluca volcano, dated from 10,666 to 10,612 cal BC, is above that layer. The eruption must have caused widespread environmental disruption in the region with evidence of extensive reworking and channelling by the Lake Texcoco shoreline and contributed to the widespread death and/or extinction of megafaunal populations, as suggested by earlier authors, but the new work reinforces the view that both catastrophic events must have caused large environmental disruption in a short time period of around two hundred years. There is no evidence for megafauna (mammoths, sabre toothed cats, camels, bison, glyptodonts) after the UTP volcanic event and subsequent lahars in the Basin of Mexico. At Tocuila, although there are some in situ tephra markers in nearshore lake sediments, such as the Great Basaltic Ash (GBA) and the UTP Ash, there is evidence of much reworking of several tephra populations in various combinations. The mammoth bone accumulation is reworked in a lahar sequence (volcanic mudflow) derived from several source sediments but associated with the major UTP Plinian eruption. Paleoindian populations were also present in the Basin of Mexico during the YD period, where several Paleoindian skeletons were found associated with the UTP ash deposits, e.g. Metro Man, Chimalhuacan Man and Tlapacoya Man.

  14. Late Quaternary stratigraphy, sedimentology, and geochemistry of an underfilled lake basin in the Puna (north-west Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlue, Michael M.; Cohen, Andrew S.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Kowler, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Depositional models of ancient lakes in thin-skinned retroarc foreland basins rarely benefit from appropriate Quaternary analogues. To address this, we present new stratigraphic, sedimentological and geochemical analyses of four radiocarbon-dated sediment cores from the Pozuelos Basin (PB; northwest Argentina) that capture the evolution of this low-accommodation Puna basin over the past ca. 43 cal kyr. Strata from the PB are interpreted as accumulations of a highly variable, underfilled lake system represented by lake-plain/littoral, profundal, palustrine, saline lake and playa facies associations. The vertical stacking of facies is asymmetric, with transgressive and thin organic-rich highstand deposits underlying thicker, organic-poor regressive deposits. The major controls on depositional architecture and basin palaeogeography are tectonics and climate. Accommodation space was derived from piggyback basin-forming flexural subsidence and Miocene-Quaternary normal faulting associated with incorporation of the basin into the Andean hinterland. Sediment and water supply was modulated by variability in the South American summer monsoon, and perennial lake deposits correlate in time with several well-known late Pleistocene wet periods on the Altiplano/Puna plateau. Our results shed new light on lake expansion–contraction dynamics in the PB in particular and provide a deeper understanding of Puna basin lakes in general.

  15. Differential resilience of ancient sister lakes Ohrid and Prespa to environmental disturbances during the Late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovska, E.; Cvetkoska, A.; Hauffe, T.; Levkov, Z.; Wagner, B.; Sulpizio, R.; Francke, A.; Albrecht, C.; Wilke, T.

    2015-09-01

    Ancient lakes, like lakes Ohrid and Prespa on the Balkan Peninsula, have become model systems for studying the link between geological and biotic evolution. Recently the scientific deep drilling program "Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid" (SCOPSCO) has been launched to better understand the environmental, climatic and limnological evolution of the lake. It revealed that Lake Ohrid experienced a number of environmental disturbances during its ca. 2.0 million year long history. They comprise disturbances that lasted over longer periods of times ("press events") such as Heinrich events as well as sudden and short disturbances ("pulse events") like the deposition of volcanic ashes. The latter include one of the most severe volcanic episodes during the Late Pleistocene, the eruption of the Campanian Ignimbrite (known as Y-5 marine tephra layer) from the Campi Flegrei caldera, dated at 39.6 0.1 ka ago. The event is recorded by the deposition of a ca. 15 cm thick Y-5 tephra layer in sediment cores of lakes Ohrid (DEEP-5045-1) and Prespa (Co1204). This pulse event is overlain by the Heinrich event 4 (H4), 40.0-38.0 ka ago. In the current paper, diatoms were used as proxies to compare the responses of these lakes to the Y-5 (pulse) and the H4 (press) disturbances. Based on stratigraphically constrained incremental sum of squares cluster (CONISS) and unconstrained Partitioning Around Medoids (PAM) analyses, we found only little evidence that the diatom community compositions in either lake responded to the H4 event. However, the Y-5 influx caused clear and rapid diatom community changes. After the initial response, community composition in Lake Ohrid and, to a lesser extent, in Lake Prespa slowly returned to their quasi pre-disturbance state. Moreover, there is no evidence for disturbance-related extinction events. The combined evidence from these findings suggests that lakes Ohrid and Prespa likely did not experience regime shifts. It is therefore concluded that both lakes show resilience to environmental disturbance. However, it seems that Lake Ohrid is more resilient than Lake Prespa as the recovery of diatom communities is more pronounced and as its estimated recovery time is only ca. 1400 years vs. ca. 3600 years in Lake Prespa. The reasons for the differential responses remain largely unknown, but differences in geology, lake age, limnology, and intrinsic parameters of the diatom proxies may play a role. Given the relative robust results obtained, this study provides important new insights into the response of lakes to (multiple) environmental disturbances. Moreover, it contributes to one of the major goals of the SCOPSCO project - to evaluate the influence of major geological events onto the evolution of endemic taxa in Lake Ohrid.

  16. Differential resilience of ancient sister lakes Ohrid and Prespa to environmental disturbances during the Late Pleistocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jovanovska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ancient lakes, like lakes Ohrid and Prespa on the Balkan Peninsula, have become model systems for studying the link between geological and biotic evolution. Recently the scientific deep drilling program "Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid" (SCOPSCO has been launched to better understand the environmental, climatic and limnological evolution of the lake. It revealed that Lake Ohrid experienced a number of environmental disturbances during its ca. 2.0 million year long history. They comprise disturbances that lasted over longer periods of times ("press events" such as Heinrich events as well as sudden and short disturbances ("pulse events" like the deposition of volcanic ashes. The latter include one of the most severe volcanic episodes during the Late Pleistocene, the eruption of the Campanian Ignimbrite (known as Y-5 marine tephra layer from the Campi Flegrei caldera, dated at 39.6 ± 0.1 ka ago. The event is recorded by the deposition of a ca. 15 cm thick Y-5 tephra layer in sediment cores of lakes Ohrid (DEEP-5045-1 and Prespa (Co1204. This pulse event is overlain by the Heinrich event 4 (H4, 40.0–38.0 ka ago. In the current paper, diatoms were used as proxies to compare the responses of these lakes to the Y-5 (pulse and the H4 (press disturbances. Based on stratigraphically constrained incremental sum of squares cluster (CONISS and unconstrained Partitioning Around Medoids (PAM analyses, we found only little evidence that the diatom community compositions in either lake responded to the H4 event. However, the Y-5 influx caused clear and rapid diatom community changes. After the initial response, community composition in Lake Ohrid and, to a lesser extent, in Lake Prespa slowly returned to their quasi pre-disturbance state. Moreover, there is no evidence for disturbance-related extinction events. The combined evidence from these findings suggests that lakes Ohrid and Prespa likely did not experience regime shifts. It is therefore concluded that both lakes show resilience to environmental disturbance. However, it seems that Lake Ohrid is more resilient than Lake Prespa as the recovery of diatom communities is more pronounced and as its estimated recovery time is only ca. 1400 years vs. ca. 3600 years in Lake Prespa. The reasons for the differential responses remain largely unknown, but differences in geology, lake age, limnology, and intrinsic parameters of the diatom proxies may play a role. Given the relative robust results obtained, this study provides important new insights into the response of lakes to (multiple environmental disturbances. Moreover, it contributes to one of the major goals of the SCOPSCO project – to evaluate the influence of major geological events onto the evolution of endemic taxa in Lake Ohrid.

  17. Late Quaternary stratigraphy and sedimentology of the central North Atlantic: A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The marine geological research program of the Department of Sedimentary Geology at the Free University of Amsterdam focuses on three areas: Banda Sea, central North Atlantic and the Mediterranean. Late Quaternary deep-sea cores taken in these areas are analysed in order to reconstruct changes in paleoceanography as reflected in the sedimentary record. Radiocarbon datings through the cores provide the necessary stratigraphic framework. The Utrecht tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) allows radiocarbon dating on minutes samples (10-25 mg carbonate) and is therefore an excellent tool for core studies. This paper concentrates on results obtained from the central North Atlantic material. The Atlantic CaCO3 profile shows a maximum at the last climate optimum at 6 ka and a minimum at the last glacial maximum at 18 ka. This is also observed in our material, and confirmed by radiocarbon dating. It is shown that sedimentation rates are distinctly higher during the period of deglaciation. The dating also provides a framework for the timing of the retreat of the polar front. A surface layer of pteropod shells covers parts of the Atlantic Ocean floor at about 3000 m depth. Many shells show Fe/Mn staining. The AMS technique allows dating of single shells, and proves that the stained specimens are considerably oder than the unstained shells. Implications for this phenomenon and for the contribution of aragonite to the sediment are given. (orig.)

  18. Age, Stratigraphy, and Correlations of the Late Neogene Purisima Formation, Central California Coast Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Charles L.; Barron, John A.; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.; Clark, Joseph C.; Perry, Frank A.; Brabb, Earl E.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    The Purisima Formation is an important upper Miocene and Pliocene stratigraphic unit in central California, cropping out from the coast at Point Reyes north of San Francisco to more extensive exposures in the Santa Cruz Mountains to the south. The fine-grained rocks in the lower parts of the Purisima Formation record a latest Miocene transgressive event, whereas the middle and upper parts of the formation consist of increasingly clastic-rich siltstones and sandstones resulting from uplift of adjacent coastal regions and the Sierra Nevada during Pliocene transgressive and regressive sea-level events. Exposures of the Purisima occur in three different, fault-bounded, structural blocks - the Santa Cruz, Pigeon Point, and Point Reyes tectonic blocks - that complicate correlations and regional age assignments. We summarize and compare published and new biostratigraphic and geochronologic data for various exposures of the Purisima Formation on the basis of mollusks, diatoms, radiometric dating, magnetostratigraphy, tephrochronology, and strontium isotope dating. On the basis of these data, we conclude that the Purisima Formation ranges in age from the latest Miocene (about 7 Ma) to the late Pliocene (about 2.6 Ma). The Purisima Formation of Santa Cruz County, exposed in the sea cliffs from Santa Cruz to Rio del Mar, is here designated a supplementary reference section because it is the most complete and well studied Purisima section in central California.

  19. Late Quaternary paleosols, stratigraphy and landscape evolution in the Northern Pampa, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Rob A.; Zárate, Marcelo; Toms, Phillip; King, Matthew; Sanabria, Jorge; Arguello, Graciella

    2006-07-01

    The field properties, micromorphology, grain-size, geochemistry, and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of two late Quaternary sections have been used to reconstruct the sequence of pedosedimentary processes and to provide insights into landscape evolution in part of the Northern Pampa of Argentina. Paleosols developed in paludal sediments adjacent to the Paraná river at Baradero and in loess at Lozada can both be correlated and linked to other sites, thus enabling for the first time the tentative recognition and tracing of a diachronous soil stratigraphic unit that probably spans the equivalent of at least part of marine oxygen isotope stage (OIS) 5. The paleosol at Lozada was truncated and buried beneath fluvial sediments during the time span of OIS 4 and 3. Eolian gradually replaced paludal inputs at Baradero over this period, and there were also two clearly defined breaks in sedimentation and development of paleosols. The period corresponding to OIS 2 was marked by significant loess accumulation at both sites with accretion continuing into the mid-Holocene only at Lozada. The more developed nature of the surface soil at Baradero probably reflects a combination of a moister climate and a longer soil-forming interval.

  20. Late Holocene stratigraphy of coastal deposits between Auckland and Dunedin, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three chronostratigraphic units based on accumulative deposits and their respective soils are proposed for late Holocene coastal deposits between Auckland and Dunedin, New Zealand: Tamatean Chronozone (c. 1,800 to 450 years BP), Ohuan Chronozone (c. 450 to 150 years BP), and Hoatan Chronozone (c. 150 years to present day). The chronozones represent depositional episodes each consisting of two phases: a high rate of deposition (unstable phase), followed by a low rate of deposition and soil formation (stable phase). Vegetation on soils formed during the stable phases is inferred principally from landsnails recovered from archaeological sites. Forest on Tamatean soil (600 to 450 years BP) advanced almost to the coast in the Manawatu, the southeast Wairarapa, and on the East Coast. Sediment thickness measured at sections along the eastern North Island coast show that rates of deposition during unstable phases have decreased during the last 650 years. The depositional episodes appear to be unrelated to sea level changes, tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions or cultural influence. Unstable phases appear to correlate with times of high temperatures, and stable phases with time of low temperatures; it is suggested that the episodes may be related to changes in the frequency of tropical and extratropical cyclones. Inferred climate during unstable phases is windy and dry, and during stable phases, less windy and moist

  1. Late Pleistocene and Holocene aeolian sedimentation in Gonghe Basin, northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau: Variability, processes, and climatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Mingrui; Jin, Yanxiang; Liu, Xingxing; Song, Lei; Li, Hao; Li, Fengshan; Chen, Fahu

    2016-01-01

    Although stratigraphic sequences of aeolian deposits in dryland areas have long been recognized as providing information about past environments, the exact nature of the environmental processes they reflect remains unclear. Here, we report the results of a detailed investigation of eight outcrop sections in the Gonghe Basin, northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Measurements of sediment grain-size and chemical composition indicate that the deposits are primarily of aeolian origin, consisting of interbedded, well-sorted sand, silty sand, loess and/or palaeosol; however, their occurrence varies from site to site. Fossil dune sands mainly occur in or close to the currently stabilized or semi-stabilized dune fields, whereas loess is distributed along the downwind marginal areas. This pattern of basin-scale differentiation was controlled mainly by spatial variability of sediment supply due to the antecedent sedimentary patterns within the basin. Together with previously-published optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages, 24 new OSL dates are used to elucidate the history of aeolian activity and its relationship to climatic changes. There is no apparent relationship between past dune activity and downwind loess deposits. Deposition of silty sand probably occurred during past phases of windy, dry and cold climate in the Late Pleistocene. However, climatic factors alone cannot explain the occurrence of silty sand deposition. This is because the deposition of silty sand was always preceded by episodes of fluvial deposition prior to river incision, thereby indicating the importance of an 'activated' sediment supply associated with fluvial processes. Deposition of well-sorted sand occurred episodically, not only during the Late Pleistocene, but also during the early- to mid-Holocene. Vegetation conditions, controlled either by the occurrence of intervals of moisture deficit during the Late Pleistocene or by changes in the balance between precipitation and evapotranspiration at a local scale, played an important role in sand mobility and deposition. The effect of vegetation on sand mobility is also suggested by independent evidence of aeolian activity from Genggahai Lake in the Gonghe Basin. Here, the deposition of aeolian sand in the basin during the early- to mid-Holocene indicates a low level of effective moisture caused by high evaporation induced by higher summer insolation, despite the coeval increased regional precipitation recorded by lacustrine sediments. In contrast, late Holocene palaeosols represent a high level of effective moisture, and their formation did not necessarily require increased regional precipitation. Overall, our results suggest that the relationship between aeolian activity and regional climate change is complex, and that sand accumulations do not represent the consistent action of surface processes that are related to climatic changes.

  2. Assessing the impact of late Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions on global vegetation and climate

    OpenAIRE

    M.-O. Brault; Mysak, L. A.; Matthews , H. D.; C. T. Simmons

    2013-01-01

    The end of the Pleistocene marked a turning point for the Earth system as climate gradually emerged from millennia of severe glaciation in the Northern Hemisphere. It is widely acknowledged that the deglacial climate change coincided with an unprecedented decline in many species of large terrestrial mammals, including the near-total eradication of the woolly mammoth. Due to an herbivorous diet that presumably involved large-scale tree grazing, the mammoth expansion would have accelerated the ...

  3. Sites without stratigraphy: Devesa do Rei, a cultual site in Galician late Prehistory and the Iron Age?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboal Fernndez, Roberto

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this text we explore a singular site that offers a series of important novelties, both in terms of its discontinuous pattern of use in different periods (covering a lengthy period from the Neolithic to the Iron Age, and its apparent use for ritual purposes in all of them, as well as the possible identification of a funerary structure from the Galician Iron Age. At the same time, this work is proposed as a case for study that makes it possible to define a procedure to reconstruct the sequence and function of open sites from Late Prehistory in Galicia characterized by a lack of vertical stratigraphy. This problem is solved by combining different analytical techniques, all based on a record of high quality excavation that makes use of analyses of material culture, radiocarbon dating, distribution patterns, as well as soil and sediment analysis.

    Se estudia en este texto un yacimiento singular que ofrece importantes novedades, tanto por su reocupacin discontinua en pocas distintas (con una secuencia amplia que cubre desde el Neoltico a la Edad del Hierro, como por su aparente funcionalidad ritual en todas ellas, y la posible identificacin de una estructura funeraria de la Edad del Hierro de Galicia. Al mismo tiempo, este trabajo se plantea como caso de estudio que permite definir un procedimiento para reconstituir la secuencia y funcin de yacimientos abiertos de la Prehistoria Reciente de Galicia caracterizados por no presentar estratigrafa vertical. Este problema se solventa con el entrecruzamiento de diferentes tcnicas de anlisis basadas todas ellas en un registro de excavacin de calidad que se sirve de anlisis de cultura material, radiocarbnicos, distributivos, sedimentolgicos y edafolgicos.

  4. Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene vegetation history of northeastern Russian Arctic inferred from the Lake El'gygytgyn pollen record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A. A.; Tarasov, P. E.; Wennrich, V.; Raschke, E.; Herzschuh, U.; Nowaczyk, N. R.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Melles, M.

    2014-05-01

    The 318 m thick lacustrine sediment record from Lake El'gygytgyn, northeastern Russian Arctic cored by the international El'gygytgyn Drilling Project provides unique opportunities for the time-continuous reconstruction of the regional paleoenvironmental history for the past 3.6 Myr. Pollen studies of the lower 216 m of the lacustrine sediments demonstrate their value as an excellent archive of vegetation and climate changes during the Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene. About 3.5-3.35 Myr BP, the vegetation at Lake El'gygytgyn, now an area of tundra was dominated by spruce-larch-fir-hemlock forests. After ca. 3.35 Myr BP dark coniferous taxa gradually disappeared. A very pronounced environmental change took place ca. 3.31-3.28 Myr BP, corresponding to the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) M2, when treeless tundra- and steppe-like habitats became dominant in the regional vegetation. Climate conditions were similar to those of Late Pleistocene cold intervals. Numerous coprophilous fungi spores identified in the pollen samples suggest the presence of grazing animals around the lake. Following the MIS M2 event, larch-pine forests with some spruce mostly dominated the area until ca. 2.6 Myr BP, interrupted by colder and drier intervals ca. 3.043-3.025, 2.935-2.912, and 2.719-2.698 Myr BP. At the beginning of the Pleistocene, ca. 2.6 Myr BP, noticeable climatic deterioration occurred. Forested habitats changed to predominantly treeless and shrubby environments, which reflect a relatively cold and dry climate. Peaks in observed green algae colonies (Botryococcus) around 2.53, 2.45, 2.32-2.305, 2.20 and 2.16-2.15 Myr BP suggest a spread of shallow water environments. A few intervals (i.e., 2.55-2.53, ca. 2.37, and 2.35-2.32 Myr BP) with a higher presence of coniferous taxa (mostly pine and larch) document some relatively short-term climate ameliorations during Early Pleistocene glacial periods.

  5. Dynamics of the late Plio-Pleistocene West Antarctic Ice Sheet documented in subglacial diamictites, AND-1B drill core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Ellen A.; Christoffersen, Poul; Powell, Ross D.; Talarico, Franco M.

    2014-08-01

    Geologic studies of sediment deposited by glaciers can provide crucial insights into the subglacial environment. We studied muddy diamictites in the ANtarctic geological DRILLing (ANDRILL) AND-1B drill core, acquired from beneath the Ross Ice Shelf in McMurdo Sound, with the aim of identifying paleo-ice stream activity in the Plio-Pleistocene. Glacial advances were identified from glacial surfaces of erosion (GSEs) and subglacial diamictites within three complete sequences were investigated using lithofacies associations, micromorphology, and quartz sand grain microtextures. Whereas conditions in the Late Pliocene resemble the modern Greenland Ice Sheet where fast flowing glaciers lubricated by surface meltwater terminate directly in the sea (interval 201-212 mbsl) conditions in the Late Pleistocene are similar to modern West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) ice streams (38-49 mbsl). We identify the latter from ductile deformation and high pore-water pressure, which resulted in pervasive rotation and formation of till pellets and low relief, rounded sand grains dominated by abrasion. In the transitional period during the Mid-Pleistocene (55-68 mbsf), a slow moving inland ice sheet deposited tills with brittle deformation, producing lineations and bi-masepic and unistrial plasma fabric, along with high relief, conchoidally fractured quartz grains. Changes in the provenance of gravel to cobble-size clasts support a distant source area of Byrd Glacier for fast-flowing paleo-ice streams and a proximal area between Darwin and Skelton Glaciers for the slow-moving inland ice sheet. This difference in till provenance documents a shift in direction of glacial flow at the core site, which indirectly reflects changes in the size and thickness of the WAIS. Hence, we found that fast ice streaming motion is a consequence of a thicker WAIS pushing flow lines to the west and introducing clasts from the Byrd Glacier source area to the drill site. The detailed analysis of diamictites in AND-1B demonstrates that Pliocene glacial intervals were warmer than in the Pleistocene when polar ice sheets grew from local inland ice to regional ice streams.

  6. THE LATE EARLY PLEISTOCENE HUMAN REMAINS FROM BUIA, DANAKIL DEPRESSION, ERITREA

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    ROBERTO MACCHIARELLI

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Early Pleistocene sedimentary succession of the Dandiero (Buia Basin (Danakil Depression, Eritrea has preserved a rich paleontological, paleoanthropological, and archeological record. Fieldwork undertaken between 1995 and 2003 on a site at Uadi Aalad (Abbate et al. 1998 led to the discovery of one-million-year-old human remains. They consist of a cranium in excellent preservation condition (UA-31, two permanent teeth (UA-222 and UA-369, and three pelvic portions (UA-173, UA-405 and UA-466, the latter recovered on 2003. The cranium and the postcranial remains represent a single adult individual, likely of female sex. The cranium evidences a blend of "erectus-like" and progressive morpho-architectural features, the latter more commonly found in the Middle Pleistocene. Preparation and restoration of the specimens (notably, of the virtually complete UA-31 face were only completed on September 2003. The revision, refinement, and integration of our previous analytical and interpretative work (cf. Abbate et al. 1998; Macchiarelli et al. 2002 is in progress within the context of the paleoanthropological reord currently available for the African Early to Middle Pleistocene.

  7. Late ordovician stratigraphy, zircon provenance and tectonics, Lachlan Fold Belt, southeastern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordovician quartz turbidites of the Lachlan Fold Belt in southeastern Australia accumulated in a marginal sea and overlapped an adjoining island arc (Molong volcanic province) developed adjacent to eastern Gondwana. The turbidite succession in the Shoalhaven River Gorge, in the southern highlands of New South Wales, has abundant outcrop and graptolite sites. The succession consists of, from the base up, a unit of mainly thick-bedded turbidites (undifferentiated Adaminaby Group), a unit with conspicuous bedded chert (Numeralla Chert), a unit with common thin-bedded turbidites [Bumballa Formation (new name)] and a unit of black shale (Warbisco Shale). Coarse to very coarse sandstone in the Bumballa Formation is rich in quartz and similar to sandstone in the undifferentiated Adaminaby Group. Detrital zircons from sandstone in the Bumballa Formation, and from sandstone at a similar stratigraphic level from the upper Adaminaby Group of the Genoa River area in eastern Victoria, include grains as young as 453-473 Ma, slightly older than the stratigraphic ages. The dominant detrital ages are in the interval 500-700 Ma (Pacific Gondwana component) with a lessor concentration of Grenville ages (1000-1300 Ma). This pattern resembles other Ordovician sandstones from the Lachlan Fold Belt and also occurs in Triassic sandstones and Quaternary sands from eastern Australia. The Upper Ordovician succession is predominantly fine grained, which reflects reduced clastic inputs from the source in the Middle Cambrian to earliest Ordovician Ross-Delamerian Fold Belts that developed along the eastern active margin of Gondwana. Development of subduction zones in the Late Ordovician marginal sea are considered to be mainly responsible for the diversion of sediment and the resulting reduction in the supply of terrigenous sand to the island arc and eastern part of the marginal sea. Sixty zircons from each sample were analysed and results are presented. Methods following standard procedures were undertaken on SHRIMP I, the analyses comprised four scans through the mass spectrum (Williams 1998 and references therein). The U/Pb ratios have been calibrated relative to the AS3 Duluth Gabbro reference zircon (Paces and Miller 1993) and relative probability plots with stacked histograms were compiled using ISOPLOT/EX (Ludwig 1999). Copyright (2002) Geological Society of Australia

  8. Late Neogene Volcanic Stratigraphy in the Southern Puertecitos Volcanic Province of Baja California: Time Constraints and Vent Source Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Carrillo, P.; Martin, A.; Lopez-Martinez, M.; Cañon, E.

    2007-05-01

    Late Neogene syn-rift explosive volcanism occurred in the Puertecitos Volcanic Province along the western margin of the Gulf of California. This volcanic episode is possibly related to extension during opening of the lower Delfin basin in mid-late Pliocene time. The volcanic stratigraphy in the southern Puertecitos Volcanic Province comprises three main groups: group 1 is a mid-Miocene, arc-related volcanic and sedimentary apron. Groups 2 and 3 are syn-rift volcanic units interstratified within alluvial conglomerate. Group 2 includes a non-welded, crystal-rich pyroclastic flow deposit, and a dark glassy dacite lava flow. Distinctive mineralogy of the crystal tuff is augite, sanidine-microcline and quartz. Two 39Ar/40Ar laser step-heating experiments on sanidine grains yielded an 6.18 ± 0.03 Ma isochron age, consistent with a 6.1 ± 0.4 Ma plateau age obtained in the dacite lava. Thickness of the crystal tuff varies from 35 m in the northeast to 10 m in the southwest along 5 km of distance. Group 3 is characterized by the lack of quartz and potassic feldspar phenocrysts. Three laser step heating experiments on groundmass samples constrain this pulse of explosive volcanism between 2.9 ± 0.1 and 2.3 ± 0.03 Ma. Thicknesses of individual units increase to the northeast and collectively reach up to 150 m. Isopath maps for distinctive flow-units indicate consistent dispersion direction to the SW (average azimuth 210° ± 15°). This inferred flow direction is similar to the orientation of magnetic susceptibility axes measured in 20 oriented samples that yield a mean azimuth of 214°± 24°. In group 3 flow-units eutaxitic foliation is concordant and dips 8-20° to the ENE. Tilting of the volcanic sequence is produced by a series of NNW-trending, west-dipping, high-angle normal faults with less than 40 m of throw. Balanced cross- sections in the southern Puertecitos Volcanic Province indicates that post-2.8 Ma extension is less than 15% suggesting that major deformation during the opening of the Lower Delfin basin has been accommodated to the east. Our data support multiple source vents located offshore the central Puertecitos Volcanic Province. These pyroclastic flows may constitute useful marker horizons in marine seismic lines for reconstructing the timing and amount of extension across conjugate margins in the Lower Delfin basin.

  9. Assessing the impact of late Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions on global vegetation and climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-O. Brault

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The end of the Pleistocene was a turning point for the Earth system as climate gradually emerged from millennia of severe glaciation in the Northern Hemisphere. The deglacial climate change coincided with an unprecedented decline in many species of Pleistocene megafauna, including the near-total eradication of the woolly mammoth. Due to an herbivorous diet that presumably involved large-scale tree grazing, the mammoth extinction has been associated with the rapid expansion of dwarf deciduous trees in Siberia and Beringia, thus potentially contributing to the changing climate of the period. In this study, we use the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM to simulate the possible effects of these extinctions on climate during the latest deglacial period. We have explored various hypothetical scenarios of forest expansion in the northern high latitudes, quantifying the biogeophysical effects in terms of changes in surface albedo and air temperature. These scenarios include a Maximum Impact Scenario (MIS which simulates the greatest possible post-extinction reforestation in the model, and sensitivity tests which investigate the timing of extinction, the fraction of trees grazed by mammoths, and the southern extent of mammoth habitats. We also show the results of a simulation with free atmospheric CO2-carbon cycle interactions. For the MIS, we obtained a surface albedo increase and global warming of 0.006 and 0.175 °C, respectively. Less extreme scenarios produced smaller global mean temperature changes, though local warming in some locations exceeded 0.3 °C even in the more realistic extinction scenarios. In the free CO2 simulation, the biogeophysical-induced warming was amplified by a biogeochemical effect, whereby the replacement of high-latitude tundra with shrub forest led to a release of soil carbon to the atmosphere and a small atmospheric CO2 increase. Overall, our results suggest the potential for a small, though non-trivial, effect of megafaunal extinctions on Pleistocene climate.

  10. Sedimentation and paleoenvironmental evolution in the China seas since the late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xuefa; Liu, Yanguang; Liu, Shengfa; Qiao, Shuqing

    2014-05-01

    Chinese seas include the Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, East China Sea and South China Sea. Systematic investigations on the sedimentary geology of the above-mentioned seas have been carried out during 2004-2011 through the project of "Synthetic Investigation and Research on the Chinese Marginal Seas". Around 21700 surface sediment samples and 1250 sediment cores have been collected for the detailed study. Around 75300 km of seismic profiles and 15220 sites of suspended matter investigation have been completed. Major advances of our study are as follows. 1. Sedimentary distribution map of 1:25 0000 of Chinese shallow seas has been complied, with the special emphasis on the harbor, bay and delta regions at 1:50000 scale. Meanwhile, an atlas of the marine sediments has been published. Several issues related to the sediments partition and variations in suspended matters and their controlling factors have been discussed. The sedimentary classification, provenance, characteristics of mineralogy, geochemistry, microfossils, physical and mechanical characteristics, content and turbidity of suspended matter have also been addressed. 2. We also compiled images of seismic profiles and its interpreted pictures, depth of representative strata boundary for Chinese seas. We have attempted to clarify the characteristics of sequence stratigraphy in these four seas since the Last Deglacial Period. Disaster geological bodies, such as sea-bottom sand waves, shallow gas and buried channel/exposed rock have been delineated. 3. High-resolution Holocene stratigraphy and time series of estuary, subaqueous delta and mud deposits in the inner shelf regions of Chinese seas have been established by using sedimentology, mineralogy, geochemistry and sequence stratigraphy. The possible responses of sea-level variations to environmental changes have also been clarified tentatively. 4. Based on the investigation of sedimentary cores, we have constructed the lithostratigraphy and magnetostratigraphy of the Bohai Sea for the last 1 Ma, and recognized nine transgression-regression cycles in this region. Likewise, based on the core from south Yellow Sea, we reconstructed the lithostratigraphy and magnetostratigraphy of the south Yellow Sea since 1.9 Ma and discussed the sedimentary environmental change and its relation with past climatic conditions and sea-level changes.

  11. High-resolution sequence stratigraphy from piezocone tests: an example from the Late Quaternary deposits of the southeastern Po Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorosi, Alessandro; Marchi, Nazaria

    1999-10-01

    Cone penetration tests are traditionally regarded as a major tool for geotechnical investigations. This study, based upon interpretation of 234 cone penetration tests with pore-pressure measurements (piezocone tests or CPTU), carried out in the Late Quaternary deposits of the southeastern Po Plain, shows how CPTU tests can also be used for sedimentological purposes, including detailed facies characterization, subsurface stratigraphic correlations, and identification of the key surfaces for sequence-stratigraphic interpretation. The Late Quaternary depositional history of the southeastern Po Plain, reconstructed on the basis of data from seventeen continuously cored boreholes, includes (1) alluvial plain development during the Late Quaternary lowstand and the early stages of transgression, (2) formation of a rapidly migrating barrier-lagoon system during the late transgressive phases (8800-6000 y BP), (3) construction and progradation of a wave-dominated delta (ancient Po delta) during the following sea-level highstand (6000-800 y BP), and (4) development of the present-day alluvial plain, following the delta lobe abandonment in the 13th century A.D. Local execution of CPTU tests in coincidence with drilling sites enables the calibration of borehole data with piezocone penetration profiles. Lithofacies characterization is based upon estimation of three major parameters: corrected cone resistance ( qt), sleeve friction ( fs), and pore water pressure ( u). Plotting of qt versus the ratio of cone friction to cone bearing (FR) is adopted as the major tool for sediment texture classification. Eight major facies associations for the southeastern Po Plain are identified. These are, for decreasing qt values: (1) fluvial channel sands, (2) beach-ridge sands, (3) transgressive barrier sands, (4) crevasse sands and silts, (5) levee silts and sands, (6) floodplain silts and clays, (7) prodelta clays, and (8) marsh clays and peats. CPTU profile interpretation also provides the basis for the identification of the three major key surfaces within the Late Quaternary 4th-order depositional sequence. (1) The transgressive surface (TS), marking the boundary between the locally pedogenized, stiff Pleistocene alluvial clays and the overlying Holocene transgressive paralic deposits, has a distinctive pore-pressure response, with very low u values, and is characterized by a sharp downward increase in fs, which is paralleled by a moderate increase in qt. (2) The ravinement surface (RS), corresponding to the boundary between fine-grained back-barrier deposits and the overlying transgressive barrier sands, is invariably marked by a sharp upward increase in qt (and decrease in FR). (3) The maximum flooding surface (MFS), which is not clearly recognizable on the sole basis of core data, is identified within shallow-marine (prodelta) clays in combination with minor peaks of qt, which have been interpreted to reflect a laterally extensive fossil lag, with transition in proximal areas to sand (shell-rich?) layers. Simplicity, speed, and comparatively low costs of CPTU tests imply that an extensive use of this method, when used in conjunction with core programs, can be a very attractive alternative to economically less convenient methods for the geological mapping of alluvial/coastal plain areas consisting of non-gravel deposits.

  12. Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene Rock Art from the Mongolian Altai: The Material and its Cultural Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Jacobson-Tepfer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rock-pecked images from the northern Mongolian Altai attest to the presence of human communities within the high valleys of that region during the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene. The material provides evidence that is hitherto largely missing from the archaeological record of that region. This paper reviews the rock art, its find sites and larger physical contexts and uses evidence from paleoenvironmental studies to propose dating and cultural significance. The material is compared with other sites said to have Paleolithic imagery from Mongolia and the adjoining Russian Altai. The body of presented material offers a major resource for the study of early hunter-gatherer communities at the interface of Central and North Asia.

  13. Late Pleistocene to Holocene soil development and environments in the Long Gang Volcanic Field area, Jilin Province, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Daniela; Zhang, Xinrong; Knbel, Jette; Maerker, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    Late Pleistocene to Holocene shifts of climate and vegetation in the Long Gang Volcanic Field in NE China have been reconstructed, e. g. by Steblich et al. (2009), based on Maar lake sediment cores. In this study, we investigated soil development during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene and linked it to the climate and vegetation reported in the literature. Three pedons were described and analyzed on a crater wall surrounding a maar. The lower part of the slope is covered by basic pyroclastics that are obviously younger than the maar itself. Pedon 1 is located on the upper slope, where the younger pyroclastics are not present; thus it developed over the entire Holocene and part of the Late Pleistocene. Pedon 2 is on the toe slope and developed from the young basic pyroclastics. Vegetation remains, charred by fire that was caused by the volcanic ash fall, were found in the lowermost part of the pyroclastics layer, on top of a paleosol. Charcoal fragments were dated to 18950-18830 cal BP (using INTCAL 09). Thus, pedon 2 developed since around 18.9 ka BP, whereas the development of the paleosol that was buried under the pyroclastics (pedon 3), was stopped at this time. Pedons 1 and 2 are Vitric Andosols, developed mainly from basic pyroclastics, as evidenced by the composition of rock fragments in the soils, comprising 78 / 81 mass % lapilli and 22 / 19 mass % gneiss fragments, respectively. Pedon 3 is a Cutanic Luvisol (Chromic) that developed entirely from gneiss fragments produced by the maar explosion. Lab data suggest increasing intensity of pedogenesis in the direction: Pedon 3 (paleosol) < Pedon 2 < Pedon 1, reflected e. g. in increasing Fed/Fet ratios, decreasing molar ratios of (Ca+K+Na)/Al, and decreasing pH. However, it needs to be considered that lapilli are more readily weatherable than gneiss fragments. The profile morphology of the paleosol, characterized by reddish-brown color (7.5YR), strong angular blocky structure and well-expressed illuvial clay coatings, rather indicates that it developed over a longer time-span and/or warmer climate than the two yellowish-brown surface soils. Since the morphology of the paleosol clearly reflects interglacial climatic conditions and forest cover, it most likely started developing during the Eemian. Steblich et al. (2009) reconstructed for the period 16.7-14.45 ka BP steppe with Betula (and minor proportions of Larix, Alnus, Picea and Salix). We assume a similar environment for the time of the deposition of the pyroclastics (18.9 ka BP) in the toe slope profile. The character of the steppe was probably more open at this time, but the presence of at least few scattered trees over the steppe is evidenced by a charred tree trunk that was found in the profile. During Holocene, vegetation consisted mainly of deciduous forest, until anthropogenic influence increased from around 1850 AD on. Reference: Steblich, M., Mingram, J., Han, J., Liu, Y. (2009): Late Pleistocene spread of (cool-)temperate forests in Northeast China and climate changes synchronous with the North Atlantic region. Global and Planetary Change, 65, 56-70.

  14. The late Pleistocene horned crocodile Voay robustus (Grandidier & Vaillant, 1872 from Madagascar in the Museum fr Naturkunde Berlin

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    C. Bickelmann

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Crocodylian material from late Pleistocene localities around Antsirabe, Madagascar, stored in the collection of the Museum fr Naturkunde, Berlin, was surveyed. Several skeletal elements, including skull bones, vertebrae, ribs, osteoderms, and limb bones from at least three large individuals could be unambiguously assigned to the genus Voay Brochu, 2007. Furthermore, the simultaneous occurrence of Voay robustus Grandidier & Vaillant, 1872 and Crocodylus niloticus Laurenti, 1768 in Madagascar is discussed. Voay robustus and Crocodylus niloticus are systematically separate but similar in stature and size, which would make them direct rivals for ecological resources. Our hypothesis on the extinction of the species Voay, which was endemic to Madagascar, suggests that C. niloticus invaded Madagascar only after V. robustus became extinct. doi:10.1002/mmng.200800007

  15. First accelerator mass spectrometry 14C dates documenting contemporaneity of nonanalog species in late Pleistocene mammal communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Thomas W., Jr.; Semken, Holmes A., Jr.; Graham, Russell W.; Klippel, Walter F.; Markova, Anastasia; Smirnov, Nikolai G.; Southon, John

    1999-10-01

    Worldwide late Pleistocene terrestrial mammal faunas are characterized by stratigraphic associations of species that now have exclusive geographic ranges. These have been interpreted as either taphonomically mixed or representative of communities that no longer exist. Accelerator mass spectrometry 14C dates (n = 60) on single bones of stratigraphically associated fossil micromammals from two American and two Russian sites document for the first time that currently allopatric mammals occurred together between 12,000 and 22,000 yr B.P. on two continents. The existence of mammal communities without modern analogs demonstrates that Northern Hemisphere biological communities are ephemeral and that many modern biomes are younger than 12 ka. Future climate change may result in new nonanalog communities.

  16. Co-occurrence of mylodontid sloths and insights on their potential distributions during the late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Luciano; Fariña, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) for the last interglacial (LIG), the global last glacial maximum (LGM) and the Holocene climatic optimum (HCO) were generated for three extinct South American Pleistocene mylodontid giant sloths, Glossotherium robustum, Lestodon armatus and Mylodon darwinii. They are recorded co-occurring in some localities including Arroyo del Vizcaíno site (AdV) in Uruguay. Co-occurrence records were studied based on the overlap of their generated areas of potential distributions, and compared with the available biome reconstructions of South America during the LGM to analyze their distribution patterns, ecological requirements and possible interactions between them. Our results suggest that these sloths could have co-existed mainly in the Chaco-Paraná Basin and the plains in the Río de la Plata area. Areas of high suitability were observed for submerged parts of the continental shelf that were exposed during the LGM showing an overall increase in potential habitat compared to the LIG and HCO. This suggests that there was a drastic reduction in total available areas of preferred habitat at the end of the Pleistocene. The co-occurrence of these sloths at the AdV site suggests the presence of vegetation indicative of mainly open, cold to temperate habitats but with mixed patches typical of humid climates.

  17. Rock-magnetic study of Late Pleistocene-Holocene sediments from the Babcora lacustrine basin, Chihuahua, northern Mexico

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    R. Cruz-Gatica

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Rock-magnetic and sedimentological studies of the Quaternary sequence of lake Babcora (29.4N, 107.7W; 2,100 m a.s.l. from Late Wisconsin to Holocene are reported. Two vertical profiles have been studied. Magnetic susceptibilities and natural remanence (NRM and isothermal remanence (IRM intensities correlate with sand, silt and clay contents in the sediments, suggesting that magnetic minerals are allogenic. IRM acquisition curves and alternating field coercivity spectra document the occurrence of Ti-poor titanomagnetites, hematites and iron-hydroxides. The fluctuations in the input of sediment correlate with changes in erosional processes, climate and tectonics in the catchment basin. Five radiocarbon dates ranging from 4,346 to 16,343 yr B.P. were obtained. The southern profile covers a longer time span than the western profile, which spans from 11,000 to 6,000 yr B.P., when the lake extended over a larger area. Two major periods of increased rainfall and high lake levels in Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene are recognized. The Late Wisconsin wet period was followed by gradual drying up to around 6,000 yr B.P. Between 11,000 and 8,000 yr B.P. there was another wet period, related to increased summer rainfall. The dry period between 3,000 and 2,000 yr B.P. was followed by widespread erosion.

  18. Long-term hydrological changes in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico (ODP-625B) during the Holocene and late Pleistocene inferred from organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limoges, Audrey; de Vernal, Anne; Van Nieuwenhove, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Palynological analyses are used in conjunction with oxygen isotopes andMg/Ca ratios in foraminifers in order to document the response of dinoflagellate cysts (dinocysts) assemblages to changing climate conditions in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico over the Holocene and late Pleistocene. During MIS...

  19. Fossils in Late Cretaceous to early Palaeocene flint nodules embedded in pleistocene glaciofluvial sediments near Fukov (Děčín District, Northern Bohemia)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, R.; Kaše, J.; Kvaček, J.; Zágoršek, K.; Kočí, T.; Žítt, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 68, 3/4 (2012), s. 119-131. ISSN 0036-5343 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Erratic boulders * Flint * Glaciofluvial sediments * Late Cretaceous * Northern Bohemia * Palaeocene * Pleistocene glaciation * Taphocoenosis Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.nm.cz/publikace/archiv.php?id=4&rok=68&kcislu=3-4&f_=Zobrazit

  20. Reconstructing late Pliocene to middle Pleistocene Death Valley lakes and river systems as a test of pupfish (Cyprinodontidae) dispersal hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, J.R.; Machette, M.N.; Klinger, R.E.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Liddicoat, J.C.; Tinsley, J. C., III; David, B.T.; Ebbs, V.M.

    2008-01-01

    During glacial (pluvial) climatic periods, Death Valley is hypothesized to have episodically been the terminus for the Amargosa, Owens, and Mojave Rivers. Geological and biological studies have tended to support this hypothesis and a hydrological link that included the Colorado River, allowing dispersal of pupfish throughout southeastern California and western Nevada. Recent mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) studies show a common pupfish (Cyprinodontidae) ancestry in this region with divergence beginning 3-2 Ma. We present tephrochronologic and paleomagnetic data in the context of testing the paleohydrologic connections with respect to the common collection point of the Amargosa, Owens, and Mojave Rivers in Death during successive time periods: (1) the late Pliocene to early Pleistocene (3-2 Ma), (2) early to middle Pleistocene (1.2-0.5 Ma), and (3) middle to late Pleistocene (<0.70.03 Ma; paleolakes Manly and Mojave). Using the 3.35 Ma Zabriskie Wash tuff and 3.28 Ma Nomlaki Tuff Member of the Tuscan and Tehama Formations, which are prominent marker beds in the region, we conclude that at 3-2 Ma, a narrow lake occupied the ancient Furnace Creek Basin and that Death Valley was not hydrologically connected with the Amargosa or Mojave Rivers. A paucity of data for Panamint Valley does not allow us to evaluate an Owens River connection to Death Valley ca. 3-2 Ma. Studies by others have shown that Death Valley was not hydrologically linked to the Amargosa, Owens, or Mojave Rivers from 1.2 to 0.5 Ma. We found no evidence that Lake Manly flooded back up the Mojave River to pluvial Lake Mojave between 0.18 and 0.12 Ma, although surface water flowed from the Amargosa and Owens Rivers to Death Valley at this time. There is also no evidence for a connection of the Owens, Amargosa, or Mojave Rivers to the Colorado River in the last 3-2 m.y. Therefore, the hypothesis that pupfish dispersed or were isolated in basins throughout southeastern California and western Nevada by such a connection is not supported. Beyond the biologically predicted time frame, however, sparse and disputed data suggest that a fluvial system connected Panamint (Owens River), Death, and Amargosa Valleys, which could account for the dispersal and isolation before 3 Ma. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  1. Pleistocene Panthera leo spelaea (Goldfuss 1810) remains from the Balve cave (NW Germany) - a cave bear, hyena den and middle palaeolithic human cave -and review of the Sauerland Karst lion cave sites

    OpenAIRE

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2011-01-01

    Pleistocene remains of Panthera leo spelaea (Goldfuss 1810) from Balve Cave (Sauerland Karst, NW-Germany), one of the most famous Middle Palaeolithic Neandertalian cave sites in Europe, and also a hyena and cave bear den, belong to the most important felid sites of the Sauerland Karst. The stratigraphy, macrofaunal assemblages and Palaeolithic stone artefacts range from the final Saalian (late Middle Pleistocene, Acheulean) over the Middle Palaeolithic (Micoquian/Mousterian), and to the final...

  2. Assessing the impact of late Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions on global vegetation and climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-O. Brault

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The end of the Pleistocene marked a turning point for the Earth system as climate gradually emerged from millennia of severe glaciation in the Northern Hemisphere. It is widely acknowledged that the deglacial climate change coincided with an unprecedented decline in many species of large terrestrial mammals, including the near-total eradication of the woolly mammoth. Due to an herbivorous diet that presumably involved large-scale tree grazing, the mammoth expansion would have accelerated the expansion of dwarf deciduous trees in Siberia and Beringia, thus contributing to the changing climate of the period. In this study, we use the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM to simulate the possible effects of megafaunal extinctions on Pleistocene climate change. We have explored various hypothetical scenarios of forest expansion in the Northern Continents, quantifying the regional and global biogeophysical effects in terms of changes in surface albedo and air temperature. In particular, we focus our attention on a Maximum Impact Scenario (MIS which simulates the greatest possible post-extinction reforestation in the model. More realistic experiments include sensitivity tests based on the timing of extinction, the fraction of trees grazed by mammoths, and the size of mammoth habitats. We also show the results of a simulation with free (non-prescribed atmospheric CO2. For the MIS, we obtained a surface albedo increase of 0.006, which resulted in a global warming of 0.175 °C. Less extreme scenarios produced smaller global mean temperature changes, though local warming in some locations exceeded 0.3 °C even in the more realistic extinction scenarios. In the free CO2 simulation, the biogeophysical-induced warming was amplified by a biogeochemical effect whereby the replacement of high-latitude tundra with shrub forest led to a release of soil carbon to the atmosphere and a small atmospheric CO2 increase. Overall, our results suggest the potential for a small, though non-trivial, effect of megafaunal extinctions on Pleistocene climate change.

  3. Geomorphic and sedimentary responses of the Bull Creek Valley (Southern High Plains, USA) to Pleistocene and Holocene environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arauza, Hanna M.; Simms, Alexander R.; Bement, Leland C.; Carter, Brian J.; Conley, Travis; Woldergauy, Ammanuel; Johnson, William C.; Jaiswal, Priyank

    2016-01-01

    Fluvial geomorphology and stratigraphy often reflect past environmental and climate conditions. This study examines the response of Bull Creek, a small ephemeral creek in the Oklahoma panhandle, to environmental conditions through the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Fluvial terraces were mapped and their stratigraphy and sedimentology documented throughout the course of the main valley. Based on their elevations, terraces were broadly grouped into a late-Pleistocene fill terrace (T3) and two Holocene fill-cut terrace sets (T2 and T1). Terrace systems are marked by similar stratigraphies recording the general environmental conditions of the time. Sedimentary sequences preserved in terrace fills record the transition from a perennial fluvial system during the late glacial period and the Younger Dryas to a semiarid environment dominated by loess accumulation and punctuated by flood events during the middle to late Holocene. The highest rates of aeolian accumulation within the valley occurred during the early to middle Holocene. Our data provide significant new information regarding the late-Pleistocene and Holocene environmental history for this region, located between the well-studied Southern and Central High Plains of North America.

  4. Giant seismites and megablock uplift in the East African Rift: Evidence for large magnitude Late Pleistocene earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert-Wolf, Hannah; Roberts, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Due to rapid population growth and urbanization of many parts of East Africa, it is increasingly important to quantify the risk and possible destruction from large-magnitude earthquakes along the tectonically active East African Rift System. However, because comprehensive instrumental seismic monitoring, historical records, and fault trench investigations are limited for this region, the sedimentary record provides important archives of seismicity in the form of preserved soft-sediment deformation features (seismites). Extensive, previously undescribed seismites of centimeter- to dekameter-scale were identified by our team in alluvial and lacustrine facies of the Late Quaternary-Recent Lake Beds Succession in the Rukwa Rift Basin, of the Western Branch of the East African Rift System. We document the most highly deformed sediments in shallow, subsurface strata close to the regional capital of Mbeya, Tanzania, primarily exposed at two, correlative outcrop localities ~35 km apart. This includes a remarkable, clastic 'megablock complex' that preserves remobilized sediment below vertically displaced breccia megablocks, some in excess of 20 m-wide. The megablock complex is comprised of (1) a 5m-tall by 20m-wide injected body of volcanic ash and silt that hydraulically displaced (2) an equally sized, semi-consolidated, volcaniclastic megablock; both of which are intruded by (3) a clastic injection dyke. Evidence for breaching at the surface and for the fluidization of cobbles demonstrates the susceptibility of the substrate in this region to significant deformation via seismicity. Thirty-five km to the north, dekameter-scale asymmetrical/recumbent folds occur in a 3 m-thick, flat lying lake floor unit of the Lake Beds Succession. In between and surrounding these two unique sites, smaller-scale seismites are expressed, including flame structures; cm- to m-scale folded beds; ball-and-pillow structures; syn-sedimentary faults; sand injection features; and m-dkm-scale clastic injection dykes. Our documentation provides evidence for M 6-7.5+ Late Pleistocene earthquakes, similar to the M7.4 earthquake at the same location in 1910, extending the record of large-magnitude earthquakes beyond the last century. Our study not only expands the database of seismogenic sedimentary structures, but also attests to repeated, large-magnitude, Late Pleistocene-Recent earthquakes along the Western Branch of the East African Rift System. Understanding how seismicity deforms the crust is critical for predicting and preparing for modern seismic hazards, especially along the East African Rift System and other tectonically active, developing regions.

  5. Compilation of information on the climate and evaluation of the hydrochemical and isotopic composition during Late Pleistocene and Holocene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarises and evaluates some of the existing information on the Late Pleistocene and Holocene climates, i.e. the last 130 000 years. An estimation of the conditions at the Aespoe island (southeast Sweden) has also been made during this time span. The knowledge about Late Pleistocene (Eemian Interglacial and Weichselian glacial) is not yet fully understood. There are still a lot of assumptions concerning this period and more information is needed to be able to establish the climatic conditions. This is not the case for the Weichselian deglaciation and the present interglacial, Holocene, for which the environmental conditions are quite certain. It has been concluded, however, that the Eemian climatic development probably was similar to the Holocene but perhaps somewhat warmer and more humid. The Eemian Baltic Sea level was probably also higher than the present Baltic Sea level and there was a connection between it and the White Sea in the northeast. Aespoe was probably situated below sea level during the greater part of Eemian. Not much is known about the last glacial period, the Weichselian glaciation, until the final deglaciation. The ice sheet during Early Weichselian was probably mostly concentrated to the Scandinavian mountain area and in northern Scandinavia. At least two intervals with higher temperatures have been recorded, the Broerup and Odderade interstadials. The Middle Weichselian substage is characterised by fluctuations, melting and re-advances. Aespoe was probably not glaciated until the middle or latter part of Middle Weichselian. The maximum extension of the Weichselian ice sheet occurred in Late Weichselian, around 20 to 18 ka BP, which was succeeded by the final deglaciation. The retreat of the Weichselian ice sheet is described by for example end moraines and glacial varved clay. The Aespoe area was glaciated until 12 500 BP. Huge quantities of glacial meltwater was released into the Baltic basin as the ice receded. Due to different causes the basin was sometimes in contact with the sea and, sometimes large freshwater lakes were formed in it. Aespoe island was situated below sea or lake level to around 3000 years BP

  6. Late Pleistocene-Holocene events on the continental slope of the Laptev Sea: Evidence from benthic and planktonic foraminiferal assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsepyan, Ya. S.; Taldenkova, E. E.; Bauch, H. A.; Kandiano, E. S.

    2015-11-01

    This work is dedicated to the study of benthic and planktonic foraminifers and is a contribution to the multidisciplinary investigations of Core PS51/154-11 from the Laptev Sea. The paleoecological analysis of foraminiferal assemblages makes it possible to reconstruct in detail environmental changes on the western continental margin of the Laptev Sea during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene. The examined core dated by the AMS radiocarbon method is divided into intervals that reflect main stages in the regional evolution for the last 17.6 k.y.: early deglaciation, Bølling-Allerød warming, Younger Dryas cooling, transition to the Interglacial, Holocene climatic optimum, Middle-Late Holocene. The presence of subpolar planktonic foraminifers and benthic species Cassidulina neoteretis (Tappan) provides grounds to reconstruct for the continental slope area stages of the enhanced activity of subsurface Atlantic-derived water in the intervals of 12.0-14.7 and 0.6-5.4 ka. The benthic assemblage reflects changes in depositional environments related to the postglacial transgression and also climatic change impacts affecting bioproductivity. The events defined on the basis of foraminifers are correlated with climatic oscillations and changes in circulation of water masses.

  7. Are Late-Pleistocene Climate Reconstructions from Cirque and Valley Moraines Possible in Regions of Decaying Ice Sheets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menounos, B.; Goehring, B. M.; osborn, G.; Clague, J. J.; Davis, P. T.; Lakeman, T.; Schaefer, J. M.; Koch, J.; Clarke, G. K.

    2012-12-01

    The extent of glaciers in the past has commonly been used to infer past climates. Both abrupt climate change and geomorphic factors, however, are required to explain the timing and apparent magnitude of latest Pleistocene advances at high latitudes in western Canada and southernmost Patagonia. At the southern end of the Andes, north and west of Ushuaia, Argentina, 10Be surface exposure ages from glaciated bedrock beyond cirque moraines indicate that alpine areas were deglaciated by ca. 15.5 ka (kilo calendar yr BP). One, and in some cases two, closely spaced moraines extend up to 2 km beyond Little Ice Age moraines within many cirques in this region. The mean of five 10Be ages from two of the moraines is 14.82-13.16 ka, whereas a smaller recessional moraine in one cirque returned a minimum-limiting AMS radiocarbon age of 12.38-12.01 ka. The ages imply that following regional deglaciation, cirque glaciers first advanced during the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR) [14.5-12.9 ka] and then advanced again or remained near their ACR limits during the Younger Dryas Chronozone (YD) [12.9-11.7 ka]. The moraines are restricted to topographic highs that were deglaciated before 15.5 ka. In western Canada, glaciers also advanced during the YD, but the magnitude of this advance differs markedly throughout the region. 10Be and 14C ages on moraines at high elevations in the Canadian Rockies and the southern Coast Mountains indicate that many glaciers built moraines during the YD that were only hundreds of meters beyond those constructed during the later part of the Little Ice Age [0.30-0.15 ka]. In contrast, 10Be ages [13.10-12.00 ka] on three moraines in northwest British Columbia indicate that glaciers up to 10 km beyond LIA glacier limits during the YD. We argue that the different responses of alpine glaciers in western Canada to climate deterioration during the YD is due to the presence of the decaying Cordilleran ice sheet. Top-down melting of the Cordilleran ice sheet allowed many high alpine sites to become ice-free prior to cirque glacier growth during the YD. Conversely, in some valleys Cordilleran ice sheet outlet glaciers advanced in response to the YD to positions far beyond LIA limits. An implication of this study is that late Pleistocene climate reconstructions based on alpine moraines may be problematic in regions with decaying ice sheets. We are currently using numerical ice sheet models, forced with GCM simulations, to further examine the roles played by climatic and geomorphic factors on the spatial distribution of latest Pleistocene glaciers in western Canada and southernmost Patagonia.

  8. Carbon mineralisation and trace gas production in Holocene and Late Pleistocene permafrost deposits and surface soils of northeast Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, C.; Sosnin, A.; Wagner, D.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2012-04-01

    The permafrost in northern latitudes contains up to 1672 Pg organic carbon representing almost 50% of the global belowground organic carbon pool. The currently observed warming of the Arctic will increase permafrost degradation followed by microbial mineralisation of organic carbon to CO2 and methane. Despite increasing awareness of permafrost vulnerability the degradability of organic matter in thawing permafrost remains unclear. To quantify the potential formation of CO2 and methane from permafrost organic matter, permafrost samples (n=29) from Holocene and Late Pleistocene deposits in the Lena Delta, Northeast Siberia, were incubated for 2.7 years at 4C. Additionally, carbon mineralization was quantified in surface soils overlying the sampled permafrost. The highest CO2 production was measured in the uppermost 2 m of the Holocene surface permafrost (14C age 2.6-3.8 ky) with 213 mol g-1 (aerobic) and 38 mol g-1 (anaerobic) and in 16 m deep Pleistocene permafrost (14C age 34 ky, 190 mol C g-1 aerobically and 53 mol C g-1 anaerobically). Anoxic conditions strongly reduced carbon mineralization since only 26 % ( 10%, n=28) of aerobically mineralized carbon was released as CO2 and methane in the absence of oxygen. Methane production was low or absent in the Pleistocene permafrost and always started after a significant lag phase of up to 1.7 years. In Holocene deposits, the maximum methane production rates reached values of up to 86 nmol CH4 g-1 d-1, which is considerably lower than CO2 production rates in the same sample (223 nmol CO2 g-1 d-1). Aerobic and anaerobic CO2 formation was highly significantly correlated with the content of organic carbon (p permafrost. The content of organic carbon was the main predictor for carbon mineralization rates in the overlaying surface soils as well. However, surface carbon mineralization rates were up to 18 fold higher than maximum rates in the underlying permafrost. Furthermore, increasing organic matter contents caused a significantly stronger increase of carbon mineralization rates in the surface soil, demonstrating the lower degradability of permafrost carbon. The obtained data indicate that on a 100 year time scale on average 24% ( 11%, n=29) of initial permafrost carbon can be released as CO2 under aerobic conditions while under anaerobic conditions only 5.8% ( 4.7%, n=28) of permafrost carbon is transferred to CO2 and methane.

  9. The late Early Pleistocene human dental remains from Uadi Aalad and Mulhuli-Amo (Buia), Eritrean Danakil: macromorphology and microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanolli, Clément; Bondioli, Luca; Coppa, Alfredo; Dean, Christopher M; Bayle, Priscilla; Candilio, Francesca; Capuani, Silvia; Dreossi, Diego; Fiore, Ivana; Frayer, David W; Libsekal, Yosief; Mancini, Lucia; Rook, Lorenzo; Medin Tekle, Tsegai; Tuniz, Claudio; Macchiarelli, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Fieldwork performed during the last 15 years in various Early Pleistocene East African sites has significantly enlarged the fossil record of Homo erectus sensu lato (s.l.). Additional evidence comes from the Danakil Depression of Eritrea, where over 200 late Early to early Middle Pleistocene sites have been identified within a ∼1000 m-thick sedimentary succession outcropping in the Dandiero Rift Basin, near Buia. Along with an adult cranium (UA 31), which displays a blend of H. erectus-like and derived morpho-architectural features and three pelvic remains, two isolated permanent incisors (UA 222 and UA 369) have also been recovered from the 1 Ma (millions of years ago) Homo-bearing outcrop of Uadi Aalad. Since 2010, our surveys have expanded to the nearby (4.7 km) site of Mulhuli-Amo (MA). This is a fossiliferous area that has been preliminarily surveyed because of its exceptional concentration of Acheulean stone tools. So far, the site has yielded 10 human remains, including the unworn crown of a lower permanent molar (MA 93). Using diverse analytical tools (including high resolution μCT and μMRI), we analysed the external and internal macromorphology and microstructure of the three specimens, and whenever possible compared the results with similar evidence from early Homo, H. erectus s.l., H. antecessor, H. heidelbergensis (from North Africa), Neanderthals and modern humans. We also assessed the UA 369 lower incisor from Uadi Aalad for root completion timing and showed that it compares well with data for root apex closure in modern human populations. PMID:24852385

  10. Late-Pleistocene evolution of the continental shelf of central Israel, a case study from Hadera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtienberg, Gilad; Dix, Justin; Waldmann, Nicolas; Makovsky, Yizhaq; Golan, Arik; Sivan, Dorit

    2016-05-01

    Sea-level fluctuations are a dominant mechanism that control coastal environmental changes through time. This is especially the case for the successive regressions and transgressions over the last interglacial cycle, which have shaped the deposition, preservation and erosion patterns of unconsolidated sediments currently submerged on continental shelves. The current study focuses on creating an integrated marine and terrestrial geophysical and litho-stratigraphic framework of the coastal zone of Hadera, north-central Israel. This research presents a case study, investigating the changing sedimentological units in the study area. Analysis suggest these represent various coastal environments and were deposited during times of lower than present sea level and during the later stages of the Holocene transgression. A multi-disciplinary approach was applied by compiling existing elevation raster grids, bathymetric charts, one hundred lithological borehole data-sets, and a 110 km-long sub-bottom geophysical survey. Based on seismic stratigraphic analysis, observed geometries, and reflective appearances, six bounding surfaces and seven seismic units were identified and characterized. These seismic units have been correlated with the available borehole data to produce a chronologically constrained lithostratigraphy for the area. This approach allowed us to propose a relationship between the lithological units and sea-level change and thus enable the reconstruction of Hadera coastal evolution over the last ~ 100 ka. This reconstruction suggests that the stratigraphy is dominated by lowstand aeolian and fluvial terrestrial environments, subsequently transgressed during the Holocene. The results of this study provide a valuable framework for future national strategic shallow-water infrastructure construction and also for the possible locations of past human settlements in relation to coastal evolution through time.

  11. Amplicon pyrosequencing late Pleistocene permafrost: the removal of putative contaminant sequences and small-scale reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Teresita M; Golding, G Brian; King, Christine; Froese, Duane; Zazula, Grant; Poinar, Hendrik N

    2013-09-01

    DNA sequencing of ancient permafrost samples can be used to reconstruct past plant, animal and bacterial communities. In this study, we assess the small-scale reproducibility of taxonomic composition obtained from sequencing four molecular markers (mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), prokaryote 16S rDNA, mitochondrial cox1 and chloroplast trnL intron) from two soil cores sampled 10cm apart. In addition, sequenced control reactions were used to produce a contaminant library that was used to filter similar sequences from sample libraries. Contaminant filtering resulted in the removal of 1% of reads or 0.3% of operational taxonomic units. We found similar richness, overlap, abundance and taxonomic diversity from the 12S, 16S and trnL markers from each soil core. Jaccard dissimilarity across the two soil cores was highest for metazoan taxa detected by the 12S and cox1 markers. Taxonomic community distances were similar for each marker across the two soil cores when the chi-squared metric was used; however, the 12S and cox1 markers did not cluster well when the Goodall similarity metric was used. A comparison of plant macrofossil vs. read abundance corroborates previous work that suggests eastern Beringia was dominated by grasses and forbs during cold stages of the Pleistocene, a habitat that is restricted to isolated sites in the present-day Yukon. PMID:23694692

  12. Late Pleistocene human occupation of the hyperarid core in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Claudio; Santoro, Calogero M.; Ugalde, Paula C.; Gayo, Eugenia M.; Osorio, Daniela; Salas-Egaa, Carolina; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo; Joly, Delphine; Rech, Jason A.

    2013-10-01

    Few archeological sites in South America contain uncontroversial evidence for when the first peopling of the continent occurred. Largely ignored in this debate, extreme environments are assumed either as barriers to this early wave of migration or without potential for past habitability. Here, we report on a rare 12-13 ka human occupation from Quebrada Man (site QM12), a plantless, near rainless landscape (1240 m asl and 85 km from the Pacific Ocean) located in the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert. This location harbored wetlands and riparian woodlands that were fed by increased rainfall further east in the central Andes during the latest Pleistocene. Excavations at QM12 yielded a diverse cultural assemblage of lithics, burned and cut bones, marine gastropods, pigments, plant fibers, and wooden artifacts alongside a prepared fireplace. Sixteen radiocarbon dates from site QM12 on charcoal, marine shells, animal dung, plant remains and wood reveal that the occupation took place between 12.8 and 11.7 ka. These results demonstrate that the Atacama Desert was not a barrier to early American settlement and dispersal, and provide new clues for understanding the cultural complexity and diversity of the peopling of South America during the Last Glacial-interglacial transition.

  13. First record of Bison antiquus from the Late Pleistocene of southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimnez-Hidalgo, Eduardo; Cabrera-Prez, Luca; MacFadden, Bruce J.; Guerrero-Arenas, Rosala

    2013-03-01

    In Mexico, just 54% of the reported Pleistocene Bison material has been identified to species. Current paleontological research in northwestern Oaxaca, southern Mexico, has allowed collection of several specimens of Bison antiquus that are part of the Viko Vijin Local Fauna. B. antiquus had a very wide geographic distribution, from lowlands to mountainous landscapes of North and Central America. The B. antiquus record from southern Mexico links their former records from central Mexico and middle Central America and confirms this wide geographic distribution. The univariate mesowear score of the B. antiquus specimens from Oaxaca is in the lower extreme of grazers and the upper end of mixed-feeders, suggesting that they had a less abrasive diet than the modern plains Bison, as has been observed in other samples of this species from diverse parts of North America. The presence of B. antiquus in the Viko Vijin L. F. constrains the age of this fossil assemblage within a range from 60 Ka to 11.7 Ka.

  14. Seasonality of the late Pleistocene Dawson tephra and exceptional preservation of a buried riparian surface in central Yukon Territory, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Duane G.; Zazula, Grant D.; Reyes, Alberto V.

    2006-07-01

    The late Pleistocene Dawson tephra was deposited by one of the largest Quaternary eruptions in northwestern North America. Its distribution is known sparsely from sites near the source area in southwestern Alaska and central Yukon Territory, where more than 20 occurrences are documented in the Klondike region. Dawson tephra erupted about 25,300C yr BP, near the onset of the last glaciation, and provides a stratigraphic marker across Eastern Beringia. We report radiocarbon ages, paleobotanical data, and cryostratigraphic observations from a new Dawson tephra locale at Goldbottom Creek, in the Klondike region of Yukon Territory, which collectively indicate that the eruption occurred in the late winter or early spring. Multiple, fining-upward tephra-rich ice beds are interpreted as remnants of surface icings, which presently are common in the region during spring. A buried in situ riparian meadow, preserved below the icing and tephra, consists of abundant tufted hair grass ( Deschampsia caespitosa), with interspersed horsetails ( Equisetum cf. palustre) and mosses. Detrital plant remains and preserved in situ grass inflorescences entombed in the icing had expelled their fruits, consistent with a late season surface when the icing was active. The extraordinary thickness of Dawson tephra in central Yukon likely reflects reworking of a winter-deposited tephra by snow melt in the spring following the eruption, indicating that the primary thickness may be overestimated at valley-bottom sites. Winter deposition of the tephra may have, in part, minimized the terrestrial ecological impacts of the eruption on zonal "steppe-tundra" vegetation through the retransportation of tephra from hillslopes to the riparian areas, where the tephra became incorporated into local fluvial systems.

  15. Tracing subarctic Pacific water masses with benthic foraminiferal stable isotopes during the LGM and late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Mea S.; Ravelo, A. Christina; Mix, Alan; Nesbitt, Ian M.; Miller, Nari V.

    2016-03-01

    As the largest ocean basin, the Pacific helps to set the global climate state, since its circulation affects mean ocean properties, air-sea partitioning of carbon dioxide, and the distribution of global oceanic poleward heat transport. There is evidence that during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) the subarctic Pacific contained a better-ventilated, relatively fresh intermediate water mass above ~2000 m that may have formed locally. The source and spatial extent of this water mass is not known, nor do we know how formation of this water mass varied during Pleistocene glaciations with different orbital and ice sheet boundary conditions. Here we present a 0.5 My multi-species benthic stable isotope record from Site U1345 (1008 m) on the northern Bering slope and a 1.0 My record from U1339 (1868 m) from the Umnak Plateau in the southeastern basin. We find that the relatively well-ventilated low-δ18O intermediate water reaches 1000 m in the Bering Sea during MIS2, but that the hydrographic divide between this water mass and poorly-ventilated deep water was shallower than 1000 m for earlier glaciations. We also compare Bering Sea piston core and IODP Expedition 323 Uvigerina data from the Holocene and LGM with the modern hydrography, and to previously published profiles from the Okhotsk Sea and Emperor Seamounts. We find that the carbon and oxygen stable isotope signatures of well-ventilated water in the Bering and Okhotsk Seas are distinct, suggesting that there may have been intermediate water formation in both basins during the LGM.

  16. Late Pliocene to early Pleistocene millennial-scale fluctuations in SST and stratification within the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, M.; Friedrich, O.; Wilson, P. A.

    2012-04-01

    The late Pliocene to early Pleistocene (5.6-1.8 Ma) represents in many ways a key interval of Cenozoic palaeoceanography, including two major changes of the Earth system: the significant glaciation of the northern hemisphere, cluminating in a major expansion of Arctic ice sheets (Northern Hemisphere Glaciation, NHG) and the closure of the Panama Gateway. The impact of changes associated with the NHG on surface-water hydrology (SST and stratification) of the subpolar North Atlantic is, however, not fully understood yet. Given its proximity to the large dynamic ice-sheets of the northern hemisphere and the role in deep-water formation, however, the North Atlantic represents one of the climatically sensitive regions on Earth. This study focuses on the combination of Mg/Ca and δ18O analyses on planktic foraminifera in order to understand and reconstruct millennial-scale climate variability during the final stage of the NHG, especially marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS) 103-95 (late Pliocene to early Pleistocene, 2.6 to 2.4 Ma). In particular, this is relevant to better understand fluctuations in the magnitude of SST and stratification changes and their link to the intensification of NHG. Stable isotope and Mg/Ca analyses have been carried out on the deep-dwelling planktic foraminiferal species Globorotalia crassaformis from IODP Site U1313 (North Atlantic, 41°N). This site is located at the base of the upper western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It therefore is under direct influence of North Atlantic Deep Water and lies on the southerly limit of the so-called 'IRD belt'. Samples are taken in millenial-scale resolution from 2.6 to 2.4 Ma, comprising isotope stages 103 to 95. Samples from this site were already used before to test the existence of a relationship between the emergence of large-amplitude millennial-scale climate oscillations and an intensification of glacial conditions during the intensification of NHG by measuring mixed-layer stable isotope data on the surface-dwelling planktic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber. Comparison of our results with these surface-water data reveal relatively stable conditions in surface waters while intermediate waters show strong fluctuations on a glacial-interglacial time scale, most probably reflecting changing intermediate-water masses.

  17. Late pleistocene glacial and environmental history of the Skagit valley, Washington and British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    Riedel, Jon Lyle

    2007-01-01

    Drainage patterns established in the Tertiary in the North Cascades were reorganized to accommodate southern drainage of Cordilleran Ice Sheet meltwater. Repeated continental glaciation rendered the Skagit an interconnected valley, with meltwater routes opening it to the Fraser and Okanogan watersheds, and linking it to a drainage system around the east margin of the Puget lobe of the ice sheet. Alpine glaciers from two major tributaries blocked Skagit valley during the late Wisconsin Evans C...

  18. Late Pleistocene pteropods, heteropods and planktonic foraminifera from the Caribbean Sea, Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Smart, Christopher W; Hart, Malcolm B.; Leng, Melanie J.; Borghini, Mireno; Manini, Elena; Aliani, Stefano; Conversi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pteropods and heteropods (holoplanktonic gastropods) are an important component of the modern oceans; however, detailed information on their distribution in the fossil record is often based on poorly preserved specimens. This study presents the micropaleontological analysis of three exceptionally well-preserved Late Pleistocenemarine sediment cores from the eastern Caribbean Sea, westernMediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean. This study presents the first stratigraphical record of he...

  19. Reconstructing the migration patterns of late Pleistocene mammals from northern Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Kathryn A.; Koch, Paul L.

    2007-11-01

    We used analyses of the strontium isotope ( 87Sr/ 86Sr) ratios of tooth enamel to reconstruct the migration patterns of fossil mammals collected along the Aucilla River in northern Florida. Specimens date to the late-glacial period and before the last glacial maximum (pre-LGM). Deer and tapir displayed low 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios that were similar to the ratios of Florida environments, which suggest that these taxa did not migrate long distance outside of the Florida region. Mastodons, mammoths, and equids all displayed a wide range of 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios. Some individuals in each taxon displayed low 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios that suggest they ranged locally, while other animals had high 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios that suggest they migrated long distances (> 150 km) outside of the Florida region. Mastodons were the only taxa from this region that provided enough well-dated specimens to compare changes in migration patterns over time. Pre-LGM mastodons displayed significantly lower 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios than late-glacial mastodons, which suggests that late-glacial mastodons from Florida migrated longer distances than their earlier counterparts. This change in movement patterns reflects temporal changes in regional vegetation patterns.

  20. Late Pleistocene and Holocene Fire History of the Swiftcurrent Lake basin, eastern Glacier National Park, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutvirt, J. C.; MacGregor, K. R.; Riihimaki, C. A.; Myrbo, A.

    2010-12-01

    High altitude alpine landscapes of the northern U.S. Rocky Mountains are geomorphically dynamic and sensitive to climate change. Understanding the timing and magnitude of past changes in temperature, aridity, and other factors such as seasonality and storminess are key in constraining natural climate variability in these sensitive environments. Fire frequency can provide strong insight into past climate regimes, with increased periodicity and/or intensity of fires reflecting episodes of warming and/or aridity. Lacustrine climate records in the Rockies are most abundant either further south of northern Montana at lower elevations, or in the Canadian Rockies further north. Here we examine a 12,900 year long lake sediment record from the northeastern basin of Swiftcurrent Lake in eastern Glacier National Park, MT to document fire frequency as a proxy for aridity in the region. Swiftcurrent Lake is fed mainly by melt from Grinnell Glacier, and thus reflects glacial, geomorphic, and climatic processes throughout the Holocene. Existing data, such as mineralogy, percent organic carbon, C/N, and grain size will be paired with the fire frequency record over the Holocene and latest Pleistocene to develop a comprehensive environmental history of the Swiftcurrent Lake Basin and greater Grinnell Glacier Valley. A clear understanding of fire history in the basin is important for future fire management decisions in Glacier National Park. Charcoal particles were tallied at contiguous 0.5 cm intervals over the first half meter of the core, and at 1 cm intervals over the remaining ~6.0 m, then converted to charcoal abundance and accumulation rates. Based age controls from radiocarbon analyses and ash fingerprinting the sampling interval represents between 5 and 20 years. A core collected in July 2010 will be analyzed for lead-210, providing additional age control for the past few centuries. Preliminary results show low charcoal counts overall with some clear peaks. High charcoal abundance and accumulation rates appear to be tied to increased fire activity in basin. We anticipate correlation with climatic anomalies such as the Medieval Warm Period. Charcoal morphotypes, also identified and tallied in conducted charcoal counts, will be used to indicate the nature of the basin vegetation. These data will be compared to pollen data to consider changing vegetation regimes. The focus on the last few centuries will provide insight into the extent of anthropogenic effects on burn periodicity. This study will also be paired with other similar fire frequency records in the greater northern Rockies region. Finally, comparisons with total organic carbon in the core, which is tied to solar forcing over the last 7500 years, will further illuminate the environmental history of the basin over the Holocene.

  1. Chronology for fluctuations in late Pleistocene Sierra Nevada glaciers and lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, F.M.; Zreda, M.G.; Benson, L.V.; Plummer, M.A.; Elmore, D.; Sharma, Prakash

    1996-01-01

    Mountain glaciers, because of their small size, are usually close to equilibrium with the local climate and thus should provide a test of whether temperature oscillations in Greenland late in the last glacial period are part of global-scale climate variability or are restricted to the North Atlantic region. Correlation of cosmogenic chlorine-36 dates on Sierra Nevada moraines with a continuous radiocarbon-dated sediment record from nearby Owens Lake shows that Sierra Nevada glacial advances were associated with Heinrich events 5, 3, 2, and 1.

  2. Contrasted morphosedimentary activity of the lower Kert River (northeastern Morocco) during the Late Pleistocene and the Holocene. Possible impact of bioclimatic variations and human action

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amrani, Mohamed; Macaire, Jean-Jacques; Zarki, Hamid; Bréhéret, Jean-Gabriel; Fontugne, Michel

    2008-08-01

    From field observations in the lower Kert valley and 16 radiocarbon dating measurements, six alluvial units (UF1 to UF6) deposited since about 30,000 years BP have been identified, comprising 18 lithofacies and separated by six incision stages resulting in three alluvial terraces (T1 to T3). While the Late Pleistocene is mainly marked by sedimentary accretion (UF1 forming part of T1), the Holocene is marked by the alternation of major incision (I2, I3 and I4) and accretion (UF2 and UF3) stages, with roughly similar height ranges, between the current river level and polyphased T1 surface. During the Lower and Middle Holocene, this complex morphosedimentary evolution could have been the result of contrasted bioclimatic trends that did not appear during the Late Pleistocene. Human activities modified the earth surface conditions, intermittently during the Middle Holocene, and during the Upper Holocene, inducing new responses from the fluvial geosystem to the environment.

  3. CHASMAPORTHETES MELEI N.SP., AN ENDEMIC HYAENID (CARNIVORA, MAMMALIA FROM THE MONTE TUTTAVISTA FISSURE FILLINGS (LATE PLIOCENE TO EARLY PLEISTOCENE; SARDINIA, ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LORENZO ROOK

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of large carnivores in island ecosystems is unusual, especially in the case of top predators. Here, a new endemic hyaenid species, Chasmaporthetes melei, from the late Late Pliocene to earliest Pleistocene fissure fillings of Monte Tuttavista, Orosei, Sardinia, is described. Although smaller, C. melei is morphologically comparable with the Plio-Pleistocene Eurasian hunting-hyena Chasmaporthetes lunensis, a possible ancestor of the Sardinian species. C. melei displays all the characteristic feeding adaptations of Chasmaporthetes, including a derived enamel structure similar to the condition in extant bone-crushing hyaenas. C. melei was an active predator that nonetheless included a relatively large amount of bone in its diet. SHORT NOTES

  4. Dinoflagellate cysts and the paleoenvironment of Late-Pliocene early-pleistocene deposits of Brittany, Northwest France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morzadec-Kerfourn, Marie Thrse

    The marine Pliocene facies of the Redon clay is widely distributed in the western part of Brittany. the decrease in the abundance of Tertiary pollen towards the top of the deposits, coupled with the increase of pollen of boreal forest taxa and the development of Ericaceae and Poaceae indicates a Late-Pliocene age. The occurrence of the transgression maximum is recorded in calcareous beds which contain the highest concentration of microforaminiferal linings and dinoflagellate cysts. Hystrichokolpoma rigaudae and Melitasphaeridium choanophorum, along with Achomosphaera andalousiensis and Operculodinium israelianum make up these aseemblages. The presence of dinoflagellate cyst assemblages with estuarine and neritic affinities but with an occasional oceanic form, indicates sedimentation in coastal waters with a neritic influence. The paleotopography exerts a control on the altitudinal distribution of the Redon clays in the western part of Brittany to the west of the Rennes Basin. The Pliocene-Pleistocene dinoflagelate cyst assemblages of southern England and northwestern france show a remarkable degree of homogeneity in their composition, chiefly expressed in the apparent contradictory association of A. andalousensis and O. israelianum that suggest sedimentation in an unusual type of environment which arose in the context of climatic change and sea-level variations at that time.

  5. Conceptual hydrochemical model of late Pleistocene aquifers at the Samario-Sitio Grande petroleum reservoir, Gulf of Mexico, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 concentrations between 0.83 and 11.79 pmC of formation water from the Activo Samaria-Sitio Grande petroleum reservoir in SE-Mexico, extracted from 3500 to 4500 m.b.s.l., indicate a common infiltration event of surface water during the late Pleistocene period. Mixing of two components - meteoric water and seawater, previously evaporated at the surface - explain the widespread mineralization (TDI = 15-257 g/L) of Na-Cl and Na-Ca-Cl type reservoir water. Statistical discrimination by clustering and a heterogeneous chemical-isotopic fluid composition indicate the existence of 4 different water types as part of local aquifer systems, which are separated by normal and thrust faults. Tectonic horst and graben structures show an ambiguous, individual hydraulic behaviour - as permeable conduits and/or as impermeable barriers, causing the local limitation of aquifer extent. The recent increase of water production in petroleum wells is not related to the injection of surface water, but the long-term extraction of oil reserves is modifying the original position and flow direction of the reservoir aquifers. The rise of the initial groundwater level reflects the final stage of an exhausted petroleum reservoir with coning effects of underlying aquifer systems. The flexible change towards superior production intervals could represent a feasible technique to avoid the abrupt closure of invaded production wells

  6. Landscape response to late Pleistocene climate change in NW Argentina: Sediment flux modulated by basin geometry and connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildgen, Taylor F.; Robinson, Ruth A. J.; Savi, Sara; Phillips, William M.; Spencer, Joel Q. G.; Bookhagen, Bodo; Scherler, Dirk; Tofelde, Stefanie; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Kubik, Peter W.; Binnie, Steven A.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-02-01

    Fluvial fill terraces preserve sedimentary archives of landscape responses to climate change, typically over millennial timescales. In the Humahuaca Basin of NW Argentina (Eastern Cordillera, southern Central Andes), our 29 new optically stimulated luminescence ages of late Pleistocene fill terrace sediments demonstrate that the timing of past river aggradation occurred over different intervals on the western and eastern sides of the valley, despite their similar bedrock lithology, mean slopes, and precipitation. In the west, aggradation coincided with periods of increasing precipitation, while in the east, aggradation coincided with decreasing precipitation or more variable conditions. Erosion rates and grain size dependencies in our cosmogenic 10Be analyses of modern and fill terrace sediments reveal an increased importance of landsliding compared to today on the west side during aggradation, but of similar importance during aggradation on the east side. Differences in the timing of aggradation and the 10Be data likely result from differences in valley geometry, which causes sediment to be temporarily stored in perched basins on the east side. It appears as if periods of increasing precipitation triggered landslides throughout the region, which induced aggradation in the west, but blockage of the narrow bedrock gorges downstream from the perched basins in the east. As such, basin geometry and fluvial connectivity appear to strongly influence the timing of sediment movement through the system. For larger basins that integrate subbasins with differing geometries or degrees of connectivity (like Humahuaca), sedimentary responses to climate forcing are likely attenuated.

  7. A simple mixing explanation for late Pleistocene changes in the Pacific-South Atlantic benthic δ13C gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Lisiecki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The fact that the deep-ocean benthic δ13C minimum shifted from the North Pacific to the South Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum is often interpretted as evidence of a change in deep water circulation, such as the development of deep water ventilation in the North Pacific or a decrease in Southern Ocean overturning. This study re-evaluates the implications of changes in benthic δ13C gradients by comparing Pacific Deep Water (PDW δ13C measurements with the values expected for the null hypothesis that PDW ventilation sources remained unchanged throughout the Late Pleistocene. The δ13C compositions of PDW, Northern Component Water (NCW and Southern Component Water (SCW are estimated from regional benthic δ13C stacks of 3–6 sites. Changes in PDW δ13C and PDW-SCW δ13C gradients over the past 800 kyr are found to be well described by a constant mixture of 60% NCW and 40% SCW plus a constant Pacific remineralization offset of −0.5‰. Thus, a change in PDW ventilation cannot be inferred solely on the basis of changes in the Pacific-South Atlantic benthic δ13C gradient.

  8. First dated human occupation of Italy at ~ 0.85 Ma during the late Early Pleistocene climate transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttoni, Giovanni; Scardia, Giancarlo; Kent, Dennis V.; Morsiani, Enrico; Tremolada, Fabrizio; Cremaschi, Mauro; Peretto, Carlo

    2011-07-01

    A candidate for the oldest human occupation site in Italy is Monte Poggiolo where the lithic tool-bearing levels are currently dated to ~ 1 Ma based on electron spin resonance (ESR). The low analytical precision of 30% at 2? makes it unclear whether the date actually conflicts with a recent reassessment of age constraints on key hominin sites from Italy, France, and Spain pointing to a uniformly young timing for the earliest habitation of southern Europe during the late Early Pleistocene climate transition within reverse magnetic polarity subchron C1r.1r (0.988-0.781 Ma). Our new magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic results show a sequence of stable normal and reverse polarities in a regional lithostratigraphic context that indicate the Monte Poggiolo tool-bearing site post-dates the Jaramillo normal polarity subchron, most probably occurring at ~ 0.85 Ma immediately after the pronounced cooling that culminated with marine isotope stage 22 when the associated regression may have opened new migration routes through the Po Valley for large mammals and hominins.

  9. The role of cryptotephra in refining the chronology of Late Pleistocene human evolution and cultural change in North Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, R. N. E.; Lane, C. S.; Albert, P. G.; White, D.; Collcutt, S. N.; Bouzouggar, A.; Ditchfield, P.; Farr, L.; Oh, A.; Ottolini, L.; Smith, V. C.; Van Peer, P.; Kindermann, K.

    2015-06-01

    Sites in North Africa hold key information for dating the presence of Homo sapiens and the distribution of Middle Stone Age (MSA), Middle Palaeolithic (MP) and Later Stone Age (LSA) cultural activity in the Late Pleistocene. Here we present new and review recently published tephrochronological evidence for five cave sites in North Africa with long MSA/MP and LSA cultural sequences. Four tephra horizons have been identified at the Haua Fteah (Cyrenaica, Libya). They include cryptotephra evidence for the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) eruption dating to ˜39 ka that allows correlation with other Palaeolithic sequences in the eastern Mediterranean and as far north as Russia. Cryptotephra have also been recorded from the Moroccan sites of Taforalt, Rhafas and Dar es-Soltane 1. At Taforalt the geochemical composition suggests a provenance in the Azores, while examples from Sodmein (Egypt) appear to derive from central Anatolia and another unknown source. In these latter examples chemical compositional data from relevant proximal volcanic centres is currently lacking so the identification of tephra in layers of known age and cultural association provides the first reliable age determinations for distal volcanic events and their geographical extent. The future potential for tephrochronological research in North Africa is also discussed.

  10. Conceptual hydrochemical model of late Pleistocene aquifers at the Samario-Sitio Grande petroleum reservoir, Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkle, P. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Geotermia, Cuernavaca, Mor. (Mexico); Angulo, M. [PEMEX-Exploracion y Produccion, Chiapas (Mexico)

    2005-06-01

    Carbon-14 concentrations between 0.83 and 11.79 pmC of formation water from the Activo Samaria-Sitio Grande petroleum reservoir in SE-Mexico, extracted from 3500 to 4500 m.b.s.l., indicate a common infiltration event of surface water during the late Pleistocene period. Mixing of two components - meteoric water and seawater, previously evaporated at the surface - explain the widespread mineralization (TDI = 15-257 g/L) of Na-Cl and Na-Ca-Cl type reservoir water. Statistical discrimination by clustering and a heterogeneous chemical-isotopic fluid composition indicate the existence of 4 different water types as part of local aquifer systems, which are separated by normal and thrust faults. Tectonic horst and graben structures show an ambiguous, individual hydraulic behaviour - as permeable conduits and/or as impermeable barriers, causing the local limitation of aquifer extent. The recent increase of water production in petroleum wells is not related to the injection of surface water, but the long-term extraction of oil reserves is modifying the original position and flow direction of the reservoir aquifers. The rise of the initial groundwater level reflects the final stage of an exhausted petroleum reservoir with coning effects of underlying aquifer systems. The flexible change towards superior production intervals could represent a feasible technique to avoid the abrupt closure of invaded production wells. (Author)

  11. Conceptual hydrochemical model of late Pleistocene aquifers at the Samario-Sitio Grande petroleum reservoir, Gulf of Mexico, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkle, Peter [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Geotermia, Av. Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca, Mor., 62490 (Mexico)]. E-mail: birkle@iie.org.mx; Angulo, Maricela [PEMEX - Exploracion y Produccion, Diseno de Explotacion Cactus-Nispero Sitio Grande, Zona Industrial S/N, Reforma, Chiapas (Mexico)

    2005-06-15

    Carbon-14 concentrations between 0.83 and 11.79 pmC of formation water from the Activo Samaria-Sitio Grande petroleum reservoir in SE-Mexico, extracted from 3500 to 4500 m.b.s.l., indicate a common infiltration event of surface water during the late Pleistocene period. Mixing of two components - meteoric water and seawater, previously evaporated at the surface - explain the widespread mineralization (TDI = 15-257 g/L) of Na-Cl and Na-Ca-Cl type reservoir water. Statistical discrimination by clustering and a heterogeneous chemical-isotopic fluid composition indicate the existence of 4 different water types as part of local aquifer systems, which are separated by normal and thrust faults. Tectonic horst and graben structures show an ambiguous, individual hydraulic behaviour - as permeable conduits and/or as impermeable barriers, causing the local limitation of aquifer extent. The recent increase of water production in petroleum wells is not related to the injection of surface water, but the long-term extraction of oil reserves is modifying the original position and flow direction of the reservoir aquifers. The rise of the initial groundwater level reflects the final stage of an exhausted petroleum reservoir with coning effects of underlying aquifer systems. The flexible change towards superior production intervals could represent a feasible technique to avoid the abrupt closure of invaded production wells.

  12. Late and middle Pleistocene ungulates dietary diversity in Western Europe indicate variations of Neanderthal paleoenvironments through time and space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivals, Florent; Schulz, Ellen; Kaiser, Thomas M.

    2009-12-01

    Mesowear and microwear on enamel from 763 teeth of middle and late Pleistocene ungulates were analysed to infer the potential of dental wear analysis of faunal remains as a paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic proxy in relation to climatic changes and diversity of vegetation available in the environment. Fossil localities including levels belonging to two glacial and two interglacial stages were selected in Germany, France, and Spain. At a temporal scale, results indicate that the dietary diversity in ungulates is higher during interglacial phases (MIS 5 and 3) than during pleniglacial phases (MIS 8 and 4). Dietary diversity is concluded to be related to climate-driven vegetation changes which during interglacials lead to increased variety of potential food items available to ungulates. At the geographical scale, during interglacials, changes in diet composition are evident along geographical gradients. The corresponding dietary gradients are proposed to be related to climate and vegetation gradients reflecting more arid climates in the Mediterranean area compared to North-Western Europe. Species consistently represented at all localities investigated are Cervus elaphus (Cervidae, Artiodactyla) and Equus ferus (Equidae, Perissodactyla). C. elaphus populations are found to consistently have less abrasive diets than E. ferus populations but dietary traits of both species varied largely, revealing a significant plasticity in the feeding adaptation of both species. Those traits are concluded to be related to differences in vegetation structure at each locality and complement the evidence that ungulates have broader dietary habits than what is usually assumed.

  13. Contribution of changes in opal productivity and nutrient distribution in the coastal upwelling systems to late Pliocene/early Pleistocene climate cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Etourneau, J.; Ehlert, C; Frank, M.; P. Martinez; Schneider, R.

    2012-01-01

    The global late Pliocene/early Pleistocene cooling (~3.02.0 million years ago, Ma) concurred with extremely high diatom and biogenic opal production in most of the major coastal upwelling regions. This phenomenon was particularly pronounced in the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS), off Namibia, where it is known as the Matuyama Diatom Maximum (MDM). Our study focuses on a new diatom silicon isotope (?30Si) record covering the MDM in the BUS. Unexpectedly, the v...

  14. Late Pleistocene sedimentation increase in the Gulf of Mexico and modeling of time-dependent long-wavelength flexural subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivins, E. R.; Blom, R. G.; Wu, X.; Dokka, R.

    2005-12-01

    Global climate change occurring near the transition from Pliocene to Pleistocene epochs is the most likely source for increased rates of sedimentary deposition into the world's catchment basins. During the Pleistocene the periodicity in sedimentation rate has periods of roughly 20,000, 41,000 and 100,000 years: having a distinct fingerprint of the Milankovich orbital forcing periods (Molnar 2004). We model the forcing of the time-dependent flexure of the Gulf of Mexico by continent-wide sediment transport rate variability over the past 4 Ma. Reconstructions of changes in sediment dispersal occurring during the Late Cenozoic indicate that glacioeustasy also plays a significant role along the shore of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Basin (Galloway 2001). We employ both spherically layered and gravitating viscoelastic half-space models employing an elastic lithosphere and using Maxwell time constants that are tuned to both regional and global seismic tomography. The latter data are consistent with a rheologically stiffer than average sub-crustal environment. Hydroisostatic loading is also included in the modeling. Paleosealevel indicators, tide gauges and recent GPS results provide rich data sources for inverse modeling of the load history and solid earth rheology. The sediment rate changes are modeled, in part, as pulsed great megaflood erosional events known to be active during Glacial to Interglacial transitions (Brown and Kennett 1998). Although the model is relatively crude in both space and time, preliminary results indicate that the subsidence rate caused by long-term sedimentary changes could sustain subsidence rates of 1 - 10 mm/yr during the past 5,000 years over many hundreds of kilometers of coastline. We also discuss the gravity change and self-gravitationally induced sea level variability predicted by the models. Refinement of such modeling in space and time is a major challenge for the future. However, long-wavelength analysis of ongoing Gulf vertical motions complement the study of more local phenomenon, wherein anthropogenic-related subsidence, growth fault-related land motion and sediment compaction may drive a very concentrated large-amplitude subsidence at present-day.

  15. Late Pliocene - Early Pleistocene paleoenvironmental reconstruction based on stable isotope compositions of Stephanorhinus sp. and Mammut sp. teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Péter; Kovács, János; Kocsis, László; Gasparik, Mihály; Vennemann, Torsten; Demény, Attila; Virág, Attila

    2014-05-01

    Stable isotope measurements of skeletal apatite from herbivorous mammals are often used to provide information on the terrestrial paleoenvironment and paleoclimate. In this study fossil teeth of Stephanorhinus Kretzoi 1942 (rhinoceros) and Mammut Blumenbach 1799 (mastodon), amongst others, were investigated from the Carpathian Basin. According to the biostratigraphy, the age of the samples has a range from Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene. Reconstructing paleoclimate and paleoenvironment of this era is important as it can be an analogue for the future climate. Oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions were measured from the tooth enamel, because it is believed to be the most resistant to diagenetic alteration (e.g., Kohn & Cerling, 2002). The carbon isotopic composition in the carbonate fraction of apatite can be related to the diet of the animal (Kohn & Cerling, 2002). Hence, it can reflect the photosynthetic pathway (C3 or C4) of the plants consumed by these herbivores. The δ18O values were determined in the phosphate fraction of apatite. In the case of large mammals that are obligate drinkers, the δ18O values closely track those of the environmental water (Bryant & Froelich, 1995). Knowing the δ18O values of environmental water and relating it to local precipitation, the mean annual temperature (MAT) of the site can be calculated (Dansgaard, 1964). The δ13C values range from -10 to -15 o (VPDB). The result clearly shows that these animals consumed C3 plants. Most of the δ13C values indicate mixed grassland-open woodland rather than a closed canopy forest. Although there is variation in the δ18O values (mean 14.2 ± 1.0 o VSMOW, n=17), most of the samples would support a MAT range of 8-12 ° C. This is in good agreement with other proxies for the localities and time period (Kovács et al., 2013). Bryant, D.J. & Froelich, P.N. (1995) A model of oxygen-isotope fractionation in bodywater of large-mammals. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 59, 4523-4537. Dansgaard, W. (1964) Stable isotopes in precipitation. Tellus 16, 436-468. Kohn, M.J. & Cerling, T.E. (2002) Stable isotope compositions of biological apatite. Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry 48, 455-488. Kovács, J. et al. (2013) Clay Mineralogy of Red Clay Deposits from the Central Carpathian Basin (Hungary): Implications for Plio/Pleistocene Chemical Weathering and Paleoclimate. Turkish J. Earth. Sci. 22, 414-426.

  16. Stratigraphy, Sequence, and Crater Populations of Lunar Impact Basins from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data: Implications for the Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    New measurements of the topography of the Moon from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA)[1] provide an excellent base-map for analyzing the large crater population (D.20 km)of the lunar surface [2, 3]. We have recently used this data to calculate crater size-frequency distributions (CSFD) for 30 lunar impact basins, which have implications for their stratigraphy and sequence. These data provide an avenue for assessing the timing of the transitions between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains, which has been linked to the late heavy bombardment (LHB). We also use LOLA data to re-examine relative stratigraphic relationships between key lunar basins.

  17. CHASMAPORTHETES MELEI N.SP., AN ENDEMIC HYAENID (CARNIVORA, MAMMALIA) FROM THE MONTE TUTTAVISTA FISSURE FILLINGS (LATE PLIOCENE TO EARLY PLEISTOCENE; SARDINIA, ITALY)

    OpenAIRE

    LORENZO ROOK; MARCO P. FERRETTI; MARISA ARCA; CATERINELLA TUVERI

    2004-01-01

    Occurrence of large carnivores in island ecosystems is unusual, especially in the case of top predators. Here, a new endemic hyaenid species, Chasmaporthetes melei, from the late Late Pliocene to earliest Pleistocene fissure fillings of Monte Tuttavista, Orosei, Sardinia, is described. Although smaller, C. melei is morphologically comparable with the Plio-Pleistocene Eurasian hunting-hyena Chasmaporthetes lunensis, a possible ancestor of the Sardinian species. C. melei displays all the charac...

  18. PERIODIZATION OF RECENT AND LATE PLEISTOCENE – HOLOCENE GEODYNAMIC AND PALEOCLIMATIC PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Rasskazov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on comparative analyses of spatial and temporal patterns of high- and medium-potassic basaltic eruptions in the Central Mongolia and marine survey records of Sr isotopes, it is revealed that the start of the recent geodynamic stage in the Central Mongolia correlates with the starting point of its global manifestation, which gives an evidence of a close relationship between magmatic occurrences in the region under study and processes of global convergence. The magmatic occurrences are considered as representing the recent geodynamic evolution of the past 90 Ma with milestones of ~66, 40–37, ~32 and 17–15 Ma ago. Global changes, except those ~32 Ma ago, are shown in marine records of Sr isotopes. The Late Plestocene – Holocene natural and climate setting is reconstructed from radiocarbon datings of various geological and paleobiological objects. Changes of the natural environment and climate of the Northern hemisphere are plotted with account of strong magma eruptions, attacks of asteroids and meteorites, changes of lithological compositions of sedimentary complexes and species compositions of fauna at the given time interval.  

  19. Spring deposits and late pleistocene ground-wter levels in southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground-water discharge deposits dating to the last glacial cycle and to several earlier cycles crop out in at least ten valleys in the southern Great Basin. The elevation and distribution of these deposits allow us to reconstruct the elevation of the water table during periods of wetter climate over much of the region, including the area around Yucca Mountain, site of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository. Results from areas undisturbed by recent ground-water pumpage reveal that water levels have varied by < 115 m, and in most cases much less, in the latter half of the Quaternary. The extent of ground-water discharge during older wet cycles is similar in scale to discharge during the last full-glacial period. This places most of the proposed repository horizon at least 85 to 285 m above the maximum levels attained by the water table under full-glacial climates. During the late-glacial period (∼11,500 to 8000 B.P.), a pulse of renewed discharge, perhaps corresponding to the Younger Dryas event well-documented elsewhere, produced organic-rich mats and flowing streams in many localities

  20. Unexpected technological heterogeneity in northern Arabia indicates complex Late Pleistocene demography at the gateway to Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Eleanor M L; Groucutt, Huw S; Jennings, Richard P; Petraglia, Michael D

    2014-10-01

    The role and significance of the Arabian Peninsula in modern human dispersals out of Africa is currently contentious. While qualitative observations of similarities between Arabian Middle Palaeolithic and African Middle Stone Age (MSA) assemblages have been made, these inferences remain untested and often situated within overly broad dichotomies (e.g., 'Africa' versus the 'Levant'), which distort concepts of geographic scale and subsume local variability. Here, we quantitatively test the hypothesis that assemblages from Jubbah, in the Nefud Desert of northern Saudi Arabia are similar to MSA industries from northeast Africa. Based on the quantitative analysis of a suite of metric and morphological data describing lithic reduction sequences, our results show that early and late core reduction at Jubbah is distinct from equivalent northeast African strategies, perhaps as a result of raw material factors. However, specific techniques of core shaping, preparation and preferential flake production at Jubbah draw from a number of methods also present in the northeast African MSA. While two Jubbah lithic assemblages (JKF-1 and JKF-12) display both similarities and differences with the northeast African assemblages, a third locality (JSM-1) was significantly different to both the other Arabian and African assemblages, indicating an unexpected diversity of assemblages in the Jubbah basin during Marine Isotope Stage 5 (MIS 5, ∼125-70,000 years ago, or ka). Along with evidence from southern Arabia and the Levant, our results add quantitative support to arguments that MIS 5 hominin demography at the interface between Africa and Asia was complex. PMID:25110207

  1. Late-Pleistocene (MIS 3-2) palaeoenvironments as recorded by sediments, palaeosols, and ground-squirrel nests at Duvanny Yar, Kolyma lowland, northeast Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanina, O. G.; Gubin, S. V.; Kuzmina, S. A.; Maximovich, S. V.; Lopatina, D. A.

    2011-08-01

    A detailed study of the Duvanny Yar section in the Kolyma Lowland (Yakutia) provides the most extensive knowledge to date about late-Pleistocene soil formation processes and environments in the North-East Siberian Arctic. Late-Quaternary palaeoenvironmental changes were reconstructed using paleopedological data and a range of palaeoecological bio-indicators (palynomorphs, plant macrofossils and insects). The frozen sediments representing marine isotope stage 3 (MIS-3), which encompasses the Karginsky interstadial, include profiles of four palaeosols of different ages. The oldest palaeosol is early Karginskian, and three overlying soil horizons represent a late-Karginskian pedocomplex. Palaeopedological data indicate a change of from synlithogenic soil formation processes to epigenic ones during these intervals. The intervening periods of synlithogenic pedogenesis were accompanied by active accumulation of eolian deposits. The Earlier Karginskian period of pedogenesis occurred in the absence of eolian sedimentation and when summer conditions were warm. The wide spectrum of peaty and peaty-gley soils observed in the late-Karginskian deposits developed under conditions of progressive cooling. The structure and content of fossil rodent burrows dated to approximately 30 000 yr BP from frozen late-Pleistocene deposits at Duvanny Yar indicate an arid and severe climate, a depth of active layer of 60-80 cm, and a wide distribution of disturbed habitats with pioneer and steppe vegetation.

  2. Tapping the Late Pleistocene-Holocene environmental change and alluvial geoarchaeology in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, Mark; Panyushkina, Irina; Toonen, Willem; Chang, Claudia; Seitkaliyev, Meyram; Voyakin, Dmitry

    2015-04-01

    We integrate the environmental history derived from spatial-temporal variability of multi proxies and the prehistory of arid lands from archaeological data in Central Asia in order to determine the relationship between the Holocene river dynamics, climate change and floodwater farming. This study addresses to developing fluvial achieves and geoarcheological records from the Talgar catchment, a south-bank tributary of the Ili River and the Talas catchment, a east-bank tributary of the Syr Darya River, in the southern Kazakhstan. The catchments of these steppe rivers flowing northwest had favorable habitats for farming from the Eneolithic to the medieval period as appears from human settlement histories documented with archaeological surveys and in some cases excavations. The river development has been reconstructed over the last 20,000 years and the key archaeological sites have been dated with radiocarbon. Periods of Holocene river aggradation and high water in downstream Lake Balkhash and Aral Sea correspond with cooler and wetter neoglacial episodes while river entrenchment and floodplain soil development are associated with warmer and drier conditions. Floodwater farming in the Talgar River reached its height in the late Iron Age (400-200 cal. BC) with more than 70 settlement sites and 700 burial mounds, and in the Talas River during the medieval period. This corresponds to a period of reduced flood flows, river stability and glacier retreat in the Tien Shan headwaters. A new hydroclimatic-based model for the spatial and temporal dynamics of floodwater farming is proposed, which explains settlement patterns since the first documented use of irrigation in the Iron Age and medieval times. The undertaken research highlights the Holocene human adaptations to the environmental change of floodplains in Central Asia.

  3. Very high-resolution seismics as a tool for sequence stratigraphy applied to outcrop scale-examples for Eastern Tyrrhenian margin holocene/pleistocene deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiocci, F.L. (CNR, C.S. Quaternario ed Evoluzione Ambientale, Rome (Italy))

    1994-03-01

    Three Eastern Tyrrhenian continental margin areas with very different depositional and tectonic settings were analyzed using single-channel very high-resolution reflection seismics coupled with sea-floor sampling. Fourth-and fifth-order depositional sequences derived from Quarternary glacio-eustatic processes are now buried at shallow depths within the continental shelf. The sequences have been reconstructed in detail with great lateral continuity. The tectonic setting did not influence the development of high-order sequences, which are probably synchronous at a global scale. Within these sequences, it has been possible to recognize all the systems tracts hypothesized by sequence stratigraphy models, confirming that this method does not depend upon time or scale. The geometry of depositional sequences is strongly dependent on sedimentation rate, i.e., on the distance from sources. Local factors must also be considered because they play an important role in the geometrical development of depositional sequences. In high-order depositional sequences, lowstand systems tracts are volumetrically predominant. High-stand and transgressive systems tracts seem to be linked to point sources because they have a three-dimensional (3-D) geometry. On the contrary, lowstand systems tracts are related to linear sources parallel to the shelf break; they cause the progradation of the whole margin so that they form the margin structure almost entirely. Offshore single channel reflection seismic surveys are generally conducted in prospecting, during planning and construction of civil engineering works and during surveys for oil-drilling sites. However, VHRS profiles also contain a large amount of data on large-scale sedimentary structures, chronostratigraphic surfaces, possible textural variations, and mutual spatial relationships between sedimentary bodies. 60 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Late Pleistocene and Holocene large magnitude earthquakes along Himalayan Frontal Thrust in the Central Seismic Gap in NW Himalaya, Kala Amb, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, G.; Bhakuni, S. S.; Suresh, N.

    2012-12-01

    The Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) forms the southernmost active tectonic mountain front of the Himalaya. To understand the ongoing tectonics further, paleoseismological study has been carried out in the vicinity of the HFT system along the Himalayan Front near Kala Amb, India. The trench excavation survey conducted across an explicit surface exposure of the HFT exhibits two distinct faults considered to be associated with the reactivation of the HFT where the Middle Siwalik rocks (Late Miocene) have repeatedly thrust over the Late Pleistocene and Holocene sediments. Presence of large-sized coseismically induced sand-injection feature and its disposition recognized in the trench also suggest occurrence of large magnitude earthquakes in this region. An uplifted and upwarped strath terrace, 3 to 5 m thick alluvium, resting over the 15 m high Middle Siwaliks, abruptly truncated by the HFT indicates its latest activity. Optically Stimulated Luminescence dating techniques were employed to constrain the chronology of events. The long term slip rate of the abandoned terraces due to the activity of the HFT is estimated to be 3.4 mm/yr or greater since Late Holocene. The paleoseismological investigations have provided unambiguous evidences of at least two large magnitude earthquakes occurred in this region where an earthquake with 12 m or larger surface displacement and magnitude 7.5 or greater hit this region in the period between 29.3 ka and 17 ka in the Late Pleistocene and another great earthquake recurred with 20-22 m or more surface displacement and magnitude of 7.7 or greater between 5.8 ka and 2 ka in the Holocene. The present study is the first time report of multiple large magnitude paleoearthquakes in the northwestern part of the Frontal Himalaya during Late Pleistocene and Holocene. The repeated reactivation of HFT substantiates high seismic potential of the Frontal Himalaya and calls for more extensive study of paleoearthquakes of this vastly populous mountainous region.

  5. Glacial chronology and palaeoclimate in the Bystra catchment, Western Tatra Mountains (Poland) during the Late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makos, Michał; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Braucher, Régis; Żarnowski, Michał

    2016-02-01

    Deglaciation chronology of the Bystra catchment (Western Tatra Mountains) has been reconstructed based on 10Be exposure age dating. Fourteen rock samples were collected from boulders located on three moraines that limit the horizontal extent of the LGM maximum advance and the Lateglacial recessional stage. The oldest preserved, maximum moraine was dated at 15.5 ± 0.8 ka, an age that could be explained more likely by post-depositional erosion of the moraine. Such scenario is supported by geomorphologic and palaeoclimatological evidence. The younger cold stage is represented by well-preserved termino-lateral moraine systems in the Kondratowa and Sucha Kasprowa valleys. The distribution of the moraine ridges in both valleys suggest a complex history of deglaciation of the area. The first Late-glacial re-advance (LG1) was followed by a cold oscillation (LG2), that occurred at around 14.0 ± 0.7-13.7 ± 1.2 ka. Glaciers during both stages had nearly the same horizontal extent, however, their thickness and geometry changed significantly, mainly due to local climatic conditions triggered by topography, controlling the exposition to solar radiation. The LG1 stage occurred probably during the pre-Bølling cold stage (Greenland Stadial 2.1a), however, the LG2 stage can be correlated with the cooling at around 14 ka during the Greenland Interstadial 1 (GI-1d - Older Dryas). This is the first chronological evidence of the Older Dryas in the Tatra Mountains. The ELA of the maximum Bystra glacier was located at 1480 m a.s.l. in accordance with the ELA in the High Tatra Mountains during the LGM. During the LG1 and LG2 stages, the ELA in the catchment rose up to 1520-1530 m a.s.l. and was located approximately 100-150 m lower than in the eastern part of the massif. Climate modelling results show that the Bystra glacier (maximum advance) could have advanced in the catchment when mean annual temperature was lower than today by 11-12 °C and precipitation was reduced by 40-60%. This is in accordance with LGM conditions previously reported for the High Tatras. During the LG1 and LG2 stages the temperature decrease in the study area reached 10 °C and precipitation was lower by ∼30% compare to modern conditions. This resulted in slightly higher accumulation (20-30%) in the Western Tatra Mountains compare to the High Tatra Mountains.

  6. Fluvial Tufa Evidence of Late Pleistocene Wet Intervals from Santa Barbara, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Y.; Corsetti, F. A.; Feakins, S. J.; Rhodes, E. J.; Kirby, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Past pluvials in the western United States provide valuable context for understanding regional hydroclimate variability. Here we report evidence of conditions substantially wetter than today from fluvial tufa deposits located near Zaca Lake, Santa Barbara County, California that have been dated by radiocarbon (14C) and Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence (IRSL). Two successions of tufa deposition occur within a small catchment that drains Miocene Monterey Formation bedrock: 1) a fluvial deposit (0-0.5 m thick, 200 m in extent) that formed along a narrow valley below a modern spring, and 2) a perched deposit about 10 m higher (2 m thick, 15 m in extent). IRSL and radiocarbon dating of the perched carbonates suggests at least two episodes of carbonate growth: one at 19.4 ± 2.4 (1σ) through 17.8 ± 2.8 (1σ) ka and another at 11.9 ± 1.5 (1σ) ka verified with a charcoal 14C age of 10.95 ± 0.12 (2σ) cal ka BP. The relationship between the perched and fluvial spring deposits is inferred to represent a drop in the water table of more than 10 m associated with a transition from a wet climate in the late glacial to a dry Holocene today. The wet period indicated by tufa growth between 19.4 and 17.8 ka is relatively consistent with other California climate records both north and south of Zaca Lake. However, tufa growth ca. 12 to 11 ka demonstrates wet conditions occurred as far south as Zaca Lake during the Younger Dryas event, in contrast to climate records farther south in Lake Elsinore indicating persistently dry conditions through this interval. A small shift north in the average position of the winter season storm track could explain wet winters at Zaca while at the same time generating dry winters at Lake Elsinore, 275 km southwest of Zaca. If true, these data indicate that rather small latitudinal shifts in the average winter season storm track can produce large changes in regional hydroclimate.

  7. Millennial-scale varnish microlamination dating of late Pleistocene geomorphic features in the drylands of western USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tanzhuo; Broecker, Wallace S.

    2013-04-01

    Varnish microlamination (VML) dating is a climate-based correlative age determination technique used to correlate and date various geomorphic features in deserts. In this study, we establish a generalized late Pleistocene (18-74 ka) millennial-scale microlamination sequence in fine-grained, fast-accumulating rock varnish for the drylands of western USA, radiometrically calibrate the sequence and correlate it with the δ18O record in the GISP2 Greenland ice core. We then use this climate-correlated varnish microstratigraphy to estimate surface exposure ages for radiometrically dated late Pleistocene geomorphic features in the study region. The VML dating of debris flow deposits on the Sehoo recessional shorelines of Lake Lahontan at the Jessup embayment of central Nevada yields a minimum-limiting age of 14.95-15.95 ka, in good agreement with a calibrated 14C age of 15.22 ± 0.12 ka for the timing of the lake recession. The VML dating of a giant ejecta block on the rim of Meteor Crater in northern Arizona yields a minimum-limiting age of 49.15 ka, closely matching a thermoluminescence (TL) age of 49 ± 3 ka and slightly younger than a recently updated cosmogenic 36Cl age of 56.0 ± 2.4 ka for the meteor impact event. The VML dating of distal Q2c fan surfaces on Hanaupah Canyon alluvial fan in Death Valley, California, yields a minimum-limiting age of 73.55 ka, in accord with cosmogenic 36Cl depth-profile ages of 66 + 22/-14 ka and 72 + 24/- 20 ka for the same fan deposits. The close agreement between the VML age estimates and the independently derived radiometric ages for these geomorphic features attests to the validity and reliability of millennial-scale VML dating. To further assess its potential in desert geomorphological research, we use the VML method to study alluvial-fan responses to millennial-scale climatic changes. The VML dating of a small tributary fan in Death Valley reveals two episodes of fan aggradation, one ceasing at 73.55-86.75 ka during the dry period of the last interglacial (MIS 5a) and the other finishing at 66.15 ka during the wet period of the last glacial (MIS 4). The VML and 36Cl dating of the distal Q2c fan surfaces on Hanaupah Canyon fan reveal two episodes of large-scale fan aggradation ended at 72 + 24/- 20 ka and 73.55 ka during the wet period of MIS 4. Fanhead incision and associated within-channel or fantoe aggradation are found to take place during the relatively dry period of the glacial-to-interglacial climatic transition (12-24 ka) and the Holocene interglacial dry period (0-12 ka). These data indicate that, on the millennial to sub-Milankovitch timescale (~ 103-104 years), fan aggradation is a discrete sedimentational process under various climatic conditions. Because fan aggradation is ultimately controlled by the intensity and frequency of precipitation events - which in turn are modulated by major climatic oscillations such as Heinrich events, Dansgaard/Oeschger (DO) events, and glacial/interglacial shifts - these major climatic changes could be the pacemaker of regionally contemporaneous large-area fan segmentation.

  8. Late Pleistocene (MIS5-3) environmental reconstruction from north-eastern Iberia through microvertebrate and palaeobotanical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allue, Ethel; Bennàssar, Maria; Biltekin, Demet; Blain, Hugues-Alexandre; Burjachs, Francesc; Euba, Itxaso; Expósito, Isabel; Fernández-García, Mónica; López-García, Juan Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the environmental changes during the Late Pleistocene on the basis of a multi-approach study based on natural and archaeological deposits from NE Iberian Peninsula. The focussed area, although having a small extension (some 32.000 square kilometres), covers a large range of ecosystems and bioclimatic conditions from the Mediterranean seashore to the summit of the Pyrenean mountain ranges (up to 2000 masl). This synthetical approach includes materials from various contexts including 10 archaeological deposits and a single natural deposit. In this work, plant (pollen and charcoals) and animal (small mammals, amphibians and reptiles) records are being analysed and compared in order to present an overview of the environmental changes occurred from the MIS5 to MIS3. On the first hand, we are using the small-vertebrate records recovered from archaeological deposits. These proxies are mainly the product of pellets from birds of prey and are key ecological markers. On the second hand, palaeobotanical evidences, pollen and charcoal, have different formation processes. Charcoal remains are mostly from archaeological deposits and are due to human activities related to fire showing evidences of the local vegetation. Pollen evidences from archaeological and natural contexts are deposited through natural processes (wind, insects, etc.) and show regional scale vegetation record. Results indicate the presence of temperate elements during all these periods (especially at the seashore area), with a more important representation and extension southwards or changes in altitude from taxa with eurosiberian affinities during coldest periods. Forest coverage, plant and vertebrate distribution along the territory point out a mosaic landscape formed by open areas and forests. These landscapes have probably a more or less Mediterranean or Eurosiberian character depending on the climatic moment and their location with variations along the sequence.

  9. Stable carbon isotope reconstructions of diet and paleoenvironment from the late Middle Pleistocene Snake Cave in Northeastern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkina, Diana; Bocherens, Herve; Chaimanee, Yaowalak; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2010-03-01

    Thailand’s geographical location in the tropics and almost complete, relatively uninterrupted forest cover makes it valuable for paleodiet and paleoclimate research. We present the first dietary and environmental reconstructions in Northeastern Thailand, using stable isotope abundances in mammalian tooth enamel from the late Middle Pleistocene locality, Tham Wiman Nakin (Snake Cave), which reflect a much higher (over 70%) than modern (13%) occurrence of C4 plants. Bovids and cervids appear to have had almost entirely a C4 plant diet. Carnivores consumed a mixture of C3 (suids) and C4 (bovids, cervids) consumers. Rhinoceroses and orangutan appear to have maintained their preference through time for forested or open C3 environment, respectively. 13C/12C from bone bioapatite, horn and hair of modern Southeast Asian mammals almost exclusively demonstrate C3 vegetation dominance. C4 consumption is rare in analysed modern species and it could be related to anthropogenic influences such as ingestion of domestic crops or livestock. Interesting implications emerge in the C4 vegetation distribution in southern Eurasian ecosystems, indicating that Southeast Asia, south of the Tibet, could be part of the global C4 vegetation spread, which occurred around 7 Ma. However, the C4 percentage in ecosystems varied geographically. Despite modern reversal towards C3 habitats due to factors such as increasing CO2, we think that anthropological influences may be responsible for habitat and dietary changes in extant species. Bovids demonstrate the most significant shift in diet and habitat through time, from C4-dominated open habitats to C3-dominated habitats indicative of dense forest understory.

  10. Greigite detected as dominating remanence carrier in Late Pleistocene sediments, Lisan formation, from Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee), Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, H.; Nowaczyk, N. R.; Frank, U.; Schwab, M. J.; Naumann, R.; Striewski, B.; Agnon, A.

    2007-07-01

    A rock magnetic investigation of three sedimentary cores of Lisan formation of late Pleistocene age from Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee) northern Israel demonstrates that the magnetization of these sediments is controlled by various degrees of a secondary chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) carried by greigite (Fe3S4). This CRM is superimposed on a primary detrital remanent magnetization (DRM) that resides in Ti-magnetite. This finding is independently confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements performed on magnetic extracts of the sediments. The domain state of the greigite is largely single domain behaviour (SD), thus dominating the magnetization. Therefore, the magnetic record retrieve from of these sediments is not reflecting geomagnetic variations but rather chemical rock magnetic properties, resulting from diagenetic processes. The results of our study suggest that paleomagnetic record of greigite bearing sediments should be interpreted with caution because of the following reasons: 1. Geomagnetic secular variations can be biased, due to large coercivity overlap between magnetite and greigite. 2. Alternating field (AF) demagnetization can produce erroneous directions due to vector distortion by acquisition of a gyro-remnant magnetization (GRM). 3. Estimation of relative paleointensity can be hampered by large-scale variations in natural remnant magnetization (NRM) intensity, caused by the acquisition of a secondary CRM of unknown age and unknown extent superimposed on the DRM. The precipitation of greigite requires reducing conditions at the sediment-water interface and/or interstitial water, associated with the presence of sulphur and iron oxides. Reducing conditions are typical of stratified lakes and other stratified water bodies, such as the Dead Sea, paleo-Lake Lisan, temporarily the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, the Caspian Sea, the Black Sea and many other marine basins. According to our findings, paleomagnetic records from such environments carried dominantly by greigite therefore should be treated with care.

  11. Analysis of vegetation and climate change during Late Pleistocene from Ziro Valley, Arunachal Pradesh, Eastern Himalaya region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Amalava; Mehrotra, Nivedita; Shah, Santosh K.; Basavaiah, Nathani; Chaudhary, Vandana; Singh, Indra Bir

    2014-10-01

    Vegetation and climate during later part of Late Pleistocene have been reconstructed from Ziro valley, Arunachal Pradesh, Eastern Himalaya based on pollen data along with carbon isotope and magnetic susceptibility data The study reveals that the area and the vicinity is occupied by mixed broad leaved - conifer forest and pine grass savanah at variable densities at least since 66,000yr BP. The phases of expansions and declines of Oaks with decline and increase of Pines and grasses probably occurred under increase (warm-moist) and decrease (cool-dry) of S.W. monsoon precipitation respectively. The increasing trend of S.W. monsoon and temperature is recorded during 44,000 to 34,000 cal yr BP synchronizing with the peat development, and which peaked at around 35,000 cal yr BP. This may link to the interstadial phase during the last major glacial cycle in the Himalayan region. It is also reflected in the decline of ?13C value indicating dominance of C-3 type of vegetation. The increased values of ?FD%, and lower values ?LF magnetic susceptibility, recorded during the phase of the peat deposit, further advocate's higher monsoon intensity. Impact of expansion of glacier felt with peak (LGM) around 20,000 cal yr BP is perceived. Tree line had moved to lower altitudes due to increased aridity and low temperature. During this time existence of savannah type of vegetation is also evident by the increase of C4 taxa. Decreased FD% and increased ?LF susceptibility also indicate reduced S.W. monsoon intensity.

  12. Late Pleistocene Climate Events and The Origin of Agriculture In SW Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol-Strick, M.

    In the Eastern Mediterranean sea, the climate succession of the last deglaciation is documented and dated in marine cores by the d18-O variation of foraminiferal cal- cite and pollen records. The Last Glacial Maximum is identified by a large abundance of grass pollen from a prairie-type vegetal cover with low annual precipitation in the mountainous north and east borderlands of the sea, where the pollen mainly origi- nates. During the first phase of the last deglaciation, the Bolling/Allerod chronozone, the moisture availability increases and makes possible the spread of a deciduous for- est, as shown by the increasing pollen abundance of the deciduous oak. The cold and arid Younger Dryas is identified by a reversal to semi-desert conditions, with the in- crease of sage-brush (Artemisia) and the saline-tolerant Chenopodiaceae. The climate of the earliest Holocene is Optimum for at least 3000 years (9000-6000yr BP), with the largest spread of the deciduous forest at low-middle elevations signalling wet sum- mers and of the Pistacia woodland at low elevations signalling mild, no-frost winters. This is the time when the most recent sapropel deposited in the eastern Mediterranean under anoxic bottom conditions generated by a surface lid of lower salinity due to the concomitant largest floods of the Nile River fed by the strongest African monsoon rains in the Ethiopian Highlands. In SW Asia, the pollen records of lakes and marshes have been correlated with those of the marine cores, thereby obtaining a robust time-frame. In that area, the archaeo- logical data of human settlements are independently dated by 14C. Thus the archaeo- logical succession can be securely set against the well-dated climatic succession. The Late Palaeolithic populations of SW Asia were wandering hunter-gatherers in the prairies of the Last Glacial Maximum, where they already collected wild wheat, barley and fruit. With the Bolling/Allerod wetter and warmer climate, they began to settle in favourable locations, on a year-long or semi-permanent basis. They exploited, proba- bly more widely, the vegetal food resources of wild cereals and pulses. In Palestine, this culture is called Natufian. In Syria on the Middle Euphrates, the settlement at Tel Abu Hureira displays a first phase of occupation that yielded wild emmer wheat and two-row barley. These wild varieties of cereals are characterized by a brittle rachis of the ear that insures the wide dispersion of the spikelets at maturity. This Phase I came to an end with the abandonment of the site for several hundred years. The following occupation Phase II immediately yields the domesticated form of cereals, which are 1 mainly identified by the non-brittle, solid rachis at maturity. This mutant form makes possible for man to more efficiently collect the seeds with a sickle or a stick. Based on the local 14C dates, the settlement interruption is coeval with the cold, arid Younger Dryas, and the incipience of Phase II is coeval with the Climate Optimum of the early Holocene. It is striking that the domestication of emmer wheat appears to have taken place during the Younger Dryas. This strong climatic shift must somehow have constrained this most fundamental step in the globally earliest emergence of agriculture, that of SW Asia. The accumulation of grain surplus supported the human population increase that eventually led to the earliest emergence of urban civilization in SW Asia. 2

  13. Lineage-specific late pleistocene expansion of an endemic subtropical gossamer-wing damselfly, Euphaea formosa, in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Jen-Pan; Lin Chung-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Pleistocene glacial oscillations have significantly affected the historical population dynamics of temperate taxa. However, the general effects of recent climatic changes on the evolutionary history and genetic structure of extant subtropical species remain poorly understood. In the present study, phylogeographic and historical demographic analyses based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences were used. The aim was to investigate whether Pleistocene climatic cycles, pa...

  14. New insights into Late Pleistocene glacial and postglacial history of northernmost Ungava (Canada) from Pingualuit Crater Lake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyard, Hervé; St-Onge, Guillaume; Pienitz, Reinhard; Francus, Pierre; Zolitschka, Bernd; Clarke, Garry K. C.; Hausmann, Sonja; Salonen, Veli-Pekka; Lajeunesse, Patrick; Ledoux, Grégoire; Lamothe, Michel

    2011-12-01

    The Pingualuit Crater was formed by a meteoritic impact ca. 1.4 million years ago in northernmost Ungava (Canada). Due to its geographical position near the center of successive North American ice sheets and its favorable morphometry, the Pingualuit Crater Lake (water depth = 246 m) promises to yield a unique continuous sedimentary sequence covering several glacial/interglacial cycles in the terrestrial Canadian Arctic. In this paper, we suggest the existence of a subglacial lake at least during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) by hydraulic potential modeling using LGM ice-surface elevation and bed topography derived from a digital elevation model. These results support the hypothesis that the bottom sediments of the Crater Lake escaped glacial erosion and may contain a long-term continental sedimentary sequence. We also present the stratigraphy of a 9 m-long core retrieved from the deep basin of the lake as well as a multiproxy reconstruction of its deglacial and postglacial history. The base of the core is formed by very dense diamicton reflecting basal melt-out environments marking the end of subglacial conditions at the coring site. The overlying finely laminated silt are related to the onset of proglacial conditions characterized by extremely low lacustrine productivity. Infra Red Stimulated Luminescence and AMS 14C dating, as well as biostratigraphic data indicate sediment mixing between recent (e.g. Holocene) and much older (pre- to mid-Wisconsinan) material reworked by glacier activity. This process prevents the precise dating of these sediments that we interpret as being deposited just before the final deglaciation of the lake. Two finer grained and organic-rich intervals reflect the inception of lacustrine productivity resulting from the cessation of glacial meltwater inputs and ice-free periods. The lower organic interval corresponds to the early postglacial period (6850-5750 cal BP) and marks the transition between proglacial and postglacial conditions during the Holocene Thermal Maximum, while the uppermost organic-rich core section represents late Holocene sediments (˜4200-600 cal BP). The organic intervals are separated by a basin-scale erosive slide occurring around 4200 cal BP and likely related to 1) a seismic event due to the glacio-isostatic rebound following the last deglaciation or 2) slope instabilities associated with rapid discharge events of the lake.

  15. Composition and provenance of Late Pleistocene-Holocene alluvial sediments of the eastern Andean piedmont between 33 and 34° S (Mendoza Province, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, A.; Blasi, A.; Zárate, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Andean cordillera, and its piedmont in the central western Argentina, has been long considered as one of the main source areas of detritus for the Chaco-Pampean plain sand dune fields and loess/loess-like deposits of central Argentina. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the composition of the late Pleistocene-Holocene alluvial deposits of the Andes cordillera piedmont, from 33° to 34° S. The results are interpreted in the context of the regional geology, tectonic setting of the study area and its implications in the continent-wide perspective of modern alluvial sands proposed by Potter (1994). Sampling was conducted at the alluvial stratigraphic sequences of four study sites along three Andean piedmont arroyos; modal mineralogy in the very fine sand fraction (3 phi to 4 phi) was determined using standard petrographic microscope methods. Q:F:LF average compositions indicate that the Late Pleistocene-Holocene very fine-grained alluvial sands of the Cordillera Frontal piedmont reflects the modern lithic arenites of the Argentine Association reported by Potter (1994). The results show two geologically distinct sources in the catchment areas, volcaniclastic and metamorphic rocks. High concentrations of mica and volcanic glass are likely related to particle morphologies and to the deposition sedimentary environment recorded in the alluvial sequences—floodplains. The overabundance of micas over the volcanic glass in the mid-late Holocene alluvial sequence indicates the drainage of a metamorphic area at the expense of other lithological sources. Source areas are located mainly in the Frontal cordillera, and to a lesser extent, in the piedmont Tertiary deposits, another likely source for the analyzed Quaternary alluvial sediments. The mineralogical signature of the late Pleistocene and Holocene alluvial sequences is in agreement with the composition of the southern Pampean sand mantles, loess and loess-like deposits mainly formed by a volcanic mineral assemblage with source areas placed at the headwaters of the main Andean rivers.

  16. Paleohydrology of the southern Great Basin, with special reference to water table fluctuations beneath the Nevada Test Site during the Late Pleistocene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnitude of water table rise during Pleistocene pluvial climates, and of the resultant shortening of ground-water flow path and reduction in unsaturated zone thickness, is investigated. The distribution of calcitic veins in alluvium and lakebeds, and of tufa deposits, between the Ash Meadows spring discharge area and the Nevada Test Site suggests that discharge from the regional Paleozoic carbonate aquifer during the Late Pleistocene occurred at distances as much as 14 kilometers northeast of Ash Meadows and at altitudes up to 50 meters higher than at present. Use of the underflow equation (relating discharge to transmissivity, aquifer width, and hydraulic gradient), and various assumptions regarding pluvial recharge, transmissivity, and altitude of ground-water base level, suggest possible rises in potentiometric level in the carbonate aquifer of 6 to 90 meters beneath central Frenchman Flat, 58 kilometers northeast of Ash Meadows. During Wisconsin time the rise probably did not exceed 30 meters. Water-level rises beneath Frenchman Flat during future pluvials are unlikely to exceed 30 meters, and future levels might even be 10 meters lower than the modern one, 210 meters beneath the center of the valley. Neither the cited rise in potentiometric level in the regional carbonate aquifer, nor the shortened flow path during the Late Pleistocene precludes utilization of the NTS as a repository for high-level or transuranic-element radioactive wastes provided other requisite conditions are met at this site. Deep water tables, attendant thick (up to several hundred meter) unsaturated zones, and ground-water flow paths tens of kilometers in length characterized the region during Wisconsin time and possibly throughout the Pleistocene, and are likely to so characterize it during future pluvial climates

  17. Acoustic stratigraphy of Bear Lake, Utah-Idaho: late Quaternary sedimentation patterns in a simple half-graben

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    A 277-km network of high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, supplemented with a sidescan-sonar mosaic of the lake floor, was collected in Bear Lake, Utah–Idaho, in order to explore the sedimentary framework of the lake's paleoclimate record. The acoustic stratigraphy is tied to a 120 m deep, continuously cored drill hole in the lake. Based on the age model for the drill core, the oldest continuously mapped acoustic reflector in the data set has an age of about 100 ka, although older sediments were locally imaged. The acoustic stratigraphy of the sediments below the lake indicates that the basin developed primarily as a simple half-graben, with a steep normal-fault margin on the east and a flexural margin on the west. As expected for a basin controlled by a listric master fault, seismic reflections steepen and diverge toward the fault, bounding eastward-thickening sediment wedges. Secondary normal faults west of the master fault were imaged beneath the lake and many of these faults show progressively increasing offset with depth and age. Several faults cut the youngest sediments in the lake as well as the modern lake floor. The relative simplicity of the sedimentary sequence is interrupted in the northwestern part of the basin by a unit that is interpreted as a large (4 × 10 km) paleodelta of the Bear River. The delta overlies a horizon with an age of about 97 ka, outcrops at the lake floor and is onlapped by much of the uppermost sequence of lake sediments. A feature interpreted as a wave-cut bench occurs in many places on the western side of the lake. The base of this bench occurs at a depth (22–24 m) similar to that (20–25 m) of the distal surface of the paleodelta. Pinch-outs of sedimentary units are common in relatively shallow water on the gentle western margin of the basin and little Holocene sediment has accumulated in water depths of less than 30 m. On the steep eastern margin of the basin, sediments commonly onlap the hanging wall of the East Bear Lake Fault. However, no major erosional or depositional features suggestive of shoreline processes were observed on acoustic profiles in water deeper than about 20–25 m.

  18. Stratigraphy, age and correlation of middle Pleistocene silicic tephras in the Auckland region, New Zealand : a prolific distal record of Taupo Volcanic Zone volcanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coastal sections in the Auckland region reveal highly carbonaceous and/or highly weathered clay-dominated cover-bed successions with numerous discrete distal volcanic ash (tephra) layers, fluvially reworked siliciclastic (tephric) deposits, and two widely distributed pyroclastic density current (PDC) deposits generated from explosive silicic volcanism within the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ). The younger of the two PDC deposits (informally named Waiuku tephra) is glass-isothermal plateau fission-track (ITPFT) dated at 1.00 0.03 Ma and occurs in a normal polarity interval interpreted as the Jaramillo Subchron. Waiuku tephra is correlated with Unit E sourced from the Mangakino Volcanic Centre of the TVZ. Waiuku tephra can be subdivided into two distinctive units enabling unequivocal field correlation: a lower stratified unit (dominantly pyroclastic surge with fall component) and an upper massive to weakly stratified unit (pyroclastic flow). At many sites in south Auckland, Waiuku tephra retains basal 'surge-like' beds (<1.4 m thickness). This provides clear evidence for primary emplacement and is an exceptional feature considering the c. 200 km this PDC has travelled from its TVZ source area. However, at many other Auckland sites, Waiuku tephra displays transitional sedimentary characteristics indicating lateral transformation from hot, gas-supported flow/surge into water-supported mass flow and hyperconcentrated flow (HCF) deposits. The older PDC deposit is dated at 1.21 0.09 Ma, is enveloped by tephras that are ITPFT-dated at 1.14 0.06 Ma (above) and 1.21 0.06 Ma (below), respectively, and occurs below a short normal polarity interval (Cobb Mountain Subchron) at c. 1.19 Ma. This PDC deposit, correlated with Ongatiti Ignimbrite sourced from the Mangakino Volcanic Centre of TVZ, has laterally transformed from a gas-supported, fine-grained pyroclastic flow deposit at Oruarangi, Port Waikato, into a water-supported volcaniclastic mass flow deposit farther north at Glenbrook Beach. The occurrence of Ongatiti Ignimbrite in Auckland significantly extends its northward distribution. Large numbers of post- and pre-Ongatiti rhyolitic tephra layers, ranging in age from c. 1.31 to 0.53 Ma, are also recognised in the region, with some up to 0.5 m in compacted fallout thickness. Although some tephras can be attributed to known TVZ eruptions (e.g., Ahuroa/Unit D), many have yet to be identified in proximal source areas and remain uncorrelated. However, some can be reliably correlated to tephra layers occurring in marine to nearshore sequences of Wanganui Basin and deep-sea cores retrieved east of North Island. The identification of previously unrecognised mid-Pleistocene TVZ-sourced tephra deposits in the Auckland region, and their correlation to the offshore marine record, represent an advance in the construction of a higher resolution history for the TVZ where, close to eruptive source, the record is fragmentary and obscured by deep burial, or erosion, or both. (author). 65 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Late Pleistocene ice export events into the Arctic Ocean from the M'Clure Strait Ice Stream, Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Chris R.; Clark, Chris D.; Darby, Dennis A.; Hodgson, Douglas A.

    2005-12-01

    Rapidly-flowing sectors of an ice sheet (ice streams) can play an important role in abrupt climate change through the delivery of icebergs and meltwater and the subsequent disruption of ocean thermohaline circulation (e.g., the North Atlantic's Heinrich events). Recently, several cores have been raised from the Arctic Ocean which document the existence of massive ice export events during the Late Pleistocene and whose provenance has been linked to source regions in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. In this paper, satellite imagery is used to map glacial geomorphology in the vicinity of Victoria Island, Banks Island and Prince of Wales Island (Canadian Arctic) in order to reconstruct ice flow patterns in the highly complex glacial landscape. A total of 88 discrete flow-sets are mapped and of these, 13 exhibit the characteristic geomorphology of palaeo-ice streams (i.e., parallel patterns of large, highly elongated mega-scale glacial lineations forming a convergent flow pattern with abrupt lateral margins). Previous studies by other workers and cross-cutting relationships indicate that the majority of these ice streams are relatively young and operated during or immediately prior to deglaciation. Our new mapping, however, documents a large (> 700 km long; 110 km wide) and relatively old ice stream imprint centred in M'Clintock Channel and converging into Viscount Melville Sound. A trough mouth fan located on the continental shelf suggests that it extended along M'Clure Strait and was grounded at the shelf edge. The location of the M'Clure Strait Ice Stream exactly matches the source area of 4 (possibly 5) major ice export events recorded in core PS1230 raised from Fram Strait, the major ice exit for the Arctic Ocean. These ice export events occur at 12.9, 15.6, 22 and 29.8 ka ( 14C yr BP) and we argue that they record vigorous episodes of activity of the M'Clure Strait Ice Stream. The timing of these events is remarkably similar to the North Atlantic's Heinrich events and we take this as evidence that the M'Clure Strait Ice Stream was also activated around the same time. This may hold important implications for the cause of the North Atlantic's Heinrich events and hints at the possibility of a pan-ice sheet response.

  20. Palynological records of climate and oceanic conditions in late Pleistocene and Holocene sediments of the Nile cone, southeastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholeif, S.; Mudie, P.

    2009-04-01

    ariations in palynomorph concentrations and relative abundances, including pollen and spores, organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts, and Amorphous Organic Matter (AOM), were studied in a sediment core, NC Core 2, from the upper slope (1030 m water depth) of the Nile Cone, southeastern Mediterranean, Egypt. Each sample represents palynomorph deposition for intervals of ca. 500-1,000 years and provides the first detailed palynological record for the Nile Cone. The dinocyst assemblages and AOM production reflect changes in surface water temperature and river discharge in response to climate forcing as marked by variations in pollen and spore indicators of semi-desert vegetation and tropical Monsoon intensity. The basal sediments (ca.14600 - 9500 yr BP) contain high concentrations and relative abundances of Spiniferites elongatus, Polysphaeridium zoharyi and other Polysphaeridium and Spiniferites species during the transition from postglacial to interglacial conditions. Variations in these taxa and total Impagidinium species suggest a gradual temperature increase, interrupted by a pre-Holocene cool interval around 11000 yr BP. The high African monsoon index for this pre-Holocene time corresponds with pollen evidence of relatively high Nile discharge. The organic-rich S1 sapropel sediments, dated ca. 9500 - 6270 yr BP, were deposited several thousand years later, during a time of lower Monsoon index, warmer surface water and increased dinocyst production. This was accompanied by moderate Nile flooding and oxygen-deficient or anoxic bottom water on the upper Nile Cone, mainly supporting the increased production and carbon import hypothesis for Eastern Mediterranean S1 formation. Dinocyst assemblages in the Nile Cone S1 differ from those of the deeper, more northern Levantine and Cretan basins in the near absence of heterotrophic protoperidinioid cysts, despite the uniformly high organic S1 carbon content. The prevailing climate during the formation of sapropelic sediments in the Southeastern Mediterranean was tropical to subtropical, but was interrupted by an early cooler interval with reduced humidity, as marked by re-appearance of Spiniferites elongatus and increased Ephedra pollen. The carbonate-rich surface layers were probably deposited under warm dry climatic conditions with minimum Nile input, but evidence of oxidation prevents detailed interpretation. Key words: dinocysts; pollen; spores; Nile Cone; Amorphous Organic Matter; sapropel S1; Late Pleistocene; Holocene.

  1. Contribution of changes in opal productivity and nutrient distribution in the coastal upwelling systems to Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene climate cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Etourneau

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The global Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene cooling (~3.02.0 million years ago Ma concurred with extremely high diatom and biogenic opal production in most of the major coastal upwelling regions. This phenomenon was particularly pronounced in the Benguela upwelling system (BUS, off Namibia, where it is known as the Matuyama Diatom Maximum (MDM. Our study focuses on a new diatom silicon isotope (?30Si record covering the MDM in the BUS. Unexpectedly, the variations in ?30Si signal follow biogenic opal content, whereby the highest ?30Si values correspond to the highest biogenic opal content. We interpret the higher ?30Si values during the MDM as a result of a stronger degree of silicate utilisation in the surface waters caused by high productivity of mat-forming diatom species. This was most likely promoted by weak upwelling intensity dominating the BUS during the Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene cooling combined with a large silicate supply derived from a strong Southern Ocean nutrient leakage responding to the expansion of Antarctic ice cover and the resulting stratification of the polar ocean 3.02.7 Ma ago. A similar scenario is hypothesized for other major coastal upwelling systems (e.g. off California during this time interval, suggesting that the efficiency of the biological carbon pump was probably sufficiently enhanced in these regions during the MDM to have significantly increased the transport of atmospheric CO2 to the deep ocean. In addition, the coeval extension of the area of surface water stratification in both the Southern Ocean and the North Pacific, which decreased CO2 release to the atmosphere, led to further enhanced atmospheric CO2 drawn-down and thus contributed significantly to Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene cooling.

  2. Contribution of changes in opal productivity and nutrient distribution in the coastal upwelling systems to Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene climate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etourneau, J.; Ehlert, C.; Frank, M.; Martinez, P.; Schneider, R.

    2012-09-01

    The global Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene cooling (~3.0-2.0 million years ago - Ma) concurred with extremely high diatom and biogenic opal production in most of the major coastal upwelling regions. This phenomenon was particularly pronounced in the Benguela upwelling system (BUS), off Namibia, where it is known as the Matuyama Diatom Maximum (MDM). Our study focuses on a new diatom silicon isotope (?30Si) record covering the MDM in the BUS. Unexpectedly, the variations in ?30Si signal follow biogenic opal content, whereby the highest ?30Si values correspond to the highest biogenic opal content. We interpret the higher ?30Si values during the MDM as a result of a stronger degree of silicate utilisation in the surface waters caused by high productivity of mat-forming diatom species. This was most likely promoted by weak upwelling intensity dominating the BUS during the Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene cooling combined with a large silicate supply derived from a strong Southern Ocean nutrient leakage responding to the expansion of Antarctic ice cover and the resulting stratification of the polar ocean 3.0-2.7 Ma ago. A similar scenario is hypothesized for other major coastal upwelling systems (e.g. off California) during this time interval, suggesting that the efficiency of the biological carbon pump was probably sufficiently enhanced in these regions during the MDM to have significantly increased the transport of atmospheric CO2 to the deep ocean. In addition, the coeval extension of the area of surface water stratification in both the Southern Ocean and the North Pacific, which decreased CO2 release to the atmosphere, led to further enhanced atmospheric CO2 drawn-down and thus contributed significantly to Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene cooling.

  3. A multiproxy reconstruction of the palaeoenvironment and palaeoclimate of the Late Pleistocene in northeastern Iberia: Cova dels Xaragalls, Vimbodí-Poblet, Paratge Natural de Poblet, Catalonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Juan Manuel; Blain, Hugues-Alexandre; Bennàsar, Maria; Euba, Itxaso; Bañuls, Sandra; Bischoff, James; López-Ortega, Esther; Saladié, Palmira; Uzquiano, Paloma; Vallverdú, Josep

    2012-01-01

    The Cova dels Xaragalls is a small open karst system, located in the municipality of Vimbodí-Poblet (Tarragona, Catalonia, NE Spain). It is an important Holocene archaeological site that was inspected in the 1970s but from which little has been published. New excavations starting in 2008 have exposed a deep Late Pleistocene stratigraphical sequence. In this paper, we present for the first time palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic reconstructions of this Late Pleistocene succession on the basis of both the small-vertebrate assemblages and the charcoals. Results from the small-vertebrate associations along the sequence indicate that the landscape had open-woodland habitats in the vicinity of the Cova del Xaragalls, with wet points in the surrounding area. Woodland habitats were dominant throughout the sequence, as evidenced by the abundance of the species Apodemus sylvaticus, but were better developed during warm periods (layers C5 and C8), whereas during cold periods (layers C4 and C3) the environment was slightly more humid in response to higher mean annual precipitation and the opening of the landscape. The charcoal analysis indicates that the woodland surrounding the cave was composed mainly of Pinus (more than 90% was identified as Pinus), but that during the cold period (C3–C4) it incorporated some Quercus ilex/coccifera and Angiosperm indet., probably linked with greater precipitation. Comparisons are made with other long palaeoenvironmental sequences from the northeastern Iberian Peninsula and with global marine isotopic curves, providing a scenario for the palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental changes that occurred during the Late Pleistocene in the woodland areas surrounding the Cova dels Xaragalls.

  4. New Constraints on Late Pleistocene - Holocene Slip Rates and Seismic Behavior Along the Panamint Valley Fault Zone, Eastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, W.; Kirby, E.; McDonald, E.; Walker, J.; Gosse, J.

    2008-12-01

    Space-time patterns of seismic strain release along active fault systems can provide insight into the geodynamics of deforming lithosphere. Along the eastern California shear zone, fault systems south of the Garlock fault appear to have experienced an ongoing pulse of seismic activity over the past ca. 1 kyr (Rockwell et al., 2000). Recently, this cluster of seismicity has been implicated as both cause and consequence of the oft-cited discrepancy between geodetic velocities and geologic slip rates in this region (Dolan et al., 2007; Oskin et al., 2008). Whether other faults within the shear zone exhibit similar behavior remains uncertain. Here we report the preliminary results of new investigations of slip rates and seismic history along the Panamint Valley fault zone (PVFZ). The PVFZ is characterized by dextral, oblique-normal displacement along a moderately to shallowly-dipping range front fault. Previous workers (Zhang et al., 1990) identified a relatively recent surface rupture confined to a ~25 km segment of the southern fault zone and associated with dextral displacements of ~3 m. Our mapping reveals that youthful scarps ranging from 2-4 m in height are distributed along the central portion of the fault zone for at least 50 km. North of Ballarat, a releasing jog in the fault zone forms a 2-3 km long embayment. Displacement of debris-flow levees and channels along NE-striking faults that confirm that displacement is nearly dip-slip, consistent with an overall transport direction toward ~340°, and affording an opportunity to constrain fault displacement directly from the vertical offset of alluvial surfaces of varying age. At the mouth of Happy Canyon, the frontal fault strand displaces a fresh debris-flow by ~3-4 m; soil development atop the debris-flow surface is incipient to negligible. Radiocarbon ages from logs embedded in the flow matrix constrain the timing of the most recent event to younger than ~ 600 cal yr BP. Older alluvial surfaces, such as that buried by the debris-flow lobe, exhibit progressively larger displacement (up to 10-12 m). Well-preserved bar and swale morphology, incipient varnishing of surface boulders, and weak soil development all suggest that this surface is Late Holocene in age. We are working to confirm this inference, but if correct, it suggests that this fault system may have experienced ~3-4 events in the relatively recent past. Finally, preliminary surface ages from even older surfaces along this portion of the fault zone place limits on the slip rate over Late Pleistocene time. Cosmogenic 10Be surface clast dating of an alluvial surface with well-developed pavement and moderate soil development near Happy Canyon suggests a surface age of 30-35 kyr. We are working to refine this estimate with new dating and soil characterization, but our preliminary reconstructions of displacement of this surface across the two primary fault strands are consistent with slip rates that exceed ~3 mm/yr. Overall, these results are consistent with the inference that the Panamint Valley fault zone is the primary structure that accomplishes transfer of right-lateral shear across the Garlock Fault.

  5. Late Pleistocene and Holocene-Age Columbia River Sediments and Bedforms: Hanford Reach Area, Washington - Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.R. Fecht, T.E. Marceau

    2006-03-28

    This report presents the results of a geologic study conducted on the lower slopes of the Columbia River Valley in south-central Washington. The study was designed to investigate glaciofluvial and fluvial sediments and bedforms that are present in the river valley and formed subsequent to Pleistocene large-scale cataclysmic flooding of the region.

  6. Stratigraphy, foraminiferal assemblages and paleoenvironments in the Late Cretaceous of the Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia (part I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Luis S.

    1997-03-01

    The present work focuses on the Cretaceous record (Middle Albian-Maastrichtian) of the Upper Magdalena Valley (UMV), with a scope that covers facies and biofacies. The nomenclatural scheme previously stated for the Girardot-Guataqui area is here extended and proposed for all the basin, the following fomational units being characterized in detail. The Hondita Formation (Middle Albian-late Turonian), placed on top of the Caballos Formation, is separated from the Lomagorda Formation (late Turonian-early Santonian) by a chert interval within a succession of predominantly dark shales deposited in outer shelf environments. The Olini Group (early Santonian-late Campanian) presents two conspicuous chert units (Lidita Inferior and Superior) overlain by the Nivel de Lutitas y Arenas (early Maastrichtian). The sandstones of La Tabla and finally the mudstones of the Seca Formation (Maastrichtian) represent diverse littoral environments of the end of the Cretaceous. In the UMV, the Cretaceous system attains approximately 1350 m of thickness. Within the paleogeographic scenario, the drowning of the basin and of the adjacent Central Cordillera during most of the Late Cretaceous enabled upwelling currents and the development of widespread pelagic sediments. These sediments graded to shallower water deposits towards the south of the basin. In the Upper Cretaceous, four sequences of second order can be identified. The longer cycle begins at the base of the Hondita Formation and exhibits the maximum flooding in the Cenomanian condensed section of this unit. Following this cycle, three successive sudden sea level drops mark the boundaries of complete sequences, each comprising well developed lowstand, transgressive and highstand system tracts. After the last cycle was completed, the basin was uplifted and rocks of the Seca Formation were cannibalized by fluvial processes during the Tertiary. An angular unconformity that truncates this unit represents the uppermost sequence boundary of the Cretaceous megasequence.

  7. Contribution of changes in opal productivity and nutrient distribution in the coastal upwelling systems to late Pliocene/early Pleistocene climate cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Etourneau

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The global late Pliocene/early Pleistocene cooling (~3.02.0 million years ago, Ma concurred with extremely high diatom and biogenic opal production in most of the major coastal upwelling regions. This phenomenon was particularly pronounced in the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS, off Namibia, where it is known as the Matuyama Diatom Maximum (MDM. Our study focuses on a new diatom silicon isotope (?30Si record covering the MDM in the BUS. Unexpectedly, the variations in ?30Si signal follow biogenic opal content, whereby the highest ?30Si values correspond to the highest biogenic opal content. We interpret the higher ?30Si values during the MDM as a result of a stronger degree of silicate utilization in the surface waters caused by high productivity of mat-forming diatom species. This was most likely promoted by weak upwelling intensity dominating the BUS during the Plio/Pleistocene cooling combined with a large silicate supply derived from a strong Southern Ocean nutrient leakage responding to the expansion of Antarctic ice cover and the resulting stratification of the polar ocean 3.02.7 Ma ago. A similar scenario is hypothesized for other major coastal upwelling systems (e.g. off California during this time interval, suggesting that the efficiency of the biological carbon pump was probably sufficiently enhanced in these regions during the MDM to have significantly increased the transport of atmospheric CO2 to the deep ocean. In addition, the coeval extension of the area of surface water stratification in both the Southern Ocean and the North Pacific, which decreased CO2 release to the atmosphere, led to further enhanced atmospheric CO2 drawn-down and thus contributed significantly to late Pliocene/early Pleistocene cooling.

  8. Phylogeographic heterogeneity of the brown macroalga Sargassum horneri (Fucaceae) in the northwestern Pacific in relation to late Pleistocene glaciation and tectonic configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zi-Min; Uwai, Shinya; Yu, Shen-Hui; Komatsu, Teruhisa; Ajisaka, Tetsuro; Duan, De-Lin

    2011-09-01

    Pleistocene glacial oscillations and associated tectonic processes are believed to have influenced the historical abundances and distribution of organisms in the Asia Northwest Pacific (ANP). Accumulating evidence indicates that factors shaping tempospatial population dynamics and distribution patterns of marine taxa vary with biogeographical latitude, pelagic behaviour and oceanographic regimes. To detect what kinds of historical and contemporary factors affected genetic connectivity, phylogeographic profiles of littoral macroalga Sargassum horneri in the ANP were analysed based on mitochondrial (Cox3) and chloroplast (rbcL) data sets. Five distinct clades were recovered. A strong signature of biogeographical structure was revealed (Φ(CT) = 0.487, P China Sea and South China Sea), whereas clades II-V are discontinuously scattered around the main Islands of Japan. Furthermore, two secondary contact regions were identified along the south Japan-Pacific coastline. This significant differentiation between the two basins may reflect historical glacial isolation in the northwestern Pacific, which is congruent with the estimates of clade divergence and demographic expansion during the late Quaternary low sea levels. Analysis of molecular variance and the population-pair statistic F(ST) also revealed significant genetic structural differences between Chinese marginal seas and the Japanese basin. This exceptional phylogeographic architecture in S. horneri, initially shaped by historical geographic isolation during the late Pleistocene ice age and physical biogeographical barriers, can be complicated by oceanographic regimes (ocean surface currents) and relocating behaviour such as oceanic drifting. PMID:21851438

  9. Late Pliocene Pleistocene stress field in the Teruel and Jiloca grabens (eastern Spain): contribution of a new method of stress inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlegui, L. E.; Simón, J. L.; Lisle, R. J.; Orife, T.

    2005-04-01

    Samples of non-striated fracture surfaces within clastic materials of Late Pliocene-Pleistocene age from the Teruel grabens (eastern Spain) have been analysed using a stress inversion method based on observations of slip sense. The results obtained at 21 sites are compared with Late Miocene-Early Pliocene extensional stress tensors previously inferred from striated faults in the same area. The similarity between both sets of stress states suggests that the extensional Miocene-Pliocene stress field essentially continues (with minor changes) into Pliocene-Pleistocene times. The main changes involve (a) the dominant trend of σ3 trajectories, which evolve from ESE to ENE; (b) the waning of the compressional component caused by Europe-Iberia-Africa convergence; and (c) the progressive trend towards a multidirectional extension regime. Stress deflection caused by large-scale extensional faults as well as switching of σ2 and σ3 axes induced by fracture development are common within this stress field. They produce groups of local stress ellipsoids with σ3 axes orthogonal to each other and either orthogonal or parallel to the faults bounding the grabens. The regional consistency of the new results gives support to the new inversion method and demonstrates its utility in research on young sedimentary rocks, where 'gaps' in palaeostress records may exist due to absence of striated faults.

  10. Late Pleistocene-Holocene earthquake-induced slumps and soft-sediment deformation structures in the Acequion River valley, Central Precordillera, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucca, Laura P.; Godoy, Enrique; Pantano, Ana

    2014-07-01

    Evidence of earthquake-induced liquefaction features in the Acequin river valley, central western Argentina, is analysed. Well-preserved soft-sediment deformation structures are present in Late Pleistocene deposits; they include two large slumps and several sand dikes, convolutions, pseudonodules, faults, dish structures and diapirs in the basal part of a shallow-lacustrine succession in the El Acequin River area. The water-saturated state of these sediments favoured deformation. All structures were studied in a natural trench created as a result of erosion by a tributary of the Acequin River, called El Mono Creek. They form part of a large-scale slump system. Two slumps occur in the western portion of the trench and must have moved towards the ENE (70), where the depocentre of the Boca del Acequin area is situated. Considering the spatial relationship with Quaternary faults, the slumps are interpreted as being due to a seismic event. The thickest dikes in the El Mono Creek trench occur in the eastern portion of the trench, indicating that the responsible earthquake was located to the east of the study area, probably at the Cerro Salinas fault system zone. The slumps, sand dikes and other soft-sediment deformation features are interpreted as having been triggered by earthquakes, thus providing a preliminary palaeoseismic record of the Cerro Salinas fault system and extending the record of moderate-to high-magnitude earthquakes in central western Argentina to the Late Pleistocene.

  11. The sedimentary sequence from the Lake Ķūži outcrop, central Latvia: implications for late glacial stratigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiiu Koff

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Sediment samples from an outcrop in the near-shore area of Lake Ķūži (Vidzeme Heights, Central Latvia were investigated using palaeobotanical (pollen and macrofossil analysis and lithological (grain-size analysis methods and accelerator mass spectrometry 14C dating. A dark, organic-rich sediment layer was found below 1.7 m of sandy layers approximately 30 cm above the present lake level. Radiocarbon dating of a wood sample from the lowermost layer (11 050 ± 60 14C BP, 13 107–12 721 cal BP shows that the layer is of late glacial age. The composition of the pollen spectra is characterized by Betula nana, Cyperaceae pollen and spores of Equisetum, confirming that the lowermost sediments were formed during the late glacial. Fossils of obligate aquatic organisms in the upper layer, which include oospores of Characeae and seeds of Potamogeton, indicate an open water environment. Pollen of Myriophyllum and Potamogeton and non-pollen palynomorphs, such as algal Botryococcus and Pediastrum cf. boryanum, confirm this conclusion. The pollen assemblage from the greyish loam layer following this lacustrine phase shows a pattern characteristic of the Younger Dryas vegetation before the start of the real expansion of birch forests at the beginning of the Holocene.

  12. Environmental magnetic records of Mid-Late Pleistocene drift sedimentary sequences from the Antarctic Peninsula, Pacific Margin

    OpenAIRE

    Venuti, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Florindo, F.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Via di Vigna Murata, 605, I-00143 Rome, Italy; Caburlotto, A.; OGS-Trieste

    2007-01-01

    The Pacific Continental Margin of the Antarctic Peninsula was the area of interest of the Sediment Drift of The Antarctic Offshore Project (SEDANO Project). A paleomagnetic and environmental study was carried out on four Pleistocene sequences from Drift 7. High resolution measurements were performed on u-channels and about forty-three discrete samples. This work focus on the definition of the mineralogy of the main magnetic carriers which is still matter of debate and on the study of the shor...

  13. A Late Pleistocene palaeoclimate record based on mineral magnetic properties of the entrance facies sediments of Kulna Cave, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šroubek, P.; Diehl, J. F.; Kadlec, Jaroslav; Valoch, K.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 147, č. 2 (2001), s. 247-262. ISSN 0956-540X Grant ostatní: National Science Foundation(US) INT-9507137; National Science Foundation(US) EAR -9705718; Czech/US Jouint Board for Science and Technology(XX) 95051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : Kulna Cave * Moravian Karst * Pleistocene Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.366, year: 2001

  14. Preliminary Findings of the Balkan Paleo Project: Evidence of Human Activity at the Gateway of Europe During the Late Pleistocene

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    Tsanko Tzankov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the initial findings of the Balkan Paleo Project (BPP. The project seeks: 1 to augment the evidence that can be used to test hypotheses about hominin and faunal dispersals into and out of Europe during the Pleistocene; 2 to gather data for testing the hypotheses regarding the adaptation of early human populations to Eurasian ecosystems, the adjustment of their tool technologies, anatomical characteristics and behaviors in response to local climates and faunal evidence.These research objectives can only be achieved by identifying and excavating a broad spectrum of archaeological and paleontological sties that span the Pleistocene within the Balkan Peninsula. Results of BPP activities conducted in southern Bulgaria are reported here. These include excavations at the Arkata rockshelter and associated caves overlooking the Arda River near (Eastern Rhodopes, Krumovgrad district, the Leyarna caves and the previously known paleontological locality of Mechata Dupka (Strandzha Mountains, Malko Tarnovo district. These activities have expanded our understanding of ecological conditions along a potentially important pathway along which early humans may have dispersed into and out of Europe, and have for the first time documented the presence of Pleistocene humans within southeastern Bulgaria.

  15. High-resolution seismic stratigraphy of the late Neogene of the central sector of the Colombian Pacific continental shelf: A seismic expression of an active continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martnez, Jaime Orlando; Lpez Ramos, Eduardo

    2011-02-01

    The sedimentary prism of the central Pacific continental shelf of Colombia was affected by regional folding and faulting, and probably later mud diapirism, from the Late Miocene to the Holocene. Interpretation of high-resolution seismic lines (2 s/dt) revealed that the prism consists of 13 high-resolution seismic units, that can be separated into 5 seismic groups. Deposition of the prism and the associated stacking pattern, are probably the response to variable uplift and subsidence in a fore-arc basin that underwent important tectonic events by the end of the Miocene. Throughout the Pliocene, the continental shelf sedimentation was affected by the growing of a dome structure probable due to mud diapirism. This fact caused peripheral faults both normal and reverse that controlled the distribution of some of the seismic units. During the Late Pleistocene (Wisconsin stage?) a eustatic sea level fall caused the shoreline to advance about 50 km westward of its present position. Because of this eustatic sea level change, a strong fluvial dissection took place and is interpreted as the probable extension of the San Juan River to the south of the present day river mouth. Within this framework it is believed that the Malaga and Buenaventura Bays were the passageways of branches of the old drainage system of the San Juan River. The inner branch circulated through the present Buenaventura Bay and runs southward leaving the mark of an apparent valley identified in the seismic information in the eastern sector of the study area. This old fluvial valley and its filling material located in the present day inner continental shelf front of Buenaventura are postulated as important targets to find placer minerals such as gold and platinum.

  16. Evidence of late Gelasian dispersal of African fauna at Coste San Giacomo (Anagni Basin, central Italy): Early Pleistocene environments and the background of early human occupation in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, L.; Bona, F.; Corrado, P.; Magri, D.; Mazzini, I.; Parenti, F.; Scardia, G.; Sardella, R.

    2014-07-01

    Since the late 70s, the Early Pleistocene (Gelasian) site of Coste San Giacomo (Anagni Basin, central Italy) has been known amongst palaeontologists for its diverse vertebrate fauna. During the last 5 years, new excavations and the drilling of a 46-m-deep core have provided novel pieces of information. Palaeomagnetic data, pollen and small vertebrates analyses are presented here for the first time and combined with the updated list of the large vertebrates and ostracod analysis in a multidisciplinary perspective. Large and small mammals, pollen and ostracod analyses have allowed an integrated palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of the sedimentary sequence, depicting the evolution of the alluvial plain in the surrounding landscape. Moreover, magnetostratigraphy, pollen and small mammal biochronological data have confirmed the position of the Coste San Giacomo Faunal Unit, focusing the possible age of the mammal assemblage around 2.1 Ma, in a reversed phase before the base of the Olduvai chron. In particular, the occurrence of the large vole Mimomys pliocaenicus has important biochronological significance. The Coste San Giacomo site offers a unique opportunity to investigate the faunal and environmental changes that occurred in Mediterranean Europe during the Early Pleistocene, coinciding with major climatic changes at a global scale. The occurrence of taxa such as Hippopotamus sp. in the assemblage provides evidence of early dispersal events of African taxa prior to the early Homo diffusion into Europe.

  17. NEW FOSSIL VERTEBRATE REMAINS FROM SAN GIOVANNI DI SINIS (LATE PLEISTOCENE, SARDINIA: THE LAST MAUREMYS (REPTILIA, TESTUDINES IN THE CENTRAL MEDITERRANEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCESCO CHESI

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available New fossil vertebrates from the most representative Upper Pleistocene section (Tyrrhenian, MIS 5e of the outcrop of San Giovanni di Sinis (Oristano, Sardinia are here reported and described. The fossils, although scarce and fragmentary, document the occurrence of a terrapin (Mauremys sp. and the endemic Sardinian deer (Praemegaceros cazioti. Significant is the occurrence of the terrapin because it is the youngest representative of the genus in the central Mediterranean area where it is extinct at present. The Late Pleistocene extinction of Mauremys in Italy follows the same pattern of other Mediterranean reptiles, in being in some cases delayed on the islands. A comparison of the modern range of Mauremys and that of the pond turtle, Emys, as well as of their past ranges as evidenced by the fossil record, might suggest that some sort of thermophily (at least during pre-hatching stages characterized the former taxon and is responsible for its past and present distribution. SHORT NOTE

  18. Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene lake-level fluctuations in the Lahontan Basin, Nevada: Implications for the distribution of archaeological sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, K.D.; Goebel, Thomas; Graf, K.; Smith, G.M.; Camp, A.J.; Briggs, R.W.; Rhode, D.

    2008-01-01

    The Great Basin of the western U.S. contains a rich record of late Pleistocene and Holocene lake-level fluctuations as well as an extensive record of human occupation during the same time frame. We compare spatial-temporal relationships between these records in the Lahontan basin to consider whether lake-level fluctuations across the Pleistocene-Holocene transition controlled distribution of archaeological sites. We use the reasonably well-dated archaeological record from caves and rockshelters as well as results from new pedestrian surveys to investigate this problem. Although lake levels probably reached maximum elevations of about 1230-1235 m in the different subbasins of Lahontan during the Younger Dryas (YD) period, the duration that the lakes occupied the highest levels was brief Paleoindian and early Archaic archaeological sites are concentrated on somewhat lower and slightly younger shorelines (???1220-1225 in) that also date from the Younger Dryas period. This study suggests that Paleoindians often concentrated their activities adjacent to large lakes and wetland resources soon after they first entered the Great Basin. ?? 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A contribution to the understanding of late Pleistocene dune sand-paleosol-sequences in Fuerteventura (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Dominik; Yanes, Yurena; Willkommen, Tobias; Roettig, Christopher; Richter, Daniel; Richter, David; Suchodoletz, Hans v.; Zller, Ludwig

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes dune sand-paleosol-sequences of four pits in Northern Fuerteventura (Canary Islands). The elaborated stratigraphy is reinforced with luminescence dating to provide a first chronological estimation. Apart from a Holocene colluvial layer, the sequence spans the period from ca. 50 ka to ca. 280 ka. Paleosols were formed during glacial times and point to a standstill in sand supply. The isotopic composition of terrestrial gastropod shells retrieved from soil horizons reflects fluctuations in humidity conditions during different edaphic phases. Because eolian sands were deposited during glacial times as well, it is inferred that soil development was simply caused by a decrease in sand supply independent of climate change. Our geomorphic, geochronological and isotopic results are discussed considering different perspectives of dune sand-paleosol intercalation and more broadly, soil-forming conditions in general.

  20. A new record of the late Pleistocene coral Pocillopora palmata from the Dry Tortugas, Florida reef tract, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Lauren; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Pocilloporid corals dominated shallow-water environments in the Caribbean during much of the Cenozoic; however, the regional diversity of this family declined over the last 15 My, culminating with the extinction of its final member, Pocillopora palmata, during the latest Pleistocene. Here we present a new record of P. palmata from Dry Tortugas National Park in the Florida Keys and infer its likely age. Although most existing records of P. palmata are from the sub-aerial reef deposits of MIS5e (∼ 125 ka), the presently submerged reef in the Dry Tortugas was too deep (> 18 m) during this period to support significant reef growth. In contrast, the maximum water depth during MIS5a (∼ 82 ka) was only ∼ 5.6 m, which would have been ideal for P. palmata. Diagenetic alteration prevented direct dating of the samples; however, the similarity between the depths of the Pleistocene bedrock in the Dry Tortugas and other reefs in the Florida Keys, which have been previously dated to MIS5a, support the conclusion that P. palmata likely grew in the Dry Tortugas during this period. Our study provides important new information on the history of P. palmata, but it also highlights the vital need for more comprehensive studies of the Quaternary history of Caribbean reef development. With modern reef degradation already driving yet another restructuring of Caribbean coral assemblages, insights from past extinctions may prove critical in determining the prognosis of Caribbean reefs in the future.

  1. Linking Late Pleistocene alpine glacial erosion and continental margin sedimentation: Insights from 40Ar/39Ar dating of silt-sized sediment, Canterbury Basin, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor, Tania; Jaeger, John M.; Foster, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Quaternary climatic and eustatic cycles in mid-latitude regions have led to more extensive alpine glaciations and continental shelf progradation, respectively. However, the glacial influence on sediment fluxes to the ocean creating continental margin strata is poorly documented. This contribution analyzes the provenance of fine sediment accumulating on the continental shelf during the Late Pleistocene to evaluate the influence of glacial cycles on sediment erosion and routing to the continental shelf. Taking advantage of the contrasting bedrock ages exposed across the Southern Alps, New Zealand, we perform 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating on the bulk silt-size sediment from three drill sites of IODP Expedition 317, Canterbury Basin, New Zealand. The results suggest that a large proportion of sediment accumulating on the continental shelf results from erosion within the Main Divide fault zone of the Southern Alps. Sediment 40Ar/39Ar age fluctuations over this time period suggest that bedrock with various 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages has been differentially eroded in the upper Waitaki River catchment and mixed in the Waitaki-Canterbury sediment-routing system. Across-shelf variations in sediment 40Ar/39Ar age reflect changing modes of sediment dispersal on the continental shelf. Fluvial material, likely derived from the main drainage divide zone, preferentially accumulates in the middle continental shelf, whereas material representing erosion of older bedrock (Torlesse Terrane), located lower in the drainage basin, is dispersed uniformly across the shelf. The age signature of the muddy sediment accumulating on the continental shelf reflects Late Pleistocene landscape evolution of the Southern Alps and its influence on sediment dispersal to the continental shelf.

  2. The Palos Verdes Fault offshore Southern California: Late Pleistocene to present tectonic geomorphology, seascape evolution, and slip rate estimate based on AUV and ROV surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Daniel S.; Conrad, James E.; Maier, Katherine L.; Paull, Charles K.; McGann, Mary; Caress, David W.

    2015-07-01

    The Palos Verdes Fault (PVF) is one of few active faults in Southern California that crosses the shoreline and can be studied using both terrestrial and subaqueous methodologies. To characterize the near-seafloor fault morphology, tectonic influences on continental slope sedimentary processes and late Pleistocene to present slip rate, a grid of high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data, and chirp subbottom profiles were acquired with an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) along the main trace of PVF in water depths between 250 and 600 m. Radiocarbon dates were obtained from vibracores collected using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) and ship-based gravity cores. The PVF is expressed as a well-defined seafloor lineation marked by subtle along-strike bends. Right-stepping transtensional bends exert first-order control on sediment flow dynamics and the spatial distribution of Holocene depocenters; deformed strata within a small pull-apart basin record punctuated growth faulting associated with at least three Holocene surface ruptures. An upper (shallower) landslide scarp, a buried sedimentary mound, and a deeper scarp have been right-laterally offset across the PVF by 55 ± 5, 52 ± 4 , and 39 ± 8 m, respectively. The ages of the upper scarp and buried mound are approximately 31 ka; the age of the deeper scarp is bracketed to 17-24 ka. These three piercing points bracket the late Pleistocene to present slip rate to 1.3-2.8 mm/yr and provide a best estimate of 1.6-1.9 mm/yr. The deformation observed along the PVF is characteristic of strike-slip faulting and accounts for 20-30% of the total right-lateral slip budget accommodated offshore Southern California.

  3. On the timing and forcing mechanisms of late Pleistocene glacial terminations: Insights from a new high-resolution benthic stable oxygen isotope record of the eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konijnendijk, T. Y. M.; Ziegler, M.; Lourens, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    Benthic oxygen isotope records of deep marine sedimentary archives have yielded a wealth of information regarding ice sheet dynamics and climate change during the Pleistocene. However, since they often lack independent age control, these records are generally bound by a fixed phase relationship between orbital forcing and the climate response, e.g. ice volume changes. We present the first long (˜1.2 Ma) benthic oxygen isotope record from the eastern Mediterranean, based on ODP Sites 967 and 968, which clearly reflects the behavior of global climate on a glacial-interglacial scale throughout the late Pleistocene time period. The age model for our record is based on tuning the elemental ratio of titanium versus aluminum (Ti/Al) against insolation. The Ti/Al record is dominated by the precession-related changes in northern African climate, i.e. monsoonal forcing, and hence largely independent of glacial-interglacial variability. We found the largest offset between our chronology and that of the widely applied, open ocean stacked record LR04 (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005) for TVII (˜624 ka), which occurred ˜9 kyr earlier according to our estimates, though in agreement with the AICC2012 δDice chronology of EPICA Dome C (Bazin et al., 2013). Spectral cross-correlation analysis between our benthic δ18O record and 65°N summer insolation reveals significant amounts of power in the obliquity and precession range, with an average lag of 5.5 ± 0.8 kyr for obliquity, and 6.0 ± 1.0 kyr for precession. In addition, our results show that the obliquity-related time lag was smaller (3.0 ± 3.3 kyr) prior to ˜900 ka than after (5.7 ± 1.1 kyr), suggesting that on average the glacial response time to obliquity forcing increased during the mid-Pleistocene transition, much later than assumed by Lisiecki and Raymo (2005). Finally, we found that almost all glacial terminations have a consistent phase relationship of ˜45 ± 45° with respect to the precession and obliquity-driven increases in 65°N summer insolation, consistent with the general consensus that both obliquity and precession are important for deglaciation during the Late Pleistocene. Exceptions are glacial terminations TIIIb, T36 and potentially T32 (and TVII T24 and T34), which show this consistent phase relationship only with precession (only with obliquity). Our findings point towards an early (>1200 ka) onset of the Mid Pleistocene Transition. Vice versa, the timing of TVII, which can only be explained as a response to obliquity forcing, indicates that the transition lasted until at least after MIS 15.

  4. Late Pliocene and early Pleistocene environments of the north-eastern Russian Arctic inferred from the Lake El'gygytgyn pollen record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A. A.; Tarasov, P. E.; Wennrich, V.; Raschke, E.; Herzschuh, U.; Nowaczyk, N. R.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Melles, M.

    2013-08-01

    The 318 m thick lacustrine sediment record in Lake El'gygytgyn, northeastern Russian Arctic cored by the international El'gygytgyn Drilling Project provides unique opportunities allowing the time-continuous reconstruction of the regional paleoenvironmental history for the past 3.6 Myr. Pollen studies of the lower 216 m of the lacustrine sediments show their value as an excellent archive of vegetation and climate changes during the Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene. About 3.50-3.35 Myr BP the vegetation at Lake El'gygytgyn, in nowadays tundra area, was dominated by spruce-larch-fir-hemlock forests. After ca. 3.4 Myr BP dark coniferous taxa gradually disappeared. A very pronounced environmental changes took place at ca. 3.305-3.275 Myr BP, corresponding with the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) M2, when treeless tundra- and steppe-like habitats became dominant in the regional vegetation. Climate conditions were similar to those of Late Pleistocene cold intervals. Numerous coprophilous fungi spores identified in the pollen samples suggest the presence of grazing animals around the lake. Following the MIS M2 event, larch-pine forests with some spruce mostly dominated in the area until ca. 2.6 Myr BP, interrupted by colder and drier intervals ca. 3.04-3.02, 2.93-2.91, and 2.725-2.695 Myr BP. At the beginning of the Pleistocene, ca. 2.6 Myr BP, noticeable climatic deterioration occurred. Forested habitats changed to predominantly treeless and shrubby environments, which reflect a relatively cold and dry climate. Revealed peaks in green algae colonies (Botryococcus) around 2.53, 2.45, 2.320-2.305 and 2.175-2.150 Myr BP suggest a spread of shallow water environments. Few intervals (i.e. 2.55-2.53, ca. 2.37, and 2.35-2.32 Myr BP) with a higher presence of coniferous taxa (mostly pine and larch) document some relatively short-term climate ameliorations.

  5. Late Pliocene and early Pleistocene environments of the north-eastern Russian Arctic inferred from the Lake El'gygytgyn pollen record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Andreev

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The 318 m thick lacustrine sediment record in Lake El'gygytgyn, northeastern Russian Arctic cored by the international El'gygytgyn Drilling Project provides unique opportunities allowing the time-continuous reconstruction of the regional paleoenvironmental history for the past 3.6 Myr. Pollen studies of the lower 216 m of the lacustrine sediments show their value as an excellent archive of vegetation and climate changes during the Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene. About 3.50–3.35 Myr BP the vegetation at Lake El'gygytgyn, in nowadays tundra area, was dominated by spruce-larch-fir-hemlock forests. After ca. 3.4 Myr BP dark coniferous taxa gradually disappeared. A very pronounced environmental changes took place at ca. 3.305–3.275 Myr BP, corresponding with the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS M2, when treeless tundra- and steppe-like habitats became dominant in the regional vegetation. Climate conditions were similar to those of Late Pleistocene cold intervals. Numerous coprophilous fungi spores identified in the pollen samples suggest the presence of grazing animals around the lake. Following the MIS M2 event, larch-pine forests with some spruce mostly dominated in the area until ca. 2.6 Myr BP, interrupted by colder and drier intervals ca. 3.04–3.02, 2.93–2.91, and 2.725–2.695 Myr BP. At the beginning of the Pleistocene, ca. 2.6 Myr BP, noticeable climatic deterioration occurred. Forested habitats changed to predominantly treeless and shrubby environments, which reflect a relatively cold and dry climate. Revealed peaks in green algae colonies (Botryococcus around 2.53, 2.45, 2.320–2.305 and 2.175–2.150 Myr BP suggest a spread of shallow water environments. Few intervals (i.e. 2.55–2.53, ca. 2.37, and 2.35–2.32 Myr BP with a higher presence of coniferous taxa (mostly pine and larch document some relatively short-term climate ameliorations.

  6. A Late Pleistocene macrobenthic assemblage in Caleta Patillos, northern Chile: paleoecological and paleobiogeographical interpretations Un ensamble macrobntico del Pleistoceno Tardo en Caleta Patillos, norte de Chile: interpretaciones paleoecolgicas y paleobiogeogrflcas

    OpenAIRE

    Rivadeneira, Marcelo M.; Erico R Carmona

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we describe and analyze the structure of a Late Pleistocene (likely last interglacial) marine macrobenthic assemblage in Caleta Patillos (2045'S, 7012'W), northern Chile. A taphonomic analysis suggests the existence of a shallow subtidal paleonvironment, mainly soft-bottom, of high energy and intense mixing from several benthic habitats. The total number of 38 taxa recorded, mainly gastropods and bivalves, was not different than the ones reported in other Late Pleistoc...

  7. Late Pleistocene and Holocene environmental and climatic conditions in the eastern Andean piedmont of Mendoza (33°-34°S, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, A. E.; Zárate, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    The main goal of this paper is to analyze the late Quaternary alluvial record of the Andean piedmont between 33° and 34°S (Mendoza, Argentina) reconstructing the prevailing paleoenvironmental conditions and discussing their regional significance. The analysis was carried out along the outcrops of Arroyo La Estacada and its tributary Arroyo Anchayuyo, complementary sections were described at Arroyo Grande and Arroyo Yaucha. The sedimentological, stratigraphical and geochronological (radiocarbon and OSL dating) results as well as the paleoenvironmental interpretation are presented and discussed on the basis of the geomorphological units identified at the piedmont fluvial systems. Late Quaternary deposits of Arroyo La Estacada compose three main geomorphological units consisting of an extensive aggradational plain, a fill terrace and the present floodplain -which is not analyzed in this contribution-. At the aggradational plain a distal alluvial fan lithofacial association was determined, mainly related to overbank sheet fluid overflows and probably temporary inactive channels of sandy-like braided streams between ˜50 ka BP and the early Holocene. The mid-late Holocene fining upward alluvial sequence of the fill terrace corresponds to a sinuous fluvial system lithofacial association. The mid-to late Holocene alluvial sequence exposed at Arroyo Grande banks shows a fining upward sequence probably related to a sinuous fluvial system lithofacial association. Finally, in the Arroyo Yaucha the upper and lower terraces analyzed in this study record a Late Glacial and Holocene fining upward alluvial sequence of a sinuous fluvial system lithofacial association. The late Pleistocene - early Holocene dynamic of the Andean piedmont documents an interval of alluvial aggradation characterized by the occurrence of sandy systems similar to braided rivers in the distal fan environments. The mid-late Holocene is marked by aggradation in sinuous fluvial systems and by two major episodes of degradation registered across the fluvial systems of the study area. This paleoenvironmental reconstruction allowed us to propose an evolutionary scheme and chronology of the major fluvial landscape landforms contributing to the general understanding of the sedimentological and geomorphological dynamic during the late Quaternary.

  8. A 50,000-year record of late Pleistocene tropical vegetation and human impact in lowland Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Chris O.; Gilbertson, David D.; Rushworth, Garry

    2012-03-01

    There has been considerable uncertainty about the nature of Pleistocene environments colonised by the first modern humans in Island SE Asia, and about the vegetation of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the region. Here, the palynology from a series of exposures in the Great Cave of Niah, Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, spanning a period from ca. 52,000 to 5000 BP is described. Vegetation during this period was climate-driven and often highly unstable. Interstadials are marked by lowland forest, sometimes rather dry and at times by mangroves. Stadials are indicated by taxa characteristic of open environments or, as at the LGM, by highly disturbed rather open forest. Stadials are also characterised by taxa now restricted to 1000-1600 m above sea level, suggesting temperature declines of ca 7-9 °C relative to present, by comparison with modern lapse rates. The practice of biomass burning appears associated with the earliest human activity in the cave.

  9. Effects of Late Quaternary climatic changes on an exposed clay layer in the Lagoon of Venice (Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    Bonardi, Maurizio; Tosi, Luigi

    1994-01-01

    Well-dated evidences of different nature, from stratigraphy, sea level and coastline changes to pollen and paleobotanical findings, have indicated climatic in Venetian basin during the transition from the Late Pleistocene to the Holocene. The sedimentation or lack of it during that period, carries the imprint of those changes. Within this sedimentation sequence is a series of compacted clay layers, locally called caranto, from few centimeters to few meters thick, that is the subject of this ...

  10. 230Th/234U dates of late Pleistocene corals from Kita- and Minami-Diato Island, Okinawa, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha spectrometric Th-230/U-234 dating was applied to 50 Pleistocene corals from Kita- and Minami-Daito Islands, both have been well known as the noteworthy representatives of raised atolls. The Th-230/U-234 dates ranged from 113±6 to 133±6 ka (123±1 ka on average) in the autochthonous corals from Kita-, and from 111±5 to 159±10 ka (123±1 ka on average) in those from Minami-Daito Island, intimating that the fringing reefs have been developed during the high sea level stand of the last interglacial maximum. These dates are correlative to the oxygen isotope stage 5e. The upper limit of occurrence of the dated autochthonous corals was 8.1 m in Kita- and 11 m in Minami-Daito Island. Besides, the somewhat younger dates corresponding to OIS-5a or 5c were obtained from some allochthonous corals in a detrital limestone unit in Kita-Daito Island. However, hermatypic corals were alive, forming small scale reefs in shallow sea around Kita-Daito Island. The former shoreline was proved by the presence of raised surf bench at some localities, where the dated autochthonous corals were collected. (K.I.)

  11. Equatorial Pacific peak in biological production regulated by nutrient and upwelling during the late Pliocene/early Pleistocene cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Etourneau

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The largest increase in export production in the eastern Pacific of the last 5.3 Myr (million years occurred between 2.2 and 1.6 Myr, a time of major climatic and oceanographic reorganization in the region. Here, we investigate the causes of this event using reconstructions of export production, nutrient supply and oceanic conditions across the Pliocene–Pleistocene in the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP for the last 3.2 Myr. Our results indicate that the export production peak corresponds to a cold interval marked by high nutrient supply relative to consumption, as revealed by the low bulk sedimentary 15N/14N (δ15N and alkenone-derived sea surface temperature (SST values. This ∼0.6 million year long episode of enhanced delivery of nutrients to the surface of the EEP was predominantly initiated through the upwelling of nutrient-enriched water sourced in high latitudes. In addition, this phenomenon was likely promoted by the regional intensification of upwelling in response to the development of intense Walker and Hadley atmospheric circulations. Increased nutrient consumption in the polar oceans and enhanced denitrification in the equatorial regions restrained nutrient supply and availability and terminated the high export production event.

  12. Old Crow tephra: A new late Pleistocene stratigraphic marker across north-central Alaska and western Yukon Territory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, J.A.; Hamilton, T.D.; Gorton, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Old Crow tephra is the first extensive Pleistocene tephra unit to be documented in the northwestern part of North America. It has a calc-alkaline dacitic composition with abundant pyroxene, plagioclase, and FeTi oxides, and minor hornblende, biotite, apatite, and zircon. Thin, clear, bubble-wall fragments are the dominant type of glass shard. This tephra can be recognized by its glass and phenocryst compositions, as determined by X-ray fluorescence, microprobe, and instrumental neutron activation techniques. It has an age between the limits of 60,000 and 120,000 yr, set by 14C and fission-track measurements, respectively. Old Crow tephra has been recognized in the Koyukuk Basin and Fairbanks region of Alaska, and in the Old Crow Lowlands of the northern Yukon Territory, some 600 km to the east-northeast. The source vent is unknown, but these occurrences, considered in relation to the distant locations of potential Quaternary volcanic sources, demonstrate the widespread distribution of this tephra and underscore its importance as a regional stratigraphic marker. ?? 1983.

  13. The recovery of ancient DNA from Dasypus bellus provides new possibilities for investigating late Pleistocene mammal response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letts, Brandon; Shapiro, Beth

    2010-05-01

    Dasypus bellus, the 'beautiful armadillo,' is well known as a casualty of the Pleistocene megafaunal mass extinction event. Appearing in the fossil record about 2.5 Mya, D. bellus was widespread throughout the mid to southern United States and Mexico until it went extinct by about 10 kya. It was replaced by D. novemcinctus, the nine-banded armadillo, which is morphologically identical but smaller. The exact taxonomic status of D. bellus and its phylogenetic relationship with D. novemcinctus has been a subject of debate. In particular, it remains unresolved whether D. bellus was more closely related to North American than South American D. novemcinctus. To address this, we extracted and sequenced fragments of ancient mitochondrial DNA from surprisingly well-preserved remains of D. bellus recovered from Mefford Cave in Florida. Our results reveal a surprisingly close relationship between the extinct D. bellus and North American D. novemcinctus. Although southern climates have been considered inhospitable for the preservation of ancient DNA, thousands of bones per individual and the propensity of the armadillo to seek out shelter in caves makes preservation more likely than for other organisms. The armadillo may therefore make an excellent proxy organism for investigating the influence of climate change on animal populations south of the cold permafrost regions.

  14. A late-Middle Pleistocene (Marine Isotope Stage 6) vegetated surface buried by Old Crow tephra at the Palisades, interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, A.V.; Jensen, B.J.L.; Zazula, G.D.; Ager, T.A.; Kuzmina, S.; La, Farge C.; Froese, D.G.

    2010-01-01

    A 40??cm thick primary bed of Old Crow tephra (131??????11??ka), an important stratigraphic marker in eastern Beringia, directly overlies a vegetated surface at Palisades West, on the Yukon River in central Alaska. Analyses of insect, bryophyte, and vascular plant macrofossils from the buried surface and underlying organic-rich silt suggest the local presence of an aquatic environment and mesic shrub-tundra at the time of tephra deposition. Autochthonous plant and insect macrofossils from peat directly overlying Old Crow tephra suggest similar aquatic habitats and hydric to mesic tundra environments, though pollen counts indicate a substantial herbaceous component to the regional tundra vegetation. Trace amounts of arboreal pollen in sediments associated with the tephra probably reflect reworking from older deposits, rather than the local presence of trees. The revised glass fission-track age for Old Crow tephra places its deposition closer to the time of the last interglaciation than earlier age determinations, but stratigraphy and paleoecology of sites with Old Crow tephra indicate a late Marine Isotope Stage 6 age. Regional permafrost degradation and associated thaw slumping are responsible for the close stratigraphic and paleoecological relations between Old Crow tephra and last interglacial deposits at some sites in eastern Beringia. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. A late-Middle Pleistocene (Marine Isotope Stage 6) vegetated surface buried by Old Crow tephra at the Palisades, interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Alberto V.; Jensen, Britta J. L.; Zazula, Grant D.; Ager, Thomas A.; Kuzmina, Svetlana; La Farge, Catherine; Froese, Duane G.

    2010-03-01

    A 40 cm thick primary bed of Old Crow tephra (131 11 ka), an important stratigraphic marker in eastern Beringia, directly overlies a vegetated surface at Palisades West, on the Yukon River in central Alaska. Analyses of insect, bryophyte, and vascular plant macrofossils from the buried surface and underlying organic-rich silt suggest the local presence of an aquatic environment and mesic shrub-tundra at the time of tephra deposition. Autochthonous plant and insect macrofossils from peat directly overlying Old Crow tephra suggest similar aquatic habitats and hydric to mesic tundra environments, though pollen counts indicate a substantial herbaceous component to the regional tundra vegetation. Trace amounts of arboreal pollen in sediments associated with the tephra probably reflect reworking from older deposits, rather than the local presence of trees. The revised glass fission-track age for Old Crow tephra places its deposition closer to the time of the last interglaciation than earlier age determinations, but stratigraphy and paleoecology of sites with Old Crow tephra indicate a late Marine Isotope Stage 6 age. Regional permafrost degradation and associated thaw slumping are responsible for the close stratigraphic and paleoecological relations between Old Crow tephra and last interglacial deposits at some sites in eastern Beringia.

  16. Humidity changes in southern Tunisia during the Late Pleistocene inferred from U-Th dating of mollusc shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcareous deposits, mainly consisting of mollusc shell accumulations, which have been dated by the U/Th disequilibrium method, mark the shorelines of paleolake highstands in the Great Chotts Area of Southern Tunisia. The 5 sites studied consist of discontinuous accumulations of fossils of marine-like organisms e.g.: Cerastoderma glaucum, Melania tuberculata, Melanopsis praemorsa, Cerithium rupestre. U/Th isochron plots and age frequency histograms for 39 shell samples are reported here. Limited variations for U content and 234U/238U activity ratios (AR) of shells support the hypothesis of closure of the geochemical system with respect to this element. It is remarkable that 234U/238U AR of shells collected in Chott Fejej or Chott Jerid are clustered around different values, reflecting probably different groundwater recharge from the Continental Intercalaire (CI) or Complexe Terminal (CT) aquifers. Furthermore waters collected near Wadi el Akarit show 234U/238U AR values comparable to those observed for shells. 14C determinations made on aliquots of some of these samples suggested an age distribution between 18 and 34 ka BP. The U/Th data of these 39 shell samples imply that 4 distinct flood episodes of these lakes occurred at about 30, 95-100, 130-150 and 180-200 ka. For the episode centred around 30 ka, the frequency histogram of ages shows a multimodal age group that could represent the existence of several humid pulses rather than a unique event. Moreover, the comparison of δ13C and δ18O with those of older humid Pleistocene phases, when very large palaeolakes have been recorded, suggests that these young carbonate shells are not related to a true highstand lake. It is suggested that they represent a period of less humid climatic conditions with carbonate accumulation in minor water ponds in which intensive biological activity could have taken place. It should be noted that this period was less arid than the present

  17. Late Pleistocene climate change and landscape dynamics in the Eastern Alps: the inner-alpine Unterangerberg record (Austria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnberger, Reinhard; Drescher-Schneider, Ruth; Reitner, Jrgen M; Rodnight, Helena; Reimer, Paula J; Sptl, Christoph

    2013-05-15

    Drill cores from the inner-alpine valley terrace of Unterangerberg, located in the Eastern Alps of Austria, offer first insights into a Pleistocene sedimentary record that was not accessible so far. The succession comprises diamict, gravel, sand, lignite and thick, fine grained sediments. Additionally, cataclastic deposits originating from two paleo-landslide events are present. Multi-proxy analyses including sedimentological and palynological investigations as well as radiocarbon and luminescence data record the onset of the last glacial period (Wrmian) at Unterangerberg at ?120-110ka. This first time period, correlated to the MIS 5d, was characterised by strong fluvial aggradation under cold climatic conditions, with only sparse vegetation cover. Furthermore, two large and quasi-synchronous landslide events occurred during this time interval. No record of the first Early Wrmian interstadial (MIS 5c) is preserved. During the second Early Wrmian interstadial (MIS 5a), the local vegetation was characterised by a boreal forest dominated by Picea, with few thermophilous elements. The subsequent collapse of the vegetation is recorded by sediments dated to ?70-60ka (i.e. MIS 4), with very low pollen concentrations and the potential presence of permafrost. Climatic conditions improved again between ?55 and 45ka (MIS 3) and cold-adapted trees re-appeared during interstadials, forming an open forest vegetation. MIS 3 stadials were shorter and less severe than the MIS 4 at Unterangerberg, and vegetation during these cold phases was mainly composed of shrubs, herbs and grasses, similar to what is known from today's alpine timberline. The Unterangerberg record ended at ?45ka and/or was truncated by ice during the Last Glacial Maximum. PMID:23805019

  18. Late Pliocene and early Pleistocene sea-level timing and amplitudes derived from fossil ostracod assemblages: Canterbury Basin, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M.; Kusunoki, S.; Yamada, K.; Hoyanagi, K.

    2013-12-01

    IODP Expedition 317 cruise drilled cores at three shelf sites (U1353, U1354 and U1351) and one slope site (U1352), in water depths between 85 and 344 m, to understand relationships between sea-level change and sequence stratigraphy. The shelf sites are well suited to reconstruction of high-resolution sea-level fluctuations because of high sedimentation rates from the uplifting Southern Alps. We examined fossil ostracod assemblages from the shelf sites to reconstruct paleo-water depth fluctuations and their amplitudes. We identified 178 ostracod species and 70 genera from more than 160 samples. Q-mode factor analysis was performed on ostracod taxa with abundances of >3.5 % in each sample containing >50 specimens. Six varimax factors were explained 70.8% of the total variance. Paleo-water depths in each factor were calibrated with reference to recent ostracodes occurring around the sites as follows: first factor, middle shelf (50-80 m); second factor, middle to outer shelf (60-130 m); third factor, middle to outer shelf (55-115 m); fourth factor, lagoon, estuary and inner shelf (0-50 m); fifth factor, middle to outer shelf (80-200 m); sixth factor, outer shelf (130-200 m). Factor analysis of ostracod assemblages reveal at least, eight transgressive- and regressive-cycles at Site U1353, seventeen at Site U1354 and two at Site U1351. These cycles probably correspond to a subset of MIS stages between MIS M2 and MIS 40. Furthermore, amplitudes of these paleo-water-depth cycles are expected to equate to eustatic amplitudes because shelf sedimentation has been continuous and minimal subsidence can have occurred during the short time period involved. We therefore estimate that eustatic amplitudes were: 10 - 30 m from 3.1 to 2.8 Ma, ca. 100 m from 2.8 to 2.6 Ma, and 30 - 115 m from 1.8 to1.2 Ma. These amplitudes, together with the timing of the increase in amplitudes (~2.7 Ma), agree with estimates derived from oxygen isotopic records (Raymo et al., 2005), suggesting that the Canterbury Basin sequences responded to global climate change. However, comparison with sea-level amplitude estimates from the North Island of New Zealand (Naish, 1997) suggests that sea-level amplitudes increased in the Canterbury Basin 200 thousand years earlier than in the North Island.

  19. Late Pleistocene sediment provenance on the Mendeleev Ridge, Arctic Ocean, from XRF Elemental Analysis and Diffuse Spectral Reflectance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, J. D.; Polyak, L.; Adler, R.; Jakobsson, M.; Darby, D.

    2007-12-01

    During the 2005 Healy-Oden Trans-Arctic Expedition (HOTRAX), core HLY0503-JPC08 was raised from the Mendeleev Ridge at the modern junction of the Beaufort Gyre and the Transpolar Drift. This core with sedimentation rates estimated on the order of 2 cm/ka is well situated to sample variations in sedimentation, and thus circulation patterns during the Quaternary. Some characteristic features such as a distinctive change in lithology and prominent IRD layers provide the basis for correlation with previously developed stratigraphies. This overall correlation is confirmed by 1 cm post-cruise diffuse spectral reflectance measurements generated using a Minolta CM-2600d spectrophotometer. Downcore analysis of principle components extracted from the DSR data indicate an inverse correlation between smectite-chlorite which reaches maxima during interglacial/interstadial intervals when sediment Mn is also high, and illite and goethite which reach maxima during glacial intervals when sediment Mn is low. These glacial-interglacial cycles are also evident in elemental composition measured using a handheld, Innov-X Alpha series XRF analyzer which we employ on Arctic sediment for the first time. Estimates of sediment Mn content inferred by diffuse spectral reflectance agree well with XRF based measurements. We observe three distinct end-members based on physical properties and elemental composition. Low density, fine- grained, glacial sediment exhibit low Mn, low Sr, and high Rb values, and thus a high Rb/Sr ratio. Moderately sandy interglacial sediment exhibits high Mn, high Sr, and low Rb values, while sediment from the transitions in to and out of glacial periods are marked by prominent spikes in density, coarse grains, and Zr concentration. Elevated Rb/Sr ratios during glacial periods may result from the re-suspension of fine-grained sediment previously deposited on the outer shelf during higher sea level, and/or by discharge from proglacial lakes. The increase in grain-size accompanied by lows in the Rb/Sr ratio during interglacial/interstadial conditions provides a proxy for fluvial sediment transport and sea-ice rafting from inner shelf environments. Zr spikes mark IRD events corresponding to ice-sheet instabilities. Because the Zr spikes are generally not associated with elevated Ca, a proxy for detrital carbonate, we infer that these spikes represent predominantly iceberg-rafted sediment of Eurasian origin, whereas three distinct Ca maxima indicate prominent iceberg events originating from the Laurentide ice sheet.

  20. Late pliocene-pleistocene expansion of C4 vegetation in semiarid East Asia linked to increased burning : Geology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, B.; Shen, C.; W. Sun; Bird, M.; Ma, W.; Taylor, D; Liu, W; Peterse, F.; W. Yi; Zheng, H

    2014-01-01

    Plants using the C4 photosynthetic pathway, commonly tropical and subtropical grasses, increased in abundance in East Asia during the late Cenozoic. Determining the exact timing and likely factors leading to this major vegetation change requires region-specific studies. Here variations in pyrogenic carbon mass accumulation rate (PyC-MAR) and isotope composition (δ13CPyC) from an ~7-m.y.- long depositional sequence from the central Loess Plateau, China, suggest increased biomass burning and an...

  1. Humidity changes in southern Tunisia during the Late Pleistocene inferred from U-Th dating of mollusc shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causse, Christiane; Ghaleb, Bassam; Chkir, Najiba; Zouari, Kamel; Ben Ouezdou, Hedi; Mamou, A

    2003-11-01

    Calcareous deposits, mainly consisting of mollusc shell accumulations, which have been dated by the U/Th disequilibrium method, mark the shorelines of paleolake highstands in the Great Chotts Area of Southern Tunisia. The 5 sites studied consist of discontinuous accumulations of fossils of marine-like organisms e.g.: Cerastoderma glaucum, Melania tuberculata, Melanopsis praemorsa, Cerithium rupestre. U/Th isochron plots and age frequency histograms for 39 shell samples are reported here. Limited variations for U content and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios (AR) of shells support the hypothesis of closure of the geochemical system with respect to this element. It is remarkable that {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U AR of shells collected in Chott Fejej or Chott Jerid are clustered around different values, reflecting probably different groundwater recharge from the Continental Intercalaire (CI) or Complexe Terminal (CT) aquifers. Furthermore waters collected near Wadi el Akarit show {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U AR values comparable to those observed for shells. {sup 14}C determinations made on aliquots of some of these samples suggested an age distribution between 18 and 34 ka BP. The U/Th data of these 39 shell samples imply that 4 distinct flood episodes of these lakes occurred at about 30, 95-100, 130-150 and 180-200 ka. For the episode centred around 30 ka, the frequency histogram of ages shows a multimodal age group that could represent the existence of several humid pulses rather than a unique event. Moreover, the comparison of {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O with those of older humid Pleistocene phases, when very large palaeolakes have been recorded, suggests that these young carbonate shells are not related to a true highstand lake. It is suggested that they represent a period of less humid climatic conditions with carbonate accumulation in minor water ponds in which intensive biological activity could have taken place. It should be noted that this period was less arid than the present.

  2. Late Pleistocene leopards across Europe - northernmost European German population, highest elevated records in the Swiss Alps, complete skeletons in the Bosnia Herzegowina Dinarids and comparison to the Ice Age cave art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2013-09-01

    European leopard sites in Europe demonstrate Early/Middle Pleistocene out of Africa lowland, and Late Pleistocene Asian alpine migrations being driven by climatic changes. Four different European Pleistocene subspecies are known. The final European Late Pleistocene Ice Age leopard Panthera pardus spelaea (Bchler, 1936) is validated taxonomically. The skull shows heavy signs of sexual dimorphism with closest cranial characters to the Caucasian Panthera pardus ciscaucasica (Persian leopard). Late Pleistocene leopards were distributed northernmost, up to S-England with the youngest stratigraphic records by skeletons and cave art in the MIS 2/3 (about 32,000-26,000 BP). The oldest leopard painting left by Late Palaeolithics (Aurignacians/Gravettians) in the Chauvet Cave (S-France) allows the reconstruction of the Ice Age leopard fur spot pattern being close to the snow or Caucasian leopards. The last Ice Age glacial leopard habitat was the mountain/alpine boreal forest (not mammoth steppe lowland), where those hunted even larger prey such as alpine game (Ibex, Chamois). Into some lairs, those imported their prey by short-term cave dwelling (e.g. Baumann's Cave, Harz Mountains, Germany). Only Eurasian Ice Age leopards specialized, similar as other Late Pleistocene large felids (steppe lions), on cave bear predation/scavenging partly very deep in caves. In Vjetrenica Cave (Dinarid Mountains, Bosnia Herzegovina), four adult leopards (two males/two females) of the MIS 3 were found about two km deep from the entrance in a cave bear den, near to one cave bear skeleton, that remained articulated in its nest. Leopards died there, partly being trapped by raising water levels of an active ponor stream, but seem to have been killed possibly either, similar as for lions known, in battles with cave bears in several cave bear den sites of Europe (e.g. Baumann's Cave, Wildkirchli Cave, Vjetrenica Cave). At other large cave sites, with overlap of hyena, wolf and dhole dens at the cave entrances, leopard bones with bite damages indicate their remains to have been imported and consumed by predators in alpine regions due to reduced prey availability. The best models for the competition/taphonomy of large predators - felids, hyenids, canids - within large cave bear dens of Europe is represented in combination of the Zoolithen Cave and Vjetrenica Cave taphonomy.

  3. Timing and depositional environments of a Middle Pleistocene glaciation of northeast England: New evidence from Warren House Gill, County Durham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, B. J.; Roberts, D. H.; Bridgland, D. R.; Cofaigh, C.; Riding, J. B.; Demarchi, B.; Penkman, K. E. H.; Pawley, S. M.

    2012-06-01

    At various times during the Quaternary, north-eastern England was a zone of confluence between dynamic ice lobes sourced from the Pennines, northern Scotland, the Cheviots, and Scandinavia. The region thus has some of the most complex exposures of Middle to Late Pleistocene sediments in Britain, with both interglacial and glacial sediments deposited in terrestrial and marine settings. We investigated sedimentary sequences exposed on the coastline of County Durham at Warren House Gill, and present a new model of British and Fennoscandian Ice Sheet interaction in the North Sea Basin during the Middle Pleistocene. The stratigraphy at Warren House Gill consists of a lower diamicton and upper estuarine sediments, both part of the Warren House Formation. They are separated from the overlying Weichselian Blackhall and Horden tills by a substantial unconformity. The lower diamicton of the Warren House Formation is re-interpreted here as an MIS 8 to 12 glaciomarine deposit containing ice-rafted lithics from north-eastern Scotland and the northeast North Sea, and is renamed the 'Ash Gill Member'. It is dated by lithological comparison to the Easington Raised Beach, Middle Pleistocene Amino Acid Racemisation values, and indirectly by optically stimulated luminescence. The overlying shallow subaqueous sediments were deposited in an estuarine environment by suspension settling and bottom current activity. They are named the 'Whitesides Member', and form the uppermost member of the Warren House Formation. During glaciation, ice-rafted material was deposited in a marine embayment. There is no evidence of a grounded, onshore Scandinavian ice sheet in County Durham during MIS 6, which has long been held as the accepted stratigraphy. This has major implications for the currently accepted British Quaternary Stratigraphy. Combined with recent work on the Middle Pleistocene North Sea Drift from Norfolk, which is now suggested to have been deposited by a Scottish ice sheet, the presence of a Scandinavian ice sheet in eastern England at any time during the Quaternary is becoming increasingly doubtful.

  4. Stratigraphic context and paleoenvironmental significance of minor taxa (Pisces,Reptilia, Aves, Rodentia) from the late Early Pleistocene paleoanthropological site of Buia (Eritrea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rook, L; Ghinassi, M; Carnevale, G; Delfino, M; Pavia, M; Bondioli, L; Candilio, F; Coppa, A; Martnez-Navarro, B; Medin, T; Papini, M; Zanolli, C; Libsekal, Y

    2013-01-01

    The Buia Homo site, also known as Wadi Aalad, is an East African paleoanthropological site near the village of Buia that, due to its very rich yield from the late Early Pleistocene, has been intensively investigated since 1994. In this paper, which reports on the finds of the 2010-2011 excavations, we include new fossil evidence on previously identified taxa (i.e., reptiles), as well as the very first description of the small mammal, fish and bird remains discovered. In particular, this study documents the discovery of the first African fossil of the genus Burhinus (Aves, Charadriiformes) and of the first rodent from the site. This latter is identified as a thryonomyid rodent (cane rat), a relatively common taxon in African paleoanthropological faunal assemblages. On the whole, the new occurrences documented within the Buia vertebrate assemblage confirm the occurrence of taxa characterized by strong water dependence. The paleoenvironmental characteristics of the fauna are confirmed as fully compatible with the evidence obtained through sedimentology and facies analysis, documenting the sedimentary evolution of fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine systems. PMID:23159190

  5. A Draft De Novo Genome Assembly for the Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) Reveals Evidence for a Rapid Decline in Effective Population Size Beginning in the Late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Yvette A.; Dowd, Scot E.; Decker, Jared E.; Seabury, Paul M.; Bhattarai, Eric; Johnson, Charles D.; Rollins, Dale; Tizard, Ian R.; Brightsmith, Donald J.; Peterson, Markus J.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Seabury, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Wild populations of northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus; hereafter bobwhite) have declined across nearly all of their U.S. range, and despite their importance as an experimental wildlife model for ecotoxicology studies, no bobwhite draft genome assembly currently exists. Herein, we present a bobwhite draft de novo genome assembly with annotation, comparative analyses including genome-wide analyses of divergence with the chicken (Gallus gallus) and zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genomes, and coalescent modeling to reconstruct the demographic history of the bobwhite for comparison to other birds currently in decline (i.e., scarlet macaw; Ara macao). More than 90% of the assembled bobwhite genome was captured within 14,000 unique genes and proteins. Bobwhite analyses of divergence with the chicken and zebra finch genomes revealed many extremely conserved gene sequences, and evidence for lineage-specific divergence of noncoding regions. Coalescent models for reconstructing the demographic history of the bobwhite and the scarlet macaw provided evidence for population bottlenecks which were temporally coincident with human colonization of the New World, the late Pleistocene collapse of the megafauna, and the last glacial maximum. Demographic trends predicted for the bobwhite and the scarlet macaw also were concordant with how opposing natural selection strategies (i.e., skewness in the r-/K-selection continuum) would be expected to shape genome diversity and the effective population sizes in these species, which is directly relevant to future conservation efforts. PMID:24621616

  6. Tectonic constraints on the late Pleistocene-Holocene relative sea-level change along the north-eastern Adriatic coast (Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri?, Maa; Korbar, Tvrtko; Jura?i?, Mladen

    2014-09-01

    In spite of very favourable coastal features, late Pleistocene-Holocene relative sea-level changes along the eastern Adriatic coast are still not completely resolved mostly due to the intensive and complicated regional and local neotectonics. We gathered current knowledge that generally presents the north Adriatic area as subsiding one, and proposed a reconstruction in new light of possible very slow (local) uplift (average rate of 0.1-0.25 mm/a for last 80 ka) which is supported by well-dated submerged speleothems and tectonic reconstruction. In addition, such a scenario supports also the formation of tidal notches that are common in the north Adriatic region, but not yet entirely understood. However, according to the latest Mediterranean data on sea level during the marine isotope stage (MIS) 5.1 being at + 1 m 80 ka ago, we do not dismiss the possibility of subsidence which would have been 0.18-0.23 mm/a on average for the last 80 ka, but notch formation under such condition would not have been realistic. Apparently, the position of the north-eastern Adriatic coast on a convergence area requires extensive palaeoenvironmental studies, including structural, lithostratigraphical, palaeontological, archaeological and radiometric data and application of isostatic modelling.

  7. A late Pleistocene refugium in Mediterranean North Africa? Palaeoenvironmental reconstruction from stable isotope analyses of land snail shells (Haua Fteah, Libya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, A. L.; Stevens, R. E.; O'Connell, T. C.; Hill, E. A.; Hunt, C. O.; Barker, G. W.

    2016-05-01

    The late Pleistocene to Holocene archaeological record of North Africa is key to understanding the emergence of anatomically modern humans into West Asia and Europe, and the broadening of subsistence strategies in the shift from hunter-gatherer to pastoral-agricultural lifeways. Some contend that these developments were modulated by major shifts in climate and environment. Evaluation of this hypothesis requires the pairing of local and regional climate records with well-dated archaeological sequences. The Haua Fteah archaeological site in the Gebel Akhdar region of Libya provides a key site to test this hypothesis as the cave contains one of the longest and most complete sequences of human occupation in North Africa as well as abundant material for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. This study uses stable isotope analyses (δ18O and δ13C) of the terrestrial mollusc Helix melanostoma to construct a palaeoenvironmental framework for interpreting North African human-environment interactions from the Upper Palaeolithic to the Neolithic (∼30,000 to 5000 years ago). The land snail stable isotope records from Haua Fteah suggests that cool arid conditions in the cave peaked during marine isotope stage (MIS) 2. This stage was, however, only marginally drier than previous and subsequent stages and coincided with an increase in occupation density in the cave. This suggests that the Gebel Akhdar may have served as an environmental refugium from the more extreme aridity in the surrounding Sahara and arid coastal plains for Late Stone Age (LSA) populations in North Africa. Conditions became progressively wetter towards the Holocene. However, generally wetter conditions were interrupted by two arid episodes at c. 8.0 ka and 7.3 ka that appear to coincide with regional changes reflected elsewhere in the Mediterranean basin.

  8. Late Pleistocene glaciation in the Central Andes: Temperature versus humidity control — A case study from the eastern Bolivian Andes (17°S) and regional synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kull, C.; Imhof, S.; Grosjean, M.; Zech, R.; Veit, H.

    2008-01-01

    A glacier-climate model was used to calculate climatic conditions in a test site on the east Andean slope around Cochabamba (17°S, Bolivia) for the time of the maximum Late Pleistocene glaciation. Results suggest a massive temperature reduction of about - 6.4 °C (+ 1.4/- 1.3 °C), combined with annual precipitation rates of about 1100 mm (+ 570 mm/- 280 mm). This implies no major change in annual precipitation compared with today. Summer precipitation was the source for the humidity in the past, as is the case today. This climate scenario argues for a maximum advance of the paleo-glaciers in the eastern cordillera during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 20 ka BP), which is confirmed by exposure age dates. In a synthesized view over the central Andes, the results point to an increased summer precipitation-driven Late Glacial (15-10 ka BP) maximum advance in the western part of the Altiplano (18°S-23°S), a temperature-driven maximum advance during full glacial times (LGM) in the eastern cordillera, and a pre- and post-LGM (32 ka BP/14 ka BP) maximum advance around 30°S related to increased precipitation and reduced temperature on the western slope of the Andes. The results indicate the importance of understanding the seasonality and details of the mass balance-climate interaction in order to disentangle drivers for the observed regionally asynchronous past glaciations in the central Andes.

  9. Time-dependent flexural subsidence caused by Holocene and Late Pleistocene sedimentation in the Gulf of Mexico: New inversion modeling of vertical motion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivins, E. R.; Dokka, R.; Blom, R. G.; Wu, X.

    2006-12-01

    The rate of sedimentary deposition into the world's catchment basins abruptly increased during the transition from Pliocene to Pleistocene climate. Pleistocene periodicity in sedimentation rate has the distinct fingerprints of Milankovich orbital forcing periods 20,000, 41,000 and 100,000 years. We model time-dependent flexure of the Gulf of Mexico by continent-wide sediment transport rate variability over the past 4 Ma. Reconstructions of changes in sediment dispersal occurring during the Late Cenozoic indicate that glacioeustasy may also be a significant role along the shore of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Basin. We employ both spherically layered and self-gravitating viscoelastic models along with a half-space model of very high resolution. We also incorporate the long-wavelength background crustal motion associated with the main Laurentide deglaciation which produces a non-negligible bulge migration. The elastic lithospheric thickness and Maxwell time constants are tuned to both regional and global seismic tomography. The latter data are consistent with a rheologically stiffer than average sub-crustal environment. Hydro-isostatic loading is included in the modeling. Paleosealevel indicators, tide gauges and recent GPS results provide rich data sources for inverse modeling of the load history and solid earth rheology. The sediment rate changes are modeled, in part, as pulsed great megaflood erosional events known to be active during Glacial to Interglacial transitions. Although the model is relatively crude in both space and time, preliminary results indicate that the subsidence rate caused by long-term sedimentary changes could sustain subsidence rates dw/dt of roughly 1 - 12 mm/yr during the past 5,000 years over many hundreds of kilometers of coastline. Geodetic data in the Mississippi Delta region of southern Louisiana show subsidence at rates greater than 5 mm/yr, having many of the spatial characteristics predicted by the sedimentary load model. These data are interpreted in terms of a formal inverse approach and we report optimum solutions for sedimentary loading in for regions where it may be freed as a model parameter.

  10. Late Pleistocene and Holocene climate and geomorphic histories as interpreted from a 23,000 14C yr B.P. paleosol and floodplain soils, southeastern West Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driese, Steven G.; Li, Zheng-Hua; Horn, Sally P.

    2005-03-01

    Field, micromorphological, pollen, whole soil (XRF), and stable isotope geochemical methods were used to evaluate the latest Pleistocene to Holocene climate record from a floodplain-terrace system in southeastern West Virginia. A late Pleistocene (22,940 ± 150 14C yr B.P.) silt paleosol with low-chroma colors formed from fluviolacustrine sediment deposited during the last glacial maximum (Wisconsinan) and records a cooler full-glacial paleoclimate. Fluvial gravel deposited between the latest Pleistocene and earliest Holocene (prior to 6360 ± 40 14C yr B.P.) was weathered in the middle Holocene under warmer, drier climate conditions, possibly correlated with the Hypsithermal and Altithermal Events of the eastern and southwestern United States, respectively. The glacial to interglacial climate shift is recorded by: (1) changes from a poorly drained landscape with fine-textured soil, characterized by high organic C and redoximorphic features related to Fe removal and concentration, to a well-drained, coarse-textured setting without gley and with significant argillic (Bt) horizon development; (2) changes from a high Zr and Ti silt-dominated parent material to locally derived, coarse fluvial gravels lower in Zr and Ti; (3) a shift from dominantly conifer and sedge pollen in the paleosol to a modern oak/hickory hardwood assemblage; and (4) a shift in δ 13C values of soil organic matter from -28‰ to -24‰ PDB, suggesting an ecosystem shift from cooler, C3-dominated flora to one that was mixed C3 and C4, but still predominantly composed of C3 plants. A root-restrictive placic horizon developed between the late Pleistocene silt paleosol and the overlying fluvial gravel because of the high permeability contrast between the two textures of soil materials. This layer formed a barrier that effectively isolated the Pleistocene paleosol from later Holocene pedogenic processes.

  11. Chronostratigraphy and changes of environment of Late Pleistocene and Holocene at Starunia palaeontological site and vicinity (Carpathian region, Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz SOKOŁOWSKI

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of absolute dating and biostratigraphical analysis carried out for alluvial sediments of an abandoned Starunia ozokerite mine located in the Velyky Lukavets River valley, in which large mammal remains were discovered in the first half of the 20th century. The sediments build up three terrace levels. The highest one, up to 8 m high (terrace II, is likely to be associated with a stage of aggradation, as well as with a short episode of valley broadening, which occurred in the Weichselian Late Pleniglacial. The lower one, 4 m high (terrace I, is most likely to be linked with the Holocene, despite a considerable transformation of its top due to mining activity. The lower part of this terrace cover bears coarse-grained channel sediments dated to 120.6-58.9 ka BP (Eemian Interglacial?-Early Pleniglacial - OIS 5e, 4 and 3, and overbank (distal floodplain mud with intercalations of biogenic deposits (peat, peat mud and biogenic mud. The overbank deposits are dated to 48.2-11.11 ka BP (Glinde Interstadial?-Younger Dryas, OIS 3-2 and are overlain by Holocene (OIS 1 mud and biogenic deposits. In boreholes drilled in the vicinity of the present-day river channel, younger sediments occur more frequently. These include sediments originating from the Late Weichselian overlain by Holocene sediments. However, sediments originating exclusively from the Holocene are infrequent. The deposition of sediments took place in specific conditions of a permanent saturation of the environment with brine, petroleum and thickened bitumen. In the longest period of deposition (48.2-1.27 ka BP, ephemeral swamps, ponds and lakes were developed in different parts of the floodplain. They were marked by the presence of: Juncus glaucus/effusus, J. articulatus, Typha sp., Batrachium sp., Potamogeton filliformis, Bidens tripartita, Ranunculus sceleratus and Phragmites communis, as well as by halophytic species, like: Zannichellia palustris, Triglochin maritimum, Schoenoplectus tabernemontani, Puccinelia distans and Eleocharis palustris. Rhythmic oscillations between cold and warm climatic conditions, typical of the Weichselian age and well identified in Western Europe, are here marked by the changes of plant communities (woody assemblages passing into steppe and tundra, but are not noticeably recorded in the sediments of the Velyky Lukavets River. This shows that the greatest part of the discussed period involved the formation of poorly differentiated silty overbank sediments with intercalations of biogenic sediments. However, the variability of sediments provides evidence for extreme events which occurred in the Holocene.

  12. Reconstruction of mass balance of Nevado Coropuna glaciers (Southern Peru) for Late Pleistocene, Little Ice Age and the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, J.; Palacios, D.

    2009-04-01

    The Nevado Coropuna volcanic complex (15th 31'S-72 ° 39 ° W) is the quaternary stratovolcano northernmost of the central volcanic zone (CVZ) in the western flank of the Central Andes (Southern Peru). This consists in four adjacent volcanic buildings that are occupied over 5.100-5.700 masl by a system of glaciers covering an area of 47 Km2 in 2007 (Ubeda et al, 2008). The maximum expansion of glaciers during the Pleistocene affected an area of ~449 Km2, dropping to altitudes around 3.600-4800 m (Ubeda et al, 2007). In this work were mapped several hundreds of moraines which constitute a record of climate change since the last glacial maximum (LGM). Current glacier system is formed by dozen of glaciers descending slope down in all directions. Coropuna complex is an excellent laboratory for to investigate the control that climate change, tectonics and volcanism exert on the dynamics of glaciers, a scale of tens of years (by studying current glaciers) and also of tens of thousands of years (by analyzing the geomorphological evidence of its evolution in the past). Ubeda et al. (2008) analyzed the evolution of eighteen glaciers of Nevado Coropuna using indicators as surfaces and Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELAs) of ice masses in 2007, 1986, 1955, Little the Ice Age (LIA) and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The glaciers were grouped into two sets: NE group (seven glaciers) and SE group (eleven glaciers). The work included statistical series of ELAs in each phase, estimates by Area x Altitud Balance Ratio (AABR) method, which was proposed by Osmaston (2005), in addition with estimates of timing (~17Cl36 Ka) and magnitude (~ 782-911 m) of ELA depression during LGM. The work included statistical series of ELAs in each phase, estimates by the method Area x Altitud Balance Ratio (AABR) proposed by Osmaston (2005), and in addition estimates of the timing (~17Cl36 Ka) and magnitude (~ 782-911 m) of ELA depression during LGM. The objective of this work is to estimate the current and past mass balance of glaciers in these phases (2007, 1986, 1955, LIA and LGM) in order to assess the current state of glaciers and deduct the regimes of temperature and precipitation for present and for LGM. To achieve this target were installed in 2007 in the gorge of Queñua Ranra (NE quadrant of Coropuna complex) four stations, that are respectively at 4886 m (E1), 5564 m (E2), 5694 (E3) m and 5822 m (E4). The stations consist of a sensor in air and one (E3) or two sensors in ground (E1). The sensors record temperature at intervals of 30 minutes (sensors 12, 13, 22 and 32) or 45 minutes (11, 21, 31 and 41), with precision of tenths of a degree Celsius (° C). The first digit of the name of the sensors referred to the station (arranged in increasing altitude) and the second at his position (eg 11-air, 12-ground and 13-deep ground, in the station E1). The records of Ta and Ts have allowed to define homogeneous data sets of 365 days (12-11-2007/11-11-2008). With these data have been calculated for each day and each sensor the average temperatures, and the minimum and maximum temperature variations and was used to estimate the vertical thermal gradient (^T/^Z) between the stations. In E1, Ta = 3.9 ° C and Ts =6.8°C. At E3, Ta=-2.9°C and Ts=1.3°C. The rain has been extrapolated from the average of the 1965-2003 series (39 years) from the station of Andahua (15 ˚ 29'36 "S-72 ˚ 20'56" W, 3587 m), 20 km to NE of the eastern summit of Coropuna, resulting in the level E1 (4886 m) a value of P = 494 mm. The availability of the temperature series has allowed develop the model of mass balance using an adaptation of the method Klein et al. (1999) developed from an earlier proposal (Kaser 1995). The method is to solve two equations. Equation 1: a=?m/Lm[(Qr+α(Ta-Ts)], where a is the value of the ablation (mm), ?m duration of ablation (days), Lm the latent heat of fusion (3.34x105J/kg), Qr heat available for melting in the form of net radiation (MJ/day/m), α a coefficient of mass transferred by heat sensitive (0864 MJ/day), and Ta and Ts air and soil temperature, respectively. Equation 2: b=c-a, where b is the mass balance (mm) and a the ablation (mm). Using the equation 1, maintaining constant Lm, and α, the values of Ta, Ts, ?m, a, c and Qr in each altitude has been estimated as follows: The values of Ta, Ts have been deducted respectively of the data from the sensors 11-31 and 12-32, using the linear temperature gradients (^T/^Z) previously deducted. c values have been deducted from the data of Andahua using the linear gradient of accumulation used by Klein et al (1999): ^c/^Z=0,1 mm/m. The values of ?m and Qr have been deducted from the value of Ta, whereas at the level Za where Ta=0, ?m=0 and Qr =0, and applying from that altitude gradients linear ^?m/^Z=0,4day/m y ^Qr/^Z=0,1°C/m (Klein et al, 1999), positive if Z>0 and negative if Z0) ELA AABBR and climate are in disequilibrium and the loss of volume, the effect of ablation, is evident across the surface of the glaciers below the level Zb=0. In gorge Santiago (Z

  13. The influence of Late Pleistocene geomorphological inheritance and Holocene hydromorphic regimes on floodwater farming in the Talgar catchment, southeast Kazakhstan, Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, Mark G.; Panyushkina, Irina P.; Toonen, Willem H. J.; Chang, Claudia; Tourtellotte, Perry A.; Duller, Geoff A. T.; Wang, Hong; Prins, Maarten A.

    2015-12-01

    In comparison to Southwest Asia and the Indian subcontinent, the relationship between Holocene river dynamics, climate change and floodwater farming in Central Asia is significantly under researched. To address this, a multi-disciplinary research project was begun in 2011 centred on the Talgar catchment, a south-bank tributary of the Ili River, southeast Kazakhstan. Building on archaeological excavations and surveys conducted over the past 20 years, we have undertaken investigations of Holocene human adaptations to changing hydromorphic regimes in the Tien Shan piedmont region, Central Asia. Fluvial geochronologies have been reconstructed over the last 20,000 years using Optically Stimulated Luminescence and 14C dating, and are compared with human settlement histories from the Eneolithic to the medieval period. Phases of Late Pleistocene and Holocene river aggradation at c. 17,400-6420, 4130-2880 and 910-500 cal. BC and between the mid-18th and early 20th centuries were coeval with cooler and wetter neoglacial episodes. Entrenchment and floodplain soil development (c. 2880-2490 cal. BC and cal. AD 1300-1640) coincided with warmer and drier conditions. Prior to the modern period, floodwater farming in the Talgar River reached its height in the late Iron Age (400 cal. BC - cal. AD 1) with more than 70 settlement sites and 700 burial mounds. This period of agricultural expansion corresponds to a phase of reduced flooding, river stability and glacier retreat in the Tien Shan Mountains. Late Iron age agriculturists appear to have been opportunistic by exploiting a phase of moderate flows within an alluvial fan environment, which contained a series of partially entrenched distributary channels that could be easily 'engineered' to facilitate floodwater farming. Holocene climate change was therefore not a proximate cause for the development and demise of this relatively short-lived (c. 200 years) period of Iron Age farming. River dynamics in the Tien Shan piedmont are, however, strongly coupled with regional hydroclimatic fluctuations, and they have likely acted locally as both 'push' and 'pull' factors for riparian agriculturists.

  14. Late Pleistocene glaciation of the Kodar Mountains, south-central Siberia, constrained by Be-10 exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margold, Martin; Jansen, John D.; Gurinov, Artem L.; Reznichenko, Natalya V.; Codilean, Alexandru T.; Fink, David

    2014-05-01

    The glacial history of the mountainous Transbaikalia region NE of Lake Baikal, Siberia, has so far received little attention. The Kodar Mountains exceed 3000 m in elevation and small cirque glaciers currently occur in the central parts of the range. Yet, greatly expanded glaciation in the past is evidenced by massive moraine complexes at the mouth of glacial valleys in the Chara Depression (part of the Baikal rift system), and along the Vitim River valley to the NW. The moraines document the existence of large valley glaciers that reached to over 120 kilometres in length. We applied Be-10 exposure dating to determine the timing of glacier advances that formed the major moraines: 19 samples from boulders on 8 moraine ridges in 5 moraine complexes. Our results indicate extensive glaciation in the Kodar Mountains at the time of the Last Glacial Maximum, with our ages spanning from about 20 ka to the Late Glacial. We attribute the age spread on some of the moraines to boulder exhumation linked to permafrost dynamics.

  15. Secuencias pleistocenas «lujanenses» en su sección tipo: Primeras dataciones 14C e implicancias estratigráficas, arqueológicas e históricas, Luján - Jáuregui, provincia de Buenos Aires Pleistocene Lujanense sequences in the type section: First 14C datings and their implications on stratigraphy, archaeology and history, Luján Jauregui, provincia de Buenos Aires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Toledo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Se dan a conocer las primeras dataciones 14C del Pleistoceno terminal o "Lujanense" en su sección tipo. Se propone un modelo secuencial preliminar en vista a ordenar las unidades litoestratigráficas y proveer un marco temporal a los descubrimientos arqueológicos del siglo XIX. Las secuencias lujanenses se datan entre >40.000 AP y >11.000 AP y se discuten las evidencias de poblamiento arcaico en este período. Se identifica la discordancia intralujanenense atribuida al comienzo del último máximo glaciario (LGM en 30.000 AP. Son resultados preliminares de un proyecto de caracterización estratigráfica y arqueológica del Pleistoceno del nordeste pampeano.The main purpose of this note is to communicate the first 14C dating of the Pleistocene sequences in the Lujan type section. A preliminary sequence stratigraphy model is presented in order to organize the lithostratigrafic units and provide a coherent stratigraphic framework to XIX century archeological discoveries. "Lujanense" sequences are dated between > 40,000 and >11,000 BP and is discussed the peopling evidence within this time interval. The base sequence boundary of the last glacial maximum (LGM is identified and called "intralujanense" at 30.000 BP. This is a preliminary result of an integral project on sequence stratigraphy and archeological characterization of the Pleistocene of the northeastern pampas.

  16. Timing and characteristics of Late Pleistocene and Holocene wetter periods in the Eastern Desert and Sinai of Egypt, based on 14C dating and stable isotope analysis of spring tufa deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Mohamed A.; Brook, George A.

    2015-12-01

    There is very little dated evidence on wet periods in the Eastern Desert and Sinai Peninsula of Egypt during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene. To obtain such information, we have studied the petrography, isotope geochemistry and AMS radiocarbon ages of mostly relict tufas deposited by springs draining perched ground water bodies in metamorphic and volcanic rocks. The tufas unconformably overly Precambrian basic igneous rocks (basalt, diabase and gabbro). As the ages of tufa carbonate are frequently older than the true ages of the deposits because of the incorporation of old, 14C-dead carbon, we have dated both the carbonate matrix and insoluble organic material of the tufas. These ages show that the tufas were largely formed during two broad time periods, the most recent from 12,058 to 6678 cal yr BP (African Humid Period), and the other from ˜31,200-22,500 cal yr BP, with preferential growth during the coldest times of this period namely during Heinrich Events 2 and 3 (H2 and H3) and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The time span between 19,000-9000 cal yr BP, including the YD and H1, appears to have been relatively more arid than the earlier LGM or H2 periods or the later Holocene. The Late Pleistocene tufas are depleted in 18O relative to the Holocene tufas and were deposited at a lower temperature (˜14.0°-20.8 °C vs. 18.4°-23.4 °C). We believe that the Holocene tufas in the Sinai were formed by rainfall from the Mediterranean and those in the southern part of the Eastern Desert by African monsoon rainfall derived from the Red Sea-Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean. In contrast, the moisture that fed the Late Pleistocene tufas, which are depleted in 18O relative to Holocene deposits, and progressively depleted from north to south, was probably brought by the Westerlies from the Atlantic-Mediterranean Sea when the Westerly circulation was pushed southwards during the coldest periods of the Late Pleistocene. Periods of tufa deposition correlate with major documented paleoclimatic events in North Africa during the late Pleistocene and Holocene; such as the Nile floods, high sea level and the formation of sapropels in the Mediterranean.

  17. Spain as an emergency air traffic hub during volcanic air fall events? Evidence of past volcanic ash air fall over Europe during the late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Mark; Lane, Christine; Blockley, Simon P. E.; Moreno, Ana; Valero-Garcés, Blas; Ortiz, José E.; Torres, Trino; Lowe, John J.; Menzies, Martin A.

    2010-05-01

    Past volcanic eruptions often leave visible ash layers in the geological record, for example in marine or lake sedimentary sequences. Recent developments, however, have shown that non-visible volcanic ash layers are also commonly preserved in sedimentary deposits. These augment the record of past volcanic events by demonstrating that past ash dispersals have been more numerous and widely disseminated in Europe than previously appreciated. The dispersal ‘footprints' of some large late Pleistocene European eruptions are examined here in the light of the recent Eyjafjallajökull eruption. For example, the Vedde Ash which was erupted from Iceland around 12 thousand years ago, delivered distal (and non-visible) glass deposits as far south as Switzerland and as far east as the Ural Mountains in Russia, with an overall European distribution remarkably similar to the dominant tracks of the recent Eyjafjallajökull plumes. The Eyjafjallajökull eruption has demonstrated that relatively small amounts of distal volcanic ash in the atmosphere can seriously disrupt aviation activity, with attendant economic and other consequences. It has raised fundamental questions about the likelihood of larger or more prolonged volcanic activity in the near future, and the possibility of even more serious consequences than those experienced recently. Given that there are several other volcanic centres that could cause such disruption in Europe (e.g. Campania and other volcanic centres in Italy; Aegean volcanoes), a key question is whether there are parts of Europe less prone to ash plumes and which could therefore operate as emergency air traffic hubs during times of ash dispersal. Although not generated to answer this question, the recent geological record might provide a basis for seeking the answer. For example, four palaeo-records covering the time frame of 8 - 40 Ka BP that are geographically distributed across Spain have been examined for non-visible distal ash content. All four have proved to be almost devoid of volcanic ash, which contrasts with results obtained from sites throughout central and northern Europe. This suggests that Spain has remained free of ashfall events throughout the late Pleistocene, or that any ash dispersal over Spain has been short-lived and/or infrequent. This appears to accord with the pattern of dispersal of Eyjafjallajökull ash clouds over April to May 2010. Most of the active period was characterised by low eruptive columns and the tropospheric dispersal of ash. Under these conditions, ash dispersal was multi-directional from eastern Europe to Greenland and beyond, but did not encroach on to the Iberian peninsula. In contrast, when the eruptive columns became more elevated and entrained in the jet stream, the dispersal directions were more uni-directional and passed over Iberia and North Africa. Thus the apparent lack of volcanic ash in Iberia (10 - 40ka) may have as much to do with eruptive column height and volcano location as with circulation patterns (tropospheric v. stratospheric). A more comprehensive assessment of geological records of non-visible ash layers in selected sites may hold the key to examining this matter more robustly.

  18. Late Pliocene to early Pleistocene (2.4-1.25 Ma) paleoproductivity changes in the Bering Sea: IODP expedition 323 Hole U1343E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghan; Khim, Boo-Keun; Takahashi, Kozo

    2016-03-01

    Late Pliocene to early Pleistocene paleoproductivity changes in the Bering Sea were reconstructed using geochemical concentrations and mass accumulation rates (MARs) of CaCO3, biogenic opal, and total organic carbon (TOC), and sedimentary nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) at IODP Expedition 323 Hole U1343E, drilled in the northern slope area (1956 m deep) of the Bering Sea. CaCO3 concentration is generally low, but prominent CaCO3 peaks occur intermittently due to subseafloor authigenic carbonate formation rather than biogenic accumulation, regardless of glacial-interglacial variations. Biogenic opal concentrations reflect orbital-scale glacial-interglacial variations. However, TOC concentration did not show clear glacial-interglacial variation, probably due to poor preservation. The sedimentary δ15N values vary synchronously with biogenic opal concentration on orbital timescales. The co-varying pattern of opal productivity and δ15N values at Hole U1343E is a result of nutrient utilization controlled by diatom productivity in the Bering slope area where Fe is not a limiting factor. Biogenic opal and TOC MARs showed a temporal shift at around 1.9 Ma from a high productivity period under nutrient-enriched conditions to a low productivity period under relatively nutrient-depleted conditions. High diatom productivity with low δ15N values before 1.9 Ma is associated with abundant nutrient supply by upwelling in relation to strong surface current system. This productivity decrease at about 1.9 Ma was also found in the southern Bering Sea (Site U1341) and may be related to global opal reorganization.

  19. Late Pleistocene evolution of the Rhine-Meuse system in the southern North Sea basin: imprints of climate change, sea-level oscillation and glacio-isostacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busschers, F. S.; Kasse, C.; van Balen, R. T.; Vandenberghe, J.; Cohen, K. M.; Weerts, H. J. T.; Wallinga, J.; Johns, C.; Cleveringa, P.; Bunnik, F. P. M.

    2007-12-01

    High-resolution continuous core material, geophysical measurements, and hundreds of archived core descriptions enabled to identify 13 Late Pleistocene Rhine-Meuse sedimentary units in the infill of the southern part of the North Sea basin (the Netherlands, northwestern Europe). This sediment record and a large set of Optical Stimulated Luminescence dates, 14C dates and biostratigraphical data, allowed to establish detailed relationships between climate change, sea-level oscillation, glaciation history and the sedimentary development of the Rhine fluvial system during the last glacial cycle (Marine Isotope Stages 5e-2, Eemian-Weichselian). A well-preserved Eemian sediment record was encountered as the infill of a Late Saalian (MIS6) subglacial basin. Part of this record reflects groundwater rise controlled (fine-grained) sedimentation as a result of postglacial (early) Eemian sea-level rise. It shows strong analogy to developments known from the Holocene Rhine-Meuse delta. Outside of the glacial depressions near coastal deposits are only fragmentarily preserved. The Early Glacial Rhine sediment record is dominated by organic debris and peat layers, marking landscape stability and low fluvial activity. Part of this record may have been formed under near coastal conditions. Significant amounts of reworked marine biomarkers in the lag-deposits of Early Pleniglacial (MIS4) fluvial systems indicate that this period is characterized by extensive reworking of older (MIS5) near-coastal sediments. Despite the marked Early Pleniglacial climatic cooling, input of new sediment from the drainage basin was relatively low, a feature that is related to the presence of regolith protective relic soil complexes in the basin. During the early Middle Pleniglacial, a major Rhine avulsion indicates the system was in an aggrading mode and that sediment supply into the lower reaches of the Rhine had strongly increased. This increase in sediment supply coincided with the timing of major climate cooling that occurred from ?50 to 45 ka onwards. The increase in sediment supply is related to final breakup of the soil complexes in the drainage basin. After ?24 ka, a strong input of coarse-grained gravelly sediments was observed which indicates a strong increase in physical weathering processes and periglacial-controlled supply of bedload sediment in the catchment. A time delay between climate change (?30 ka) and channel belt aggradation (<24 ka), is explained as a result of transport path length between source and sink and/or effects of higher continental runoff rates after 22 ka. The Late Middle Pleniglacial, Late Pleniglacial and Lateglacial Rhine-Meuse record testifies for strong influence of glacio-isostatic-controlled differential upwarping of the study area. Glacio-isostatic-controlled forebulge upwarping and lateral valley tilting is shown to have deflected Rhine-Meuse channel belts after 35 ka. Glacio-isostatic upwarping is seen as the main cause for strong incision during the first phase of the Late Pleniglacial (30-24 ka). At later stage glacio-isostatic-controlled incision was overruled due to high climate-controlled sediment input from the catchment and probably initial glacio-isostatic subsidence. Migration of channel belts towards the direction of the former centre of glacio-isostatic uplift indicates that glacio-isostacy influenced Rhine-Meuse paleogeography until far into the Lateglacial.

  20. Palaeovegetation dynamics of an ecotone forest-savanna in southern Brazilian Amazon during the late Pleistocene and Holocene based on carbon isotopes of soil organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out in the Brazilian southern Amazon region (Rondonia state and Humaita, southern Amazon state). Carbon isotope data on soil organic matter have been collected along an ecosystem transect of about 750 km that includes a savanna, a wooded savanna (cerrado), a tropical semideciduous forest (cerradao), a forest transition type and a tropical forest. The main objective is to evaluate the expansion-regression dynamics of these vegetation units in relation to climate changes during the Late Pleistocene (Late Glacial) and Holocene. Large ranges in ?13 values were observed in soil organic matter collected from profiles in the savanna (-27 to -14 per mille and forest regions (-26 to -19 per mille) reflecting changing distribution of 13C-depleted C3 forest and 13C enriched C4 savanna vegetation in response to climate change. 14C data of humin fraction and buried charcoal indicate that the organic matter in these soils is at least 17,000 years BP at 300-cm depth. In this period, the entire ecosystem transect are characterized by ?13C soil depth profiles, generated typically by C3 plants (forest), inferring a humid climate in the southern Amazon region after the end of last glaciation. 13C data also indicate that C4 plants (grasses) have influenced significantly the vegetation at the transitional forest and the cerrado sites of southern Rondonia state and two distinct points in the forest ecosystem in the southern Amazon state. These typical C4 type isotopic signatures probably reflect a drier climate during about 9000-8000 yr BP to 3000 yr BP and the savanna and wooded savanna expansion in distinct points of the transect. The 13C records representing the 3000 yr show an expansion of the forest, due to a climatic improvement, in areas previously occupied by savanna vegetation. This study adds to the mounting evidence that extensive forested areas existed in the Amazon during the last glacial and that savanna vegetation expanded in response to warm and dry conditions during the early to middle Holocene. (author)

  1. Reconstruction of Equilibrium Line Altitudes of Nevado Coropuna Glaciers (Southern Peru) from the Late Pleistocene to the present

    Science.gov (United States)

    beda, J.; Palacios, D.; Vzquez, L.

    2009-04-01

    The Nevado Coropuna (1531'S-7239'W) is a volcanic complex located 200 km NE of the city of Arequipa, in the Southern Peruvian Andes. The summit area in the complex is covered with a glacier system formed by dozens of branches descending in all directions totaling many km2 in surface area. The study of the volcanic complex and its glaciers is of great interest because it is the main water reserve for tens of thousands of people, because of the risk scenario created by the presence of ice masses on a volcano with relatively recent activity, and because it constitutes an excellent geoindicator of the effects of climate change on ice masses in the western mountain chain of the Central Andes. This research aims to analyze glacier evolution using as geoindicators variations in glacier surface and equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs), defining deglaciation rates based on those variations and preparing forecasts with them on when the ice masses might disappear if the same rates were to occur in the future. In addition, a first estimation is attempted of the chronologies of the last phase of volcanic activity and the last phase of maximum glacier advance that can be attributed to the Late Glacial or Last Glacial Maximum periods. To achieve these aims, digital topography with 50m contour interval, two orthophotos of the central section of the Coropuna complex (15-6-1955 and 21-10-1986), an ASTER satellite image (12-11-2007) and geomorphological mapping of the volcanic complex created in a previous phase of the research (Ubeda, 2007) were integrated into a Geographical Information System (GIS). The GIS was used to determine the global extent of the glacier system, and in more detail, that of two groups (NE and SE) in 1955, 1986 and 2007. Using the geomorphological cartography as a basis, the extent of the glaciers during their last advance in the Little Ice Age (LIA) and their last maximum advance were calculated. Next, surface areas for all phases were calculated using automatic functions within the GIS operating environment. To reconstruct the ELAs of the glaciers, the Area x Altitude Balance Ratio (AABR) method was used. This method is extensively described in Osmaston (2005). To determine the rates of deglaciation, variations observed for 2007 in surface areas and ELAs against their values in 1986, 1955 and the Little Ice Age (LIA) were used as geoindicators. Establishing deglaciation rates has allowed forecasts to be made as to when the complete disappearance of ice mass could occur for three future scenarios, considering the hypothetical reproduction in each scenario of the rates of deglaciation observed since 1986 (Scenario 1), 1955 (Scenario 2) and the LIA (Scenario 3). To determine the chronology of the last maximum advance of the glaciers and the last volcanic manifestations, samples were taken from moraine blocks and glaciated rocky thresholds, and also from lava ejected during the last eruption, in the eastern sector of the complex. Due to their recent external appearance, since they have been channeled by glacial valleys and have been affected by ice masses only at the head, these lavas had been dated as Holocene. Absolute dating was performed using cosmogenic methods (Cl36). As a result of applying the proposed method, glacial system surface areas have been estimated for 2007 (47 km2), 1986 (54 km2) and 1955 (56 km2), implying a reduction of ~18% in 52 years. The process appears to have speeded up in the last decades (~13% in only 21 years). Surfaces were also estimated and ELAs reconstructed for the NE and SE groups in 2007, 1986, 1955, the Little Ice Age and during the last maximum advance. Glaciers from the NE group show an area during all periods (2.3, 2.7, 2.9, 3.3 and 30 km2) smaller than SE group glaciers (8.1, 9.9, 10.3, 11.9 and 66.5 km2). An individual analysis of glaciers in the NE and SE groups in 2007 shows a reduction in surface area two to four times greater than that observed between 1955 and 1986. ELAs are also higher for all periods in the Northern section (5968, 5930, 5923, 5886 and 5186 m) than in

  2. Middle-late pleistocene evolution of the adriatic coastline of southern apulia (Italy) in response to relative sea-level changes

    OpenAIRE

    Mastronuzzi, G.; Dipartimento di Geologia e Geofisica, Universit di Bari; Caputo, R.; Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita? di Ferrara; Di Bucci, D.; Dipartimento della Protezione Civile; Fracassi, U.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome, Italy; Iurilli, V.; Dipartimento di Geologia e Geofisica, Universit di Bari; Milella, M.; Spin Off Universitario Environmental Surveys s.r.l., Taranto; Pignatelli, C.; Dipartimento di Geologia e Geofisica, Universita? degli Studi Aldo Moro, via Orabona 4 - 70125 Bari; Sanso, P.; Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita? del Salento, Lecce; Selleri, G.; Geo Data Service s.r.l., Taranto

    2011-01-01

    The Adriatic coastal area stretching from Monopoli to Brindisi in Apulia is characterised by landforms and marine/coastal deposits of Mid- dle-Upper Pleistocene age. An E-W striking fault system, roughly corre- sponding to the geographic Soglia Messapica, is also present. This area shows the effects of different phases of coastal evolution. During the Middle Pleistocene, north of the Soglia Messapica, thin coastal deposits accumulated and abrasion surfaces were cut whereas, to the south, ma...

  3. Cosmogenic dating of rock avalanches constraining Quaternary stratigraphy and regional neotectonics in the Argentine Central Andes (32° S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreiras, Stella M.; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Fauqué, Luis

    2015-03-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive review of the chronostratigraphy of six rock avalanches clustered in the northern extreme of the Cordon del Plata range. These rock avalanches are stratigraphically related to Pleistocene glacial drifts and valley-fill deposits documenting the regional neotectonic activity. We used cosmogenic dating (TCN) to directly date block surfaces of rock-avalanche deposits, as well as optically stimulated luminescence dating (OSL) of paleo-lakes dammed by these rock avalanches. Our new direct dates (17 TCN and 4 OSL) determine the Middle-to-Late Pleistocene age of these collapses. These are in contrast to the previously established chronostratigraphy based on relative dating techniques, paleontological context, and tephrochronology. These new data help to redefine the geomorphological evolution of the Mendoza River valley. Especially, the new data indicate that the glacial stratigraphy earlier proposed must be reconsidered. We redefine this stratigraphy as far as possible with our data and discuss the data in relation with other recently published results. However, it becomes clear that the glacial history of the Mendoza valley has to be studied anew by using modern dating techniques. In addition, our data suggest that the Carrera Fault system bounding the valleys of the Cordillera del Plata has been active more recently than proposed earlier.

  4. Traces of Late Miocene and Pleistocene tectonics on recent surface morphology in the Western Pannonian Alpine Foothills - a case study of geomorphometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Gábor; Telbisz, Tamás; Székely, Balázs

    2014-05-01

    The study area is located at the eastern foothills of the Eastern Alps, which is a transition zone between the still uplifting mountainous region and the subsiding Danube Basin, part of the Pannonian Basin. As the Pannonian Lake filled up during Late Miocene, totally plain surface left behind covering the rugged pre-Tertiary basement. Nowadays, totally flat alluvial plain only recognizable on the easternmost and northeastern part of the investigated area. Slightly undulating hilly surface dissected by N-S and E-W oriented steep scarps prevail the middle part of the area. West from the Austrian-Hungarian border, landscape is quite different. Steep scarps are either observable, however the hills are much more eroded by mostly N-S directed creeks. As Pleistocene rivers drained the Eastern Alps, wide area covered by fluvial, mostly gravel sediments. The whole process span the Pleistocene era with different intensity, forcing drainage reorganization occurred in several steps. Modification of the drainage network were triggered by the general tilting of the study area, normal faults and effects of the basement morphology. In our earlier study, correspondence between surface and basement morphology was detected. Results revealed the differences of the general morphology depend on the pre-Tertiary basement height under the coverage of basement fill. Above South Burgenland Swell (basement ridge of ca. -500 m asl.), recent surface is elevated with ~50 m compared to the close environment. Due to the elevated position of the surface and approximately the same base level, incision of streams are clearly deeper. In this paper we reveal the importance of geomorphometry as a prior investigation method in tectonic geomorphology studies, we show the applicability of tools such as mode of slope, standard deviation of slope in impoundment of surface blocks under different tectonic forces. Sinuosity evaluation of alluvial rivers compared with surface aspect was proven to be very effective method on apparently totally flat area in showing location of tectonic forces. We compared the revealed features with the basement morphology using previously composed basement maps and industrial seismic sections. Latter proved that morphological similarities are not only observable between the basement and the surface, but the geometry of basin-fill lacustrine sediment horizons strengthen the correspondence and in some cases explain the root causes. Our results provide additional information to the geodynamic sketch of the Alpine-Pannonian transition zone and emphasize the applicability of geomorphometry in tectonic studies. The study was supported by Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA NK83400) and was realized in the frames of TÁMOP 4.2.4.A/2-11-1-2012-0001 high priority "National Excellence Program - Elaborating and Operating an Inland Student and Researcher Personal Support System convergence program" project's scholarship support.

  5. Late Pleistocene to early Holocene aeolian and flash-flood sedimentation and soil formation in a small hilly catchment in SW-Germany (Palatinate forest)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotterweich, M.; Kühn, P.; Tolksdorf, J. F.; Müller, S.; Nelle, O.

    2012-04-01

    This paper focuses on the dynamics of sedimentation processes and soil development in a steep slope 0-order catchment in the sandy Lower Bunter of the south-western mid-range mountains in Germany during the transition period from the late Glacial to the early Holocene. Italso discusses how late Palaeolithic gatherers and hunters may have influenced these processes by sedentary land occupation. The investigated dry valley covers an area of around 16.6 ha and is characterized by short and steep slopes of 30° to 60°. A significant amount of the sediments from the adjacent slopes had been captured along the wide and rather flat valley bottom and at the small outlet. Several exposures, pits, and percussion liner drillings revealed a weak to highly weathered reddish sandy material at the base and eight subsequent layers of incoherent sandy and charcoal (from pines) enriched sediments with different colours ranging from olive-brown to dull reddish brown. By stratigraphical means, the lowermost sediment can be ascribed to the early Lateglacial when the deposition of aeolian sands under cold conditions with scarce vegetation cover was a widespread phenomenon. The subsequent layer contains a higher amount of silt and dates into the Allerød as suggested by radiocarbon dating. This is corroborated by the occurrence of LST that indicate that these sediments have been near to the surface around 12,900 yr BP. It shows characteristics of a palaeosol with Bwb and BwAhb horizons (Brunic Arenosols dystric) and with greyish Ahb and Eb horizons (Albic Arenosols dystric) similar to the Usselo/Finow soils in north-eastern Germany. In the material above, many remnants of roots and organic particles and rounded bone fragments were revealed by micromorphological analyses. Then, an alternation of reddish brown coarse to fine sands and small, partly rounded stones with some small intercalate aggregations of humic material rich in charcoal which dates to around 10,000 yr BP were deposited. The layers are overlain by very clear visible wavy and frequently distributed clay-illuviation bands typical for a Luvisol. The upper meter looks duller and more homogenous which is typical for a Bv-horizion of a Cambisol. The embedded deposition shows structures in this sediment package that are typical for a flash-flood event. Records of soil erosion during this time period are sparse and it is generally assumed that sediments were fixed by forest vegetation. In contrast, these presented results indicate that the manipulation of forest vegetation by fire by sedentary Mesolithic hunter-gatherers created an open area and enabled soil erosion with a high geomorphological impact on a local scale. This geoarchive provides first time high resolution data on a natural (and anthropogenic) soil-sediment formation during the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene in SW-Germany.

  6. (UnResolved contradictions in the Late Pleistocene glacial chronology of the Southern Carpathians - new samples and recalculated cosmogenic radionuclide age estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsófia RUSZKICZAY-RÜDIGER

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Application of cosmogenic nuclides in the study of Quaternary glaciations has increased rapidly during the last decade owing to the previous absence of direct dating methods of glacial landforms and sediments. Although several hundred publications have already been released on exposure age dating of glacial landforms worldwide, very few studies targeted the Carpathians so far (Kuhlemann et al, 2013a; Makos et al., 2014; Reuther et al, 2004, 2007; Rinterknecht et al. 2012.There are many unresolved or contradictory issues regarding the glacial chronology of the Romanian Carpathians. Recently, some attempts have been made to develop an improved temporal framework for the glaciations of the region using cosmogenic 10Be dating (Reuther et al. 2004, 2007, Kuhlemann et al. 2013a. However, these studies made the picture even more confusing because the local last glacial maximum, for instance, apparently occurred in asynchronous timing compared to each other and also to other dated glacial events in Europe (Hughes et al, 2013.This situation is even more interesting if we take into account that the local glacial maximum tends to agree with the global LGM derived from the Eastern Balkans (Kuhlemann et al. 2013b, while the penultimate glaciation seems to significantly overtake the LGM advance over the Western Balkans (Hughes et al. 2011.The primary candidate reasons to resolve these discrepancies are methodological, e.g. insufficient number of samples (one sample/landform ignoring geological scatter of the data and the application of different half-lives, production rates and scaling schemes during the calculation of exposure ages. Systematic methodological uncertainties in computing exposure ages from measured nuclide concentrations have a significant impact on the conclusions concerning correlations of exposure-dated glacier chronologies with millennial scale climate changes (Balco, 2011. The changes in glacial timing generated by only using the most recent constants for the exposure age calculations has not been considered in the most recent review on the timing of the LGM (Hughes et al., 2013.Main objective of our study is to utilize the potential offered by the cosmogenic in situ produced 10Be dating to disentangle the contradictions in the available Southern Carpathian Late Pleistocene glacial chronology (Kuhlemann et al, 2013a; Reuther et al, 2004, 2007. We recalculate 10Be data published by Reuther et al. (2007 in accordance with the new half-life and production rate of 10Be. Besides, a new sample set has been collected to establish a precise chronological framework supported by in-situ exposure dating of several additional moraine generations.

  7. Identifying potentially active volcanoes in the Andes: Radiometric evidence for late Pleistocene-early Holocene eruptions at Volcán Imbabura, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pennec, J. L.; Ruiz, A. G.; Eissen, J. P.; Hall, M. L.; Fornari, M.

    2011-09-01

    Recent eruptions from volcanoes with no previously known historical activity in Chile and Indonesia have raised the importance of the early identification of potentially active centers for the purpose of hazard assessment. Here we bring radiometric evidence ( 14 C, 39Ar- 40Ar) of previously unrecognized but significant magmatic activity at partly eroded Imbabura volcano (Ecuador) in late Pleistocene to early Holocene times, on whose perimeter live more than 300,000 persons. Following an effusive stage from 50 to 30 ka with the emplacement of andesitic lava flows on different flanks of its edifice, the activity became explosive with the generation of andesitic block-and-ash flows on its eastern side, beginning at ~ 35 ka cal BP. Subsequently a flank collapse associated with a volcanic blast occurred on the volcano's SW flank at ~ 30 ka cal BP. The resulting debris avalanche and blast breccias cover an area now heavily populated around San Pablo Lake and its source was later concealed by successive dome building episodes at Huarmi which produced ~ 2.8 km 3 of silicic andesite. Renewed dome activity at the edifice's Taita summit occurred at ~ 17 ka cal BP and continued intermittently into early Holocene times, as indicated by pyroclastic flow deposits overlying a palaeosoil dated at ~ 9 ka cal BP. In summary, this study reveals an eruptive behavior characterized by a low recurrence rate but with quite large eruptions, a pattern which is also observed at other silicic volcanoes of Ecuador's Western Cordillera. It is now imperative to reconsider the origin and source of the many tephra layers catalogued in Holocene lacustrine sediments in the Imbabura area. Tephra and lava volume estimates for Imbabura volcano converted to Dense Rock Equivalent values yield a minimum magmatic output rate of 0.13 km 3/ka in the past 35,000 years, which argues for sustained magma production for this volcano in recent geological times. The Imbabura example thus raises the question of how to improve population preparedness for volcanoes with infrequent eruptions, and how to guide authorities' decisions concerning the development of urban areas and infrastructures near presently inactive but potentially highly dangerous volcanoes.

  8. Influence of Late Pleistocene and Holocene climate on vegetation distributions in southwest Africa elucidated from sedimentary n-alkanes - Differences between 12°S and 20°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badewien, Tanja; Vogts, Angela; Dupont, Lydie; Rullkötter, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Global and local climatic forcing, e.g. concentration of atmospheric CO2 or insolation, influence the distribution of C3 and C4 plants in southwest Africa. C4 plants dominate in more arid and warmer areas and are favoured by lower pCO2 levels. Several studies have assessed past and present continental vegetation by the analysis of terrestrial n-alkanes in near-coastal deep sea sediments using single samples or a small number of samples from a given climatic stage. The objectives of this study were to evaluate vegetation changes in southwest Africa with regard to climatic changes during the Late Pleistocene and the Holocene and to elucidate the potential of single sample simplifications. We analysed two sediment cores at high resolution, altogether ca. 240 samples, from the Southeast Atlantic Ocean (20°S and 12°S) covering the time spans of 18 to 1 ka and 56 to 2 ka, respectively. Our results for 20°S showed marginally decreasing C4 plant domination (of ca. 5%) during deglaciation based on average chain length (ACL27-33 values) and carbon isotopic composition of the C31 and C33n-alkanes. Values for single samples from 18 ka and the Holocene overlap and, thus, are not significantly representative of the climatic stages they derive from. In contrast, at 12°S the n-alkane parameters show a clear difference of plant type for the Late Pleistocene (C4 plant domination, 66% C4 on average) and the Holocene (C3 plant domination, 40% C4 on average). During deglaciation vegetation change highly correlates with the increase in pCO2 (r² = 0.91). Short-term climatic events such as Heinrich Stadials or Antarctic warming periods are not reflected by vegetation changes in the catchment area. Instead, smaller vegetation fluctuations during the Late Pleistocene occur in accordance with local variations of insolation.

  9. Recycling of Badger/Fox Burrows in Late Pleistocene Loess by Hyenas at the Den Site Bad Wildungen-Biedensteg (NW, Germany): Woolly Rhinoceros Killers and Scavengers in a Mammoth Steppe Environment of Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Cajus Diedrich

    2013-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene (MIS 5c-d) Ice Age spotted hyena open air den and bone accumulation site Bad Wildungen-Biedensteg (Hesse, NW, Germany) represents the first open air loess fox/badger den site in Europe, which must have been recycled by Crocuta crocuta spelaea (Goldfuss, 1823) as a birthing den. Badger and fox remains, plus remains of their prey (mainly hare), have been found within the loess. Hyena remains from that site include parts of cub skeletons which represent 10% of the megafauna ...

  10. Neogene-Quaternary tectonic stratigraphy of the eastern Southern Alps, NE Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, R.; Poli, M. E.; Zanferrari, A.

    2010-07-01

    In order to reconstruct the Neogene-Quaternary Tectonic Stratigraphy of the eastern Southern Alps, the late Tortonian-lower Pleistocene foredeep clastic sequences, cropping out in the Veneto and Friuli piedmont areas have been extensively investigated focusing on the contractional features observed in the frequent conglomerate layers (pitted pebbles). The eastern Southern Alps is the result of a typical polyphase tectonic activity initiated in Late Oligocene, characterised by the occurrence of several non-coaxial stress regimes. Based on careful analyses of the pebbles' surfaces (shape and orientation of the indented features) and following a systematic and statistical approach, the mean orientation of the maximum compressive stress axis (σ 1) has been obtained for more than 30 sites of measurements along the ca. 120 km-long investigated piedmont area. The affected lithostratigraphic units and the orientation (pre- versus post-tilting) of the stereonets density peaks make it possible to recognize four distinct deformational events and characterize them in terms of mean σ 1 direction and timing: late Tortonian ( σ1 = 313°/00°), late Messinian-Early Pliocene (338°/04°), Late Pliocene (314°/03°), and Early-Middle Pleistocene (160°/03°). The Tectonic Stratigraphy of the eastern Southern Alps during the last ca. 10 Ma shows the occurrence of several variations of the stress field characterized by a repeated oscillation of the σ 1 axis between an NNW-SSE and NW-SE directions (Twist Tectonics). Taking also into account literature data about older deformational events (Chattian-Burdigalian and Serravallian-Tortonian), we analyse the Neogene-Quaternary tectonic evolution in the frame of the central Mediterranean realm and compare it with the convergence direction between the Adria-Africa and Europe lithospheric plates. We show that compressional directions within the eastern Southern Alps are basically governed by the remote plate convergence, though since late Messinian, the approaching Northern Apennines started to play a crucial role within the investigated area. Alternating short-lived phases (1-2 Ma) of coupling and decoupling along the basal detachment of the Apennines accretionary wedge probably caused temporary perturbations of the 'local' stress field and complex accommodation structures in this region of ongoing crustal collision.

  11. Contribution to the stratigraphy of the onshore Paraiba Basin, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossetti, Dilce F.; Valeriano, Marcio M., E-mail: rossetti@dsr.inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Sensoriamento Remoto; Goes, Ana M.; Brito-Neves, Benjamim B. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias; Bezerra, Francisco H.R.; Ochoa, Felipe L. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra. Departamento de Geologia

    2012-06-15

    Several publications have contributed to improve the stratigraphy of the Paraiba Basin in northeastern Brazil. However, the characterization and distribution of sedimentary units in onshore areas of this basin are still incomplete, despite their significance for reconstructing the tectono- sedimentary evolution of the South American passive margin. This work provides new information to differentiate among lithologically similar strata, otherwise entirely unrelated in time. This approach included morphological, sedimentological and stratigraphic descriptions based on surface and sub-surface data integrated with remote sensing, optically stimulated luminescence dating, U+Th/He dating of weathered goethite, and heavy mineral analysis. Based on this study, it was possible to show that Cretaceous units are constrained to the eastern part of the onshore Paraiba Basin. Except for a few outcrops of carbonatic-rocks nearby the modern coastline, deposits of this age are not exposed to the surface in the study area. Instead, the sedimentary cover throughout the basin is constituted by mineralogically and chronologically distinctive deposits, inserted in the Barreiras Formation and mostly in the Post-Barreiras Sediments, of early/middle Miocene and Late Pleistocene-Holocene ages, respectively. The data presented in this work support tectonic deformation as a factor of great relevance to the distribution of the sedimentary units of the Paraiba Basin. (author)

  12. The presence of Ursus ex gr. minimus-thibetanus in the late villányian and its position among the Pliocene and Pleistocene black bears in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagner, Jan; Čermák, Stanislav; Horáček, I.

    -, č. 4 (2011), s. 39-58. ISSN 1771-1150 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/0184 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : Black bear * MN17 * Ursus aff. thibetanus * Villány 3 * Central Europe - Hungary * Ursus * Pleistocene * Pliocene Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  13. New approach on the Saiga antelopes (Saiga tatarica/borealis; Bovidae) from the Late Pleistocene and Holocene of Crimea (SE Ukraine)

    OpenAIRE

    Matei Vremir

    2004-01-01

    The present paper is a short review of the knowledge regarding the fossil saiga antelopes from the Pleistocene and Holocene of Crimea, in the context of the general taxonomic and phylogenetic problems in question. According to the newly discovered paleontological material from the Crimean Mountain cave-sites, a new point of view is considered.

  14. The Pleistocene glaciations of the North Sea Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Alastair G.C.; Stoker, Martyn S.; Lonergan, Lidia; Bradwell, Tom; Stewart, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    We review the Quaternary geology of the North Sea area, summarising evidence for extents, configurations and timing of former glacial activity, focusing attention on key sites across the basin, and for the first time, integrating the stratigraphy with up-to-date information on the geomorphic (morphological) framework of the Pleistocene glacial sequence.

  15. Late Pleistocene-Holocene evolution of the southern Marmara shelf and sub-basins: middle strand of the North Anatolian fault, southern Marmara Sea, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardar, Denizhan; Öztürk, Kurultay; Yaltırak, Cenk; Alpar, Bedri; Tur, Hüseyin

    2014-03-01

    Although there are many research studies on the northern and southern branches of the North Anatolian fault, cutting through the deep basins of the Sea of Marmara in the north and creating a series of pull-apart basins on the southern mainland, little data is available about the geometrical and kinematical characteristics of the middle strand of the North Anatolian fault. The first detailed geometry of the middle strand of the North Anatolian fault along the southern Marmara shelf, including the Gemlik and Bandırma Bay, will be given in this study, by a combined interpretation of different seismic data sets. The characteristic features of its segments and their importance on the paleogeographic evolution of the southern shelf sub-basins were defined. The longest one of these faults, the Armutlu-Bandırma segment, is a 75-km long dextral strike-slip fault which connects the W-E trending Gençali segment in the east and NE-SW trending Kapıdağ-Edincik segment in the west. In this context, the Gemlik Bay opened as a pull-apart basin under the control of the middle strand whilst a new fault segment developed during the late Pleistocene, cutting through the eastern rim of the bay. In this region, a delta front forming the paleoshoreline of the Gemlik paleolake was cut and shifted approximately 60 ± 5 m by the new segment. The same offset on this fault was also measured on a natural scarp of acoustic basement to the west and integrated with this paleoshoreline forming the slightly descending topset-foreset reflections of the delta front. Therefore the new segment is believed to be active at least for the last 30,000 years. The annual lateral slip rate representing this period of time will be 2 mm, which is quite consistent with modern GPS measurements. Towards the west, the Bandırma Bay is a rectangular transpressional basin whilst the Erdek Bay is a passive basin under the control of NW-SE trending faults. When the water level of the paleo-Marmara lake dropped down to -90 m, the water levels of the suspended paleolakes of Bandırma and Gemlik on the southern shelf were -50.3 (-3.3 Global Isostatic Adjustment—GIA) and -60.5 (-3.3 GIA) m below the present mean sea level, respectively. As of today a similar example can be seen between the Sea of Marmara and the shallow freshwater lakes of Manyas and Uluabat. Similarly, the paleolakes of Gemlik and Bandirma were affected by the water level fluctuations at different time periods, even though both lakes were isolated from the Sea of Marmara during the glacial periods.

  16. Causes of Late Pleistocene water level change in Lake Victoria, Equatorial East Africa, derived from clumped isotopes of land snails and fresh water mollusks. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaarur, S.; Affek, H. P.; Tryon, C.; Peppe, D. J.; Faith, J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on the dependence of 13C-18O bond abundance in the carbonate lattice (measured as Δ47) on the carbonate formation temperature. Most marine and freshwater biogenic carbonates are found to be in agreement with the clumped isotopes - temperature calibration. Clumped isotope thermometry is particularly useful in terrestrial environments where the interpretation of carbonate δ18O is limited due to difficulty in estimating the paleo-water isotopic composition. Clumped isotope-derived temperatures from land snails are generally higher than the ambient environmental temperatures, but show no evidence for disequilibrium. We attribute these higher body temperatures to snail eco-physiological adaptations through shell color, morphology, and behavior. We use the clumped isotope-derived temperatures in combination with shell δ18O to calculate snail body water δ18O composition. This parameter is interpreted as a paleo-hydrological indicator that reflects the isotopic composition of local precipitation modified by local evaporation. Rusinga and Mfangano Islands in Lake Victoria provide a unique opportunity to compare extant species of modern and fossil freshwater mollusks and land snails from the same location to examine lake paleo-hydrology. This location is particularly interesting as Lake Victoria itself is the main source of rain-water in the region such that the isotopic composition of land snail body water can be related back to the source waters. We combine clumped isotope and oxygen isotope measurements of both freshwater mollusks and land snails to examine the water balance of the lake, testing hypotheses about the mechanism of a significant rise in lake level in Lake Victoria ~35 - 40 ka BP. Outcrops of paleo-beach deposits ~18 m above the modern day lake level indicate high water stands at ~35-40 ka BP. Based on water balance models for Lake Victoria, an increase in lake level of this magnitude could be driven by local mean annual precipitation that is significantly greater than modern. However, this is inconsistent with regional climate reconstructions. This suggests that either lake level was controlled by non-climatic factors, or that local climate in the Lake Victoria basin was different than regional patterns of climate across eastern Africa. We use oxygen and clumped isotopes of modern and fossil shells (Corbicula sp., Melanoides sp. and Bellamya unicolor) from this 18 m beach outcrop on Mfangano Island to (1) compare with modern lake water δ18O values and (2) calculate paleo-water compositions. We combine these results with calculated snail body water δ18O composition (using oxygen and clumped isotopes) of land snails (Limicoloria cf. martensiana) from Rusinga and Mfangano Islands, to study hydrological changes of Lake Victoria. We use these data to evaluate the relative importance of climate change and tectonics as mechanisms for the Late Pleistocene expansion of Lake Victoria.

  17. Late Pleistocene variations in Antarctica sea ice. I - Effect of orbital isolation changes. II - Effect of interhemispheric deep-ocean heat exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Thomas J.; Parkinson, Claire L.

    1988-01-01

    A dynamic-thermodynamic sea-ice model is presently used to ascertain the effects of orbitally-induced insolation changes on Antarctic sea-ice cover; the results thus obtained are compared with modified CLIMAP reconstructions of sea-ice 18,000 years ago. The minor influence exerted by insolation on Pleistocene sea-ice distributions is attributable to a number of factors. In the second part of this investigation, variations in the production of warm North Atlantic Deep Water are proposed as a mechanism constituting the linkage between climate fluctuations in the Northern and Southern hemispheres during the Pleistocene; this hypothesis is tested by examining the sensitivity of the dynamic-thermodynamic model for Antarctic sea-ice changes in vertical ocean heat flux, and comparing the simulations with modified CLIMAP sea-ice maps for 18,000 years ago.

  18. Climatic, geomorphic, and archaeological implications of a late Quaternary alluvial chronology for the lower Salt River, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckleberry, Gary; Onken, Jill; Graves, William M.; Wegener, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Recent archaeological excavations along the lower Salt River, Arizona resulted in the unexpected discovery of buried late Pleistocene soils and cultural features dating 5800-7100 cal YBP (Early Archaic), the latter representing the earliest evidence of human activity in the lower Salt River floodplain thus far identified. Because the lower Salt River floodplain has been heavily impacted by recent agriculture and urbanization and contains few stratigraphic exposures, our understanding of the river's geological history is limited. Here we present a late Quaternary alluvial chronology for a segment of the lower Salt River based on 19 accelerator mass spectrometry 14C and four optically stimulated luminescence ages obtained during two previous geoarchaeological investigations. Deposits are organized into allostratigraphic units and reveal a buried late Pleistocene terrace inset into middle-to-late Pleistocene terrace deposits. Holocene terrace fill deposits unconformably cap the late Pleistocene terrace tread in the site area, and the lower portion of this fill contains the Early Archaic archaeological features. Channel entrenchment and widening ~ 900 cal YBP eroded much of the older terrace deposits, leaving only a remnant of fill containing the buried latest Pleistocene and middle-to-late Holocene deposits preserved in the site area. Subsequent overbank deposition and channel filling associated with a braided channel system resulted in the burial of the site by a thin layer of flood sediments. Our study confirms that the lower Salt River is a complex mosaic of late Quaternary alluvium formed through vertical and lateral accretion, with isolated patches of buried soils preserved through channel avulsion. Although channel avulsion is linked to changes in sediment load and discharge and may have climatic linkages, intrinsic geomorphic and local base level controls limit direct correlations of lower Salt River stratigraphy to other large rivers in the North American Southwest.

  19. Climatic characteristics of the late Pleistocene and Holocene continental deposits from southwestern Syria based on palynological data / Caractersticas climaticas de los depsitos continentales del Pleistoceno tardo y Holoceno del suroeste de Siria sobre la base de datos palinolgicos

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Kamal M., Hussein.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta investigacin fue reconstruir la vegetacin, el clima y los cambios que han tenido lugar durante el Pleistoceno tardo y el Holoceno, en el suroeste de Siria. Esta reconstruccin se bas en datos palinolgicos obtenidos del anlisis de 27 sedimentos y muestras de superficie (con [...] un espesor total de 4,55 m) coleccionadas durante el verano de 1998 en el lago Al-Hijaneh (Pleistoceno tardo) y en el valle del rio Al-Aouaj (Holoceno), y analizadas en 1999. Se establecieron tres zonas de alemacenamiento de polen. La ms antigua (zona A) corresponde al Pleistoceno tardo en los depsitos lacustres del lago Al-Hijaneh. Las zonas B y C quedaron definidas en los depsitos lacustres del Holoceno del valle del rio Al-Aouaj. Las tres zonas polnicas son correlativas con zonas de polen similar en territorios del Mediterrneo del este. Los climas presentes y pasados de la regin, y su vegetacin son tema de discusin. Abstract in english The goal of this research was to reconstruct the vegetational and climatic changes that took place during the late Pleisocene and Holocene in southwestern Syria. This reconstruction was based on palynological data obtained from the analysis of 27 sediments and surface samples (with a total thickness [...] of 4.55 m) collected from Al-Hijaneh Lake basin (late Pleistocene) and from Al-Aouaj River valley (Holocene). Three pollen zones were established. The oldest one (zone A) corresponds to the late Pleistocene lacustrine deposits of Lake Al-Hijaneh. Zones B and C were defined in the Holocene fluvial- lacustrine deposits of the Al-Aouaj River valley. These three pollen assemblage zones are correlated to synchronic and similar C14 dated pollen zones from Syria, Turkey, Iran and Greece. This allows a more definite age determination for the deposits of this study. The region's past climates and vegetation are discussed.

  20. Stratigraphy and structural geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M. H.; Wilhelms, D. E.; Greeley, R.; Guest, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The immediate goal of stratigraphy and structural geology is to reduce the enormous complexity of a planetary surface to comprehensible proportions by dividing the near-surface rocks into units and mapping their distribution and attitude.

  1. Late Pleistocene ice margin fluctuations in the Nahanni National Park-UNESCO World Heritage Site and their impact on glacial lake formation and architecture of drainage systems across the Yukon-NWT continental divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duk-Rodkin, A.; Barendregt, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    In the late Pleistocene the southern Mackenzie region was glaciated by ice masses from a Cordilleran and continental source (Laurentide). Stratigraphic and geomorphologic evidence indicate that the two glaciers occupied this region at different times during the Late Pleistocene. The continental ice sheet advanced over the foothills and up major valleys reaching its maximum extent, ca. 30 ka. B. P. This took place when Cordilleran glaciers were in their initial stages of development. The Laurentide Ice Sheet blocked the drainage of the South Nahanni River near Virginia Falls, forming a glacial lake which inundated an area of approximately 900 km2 at its maximum stand, and had an outlet to the southwest, across the continental divide into the Yukon Territory and eventually into the Pacific Ocean. Lacustrine sediments at various sites reach thicknesses ranging from 110 to 120 metres, at an elevation of around 700 m. Cordilleran glaciers advanced eastward and approximately 5000 years later blocked this southwestward drainage, rerouting it to the east and north along the Mackenzie Mountain front. The drainage was confined between the mountains and continental ice margin where it incised major canyons into the limestone bedrock, and produced a spectacular karst landscape, which today forms part of the Nahanni National Park. During the retreat of the Laurentide and advance of Cordilleran glaciers, glacial Lake Nahanni cut an outlet to the east at First Canyon. This outlet drained into a continuous northbound network of marginal meltwater channels joining the north-flowing drainage that eventually reached the Arctic Ocean, and during further retreat of the ice sheet established the Mackenzie River in its modern location. The presence of Laurentide ice in this region is evidenced by large granite boulders carried from the Canadian Shield. Erratics are found up to 100 km west of the mountain front. Neotectonic activity in the area is interpreted from exposures such as those seen at Virginia Falls. Here glaciolacustrine sediments of Lake Nahanni are found both above and below the falls, but those above the falls are offset along the fault by approximately 30 meters, indicating that the falls most likely formed or were tectonically reactivated in postglacial time. Pre-late Pleistocene terraces of the South Nahanni River lie above the upstream terraces found near Virginia Falls, and slope to the west, further providing evidence of postglacial rebound and tectonics.

  2. Orogénesis y drenaje en la región del Valle de Lerma (cordillera oriental, Salta, Argentina durante el Pleistoceno Tardío Orogeny and drainage in the Lerma Valley region (Eastern Cordillera, Salta, Argentina during the late Pleistocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo González Bonorino

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available En el Pleistoceno tardío, luego de la incipiente elevación de las serranías subandinas, la contracción retornó al interior del orógeno. En aquel tiempo un piedemonte conectaba los contrafuertes occidentales de la Cordillera Oriental (sierras de Lesser y Obispo con la llanura subandina, a través de la región que hoy7 ocupan el valle de Lerma y la serranía Mojotoro-Castillejo. La contracción dio origen a las elevaciones interiores en la sierra de Vaqueros y los Cerrillos de San Miguel, y luego se propagó al este una falla que derivó en el desarrollo de la serranía Mojotoro-Castillejo y el cierre del valle de Lerma. Algunos ríos incidieron a través de las nacientes barreras topográficas mientras que otros fueron a una cuenca endorreica inundada por un antiguo lago Lerma. La capacidad de incisión fue mayor en el valle de Lerma septentrional, donde los ríos llegaban con gradientes de cauce elevados a los sitios de ascenso topográfico, y donde el río Mojotoro persistió como cauce antecedente. En el sur, el lago Lerma colmató la cuenca hasta un punto de derrame por bajos estructurales en capas del Grupo Salta, y el agua labró el cauce subsecuente del actual río Juramento a través de la sierra de Castillejo. Más de 800 m de sedimento (aquí denominado Grupo Valle de Lerma se acumularon en el valle de Lerma durante el Pleistoceno tardío. Información de subsuelo permite hacer una revisión crítica de la estratigrafía de este relleno y proponer una subdivisión más detallada. En particular se acota la extensión geográfica de la Formación Tajamar y se revisan las extrapolaciones que de ella se han hecho.In the late Pleistocene, following uplift of the first subandean ranges, contraction returned to the orogen interior. At the time, a wide piedmont connected the western ramparts of the Eastern Cordillera (Lesser and Obispo ranges to the subandean plain, spanning the zone presently occupied by the Lerma Valley and the Mojotoro and Castillejo ranges. Contraction gave rise to the interior Vaqueros Range and the San Mguel Hills, and then propagated eastward with a regional reverse fault that derived in the development of the Mojotoro and Castillejo ranges and closure of the Lerma Valley. Some river courses incised across the rising barriers, whereas others were diverted to an internally drained basin flooded by ancient Lake Lerma. Incision power was greater in the northern Lerma Valley, where the rivers reached the sites of topographic uplift with high bed gradients, and where the Mojotoro River persisted as an antecedent course. In the south, Lake Lerma filled the basin to a pour point through structural lows in Salta Group strata, and the issuing water carved the subsequent channel of the present Juramento River across the Castillejo Range. More than 800 m of sediment (herein designated Lerma Valley Group accumulated in the Lerma Valley during the late Pleistocene. Subsurface information allowed a critical revision of the stratigraphy of this fill and a more detailed subdivision. In particular, the geographical extension of the Tajamar Formation is restricted and previously proposed extrapolations for it are revised.

  3. Late Pleistocene to Holocene alluvial tableland formation in an intra-mountainous basin in a tectonically active mountain belt ― A case study in the Puli Basin, central Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chia-Han; Lüthgens, Christopher; Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Reimann, Tony; Frechen, Manfred; Böse, Margot

    2016-01-01

    The morphology in Taiwan is a product of high tectonic activity at the convergent margin and East Asian monsoon climate. Tablelands are prominent geomorphic features in the Puli Basin in central Taiwan. These tablelands provide an archive to understand links between past climatic evolution and tectonic events resulting in the formation of the present-day landforms. To establish a geochronological framework for the alluvium underlying the tablelands in the Puli Basin, optically stimulated luminescence dating was applied to obtain burial ages. The numerical data indicate an accumulation phase of alluvial fans in the Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene transition. The study area in the Taomi River catchment, an obvious longer precursor of the Taomi River, originating from west of the Yuchih Basin, transported the sediments forming the present-day southern tablelands. During the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, the climate changed to wetter and warmer conditions, so that slope processes might have changed and an increasing transport in the fluvial system was stimulated. Fluvial and fan terraces in other river catchments in Taiwan also indicate a period of increased fluvial transport and deposition. A geomorphic evolution model in the Puli Basin is reconstructed on the basis of the chronological framework and of sedimentological features. Fluvial processes controlled by climatic change and accompanied by tectonic activities have created the diverse topography in the Puli Basin.

  4. Late Pleistocene steppe lion Panthera leo spelaea (Goldfuss, 1810) footprints and bone records from open air sites in northern Germany - Evidence of hyena-lion antagonism and scavenging in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2011-07-01

    Bone remains and a trackway of Pantheraichnus bottropensis nov. ichg. ichnsp. of the Late Pleistocene lion Panthera leo spelaea ( Goldfuss, 1810) have been recovered from Bottrop and other open air sites in northern Germany. Some of these bones are from open air hyena den sites. A relative high proportion of lion bones (20%) exhibit bite, chew or nibble marks, or bone crushing and nibbling caused by a large carnivore. Repeated patterns of similar bone damage have been compared to bone remains found at hyena dens in gypsum karst areas and cave sites in northern Germany. Ice Age spotted hyenas have been the main antagonists and the main scavengers on lion carcasses. The remains appear to have been imported often by hyenas into their communal dens, supporting the theory of strong hyena-lion antagonism, similar to the well documented antagonism between modern African lions and spotted hyenas. Most of the lion bones from the open air hyena den at Bottrop are probably a result of such antagonism, as are the rare remains of these carnivores found within large hyena prey bone accumulations along the Pleistocene rivers. The Emscher River terrace also has the largest quantity of hyena remains from open air river terrace sites in northern Germany. Their cub remains, and incomplete chewed prey bones from mammoths and woolly rhinoceroses, typical of hyena activity, underline the character of these sites as cub-raising and communal dens, where their prey was accumulated along the riverbanks in a similar manner to modern African hyenas.

  5. Size and shape stasis in late Pleistocene mammals and birds from Rancho La Brea during the Last Glacial-Interglacial cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prothero, Donald R.; Syverson, Valerie J.; Raymond, Kristina R.; Madan, Meena; Molina, Sarah; Fragomeni, Ashley; DeSantis, Sylvana; Sutyagina, Anastasiya; Gage, Gina L.

    2012-11-01

    Conventional neo-Darwinian theory views organisms as infinitely sensitive and responsive to their environments, and considers them able to readily change size or shape when they adapt to selective pressures. Yet since 1863 it has been well known that Pleistocene animals and plants do not show much morphological change or speciation in response to the glacial-interglacial climate cycles. We tested this hypothesis with all of the common birds (condors, golden and bald eagles, turkeys, caracaras) and mammals (dire wolves, saber-toothed cats, giant lions, horses, camels, bison, and ground sloths) from Rancho La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles, California, which preserves large samples of many bones from many well-dated pits spanning the 35,000 years of the Last Glacial-Interglacial cycle. Pollen evidence showed the climate changed from chaparral/oaks 35,000 years ago to snowy pion-juniper forests at the peak glacial 20,000 years ago, then back to the modern chaparral since the glacial-interglacial transition. Based on Bergmann's rule, we would expect peak glacial specimens to have larger body sizes, and based on Allen's rule, peak glacial samples should have shorter and more robust limbs. Yet statistical analysis (ANOVA for parametric samples; Kruskal-Wallis test for non-parametric samples) showed that none of the Pleistocene pit samples is statistically distinct from the rest, indicating complete stasis from 35 ka to 9 ka. The sole exception was the Pit 13 sample of dire wolves (16 ka), which was significantly smaller than the rest, but this did not occur in response to climate change. We also performed a time series analysis of the pit samples. None showed directional change; all were either static or showed a random walk. Thus, the data show that birds and mammals at Rancho La Brea show complete stasis and were unresponsive to the major climate change that occurred at 20 ka, consistent with other studies of Pleistocene animals and plants. Most explanations for such stasis (stabilizing selection, canalization) fail in this setting where climate is changing. One possible explanation is that most large birds and mammals are very broadly adapted and relatively insensitive to changes in their environments, although even the small mammals of the Pleistocene show stasis during climate change, too.

  6. Palaeoecology of well-preserved coral communities in a siliciclastic environment from the Late Pleistocene (MIS 7), Kish Island, Persian Gulf (Iran): the development of low-relief reef frameworks (biostromes) in increasingly restricted environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossadegh, Zahra Karimi; Parker, Justin; Gischler, Eberhard; Oschmann, Wolfgang; Blakeway, David; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2013-03-01

    Major changes in community structure and depositional relief of high-latitude coral communities in the southern Persian Gulf between marine isotope stage (MIS) 7 and the present day suggest that the area has become increasingly restricted. Corals and bivalves from outcrops on Kish Island, Iran, were identified in order to interpret the Late Pleistocene palaeoenvironmental setting. U/Th disequilibrium dating was used to constrain the ages of the stratigraphic units. During MIS 7, two coral-bearing sequences were deposited on what is now Kish Island. The lower sequence is dated as MIS 7.5 and changes laterally from an assemblage dominated by Cyphastrea sp. and Platygyra daedalea in the west to one characterized by branching Montipora in the east. By contrast, the upper sequence, dated as MIS 7.1, transitions from an assemblage dominated by platy Montipora in the west to a diverse assemblage of Platygyra and other faviids in the east. The assemblages of both sequences are within a marl matrix and bounded by thin lithified mollusc-rich layers. Corals and bivalves indicate that the sequences were deposited on gentle slopes in sheltered environments less than 20 m deep. The MIS 7 deposits may be classified as coral carpets or biostromes that developed a low-relief framework. During MIS 5, coral communities were no longer framework building and are now limited to an Acropora-rich layer of coral rubble that covers large parts of the island, and two small incipient reefs with sparse faviids. Similarities between the MIS 5 and modern nearshore coral communities suggest that the environmental conditions during MIS 5 were comparable to those of today. The late Pleistocene coral carpets and non-framework coral communities of the southern Persian Gulf may serve as models for coral biostromes in the fossil record, which formed under restricted environmental conditions such as elevated terrigenous input, high turbidity, and strong seasonal changes in temperature and/or salinity.

  7. Sobre la presencia de un supuesto Haplodontheriinae (Mammalia, Toxodontidae en el Pleistoceno tardo de la provincia de Corrientes (Argentina On the presence of an alleged Haplodontheriinae (Mammalia, Toxodontidae from the late Pleistocene of the Corrientes province (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ngel R. Mio-Boilini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available En el extremo sur de Sudamrica se han postulado varias reas que podran haber actuado como reservorio de taxones suprstites, especialmente en el lapso Mioceno-Pleistoceno tardo ("Araucanense"-Lujanense. As, en el Pleistoceno tardo (ca. 58-28 ka de la provincia de Corrientes, Argentina, se ha reconocido la persistencia de ciertos taxones ya desaparecidos en la regin pampeana de Argentina, particularmente entre los Xenarthra Glyptodontidae, Artiodactyla Cervidae y Notoungulata "Haplodontheriinae". Aqu se efectua una revisin con criterios taxonmicos modernos de los materiales (3 restos dentarios asignados a Toxodontidae Haplodontheriinae, cuyos registros ltimos en la regin pampeana provienen del Montehermosense (Plioceno. El estudio comparado indica que los 2 "caniniformes" superiores derechos (CTES-PZ 1608, 1609 corresponden en realidad a un Xenarthra Phyllophaga (Lestodon, en tanto que el tercero (CTES-PZ 1610 debe ser asignado a un Notoungulata (Toxodon, ambos gneros tpicos del Pleistoceno de Amrica del Sur. Por ltimo, las revisiones sistemticas que se llevan a cabo son claves para refinar el registro paleontolgico regional, y brindar un aporte fundamental al esquema bioestratigrfico en reas extra-pampeanas.In southern South America, some regions have been postulated as containing supersite taxa, especially during the Miocene-late Pleistocene lapse. Thus, from the Late Pleistocene (ca. 58-28 ka of the current territory of the Corrientes Province, Argentina, it has been recognized the presence of some taxa, which were extinct from the Pampean region of Argentina: Xenarthra Glyptodontidae, Artiodactyla Cervidae and Notoungulata "Haplodontheriinae". In this contribution, we carried out a review with modern taxonomic criteria of the materials belonging to Toxodontidae "Haplodontheriinae" (represented by 3 teeth, whose last record in the Pampean region corresponds to Montehermosan Age/Stage (Pliocene. The comparative study clearly shows that 2 of the 3 teeth (CTES-PZ 1608, 1609 belong to the Xenrthra Phyllophaga (Lestodon, whereas the other (CTES-PZ 1610 corresponds to the Notoungulata (Toxodon. Both genera are typical of the Pleistocene of South America. Finally, this kind of taxonomic revisions are essentials to depurate the regional paleontological record, and thus to provide a key contribution to the biostratigraphic scheme in extra-pampean areas.

  8. Stratigraphy of the Harwell boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven boreholes, five of them partially cored, were drilled at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell as part of a general investigation to assess the feasibility of storing low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste in underground cavities. Two of the deeper boreholes were almost wholly cored to provide samples for hydrogeological, hydrochemical, mineralogical, geochemical, geotechnical, sedimentological and stratigraphical studies to enable variations in lithology and rock properties to be assessed, both vertically and laterally, and related to their regional geological setting. This report describes the lithologies, main faunal elements and stratigraphy of the Cretaceous, Jurassic, Triassic and Carboniferous sequences proved in the boreholes. More detailed stratigraphical accounts of the late Jurassic and Cretaceous sequences will be prepared when current studies of the faunal assemblages are complete. (author)

  9. TAPHONOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE LATE EARLY PLEISTOCENE BONE REMAINS FROM BUIA (DANDIERO BASIN, DANAKIL DEPRESSION, ERITREA:EVIDENCE FOR LARGE MAMMAL AND REPTILE BUTCHERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANA FIORE

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Early Pleistocene sedimentary succession of the Dandiero (Buia Basin (Danakil Depression, Eritrea has preserved a rich paleontological, paleoanthropological, and archeological record circa one million years old. Fieldwork undertaken between 1995 and 2003 led to the collection of fossil vertebrate remains now stored at the National Museum of Eritrea. Bones were recovered in different localities of the Dandiero Basin, where abundant archaeological and paleontological remains outcrop from the eroded sediments. The faunal collection of 436 animal bones from the Buia Basin, mostly derived from Uadi Aalad area, have undergone taphonomic analysis. Even though bone surfaces are poorly preserved due to abrasion, our work demonstrates carcass exploitation. Some specimens, mostly representing Hippopotamus gorgops and medium- to large-sized bovids, show traces of butchering left by stone tools. We also document, as far as we know for the first time, a single case of butchering involving a femur of a crocodile.   

  10. Last straw versus Blitzkrieg overkill: Climate-driven changes in the Arctic Siberian mammoth population and the Late Pleistocene extinction problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolskiy, P. A.; Sulerzhitsky, L. D.; Pitulko, V. V.

    2011-08-01

    A set of radiocarbon dates on woolly mammoth were obtained from several regions of Arctic Siberia: the New Siberian Islands ( n = 68), north of the Yana-Indigirka Lowland ( n = 43), and the Taimyr Peninsula ( n = 18). Based on these and earlier published dates ( n = 201) from the East Arctic, a comparative analysis of the time-related density distribution of 14C dates was conducted. It was shown that the frequencies of 14C dates under certain conditions reflect temporal fluctuations in mammoth numbers. At the end of the Pleistocene the number of mammoths in the East Arctic changed in a cyclic manner in keeping with a general "Milankovitch-like" trend. The fluctuations in numbers at the end of the Pleistocene occurred synchronously with paleoenvironmental changes controlled by global climatic change. There were three minima of relative mammoth numbers during the last 50 000 years: 22 000, 14 500-19 000, and 9500 radiocarbon years ago, or around 26 000, 16-20 000, and 10 500 calendar years respectively. The last mammoths lived on the New Siberian Islands, which were connected to the continent at that time, 9470 ± 40 radiocarbon years ago (10 700 ± 70 calendar years BP). This new youngest date approximates the extinction time of mammoths in the last continental refugium of the Holarctic. The adverse combination of environmental parameters was apparently a major factor in the critical reduction in mammoth numbers. The dispersal of humans into the Arctic areas of Siberia no later than 28 000 radiocarbon years ago did not overtly influence animal numbers. Humans were not responsible for the destruction of a sustainable mammoth population. The expanding human population could have become fatal to mammoths during strong the minima of their numbers, one of which occurred at the very beginning of the Holocene.

  11. Pollen analyses of Pleistocene hyaena coprolites from Montenegro and Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argant Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of pollen analyses of hyaena coprolites from the Early Pleistocene cave of Trlica in northern Montenegro and the Late Pleistocene cave of Baranica in southeast Serbia are described. The Early Pleistocene Pachycrocuta brevirostris, and the Late Pleistocene Crocuta spelaea are coprolite-producing species. Although the pollen concentration was rather low, the presented analyses add considerably to the much-needed knowledge of the vegetation of the central Balkans during the Pleistocene. Pollen extracted from a coprolite from the Baranica cave indicates an open landscape with the presence of steppe taxa, which is in accordance with the recorded conditions and faunal remains. Pollen analysis of the Early Pleistocene samples from Trlica indicate fresh and temperate humid climatic conditions, as well as the co-existence of several biotopes which formed a mosaic landscape in the vicinity of the cave.

  12. Basalt stratigraphy - Pasco Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geologic history of the Pasco Basin is sketched. Study of the stratigraphy of the area involved a number of techniques including major-element chemistry, paleomagnetic investigations, borehole logging, and other geophysical survey methods. Grande Ronde basalt accumulation in the Pasco Basin is described. An illustrative log response is shown. 1 figure

  13. Mineralogical Stratigraphy of Ganges Chasma, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull-Hearth, Selby; Clark, M. Caroline

    2015-11-01

    Mars Valles Marineris canyon system reveals a several-kilometer deep stratigraphies sequence that extends thousands of kilometers; this sequence thus represents a unique opportunity to explore millions of years of volcanic and aqueous activity in this region of Mars. Of particular interest to the study of both volcanic and aqueous processes is Ganges Chasma, which lies on the northeastern boundary of the Valles Marineris canyon system on Mars. The canyon likely opened during the Late Noachian to Early Hesperian, modifying previously emplaced Noachian-aged volcanic plains. During formation, volcanic activity from the nearby Tharsis shield complex emplaced olivine-rich dikes throughout the region. After formation, sulfate-bearing Interior Layered Deposits (ILDs) were emplaced in Ganges and many other chasmata throughout the Valles Marineris system. Today, Ganges reveals a complex stratigraphy, including wide-spread olivine-rich sands, hydrated minerals on the plateaus surrounding the canyon, and a central sulfate-rich ILD. Here, we present updated stratigraphies of Ganges Chasma, using new data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM), and synthesizing it with previous data sets. Olivine sands are traced back to source outcrops on the canyon floor, and new outcrops of hydrated minerals on the surrounding plateau are identified and mapped. Recently reported spectroscopic signatures of ankerite and smectite in the chasm are assessed, and new olivine-rich outcrops identified and mapped. Understanding the stratigraphy of Ganges Chasma will help us compare stratigraphies among the chasmata of the Valles Marineris, further building our understanding of the geologic history of this large region of Mars.

  14. Turbidite Megabeds in an Oceanic Rift Valley Recording Jökulhlaups of Late Pleistocene Glacial Lakes of the Western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuffa; Normark; Serra; Brunner

    2000-05-01

    Escanaba Trough is the southernmost segment of the Gorda Ridge and is filled by sandy turbidites locally exceeding 500 m in thickness. New results from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1037 and 1038 that include accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dates and revised petrographic evaluation of the sediment provenance, combined with high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, provide a lithostratigraphic framework for the turbidite deposits. Three fining-upward units of sandy turbidites from the upper 365 m at ODP Site 1037 can be correlated with sediment recovered at ODP Site 1038 and Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) Site 35. Six AMS 14C ages in the upper 317 m of the sequence at Site 1037 indicate that average deposition rates exceeded 10 m/k.yr. between 32 and 11 ka, with nearly instantaneous deposition of one approximately 60-m interval of sand. Petrography of the sand beds is consistent with a Columbia River source for the entire sedimentary sequence in Escanaba Trough. High-resolution acoustic stratigraphy shows that the turbidites in the upper 60 m at Site 1037 provide a characteristic sequence of key reflectors that occurs across the floor of the entire Escanaba Trough. Recent mapping of turbidite systems in the northeast Pacific Ocean suggests that the turbidity currents reached the Escanaba Trough along an 1100-km-long pathway from the Columbia River to the west flank of the Gorda Ridge. The age of the upper fining-upward unit of sandy turbidites appears to correspond to the latest Wisconsinan outburst of glacial Lake Missoula. Many of the outbursts, or jökulhlaups, from the glacial lakes probably continued flowing as hyperpycnally generated turbidity currents on entering the sea at the mouth of the Columbia River. PMID:10769156

  15. Late Pleistocene horse and camel hunting at the southern margin of the ice-free corridor: reassessing the age of Wally's Beach, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Michael R; Stafford, Thomas W; Kooyman, Brian; Hills, L V

    2015-04-01

    The only certain evidence for prehistoric human hunting of horse and camel in North America occurs at the Wally's Beach site, Canada. Here, the butchered remains of seven horses and one camel are associated with 29 nondiagnostic lithic artifacts. Twenty-seven new radiocarbon ages on the bones of these animals revise the age of these kill and butchering localities to 13,300 calibrated y B.P. The tight chronological clustering of the eight kill localities at Wally's Beach indicates these animals were killed over a short period. Human hunting of horse and camel in Canada, coupled with mammoth, mastodon, sloth, and gomphothere hunting documented at other sites from 14,800-12,700 calibrated y B.P., show that 6 of the 36 genera of megafauna that went extinct by approximately 12,700 calibrated y B.P. were hunted by humans. This study shows the importance of accurate geochronology, without which significant discoveries will go unrecognized and the empirical data used to build models explaining the peopling of the Americas and Pleistocene extinctions will be in error. PMID:25831543

  16. Calibration of amino acid racemization (AAR) kinetics in United States mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain Quaternary mollusks using 87Sr/ 86Sr analyses: Evaluation of kinetic models and estimation of regional Late Pleistocene temperature history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehmiller, J. F.; Harris, W.B.; Boutin, B.S.; Farrell, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of amino acid racemization (AAR) for estimating ages of Quaternary fossils usually requires a combination of kinetic and effective temperature modeling or independent age calibration of analyzed samples. Because of limited availability of calibration samples, age estimates are often based on model extrapolations from single calibration points over wide ranges of D/L values. Here we present paired AAR and 87Sr/ 86Sr results for Pleistocene mollusks from the North Carolina Coastal Plain, USA. 87Sr/ 86Sr age estimates, derived from the lookup table of McArthur et al. [McArthur, J.M., Howarth, R.J., Bailey, T.R., 2001. Strontium isotopic stratigraphy: LOWESS version 3: best fit to the marine Sr-isotopic curve for 0-509 Ma and accompanying Look-up table for deriving numerical age. Journal of Geology 109, 155-169], provide independent age calibration over the full range of amino acid D/L values, thereby allowing comparisons of alternative kinetic models for seven amino acids. The often-used parabolic kinetic model is found to be insufficient to explain the pattern of racemization, although the kinetic pathways for valine racemization and isoleucine epimerization can be closely approximated with this function. Logarithmic and power law regressions more accurately represent the racemization pathways for all amino acids. The reliability of a non-linear model for leucine racemization, developed and refined over the past 20 years, is confirmed by the 87Sr/ 86Sr age results. This age model indicates that the subsurface record (up to 80m thick) of the North Carolina Coastal Plain spans the entire Quaternary, back to ???2.5Ma. The calibrated kinetics derived from this age model yield an estimate of the effective temperature for the study region of 11??2??C., from which we estimate full glacial (Last Glacial Maximum - LGM) temperatures for the region on the order of 7-10??C cooler than present. These temperatures compare favorably with independent paleoclimate information for the region. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Dark humic alluvial paleosols in Central and Southern Mexico: Micromorphological indicators of Late Pleistocene megafauna habitats Paleosuelos aluviales con humus oscuro en el Centro y Sur de México: indicadores micromorfológicos de los hábitats de la megafauna del Pleistoceno tardío Paleosolos aluviais com húmus escuro no Centro e Sul do México: indicadores micromorfológicos dos habitats da megafauna do Pleistocénico tardio

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa E. Tovar; Sergey Sedov; Berenice Solís; Elizabeth Solleiro

    2013-01-01

    During the Late Pleistocene, Mexico had a richer fauna than today with many different forms of megafauna that are now extinct. However, the ecosystems they inhabited and the particular ecological niches that they occupied are still poorly understood. Most of the findings of Pleistocene megafauna have been in alluvial deposits that present rich opportunities for paleoecological studies using paleopedological records. Floodplain paleosols commonly are poorly developed. However, micromorphologic...

  18. Analysis of Pleistocene paleodrainage evolution in the Po Basin (Italy) by multivariate statistical techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Vezzoli, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    In order to obtain a high-resolution Pleistocene stratigraphy, eleven continuously cored boreholes, 100 to 220m deep were drilled in the northern part of the Po Plain by Regione Lombardia in the last five years. Quantitative provenance analysis (QPA, Weltje and von Eynatten, 2004) of Pleistocene sands was carried out by using multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis, PCA, and similarity analysis) on an integrated data set, including high-resolution bulk ...

  19. Late Pleistocene to Holocene sedimentation and hydrocarbon seeps on the continental shelf of a steep, tectonically active margin, southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Lorenson, T.D.; Ryan, Holly F.; Wong, Florence L.; Sliter, Ray W.; Conrad, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Small, steep, uplifting coastal watersheds are prolific sediment producers that contribute significantly to the global marine sediment budget. This study illustrates how sedimentation evolves in one such system where the continental shelf is largely sediment-starved, with most terrestrial sediment bypassing the shelf in favor of deposition in deeper basins. The Santa Barbara-Ventura coast of southern California, USA, is considered a classic area for the study of active tectonics and of Tertiary and Quaternary climatic evolution, interpretations of which depend upon an understanding of sedimentation patterns. High-resolution seismic-reflection data over >570 km2 of this shelf show that sediment production is concentrated in a few drainage basins, with the Ventura and Santa Clara River deltas containing most of the upper Pleistocene to Holocene sediment on the shelf. Away from those deltas, the major factor controlling shelf sedimentation is the interaction of wave energy with coastline geometry. Depocenters containing sediment 5-20 m thick exist opposite broad coastal embayments, whereas relict material (bedrock below a regional unconformity) is exposed at the sea floor in areas of the shelf opposite coastal headlands. Locally, natural hydrocarbon seeps interact with sediment deposition either to produce elevated tar-and-sediment mounds or as gas plumes that hinder sediment settling. As much as 80% of fluvial sediment delivered by the Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers is transported off the shelf (some into the Santa Barbara Basin and some into the Santa Monica Basin via Hueneme Canyon), leaving a shelf with relatively little recent sediment accumulation. Understanding factors that control large-scale sediment dispersal along a rapidly uplifting coast that produces substantial quantities of sediment has implications for interpreting the ancient stratigraphic record of active and transform continental margins, and for inferring the distribution of hydrocarbon resources in relict shelf deposits.

  20. Arctic ground squirrels of the mammoth-steppe: paleoecology of Late Pleistocene middens (24 000 29 450 14C yr BP), Yukon Territory, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazula, Grant D.; Froese, Duane G.; Elias, Scott A.; Kuzmina, Svetlana; Mathewes, Rolf W.

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents paleoecological analyses of 48 fossil arctic ground squirrel ( Spermophilus parryii) middens (nests and caches) recovered from ice-rich loess sediments in the Klondike region of west-central Yukon Territory. AMS radiocarbon dates and stratigraphic association of middens with Dawson tephra (25 300 14C yr BP), indicate these paleoecological data reflect the onset of glacial conditions of early Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 and terminal MIS 3 (24 000-29 450 14C yr BP). Plant macrofossils include at least 60 plant taxa, including diverse graminoids ( Poa, Elymus trachycaulus, Kobresia myosuroides), steppe forbs ( Penstemon gormanii, Anemone patens var. multifida, Plantago cf. canescens), tundra forbs ( Draba spp., Bistorta vivipara), dwarf shrubs ( Salix cf. arctica, S. cf. polaris), sage ( Artemisia frigida) and rare trees ( Picea mariana). Many of these taxa identified in the middens represent the first recorded fossils for these plants in Eastern Beringia and add to our knowledge of the floristic composition of Pleistocene vegetation and biogeography in this region. Fossil beetles include typical members of the Eastern Beringian steppe-tundra fauna ( Lepidophorus lineaticollis and Connatichela artemisiae) and others suggesting predominantly dry, open habitats. Cache forage selection is suggested by some plant taxa which were particularly frequent and abundant in the middens ( Bistorta vivipara, Kobresia myosuroides, Ranunculus spp., Potentilla, Erysimum cf. cheiranthoides, Poa, Carex and Draba). Factors such as proximity of vegetation to burrows and abundance of fruits and seeds per plant were probably important in cache selection. Glacial conditions enabled arctic ground squirrels to form widespread and dense populations in regions such as the Klondike in which they are rare or absent at present. This fossil midden record supports previous hypotheses that suggest arctic ground squirrels evolved in and are well-adapted to the open, steppe-tundra vegetation, loessal soils and glacial climates of the mammoth-steppe biome.

  1. A new record of Equus (Mammalia: Equidae from the Late Pleistocene of central-south Chile Un nuevo registro de Equus (Mammalia: Equidae para el Pleistoceno Superior de Osorno, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OMAR P RECABARREN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen dental and bone parts of a horse excavated from the Pilauco paleontological site, Osorno (40°39' S-73°07' W are analysed and interpreted. This site was formed in association with a peat bog located on the banks of the old Damas River and has conserved abundant late Pleistocene mammalian fauna and flora materials. A date of 11457 ± 140 14C yrs B.P. was obtained from a molar and agrees with our stratigraphic age model. We have identified the fossils as pertaining to the species Equus (Amerhippus andium, which confirms its presence in central-south Chile. Furthermore, the recorded geographic location indicate that the metapodial adaptations of the specimens previously described agree with the reconstructed late Pleistocene landscape of Pilauco, dominated by soft volcanic soils and isolated forest patches over large extensions of grasslands.Se analizan e interpretan 14 fósiles correspondientes a dientes y huesos de caballo registrados en el sitio Pilauco, Osorno (40°39' S-73°07' W. El sitio se formó asociado a un pantano en un borde del antiguo río Damas; en él se ha conservado abundante material de mastofauna y flora pleistocénica. Una fecha radiocarbónica de 11457 ± 140 A.P obtenida de un molar, es concordante con el modelo de edad del sitio. La identificación taxonómica permite asociar a los fósiles a la especie Equus (Amerhippus andium, lo que confirma la presencia de la especie en el centro-sur de Chile. Por otra parte, la posición geográfica de los hallazgos y la reconstrucción del paisaje indicarían que se trata de ejemplares cuyas adaptaciones en los metapodios son concordantes para el paisaje pleistocénico de Pilauco dominado por suelos volcánicos blandos, con presencia de bosquetes dispersos en grandes extensiones de praderas de gramíneas.

  2. Human burial evidence from Hattab II Cave and the question of continuity in Late Pleistocene-Holocene mortuary practices in Northwest Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, N.; Bouzouggar, A; Humphrey, L.; Berridge, P.; Collcutt, S; Gale, R; Parfitt, S.; Parker, A; Rhodes, E; Schwenninger, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Archaeological excavations in 2002-3 at Hattab H Cave in northwestern Morocco revealed all undisturbed Late Palaeolithic Iberomaurusian human burial. This is the first Iberomaurusian inhumation discovered in the region. The skeleton is probably that Of a male aged between 25 and 30 years. The individual shows a characteristic absence of the central upper incisors reported in other Iberomaurusian burials. Accompanying the burial are a stone core and a number of grave goods including bone point...

  3. Spain as an emergency air traffic hub during volcanic air fall events? Evidence of past volcanic ash air fall over Europe during the late Pleistocene.

    OpenAIRE

    Hardiman, Mark; Lane, Christine S.; Blockley, Simon P. E.; Moreno, Ana; Valero-Garces, Blas; Ortiz Menéndez, José Eugenio; Torres Pérez-Hidalgo, Trinidad José; Lowe, John J.; Menzies, Martin A.

    2010-01-01

    Past volcanic eruptions often leave visible ash layers in the geological record, for example in marine or lake sedimentary sequences. Recent developments, however, have shown that non-visible volcanic ash layers are also commonly preserved in sedimentary deposits. These augment the record of past volcanic events by demonstrating that past ash dispersals have been more numerous and widely disseminated in Europe than previously appreciated. The dispersal ‘footprints’ of some large late Pleistoc...

  4. Coastal dynamics under conditions of rapid sea-level rise: Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene evolution of barrier lagoon systems on the northern Adriatic shelf (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, Joep E. A.; Weltje, Gert Jan; Terra, Guido J.; Cattaneo, Antonio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2008-06-01

    This multidisciplinary case study of two preserved barrier systems combined the analysis of radiocarbon datings, grain-size distributions, high-resolution seismics, and shelf bathymetry with reconstructions of palaeo-environmental conditions (tides, waves, sea-level change) and forward modelling of barrier-lagoon systems, to provide an integrated view of the coastal transgressive evolution of a large sector of the northern Adriatic shelf between 15 and 8 ka BP. Palaeo-environmental reconstructions point to increased tidal amplitude, low-energy wave climate and high rates of sea-level rise (up to 60 mm/a) during the formation of the oldest preserved barrier system (90 m water depth; 14.3 cal ka BP). A younger barrier system (42 m water depth; 10.5 cal ka BP) formed under conditions of lower tidal amplitude, higher wave energy and a lower rate of sea-level rise (10 mm/a). Forward modelling suggests that the probability of barrier-island overstepping during transgression is inversely proportional to tidal amplitude, if all other factors are assumed equal. The oldest barrier-lagoon system developed under conditions of large tidal amplitude, which permitted rapid transgression. However, this system apparently failed to keep up with the anomalously high rate of sea-level rise resulting from melt-water pulse 1A. The youngest barrier system appears to have drowned in place due to antecedent topography. As the barrier system transgressed over an ancient Pleistocene alluvial plain, the rapid increase in backbarrier accommodation caused an abrupt disequilibrium between shoreface and backbarrier sedimentation, which led to barrier overstepping. Although BarSim modelling indicates that tidal deposition can reduce the probability of barrier overstepping, there are other driving mechanisms (in our case extremely rapid sea-level rise and antecedent topography), which are more determinative in explaining the transgressive coastal evolution of barrier-lagoon systems in the northern Adriatic Sea. Grain-size analysis of shoreface deposits sampled above the transgressive ravinement surface across the northern Adriatic shelf indicate a distinct relation between the sediment grain size and the rate of sea-level rise during deposition, which implies that progressive sorting must have been highly effective.

  5. Tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the late Miocene-Pleistocene Dali Basin in the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau: Evidences from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and rock magnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shihu; Deng, Chenglong; Paterson, Greig A.; Yao, Haitao; Huang, Sheng; Liu, Chengying; He, Huaiyu; Pan, Yongxin; Zhu, Rixiang

    2014-08-01

    The Cenozoic Dali Basin, located at the northeast of Diancang Shan and south of the first bend of Yangtze River, is tectonically controlled by the Dali fault system in the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau. The basin is filled with late Miocene to Pleistocene fluviolacustrine sediments, which provide invaluable information about the tectonic deformation and drainage network reorganization in this area. In this study, we discuss the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of the Dasongping section in the Dali Basin, which spans an interval from 7.6 to 1.8 Ma. Although rock magnetic experiments indicate that magnetite and hematite are the main remanence carriers, hysteresis loops, low values of bulk susceptibility and low temperature susceptibility suggest that paramagnetic minerals are major contributors to low-field AMS. The rock magnetic parameters indicate that the Dali Basin experienced four stages of infilling and the sediment sources may have changed at 4.2 Ma. The clustering of the minimum principle axes (Kmin) nearly perpendicular to the bedding plane and the pronounced N-S magnetic lineation parallel to the bedding plane indicate that the AMS of the Dali Basin is a superimposed fabric consisting of a sedimentary-compaction and a mild initial deformation overprint. The well-defined N-S magnetic lineation is likely due to the NNW and NNE oblique shear caused by the Heqing and Red River faults.

  6. Ancient feeding ecology and extinction of Pleistocene horses from the Pampean Region (Argentina)

    OpenAIRE

    Snchez Chilln, Begoa; Prado, Jos Luis; Alberdi Alonso, Mara Teresa

    2006-01-01

    To reconstruct the diet and habitat preference of fossil horses, we measured the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of 35 bone and tooth samples of Equus (Amerhippus) neogeus Lund, Hippidion principale (Lund), and Hippidion devillei (Gervais) from 10 different Pleistocene localities in the Pampean region (Argentina). To compare the three species by stratigraphic age, we divided the samples into three groups: lower Pleistocene, middle-late Pleistocene and latest Pleistocene. Sam...

  7. Possible Late Pleistocene volcanic activity on Nightingale Island, South Atlantic Ocean, based on geoelectrical resistivity measurements, sediment corings and (14)C dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Anders Anker; Björck, Svante; Cronholm, Anders; Haile, James; Ljung, Karl; Porter, Charles

    Tristan da Cunha is a volcanic island group situated in the central South Atlantic. The oldest of these islands, Nightingale Island, has an age of about 18Ma. In the interior of the island, there are several wetlands situated in topographic depressions. The ages of these basins have been unknown...... method. The irregular shapes of the basins and the lack of clear erosional features indicate that they are not eruption craters and were not formed by erosion. Instead, we regard them as morphological depressions formed between ridges of trachytic lava flows and domes at a late stage of the formation of...... the volcanic edifice. The onset of sedimentation within these basins appears to have occurred between 24 and 37 ka with the highest situated wetland yielding the highest ages. These ages are very young compared to the timing of the main phase of the formation of the island, implying volcanic activity...

  8. Late Pleistocene monsoon variability in northwest Thailand: an oxygen isotope sequence from the bivalve Margaritanopsis laosensis excavated in Mae Hong Son province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwick, Ben; Gagan, Michael K.

    2011-10-01

    Long, continuous records of Late Quaternary environmental change are rare in Southeast Asia, yet they are crucial for understanding the nature of early human dispersal and occupation in the Australasian region. We present a new record of palaeomonsoon activity extending back to 35,000 BP (years before the present), based on the analysis of oxygen isotope ratios (δ 18O) in the freshwater bivalve Margaritanopsis laosensis excavated from the Tham Lod and Ban Rai rockshelters in Mae Hong Son Province, northwest Thailand. Long-term changes in the M. laosensis δ 18O record reflect changes in the δ 18O of the river water in which these organisms grew, and correlate well with changes in speleothem δ 18O records of east Asian monsoon rainfall from Hulu Cave and Dongge Cave in China. The new northwest Thailand δ 18O sequence indicates wetter and relatively unstable climatic conditions from 35,000 to 20,000 BP, followed by drier conditions from 20,000 to 11,500 BP. A period of peak aridity occurred around 15,600 BP during Heinrich Event 1, suggesting that the intertropical convergence zone shifted southward when the North Atlantic region cooled. However, there is little evidence for the Younger Dryas event at ˜12,800-11,500 BP. After 9,800 BP, precipitation increased substantially and climatic variability declined. Our findings provide an improved baseline against which to gauge interactions between early humans and climate change in Southeast Asia. For example, there was no significant change in the prehistoric flake stone technology used at Tham Lod and Ban Rai despite the bivalve δ 18O evidence for substantial climate change in the region. Also, the climatic impact of the Younger Dryas event appears to have been less intense in northwest Thailand compared to the cooling and drying observed in China, and may explain why agriculture made a relatively late appearance in Thailand, possibly involving migrants from China.

  9. Mesozoic-Cenozoic stratigraphy of the Fuegian Andes, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Olivero, Eduardo Bernardo; Malumián, Norberto

    2008-01-01

    The stratigraphy of the Argentinean Fuegian Andes reveals contrasting Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic regimes. The Lemaire Formation, submarine complex of bimodal volcanites, breccias, and sedimentary rocks; the Yahgán Formation, volcaniclastic apron of deep-marine andesite-rich turbidites and mudstones; and the Beauvoir Formation, slope mudstones, all evidence late Jurassic early Cretaceous extension and consequent origination of the Rocas Verdes Marginal Basin. The basal late Cretaceous ductile ...

  10. Subsurface geology at the Lake Mikata and Nakayama lowlands, Fukui Prefecture, central Japan. Implications on the late pleistocene activity for the Mikata fault zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lake Mikata and Nakayama lowlands are situated along the central coast of Wakasa Bay, at the center of the Japan Sea side of Honshu Island, and fringed by the Mikata fault zone at the east side. The 1662 Kanbun Great Earthquake (estimated magnitude of 7.2 to 7.6) occurred there with vertical crustal movements up to 3 to 4 meters. Submerged topography with thick alluvial deposits in the lowlands might have been caused by Late Quaternary crustal movements of the Mikata fault zone. We analyzed the subsurface geology of the lowlands using many drilling cores recently obtained for scientific purpose such as the 60-m long MK09 core and highway construction (represented by NEXCO core). The main results are summarized below. (1) Subsurface geology beneath the eastern basin and eastern coast of Lake Mikata is clarified by detailed investigations of many drilling cores up to 100 m deep including the NEXCO core. Many radiocarbon (14C) dating and tephrochronological correlations have elucidated the standard chronostratigraphy during the Late Quaternary in this area. At least 100-m thick sediments have deposited continuously for about 130 kyr, recording climatic and seismic events etc. during the last glacial period. (2) The MK09 core is composed of a repeated coarsening-upward sequence with rapid facies changes at unit boundaries. We infer that these units reflect the rapid rise of a relative level of a paleo-lake and subsequent progradation of alluvial fans. The mean interval of individual units is estimated to be about 7.7 kyr from the sedimentary age of each unit, and is considered to be an upper limit of the recurrence interval of the Mikata fault zone. (3) The Mikata fault is recognized for observations of new outcrops and core inspections at the northeastern part of the Nakayama lowland. The vertical displacement across the Mikata fault is inferred to be 30-35 m, and probably reached further after formation of a higher terrace. (4) The concealed Mikata fault extending N-S parallel to the Mikata fault on the east, is estimated from our drilling data. On the basis of the displacements of tephra horizons such as the Aira-Tn volcanic ash beds (AT) in deposits of the Nakayama lowland, it is possible that activity of this fault is equivalent to or larger than that of the Mikata fault. Further detailed studies by deeper drilling cores and seismic refraction surveys are required to clarify the E-W direction underground structure across the Mikata fault zone. They will unravel major development histories of this lowland with many datable materials. (author)

  11. Quaternary stratigraphy: Recent changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaudenji Tivadar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrections to the Quaternary stratigraphic division of Serbia was updated/renewed by lowering limit of the Pleistocene / Quaternary to the beginning of the Gelasian that is at approximately 2.588 million years. Rather than the officially rejected Penck & Brckner Alpine stratigraphic model, the use of oxygen isotope stages (OIS / MIS is recommended. Climatostratigraphic terms glacial and interglacial have a regional applicability and their use is recommended only in areas where there are traces of glaciation, while the terms cold and warm stage (or moderate stages should be used within the global context. Eopleistocene is a regional term for the former Soviet Union and due to its uniqueness it can hardly be applied in the stratigraphical scheme of the Quaternary depostis in Serbia. With the latest extension of the Lower Pleistocene, further use of Eopleistocene would lead to further confusion in stratigraphic correlation as such the use of the Lower / Early Pleistocene or other appropriate stratigraphic units is recommended. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 47007

  12. Late Pleistocene eolian features in southeastern Maryland and Chesapeake Bay region indicate strong WNW-NW winds accompanied growth of the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, H.W.; Litwin, R.J.; Pavich, M.J.; Brook, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Inactive parabolic dunes are present in southeastern Maryland, USA, along the east bank of the Potomac River. More elongate and finer-grained eolian deposits and paha-like ridges characterize the Potomac River-Patuxent River upland and the west side of Chesapeake Bay. These ridges are streamlined erosional features, veneered with eolian sediment and interspersed with dunes in the low-relief headwaters of Potomac- and Patuxent-river tributaries. Axis data for the dunes and ridges indicate formation by WNW-NW winds. Optically stimulated luminescence and radiocarbon age data suggest dune formation from ??? 33-15??ka, agreeing with the 30-13??ka ages Denny, C.S., Owens, J.P., Sirkin, L., Rubin, M., 1979. The Parsonburg Sand in the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware. U.S. Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 1067-B, 16??pp. suggested for eolian deposits east of Chesapeake Bay. Age range and paleowind direction(s) for eolian features in the Bay region approximate those for late Wisconsin loess in the North American midcontinent. Formation of midcontinent loess and Bay-region eolian features was coeval with rapid growth of the Laurentide Ice Sheet and strong cooling episodes (??18O minima) evident in Greenland ice cores. Age and paleowind-direction coincidence, for eolian features in the midcontinent and Bay region, indicates strong mid-latitude WNW-NW winds for several hundred kilometers south of the Laurentide glacial terminus that were oblique to previously simulated anticyclonic winds for the last glacial maximum.

  13. Oxygen and silicon stable isotopes of diatom silica. Reconstructing changes in surface water hydrography and silicic acid utilization in the late Pleistocene subarctic Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deglacial variations in upper ocean nutrient dynamics and stratification in high latitudes, as well as associated changes in thermohaline overturning circulation, are thought to have played a key role in changing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This thesis examines the relationship between past changes in subarctic Pacific upper ocean stratification and nutrient (silicic acid) utilization, using oxygen and silicon stable isotopes of diatom silica, for the first time at millennial-scale resolution and analyzed with a new and efficient instrumentation set-up. The isotopic data, presented in three manuscripts, show a consistent picture of millennial-scale variability in upper ocean stratification and silicic acid utilization during the last ∝50 ka BP, e.g. indicating that the subarctic Pacific was a source region for atmospheric CO2 during the last deglaciation (late Heinrich Stadial 1 and the Boelling/Alleroed). The presented results demonstrate the high potential of combined diatom oxygen and silicon stable isotope analysis especially for, but not restricted to, marine regions characterized by a low biogenic carbonate content like the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean.

  14. Tectonic control on the stratigraphic framework of Late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits in Marajó Island, State of Pará, eastern Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilce F. Rossetti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view that the Brazilian Amazonia is located in a tectonically stable area since the Cretaceous is changing in front of the increasing documentation of fault reactivations even during the Holocene. How the sedimentary record has responded to these events is an issue that remains to be approached with basis on field data. This work focuses on the stratigraphic correlation of late Quaternary deposits from eastern Marajó Island, with the goal of demonstrating the role of fault reactivation on the origin and preservation of these deposits. Despite the location in a stable platform of a continental passive margin, three studied stratigraphic units display significant vertical offsets that define two depocenters that are better explained through tectonic displacements. This interpretation is reinforced by several morphostructural features related to faults that occur between the studied drills. Without the influence of tectonics, sediment preservation in this characteristically low-lying terrain would have been negligible. The results of the present work motivate to look for other tectonically-influenced areas in Amazonia, which similarly might have acted as sites for sediment accommodation during the late Quaternary. These sedimentary records have great potential to be the source of valuable information for reconstructing Quaternary geological events in Northern Brazil.A visão tradicional de que a Amazônia brasileira localiza-se em ma área tectonicamente estável desde o Cretáceo está mudando perante a crescente documentação de reativações de falha, até mesmo durante o Holoceno. Como o registro sedimentar respondeu a esses eventos é um tema que permanece por ser abordado com base em dados de campo. Este trabalho enfatiza a correlação estratigráfica de depósitos quaternários tardios no leste da Ilha do Marajó, com o objetivo de demonstrar a importância de reativações de falha na origem e preservação desses depósitos. Apesar da localização em área de plataforma de uma margem continental passiva, três unidades estratigráficas estudadas mostram significantes rejeitos verticais, que definem dois depocentros, explicados por deslocamentos tectônicos. Esta interpretação é reforçada por várias feições morfoestruturais relacionadas com falhas localizadas entre os poços estudados. Sem influência tectônica, a preservação de sedimentos nesse terreno, caracteristicamente plano, seria imperceptível. Os resultados do presente trabalho motivam a procurar outras áreas tectonicamente influenciadas da Amazônia, que possam ter atuado como sítios de acomodação de sedimentos durante o Quaternário tardio. Esses registros sedimentares têm grande potencial de serem fontes de informações valiosas para auxiliar na reconstrução de eventos geológicos quaternários no norte do Brasil.

  15. Late Miocene to Pleistocene Environmental Changes in the Western Qaidam Basin (NE Tibetan Plateau) Revealed By Magnetic Properties in Lacustrine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herb, C.; Appel, E.; Zhang, W.; Koutsodendris, A.; Fang, X.; Pross, J.

    2014-12-01

    The advantage of studying magnetic properties of the lacustrine sediments deposited in the Qaidam paleolake to reconstruct past environmental changes was shown in detail for the 940-m-long drill core SG-1 (2.69-0.08 Ma) recovered from the western Qaidam Basin. Especially magnetic susceptibility (χ) turned out to be a useful proxy indicating past humidity changes in the study region. The causes of χ variation could be related to weathering (low-temperature oxidation) in the catchment area and a changing catchment area, respectively. To benefit further from magnetic properties as high-resolution paleoclimate proxies in the Qaidam paleolake, we expand our magnetic record to the late Miocene by investigating magnetic properties of the 723-m deep drilling SG-1b. While SG-1 was drilled in the flat lying strata of the Chahansilatu sub-basin, SG-1b was recovered from the adjacent Jianshan anticline (in ~20 km distance from SG-1). Magnetostratigraphy of core SG-1b detects a time span ranging from 7.3 to 1.6 Ma, missing the younger sequence as a consequence of the anticline structure. We analyze climatic implications of the magnetic record of SG-1b, especially by observing 750 hysteresis loops and 20 FORC diagrams, and check for small-scale variations of the studied sediments by comparing χ of bulk samples (in the order of 10 g) and samples used for hysteresis measurements (in the order of 0.01 g). Spectral analysis based on the time scale provided by magnetostratigraphy reveals variations of χ in the order of Milankovitch cycles (precession, obliquity, and eccentricity) indicating insolation changes as one important driving factor of the magnetic concentration signal. The magnetic records of SG-1 and SG-1b are also used to check implications of the anticline structure on magnetic signatures by comparing the overlapping interval of both cores (2.69-1.6 Ma).

  16. Pleistocene horses (genus Equus in the central Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forsten Ann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the fossil horses of the genus Equus from the central Balkans, a mountainous area comprising Serbia and Montenegro, is presented in this paper. The time period covered by the finds is from the late Early to and including the Late Pleistocene, but the record is not complete: the dated finds are Late Pleistocene in age, while Early and Middle Pleistocene are poorly represented. The horses found resemble those from neighbouring countries from the same time period, probably showing the importance of river valleys as migration routes. The Morava River valley runs in a roughly south-to-north direction, connecting, via the Danube and Tisa River valleys the Hungarian Pannonian Plain in the north with northern Greece in the south, via the Vardar River valley in Macedonia. In Pleistocene, large mammals, including horses, probably used this route for dispersal.

  17. Late Pleistocene to Holocene composite speleothem 18O and 13C chronologies from South Island, New Zealanddid a global Younger Dryas really exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. W.; King, D. N. T.; Zhao, J.-X.; Collerson, K. D.

    2005-02-01

    Oxygen and carbon data from eight stalagmites from northwest South Island are combined to produce composite records of ?18O and ?13C from 23.4 ka to the present. The chronology is anchored by 43 thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) uranium series ages. Delta 18O values are interpreted as having a first order positive relationship to temperature, but also to be influenced by precipitation in a complex manner. Delta 13C is interpreted as responding negatively to increases in atmospheric CO 2 concentration, biological activity and precipitation amount. Six climatic phases are recognized. After adjustment of 1.2 for the ice volume effect, the ?18O record between 23 and 18 ka varies around -3.72 compared to the Holocene average of -3.17. Late-glacial warming commenced between 18.2 and 17.8 ka and accelerated after 16.7 ka, culminating in a positive excursion between 14.70 and 13.53 ka. This was followed by a significant negative excursion between 13.53 and 11.14 ka of up to 0.55 depth that overlapped the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR) and spanned the Younger Dryas (YD). Positive ?18O excursions at 11.14 ka and 6.91-6.47 ka represent the warmest parts of the Holocene. The mid-Holocene from 6 to 2 ka was marked by negative excursions that coincide with increased glacial activity in the South Island. A short positive excursion from 0.71 to 0.57 ka was slightly later than the Medieval Warm Period of Europe. Delta 13C values were high until 17.79 ka after which there was an abrupt decrease to 17.19 ka followed by a steady decline to a minimum at 10.97 ka. Then followed a general increase, suggesting a drying trend, to 3.23 ka followed by a further general decline. The abrupt decrease in ?-values after 17.79 ka probably corresponds to an increase in atmospheric CO 2 concentration, biological activity and wetness at the end of the Last Glaciation, but the reversal identified in the ?18O record from 13.53 to 11.14 ka was not reflected in ?13C changes. The lowest ?13C values coincided with the early Holocene climatic suboptimum when conditions were relatively wet as well as mild. Major trends in the ?18O c record are similar to the Northern Hemisphere, but second order detail is often distinctly different. Consequently, at the millennial scale, a more convincing case can be made for asymmetric climatic response between the two hemispheres rather than synchronicity.

  18. Hippidion saldiasi Roth, 1899 (Mammalia, Perissodactyla en el Pleistoceno tardío de Calama, norte de Chile Late Pleistocene Hippidion saldiasi Roth, 1899 (Mammalia, Perissodactyla from Calama, northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA TERESA ALBERDI

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Se describen restos del género Hippidion procedentes de la zona del desierto de Atacama (Calama, Segunda Región de Chile. El conjunto analizado corresponde a un esqueleto bastante completo proveniente del yacimiento Betecsa 1, así como escasas unidades del yacimiento Kamac Mayu. En ambos sitios se identifica H. saldiasi. A partir de dos dataciones radiométricas por AMS del ejemplar estudiado, los restos se sitúan estratigráficamente en el Pleistoceno Superior (21.070 ± 100 AP y 21.380 ± 100 14C AP. Se infieren datos ambientales y de dieta a partir de análisis de isótopos estables en los restos de Hippidion saldiasi del sitio Betecsa 1 cuyo valor de δ13C en hueso fue de -15,45 y el valor en esmalte de dientes fue de -16,68, sugiriendo una alimentación con pastos C3. El cráneo recuperado es el primero conocido de esta especieThis paper describes the Hippidion bones recovered from the Atacama Desert (Calama, Second Region of Chile. The analyzed assemblage corresponds to a nearly complete skeleton from Betecsa 1 site and more poorly preserved remains from Kamac Mayu site. In both H. saldiasi is identified. Two 14C radiometric determinations indicate late Pleistocene age for these remains (21,070 ± 100 BP and 21,380 ± 100 BP. Environmental and diet inferences from stable isotope analysis are also presented. The δ13C value from Betecsa 1 horses (-15.45 from bone sample and -16.68 from enamel sample suggest a dietary adaptation exclusively C3 feeders. This is the first skull and associated skeleton recovered of this species

  19. The Balitx landslide (Mallorca, Spain) and its possible seismic origin: active spreading since the Late Pleistocene; El deslizamiento de Balitx (Mallorca) y su posible origen sismico. Procesos activos desde el Pleistoceno superior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, R. M.; Rodriguez-Peces, M. J.; Azanon, J. M.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, J.; Roldan, F. J.; Garcia-Moreno, I.; Galabert, B.; Garcia-Mayordomo, J.

    2013-02-01

    The Balitx landslide, located on the steep coastal side of the Tramuntana range on the island of Mallorca, is a large translational rock landslide in which the failure surface coincides with the reactivation of an earlier normal fault. The dating of calcite striae on the fault plane with U/Th techniques reveals that the last movement was over 400 kyr ago, which falls outside of the range of this method. The volume of the landslide is estimated to be over 700 million cubic metres, with a north-westward displacement of 300 m. Active extensional cracks as well as block spreads have been identified along the main scarp, together with displacement and toppling of blocks, the beginning of which coincides with oxygen isotope stage OIS 5a (Late Pleistocene = 83 kyr), a wetter and warmer period than the present. Currently active decametre-long cracks up to 50 m wide can be seen to affect the displaced materials. They reveal the rupture of the displaced block into several units at different speeds. A retrospective analysis of slope stability has been carried out, taking into account different scenarios according to three critical sea stands. All the scenarios are stable, with a safety factor of over 1.35. These results support the thesis that the Balitx landslide could have been triggered by seismicity. A study of the Balitx landslide under dynamic conditions reveals that the landslide could have been triggered by a moderate-to-high-magnitude earthquake (Mw=6.0) located close to the landslide (10-30 km) and probably related to some of the active faults identified in Majorca, such as the Palma Fault. (Author) 58 refs.

  20. New evidence of the sabertooth cat Smilodon (Carnivora: Machairodontinae in the late Pleistocene of southern Chilean Patagonia Nueva evidencia del gato dientes de sable Smilodon (Carnivora: Machairodontinae en el Pleistoceno tardío de Patagonia meridional chilena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALFREDO PRIETO

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Southern Patagonia is rich in late Pleistocene mammals, especially herbivores such as Camelids, Equids and Xenarthrans. Carnivores, on the other hand, are not commonly found in the paleontological record. One genus, Smilodon, is of particular interest because its presence in the region has not been demonstrated. In this paper, we present new fossil dental evidence that supports the presence of Smilodon populator (Lund in the region. This evidence corresponds to the most southern record of the genus in the world, and the final step in the colonization of South America after the Great American Biotic Interchange. An AMS radiocarbon date on teeth indicates that the remains from Southern Chilean Patagonia are the most recent record for the genus in South America.Surpatagonia es particularmente rica en mamíferos finiplesitocenos, particularmente camélidos, équidos y xenartros. Los carnívoros, por su parte, se encuentran representados en menor número en el registro paleontológico. Dentro de estos, el género Smilodon, es de particular interés debido a que su presencia en la región no ha sido convincentemente demostrada. En este trabajo presentamos evidencia dental que permite confirmar la presencia de Smilodon populator (Lund en la región. Esta evidencia corresponde al registro más sureño de este taxón y al paso final en la colonización de América del Sur después del Gran Intercambio Biótico Americano. Un fechado radiocarbónico directo AMS indica que los restos de Patagonia del Sur corresponden a los registros más tardíos para este género en el subcontinente.

  1. Late Pleistocene Panthera leo spelaea (Goldfuss, 1810 skeletons from the Czech Republic (central Europe; their pathological cranial features and injuries resulting from intraspecific fights, conflicts with hyenas, and attacks on cave bears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diedrich C G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The world’s first mounted "skeletons" of the Late Pleistocene Panthera leo spelaea (Goldfuss, 1810 from the Sloup Cave hyena and cave bear den in the Moravian Karst (Czech Republic, central Europe are compilations that have used bones from several different individuals. These skeletons are described and compared with the most complete known skeleton in Europe from a single individual, a lioness skeleton from the hyena den site at the Srbsko Chlum-Komín Cave in the Bohemian Karst (Czech Republic. Pathological features such as rib fractures and brain-case damage in these specimens, and also in other skulls from the Zoolithen Cave (Germany that were used for comparison, are indicative of intraspecific fights, fights with Ice Age spotted hyenas, and possibly also of fights with cave bears. In contrast, other skulls from the Perick and Zoolithen caves in Germany and the Urșilor Cave in Romania exhibit post mortem damage in the form of bites and fractures probably caused either by hyena scavenging or by lion cannibalism. In the Srbsko Chlum-Komín Cave a young and brain-damaged lioness appears to have died (or possibly been killed by hyenas within the hyena prey-storage den. In the cave bear dominated bone-rich Sloup and Zoolithen caves of central Europe it appears that lions may have actively hunted cave bears, mainly during their hibernation. Bears may have occasionally injured or even killed predating lions, but in contrast to hyenas, the bears were herbivorous and so did not feed on the lion carcasses. The articulated lion skeletons found in cave bear dens deep within caves scattered across Europe (such as those from the Sloup, Zoolithen and Urșilor caves can therefore now be explained as being the result of lions being killed during predation on cave bears, either by the cave bears defending themselves or as a result of interspecific fights.

  2. Palaeoseismic evidence for a medieval earthquake, and preliminary estimate of late Pleistocene slip-rate, on the Firouzkuh strike-slip fault in the Central Alborz region of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, H.; Ritz, J.-F.; Walker, R. T.; Salamati, R.; Rizza, M.; Patnaik, R.; Hollingsworth, J.; Alimohammadian, H.; Jalali, A.; Kaveh Firouz, A.; Shahidi, A.

    2014-03-01

    The 55 km-long Firouzkuh fault is located in the Central Alborz Mountains of Iran. It is a left-lateral fault, which dips to the south, and possesses a small dip-slip component of motion that we interpret to result from extension. The ratio of horizontal to vertical displacement across the fault, calculated from the cumulative displacement of landscape features, is 7.6. We provide constraints on the timing of the last earthquake on the Firouzkuh fault from two trenches (T1 and T2) across the fault zone, excavated in 2004, and located east of Firouzkuh city. The trenches expose faulted sedimentary deposits. Two optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages from sediments in the lower part of trench T1 date from the late Pleistocene (15.9 0.9 ka and 27.1 1.7 ka). The younger of the two dated units in T1 is displaced vertically across the fault by 2.2-4.4 m, from which we estimate a strike-slip displacement of 18.2-33.4 m, and hence a average horizontal slip-rate of 1.1-2.2 mm/yr. The sediments exposed in T1 do not yield constraints on the most recent earthquake history. In trench T2, however, human skeletal remains of a middle aged male, which yield a radiocarbon age of 1159 28 BP (corresponding to a mean calendar age of 791 AD), were found within a faulted alluvial layer at a depth of 60-70 cm from the surface. The existence of these medieval human places shows that a surface-rupturing earthquake occurred at some time after 1159 28 BP. The amount of slip in each earthquake on the Firouzkuh fault is difficult to estimate, but assuming the entire 55 km fault length ruptures in each event, they will have had a maximum magnitude of 7.1. At our estimated late Quaternary slip-rate of 1.1-2.2 mm/yr magnitude 7.1 earthquakes, involving 1.2 m average displacement, would be expected to occur every 1100-540 years. As the last earthquake on the Firouzkuh fault may be up to 700 years in age we suggest that the Firouzkuh fault is a major hazard for earthquakes in the near future.

  3. Continental deposits and archaeological data in the Trieste Karst area (north-east Italy: evidence of sea-level changes and possible tectonic activity in the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschian, G.

    1993-07-01

    The relationships between the land and sea in the northern Adriatic at the PleistoceneHolocene boundary are examined by considering sea-level curves and archaeological data. Changes in the Mesolithic (Early Holocene) economy of the inhabitants can be interpreted as a result of palaeoecological variations due to glacioecustatic sea-level changes and recent tectonics. This hypothesis is also supported by evidence of older tectonic movements which may have continued until the end of the Pleistocene.

  4. STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CENOZOIC SUBSURFACE SUCCESSION OF THEVENETIAN-FRIULIAN BASIN (NE ITALY): A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    NICOLETTA MANCIN; MIRIAM COBIANCHI; ANDREA DI GIULIO; DANIELE CATELLANI

    2007-01-01

    The present paper reviews and improves the stratigraphy of the Cenozoic subsurface succession of the Venetian-Friulian Basin by means of a foraminiferal study, integrated by calcareous nannofossil analysis in some key stratigraphic intervals, of thirteen ENI wells drilled in the 60-70s and kept reserved since now.The Venetian Friulian Basin is a complex basin due to the superimposition of three overlapping foreland systems, during the Paleocene to Pleistocene time interval. These systems are ...

  5. Quaternary alluvial stratigraphy and palaeoclimatic reconstruction at the Thar margin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, M.; Tandon, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    /chlorite and smectite/illite of the alluvial palaeosols have been used as proxy indicators of climate change. These indicate wet phases during the OIS 5 and OIS 1. The overall stratigraphic development is discussed in the framework of fluvial response to climate change during the Late Pleistocene....

  6. Middle pleistocene pollen biostratigraphy in the central North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Sten R.

    1998-09-01

    Middle Pleistocene sequences from the northernmost (Fladen Ground) and the southernmost (Devil's Hole area) parts of the British sector of the central North Sea are correlated on the basis of pollen biostratigraphy. Four pollen stratigraphies are compared, with reference taken to existing borehole and seismic data. The most pronounced influence of reworked pre-Quaternary sediments are present in an upper interval, rich in pre-Neogene palynomorphs, and in a lower interval, rich in Neogene palynomorphs. This change can be related to Middle Pleistocene glacial periods. The pollen content in the younger interval indicates a British provenance, possibly correlated with the Saalian stage. The pollen content in the older interval indicates derivation from the Scandinavian ice sheet, and may correlate with the Elsterian stage. The pollen stratigraphies between these two intervals reflect a vegetational transition from dwarf shrub heaths and peatlands towards boreal forests, possibly followed by a return to a more open landscape. This pollen stratigraphical succession is best preserved in the Devil's Hole sequences. In the Fladen Ground the upper part of the sequence may have been glacially eroded. Deposits of Cromerian Complex age occur at base of the Middle Pleistocene sequences.

  7. Pleistocene and pre-Pleistocene Begonia speciation in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plana, Vanessa; Gascoigne, Angus; Forrest, Laura L; Harris, David; Pennington, R Toby

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a historical biogeographic analysis of African Begonia based on combined internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and trnL intron sequences. Age range estimates for Begonia in Africa ranged from only 1.5 Ma for some terminal nodes to 27 Ma for basal nodes when the ages of Réunion (2 Ma) andMayotte (5.4 Ma) were used to date the split between Begonia salaziensis and Begonia comorensis. Assuming a more recent origin age for Begonia salaziensis (2 Ma) provided age estimates in other parts of the phylogeny which agreed with patterns observed in other African organisms. A large proportion of the Begonia diversity seen today in Africa is of pre-Pleistocene origin. Species of Pleistocene origin are concentrated in species-rich groups such as sections Loasibegonia, Scutobegonia, and Tetraphila, which have their centre of diversity in western Central Africa. Phylogenetically isolated taxa such as Begonia longipetiolata, Begonia iucunda, and Begonia thomeana date to the late Miocene, a period of extended aridification on the African continent that had severe effects on African rain forest species. A general pattern is identified where phylogenetically isolated species occur outside the main identified rain forest refuges. Endemic species on the island of São Tomé such as Begonia baccata, Begonia molleri, and Begonia subalpestris appear to be palaeoendemics. Of these species, the most recent age estimate is for B. baccata, which is dated at ca. 3 Ma. Therefore, São Tomé appears to have functioned as an important (if previously unrecognised) pre-Pleistocene refuge. On the mainland, areas such as the Massif of Chaillu in Gabon, southern Congo (Brazzaville), and far western areas of Congo (Kinshasa) have played similar roles to São Tomé. PMID:15062787

  8. Interhemispheric correlation of late pleistocene glacial events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, T V; Heusser, C J; Andersen, B G; Moreno, P I; Hauser, A; Heusser, L E; Schlüchter, C; Marchant, D R; Denton, G H

    1995-09-15

    A radiocarbon chronology shows that piedmont glacier lobes in the Chilean Andes achieved maxima during the last glaciation at 13,900 to 14,890, 21,000, 23,060, 26,940, 29,600, and >/=33,500 carbon-14 years before present ((14)C yr B.P.) in a cold and wet Subantarctic Parkland environment. The last glaciation ended with massive collapse of ice lobes close to 14,000(14)C yr B.P., accompanied by an influx of North Patagonian Rain Forest species. In the Southern Alps of New Zealand, additional glacial maxima are registered at 17,720(14)C yr B.P., and at the beginning of the Younger Dryas at 11,050 (14)C yr B. P. These glacial maxima in mid-latitude mountains rimming the South Pacific were coeval with ice-rafting pulses in the North Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, the last termination began suddenly and simultaneously in both polar hemispheres before the resumption of the modern mode of deep-water production in the Nordic Seas. Such interhemispheric coupling implies a global atmospheric signal rather than regional climatic changes caused by North Atlantic thermohaline switches or Laurentide ice surges. PMID:17789444

  9. Obliquity and precession as pacemakers of Pleistocene deglaciations

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Fabo; Bailer-Jones, C.A.L.

    2015-01-01

    The Milankovitch theory states that the orbital eccentricity, precession, and obliquity of the Earth influence our climate by modulating the summer insolation at high latitudes in the northern hemisphere. Despite considerable success of this theory in explaining climate change over the Pleistocene epoch (2.6 to 0.01 Myr ago), it is inconclusive with regard to which combination of orbital elements paced the 100 kyr glacial-interglacial cycles over the late Pleistocene. Here we explore the role...

  10. Temporal labyrinths of eastern Eurasian Pleistocene humans

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiu-Jie; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Liu, Wu; Xing, Song; Trinkaus, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of the paleobiology and morphological affinities of the Neandertals and other Late Pleistocene archaic humans is central to resolving issues regarding the emergence and establishment of modern human morphology and diversity. One feature, which has been used as a distinctive Neandertal feature in this context, is the apparently derived shape of their temporal labyrinths (especially semicircular canals). Analysis of East Asian labyrinths documents the “Neandertal” pattern in the ...

  11. Pleistocene Paleoart of Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pleistocene rock art is abundant in Australia, but has so far received only limited attention. Instead there has been a trend, begun over a century ago, to search for presumed depictions of extinct megafauna and the tracks of such species. All these notions have been discredited, however, and the current evidence suggests that figurative depiction was introduced only during the Holocene, never reaching Tasmania. Nevertheless, some Australian rock art has been attributed to the Pleistocene by direct dating methods, and its nature implies that a significant portion of the surviving corpus of rock art may also be of such age. In particular much of Australian cave art is of the Ice Age, or appears to be so, and any heavily weathered or patinated petroglyphs on particularly hard rocks are good candidates for Pleistocene antiquity. On the other hand, there is very limited evidence of mobiliary paleoart of such age in Australia.

  12. Una sucesin de paleosuelos superpuestos del pleistoceno medio - tardio, holoceno: Zona sur de La Plata, Provincia de Buenos Aires A succession of superposed paleosols (Middle-Late Pleistocene and Holocene in the south area of La Plata. Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perla A Imbellone

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Se estudia una sucesin (Pleistoceno medio-tardo y Holoceno de 11 m de exposicin, ubicada en un interfluvio plano de la zona sur de la ciudad de la Plata (3455 00S y 575730O. El objetivo del trabajo es analizar los procesos sedimentario-pedolgicos acaecidos a fin de obtener: a nuevas evidencias que permitan hacer consideraciones sobre el modelo sedimentario-pedolgico propuesto por Teruggi e Imbellone (1987; b correlacionar los eventos indicados en la descripcin del perfil tipo en los diferentes frentes de exposicin de la cantera, y c correlacionar el contenido de vitroclastos con otros perfiles de la zona. En el perfil tipo se identifican 6 unidades constituidas por loess retrabajado y paleosuelos asociados con rasgos semejantes al de suelos actuales. La porcin superior muestra cambios morfolgicos ms sutiles que la inferior hasta la base y correspondera a la Fm La Postrera y Fm Buenos Aires hasta 2,10 y 4,45 m de profundidad, respectivamente. Se identifican dos paleosuelos adems del suelo actual separados por una superficie de erosin suave y discontinua, y una discontinuidad temporal insinuada p or cambios de color y caractersticas de las calcretas. A partir de 4,45 m de profundidad (Fm Ensenada la sucesin refleja acontecimientos sedimentario-pedolgicos identificables claramente en el campo y laboratorio. Se identifican tres paleosuelos superpuestos separados por superficies de erosin. Dos de ellas onduladas y acompaadas por concreciones de carbonato de calcio subparalelas a la superficie de erosin a 4,45 y 9,60 m, respectivamente, y otra totalmente planar a 7,30 m slo interrumpida en su continuidad lateral por megacrotovinas. La variacin lateral de las paleosuperficies muestra unidades de contactos concordantes, paralelos y subparalelos con escasa variacin de espesores entre ellas. Los rasgos pedolgicos con mayor variacin entre uno y otro frente son los de carbonatacin e hidromorfismo. La ciclicidad sedimentariopedolgica est mejor definida en la base de la cantera. Toda la seccin posee clases texturales arcillo limosas y franco limosas, y con caracterstica de loess retrabajado. El intervalo modal es 62-31mm (limo grueso y 62-125 mm (arena muy fina con escasa representatividad de las subfracciones de mayor tamao. La arena se incrementa en la mitad inferior de la sucesin por aumento de pseudopartculas. La micromorfologa fue instrumental en la verificacin de a procesos pedogenticos superpuestos de iluviacin, hidromorfismo y carbonatacin indicados por rasgos texturales, amorfos y cristalinos; b presencia de biorasgos como pedotblulos y fbrica excremental de fundamental importancia en procesos de bioturbacin, y c presencia de microestructura laminar, sedirelictos y pedorelictos que aseguran el carcter retrabajado del loess. En los paleosuelos inferiores la evidencia micromorfolgica se corresponde con la observacin de campo. En cambio, en los superiores los aparentes rasgos macroscpicos de iluviacin perteneceran a superficies de friccin muy finas en correspondencia con abundante fbrica plsmica poro, grano estriada y reticulada. El modelo clsico de sedimentacin y pedognesis episdica se aplicara a los tres paleosuelos inferiores. Ellos estn separados espacialmente en la columna sedimentaria, con el material originario identificable, y decapitados por una superficie de erosin. Se habran desarrollado con aporte discontinuo de sedimentos y un perodo de pedognesis suficiente para desarrollar un suelo maduro. En los paleosuelos superiores habra existido un aporte continuo o levemente discontinuo pero lento, que permiti la formacin de rasgos pedolgicos mientras el paisaje se elevaba acrecionalmente y se produca la superposicin de pedognesis.A 11-m deep pedological sedimentary succession (Middle-Late Pleistocene and Holocene has been studied in a quarry exposure located on a flat interfluve, in the vicinity of La Plata airport, Argentina (345500S y 575730

  13. A long-lasting steady period of isotopically heavy carbon in the late Silurian ocean: evolution of the δ13 record and its significance for an integrated δ13, graptolite and conodont stratigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frýda J

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The mid-Ludfordian carbon isotope excursion (CIE is probably the most intensively studied of all Palaeozoic geochemical events. This is mainly due to the fact that it represents the largest perturbation of the global carbon cycle during the entire Phanerozoic and the second largest in Earth’s history. Herein an uninterrupted and complete δ13C record is presented for the first time across the mid-Ludfordian carbon isotope excursion from the middle palaeolatitudes (Barrandian, Perunica, northern peri-Gondwana. Similar evolution of the δ13C geochemical anomaly identified in middle palaeolatitudinal and palaeotropical regions enables three distinct chemostratigraphic zones (R-Zone, S-Zone and F-Zone to be established, differentiated on the basis of their δ13C dynamics. Application of the δ13C chemostratigraphy has considerably improved correlation of earlier described Barrandian sections and allows re-evaluation of the duration of several gaps in sedimentary records. Detailed comparison of the δ13C chemostratigraphic zonation with graptolite and conodont biostratigraphic zonations has resulted in a proposal for an integrated δ13C, graptolite and conodont stratigraphy for the mid-Ludfordian interval. Analysis of the available δ13C data on the global mid-Ludfordian CIE revealed that high δ13C values attain a similar level during a long-lasting steady period. There is no statistically significant difference in the level of these high values among the δ13C records obtained from different palaeocontinents. This fact suggests that the mid-Ludfordian δ13C anomaly from different palaeocontinents originated from the same global oceanic isotopic reservoir rather than being independently evolved within small restricted epeiric basins.

  14. Obliquity and precession as pacemakers of Pleistocene deglaciations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Fabo; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.

    2015-08-01

    The Milankovitch theory states that the orbital eccentricity, precession, and obliquity of the Earth influence our climate by modulating the summer insolation at high latitudes in the northern hemisphere. Despite considerable success of this theory in explaining climate change over the Pleistocene epoch (2.6-0.01 Myr ago), it is inconclusive with regard to which combination of orbital elements paced the 100 kyr glacial-interglacial cycles over the late Pleistocene. Here we explore the role of the orbital elements in pacing the Pleistocene deglaciations by modeling ice-volume variations in a Bayesian approach. When comparing models, this approach takes into account the uncertainties in the data as well as the different degrees of model complexity. We find that the Earth's obliquity (axial tilt) plays a dominant role in pacing the glacial cycles over the whole Pleistocene, while precession only becomes important in pacing major deglaciations after the transition of the dominant period from 41 kyr to 100 kyr (the mid-Pleistocene transition). We also find that geomagnetic field and orbital inclination variations are unlikely to have paced the Pleistocene deglaciations. We estimate that the mid-Pleistocene transition took place over a 220 kyr interval centered on a time 715 kyr ago, although the data permit a range of 600-1000 kyr. This transition, occurring within just two 100 kyr cycles, indicates a relatively rapid change in the climate response to insolation.

  15. Evaluation of the structure and stratigraphy over Richton Dome, Mississippi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and stratigraphy over Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, have been evaluated from 70 borings that were completed to various depths above the dome. Seven lithologic units have been identified and tentatively correlated with the regional Tertiary stratigraphy. Structure-contour and thickness maps of the units show the effects of dome growth from Eocene through early Pliocene time. Growth of the salt stock from late Oligocene through early Pliocene is estimated to have averaged 0.6 to 2.6 centimeters (0.2 to 1.1 inches) per 1000 years. No dome growth has occurred since the early Pliocene. The late Oligocene to early Pliocene strata over and adjacent to the dome reflect arching over the entire salt stock; some additional arching over individual centers may represent pre-Quaternary differential movement in the salt stock. The lithology and structure of the caprock at the Richton Salt Dome indicate that the caprock probably was completely formed by late Oligocene. In late Oligocene, the caprock was fractured by arching and altered by gypsum veining. Since late Oligocene, there are no indications of significant hydrologic connections through the caprock - that is, there are no indications of dissolution collapse or further anhydrite caprock accumulation. This structural and stratigraphic analysis provides insights on dome growth history, dome geometry, and neardome hydrostratigraphy that will aid in planning site characterization field activities, including an exploratory shaft, and in the conceptual design of a high-level waste (HLW) repository

  16. A phase-space model for Pleistocene ice volume

    CERN Document Server

    Imbrie, John Z; Lisiecki, Lorraine E

    2011-01-01

    We present a phase-space model that simulates Pleistocene ice volume changes based on Earth's orbital parameters. Terminations in the model are triggered by a combination of ice volume and orbital forcing and agree well with age estimates for Late Pleistocene terminations. The average phase at which model terminations begin is approximately 90 +/- 90 degrees before the maxima in all three orbital cycles. The large variability in phase is likely caused by interactions between the three cycles and ice volume. Unlike previous ice volume models, this model produces an orbitally driven increase in 100-kyr power during the mid-Pleistocene transition without any change in model parameters. This supports the hypothesis that Pleistocene variations in the 100-kyr power of glacial cycles could be caused, at least in part, by changes in Earth's orbital parameters, such as amplitude modulation of the 100-kyr eccentricity cycle, rather than changes within the climate system.

  17. Sedimentología de unidades loéssicas (Pleistoceno tardío - Holoceno del centro-sur de Santa Fe Sedimentology of loessic units (Late Pleistocene - Holocene of the center-south of Santa Fe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Kröhling

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una caracterización integral de las secuencias loess-paleosuelos aflorantes en un área típica de la Pampa Norte, basada en el análisis estratigráfico y en la variabilidad granulométrica y mineralógica. El estudio sedimentológico de detalle del loess fue practicado en dos perfiles del centro-sur de Santa Fe (Tortugas y Carcarañá. El loess está representado por la Fm Tezanos Pinto, integrada por dos miembros separados por una discordancia intraformacional (generados durante el Ultimo Máximo Glacial y el Pleistoceno tardío-Holoceno temprano, respectivamente. Esta unidad está coronada por un suelo parcialmente erodado, desarrollado durante el Período Hypsithermal. Una formación loéssica delgada (Fm San Guillermo; Holoceno tardío yace sobre el suelo decapitado. La fracción granulométrica dominante de la Fm Tezanos Pinto en ambos perfiles es el limo (≈70%, con participación subordinada de arena muy fina y arcilla. En general, el tamaño medio corresponde a la fracción limo entre 4 y 6 Φ; con una tendencia granodecreciente y un mejoramiento del coeficiente de selección desde el miembro inferior hacia el superior. Las curvas de frecuencias acumuladas evidencian una subpoblación transportada por saltación y dos subpoblaciones de partículas asociadas a transporte por suspensión. Cada una de estas dos subpoblaciones representa entre el 30 y el 50% de la distribución. La población mayoritaria de minerales livianos de la fracción modal de arenas (125- 63µm del loess aflorante en ambos perfiles está formada por materiales volcaniclásticos andinos aportados por vía eólica (cuarzo policristalino, microaglomerados, vidrio volcánico, fragmentos líticos y plagioclasas. La fuente minoritaria integra minerales provenientes del basamento cristalino de las Sierras Pampeanas, transportados y depositados por acción fluvial (cuarzo y feldespatos potásicos. El limo (63-4µm está compuesto por cuarzo, con menor cantidad de feldespatos; la illita es el mineral arcilloso más abundante. En la arcilla (An integral characterization of the outcropping loess-paleosols sequence in a type area of North Pampa is presented, based on the stratigraphic analyses and the grain size and mineralogic variability. Two loess profiles representative of interfluve areas of southern Santa Fe province were selected for detailed sedimentological analyses (Tortugas and Carcarañá Profiles. The loessic cover is part of the quaternary aeolian sedimentary body of the Argentine plain, defined as "Pampean Aeolian System" by Iriondo (1990a and Iriondo and Kröhling (1995. Both geomorphological and sedimentological systems compose the Pampean Aeolian System: a Sand Sea and a Peripheral Loess Belt. The Loess Belt, about 2,000 Km long and 250-300 Km wide in North Pampa, is located at the northeast of the Sand Sea. The sediments of the Pampean Aeolian System accumulated during the first stages of the last Pleistocene glaciation; later on they were partially reworked during successive dry phases and underwent pedogenesis in humid periods (Iriondo and Kröhling, 1995. The outcropping sedimentary sequence of the area is represented by fine aeolian units interbedded with buried soils. The Tezanos Pinto Fm (Iriondo, 1987 is the typical loessic unit of the North Pampa. In most places (Carcarañá Profile it lays in erosive contact on a dissipation deposit of aeolian sand (Carcarañá Fm; Kröhling, 1999a. The loess is a loose deposit, silt with subordinated clay and very fine sand, light brown in colour. The loess thickness generally ranges from 4 to 10 m in the interfluves. The loess is a homogeneous, massive and permeable deposit. The sedimentary mass is calcareous; it contains powdery concentrations and hard concretions of CaCO3. The loess body is crossed by fine rhizoid ramified canalicula and very fine micropores of tubular forms. It is stable in steep walls, in parts altered by subcutaneous subfussion and shaped by columnar disjunction. Two members of the loess unit are differentiated in both profiles. The lower member, 2-3 m thick, has a moderate degree of consolidation and is very calcareous. There are abundant molds of CaCO3 concretions. Sedimentary structures filling regular hollows are interpreted as originated by aeolian erosion and subsequent alluvial action. Locally there are discontinuous table-like or lense-shaped intercalations of clayey silt, dark brown in colour, strongly structured and including abundant coats of Fe- and Mn-sesquioxides. The lower member was accumulated in subaerial environment and in sectors with imperfect drainage occupied by non-permanent swamps with oxidation periods. The upper member, is a 2-4 m thick, friable, massive, and slightly calcareous loess. Krotovinas appear in the lower part. The upper part includes numerous fossil nests. The upper member characterises a subaerial environment and represents the typical loess of North Pampa. The members are separated by an intraformational unconformity. Locally, a level with abundant CaCO3 rhizoconcretions was preserved along this unconformity, as an indicator of pedogenesis. Preserved relicts of a well developed buried soil appear in the Tortugas Profile, at the level of discordance. The top of the Tezanos Pinto Fm is marked by a partially eroded soil, 0.40 to 1.60 m thick, typically represented by the Bt- and BC-horizons. It is a moderatelly developed Argillisol; locally the buried soil forms a pedocomplex. The Bt-horizon is formed by a dark brown clayey silt. The common illuvial clay features are represented by clay coatings of root channels. The Bt-horizon has a moderately to well developed structure in fine to medium angular prisms, strong consistence, with very fine and fine cracks between peds. There are abundant root molds and fine tubular micropores. A younger loessic formation lays in erosive discordance on the paleosol above the Tezanos Pinto Fm. It was defined as the San Guillermo Fm by Iriondo (1987. It is composed of a grey silt with scarce proportions of very fine sand and clay. The typical thickness is 0.30 m, with 0.55 m maximum thickness. The unit is massive, non-calcareous, friable, porous and moderately structured in very coarse resistant prisms limited by very fine fissures. It contains numerous root molds, abundant macropores, very fine and fine canalicula and tubes generated by bioturbation. This unit is partially the product of deflation of the A-horizon of the underlying soil and the subsequent deposition of dust. The San Guillermo Fm covers as a continuous mantle the Tezanos Pinto loess; in general culminating the sedimentary sequence of the area. According to thermoluminiscence datings, the lower member of the Tezanos Pinto Fm was deposited during the Last Glacial Maximum (between 36,000 and 16,000 years BP. The upper member was accumulated during the late Pleistocene / early Holocene period equivalent, in broad sense, to the "Younger Dryas" (between 14,000 and 8,000 years BP. The Hypsithermal period -Optimum Climaticumof the Holocene (between 8,000 and 3,500 years BP is represented by the buried soil developed at the top of the loess. A semiarid pulse occurred during the late Holocene (between 3,500 and 1,400 years BP generated the deflation of the A-horizon of the soil and the subsequent deposition of the San Guillermo Fm. The average textural composition of the Tezanos Pinto Fm in both profiles is 70% silt with subordinated clay and very fine sand. In general, the median ranges between 4 and 6 Φ; (coarse silt to medium silt, 63-15 µm. According to the values of the mean size of the loessic members, a progressive increase in grain size to the top can be noted. The mean size are bigger than median, indicating abundance of fine materials (positive skewness in the distribution. Typical loess is very poorly to poorly sorted. On the Bt-horizon on top of the loess, the silt fraction diminishes (on average: 55% and the clay fraction increases (on average 40% in comparison with the parent material. The mean grain size is located between 7 and 8 Φ;. The San Guillermo Fm is composed of 70% silt, with clay and colloids (25% and scarce very fine sand (<5%. The mean grain size ranges between 6 and 7 Φ;. Cumulative frequency percent-probability curves of both loessic units normally exhibits three straight-line segments, with truncation points at 4 and 5 Φ;. These include a poorly sorted saltation population, a well sorted suspension population and a poorly sorted suspension population. The sediment of the Tezanos Pinto Fm was principally originated by aeolian suspension; it represents around 70% to 90% of the identified transport mechanisms. Saltation and surface creep processes were scarcely represented. The dominance of materials of volcaniclastic nature from Andean Cordillera is revealed in the modal sand fraction of the Tezanos Pinto Fm in both profiles: polycrystalline quartz, volcanic glass shards derived from acidic rocks, microaglomerates of silt particles composed of quartz and volcanic silica, plagioclases and lithic fragments. The plutonic-metamorphic minerals derived from the Pampean Ranges are minor components: quartz and K-feldspars. The silt skeleton of the typical loess is predominantly quartz, with feldspars as subsidiary minerals. Illite, kaolinite, calcite and allophane are minor constituents. The mineralogy of the clay fraction of the loess is dominated by quartz, with important percentages of feldspars and illite and subordinated smectites and kaolinite. The colloidal fraction is composed of a mixture of poorly crystallised minerals. Illite is the dominant mineral, with scarce smectites, feldspars, quartz and amorphous silica-allophane.

  18. Global stratigraphy. [of planet Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Scott, David H.; Greeley, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to recent major advances in the definition and documentation of Martian stratigraphy and geology. Mariner 9 provided the images for the first global geologic mapping program, resulting in the recognition of the major geologic processes that have operated on the planet, and in the definition of the three major chronostratigraphic divisions: the Noachian, Hesperian, and Amazonian Systems. Viking Orbiter images permitted the recognition of additional geologic units and the formal naming of many formations. Epochs are assigned absolute ages based on the densities of superposed craters and crater-flux models. Recommendations are made with regard to future areas of study, namely, crustal stratigraphy and structure, the highland-lowland boundary, the Tharsis Rise, Valles Marineris, channels and valley networks, and possible Martian oceans, lakes, and ponds.

  19. Influence of near-surface stratigraphy on coastal landslides at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Lake Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhardt, W.A.; Jaffe, B.E.; Kayen, R.E.; Cochrane, G.R.

    2004-01-01

    Lake-level change and landslides are primary controls on the development of coastal environments along the coast of northeastern Lake Michigan. The late Quaternary geology of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore was examined with high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and boreholes. Based on sequence-stratigraphic principles, this study recognizes ten stratigraphic units and three major unconformities that were formed by late Pleistocene glaciation and postglacial lake-level changes. Locally high sediment supply, and reworking by two regressions and a transgression have produced a complex stratigraphy that is prone to episodic failure. In 1995, a large landslide deposited approximately 1 million m3 of sediment on the lake floor. The highly deformed landslide deposits, up to 18 m thick, extend 3-4 km offshore and unconformably overlie well-stratified glacial and lacustrine sediment. The landslide-prone bluff is underlain by channel-fill deposits that are oriented nearly perpendicular to the shoreline. The paleochannels are at least 10 m deep and 400 m wide and probably represent stream incision during a lake-level lowstand about 10.3 ka B.P. The channels filled with sediment during the subsequent transgression and lake-level highstand, which climaxed about 4.5 ka B.P. As lake level fell from the highstand, the formation of beach ridges and sand dunes sealed off the channel and isolated a small inland lake (Glen Lake), which lies 5 m above the level of Lake Michigan and may be a source of piped groundwater. Our hypothesis is that the paleochannels act as conduits for pore water flow, and thereby locally reduce soil strength and promote slope failure.

  20. Aspectos sedimentológicos de arenas eólicas del Pleistoceno tardío-Holoceno de la provincia de La Pampa Sedimentologic aspects of eolian sands from the Late Pleistocene-Holocene of the La Pampa Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Szelagowski

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo general de este trabajo es analizar la procedencia, génesis y dinámica de transporte de los depósitos eólicos arenosos del centro-este de la provincia de la Pampa. Para ello, se analizaron el marco geológico-geomorfológico y los aspectos estratigráficos de tres sectores considerados como sendos estudios de casos: cordón medanoso La Pastoril-Santa Isabel, cordón medanoso Toay y cordón medanoso General Acha. Estos cordones se caracterizaron sedimentológicamente (granulometría, mineralogía a través del análisis de 20 muestras. Se identificaron dos unidades eólicas asociadas a dos ciclos de sedimentación, informalmente denominadas inferior (Pleistoceno tardío-Holoceno medio y superior (originado por acción antrópica durante el siglo XX relacionados con vientos del cuadrante O-NO en Santa Isabel y del S y SO en General Acha. Los resultados obtenidos sugieren que la topografía sería un factor de control importante en la distribución de los sedimentos, además de la distancia al sistema fluvial, que determinaría su tamaño de grano. Los análisis mineralógicos indicarían un aporte mixto de materiales, tanto distal (sistema fluvial del Bermejo-Desaguadero-Salado-Curacó, como local (afloramientos rocosos de la provincia.The main goal of this paper is to analyze the provenience of sandy eolian deposits of the central eastern part of La Pampa Province. Considering present eolian models proposed by different authors, the hypothesis tested in this paper is that eolian sediments are the result of deflation of alluvial deposits from the Bermejo-Desaguadero-Salado-Curacó fluvial system. With this purpose in mind, three case studies were selected (La Pastoril-Santa Isabel, Toay and General Acha (Fig. 1. The analysis was made following the concept of spatial scale hierarchy which considered the geological and general environmental setting of the studied areas along with fundamental geomorphological features of the analyzed dune systems. This was complemented by the stratigraphic survey of selected sections from which 20 samples were collected for sedimentological analysis (grain-size and mineralogy. Also, due to the lack of information, three samples were collected from the present Desaguadero fluvial system for general characterization. At the regional scale two main geoforms were identified: an extensive plain and the paleovalley of the Desaguadero fluvial system. The plain grades eastward and includes several longitudinal depressions (longitudinal valleys. A sandy silt mantle is covering the plain, whereas the main dune system is located along the longitudinal depressions and the Desaguadero paleovalley (Fig. 1. In the three studied areas two eolian units, informally named lower and upper, were identified. These units, separated by a buried soil, were generated by winds from the W-NW in Santa Isabel and from the S and SW in General Acha. Wind directions coincide with present wind systems. The upper part of the lower unit is modified by the development of a buried soil showing an A-C horizon sequence. This soil is only buried in areas deeply affected by anthropic activities. Away from these impacted settings, the soil is on the present groundsurface. In Toay, fossil remains of Megatherium americanum were exhumed from the lowermost part of the sampled section which together with regional evidences indicate a late Pleistocene-Holocene age to the lower eolian unit. The upper eolian unit is also restricted to areas deeply modified by human activities, where the vegetation cover was removed and the sediments exposed to eolian reactivation. The occurrence of cultural artifacts (pieces of wire fences, plastic bags as well as written documents suggest that this eolian reactivation occurred during the XXth century. Based on the stratigraphic results, the sedimentolo-gical analysis was focused on the lower eolian unit. In all three areas the eolian sediments are medium to fine sands with unimodal distribution, transported in saltation and modified saltation or short term suspensions unde

  1. Pleistocene glaciation of the Biokovo Massif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manja Žebre

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biokovo massif is situated in the coastal part of the Dinaric Mountains in Croatia. Detailed morphographic and morphometric analysis of the highest parts of the massif were used to determine the extent and characteristics of Late Pleistocene glaciation. The reconstruction of glaciers and calculations of equilibrium line altitude (ELA were carried out. Our research revealed that on the north-eastern side of the highest peak Sveti Jure two cirque glaciers with an overall area of 1 km2 were formed and their ELA was 1515 m a.s.l.

  2. OSTEOMETRA DE VICUGNA VICUGNA MOLINA, 1782 EN EL PLEISTOCENO FINAL DE PATAGONIA MERIDIONAL CHILENA: IMPLICANCIAS PALEOECOLGICAS Y BIOGEOGRFICAS / Osteometry of Vicugna vicugna Molina, 1782 in the late Pleistocene of southern chilean Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Labarca Encina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un anlisis osteomtrico uni y multivariado con los materiales fsiles -principalmente huesos cortos y falanges- de Vicugna sp. del yacimiento Cueva Lago Sofa 4 (13500 11000 AP, ubicado en la provincia de ltima Esperanza (Regin de Magallanes, Chile. Los resultados indican que los elementos analizados poseen un tamao compatible con los registrados para Vicugna vicugna, no superando en ningn caso a los especmenes conocidos para Vicugna gracilis del Pleistoceno de la regin Pampeana. Esto confirma la informacin morfolgica y de ADN antiguo que indicaba la presencia de Vicugna vicugna en la Patagonia meridional chilena. Se discuten los resultados en trminos taxonmicos, biogeogrficos y paleoecolgicos sugiriendo que la presencia de este taxn fuera de su rango actual de distribucin se debi a las condiciones ambientales compartidas entre la Puna y Patagonia austral durante la transicin Pleistoceno-Holoceno. La extincin de V. vicugna se habra debido al impacto de los cambios climticos ocurridos al inicio del Holoceno producto de su dieta pastadora y etologa no migratoria y territorial, a lo que se habra sumado una caza por parte de depredadores humanos y no humanos.Palabras clave: gnero Vicugna, osteometra, Pleistoceno, PatagoniaAbstractThis contribution presents the results of single and multi-variable osteometric analyses performed on a sample of short bones and phalanxes assigned to Vicugna sp. from Lago Sofa Cave 4 site (13500 11000 BP, Regin de Magallanes, Chile. The elements analyzed show a similar size to the reference collections for Vicugna vicugna, and do not exceed the metrics for the pampean pleistocenic specimens of Vicugna gracilis. This confirms the morphological and ancient DNA data that indicated the presence of vicua in southern Chilean Patagonia. The taxonomic, biogeographic and palaeoecologic discussion of these results, suggests that the presence of this species outside its current distribution range was due to shared environmental conditions between the Puna and Patagonia during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. The extinction of this form is, most likely, due to the impact of climatic change during the begining of the Holocene over its pasturing diet and its territorial and non migratory habits. It is added to this, a hunting pressure by human and non-human predators.Keywords: Vicugna genus, osteometry, Pleistocene, Patagonia

  3. Integrated diagenetic and sequence stratigraphy of a late Oligocene-early Miocene, mixed-sediment platform (Austral Basin, southern Patagonia): Resolving base-level and paleoceanographic changes, and paleoaquifer characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, George R.; Parras, Ana

    2014-06-01

    A condensed (~ 20-m-thick) marine transgressive-highstand succession comprises the upper San Julin Formation (upper Oligocene-lower Miocene) of the northern retroarc Austral Basin, southern Patagonia. Mixed-sediment facies identify a shelf-interior setting, part of an overall warm-temperate regional platform of moderate energy. Giant oyster-dominated skeletal-hiatal accumulations along the maximum flooding surface and forming high-energy event beds in the highstand succession preserve relict micrite in protected shelter porosity, and identify periods of reduced sediment accumulation. The stratigraphic distribution of marine-derived glaucony and diagenetic carbonates is spatially related to sequence development. Depositional siderite coincides with prominent marine transgression, defining transient mixing of marine and meteoric waters across coastal-plain deposits. Chemically evolved autochthonous glaucony coincides with periods of extended seafloor exposure and transgressions that bracket the marine succession, and within the oyster-dominated skeletal accumulations. Seafloor cement, likely once magnesian calcite, formed in association with an encrusting/boring biota along the maximum flooding surface in concert with incursion of cool (11-13 C) water. The cement is present locally in skeletal event beds in the highstand succession suggesting a possible association with high-order base-level change and cooler water. As the highstand succession coincides with elevated global sea level in the late Oligocene-early Miocene, the locally marine-cemented glauconitic skeletal event beds in the highstand succession may identify higher order glacio-eustatic control. Local stratal condensation, however, is best explained by regional differences in basement subsidence. In the burial realm, carbonate diagenesis produced layers of phreatic calcrete coincident with skeletal-rich deposits. Zeolite (clinoptilolite-K) cement is restricted to the lowermost marine transgressive interval probably due to initial elevated metastability of reworked weathered silicates. Clay (illite)-cement is restricted to siliciclastic-rich intervals wherein skeletal carbonate did not buffer pore-water pH. Diagenetic carbonate geochemistry (Sr, Na, and ?18O and ?13C) shows that, with burial, the transgressive and highstand system tracts developed as distinct paleoaquifers resulting from different proximities to meteoric recharge zones.

  4. Late Quaternary speleogenesis and landscape evolution in a tropical carbonate island: Pango la Kuumbi (Kuumbi Cave, Zanzibar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Kourampas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kuumbi Cave is one of a group of caves that underlie a flight of marine terraces in Pleistocene limestone in eastern Zanzibar (Indian Ocean. Drawing on the findings of geoarchaeological field survey and archaeological excavation, we discuss the formation and evolution of Kuumbi Cave and its wider littoral landscape. In the later part of the Quaternary (last ca. 250,000 years?, speleogenesis and terrace formation were driven by the interplay between glacioeustatic sea level change and crustal uplift at rates of ca. 0.10-0.20 mm/yr. Two units of backreef/reef limestone were deposited during ‘optimal’ (highest highstands, tentatively correlated with MIS 7 and 5; (mainly erosive marine terraces formed in these limestones in ‘suboptimal’ highstands. Kuumbi and other sub-terrace caves developed as flank margin caves, in the seaward portion of freshwater lenses during such ‘suboptimal’ highstands. Glacioeustacy-induced fluctuations of the groundwater table may have resulted in shifts from vadose (with deposition of well-developed speleothems to phreatic/epiphreatic conditions in these caves. At Kuumbi, Late Pleistocene (pre-20,000 cal. BP ceiling collapse initiated colluvial deposition near-entrance and opened the cave to large plants and animals, including humans. A phase of terminal Pleistocene human occupation ca. 18,500-17,000 cal. BP resulted in the deposition of a dense assemblage of Achatina spp. landsnails, alongside marine molluscs and mammal remains (including zebra, buffalo and other taxa now extinct on Zanzibar. The Holocene part of the cave stratigraphy near-entrance records phases of abandonment and intensified late Holocene human use.

  5. Plio-Pleistocene dinoflagellate cyst biostratigraphy and palaeoecology of the eastern North Atlantic and southern North Sea Basin

    OpenAIRE

    De Schepper, S.

    2006-01-01

    This study provides an independently calibrated high-resolution dinoflagellate cyst (hereafter ‘dinocyst’) biostratigraphy for Plio-Pleistocene (4.0–0.5 Ma) deposits recovered from eastern North Atlantic Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Hole 610A. The age model, which is largely tied to marine isotope stratigraphy and magnetostratigraphy, has been revised for the lower part of the hole using new data on the range of the calcareous nannofossil Reticulatosphaera pseudoumbilicus.The present stud...

  6. Volcanic stratigraphy and geological evolution of the Apan region, east-central sector of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Valdez

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The Apan region, which straddles the central and eastern sectors of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB, was geologically shaped by interrelated, intermittent tectonism and volcanism. The oldest volcanic rocks in the area were erupted about 13.5 Ma ago, followed by a nearly 10-million year volcanic hiatus. Volcanism in the area then resumed ~3.0-1.5 Ma; the most recent volcanic activity occurred in the late Pleistocene (~42-31 ka. The volcanic rocks in the Apan region range in composition from basalt to rhyolite (50-75 wt.% SiO2 and exhibit calc-alkaline affinity; their geochemical characteristics suggest that they are subduction-zone eruptive products. Detailed geologic and stratigraphic studies using a new digital 1:100 000 scale base map for compilation of new and previous data, coupled with new K-Ar age determinations, demonstrate that the loci of volcanic centers in the region were controlled largely by a system of NE-SW-trending normal faults and associated horst-and-graben structures, resulting from a stress field with a least principal stress (σ3 oriented to the NW. Moreover, the results of this study, combined with a reexamination of geologic and age data from other investigations of the TMVB, make possible a refined correlation of the volcanic stratigraphy of the Apan region with the stratigraphic sequences of volcanic rocks in other areas of the TMVB. An important conclusion of our study is that volcanic activity in the TMVB was initiated during the Middle Miocene.

  7. Late Pleistocene to Holocene river terrace deformation within the Little Salmon Fault Zone: insights to tectonic transition from Cascadia Subduction to San Andreas transform stress regimes, Van Duzen river, Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicovich, S.; Hemphill-Haley, M. A.; Leroy, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    The southern Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) of northwestern California exhibits northeast-directed contraction, transitioning to north-northwest directed translation within the broad San Andreas fault (SAF) transform margin to the south. The Little Salmon fault (LSF) is one of the southern-most, active thrust faults within the onshore fold and thrust belt of the CSZ, and lies proximal to the transition from compressional to dextral stress across the Mendocino Triple Junction. Thus, it is an ideal location to characterize strain associated with this complex region of transitional stress regimes. High precision topographic data (LiDAR) enabled detailed mapping of geomorphic features that would otherwise be obscured by dense vegetation of the area. A northwest trending lineament, sub-parallel and south of the main splay of the LSF is observed on LiDAR imagery. The lineament exhibits potential up-to-the-northeast offset and traverses several Van Duzen river terrace risers and treads that range from Pleistocene to potentially Holocene in age. A shallow, exploratory trench was hand-excavated across the lineament. The shallow, roughly 1.5 m-deep, 16 m-long trench exposed imbricated gravels that dip into the base of the trench in the upper end. Coring within the lower end of the trench mapped the southern extent of the gravels. The architecture of the unconsolidated, clast-supported gravel deposit displays a diffuse up-to-the-northeast step. More obvious offset may be expressed at lower depths and/or in mediums with more confining stress. The linear map expression of the lineament across relatively steep terrain suggests that the fault may be relatively steeply dipping. Conjugate deformation shear bands within Neogene bedrock nearby along the Van Duzen river provide additional information about the state of stress within this area of transition.

  8. Oxygen isotope stratigraphy in the Gulf of Alaska (IODP Exp. 341)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, H.; Mix, A. C.; Suto, I.; Belanger, C. L.; Fukumura, A.; Gupta, S.; Konno, S.; Matsuzaki, K. M.; Romero, O. E.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Jaeger, J. M.; Schneider, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Age constrains provided by oxygen isotope stratigraphy, biostratigraphy and paleomagnetics can provide fundamental insights for interpreting other paleoceanographic reconstructions at orbital scale. In the case of the high latitude in the North Pacific, most paleoceanographic studies investigating the evolution of the North Pacific climate since the intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (iNHG) face difficulties in establishing orbital-scale age models due to the low preservation of foraminifer fossils. Most North Pacific studies targeting the Pleistocene heavily rely on alternative approaches with higher preservation potential (e.g. MS: Magnetic Susceptibility) for orbital-scale age models, and assume such data are mainly reflecting the Glacial-Interglacial (G-IG) cycle. A continuous oxygen iope record from the subarctic North Pacific is long anticipated data set to test such assumptions. Two sites (Sites U1417 and U1418) in the Gulf of Alaska (GoA) drilled during IODP Exp. 341 are expected to provide continuous sediment records back to the middle Pleistocene (U1418) and Miocene (U1417), respectively. Here we present age models at Sites U1417 and U1418 derived from refined biostratigraphy and planktic foraminiferal (PF) oxygen isotope (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma sinistral, 150-250 μm fraction) stratigraphy (~1.2Ma at Site U1418 and ~3.0Ma at U1417, respectively). General agreement between oxygen isotope stratigraphy and other age constraints (biostratigraphy and paleomagnetism) at Site U1418 confirms the reliability of those age models. Furthermore, general trends seen in PF oxygen isotope time series roughly matches MS, suggesting that MS can be used for further age model tuning or as an alternative solution for the orbital scale age constrains in the GoA.

  9. A partial distal humerus from the Middle Pleistocene deposits at Bodo, Middle Awash, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Carretero, José Miguel; Haile Selassie, Yohannes; Rodríguez García, Laura; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2009-01-01

    The Bodo partial distal humerus with an approximate age of 0.6 million years is one of the very few postcranial remains from the African Middle Pleistocene. Despite its fragmentary status, comparisons of the Bodo humerus with other fossil hominid and modern human samples reveal some insights into African hominids of this time period. The Bodo partial humerus displays distal humeral features very common in the European Middle and Late Pleistocene hominids, such as a relatively w...

  10. Megafauna and ecosystem function from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Yadvinder; Doughty, Christopher E.; Galetti, Mauro; Smith, Felisa A.; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Terborgh, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Large herbivores and carnivores (the megafauna) have been in a state of decline and extinction since the Late Pleistocene, both on land and more recently in the oceans. Much has been written on the timing and causes of these declines, but only recently has scientific attention focused on the consequences of these declines for ecosystem function. Here, we review progress in our understanding of how megafauna affect ecosystem physical and trophic structure, species composition, biogeochemistry, and climate, drawing on special features of PNAS and Ecography that have been published as a result of an international workshop on this topic held in Oxford in 2014. Insights emerging from this work have consequences for our understanding of changes in biosphere function since the Late Pleistocene and of the functioning of contemporary ecosystems, as well as offering a rationale and framework for scientifically informed restoration of megafaunal function where possible and appropriate. PMID:26811442

  11. Megafauna and ecosystem function from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Yadvinder; Doughty, Christopher E; Galetti, Mauro; Smith, Felisa A; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Terborgh, John W

    2016-01-26

    Large herbivores and carnivores (the megafauna) have been in a state of decline and extinction since the Late Pleistocene, both on land and more recently in the oceans. Much has been written on the timing and causes of these declines, but only recently has scientific attention focused on the consequences of these declines for ecosystem function. Here, we review progress in our understanding of how megafauna affect ecosystem physical and trophic structure, species composition, biogeochemistry, and climate, drawing on special features of PNAS and Ecography that have been published as a result of an international workshop on this topic held in Oxford in 2014. Insights emerging from this work have consequences for our understanding of changes in biosphere function since the Late Pleistocene and of the functioning of contemporary ecosystems, as well as offering a rationale and framework for scientifically informed restoration of megafaunal function where possible and appropriate. PMID:26811442

  12. The Early Pleistocene Equidae from Pirro Nord (Apricena, Southern Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    Alberdi Alonso, María Teresa; Palombo, María Rita

    2013-01-01

    Fossil horse remains from Pirro Nord (Southern Italy) are described and compared with the late Early to Middle Pleistocene equids from the main sites of Western and Central Europe (Spain, France, Italy and Germany). Morphological features and dimensions indicate the unequal occurrence of two horses, close in morphology but different in size as supported by the statistical analyses (PCA and DA) performed including the most significant samples of Spain (Venta Micena, Barranco León-5, Fuente Nue...

  13. Megafauna and ecosystem function from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene

    OpenAIRE

    Malhi, Yadvinder; Doughty, Christopher E.; Galetti, Mauro; Smith, Felisa A.; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Terborgh, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Large herbivores and carnivores (the megafauna) have been in a state of decline and extinction since the Late Pleistocene, both on land and more recently in the oceans. Much has been written on the timing and causes of these declines, but only recently has scientific attention focused on the consequences of these declines for ecosystem function. Here, we review progress in our understanding of how megafauna affect ecosystem physical and trophic structure, species composition, biogeochemistry,...

  14. Registros de fluctuaciones paleobatimtricas del sistema lacustre Pueyrredon-Posadas-Salitroso durante el Pleistoceno Tardo? - Holoceno Temprano, noroeste de Santa Cruz, Argentina / Register of paleobametric fluctuations of the Pueyrredon-Posadas-salitroso Lacustrine System during the Late Pleistocene? -Early holocene (Northwestern of Santa Cruz, Argentina

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luis R, Horta; Sergio M, Georgieff; Carlos A, Console Gonella; Jos, Busnelli; Carlos A, Aschero.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El estudio de depsitos lacustres datados entre el Pleistoceno Tardo? - Holoceno Temprano vinculado con un modelo de elevacin digital han permitido reconstruir la posicin de las paleocostas del Sistema lacustre Pueyrredn - Posadas - Salitroso, demostrando la conexin entre ellos, que se verifica [...] en algunos niveles especficos de paleocotas. En este trabajo, se utilizaron como indicadores paleobatimtricos: la ubicacin altitudinal relativa de depsitos glacilacustres, depsitos de arenas costeras, depsitos de abanico deltaico en la margen sur del lago Pueyrredn, dataciones absolutas (AMS y 14C), trazas fsiles y comparaciones de malacofauna fsil con la actual para las interpretaciones paleoambientales. Abstract in english The palaeocoast line positions of the lacustrine system of Pueyrredn - Posadas - Salitroso lakes were determined through the study of the lacustrine deposits, which were dated between the Late Pleistocene? - Early Holocene, together with a digital elevation model (DEM). This has demonstrated the li [...] nk among them verified on some specific palaeoheight levels. In this research, paleo-bathymetric geoindicators, as relative height of glaci-lacustrine, coastal sand and fandelta deposits onto the southern margin of Pueyrredon Lake, and absolute dating techniques (AMS & 14C), fossil trace and fossil and current malacofauna comparison were used in order to develop palaeoenvironment interpretations.

  15. Late-glacial pollen, macrofossils and fish remains in northeastern U.S.A. — The Younger Dryas oscillation. A contribution to the 'North Atlantic seaboard programme' of IGCP-253, 'Termination of the Pleistocene'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, D. M.; Daniels, R. A.; Heusser, L. E.; Vogel, J. S.; Southon, J. R.; Nelson, D. E.

    The late-glacial environmental histories of Allamuchy Pond, New Jersey and Linsley Pond, Connecticut are reconstructed from pollen, macrofossil and fish scale remains. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating of seeds and needles indicates that the first organic deposition, evidenced by fossil Picea (spruce) needles, occurred approximately 12,400 BP. A major regional warming began in the northeastern United States at this time, correlative with the Bølling/Allerød warming of Europe and Greenland. The increase in Quercus (oak) pollen and presence of Pinus strobus (white pine) needles demonstrates the magnitude of warming reached at about 11,000 BP. The subsequent decline of thermophilous species and increase in boreal Picea, Abies (fir), Larix (larch), Betula papyrifera (paper birch) and Alnus (alder) from 10,800-10,000 BP was a regional vegetational reversal. Thus we find a North American expression of the Younger Dryas with a mean annual temperature depression of 3-4° C. The subsequent classical southern New England pine pollen zone 'B' and Pinus strobus macrofossils signalled a return to warmer conditions at approximately 10,000 BP, regionally, within approximately 50-100 years. A large increase in Quercus follows. This study is unique in documenting a continuous late-glacial record of fish remains from Allamuchy Pond, New Jersey sediments, indicating that members of the families Centrarchidae (sunfish), Salmonidae (trout), Percidae (perch) and Cyprinidae (minnow) were regionally present.

  16. Journey of Time in Stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    In stratigraphy, stratal surfaces (e.g. bedding planes) are generally considered as discrete time lines. However, expression of time in stratigraphic record can be quite complex. Unlike flat stratal surfaces, time surfaces are mostly undulating. Moreover, time was not only elapsed vertically across stratal surfaces, it was also elapsed horizontally along such surfaces. These complexities can generate contentions when it comes to dividing stratigraphic packages into chronostratigraphic or genetic units. Since many stratal surfaces are composite in nature, they represent a diachronous interval of time. This is particularly true for active depositional systems where undulating geomorphic units migrate in time and space to fill a basin. At each level of hierarchy from ripple- to basin-scale clinoformal packages, composite stratal surfaces can develop, where deposits above such a stratal surface are NOT everywhere younger than deposits below the same stratal surface. This may violate the Law of Superposition, which states that, in an undisturbed stratigraphic record, each layer is always younger than the layer beneath it. In fact, this Law holds true in one location moving strictly vertically through an undisturbed succession. While moving vertically, if an observer also moves laterally along a stratal surface for some distance, this Law may break down. These observations have critical implications in interpreting stratigraphic record, particularly in testing sequence stratigraphic concepts.

  17. Paleosuelos y niveles lmnicos desarrollados en sucesiones aluviales del Pleistoceno tardo y Holoceno del Piedemonte Andino de Mendoza (33-34 ls), Argentina / Paleosoils and limnic levels in the late Pleistocene and Holocene alluvial successions of the Andean Piedmont of Mendoza (33-34 LS), Argentina

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Adriana, Mehl; Marcelo, Zrate.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Los depsitos aluviales del Pleistoceno tardo y Holoceno de la cuenca del Arroyo La Estacada, en el piedemonte andino mendocino, entre los 33 y 34 LS, componen tres unidades geomorfolgicas conspicuas: una planicie de agradacin regional (PAR, Pleistoceno tardo - Holoceno temprano), una terraza [...] de relleno aluvial (TRA, Holoceno medio y tardo) y la planicie de inundacin actual (posterior a los 400 a AP). La PAR y la TRA registran procesos alternantes de agradacin y pedognesis, siendo estos ltimos ms frecuentes en los depsitos holocenos, caracterizados tambin por una mayor abundancia de niveles con contenido orgnico elevado (niveles lmnicos). Este trabajo evala el registro de paleosuelos y niveles lmnicos de la cuenca, con el objetivo de inferir sus implicancias en la dinmica paleoambiental y paleoclimtica de la regin centrooeste de Argentina durante el Pleistoceno tardo y Holoceno, y aportar informacin al marco paleoclimtico del extremo sur de Sudamrica. Se muestrearon depsitos aluviales que exhiben paleosuelos y niveles lmnicos en cuatro perfiles litoestratigrficos en las mrgenes del Arroyo La Estacada y su tributario el Arroyo Anchayuyo; se utiliz el color como indicador de campo. Se describieron atributos en forma cualitativa (granulometra, color; consistencia, tipo y grado de estructuracin de los sedimentos; forma y tipo de lmites, sustancias cementantes y/o aglutinantes, rasgos redoximrficos, etc) y cuantitativa (contenido de materia orgnica y carbonato de calcio); se realizaron anlisis micromorfolgicos en muestras de sedimentos no disturbadas. Los resultados se presentan con un criterio cronolgico decreciente basado en la calibracin cronolgica de los depsitos aluviales. Los paleosuelos de la PAR revelan un pobre desarrollo pedolgico, con presencia de carbonato de calcio en la masa, y en forma de ndulos y concreciones. Por su parte, los paleosuelos de la TRA presentan mayor desarrollo relativo, y ausencia de carbonatos en general. Los niveles lmnicos reflejan un incremento en la productividad vegetal en ambientes de la planicie de inundacin saturados en agua; y quizs tambin un mayor transporte de MO por parte de las corrientes de agua en el valle fluvial. La mayor concentracin de rasgos de carbonatacin de la PAR reflejara condiciones de mayor evaporacin en los ambientes depositacionales del Pleistoceno tardo - Holoceno temprano; mientras que la abundancia de rasgos redoximrficos en los niveles de la TRA, registrara la saturacin en agua de los depsitos del Holoceno medio y tardo, quizs en respuesta a frecuentes fluctuaciones del nivel fretico. Las sucesiones aluviales analizadas registran los cambios paleoambientales / paleoclimticos acaecidos en el piedemonte andino oriental entre los 33 y 34 LS, en vinculacin con la transicin climtica del Pleistoceno tardo - Holoceno. Los paleosuelos y niveles lmnicos observados resultaron herramientas tiles para la calibracin geocronolgica de las sucesiones aluviales estudiadas. Abstract in english The late Pleistocene and Holocene alluvial deposits of the Arroyo La Estacada basin, located in the Andean piedmont of Mendoza province between 33 and 34 SL (Fig. 1a-b), are arranged in three conspicuous geomorphological units, a regional aggradational plain (RAP, late Pleistocene - early Holocene [...] ), a fill terrace (FT, middle and late Holocene) and a present floodplain (developed ca. 400 yr BP) (A-A', B-B', Fig. 1c). The RAP (Figs. 2a, 3a) and the FT (Figs. 2b, 3b) record aggradational and pedological proccesses; the latter are more frequents in the Holocene deposits together with abundant sedimentary levels showing high organic matter content (limnic levels). High organic matter content deposits have been studied by the international scientific community, particularly in North America, where some authors discussed the paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic implicances of the 'black mats' (Haynes, 1968; 2008; Firesto

  18. Obliquity and precession as pacemakers of Pleistocene deglaciations

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Fabo

    2015-01-01

    The Milankovitch theory states that the orbital eccentricity, precession, and obliquity of the Earth influence our climate by modulating the summer insolation at high latitudes in the northern hemisphere. Despite considerable success of this theory in explaining climate change over the Pleistocene epoch (2.6 to 0.01 Myr ago), it is inconclusive with regard to which combination of orbital elements paced the 100 kyr glacial-interglacial cycles over the late Pleistocene. Here we explore the role of the orbital elements in pacing the Pleistocene deglaciations by modeling ice-volume variations in a Bayesian approach. When comparing models, this approach takes into account the uncertainties in the data as well as the different degrees of model complexity. We find that the Earth's obliquity (axial tilt) plays a dominant role in pacing the glacial cycles over the whole Pleistocene, while precession only becomes important in pacing major deglaciations after the transition of the dominant period from 41 kyr to 100 kyr ...

  19. Contribution of stable isotopes (C,N,S) in collagen of late Pleistocene large mammal trophic ecology and landscape use: a case study in Goyet and Scladina cave (30-40,000 years BP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocherens, Hervé; Germonpré, Mietje

    2010-05-01

    Two Belgian caves yielded very rich large mammal associations dating around 30 to 40,000 years ago: Goyet and Scladina cave (layer 1A). These sites are only 5 km apart but the cave entrances open on different valleys, in a quite diverse landscape ranging between open, unprotected uplands, steep cliffs and sheltered sun-exposed gorges, with the larger Meuse valley nearby. This mosaic scenery permitted during the Last Glacial a rich diversity of fossil flora and fauna. The faunal association includes a large diversity of taxa including Aurochs Bos primigenius, steppe bison Bison priscus, reindeer Rangifer tarandus, giant deer Megaloceros giganteus, horse Equus ferus, woolly rhinoceros Coelodonta antiquitatis, woolly mammoth Mammuthus primigenius, cave bear Ursus spelaeus, brown bear Ursus arctos, wolf Canis lupus, cave lion Panthera leo spelaea, and cave hyaena Crocuta crocuta spelaea. All the 90 studied bones and teeth yielded collagen with excellent collagen preservation, allowing reliable investigations of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotopic biogeochemistry. The combination of three different isotopic tracers allows to deciphering the effects of food selection and landscape use by different herbivorous and carnivorous taxa. This is the first study to include sulfur isotopic signatures in the study of late Quaternary large mammal palaeobiology. This new tracer yields evidence on mobility and differences in pasture areas, as different geological bedrock may exhibit various sulfur isotopic signatures that will pass on the herbivores and further on their predators. Using this feature in addition to the trophic information provided by carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures, it appears that for some species present in both sites, such as horse and woolly rhinoceros, the individuals found in each site probably did not use the same pasture areas. This seems to also the case for the overwhelmingly vegetarian cave bears. In addition, individuals from the same species found in one site sometimes exhibit clear isotopic differences in the three isotopic tracers that suggest different pasture grounds as well, and therefore the possibility of different herds in the vicinity of the cave site. In the case of cave hyeanas, the isotopic signatures of individuals from both caves are not significantly different and suggest that these predators obtained their prey from a large territory including the pasture grounds of herbivores from both caves. In addition, direct radiocarbon dating of some of the studied collagen allows to investigating possible chronological trends. This study shows how new isotopic tracers can provide invaluable information on late Quaternary large mammal palaeobiology.

  20. Pleistocene Palaeoart of the Americas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the great time depth of Pleistocene rock art and mobiliary ‘art’ in the four other continents, the available evidence from the Americas is very limited, and restricted at best to the last part of the final Pleistocene. A review of what has so far become available is hampered by a considerable burden of literature presenting material contended to be of the Ice Age, even of the Mesozoic in some cases, that needs to be sifted through to find a minute number of credible claims. Even the timing of the first colonization of the Americas remains unresolved, and the lack of clear-cut substantiation of palaeoart finds predating about 12,000 years bp is conspicuous. There are vague hints of earlier human presence, rendering it likely that archaeology has failed to define its manifestations adequately, and Pleistocene palaeoart remains almost unexplored at this stage.

  1. Mechanical stratigraphy of deep-water sandstones: insights from a multisciplinary field and laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele; Corradetti, Amerigo; Cantalamessa, Gino

    2010-05-01

    Turbidite sandstones found in deep-water fold-and-thrust belts are increasingly exploited as hydrocarbon reservoirs. Within these rocks, the fluid flow is profoundly affected by the complex interaction between primary sedimentological and stratigraphic attributes (i.e, facies, layering, reservoir quality, stacking patterns, bed connectivity and lateral extent) and fracture characteristics (i.e., length, spacing, distribution, orientation, connectivity). Unfortunately, most of these features are at, or below, the resolution of conventional seismic datasets and, for this reason, their identification and localization represent one of the fundamental challenges facing exploration, appraisal and production of the sandstone reservoirs. In this respect, whereas considerable effort has been afforded to a characterization of the sedimentological and stratigraphic aspects of sandstones, detailed analysis of fractures in this type of successions has received significantly less attention. In this work, we combine field and laboratory analyses to assess the possible mechanical control exerted by the rock properties (grain size, intergranualr porosity, and Young modulus), as well as the influence of bed thickness, on joint density in turbidite sandstones. Joints are mode-I fractures occurring parallel to the greatest principle stress axis, which solve opening displacement and do not show evidence of shearing and enhance the values of total porosity forming preferential hydraulic conduits for fluid flow. Within layered rocks, commonly, joints form perpendicular to bedding due to overburden or exhumation. The empirical relation between joint spacing and bed thickness, documented in the field by many authors, has been mechanically related to the stress perturbation taking place around joints during their formation. Furthermore, close correlations between joint density and rock properties have been already established. In this present contribution, we focus on the bed-perpendicular joint spacing/bed thickness (S/T) relationships on sandstone bodies that experienced similar diagenetic and tectonic histories. The field area is located in the Periadriatic foreland basin, eastern central Italy, which show late Pliocene slope turbidites in excellent 3d views. The Periadriatic foreland basin is an elongated, roughly N-S oriented trough located immediately east of the Apennines fold-thrust belt. The basin fill mostly consists of deepwater Plio-Pleistocene sediments partially incorporated into the frontal part of the orogenic wedge. During the late Pliocene, gravel and sand originated from the uplifting Apennines were abundantly supplied to the deep-water basin through a series of erosional conduits that, in the rock record, appear as a series of N-S oriented slope submarine canyon systems deeply incised into the hemipelagic mudstones of the adjacent slope. The studied exposure allows direct observation of spatial and temporal relationships among the various depositional elements comprising the canyon system and related lithofacies, as well as the bed-perpendicular joint density within each lithofacies. We performed a multidisciplinary work involving the following tasks: (i) 3D stratigraphic model of the depositional architecture of the Castignano and Ascensione canyon systems (Marche region, Italy); (ii) 2D scanline survey of several outcrops displaying bed-perpendicular joints; (iii) digital image analysis of selected thin-section obtained from oriented hand samples to characterize the 3D intergranualr porosity; (iv) Stiffness analysis of representative sandstone bodies by mean of Schmidt hammer tests. The first results of this ongoing study on the mechanical stratigraphy of the two Late Pliocene canyon systems are consistent with the joint density being effected by both geometrical (i.e., bed thickness) and mechanical properties. This data set will help field and experimental geologists to better define common strategies to assess the controlling factors on joint distribution within layered media. Furthermore, this knowledge can be very import

  2. Buried Middle Pleistocene ice wedge systems and longterm survival of ancient Yedoma carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, D. G.; Jensen, B. J.; Reyes, A.; Poinar, H.; Shapiro, B.; Zazula, G.; Calmels, F.

    2012-12-01

    Deep syngenetic permafrost of Beringia, or the deep Yedoma, hosts a reservoir of at least several hundred Pg of C that has survived through multiple interglaciations at least as warm or warmer than the present interglaciation. Relatively few sites are known across the northern hemisphere to estimate this reservoir, but based on a review of existing data, it appears that this reservoir is largely a feature of the Middle Pleistocene and may not pre-date the Early to Middle Pleistocene transition. Relict polygonal ice-wedge networks associated with syngenetic permafrost are present at four sites in the discontinuous permafrost zone of central Yukon. They are stratigraphically associated with the Gold Run tephra (ca. 700 ka) and other Middle Pleistocene tephra beds, consistent with their normal magnetic polarity and vertebrate fossil assemblages. Soil organic matter content within these deposits is indistinguishable from Late Pleistocene and Holocene organic matter, with organic carbon ranging between 1 and 15% reflecting the depositional context. Plant and vertebrate communities show that the majority of this material accumulated in typical steppe-tundra ecosystems associated with Pleistocene cold stages, similar to late Pleistocene contexts. Where differences are more pronounced, however, is at the molecular scale. Ancient biomolecules show much greater rates of DNA damage reflected by decreases in the obtained plant and bacterial sequence diversity and elevated deamination of the 5 and 3' termini of DNA molecules, characteristic of ancient DNA extracts.

  3. Stratigraphy and depositional environments of the upper Pleistocene Chemehuevi Formation along the lower Colorado River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmon, Daniel V.; Howard, Keith A.; House, P. Kyle; Lundstrom, Scott C.; Pearthree, Philip A.; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.; Wan, Elmira; Wahl, David B.

    2011-01-01

    The Chemehuevi Formation forms a conspicuous, widespread, and correlative set of nonmarine sediments lining the valleys of the Colorado River and several of its larger tributaries in the Basin and Range geologic province. These sediments have been examined by geologists since J. S. Newberry visited the region in 1857 and are widely cited in the geologic literature; however their origin remains unresolved and their stratigraphic context has been confused by inconsistent nomenclature and by conflicting interpretations of their origin. This is one of the most prominent stratigraphic units along the river below the Grand Canyon, and the formation records an important event or set of events in the history of the Colorado River. Here we summarize what is known about these deposits throughout their range, present new stratigraphic, sedimentologic, topographic, and tephrochronologic data, and formally define them as a lithostratigraphic unit. The Chemehuevi Formation consists primarily of a bluff-forming mud facies, consisting of gypsum-bearing, horizontally bedded sand, silt, and clay, and a slope-forming sand facies containing poorly bedded, well sorted, quartz rich sand and scattered gravel. The sedimentary characteristics and fossil assemblages of the two facies types suggest that they were deposited in flood plain and channel environments, respectively. In addition to these two primary facies, we identify three other mappable facies in the formation: a thick-bedded rhythmite facies, now drowned by Lake Mead; a valley-margin facies containing abundant locally derived sediment; and several tributary facies consisting of mixed fluvial and lacustrine deposits in the lower parts of major tributary valleys. Observations from the subsurface and at outcrops near the elevation of the modern flood plain suggest that the formation also contains a regional basal gravel member. Surveys of numerous outcrops using high-precision GPS demonstrate that although the sand facies commonly overlies the mud facies where the two are found together, contacts between the two occur over a range in elevation, and as a consequence, the sand and mud facies are similarly distributed both horizontally and vertically throughout the valley. Collectively, the outcrops of the formation lie below a smooth elevation envelope that slopes 50 percent more steeply than the historic (pre-Hoover Dam) valley, from nearly 150 m above the historic flood plain near the mouth of the Grand Canyon to less than 30 m above the flood plain at the head of the flood plain near Yuma, Arizona. The steepness of the valley at the peak of aggradation probably represents a depositional slope. Layers of fine grained volcanic tephra have been found below and within the Chemehuevi Formation at five widely separated sites, one of which is now submerged beneath Lake Mead. Major element geochemistry of glass shards from the four accessible tephra sites were analyzed. Three of the sampled tephra layers are interbedded within the Chemehuevi Formation, and a fourth tephra conformably underlies the formation. The three interbedded tephra layers are similar enough to one another that they are probably from the same eruptive unit, hereafter referred to as the Monkey Rock tephra bed. The other sample, which locally underlies the formation, is similar enough to the Monkey Rock tephra bed to suggest it is from the same volcanic source area; however, it may not be from the same eruption, and thus may not be the same age. On the basis of the stratigraphic contexts of chemically similar tephra layers found elsewhere in the Basin and Range, we suspect that the source area is the Mammoth Mountain dome complex in Long Valley, east-central California. Two samples of proximal Mammoth Mountain pumice were analyzed and produced geochemical signatures similar to all four of the Chemehuevi Formation tephra, supporting Mammoth Mountain as a possible source area. The Mammoth Mountain volcanic center produced eruptions between about 111±2 and 57±2 ka and was most active in the later part of this time interval, during Marine Oxygen Isotope (MOI) stage 4 (between 74 and 59 ka ago). Chemically similar tephra in cores from Owens Lake and Walker Lake are approximately 70 and 74 ky old, based on age models of those cores. Other lines of stratigraphic evidence from nine tephra-containing sections in the Basin and Range are also consistent with an age assignment for the Monkey Rock tephra of ~72 ky, near the beginning of MOI stage 4. We propose to designate the Chemehuevi Formation as a formal lithostratigraphic unit, and propose as the type section a well exposed outcrop near the ranger station at Katherine Landing, Arizona, in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. This exposure shows the two dominant facies, an example of one of the four known tephra layers, and interbedded lenses of locally derived gravel. In the type section, as in many of the other examples of the formation, the sand facies overlies the mud facies on a conspicuous, abrupt erosional surface; however, nearby is a contiguous section demonstrating that the mud and sand facies interfinger. In addition to the type section, measured reference sections compiled here illustrate other important lithologic and stratigraphic features of the formation. Our preferred interpretation of the Chemehuevi Formation is that it contains the remnants of deposits formed during a single major episode of fluvial aggradation, during which the Colorado River filled its valley with a great volume of dominantly sand-size sediment. This would reflect an increase in the supply of sand-size sediment, and(or) a reduction in transport capacity below the mouth of Grand Canyon. The most likely cause for the aggradation is an extraordinary increase in sand supply, likely due to widespread climatic change. However, other explanations have not been ruled out. Other aggradation events predated the Chemehuevi Formation, and some smaller events may have postdated the formation. However, the Chemehuevi Formation contains the remnants of the most recent large magnitude (>100 m) aggradation of the Colorado River.

  4. Early pleistocene sediments at Great Blakenham, Suffolk, England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbard, P. L.; Allen, P.; Field, M. H.; Hallam, D. F.

    Detailed investigation of a fine sediment sequence, the College Farm Silty Clay Member, that overlies the Creeting Sands (Early Pleistocene) in Suffolk, is presented. The sedimentary sequence is thought to represent a freshwater pool accumulation in a small coastal embayment. Palaeobotanical investigation of the sediment indicates that it accumulated during the late temperate substage of a temperate (interglacial) event. The occurrence of Tsuga pollen, associated with abundant remains of the water fern Azolla tegeliensis indicate that the deposits are of Early Pleistocene age and are correlated with a later part of the Antian-Bramertonian Stage. Correlation with Tiglian TO substage in The Netherlands' sequence is most likely. The sediments' normal palaeomagnetic polarity reinforces the biostratigraphical correlation.

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome and phylogeny of Pleistocene mammoth Mammuthus primigenius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogaev, Evgeny I; Moliaka, Yuri K; Malyarchuk, Boris A; Kondrashov, Fyodor A; Derenko, Miroslava V; Chumakov, Ilya; Grigorenko, Anastasia P

    2006-03-01

    Phylogenetic relationships between the extinct woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius), and the Asian (Elephas maximus) and African savanna (Loxodonta africana) elephants remain unresolved. Here, we report the sequence of the complete mitochondrial genome (16,842 base pairs) of a woolly mammoth extracted from permafrost-preserved remains from the Pleistocene epoch--the oldest mitochondrial genome sequence determined to date. We demonstrate that well-preserved mitochondrial genome fragments, as long as approximately 1,600-1700 base pairs, can be retrieved from pre-Holocene remains of an extinct species. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the Elephantinae clade suggests that M. primigenius and E. maximus are sister species that diverged soon after their common ancestor split from the L. africana lineage. Low nucleotide diversity found between independently determined mitochondrial genomic sequences of woolly mammoths separated geographically and in time suggests that north-eastern Siberia was occupied by a relatively homogeneous population of M. primigenius throughout the late Pleistocene. PMID:16448217

  6. Stratigraphy and dissolution of the Rustler Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the physical stratigraphy of the Rustler Formation, because the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant will be constructed in salt beds that underlie this formation. Described are subdivisions of the formations, the major karst features, and a proposed method for the formation of Nash Draw. 2 refs., 2 figs

  7. Anthropogenic Origin of Siliceous Scoria Droplets from Pleistocene and Holocene Archeaological Sites in Northern Syria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thy, Peter; Willcox, George; Barfod, Gry; Fueller, Dorian

    2015-01-01

    Siliceous scoria droplets, measuring from 1 to 10 mm, from one late Pleistocene and four early Holocene archaeological sites in northern Syria are compared to similar droplets previously suggested to be the result of a cosmic impact at the onset of the Younger Dryas global cooling event. The...

  8. Macro fossils vegetable in Palmar formation (later pleistocene) in Entre Rios - Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is about the macro fossil knowledge preserved like wood fossils in the El Palmar Formation (Late Pleistocene) from a systematic - anatomical as well as paleoecological and paleoclimate point of view.The paleo Flora comes from various fossil located in the province of Entre Rios - Argentina

  9. Upper Cretaceous to Pleistocene melilitic volcanic rocks of the Bohemian Massif: petrology and mineral chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Skála Roman; Ulrych Jaromír; Ackerman Lukáš; Krmíček Lukáš; Fediuk Ferry; Balogh Kadosa; Hegner Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Upper Cretaceous to Pleistocene volcanic rocks of the Bohemian Massif represent the easternmost part of the Central European Volcanic Province. These alkaline volcanic series include rare melilitic rocks occurring as dykes, sills, scoria cones and flows. They occur in three volcanic periods: (i) the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene period (80–59 Ma) in northern Bohemia including adjacent territories of Saxony and Lusatia, (ii) the Mid Eocene to Late Miocene (32.3–5.9 Ma) period disseminated in th...

  10. Weichselian stratigraphy, geomorphology and glacial dynamics in southern Finnish Lapland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertti Sarala

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Quaternary stratigraphy and geomorphology were investigated by using aerial photo interpretation, digital elevation models and stratigraphical studies in southern Finnish Lapland. The development of glacial morphology was examined by reconstructing glacial flow patterns and subglacial conditions with emphasis on glacial dynamics. By comparing the climate history and available chronological data the ice-sheet development during the Weichselian was modelled in the area. Also, the Quaternary lithostratigraphy with descriptions, formalnames and type sections of the Peräpohja Group was proposed. Glacial morphology with clear indication of glacial flow directions represents two Weichselian glacial advances in the area of southern Finnish Lapland. The older, northwest-southeast oriented glacial movement was seen as a drumlin field and was preserved under a later cold-based ice sheet. A west-east oriented landform assemblage of ribbed moraines, drumlins and flutings mainly indicated the younger glacial phase. Of the age of ice sheet development during the Weichselian two alternative interpretations have been presented:In the first model, the first glacial advance occurred during the Early Weichselian and was followed by interstadial about 85–74 ka ago. The Middle and Late Weichselian glaciation was continuously covering southern Finnish Lapland after that. The second model includes a new interpretation, in which the first glacial advance that reached the area is connected to the beginning of the Middle Weichselian. Ice-free interstadial occurred about 50–30 ka ago before the Late Weichselian glacial advance, when the Weichselian maximum wasreached.

  11. Climate variability of the tropical Andes since the late Pleistocene

    OpenAIRE

    A. Bräuning

    2009-01-01

    Available proxy records witnessing palaeoclimate of the tropical Andes are comparably scarce. Major implications of palaeoclimate development in the humid and arid parts of the Andes are briefly summarized. The long-term behaviour of ENSO has general significance for the climatic history of the Andes due to its impact on regional circulation patterns and precipitation regimes, therefore ENSO history derived from non-Andean palaeo-records is highlighted. Methodological constr...

  12. Climate variability of the tropical Andes since the late Pleistocene

    OpenAIRE

    A. Bräuning

    2009-01-01

    Available proxy records witnessing palaeoclimate of the tropical Andes are comparably scarce. Major implications of palaeoclimate development in the humid and arid parts of the Andes are briefly summarized. The long-term behaviour of ENSO has general significance for the climatic history of the Andes due to its impact on regional circulation patterns and precipitation regimes, therefore ENSO history derived from non-Andean palaeo-records is highlighted. Methodological constraints of the chron...

  13. Climate variability of the tropical Andes since the late Pleistocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bräuning

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Available proxy records witnessing palaeoclimate of the tropical Andes are comparably scarce. Major implications of palaeoclimate development in the humid and arid parts of the Andes are briefly summarized. The long-term behaviour of ENSO has general significance for the climatic history of the Andes due to its impact on regional circulation patterns and precipitation regimes, therefore ENSO history derived from non-Andean palaeo-records is highlighted. Methodological constraints of the chronological precision and the palaeoclimatic interpretation of records derived from different natural archives, such as glacier sediments and ice cores, lake sediments and palaeo-wetlands, pollen profiles and tree rings are addressed and complementary results concerning former climatic conditions are discussed in terms of possible implications of former atmospheric circulation patterns and main climatic forcing factors. During the last years, increasing tree-ring information is getting available from the tropical Andes, providing high-resolution climate-sensitive records covering the past centuries for the study of climate variability.

  14. Triggering of New Madrid seismicity by late-Pleistocene erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calais, E; Freed, A M; Van Arsdale, R; Stein, S

    2010-07-29

    The spatiotemporal behaviour of earthquakes within continental plate interiors is different from that at plate boundaries. At plate margins, tectonic motions quickly reload earthquake ruptures, making the location of recent earthquakes and the average time between them consistent with the faults' geological, palaeoseismic and seismic histories. In contrast, what determines the activation of a particular mid-continental fault and controls the duration of its seismic activity remains poorly understood. Here we argue that the concentration of magnitude-7 or larger earthquakes in the New Madrid seismic zone of the central United States since the end of the last ice age results from the recent, climate-controlled, erosional history of the northern Mississippi embayment. We show that the upward flexure of the lithosphere caused by unloading from river incision between 16,000 and 10,000 years ago caused a reduction of normal stresses in the upper crust sufficient to unclamp pre-existing faults close to failure equilibrium. Models indicate that fault segments that have already ruptured are unlikely to fail again soon, but stress changes from sediment unloading and previous earthquakes may eventually be sufficient to bring to failure other nearby segments that have not yet ruptured. PMID:20671707

  15. Stratigraphy of the Caloris basin, Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, J. F.; Guest, J. E.; Schaber, G. G.; Trask, N. J.; Greeley, R.

    1981-08-01

    A formal rock stratigraphic nomenclature in proposed for the ejecta units of the 1300-km diameter Caloris impact basin of Mercury. The ejecta units can be recognized for more than 1000 km radially outward from the basin edge, and are collectively called the Caloris Group. The formations recognized within the Caloris Group include: (1) the Caloris Montes; (2) the Nervo; (3) the Odin; and (4) two Van Eyck Formations, one with lineated facies and the other with secondary crater facies. It is shown that of the craters in the 30-100-km size range superposed on the Caloris ejecta assemblage, most are of the c(4) and c(5) type. The youngest craters are assigned the highest subscript numbers. If other basins and craters can be tied into the Caloris basin over the rest of Mercury using data from Mariner 10, the stratigraphy described may help establish a time stratigraphy consisting of formal systems and periods in the history of Mercury.

  16. PLIO-PLEISTOCENE FOSSIL VERTEBRATES OF MONTE TUTTAVISTA (OROSEI, EASTERN SARDINIA, ITALY, AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAURA ABBAZZI

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The preliminary results of the analisys of fossil vertebrate remains from 19 fissure fillings in the karst network at Monte Tuttavista (Orosei, NMoro are reported. about 80 taxa, among fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals have been recognised.These remains document the evolution of vertebrate assemblages in the Sardinian insular domain, during a time interval apparently spanning the Late Pliocene to Late Pleistocene or Holocene. A succession of at least four populating complexes has been identified which document the vertebrate colonisation phases from the Italian mainland and the following periods of insularity. Indeed, the occurrence of endemic taxa such as the murid Rhagapodemus minor, the primate Macaca cf. M. majori and the caprine Nesogoral, suggest some fissure fillings date to a phase close to the Plio/Pleistocene boundary since these taxa occur at the Sardinian locality Capo Figari I which has been dated to about 1.8 Ma. However, the presence of the "hunting-hyaena" Chasmaporthetes, never reported before in Sardinia, could suggest that the beginning of the vertebrate record of Monte Tuttavista is older, given that this carnivore is documented in European Middle Pliocene-Early Pleistocene localities. The vertebrate assemblages that document the most recent migratory phases in the karst network of Monte Tuttavista are characterised by the occurrence of the endemic megalocerine cervid Praemegaceros cazioti and the arvicolid Tyrrhenicola henseli which are comparable with those occurring in other Late Pleistocene and early Holocene Sardinian sites.

  17. Dietary resource partitioning in the Late Pleistocene horses from Cedral, north-central Mexico: evidence from the study of dental wear / Particin de recursos dietticos en los caballos del Pleistoceno Tardo de Cedral, centro-norte de Mxico: evidencia del estudio de desgaste dental

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Christian R., Barrn-Ortiz; Jessica M., Theodor; Joaqun, Arroyo-Cabrales.

    Full Text Available Los sedimentos del Pleistoceno Tardo (etapa glacial del Wisconsiniano tardo) del sitio arqueolgico-paleontolgico de Cedral, centro-norte de Mxico, han producido abundantes restos fsiles de tres especies de quidos, los cuales han sido identificados como Equus mexicanus, E. conversidens y E. sp [...] . Estos caballos al parecer fueron simptricos, no solamente en esta localidad, sino tambin en diferentes sitios de Mxico y el suroeste de Estados Unidos, lo que plantea la posibilidad de que presentaban una particin de los recursos alimenticios disponibles para coexistir. En el presente estudio, se investigaron los hbitos alimenticios de los caballos de Cedral a travs del anlisis del desgaste dental. Se emplearon los mtodos de mesodesgaste y microdesgaste de baja magnificacin para inferir la paleodieta de cada especie de caballo. El anlisis de mesodesgate muestra diferencias significativas en la forma de las cspides de los molares entre E. mexicanus y las otras dos especies, ya que E. mexicanus presenta un mayor porcentaje de cspides redondeadas y menores porcentajes de cspides aguzadas y romas. Estas diferencias son consistentes con los resultados reportados en un estudio reciente de istopos estables. Por otra parte, el anlisis de microdesgaste dental indica diferencias significativas en el patrn de microdesgaste de los tres quidos. Los resultados del anlisis de microdesgaste sugieren que cada especie tenda a ingerir materiales con diferentes propiedades fsicas, lo cual apoya la hiptesis de que presentaban una particin de recursos alimenticios. Integrando los resultados derivados del estudio de mesodesgaste y microdesgaste con aqullos reportados en un estudio de istopos estables, se sugiere que E. conversidens y E. sp. presentaban una dieta predominantemente pacedora y posiblemente se alimentaban a diferentes alturas del suelo y/o en diferentes microhbitats. Equus mexicanus parece tambin haber incorporado en su dieta una gran proporcin de pastos, pero con un hbito alimenticio ms generalista que los otros dos quidos. Abstract in english The Late Pleistocene (late Wisconsinan glacial stage) deposits of the archeological-paleontological site of Cedral, north-central Mexico, have yielded abundant fossil remains of three horse species: Equus mexicanus, E. conversidens, and E. sp. These horses appear to have been sympatric, not only at [...] this locality but in different sites in Mexico and the southwestern United States, posing the possibility that they partitioned available food resources in order to coexist. In this study, we investigated the feeding ecology of the Cedral horses through the analysis of dental wear (i.e., mesowear and microwear). The extended mesowear and low magnification microwear methods were used to infer the paleodiet of each species. The analysis of mesowear reveals significant differences in cusp shape between E. mexicanus and the other two equid species, with the former showing a higher percentage of rounded cusps and lower percentages of sharp and blunt cusps. These differences are consistent with those reported in a recent study of stable isotopes. Furthermore, the analysis of dental microwear indicates significant differences between the microwear patterns of the three equids. The results of the microwear analysis suggest that each species tended to feed on different foodstuffs with varying physical properties, supporting the hypothesis of dietary resource partitioning. Integrating the results derived from the examination of mesowear and microwear, as well as those gathered from the study of stable isotopes, it is suggested that E. conversidens and E. sp. were predominantly grazers, which may have fed at different feeding heights and/or in different microhabitats. Equus mexicanus also appears to have grazed to a large extent, but possibly with a more generalist dietary behavior.

  18. Thermoluminescence dating of pleistocene sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a short introduction on recent trends in quaternary geochronology, this article focuses on the thermoluminescence dating of sediments, whose principles and present limits and prospects are discussed. Results are presented for the TL behaviour of sands from various geological contexts in Brazil. They show that the coarse (approx. 100-200μm) quartz fraction of coastal and intra continental, eolian and fluvial-type deposits, might be datable by TL from the upper Holocene to at least the basis of the upper Pleistocene, with a precision of + - 10-15%. (Author)

  19. Thermoluminescence dating of pleistocene sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a short introduction on recent trends in quaternary geochronology, this article focuses on the thermoluminescence (TL) dating of sediments, whose principles, present limits and prospects are discussed. Results are presented for TL behavior of sands from various geological contexts in Brazil. They show that the coarse (approx. 100-200 μm) quartz fraction of coastal and intracontinental, eolian and fluvial - type deposits, might be datable by TL from the upper Holocene to at least the base of the upper Pleistocene, with a precision of +- 10-15%. (Author)

  20. The sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Early Tertiary, Cusiana field, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cusiana field (BP, Ecopetrol, Total and Triton is located in the llanos foothills of Eastern Colombia. There are three key reservoirs in the Cusiana field; the late Eocene to Early Oligocene Mirador Formation, the late Paleocene Barco Formation and the Santonian to Late Campanian Guadalupe Formation. The Mirador Formation contains over 50% of the original oil in place. Production for 1995 is planned at 130.000 barrels of oil per day (bopd; daily average), principally for the Mirador Formation with some production from the Guadalupe Formation. The mirador formation has therefore been the focus of a detailed reservoir description study aimed at understanding reservoir performance and putting a foundation in place for long-term reservoir management. The Mirador Formation comprises sandy (>60%), high frequency sequences dominated by the deposits of incised valleys. This paper describes the sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Mirador and the methodology chosen to construct a reservoir model fit for reservoir simulation

  1. Contribution to the stratigraphy of the onshore Paraíba Basin, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilce F. Rossetti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Several publications have contributed to improve the stratigraphy of the Paraíba Basin in northeastern Brazil. However, the characterization and distribution of sedimentary units in onshore areas of this basin are still incomplete, despite their significance for reconstructing the tectono-sedimentary evolution of the South American passive margin. This work provides new information to differentiate among lithologically similar strata, otherwise entirely unrelated in time. This approach included morphological, sedimentological and stratigraphic descriptions based on surface and sub-surface data integrated with remote sensing, optically stimulated luminescence dating, U+Th/He dating of weathered goethite, and heavy mineral analysis. Based on this study, it was possible to show that Cretaceous units are constrained to the eastern part of the onshore Paraíba Basin. Except for a few outcrops of carbonatic rocks nearby the modern coastline, deposits of this age are not exposed to the surface in the study area. Instead, the sedimentary cover throughout the basin is constituted by mineralogically and chronologically distinctive deposits, inserted in the Barreiras Formation and mostly in the Post-Barreiras Sediments, of early/middle Miocene and Late Pleistocene-Holocene ages, respectively. The data presented in this work support tectonic deformation as a factor of great relevance to the distribution of the sedimentary units of the Paraíba Basin.Várias publicações têm contribuído para melhorar a estratigrafia da Bacia Paraíba no nordeste do Brasil. Entretanto, a caracterização e distribuição das unidades sedimentares em áreas continentais desta bacia são ainda incompletas, apesar de sua importância para reconstruir a evolução tectono-sedimentar da margem passiva sulamericana. Este trabalho fornece novas informações para diferenciar entre estratos litologicamente similares que, por outro lado, não são relacionados no tempo. Esta abordagem incluiu descrições morfológica, sedimentológica e estratigráfica baseadas em dados de superfície e sub-superfície, integrada com sensoriamento remoto, datação por luminescência opticamente estimulada, datação de goetita intempérica por U+Th/He e análise de minerais pesados. Baseado neste estudo, foi possível mostrar que unidades cretáceas são restritas à parte leste da porção continental da Bacia Paraíba. Exceto por poucos afloramentos de rochas carbonáticas próximo da linha de costa atual, depósitos desta idade não são expostos à superfície na área de estudo. Ao invés disto, a cobertura sedimentar ao longo da bacia é constituída por depósitos mineralogicamente e cronologicamente distintos, inseridos na Formação Barreiras e, principalmente, nos Sedimentos Pós-Barreiras, de idade eo/mesomiocena e pleistocena tardia-holocena, respectivamente. Os dados apresentados neste trabalho suportam deformação tectônica como um fator de grande relevância na distribuição das unidades sedimentares da Bacia Paraíba.

  2. Dynamics of Pleistocene population extinctions in Beringian brown bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, I; Matheus, P; Shapiro, B; Jensen, D; Cooper, A

    2002-03-22

    The climatic and environmental changes associated with the last glaciation (90,000 to 10,000 years before the present; 90 to 10 ka B.P.) are an important example of the effects of global climate change on biological diversity. These effects were particularly marked in Beringia (northeastern Siberia, northwestern North America, and the exposed Bering Strait) during the late Pleistocene. To investigate the evolutionary impact of these events, we studied genetic change in the brown bear, Ursus arctos, in eastern Beringia over the past 60,000 years using DNA preserved in permafrost remains. A marked degree of genetic structure is observed in populations throughout this period despite local extinctions, reinvasions, and potential interspecies competition with the short-faced bear, Arctodus simus. The major phylogeographic changes occurred 35 to 21 ka B.P., before the glacial maximum, and little change is observed after this time. Late Pleistocene histories of mammalian taxa may be more complex than those that might be inferred from the fossil record or contemporary DNA sequences alone. PMID:11910112

  3. A NEW EARLY PLEISTOCENE BIRD ASSOCIATION FROM PIETRAFITTA (PERUGIA, CENTRAL ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GILDA ZUCCHETTA

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available We here present che preliminary results of the analysis of the fossil bird assemblages found in the lignite deposits of the Pietrafitta Mine (Perugia, Central Italy. A rich vertebrate association, mainly mammals, has been retrieved in Pietrafitta, which is the richest local fauna of the Farneta Faunal Unit (late Villafranchian, early Pleistocene. Avian remains of Podicipedidae, Ardeidae, Phalacrocoracidae, Anatidae, Phasianidae and Rallidae have been identified, for most of which Pietrafitta represents the earliest occurrence in Italy. The Pietrafitta fossil bird association is the first Italian bird assemblage of the Early Pleistocene and seems to be one of the most important ones for the early Pleistocene in Europe, especially because it contains mainly aquatic birds, often rare in many other European deposits. 

  4. Stratigraphy of the Jurassic system in northern Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeley, M.L.; Shaw, D.; Forbes, G.A.

    1988-08-01

    A regional synthesis is presented of the stratigraphy of Jurassic strata in Egypt north of 30/degree/N, based on the study of about 80 wells and outcrops from northeastern Egypt. Almost all fossil groups have been investigated for biostratigraphic control. Published work on ammonite faunas from Gebel el Maghara (north Sinai) is integrated with extensive original work on palynofloras (and, to a lesser extent, ostracod/foraminiferal faunas) recovered from marine rocks in the subsurface. The recovery of rich dinocyst assemblages enables the recognition of a ten-fold zonation scheme, largely within the Middle-Late Jurassic sedimentary package. The upper limit of this package is marked by the Cimmerian erosional event; strata younger than Oxfordian are rarely preserved. Only east of 30/degree/E is significant sedimentation known to have occurred immediately prior to the major early Bajocian transgressive event. Thereafter mean sea level rose steadily. The Lower Triassic-Lower Jurassic sedimentary package is poorly understood, largely the result of scanty and ambiguous stratigraphic evidence. However, regional correlations suggest that only very thin earliest Jurassic (Hettangian ) clastic deposition succeeded a sequence of Upper Triassic carbonates and evaporites (Wadi en Natrun Formation) in the north. Arising from these studies is a standard lithostratigraphical scheme. The upper sedimentary package, the Gebel el Maghara Group, comprises three formations (Masajid, Khatatba, and Inmar) and seven members; new units are defined and old units redefined.

  5. Stratigraphy Cretaceous sediments of the Kerch Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishchenko I.I.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Subdivision and correlation of the Cretaceous sedimentary sequences within the Kerch Peninsula are made applying comprehensive study, revision and critical analysis of the all available data on paleontology, stratigraphy and lithology of those sedimentary rocks. It is proposed new stratigraphic chart for the Cretaceous rocks subdivision of this region. A collection of all available materials with paleontology, stratigraphy and lithology Cretaceous sediments of the Kerch Peninsula, contained for boreholes annual reports of the "Krymnaftohazrozvidka" thematic reports and other stock materials. Working with all the accumulated material able to establish and justify paleontological Cretaceous thicker in the study area lower sediments (in the Aptian and Albian layers and upper (in the Cenomanian, Coniacian, Campanian and Maastricht stages departments Cretaceous system. With modern domestic ("HeoPoysk" and foreign (Petrel, of Schlumberge software packages for processing and interpretation of seismic and geological and geophysical data on the basis of geophysical (logging, given existing structural constructions on deposits of Cretaceous, paleontological determinations of relative geological age of rocks was conducted partition Cretaceous sediments in the sections most well Kerch Peninsula and their correlation within the Kerch Peninsula and surrounding areas (zone junction plain Crimea and Kerch peninsula.

  6. Spatial distribution of Pleistocene/Holocene warming amplitudes in Northern Eurasia inferred from geothermal data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Demezhko

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze 48 geothermal estimates of Pleistocene/Holocene warming amplitudes from various locations in Greenland, Europe, Arctic regions of Western Siberia, and Yakutia. The spatial distribution of these estimates exhibits two remarkable features. (i In Europe and part of Asia the amplitude of warming increases toward the northwest and displays clear asymmetry with respect to the North Pole. The region of maximal warming is close to the North Atlantic. A simple parametric dependence of the warming amplitudes on the distance to the warming center explains 91% of the amplitude variation. The Pleistocene/Holocene warming center is located northeast of Iceland. We claim that the Holocene warming is primarily related to the formation (or resumption of the modern system of currents in the North Atlantic. (ii In Arctic Asia, north of the 68-th parallel, the amplitude of temperature change sharply decreases from South to North, reaching zero and even negative values. These small or negative amplitudes could be attributed partially to a joint influence of Late Pleistocene ice sheets. Using a simple model of the temperature regime underneath the ice sheet we show that, depending on the relationship between the heat flow and the vertical ice advection velocity, the base of the glacier can either warm up or cool down. Nevertheless, we speculate that the more likely explanation of these observations are warm-water lakes thought of have formed in the Late Pleistocene by the damming of the Ob, Yenisei and Lena Rivers.

  7. A Pleistocene lacustrine episode in southeastern Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of an investigation of the Th/U dating and isotopic (stable carbon and oxygen) palaeohydrology of the fossiliferous lacustrine deposits of middle Pleistocene age found in Central Fezzan (Libya) are reported. (U.K.)

  8. Early capture of a central Apennine (Italy) internal basin as a consequence of enhanced regional uplift at the Early-Middle Pleistocene Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Gori, Stefano; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; Falcucci, Emanuela; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; Scardia, Giancarlo; Instituto Oceanogrfico, Universidade de So Paulo, So Paulo, Brazil; Nomande, Sebastien; LSCE/IPSL, Laboratoire CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, Domaine du CNRS, France; Guillou, H.; LSCE/IPSL, Laboratoire CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, Domaine du CNRS, France; Galadini, Fabrizio; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; Fredi, Paola; La Sapienza Universit di Roma, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra

    2015-01-01

    Extensional tectonics in the inner portion of the central Apennines began during the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene. It resulted in the formation of chain-parallel normal fault systems, whose activity through the Quaternary led to the formation of intermontane tectonic basins; these represented traps for continental sedimentary sequences. In particular, during the Early Pleistocene most of the central Apennine depressions hosted lakes, testifying to endorheic hydrographic networks. Afterward...

  9. The Pleistocene rivers of the English Channel region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Pierre; Coutard, Jean-Pierre; Gibbard, Philip; Hallegouet, Bernard; Lautridou, Jean-Pierre; Ozouf, Jean-Claude

    2003-02-01

    The Pleistocene history of river systems that enter the English Channel from northern France and southern England is reviewed. During periods of low sea-level (cold stages) these streams were tributaries of the Channel River. In southern England the largest, the River Solent, is an axial stream that has drained the Hampshire Basin from the Early Pleistocene or late Pliocene. Other streams of southern England may be of similar antiquity but their records are generally short and their sedimentary history have been destroyed, as in northern Brittany, by coastal erosion and valley deepening as a consequence of tectonic uplift. In northern France, the Seine and Somme rivers have very well developed terrace systems recording incision that began at around 1 Ma. The uplift rate, deduced from the study of these terrace systems, is of 55 to 60 m myr-1 since the end of the Early Pleistocene. Generally the facies and sedimentary structures indicate that the bulk of the deposits in these rivers accumulated in braided river environments under periglacial climates in all the area around the Channel. Evolution of the rivers reflects their responses to climatic change, local geological structure and long-term tectonic activity. In this co