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Sample records for large bowel mucosa

  1. Prebiotic carbohydrates modify the mucosa associated microflora of the human large bowel

    Langlands, S J; Hopkins, M J; Coleman, N; Cummings, J H

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: The mucosa associated flora of the large intestine is important in determining mucosal function although what controls its composition is unknown. This study has determined the effect of the prebiotic carbohydrates oligofructose and inulin on the mucosal flora.

  2. Large bowel resection - slideshow

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100089.htm Large bowel resection - Series To use the sharing features ... 6 out of 6 Normal anatomy Overview The large bowel [large intestine or the colon] is part ...

  3. Large bowel resection - discharge

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000151.htm Large bowel resection - discharge To use the sharing features ... surgery to remove all or part of your large intestine (large bowel). You may also have had ...

  4. Large bowel resection

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002941.htm Large bowel resection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Large bowel resection is surgery to remove all or ...

  5. Antioxidants and mucosa protectives: realistic therapeutic options in inflammatory bowel disease?

    L. Kruidenier; Verspaget, H. W.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative damage is involved in the pathogenic process of idiopathic chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Although specific intervention in the oxidative cascade showed promising results in animal models and preliminary patient trials, the clinical efficacy of antioxidants still has to be established. Mucosa protection, for example by dietary fatty acids, seems to attenuate the intestinal inflammatory process as well but awaits definite clinical proof for the treatment of inflammatory bowel di...

  6. Increased density of tolerogenic dendritic cells in the small bowel mucosa of celiac patients

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Uibo, Oivi; Heilman, Kaire; Uibo, Raivo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the densities of dendritic cells (DCs) and FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and their interrelations in the small bowel mucosa in untreated celiac disease (CD) patients with and without type 1 diabetes (T1D). METHODS: Seventy-four patients (45 female, 29 male, mean age 11.1 ± 6.8 years) who underwent small bowel biopsy were studied. CD without T1D was diagnosed in 18 patients, and CD with T1D was diagnosed in 15 patients. Normal small bowel mucosa was found in two T1D patients. Thirty-nine patients (mean age 12.8 ± 4.9 years) with other diagnoses (functional dyspepsia, duodenal ulcer, erosive gastritis, etc.) formed the control group. All CD patients had partial or subtotal villous atrophy according to the Marsh classification: Marsh grade IIIa in 9, grade IIIb in 21 and grade IIIc in 3 cases. Thirty-nine patients without CD and 2 with T1D had normal small bowel mucosa (Marsh grade 0). The densities of CD11c+, IDO+, CD103+, Langerin (CD207+) DCs and FOXP3+ Tregs were investigated by immunohistochemistry (on paraffin-embedded specimens) and immunofluorescence (on cryostat sections) methods using a combination of mono- and double-staining. Sixty-six serum samples were tested for IgA-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) using a fully automated EliA™ Celikey® IgA assay (Pharmacia Diagnostics, Freiburg, Germany). RESULTS: The density of CD11c+ DCs was significantly increased in CD patients compared with patients with normal mucosa (21.67 ± 2.49 vs 13.58 ± 1.51, P = 0.007). The numbers of FOXP3+ cells were significantly higher in CD patients (10.66 ± 1.50 vs 1.92 ± 0.37, P = 0.0002) and in patients with CD and coexisting T1D (8.11 ± 1.64 vs 1.92 ± 0.37, P = 0.002) compared with patients with normal mucosa. The density of FOXP3+ cells significantly correlated with the histological grade of atrophic changes in the small bowel mucosa according to the March classification (r = 0.62; P < 0.0001) and with levels of IgA antibody (r = 0.55; P < 0

  7. Endocrine cells in the oxyntic mucosa of the stomach in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Gilja, Odd Helge; Gundersen, Doris Irene; Hausken,Trygve

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the different endocrine cell types in the oxyntic mucosa of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: Seventy-six patients with IBS were included in the study (62 females and 14 males; mean age 32 years, range 18-55 years), of which 40 also fulfilled the Rome III criteria for functional dyspepsia (FDP). Of the entire IBS cohort, 26 had diarrhea as the predominant symptom (IBS-D), 21 had a mixture of diarrhea and constipation (IBS-M), and 29 had constipation as th...

  8. An atypical case of large bowel obstruction

    Hughes, Kaylie E.; Arthur, James

    2013-01-01

    In Europe up to nine per cent of people suffer from renal calculi during their lifetime. Staghorn calculi are common and account for ∼11% of cases. Classic presentations include persistent loin pain, recurrent pyelonephritis or cystitis-like symptoms, renal colic or occasional haematuria. We present what we believe to be the first documented case of large bowel obstruction caused by a benign colonic stricture formed secondary to extravasation of a staghorn calculus.

  9. Automatic classification of small bowel mucosa alterations in celiac disease for confocal laser endomicroscopy

    Boschetto, Davide; Di Claudio, Gianluca; Mirzaei, Hadis; Leong, Rupert; Grisan, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by exposure to gluten and similar proteins, affecting genetically susceptible persons, increasing their risk of different complications. Small bowels mucosa damage due to CD involves various degrees of endoscopically relevant lesions, which are not easily recognized: their overall sensitivity and positive predictive values are poor even when zoom-endoscopy is used. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (CLE) allows skilled and trained experts to qualitative evaluate mucosa alteration such as a decrease in goblet cells density, presence of villous atrophy or crypt hypertrophy. We present a method for automatically classifying CLE images into three different classes: normal regions, villous atrophy and crypt hypertrophy. This classification is performed after a features selection process, in which four features are extracted from each image, through the application of homomorphic filtering and border identification through Canny and Sobel operators. Three different classifiers have been tested on a dataset of 67 different images labeled by experts in three classes (normal, VA and CH): linear approach, Naive-Bayes quadratic approach and a standard quadratic analysis, all validated with a ten-fold cross validation. Linear classification achieves 82.09% accuracy (class accuracies: 90.32% for normal villi, 82.35% for VA and 68.42% for CH, sensitivity: 0.68, specificity 1.00), Naive Bayes analysis returns 83.58% accuracy (90.32% for normal villi, 70.59% for VA and 84.21% for CH, sensitivity: 0.84 specificity: 0.92), while the quadratic analysis achieves a final accuracy of 94.03% (96.77% accuracy for normal villi, 94.12% for VA and 89.47% for CH, sensitivity: 0.89, specificity: 0.98).

  10. Mucosa-associated Faecalibacterium prausnitzii phylotype richness is reduced in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Lopez-Siles, Mireia; Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Abellà, Carles; Busquets, David; Sabat-Mir, Miriam; Duncan, Sylvia H; Aldeguer, Xavier; Flint, Harry J; Garcia-Gil, L Jesús

    2015-11-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii depletion in intestinal diseases has been extensively reported, but little is known about intraspecies variability. This work aims to determine if subjects with gastrointestinal disease host mucosa-associated F. prausnitzii populations different from those hosted by healthy individuals. A new species-specific PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method targeting the 16S rRNA gene was developed to fingerprint F. prausnitzii populations in biopsy specimens from 31 healthy control (H) subjects and 36 Crohn's disease (CD), 23 ulcerative colitis (UC), 6 irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and 22 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The richness of F. prausnitzii subtypes was lower in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients than in H subjects. The most prevalent operational taxonomic units (OTUs) consisted of four phylotypes (OTUs with a 99% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity [OTU99]), which were shared by all groups of patients. Their distribution and the presence of some disease-specific F. prausnitzii phylotypes allowed us to differentiate the populations in IBD and CRC patients from that in H subjects. At the level of a minimum similarity of 97% (OTU97), two phylogroups accounted for 98% of the sequences. Phylogroup I was found in 87% of H subjects but in under 50% of IBD patients (P = 0.003). In contrast, phylogroup II was detected in >75% of IBD patients and in only 52% of H subjects (P = 0.005). This study reveals that even though the main members of the F. prausnitzii population are present in both H subjects and individuals with gut diseases, richness is reduced in the latter and an altered phylotype distribution exists between diseases. This approach may serve as a basis for addressing the suitability of F. prausnitzii phylotypes to be quantified as a putative biomarker of disease and depicting the importance of the loss of these subtypes in disease pathogenesis. PMID:26296733

  11. Reduced expression of aquaporins in human intestinal mucosa in early stage inflammatory bowel disease

    Ricanek P

    2015-01-01

    -dimensional structures of AQP1, 3, 7, and 8 were modeled. Results: AQP1, 3, 7, and 8 mRNAs were detected in all parts of the intestinal mucosa. Notably, AQP1 and AQP3 mRNA levels were reduced in the ileum of patients with Crohn's disease, and AQP7 and AQP8 mRNA levels were reduced in the ileum and the colon of patients with ulcerative colitis. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed localization of AQP3, 7, and 8 at the mucosal epithelium, whereas the expression of AQP1 was mainly confined to the endothelial cells and erythrocytes. The reduction in the level of AQP3, 7, and 8 mRNA was confirmed by immunofluorescence, which also indicated a reduction of apical immunolabeling for AQP8 in the colonic surface epithelium and crypts of the IBD samples. This could indicate loss of epithelial polarity in IBD, leading to disrupted barrier function. Conclusion: AQPs 1 and 8 and the aquaglyceroporins AQPs 3 and 7 are the AQPs predominantly expressed in the lower intestinal tract of humans. Their expression is significantly reduced in patients with IBD, and they are differentially expressed in specific bowel segments in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The data present a link between gut inflammation and water/solute homeostasis, suggesting that AQPs may play a significant role in IBD pathophysiology. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, aquaporins, aquaglyceroporins

  12. Anastomotic disruption after large bowel resection

    NasirKhan, Mohammad U; Abir, Farshad; Longo, Walter; Kozol, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic disruption is a feared and serious complication of colon surgery. Decades of research have identified factors favoring successful healing of anastomoses as well as risk factors for anastomotic disruption. However, some factors, such as the role of mechanical bowel preparation, remain controversial. Despite proper caution and excellent surgical technique, some anastomotic leaks are inevitable. The rapid identification of anastomotic leaks and the timely treatment in these cases are...

  13. Anastomotic disruption after large bowel resection

    Mohammad U NasirKhan; Farshad Abir; Walter Longo; Robert Kozol

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic disruption is a feared and serious complication of colon surgery. Decades of research have identified factors favoring successful healing of anastomoses as well as risk factors for anastomotic disruption. However, some factors, such as the role of mechanical bowel preparation, remain controversial.Despite proper caution and excellent surgical technique,some anastomotic leaks are inevitable. The rapid identification of anastomotic leaks and the timely treatment in these cases are paramount.

  14. Lower Bifidobacteria counts in both duodenal mucosa-associated and fecal microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome patients

    Angèle PM Kerckhoffs; Melvin Samsom; Michel E van der Rest; Joris de Vogel; Jan Knol; Kaouther Ben-Amor; Louis MA Akkermans

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the composition of both fecal and duodenal mucosa-associated microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients and healthy subjects using molecular-based techniques. METHODS: Fecal and duodenal mucosa brush samples were obtained from 41 IBS patients and 26 healthy subjects. Fecal samples were analyzed for the composition of the total microbiota using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and both fecal and duodenal brush samples were analyzed for the composition of bifidobacteria using real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The FISH analysis of fecal samples revealed a 2-fold decrease in the level of bifidobacteria (4.2 ± 1.3 vs 8.3 ± 1.9, P < 0.01) in IBS patients compared to healthy subjects, whereas no major differences in other bacterial groups were observed. At the species level, Bifidobacterium catenulatum levels were significantly lower (6 ± 0.6 vs 19 ± 2.5, P < 0.001) in the IBS patients in both fecal and duodenal brush samples than in healthy subjects. CONCLUSION: Decreased bifidobacteria levels in both fecal and duodenal brush samples of IBS patients compared to healthy subjects indicate a role for microbiotic composition in IBS pathophysiology.

  15. Toll-like receptor mRNA expression is selectively increased in the colonic mucosa of two animal models relevant to irritable bowel syndrome.

    Declan P McKernan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is largely viewed as a stress-related disorder caused by aberrant brain-gut-immune communication and altered gastrointestinal (GI homeostasis. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that stress modulates innate immune responses; however, very little is known on the immunological effects of stress on the GI tract. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are critical pattern recognition molecules of the innate immune system. Activation of TLRs by bacterial and viral molecules leads to activation of NF-kB and an increase in inflammatory cytokine expression. It was our hypothesis that innate immune receptor expression may be changed in the gastrointestinal tract of animals with stress-induced IBS-like symptoms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, our objective was to evaluate the TLR expression profile in the colonic mucosa of two rat strains that display colonic visceral hypersensitivity; the stress-sensitive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rat and the maternally separated (MS rat. Quantitative PCR of TLR2-10 mRNA in both the proximal and distal colonic mucosae was carried out in adulthood. Significant increases are seen in the mRNA levels of TLR3, 4 & 5 in both the distal and proximal colonic mucosa of MS rats compared with controls. No significant differences were noted for TLR 2, 7, 9 & 10 while TLR 6 could not be detected in any samples in both rat strains. The WKY strain have increased levels of mRNA expression of TLR3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9 & 10 in both the distal and proximal colonic mucosa compared to the control Sprague-Dawley strain. No significant differences in expression were found for TLR2 while as before TLR6 could not be detected in all samples in both strains. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that both early life stress (MS and a genetic predisposition (WKY to stress affect the expression of key sentinels of the innate immune system which may have direct relevance for the molecular pathophysiology of IBS.

  16. Lumbar hernia: a rare cause of large bowel obstruction

    Hide, I; Pike, E; Uberoi, R

    1999-01-01

    We describe a 70-year-old woman presenting with large bowel obstruction secondary to incarceration of the mid descending colon within a lumbar hernia. This was diagnosed on barium enema and successfully treated surgically.


Keywords: hernia; intestinal obstruction; colon

  17. Morphological changes of intestinal mucosa in patients with different clinical variants of irritable bowel syndrome using tetracyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    Nagieva S.; Svintsitskyy A.; Kuryk O.; Korendovych I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess histological changes of colonic mucosa in patients with clinically different types of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) before and after the treatment with tetracyclic antidepressant and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Methods. Adult patients (over 18 years) with confirmed diagnosis of IBS were examined. Biopsy specimens were taken from colon during colonoscopy for the next histological examination. One expert gastrointestinal pathologist assessed all tissue samples....

  18. Overexpression of GRß in colonic mucosal cell line partly reflects altered gene expression in colonic mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Nagy, Zsolt; Acs, Bence; Butz, Henriett; Feldman, Karolina; Marta, Alexa; Szabo, Peter M; Baghy, Kornelia; Pazmany, Tamas; Racz, Karoly; Liko, Istvan; Patocs, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) plays a crucial role in inflammatory responses. GR has several isoforms, of which the most deeply studied are the GRα and GRß. Recently it has been suggested that in addition to its negative dominant effect on GRα, the GRß may have a GRα-independent transcriptional activity. The GRß isoform was found to be frequently overexpressed in various autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this study, we wished to test whether the gene expression profile found in a GRß overexpressing intestinal cell line (Caco-2GRß) might mimic the gene expression alterations found in patients with IBD. Whole genome microarray analysis was performed in both normal and GRß overexpressing Caco-2 cell lines with and without dexamethasone treatment. IBD-related genes were identified from a meta-analysis of 245 microarrays available in online microarray deposits performed on intestinal mucosa samples from patients with IBD and healthy individuals. The differentially expressed genes were further studied using in silico pathway analysis. Overexpression of GRß altered a large proportion of genes that were not regulated by dexamethasone suggesting that GRß may have a GRα-independent role in the regulation of gene expression. About 10% of genes differentially expressed in colonic mucosa samples from IBD patients compared to normal subjects were also detected in Caco-2 GRß intestinal cell line. Common genes are involved in cell adhesion and cell proliferation. Overexpression of GRß in intestinal cells may affect appropriate mucosal repair and intact barrier function. The proposed novel role of GRß in intestinal epithelium warrants further studies. PMID:26480216

  19. Effects of Imbalance of Apoptosis and Proliferation on Large Bowel Carcinogenesis in Mice

    BaocunSun; ShiwuZhang; XiulanZhao; LanWang

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe the pattern of changes in the proliferation and apoptosis at different stages of large bowel carcinoma in mice, and to explore the effects of the imbalance of apoptosis and proliferation at different stages of large-intestine carcinogenesis.METHODS An experimental animal model for large intestine carcinogenesis of KUNMING-strain mice was used. The carcinomas were induced by subcuteneous injection of dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and the distribution and density changes of proliferating and apoptotic cells observed through multistages toward cancer formation. The animals were killed in groups at the 12th, 18th, 24th,and 32nd weeks of carcinoma induction. The apoptotic and proliferating cells were labeled separately using TUNEL and PCNA immunohistochemical staining methodsRF, RESULTS In the normal mouse mucosa, all the apoptotic cells were situated in the superficial layers, however, the proliferating cells were situated in the basement layers, and the amount of both were small. In the early stage of carcinoma induction, the proliferation and the apoptotic cells slightly increased in amount, but there were no obvious changes in their ratio. In the medium stage, the densities of both distinctly increased, but there were no obvious changes in the ratio. In the late stage, the densities of the proliferating and the apoptotic cells in the non-carcinoma mucosa were higher than those at other stages. The proliferating cells in the dysplastic mucosa increased progressively with the increasing degree of the lesions. Although the apoptotic cells increased, their changes did not occur with the degree of the lesions. Their ratio showed a decreasing tendency with the degree of the lesions.CONCLUSIONS (①The presence of an imbalance between cell proliferation and apoptosis was confirmed in the course of large intestine carcinogenesis in a mouse model. ②In the early stage of carcinoma induction both proliferation and apoptosis were at a low level; in the medium

  20. The Bowel Microbiota and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Gerald W. Tannock

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The human bowel contains a large and biodiverse bacterial community known as the microbiota or microbiome. It seems likely that the microbiota, fractions of the microbiota, or specific species comprising the microbiota provide the antigenic fuel that drives the chronic immune inflammation of the bowel mucosa that is characteristic of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. At least twenty years of microbiological research have been expended on analysis of the composition of the bowel microbiota of inflammatory bowel disease patients in comparison to that of control subjects. Despite extensive speculations about the aetiological role of dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel diseases, knowledge that can be easily translated into effective remedies for patients has not eventuated. The causes of this failure may be due to poorly defined and executed bacteriological studies, as well as the overwhelming complexity of a biome that contains hundreds of bacterial species and trillions of bacterial cells.

  1. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the bifidobacterial microbiota in the colonic mucosa of patients with colorectal cancer, diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the bifidobacterial microbiota of the colonic mucosa in patients with colon cancer,inflammatory bowel disease or diverticulitis.METHODS: A sample of the distal colonic mucosa was taken during surgery from a total of 34 patients,twenty-one with diagnosed colorectal cancer, nine with diverticulitis and four with inflammatory bowel disease, requiring surgery for their condition. Bacterial DNA was extracted from the resected mucosal samples and bifidobacterial mucosa-associated microbiota was qualitatively and quantitatively determined by means of qualitative and quantitative PCR.RESULTS: Bifidobacteria were found in 100% of the samples from patients with diverticulitis or IBD and a 76% of those suffering colon cancer. The species B. longum and B. bifidum were the most widely found, followed by B. animalis, B. catenulatum and B.adolescentis. B. breve, B. dentium and B. angulatum were not detected in any sample. A significantly higher occurrence of B. longum was observed in patients with diverticulitis than in those with colon cancer or IBD (100%, 62% and 75%, respectively, P < 0.05).Similar results were obtained for B. animalis (56%, 0%and 25%, P < 0.05), while B. adolescentis was only found in the mucosa from patients with colon cancer (5 out of 21, 24%). At the quantitative level, patients with colon cancer or IBD showed lower counts of total Bifidobacterium (4.94 and 5.91 vs 6.96 log Cells/sample,respectively, P < 0.05) and of the species B.longum (4.05 and 4.79 vs 6.76, P < 0.05) than those with diverticulitis.CONCLUSION: Aberrancies in mucosa associated microbiota are present in different intestinal diseases.This may indicate a role of the microbiota in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  2. Small bowel adenocarcinoma mimicking a large adrenal tumor

    Ivović Miomira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel is a rare gastrointestinal neoplasm usually affecting the distal duodenum and proximal jejunum. Because of their rarity and poorly defined abdominal symptoms, a correct diagnosis is often delayed. Case Outline. We present a 43-year-old woman admitted at the Clinic for Endocrinology due to a large tumor (over 7 cm of the left adrenal gland. The tumor was detected by ultrasound and confirmed by CT scan. The patient complained of abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant, fatigue and septic fever. Normal urinary catecholamines excluded pheochromocytoma. The endocrine evaluations revealed laboratory signs of subclinical hypercorticism: midnight cortisol 235 nmol/L, post 1 mg - overnight Dexamethasone suppression test for cortisol 95.5 nmol/L and basal ACTH 4.2 pg/mL. Plasma rennin activity and aldosterone were within the normal range. Surgery was performed. Intraoperative findings showed signs of acute peritonitis and a small ulceration of the jejunum below at 70 cm on the anal side from the Treitz’s ligament. Adrenal glands were not enlarged. Patohistology and immunochemistry identified adenocarcinoma of the jejunum without infiltration of the lymphatic nodules. The extensive jejunal resection and lavage of the peritoneum were performed. Due to complications of massive peritonitis, the patient died seven days after surgery. Conclusion. Poorly defined symptoms and a low incidence make the diagnosis of small bowel carcinoma, particularly of the jejunal region, very difficult in spite of the new endoscopic techniques.

  3. Morphological changes of intestinal mucosa in patients with different clinical variants of irritable bowel syndrome using tetracyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    Nagieva S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess histological changes of colonic mucosa in patients with clinically different types of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS before and after the treatment with tetracyclic antidepressant and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Methods. Adult patients (over 18 years with confirmed diagnosis of IBS were examined. Biopsy specimens were taken from colon during colonoscopy for the next histological examination. One expert gastrointestinal pathologist assessed all tissue samples. We patent semi quantitative assessment of the severity of cell infiltration of colonic mucosa, which could be assessed as inflammatory (neutrophils, immune (lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages, or allergic (eosinophils response (0 to 3 degrees. All patients received treatment due to the clinical variant of IBS: 1 IBS-constipation – mirtazapinum 15 mg/night+lactulose 30ml/morning (+30ml/night if needed; 2 IBS-diarrhea – escitalopram 5mg/night+rifaximine 600mg/twice a day; 3 IBS-unspecified – mirtazapinum 15 mg/escitalopram 5mg/ night; 4 IBS-mixed – mirtazapinum 15 mg, lactulose 30ml/morning (+30ml/night if needed / escitalopram 5mg/night+rifaximine 600mg/twice a day. Results. 107 patients were examined, 36 of them had constipation (I group, 35 – diarrhea (II group, 22- unspecified variant (III group and 12 patients had mixed variant of IBS (IV group due to Rome III criteria (2006. 1st degree of lymphocyte infiltration was detected in 100% IBS-constipation patients and in 58,3% IBS-mixed variant (p0.05. No cases of 2nd or 3rd degree of colonic mucosa infiltration were found. Conclusion. After the treatment with tetracyclic antidepressant and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor we found that the degree of inflammation of colonic mucosa was reduced or disappeared, due to the zero degree of infiltration according to our patented classification. Citation: Nagieva S, Svintsitskyy A, Kuryk O, Korendovych I. [Morphological changes of intestinal mucosa

  4. Large Intraluminal Ileal Hematoma Presenting as Small Bowel Obstruction in a Child

    Intraluminal small bowel hematoma has been rarely reported in children, as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. We present a case of an intraluminal ileal hematoma presenting as small bowel obstruction in a child. Computed Tomography (CT) indicated a large intraluminal hyperdense lesion in the distal ileum as the cause of small bowel obstruction. Abdominal ultrasonography (US) showed an echogenic mass-like lesion with multiple septa in the distal ileum. Small bowel obstruction due to a complicated cystic mass was provisionally diagnosed. Histopathologic examination of the resected mass suggested a submucosal ileal hematoma. Although intraluminal small bowel hematoma is rare in children, it can present as an intraluminal cystic mass and should be considered as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. The US and CT findings of submucosal ileal hematoma could be useful for the diagnosis of such cases in the future

  5. Reduction in diversity of the colonic mucosa associated bacterial microflora in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease

    Ott, S.J.; Musfeldt, M; Wenderoth, D F; Hampe, J; Brant, O; Fölsch, U R; Timmis, K N; Schreiber, S

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: The intestinal bacterial microflora plays an important role in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As most of the colonic bacteria cannot be identified by culture techniques, genomic technology can be used for analysis of the composition of the microflora.

  6. Gastrointestinal bleeding due to large bowel infiltration by chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Tucker, J.; Cachia, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    A 66 year old woman with a 9 year history of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia developed intermittent rectal bleeding for 9 months; sigmoidoscopic biopsy proved that this was due to large bowel infiltration by leukaemia. This is a very rare occurrence.

  7. The role of the colonic flora in maintaining a healthy large bowel mucosa.

    Chapman, M A

    2001-01-01

    This work explores the intricate relationships between bacterial products of fermentation, the short chain fatty acids and the effect that these have on the colonic epithelium and the immune system. It confirms that butyrate is a major energy source for the colonic epithelium and there may be a minor epithelial abnormality in the metabolism of butyrate in patients with ulcerative colitis. Immunological studies suggest that butyrate has an effect on lymphocyte activation and inhibits cell prol...

  8. Primary restorative colectomy in malignant left-sided large bowel obstruction.

    Dorudi, S.; Wilson, N. M.; Heddle, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    A series of 18 consecutive patients who underwent primary resection and immediate anastomosis as the treatment for malignant left-sided large bowel obstruction are presented. Intraoperative mechanical preparation of the colon was omitted. There was no clinical evidence of anastomotic dehiscence or wound infection. The mean duration of hospital stay was 11 days. It is suggested that colonic continuity can be restored immediately and safely without mechanical bowel preparation, providing attent...

  9. The impact of helical computed tomography on the diagnosis of unsuspected inflammatory bowel disease in the large bowel

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are diagnoses that can be easily overlooked clinically. The aim of this study was to investigate if CT is able to make a contribution to the identification of previously unsuspected cases of IBD. We retrospectively identified cases in which the possibility of an IBD was raised in CT reports (over a 4-year period), by utilising a keyword search of the radiology database. Cases with a previously known or suspected IBD were rigorously excluded by review of case notes, and endoscopic, radiological, histological and microbiological findings. The CT images of the identified cases were reviewed by a blinded observer to document the extent of bowel wall thickening, the location of lesion(s), and presence of peri-colic fat abnormality, ascites and/or collections. The observer also attempted to corroborate the presence, and to identify the type, of IBD based on the CT appearances alone. Thirty-five cases (out of approximately 19,000 body CTs performed) of clinically unsuspected IBD were identified, of which 27 underwent further investigation. An IBD was confirmed in 48% (13 of 27): Crohn's disease (n=6), ulcerative colitis (n=2), pseudomembranous colitis (n=3) and other (n=2), of which 70% (9 of 13) were correctly typed by the reviewer. Inflammatory bowel disease was not substantiated in the remainder (14 of 27), although 7 of these had other bowel pathologies: diverticular disease (n=4); and carcinoma (n=3). Prospectively determining the presence, and furthermore type, of IBD on CT is challenging largely because of the considerable overlap in the appearances of the individual IBDs and indeed of normality. Nevertheless, CT is able to identify clinically unsuspected cases and radiologists should be alert to this treatable and not infrequently elusive diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Value of CT scan in the diagnosis of primary large bowel lymphoma

    赵修义; 张雪林; 王劲; 郑卫权; 文戈

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To study the CT imaging of primary large bowel lymphoma and evaluate the value of CT scan.Methods:CT reports of 8 patients with proven primary large bowel lymphoma were retrospectively reviewed.Plain CT scans were done on all patients,enhanced CT scans simultaneously with 5 - 10 mm section thickness,and 5 - 10 mm table increments in 6 cases.Results:Primary involved sites were on the cecum(n = 3),the ascending colon(n = 2),and the rectum(n = 1).The tumor was found in multiple areas of the large bowel in 2 cases.CT appearance fell into 3 typical patterns in our study.The first was focal mass type in 2 cases,with one combined with intussusception and retroperitoneal adenopathy; the second was segmental annular involvement type in 3 cases,with one of them combined with mesenteric adenopathy; the last was diffuse involvement type in 2 cases.Multiple nodules were seen in the rectum in 1 case.Conclusion:CT was found to be accurate in detecting the primary sites and complications of lymphoma,and evaluating invasion of adjacent structures; Focal mass type,segmental annular involvement type and diffuse involvement type are the main patterns of CT features in the primary large bowel lymphoma; The features revealed by CT scan are suggestive of primary large bowel lymphoma in some cases.

  11. The impact of langerin (CD207)+ dendritic cells and FOXP3+ Treg cells in the small bowel mucosa of children with celiac disease and atopic dermatitis in comparison to children with functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Ress, Krista; Luts, Katrin; Uibo, Oivi; Uibo, Raivo

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we aimed to evaluate the impact of langerin (CD207)+ dendritic cells (DCs) and FOXP3+ Treg cells in the intestinal mucosa of children with celiac disease (CD) and atopic dermatitis (AD) in comparison to children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGD). Seventy-five children (37 male, mean age 8.4 ± 4.8 years), who randomly underwent small bowel biopsy, were studied. The CD was diagnosed in 14 children, including five persons with concomitant AD (all positive for anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies and with small bowel atrophy). Normal small bowel mucosa was found in eight patients with AD and in 53 patients with FGD. The sera of all patients were tested for total and specific IgE antibodies to food allergen panels. Staining for CD11c+, langerin (CD207+) DCs, CD4+, and FOXP3+ Treg cells was performed on paraffin-embedded sections of bioptates using immunohistochemistry. The density of CD11c+ DCs, CD4+, and FOXP3+ Treg cells was higher in the CD patients compared to the AD and FGD patients (p = 0.02; p = 0.001). In AD, significantly higher density of CD11c+ DCs was detected in patients positive for specific IgE to food allergen panels (p = 0.02). The FGD patients with elevated total IgE had increased density of langerin (CD207)+ DCs compared to the patients with normal total IgE levels (p = 0.01). The increased density of FOXP3+ Treg cells, CD4+, cells and CD11c+ DCs was associated with CD but not with AD. The elevated level of total IgE or specific IgE to food allergens was associated with more pronounced expression of DCs, indicating a possible link between the presence of these cells in small bowel mucosa with elevated level of serum IgE. PMID:27200487

  12. FOLLOW UP IN LARGE BOWEL RESECTIONS: WERNICKE-KORSAKOFF’S SYNDROME

    M. Lo Gatto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The main complication of large bowel resection is the malabsorption syndrome, a rare form of which is the syndrome of Wernicke-Korsakoff. Patients and Methods. B.E. following gastro-entero anastomosis develops Syndrome Wernicke-Korsakoff characterized by progressive state of disorientation, fixity of gaze, dysphoria. Results. Syndrome Wernicke-Korsacoff is linked to a deficiency of thiamin (also known as vitamin B1. Conclusions. In the follow up of patients who underwent a large bowel resection will be important to carry out systematic blood tests that can detect any frameworks-megaloblastic anemia macrocytosis deficiency vit. B12, iron deficiency, hypomagnesaemia, hypocalcemia, ipodisprotidemy. In the follow up of patients who underwent a large bowel resection will be important to carry out systematic blood tests that can detect any frameworks-megaloblastic anemia macrocytosis deficiency vit. B12, iron deficiency, hypomagnesaemia, hypocalcemia,ipodisprotidemy.

  13. FOLLOW UP IN LARGE BOWEL RESECTIONS: WERNICKE-KORSAKOFF’S SYNDROME

    M. Lo Gatto; C. Staffieri; Y. Macchitella; F. Varrone; G. Tamo Tamo; G. Marzocca

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The main complication of large bowel resection is the malabsorption syndrome, a rare form of which is the syndrome of Wernicke-Korsakoff. Patients and Methods. B.E. following gastro-entero anastomosis develops Syndrome Wernicke-Korsakoff characterized by progressive state of disorientation, fixity of gaze, dysphoria. Results. Syndrome Wernicke-Korsacoff is linked to a deficiency of thiamin (also known as vitamin B1). Conclusions. In the follow up of patients who underwent a larg...

  14. Large bowel obstruction resulting from bladder transitional cell carcinoma metastasis: a common cancer presenting in an uncommon manner.

    Rohloff, Matthew; VandenBerg, Todd; MacMath, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and large bowel obstructions are both common disease processes typically considered unrelated. Presented below is the case of a 49-year-old male with a large bowel obstruction caused by a bladder TCC metastasis. One year prior to large bowel obstruction presentation, the patient had a T2, Grade III TCC of the bladder with no nodal involvement or metastasis, which was removed via radical cystoprostatectomy. This case serves as a reminder that cancer, despite common pathogenesis patterns, can present in atypical ways. PMID:26197806

  15. THE EXPRESSION OF HSP60 AND HSP10 IN LARGE BOWEL CARCINOMAS WITH LYMPH NODE METASTASE

    Bartolotta Tommaso E; Marasà Lorenzo; Bucchieri Fabio; Rappa Francesca; David Sabrina; Cappello Francesco; Farina Felicia; Zummo Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The involvement of Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) in cancer development and progression is a widely debated topic. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence and expression of HSP60 and HSP10 in a series of large bowel carcinomas and locoregional lymph nodes with and without metastases. Methods 82 Astler and Coller's stage C2 colorectal cancers, of which 48 well-differentiated and 34 poorly-differentiated, were selected along with 661 lymph nodes, including...

  16. Anastomotic integrity after operations for large-bowel cancer: a multicentre study.

    Fielding, L P; Stewart-Brown, S; Blesovsky, L; Kearney, G.

    1980-01-01

    Clinically evident anastomotic dehiscence was studied in 1466 patients who had undergone resection of a large-bowel adenocarcinoma. The overall incidence of anastomotic leakage was 13%, but the incidence varied between surgeons (range 0.5% to over 30%). Morbidity and mortality were significantly higher in those patients in whom the anastomosis failed to heal primarily. If these results are extrapolated to the national level, it should be possible by achieving results closer to those in patien...

  17. A comparison of two methods of palliation of large bowel obstruction due to irremovable colon cancer.

    Johnson, Richard; Marsh, Ralph; Corson, John; Seymour, Keith

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Untreated malignant large bowel obstruction is rapidly fatal. Short-term palliation of symptoms can be achieved by formation of a stoma in those patients for whom resection surgery is inappropriate. In the final months of life, a stoma represents a significant burden for both patients and carers. Palliative endoluminal stenting may therefore be an attractive alternative option for this poor prognostic group. PATIENTS: Thirty-six patients were studied of whom 18 had obstructing l...

  18. Role of stem cells in large bowel carcinogenesis

    N. A. Nefedova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Сancer stem cells (CSC play a significant role in the development and progression of colorectal cancer. They are capable of self-senewal and multipotent differentiation. CSC can be formed from stem cells or mutant by dedifferentiation of crypt epithelial cells. Recently, much attention is paid to CSC in colon cancer, but very little has been published regarding their expression in colon polyps. In 2010 The World Health Organization attributed the so-called serrated lesions, including hyperplastic polyp, serrated sessile adenoma and traditional serrated adenoma to a group of precancerous lesions of the colon in addition to the classical tubular, villous and tubulo-villous adenomas. Despite the large number of publications devoted to the newly selected category, a full understanding of the processes involved in the formation of polyps and their progression into colon cancer, there is still no. Identification of CSC in colon polyps will assess their potential malignancy conduct adequate therapy, determine the amount of the operation and further treatment strategy. This in turn will contribute to the early detection and prevention of cancer. Identification of CSC, an assessment of their localization and distribution in tubular adenomas, serrated adenoma broad-based, traditional serrated adenoma and hyperplastic polyps allow to evaluate the potential of malignancy and prognosis for each of the polyps. In this regard, the definition of markers characteristic of colon CSC, is interesting not only from a scientific, but also from a practical point of view.

  19. Imaging findings of midgut volvuIus associated with a large small-bowel diverticulum in an aduIt patient: case report

    Kim, Jee Young; Rha, Sung Eun; Oh, Soon Nam; Bo, Seal Hwang; Byun, Jae Young [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-05-01

    Although most patients with jejunoileal diverticulum are asymptomatic, a large, small-bowel diverticulum can be associated with midgut volvulus in an adult. We present a rare case of midgut volvulus that was associated with a large, small-bowel diverticulum in a 77-year-old woman presenting with chronic recurrent abdominal pain. The CT showed the characteristic whirl sign of twisted mesentery, the small bowel loops along the superior mesenteric artery and a large sac-like small-bowel diverticulum. A small bowel series also demonstrated a corkscrew appearance of proximal jejunum, a finding suggestive of midgut volvulus, and a large jejunal diverticulum. During the laparotomy, the small bowel was seen twisted counterclockwise 270 .deg.. The mesenteric root was very shortened. A 4 cm sized diverticulum was seen on the mesenteric border of jejunum, on the portion about 40 cm distal from the Treitz ligament.

  20. Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis without inflammatory bowel disease is genetically different from large duct disease

    Næss, Sigrid; Björnsson, Einar; Anmarkrud, Jarl A.; Al Mamari, Said; Juran, Brian D.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Chapman, Roger; Bergquist, Annika; Melum, Espen; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Schrumpf, Erik; Lie, Benedicte A.; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Karlsen, Tom H.; Hov, Johannes R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is phenotypically a mild version of large duct PSC, but it is unknown whether these phenotypes share aetiology. We aimed to characterize their relationship by investigating genetic associations in the HLA complex, which represent the strongest genetic risk factors in large duct PSC. Methods Four classical HLA loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1) were genotyped in 87 small duct PSC patients, 485 large duct PSC patients and 1117 controls across three geographical regions. Results HLA-DRB1*13:01 (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.4, P=0.01) and HLA-B*08 (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.4, P=0.02) were significantly associated with small duct PSC compared with healthy controls. Based on the observed frequency of HLA-B*08 in small duct PSC, the strongest risk factor in large duct PSC, an estimated 32% (95% CI 4%–65%) of this population can be hypothesized to represent early stages or mild variants of large duct PSC. This subgroup may be constituted by small duct PSC patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which greatly resembled large duct PSC in its HLA association. In contrast, small duct PSC without IBD was only associated with HLA-DRB1*13:01(P=0.03) and was otherwise distinctly dissimilar from large duct PSC. Conclusions Small duct PSC with IBD resembles large duct PSC in its HLA association and may represent early stages or mild variants of large duct disease. Different HLA associations in small duct PSC without IBD could indicate that this subgroup is a different entity. HLA-DRB1*13:01 may represent a specific risk factor for inflammatory bile duct disease. PMID:24517468

  1. [Correlation of the microbiota and intestinal mucosa in the pathophysiology and treatment of irritable bowel, irritable eye, and irritable mind syndrome].

    Fehér, János; Kovács, Illés; Pacella, Elena; Radák, Zsolt

    2014-09-14

    Accumulating clinical evidence supports co-morbidity of irritable bowel, irritable eye and irritable mind symptoms. Furthermore, perturbation of the microbiota-host symbiosis (dysbiosis) is considered a common pathogenic mechanism connecting gastrointestinal, ocular and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Consequently, maintaining or restoring microbiota-host symbiosis represents a new approach to treat these symptoms or to prevent their relapses. Current treatment approach assigned a primary role to live probiotics alone or in combination with prebiotics to enhance colonization of beneficial bacteria and to strengthen the symbiosis. However, several papers showed major benefits of heat-killed probiotics as compared to their live counterparts on both intestinal and systemic symptoms. Recently, in addition to killing probiotics, in a proof of concept study lysates (fragments) of probiotics in combination with vitamins A, B, D and omega 3 fatty acids were successfully tested. These findings suggested a conceptual change in the approach addressed to both the microbiota and host as targets for intervention. PMID:25194867

  2. Increased Chromogranin A Cell Density in the Large Intestine of Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome after Receiving Dietary Guidance

    Tarek Mazzawi; Doris Gundersen; Trygve Hausken; Magdy El-Salhy

    2015-01-01

    The large intestine contains five types of endocrine cells that regulate its functions by sensing its luminal contents and releasing specific hormones. Chromogranin A (CgA) is a common marker for the gastrointestinal endocrine cells, and it is abnormal in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Most IBS patients relate their symptoms to certain food elements. The present study investigated the effect of dietary guidance on the total endocrine cells of the large intestine as detected by CgA i...

  3. Carrageenan Gum and Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli in a Piglet Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Impact on Intestinal Mucosa-associated Microbiota.

    Munyaka, Peris M; Sepehri, Shadi; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) including Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic conditions characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. Adherent invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) pathotype has been increasingly implicated in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. In a 21-day study, we investigated the effects of AIEC strain UM146 inoculation on microbiota profile of the ileal, cecal, ascending and descending colon in a pig model of experimental colitis. Carrageenan gum (CG) was used to induce colitis in weaner piglets whereas AIEC strain UM146 previously isolated from a CD patient was included to investigate a cause or consequence effect in IBD. Treatments were: (1) control; (2) CG; (3) AIEC strain UM146; and (4) CG+UM146. Pigs in groups 2 and 4 received 1% CG in drinking water from day 1 of the study while pigs in groups 3 and 4 were inoculated with UM146 on day 8. Following euthanization on day 21, tissue mucosal scrapings were collected and used for DNA extraction. The V4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA gene was then subjected to Illumina sequencing. Microbial diversity, composition, and the predicted functional metagenome were determined in addition to short chain fatty acids profiles in the digesta and inflammatory cytokines in the intestinal tissue. CG-induced colitis decreased bacterial species richness and shifted community composition. At the phylum level, an increase in Proteobacteria and Deferribacteres and a decrease in Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were observed in CG and CGUM146 compared to control and UM146. The metabolic capacity of the microbiome was also altered in CG and CGUM146 compared to UM146 and control in the colon. We demonstrated that CG resulted in bacterial dysbiosis and shifted community composition similar to what has been previously observed in IBD patients. However, AIEC strain UM146 alone did not cause any clear changes compared to CG or control in our experimental IBD pig model. PMID:27092122

  4. Primary Breast Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (MALT Lymphoma Transformation to Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma: A Case Report

    Şerife Hülya Arslan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL of the breast constitutes 0.04%-0.53% of all malignancies and 2.2% of extra nodal lymphomas. In total, 7%-8% of all B-cell lymphomas are the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT type, of which up to 50% of primary gastric MALT lymphoma. Herein we present a patient with breast MALT lymphoma that transformed to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. A 69-year-old female presented with a mass on her left breast. Physical examination showed a 3 × 3-cm mass located 1 cm from the areola on the upper lateral quadrant of the breast at the 1 o’clock position, which was fixed and firm. Excisional biopsy was performed and pathologic examination of the specimen showed MALT lymphoma transformation to DLBCL. The patient was staged as II-EA. The rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP protocol was scheduled as treatment. Following 6 courses of R-CHOP, 2 additional courses of rituximab were administered. Positron emission tomography (PET-CT was done at the end of the treatment. PET showed that the patient was in complete remission. At the time this report was written, the patient was being followed-up at the outpatient clinic on a regular basis. Lymphoma of the breast is a rarity among malignant tumors of the breast. The most common type of lymphoma is DLBCL. Breast MALT lymphoma is extremely rare. Primary MALT lymphoma of the breast can transform from low grade to high grade and recurrence is possible; therefore, such patients should be monitored carefully for transformation.

  5. Colonic stenting as a bridge to surgery in malignant large-bowel obstruction: a report from two large multinational registries

    Jiménez-Pérez, J; Casellas, J; García-Cano, J;

    2011-01-01

    To date, this is the largest prospective series in patients with malignant colorectal obstruction to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of colonic self-expanding metal stents (SEMSs) as an alternative to emergency surgery. SEMSs allow restoration of bowel transit and careful tumor staging in p...... preparation for elective surgery, hence avoiding the high morbidity and mortality associated with emergency surgery and stoma creation....

  6. Pelvic actinomycosis presenting with a large abscess and bowel stenosis with marked response to conservative treatment: a case report

    Nozawa Hiroaki

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pelvic actinomycosis is a rare disease that can result in abscess formation, bowel obstruction, and other serious complications. Moreover, the correct diagnosis can seldom be established before radical surgery because the disease often mimics pelvic neoplasms. It has been recently recognized that pelvic actinomycosis is associated with long-term use of an intrauterine contraceptive device. We report a woman with a long-standing intrauterine contraceptive device who visited our hospital complaining of symptoms mimicking large bowel ileus with a subacute course. X-ray fluorography and sigmoidoscopy showed marked stenosis in the sigmoid colon but rejected the possibility of colon cancers. Abdomino-pelvic CT and MRI revealed a huge abscess lying over the urinary bladder and anterior to the uterus. Furthermore, a cervical Papanicolaou smear disclosed Actinomyces species. We removed the intrauterine device from the patient. Subsequent high-dose ampicillin administration led to dramatic shrinkage of the abscess and improved the management of the bowel movement quickly. This is a successful case of symptomatic pelvic actinomycosis that was correctly diagnosed and treated without unnecessary surgical intervention.

  7. The expression of HSP60 and HSP10 in large bowel carcinomas with lymph node metastase

    The involvement of Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) in cancer development and progression is a widely debated topic. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence and expression of HSP60 and HSP10 in a series of large bowel carcinomas and locoregional lymph nodes with and without metastases. 82 Astler and Coller's stage C2 colorectal cancers, of which 48 well-differentiated and 34 poorly-differentiated, were selected along with 661 lymph nodes, including 372 with metastases and 289 with reactive hyperplasia only, from the same tumours. Primitive tumours and both metastatic and reactive lymph nodes were studied; specifically, three different compartments of the lymph nodes, secondary follicle, paracortex and medullary sinus, were also analysed. An immunohistochemical research for HSP60 and HSP10 was performed and the semiquantitative results were analysed by statistical analysis to determine the correlation between HSPs expression and 1) tumour grading; 2) degree of inflammation; 3) number of lymph nodes involved; 4) lymph node compartment hyperplasia. Moreover, western blotting was performed on a smaller group of samples to confirm the immunohistochemical results. Our data show that the expression of HSP60, in both primary tumour and lymph node metastasis, is correlated with the tumoral grade, while the HSP10 expression is not. Nevertheless, the levels of HSP10 are commonly higher than the levels of HSP60. In addition, statistical analyses do not show any correlation between the degree of inflammation and the immunopositivity for both HSP60 and HSP10. Moreover, we find a significant correlation between the presence of lymph node metastases and the positivity for both HSP60 and HSP10. In particular, metastatic lymph nodes show a higher percentage of cells positive for both HSP60 and HSP10 in the secondary follicles, and for HSP10 in the medullary sinuses, when compared with hyperplastic lymph nodes. HSP60 and HSP10 may have diagnostic and prognostic

  8. The Interaction of Large Bowel Microflora with the Colonic Mucus Barrier

    Pearson, Jeffrey P.; Brownlee, Iain A.

    2010-01-01

    The colonic mucus barrier is the first line of defence that the underlying mucosa has against the wide range of potentially damaging agents of microbial, endogenous, and dietary origin that occur within the colonic lumen. The functional component of mucus is the secreted, polymeric glycoprotein mucin. The mucus barrier can either act as an energy source or a support medium for growth to the intestinal microflora. The mucus barrier appears to effectively partition the vast number of microbial ...

  9. Plasma lipids and large bowel volatile fatty acids in pigs fed on white rice, brown rice and rice bran.

    Marsono, Y; Illman, R J; Clarke, J M; Trimble, R P; Topping, D L

    1993-09-01

    Adult male pigs were fed on a diet containing (% of energy) fat 25 starch 55 from white rice and providing 20 g fibre/pig d (diet WR). In two other groups rice bran was added to the diet to provide 43 g fibre/d. One group received the diet unmodified (diet RB), but in another (diet RO) heat-stabilized unrefined rice oil replaced the palm oil. In a further group brown rice replaced white rice and provided 37 g fibre/pig per d (diet BR). Plasma cholesterol concentrations were similar with diets WR, RB and BR. With diet RO the concentration was significantly lower than with diets WR and BR but was not different from diet RB. Plasma high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol and plasma triacylglycerols were unaffected by diet. In all groups, digesta mass rose from the caecum to the proximal colon but fell in the distal colon. Diet WR gave the lowest digesta mass while diet BR gave a significantly higher mass along the large bowel length. RB- and RO-fed pigs had equal masses of digesta which were intermediate between BR- and WR-fed pigs at all sampling sites. Pools of individual and total volatile fatty acids (VFA) in the proximal large bowel were unaffected by diet. Pools of total and individual VFA in the median and distal colon were lowest with diets WR and RB and significantly higher with diet BR. In these regions of the colon pools of acetate in RO-fed pigs did not differ from those in the BR-fed group but were higher than in other groups. However, pools of propionate and butyrate with the RO diet were significantly lower than with diet BR and the same as with diets WR and RB. Portal venous VFA concentrations were unaffected by diet. The higher large bowel digesta masses and VFA with diet BR may reflect the escape of starch from the small intestine. PMID:8260477

  10. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Transformed from Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Arising in a Female Urethra Treated with Rituximab for the First Time

    Zahrani, A. Al; Abdelsalam, M.; Fiaar, A. Al; Ibrahim, N.; Al-Elawi, A.; Muhammad, B

    2012-01-01

    A 30-year-old female patient presented to the gynecology clinic with a small (painless) swelling at the urethral orifice. She underwent surgical excision of the lesion. Pathological examination revealed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of diffuse large B-cell type and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type, stage IE. The patient refused radiotherapy. Accordingly, we started CHOP-R chemotherapy. She received a total of 6 cycles of CHOP and 8 cycles of rituximab. Patient follow-up was done 3 months later...

  11. Acute pseudo-obstruction of the large bowel with caecal perforation following normal vaginal delivery: a case report

    Seenath Marlon

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute pseudo-obstruction of the large bowel following normal vaginal delivery is an extremely rare complication of normal vaginal delivery. It can be fatal if not recognized early. Only one previous report has been found in the English literature. Case presentation A 36-year old Caucasian, normally fit woman presented with abdominal distension and vomiting five days post-normal vaginal delivery at term. Localised peritonitis in the right iliac fossa developed in the next few days, and caecal perforation was found at laparotomy, without evidence of appendicitis or colitis. Conclusion Although very rare, Ogilvie's syndrome should be considered by obstetricians, general surgeons and general practitioners as a potential cause of vomiting and abdominal pain following normal vaginal delivery. Early recognition and management are essential to minimize the possibility of developing serious complications.

  12. No difference in small bowel microbiota between patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy controls

    Aldona Dlugosz; Björn Winckler; Elin Lundin; Katherina Zakikhany; Gunnar Sandström; Weimin Ye; Lars Engstrand; Greger Lindberg

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that colonic microbiota may exhibit important differences between patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and healthy controls. Less is known about the microbiota of the small bowel. We used massive parallel sequencing to explore the composition of small bowel mucosa-associated microbiota in patients with IBS and healthy controls. We analysed capsule biopsies from the jejunum of 35 patients (26 females) with IBS aged 18-(36)-57 years and 16 healthy voluntee...

  13. Effects of ε-viniferin, a dehydrodimer of resveratrol, on transepithelial active ion transport and ion permeability in the rat small and large intestinal mucosa.

    Karaki, Shin-Ichiro; Ishikawa, Junji; Tomizawa, Yuka; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2016-05-01

    ε-Viniferin is a dehydrodimer of resveratrol, a polyphenol synthesized in many plants, including grapevine. The present study investigated the effects of ε-viniferin and resveratrol on epithelial secretory and barrier functions in isolated rat small and large intestinal mucosa. Mucosa-submucosa tissue preparations of various segments of the rat large and small intestines were mounted on Ussing chambers, and short-circuit current (Isc) and tissue conductance (Gt) were continuously measured. The mucosal addition of ε-viniferin (>10(-5) mol/L) and resveratrol (>10(-4) mol/L) to the cecal mucosa, which was the most sensitive region, induced an increase in Isc and a rapid phase decrease (P-1) followed by rapid (P-2) and broad (P-3) peak increases in Gt in concentration-dependent manners. Mucosal ε-viniferin (10(-4) mol/L), but not resveratrol (10(-4) mol/L), increased the permeability of FITC-conjugated dextran (4 kDa). The mucosal ε-viniferin-evoked changes in Isc (Cl(-) secretion), but not in Gt, were attenuated by a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 inhibitor and a selective EP4 prostaglandin receptor. The mucosal ε-viniferin-evoked increase in Isc was partially attenuated, and P-2, but not P-1 or P-3, change in Gt was abolished by a transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) inhibitor. Moreover, the mucosal ε-viniferin concentration-dependently attenuated the mucosal propionate (1 mmol/L)-evoked increases in Isc and Gt Immunohistochemical studies revealed COX-1-immunoreactive epithelial cells in the cecal crypt. The present study showed that mucosal ε-viniferin modulated transepithelial ion transport and permeability, possibly by activating sensory epithelial cells expressing COX-1 and TRPA1. Moreover, mucosal ε-viniferin decreased mucosal sensitivity to other luminal molecules such as short-chain fatty acids. In conclusion, these results suggest that ε-viniferin modifies intestinal mucosal transport and barrier

  14. Colorectal carcinomas with microsatellite instability display a different pattern of target gene mutations according to large bowel site of origin

    Only a few studies have addressed the molecular pathways specifically involved in carcinogenesis of the distal colon and rectum. We aimed to identify potential differences among genetic alterations in distal colon and rectal carcinomas as compared to cancers arising elsewhere in the large bowel. Constitutional and tumor DNA from a test series of 37 patients with rectal and 25 patients with sigmoid carcinomas, previously analyzed for microsatellite instability (MSI), was studied for BAX, IGF2R, TGFBR2, MSH3, and MSH6 microsatellite sequence alterations, BRAF and KRAS mutations, and MLH1 promoter methylation. The findings were then compared with those of an independent validation series consisting of 36 MSI-H carcinomas with origin from each of the large bowel regions. Immunohistochemical and germline mutation analyses of the mismatch repair system were performed when appropriate. In the test series, IGFR2 and BAX mutations were present in one and two out of the six distal MSI-H carcinomas, respectively, and no mutations were detected in TGFBR2, MSH3, and MSH6. We confirmed these findings in the validation series, with TGFBR2 and MSH3 microsatellite mutations occurring less frequently in MSI-H rectal and sigmoid carcinomas than in MSI-H colon carcinomas elsewhere (P = 0.00005 and P = 0.0000005, respectively, when considering all MSI-carcinomas of both series). No MLH1 promoter methylation was observed in the MSI-H rectal and sigmoid carcinomas of both series, as compared to 53% found in MSI-H carcinomas from other locations (P = 0.004). KRAS and BRAF mutational frequencies were 19% and 43% in proximal carcinomas and 25% and 17% in rectal/sigmoid carcinomas, respectively. The mechanism and the pattern of genetic changes driving MSI-H carcinogenesis in distal colon and rectum appears to differ from that occurring elsewhere in the colon and further investigation is warranted both in patients with sporadic or hereditary disease

  15. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma transformed from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma arising in a female urethra treated with rituximab for the first time.

    Zahrani, A Al; Abdelsalam, M; Fiaar, A Al; Ibrahim, N; Al-Elawi, A; Muhammad, B

    2012-05-01

    A 30-year-old female patient presented to the gynecology clinic with a small (painless) swelling at the urethral orifice. She underwent surgical excision of the lesion. Pathological examination revealed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of diffuse large B-cell type and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type, stage IE. The patient refused radiotherapy. Accordingly, we started CHOP-R chemotherapy. She received a total of 6 cycles of CHOP and 8 cycles of rituximab. Patient follow-up was done 3 months later through CT scan and cytoscopy confirming the complete remission. The patient has been disease-free for 4 years. We reviewed 26 cases of this rare entity reported previously. PMID:22679430

  16. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in mucosal homeostasis at the intestinal epithelial barrier in inflammatory bowel disease

    Noah P Zimmerman; Vongsa, Rebecca A.; Wendt, Michael K; Michael B Dwinell

    2008-01-01

    Chemokines, a large family of small chemoattractive cytokines, and their receptors play an integral role in the regulation of the immune response and homeostasis. The ability of chemokines to attract specific populations of immune cells sets them apart from other chemoattractants. Chemokines produced within the gastrointestinal mucosa, are critical players in directing the balance between physiological and pathophysiological inflammation in health, inflammatory bowel disease and the progressi...

  17. Pan-enteric dysmotility, impaired quality of life and alexithymia in a large group of patients meeting ROME II criteria for irritable bowel syndrome

    Portincasa, Piero; Moschetta, Antonio; Baldassarre, Giuseppe; Donato F. Altomare; Palasciano, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Psychological factors, altered motility and sensation disorders of the intestine can be variably associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Such aspects have not been investigated simultaneously. The aim of this paper was to evaluate gastrointestinal motility and symptoms, psychological spectrum and quality of life in a large group of IBS patients in southern Italy.

  18. Increased Chromogranin A Cell Density in the Large Intestine of Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome after Receiving Dietary Guidance

    Tarek Mazzawi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The large intestine contains five types of endocrine cells that regulate its functions by sensing its luminal contents and releasing specific hormones. Chromogranin A (CgA is a common marker for the gastrointestinal endocrine cells, and it is abnormal in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS patients. Most IBS patients relate their symptoms to certain food elements. The present study investigated the effect of dietary guidance on the total endocrine cells of the large intestine as detected by CgA in 13 IBS patients. Thirteen control subjects were also included. Each patient received three sessions of dietary guidance. Colonoscopies were performed on controls and patients (at baseline and at 3–9 months after receiving guidance. Biopsy samples from the colon and rectum were immunostained for CgA and quantified by computerized image analysis. The densities of CgA cells in the total colon (mean ± SEM among the controls and the IBS patients before and after receiving dietary guidance were 83.3±10.1, 38.6±3.7, and 64.7±4.2 cells/mm2, respectively (P=0.0004, and were unchanged in the rectum. In conclusion, the increase in CgA cell density after receiving dietary guidance may reflect a change in the densities of the large intestinal endocrine cells causing an improvement in the IBS symptoms.

  19. Leiomiossarcoma do intestino grosso: relato de um caso Large bowel leiomyosarcoma: a case report

    Simone Gonçalves Lopes

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam um caso de leiomiossarcoma de cólon ascendente acometendo um paciente do sexo masculino, de 49 anos de idade. O paciente iniciou o quadro com anemia e massa abdominal, e a evolução dos sintomas até o diagnóstico final foi de nove meses. Na radiografia simples do abdome havia presença de coleção aérea localizada no hipocôndrio direito, fora da topografia de alças; no clister opaco com duplo contraste foi demonstrado deslocamento inferior da flexura hepática e divertículos. A ultra-sonografia abdominal mostrou lesão expansiva heterogênea, com gás no seu interior, de localização sub-hepática. A tomografia computadorizada do abdome revelou massa escavada com nível líquido, sub-hepática, que não se impregnou pelo meio de contraste. Foi realizada hemicolectomia direita com ileocoloanastomose, e o diagnóstico histopatológico foi de leiomiossarcoma de cólon ascendente.The authors report a case of a 49-year-old male patient with leiomyosarcoma of the ascending colon. The patient presented with anemia and an abdominal mass, and the symptoms progressed until a final diagnosis was made nine months later. A plain abdominal x-ray showed the presence of gas outside the bowel, in the right hypochondrium. The double contrast barium enema showed a sublevel displacement of the hepatic flexure and diverticula. An abdominal ultrasound revealed a heterogeneous expansive lesion below the liver containing gas, and a computed tomography of the abdomen revealed an excavated mass below the liver containing liquid, that was not filled in by contrast medium. The patient was submitted to a right hemicolectomy with ileocoloanastomosis and the histopathological analysis of the excised material revealed a leiomyosarcoma of the ascending colon.

  20. Deficiency of the intestinal growth factor, glucagon-like peptide 2, in the colon of SCID mice with inflammatory bowel disease induced by transplantation of CD4+ T cells

    Schmidt, P T; Hartmann, B; Bregenholt, S;

    2000-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is produced in endocrine L-cells of the intestinal mucosa. Recently, GLP-2 was found to stimulate intestinal mucosal growth. Our objective was to study the content of GLP-2 in the large intestine in a murine model of T-cell-induced inflammatory bowel disease....

  1. Increased expression of interleukin 17 in inflammatory bowel disease

    Fujino, S; Andoh, A; Bamba, S; Ogawa, A.; Hata, K.; Araki, Y; Bamba, T; Fujiyama, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Background and aim: Interleukin (IL) 17 is a cytokine which exerts strong proinflammatory activities. In this study we evaluated changes in IL-17 expression in the inflamed mucosa and in the serum of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  2. Self-reported disability in patients with inflammatory bowel disease largely determined by disease activity and illness perceptions

    van der Have, Mike; Fidder, Herma H; Leenders, Max; Kaptein, Ad A; van der Valk, Mirthe E; van Bodegraven, Ad A; Dijkstra, Gerard; de Jong, Dirk J; Pierik, Marieke; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; van der Woude, C Janneke; van de Meeberg, Paul C; Romberg-Camps, Mariëlle J L; Clemens, Cees H M; Jansen, Jeroen M; Mahmmod, Nofel; Bolwerk, Clemens J M; Vermeijden, J Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D; Oldenburg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) disability index has recently been introduced to measure patients' physical, psychological, familial, and social limitations associated with IBD. We assessed factors related to self-reported disability and the relationship between disability and direc

  3. The fate of (13)C-labelled and non-labelled inulin predisposed to large bowel fermentation in rats.

    Butts, Christine A; Paturi, Gunaranjan; Tavendale, Michael H; Hedderley, Duncan; Stoklosinski, Halina M; Herath, Thanuja D; Rosendale, Douglas; Roy, Nicole C; Monro, John A; Ansell, Juliet

    2016-04-20

    The fate of stable-isotope (13)C labelled and non-labelled inulin catabolism by the gut microbiota was assessed in a healthy rat model. Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly assigned to diets containing either cellulose or inulin, and were fed these diets for 3 days. On day (d) 4, rats allocated to the inulin diet received (13)C-labelled inulin. The rats were then fed the respective non-labelled diets (cellulose or inulin) until sampling (d4, d5, d6, d7, d10 and d11). Post feeding of (13)C-labelled substrate, breath analysis showed that (13)C-inulin cleared from the host within a period of 36 hours. Faecal (13)C demonstrated the clearance of inulin from gut with a (13)C excess reaching maximum at 24 hours (d5) and then declining gradually. There were greater variations in caecal organic acid concentrations from d4 to d6, with higher concentrations of acetic, butyric and propionic acids observed in the rats fed inulin compared to those fed cellulose. Inulin influenced caecal microbial glycosidase activity, increased colon crypt depth, and decreased the faecal output and polysaccharide content compared to the cellulose diet. In summary, the presence of inulin in the diet positively influenced large bowel microbial fermentation. PMID:26778667

  4. Vermilion Reconstruction with Genital Mucosa.

    Müller-Richter, Urs D A; Weyandt, Gerhard H; Woeckel, Achim; Kübler, Alexander C

    2016-05-01

    Functional and aesthetical reconstruction, especially of the upper lip after ablative tumor surgery, can be very challenging. The skin of the lip might be sufficiently reconstructed by transpositional flaps from the nasolabial or facial area. Large defects of the lip mucosa, including the vestibule, are even more challenging due to the fact that flaps from the inner lining of the oral cavity often lead to functional impairments. We present a case of multiple vermilion and skin resections of the upper lip. At the last step, we had to resect even the whole vermilion mucosa, including parts of the oral mucosa of the vestibule, leaving a bare orbicularis oris muscle. To reconstruct the mucosal layer, we used a mucosal graft from the labia minora and placed it on the compromised lip and the former transpositional flaps for the reconstructed skin of the upper lip with very good functional and aesthetic results. PMID:27579226

  5. Multiple metastases to the small bowel from large cell bronchial carcinomas

    Davor Tomas; Mario Ledinsky; Mladen Belicza; Bozo Kru(s)lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Metastases from lung cancer to gastrointestinal tract are not rare atpostmortem studies but the development of clinically significant symptoms from the gastrointestinal metastases is very unusual.METHODS: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were cut into 5 μm thick sections and routinely stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Some slides were also stained with Alcian-PAS. Antibodies used were primary antibodies to pancytokeratin, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, smooth muscle actin and CD-117.RESULTS: We observed three patients who presented with multiple metastases from large cell bronchial carcinoma to small intestine. Two of them had abdominal symptoms (sudden onset of abdominal pain, constipation and vomiting) and in one case the tumor was incidentally found during autopsy. Microscopically, all tumors showed a same histological pattern and consisted almost exclusively of strands and sheets of poorly cohesive, polymorphic giant cells with scanty, delicate stromas. Few smaller polygonal anaplastic cells dispersed between polymorphic giant cells,were also observed. Immunohistochemistry showed positive staining of the tumor cells with cytokeratin and vimentin. Microscopically and immunohistochemically all metastases had a similar pattern to primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine.CONCLUSION: In patients with small intestine tumors showing anaplastic features, especially with multiple tumors, metastases from large cell bronchial carcinoma should be first excluded, because it seems that they are more common than expected.

  6. Feasibility of iodine-125 labeled anti-human hemoglobin antibody in the detection of bleeding sites from the large bowel-A preliminary study

    A monoclonal anti-human hemoglobin antibody that cross-reacts with mouse hemoglobin was labeled with Iodine-125 through the Chloramine-T method. The labeled antibody was used in an attempt to recognize bleeding sites from the large bowel in a mouse model, through a non-invasive enema-like study. In vitro experiments after double column chromatography of the labeled antibody and 10% trichloroacetic acid conjugation revealed that about 80% of the radioactivity was incorporated into protein. Inhibition assay containing could (non-radiolabeled) antibody showed that Iodine-125 radiolabeled antibody preserved its immunoreactivity. Autoradiographs exquisitely demonstrated accumulation of isotope in the corresponding intestinal bleeding areas. These findings suggest that this method can be useful for scintigraphic localization of bleeding sites in the large bowel. (author)

  7. Somatostatin in inflammatory bowel disease

    van Bergeijk, J D; Wilson, J H P

    1997-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation is controlled by various immunomodulating cells, interacting by molecular mediators. Neuropeptides, released by enteric nerve cells and neuroendocrine mucosa cells, are able to affect several aspects of the general and intestinal immune system, with both pro- as well as anti-inflammatory activities. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) there is both morphological as well as experimental evidence for involvement of neuropeptides in the pathogenesis. Somatostatin is the m...

  8. Epigenetic maturation in colonic mucosa continues beyond infancy in mice.

    Monozygotic twin and other epidemiologic studies indicate that epigenetic processes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases that commonly affect the colonic mucosa. The peak onset of these disorders in young adulthood, suggests that epigenetic changes normally o...

  9. Self-reported Disability in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Largely Determined by Disease Activity and Illness Perceptions

    van der Have, Mike; Fidder, Herma H.; Leenders, Max; Kaptein, Ad A.; van der Valk, Mirthe E.; van Bodegraven, Ad A.; Dijkstra, Gerard; de Jong, Dirk J.; Pierik, Marieke; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; van de Meeberg, Paul C.; Romberg-Camps, Marielle J. L.; Clemens, Cees H. M.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Mahmmod, Nofel; Bolwerk, Clemens J. M.; Vermeijden, J. Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D.; Oldenburg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Background:The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) disability index has recently been introduced to measure patients' physical, psychological, familial, and social limitations associated with IBD. We assessed factors related to self-reported disability and the relationship between disability and direct

  10. Accumulation of immunoglobulin-containing cells in the gut mucosa and presence of faecal immunoglobulin in severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice with T cell-induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

    Bregenholt, S; Brimnes, J; Reimann, J; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1998-01-01

    individual colon segments obtained from 20 gut wall- or CD4+ T cell-transplanted diseased scid mice was evaluated by histology and the numbers of infiltrating immunoglobulin-containing cells were determined. In particular, cells positive for IgM, IgA and non-inflammatory immunoglobulin isotypes such as IgG1...... positive for the IgG classes. Faecal extracts of the CD4+ T cell-transplanted scid mice revealed the presence of all six murine immunoglobulin isotypes. Disease progression was accompanied by an increased level of excreted IgM and IgG3 and decreased levels of IgA. It is concluded that locally secreted...... immunoglobulins may play an immunomodulating role in the pathological changes observed in the present model of T cell-induced inflammatory bowel disease....

  11. Acute small bowel obstruction due to a large intraluminal blood clot after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Green, Jessica; Ikuine, Tomoko; Hacker, Shoshana; Urrego, Hernan; Tuggle, Karleena

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) are a known perioperative complication of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and common etiologies include internal hernia, port site hernia, jejunojejunostomy stricture, ileus and adhesions. Less commonly, SBO can be caused by superior mesenteric artery syndrome, intussusception and intraluminal blood clot. We present a case of SBO caused by intraluminal blood clot from jejunojejunostomy staple line bleeding in a patient with a normal coagulation profile. Computed tomography was used to elucidate the cause of perioperative SBO, and diagnostic laparoscopy was used to both diagnose and treat the complication. In this case, the intraluminal clot was evacuated laparoscopically by enterotomy, thrombectomy and primary closure without anastomotic revision since there was no evidence of continued bleeding. Administration of enoxaparin and Toradol post-operatively may have exacerbated mild intraluminal bleeding occurring at the stapled jejunojejunal anastomosis. Prompt recognition and treatment of perioperative SBO can prevent catastrophic consequences related to bowel perforation. PMID:27554828

  12. Diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    ... your anus. The doctor will fill your large intestine with barium . You may be asked to change positions several times during the test. ​​​​​ ​February 23, 2015​​​​ Previous: Symptoms and Causes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Next: Treatment for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Digestive Disease ...

  13. Role of wireless capsule endoscopy in the follow-up ofinflammatory bowel disease

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of wireless capsule endoscopy in2000 has revolutionized our ability to visualize partsof the small bowel mucosa classically unreached bythe conventional endoscope, and since the recentintroduction of colon capsule endoscopy, a promisingalternative method has been available for the evaluationof large bowel mucosa. The advantages of wirelesscapsule endoscopy include its non-invasive characterand its ability to visualize proximal and distal parts ofthe intestine, while important disadvantages include theprocedure's inability of tissue sampling and significantincompletion rate. Its greatest limitation is the prohibiteduse in cases of known or suspected stenosis of theintestinal lumen due to high risk of retention. Wirelesscapsule endoscopy plays an important role in theearly recognition of recurrence, on Crohn's diseasepatients who have undergone ileocolonic resection forthe treatment of Crohn's disease complications, andin patients' management and therapeutic strategyplanning, before obvious clinical and laboratory relapse.Although capsule endoscopy cannot replace traditionalendoscopy, it offers valuable information on theevaluation of intestinal disease and has a significantimpact on disease reclassification of patients with aprevious diagnosis of ulcerative colitis or inflammatorybowel disease unclassified/indeterminate colitis.Moreover, it may serve as an effective alternativewhere colonoscopy is contraindicated and in cases withincomplete colonoscopy studies. The use of patencycapsule maximizes safety and is advocated in cases ofsuspected small or large bowel stenosis.

  14. MRI for chronic inflammatory bowel disease; MRT chronisch entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen

    Hansmann, H.J.; Hess, T.; Hahmann, M.; Erb, G.; Richter, G.M.; Duex, M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Roentgendiagnostik; Elsing, C. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. IV - Gastroenterologie

    2001-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory bowel disease is diagnosed and monitored by the combination of colonoscopy and small bowel enteroklysis. Magnetic resonance imaging has become the gold standard for the imaging of perirectal and pelvic fistulas. With the advent of ultrafast MRI small and large bowel imaging has become highly attractive and is being advocated more and more in the diagnostic work up of inflammatory bowel disease. Imaging protocols include fast T{sub 1}-weighted gradient echo and T{sub 2}-weighted TSE sequences and oral or rectal bowel distension. Furthermore, dedicated imaging protocols are based on breath-hold imaging under pharmacological bowel paralysis and gastrointestinal MR contrast agents (Hydro-MRI). High diagnostic accuracy can be achieved in Crohn's disease with special reference to the pattern of disease, depth of inflammation, mesenteric reaction, sinus tract depiction and formation of abscess. In ulcerative colitis, the mucosa-related inflammation causes significantly less bowel wall thickening compared to Crohn's disease. Therefore with MRI, the extent of inflammatory changes is always underestimated compared to colonoscopy. According to our experience in more than 200 patients as well as the results in other centers, Hydro-MRI possesses the potential to replace enteroklysis in the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease and most of the follow-up colonoscopies in Crohn's disease. Further technical improvements in 3D imaging will allow interactive postprocessing of the MR data. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassung: Die Standardverfahren in der Diagnostik und der Verlaufskontrolle chronisch entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen, speziell des Morbus Crohn und der Colitis ulcerosa, sind die Koloskopie und das Enteroklysma. Die MRT hat sich dazu ihren festen Platz in der Diagnostik perirektaler Fisteln erobert. Mit schnellen, T{sub 1}-gewichteten Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen und T{sub 2}-gewichteten Turbo-Spin-Echo-Sequenzen koennen auch Duenn

  15. Surgical techniques in short bowel syndrome.

    Waag, K L; Heller, K

    1990-01-01

    An operation according to Bianchi in a 2-year-old girl is described and indications as well as technical procedure are discussed. The girl was born with a gastroschisis. There was a jejunal perforation 10 cm below the ligament of Treitz caused by a volvulus. Only 20 cm of the jejunum remained. Moreover, only the left part of the colon was present. Total parenteral nutrition for 2 years was necessary. The principle of the operation is based on a longitudinal division of the remaining bowel and a creation of two separate bowel tubes out of the divided bowel halves, thus effecting an isoperistaltic serial connection by means of two anastomoses. This is technically possible since each half of the bowel wall has its own blood supply. The vessels originating from the mesenterium branch off before they reach the bowel wall so that the mesenteric dissection line can be anastomosed longitudinally with the antimesenteric border. This results in doubling of the bowel length, narrowing of the preoperatively dilated bowel diameter, closer contact of bowel contents with the mucosa, prolonged transit time and a Bacteroides colonization which is reduced by more effective peristalsis. Indications, time of operation and our own experiences are discussed and three cases are described. All children are alive and show marked improvement in nutrition. PMID:2105523

  16. Review article: the potential role of nitric oxide in chronic inflammatory bowel disorders

    Perner, Anders; Rask-Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    The aetiology of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases-ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease-as well as 'microscopic colitis'-both collagenous (COC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC)-remains unknown. Autoimmune mechanisms, cytokine polymorphism, commensal bacteria, infectious agents and vascular...... phagocytes to the venular endothelium and extravasation of these cells into the colonic mucosa. In addition to large amounts of nitric oxide (NO), injurious peroxynitrite may be formed in the epithelium by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is considered to elicit cytotoxicity by the...

  17. Complementary and alternative medicine use and cost in functional bowel disorders: A six month prospective study in a large HMO

    Drossman Douglas A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional Bowel Disorders (FBD are chronic disorders that are difficult to treat and manage. Many patients and doctors are dissatisfied with the level of improvement in symptoms that can be achieved with standard medical care which may lead them to seek alternatives for care. There are currently no data on the types of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM used for FBDs other than Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS, or on the economic costs of CAM treatments. The aim of this study is to determine prevalence, types and costs of CAM in IBS, functional diarrhea, functional constipation, and functional abdominal pain. Methods 1012 Patients with FBD were recruited through a health care maintenance organization and followed for 6 months. Questionnaires were used to ascertain: Utilization and expenditures on CAM, symptom severity (IBS-SS, quality of life (IBS-QoL, psychological distress (BSI and perceived treatment effectiveness. Costs for conventional medical care were extracted from administrative claims. Results CAM was used by 35% of patients, at a median yearly cost of $200. The most common CAM types were ginger, massage therapy and yoga. CAM use was associated with female gender, higher education, and anxiety. Satisfaction with physician care and perceived effectiveness of prescription medication were not associated with CAM use. Physician referral to a CAM provider was uncommon but the majority of patients receiving this recommendation followed their physician's advice. Conclusion CAM is used by one-third of FBD patients. CAM use does not seem to be driven by dissatisfaction with conventional care. Physicians should discuss CAM use and effectiveness with their patients and refer patients if appropriate.

  18. Bowel incontinence

    ... move well enough to safely get to the bathroom on their own. These people need special care. They may become used to not getting to the toilet when it's time to have a bowel movement. To ... the bathroom is safe and comfortable. Using special pads or ...

  19. Short bowel syndrom as a complication of Crohn's disease

    Skok, Pavel; Ocepek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    During the course of Crohn's disease, some patients require surgical bowel resection due to intestinal stenosis. Attention is drawn to a possible complication of such surgical procedures: in a patients with Crohn's disease, short bowel syndrome developed following several small and large intestine resections that were necessary in the treatment of recidiving acute bowel obstructions. When the remnant small bowel is shorter than 200 cm, characteristic symptoms of short bowel syndrome develop i...

  20. Current Role of Ultrasound in Small Bowel Imaging.

    Wale, Anita; Pilcher, James

    2016-08-01

    Bowel ultrasound is cheap, relatively quick, allows dynamic evaluation of the bowel, has no radiation burden, is well tolerated by patients, and allows repeat imaging. Bowel ultrasound requires a systematic assessment of the entire bowel using high-frequency probes. In addition, hydrosonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound may be performed. We present the normal sonographic appearances of large and small bowel and the sonographic appearances of acute appendicitis, Crohn's disease, celiac disease, intussusception, infectious enteritis, intestinal tuberculosis, small bowel ileus and obstruction, small bowel ischemia, and malignant tumors. PMID:27342894

  1. Limitations in assessment of mucosal healing in inflammatory bowel disease

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2010-01-01

    An emerging parameter to define the effectiveness of new therapeutic agents in clinical trials,and by extension,for use in day-to-day clinical practice has been labeled mucosal healing.It has been hypothesized that complete healing of the intestinal mucosa in inflammatory bowel diseases should result in reduced disease complications,reduced hospitalization and reduced surgical treatment.By implication,the natural history of inflammatory bowel disease might then be altered. Measurement of mucosal healing,how...

  2. Laparoscopic treatment of ileal intussusception due to heterotopic gastric mucosa in an adult patient

    Yılmaz, Tonguç Utku; Güneş, Abdullah; Pösteki, Gökhan; Güler, Sertaç Ata

    2014-01-01

    Adult intussusception, which is a rare condition, generally requires surgical treatment. A 25-year-old-male with abdominal pain was diagnosed as ileal intussusception with computerized tomography. The patient underwent diagnostic laparoscopy, laparoscopic small bowel resection and anastomosis. The pathologic evaluation revealed heterotopic gastric mucosa. Heterotopic gastric mucosa is rarely seen in ileum and is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. Excision is the choice of treatment. Laparo...

  3. Pan-enteric dysmotility, impaired quality of life and alexithymia in a large group of patients meeting ROMEⅡ criteria for irritable bowel syndrome

    Piero Portincasa; Antonio Moschetta; Giuseppe Baldassarre; Donato F. Altomare; Giuseppe Palasciano

    2003-01-01

    AIM:Psychological factors, altered motility and sensation disorders of the intestine can be variably associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Such aspects have not been investigated simultaneously. The aim of this paper was to evaluate gastrointestinal motility and symptoms, psychological spectrum and quality of life in a large group of IBS patients in southern Italy.METHODS: One hundred IBS patients (F:M=73:27, age 48±2 years, mean±SE) fulfilling ROME Ⅱ criteria matched with 100 healthy subjects (F:M=70:30, 45±2 years). Dyspepsia,bowel habit, alexithymia, psycho-affective profile and quality of life were assessed using specific questionnaires. Basally and postprandially, changes in gallbladder volumes and antral areas after liquid meal and orocaecal transit time (OCTT)were measured respectively by ultrasonography and H2-breath test. Appetite, satiety, fullness, nausea, and epigastric pain/discomfort were monitored using visual-analogue scales.RESULTS: Compared with controls, IBS patients had increased dyspepsia (score 12.6±0.7 VS 5.1±0.2, P<0.0001),weekly bowel movements (12.3±0.4 VS 5.5±0.2, P<0.00001, comparable stool shape), alexithymia (score 59.11.1 VS40.5±1.0, P=0.001), poor quality of life and psychoaffective profile. IBS patients had normal gallbladderemptying, but delayed gastric emptying (T50:35.5±1.0 VS 26.1±0.6 min, P=0.00001) and OCTT (163.0±5.4 VS96.6±1.8min, P=0.00001). Fullness, nausea, and epigastric pain/discomfort were greater in IBS than in controls.CONCLUSION: ROME Ⅱ IBS patients have a pan-enteric dysmotility with frequent dyspepsia, associated with psychological morbidity and greatly impaired quality of life.The presence of alexithymia, a stable trait, is a novel finding of potential interest to detect subgroups of IBS patients with different patterns recoveed after therapy.

  4. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  5. Study on the role of mast cells in claudin-3 expression and permeability of colon mucosa in animal model of inflammatory bowel disease%肥大细胞改变炎症性肠病动物模型中结肠黏膜claudin-3表达及其通透性的研究

    孙瑜; 郭庆棠; 高峰; 罗鹏

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨肥大细胞改变炎症性肠病(inflammatory bowel disease ,IBD)动物模型中结肠黏膜紧密连接蛋白‐(Claudin‐3)表达及其通透性的研究。方法60只3个月小鼠分为三组:白介素‐10(IL‐10)基因缺陷组(IL‐10-/-)、IL‐10基因缺陷及肥大细胞基因部分缺陷组(IL‐10-/-/Sash+/-)和IL‐10基因缺陷及肥大细胞基因缺陷组(IL‐10-/-/Sash-/-,DKO)。采用Ussing chamber检测结肠上皮通透性;HE染色评价各组结肠损伤严重程度;免疫组化评估结肠 claudin‐3表达。结果 IL‐10-/-/Sash+/-组、DKO 组结肠黏膜损伤较 IL‐10-/-组明显严重(P<0.05)。与 IL‐10-/-组比,IL‐10-/-/Sash+/-组、DKO 组肠上皮跨膜电阻抗值和跨膜电势差显著降低(P<0.05),短路电流值明显增加( P< 0.05)。三组的结肠均表达 claudin‐3,IL‐10-/-/Sash+/-组、DKO 组的claudin‐3表达较IL‐10-/-组明显降低(P<0.05)。结论肥大细胞通过上调结肠Claudin‐3的表达而达到保护肠黏膜屏障功能的作用。%Objective To investigate the role of mast cells in claudin‐3 expression and permeability of colon muco‐sa in animal model of inflammatory bowel disease .Method Mice of 3 months were divided into 3 groups which were IL‐10‐deficient group (IL‐10-/-) ,IL‐10‐deficient with half mast cells group (IL‐10-/- /Sash+ /-) ,and IL‐10‐de‐ficient without mast cells group (IL‐10-/- /Sash-/- ,DKO) .Histopathological scores of colon samples were tested by HE staining . Immunohistochemistry was used to measure the expression of claudin‐3 in colon tissue . The transepithelial electric resistance ( TEER) ,transepithelial potential difference ( TEPD) and short circuit current (Isc) of the specimens were measured by using chamber .Result The degree of histopathological scores

  6. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    -intestinal biopsies, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal...... permeability. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients with CC and chronic diarrhoea participated in the study. Coeliac disease was excluded by small-bowel biopsy and/or serology. Intestinal permeability was assessed as urinary excretion (ratios) 2, 4 and 6 h after ingestion of 14C-labelled mannitol (14C......: No alterations in intestinal permeability in patients with CC could be demonstrated. Impairment of the integrity of the mucosa of the small bowel and the presence of a general dysfunction of the small intestine in patients with CC seem unlikely....

  7. A new method for radiolucent presentation of small bowel

    A new method for radiolucent presentation of small bowell is described. A modified easy introducible small tube for contrast medium instillation is used. For stabilization of contrast medium a contrast enhancing substance is added. A 0.5% solution of this substance is also used as distention medium. Consequently contrast medium is equally distributed and coating of intestinal mucosa pattern is greatly enhanced. (orig.)

  8. Biomarkers for inflammation and surveillance strategies in inflammatory bowel disease

    Mooiweer, E.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the colonic mucosa, as observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Endoscopic surveillance aimed at the detection of dysplasia and asymptomatic CRC is therefore recommended in order to mitigate t

  9. DYSMICROBISM, INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE AND THYROIDITIS: ANALYSIS OF THE LITERATURE.

    Tomasello, G; Tralongo, P; Amoroso, F; Damiani, P; Sinagra, E; Noto, M; Arculeo, V M; Jurjus Zein, R; Saad, W; Jurjus, A; Gerbino, A; Leone, A

    2015-01-01

    The human body is colonized by a large number of microbes that are collectively referred to as the microbiota. They interact with the hosting organism and some do contribute to the physiological maintenance of the general good health thru regulation of some metabolic processes while some others are essential for the synthesis of vitamins and short-chain fatty acids. The abnormal variation, in the quality and/or quantity of individual bacterial species residing in the gastro-intestinal tract, is called “dysmicrobism”. The immune system of the host will respond to these changes at the intestinal mucosa level which could lead to Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). This inflammatory immune response could subsequently extend to other organs and systems outside the digestive tract such as the thyroid, culminating in thyroiditis. The goal of the present study is to review and analyze data reported in the literature about thyroiditis associated with inflammatory bowel diseases such as Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and Crohn’s Disease (CD). It was reported that similarities of some molecular bacterial components with molecular components of the host are considered among the factors causing IBD through an autoimmune reaction which could involve other non-immune cell types. The axis dysmicrobism-IBD-autoimmune reaction will be investigated as a possible etiopathogenic mechanism to Autoimmune Thyroiditis. If such is the case, then the employment of specific probiotic strains may represent a useful approach to moderate the immune system. PMID:26122213

  10. Histological and histochemical evaluation of human oral mucosa constructs developed by tissue engineering

    Sánchez-Quevedo, M.C.; Alaminos, M.; Capitan, L.M.; Moreu, G.; Garzon, I.; Crespo, P.V.; Campos, A.

    2007-01-01

    Reconstruction of large oral mucosa defects is often challenging, since the shortage of healthy oral mucosa to replace the excised tissues is very common. In this context, tissue engineering techniques may provide a source of autologous tissues available for transplant in these patients. In this work, we developed a new model of artificial oral mucosa generated by tissue engineering using a fibrin-agarose scaffold. For that purpose, we generated primary cultures of human oral mucosa ...

  11. Bowel perforation from occult ileal involvement after diagnosis in a case of primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma.

    De Philippis, Chiara; Di Chio, Maria Chiara; Sabattini, Elena; Bolli, Niccolo

    2016-01-01

    Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL) is confined to the mediastinum or contiguous nodal areas in most cases. Extramediastinal and abdominal involvement, especially at diagnosis, is extremely rare. Our case describes the first case of histologically proven ileal involvement of PMBCL at diagnosis that led to ileal perforation. Positron emission tomography CT could increase the sensitivity of staging by detecting unusual sites of disease localisation, and could impact clinical management. PMID:27417993

  12. Acute small bowel obstruction: a rare initial presentation for the metastasis of the large-cell carcinoma of the lung

    Song Yongmao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present one case with symptom of paroxysmal abdominal pain for over 20 days. Abdominal computerized tomography (CT scan revealed intestinal obstruction and a mass of 6.0 cm × 6.0 cm in size located at the left adrenal. Chest CT scan showed a lobulated mass of 2.7 cm × 2.7 cm in size at the upper left lung. Core needle biopsy of the lung mass confirmed the diagnosis of large cell carcinoma. The patient underwent an emergency abdominal laparotomy and received a chemotherapy regimen that consisted of pemetrexed and cisplatin postoperatively. In addition, we made a review of the literature of the occurrence, diagnosis and outcome of this manifestation.

  13. Changes in tight junction protein expression and permeability of colon mucosa in rats with dextran sulfate sodium-induced inflammatory bowel disease%葡聚糖硫酸钠诱导炎症性肠病大鼠结肠黏膜紧密连接蛋白表达及其通透性的改变

    饶艳霞; 陈洁; 陈蕾蕾; 顾伟忠; 舒小莉

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop an experimental rat model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) , and to observe changes in the tight junction protein expression and permeability of colon mucosa. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into control (n=27) and IBD model groups (n =27). In the IBD model group, IBD was induced by 6-day administration of 3% DSS in water followed by 14-day administration of water only. The control group was fed with water only. Pathological changes in colon mucosae were observed on days 7, 14 and 21 after DSS administration. Colon tissue specimens were collected on day 21 for measuring myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. The transepithelial electric resistance (TEER) , transepithefial potential difference (TEPD) and short circuit current (isc) of tne specimens were measured by Ussing chamber. Real-time PCR and Western blot were used to measure the mRNA and protein expression of tight junction proteins in colon epithelia. Results In the IBD model group, diarrhea, hernafecia and weight loss were seen. Inflammation occurred mainly in the distal colon and was characterized by crypt abscess and inflammatory cell infiltration. The IBD model group showed significantly increased MPO activity (P < 0. 01) , significandy decreased TEER (P <0.01) and TEPD (F<0.01), and significantly increased Isc (P<0.01) compared with the control group. No claudin 2 expression of mRNA and protein was detected in the control group, and they were expressed in the IBD model group. The expression levels of claudin 3, occludin and ZO-1 in the IBD model group were significantly decreased, compared with in the control group (P < 0. 01 ). Conclusions IBD rats show colonic barrier dysfunction and changes in the expression of tight junctionproteins. The changes in the expression of tight junction proteins may contribute to colonic barrier dysfunction in cases of IBD in the chronic recovery stage.%目的 建立葡聚糖

  14. Narcotic Bowel Syndrome

    ... Intolerance Malabsorption Narcotic Bowel Syndrome Radiation Therapy Injury Short Bowel Syndrome Symptoms & Causes Treatments Nutrition and Diet Managing Secondary Effects Medications Surgery Daily Living with SBS Resources SMA Syndrome Volvulus ...

  15. Studies on nerve terminations in human mucosa and skin

    Hilliges, Marita

    1997-01-01

    - In spite of their accessibility and important sensory function,the nervous tissue components of human oral and vaginal mucosa and skin have beensubject to very few, if any, systematic investigations. Studies on the innervationof oral tissues have mainly focused on the dental pulp, the periodontium and thegingiva, probably because of specific clinical interest, thus largely neglectingthe mucosa. Genital studies comprise only in a few cases the vagina and when thevagina is i...

  16. Detection of a fluorescent-labeled avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly by confocal laser endomicroscopy in the microvasculature of chronically inflamed intestinal mucosa

    Buda A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Buda,1,* Sonia Facchin,1,* Elisa Dassie,2 Elisabetta Casarin,3 Mark A Jepson,4 Helmut Neumann,5 Giorgia Hatem,1 Stefano Realdon,6 Renata D’Incà,1 Giacomo Carlo Sturniolo,1 Margherita Morpurgo3 1Department of Surgical, Oncological, and Gastroenterological Sciences, University of Padova, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; 3Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; 4School of Biochemistry and Wolfson Bioimaging Facility, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; 5Ludwig Demlig Endoscopic Center of Excellence, ESGE Endoscopy Training Center, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany; 6Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, Padova, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal pathologies causing great discomfort in both children and adults. The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases is not yet fully understood and their diagnosis and treatment are often challenging. Nanoparticle-based strategies have been tested in local drug delivery to the inflamed colon. Here, we have investigated the use of the novel avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly (ANANAS platform as a potential diagnostic carrier in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel diseases. Fluorescent-labeled ANANAS nanoparticles were administered to mice with chemically induced chronic inflammation of the large intestine. Localization of mucosal nanoparticles was assessed in vivo by dual-band confocal laser endomicroscopy. This technique enables characterization of the mucosal microvasculature and crypt architecture at subcellular resolution. Intravascular nanoparticle distribution was observed in the inflamed mucosa but not in healthy controls, demonstrating the utility of the combination of ANANAS and confocal laser endomicroscopy for highlighting intestinal inflammatory conditions. The specific localization of

  17. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Rasmussen, Ditlev Nytoft; Karstensen, John Gásdal; Riis, Lene Buhl;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy is an endoscopic method that provides in vivo real-time imaging of the mucosa at a cellular level, elucidating mucosal changes that are undetectable by white light endoscopy. This paper systematically reviews current indications and perspectives...... of confocal laser endomicroscopy for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Available literature was searched systematically for studies applying confocal laser endomicroscopy in Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Relevant literature was reviewed and only studies reporting original clinical data were...... included. Next, eligible studies were analysed with respect to several parameters, such as technique and clinical aim and definitions of outcomes. RESULTS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy has been used for a wide range of purposes in inflammatory bowel disease, covering assessment of inflammatory severity...

  18. Bowel perforation detection using metabolic fluorescent chlorophylls

    Han, Jung Hyun; Jo, Young Goun; Kim, Jung Chul; Choi, Sujeong; Kang, Hoonsoo; Kim, Yong-Chul; Hwang, In-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Thus far, there have been tries of detection of disease using fluorescent materials. We introduce the chlorophyll derivatives from food plants, which have longer-wavelength emissions (at >650 nm) than those of fluorescence of tissues and organs, for detection of bowel perforation. To figure out the possibility of fluorescence spectroscopy as a monitoring sensor of bowel perforation, fluorescence from organs of rodent models, intestinal and peritoneal fluids of rodent models and human were analyzed. In IVIS fluorescence image of rodent abdominal organ, visualization of perforated area only was possible when threshold of image is extremely finely controlled. Generally, both perforated area of bowel and normal bowel which filled with large amount of chlorophyll derivatives were visualized with fluorescence. The fluorescence from chlorophyll derivatives penetrated through the normal bowel wall makes difficult to distinguish perforation area from normal bowel with direct visualization of fluorescence. However, intestinal fluids containing chlorophyll derivatives from food contents can leak from perforation sites in situation of bowel perforation. It may show brighter and longer-wavelength regime emissions of chlorophyll derivatives than those of pure peritoneal fluid or bioorgans. Peritoneal fluid mixed with intestinal fluids show much brighter emissions in longer wavelength (at>650 nm) than those of pure peritoneal fluid. In addition, irrigation fluid, which is used for the cleansing of organ and peritoneal cavity, made of mixed intestinal and peritoneal fluid diluted with physiologic saline also can be monitored bowel perforation during surgery.

  19. Solid Organ Transplantation in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD: Analysis of Transplantation Outcome and IBD Activity in a Large Single Center Cohort.

    Fabian Schnitzler

    Full Text Available Currently, limited data of the outcome of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in patients after solid organ transplantation (SOT are available. We aimed to analyze effects of SOT on the IBD course in a large IBD patient cohort.Clinical data from 1537 IBD patients were analyzed for patients who underwent SOT (n = 31 between July 2002 and May 2014. Sub-analyses included SOT outcome parameters, IBD activity before and after SOT, and efficacy of IBD treatment.4.74% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC and 0.84% of patients with Crohn's disease (CD underwent SOT (p = 2.69 x 10(-6, UC vs. CD. 77.4% of patients with SOT underwent liver transplantation (LTx with tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive therapy after SOT. All LTx were due to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC or PSC overlap syndromes. Six patients (19.4% required renal transplantation and one patient (3.2% heart transplantation. A survival rate of 83.9% after a median follow-up period of 103 months was observed. Before SOT, 65.0% of patients were in clinical remission and 5 patients received immunosuppressive therapy (16.1%. After SOT, 61.0% of patients were in remission (p = 1.00 vs. before SOT and 29.0% required IBD-specific immunosuppressive or anti-TNF therapy (p = 0.54 vs. before SOT. 42.9% of patients with worsening of IBD after SOT were at higher risk of needing steroid therapy for increased IBD activity (p = 0.03; relative risk (RR: 10.29; 95% CI 1.26-84.06. Four patients (13.0% needed anti-TNF therapy after SOT (response rate 75%.SOT was more common in UC patients due to the higher prevalence of PSC-related liver cirrhosis in UC. Despite mainly tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive regimens, outcome of SOT and IBD was excellent in this cohort. In this SOT cohort, concomitant immunosuppressive therapy due to IBD was well tolerated.

  20. 5-Millimeter Trocar-Site Bowel Herniation Following Laparoscopic Surgery

    Khurshid, Nauman; Chung, Maurice; Horrigan, Terrence; Manahan, Kelly; Geisler, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This is a case report of a 5-mm trocar-site large bowel herniation following laparoscopic tubal sterilization. During laparoscopic sterilization, the 5-mm port site was closed initially. Large bowel herniation was recognized at the end of the case and managed immediately by laparoscopically reducing the hernia and closing the port site without any short- or long-term complications. Trocar-site bowel hernia is a rare complication after laparoscopic surgery. It is usu...

  1. [NEWS IN ETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS OF IRRITATED BOWEL SYNDROME].

    Sheptulin, A A; Vize-Khripunova, M A

    2016-01-01

    The concept of irritated bowel syndrome as a complex of functional disorders that can not be explained by organic changes and are totally due to intestinal motility and visceral sensitivity needs revision. The development of this syndrome also depends on a number of pathogenetic and etiological factors, such as inflammation of intestinal mucosa, changes of its permeability, previous infection, altered microflora, gene polymorphism, and food hypersensitivity. PMID:27459756

  2. Epithelial restitution and wound healing in inflammatory bowel disease

    Sturm, Andreas; Dignass, Axel U.

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by a chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. The mucosal epithelium of the alimentary tract constitutes a key element of the mucosal barrier to a broad spectrum of deleterious substances present within the intestinal lumen including bacterial microorganisms, various dietary factors, gastrointestinal secretory products and drugs. In addition, this mucosal barrier can be disturbed in the course of various intestinal disorders including inflamma...

  3. Probiotics in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and Associated Conditions

    Mack, David R.

    2011-01-01

    A complex set of interactions between the human genes encoding innate protective functions and immune defenses and the environment of the intestinal mucosa with its microbiota is currently considered key to the pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Probiotics offer a method to potentially alter the intestinal microbiome exogenously or may provide an option to deliver microbial metabolic products to alter the chronicity of intestinal mucosal inflammation characterizing...

  4. Role of Rho kinase signal pathway in inflammatory bowel disease

    Huang, Yuan; Xiao, Shiyu; Jiang, Quanhang

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is nonspecific inflammation in the intestinal track, including Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). The incidence of IBD has increased significantly, with its numerous rising up to five million globally, more than 1,700,000 in China. Pathological character of IBD is the inflammation of intestinal mucosa and intestinal fibrosis. Although the pathogenesis of the disease has not yet been fully clarified, some evidence suggests that excessive intestin...

  5. Effect of small bowel preparation with simethicone on capsule endoscopy

    You-hong FANG; Chun-xiao CHEN; Bing-ling ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Background: Capsule endoscopy is a novel non-invasive method for visualization of the entire small bowel. The diagnostic yield of capsule endoscopy depends on the quality of visualization of the small bowel mucosa and its complete passage through the small bowel. To date, there is no standardized protocol for bowel preparation before capsule endoscopy. The addition ofsimethicone in the bowel preparation for the purpose of reducing air bubbles in the intestinal lumen had only been studied by a few investigators. Methods: Sixty-four participants were randomly divided into two groups to receive a bowel preparation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution (Group 1) and both PEG solution and simethicone (Group 2). The PEG solution and sime-thicone were taken the night before and 20 min prior to capsule endoscopy, respectively. Frames taken in the small intestine were examined and scored for luminal bubbles by two professional capsule endoscopists. Gastric emptying time and small bowel transit time were also recorded. Results: Simethicone significantly reduced luminal bubbles both in the proximal and distal small intes-tines. The mean time proportions with slight bubbles in the proximal and distal intestines in Group 2 were 97.1% and 99.0%, respectively, compared with 67.2% (P<0.001) and 68.8% (P<0.001) in Group 1. Simethicone had no effect on mean gastric emptying time, 32.08 min in Group 2 compared with 30.88 min in Group 1 (P=0.868), but it did increase mean small intestinal transit time from 227.28 to 281.84 min (P=0.003). Conclusion: Bowel preparation with both PEG and simethicone significantly reduced bubbles in the intestinal lumen and improved the visualization of the small bowel by capsule endoscopy without any side effects observed.

  6. Type 1 Diabetes Is Associated With Enterovirus Infection in Gut Mucosa

    Oikarinen, M. (Milla); Tauriainen, S.; Oikarinen, S.; Honkanen, T.; Collin, P.; Rantala, I; M. Maki; Kaukinen, K.; Hyoty, H.

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus infections have been linked to type 1 diabetes in several studies. Enteroviruses also have tropism to pancreatic islets and can cause β-cell damage in experimental models. Viral persistence has been suspected to be an important pathogenetic factor. This study evaluates whether gut mucosa is a reservoir for enterovirus persistence in type 1 diabetic patients. Small-bowel mucosal biopsy samples from 39 type 1 diabetic patients, 41 control subjects, and 40 celiac disease patients wer...

  7. Short bowel syndrome

    This thesis describes some aspects of short bowel syndrome. When approximately 1 m or less small bowel is retained after extensive resection, a condition called short bowel syndrome is present. Since the advent of parenteral nutrition, the prognosis of patients with a very short bowel has dramatically improved. Patients with 40 to 100 cm remaining jejunum and/or ileum can generally be maintained with oral nutrition due to increased absorption of the small bowel remnant as result of intestinal adaptation. This study reports clinical, biochemical and nutritional aspects of short bowel patients on oral or parenteral nutrition, emphasizing data on absorption of various nutrients and on bone metabolism. Furthermore, some technical apsects concerning long-term parenteral nutrition are discussed. (Auth.)

  8. Hemorragia maciça do intestino grosso: o que está ao nosso alcance? Massive large bowel bleeding: what is within our reach?

    Júlio César M Santos Jr.

    2010-06-01

    demonstrate with simplicity how to treat the patients with acute lower intestinal hemorrhage. Diseases of the large bowel account for the ¼ of the cases of digestive hemorrhages on the hospital admission and have as main etiological agents the diverticula, in the diverticular disease, and small vascular malformation, in the angiodysplasias. Sometime, it can be seen as a life-threatening condition, however, most of the times, the hemorrhage stops spontaneously. The serious circulatory disturbances are not common; the most frequent signs are the decrease in hemoglobin occurring on about one half of patients and some form of circulatory disturbance as orthostatic changes in 30%; as syncope in 10% and as cardiovascular collapse in 9%. However, the age group, the conditions of the senility, the eventually associated diseases and the lack of material and human resources to handle with that kind of problem are the reasons for concern. The simple clinical approach with a well elaborated history; the physical examination released with attention and objectivity, the inclusion of the proctologic exam, the obligatory readiness for an endoscope for colonoscopy, the basic knowledge on the event are necessary and, in most of the times, enough for the good professional acting in the elaboration of the cares that it should be given to those patient ones.

  9. Interplay of nutrients and microbial metabolites in intestinal immune homeostasis: distinct and common mechanisms of immune regulation in the small bowel and colon.

    Perrigoue, Jacqueline; Das, Anuk; Mora, J Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa is the largest body surface exposed to the environment. While there are common features when comparing immune responses along the intestinal mucosa, the small bowel and colon exhibit striking differences in their mechanisms driving immune regulation. The vitamin A (VA) metabolite all-trans retinoic acid (RA) signaling via RA nuclear receptors plays a key role in immune homeostasis in the small bowel, and recent work indicates that RA is required for establishing immune tolerance to dietary antigens in the upper intestinal tract by inducing α4β7(+)CCR9(+) gut-tropic TREG. In contrast, microbiota-specific TREG in the colon do not appear to require RA, but can be regulated by short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), microbial metabolites that signal through the G protein-coupled receptor GPR43. Moreover, TREG do not need CCR9 to home to the colon, but utilize another G protein-coupled receptor, GPR15, which is upregulated by SCFA. Thus, the mechanisms governing intestinal tolerance to dietary antigens in the upper digestive tract differ from those controlling tolerance to the microbiota in the colon, with RA and SCFA playing key complementary roles in their respective compartments. In addition to VA and SCFA, recent studies have highlighted the roles of other dietary and microbial metabolites that influence immune cell homeostasis across the small and large bowel including dietary ligands for aryl hydrocarbon receptor and microbiota-modified bile acids. Understanding the complex and dynamic interplay between dietary metabolites and commensal microbiota within the intestinal microenvironment could therefore inform novel strategies for the treatment of food allergies and inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25227295

  10. Macroscopic small bowel mucosal injury caused by chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIS use as assessed by capsule endoscopy Valoración mediante cápsulas endoscópicas de las lesiones intestinales mucosas causadas por antiinflamatorios no esteroideos (AINE

    A. Caunedo-Álvarez

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the type, frequency, and severity of macroscopic small bowel mucosal injury after chronic NSAID intake as assessed by capsule endoscopy (CE, as well as to correlate the severity of gastroduodenal and intestinal damage in these patients. Material and methods:a prospective, endoscopist-blind, controlled trial. Sixteen patients (14F/2M; age: 57.06 ± 10.16 yrs with osteoarthritis (OA on chronic therapy with NSAIDs underwent CE and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE. Seventeen patients with OA (9F/2M; age: 57.47 ± 9.82 yrs who did not take NSAIDs were included as a control group. A scale ranging from 0 to 2 (0 = no lesions, 1-minor = red spots or petechiae, denuded areas and/or 1-5 mucosal breaks; 2-major = > 5 mucosal breaks and/or strictures, or hemorrhage was designed to assess the severity of small bowel mucosal injuries. Results: CE found intestinal lesions in 75% (12/16 of patients in the study group and in 11.76% (2/17 of controls (p < 0.01. Seven out of 16 NSAID consumers (43.75% and none in the control group (0% had a major small bowel mucosal injury (p < 0.01. The percentages of patients with grade 1 and 2 gastroduodenopathy in the study group, as assessed by UGE, were 37.14 and 23.81%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the rate of major enteropathy between patients with none or minor gastroduodenal injury, and those with major gastroduodenopathy (43.75 vs. 40%; p = N.S.. Conclusions: chronic NSAID intake is associated with a high rate of small bowel mucosal injuries. Our data have failed to demonstrate a relationship between the severity of gastroduodenal and intestinal injury.

  11. Detection of ectopic gastric mucosa using 99mTc pertechnetate. Review of the literature

    Technetium-99m (99mTc) pertechnetate scintigraphy in a child with acute gastrointestinal bleeding of unknown origin suggests ectopic gastric mucosa caused by Meckel's diverticulum or gastrointestinal duplication cysts. Our objective was to define the patterns of scintigraphic findings likely to be encountered in patients with ectopic gastric mucosa with illustrative cases and to review the literature. Fifty children (age 1 year to 14 years) were evaluated for ectopic gastric mucosa using 99mTc pertechnetate scintigraphy. Functioning ectopic gastric mucosa was detected in eight patients with Meckel's diverticula and three patients with bowel duplication. Three patients showed atypical findings on scintigraphy which were perforated appendix, calyceal stasis, and regional enteritis. Ectopic functioning gastric mucosa in Meckel's diverticulum is visualized simultaneously with the stomach, whereas in intestinal duplications tracer activity can be visualized in the dynamic sequence or before gastric tracer visualization in an irregular pattern. A variety of scintigraphic patterns can be found in patients with ectopic gastric mucosa undergoing 99mTc pertechnetate scintigraphy depending on the location and size of the ectopic tissue. Also, acquisition of delayed images is useful when the initial images are equivocal in children. (author)

  12. Short Bowel Syndrome

    ... may include nutritional support medications surgery intestinal transplant Nutritional Support The main treatment for short bowel syndrome is nutritional support, which may include the following: Oral rehydration. Adults ...

  13. The short-bowel syndrome.

    Nightingale, J M

    1995-06-01

    Patients with a short bowel have usually had a bowel resection for Crohn's disease. Two types of short-bowel patient can be distinguished: those with a jejunostomy and those with their jejunum anastomosed to a functioning colon. Both types of patient have problems with macronutrient absorption, although those with a colon experience fewer problems because some energy from unabsorbed carbohydrate is salvaged in the colon. Patients with a jejunostomy have problems with large stomal losses of water, sodium and magnesium, whereas those with a jejuno-colic anastomosis rarely have problems with water and electrolyte absorption. Patients with a jejunostomy 100-200 cm from the duodeno-jejunal flexure ('absorbers') usually absorb more from the diet than they pass through the stoma and therefore require oral electrolyte or nutrient supplements. Those with a residual jejunal length of less than 100 cm usually secrete more from the stoma than they take in orally ('secretors') and therefore require long-term parenteral fluid or nutrient supplements. A high output resulting from a jejunostomy is treated by reducing the oral intake of hypotonic fluid, administering a sipped glucose-saline solution and, often, by giving drugs that reduce intestinal motility (most effective in absorbers) or gastrointestinal secretions (most effective in secretors). Gallstones are common both in short-bowel patients with and in those without a colon (45%), and calcium oxalate renal stones occur in the former (25%). However, it is now possible to provide adequate nutrition and fluid supplements for most patients with a short bowel, and the prospects for the rehabilitation of such patients are good. PMID:7552632

  14. CT findings of bowel injury following blunt abdominal trauma

    To determine the diagnostic value of CT, the author retrospectively reviewed preoperative CT findings of 57 cases with surgically proven bowel injury following blunt trauma. The small bowel injuries were divided into two groups, i.e., those without mesenteric injury, group A, and those with mesenteric injury, group B. The incidence of CT findings including extraluminal air, bowel wall thickening, peritoneal fluid, mesenteric thickening, and high density hematoma, were determined. CT findings were also assessed by time intervals between injury and examination. CT scans of small bowel injury were compared with those of surgically proven 25 cases of mesenteric injury without bowel injury, group C. CT showed findings suggestive of bowel injury in 96.4% of the cases. There were 5 false negative CT scans, which consisted of 4 small bowel and one large bowel injuries, all performed within 2 hours from injury. The patients in group A small bowel injury had a higher incidence of pneumoperitoneum on CT scans performed over 4 hours after injury than on those performed within 4 hours. Bowel wall thickening was more frequent in group A than in group B or C. Peritoneal fluid collection within 4 hours from injury was less frequent in group A than in group B or C. High density hematoma was more frequent in group B and C than in group A. The analysis suggested that early diagnosis of isolated small bowel injury was difficult because of lack of signs indicating mesenteric injury. In these cases bowel wall thickening appeared earlier, then peritoneal fluid developed, with and without mesenteric thickening or extraluminal air. Thus in those with suspicion of bowel injury, bowel wall thickening on initial CT should be carefully followed up in regard to additional or progressive findings. Operative indication can be determined with careful clinical correlation before detection of extraluminal air. (K.H.)

  15. No difference in small bowel microbiota between patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy controls.

    Dlugosz, Aldona; Winckler, Björn; Lundin, Elin; Zakikhany, Katherina; Sandström, Gunnar; Ye, Weimin; Engstrand, Lars; Lindberg, Greger

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that colonic microbiota may exhibit important differences between patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and healthy controls. Less is known about the microbiota of the small bowel. We used massive parallel sequencing to explore the composition of small bowel mucosa-associated microbiota in patients with IBS and healthy controls. We analysed capsule biopsies from the jejunum of 35 patients (26 females) with IBS aged 18-(36)-57 years and 16 healthy volunteers (11 females) aged 20-(32)-48 years. Sequences were analysed based on taxonomic classification. The phyla with the highest total abundance across all samples were: Firmicutes (43%), Proteobacteria (23%), Bacteroidetes (15%), Actinobacteria (9.3%) and Fusobacteria (7.0%). The most abundant genera were: Streptococcus (19%), Veillonella (13%), Prevotella (12%), Rothia (6.4%), Haemophilus (5.7%), Actinobacillus (5.5%), Escherichia (4.6%) and Fusobacterium (4.3%). We found no difference among major phyla or genera between patients with IBS and controls. We identified a cluster of samples in the small bowel microbiota dominated by Prevotella, which may represent a common enterotype of the upper small intestine. The remaining samples formed a gradient, dominated by Streptococcus at one end and Escherichia at the other. PMID:25687743

  16. Intraluminal injection of short chain fatty acids diminishes intestinal mucosa injury in experimental ischemia-reperfusion

    Aguilar-Nascimento José Eduardo de

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Investigated the effect of intraluminal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA on the intestinal mucosa in the presence of ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI. METHODS: Six blind sacs of the small bowel (3at the jejunum and 3 at the ileum were created in ten Wistar rats. The lateral sacs of both bowel regions were subjected to IRI (15/15 minutes while the medial sacs were let free to receive blood supply. In the lateral sacs, it was injected either a solution containing SCFA (butyrate, propionate and acetate or pure saline at the bowel lumen. No fluid was injected in the medial sacs. RESULTS: Both at the jejunum and at the ileum the score of the mucosal injury was higher in saline than in control sacs. SCFA treated sacs showed lesser score at the ileum (p=0.03 but were not significantly different at the jejunum (p=0.83 when compared with saline sacs. It was found a significant greater number of neutrophils (p < 0.01 in the sacs treated with saline than in the other two sacs in both regions. CONCLUSION: SCFA protect the distal small bowel mucosa and diminishes infiltration of neutrophils to the gut lamina propria in IRI.

  17. Dysmotility of the small intestine in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Kellow, J E; Phillips, S F; Miller, L J; Zinsmeister, A R

    1988-01-01

    Though the pathophysiology of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is commonly attributed to dysfunction of the large intestine, evidence exists to incriminate the small bowel. In order to further explore the role of the small bowel in IBS several stimuli were applied, in an attempt to unmask the dysmotility of the jejunum and ileum. These included infusions of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-OP), a high fat meal, neostigmine and balloon distension of the ileum. Three groups (n = 8) each of ag...

  18. Small Bowel Bleeding

    ... ACG on Facebook About ACG ACG Store ACG Patient Education & Resource Center Home GI Health and Disease Recursos en Español What is a Gastroenterologist? Podcasts and Videos GI Health Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity © ...

  19. Patterns of airway involvement in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Ilias; Papanikolaou; Konstantinos; Kagouridis; Spyros; A; Papiris

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur commonly in inflammatory bowel diseases(IBD). Pulmonary manifestations(PM) of IBD may be divided in airway disorders, interstitial lung disorders, serositis, pulmonary vasculitis, necrobiotic nodules, drug-induced lung disease, thromboembolic lung disease and enteropulmonary fistulas. Pulmonary involvement may often be asymptomatic and detected solely on the basis of abnormal screening tests. The common embryonic origin of the intestine and the lungs from the primitive foregut, the co-existence of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue in both organs, autoimmunity, smoking and bacterial translocation from the colon to the lungs may all be involved in the pathogenesis of PM in IBD. PM are mainly detected by pulmonary function tests and highresolution computed tomography. This review will focus on the involvement of the airways in the context of IBD, especially stenoses of the large airways, tracheo-bronchitis, bronchiectasis, bronchitis, mucoid impaction, bronchial granulomas, bronchiolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and the co-existence of IBD with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sarcoidosis and a1-antitrypsin deficiency.

  20. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in mucosal homeostasis at the intestinal epithelial barrier in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Zimmerman, Noah P; Vongsa, Rebecca A; Wendt, Michael K; Dwinell, Michael B

    2008-07-01

    Chemokines, a large family of small chemoattractive cytokines, and their receptors play an integral role in the regulation of the immune response and homeostasis. The ability of chemokines to attract specific populations of immune cells sets them apart from other chemoattractants. Chemokines produced within the gastrointestinal mucosa are critical players in directing the balance between physiological and pathophysiological inflammation in health, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and the progression to colon cancer. In addition to the well-characterized role of chemokines in directed trafficking of immune cells to the gut mucosa, the expression of chemokine receptors on the cells of the epithelium makes them active participants in the chemokine signaling network. Recent findings demonstrate an important role for chemokines and chemokine receptors in epithelial barrier repair and maintenance as well as an intricate involvement in limiting metastasis of colonic carcinoma. Increased recognition of the association between barrier defects and inflammation and the subsequent progression to cancer in IBD thus implicates chemokines as key regulators of mucosal homeostasis and disease pathogenesis. PMID:18452220

  1. [Parasitosis and irritable bowel syndrome].

    Ibarra, Catalina; Herrera, Valentina; Pérez de Arce, Edith; Gil, Luis Carlos; Madrid, Ana María; Valenzuela, Lucía; Beltrán, Caroll J

    2016-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract characterised by multi-factorial aetiology. In IBS physiopathology are involved diverse factors between them biological, psychosocial, and environmental components which affect the immune activation status of gut mucosa. Among these factors is recognized the intestinal parasitosis. Post-infection IBS (PI-IBS) is recognised as a subgroup of functional disorders whose symptoms onset appear after a symptomatic intestinal infection caused by microbial agents. There are few studies regarding of relationship between IBS and intestinal parasitosis in Chile. However, is has been well described a positive association between IBS and Blastocystis hominis infections, one of prevalent parasites in Chile. In other countries, is also described a relationship between IBS and amebiasis and giardiasis. Both, characterized by a common mode of transmission through water as well as contaminated food. Because the high prevalence of parasitosis in our country it is necessary to expand the association studies to clarify the strength of the parasites ethiology in IBS. PMID:27598274

  2. Drug Reactions in Oral Mucosa

    Emine Derviş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Both immunologic and nonimmunologic drug reactions can be seen in oral mucosa. Since considerable number of these reactions heals spontaneously without being noticed by the patients, exact frequency of the lesions is unknown. Most common lesions are xerostomia, taste disorders, mucosal ulcerations and edema. In this article, oral lesions resulting from drug intake similar to those from oral lesions of local and systemic diseases, and diagnostic problems caused by these similarities, have been reviewed.

  3. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    ... Surgical procedures that create a loop of small intestine where excess bacteria can grow. An example is a Billroth II type of stomach removal ( gastrectomy ). Some cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) Symptoms The most common symptoms are: Abdominal ...

  4. Prevalence of Bowel Incontinence

    ... Incontinence and Aging Managing Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on ... is the word used to describe loss of control over when and where we go to the bathroom. It is also called accidental bowel leakage, or ...

  5. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    ... foods are linked to other digestive conditions like lactose intolerance or celiac disease , though, so it's important to ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Lactose Intolerance Inflammatory Bowel Disease Ulcers Digestive System Eating Well ...

  6. Small bowel resection - discharge

    ... incision is red, warm, swollen, or more painful Short of breath or chest pain Swollen legs or pain in your calves Alternative Names Small intestine surgery - discharge; Bowel resection - small intestine - discharge; Resection of ...

  7. Gut-homing CD4+ T cell receptor alpha beta+ T cells in the pathogenesis of murine inflammatory bowel disease

    Rudolphi, A; Boll, G; Poulsen, S S;

    1994-01-01

    +/+) mice. No antigen receptor-expressing lymphoid cells were found in GALT of congenic C.B-17 scid/scid (scid) mice. The heterotopic transplantation of a full-thickness gut wall graft from the ileum or colon of immunocompetent (C.B-17+/+, BALB/cdm2) donor mice onto immunodeficient scid mice selectively...... reconstituted a CD3+ T cell receptor alpha beta+ CD4+ T cell subset. CD4+ cells of this subset expressed the surface phenotype of mucosa-seeking, memory T cells. In the immunodeficient scid host, this gut-derived CD4+ T cell subset was found in spleen, peritoneal cavity, mesenteric lymph nodes (LN), epithelial...... layer and lamina propria of the small and large intestine, but not in peripheral LN. Scid mice heterotopically transplanted with gut from a congenic, immunocompetent donor developed clinical and histological signs of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Hence, the selective repopulation of GALT...

  8. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    Beck, E.; Hurwitz, B

    1992-01-01

    1. Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional disorder of the lower intestinal tract affecting approximately 10% of the population and causing a wide range of symptoms. 2. Most cases of irritable bowel syndrome can be diagnosed in general practice on the basis of the presenting history and clinical examination but some patients may need to be referred to a gastro-enterologist for further assessment including sigmoidoscopy and barium enema. 3. The clinical picture may include symptoms of abdomin...

  9. LYMPHANGIOMA OF THE BUCCAL MUCOSA

    Shashidevi HARANAL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangiomas are uncommon congenital hamarto‑ mas of the lymphatic system, usually diagnosed in infancy and early childhood. Most lymphangiomas are present at birth (60% and, by the age of 2 years, 80% to 90% are present. Tongue, palate, gingiva, lip, alveolar ridge and buccal mucosa are the most commonly affected sites in the oral cavity. Various methods have been tried for the treat‑ ment of lymphangioma, including surgery, radiation, laser therapy, sclerotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. This paper reports a case of lymphangioma in a 28 year-old female patient.

  10. Quantitative Risk-Benefit Analysis of Probiotic Use for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Bennett, William E

    2016-04-01

    Probiotics have seen widespread use for a variety of gastrointestinal problems, especially in two common disorders: irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Since a wide variety of probiotic preparations has been used, and despite a large number of studies performed, a great deal of heterogeneity exists among them. Straightforward evidence-based recommendations for the use of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease have thus been difficult to formulate. In an effort to improve understanding of the risk-benefit balance of probiotics in these conditions, this study (1) queried the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database for all reported adverse drug events related to probiotics in 2013, and (2) constructed risk-benefit planes for both irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease using a geometric approximation of the confidence region between risk and benefit. The results show that adverse events from probiotics vary widely by disease, and when they occur, they are mild and may be difficult to distinguish from the natural history of the underlying disorders they are used to treat. The risk-benefit plane for irritable bowel syndrome straddles the risk-benefit threshold, so patients can expect a balance between a low chance of risk and also a low chance of benefit. The risk-benefit plane for inflammatory bowel disease largely lies above the risk-benefit threshold, so patients may expect more benefit than risk in most cases. More standardized and high-quality research is needed to improve our understanding of risk and benefit for these complex biopharmaceuticals. PMID:26467550

  11. Epithelioid leiomyoma of the oral mucosa.

    Koutlas, I G; Manivel, J C

    1996-12-01

    Oral leiomyomas are rare because of the paucity of smooth muscle in the mouth. The solid and vascular types are the most frequent variants. The purpose of this article is to present the pathologic features and differential diagnosis of an example of epithelioid leiomyoma. A 50-year-old woman presented with a small raised nonpainful polypoid lesion of unknown duration on the right buccal mucosa. The tumor was well demarcated and consisted of large epithelioid cells with distinct cytoplasmic borders, round to oval nuclei, and prominent nucleoli. A few mitoses (4 in 20 high power fields) were present. Scattered spindle cells were also seen. The cytoplasm was eosinophilic to amphophilic and showed frequent clearing and retraction. Small capillaries were identified and surrounded by neoplastic cells that gave the lesion an angiomyomatous appearance. Masson trichrome stain highlighted focally smooth muscle cells. Immunohistochemical evaluation revealed staining for vimentin, desmin, and muscle-specific actim. PMID:8974140

  12. Age and the architecture of oral mucosa

    Abu Eid, Rasha; Sawair, Faleh; Landini, Gabriel; Saku, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Age changes affect the oral mucosa (the protective lining of the oral cavity), but few of these have been studied objectively. The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyse a number of morphometric parameters of the ageing oral mucosa. The fractal dimension of the epithelial connective tissue interface (ECTI) was estimated in 42 samples of normal buccal mucosa to correlate any changes in their irregularity to the age of the individuals. Morphometric parameters extracted from theoretical...

  13. Bowel vaginoplasty in children

    Sarin Yogesh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To describe our experience with bowel vaginoplasty done in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective study of eight children aged 10 months to 8 years, who underwent bowel vaginoplasty over a period of 5 years (2000-2005. The indications of bowel vaginoplasty included anorectovestibular fistula (ARVF associated with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH syndrome (n=6 and cloaca (n=2. The bowel segment used for vaginoplasty included colon (n=3, ileum (n=2 and duplicated rectum (n=1. In two patients of ARVF associated with uterovaginal agenesis, the distal- most part of ARVF was transected at the level of peritoneal reflection and left as neovagina, whereas the proximal bowel was pulled through at the proposed neo-anal site. All the patients were advised daily home dilatation of the neo vaginal orifice with Hegar′s dilators, for a period of six weeks. RESULTS: Bowel vaginoplasty was done in eight patients. None had any significant per-operative complication. Two patients had abdominal wound dehiscence, requiring secondary suturing. Two patients had mucosal prolapse of the neovagina, which required trimming. One patient died two months after discharge, because of meningitis. Out of the eight patients, seven are in regular follow-up. Six patients have neovagina, cosmetically acceptable to the parents; all have been radiologically proven to have adequate length. One patient had unacceptable perineal appearance with nipple-like vaginal orifice and scarred perineal wound, that merits a revision. None of the patients had vaginal stenosis and excessive mucus discharge, during follow-up visits. Although post surgical results are acceptable to the parents cosmetically, the sexual and psychological outcome is yet to be assessed. Conclusions: Bowel vaginoplasty is a safe and acceptable procedure to treat the pediatric patients of uterovaginal agenesis and cloaca.

  14. CEACAM6 acts as a receptor for adherent-invasive E. coli, supporting ileal mucosa colonization in Crohn disease

    Barnich, N.; Carvalho, FA; Glasser, AL; Darcha, C; Jantscheff, P; Allez, M; Peeters, Harald; Bommelaer, G.; Desrumeaux, P; Colombel, JF; Darfeuille-Michaud, A

    2007-01-01

    The ileal mucosa of Crohn disease (CD) patients is abnormally colonized by adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC) that are able to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells. Here, we show that CD-associated AIEC strains adhere to the brush border of primary ileal enterocytes isolated from CD patients but not controls without inflammatory bowel disease. AIEC adhesion is dependent on type 1 pili expression on the bacterial surface and on carcinoembryonic antigen–related cell adhesion molecule ...

  15. Ostomy Surgery of the Bowel

    ... sustain life. Diarrhea is the main symptom of short bowel syndrome. Other symptoms may include cramping bloating heartburn weakness and fatigue vomiting excessive gas foul-smelling stool Short bowel syndrome is uncommon and can occur with Crohn’s ...

  16. Characteristics of benign lymphoadenosis of oral mucosa

    Shu-Xia Li; Shi-Feng Yu; Kai-Hua Sun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathological characteristics and carcinogenesis mechanism of benign lymphoadenosis of oral mucosa (BLOM).METHODS: The expressions of Ki-67, CD34 and apoptosis were evaluated by immunohistochemical SP staining in 64 paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Of them, 9 were from BLOM with dysplasia, 15 from BLOM without dysplasia,15 from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), 15 from oral precancerosis, and 10 from normal tissues. Cell proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis of tissue samples were also analyzed.RESULTS: The expression of Ki-67 in BLOM with dysplasia,oral precancerosis and OSCC was significantly higher than in BLOM without dysplasia and normal mucosa. The microvascular density (MVD) in BLOM with and without dysplasia, oral precancerosis, and OSCC was significantly higher than in normal mucosa. Apoptosis in BLOM and oral precancerosis was significantly higher than in OSCC and normal mucosa.CONCLUSION: Benign lymphoadenosis of oral mucosa has potentialities of cancerization.

  17. Duodenal Bulb Mucosa with Hypertrophic Gastric Oxyntic Heterotopia in Patients with Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

    Emil Kohan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (ZES results in hypersecretion of gastric acid (via gastrinoma leading to peptic ulcers, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. We describe the novel discovery of hypertrophic, heterotopic gastric mucosa in the proximal duodenal bulb in patients with ZES, which we hypothesize results in an increased incidence of postbulbar ulcers in patients with ZES (a mechanism previously unreported. We determined the incidence of the novel finding of duodenal gastric oxyntic hypertrophic heterotopia (GOH in patients with ZES. Methods. Seven patients with ZES were enrolled. The diagnosis of ZES was established by hypergastrinemia, gastric acid hypersecretion, and a positive secretin test or based on biopsy specimens (evaluated via tissue staining. Basal acid output (BAO and baseline gastrin secretion were determined by established methods. Endoscopic examinations with methylene blue staining and biopsy of the gastric and duodenal mucosa were conducted in all patients every 3–6 months for an average of 5 years. Results. The duodenal mucosa demonstrated hypertrophic GOH in 5 out of 7 patients with ZES and an intact stomach and duodenum. Biopsies from the bowel mucosa demonstrated patchy replacement of surface epithelium by gastric-type epithelium with hypertrophic oxyntic glands in the lamina propria in 5 patients. Two of the patients had no evidence of GOH in the duodenal bulb. Patients with GOH had an average serum gastrin level of 1245 pg/mL and BAO of 2.92 mEq/hr versus 724 pg/mL and 0.8 mEq/hr in patients without GOH. Conclusions. This study demonstrated the presence of duodenal mucosa with GOH in 5 out of 7 patients with ZES and an intact stomach and duodenum. The presence of hypertrophic and heterotopic gastric mucosa is proposed to result from increased gastrin levels and may contribute to the increased incidence of postbulbar ulcers in these patients.

  18. MRI enterography: the future of small bowel diagnostics?

    Feuerbach, S

    2010-01-01

    MRI plays an increasing role in small bowel imaging of Crohn's disease. MR enterography (MRE) without nasojejunal intubation and radiation exposure offers similar results compared to MR enteroclysis (with intubation) and should be therefore the preferred method. Sensitivity and specificity is comparable to that of CT enterography. Capsule endoscopy is obviously superior to MRE in detecting superficial lesions, but this is limited to the mucosa and stenosis has to be excluded before examination using imaging, like MRE. There are no convincing studies in the literature regarding assessment of disease activity with imaging. Moreover, there is no consensus in the literature about a suitable reference standard. PMID:20926869

  19. Small bowel injury in low-dose aspirin users.

    Endo, Hiroki; Sakai, Eiji; Kato, Takayuki; Umezawa, Shotaro; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    The use of low-dose aspirin (LDA) is well known to be associated with an increased risk of serious upper gastrointestinal complications, such as peptic ulceration and bleeding. Until recently, attention was mainly focused on aspirin-induced damage of the stomach and duodenum. However, recently, there has been growing interest among gastroenterologists on the adverse effects of aspirin on the small bowel, especially as new endoscopic techniques, such as capsule endoscopy (CE) and balloon-assisted endoscopy, have become available for the evaluation of small bowel lesions. Preliminary CE studies conducted in healthy subjects have shown that short-term administration of LDA can induce mild mucosal inflammation of the small bowel. Furthermore, chronic use of LDA results in a variety of lesions in the small bowel, including multiple petechiae, loss of villi, erosions, and round, irregular, or punched-out ulcers. Some patients develop circumferential ulcers with stricture. In addition, to reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal lesions in LDA users, it is important for clinicians to confirm the differences in the gastrointestinal toxicity between different types of aspirin formulations in clinical use. Some studies suggest that enteric-coated aspirin may be more injurious to the small bowel mucosa than buffered aspirin. The ideal treatment for small bowel injury in patients taking LDA would be withdrawal of aspirin, however, LDA is used as an antiplatelet agent in the majority of patients, and its withdrawal could increase the risk of cardiovascular/cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality. Thus, novel means for the treatment of aspirin-induced enteropathy are urgently needed. PMID:25501289

  20. The lack of impact of pelvic irradiation on small bowel mobility: implications for radiotherapy treatment planning

    Purpose: Small bowel contrast is frequently used during simulation for patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy to assist in the design of blocks that exclude small bowel from the radiation field. In many instances, a large field is treated to 45 gray (Gy), followed by a field reduction to exclude the small bowel. This prospective study was designed to assess whether the position and mobility of the small bowel changed after the initial 45 Gy, thereby determining whether a special small bowel series done at initial simulation is applicable at the time of field reduction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing pelvic irradiation were given small bowel contrast for their initial simulation. Radiographs were taken with the bladder empty and the bladder full. The location of the small bowel and its displacement with bladder distention was measured. This entire procedure was repeated prior to field reduction (after 39.6-46.0 Gy). Results: There was no demonstrable alteration in small bowel mobility after 39.6-46.0 Gy. The approximate position of the small bowel relative to bony landmarks was unchanged. Conclusion: The position and mobility of the small bowel appears not to be affected by 39.6-46.0 Gy of pelvic radiotherapy. Therefore, it is reasonable to design reduced pelvic fields to exclude the small bowel based on special small bowel series done at initial treatment simulation

  1. Urethral fistula following circumcision: salvaged by buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty

    Sinha, Rahul Janak; Dalela, Divakar; S N Sankhwar; Singh, Vishwajeet

    2009-01-01

    Fistula following circumcision and at times accompanied by disfigurement of the glans penis is a common problem in our country, where a large number of circumcision is performed by untrained professionals. These complications may have profound negative psychological impact on the growing child. Herein, we report the successful closure of such fistula using buccal mucosa, which occurred following circumcision (for phimosis) in a 15 year old boy. This resulted in the disfigurement of the glans ...

  2. Understanding Bowel Preparation

    ... will receive specific instructions. In general, here is what you can expect: Your doctor will prescribe the type of bowel prep that is best for you. ... out if you have any out-ofpocket costs. What determines the type of prep I get? Your medical condition is the most important factor in ...

  3. Inflammatory bowel disease epidemiology

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide, yet the reasons remain unknown. New therapeutic approaches have been introduced in medical IBD therapy, but their impact on the natural history of IBD remains uncertain. This review will summarize the recent findings in t...... epidemiology of IBD....

  4. Semitransparent peroral small bowel imaging

    Emons, D.

    1981-10-01

    171 follow-through examinations of the small bowel performed in children and adolescents with a large contrast medium meal and the high voltage-low density barium technique (10 to 25 g BaSO/sub 4//100 ml, depending on age), are described. A ready made suspension, diluted with water, proved unsatisfactory. Coating properties and stability of the diluted, weak suspension were then greatly improved by hydroxyethylcellulose as a thickening agent and in addition by premedication of the patient with cimetidine. Pure cellulose solution instead of the last portion of barium prevented thickening in the ileum. The procedure has the well known advantages of a large contrast medium meal without the problem of overly dense superpositions.

  5. Small bowel enteroclysis with magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in patients with failed and uncertain passage of a patency capsule

    Video capsule enteroscopy (VCE) has revolutionized small bowel imaging, enabling visual examination of the mucosa of the entire small bowel, while MR enteroclysis (MRE) and CT enteroclysis (CTE) have largely replaced conventional barium enteroclysis. A new indication for MRE and CTE is the clinical suspicion of small bowel strictures, as indicated by delayed or non-delivery of a test capsule given before a VCE examination, to exclude stenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical value of subsequent MRE and CTE in patients in whom a test capsule did not present itself in due time. Seventy-five consecutive patients were identified with a delayed or unnoticed delivery of the test capsule. Seventy patients consented to participate and underwent MRE (44) or CTE (26). The medical records and imaging studies were retrospectively reviewed and symptoms, laboratory results and imaging findings recorded. Lesions compatible with Crohns disease were shown by MRE in 5 patients, by CTE in one and by VCE in four, one of whom had lesions on MRE. In patients without alarm symptoms and findings (weight loss, haematochezia, anaemia, nocturnal diarrheoa, ileus, fistula, abscess and abnormal blood tests) imaging studies did not unveil any such lesion. VCE's were performed in only 20 patients, mainly younger than 50 years of age, although no stenotic lesion was shown by MRE and CTE. In the remaining 50 patients no VCE or other endoscopic intervention was performed indicating that the referring physician was content with the diagnostic information from MRE or CTE. The diagnostic value of MRE and CTE is sufficient for clinical management of most patients with suspected small bowel disease, and thus VCE may be omitted or at least postponed for later usage

  6. Oral sodium phosphate for bowel preparation in endoscopic submucosal dissection training in a pig model: A pilot study

    Chien-Yuan Hung

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: The use of oral sodium phosphate is easy and safe in porcine bowel preparation for ESD training. Bowel preparation using a split dose of 2 mL/kg or 4 mL/kg sodium phosphate produces an adequate bowel cleansing. The optimal dosage still needs to be established in a large-scale study.

  7. Permeation and Systemic Absorption of R- and S-Baclofen across the Nasal Mucosa

    Zhang, Hefei; Schmidt, Mark; Murry, Daryl J.; Donovan, Maureen D.

    2011-01-01

    Baclofen, an antispasmodic agent that acts as a GABAB agonist, resembles phenylalanine in structure and has been reported to be a substrate of the large amino acid transporter, LAT-1. The objective of this study was to investigate the absorption of baclofen across the nasal mucosa both in vitro and in vivo. Baclofen transport was measured across excised bovine olfactory and respiratory mucosae to investigate site-specific uptake of baclofen, and the intranasal bioavailability of R- and S- bac...

  8. Identification of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -9 Activities within Intestinal Mucosa of Clinically Healthy Beagle Dogs

    Hanifeh, Mohsen; Rajamäki, Minna M.; MÄKITALO, Laura; Syrjä, Pernilla; Sankari, Satu; Kilpinen, Susanne; Spillmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9 are zinc-dependent endopeptidases that contribute to the control of breakdown and reconstitution of extracellular matrix under both normal and pathological conditions. The main objective of this study was to identify the presence of MMP-2 and -9 in the mucosa of the small and large intestines of clinically healthy beagle dogs using gelatin zymography technique. Intestinal mucosa samples from four different parts of the intestine (duodenum, jej...

  9. Use of biosimilars in inflammatory bowel disease: Statements of the Italian Group for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Annese, Vito; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-11-01

    The introduction of biological therapies, particularly anti-TNFα agents, has revolutionized the management of inflammatory bowel disease in those cases which are refractory to conventional treatment; however these drugs are not risk-free and their use has substantially increased the cost of treatment. As marketing protection expires for original, first-generation biopharmaceuticals, lower-cost "copies" of these drugs produced by competitor companies-referred to as biosimilars-are already entering the market. In September 2013, the European Medicines Agency approved two infliximab biosimilars for treatment of adult and paediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients, a decision based largely on efficacy and safety data generated in studies of patients with ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis. For many clinicians, extrapolation practices and the general question of interchangeability between biosimilars and reference biologics are cause for concern. In the present paper, the Italian Group for inflammatory bowel disease presents its statements on these issues, with emphasis on the peculiar clinical characteristics of inflammatory bowel disease and the importance of providing physicians and patients with adequate information and guarantees on the safety and efficacy of these new drugs in the specific setting of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25139379

  10. Teduglutide reduces need for parenteral support among patients with short bowel syndrome with intestinal failure

    Jeppesen, Palle B; Pertkiewicz, Marek; Messing, Bernard; Iyer, Kishore; Seidner, Douglas L; O'keefe, Stephen J D; Forbes, Alastair; Heinze, Hartmut; Joelsson, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, might restore intestinal structural and functional integrity by promoting growth of the mucosa and reducing gastric emptying and secretion. These factors could increase fluid and nutrient absorption in patients with short bowel syndrome with...... intestinal failure (SBS-IF). We performed a prospective study to determine whether teduglutide reduces parenteral support in patients with SBS-IF....

  11. Role of interleukin 1 in inflammatory bowel disease--enhanced production during active disease.

    Ligumsky, M; Simon, P L; Karmeli, F; Rachmilewitz, D

    1990-01-01

    Interleukin 1 is a polypeptide cytokine produced by various cell types and has been shown to have a major role in inflammatory and immunological responses. In experimental colitis it proved to be a dominant mediator and a reliable marker of inflammation. The aim of the present study was to determine in vitro the extent of production and release of interleukin 1 from colonic mucosa of patients with active untreated inflammatory bowel disease. Colonic mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained duri...

  12. Resveratrol Attenuates Both Small Bowel and Liver Changes in Obstructive Jaundice

    Temi, Volkan; Okay, Erdem; Güneş, Abdullah; Şimşek, Turgay; Çekmen, Mustafa; Bilgili, Ümit

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is well known that mucosal changes and alterations in liver function occur in the experimental obstructive jaundice model. Aims: We aimed to evaluate the effect of resveratrol on obstructive jaundice-induced changes in the small bowel mucosa and liver using ischaemia-modified albumin as a marker of oxidative damage. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: The study used a rodent experimental model of obstructive jaundice, including a sham gr...

  13. Irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease and the microbiome

    Major, Giles; Robin C. Spiller

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The review aims to update the reader on current developments in our understanding of how the gut microbiota impact on inflammatory bowel disease and the irritable bowel syndrome. It will also consider current efforts to modulate the microbiota for therapeutic effect. Recent findings Gene polymorphisms associated with inflammatory bowel disease increasingly suggest that interaction with the microbiota drives pathogenesis. This may be through modulation of the immune response,...

  14. Laser Treatment of Oral Mucosa Tattoo

    Gojkov-Vukelic, Mirjana; Hadzic, Sanja; Pasic, Enes

    2011-01-01

    The most common oral solitary pigmented lesion is the dental amalgam tattoo. It occurs as a result of colouring of the tissue by alien pigment which was administered intra or subepidermaly either intentionally or accidentally. The most common material used for the colouring of the oral mucosa is amalgam from amalgam fillings and metal particles from prosthetic restorations which are absorbed accidentally. The oral mucosa tattoos are most often found in the area of the marginal gingiva or the ...

  15. Autofluorescence spectroscopy of oral mucosa

    Majumdar, S. K.; Uppal, A.; Gupta, P. K.

    1998-06-01

    We report the results of an in-vitro study on autofluorescence from pathologically characterized normal and malignant squamous tissues from the oral cavity. The study involved biopsy samples from 47 patients with oral cancer of which 11 patients had cancer of tongue, 17 of buccal mucosa and 19 of alveolus. The results of excitation and emission spectroscopy at several wavelengths (280 nm less than or equal to (lambda) exless than or equal to 460 nm; 340 nm less than or equal to (lambda) em less than or equal to 520 nm) showed that at (lambda) ex equals 337 nm and 400 nm the mean value for the spectrally integrated fluorescence intensity [(Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) )] from the normal tissue sites was about a factor of 2 larger than that from the malignant tissue sites. At other excitation wavelengths the difference in (Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) ) was not statistically significant. Similarly, for (lambda) em equals 390 nm and 460 nm, the intensity of the 340 nm band of the excitation spectra from normal tissues was observed to be a factor of 2 larger than that from malignant tissues. Analysis of these results suggests that NADH concentration is higher in normal oral tissues compared to the malignant. This contrasts with our earlier observation of an reduced NADH concentration in normal sites of breast tissues vis a vis malignant sites. For the 337 nm excited emission spectra a 10-variable MVLR score (using (Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) ) and normalized intensities at nine wavelengths as input parameters) provided a sensitivity and specificity of 95.7% and 93.1% over the sample size investigated.

  16. Genetics of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Henström, Maria; D'Amato, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition with a complex and largely unknown etiology. There is no cure, and treatment options are mainly directed to the amelioration of symptoms. IBS causes reduced quality of life and poses considerable repercussions on health and socioeconomic systems. There is a heritable component in IBS, and genetic research is a valuable tool for the identification of causative pathways, which will provide important insight into the pathophysiology. However, although some gene-hunting efforts have been conducted and a few risk genes proposed, IBS genetic research is lagging behind compared to other complex diseases. In this mini-review, we briefly summarize existing genetic studies, discuss the main challenges in IBS genetic research, and propose strategies to overcome these challenges for IBS gene discovery. PMID:26873717

  17. Physiologic effects of bowel preparation

    Holte, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kristine Grubbe; Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Kehlet, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    , plasma and extracellular volume, balance function, and biochemical parameters were measured. RESULTS: Bowel preparation led to a significant decrease in exercise capacity (median, 9 percent) and weight (median, 1.2 kg). Plasma osmolality was significantly increased from 287 to 290 mmol kg(-1), as well as...... healthy volunteers (median age, 63 years) underwent bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate. Fluid and food intake were standardized according to weight, providing adequate calorie and oral fluid intake. Before and after bowel preparation, weight, exercise capacity, orthostatic tolerance...... increased phosphate and urea concentrations, whereas calcium and potassium concentrations decreased significantly after bowel preparation. No differences in plasma or extracellular volumes were seen. Orthostatic tolerance and balance function did not change after bowel preparation. CONCLUSIONS: Bowel...

  18. Bowel disease after radiotherapy

    The clinical presentation, operative findings and outcome in 40 patients who required surgery for bowel disease after radiotherapy are presented. The type of presentation varied according to the time after radiotherapy. In the first month, many patients had a proctitis but none required surgery. Five patients were operated on within one month, 2 for radiation-induced acute ileitis and 3 for exacerbations of pre-existing disease (diverticular disease 2, ulcerative colitis 1). The commonest time of presentation was between 3 and 18 months after radiotherapy, when 20 patients needed surgery for bowel disease caused by radiation-induced local ischaemia. Twelve of these patients had chronic perforation, 6 had severe rectal bleeding and 2 had painful anorectal ulceration. Fifteen patients presented between 2 and 24 years after radiotherapy, usually with incomplete intestinal obstruction due to a fibrous stricture, but 2 patients had rectal carcinoma. Wide resection of the involved bowel was the principal method of treatment but any anastomosis was protected by a proximal defunctioning stoma. There was no operative mortality but 10 patients have died subsequently. The danger of dismissing these patients as having incurable malignancy is stressed because, although the condition is infrequent, it is usually amenable to adequate surgery. (author)

  19. Short bowel syndrome.

    Donohoe, Claire L

    2012-02-01

    The short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a state of malabsorption following intestinal resection where there is less than 200 cm of intestinal length. The management of short bowel syndrome can be challenging and is best managed by a specialised multidisciplinary team. A good understanding of the pathophysiological consequences of resection of different portions of the small intestine is necessary to anticipate and prevent, where possible, consequences of SBS. Nutrient absorption and fluid and electrolyte management in the initial stages are critical to stabilisation of the patient and to facilitate the process of adaptation. Pharmacological adjuncts to promote adaptation are in the early stages of development. Primary restoration of bowel continuity, if possible, is the principle mode of surgical treatment. Surgical procedures to increase the surface area of the small intestine or improve its function may be of benefit in experienced hands, particularly in the paediatric population. Intestinal transplant is indicated at present for patients who have failed to tolerate long-term parenteral nutrition but with increasing experience, there may be a potentially expanded role for its use in the future.

  20. Physiologic effects of bowel preparation

    Holte, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kristine Grubbe; Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Kehlet, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    healthy volunteers (median age, 63 years) underwent bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate. Fluid and food intake were standardized according to weight, providing adequate calorie and oral fluid intake. Before and after bowel preparation, weight, exercise capacity, orthostatic tolerance...... preparation has significant adverse physiologic effects, which may be attributed to dehydration. The majority of these findings is small and may not be of clinical relevance in otherwise healthy patients undergoing bowel preparation and following recommendations for oral fluid intake....

  1. Úlcera eosinófila de la mucosa oral Eosinophilic ulcer of oral mucosa

    A.C. Bencini

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available La Úlcera Eosinófila de la Mucosa Oral, es una entidad poco frecuente, pobremente descrita en la literatura mundial. Se define como una lesión benigna autolimitada que si bien puede presentarse en distintas áreas de la cavidad bucal, presenta una marcada predilección por la mucosa ventral de la lengua. Clínicamente, se presenta como una lesión ulcerada de bordes indurados y sobreelevados. Los hallazgos histopatológicos son característicos y consisten en un infiltrado mixto rico en eosinófilos, acompañado de una población de grandes células mononucleadas. Recientes artículos basados en estudios inmunohistoquimicos, permiten afirmar la presencia de grandes linfocitos atípicos CD30+ y por lo tanto, incluir esta lesión en el espectro de las entidades simuladoras de desordenes linfoproliferativos. A pesar de esto, el mecanismo etiopatogenico permanece oscuro y el trauma local juega un rol todavía no dilucidado; aunque se halla presente en la mayoría de las publicaciones, explicando el fenómeno como un mecanismo reactivo. La importancia de esta lesión, radica en su diagnostico diferencial por su semejanza clínica al carcinoma espinocelular, histoplasmosis, chancro sifilítico, Úlcera tuberculosa, carcinoma epidermoide y otras. En nuestro trabajo se revisa la literatura y se discuten la características clínicas, histopatológicas y alternativas terapéuticas, a partir del artículo de un caso clínico en una paciente joven, que luego de la biopsia escisión como método para el diagnostico de certeza, se produce una recidiva de la lesión; lo que orientó el tratamiento hacia la cirugía combinada con corticoterapia local intralesional, logrando su remisión.Eosinophilic Ulcer of the Oral Mucosa, an entity, poorly deciphers in world-wide literature. It is defined as a self-limited, benign injury that although it can appear in different areas of the buccal cavity it presents a noticeable predilection via the ventral mucosa of the

  2. A potential association between exposure to hepatitis B virus and small bowel adenocarcinoma.

    DeFilippis, Ersilia M; Mehta, Mamta; Ludwig, Emmy

    2016-06-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) has never been described as a risk factor for small bowel adenocarcinoma, although infection is a known risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. From May 2009 to December 2014, we implemented an institution-wide screening program for hepatitis B viral serologies prior to starting chemotherapy. Evidence of exposure [hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) positivity in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity] was highest in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (21.1%), followed by small bowel cancer (12.5%). The small bowel adenocarcinoma cases with anti-HBc positivity were reviewed. Special attention was paid to known risk factors for small bowel cancers. One patient had a diagnosis of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). However, the other patients had no genetic syndromes, history of inflammatory bowel disease or other chronic inflammation to explain their risk. We postulate exposure to bile acids, tumorigenesis of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and/or damage to the intestinal mucosa secondary to HBV exposure/infection as potential mechanisms for development of small bowel adenocarcinoma. More research is warranted to further elucidate this association. PMID:27284484

  3. Small bowel imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    Emanuele; Casciani; Chiara; De; Vincentiis; Gianfranco; Gualdi

    2015-01-01

    The study of the small bowel(SB) has always beenchallenging both for clinicians and radiologist. It is a long and tortuous tube that can be affected by various pathologies whose signs and symptoms are usually non specific and can mimic other acute abdominal disorders. For these reasons, imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of the different pathological conditions that can occur. They are important also in the management and follow up of chronic diseases. We expose and evaluate all the radiological methods that are now available for the study of the SB with particular emphasis on the technological improvement of cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI). These techniques have, infact, highly improved in terms of execution times(fast acquisitions images), patients discomfort and radiation dose, for CT, with consequent reduced biological risks. Moreover, the new post-processing options with multiplanar reconstruction and isotropic images have made significant changes in the evaluation of the exams. Especially MRI scans have been improved by the advent of new sequences, such as diffusion weighted imaging and cine-MRI, parallel imaging and breath-hold sequences and can provide excellent soft-tissue contrast without the use of ionizing radiations.

  4. Immunogenetic Susceptibilities in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Rotter, Jerome I

    1990-01-01

    It is now clear that the major identified risk factor for the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) is a positive family history. Furthermore, the available data in spouses and twins indicate that the genetic susceptibility is due in large measure to shared familial predisposition. This emphasizes the importance of identifying the actual familial susceptibilities. Given the data for immunopathogenetic etiologies in the genesis of IBD, the logical candidate genes are those that involve the immune...

  5. Genomic Landscape of Colorectal Mucosa and Adenomas.

    Borras, Ester; San Lucas, F Anthony; Chang, Kyle; Zhou, Ruoji; Masand, Gita; Fowler, Jerry; Mork, Maureen E; You, Y Nancy; Taggart, Melissa W; McAllister, Florencia; Jones, David A; Davies, Gareth E; Edelmann, Winfried; Ehli, Erik A; Lynch, Patrick M; Hawk, Ernest T; Capella, Gabriel; Scheet, Paul; Vilar, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    The molecular basis of the adenoma-to-carcinoma transition has been deduced using comparative analysis of genetic alterations observed through the sequential steps of intestinal carcinogenesis. However, comprehensive genomic analyses of adenomas and at-risk mucosa are still lacking. Therefore, our aim was to characterize the genomic landscape of colonic at-risk mucosa and adenomas. We analyzed the mutation profile and copy number changes of 25 adenomas and adjacent mucosa from 12 familial adenomatous polyposis patients using whole-exome sequencing and validated allelic imbalances (AI) in 37 adenomas using SNP arrays. We assessed for evidence of clonality and performed estimations on the proportions of driver and passenger mutations using a systems biology approach. Adenomas had lower mutational rates than did colorectal cancers and showed recurrent alterations in known cancer driver genes (APC, KRAS, FBXW7, TCF7L2) and AIs in chromosomes 5, 7, and 13. Moreover, 80% of adenomas had somatic alterations in WNT pathway genes. Adenomas displayed evidence of multiclonality similar to stage I carcinomas. Strong correlations between mutational rate and patient age were observed in at-risk mucosa and adenomas. Our data indicate that at least 23% of somatic mutations are present in at-risk mucosa prior to adenoma initiation. The genomic profiles of at-risk mucosa and adenomas illustrate the evolution from normal tissue to carcinoma via greater resolution of molecular changes at the inflection point of premalignant lesions. Furthermore, substantial genomic variation exists in at-risk mucosa before adenoma formation, and deregulation of the WNT pathway is required to foster carcinogenesis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(6); 417-27. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27221540

  6. Laparoscopic surgery for small-bowel obstruction caused by Meckel's diverticulum.

    Matsumoto, Takatsugu; Nagai, Motoki; Koike, Daisuke; Nomura, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Nobutaka

    2016-02-27

    A 26-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of abdominal distention and vomiting. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a blind loop of the bowel extending to near the uterus and a fibrotic band connecting the mesentery to the top of the bowel, suggestive of Meckel's diverticulum (MD) and a mesodiverticular band (MDB). After intestinal decompression, elective laparoscopic surgery was carried out. Using three 5-mm ports, MD was dissected from the surrounding adhesion and MDB was divided intracorporeally. And subsequent Meckel's diverticulectomy was performed. The presence of heterotopic gastric mucosa was confirmed histologically. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged 5 d after the operation. She has remained healthy and symptom-free during 4 years of follow-up. This was considered to be an unusual case of preoperatively diagnosed and laparoscopically treated small-bowel obstruction due to MD in a young adult woman. PMID:26981191

  7. Breastfeeding and genetic factors in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease in children

    Theresa A Mikhailov; Sylvia E Furner

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic, debilitating disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease has not been elucidated, but is thought to be multifactorial with both environmental and genetic influences. A large body of research has been conducted to elucidate the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease. This article reviews this literature, emphasizing the studies of breastfeeding and the studies of genetic factors, particularly NOD2 polymorphisms.

  8. Diet in irritable bowel syndrome.

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Gundersen, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic gastrointestinal disorder that is characterized by intermittent abdominal pain/discomfort, altered bowel habits and abdominal bloating/distension. This review aimed at presenting the recent developments concerning the role of diet in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. There is no convincing evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy/intolerance, and there is no evidence that gluten causes the debated new diagnosis of non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The component in wheat that triggers symptoms in NCGS appears to be the carbohydrates. Patients with NCGS appear to be IBS patients who are self-diagnosed and self-treated with a gluten-free diet. IBS symptoms are triggered by the consumption of the poorly absorbed fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) and insoluble fibre. On reaching the distal small intestine and colon, FODMAPS and insoluble fibre increase the osmotic pressure in the large-intestine lumen and provide a substrate for bacterial fermentation, with consequent gas production, abdominal distension and abdominal pain or discomfort. Poor FODMAPS and insoluble fibres diet reduces the symptom and improve the quality of life in IBS patients. Moreover, it changes favourably the intestinal microbiota and restores the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells. Five gastrointestinal endocrine cell types that produce hormones regulating appetite and food intake are abnormal in IBS patients. Based on these hormonal abnormalities, one would expect that IBS patients to have increased food intake and body weight gain. However, the link between obesity and IBS is not fully studied. Individual dietary guidance for intake of poor FODMAPs and insoluble fibres diet in combination with probiotics intake and regular exercise is to be recommended for IBS patients. PMID:25880820

  9. Small bowel transplantation: An overview

    R.W.F. de Bruin (Ron); E. Heineman (Erik); R.L. Marquet (Richard)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractSmall bowel transplantation (SBT) would, in theory, be the treatment of choice for patients suffering from the short bowel syndrome. Although SBT has been done with a considerable degree of success in some centers [36,145], it is by no means an established or widely applicable therapy fo

  10. Randomised placebo-controlled trial of teduglutide in reducing parenteral nutrition and/or intravenous fluid requirements in patients with short bowel syndrome

    Jeppesen, P B; Gilroy, R; Pertkiewicz, M;

    2011-01-01

    Teduglutide, a GLP-2 analogue, may restore intestinal structural and functional integrity by promoting repair and growth of the mucosa and reducing gastric emptying and secretion, thereby increasing fluid and nutrient absorption in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). This 24-week placebo-co...

  11. Common polymorphisms in the microsomal epoxide hydrolase and N-acetyltransferase 2 genes in association with inflammatory bowel disease in the Danish population

    Ernst, Anja; Andersen, Vibeke; Ostergaard, Mette;

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by recurrent inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. Reactive molecules play a central role in altering the intestinal permeability, which may induce or sustain an immune response. Changes in detoxification of substances that causes epithel...

  12. Imaging of inflammatory bowel disease. How?

    Traditionally the small bowel (barium) follow through (SBFT) has been the investigation of choice for that otherwise inaccessible length of gut between the duodenum and the ileocaecal valve. Whilst it is still a widely practised examination by radiologists it is being largely overtaken by other imaging modalities with CT, MRI and capsule endoscopy (CE) all competing for the territory. At the end of the last century, proponents of enteroclysis were predicting the eventual decline of the SBFT (in adults) although at that stage, in a 'state of the art' article, they were still brave enough to say that 'only in the small bowel does barium radiography remain unchallenged'. The same authors now write of how radiological investigations complement other techniques but are no longer the mainstay. (orig.)

  13. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    Enck, Paul; Aziz, Qasim; Barbara, Giovanni; Farmer, Adam D; Fukudo, Shin; Mayer, Emeran A; Niesler, Beate; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Schemann, Michael; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Simren, Magnus; Zipfel, Stephan; Spiller, Robin C

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy. Although the underlying pathogenesis is far from understood, aetiological factors include increased epithelial hyperpermeability, dysbiosis, inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, epigenetics and genetics, and altered brain-gut interactions. IBS considerably affects quality of life and imposes a profound burden on patients, physicians and the health-care system. The past decade has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of functional bowel disorders such as IBS that will be summarized in this Primer. PMID:27159638

  14. Up-regulation and Pre-activation of TRAF3 and TRAF5 in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Jun Shen, Yu-qi Qiao, Zhi-hua Ran, Tian-rong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: TRAF3 and TRAF5 share a common ancestral gene, and interact as essential components of signaling pathways in immunity. TRAF3 and TRAF5 are overexpressed in the colon of rat/mouse models with colitis. However, the expressions of TRAF3 and TRAF5 in patients with inflammatory bowel disease have not been elucidated. The aim of the present study is to explore the potential roles of TRAF3 and TRAF5 in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.Methods: Plasma levels of TRAF3 and TRAF5 proteins were detected by Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. Colonic expression of TRAF3 and TRAF5 proteins was detected by western blot analysis. Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR was applied for gene expression. Inflamed intestinal mucosa and non-inflamed intestinal mucosa in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal mucosa was analyzed from healthy controls.Results: The plasma levels of TRAF3 and TRAF5 were significantly higher both in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis than in healthy controls. Only soluble TRAF5 showed a weak correlation with endoscopic disease activity index (Baron score in patients with ulcerative colitis (spearman's r=0.358, P=0.022. Gene expressions of TRAF3 and TRAF5 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were significantly higher both in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis than in healthy controls (all P<0.0001. Gene and protein expressions of TRAF3 and TRAF5 were significantly higher in inflamed colonic mucosa of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis than in non-inflamed colonic mucosa and normal mucosa of healthy controls (all P<0.0001. Furthermore, gene and protein expressions of TRAF3 and TRAF5 were also significantly higher in non-inflamed colonic mucosa of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis than in normal mucosa of healthy controls.Conclusions: TRAF3 and TRAF5 are overexpressed in inflammatory bowel disease. Although the endoscopic appearance

  15. Differences in Lung Dysfunction between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Ir-ritable Bowel Syndrome Based on Interaction of Lung and Large Intestine%基于肺与大肠相表里理论探讨炎症性肠病与肠易激综合征患者肺功能改变的差异

    王鹏; 王新月; 王建云; 程瑞莹; 刘大铭; 孙慧怡; 张雯; 金晨曦

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the differences in lung function indexes and pulmonary manifes-tations among the patients of inflammatory bowel disease( IBD)and irritable bowel syndrome( IBS)as well as healthy group so as to sum up the occurrence rule of bronchial damage in IBD patients and seek the clinical evidence on“interaction of lung and large intestine”. Methods Two hundred and nineteen IBD patients were in accordance with the inclusive criteria,of them,183 cases had ulcerative colitis and 36 cases Crohn′s disease( CD). Thirty patients were collected,suffered from diarrhea IBS,and at same time 20 healthy volun-teers were chosen in the control group. The general data and lung symptoms were collected. Serum liver and kidney functions were detected. X-ray test of chest and lung function examinations were given. Results A-mong IBD patients,71. 2% of them had lung dysfunction,19. 6% of them had abnormal indications on the chest X-ray film,18. 7% of them had lung symptoms such as cough and short breath and 30. 1% of them had parenteral symptoms except lung such as recurrent dental ulcer. Among those diarrhea IBS patients, 33. 3% of them had lung dysfunction,3. 3% of them had lung symptoms. Among the healthy volunteers,20%of them had lung dysfunction and no case had lung symptom. The results of VC,FEV 1. 0%,MMEF,FEF 75%,DLCO and TLC in CD patients were reduced apparently as compared with those diarrhea IBS patients and healthy volunteers. The results of FEV 1. 0%,FEF 75%,MMEF and DLCO in UC patients were reduced apparently as compared with those diarrhea IBS patients and healthy volunteers. Conclusion Compared with diarrhea IBS patients and healthy volunteers,IBD patients have lung dysfunction more likely. The lung damage in CD patients is obstructive ventilation impairment and restrictive ventilation impairment and that in UC pa-tient is obstructive or mixed ventilation impairment;and that in IBD patients is much serious than the other parenteral manifestation. All of

  16. Altered gastric emptying in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Caballero-Plasencia, A.M.; Valenzuela-Barranco, M. [Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Granada (Spain); Herrerias-Gutierrez, J.M. [Division of Gastroenterology, University Hospital ``Virgen de la Macarena``, Sevilla (Spain); Esteban-Carretero, J.M. [Central Service of Investigation in Health Sciences, University of Cadiz, Cadiz (Spain)

    1999-04-29

    Irritable bowel syndrome is the most frequent functional disorder of the digestive system. Patients with irritable bowel syndrome have motor disorders not only in the colon, but also in other parts of the digestive tract such as the oesophagus and small intestine; however, it is not known whether the stomach is also involved. We used a radiolabelled mixed solid-liquid meal (technetium-99m for the solid component, indium-111 for the liquid component) to study gastric emptying of solids (GES), liquids (GEL) and indigestible solids (GER) in 50 patients diagnosed as having irritable bowel syndrome (30 with predominant constipation and 20 with predominant diarrhoea). GER was measured by counting the number of indigestible solids remaining in the stomach 4 h after they were swallowed. In patients with irritable bowel syndrome, GES and GEL were slower than in control subjects (P<0.05). GER was normal in all patients except for two women. Thirty-two patients (64%) showed delayed GES, 29 (58%) delayed GEL, and 2 (4%) delayed GER. Among patients with irritable bowel syndrome, GES was slower in those with predominant constipation than in those with predominant diarrhoea (P<0.05); GEL and GER were similar in both groups. Gastroparesis was found in a large proportion of patients with irritable bowel syndrome, suggesting the presence of a more generalised motor disorder of the gut. (orig.) With 1 fig., 3 tabs., 48 refs.

  17. Accuracy of abdominal auscultation for bowel obstruction

    Breum, Birger Michael; Rud, Bo; Kirkegaard, Thomas; Nordentoft, Tyge

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the accuracy and inter-observer variation of bowel sound assessment in patients with clinically suspected bowel obstruction. METHODS: Bowel sounds were recorded in patients with suspected bowel obstruction using a Littmann(®) Electronic Stethoscope. The recordings were processed...

  18. Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel

    Adenocarcinoma of small bowel is generally a rather rare primary tumour of small bowel with a prevalence rate of 0.5 - 3.0 / 100.000 population, but the most frequent tumour of small intestine. It more often involves the duodenum and jejunum than the ileum. The aim of this paper is also to point out the value of small bowel follow through (SBFT) in the diagnosis of stenosing lesions. An 83 - year old male patient suffered from abdominal pain, malaise, vomiting, cachexia and diarrhoea for 3 months. The result of occult blood testing was negative. Haemoglobin level was normal. Proctoscopy, colonoscopy, upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and ultrasonography (US) did not explain the patient's problems. Ileus of the small bowel was established with abdominal plain film. Small bowel follow through (SBFT) and computer tomography (CT) showed a stenosing tumour in the jejunum. Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel was established with histological examination after resection of the tumor. SBFT, with manual compression of all segments of the small bowel, can be a very accurate diagnostic investigation for evaluation of stenosing lesions in this part of the intestine. (author)

  19. Clinical, endoscopical and morphological efficacy of mesalazine in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Dorofeyev AE

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrey E Dorofeyev1, Elena A Kiriyan2, Inna V Vasilenko1, Olga A Rassokhina1, Andrey F Elin11National Medical University, Donetsk, Ukraine; 2Gastroenterological Center of Poltava Hospital Clinic, Poltava, UkraineObjectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical efficacy and cytomorphologic changes of colon mucosa following the treatment of patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS with mesalazine (5-aminosalicylic acid [5-ASA].Methods: In this controlled, randomized, blind clinical trial, a total of 360 patients with varying subtypes of IBS were randomly treated with 500 mg of mesalazine qid or by standard therapy without mesalazine for a period of 28 days. Pre- and post-treatment pain intensity, pain duration, meteorism, stool abnormalities and endoscopic parameters were monitored, and biopsies or brush biopsies were examined histologically.Results: Treatment of IBS patients with mesalazine significantly reduced intensity and duration of pain in all subtypes of IBS, except for duration of pain in the subtype “undifferentiated”, where the difference was not significant. In addition, in patients with diarrhea type and undifferentiated type of IBS, mesalazine also significantly reduced the abnormal stool pattern. In comparison to the control group, administration of mesalazine reduced the incidence of endoscopic and cytomorphologic changes of the bowel mucosa, including changes in colon mucus, mucus production, cytologic or histologic parameters, epithelial cell degeneration, appearance of leukocytes and macrophages and cell infiltrations.Conclusion: Mesalazine was effective in reducing several symptoms characteristic of IBS. It significantly reduced pain intensity and duration and improved cytohistologic parameters of the bowel mucosa.Keywords: 5-amino salicylic acid, 5-ASA, abdominal pain, irritable bowel syndrome, IBS, meteorism, stool abnormalities

  20. Hodgkin Lymphoma of the Oral Mucosa

    Darling, Mark R.; Cuddy, Karl K.; Rizkalla, Kamilia

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we describe a rare case of relapsed nodular sclerosing Hodgkin lymphoma presenting as a lesion of the oral mucosa. Although this is an uncommon clinical scenario, health care professionals should be aware of this possibility. A brief differential diagnosis and review of Hodgkin lymphoma is discussed.

  1. Expression of integrin alphavbeta6 in the intestinal epithelial cells of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Bai-Sui Feng

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is about 0.05% in industrialized countries. The pathogenesis of IBD remains to be further understood. The present study aims to elucidate the expression of integrin αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa of patients with IBD. Materials and Methods: Colonic biopsy was obtained from a group of IBD patients. The expression of αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa was detected by Western blotting. Human colonic epithelial cell line T84 cells were stimulated by microbial antigen flagellin. The expression of αvβ6 in T84 cells was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results: The levels of αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa were much lower than it in normal control subjects. The serum levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO were higher in IBD patients that were negatively correlated with the levels of αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa. The expression of αvβ6 was detectable in T84 cells at naïve status that could be upregulated by exposure to microbial antigen flagellin. Pretreatment with MPO dramatically suppressed the expression of αvβ6 in T84 cells. Conclusions: We conclude that the expression of αvβ6 was suppressed in IBD intestinal mucosa, which could be resulted from the high levels of MPO.

  2. The immediate response of jejunal mucosa to small bowel heterotopic allotransplatation in rats.

    Jonecová, Z; Tóth, Š; Varga, J; Staško, P; Kovalčinová, B; Maretta, M; Veselá, J

    2014-02-01

    The course of histopathological alterations within jejunal graft architecture during the initial adaptation phase in the host body was investigated. Graft tissues were compared to the intestinal tissues of the recipients. This study demonstrates: (1) renewal of intestinal epithelial lining in the graft biopsies during initial hours after transplantation is more likely caused by migration and extension of remaining epithelial cells than by their increased mitotic division. (2) Distinct decrease in histopathological injury was observed in transplanted grafts after 6h, but the morphometrical parameters, particularly villus height and wall thickness, remained altered. (3) Significant decrease in apoptotic cell death in the epithelial lining within 6h of graft recirculation was accompanied by no effect on apoptosis levels of the cells in lamina propria connective tissue. (4) Although the apoptosis level in the connective tissue cells was not modulated in the grafts within the first hour after transplantation, caspase-3 dependent apoptosis was decreased significantly. PMID:24079856

  3. Occult spondyloarthritis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Bandinelli, Francesca; Manetti, Mirko; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia

    2016-02-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a frequent extra-intestinal manifestation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), although its real diffusion is commonly considered underestimated. Abnormalities in the microbioma and genetic predisposition have been implicated in the link between bowel and joint inflammation. Otherwise, up to date, pathogenetic mechanisms are still largely unknown and the exact influence of the bowel activity on rheumatic manifestations is not clearly explained. Due to evidence-based results of clinical studies, the interest on clinically asymptomatic SpA in IBD patients increased in the last few years. Actually, occult enthesitis and sacroiliitis are discovered in high percentages of IBD patients by different imaging techniques, mainly enthesis ultrasound (US) and sacroiliac joint X-ray examinations. Several diagnostic approaches and biomarkers have been proposed in an attempt to correctly classify and diagnose clinically occult joint manifestations and to define clusters of risk for patient screening, although definitive results are still lacking. The correct recognition of occult SpA in IBD requires an integrated multidisciplinary approach in order to identify common diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The use of inexpensive and rapid imaging techniques, such as US and X-ray, should be routinely included in daily clinical practice and trials to correctly evaluate occult SpA, thus preventing future disability and worsening of quality of life in IBD patients. PMID:26354428

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bowel. Today and tomorrow; Magnetresonanztomografie des Darms. Altbewaehrtes und Innovatives

    Kinner, S.; Hahnemann, M.L.; Forsting, M.; Lauenstein, T.C. [Univ. Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology

    2015-03-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel has been feasible for more than 15 years. This review is meant to give an overview of typical techniques, sequences and indications. Furthermore, newly evaluated promising techniques are presented, which have an impact on the advance of MR imaging of the small and large bowel.

  5. Functional bowel disease

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with functional bowel disease were given fructose, sorbitol, fructose-sorbitol mixtures, and sucrose. The occurrence of malabsorption was evaluated by means of hydrogen breath tests and the gastrointestinal symptoms, if any, were recorded. One patient could not be evaluated...... fructose caused marked abdominal distress in patients with demonstrable malabsorption. Ingestion of sucrose in these patients gave less pronounced symptoms of abdominal distress. Malabsorption of a 5-g dose of sorbitol could be detected in 8 of 13 patients. Mixtures of 25 g of fructose and 5 g of sorbitol...... caused significantly increased abdominal distress, and more than additive malabsorption was found in several cases. The present study shows that pronounced gastrointestinal distress may be provoked by malabsorption of small amounts of fructose, sorbitol, and fructose-sorbitol mixtures in patients with...

  6. CT assessment of anastomotic bowel leak

    Aim: To evaluate the predictors of clinically important gastrointestinal anastomotic leaks using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Subjects and methods: Ninety-nine patients, 73 with clinical suspicion of anastomotic bowel leak and 26 non-bowel surgery controls underwent CT to investigate postoperative sepsis. Fifty patients had undergone large bowel and 23 small bowel anastomoses. The time interval from surgery was 3-30 days (mean 10 ± 5.9 SD) for the anastomotic group and 3-40 days (mean 14 ± 11 SD) for the control group (p = 0.3). Two radiologists blinded to the final results reviewed the CT examinations in consensus and recorded the presence of peri-anastomotic air, fluid or combination of the two; distant loculated fluid or combination of fluid and air; free air or fluid; and intestinal contrast leak. Final diagnosis of clinically important anastomotic leak (CIAL) was confirmed at surgery or by chart review of predetermined clinical and laboratory criteria. Results: The prevalence of CIAL in the group undergoing CT was 31.5% (23/73). The CT examinations with documented leak were performed 5-28 (mean; 11.4 ± 6 SD) days after surgery. Nine patients required repeat operation, 10 percutaneous abscess drainage, two percutaneous drainage followed by surgery, and two prolonged antibiotic treatment and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Of the CT features examined, only peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air was more frequently seen in the CIAL group as opposed to the no leak group (p = 0.04). There was no intestinal contrast leakage in this cohort. Free air was present up to 9 days and loculated air up to 26 days without CIAL. Conclusion: Most postoperative CT features overlap between patients with and without CIAL. The only feature seen statistically more frequently with CIAL is peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air

  7. CT assessment of anastomotic bowel leak

    Power, N. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Atri, M. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)]. E-mail: mostafa.atri@sw.ca; Ryan, S. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Haddad, R. [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Smith, A. [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2007-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the predictors of clinically important gastrointestinal anastomotic leaks using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Subjects and methods: Ninety-nine patients, 73 with clinical suspicion of anastomotic bowel leak and 26 non-bowel surgery controls underwent CT to investigate postoperative sepsis. Fifty patients had undergone large bowel and 23 small bowel anastomoses. The time interval from surgery was 3-30 days (mean 10 {+-} 5.9 SD) for the anastomotic group and 3-40 days (mean 14 {+-} 11 SD) for the control group (p = 0.3). Two radiologists blinded to the final results reviewed the CT examinations in consensus and recorded the presence of peri-anastomotic air, fluid or combination of the two; distant loculated fluid or combination of fluid and air; free air or fluid; and intestinal contrast leak. Final diagnosis of clinically important anastomotic leak (CIAL) was confirmed at surgery or by chart review of predetermined clinical and laboratory criteria. Results: The prevalence of CIAL in the group undergoing CT was 31.5% (23/73). The CT examinations with documented leak were performed 5-28 (mean; 11.4 {+-} 6 SD) days after surgery. Nine patients required repeat operation, 10 percutaneous abscess drainage, two percutaneous drainage followed by surgery, and two prolonged antibiotic treatment and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Of the CT features examined, only peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air was more frequently seen in the CIAL group as opposed to the no leak group (p = 0.04). There was no intestinal contrast leakage in this cohort. Free air was present up to 9 days and loculated air up to 26 days without CIAL. Conclusion: Most postoperative CT features overlap between patients with and without CIAL. The only feature seen statistically more frequently with CIAL is peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air.

  8. A retrospective study of 5-year outcomes of radiotherapy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    The favorable response rate of radiotherapy for localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication has been demonstrated. However, there are limited data available on the long-term outcomes. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of radiotherapy for localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication. Thirty-four consecutive patients with localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma that were refractory to eradication were treated with radiotherapy (a total dose of 30 Gy). The response and adverse events of radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed as short-term outcomes, and recurrence-free, overall and disease-specific survival rates were calculated as long-term outcomes. Thirty-three (97.1%) patients achieved complete remission and radiotherapy was well tolerated. One patient underwent emergency gastrectomy due to severe hematemesis. Of the 34 patients during the median follow-up period of 7.5 (1.2-13.0) years, one patient had local recurrence after 8.8 years, one patient underwent surgery for bowel obstruction secondary to small bowel metastasis after 5.1 years and one patient had pulmonary metastasis after 10.9 years. Pathologically, all three recurrences revealed mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma without any transformation to high-grade lymphoma. None died of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 97.0%. The 5-year overall survival rates and disease-specific survival rates were 97.0 and 100%, respectively. Radiotherapy in patients with localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication can achieve excellent overall survival. However, long-term surveillance is necessary to identify late recurrences. (author)

  9. Bringing the Inflamed and Fibrotic Bowel into Focus: Imaging in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Adler, Jeremy; Stidham, Ryan. W.; Higgins, Peter D. R.

    2009-01-01

    Radiologic imaging has been a critical aid in the diagnosis, assessment, and management of inflammatory bowel disease since the first description of the disease by Crohn in 1932. Newer techniques, including computed tomography enterography, magnetic resonance enterography, and ultrasound, have entered clinical use for assessing disease activity and complications, and have largely replaced classic barium studies. We review the clinical utility of these imaging modalities and examine several im...

  10. Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Children

    ... KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Children Page Content On this page: What is irritable ... GI tract [ Top ] How common is IBS in children? Limited information is available about the number of ...

  11. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Teens)

    ... Just like other organs in your body, the intestines can develop problems or diseases. IBD (which is not the same thing as irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS), can cause more serious problems than ...

  12. Sleep and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    ... Bruce D. Naliboff, PhD, Clinical Professor of Medical Psychology in the Dept. of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, ... Gynecological Aspects of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptom Diary Testing in IBS Changes You Should Not Ignore if ...

  13. Short bowel syndrome in adults

    Matarese, Laura E; Jeppesen, Palle B; O'Keefe, Stephen J D

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a heterogeneous disorder with broad variation in disease severity arising from different types of intestinal resection. The spectrum of malabsorption ranges from intestinal insufficiency to intestinal failure. Individualized patient strategies involving modifications...

  14. Sleep and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    ... of IBS Who We Are Contact Us Donate Sleep and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Sleep difficulties are common ... More: Treating Pain in IBS How to improve sleep While there are a variety of medications that ...

  15. Neurostimulation for Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction

    J. Worsøe; Rasmussen, M.; Christensen, P.; Krogh, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Loss of normal bowel function caused by nerve injury, neurological disease or congenital defects of the nervous system is termed neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD). It usually includes combinations of fecal incontinence, constipation, abdominal pain and bloating. When standard treatment of NBD fails surgical procedures are often needed. Neurostimulation has also been investigated, but no consensus exists about efficacy or clinical use. Methods. A systematic literature search of NB...

  16. Diet in irritable bowel syndrome

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Gundersen, Doris Irene

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic gastrointestinal disorder that is characterized by intermittent abdominal pain/discomfort, altered bowel habits and abdominal bloating/distension. This review aimed at presenting the recent developments concerning the role of diet in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. There is no convincing evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy/intolerance, and there is no evidence that gluten causes the debated new diagnosis of non-coel...

  17. Small Bowel Review - Part I

    Thomson, ABR; Wild, G.

    1997-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the study of the small bowel. Part I of this two-part review of the small bowel examines carbohydrates, including brush border membrane hydrolysis and sugar transport; amino acids, dipeptides, proteins and food allergy, with a focus on glutamine, peptides and macromolecules, and nucleosides, nucleotides and polyamines; salt and water absorption, and diarrhea, including antidiarrheal therapy and oral rehydration treatment; lipids (digestion and absorption...

  18. 胃弥漫大B细胞淋巴瘤与黏膜相关淋巴组织淋巴瘤CT比较研究%Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma and Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma: A CT Comparison Study

    唐磊; 张晓鹏; 孙应实; 曹崑; 汪宁; 齐丽萍; 崔湧

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨胃淋巴瘤两种主要类型:弥漫性大B细胞淋巴瘤(Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma,DLBCL)和黏膜相关淋巴组织淋巴瘤(Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma,MALToma)CT征象的异同,为胃淋巴瘤的生物学行为评价和影像学鉴别诊断提供依据.方法 回顾分析我院规范CT检查胃淋巴瘤病例42例,均经胃镜或手术病理证实.根据病理结果将全部病例分为DLBCL和MALToma.分析两种类型淋巴瘤CT影像学征象特征,包括病变所处胃的分部、范围、形态、厚度、强化、黏膜及浆膜面情况、淋巴结转移、腹腔大血管及脏器侵犯情况、腹腔转移及有无腹水等.统计学分析比较两种类型淋巴瘤的CT征象差异.结果 DLBCL多累及胃的多个部分,且以近端胃受累为主,MALToma以胃的单一部分受累更为多见,且以胃远端分布为主,差异有显著性.DLBCL癌肿平均厚度(2.75±1.52)cm,大于MALToma癌肿平均厚度(1.23±0.64)cm,差异存在显著性(P<0.01).DLBCL胃壁以弥漫性、不均匀增厚为主,MALToma以局限性、均匀增厚为主;DLBCL较MALToma更易侵犯浆膜,淋巴结转移率较MALToma高,转移淋巴结体积大、分布更为广泛,侵犯腹腔干分支大血管及腹腔脏器的比例均高于MALToma.DLBCL静脉期强化CT值(69.09±13.49)HU,低于 MALToma静脉期强化CT值(81.79±25.82)HU.MALToma黏膜面"白线征"显示率高于 DLBCL;DLBCL浆膜侧"血管穿行征"显示率高于MALToma.结论 CT影像学征象可反映DLBCL和MALToma的生物学行为,显示两种胃淋巴瘤侵袭性的差异,可作为两者鉴别的重要手段.MALToma黏膜面"白线征"、DLBCL浆膜侧"血管穿行征"丰富了胃淋巴瘤的CT征象,为鉴别诊断及生物学行为评价提供了新的指标.%Objective To explore the differences of CT signs in two kinds of gastric lymphomas, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, DLBCL and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, MALToma, to provide the evidence for the

  19. Oral Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Two Case Reports

    Pereira, Manoela Seadi; Munerato, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are known as chronic inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract, represented mainly by Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Among the main oral manifestations of IBD are cobblestoning of the oral mucosa, labial swellings with vertical fissures, pyostomatitis vegetans, angular cheilitis, perioral erythema, and glossitis. In this sense, understanding these nosological entities by dentists would help reach early and differential diagnosis. Thus, two case reports are presented and discussed based on theoretical references obtained by a literature review. The first case report refers to an adult patient whose IBD diagnosis was established after stomatological assessment. The second case was a patient with CD diagnosed in childhood with characteristic oral lesions. PMID:26864508

  20. Probiotics in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and Associated Conditions

    David R. Mack

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A complex set of interactions between the human genes encoding innate protective functions and immune defenses and the environment of the intestinal mucosa with its microbiota is currently considered key to the pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Probiotics offer a method to potentially alter the intestinal microbiome exogenously or may provide an option to deliver microbial metabolic products to alter the chronicity of intestinal mucosal inflammation characterizing IBD. At present, there is little evidence for the benefit of currently used probiotic microbes in Crohn’s disease or associated conditions affecting extra-intestinal organs. However, clinical practice guidelines are now including a probiotic as an option for recurrent and relapsing antibiotic sensitive pouchitis and the use of probiotics in mild ulcerative colitis is provocative and suggests potential for benefit in select patients but concerns remain about proof from trials.

  1. Probiotics in inflammatory bowel diseases and associated conditions.

    Mack, David R

    2011-02-01

    A complex set of interactions between the human genes encoding innate protective functions and immune defenses and the environment of the intestinal mucosa with its microbiota is currently considered key to the pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Probiotics offer a method to potentially alter the intestinal microbiome exogenously or may provide an option to deliver microbial metabolic products to alter the chronicity of intestinal mucosal inflammation characterizing IBD. At present, there is little evidence for the benefit of currently used probiotic microbes in Crohn's disease or associated conditions affecting extra-intestinal organs. However, clinical practice guidelines are now including a probiotic as an option for recurrent and relapsing antibiotic sensitive pouchitis and the use of probiotics in mild ulcerative colitis is provocative and suggests potential for benefit in select patients but concerns remain about proof from trials. PMID:22254095

  2. Prophylactic and therapeutic management of acute radiation related morbidity of the skin and mucosa. Part I. Results of a German multicenter questionnaire

    In this work, it was to evaluate the remedies, which are used for prevention and therapeutic management of acute radiation related morbidity of the skin and mucosa (mouth, pharynx, esophagus, small and large bowel, rectum and vagina). A questionnaire was sent to 130 radiotherapeutic departments in Germany in Juli 1995. The questionnaire had been designed with 22 open questions concerning the preventive and therapeutic management of acute radiation related morbidity of skin and mucosal sites. From 130 questionnaires, 89 (68.4%) were sent back till August 1995. All of them were evaluable. The recommendations showed a broad spectrum for each site. Especially the oral mucositis was treated in many different ways and combinations. The prevention and therapy of complicating superinfections seem to be the joint principle of most of the recommendations. The management of the acute radiation related morbidity has a wide clinical spectrum among different radiation therapy centers. Systematic prospectively designed investigations are necessary in order to achieve a further reduction in the radiation related acute morbidity. Therefore, a multicenter collaborative working group has been founded. (orig./MG)

  3. Benign Papules and Nodules of Oral Mucosa

    Mehmet Salih Gürel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews some of the more common benign oral papules and nodules of oral mucosa with emphasis on their etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, histopathology, and treatment. These lesions include mucocele, traumatic fibroma, epulis, pyogenic granuloma, oral papilloma, oral warts, lymphangioma, hemangioma, lipoma, oral nevi and some soft tissue benign tumors. These benign lesions must be separated clinically and histologically from precancerous and malign neoplastic lesions. Accurate clinico-pathological diagnosis is mandatory to insure appropriate therapy.

  4. Human keratinocyte culture from the peritonsillar mucosa.

    Neugebauer, P; Bonnekoh, B; Wevers, A; Michel, O; Mahrle, G; Krieg, T; Stennert, E

    1996-01-01

    Tonsillectomy tissue can be used as a routine source for cultures of oropharyngeal keratinocytes. In so doing, a peritonsillar strip of unaltered mucosa was dissected in the upper submucosa. Subsequent trypsinization yielded 7.0 +/- 3.4 x 10(6) keratinocytes per bilateral tonsillectomy. Keratinocyte attachment and growth in primary culture were promoted by sublethally irradiated 3T3 murine fibroblasts. Three subcultures could be performed without a feeder layer and were characterized by a population doubling time of 4.5 days during log growth phase. Electrophoretic and immunoblot analysis of the third subculture revealed a strong expression of keratin pairs 5/14 and 6/16 as well as keratins 7 and 19, whereas keratins 8/18 were expressed less intensely. The lowest intensity, was found for keratin 13, which is known to be indicative of the differentiated mucosa. The culture technique thus provides an easily available in vitro model for morphological and functional studies on the epithelial compartment of human oropharyngeal mucosa. PMID:8737778

  5. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Changing Associations to Mechanisms.

    Click, Benjamin; Whitcomb, David C

    2016-01-01

    Managing the health of individual patients suffering from complex disorders is a challenge and is costly. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a prototypic complex disorder of the small and large intestines. Susceptibility is complex, severity is variable, and response to treatment is unpredictable. Di Narzo et al. (Clin Transl Gastroenterol 7: e177; doi:10.1038/ctg.2016.34) bring diverse teams of physicians and scientists together to break down the mechanisms of IBD by linking pathogenic genetic variants with altered gene expression in specific cell types causing IBD. Framing new findings in the context of other complex diseases provides a roadmap for predictive medicine. PMID:27607898

  6. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    Zuhal Ozisler; Kurtulus Koklu; Sumru Ozel; Sibel Unsal-Delialioglu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efifcacy of bowel program on gas-trointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-ifve spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, dififcult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysrelfexia) and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral med-ication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation) were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identiifed in 44 (80%) of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55) and incontinence (42%, 23/55) were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55) and after (73%, 40/55) bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were signiifcantly decreased and constipation, dififcult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were signiifcantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury.

  7. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    Zuhal Ozisler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efficacy of bowel program on gastrointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-five spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysreflexia and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral medication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identified in 44 (80% of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55 and incontinence (42%, 23/55 were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55 and after (73%, 40/55 bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were significantly decreased and constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were significantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury.

  8. Gene expression profiling of duodenal biopsies discriminates celiac disease mucosa from normal mucosa.

    Bragde, Hanna; Jansson, Ulf; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Söderman, Jan

    2011-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is identified by histopathologic changes in the small intestine which normalize during a gluten-free diet. The histopathologic assessment of duodenal biopsies is usually routine but can be difficult. This study investigated gene expression profiling as a diagnostic tool. A total of 109 genes were selected to reflect alterations in crypt-villi architecture, inflammatory response, and intestinal permeability and were examined for differential expression in normal mucosa compared with CD mucosa in pediatric patients. Biopsies were classified using discriminant analysis of gene expression. Fifty genes were differentially expressed, of which eight (APOC3, CYP3A4, OCLN, MAD2L1, MKI67, CXCL11, IL17A, and CTLA4) discriminated normal mucosa from CD mucosa without classification errors using leave-one-out cross-validation (n = 39) and identified the degree of mucosal damage. Validation using an independent set of biopsies (n = 27) resulted in four discrepant cases. Biopsies from two of these cases showed a patchy distribution of lesions, indicating that discriminant analysis based on single biopsies failed to identify CD mucosa. In the other two cases, serology support class according to discriminant analysis and histologic specimens were judged suboptimal but assessable. Gene expression profiling shows promise as a diagnostic tool and for follow-up of CD, but further evaluation is needed. PMID:21378598

  9. Influência da glutamina na mucosa do instestino de ratos submetidos à enterectomia extensa Influence of glutamine on intestinal mucosa of rats after extensive enterectomy

    José de Souza Neves

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a influência de uma dieta suplementada com glutamina sobre as alterações adaptativas no intestino delgado de ratos com enterectomia extensa. MÉTODO: Vinte ratos Wistar, divididos aleatoriamente em dois grupos de dez animais, foram enterectomizados e alimentados com dois tipos diferentes de dieta nos 14 dias de pós-operatório: grupo controle (GC-dieta padrão; grupo glutamina (GG-dietapadrão acrescida de 3,05% de glutamina. Avaliou-se evolução ponderal, peso da mucosa intestinal (PM, profundidade das criptas (PC, altura das vilosidades (AV, espessura da parede (EP e o conteúdo de ácido desoxirribonucléico (DNA na mucosa intestinal, no início e no final do experimento. RESULTADOS: Com exceção da PC ileal do Grupo GG, todas as variáveis estudadas tiveram um aumento significativo em seus valores finais tanto no jejuno quanto no íleo (p0,05. No jejuno inicial, a PC no grupo GC foi maior (p=0,005. A EP do jejuno e íleo final foi maior no grupo GC. CONCLUSÃO: A suplementação dietética com a glutamina não melhorou as alterações adaptativas que ocorrem no remanescente intestinal.BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of glutamine supplementation in the adaptive response of the intestinal mucosa in rats submitted to extensive resection of the small bowel. METHODS: Twenty Wistar rats were randomized to two groups of ten animals which received different nutrition regimens after operation: control group (GC n=10-standard rat chow; glutamine group (GG n=10-standart rat chow supplemented with 3.05% glutamine. The weight evolution, mucosa weight (PM, crypts depth (PC, vilus height (AV, thickness wall (EP and the mucosal content of DNA were evaluated at the beginning and at the end of the experiment both at the jejunum and ileum. RESULTS: In both groups all parameters showed significant increase in final values both at the jejunum and ileum (p<0,05, except for ileal PC of GG group (p=0

  10. Degloving Injury of Bowel: An Unheard Complication of Surgical Abortion

    Jain, Sandhya; Suneja, Amita; Guleria, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Unsafe abortion is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality. Various types of intestinal injury in form of haematoma, perforation, contusion and transection have been reported. Degloving injury of intestine is one of the rarest complications. We report a case of 32-year-old lady Gravida 4, para 3 admitted with history of induced surgical abortion by a quack with degloving injury to bowel. Though there was no fecal soiling of peritoneal cavity but large segment of bowel was lost. She was managed by end ileostomy and discharged in stable condition.

  11. The Roles of Cathelicidin LL-37 in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Sun, Lihua; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Yang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    Human cathelicidin LL-37, the only member of the cathelicidin family of host defense peptides expressed in humans, plays a crucial role in host defense against pathogen invasion, as well as in regulating the functions of anti-inflammation, antitumorigenesis, and tissue repair. It is primarily produced by phagocytic leukocytes and epithelial cells, and mediates a wide range of biological responses. Emerging evidence from several studies indicates that LL-37 plays a prominent and complex role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although overexpression of LL-37 has been implicated in the inflamed and noninflamed colon mucosa in patients with ulcerative colitis, LL-37 expression was not changed in the inflamed or noninflamed colon or ileal mucosa in patients with Crohn's disease. Furthermore, studies in animal models and human patients further characterized the protective effect of cathelicidins both in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. These data suggest the intricate functions of LL-37 in IBD. They will also create many strategies and opportunities for therapeutic intervention in IBD in the future. This review aims to elucidate the structure and bioactivity of LL-37 and also discuss the recent progress in understanding the relationship between LL-37 and IBD. PMID:27135484

  12. Differential patterns of histone acetylation in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Adcock Ian M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Post-translational modifications of histones, particularly acetylation, are associated with the regulation of inflammatory gene expression. We used two animal models of inflammation of the bowel and biopsy samples from patients with Crohn's disease (CD to study the expression of acetylated histones (H 3 and 4 in inflamed mucosa. Acetylation of histone H4 was significantly elevated in the inflamed mucosa in the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of colitis particularly on lysine residues (K 8 and 12 in contrast to non-inflamed tissue. In addition, acetylated H4 was localised to inflamed tissue and to Peyer's patches (PP in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-treated rat models. Within the PP, H3 acetylation was detected in the mantle zone whereas H4 acetylation was seen in both the periphery and the germinal centre. Finally, acetylation of H4 was significantly upregulated in inflamed biopsies and PP from patients with CD. Enhanced acetylation of H4K5 and K16 was seen in the PP. These results demonstrate that histone acetylation is associated with inflammation and may provide a novel therapeutic target for mucosal inflammation.

  13. Role of bacteria in the etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    2007-01-01

    Increased numbers of mucosa-associated Escherichia coli are observed in both of the major inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (DC). A potential pathophysiological link between the presence of pathogenic invasive bacteria and genetic host susceptibility of patients with ileal CD is suspected. In CD patients, with increased ileal expression of the CEACAM6 molecule acting as a receptor recognized by type 1 pilus bacterial adhesin, and with the identification of mutations in the NOD2-encoding gene, the presence of pathogenic invasive bacteria could be the link between abnormal ileal bacterial colonization and innate immune responses to invasive bacteria. In a susceptible host, the sequential etiological steps of the disease induced by adherent-invasive E. Coli (AIEC) are: (1) abnormal colonization via binding to the CEACAM6 receptor, which is overexpressed in the ileal mucosa of CD patients; (2) ability to adhere to and to invade intestinal epithelial cells, which allows bacteria to cross the mucosal barrier; (3) survival and replication within infected macrophages in the lamina propria; and (4) induction of tumor necrosis factor-a secretion and granuloma formation.

  14. Brain gut microbiome interactions and functional bowel disorders

    Alterations in the bidirectional interactions between the intestine and the nervous system have important roles in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A body of largely preclinical evidence suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate these interactions. A small and poorly defined r...

  15. Biologic targeting in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Bosani, Matteo; Ardizzone, Sandro; Porro, Gabriele Bianchi

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not yet been clarified and immunosuppressive agents which nonspecifically reduce inflammation and immunity have been used in the conventional therapies for IBD. Evidence indicates that a dysregulation of mucosal immunity in the gut of IBD causes an overproduction of inflammatory cytokines and trafficking of effector leukocytes into the bowel, thus leading to an uncontrolled intestinal inflammation. Under normal situations, the intestinal mucosa is in a state of "controlled" inflammation regulated by a delicate balance of proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor [TNF-alpha], interferon-gamma [IFN-gamma], interleukin-1 [IL-1], IL-6, IL-12 and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-10, IL-11). The mucosal immune system is the central effector of intestinal inflammation and injury, with cytokines playing a central role in modulating inflammation. Cytokines may therefore be a logical target for inflammatory bowel disease therapy using specific cytokine inhibitors. Biotechnology agents targeted against TNF, leukocyte adhesion, Th1 polarization, T cell activation, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), and other miscellaneous therapies are being evaluated as potential therapies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. In this context, infliximab and adalimumab are currently the only biologic agents approved in Europe for the treatment of inflammatory Crohn's disease. Other anti-TNF biologic agents have emerged, including CDP571, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, onercept. However, ongoing research continues to generate new biologic agents targeted at specific pathogenic mechanism involved in the inflammatory process. Lymphocyte-endothelial interactions mediated by adhesion molecules are important in leukocyte migration and recruitment to sites of inflammation, and selective blockade of these adhesion molecules is a novel and promising strategy to treat Crohn's disease. Therapeutics agents to inhibit leukocyte trafficking

  16. Intestinal anisakiasis as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    Kojima, Gotaro; Usuki, Shinichiro; Mizokami, Ken; Tanabe, Marianne; Machi, Junji

    2013-09-01

    Anisakiasis, a parasitic infection by larvae of the nematode Anisakis found in raw or undercooked saltwater fish, mostly involves stomach but rarely small intestine. We report a rare case of a 61-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain and developed small bowel obstruction caused by intestinal anisakiasis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed segmental edema of the intestinal wall with proximal dilatation. The patient underwent urgent laparotomy because strangulated small bowel obstruction was suspected. A localized portion of the intestine around jejunoileal junction was found to be erythematous, edematous, and hardened, which was resected. The resected specimen showed a linear whitish worm, Anisakis simplex, penetrating into the intestinal mucosa. It is often clinically challenging to consider intestinal anisakiasis in the differential diagnosis because of its nonspecific abdominal symptoms and findings. Although gastrointestinal anisakiasis is still rare in the United States, the incidence is expected to rise given the growing popularity of Japanese cuisine such as sushi or sashimi. Anisakiasis should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses in patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms after consumption of raw or undercooked fish. PMID:23786678

  17. Radiological assessment of small bowel obstructions: value of conventional enteroclysis and dynamic MR-enteroclysis

    Purpose: To compare small bowel lesions, especially stenoses, with conventional enteroclysis, static MRI and dynamic MR-enteroclysis. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with Crohn's disease or other suspected small bowel lesions were examined. MRI was performed in a static and a dynamic way either within one hour after conventional enteroclysis (n = 30) or a few days afterwards (n = 12). In order to monitor bowel filling and to characterize stenoses in a dynamic fashion, 4 series of coronal T2w HASTE breath hold sequences were used, first without additional bowel opacification and then during administration of 1,5 l methyl cellulose via a naso-intestinal tube in the MR unit. Intravenously applied Buscopan was used to reduce bowel movement. Results: In 4 out of 42 Patients, application of methylcellulose was limited to 1000 ml because of gastrointestinal complaints or visible gastral reflux. All patients could be evaluated. Static MRI performed within one hour after conventional enteroclysis and no additional bowel opacification showed insufficient bowel distension. Distension was still better than in MRI without prior application of contrast medium. On the contrary, dynamic MR - enteroclysis lead to controlled and complete bowel distension which allowed for significantly better evaluation of normal bowel anatomy and pathological alterations of the gut. Because of a better bowel distension and dynamic evaluation, MR-enteroclysis revealed significantly more stenoses (n = 42) than MRI obtained with less distension (n = 27, p < 0.001), and characterization of lesions was comparable to conventional enteroclysis (p < 0.001). Fixed and non-fixed stenoses could be differentiated by dynamic MR-enteroclysis. Furthermore, extraluminal complication of Crohn's disease such as abscesses and fistulae or large bowel manifestation of disease were shown in 13 patients. (orig.)

  18. Long-term efficacy and safety of otilonium bromide in the management of irritable bowel syndrome: a literature review

    Triantafillidis JK; Malgarinos G

    2014-01-01

    John K Triantafillidis, George Malgarinos Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unit, IASO General Hospital, Athens, Greece Abstract: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a very common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habits. The disease affects a large part of the world population. The clinical course is mostly characterized by a cyclic recurrence of symptoms. Therefore, IBS patients should receive, as an initial therapeutic approach, a ...

  19. Pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on intestinal mucosa: Not just trefoil peptides

    Stelios F Assimakopoulos; Chrisoula D Scopa; Vassiliki N Nikolopoulou; Constantine E Vagianos

    2008-01-01

    Bombesin and neurotensin are neuropeptides which exert a wide spectrum of biological actions on gastrointestinal tissues influencing intestinal growth and adaptation, intestinal motility, blood flow, secretion, nutrient absorption and immune response. Based mainly on their well-established potent enterotrophic effect, numerous experimental studies investigated their potential positive effect on the atrophic or injured intestinal mucosa. These peptides proved to be effective mucosa-healing factors, but the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms for this action remained unresolved. In a recently published study (World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14 (8): 1222-1230), it was shown that their protective effect on the intestine in experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease was related to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiapoptotic actions. These results are in close agreement with our previous studies on jaundiced and hepatectomized rats that showed a regulatory effect of bombesin and neurotensin on critical cellular processes such as enterocyte' proliferation and death, oxidative stress and redox equilibrium, tight junctions' formation and function, and inflammatory response. The pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on diverse types of intestinal injury may justify their consideration for clinical trials.

  20. Pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on intestinal mucosa: Not just trefoil peptides

    Stelios F Assimakopoulos, Chrisoula D Scopa, Vassiliki N Nikolopoulou, Constantine E Vagianos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Bombesin and neurotensin are neuropeptides which exert a wide spectrum of biological actions on gastrointestinal tissues influencing intestinal growth and adaptation, intestinal motility, blood flow, secretion, nutrient absorption and immune response. Based mainly on their well-established potent enterotrophic effect, numerous experimental studies investigated their potential positive effect on the atrophic or injured intestinal mucosa. These peptides proved to be effective mucosa-healing factors, but the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms for this action remained unresolved. In a recently published study (World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14(8: 1222-1230, it was shown that their protective effect on the intestine in experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease was related to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiapoptotic actions. These results are in close agreement with our previous studies on jaundiced and hepatectomized rats that showed a regulatory effect of bombesin and neurotensin on critical cellular processes such as enterocyte’ proliferation and death, oxidative stress and redox equilibrium, tight junctions’ formation and function, and inflammatory response. The pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on diverse types of intestinal injury may justify their consideration for clinical trials.

  1. Impaired sulphation of phenol by the colonic mucosa in quiescent and active ulcerative colitis.

    Ramakrishna, B S; Roberts-Thomson, I C; Pannall, P R; Roediger, W E

    1991-01-01

    Substantial amounts of phenols are produced in the human colon by bacterial fermentation of protein. In the colonic mucosa of animals, phenols are inactivated predominantly by conjugation with sulphate. The purpose of this study was to confirm sulphation of phenols by isolated colonocytes from man and to evaluate mucosal sulphation in inflammatory bowel disease using the phenol, paracetamol, in rectal dialysis bags. The incubation of paracetamol with colonocytes isolated from resected colon specimens (n = 7) yielded a mean (SE) value of 7.0 (0.9) mumols/g dry weight of paracetamol sulphate after 60 minutes but virtually undetectable values of paracetamol glucuronide. Paracetamol sulphate was detected in rectal dialysates from all control subjects, with a mean (SE) value of 4.2 (0.8) nmol/hour. Sulphation was significantly impaired (p less than 0.01) in 19 patients with active ulcerative colitis (0.6 (0.2) nmol/hour) and in 17 patients with ulcerative colitis in remission (1.1 (0.4) nmol/hour). Sulphation in eight patients with Crohn's colitis (4.3 (2.1) nmol/hour) was similar to that in control subjects. Impairment of the capacity of the mucosa to sulphate phenols in quiescent and active ulcerative colitis may pose a metabolic burden on colonic epithelial cells, which are continuously exposed to endogenous phenols from the colonic lumen. PMID:1991638

  2. Úlcera eosinófila de la mucosa oral Eosinophilic ulcer of oral mucosa

    A.C. Bencini; C.A. Bencini; V. Strada; M. Florencia Soldavini; G.M. Bruno; M.F. Cordeu; M.A. Cotignola

    2009-01-01

    La Úlcera Eosinófila de la Mucosa Oral, es una entidad poco frecuente, pobremente descrita en la literatura mundial. Se define como una lesión benigna autolimitada que si bien puede presentarse en distintas áreas de la cavidad bucal, presenta una marcada predilección por la mucosa ventral de la lengua. Clínicamente, se presenta como una lesión ulcerada de bordes indurados y sobreelevados. Los hallazgos histopatológicos son característicos y consisten en un infiltrado mixto rico en eosinófilos...

  3. Epithelial restitution and wound healing in inflammatory bowel disease

    Andreas Sturm; Axel U Dignass

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by a chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. The mucosal epithelium of the alimentary tract constitutes a key element of the mucosal barrier to a broad spectrum of deleterious substances present within the intestinal lumen including bacterial microorganisms, various dietary factors, gastrointestinal secretory products and drugs. In addition, this mucosal barrier can be disturbed in the course of various intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. Fortunately, the integrity of the gastrointestinal surface epithelium is rapidly reestablished even after extensive destruction. Rapid resealing of the epithelial barrier following injuries is accomplished by a process termed epithelial restitution, followed by more delayed mechanisms of epithelial wound healing including increased epithelial cell proliferation and epithelial cell differentiation. Restitution of the intestinal surface epithelium is modulated by a range of highly divergent factors among them a broad spectrum of structurally distinct regulatory peptides, variously described as growth factors or cytokines. Several regulatory peptide factors act from the basolateral site of the epithelial surface and enhance epithelial cell restitution through TGF-β-dependent pathways. In contrast, members of the trefoil factor family (TFF peptides) appear to stimulate epithelial restitution in conjunction with mucin glycoproteins through a TGF-β-independent mechanism from the apical site of the intestinal epithelium. In addition,a number of other peptide molecules like extracellular matrix factors and blood clotting factors and also nonpeptide molecules including phospholipids, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), adenine nucleotides, trace elements and pharmacological agents modulate intestinal epithelial repair mechanisms. Repeated damage and injury of the intestinal surface are key features of various intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases

  4. Clostridium difficile and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Greenfield, C.; Aguilar Ramirez, J R; Pounder, R E; Williams, T.; Danvers, M; Marper, S R; Noone, P

    1983-01-01

    Stools from 109 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (13.4%) contained Clostridium difficile or its toxin, an incidence similar to the stools of 99 control patients with diarrhoea (11.9%), but significantly higher than the stools of 77 control patients with a normal bowel habit (1.4%). Sixty-six per cent of the diarrhoea controls, but only 11% of the inflammatory bowel disease patients, reported recent antibiotic use: however, 67% of inflammatory bowel disease patients were taking sulphas...

  5. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease

    Walsham NE; Sherwood RA

    2016-01-01

    Natalie E Walsham,1 Roy A Sherwood2 1Department of Clinical Biochemistry, University Hospital Lewisham, Lewisham, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Viapath at King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Acc...

  6. Small bowel neoplasia in coeliac disease

    Rampertab, S D; Forde, K A; Green, P. H. R.

    2003-01-01

    There is an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma in patients with coeliac disease compared with the normal population. It has been suggested that adenocarcinoma of the small intestine in coeliac disease arises through an adenoma-carcinoma sequence but there has been only one reported case of a small bowel adenoma in a patient with coeliac disease. We report three additional cases of a small bowel adenoma in the setting of coeliac disease. In addition, four cases of small bowel adenoca...

  7. Loss of fragile histidine triad protein expression in inflammatory bowel disease

    Chun-Mei Xu; Chuan-Hu Qiao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of fragile histidine triad (FHIT) protein in 64 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), and its relation with clinicopathological data.METHODS: Rabbit-anti-FHIT antibody was used to detect FHIT protein expression in 64 formalin-fixed,paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by citrate-microwave-streptavidin (SP)-HRP immunohistochemical method.RESULTS: The positive FHIT protein expression was 22.79% ± 16.16%, 42.14% ± 16.82% in active and remittent phases of UC, 36.07% ± 19.23% in CD, and 57.05% ± 8.86% in normal colon mucosa. Statistically significant differences in FHIT protein expression were observed between the active and remittent phases of UC, between the active phase of UC and normal colon mucosa, as well as between the remittent phase of UC and normal colon mucosa, and between CD and normal colon mucosa.CONCLUSION: Our results show that FHIT protein expression is completely absent or reduced in IBD,suggesting that the FHIT gene might be associated with the oncogenesis and progression of IBD, an early event from inflammatory conditions to carcinoma in IBD.

  8. The importance of vitamin D in the pathology of bone metabolism in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Krela-Kaźmierczak, Iwona; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana; Eder, Piotr; Stawczyk-Eder, Kamila; Klimczak, Katarzyna; Linke, Krzysztof; Horst-Sikorska, Wanda

    2015-10-12

    Etiological factors of bone metabolism disorders in inflammatory bowel diseases have been the subject of interest of many researchers. One of the questions often raised is vitamin D deficiency. Calcitriol acts on cells, tissues and organs through a vitamin D receptor. The result of this action is the multi-directional effect of vitamin D. The reasons for vitamin D deficiency are: decreased exposure to sunlight, inadequate diet, inflammatory lesions of the intestinal mucosa and post-gastrointestinal resection states. This leads not only to osteomalacia but also to osteoporosis. Of significance may be the effect of vitamin D on the course of the disease itself, through modulation of the inflammatory mechanisms. It is also necessary to pay attention to the role of vitamin D in skeletal pathology in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and thus take measures aimed at preventing and treating these disorders through the supplementation of vitamin D. PMID:26528347

  9. CYTOKINE REGULATION OF ULCEROGENESIS IN GASTRODUODENAL MUCOSA

    L. V. Matveeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ulcerogenesis in gastroduodenal mucosa area is a complex multistep process. Its, phases arecontrolled by interaction and activation of pro­ and antiinflammatory cytokine cascade. Present review article summarizes scientific data on impact of cytokines upon ulcerative and reparatory processes, a variety of their diagnostic and therapeutic options is defined. Evaluation of cytokine status, or, in some cases, cytokine genotyping in patients with stomach and duodenal ulcers, may predict clinical course of the disease, as well as efficiency of basic and eradication therapy, correction of the treatment.

  10. Implications of probiotics in the treatment on functional bowel diseases in infants

    Marushko RV

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadayes in the treatment of most diseases of the gastrointestinal tract correction of microbiota is one of the important part of pathogenetic therapy. Studies of relationship between intestinal microbiota disorders and functional bowel diseases in infants are actually insufficient. Promising is the use of spores generating probiotics in functional bowel disease in infants Aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the preparation called «BiosporinBiopharma» in the treatment of functional bowel disorders in infants. Materials and methods. The study involved 86 children aged from 3 to 18 months of which 45 were children with functional constipation and 41 children with functional diarrhea. Underwent clinical and laboratory investigations, including bacteriological, biochemical (structural components of mucosal bar rier mucins. We studied the clinical efficacy of the drug «BiosporinBiopharma» — shores generating probiotic, which is composed of bacteria of the Bacillus genus (B. Subtilis, B. Licheniformis in young children. Results. Revealed characteristic clinical manifestations of functional constipation and functional diarrhea accompanied by severe disorders of intestinal microbial flora, reduction of the level main representatives of the indigenous microflora (Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus and E. Coli and increasing the concentration of saprophytic microflora, opportunistic bacteria and fungal flora as well as changes in the status of mucin glycoproteins in intestinal mucosa. Using the preparation «BiosporinBiopharma» in a complex treatment of functional bowel disease had pronounced positive effect on the clinical course of functional bowel disorders, with improvement and normalization of the sntestinal microbial flora and the status protective mucosal barrier of the intestine. Conclusions. The results of studies on the effectiveness of the preparation «BiosporinBiopharma» allow us to recommend it for widespread

  11. Honey and Apoptosis in Human Gastric Mucosa

    Alireza Ostadrahimi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the world. Honey is acomplex mixture of special biological active constituents. Honey possesses antioxidant and antitumorproperties. Nutritional studies have indicated that consumption of honey modulates therisk of developing gastric cancer. On the other hand, apoptosis has been reported to play a decisiverole in precancerous changes. Our chief study was conducted to assess the relationship betweenconsumption of honey and apoptosis in human gastric mucosa.Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 98 subjects over 18 years old, referred totwo hospitals in Tabriz, Iran. Subjects were undergone an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 62subjects were finally enrolled. Honey consumption was assessed by a Food Frequency Questionnaire(FFQ and apoptosis was detected by TUNEL technique. We tested polynomial curve tofind the best fit between honey consumption and apoptosis.Results: A positive relation between honey consumption and apoptosis was found (P=0.024.Our results indicated that the final and the best fit curve was: apoptosis = 1.714+1.648(honeyamount - 0.533(honey amount2 +1.833×10-5(honey amount7.Conclusion: Honey consumption had positive effects on gastric cancer by inducing apoptosis ingastric mucosa.

  12. Cholesterol esterase activity of human intestinal mucosa

    It has been suggested that cholesterol absorption in humans is dependent on bile acid pool composition and that expansion of the cholic acid pool size is followed by an increase of the absorption values. Similar observations were reported in rats. In the present study, therefore, the authors investigated some general properties of human intestinal cholesterol esterase, with particular emphasis on the effect of bile acids on this enzymatic activity. Twenty-nine segments of small intestine were taken during operations; the enzymatic activity was studied by using mucosal homogenate as a source of enzyme and oleic acid, cholesterol, and 14C-labeled cholesterol as substrates. The time-activity relationship was linear within the first two hours; optimal pH for esterification ranged between 5 and 6.2. There was little difference between the esterifying activity of the jejunal and ileal mucosa. Esterification of cholesterol was observed with all the investigated fatty acids but was maximal with oleic acid. Bile acids did not affect cholesterol esterase activity when present in the incubation mixture at 0.1 and 1.0 mM; the enzymatic activity, however, was significantly inhibited when bile acids were added at 20 mM. In conclusion, this study has shown that the human intestinal mucosa possesses a cholesterol esterase activity; at variance with the rat, however, the human enzyme does not seem to be stimulated by trihydroxy bile acids

  13. Cutaneous Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Simona Roxana Georgescu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases have a high frequency in Europe. They are chronic disorders that evolve with relapses and remissions. Clinical features include the signs of underlying inflammatory bowel disease and also signs of extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous disorders are the most common extraintestinal manifestations associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, which can be dependent on or independent of gastrointestinal disease activity. The main cutaneous disorders are erythema nodosum and pyodermagangrenosum. The pathogenic mechanisms are not fully understood but it seems that related mechanisms are involved in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases and extraintestinal manifestations. Treatment should be aimed at both the cutaneous manifestations and the bowel inflammation

  14. CT enteroclysis in small bowel Crohn's disease

    The diagnostic evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease has changed dramatically over the last decade. The introduction of wireless capsule endoscopy, double balloon endoscopy and the introduction of newer therapeutic agents have changed the role of imaging in the small bowel. Additionally, advances in multidetector CT technology have further changed how radiologic investigations are utilized in the diagnosis and management of small bowel Crohn's disease. This article describes how we perform CT enteroclysis in the investigation of small bowel Crohn's disease and discusses the role of CT enteroclysis in the current management of small bowel Crohn's disease.

  15. Mucoadhesive properties of various pectins on gastrointestinal mucosa: an in vitro evaluation using texture analyzer.

    Thirawong, Nartaya; Nunthanid, Jurairat; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Sriamornsak, Pornsak

    2007-08-01

    Mucoadhesive performance of various pectins with different degrees of esterification and molecular weights was examined with porcine gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa, i.e. buccal, stomach, small intestine and large intestine, using a texture analyzer equipped with mucoadhesive platform. The instrumental parameters and test conditions such as pre-hydration time of pectin disc, contact time, contact force, test speed of probe withdrawal, GI tissue and test medium were also studied. Two parameters derived from texture analysis, namely maximum detachment force (F(max)) and work of adhesion (W(ad)), were used as parameters for comparison of mucoadhesive performance. The results indicated that degree of hydration of pectin disc affected the mucoadhesive properties. The mucoadhesion of pectin increased with the increased contact time and contact force, but not by the increased probe withdrawal speed. Tissue from different parts of GI tract and test medium also influenced the mucoadhesion. Pectins showed a stronger mucoadhesion on large intestinal mucosa than on small intestinal mucosa. The mucoadhesive properties of pectins on gastric mucosa depended on pH of the medium; a higher F(max) and W(ad) in a pH 4.8 medium than a pH 1.2 medium was revealed. Additionally, pectin showed a significantly higher mucoadhesion than carbomer934P in most of the GI mucosa tested. The results also demonstrated that the mucoadhesive performance of pectins largely depended on their characteristics, i.e. higher degree of esterification and molecular weight gave a stronger mucoadhesion. These findings suggest that pectin can be used as a mucoadhesive carrier for GI-mucoadhesive drug delivery systems. PMID:17321731

  16. Dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel disease

    Tamboli, C P; Neut, C; Desreumaux, P; Colombel, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Abundant data have incriminated intestinal bacteria in the initiation and amplification stages of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the precise role of intestinal bacteria remains elusive. One theory has suggested a breakdown in the balance between putative species of “protective” versus “harmful” intestinal bacteria—this concept has been termed “dysbiosis”. Arguments in support of this concept are discussed.

  17. Cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    Jianlin Xie; Steven H Itzkowitz

    2008-01-01

    Patients with long-standing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Many of the molecular alterations responsible for sporadic colorectal cancer, namely chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and hypermethylation, also play a role in colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis. Colon cancer risk in inflammatory bowel disease increases with longer duration of colitis, greater anatomic extent of colitis, the presence of primary sclerosing cholangitis, family history of CRC and degree of inflammation of the bowel. Chemoprevention includes aminosalicylates, ursodeoxycholic acid, and possibly folic acid and statins. To reduce CRC mortality in IBD, colonoscopic surveillance with random biopsies remains the major way to detect early mucosal dysplasia. When dysplasia is confirmed, proctocolectomy is considered for these patients. Patients with small intestinal Crohn's disease are at increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma. Ulcerative colitis patients with total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anal- anastomosis have a rather low risk of dysplasia in the ileal pouch, but the anal transition zone should be monitored periodically. Other extra intestinal cancers, such as hepatobiliary and hematopoietic cancer, have shown variable incidence rates. New endoscopic and molecular screening approaches may further refine our current surveillance guidelines and our understanding of the natural history of dysplasia.

  18. Fetal bowel anomalies - US and MR assessment

    Rubesova, Erika [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The technical quality of prenatal US and fetal MRI has significantly improved during the last decade and allows an accurate diagnosis of bowel pathology prenatally. Accurate diagnosis of bowel pathology in utero is important for parental counseling and postnatal management. It is essential to recognize the US presentation of bowel pathology in the fetus in order to refer the patient for further evaluation or follow-up. Fetal MRI has been shown to offer some advantages over US for specific bowel abnormalities. In this paper, we review the normal appearance of the fetal bowel on US and MRI as well as the typical presentations of bowel pathologies. We discuss more specifically the importance of recognizing on fetal MRI the abnormalities of size and T1-weighted signal of the meconium-filled distal bowel. (orig.)

  19. Bowel resection in Nigerian children

    Abdur-Rahman L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Although bowel resections are commonly done for congenital malformations in children in developed countries, they usually follow neglected and preventable acquired diseases of the intestine in developing countries. Objectives : To determine the indications and outcome of bowel resections in children of a developing country in a university teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Data of the patients operated (from birth to 15 years was retrospectively collected over eight years (January 1999 to December 2006. The biodata of children included the following: Indications for operation, type of operations, duration of admission, and outcome of treatment including complications. Patients with Hirschsprung′s disease were excluded from the study because bowel resection forms part of their definitive surgical management. Results : There were 70 patients (38 boys and 32 girls. The age ranged between four hours to 15 years (median, five months. There were 16 (22.9% neonates, 26 (37.1% infants, and 28 (40% grown children. The indications were congenital anomalies in the 16 neonates. Also, 23 (88.5% infants had intussusception, 2 (7.7% had midgut vovulusm and 1 (3.8% had congenital small intestine band. Among the grown children, typhoid ileal perforation (TIP was seen in 14 (50.0%, intussusception in 5 (17.9%, and other causes in nine patients. Overall, intussusception was the most common indication for bowel resection, followed by TIP. A total of 24 patients developed 33 complications. Complications included wound infection in 47.8% and anastomotic leak in 42.8%. The duration of admission ranged between 4-35 days (median, 15 days. The overall mortality was 17.1% -; which was highest among neonates (56.3%, followed by the infants (26.9% -. Conclusion : Bowel resections are mainly done for intussusception and complications of TIP at our centre. Late presentation, preexisting malnutrition, and nonavailability of parenteral nutrition

  20. Management of patients with a short bowel

    Jeremy M D Nightingale

    2001-01-01

    There are two common types of adult patient with a short bowel, those with jejunum in continuity with a functioning colon and those with a jejunostomy. Both groups have potential problems of undemutrition, but this is a greater problem in those without a colon, as they do not derive energy from anaerobic bacterial fermentation of carbohydrate to short chain fatty acids in the colon. Patients with a jejunostomy have major problems of dehydration,sodium and magnesium depletion all due to a large volume of stomal output. Both types of patient have lost at least 60cm of terminal ileum and so will become deficient of vitamin B12. Both groups have a high prevalence of gallstones (45%) resulting from periods of biliary stasis. Patients with a retained colon have a 25% chance of developing calcium oxalats renal atones and they may have problems with D (-)lactic acidosis. The survival of patients with a short bowel,even if they need long-term parenteral nutrition, is good.

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease: clinical aspects and treatments

    Fakhoury M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marc Fakhoury,1 Rebecca Negrulj,2 Armin Mooranian,2 Hani Al-Salami2 1Biomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Artificial Cells and Organs Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Biotechnology and Drug Development Research Laboratory, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Biosciences Research Precinct, School of Pharmacy, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is defined as a chronic intestinal inflammation that results from host-microbial interactions in a genetically susceptible individual. IBDs are a group of autoimmune diseases that are characterized by inflammation of both the small and large intestine, in which elements of the digestive system are attacked by the body's own immune system. This inflammatory condition encompasses two major forms, known as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Patients affected by these diseases experience abdominal symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloody stools, and vomiting. Moreover, defects in intestinal epithelial barrier function have been observed in a number of patients affected by IBD. In this review, we first describe the types and symptoms of IBD and investigate the role that the epithelial barrier plays in the pathophysiology of IBD as well as the major cytokines involved. We then discuss steps used to diagnose this disease and the treatment options available, and finally provide an overview of the recent research that aims to develop new therapies for such chronic disorders. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, cytokines

  2. Bacteria, genetics and irritable bowel syndrome.

    Craig, Orla F

    2010-06-01

    EVALUATION OF: Villani AC, Lemire M, Thabane M et al. Genetic risk factors for post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome following a waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis. Gastroenterology 138, 1502-1513 (2010). While the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains to be fully defined, two clinical observations - the occurrence, de novo, of IBS following bacterial gastroenteritis and the history, commonly obtained from IBS patients, of other instances of the syndrome within their families - have instigated investigations, in IBS, of the potential roles, on the one hand, of the gut microbiota and the host response and, on the other hand, of genetic factors. The study reviewed here relates to both of these factors by studying genetic predisposition to postinfective IBS in a large population of individuals who were exposed to a multimicrobial enteric infection, which resulted in a severe outbreak of gastroenteritis and was followed by the development of IBS in over a third. In this detailed study, the investigators identified a number of genes that were linked significantly to the development of postinfectious-IBS in the Toll-like receptor 9, IL-6 and cadherin 1 regions. These genes play important roles in bacterial recognition, the inflammatory response and epithelial integrity, respectively, and provide considerable support for the hypothesis that links IBS onset to disturbances in the microbiota and the host response.

  3. Emerging leadership lecture: Inflammatory bowel disease in Asia: emergence of a "Western" disease.

    Ng, Siew C

    2015-03-01

    More than a decade ago, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is rare in Asia. Today, the importance of IBD in Asia is exemplified by its rapidly increasing incidence, complicated disease behavior, and substantial morbidity. In the first large-scale population-based epidemiologic study in Asia, the incidence of IBD varied from 0.60 to 3.44 per 100,000. There has been a twofold to threefold increase in the incidence of IBD in several countries in Asia. Ulcerative colitis (UC) is more prevalent than Crohn's disease (CD), although CD incidence is rapidly increasing. A positive family history is much less common than in the West, as are extra-intestinal disease manifestations. Complicated and penetrating CD are common in Asia. These epidemiologic changes may relate to increased contact with the West, westernization of diet, improved hygiene, increasing antibiotics use, or changes in the gut microbiota. Asian patients with CD have altered gut microbiota compared with their healthy counterparts and Caucasian CD subjects. Mucosa-associated microbiota in IBD may differ geographically. In a population-based case-control study, breast-feeding, having pets, and better sanitary conditions were protective of IBD, suggesting that childhood environment plays an important role in modulating disease development. Genetic factors also differ between Asians and Caucasians. Nucleotide oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) and autophagy variants were not associated with CD, but tumor necrosis factor superfamily gene-15 polymorphisms were strongly associated with CD in East Asians. Research in Asia, an area of rapidly changing IBD epidemiology, may lead to the discovery of critical etiologic factors that lead to the development of IBD. PMID:25469874

  4. Small bowel intubation using guide wire: use in decompression of small bowel obstruction

    Small bowel intubation is a useful method in the non-operative decompression of small bowel obstruction and enteral hyperalimentation in malnourished patients. We have tried small bowel intubation with Ventrol tube guided by small bowel enteroclysis guide wire (Bilbao-Dotter wire) in 12 patients. Ten cases were successfully intubated. In 11 cases of bowel obstruction, 9 cases were intubated and 8 cases were effectively drained. One malnourished patient was improved in nutritional state after enteral hyperalimentation through the intubated tube. We believe this method is an easy and time-saving method in the small bowel decompression

  5. MR findings of bowel ischemia with mesenteric vascular occlusion : comparison with pathologic findings in a cat model

    In order to determine the characteristic MR findings for the early diagnosis of bowel ischemia, we analysed the dynamic enhanced MR images of ischemic bowel induced by mesenteric vascular occlusion in a cat model, and compared the T1-and T2-weighted images (W1) of extracted bowel with the pathologic findings. According to the ischemic period, twelve cats were assigned to either the normal control group (no ischemic period, N=3D2), the acute ischemic group (ligation of mesenteric vessels for 3 hours, n=3D6) or the subacute ischemic group (ligation of mesenteric vessels for 10 hours, n=3D4). Under general anesthesia, laparotomy was performed. The ileal artery and vein were ligated, and a columnar surface coil was applied to the expected bowel ischemia. Using a 4.7 T MR scanner, contrast-enhanced T1W1 were obtained, after bolus injection of contrast media, at 10, 20, 30, 60, and 90 minutes. After formalin fixation of the extracted bowel, T1- and T2W1 were obtained, and the specimens were pathologically examined. MR signal intensity at each layer of the bowel wall was measured and compared with the histopathologic findings. On contrast enhanced MR images, the submucosal layer showed most intensive enhancement, followed-in decreasing order of signal intensity- by muscle and mucosa. Time to peak enhancement of bowel wall was 10-minutes in the normal control group, and 20 and 60 minutes in the acute and subacute bowel ischemia groups, respectively. On T1W1, no significant differences in signal intensity were observed between the ischemic group and the normal control group. On T2W1, the signal intensity of the submucosal layer of the acute ischemic group was significantly higher than that of the normal control or subacute ischemic group, and the signal intensity of the muscular layer of the ischemic group was significantly higher than that of the normal control group. Time to peak enhancement of bowel wall was a helpful criterion for assessment of the ischemic period

  6. Morphological characteristics of the canine and feline stomach mucosa.

    Zahariev, P; Sapundzhiev, E; Pupaki, D; Rashev, P; Palov, A; Todorov, T

    2010-12-01

    The stomach mucosa structure in animals belonging to Order Carnivora indicates some specific characteristics in comparison with the other mammals. Between the bases of the mucosal glands and the lamina muscularis mucosae there is an additional plate which most of the morphologists have defined as lamina subglandularis. In currently used Nomina histologica this layer is indicated as stratum compactum in carnivorous stomach mucosa. The investigation aims were to study and compare canine and feline stomach tunica mucosa characteristics as well as to measure the thickness of stratum compactum and to specify some of the certain collagen types and fibronectin compounds. Conventional and differential histological and ultrastructural methods and immuno-histochemical approaches for investigation of the canine and feline stomach samples were used. The specific organization of the carnivorous stomach wall arrangement was established. In the structure of the canine stomach mucosa, no evidence of stratum compactum was observed. The presence of stratum compactum in feline stomach mucosa was ascertained and measured. Using an immunohistochemical method very high expression of collagen type IV and fibronectin, moderate positive reaction of collagen type III, and a comparatively weakest expression of collagen types I and V in the structure of stratum compactum from cat stomach mucosa was shown. The obtained results clarify the characteristics of the stomach mucosa morphology and could be used as a basis for distinguishing the stomach wall structure of the animal species belonging to Canidae and Felidae families although they are both carnivores. PMID:20825386

  7. Butyrate attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in intestinal cells and Crohn's mucosa through modulation of antioxidant defense machinery.

    Russo, Ilaria; Luciani, Alessandro; De Cicco, Paola; Troncone, Edoardo; Ciacci, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CrD). High levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) induce the activation of the redox-sensitive nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-κB), which in turn triggers the inflammatory mediators. Butyrate decreases pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by the lamina propria mononuclear cells in CrD patients via inhibition of NF-κB activation, but how it reduces inflammation is still unclear. We suggest that butyrate controls ROS mediated NF-κB activation and thus mucosal inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells and in CrD colonic mucosa by triggering intracellular antioxidant defense systems. Intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and colonic mucosa from 14 patients with CrD and 12 controls were challenged with or without lipopolysaccaride from Escherichia coli (EC-LPS) in presence or absence of butyrate for 4 and 24 h. The effects of butyrate on oxidative stress, p42/44 MAP kinase phosphorylation, p65-NF-κB activation and mucosal inflammation were investigated by real time PCR, western blot and confocal microscopy. Our results suggest that EC-LPS challenge induces a decrease in Gluthation-S-Transferase-alpha (GSTA1/A2) mRNA levels, protein expression and catalytic activity; enhanced levels of ROS induced by EC-LPS challenge mediates p65-NF-κB activation and inflammatory response in Caco-2 cells and in CrD colonic mucosa. Furthermore butyrate treatment was seen to restore GSTA1/A2 mRNA levels, protein expression and catalytic activity and to control NF-κB activation, COX-2, ICAM-1 and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine. In conclusion, butyrate rescues the redox machinery and controls the intracellular ROS balance thus switching off EC-LPS induced inflammatory response in intestinal epithelial cells and in CrD colonic mucosa. PMID:22412931

  8. Enhanced transferrin receptor expression by proinflammatory cytokines in enterocytes as a means for local delivery of drugs to inflamed gut mucosa.

    Efrat Harel

    Full Text Available Therapeutic intervention in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs is often associated with adverse effects related to drug distribution into non-diseased tissues, a situation which attracts a rational design of a targeted treatment confined to the inflamed mucosa. Upon activation of immune cells, transferrin receptor (TfR expression increases at their surface. Because TfR is expressed in all cell types we hypothesized that its cell surface levels are regulated also in enterocytes. We, therefore, compared TfR expression in healthy and inflamed human colonic mucosa, as well as healthy and inflamed colonic mucosa of the DNBS-induced rat model. TfR expression was elevated in the colonic mucosa of IBD patients in both the basolateral and apical membranes of the enterocytes. Increased TfR expression was also observed in colonocytes of the induced colitis rats. To explore the underlying mechanism CaCo-2 cells were treated with various proinflammatory cytokines, which increased both TfR expression and transferrin cellular uptake in a mechanism that did not involve hyper proliferation. These findings were then exploited for the design of targetable carrier towards inflamed regions of the colon. Anti-TfR antibodies were conjugated to nano-liposomes. As expected, iron-starved Caco-2 cells internalized anti-TfR immunoliposomes better than controls. Ex vivo binding studies to inflamed mucosa showed that the anti-TfR immunoliposomes accumulated significantly better in the mucosa of DNBS-induced rats than the accumulation of non-specific immunoliposomes. It is concluded that targeting mucosal inflammation can be accomplished by nano-liposomes decorated with anti-TfR due to inflammation-dependent, apical, elevated expression of the receptor.

  9. Mucosal bacterial microflora and mucus layer thickness in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease

    Krzysztof Fyderek, Magdalena Strus, Kinga Kowalska-Duplaga, Tomasz Gosiewski, Andrzej Wędrychowicz, Urszula Jedynak-Wąsowicz, Małgorzata Sładek, Stanisław Pieczarkowski, Paweł Adamski, Piotr Kochan, Piotr B Heczko

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess the mucosa-associated bacterial microflora and mucus layer in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD.METHODS: Sixty-one adolescents (mean age 15 years, SD ± 4.13 were included in the study. Intestinal biopsies from inflamed and non-inflamed mucosa of IBD patients and from controls with functional abdominal pain were cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The number of microbes belonging to the same group was calculated per weight of collected tissue. The mucus thickness in frozen samples was measured under a fluorescent microscope.RESULTS: The ratios of different bacterial groups in inflamed and non-inflamed mucosa of IBD patients and controls were specific for particular diseases. Streptococcus spp. were predominant in the inflamed mucosa of Crohn’s disease (CD patients (80% of all bacteria, and Lactobacillus spp. were predominant in ulcerative colitis patients (90%. The differences were statistically significant (P = 0.01-0.001. Lower number of bifidobacteria was observed in the whole IBD group. A relation was also found between clinical and endoscopic severity and decreased numbers of Lactobacillus and, to a lesser extent, of Streptococcus in biopsies from CD patients. The mucus layer in the inflamed sites was significantly thinner as compared to controls (P = 0.0033 and to non-inflamed areas in IBD patients (P = 0.031.CONCLUSION: The significantly thinner mucosa of IBD patients showed a predominance of some aerobes specific for particular diseases, their numbers decreased in relation to higher clinical and endoscopic activity of the disease.

  10. Randomised placebo-controlled trial of teduglutide in reducing parenteral nutrition and/or intravenous fluid requirements in patients with short bowel syndrome

    Jeppesen, P B; Gilroy, R; Pertkiewicz, M; Allard, J P; Messing, B.; O'Keefe, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Teduglutide, a GLP-2 analogue, may restore intestinal structural and functional integrity by promoting repair and growth of the mucosa and reducing gastric emptying and secretion, thereby increasing fluid and nutrient absorption in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). This 24-week placebo-controlled study evaluated the ability of teduglutide to reduce parenteral support in patients with SBS with intestinal failure. Methods In 83 patients randomised to receive subcutan...

  11. FoxP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells with regulatory properties can be cultured from colonic mucosa of patients with Crohn's disease

    Rømer, Johanne Lade

    2005-01-01

    /winged helix transcription factor FoxP3 is a master gene for T(reg) function and defects in the FoxP3 gene lead to a clinical picture similar to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Murine colitis can be cured by adoptive transfer of T(regs) and ex vivo-generated gut-specific T(regs) represent an attractive...... option for therapy in CD. Thus, defective T(regs) could contribute to the development of CD. We cultured biopsies of colonic mucosa in the presence of high concentrations of interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-4 to overcome the anergic nature of naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+) T(regs) in the mucosa. We...

  12. Heritability in inflammatory bowel disease

    Gordon, Hannah; Trier Moller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke;

    2015-01-01

    Since Tysk et al's pioneering analysis of the Swedish twin registry, twin and family studies continue to support a strong genetic basis of the inflammatory bowel diseases. The coefficient of heritability for siblings of inflammatory bowel disease probands is 25 to 42 for Crohn's disease and 4 to 15...... for ulcerative colitis. Heritability estimates for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis from pooled twin studies are 0.75 and 0.67, respectively. However, this is at odds with the much lower heritability estimates from Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). This "missing heritability" is likely due...... estimation regard genetic and environmental variance as separate entities, although it is now understood that there is a complex multidirectional interplay between genetic are environmental factors mediated by the microbiota, the epigenome, and the innate and acquired immune systems. Due to the limitations...

  13. Roentgenographic findings of experimental bowel ischaemia in dogs following occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery

    The results after ligation of the superior mesenteric artery in 17 dogs demonstrate that a gasless abdomen and small bowel pseudoobstruction are unspecific early roentgenographic findings and bowel-wall thickening with narrowed lumen and increased distance to neighbouring loops are a specific early roentgenographic plain-film finding of acute bowel ischemia following mesenteric vascular occlusion. Approximately 10 hours after ligation a combined distension of small and large bowel with dilatation and air-fluid levels is demonstrable as a sign of paralytic ileus with diffuse peritonitis without possibility of differentiation from other causes of this entity. Gas in the bowel wall, in the superior mesenteric vein and in the portal venous system is a late specific plain-film finding resulting from the invasion of gas-forming bacteria into the devitalized bowel wall with advanced gangrene and a sign of infaust prognosis. The results of the plain-film examinations are correlated to angiographic, clinical and laboratory findings, as well as to histology and bacteriology of the ischemic bowel segments. (orig.)

  14. An unusual white blood cell scan in a child with inflammatory bowel disease: a case report.

    Porn, U; Howman-Giles, R; O'Loughlin, E; Uren, R; Chaitow, J

    2000-10-01

    Technetium-99m-labeled leukocyte (WBC) imaging is a valuable screening method for inflammatory bowel disease, especially in children, because of its high rate of sensitivity, low cost, and ease of preparation. A 14-year-old girl is described who had juvenile arthritis and iritis complicated by inflammatory bowel disease. She was examined for recurrent abdominal pain. A Tc-99m stannous colloid WBC scan was performed, and tracer accumulation was seen in the small bowel in the region of the distal ileum on the initial 1-hour image. Delayed imaging at 3 hours also revealed tracer accumulation in the cecum and ascending colon, which was not seen on the early image. A biopsy of the colon during endoscopy showed no evidence of active inflammation in the colon. The small bowel was not seen. Computed tomography revealed changes suggestive of inflammatory bowel disease in the distal ileum. The appearance on the WBC study was most likely a result of inflammatory bowel disease involving the distal ileum, with transit of luminal activity into the large bowel. PMID:11043720

  15. Pyometra presenting in conjunction with bowel cancer in a post-menopausal women: a case report

    Soleymani majd, Hooman; Watermeyer, Sean; Ismail, Lamiese

    2008-01-01

    This case describes a 71 year old, post-menopausal woman who developed vaginal discharge. This complaint ultimately led to the discovery of bowel cancer in conjunction with a large sterile pyometra. The pyometra was not due to genital malignancy. The most likely conclusion is that the pyometra may have arisen as an inflammatory response to the adjacent bowel pathology. This case report highlights the need for clinicians to consider non-gynaecological cancer as a possible cause for otherwise u...

  16. Prospective study of immunological factors in non-inflammatory bowel disease enterocutaneous fistulas

    Rahbour, Goher; Hart, Ailsa L.; Al-Hassi, Hafid O.; Ullah, Mohammad R; Gabe, Simon M; Knight, Stella C.; Warusavitarne, Janindra; Vaizey, Carolynne J

    2011-01-01

    Background Enterocutaneous fistulas (ECF) are debilitating and usually result following complex abdominal surgery. While there is an association with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a large number of fistulas occur after surgery not related to IBD. The consequences of ECF include short bowel syndrome and the need for long term parenteral nutrition. ECF can heal spontaneously and in the case of IBD can be cured by medical therapy in some instances. Those that do not resolve spontaneously hav...

  17. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets—such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disac...

  18. Comorbidity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Antonio López San Román; Fernando Mu(n)oz

    2011-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be affected by other unrelated diseases. These are called comorbid conditions, and can include any secondary health problem that affects a person suffering from a primary or main disease, and which is neither linked physiopathologically to the primary condition, nor is it due to the treatments used for the primary condition or to its long-term anatomical or physiological consequences.Different comorbid conditions, as well as their influence on IBD, are discussed.

  19. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Thrombosis

    Ahmet Tezel; Muzaffer Demir

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a group of chronic and relapsing inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal system. In these cases, findings are detected in extraintestinal systems also. There is a tendency for thrombotic events in IBD, as in the other inflammatory processes. The pathogenesis of this thrombotic tendency is multidimensional, including lack of natural anticoagulants, prothrombotic media induced via the inflammatory process, long-term sedentary life style, steroid use, s...

  20. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Jess, Tine;

    2014-01-01

    Background The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) – ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) - are caused by complex gene-environment interactions. This study provides updated familial aggregation patterns in a large population-based Danish IBD cohort. Methods: Our cohort study was based on...... the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (n=8,295,773). Through a unique personal identification number assigned to each Danish citizen, sex, date and location of birth, identity of parents, and information on vital status and emigration were available. This information was used to establish...... kinship in the entire population. Individuals receiving at least 2 diagnoses of IBD during the time period (n=45,780) were identified using the Danish National Registry of Patients. Risk of IBD in family members to individuals with IBD was assessed by Poisson regression analysis. Results: The overall...

  1. Genetics and Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Liu, Ta-Chiang; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2016-05-23

    We are currently in an exciting time when our understanding of genetic underpinnings of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has undergone a revolution, based in large part on novel genotyping and sequencing technologies. With >160 susceptible loci identified for IBD, the goal is now to understand at a fundamental level the function of these susceptibility alleles. Determining the clinical relevance of how these susceptible genes shape the development of IBD is also a high priority. The main challenge is to understand how the environment and microbiome play a role in triggering disease in genetically susceptible individuals, as the interactions may be complex. To advance the field, novel in vitro and mouse models that are designed to interrogate complex genetics and functionally test hypotheses are needed. Ultimately, the goal of genetics studies will be to translate genetics to patients with IBD and improve their care. PMID:26907531

  2. Neurostimulation for Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction

    J. Worsøe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Loss of normal bowel function caused by nerve injury, neurological disease or congenital defects of the nervous system is termed neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD. It usually includes combinations of fecal incontinence, constipation, abdominal pain and bloating. When standard treatment of NBD fails surgical procedures are often needed. Neurostimulation has also been investigated, but no consensus exists about efficacy or clinical use. Methods. A systematic literature search of NBD treated by sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS, sacral nerve stimulation (SNS, peripheral nerve stimulation, magnetic stimulation, and nerve re-routing was made in Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library. Results. SARS improves bowel function in some patients with complete spinal cord injury (SCI. Nerve re-routing is claimed to facilitate defecation through mechanical stimulation of dermatomes in patients with complete or incomplete SCI or myelomeningocele. SNS can reduce NBD in selected patients with a variety of incomplete neurological lesions. Peripheral stimulation using electrical stimulation or magnetic stimulation may represent non-invasive alternatives. Conclusion. Numerous methods of neurostimulation to treat NBD have been investigated in pilot studies or retrospective studies. Therefore, larger controlled trials with well-defined inclusion criteria and endpoints are recommended before widespread clinical use of neurostimulation against NBD.

  3. Management of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Torii, Akira; Toda, Gotaro

    2004-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders. The prevalence rate is 10-20% and women have a higher prevalence. IBS adversely affects quality of life and is associated with health care use and costs. IBS comprises a group of functional bowel disorders in which abdominal discomfort or pain is associated with defecation or a change in bowel habit, and with features of disordered defecation. The consensus definition and criteria for IBS have been formalized in the "Rome II criteria". Food, psychiatric disorders, and gastroenteritis are risk factors for developing IBS. The mechanism in IBS involves biopsychosocial disorders; psychosocial factors, altered motility, and heightened sensory function. Brain-gut interaction is the most important in understanding the pathophysiology of IBS. Effective management requires an effective physician-patient relationship. Dietary treatment, lifestyle therapy, behavioral therapy, and pharmacologic therapy play a major role in treating IBS. Calcium polycarbophil can benefit IBS patients with constipation or alternating diarrhea and constipation. PMID:15206545

  4. Biologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Ardizzone, Sandro; Bianchi Porro, Gabriele

    2005-01-01

    Despite all of the advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), we still do not know its cause. Some of the most recently available data are discussed in this review; however, this field is changing rapidly and it is increasingly becoming accepted that immunogenetics play an important role in the predisposition, modulation and perpetuation of IBD. The role of intestinal milieu, and enteric flora in particular, appears to be of greater significance than previously thought. This complex interplay of genetic, microbial and environmental factors culminates in a sustained activation of the mucosal immune and non-immune response, probably facilitated by defects in the intestinal epithelial barrier and mucosal immune system, resulting in active inflammation and tissue destruction. Under normal situations, the intestinal mucosa is in a state of 'controlled' inflammation regulated by a delicate balance of proinflammatory (tumour necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha, interferon [IFN]-gamma, interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6, IL-12) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IL-11). The mucosal immune system is the central effector of intestinal inflammation and injury, with cytokines playing a central role in modulating inflammation. Cytokines may, therefore, be a logical target for IBD therapy using specific cytokine inhibitors. Biotechnology agents targeted against TNF, leukocyte adhesion, T-helper cell (T(h))-1 polarisation, T-cell activation or nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, and other miscellaneous therapies are being evaluated as potential therapies for IBD. In this context, infliximab is currently the only biologic agent approved for the treatment of inflammatory and fistulising Crohn's disease. Other anti-TNF biologic agents have emerged, including CDP 571, certolizumab pegol (CDP 870), etanercept, onercept and adalimumab. However, ongoing research continues to generate new biologic agents targeted at specific pathogenic mechanisms involved

  5. Updates on treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    Christopher W Hammerle; Christina M Surawicz

    2008-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and discomfort in association with altered bowel habits.It is estimated to affect 10%-15% of the Western population,and has a large impact on quality of life and (in)direct healthcare costs.IBS is a multifactorial disorder involving dysregulation within the brain-gut axis,and it is frequently associated with gastrointestinal motor and sensory dysfunction,enteric and central nervous system irregularities,neuroimmune dysregulation,and postinfectious inflammation.As with other functional medical disorders,the treatment for IBS can be challenging.Conventional therapy for those with moderate to severe symptoms is largely unsatisfactory,and the development of new and effective drugs is made difficult by the complex pathogenesis,variety of symptoms,and lack of objective clinical findings that are the hallmark of this disorder.Fortunately,research advances over the past several decades have provided insight into potential mechanisms responsible for the pathogenesis of IBS,and have led to the development of several promising pharmaceutical agents.In recent years there has been much publicity over several of these new IBS medications (alosetron and tegaserod) because of their reported association with ischemic colitis and cardiovascular disease.While these agents remain available for use under restricted prescribing programs,this highlights the need for continued development of safe and effective medication for IBS.This article provides a physiologicallybased overview of recently developed and frequently employed pharmaceutical agents used to treat IBS,and discusses some non-pharmaceutical options that may be beneficial in this disorder.

  6. Primary Amyloidosis Presenting as Small Bowel Encapsulation

    Jones, Jennifer; van Rosendaal, Guido; Cleary, Cynthia; Urbanski, Stefan; Woodman, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a pathological process which encompasses a spectrum of diseases that result from extracellular deposition of pathological fibrillar proteins. Clinical presentations vary depending on the organs involved. There is no documented case of amyloidosis presenting as small bowel encapsulation. A previously healthy 62-year-old man developed a small bowel obstruction in 1997. At surgery, a peculiar membrane encasing his entire small bowel was discovered. This appeared to have no vascula...

  7. Cutaneous Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Simona Roxana Georgescu; Cristina Iulia Mitran; Madalina Irina Mitran; Monica Costescu; Vasile Benea; Maria Isabela Sarbu; Mircea Tampa

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases have a high frequency in Europe. They are chronic disorders that evolve with relapses and remissions. Clinical features include the signs of underlying inflammatory bowel disease and also signs of extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous disorders are the most common extraintestinal manifestations associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, which can be dependent on or independent of gastrointestinal disease activity. The main cutaneous disorders are erythema nod...

  8. Anorexia nervosa complicating inflammatory bowel disease.

    Mallett, P; MURCH, S.

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of inflammatory bowel disease, occurring in adolescence and complicated by anorexia nervosa, are presented. The management of the bowel disease with corticosteroids appeared to precipitate the eating disorder in one case whereas covert withdrawal of steroid treatment led to life threatening complications of inflammatory bowel disease in the other. The difficulties of managing two serious conditions, each ideally treated in a specialist centre, are discussed and the dangers of treati...

  9. Efecto del Tisuacryl sobre la mucosa oral

    Gastón García-Simons

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Los ensayos estipulados para el registro de los equipos médico, biomateriales y materiales implantables están regidos por un conjunto de normas que regulan cuáles deben efectuarse. En dependencia del tipo de aplicaci ón que se pretende dar al material en estudio o el tiempo del contacto con el organismo, así será el rigor que se exija para la evaluación. Con el objetivo de ampliar a la zona de la boca las aplicaciones del adhesivo tisular compuesto por cianoacrilato de n-butilo, de fabricación nacional, Tisuacryl, se efectuó la evaluaci ón de la irritación que provoca el producto a la mucosa oral. Estos productos están constituidos entre otras cosas por monómeros de cianoacrilato de nbutilo, que polimerizan con facilidad por contacto con sustratos orgánicos e inorgánicos por lo que exigen un tratamiento especial para aplicar la metodología seleccionada sin invalidar el resultado de las evaluaciones. En los experimentos que se desarrollaron se pudo aplicar directamente la norma internacional vigente con la utilización de un circulo plástico para delimitar la zona de aplicación del adhesivo. En la evaluación macroscópica se encontró una irritación ligera según la puntuación obtenida y en la histológica se observó una irritación promedio de 3,4, lo que le confiere al producto una irritación mínima, aceptable para el uso en mucosa. No obstante los resultados, es recomendable ampliar el estudio incorporando ensayos que no recoge la norma vigente, tales como la evaluación del comportamiento del adhesivo frente a las enzimas bucales antes de su aplicación oral, pues se conoce que tales productos son degradados por dichas enzimas en un corto período. Esto permitiría obtener una informaci ón más completa acerca de la toxicidad del adhesivo.

  10. Effectiveness of improved treatment of inflamatory bowel disiseases in infants

    Marushko RV

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Actually is required to improve the treatment of chronic inflammatory bowel disease in infants on the principles of safety of therapeutic interventions and the impact on the basic pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the formation of the pathology of the bowel. Purpose — to evaluate the effectiveness of improved treatment of chronic non"specific non"ulcered colitis in infants using functional foods (pro", prebiotics, omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, L-carnitine, hepatoprotectors and alternative formulas. Patients and methods. A total of 114 infants (from 9 months up to 3 years of life with chronic non-specific non-ulcerated (unidentified colitis were studded. Researched the effectiveness of improved treatment using pro-, prebiotics, omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, L-carnitine, hepatoprotectors and semi-elemental formula of chronic non-specific non-ulcerated colitis on the basis of clinical and laboratory research methods, including bacteriological and immunological (TNF-α, ITF in serum, SIgA in coprofiltrates. Were used chronic non-specific non-ulcerated colitis activity index and the index of endoscopic changes of the intestinal mucosa during the treatment in infants. Results. It is shown that the use of functional foods as multiprobiotics, prebiotics, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and enhancing cellular energy provitamins as well as hepatoprotectors and alternative formulas in the treatment of chronic colitis in infants contributes to a significant improvement in the results of chronic non-specific non-ulcerated colitis treatment, more rapidly elimination of main symptoms and increase the number of positive results of treatment in infants with chronic non-specific non-ulcerated colitis (80.4% versus 55.2%. Conclusions. Results of the study allow us to recommend the use of elaborated improved treatment in infants with chronic non-specific non-ulcerated colitis on different levels of child healthcare.

  11. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    Liu, N R; Chen, J X; Zhuo, S M; Zheng, L Q; Jiang, X S [Institute of Laser and Optoelectronics Technology, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine of Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou (China); Chen, G [Department of Pathology, Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Yan, J, E-mail: chenjianxin@fjnu.edu.cn, E-mail: ynjun@yahoo.com [Department of Surgery, Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital, Fuzhou (China)

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  12. Condyloma acuminatum of the buccal mucosa.

    Jaiswal, Rashmi; Pandey, Manoj; Shukla, Mridula; Kumar, Mohan

    2014-06-01

    Condyloma acuminatum is a human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced disease. It is usually transmitted sexually, and it frequently occurs in the anogenital area. A finding of condyloma acuminatum in the oral cavity is rare. Besides HPV, other risk factors for oral condyloma include chewing betel quid and smoking. We report the case of a 52-year-old man who presented with a 2 × 2-cm verrucous white patch on his buccal mucosa. He was habituated to both betel quid and cigarette smoking. A biopsy of the lesion identified it as a verrucous hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium with HPV-related koilocytic changes. The lesion was excised, and further histopathology identified it as condyloma acuminatum. The patient was disease-free 9 months postoperatively. The possibility of condyloma acuminatum should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an oral white lesion. The most common treatments are surgical excision, cryosurgery, electrocautery, and laser excision. There is no known role for antiviral therapy. PMID:24932820

  13. Heterotopic respiratory mucosa of the uterine corpus

    Sarala Ravindran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 47-year-old, single, Chinese woman presented with pain on the 1st day of menses for more than 30 years. Her dysmenorrhea worsened over years and underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingooophorectomy. The myometrium showed trabeculated appearance, and there were adhesions between ovaries and fallopian tubes. A pale solid brownish mass measuring 1.5 cm and times; 1 cm and times; 0.6 cm with fibrous whitish cut surfaces was present on the lateral wall of the uterus in the lower uterine segment. Histologically, adenomyosis and left ovarian endometriosis were confirmed. The lateral uterine wall nodule showed a tubular structure lined by ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium. Smooth muscle bundles were found around the entire tubular structure. Lobules of salivary type glands containing both serous and mucous cells are present. The pathological diagnosis of heterotopic respiratory mucosa (HRM was made. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of HRM of the uterine corpus. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2016; 4(1.000: 26-28

  14. Cell volume regulation in goldfish intestinal mucosa.

    Groot, J A

    1981-11-01

    1. Ion and water content of goldfish intestinal mucosa, stripped free from muscular layers were measured under various incubation conditions. 2. Ouabain induces an increase in cation content that is electrically compensated for by chloride. The increase in solute content is accompanied by an increase in water content. 3. When extracellular chloride is partially replaced by sulphate, ouabain does induce cell shrinkage. 4. Anoxia induces a rapid increase in cell volume that is restored by oxygenation of the incubation solution. Ouabain prevents the restoration of volume. 5. It is concluded that the classical ouabain-sensitive Na/K pump participates in the maintenance of cellular volume. We suggest that the constancy in volume after ouabain poisoning as is reported for many tissues might be due to a low chloride conductance of its membranes. 6. Anisotonic media (range: 0.6-1.2 isotonicity), made by variation on mannitol concentration, induce changes in cell water content that deviates from the simplified van't Hoff equation by about 10%. No change in water content after the initial increase was found. 7. We conclude that goldfish enterocytes do not possess a mechanism for rapid volume readjustment. PMID:7322833

  15. Effect of Enteral Nutrition Formula on Fat Absorption and Serum Free Fatty Acid Profiles in Rat with Short-Bowel Syndrome

    ZHOU Jian-Nong; TAN Li; WANG Xue-Hao; JU Huang-Xian

    2006-01-01

    The effects of enteral nutrition containing long chain triglycerides (LCT) and medium chain triglycerides (MCT) or L-arginine (Arg) on fat absorbability, serum free fatty acid profiles and intestinal morphology in rats with short-bowel syndrome (SBS) were studied using gas chromatography. Twenty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: sham operation fed with LCT as control; 85% small bowel resection fed with LCT,MCT/LCT, and Arg/LCT, respectively. SBS rats showed a decrease of fat absorptivity. Enteral nutrition supplemented with MCT could increase fat absorptivity. L-Arginine enhanced enteral nutrition was associated with the elevation of fat absorptivity, possibly due to its enterotrophic effect on remnant small bowel mucosa. LCT group showed a significant deficiency of total free fatty acid and the decreased essential fatty acid content, which was improved in other two SBS groups.

  16. MicroRNA-24 inhibits serotonin reuptake transporter expression and aggravates irritable bowel syndrome.

    Liao, Xiu-Jun; Mao, Wei-Ming; Wang, Qin; Yang, Guan-Gen; Wu, Wen-Jing; Shao, Shu-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been widely demonstrated to take part in various physiological and pathological processes. In the present study, the role of miR-24 in the pathogenesis of IBS and the potential mechanism in this process were evaluated. Human intestinal mucosa epithelial cells of colon from IBS patients and healthy subjects were collected. An IBS mouse model was established with the induction of trinitro-benzene-sulfonic acid (TNBS). The expression levels of miR-24 and serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) were analyzed using Real-time PCR and western blot in both human specimen and mice. miR-24 was upregulated in IBS patients and mice intestinal mucosa epithelial cells. Luciferase reporter assay showed that SERT was a potential target gene of miR-24. The treatment of miR-24 inhibitor increased pain threshold and nociceptive threshold levels and reduced MPO activity in proximal colon of IBS mice, and up-regulated the mRNA and protein expression levels of SERT in intestinal mucosa epithelial cells. miR-24 played a role in the pathogenesis of IBS probably through regulating SERT expression. PMID:26631964

  17. Small bowel imaging-- a rapidly changing field and a challenge to radiology.

    Maglinte, Dean D T

    2006-05-01

    There was a time when the small bowel follow-through (SBFT) was the primary method of diagnosing diseases of the small intestine. Enteroclysis was reinvented in the 70's and with the SBFT remained the dominant methods of investigating the mesenteric small intestine to the late 90's. Since the introduction of the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanner in 1973, the ability of monoslice CT to diagnose different causes of intestinal obstruction and inflammatory bowel diseases emerged. The introduction of helical CT technology in 1989 and subsequently multichannel CT further changed small bowel imaging. Faster acquisition of a large volume of data with thinner collimation allowed multiplanar reformatting a distinct advantage in evaluating an organ which is longer than wide. The introduction of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with its increased soft tissue contrast, lack of ionizing radiation, and the ability to acquire ultrafast sequences has made MR imaging an important tool in small bowel imaging (1). PMID:16395533

  18. Small bowel imaging- a rapidly changing field and a challenge to radiology

    There was a time when the small bowel follow-through (SBFT) was the primary method of diagnosing diseases of the small intestine. Enteroclysis was reinvented in the 70's and with the SBFT remained the dominant methods of investigating the mesenteric small intestine to the late 90's. Since the introduction of the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanner in 1973, the ability of monoslice CT to diagnose different causes of intestinal obstruction and inflammatory bowel diseases emerged. The introduction of helical CT technology in 1989 and subsequently multichannel CT further changed small bowel imaging. Faster aquisition of a large volume of data with thinner collimation allowed multiplanar reformatting a distinct advantage in evaluating an organ which is longer than wide. The introduction of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with its increased soft tissue contrast, lack of ionizing radiation, and the ability to acquire ultrafast sequences has made MR imaging an important tool in small bowel imaging (1). (orig.)

  19. Mucosal barrier, bacteria and inflammatory bowel disease: possibilities for therapy.

    Merga, Yvette; Campbell, Barry J; Rhodes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal barrier has three major components, the mucus layer, the epithelial glycocalyx and the surface epithelium itself, whose integrity largely depends on tight junction function. In health, there is relatively little direct interaction between the luminal microbiota and the epithelium - the continuous mucus layer in the colon keeps the surface epithelium out of contact with bacteria and the ileo-caecal valve ensures that the distal small intestine is relatively microbe free. Most interaction takes place at the Peyer's patches in the distal ileum and their smaller colonic equivalents, the lymphoid follicles. Peyer's patches are overlain by a 'dome' epithelium, 5% of whose cells are specialised M (microfold) epithelial cells, which act as the major portal of entry for bacteria. There are no goblet cells in the dome epithelium and M cells have a very sparse glycocalyx allowing easy microbial interaction. It is intriguing that the typical age range for the onset of Crohn's disease (CD) is similar to the age at which the number of Peyer's patches is greatest. Peyer's patches are commonly the sites of the initial lesions in CD and the 'anti-pancreatic' antibody associated with CD has been shown to have as its epitope the glycoprotein 2 that is the receptor for type-1 bacterial fimbrial protein (fimH) on M cells. There are many reasons to believe that the mucosal barrier is critically important in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These include (i) associations between both CD and ulcerative colitis (UC) with genes that are relevant to the mucosal barrier; (ii) increased intestinal permeability in unaffected relatives of CD patients; (iii) increased immune reactivity against bacterial antigens, and (iv) animal models in which altered mucosal barrier, e.g. denudation of the mucus layer associated with oral dextran sulphate in rodents, induces colitis. Whilst some IBD patients may have genetic factors leading to weakening of the mucosal barrier

  20. Segmental reversal of the small bowel as treatment of short bowel syndrome in adults

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Qvist, Niels; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome is the result of extensive surgical resection, inherited defects or loss of functional absorbing intestine. Parenteral nutrition is associated with high economical expenses, increased morbidity and decreased quality of life. Intestinal transplantation is associated with high...... morbidity and mortality rates. Segmental reversal of the small bowel can prolong the transit time in the small bowel and in many cases permanently end parenteral nutrition dependency. Segmental reversal of the small bowel should be integrated in the surgical treatment of adults with short bowel syndrome....

  1. CEACAM6 acts as a receptor for adherent-invasive E. coli, supporting ileal mucosa colonization in Crohn disease.

    Barnich, Nicolas; Carvalho, Frédéric A; Glasser, Anne-Lise; Darcha, Claude; Jantscheff, Peter; Allez, Matthieu; Peeters, Harald; Bommelaer, Gilles; Desreumaux, Pierre; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2007-06-01

    The ileal mucosa of Crohn disease (CD) patients is abnormally colonized by adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC) that are able to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells. Here, we show that CD-associated AIEC strains adhere to the brush border of primary ileal enterocytes isolated from CD patients but not controls without inflammatory bowel disease. AIEC adhesion is dependent on type 1 pili expression on the bacterial surface and on carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) expression on the apical surface of ileal epithelial cells. We report also that CEACAM6 acts as a receptor for AIEC adhesion and is abnormally expressed by ileal epithelial cells in CD patients. In addition, our in vitro studies show that there is increased CEACAM6 expression in cultured intestinal epithelial cells after IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha stimulation and after infection with AIEC bacteria, indicating that AIEC can promote its own colonization in CD patients. PMID:17525800

  2. Phenotypic change of muscularis mucosae in early invasive colorectal adenocarcinoma

    S. Ban; Kamada, K; Mitsuki, N; Goto, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Takahama, M; Shibata, T.

    2000-01-01

    Background—Invasive colorectal adenocarcinomas have bundles of eosinophilic spindle cells, which are regarded as myofibroblasts, in their desmoplastic stroma, some of which are continuous with the muscularis mucosa.

  3. Pregnancy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease

    Bortoli, A; Pedersen, N; Duricova, D; D'Inca, R; Gionchetti, P; Panelli, M R; Ardizzone, S; Sanroman, A L; Gisbert, J P; Arena, I; Riegler, G; Marrollo, M; Valpiani, D; Corbellini, A; Segato, S; Castiglione, F; Munkholm, P

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies.......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies....

  4. Mechanical bowel preparation for elective colorectal surgery

    Güenaga, Katia F; Matos, Delcio; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2011-01-01

    The presence of bowel contents during colorectal surgery has been related to anastomotic leakage, but the belief that mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is an efficient agent against leakage and infectious complications is based on observational data and expert opinions only.An enema before the...

  5. Mechanical bowel preparation for elective colorectal surgery

    Güenaga, Katia F; Matos, Delcio; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2011-01-01

    The presence of bowel contents during colorectal surgery has been related to anastomotic leakage, but the belief that mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is an efficient agent against leakage and infectious complications is based on observational data and expert opinions only.An enema before the r...

  6. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  7. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain. (orig.)

  8. Radiological Evaluation of Bowel Ischemia.

    Dhatt, Harpreet S; Behr, Spencer C; Miracle, Aaron; Wang, Zhen Jane; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2015-11-01

    Intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel, is a potentially catastrophic entity that may require emergent intervention or surgery in the acute setting. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of intestinal ischemia are nonspecific, computed tomography (CT) findings can be highly suggestive in the correct clinical setting. In our article, we review the CT diagnosis of arterial, venous, and nonocclusive intestinal ischemia. We discuss the vascular anatomy, pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia, CT techniques for optimal imaging, key and ancillary radiological findings, and differential diagnosis. PMID:26526436

  9. [Inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy].

    Parfenov, A I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pregnant women in their characteristics do not differ from general population, unless they had operations on the pelvic organs. Women with a first pregnancy, regardless of the activity of IBD have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy and high risk births. Most treatment methods are compatible with pregnancy and breastfeeding. Women affected by IBD should discuss their plans for pregnancy with the doctor first in order to know the possible dangers. Every patient in the IBD during pregnancy must be observed by a gastroenterologist, accoucheur and pediatrician to ensure peace of mother and child. PMID:22830229

  10. Immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    David Q Shih; Stephan R Targan

    2008-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic relapsing immune mediated disorders that results from an aberrant response to gut luminal antigen in genetically susceptible host. The adaptive immune response that is then triggered was widely considered to be a T-helper-1 mediated condition in Crohn's disease and T-helper-2 mediated condition in ulcerative colitis. Recent studies in animal models, genome wide association, and basic science has provided important insights in in the immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, one of which was the characterization of the interleukin-23/Th-17 axis.

  11. PPARγ in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Vito Annese

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is member of a family of nuclear receptors that interacts with nuclear proteins acting as coactivators and corepressors. The colon is a major tissue which expresses PPARγ in epithelial cells and, to a lesser degree, in macrophages and lymphocytes and plays a role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. Indeed, both natural and synthetic PPARγ ligands have beneficial effects in different models of experimental colitis, with possible implication in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. This paper will specifically focus on potential role of PPARγ in the predisposition and physiopathology of IBD and will analyze its possible role in medical therapy.

  12. Histamine, mast cells, and the enteric nervous system in the irritable bowel syndrome, enteritis, and food allergies

    J D Wood

    2006-01-01

    There is altered expression of histamine H1 and H2 receptor subtypes in mucosal biopsies from the terminal ileum and large intestine of patients with symptoms of food allergy and/or irritable bowel syndrome

  13. Alterations in the laryngeal mucosa after exposure to asbestos.

    Kambic, V; Radsel, Z; Gale, N

    1989-01-01

    The laryngeal mucosa of 195 workers in an asbestos cement factory (Salonit Anhovo, Yugoslavia) and in a control group was examined. The factory manufactures asbestos cement products containing about 13% of asbestos (8% amosite, 12% crocidolite, and 80% chrysotile) of different provenance. Alterations in the laryngeal mucosa were more frequent in the factory workers than in the control group. The changes, mostly consistent with chronic laryngitis, were closely related to the degree of workplac...

  14. Intraepithelial lymphocytes in the jejunal mucosa of malnourished rats.

    Maffei, H V; Rodrigues, M. A.; de Camargo, J L; Campana, A. O.

    1980-01-01

    Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) have been counted in the jejunal mucosa of adult Wistar rats submitted to a protein-free diet for 84 days and of a control group receiving a 20% casein diet, in order to evaluate the effect of protein deprivation. Relative counts (IEL/100 epithelial cells), absolute counts (number of IEL per millimetre of muscularis mucosae), and the proportion of lymphocytes crossing the basement membrane have been evaluated. Both relative and absolute IEL counts were dimini...

  15. Ultrastructural pathology of the rectal mucosa in Shigella dysentery.

    Mathan, M M; Mathan, V I

    1986-01-01

    Colonocyte damage in the rectal mucosa in shigellosis is the result of bacterial invasion and leads to ulceration. Additional factors in colonocyte damage may be the Shigella cytotoxin and, especially in colonic crypt cells, bacterial endotoxin. A vascular lesion was present in the lamina propria of the rectal mucosa, which resembled endothelial damage secondary to bacterial endotoxins. In patients with longer duration of symptoms, relative vascular insufficiency, activated lymphocytes, eosin...

  16. Speech and Swallowing Outcomes in Buccal Mucosa Carcinoma

    Sunila John; Hassuji, Rashida M; Rajashekhar, B.

    2011-01-01

    Buccal carcinoma is one of the most common malignant neoplasms among all oral cancers in India. Understanding the role of speech language pathologists (SLPs) in the domains of evaluation and management strategies of this condition is limited, especially in the Indian context. This is a case report of a young adult with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa with no deleterious habits usually associated with buccal mucosa carcinoma. Following composite resection, pectoralis maj...

  17. Habitual biting of oral mucosa: A conservative treatment approach

    Sarabjot Kaur Bhatia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic biting of oral mucosa is an innocuous self inflicted injury, commonly seen in children suffering from developmental and psychological problems and has rarely been reported in normal unaffected individuals. The management strategies vary from counseling, prescription of sedatives to different prosthetic shields. The paper highlights the efficacy of a simple approach using soft mouth guard in the management of self inflicted lesions due to habitual biting of oral mucosa in two normal healthy children.

  18. Computed tomography of the whole bowel in patients suspected of Crohn's disease. Preliminary report - assessment of examination technique and image quality

    Evaluation of the usefulness of new technique - computed tomography (CT) of the whole bowel in patients with Crohn's disease and correlation of obtained images with other modalities (MR of the bowel, enteroclysis, barium enema, colonoscopy) and operation results. CT examination was performed in 20 patients suspected of having Crohn's disease, which was confirmed in 16 cases. CT was performed after filling small bowel with fluid administered by catheter placed in duodenum (in 10 patients) or orally (in 10 patients), distension of large bowel with air and intravenous injection of contrast material. Distension of small bowel was assessed in both groups by two radiologists. In 7 patients immediately after CT examination MR of the bowel was performed with contrast enhanced T1-weighted images. Distension of small bowel was better in patients examined after administration of fluid directly to duodenum, although the difference was not statistically significant. In 16 CT studies performed in patients with confirmed Crohn's disease all narrowed bowel segments (n = 25) were diagnosed and extraintestinal abnormalities were visualized (thickening of the mesenteries, enlarged lymph nodes, perirectal changes, abscess, fistula). In 7 patients examined by MR 2 of 10 narrowing (20%) were not diagnosed. CT of the whole bowel is promising method in diagnosis of patients with Crohn's disease. The best views of the small bowel were obtained with the use of CT enteroclysis. (author)

  19. Morphoclinical aspects of the human paraprostethic gingival mucosa.

    Scrieciu, Monica; Niculescu, Mihaela; Mercuţ, Veronica; Andrei, Victoria; Pancă, Oana Adina

    2005-01-01

    The multiple and various changes that the human gingival mucosa undergoes when coming into contact with a denture, require a histopathological study correlated with that of clinical manifestations. The highlighting of the histological lesions of the prosthetic field's mucosa is extremely important in the study concerning the tolerance of the oral cavity tissues towards the materials of dentures, because it has been observed that different materials can cause the same type of clinical changes. The clinical research has been carried out having as a basis a group of patients, carriers of fixed dentures made of different materials, the study method consisting in their clinical evaluation. The investigation of microscopic preparations, obtained through drawing mucosa from those patients under study, has been made by using both usual colorations for an overall examination of the tissue architecture, as well as special colorations for pointing out certain structures. The results of the investigation have made clear the fact that the clinical changes of the prosthetic field's mucosa can be adaptable to the denture or can react pathologically to the various possibilities of denture aggression. The histopathological picture of the paraprosthetic mucosa lesions is polymorphous due to the morphofunctional complexity as well as to the reacting capacity of the oral mucosa when interfering with a fixed denture. PMID:16688373

  20. The Relationship between Small-Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and Intestinal Permeability in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Won, Kyoung Hee; Park, Soon Min

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a frequent finding in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Many patients with IBS also have abnormal intestinal permeability, which is probably due to low-grade inflammation in the intestinal mucosa. Our aim was to verify the relationship between SIBO and small-intestinal permeability in IBS patients. Methods A cohort of 38 IBS patients (20 women and 18 men; age range 16-70 years; mean age 40.2 years) with symptoms that ...

  1. Bowel obstruction following deep circumflex iliac artery free flap harvesting.

    Tan, Neil C-W; Brennan, Peter A; Senapati, Asha; Puxeddu, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    The deep circumflex iliac artery flap (DCIA) has been well described as an autograft flap used in head and neck reconstructions, particularly for large maxillary and mandibular defects. Complications, particularly at the donor site, have been well documented. Although it is considered a minor complication, herniation should not be underestimated as it can potentially lead to bowel obstruction, necessitating an emergency operation. We report a case of acute obstruction of the small bowel secondary to herniation at the donor site after harvesting a DCIA free flap for a maxillary defect, a complication that to our knowledge has been reported only once. We review the pathogenesis and possible ways to reduce the likelihood of developing this serious complication. PMID:19249144

  2. Smoking in inflammatory bowel diseases: Good, bad or ugly?

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is an important environmental factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), having different effects in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). A recent meta-analysis partially confirmed previous findings that smoking was found to be protective against ulcerative colitis and, after onset of the disease, might improve its course,decreasing the need for colectomy. However,smoking increases the risk of developing Crohn's disease and worsens its course, increasing the need for steroids, immunosuppressants and re-operations.Smoking cessation aggravates ulcerative colitis and improves Crohn's disease. Data are however, largely conflictive as well as the potential mechanisms involved in this dual relationship are still unknown. In this review article, the authors review the role of smoking in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  3. Biologic targeting in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Matteo Bosani

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Matteo Bosani, Sandro Ardizzone, Gabriele Bianchi PorroChair of Gastroenterology, “L. Sacco” University Hospital, Milan, ItalyAbstract: The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has not yet been clarified and immunosuppressive agents which nonspecifically reduce inflammation and immunity have been used in the conventional therapies for IBD. Evidence indicates that a dysregulation of mucosal immunity in the gut of IBD causes an overproduction of inflammatory cytokines and trafficking of effector leukocytes into the bowel, thus leading to an uncontrolled intestinal inflammation. Under normal situations, the intestinal mucosa is in a state of “controlled” inflammation regulated by a delicate balance of proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor [TNF-α], interferon-gamma [IFN-γ], interleukin-1 [IL-1], IL-6, IL-12 and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-10, IL-11. The mucosal immune system is the central effector of intestinal inflammation and injury, with cytokines playing a central role in modulating inflammation. Cytokines may therefore be a logical target for inflammatory bowel disease therapy using specific cytokine inhibitors. Biotechnology agents targeted against TNF, leukocyte adhesion, Th1 polarization, T cell activation, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB, and other miscellaneous therapies are being evaluated as potential therapies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. In this context, infliximab and adalimumab are currently the only biologic agents approved in Europe for the treatment of inflammatory Crohn’s disease. Other anti-TNF biologic agents have emerged, including CDP571, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, onercept. However, ongoing research continues to generate new biologic agents targeted at specific pathogenic mechanism involved in the inflammatory process. Lymphocyte-endothelial interactions mediated by adhesion molecules are important in leukocyte migration and recruitment to sites of inflammation, and

  4. Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (abdominal cocoon) associated with liver cirrhosis and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: autopsy case.

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Tanimoto, Akihide; Matsuki, Yasumasa; Hisada, Yuji; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2009-09-01

    A case of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) associated with liver cirrhosis (LC) and complicated by diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is reported herein. A 49-year-old Japanese man had undergone peritoneo-venous shunt against refractory ascites due to hepatitis C virus-positive uncompensated LC for 2 years. After he received a diagnosis of DLBCL of the left neck lymph node 3 months before his death, palliative care was given because of his poor general condition. He developed severe abdominal distention and pain over 1 week and was found to have marked ascites and whole bowel lumped together on abdominal CT. At autopsy, the peritoneum was covered with a thick white membrane and the bowel could not be distinguished, which was macroscopically characterized by a cocoon-like appearance. Histology indicated a proliferation of diffusely thickened or hyalinized fibrocollagenous tissue in the entire peritoneum with a slight chronic inflammatory infiltrate and without remarkable change of mucosa. A diagnosis of SEP, also known as abdominal cocoon, was established based on these features. Additionally, in the abdominal cavity, a large amount of serous ascites and multiple peritoneal nodules or masses involved by DLBCL were recognized. To the authors' knowledge this is the first case report of SEP associated with LC and complicated by the invasion of DLBCL in the abdominal cavity. PMID:19712139

  5. Evaluation of the mRNA and Protein Expressions of Nutritional Biomarkers in the Gastrointestinal Mucosa of Patients with Small Intestinal Disorders.

    Nakamura, Masanao; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Watanabe, Osamu; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Miyahara, Ryoji; Kawashima, Hiroki; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to investigate the mRNA and protein expression of biomarkers related to absorption in the small intestinal mucosa of humans and determine the relationships between small intestinal diseases and nutrition. Methods The study subjects consisted of patients scheduled to undergo double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) or total colonoscopy for suspected gastrointestinal disorder in a clinical practice. Biopsies were taken from apparently normal mucosa in the visible areas of 6 parts of the intestines from the duodenum to the colon. The mRNA expression of specific biomarkers (SGLT1, SGLT5, GIP, GLP, LAT1, LAT2, and NPC1L1) in the mucosa was compared among three patient groups: Inflammation, Tumor, and Control. Results Sixty-six patients participated in this study. Both routes of DBE were performed in 20 patients, in whom biopsy samples were obtained from the mucosa for all sections. There were no remarkable differences in the mRNA expression levels among the 3 groups. However, SGLT1, GIP, GLP, and NPC1L1 exhibited specific distribution patterns. The expression levels of GIP and NPC1L1 were highest in the upper jejunum, but were extremely low in the terminal ileum and colon. A comparison of the mRNA expression profile in each intestinal section revealed that the SGLT1 mRNA expression in the Tumor group and the GIP mRNA expression in the Inflammation group were significantly higher than the corresponding levels in the Control group in the upper jejunum. Conclusion The gastrointestinal mucosa of patients with small bowel diseases can maintain proper nutrient absorption, except in the upper jejunum. PMID:27522989

  6. Physiological basis for novel drug therapies used to treat the inflammatory bowel diseases I. Pathophysiological basis and prospects for probiotic therapy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2012-02-03

    Mechanisms underlying the conditioning influence of the intestinal flora on mucosal homeostasis, including development and function of immune responses, are attracting increasing scientific scrutiny. The intestinal flora is a positive asset to host defense, but some of its components may, in genetically susceptible hosts, become a risk factor for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It follows that strategies to enhance assets or offset microbial liabilities represent a therapeutic option; therein lies the rationale for manipulation of the flora in IBD. In addition, the diversity of regulatory signalling among the flora and host epithelum, lymphoid tissue, and neuromuscular apparatus is an untapped reservoir from which novel therapeutics may be mined. Moreover, the capacity to engineer food-grade or commensal bacteria to deliver therapeutic molecules to the intestinal mucosa promises to extend the scope of microbial manipulation for the benefit of mankind.

  7. [Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network].

    Schreiber, Stefan; Hartmann, Heinz; Kruis, Wolfgang; Kucharzik, Torsten; Mudter, Jonas; Siegmund, Britta; Stallmach, Andreas; Witte, Christine; Fitzke, Klaus; Bokemeyer, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network is a network of more than 500 physicians and scientists from university clinics, hospitals and gastroenterology practices. The focus extends from the two major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, into other chronic inflammatory conditions affecting the intestine, including coeliac disease and microscopic colitis. The network translates basic science discoveries (in particular in the molecular epidemiology research) into innovative diagnostics and therapy. Through its strong networking structures it supports a continuous process to improve quality and standardisation in patient care that is implemented in close interaction with European networks addressing this disease group.Optimisation of patient care based on scientifically proven evidence is a main focus of the network. Therefore, it supports and coordinates translational research and infrastructure projects that investigate aetiology, improvement of diagnostic methods, and development of new or improved use of established therapies. Members participate in various training projects, thus ensuring the rapid transfer of research results into clinical practice.The competence network cooperates with the main patient organisations to engage patients in all levels of activities. The network and the patient organisations have interest in promoting public awareness about the disease entities, because their importance and burden is underestimated in non-specialised medical fields and among the general public. PMID:26968556

  8. Role of the intestinal barrier in inflammatory bowel disease

    Mike G Laukoetter; Porfirio Nava; Asma Nusrat

    2008-01-01

    A critical function of the intestinal mucosa is to form a barrier that separates luminal contents from the interstitium. The single layer of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) serves as a dynamic interface between the host and its environment. Cell polarity and structural properties of the epithelium is complex and is important in the development of epithelial barrier function. Epithelial cells associate with each other via a series of intercellular junctions. The apical most intercellular junctional complex referred to as the Apical Junction Complex (AJC) is important in not only cell-cell recognition, but also in the regulation of paracellular movement of fluid and solutes. Defects in the intestinal epithelial barrier function have been observed in a number of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is now becoming evident that an aberrant epithelial barrier function plays a central role in the pathophysiology of IBD. Thus, a better understanding of the intestinal epithelial barrier structure and function in healthy and disease states such as IBD will foster new ideas for the development of therapies for such chronic disorders.

  9. Sex hormones in the modulation of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Mulak, Agata; Taché, Yvette; Larauche, Muriel

    2014-03-14

    Compelling evidence indicates sex and gender differences in epidemiology, symptomatology, pathophysiology, and treatment outcome in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Based on the female predominance as well as the correlation between IBS symptoms and hormonal status, several models have been proposed to examine the role of sex hormones in gastrointestinal (GI) function including differences in GI symptoms expression in distinct phases of the menstrual cycle, in pre- and post-menopausal women, during pregnancy, hormonal treatment or after oophorectomy. Sex hormones may influence peripheral and central regulatory mechanisms of the brain-gut axis involved in the pathophysiology of IBS contributing to the alterations in visceral sensitivity, motility, intestinal barrier function, and immune activation of intestinal mucosa. Sex differences in stress response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and autonomic nervous system, neuroimmune interactions triggered by stress, as well as estrogen interactions with serotonin and corticotropin-releasing factor signaling systems are being increasingly recognized. A concept of "microgenderome" related to the potential role of sex hormone modulation of the gut microbiota is also emerging. Significant differences between IBS female and male patients regarding symptomatology and comorbidity with other chronic pain syndromes and psychiatric disorders, together with differences in efficacy of serotonergic medications in IBS patients confirm the necessity for more sex-tailored therapeutic approach in this disorder. PMID:24627581

  10. Clostridium difficile Carriage Rate in Outpatients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Mohammad Hosain Salari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective: Closteridium difficile is a gram positive, anaerobic and spore-forming bacillus. Inflammatory bowel disease or IBD includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Inflammation of the intestinal mucosa in these patients can be as a risk factor for colonization of Clostridium difficile. The purpose of this study was to analysis of Clostridium difficile carriage in the IBD outpatients. Materials and methods: Stool specimens were obtained from 50 outpatients with IBD. Stools were cultured on selective media under anaerobic conditions. Filtered extract of bacteria was exposed to HeLa cell culture for analysis of toxin production after identification of Clostridium difficile isolates. Results: The results showed that 3 IBD patients (6% had stool cultures positive for Clostridium difficile. Stool cultures were negative in all patients with Crohn's disease. All 3 patients had ulcerative colitis. Only one isolate was positive for toxin production. Conclusion: The ulcerated colitis than Crohn's patients had higher carriage. In general IBD outpatients carriage rates for Clostridium difficile was low.

  11. Potential Benefits of Dietary Fibre Intervention in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Wong, Celestine; Harris, Philip J; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis is thought to be an important cause of disease progression and the gastrointestinal symptoms experienced in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Inflammation appears to be a major contributor in perpetuating a dysregulated gut microbiota. Although current drug therapies can significantly induce and maintain disease remission, there is no cure for these diseases. Nevertheless, ongoing human studies investigating dietary fibre interventions may potentially prove to exert beneficial outcomes for IBD. Postulated mechanisms include direct interactions with the gut mucosa through immunomodulation, or indirectly through the microbiome. Component species of the microbiome may degrade dietary-fibre polysaccharides and ferment the products to form short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. Prebiotic dietary fibres may also act more directly by altering the composition of the microbiome. Longer term benefits in reducing the risk of more aggressive disease or colorectal cancer may require other dietary fibre sources such as wheat bran or psyllium. By critically examining clinical trials that have used dietary fibre supplements or dietary patterns containing specific types or amounts of dietary fibres, it may be possible to assess whether varying the intake of specific dietary fibres may offer an efficient treatment for IBD patients. PMID:27314323

  12. Potential Benefits of Dietary Fibre Intervention in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Celestine Wong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal dysbiosis is thought to be an important cause of disease progression and the gastrointestinal symptoms experienced in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Inflammation appears to be a major contributor in perpetuating a dysregulated gut microbiota. Although current drug therapies can significantly induce and maintain disease remission, there is no cure for these diseases. Nevertheless, ongoing human studies investigating dietary fibre interventions may potentially prove to exert beneficial outcomes for IBD. Postulated mechanisms include direct interactions with the gut mucosa through immunomodulation, or indirectly through the microbiome. Component species of the microbiome may degrade dietary-fibre polysaccharides and ferment the products to form short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. Prebiotic dietary fibres may also act more directly by altering the composition of the microbiome. Longer term benefits in reducing the risk of more aggressive disease or colorectal cancer may require other dietary fibre sources such as wheat bran or psyllium. By critically examining clinical trials that have used dietary fibre supplements or dietary patterns containing specific types or amounts of dietary fibres, it may be possible to assess whether varying the intake of specific dietary fibres may offer an efficient treatment for IBD patients.

  13. Application of 256 Multi-Detector Computed Tomography Enterography in Small Bowel Inflammatory Diseases%256层多排螺旋CT小肠成像对小肠炎症性病变的临床应用研究

    解骞; 窦娅芳; 梁宗辉; 朱全东; 祝瑞江

    2013-01-01

    To discuss the utility of MDCTE for evaluating inflammatory diseases of the small bowel. Materials and methods: At our institution, 118 patients (male 53; female 65; mean age 48.5 years) with symptoms of suspected small bowel diseases underwent 256-MDCTE. Pertinent MDCTE and histopathology reports were reviewed. The CT appearances characteristic of small-bowel inflammatory bowel disease are described and illustrated in detail. Associated complications and extraenteric manifestations also are described. Results: Of 118 MDCTEs performed, there were 25 cases of small bowel inflammations (male 13; female 12; mean age 45.5 years). In all 12 cases of Crohn's diseases, small bowel involvement was typically transmural, with characteristic skip lesions. CT features of active Crohn^s disease include mucosal hyper-enhancement, irregular wall thickening, mural stratification with a prominent vasa recta (comb sign), and mesenteric fat stranding. 2 cases of ulceratiiwe colitis characterized by a continuous pattern of bowel wall involvement, starting from the rectum, without evidence of skip lesions. Ulcerative colitis predominantly involved the large bowel but may extend to the terminal ileum. Extra-intestinal manifestations may occur but were uncommon. Mucosal hyper-enhancement along with circumferential and symmetric boweli wall thickening was- present. There was mural stratification witto enhancement of the inner mucosa and outer muscularis propria. Mesenteric hyperemia was present in the pericolonic fat; MDCTE demonstrated findings suggestive of intestinal tuberculosis in one patient by depicting ulcero-nodular with strictures, edema and thickening of the ileocecal region, the presence of neexotic mesenteric lymph nodes that were adjacent to a small-bowel thickening; There-was 1 case of viral gastroenteritis and 7 cases of generalized small bowel enteritis withsnon-specific MDCTE features include bowej thickening and submucosai edema appreciable in the entire intestine

  14. The role of nuclear medicine in inflammatory bowel disease. A review with experiences of aspecific bowel activity using immunoscintigraphy with 99mTc anti-granulocyte antibodies

    The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) needs a complex diagnostic work-up. Beside verifying the disease itself, it is fundamental to assess disease extent and activity and to detect associated complications, to find the most effective treatment and for follow up. Scintigraphy with radiolabelled leukocytes is able to provide a complete survey of the whole intestinal tract, both the small and large bowel, and detects septic complications successfully with negligible risk. Radionuclide procedures are useful in establishing or ruling out IBD in patients with intestinal complaints, in assessing disease severity, and in the evaluation of extraintestinal septic complications. Widely available radionuclide procedures are discussed, i.e. scintigraphy by 111Indium oxime or 99mTechnetium HMPAO labelled white blood cells and immunoscintigraphy with 99mTc anti-granulocyte antibodies. Advantages and disadvantages of all three methods are stressed out. Patients and methods: The immunoscintigraphies with 99mTc anti-granulocyte antibodies (ANTI-GRANULOCYTE[reg] BW 250/183) of 27 patients with suspicion of IBD were retrospectively analysed. Planar anterior and posterior images were obtained 4 and 24 h postinjection, respectively. The bowel was divided into six segments and the activity was visually graded with reference to bone marrow in each segments. The scans were compared with the results of radiological and endoscopical investigations. The diagnosis of IBD was proved or ruled out by means of enteroclysis, large bowel enema or endoscopy. Results: In the 27 patients, 74 bowel segments with increased activity were detected. In the case of 30 segments in 16 patients, bowel inflammation was revealed by the other methods (true positives). In the case of 44 bowel segments, no underlying bowel inflammation could be verified, and these activities were regarded as aspecific activity. We could not differentiate between true positive and aspecific activity based on scan pattern

  15. Transabdominal Ultrasonography of the Small Bowel

    Rudolf Kralik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the era of double balloon enteroscopy, capsule endoscopy, CT, and MRI enterography is transabdominal ultrasonography (TUS underestimated method for evaluation of small bowel pathology. As often initial imagine method in abdominal complaints, nowadays has TUS much better diagnostic potential than two decades ago. High-resolution ultrasound probes with harmonic imaging significantly improve resolution of bowel wall in real time, with possibility to asses bowel peristalsis. Color flow doppler enables evaluation of intramural bowel vascularisation, pulse wave doppler helps to quantificate flow in coeliac and superior mesenteric arteries. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography with oral contrast fluid, as well as contrast enhanced ultrasonography with intravenous microbubble contrast also improves small bowel imaging. We present a review of small intestine pathology that should be detected during ultrasound examinations, discuss technical requirements, advantages and limitations of TUS, typical ultrasound signs of Crohn's disease, ileus, celiac disease, intussusception, infectious enteritis, tumours, ischemic and haemorrhagic conditions of small bowel. In the hands of experienced investigator, despite some significant limitations(obesity, meteorism, is transabdominal ultrasonography reliable, noninvasive and inexpensive alternative method to computerised tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in small bowel examination.

  16. Does MRI with oral contrast medium allow single-study depiction of inflammatory bowel disease enteritis and colitis?

    To assess the feasibility and utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the bowel in concurrent small- and large-bowel evaluation for the presence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Over a 5-year period, 62 MR examinations performed on 53 patients demonstrated evidence of IBD. Sixteen of these 53 (30.1%) patients had imaging findings of colonic disease and underwent 19 formal MR small bowel examinations. These were further evaluated for bowel distention and image quality. The sensitivity and specificity of the technique compared with colonoscopy as the 'gold standard' was evaluated. Simultaneous imaging of the colon is feasible at MR small bowel follow-through with moderate-to-excellent colonic visibility and colon distention obtained when the contrast medium is present in the colon at the time of image acquisition. MR imaging had a sensitivity of 80% (0.56-0.93), specificity of 100% (0.77-1.00), positive predictive value (PPV) of 1 and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 0.8 for the identification of colitis (based on available concurrent correlation of 38/62 examinations with colonoscopy). Small and large bowel MR imaging with orally consumed contrast medium represents a promising, feasible, non-invasive, non-radiating single mode of assessment of the entire gastrointestinal tract, performed at a single sitting. (orig.)

  17. Does MRI with oral contrast medium allow single-study depiction of inflammatory bowel disease enteritis and colitis?

    Cronin, Carmel G.; Lohan, Derek G.; Browne, Ann Michelle; Roche, Clare; Murphy, Joseph M. [University College Hospital, Department of Radiology, Galway (Ireland)

    2010-07-15

    To assess the feasibility and utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the bowel in concurrent small- and large-bowel evaluation for the presence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Over a 5-year period, 62 MR examinations performed on 53 patients demonstrated evidence of IBD. Sixteen of these 53 (30.1%) patients had imaging findings of colonic disease and underwent 19 formal MR small bowel examinations. These were further evaluated for bowel distention and image quality. The sensitivity and specificity of the technique compared with colonoscopy as the 'gold standard' was evaluated. Simultaneous imaging of the colon is feasible at MR small bowel follow-through with moderate-to-excellent colonic visibility and colon distention obtained when the contrast medium is present in the colon at the time of image acquisition. MR imaging had a sensitivity of 80% (0.56-0.93), specificity of 100% (0.77-1.00), positive predictive value (PPV) of 1 and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 0.8 for the identification of colitis (based on available concurrent correlation of 38/62 examinations with colonoscopy). Small and large bowel MR imaging with orally consumed contrast medium represents a promising, feasible, non-invasive, non-radiating single mode of assessment of the entire gastrointestinal tract, performed at a single sitting. (orig.)

  18. Bowel injuries secondary to induced abortion: a dilemma

    To study the pattern of bowel injuries incurred by induced abortion, and the morbidity and mortality associated with them. All patients with bowel injuries due to induced abortion. Detailed data of all the patients was collected and analyzed. A total of 22 patients, mostly young with an average age of 26.86 years, presented with bowel injuries following induced abortion. Severe hemorrhage occurred in 8(36.4%) patients while 11(50%) had ileal perforation; 9(40.9%) underwent primary repair and 2(9.1%) ileostomy formation. Two (9.1%) patients with jejunal perforation had primary repair, whereas two with both jejunal and ileal perforations underwent resections with anastomosis in one and ileostomy in another. Seven (31.8%) with large gut involvement had colostomy formation. Septicemia and wound infection occurred in 7(31.8%) patients each, faecal fistula and abdominal wound dehiscence in 3(13.6%), and pelvic abscess in 1(4.6%) patient. The total mortality in this series was 6(27.3%) patients. Iatrogenic injuries during induced abortion, most commonly caused by quacks, can be minimized substantially if the procedure is performed by qualified medical personnel in proper health care facilities. There is a need for radical overhauling of the mind set in our society together with legislation. (author)

  19. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T

    2015-08-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets-such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide, and polyol diet; the specific carbohydrate diet; the anti-inflammatory diet; and the Paleolithic diet-have become popular. This article discusses the diets commonly recommended to IBD patients and reviews the supporting data. PMID:27118948

  20. Disturbances in small bowel motility.

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    Recently, the small intestine has become the focus of investigation as a potential site of dysmotility in the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A number of motor abnormalities have been defined in some studies, and include \\'clustered\\' contractions, exaggerated post-prandial motor response and disturbances in intestinal transit. The significance of these findings remains unclear. The interpretation of available studies is complicated by differences in subject selection, the direct influence of certain symptoms, such as diarrhoea and constipation, and the interference of compounding factors, such as stress and psychopathology. Dysmotility could also reflect autonomic dysfunction, disturbed CNS control and the response to heightened visceral sensation or central perception. While motor abnormalities may not explain all symptoms in IBS, sensorimotor interactions may be important in symptom pathogenesis and deserve further study.

  1. An extended assessment of bowel habits in a general population

    Gabrio Bassotti; Massimo Bellini; Filippo Pucciani; Renato Bocchini; Antonio Bove; Pietro Alduini; Edda Battaglia; Paolo Bruzzi; Italian Constipation Study Group

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Bowel habits are difficult to study, and most data on defecatory behaviour in the general population have been obtained on the basis of recalled interview. The objective assessment of this physiological function and its pathological aspects continues to pose a difficult challenge. The aim of this prospective study was to objectively assess the bowel habits and related aspects in a large sample drawn from the general population.METHODS: Over a two-month period 488 subjects were prospectively recruited from the general population and asked to compile a daily diary on their bowel habits and associated signs and symptoms (the latter according to Rome II criteria). A total of 298 (61%) participants returned a correctly compiled record, so that data for more than 8 000 patient-days were available for statistical analysis.RESULTS: The average defecatory frequency was once per day (range of 0.25-3.25) and was similar between males and females. However, higher frequencies of straining at stool (P=0.001), a feeling of incomplete emptying and/or difficult evacuation (P=0.0001), and manual manoeuvres to facilitate defecation (P=0.046) were reported by females as compared to males.CONCLUSION: This study represents one of the first attempts to objectively and prospectively assess bowel habits in a sample of the general population over a relatively long period of time. The variables we analyzed are coherent with the criteria commonly used for the clinical assessment of functional constipation, and can provide a useful adjunt for a better evaluation of constipated patients.

  2. Drug-induced lesions of the oesophageal mucosa.

    2015-09-01

    Lesions of the oesophageal mucosa are observed in various situations: most often with gastrooesophageal reflux disease, but also with infections, cancer, contact with a toxic substance, etc. When they are symptomatic, these lesions provoke burning sensations, dysphagia, regurgitation and sometimes dorsal pain. The changes to the oesophageal mucosa may take various forms: inflammation, erosion, ulceration or necrosis. Serious or even fatal complications can develop but are rare; they include oesophageal perforation, stricture and haemorrhage. Some oral drugs damage the oesophageal mucosa through direct contact. The symptoms often develop several hours after ingestion. The pain is of sudden onset. The resulting lesions are solitary or multiple ulcers that vary in depth and usually occur in the upper portion of the oesophagus. Various factors prolong contact between a drug and the oesophageal mucosa, in particular: swallowing the drug with insufficient liquid or just before lying down; capsule forms; and oesophageal abnormalities. The drugs most frequently implicated are tetracyclines, particularly doxycycline, bisphosphonates and various nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Many drugs, used in various situations, provoke gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, sometimes causing mucosal lesions in the lower oesophagus: calcium-channel blockers, nitrates, exenatide and liraglutide, drugs with antimuscarinic effects, theophylline, etc. Some drugs affect all mucous membranes in the body, including the oesophageal mucosa, irrespective of their route of administration: cancer drugs, isotretinoin, and nicorandil. PMID:26417631

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel

    Deeab, Dhafer A., E-mail: dhafer_ahmed@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, St Mary' s Campus, Imperial College NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Dick, Elizabeth; Sergot, Antoni A.; Sundblon, Lauren; Gedroyc, Wady [Department of Radiology, St Mary' s Campus, Imperial College NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel (MR Enterography, or MRE) is becoming increasingly popular as the first imaging modality for the diagnosis and follow-up of small bowel diseases. The inherent advantages of MRI, including excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability and lack of ionising radiation are well known. In addition, the use of luminal contrast agents in MRE has the added advantage of demonstrating the lumen and the wall directly, something not possible to achieve with conventional small bowel barium follow-through imaging. This review will highlight recent technical advances to this low cost, simple technique which is easily achievable in all hospitals. It will also review normal and abnormal radiological findings and highlight the value of this technique to both the clinician and patient alike in the investigation of small bowel disease.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel (MR Enterography, or MRE) is becoming increasingly popular as the first imaging modality for the diagnosis and follow-up of small bowel diseases. The inherent advantages of MRI, including excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability and lack of ionising radiation are well known. In addition, the use of luminal contrast agents in MRE has the added advantage of demonstrating the lumen and the wall directly, something not possible to achieve with conventional small bowel barium follow-through imaging. This review will highlight recent technical advances to this low cost, simple technique which is easily achievable in all hospitals. It will also review normal and abnormal radiological findings and highlight the value of this technique to both the clinician and patient alike in the investigation of small bowel disease.

  5. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease

    Frei, Pascal; Biedermann, Luc; Nielsen, Ole Haagen;

    2013-01-01

    The use of thiopurines as immunosuppression for the treatment of refractory or chronic active inflammatory bowel disease is established for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine ...

  6. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Walsham, Natalie E; Sherwood, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Accurate diagnosis of IBD is therefore essential. Clinical assessment, together with various imaging modalities and endoscopy, has been the mainstay of diagnosis for many years. Fecal biomarkers of gastrointestinal inflammation have appeared in the past decade, of which calprotectin, a neutrophil cytosolic protein, has been studied the most. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic remitting and relapsing diseases, and objective assessment of disease activity and response to treatment are important. This review focuses on the use of fecal calprotectin measurements in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with IBD. PMID:26869808

  7. Histochemical study of the olfactory mucosae of the horse.

    Lee, Kwang-Hyup; Park, Changnam; Bang, Hyojin; Ahn, Meejung; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Seungjoon; Shin, Taekyun

    2016-05-01

    The olfactory mucosae of the horse were examined by using histology and lectin histochemistry to characterize the carbohydrate sugar residues therein. Histological findings revealed that olfactory epithelium (OE) consisted of both olfactory marker protein (OMP)- and protein gene product (PGP) 9.5-positive receptor cells, supporting cells and basal cells with intervening secretory ducts from Bowman's glands. Mucus histochemistry showed that Bowman's gland acini contain periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reagent-positive neutral mucins and alcian blue pH 2.5-positive mucosubstances. Lectin histochemistry revealed that a variety of carbohydrate sugar residues, including N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, fucose and complex type N-glycan groups, are present in the various cell types in the olfactory mucosa at varying levels. Collectively, this is the first descriptive study of horse olfactory mucosa to characterize carbohydrate sugar residues in the OE and Bowman's glands. PMID:27040092

  8. Speech and swallowing outcomes in buccal mucosa carcinoma

    Sunila John

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Buccal carcinoma is one of the most common malignant neoplasms among all oral cancers in India. Understanding the role of speech language pathologists (SLPs in the domains of evaluation and management strategies of this condition is limited, especially in the Indian context. This is a case report of a young adult with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa with no deleterious habits usually associated with buccal mucosa carcinoma. Following composite resection, pectoralis major myocutaneous flap reconstruction, he developed severe oral dysphagia and demonstrated unintelligible speech. This case report focuses on the issues of swallowing and speech deficits in buccal mucosa carcinoma that need to be addressed by SLPs, and the outcomes of speech and swallowing rehabilitation and prognostic issues.

  9. Genetic epidemiology of irritable bowel syndrome

    Makker, Jasbir; Chilimuri, Sridhar; Bella, Jonathan N

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by presence of abdominal pain or discomfort associated with altered bowel habits. It has three main subtypes - constipation predominant IBS (C-IBS), diarrhea predominant IBS (D-IBS) and IBS with mixed features of both diarrhea as well as constipation (M-IBS). Its pathophysiology and underlying mechanisms remain elusive. It is traditionally believed that IBS is a result of multiple factors incl...

  10. Modern treatment of short bowel syndrome

    Jeppesen, Palle B

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency approved the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, teduglutide, for the treatment of short bowel syndrome (SBS), and this review describes the physiological basis for its clinical use.......Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency approved the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, teduglutide, for the treatment of short bowel syndrome (SBS), and this review describes the physiological basis for its clinical use....

  11. Rifaximin Therapy of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Koo, Hoonmo L.; Saman Sabounchi; Huang, David B.; Herbert L. DuPont

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of specific organic pathology. Although the underlying pathogenesis of IBS is not well-understood, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or other abnormalities in the gut flora is believed to contribute to the development of a subset of IBS cases. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed antimicrobial with activity against enteric pathogens. A number of stu...

  12. Cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Al Roujayee Abdulaziz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has many extraintestinal manifestations, and skin lesions are one of the most frequently described extraintestinal findings. Reports indicate an incidence of cutaneous manifestations ranging from 2 to 34%, Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. In this review we aim to address the various cutaneous manifestations associated with IBD, their impact on the disease course, and the treatment options available.

  13. NATURAL AGENTS FOR INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Darji Vinay Chhanalal; Bariya Aditi Hemrajbhai; Deshpande Shrikalp Shrikant

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of gastrointestinal tract. It comprises the two conditions, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, characterized by chronic recurrent ulceration of the bowel. Conventional drugs for colitis treatment include aminosalicylate, corticosteroids,antibiotics & immunomodulators. 5- Amino salicylic acid having side effects in 30% of the patients. Systemic corticosteroids producing incidence of complication is 4.3%. Antibiotic therapy...

  14. Delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion

    Mehta Ajay; Ahmed Shwan J; Rimington Peter

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Complications of suprapubic catheter insertion are rare but can be significant. We describe an unusual complication of a delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion. Case presentation A gentleman presented with features of peritonitis and feculent discharge along a suprapubic catheter two months after insertion of the catheter. Conclusion Bowel perforation is the most feared complication of suprapubic catheter insertion especially in patients with low...

  15. Small bowel emergency surgery: literature's review

    Di Saverio Salomone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Emergency surgery of the small bowel represents a challenge for the surgeon, in the third millennium as well. There is a wide number of pathologies which involve the small bowel. The present review, by analyzing the recent and past literature, resumes the more commons. The aim of the present review is to provide the main indications to face the principal pathologies an emergency surgeon has to face with during his daily activity.

  16. The Immune System in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Barbara, Giovanni; Cremon, Cesare; Carini, Giovanni; Bellacosa, Lara; Zecchi, Lisa; De Giorgio, Roberto; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The potential relevance of systemic and gastrointestinal immune activation in the pathophysiology and symptom generation in the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is supported by a number of observations. Infectious gastroenteritis is the strongest risk factor for the development of IBS and increased rates of IBS-like symptoms have been detected in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in remission or in celiac disease patients on a gluten free diet. The number of T cells and mast cells in the...

  17. Use of Prebiotics for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The relevance of diet in both the pathogenesis and the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease is an evolving science. Disturbance of intestinal microflora (dysbiosis) is putatively a key element in the environmental component causing inflammatory bowel disease. Prebiotics are among the dietary components used in an attempt to counteract dysbiosis. Such predominantly carbohydrate dietary components exert effects on the luminal environment by physicochemical changes through pH alteration, by pro...

  18. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana Sofía; Martínez-Reyes, Cynthia; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús Kazúo

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways, frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune...

  19. PYODERMA GANGRENOSUM WITH INFLAMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Guru Prasad; Jhansi Lakshmi; Krishna Rao; Parvathi; Durga Bhavani

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a chronic , painful ulcerated skin disease of unknown etiology. Its association with inflammatory bowel disease like ulcerative colitis is common . The lesions generally appear dur ing the course of active bowel disease , frequently concur with exacerbations of colitis , sometimes with inactive ulcerative colitis. 15 to 20 % of patients with Pyoderma gangrenosum have ulcerative colitis and 0.5 to 5 % of patients w...

  20. Feasibility of laparoscopy for small bowel obstruction

    De Sol Angelo A; Migliaccio Carla; Delmonaco Pamela; Cattorini Lorenzo; Morelli Umberto; La Mura Francesco; Cirocchi Roberto; Farinella Eriberto; Cozzaglio Luca; Sciannameo Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Adherential pathology is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction. Laparoscopy in small bowel obstruction does not have a clear role yet; surely it doesn't always represent only a therapeutic act, but it is always a diagnostic act, which doesn't interfere with abdominal wall integrity. Methods We performed a review without any language restrictions considering international literature indexed from 1980 to 2007 in Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library. We analyzed th...

  1. Short Bowel Syndrome: A Case Report

    Celayir, Sinan; Sarımurat, Nüvit; Ilıkkan, Barbaros; ERAY, Nur; Yeşildağ, Ebru; Yeker, Daver

    1996-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis atresia volvulus gastroschisis are the most common causes of short bowel syndrome in the pediatric population Although the prognosis for patients with short bowel syndrome improved since the advent of parenteral nutrition the cost of long term total parenteral nutrition and attendant morbidity and mortality cannot be ignored in these patients Long term follow up of a case with short small intestine of 25 cm length following surgery is presented and the problems assoc...

  2. [Contemporary dietotherapy of the irritable bowel syndrome].

    Pilipenko, V I; Burliaeva, E A; Isakov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional disease of the gastrointestinal tract. This highly prevalent condition is best diagnosed by assessing the constellation of symptoms with which patients present to their physicians. Because some critics have previously questioned whether irritable bowel syndrome and other functional gastrointestinal disorders truly exist because they do not have defining structural features, the Rome Foundation fostered the use of symptom-based criteria for universal use. In most cases treatment is reduced to symptomatic therapy because a lot of unknown in pathogenesis by irritable bowel syndrome. Irritable bowel syndrome leads to decrease of quality of life of the patients and could be one of the reasons of patients' disability. Food is believed by patients promotes symptoms and the diet or avoiding specific food can reduce symptoms. Possible role of different food and microbiota in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome, as well as the data from randomized, controlled clinical trials dedicated to the effects of diet in irritable bowel syndrome are summarized and discussed in this review. The efficacy of the diet, enriched by fiber, prebiotics, probiotics, peppermint oil, curcumin and vitamin B6 in irritable bowel syndrome patients was shown in numerous studies. In some studies restriction in consumption of fermented carbohydrates, coffee and alcohol, as well as diet with elimination IgG-sensed food was also shown to be effective in irritable bowel syndrome. Food intolerances, defined as non-toxic non-immune adverse reactions to food, include reactions to bioactive chemicals in foods and metabolic reactions to poorly absorbed dietary carbohydrates. New dietary approaches like polyunsaturated fatty acids intake correction and the low tryptophan intake are discussed. PMID:23808281

  3. Buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation: incidence and associated factors.

    Piquero, K; Ando, T; Sakurai, K

    1999-05-01

    Buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation have been considered as one of the visible and reliable signs of bruxism. However, there have not been any reports justifying this relationship scientifically. Moreover, there have not been any studies reporting specific procedures to assess them. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to determine the clinical incidence of buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation and assess the possible relationship between certain factors that can influence their occurrence. A total of 244 (178 males and 66 females) dentulous adults from 20 to 59 years of age, who were employees at the Bank of Yokohama, were randomly selected. At first, the buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation were classified into three groups based in their intensity: none, mild, and severe. The incidence of both conditions in the different age groups, as well as the incidence by gender was evaluated. Furthermore, the possible relationships between buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation and age, gender, clenching awareness, grinding awareness, headache, neck stiffness, vertical dimension, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain to palpation, masticatory muscle tenderness to palpation, and the presence of premature contacts were evaluated using the chi-square test. A positive relationship was found between the occurrence of buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation and gender (p < 0.01); both conditions were observed more frequently in females than in males. A positive relationship was also found to age; the group between 20-29 years old showed the highest incidence. The vertical dimension had a positive relationship with the occurrence of both buccal mucosa ridging and tongue indentation. Other factors evaluated did not show any correlation. PMID:10825817

  4. Rifaximin Resistance in Escherichia coli Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Correlates with Prior Rifaximin Use, Mutations in rpoB, and Activity of Phe-Arg-β-Naphthylamide-Inhibitable Efflux Pumps

    Kothary, Vishesh; Scherl, Ellen J.; Bosworth, Brian; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Herbert L. DuPont; Harel, Josee; Simpson, Kenneth W.; Dogan, Belgin

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable derivative of rifampin effective against E. coli, improves symptoms in mild-to-moderate IBD. However, rifaximin resistance can develop in a single step in vitro. We examined the prevalence and mechanisms of rifaximin resistance in 62 strains of E. coli isolated from the ileal mucosa of 50 patients (19 with ileal Crohn's disease [L1+L3], 6 with colonic Crohn's disease [L2], 13 wit...

  5. Estudio de la mucosa oral en pacientes que emplean colutorios

    Marzal Gamarra, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN 1. Recuerdo histológico de la mucosa oral La cavidad bucal, como toda cavidad orgánica que se comunica con el exterior, esta tapizada por una membrana mucosa de superficie húmeda. La humedad, que es aportada por las glándulas salivales mayores y menores, es necesaria para el mantenimiento de la estructura normal de los tejidos. 2. Colutorios y su utilización en Odontología Los colutorios son preparaciones líquidas destinadas a ser aplicadas sobre los dientes, las...

  6. Toll-like receptors -2, -4 and CD14 in human intestinal mucosa from patients with inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

    Frolová, Lenka; Drastich, P.; Klimešová, Klára; Rossmann, Pavel; Tlaskalová, Helena

    Prague : Verlag, 2006, s. 80-80. [Meeting of the European Mucosal Immunology Group /5./. Prague (CZ), 05.10.2006-07.10.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GD310/03/H147 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : crohns disease * ulcerative colitis * toll-like receptors Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  7. Favorable results from the use of herbal and plant products in inflammatory bowel disease: evidence from experimental animal studies

    Triantafillidis, John K.; Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Vagianos, Constantinos; Papalois, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy for inflammatory bowel disease is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the available literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in experimental colitis. All relevant studies published in Medline and Embase up to June 2015 have been reviewed. The results of bowel histology and serum parameters have been recorded. A satisfactory number of published experimental studies, and a quite large one of both herbal and plant products tested in different s...

  8. Long-term efficacy and safety of otilonium bromide in the management of irritable bowel syndrome: a literature review

    Triantafillidis, John K.; Malgarinos, George

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a very common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habits. The disease affects a large part of the world population. The clinical course is mostly characterized by a cyclic recurrence of symptoms. Therefore, IBS patients should receive, as an initial therapeutic approach, a short course of treatment, and long-term treatment should be reserved for those patients with recurrent symptoms. The availa...

  9. Nutritional Support Process for a Patient with Short Bowel Syndrome in Conjunction with Panperitonitis: A Case Report

    Kim, Sun Jung; Kim, Bo Ram; Lee, Song Mi; Kong, Hee Jung; Shin, Cheung Soo

    2013-01-01

    Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) is a condition that causes malabsorption and nutrient deficiency because a large section of the small intestine is missing or has been surgically removed. SBS may develop congenitally or from gastroenterectomy, which often change the motility, digestive, and/or absorptive functions of the small bowel. The surgical procedure for SBS and the condition itself have high mortality rates and often lead to a range of complications associated with long-term parenteral nutri...

  10. Acute small bowel obstruction caused by endometriosis: A case report and review of the literature

    Antonella De Ceglie; Claudio Bilardi; Sabrina Blanchi; Massimo Picasso; Marcello Di Muzio; Alberto Trimarchi; Massimo Conio

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal involvement of endometriosis has been found in 3%-37% of menstruating women and exclusive localization on the ileum is very rare (1%-7%).Endometriosis of the distal ileum is an infrequent cause of intestinal obstruction,ranging from 7% to 23% of all cases with intestinal involvement.We report a case in which endometrial infiltration of the small bowel caused acute obstruction requiring emergency surgery,in a woman whose symptoms were not related to menses.Histology of the resected specimen showed that endometriosis was mainly prevalent in the muscularis propria and submucosa and that the mucosa was not ulcerated but had inflammation and glandular alteration. Endometrial lymph node involvement,with a cystic glandular pattern was also deted.

  11. Capsule Endoscopy for Ileitis with Potential Involvement of Other Sections of the Small Bowel

    Hyun Seok Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ileitis is defined as inflammation of the ileum. This condition includes ulcers, aphthous ulcers, erosions, and nodular or erythematous mucosa. Various etiologies are associated with ileitis. Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, infectious conditions, neoplasms, infiltrative disorders, vasculitides, spondyloarthritis, endometriosis, and radiation therapy-related conditions involve the ileum. However, the differential diagnosis of terminal ileitis can be difficult in many cases. Video capsule endoscopy (VCE has become a useful tool for the diagnosis of a variety of small bowel lesions. This review describes each of the various conditions associated with ileitis and the diagnostic value of VCE for ileitis, which may help identify and evaluate these conditions in clinical practice. Based on the information provided by VCE, a definitive diagnosis could be made using the patients’ medical history, clinical course, laboratory and ileocolonoscopic findings, radiologic imaging findings, and histologic findings.

  12. Value of gastrografin in adhesive small bowel obstruction after unsuccessful conservative treatment: A prospective evaluation

    Hok-Kwok Choi; Wai-Lun Law; Judy Wai-Chu Ho; Kin-Wah Chu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Gastrografin is a hyperosmolar water-soluble contrast medium. Besides its predictive value for the need for operative treatment, a potential therapeutic role of this agent in adhesive small bowel obstruction has been suggested. This study aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of gastrografin in adhesive small bowel obstruction when conservative treatment failed.METHODS: Patients with adhesive small bowel obstruction were given trial conservative treatment unless there was fear of bowel strangulation. Those responded in the initial 48 h had conservative treatment continued. Patients who showed no improvement in the initial 48 h were given 100 mL of gastrografin through nasogastric tube followed by serial abdominal radiographs. Patients with the contrast appeared in large bowel within 24 h were regarded ashaving partial obstruction and conservative treatment wascontinued. Patients in which the contrast failed to reachlarge bowel within 24 h were considered to have completeobstruction and laparotomy was performed.RESULTS: Two hundred and twelve patients with 245episodes of adhesive obstruction were included. Fifteenpatients were operated on soon after admission due tofear of strangulation. One hundred and eighty-six episodesof obstruction showed improvement in the initial 48 h andconservative treatment was continued. Two patients hadsubsequent operations because of persistent obstruction.Forty-four episodes of obstruction showed no improvementwithin 48 h and gastrografin was administered. Sevenpatients underwent complete obstruction surgery. Partialobstruction was demonstrated in 37 other cases, obstruction resolved subsequently in all of them except one patient who required laparotomy because of persistent obstruction. The overall operative rate in this study was 10%. There was no complication that could be attributed to the use of gastrografin.CONCLUSION: The use of gastrografin in adhesive small bowel obstruction after unsuccessful conservative treatment is

  13. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms in childhood irritable bowel syndrome.

    Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects a large number of children throughout the world. The symptom expression of IBS is heterogeneous, and several factors which may be interrelated within the IBS biopsychosocial model play a role. These factors include visceral hyperalgesia, intestinal permeability, gut microbiota, psychosocial distress, gut inflammation, bile acids, food intolerance, colonic bacterial fermentation, and genetics. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of these factors are being actively investigated. In this mini-review, we present updates of these mechanisms and, where possible, relate the findings to childhood IBS. Mechanistic elucidation may lead to the identification of biomarkers as well as personalized childhood IBS therapies. PMID:26883355

  14. Contrast enema depiction of small-bowel volvulus in complicated neonatal bowel obstruction

    Navarro, Oscar M.; Daneman, Alan; Miller, Stephen F. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2004-12-01

    About one-half of patients with meconium ileus (MI) present with a complication such as volvulus, atresia, meconium peritonitis or giant cystic meconium peritonitis. The treatment of these complications requires surgery. However, the preoperative diagnosis of complicated MI is difficult. We describe two neonates with complicated small-bowel obstruction, one with MI related to cystic fibrosis and the other not related to cystic fibrosis. In both, contrast enema depicted a spiral appearance of the distal small bowel, which at surgery proved to be the result of volvulus associated with antenatal bowel perforation. This appearance of the small bowel on contrast enema in this clinical setting has not been previously described. The recognition of this spiral appearance of the distal small bowel suggests the need for surgery. (orig.)

  15. Etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Silvio Danese; Claudio Fiocchi

    2006-01-01

    Theories explaining the etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been proposed ever since Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) were recognized as the two major forms of the disease. Although the exact cause(s) and mechanisms of tissue damage in CD and UC have yet to be completely understood, enough progress has occurred to accept the following hypothesis as valid: IBD is an inappropriate immune response that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals as the result of a complex interaction among environmental factors, microbial factors, and the intestinal immune system. Among an almost endless list of environmental factors, smoking has been identified as a risk factor for CD and a protective factor for UC. Among microbial factors, no convincing evidence indicates that classical infectious agents cause IBD, while mounting evidence points to an abnormal immune response against the normal enteric flora as being of central importance. Gut inflammation is mediated by cells of the innate as well as adaptive immune systems, with the additional contribution of non-immune cells, such as epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells, and platelets.

  16. Pharmacogenetics in inflammatory bowel disease

    Marie Pierik; Paul Rutgeerts; Robert Vlietinck; Severine Vermeire

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics is the study of the association between variability in drug response and (or) drug toxicity and polymorphisms in genes. The goal of this field of science is to adapt drugs to a patient's specific genetic background and therefore make them more efficacious and safe. In this article we describe the variants in genes that influence either the efficacy or toxicity of common drugs used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC),and Crohn's disease (CD) including sulfasalazine and mesalazine, azathioprine (AZA) and 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP), methotrexate (MTX), glucocorticosteroids (CSs) and infliximab. Furthermore, difficulties with pharmacogenetic studies in general and more specifically in IBD are described. Although pharmacogenetics is a promising field that already contributed to a better understanding of some of the underlying mechanisms of action of drugs used in IBD, the only discovery translated until now into daily practice is the relation between thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) gene polymorphisms and hematological toxicity of thiopurine treatment. In the future it is necessary to organize studies in well characterized patient cohorts who have been uniformly treated and systematically evaluated in order to quantitate drug response more objectively. An effort should be made to collect genomic DNA from all patients enrolled in clinical drug trials after appropriate informed consent for pharmacogenetic studies.

  17. Inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy

    Dawn B Beaulieu; Sunanda Kane

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis affect women in their child-bearing years. Family planning has come to be a common discussion between the gastroenterologist and the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient.Disease control prior to desired conception and throughout pregnancy is the most important thing to keep in mind when caring for the IBD patient. Continued medical management during pregnancy is crucial in optimizing outcomes. Studies indicate that quiescent disease prior to conception infer the best pregnancy outcomes, similar to those in the general population.Active disease prior to and during pregnancy, can lead to complications such as pre-term labor, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. Although there are no definitive long term effects of pregnancy on IBD, there are some limited studies that suggest that it may alter the disease course. Understanding the literature and its limitations is important in the modern era of IBD care. Educating the patient and taking a team approach with the obstetrician will help achieve successful outcomes for mother and baby.

  18. Smoking and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Rubin, D T; Hanauer, S B

    2000-08-01

    It is well established that smoking cigarettes is associated with Crohn's disease (CD) and that non-smoking is associated with ulcerative colitis (UC). Furthermore, there is convincing evidence that smoking cigarettes has a negative effect on the course of CD, and that smoking cigarettes may improve the disease severity or have a 'protective' effect in some patients with UC. Despite these well-described associations, the mechanism by which cigarette smoking affects CD and UC is not known. Researchers have studied the systemic effects, cellular and humoral immune effects, mucosal changes, and the intestinal permeability changes with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and smoking. To date, none of these studies adequately explains the observed clinical patterns. It has been assumed that nicotine is the active agent in these associations, but clinical trials of nicotine chewing gum and transdermal nicotine in UC have shown limited benefit, and have been complicated by significant side-effects. Topical delivery systems for nicotine therapy are currently under development and await future clinical trials. PMID:10958212

  19. Picornavirus-Induced Airway Mucosa Immune Profile in Asymptomatic Neonates

    Wolsk, Helene M.; Følsgaard, Nilofar V.; Birch, Sune;

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial airway colonization is known to alter the airway mucosa immune response in neonates whereas the impact of viruses is unknown. The objective was therefore to examine the effect of respiratory viruses on the immune signature in the airways of asymptomatic neonates. Nasal aspirates from 57...

  20. Small intestinal mucosa expression of putative chaperone fls485

    Raupach Kerstin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maturation of enterocytes along the small intestinal crypt-villus axis is associated with significant changes in gene expression profiles. fls485 coding a putative chaperone protein has been recently suggested as a gene involved in this process. The aim of the present study was to analyze fls485 expression in human small intestinal mucosa. Methods fls485 expression in purified normal or intestinal mucosa affected with celiac disease was investigated with a molecular approach including qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and expression strategies. Molecular data were corroborated with several in situ techniques and usage of newly synthesized mouse monoclonal antibodies. Results fls485 mRNA expression was preferentially found in enterocytes and chromaffine cells of human intestinal mucosa as well as in several cell lines including Rko, Lovo, and CaCo2 cells. Western blot analysis with our new anti-fls485 antibodies revealed at least two fls485 proteins. In a functional CaCo2 model, an increase in fls485 expression was paralleled by cellular maturation stage. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated fls485 as a cytosolic protein with a slightly increasing expression gradient along the crypt-villus axis which was impaired in celiac disease Marsh IIIa-c. Conclusions Expression and synthesis of fls485 are found in surface lining epithelia of normal human intestinal mucosa and deriving epithelial cell lines. An interdependence of enterocyte differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and fls485 chaperone activity might be possible.

  1. MAGE-A antigens in lesions of the oral mucosa.

    Krauss, Eva; Rauthe, Stephan; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Reuther, Tobias; Kochel, Michael; Kriegebaum, Ulrike; Kübler, Alexander C; Müller-Richter, Urs D A

    2011-06-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma develops continuously out of predamaged oral mucosa. For the physician and pathologist, difficulties arise in distinguishing precancerous from cancerous lesions. MAGE-A antigens are tumor antigens that are found solely in malignant transformed cells. These antigens might be useful in distinguishing precancerous from cancerous lesions. The aim of this study was to verify this assumption by comparing MAGE-A expression in benign, precancerous, and cancerous lesions of the oral mucosa. Retrospectively, biopsies of different oral lesions were randomly selected. The lesions that were included are 64 benign oral lesions (25 traumatic lesions (oral ulcers), 13 dental follicles, and 26 epulis), 26 oral lichen planus, 123 epithelial precursor lesions (32 epithelial hyperplasia found in leukoplakias, 24 epithelial dysplasia found in leukoplakias, 26 erythroplasia with oral epithelial dysplasia, and 41 carcinomas in situ in erythroleukoplakias). The lesions were immunohistochemically stained with the poly-MAGE-A antibody 57B, and the results were compared. Biopsies of oral lichen planus, oral ulcers, dental follicles, epulis, and leukoplakia without dysplasia showed no positive staining for MAGE-A antigens. Leukoplakia with dysplasia, dysplasia, and carcinomata in situ displayed positive staining in 33%, 65%, and 56% of the cases, respectively. MAGE-A antigens were not detectable via immunohistochemistry in benign lesions of the oral mucosa. The staining rate of dysplastic precancerous lesions or malignant lesions ranged from 33% to 65%. The MAGE-A antigens might facilitate better differentiation between precancerous and cancerous lesions of the oral mucosa. PMID:20174843

  2. Effects of individual characteristics on healthy oral mucosa autofluorescence spectra

    de Veld, DCG; Sterenborg, HJCM; Roodenburg, JLN; Witjes, MJH

    2004-01-01

    Autofluorescence spectroscopy is a tool. for detecting tissue alterations in vivo. In a previous study, we found spectral differences between clinically normal mucosa of different patient groups. These are possibly caused by associated patient characteristics. In the present study, we explore the in

  3. Heterotaxy syndromes and abnormal bowel rotation

    Newman, Beverley [Stanford University, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Koppolu, Raji; Sylvester, Karl [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Surgery, Stanford, CA (United States); Murphy, Daniel [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Cardiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bowel rotation abnormalities in heterotaxy are common. As more children survive cardiac surgery, the management of gastrointestinal abnormalities has become controversial. To evaluate imaging of malrotation in heterotaxy with surgical correlation and provide an algorithm for management. Imaging reports of heterotaxic children with upper gastrointestinal (UGI) and/or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) were reviewed. Subsequently, fluoroscopic images were re-reviewed in conjunction with CT/MR studies. The original reports and re-reviewed images were compared and correlated with surgical findings. Nineteen of 34 children with heterotaxy underwent UGI, 13/19 also had SBFT. In 15/19 reports, bowel rotation was called abnormal: 11 malrotation, 4 non-rotation, no cases of volvulus. Re-review, including CT (10/19) and MR (2/19), designated 17/19 (90%) as abnormal, 10 malrotation (abnormal bowel arrangement, narrow or uncertain length of mesentery) and 7 non-rotation (small bowel and colon on opposite sides plus low cecum with probable broad mesentery). The most useful CT/MR findings were absence of retroperitoneal duodenum in most abnormal cases and location of bowel, especially cecum. Abnormal orientation of mesenteric vessels suggested malrotation but was not universal. Nine children had elective bowel surgery; non-rotation was found in 4/9 and malrotation was found in 5/9, with discrepancies (non-rotation at surgery, malrotation on imaging) with 4 original interpretations and 1 re-review. We recommend routine, early UGI and SBFT studies once other, urgent clinical concerns have been stabilized, with elective laparoscopic surgery in abnormal or equivocal cases. Cross-sectional imaging, usually obtained for other reasons, can contribute diagnostically. Attempting to assess mesenteric width is important in differentiating non-rotation from malrotation and more accurately identifies appropriate surgical candidates. (orig.)

  4. Feasibility of laparoscopy for small bowel obstruction

    De Sol Angelo A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherential pathology is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction. Laparoscopy in small bowel obstruction does not have a clear role yet; surely it doesn't always represent only a therapeutic act, but it is always a diagnostic act, which doesn't interfere with abdominal wall integrity. Methods We performed a review without any language restrictions considering international literature indexed from 1980 to 2007 in Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library. We analyzed the reference lists of the key manuscripts. We also added a review based on international non-indexed sources. Results The feasibility of diagnostic laparoscopy is high (60–100%, while that of therapeutic laparoscopy is low (40–88%. The frequency of laparotomic conversions is variable ranging from 0 to 52%, depending on patient selection and surgical skill. The first cause of laparotomic conversion is a difficult exposition and treatment of band adhesions. The incidence of laparotomic conversions is major in patients with anterior peritoneal band adhesions. Other main causes for laparotomic conversion are the presence of bowel necrosis and accidental enterotomies. The predictive factors for successful laparoscopic adhesiolysis are: number of previous laparotomies ≤ 2, non-median previous laparotomy, appendectomy as previous surgical treatment causing adherences, unique band adhesion as phatogenetic mechanism of small bowel obstruction, early laparoscopic management within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms, no signs of peritonitis on physical examination, experience of the surgeon. Conclusion Laparoscopic adhesiolysis in small bowel obstruction is feasible but can be convenient only if performed by skilled surgeons in selected patients. The laparoscopic adhesiolysis for small bowel obstruction is satisfactorily carried out when early indicated in patients with a low number of laparotomies resulting in a short hospital stay and a lower postoperative

  5. Cadmium inhibits acid secretion in stimulated frog gastric mucosa

    Cadmium, a toxic environmental pollutant, affects the function of different organs such as lungs, liver and kidney. Less is known about its toxic effects on the gastric mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which cadmium impacts on the physiology of gastric mucosa. To this end, intact amphibian mucosae were mounted in Ussing chambers and the rate of acid secretion, short circuit current (Isc), transepithelial potential (Vt) and resistance (Rt) were recorded in the continuous presence of cadmium. Addition of cadmium (20 μM to 1 mM) on the serosal but not luminal side of the mucosae resulted in inhibition of acid secretion and increase in NPPB-sensitive, chloride-dependent short circuit current. Remarkably, cadmium exerted its effects only on histamine-stimulated tissues. Experiments with TPEN, a cell-permeant chelator for heavy metals, showed that cadmium acts from the intracellular side of the acid secreting cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced inhibition of acid secretion and increase in Isc cannot be explained by an action on: 1) H2 histamine receptor, 2) Ca2+ signalling 3) adenylyl cyclase or 4) carbonic anhydrase. Conversely, cadmium was ineffective in the presence of the H+/K+-ATPase blocker omeprazole suggesting that the two compounds likely act on the same target. Our findings suggest that cadmium affects the functionality of histamine-stimulated gastric mucosa by inhibiting the H+/K+-ATPase from the intracellular side. These data shed new light on the toxic effect of this dangerous environmental pollutant and may result in new avenues for therapeutic intervention in acute and chronic intoxication.

  6. Irradiation injuries of the large intestine

    A series of 15 patients suffering from irradiation injuries to the large bowel is reviewed. Ten patients required surgical intervention; intestinal continuity was re-established in three patients. As only three of the patients developed recurrent carcinoma, the initial operation for irradiation injury to the large bowel should be carefully planned so that the patient is not ultimately cured of carcinoma but left with a permanent stoma

  7. [The role of defensins in the pathogenesis of chronic-inflammatory bowel disease].

    Schmid, M; Fellermann, K; Wehkamp, J; Herrlinger, K; Stange, E F

    2004-04-01

    Defensins are endogenous antimicrobial peptides with a broad activity spectrum. Even at micromolar concentrations gramnegative and grampositive bacteria, but also mycobacteria, as well as fungi (candida), viruses (herpes) and protozoa (giardia lamblia) are destroyed. As part of the innate immune system defensins are expressed by the intestinal epithelium and contribute to the maintenance of the mucosal barrier. This barrier appears to be defective in inflammatory bowel diseases since on one hand, the immune response is directed against the "normal" luminal bacterial flora and on the other hand, mucosal adherent and invasive bacteria have been observed in these diseases. A defective defensin expression may well explain these phenomena. Indeed, Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum, especially if associated with a NOD2 mutation, is characterised by a diminished alpha-defensin (human defensin 5 and 6) expression, and in inflamed Crohn's colitis, in contrast to ulcerative colitis, the beta-defensin (human beta-defensins 2 and 3) response is reduced. Through a deficient chemical mucosal barrier this defect could lead to increased bacterial invasion into the intestinal mucosa and might well explain an adequate inflammatory response. Although the final proof that this deficient defensin response leads to a reduced antibacterial activity of the intestinal mucosa is still lacking, the most plausible concept of pathogenesis of Crohn's disease is a defensin deficiency syndrome. PMID:15095125

  8. Small bowel obstruction secondary to migration of a fragment of lithobezoar: a case report.

    Medani, Mekki

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Small bowel obstruction is a common world-wide condition that has a range of etiological factors. The management is largely dependent on the cause of the obstruction. Small bowel obstruction caused by foreign body ingestion is rare; many items have been reported as responsible, but there are no reports implicating polyurethane foam. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a 44-year-old Irish male who presented following ingestion of polyurethane foam. He was asymptomatic on presentation but developed a small bowel obstruction shortly thereafter. CONCLUSION: Patients presenting following ingestion of polyurethane foam should be scheduled for elective laparotomy, gastrotomy, and retrieval of the cast on the next available theatre list - given that they are suitable for surgery.

  9. Enfermedad de la mucosa oral: Penfigoide de las membranas mucosas Oral mucosal disease: Mucouse membrane pemphigoid

    N. Discepoli

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Los trastornos vesículobullosos subepiteliales representan desordenes autoinmunitarios que cogen origen de reacciones dirigidas hacia componentes de los hemidesmosomas o bien de las Zonas de la Membrana Basal (ZMB de los epitelios escamosos estratificados. A estos trastornos ha sido conferidoel término de enfermedades ampollosa subepiteliales inmunomediadas (EASIM y el penfigoide de las membranas mucosas (PMM es el más frecuente. Todas las enfermedades subepiteliales vesiculobullosas se presentan como lesiones ampollosas y descamativas, y el diagnostico debe de ser confirmado por una biopsia junta a tinción inmunológica. No hay un único tratamiento capaz de controlar todas las enfermedades subepiteliales vesiculoampollosas; las diferencias inmunológicas entre las EASIM proporciona diferencias en las respuestas al tratamiento. Hoy en día el tratamiento inmunorregulador es usado para controlar la lesión oral de PMM.Subepithelial vesiculobullous conditions are chronic autoimmune disorders that arise from reactions directed against components of the hemidesmosomes or basement membrane zones (BMZ of stratified squamous epithelium to which the term immune-mediated subepithelial blistering diseases (IMSEBD has been given. Mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP is the most common, but variants do exist. All subepithelial vesiculobullous disorders present as blisters and erosions, and diagnosis must be confirmed by biopsy examination with immunostaining, sometimes supplemented by other investigations. No single treatment reliably controls all subepithelial vesiculobullous disorders; the immunological differences within IMSEBD may account for differences in responses to treatment. Currently, as well as improving oral hygiene, immunomodulatory treatment is used to control the oral lesions of MMP, but it is not known if its specific subsets reliably respond to different agents.

  10. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease

    Walsham NE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natalie E Walsham,1 Roy A Sherwood2 1Department of Clinical Biochemistry, University Hospital Lewisham, Lewisham, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Viapath at King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Accurate diagnosis of IBD is therefore essential. Clinical assessment, together with various imaging modalities and endoscopy, has been the mainstay of diagnosis for many years. Fecal biomarkers of gastrointestinal inflammation have appeared in the past decade, of which calprotectin, a neutrophil cytosolic protein, has been studied the most. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic remitting and relapsing diseases, and objective assessment of disease activity and response to treatment are important. This review focuses on the use of fecal calprotectin measurements in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with IBD. Keywords: calprotectin, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, inflammation 

  11. A case of Polyarteritis Nodosa Mimicking Pyelonephritis and was Misdiagnosed as Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Ebubekir ŞENATEŞ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN is characterized by necrotizing inflammation of small- or medium-sized muscular arteries. Atypic clinical presentation leads to delay in diagnosis. For this reason, it can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Here, we described a case which presented first with fever and left costovertebral angle tenderness, and was misdiagnosed as pyelonephritis. The patient did not benefit from intravenous antibiotherapy that was prescribed in the outpatient clinic and then hospitalized for left lower abdominal pain. No source of fever was found despite detailed physical examination and laboratory investigation. An abdominal ultrasonography showed hyperechogenity of the left kidney. An abdominal computed tomography was performed for left lower abdominal pain suggesting inflammatory bowel disease findings. Colonoscopy showed an ulcero-vegetating and nodular mass surrounding the whole sigmoid colon mucosa and suggesting a malignant tumour. A conventional angiography of the mesenteric artery showed total occlusion of the inferior mesenteric artery. He developed acute abdominal pain and, left hemicolectomy was performed for colonic perforation. Histopathological findings consistent with PAN were detected in the pathological examination of the resected bowel, and the patient was diagnosed with PAN. After initiation of corticosteroid and cyclophosphamide therapy, the clinical status of the patient was improved dramatically with disappearence of fever and relief of abdominal pain. Turk J Phys Med Rehab 2013;59:79-82.

  12. Effect of commensals and probiotics on visceral sensitivity and pain in irritable bowel syndrome

    Theodorou, Vassilia; Belgnaoui, Afifa Ait; Agostini, Simona; Eutamene, Helene

    2014-01-01

    The last ten years’ wide progress in the gut microbiota phylogenetic and functional characterization has been made evidencing dysbiosis in several gastrointestinal diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a functional gut disease with high prevalence and negative impact on patient’s quality of life characterized mainly by visceral pain and/or discomfort, representing a good paradigm of chronic gut hypersensitivity. The IBS features are strongly regulated by bidirectional gut-brain interactions and there is increasing evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria and/or their metabolites in these features, including visceral pain. Further, gut microbiota modulation by antibiotics or probiotics has been promising in IBS. Mechanistic data provided mainly by animal studies highlight that commensals or probiotics may exert a direct action through bacterial metabolites on sensitive nerve endings in the gut mucosa, or indirect pathways targeting the intestinal epithelial barrier, the mucosal and/or systemic immune activation, and subsequent neuronal sensitization and/or activation. PMID:25184834

  13. Microbial Sensing by the Intestinal Epithelium in the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Michael Scharl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have raised evidence that the intestinal microbiota plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowels diseases. This evidence comes from several observations. First, animals raised under germ-free conditions do not develop intestinal inflammation in several different model systems. Second, antibiotics are able to modulate the course of experimental colitis. Third, genetic polymorphisms in a variety of genes of the innate immune system have been associated with chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases. Dysfunction of these molecules results in an inappropriate response to bacterial and antigenic stimulation of the innate immune system in the gastrointestinal tract. Variants of pattern recognition receptors such as NOD2 or TLRs by which commensal and pathogenic bacteria can be detected have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of IBD. But not only pathways of microbial detection but also intracellular ways of bacterial processing such as autophagosome function are associated with the risk to develop Crohn's disease. Thus, the “environment concept” and the “genetic concept” of inflammatory bowel disease pathophysiology are converging via the intestinal microbiota and the recognition mechanisms for an invasion of members of the microbiota into the mucosa.

  14. Endothelial Fas-Ligand in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and in Acute Appendicitis.

    Kokkonen, Tuomo S; Karttunen, Tuomo J

    2015-12-01

    Fas-mediated induction of apoptosis is a major factor in the selection of lymphocytes and downregulation of immunological processes. In the present study, we have assessed endothelial Fas-ligand (FasL) expression in normal human ileum, appendix, and colon, and compared the expression levels with that in inflammatory bowel disease and in acute appendicitis. In a normal appendix, endothelial FasL levels were constant in almost half of the mucosal vessels; but, in the normal ileum and colon, endothelial FasL was practically restricted to areas in close proximity to lymphatic follicles, and was expressed mainly in the submucosal aspect of the follicles in the vessels with high endothelium. In samples from subjects with either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, the extent of endothelial FasL expression was elevated in the submucosa and associated with an elevated number of lymphoid follicles. In inflammatory bowel disease, ulcers and areas with a high density of mononuclear cells expressing FasL also showed an elevated density of blood vessels with endothelial FasL expression. Although the function of endothelial FasL remains unclear, such a specific expression pattern suggests that endothelial FasL expression has a role in the regulation of lymphocyte access to the peripheral lymphoid tissues, including the intestinal mucosa. PMID:26374830

  15. Recent advances in biological therapy for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Kurtovic, Jelica; Segal, Isidor

    2004-01-01

    Immune system is a major determinant of pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and cytokines are well known mediators of immune system. Recently, informations on pro-inflammatory cytokines and their role in IBD have led to development of potential therapeutic approach to manipulate these cytokines and there by inhibiting inflammation in IBD. These therapeutic approaches include inhibitors of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha lymphocyte trafficking, type 1 T helper (Th1) cell polarization and nuclear factor type beta; immunoregulatory cytokines and various growth factors. Studies on these therapies have documented variable results and the outcomes of many clinical trials are awaited. However, these potential therapies, if become real may revolutionise approach in patients with IBD. Analysis of the inflammed mucosa from patients with Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) have shown increased expression of certain proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and TNF-alpha. The latter is important in the recruitment of neutrophils into inflammed tissue, a process which results from three physiological steps: (i) rolling, (ii) adhesion, and (iii) transendothelial migration. Understanding of the biology of chronic inflammation has expanded the therapies available for IBD and particularly CD. At present, the biological therapies that are being used in clinical practice or investigated for the treatment of IBD are predominantly proteins, usually delivered intravenously or subcutaneously. The therapies used include: 1. TNF-alpha inhibitors: infliximab, CDP 571, etanercept, onercept, CNI- 1493 and thalidomide. 2. Inhibitors of lymphocyte trafficking: natalizumab, LPD-02 and ICAM-1. 3. Inhibitors of Th1 polarization: monoclonal antibodies for IL-12, interferon (IFN)-gamma and anti IFN-gamma. 4. Immunoregulatory cytokines: IL-10 and IL-11. 5. Inhibitors of nuclear factor kappa (beta NF-kbeta.) 6. Growth factors

  16. Biofeedback & Bowel Disorders: Teaching Yourself to Live without the Problem

    ... Constipation Personal Stories Contact Us Biofeedback & Bowel Disorders: Teaching Yourself to Live Without the Problem Home Biofeedback ... donation. Adapted from IFFGD Publication: Biofeedback & Bowel Disorders: Teaching Yourself to Live without the Problem by Mary ...

  17. Visceral hypersensitivity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome:pathophysiological mechanisms

    Kerckhoffs, A.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disease characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort associated with a disordered defecation. No unique pathophysiological mechanism has been identified. It is most likely a multifactorial disease involving alterations in intestinal microbiota co

  18. Cannabis for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Naftali, Timna; Mechulam, Raphael; Lev, Lihi Bar; Konikoff, Fred M

    2014-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been used for centuries as a treatment for a variety of ailments. It contains over 60 different cannabinoid compounds. Studies have revealed that the endocannabinoid system is involved in almost all major immune events. Cannabinoids may, therefore, be beneficial in inflammatory disorders. In murine colitis, cannabinoids decrease histologic and microscopic inflammation. In humans, cannabis has been used to treat a plethora of gastrointestinal problems, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and diabetic gastroparesis. Despite anecdotal reports on medical cannabis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), there are few controlled studies. In an observational study in 30 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), we found that medical cannabis was associated with improvement in disease activity and reduction in the use of other medications. In a more recent placebo-controlled study in 21 chronic CD patients, we showed a decrease in the CD activity index >100 in 10 of 11 subjects on cannabis compared to 4 of 10 on placebo. Complete remission was achieved in 5 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group and 1 of 10 in the placebo group. Yet, in an additional study, low-dose cannabidiol did not have an effect on CD activity. In summary, evidence is gathering that manipulating the endocannabinoid system can have beneficial effects in IBD, but further research is required to declare cannabinoids a medicine. We need to establish the specific cannabinoids, as well as appropriate medical conditions, optimal dose, and mode of administration, to maximize the beneficial effects while avoiding any potential harmful effects of cannabinoid use. PMID:24969296

  19. Jejunitis and brown bowel syndrome with multifocal carcinogenesis of the small bowel.

    Raithel, Martin; Rau, Tilman T; Hagel, Alexander F; Albrecht, Heinz; de Rossi, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Hahn, Eckhart G

    2015-09-28

    This is the first report describing a case where prolonged, severe malabsorption from brown bowel syndrome progressed to multifocally spread small bowel adenocarcinoma. This case involves a female patient who was initially diagnosed with chronic jejunitis associated with primary diffuse lymphangiectasia at the age of 26 years. The course of the disease was clinically, endoscopically, and histologically followed for 21 years until her death at the age 47 due to multifocal, metastasizing adenocarcinoma of the small bowel. Multiple lipofuscin deposits (so-called brown bowel syndrome) and severe jejunitis were observed microscopically, and sections of the small bowel showed dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the lamina propria as well as blocked lymphatic vessels. After several decades, multifocal nests of adenocarcinoma cells and extensive, flat, neoplastic mucosal proliferations were found only in the small bowel, along with a loss of the mismatch repair protein MLH1 as a long-term consequence of chronic jejunitis with malabsorption. No evidence was found for hereditary nonpolyposis colon carcinoma syndrome. This article demonstrates for the first time multifocal carcinogenesis in the small bowel in a malabsorption syndrome in an enteritis-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. PMID:26420973

  20. The adhesiometer: a simple device to measure adherence of barium sulfate to intestinal mucosa.

    Salomonowitz, E; Frick, M P; Cragg, A H; Lund, G

    1984-04-01

    A simple, inexpensive device assessing barium sulfate adherence to alimentary tract mucosa was tested in an animal study using pigs and dogs. Interaction of gastric, intestinal, and colonic mucosal lining with three different barium preparations was studied. In both pigs and dogs, barium adherence to gastric mucosa was significantly stronger when compared with colonic mucosa. PMID:6608230

  1. Studies of the small bowel surface by scanning electron microscopy in infants with persistent diarrhea

    U. Fagundes-Neto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the ultrastructural abnormalities of the small bowel surface in 16 infants with persistent diarrhea. The age range of the patients was 2 to 10 months, mean 4.8 months. All patients had diarrhea lasting 14 or more days. Bacterial overgrowth of the colonic microflora in the jejunal secretion, at concentrations above 10(4 colonies/ml, was present in 11 (68.7% patients. The stool culture was positive for an enteropathogenic agent in 8 (50.0% patients: for EPEC O111 in 2, EPEC O119 in 1, EAEC in 1, and Shigella flexneri in 1; mixed infections due to EPEC O111 and EAEC in 1 patient, EPEC O119 and EAEC in 1 and EPEC O55, EPEC O111, EAEC and Shigella sonnei in 1. Morphological abnormalities in the small bowel mucosa were observed in all 16 patients, varying in intensity from moderate 9 (56.3% to severe 7 (43.7%. The scanning electron microscopic study of small bowel biopsies from these subjects showed several surface abnormalities. At low magnification (100X most of the villi showed mild to moderate stunting, but on several occasions there was subtotal villus atrophy. At higher magnification (7,500X photomicrographs showed derangement of the enterocytes; on several occasions the cell borders were not clearly defined and very often microvilli were decreased in number and height; in some areas there was a total disappearance of the microvilli. In half of the patients a mucus-fibrinoid pseudomembrane was seen partially coating the enterocytes, a finding that provides additional information on the pathophysiology of persistent diarrhea.

  2. The role of fecal calprotectin in investigating inflammatory bowel diseases

    Mustafa Erbayrak; Cansel Turkay; Elife Eraslan; Hulya Cetinkaya; Benan Kasapoglu; Mehmet Bektas

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Invasive and non-invasive tests can be used to evaluate the activity of inflammatory bowel diseases. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of fecal calprotectin in evaluating inflammatory bowel disease activity and the correlation of fecal calprotectin with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C reactive protein values in inflammatory bowel disease. METHOD: Sixty-five patients affected with inflammatory bowel disease were enrolled. Twenty outpatie...

  3. Transient small bowel angioedema due to intravenous iodinated contrast media

    Hu, Xiu-Hua; Gong, Xiang-Yang; Hu, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Three cases of transient proximal small bowel angioedema induced by intravenous administration of nonionic iodinated contrast media (CM) are presented. Computed tomography (CT) images in the venous phase displayed the proximal small bowel with circumferential thickening of the wall including the duodenum and proximal segment of the jejunum. The bowel wall was normal in non-enhanced images, and normal or inconspicuous in arterial phase enhanced images. In one of the three cases, the bowel wall...

  4. Arteriovenous Malformation Detected by Small Bowel Endoscopy

    Takaaki Fujii

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal bleeding that originates in the small intestine is often difficult to diagnose. When successful diagnosis reveals a lesion that can be localized preoperatively, the laparoscopic approach is an appropriate and beneficial treatment modality for small bowel resection. A 69-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of gastrointestinal bleeding and symptomatic transfusion-dependent anemia. Upper and lower endoscopy were normal. Double-balloon endoscopy established the source of the bleeding as a 0.5-cm polypoid mass appearing as a submucosal tumor with redness and pulsation in the lower ileum, suggesting a vascular lesion. Laparoscopic small bowel resection was successful in removing the mass in the ileum. Histological evaluation of the mass revealed an arteriovenous malformation. Preoperative small bowel endoscopy can be useful for diagnosing the cause and localization of arteriovenous malformation in the small intestine.

  5. Laparoscopic Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction

    Konjic, Ferid; Idrizovic, Enes; Hasukic, Ismar; Jahic, Alen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adhesions are the reason for bowel obstruction in 80% of the cases. In well selected patients the adhesive ileus laparoscopic treatment has multiple advantages which include the shorter hospitalization period, earlier food taking, and less postoperative morbidity rate. Case report: Here we have a patient in the age of 35 hospitalized at the clinic due to occlusive symptoms. Two years before an opened appendectomy had been performed on him. He underwent the treatment of exploration laparoscopy and laparoscopic adhesiolysis. Dilated small bowel loops connected with the anterior abdominal wall in the ileocecal region by adhesions were found intraoperatively and then resected harmonically with scalpel. One strangulation around which a small bowel loop was wrapped around was found and dissected. Postoperative course was normal. PMID:27041815

  6. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement

    Bonasso, Patrick C.; Brandon Lucke-Wold; Uzer Khan

    2016-01-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection.

  7. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement

    Patrick C. Bonasso

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection.

  8. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement.

    Bonasso, Patrick C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Khan, Uzer

    2016-07-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection. PMID:27335801

  9. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  10. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hong Il [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  11. Cholecystectomy and adenomatous polyps of the large bowel.

    Llamas, K J; Torlach, L G; Ward, M.; Bain, C.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy two patients (39 women) with colonic adenomas were compared with 72 adenoma free controls (39 women) to investigate the possible association between previous cholecystectomy and the subsequent development of adenomas. Data were gathered retrospectively from medical records. Overall there was no significant association between colonic adenomas and previous cholecystectomy. When women are considered separately, however, eight cases and no controls had undergone cholecystectomy (odds rat...

  12. Post-kidney transplant large bowel lymphoproliferative disorder

    Neeraj Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a serious complication of organ transplantation. The gastrointestinal (GI tract is a common site involved, but non-specific signs and symptoms often delay the diagnosis. We report a case of EBV-associated GI-PTLD in a 68-year-old kidney transplant patient who received the kidney ten months earlier. He presented with chronic diarrhea and developed massive pneumo-peritoneum secondary to multiple colonic perforations.

  13. Omphalocele minor associated with complete absence of the large bowel.

    Ferede, Atakelet

    2012-02-01

    Colonic atresia, unlike small intestine atresia, is a rare congenital malformation. Congenital absence of the entire colon is exceptionally rare. Moreover, an association of omphalocele and complete absence of the colon has not yet been reported in the literature. We present an infant born with such combination of congenital anomalies.

  14. Meat consumption and cancer of the large bowel.

    Truswell, A S

    2002-03-01

    Since the major reviews on diet and cancer by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and by the British Department of Health's Committee on Medical Aspects of Food Policy (COMA) in 1997 and 1998, additional epidemiological studies relating (red) meat consumption and colorectal cancer have been published or found by search. These are collected here. Thirty adequate case-control studies have been published up to 1999 (from 16 different countries). Twenty of them found no significant association of (red) meat with colorectal cancer. Of the remaining 10 studies reporting an association, some obtained statistical significance only in rectal or colon cancers, another only in men, not women, or found a stronger association with pasta and rice, or used an inadequate food list in the food frequency questionnaire. Fifteen cohort studies have now been published. Only in three were significant associations of (red) meat found with colorectal cancer. Two of these positive studies were from the same group in the USA (relative risk 1.7). The results of the third positive study appear to conflict with data from part of the vegetarians follow up mortality study. Here, five groups of vegetarians (in three different countries) with socially matched controls were followed up (total 76 000 people). Mortality from colorectal cancer was not distinguishable between vegetarians and controls. While it is still possible that certain processed meats or sausages (with a variety of added ingredients) or meats cooked at very high temperature carry some risk, the relationship between meats in general and colorectal cancer now looks weaker than the 'probable' status it was judged to have by the WCRF in 1997. PMID:11965518

  15. Colon cancer and large bowel function in Denmark and Finland

    Cummings, J H; Branch, W J; Bjerrum, L;

    1982-01-01

    Stool weight and transit time through the gut were measured in 4 groups of 30 men, aged 50-59 years, randomly selected from populations in urban (Copenhagen) and rural (Them) Denmark and urban (Helsinki) and rural (Parikkala) Finland. These populations exhibited a 3-4 fold difference in risk for ...

  16. A prospective study of differences in duodenum compared to remaining small bowel motion between radiation treatments: Implications for radiation dose escalation in carcinoma of the pancreas

    As a foundation for a dose escalation trial, we sought to characterize duodenal and non-duodenal small bowel organ motion between fractions of pancreatic radiation therapy. Nine patients (4 women, 5 men) undergoing radiation therapy were enrolled in this prospective study. The patients had up to four weekly CT scans performed during their course of radiation therapy. Pancreas, duodenum and non-duodenal small bowel were then contoured for each CT scan. On the initial scan, a four-field plan was generated to fully cover the pancreas. This plan was registered to each subsequent CT scan. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analyses were performed for the duodenum, non-duodenal small bowel, large bowel, and pancreas. With significant individual variation, the volume of duodenum receiving at least 80% of the prescribed dose was consistently greater than the remaining small bowel. In the patient with the largest inter-fraction variation, the fractional volume of non-duodenal small bowel irradiated to at least the 80% isodose line ranged from 1% to 20%. In the patient with the largest inter-fraction variation, the fractional volume of duodenum irradiated to at least the 80% isodose line ranged from 30% to 100%. The volume of small bowel irradiated during four-field pancreatic radiation therapy changes substantially between fractions. This suggests dose escalation may be possible. However, dose limits to the duodenum should be stricter than for other segments of small bowel

  17. Delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion

    Mehta Ajay

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complications of suprapubic catheter insertion are rare but can be significant. We describe an unusual complication of a delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion. Case presentation A gentleman presented with features of peritonitis and feculent discharge along a suprapubic catheter two months after insertion of the catheter. Conclusion Bowel perforation is the most feared complication of suprapubic catheter insertion especially in patients with lower abdominal scar. The risk may be reduced with the use of ultrasound scan guidance.

  18. Case report: Congenital short bowel syndrome

    Palle Lalitha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital short bowel syndrome (SBS is a relatively rare condition as compared to acquired SBS. It is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Infants usually present with failure to thrive, recurrent vomiting, and diarrhea. It is important to suspect and diagnose this condition promptly, as early initiation of parenteral nutrition or surgery, if necessary, may result in a favorable outcome. We discuss a case of an infant aged 26 days, who presented with failure to thrive, recurrent vomiting, and weight loss. A contrast study of the gastrointestinal tract revealed a short small bowel, with malrotation. The infant was started on parenteral nutrition, but succumbed shortly thereafter to severe disseminated sepsis.

  19. Biologic targeting in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases [Retraction

    Bosani M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bosani M, Ardizzone S, Porro GB. Biologics: Targets and Therapy. 2009;3:77–97.This paper has been retracted after we were made aware that it contains a large amount of reused, and uncited material that was not placed within quotation marks.The following statement has been supplied by Dr Sandro Ardizzone:The review entitled "Biologic targeting in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease" has been commissioned by this journal and published in 2009 (Matteo Bosani, Sandro Ardizzone, Gabriele Bianchi Porro. Biologics: Targets & Therapy 2009;3:77–97. The paper was written by our young coworker (Dr M Bosani. He has consulted many papers, including our previous reviews published years before. The not perfect knowledge of English language has greatly influenced the writing of the paper itself. So he saved in word file several parts of our previous papers (Ardizzone S, Bianchi Porro G. Inflammatory bowel disease: new insights into pathogenesis and treatment. J Intern Med 2002;252:475–496 – Ardizzone S, Bianchi Porro G. Biologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease. Drugs 2005:2253–2286, and then transferred to the final paper. He was unaware as we are, of the fact that he could not reuse previously published material in other journals. The reuse of this material was made in good faith.Taking our responsibility for what happened, we intend to apologize for this inconvenience to the Editor (Dr Doris Benbrook and Publisher (Dr Tim Hill. Moreover, for the reasons mentioned above, I consider appropriate to retract the paper itself.This retraction relates to this paper.

  20. Sulphation of the heterocyclic amine 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline in the human liver and intestinal mucosa: interindividual variability.

    Pacifici, G M; D'alessandro, C; Gucci, A; Giuliani, L

    1997-01-01

    The sulphation rate of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (TIQ) was measured in the human liver and in the intestinal mucosa isolated from the transverse colon, ileum and duodenum. The rate (mean +/- SD) of hepatic TIQ sulphation was 500 +/- 174 pmol/min per mg in women (n = 61) and 591 +/- 201 in men (n = 39; P = 0.0087), varying over one order of magnitude in men and women. The sulphation rate of testosterone showed the same sex-dependent pattern and was correlated (r = 0.6055; P < 0.001) with that of TIQ. The frequency distribution of TIQ sulphation rate in human liver was bimodal: 70% of the population fell into the low-activity subgroup and the remaining 30% feel into the high-activity subgroup. In the colon (n = 56), the rate of TIQ sulphation was 30.4 +/- 15.6 pmol/min per mg and the values were similar in men and women (29.8 and 30.9 pmol/min per mg, respectively) but, varied over one order of magnitude and correlated (r = 0.7231; P < 0.001) with that of 4-nitrophenol. The rate of TIQ sulphation changed along the human bowel and mean (+/-SD) estimates for duodenum, ileum and transverse colon were 444 +/- 25, 182 +/- 87 and 30.4 +/- 15.6 pmol/ min per mg, respectively. The present results are consistent with the view that the heterocyclic amine TIQ is sulphated in the human liver and intestinal mucosa. TIQ-sulphotransferase activity varies among subjects and is mostly associated with the liver and duodenum. PMID:9248624

  1. Effective in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer to intestinal mucosa by VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors

    Kasahara Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer to the gastrointestinal (GI mucosa is a therapeutic strategy which could prove particularly advantageous for treatment of various hereditary and acquired intestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, GI infections, and cancer. Methods We evaluated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein envelope (VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LV for efficacy of gene transfer to both murine rectosigmoid colon in vivo and human colon explants ex vivo. LV encoding beta-galactosidase (LV-β-Gal or firefly-luciferase (LV-fLuc reporter genes were administered by intrarectal instillation in mice, or applied topically for ex vivo transduction of human colorectal explant tissues from normal individuals. Macroscopic and histological evaluations were performed to assess any tissue damage or inflammation. Transduction efficiency and systemic biodistribution were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR. LV-fLuc expression was evaluated by ex vivo bioluminescence imaging. LV-β-Gal expression and identity of transduced cell types were examined by histochemical and immunofluorescence staining. Results Imaging studies showed positive fLuc signals in murine distal colon; β-Gal-positive cells were found in both murine and human intestinal tissue. In the murine model, β-Gal-positive epithelial and lamina propria cells were found to express cytokeratin, CD45, and CD4. LV-transduced β-Gal-positive cells were also seen in human colorectal explants, consisting mainly of CD45, CD4, and CD11c-positive cells confined to the LP. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of LV-mediated gene transfer into colonic mucosa. We also identified differential patterns of mucosal gene transfer dependent on whether murine or human tissue was used. Within the limitations of the study, the LV did not appear to induce mucosal damage and were not distributed beyond the distal colon.

  2. [Microflora of pharyngeal mucosa in children with solid tumors].

    Polishchuk, V B; Baturo, A P; Romanenko, E E; Kostinov, M P; Zaeva, G E; Mikhaĭlova, S N; Leonova, A Iu; Moiseenko, E I

    2008-01-01

    Microbiological study of pharyngeal mucosa in 43 children with solid tumors revealed that 77.2% of isolated microorganisms belonged to Gram-positive flora. It was shown that streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus were the main species. Species composition of streptococci included both pyogenic (S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae, S. equi) andviridans species (S. acidominimus, S. oralis and "S. milleri" group). Nocardioform actinomycetes, corynebacteria and other staphylococci were referred to additional microflora. Accidental microflora was represented by Neisseria spp., non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria, enterobacteria and yeast-like fungi. Microbiologic study of pharyngeal mucosa biocenosis showed that monoculture was present only in 2.3% of cases; in other cases microorganisms formed both intra-genus and inter-species associations. 2-6-component associations were revealed with predominance of 3-4-component associations (37.2% and 32.6% respectively). Relationship of distribution of microorganisms belonging to main and additional microflora was revealed. PMID:19186552

  3. Carcinogenesis of gallbladder mucosa with occult pancreatobiliary reflux

    Characteristics of gallbladder cancer (GC) with occult pancreatobiliary reflux (OPBR) were retrospectively examined with images by US (ultrasonography), endoscopic US (EUS), ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) and multi-row CT, and with pathological specimens of the mucosa to consider its carcinogenesis. Subjects were 51-77 years old, 7 female patients with GC in whom OPBR was suggested mainly by mucosal hypertrophy in those images. Pathological observation was performed on specimens stained by HE and Ki-67 (for detecting cell proliferation). Imaging and pathological findings of the mucosa in the present GC were found analogous to known characteristics of GC with abnormal pancreatbiliary confluence, suggesting a similar carcinogenetic process to each other, where biliary phospholipids (PL) were degraded to toxic lyso-PL and free fatty acids. The subject with OPBR could thus be classified in the high risk group. More cases in number were thought necessary to define the surgical treatment, its timing and procedure in GC. (R.T.)

  4. Concentrations of acidic antiinflammatory drugs in gastric mucosa.

    Frey, H H; El-Sayed, M A

    1977-12-01

    In rats, the concentrations of the acidic antiinflammatory drugs salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, phenylbutazone, flufenamic acid and indomethacin in the glandular portion of the gastric mucosa were determined 30 and 60 min after oral or subcutaneous administration. In another series of experiments, solutions of the drugs were introduced into the ligated stomach and the concentrations in the mucosa and in the contents of the stomach were determined after 60 min. The ratio between the concentrations in the musoca and those in serum or gastric contents were much lower than expected according to the distribution by passive non-ionic diffusion. This apparent discrepancy may be explained as a result of a drug-induced damage to the mucosal cell allowing free diffusion of ionized drug across the cell membrane. PMID:603322

  5. "Osteolipoma of buccal mucosa: case report and literature review"

    Raviraj, Jayam; Kumar-Bokkasam, Vijay; Suresh, Dirasantchu; Venkata, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Osteolipoma affecting oral cavity is indeed rare. We hereby report a case of osteolipoma affecting buccal mucosa. A review of literature of osteolipoma of oral cavity, particularly on radiographic/imaging findings was done. Only 16 cases of Osteolipoma of oral cavity are reported in the literature. The radiographic findings of our case, i.e. multiple dense homogenous radio-opaque structures was reported earlier only in one case [out of 16] of osteolipoma of oral cavity

  6. Nasal mucosa in workers exposed to formaldehyde: a pilot study.

    Boysen, M; Zadig, E; Digernes, V; Abeler, V; Reith, A.

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluates the histological changes, especially the presence of possible precancerous lesions, in the nasal mucosa of workers exposed to formaldehyde. Nasal biopsies of 37 workers occupationally exposed to formaldehyde for more than five years and 37 age matched referents showed a higher degree of metaplastic alterations in the former group. In addition, three cases of epithelial dysplasia were observed among the exposed. These results indicate that formaldehyde may be potentially c...

  7. Paraneoplastic disorders of hair, nails, oral mucosa and pigmentation

    Ayşe Kavak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this section, paraneoplastic entites of hair, nail, oral mucosa and pigmentation changes have been discussed. Some skin findings are “strong” indicator of a malignancy whereas others are not. Readers will encounter some “coincidental” or “common” entities as well as more “severe” changes for a paraneoplastic sign. In addition, it is crucial that some paraneoplastic lesions may predict for a recurrence of malignancy.

  8. Morphological changes of gastric mucosa depending on functional dyspepsia syndrome

    Svintsitskyy A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic gastritis process of cell renewal in the mucosa is disturbed, leading to rapid movement of the generative cell zone without full differentiation into mature specialized area accommodation epithelial cells. The result of this process is the inability to fully function gastric glands. Crucial in the diagnosis of gastritis given the nature of the morphological changes of the gastric mucosa and preferential localization of these changes. Objective. To assess histological changes of gastric mucosa in patients with clinically different types of functional dyspepsia. Methods. Adult patients (18-65 years with confirmed diagnosis of functional dyspepsia were eligible to participate. Biopsy specimens were taken from stomach due to the Houston-updated gastric biopsy sampling protocol for the next histological examination. One expert gastrointestinal pathologist assessed all tissue samples. Atrophy was assessed due to Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment (OLGA staging system. Results. 75 patients were recruited, 42 of which had epigastric pain (I group and 33 – postprandial distress syndrome (II group due to Rome III criteria (2006. Antral and corpus atrophy were detected at the same frequency in both groups (p>0.05, however the stage of atrophy didn’t exceed I in all cases. Complete antral metaplasia was revealed in 11 (26.2% patients of the I group and 11 (33.3% patients of the II one. Incomplete antral metaplasia was seen in 2 (4.7% patients of the I group and 2 (6.1% patients of the II one. No cases of corpus metaplasia or dysplasia were found. Conclusion. Our study didn’t reveal statistically significant correlation between stage of gastritis, atrophic or metaplastic changes and clinical symptoms of functional dyspepsia. Citation: Svintsitskyy A, Korendovych I, Kuryk O, Solovyova G. [Morphological changes of gastric mucosa depending on functional dyspepsia syndrome]. Morphologia. 2014;8(2:50-5. Ukrainian.

  9. Histopathological findings in the oral mucosa of celiac patients

    Elena Bardellini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible subjects. Although the small intestinal mucosa is the main site of the gut's involvement in CD, other mucosal surfaces belonging to the gastrointestinal tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue are known to be affected. Aim: Assuming that the oral mucosa could reflect the histopathological inflammatory alterations of the intestine in CD patients, this study wishes to assess the pattern of T-cell subsets in the oral mucosa of young adults with CD. Methods: A group of 37 patients (age range 20-38 years; female: male ratio 28:9 with CD were enrolled. Out of 37 patients, 19 patients (group A followed a gluten free diet (GFD -2 patients from less than one year; 6 patients between 1 and 5 years; 11 patients more than 5 years- while 18 patients (group B were still untreated. Fifteen healthy volunteers (age range 18-35 years, female: Male ratio 11:4 served as controls for the CD patients. Ethical approval for the research was granted by the Ethics Committee. Biopsy specimens were taken from normal looking oral mucosa. The immunohistochemical investigation was performed with monoclonal antibodies to CD3, CD4, CD8, and γδ-chains T cell receptor (TCR. Results: The T-lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate was significantly (p < 0.0001 increased in group B (both compared with group A and with the control group. Conclusion: This study confirms the oral cavity to be a site of involvement of CD and its possible diagnostic potentiality in this disease.

  10. Glass embedded in labial mucosa for 20 years

    Sumanth K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies may be deposited in the oral cavity either by traumatic injury or iatrogenically. Among the commonly encountered iatrogenic foreign bodies are restorative materials like amalgam, obturation materials, broken instruments, needles, etc. Few reports of glass pieces embedded in the soft tissues of the mouth have been published. We report a case where glass pieces had been lodged in the lower labial mucosa for 20 years, with consequent peripheral reactive bone formation.

  11. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome with esophagitis and Barrett mucosa.

    Karl, T R; Pindyck, F; Sicular, A

    1983-10-01

    Although esophageal disease in Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is being recognized with increasing frequency, Barrett esophagus is seen only rarely. Basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure is probably not different in Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and non-Zollinger-Ellison syndrome patients. Circulating gastrin, therefore, cannot be the major determinant of lower esophageal sphincter pressure in vivo. Total gastrectomy and resection of all metaplastic esophagus, when feasible, is the treatment of choice for patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and Barrett mucosa. PMID:6624733

  12. Mechanisms of histamine stimulated secretion in rabbit ileal mucosa.

    Linaker, B D; McKay, J S; Higgs, N B; Turnberg, L A

    1981-01-01

    Histamine is present in high concentrations in the intestine and we investigated the possibility that it might have a role here in intestinal transport. When added to the basal side of rabbit ileal mucosa in vitro histamine (10(-4)M) induced a short-lived increase in electrical potential difference and short circuit current. It inhibited net chloride absorption but did not influence sodium transport. Alkali secretion, measured by a pH stat technique, was inhibited, suggesting that bicarbonate...

  13. Method of expression of certain bacterial microflora mucosa olfactory area

    Avrunin, Oleg G.; Nosova, Yana V.; Shushlyapina, Natalia O.; Surtel, Wojciech; Burlibay, Aron; Zhassandykyzy, Maral

    2015-12-01

    The article is devoted to the actual problem - the development of new express diagnostic methods, based on which a doctor-otolaryngologist can quickly and efficiently determine a violation of smell. The work is based on the methods of processing and analysis of medical images and signals. We have also identified informative indicators of endoscopic image of the olfactory region of the nasal mucosa of the upper course.

  14. Untersuchungen zur Regeneration des Hinterendes bei Anaitides mucosa (Polychaeta, Phyllodocidae)

    Röhrkasten, A.

    1983-06-01

    Caudal regeneration was investigated in decerebrate Anaitides mucosa and in brain-intact individuals. Both groups show an identical capacity to regenerate lost caudal segments. Furthermore there is no difference in males and females. Low temperature (5 °C) inhibits the regeneration of caudal segments, but it is necessary for normal oogenesis. Under conditions of high temperature (15 °C), caudal regeneration is very extensive. At the same time degeneration of most oocytes occurs.

  15. Incidence of bone metastasis in carcinoma buccal mucosa

    Virendra Bhandari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Head and neck cancer is a leading health problem in India due to the habit of chewing tobacco and bad oral and dental hygiene. Carcinoma buccal mucosa is more common and is 2.5% of all malignancies at our center. Most of the patients present in stage III and IV and the survival in these cases is not very good. Bone metastasis in advanced cases of carcinoma buccal mucosa is rarely reported in the world literature. Materials and Methods: We present here cases developing bone metastasis in carcinoma buccal mucosa in last 5 years. These patients were young with loco-regionally advanced disease where bone metastasis developed within 1-year of definitive treatment. Results: The flat bones and vertebrae were mainly involved and the survival was also short after diagnosis of metastasis despite the treatment with local Radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Conclusion: The exact cause of metastasis cannot be proved, but the probability of subclinical seedling of malignant cells before the eradication of the primary tumor should be considered along with advanced local and nodal disease with high grade of tumor.

  16. Nested PCR for detection of HSV-1 in oral mucosa

    Jalouli, Miranda-Masoumeh; Jalouli, Jamshid; Hasséus, Bengt; Öhman, Jenny; Hirsch, Jan-Michaél

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been estimated that 15%-20% of human tumours are driven by infection and inflammation, and viral infections play an important role in malignant transformation. The evidence that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) could be involved in the aetiology of oral cancer varies from weak to persuasive. This study aimed to investigate by nested PCR (NPCR) the prevalence of HSV-1 in samples from normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Material and Methods We investigated the prevalence of HSV-1 in biopsies obtained from 26 fresh, normal oral mucosa from healthy volunteers as well as 53 oral leukoplakia and 27 OSCC paraffin-embedded samples. DNA was extracted from the specimens and investigated for the presence of HSV-1 by nested polymerase chain reaction (NPCR) and DNA sequencing. Results HSV-1 was detected in 14 (54%) of the healthy samples, in 19 (36%) of the oral leukoplakia samples, and in 14 (52%) of the OSCC samples. The differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions We observed a high incidence of HSV-1 in healthy oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and OSCC tissues. Thus, no connection between OSCC development and presence of HSV-1 was detected. Key words:HSV-1, nested PCR, PCR. PMID:26449432

  17. Influence of astragaloside on gastric mucosa of stress ulcer rats

    LI Yan-wu

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of astragaloside (AST) on the gastric mucosal injury of water immersion restraint stress ulcer rat. Methods The stress ulcer model was made by water immersion and restraint. The gastric mucosal injury index was observed. The SOD activity, the MDA contents and the gene expression of melatonin receptor 1 and 2 were detected in gastric mucosa. Results Compared with the normal group, the model group showed mucous edema, hyperemia and even ulcer damage. The injury index and the MDA content of gastric mucosa in model group were significantly increased (P<0.05), the SOD activity of gastric obviously depressed(P<0.01), and the melatonin receptor 1 and 2 mRNA expressions of damaged gastric mucosa were also lower. After administration of AST, the gastric mucosal ulcer index and MDA contents relieved obviously (P<0.01, P<0.05), the SOD activity and the expressions of melatonin receptor 1 and 2 mRNA raised up (P<0.01, P<0.05).Conclusions AST could prevent the gastric mucosal damage of rat in stress ulcer. And the mechanism of the gastric mucosal protection should be concerned with regulating the melatonin receptor and lessening the injury of oxygen free radical.

  18. Incidence of bone metastasis in carcinoma buccal mucosa

    Bhandari, Virendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Head and neck cancer is a leading health problem in India due to the habit of chewing tobacco and bad oral and dental hygiene. Carcinoma buccal mucosa is more common and is 2.5% of all malignancies at our center. Most of the patients present in stage III and IV and the survival in these cases is not very good. Bone metastasis in advanced cases of carcinoma buccal mucosa is rarely reported in the world literature. Materials and Methods: We present here cases developing bone metastasis in carcinoma buccal mucosa in last 5 years. These patients were young with loco-regionally advanced disease where bone metastasis developed within 1-year of definitive treatment. Results: The flat bones and vertebrae were mainly involved and the survival was also short after diagnosis of metastasis despite the treatment with local Radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Conclusion: The exact cause of metastasis cannot be proved, but the probability of subclinical seedling of malignant cells before the eradication of the primary tumor should be considered along with advanced local and nodal disease with high grade of tumor.

  19. Fecal lactoferrin in discriminating inflammatory bowel disease from Irritable bowel syndrome: a diagnostic meta-analysis

    Zhou, Xing-lu; Xu, Wen; Tang, Xiao-xiao; Luo, Lai-sheng; Tu, Jiang-feng; Zhang, Chen-jing; Xu, Xiang; Wu, Qin-dong; Pan, Wen-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background To perform a meta-analysis evaluating the diagnostic ability of fecal lactoferrin (FL) to distinguish inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods The Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane library and CNKI databases were systematically searched for studies that used FL concentrations to distinguish between IBD and IBS. The sensitivity, specificity, and other diagnostic indexes of FL were pooled using a random-effects model. Results Seven studies...

  20. Endoscopic Evaluation of Surgically Altered Bowel in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Sinh, Preetika; Shen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases often undergo surgical procedures for medically refractory disease or colitis associated dysplasia. Endoscopic evaluation of the surgically altered bowel is often needed to assess for disease recurrence, its severity, and for therapy. It is important to obtain and review the operative report and abdominal imaging before performing the endoscopy. Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy can be safely performed in most patients with inflammatory b...

  1. New pharmaceuticals in inflammatory bowel disease

    Łodyga, Michał; Eder, Piotr; Bartnik, Witold; Gonciarz, Maciej; Kłopocka, Maria; Linke, Krzysztof; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Radwan, Piotr; Rydzewska, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    This paper complements the previously published Guidelines of the Working Group of the Polish Society of Gastroenterology and former National Consultant in Gastroenterology regarding the management of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Attention was focused on the new pharmaceutical recently registered for inflammatory bowel disease treatment.

  2. Unusual causes of mechanical small bowel obstruction

    We herein report our experience regarding unusual causes of bowel obstruction to increase the awareness of surgeons regarding this disease. From 1991 to 2003, we had experience at the University affiliated hospitals, northern Jordan with 24 patients with small bowel obstruction resulting from unusual causes. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of these patients with regards to the mode of presentation, cause of obstruction, radiological and operative findings, management and outcome. We recorded 15 patients who underwent previous abdominal surgery. Preoperative diagnosis was correct in only one patient with an internal hernia, but the abdominal CT scan suggested the diagnosis in 5 of the 9 patients who had the scan. The final diagnosis was internal hernias in 11 patients, foreign bodies in 5, ischemic strictures in 3, carcinoid tumors in 2, endometriosis in 2, and metastatic deposit from interstitial bladder carcinoma in one patient. Nine of the 12 patients with recurrent obstruction had either short course or recurrence obstruction during the same hospital admission. W carried out bowel resections in 15 patients (5 resections were due to bowel strangulation). Post operative death occurred in 4 patients. Awareness of these rare causes of intestinal obstruction even in patients with previous abdominal operation might improve the outcome. The tentative diagnosis of adhesion obstruction in patients with unusual obstructive etiology might lead to a higher rate of gangrenous complications. Rigorous preoperative evaluation including careful history and early abdominal CT may show the obstructive cause. (author)

  3. Inflammatory bowel disease: potential therapeutic strategies

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Bregenholt, S;

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with potential and possibly primary therapeutics that, through insight into the inflammatory cascade, result in more rational treatment principles replacing the classical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). These new...

  4. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    , indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal permeability....

  5. Environmental factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    Hansen, Tanja Stenbaek; Jess, Tine; Vind, Ida;

    2011-01-01

    The role of environmental factors in development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains uncertain. The aim of the present study was to assess a number of formerly suggested environmental factors in a case-control study of an unselected and recently diagnosed group of patients with IBD and a...

  6. A rare cause of small bowel infarction

    Lim, L.; Collier, K; Harland, R; Temperley, D

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of small bowel infarction due to superior mesenteric artery occlusion secondary to cardiac tumour embolism. To our knowledge, this has not been previously reported in the literature. This case highlights a rare case and reviews current knowledge on the subject.

  7. Recovery After Stroke: Bladder and Bowel Function

    ... effects from prescription drugs.  Being unaware that you need to use the bathroom.  Weakness in the muscle that holds a bowel ... toilet  Occupational therapists can help if your home needs to be ... issues. They can with grants to adapt the bathroom or to build a new one, and can ...

  8. Microbiota biodiversity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Comito, Donatella; Cascio, Antonio; Romano, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a significant role in human health and energy balance, and provides protection against disease states. An altered balance between microbiota and its host (dysbiosis) would appear to contribute to the development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Crohn’s Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC). CD and UC are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tes.

  9. Analysis of bowel perforation in necrotizing enterocolitis

    Frey, E.E.; Smith, W.; Franken, E.A. Jr.; Wintermeyer, K.A.

    1987-07-01

    The most severe complication of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is bowel perforation. Identification of neonates at high risk for perforation and optimization of radiologic imaging to identify bowel perforation are necessary to reduce the high mortality rate associated with this catastrophic event. One hundred 55 cases of NEC were seen at our institution during a 5.5 year period. Nineteen (12%) progressed to perforation. A review of surgical findings, autopsy results and radiographs from these patients shows only 63% had radiographic evidence of free air in the peritoneal cavity at the time of perforation. Twenty-one percent had radiographic evidence of ascites but no pneumoperitoneum, and 16 percent had neither free air nor ascites. Thus purely radiographic criteria for bowel perforation in NEC are imprecise, and paracentesis is mandatory in NEC patients with ascites or clinical findings indicative of peritonitis. Timing of radiographic studies and site of bowel involvement are also important. Seventy-nine percent of perforations occurred by 30 h from confirmation of diagnosis (by clinical or radiographic criteria). Surgery or autopsy revealed involvement of the ileo-cecal region in 89% of cases with the actual site of perforation occurring in this area in 58% of patients.

  10. ARMA-based spectral bandwidth for evaluation of bowel motility by the analysis of bowel sounds

    Approximately 10%–20% of adults and adolescents suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) worldwide. IBS is characterized by chronic gastrointestinal dysfunction which may reflect in altered motility. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is made through expensive invasive radiographic and endoscopic examinations. However these are inconvenient and unsuited for community screening. Bowel sounds (BSs) can be easily recorded with non-invasive and low-cost equipment. Recently, several researchers have pointed out changes in features obtained from BS according to the pathological condition of bowel motility. However a widely accepted, simple automatic BS detection algorithm still has to be found, and the appropriate recording period needs to be investigated for further evaluation of bowel motility. In this study we propose a novel simple automatic method to detect the BSs based on the 3 dB bandwidth of the frequency peaks in the autoregressive moving average spectrum. We use the measure, sound-to-sound interval (SSI) obtained by the proposed method, to capture bowel motility. In this paper, we show that the proposed method for automatic detection could achieve a sensitivity of 87.8±5.88%, specificity of 91.7±4.33% and area under the curve of 0.923 when working on 16 healthy volunteers during mosapride administrations. Furthermore, we show that the measured SSI averaged over a period of 30 min can clearly capture bowel motility. Our findings should have the potential to contribute toward developing automated BS-based diagnosis of IBS. (paper)

  11. Systemically administered IgG anti-toxin antibodies protect the colonic mucosa during infection with Clostridium difficile in the piglet model.

    Cohen, Ocean R; Steele, Jennifer A; Zhang, Quanshun; Schmidt, Diane J; Wang, Yuankai; Hamel, Philip E S; Beamer, Gillian; Xu, Bingling; Tzipori, Saul

    2014-01-01

    The use of anti-toxin human monoclonal antibodies (HMab) as treatment for C. difficile infection has been investigated in animal models and human clinical trials as an alternative to or in combination with traditional antibiotic therapy. While HMab therapy appears to be a promising option, how systemically administered IgG antibodies protect the colonic mucosa during Clostridium difficile infection is unknown. Using the gnotobiotic piglet model of Clostridium difficile infection, we administered a mixture of anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB HMabs systemically to piglets infected with either pathogenic or non-pathogenic C. difficile strains. The HMabs were present throughout the small and large intestinal tissue of both groups, but significant HMabs were present in the lumen of the large intestines only in the pathogenic strain-infected group. Similarly, HMabs measured in the large intestine over a period of 2-4 days following antibody administration were not significantly different over time in the gut mucosa among the groups, but concentrations in the lumen of the large intestine were again consistently higher in the pathogenic strain-infected group. These results indicate that systemically administered HMab IgG reaches the gut mucosa during the course of CDI, protecting the host against systemic intoxication, and that leakage through the damaged colon likely protects the mucosa from further damage, allowing initiation of repair and recovery. PMID:25347821

  12. Structural analysis of toad oviductal mucosa in relation to jelly components secretion throughout the reproductive cycle.

    Crespo, Claudia Alejandra; Ramos, Inés; Medina, Marcela Fátima; Cisint, Susana Beatriz; Iruzubieta Villagra, Ana Lucrecia; Fernández, Silvia Nélida

    2014-05-01

    In amphibians, the components of the jelly coats that surround the oocytes at the time of fertilization and coordinate gamete interaction are secreted by the oviduct. We analysed the histological variations in the mucosa of the oviductal pars convoluta (PC) of Rhinella arenarum during the reproductive cycle and its relationship with secretion. During the preovulatory period, the mucosa reaches a high degree of morphological and functional development, with a large number of epithelial (ESC) and glandular secretory cells (GSC) loaded with contents that are secreted into the oviductal lumen. During the ovulatory period, the secretory cells (SC) of both layers present maximum secretory activity through apocrinia and merocrinia. While the ESC located at the tips of the folds release their content directly in contact with the oocytes, the GSC secrete material from the bottom of the epithelial folds that, by interaction with the secretion of the ESC in the lateral faces, form a product with a certain degree of organization. Secretion is a continuous process with formation of coats of increasing complexity from the intermediate proximal zone (IPZ) to the pars convoluta (pc) itself, and the passage of the oocyte is a requisite for the organization of the jelly coats around the gamete. During the early postovulatory period, although there is a marked decrease in the number and volume of the SC, the ESC still release material into the oviductal lumen. In the late postovulatory period the morphological characteristics of the PC begin to recovery although there is no evidence of secretion. PMID:23174084

  13. Comparative study of pathological findings and trace elements profiles of gastric mucosa in benign gastric disease

    The purpose of this study is to clarify how trace elements in gastric mucosa, reflex bile acid and inflammation of gastric mucosa relate to environment of Helicobacter Pylori. Subjects were 33 patients who had colonic endoscopic examination. 11 gastric ulcer and 14 duodenal ulcer patients were chosen as subjects of the study. The control group had 8 members who had no localized lesions. Trace elements were measured by PIXE analysis which use Pd as internal standard. Cu and Zn, especially Zn, were found in large amount in gastric body and antrum. Zn value for the antrum was higher than that for the gastric body. Especially, the values of Zn for antrum showed significant differences between grade I, II and III of inflammatory cell infiltration. In gastric ulcer group, the value of Cu indicated high at gastric body and low at antrum. On the other hand, the values of Zn were low at both gastric body and antrum. Particularly, development of atrophy in antrum requires less than one in gastric body; therefore, trace elements decreased in gastric ulcer group. (author)

  14. Inmunología de la mucosa oral: Revisión Immunology of oral mucosa: A review

    Zulema J. Casariego

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Durante los últimos 50 años numerosas publicaciones han tratado de explicar los cambios inmunológicos en relación con exclusivas o determinadas enfermedades. El objetivo de esta presentación es realizar una revisión sobre lo publicado hasta el momento sobre la respuesta del sistema inmune innato y adaptativo en relación con la mucosa oral, un panorama sobre el rol o roles de las células inmunes, citoquinas, receptores, factores de crecimiento y otros productos secretorios y el los distintos elementos inmunológicos que actúan sobre la mucosa oral asociados con los estados de salud, inflamación, stress crónico, desregulación inmune, longevidad tolerancia inmune e inmunosenescencia.During the last 50 years several papers have been put forward to explain induce immunological changes in relationship with exclusive or determinated oral diseases. The objective of this presentation is to make a rewie about what is published at the moment about of innated and adaptative immune response, in relationship with oral mucosa, and an overwie of the role (s of immune cells, cytoquines, receptors, grow factors, and other secretory products associated with health, inflammation, chronic stress, Immune dysregulation aging, inmuno tolerance and inmunosenescence.

  15. Irritable bowel syndrome: the role of gut neuroendocrine peptides.

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Seim, Inge; Chopin, Lisa; Gundersen, Doris; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Hausken, Trygve

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic disorder with a prevalence ranging from 5 to 10 percent of the world's population. This condition is characterised by abdominal discomfort or pain, altered bowel habits, and often bloating and abdominal distension. IBS reduces quality of life in the same degree of impairment as major chronic diseases such as congestive heart failure and diabetes and the economic burden on the health care system and society is high. Abnormalities have been reported in the neuroendocrine peptides/amines of the stomach, small- and large intestine in patients with IBS. These abnormalities would cause disturbances in digestion, gastrointestinal motility and visceral hypersensitivity, which have been reported in patients with IBS. These abnormalities seem to contribute to the symptom development and appear to play a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS. Neuroendocrine peptides/amines are potential tools in the treatment and diagnosis of IBS. In particular, the cell density of duodenal chromogranin A expressing cells appears to be a good histopathological marker for the diagnosis of IBS with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:22652678

  16. Microbiome Heterogeneity Characterizing Intestinal Tissue and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype.

    Tyler, Andrea D; Kirsch, Richard; Milgrom, Raquel; Stempak, Joanne M; Kabakchiev, Boyko; Silverberg, Mark S

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with differential abundance of numerous organisms when compared to healthy controls (HCs); however, few studies have investigated variability in the microbiome across intestinal locations and how this variability might be related to disease location and phenotype. In this study, we have analyzed the microbiome of a large cohort of individuals recruited at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Biopsies were taken from subjects with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and HC, and also individuals having undergone ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for treatment of ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. Microbial 16S rRNA was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We observed a great deal of variability in the microbiome characterizing different sampling locations. Samples from pouch and afferent limb were comparable in microbial composition. When comparing sigmoid and terminal ileum samples, more differences were observed. The greatest number of differentially abundant microbes was observed when comparing either pouch or afferent limb samples to sigmoid or terminal ileum. Despite these differences, we were able to observe modest microbial variability between inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes and HCs, even when controlling for sampling location and additional experimental factors. Most detected associations were observed between HCs and Crohn's disease, with decreases in specific genera in the families Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae characterizing tissue samples from individuals with Crohn's disease. This study highlights important considerations when analyzing the composition of the microbiome and also provides useful insight into differences in the microbiome characterizing these seemingly related phenotypes. PMID:26954709

  17. Role of Rifaximin in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Treatment.

    Scribano, Maria Lia

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterised by an altered composition of the intestinal microbiota, which may contribute to their development and maintenance in susceptible hosts. The involvement of bacteria in the inflammation has provided the rationale for a therapeutic manipulation of the gut flora through the use of antibiotics. However, the role of antibiotics has not been clearly demonstrated and their long-term employment is often restricted by an elevated number of adverse events. The use of rifaximin, which is characterised by an excellent safety profile thanks to its negligible intestinal absorption, appears to have some promise. Study results suggest that rifaximin could be useful in Crohn's disease, and a new gastroresistant formulation (rifaximin-extended intestinal release) has recently shown its efficacy in patients with moderate Crohn's disease. Less consistent data support the use of rifaximin in ulcerative colitis and in pouchitis, although the results of some studies have been encouraging. Further large controlled trials are warranted to confirm the role of rifaximin in inflammatory bowel disease treatment. PMID:26202194

  18. Effects of Probiotics on Intestinal Mucosa Barrier in Patients With Colorectal Cancer after Operation: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Liu, Dun; Jiang, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Lan-Shu; Song, Ji-Hong; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have found that probiotics or synbiotics can be used in patients with diarrhea or inflammatory bowel disease for the prevention and treatment of some pathologies by improving gastrointestinal barrier function. However, there are few studies availing the use of probiotics in patients with colorectal cancer. To lay the foundation for the study of nutritional support in colorectal cancer patients, a meta-analysis has been carried out to assess the efficacy of probiotics on the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer after operation.To estimate the efficacy of probiotics on the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer after operation, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials has been conducted.Databases including PubMed, Ovid, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure have been searched to identify suitable studies. Stata 12.0 was used for statistical analysis, and sensitivity analysis was also conducted. Six indicators were chosen to evaluate probiotics in protecting the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer. Ratios of lactulose to mannitol (L/M) and Bifidobacterium to Escherichia (B/E), occludin, bacterial translocation, and levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were chosen to evaluate probiotics in protecting the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer.Seventeen studies including 1242 patients were selected for meta-analysis, including 5 English studies and 12 Chinese studies. Significant effects were found in ratios of L/M (standardized mean difference = 3.83, P = 0.001) and B/E (standardized mean difference = 3.91, P = 0.000), occludin (standardized mean difference = 4.74, P = 0.000), bacterial translocation (standardized mean difference = 3.12, P = 0.002), and levels of SIgA (standardized mean difference

  19. Acidic Conditions in the NHE2-/- Mouse Intestine Result in an Altered Mucosa-Associated Bacterial Population with Changes in Mucus Oligosaccharides

    Melinda A. Engevik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanisms bacteria use to proliferate and alter the normal bacterial composition remain unknown. The ability to link changes in the intestinal micro-environment, such as ion composition and pH, to bacterial proliferation is clinically advantageous for diseases that involve an altered gut microbiota, such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease, obesity and diabetes. In human and mouse intestine, the apical Na+/H+ exchangers NHE2 and NHE3 affect luminal Na+, water, and pH. Loss of NHE2 results in acidic luminal pH. Since acid resistance systems in gram-positive bacteria are well documented, we hypothesize that gram-positive bacteria would increase in representation in the acidic NHE2-/- intestine. Methods: Intestinal ion composition was measured by fame photometry and chloridometry and pH measured electrochemically. DNA extracted from intestinal flushes or from mucosal scrapings was analyzed by qRT-PCR to examine luminal and mucosa-associated bacterial populations. Epithelial mucus oligosaccharide patterns were examined by histology with FIT-C labeled lectins. Results: Although total luminal and mucosa-associated bacteria were unchanged in NHE2-/- intestine, gram-positive bacterial phyla were increased in the mucosa-associated bacterial population in a region-specific manner. The genera Clostridium and Lactobacillus were increased in the cecum and colon which corresponded to changes in NHE2-/- mucus oligosaccharide composition of mannose, N-acetyglucosamine, N-acetygalactosamine and galactose. Conclusions: Together these data indicate that changes in ion transport induce region-specific bacterial changes, which alter host mucus oligosaccharide patterns. These host-bacterial interactions provide a possible mechanism of niche-development and shed insight on how certain groups proliferate in changing environments and maintain their proliferation by altering the host.

  20. Increased apoptosis in gastric mucosa adjacent to intestinal metaplasia

    van Grieken, N C T; Meijer, G A; zur Hausen, A; Meuwissen, S G M; Baak, J P A; Kuipers, E J

    2003-01-01

    Background: The biological processes involved in the development of gastric mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia are still incompletely understood. Reports testing the hypothesis that apoptosis leads to atrophy have yielded conflicting results. The availability of new antibodies for the detection of apoptotic cells in tissue sections has facilitated the analysis of the role of apoptosis in the gastritis–atrophy–intestinal metaplasia sequence. Methods: Archival material from 40 gastric resection specimens with normal mucosa (n = 5), chronic active gastritis (n = 17), or intestinal metaplasia (n = 18) was studied. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies directed against cleaved cytokeratin 18 and active caspase 3. Slides were scored on a 0–3 scale for the presence of apoptotic cells. Results: Normal gastric mucosa contained low numbers of apoptotic cells at the surface epithelium (mean score, 0.20). This number was significantly increased in cases with chronic gastritis (mean score, 1.06) and in those with intestinal metaplasia (mean score, 2.56). Within the intestinal metaplasia cases, 44 different foci of intestinal metaplasia were identified. In 39 of these 44 areas, concentrations of apoptotic cells were seen immediately adjacent to the foci of intestinal metaplasia, but not in the metaplastic epithelium itself. Conclusions: Apoptosis is uncommon in normal gastric mucosa. Chronic inflammation and intestinal metaplasia are associated with increased apoptosis, but occur mainly at the mucosal surface and not in the deeper layers. These findings do not support the concept that apoptosis underlies the loss of gastric glands and leads to atrophy, but the observed concentration of apoptotic epithelial cells adjacent to foci of intestinal metaplasia could be related to heterogeneity of epithelial damage, causing apoptosis, to which intestinal metaplasia is a response. PMID:12719456

  1. Interactions Between Bacteria and the Gut Mucosa: Do Enteric Neurotransmitters Acting on the Mucosal Epithelium Influence Intestinal Colonization or Infection?

    Green, Benedict T; Brown, David R

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical barrier between the internal and external milieux of the mammalian host. Epithelial interactions between these two host environments have been shown to be modulated by several different, cross-communicating cell types residing in the gut mucosa. These include enteric neurons, whose activity is influenced by bacterial pathogens, and their secreted products. Neurotransmitters appear to influence epithelial associations with bacteria in the intestinal lumen. For example, internalization of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157:H7 into the Peyer's patch mucosa of the small intestine is altered after the inhibition of neural activity with saxitoxin, a neuronal sodium channel blocker. Catecholamine neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and norepinephrine, also alter bacterial internalization in Peyer's patches. In the large intestine, norepinephrine increases the mucosal adherence of E. coli. These neurotransmitter actions are mediated by well-defined catecholamine receptors situated on the basolateral membranes of epithelial cells rather than through direct interactions with luminal bacteria. Investigations of the involvement of neuroepithelial communication in the regulation of interactions between the intestinal mucosa and luminal bacteria will provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying bacterial colonization and pathogenesis at mucosal surfaces. PMID:26589216

  2. Cytoprotective effects of disodium cromoglycate on rat stomach mucosa.

    Goossens, J.; Van Reempts, J.; Van Wauwe, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    The cytoprotective effects of the anti-asthmatic drug, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on gastric mucosal necrosis induced by ethanol in rats were studied. Subcutaneous, but not oral, DSCG prevented the formation of gastric lesions and this effect was dose-dependent between 1.25 and 40 mg kg-1, with an ED50 value of 6.8 mg kg-1. Maximal cytoprotection occurred 15-30 min after DSCG treatment. Histological examination revealed that DSCG effectively protected the gastric mucosa against ethanol-ind...

  3. Diseases of the small bowel in chronic diarrhea: diagnosis and treatment

    M. Simadibrata

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic diarrhea in Asia is between 0.8-1.0%. The diseases and abnormalities according to the location, which can cause chronic diarrhea, are divided into three locations: the small bowel, the large bowel and extraintestinal. The small bowel diseases include infectious and non-infectious diseases. The infectious diseases are bacterial infections, parasitic infections etc. The non-infectious diseases include of Crohn’s disease, Celiac sprue, NSAID enteropathy, lactose intolerance, benign tumor, carcinoid tumor, carcinoma, post surgery complications, laxative etc. The approaches to diagnosis include good anamnesis, careful physical examination, supporting laboratory tests, more specialized supporting examinations including X-ray of the colon, esophagogastroduodenum follow-through, enteroclysis, ileo-colonoscopy and endoscopy on the upper portion of the digestive tract including the small intestine with biopsy for histopathology examinations. The treatment for chronic diarrhea is divided into supportive and causal therapy. (Med J Indones 2002; 11: 179-89 Keywords: small bowel, chronic diarrhea, approaches to diagnosis, treatment

  4. Leukocyte migration in experimental inflammatory bowel disease

    E. P. Van Rees

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Emigration of leukocytes from the circulation into tissue by transendothelial migration, is mediated subsequently by adhesion molecules such as selectins, chemokines and integrins. This multistep paradigm, with multiple molecular choices at each step, provides a diversity in signals. The influx of neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes into inflamed tissue is important in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The importance of each of these groups of adhesion molecules in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, either in human disease or in animal models, will be discussed below. Furthermore, the possibilities of blocking these different steps in the process of leukocyte extravasation in an attempt to prevent further tissue damage, will be taken into account.

  5. Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    Andersen, Vibeke; Olsen, Anja; Carbonnel, Franck;

    2012-01-01

    European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty...... dioxide and aluminium silicate). Conclusions: A diet high in protein, particular animal protein, may be associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease and relapses. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may predispose to ulcerative colitis whilst n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may protect. These...... results should be confirmed in other countries and in younger subjects before dietary counselling is recommended in high risk subjects....

  6. Influence of perception of colorectal cancer risk and patient bowel preparation behaviors: a study in minority populations

    Gaduputi V

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vinaya Gaduputi, Chaitanya Chandrala, Hassan Tariq, Sailaja Sakam, Anil Dev, Sridhar Chilimuri Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center, Department of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY, USA Background: Large disparities exist in the utilization rates of screening modalities for colorectal cancer (CRC in different socioeconomic areas. In this study, we evaluated whether the quality of bowel preparation differed significantly among populations with a high risk of CRC compared with that among the general population after matching for potential confounding factors.Methods: Hispanic and African American patients who underwent routine screening or surveillance colonoscopies in an outpatient setting between 2003 and 2013 were included in this retrospective study. Patients who underwent colonoscopies for emergent indications and repeat routine screening colonoscopies because of prior history of inadequate bowel preparation were excluded from this study. The patients were divided into three groups: patients having an average risk of being diagnosed with CRC (group 1; patients having a high risk of being diagnosed with CRC because of a personal history of adenomatous polyps (group 2; and patients having a high risk of being diagnosed with CRC because of a family history of CRC in first-degree relatives (group 3. All the patients were given preprocedural counseling and written instructions for bowel preparation. Data on demographic information, method of bowel preparation, quality of bowel preparation, comorbidities, and prescription medications were collected.Results: In all, 834 patients had a "high-risk for CRC" surveillance colonoscopy in view of their personal history of adenomatous polyps and were included in group 2. In total, 250 patients had a "high-risk for CRC" screening colonoscopy in view of their family history of CRC in first-degree relatives and were included in group 3. Further, 1,000 patients were selected to serve as controls (after matching for age

  7. Cytokeratin changes in cell culture systems of epithelial cells isolated from oral mucosa: a short review.

    Gasparoni, Alberto; Squier, Christopher Alan; Fonzi, Luciano

    2005-01-01

    In the past three decades, many studies have analyzed ultrastructural and molecular markers of differentiation in squamous stratified epithelial tissues. In these tissues, epithelial cells migrating from the basal layer to the upper layers undergo drastic changes, which involve membrane-associated proteins, DNA synthesis, phenotypic aspects, lipid composition, and cytoskeletal components. Cytoskeletal components include a large and heterogeneous group, including intermediate filaments, components of the cornified envelope, and of the stratum corneum. When grown in mono- and multilayer cell cultures, epithelial cells isolated from the oral mucosa may reproduce many of the biochemical and morphological aspects of epithelial tissue in vivo. In the present paper, we examine phenotypic changes, development of suprabasal layer, and Involucrin expression occurring in differentiating oral epithelial cells, based on literature review and original data. PMID:16277157

  8. Arthritic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Suh, C. H.; Lee, C H; Lee, J.; Song, C. H.; Lee, C.W.; Kim, W. H.; S.K. Lee

    1998-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is commonly associated with arthritic manifestations. They are divided into three clinical categories; peripheral arthritis, spondylitis, and sacroiliitis. To evaluate the incidence of arthritis associated with IBD in Korea, we retrospectively reviewed one hundred and twenty-nine patients with IBD, 77 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 52 with Crohn's disease (CD). Arthritis occurred in twenty-two patients (17.1%); 15 with UC(19.6%), 7 with CD (13.5%). Patients ...

  9. Small bowel neoplasm - a diagnostic dilemma

    Although uncommon, small bowel tumors often present as a diagnostic dilemma for the clinicians. This important clinical entity requires various diagnostic steps and quite often these steps have to be repeated to reach a firm diagnosis. We present here our experience with three such cases and a brief review of the literature regarding the presentation and the diagnostic steps found helpful in arriving at a diagnosis. (author)

  10. Using abdominal massage in bowel management.

    Connor, Michelle; Hunt, Catherine; Lindley, Alison; Adams, John

    2014-07-15

    This article describes the introduction of abdominal massage techniques by a community team as part of a total bowel management programme for people with learning disabilities. A trust-wide audit of prescribed laxative use by this client group raised concerns, and led to a more systematic approach to managing constipation in people with learning disabilities. An education programme for carers proved to be successful. Some reported that adopting abdominal massage provided further opportunity to develop the therapeutic relationship. PMID:25005415

  11. The evolving epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include assessments of disease burden and evolving patterns of disease presentation. Although it is hoped that sound epidemiologic studies provide aetiological clues, traditional risk factor-based epidemiology has provided limited insights into either Crohn\\'s disease or ulcerative colitis etiopathogenesis. In this update, we will summarize how the changing epidemiology of IBD associated with modernization can be reconciled with current concepts of disease mechanisms and will discuss studies of clinically significant comorbidity in IBD.

  12. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: PartⅡ

    Alan BR Thomson; Angeli Chopra; Michael Tom Clandinin; Hugh Freeman

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology,in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases.Over 1000 publications were reviewed,and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered.In Part Ⅱ we review six topics:absorption,short bowel syndrome,smooth muscle function and intestinal motility,tumors,diagnostic imaging,and cystic fibrosis.

  13. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease

    Frei, Pascal; Biedermann, Luc; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Rogler, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The use of thiopurines as immunosuppression for the treatment of refractory or chronic active inflammatory bowel disease is established for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine and thioguanine. We will briefly summarize dose recommendations, indications for thiopurine therapy and side effects which are relevant in clinical practice. We discuss some currently debated topics, ...

  14. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Molodecky, Natalie A; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune res...

  15. Environment and the Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Frolkis, Alexandra; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Barkema, Herman W.; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Richard N Fedorak; Madsen, Karen; Kaplan, Gilaad G; on behalf of the Alberta IBD Consortium

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which consists of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gas-trointestinal tract. In genetically susceptible individuals, the interaction between environmental factors and normal intestinal commensal flora is believed to lead to an inappropriate immune response that results in chronic inflammation. The incidence of IBD have increased in the past century in developed and developing countries. The purpose of the presen...

  16. Environmental Triggers for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases [IBD; Crohn’s disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC)] are chronic immunologically mediated diseases that are due to a dysregulated immune response to intestinal flora in a genetically susceptible host. Despite advances in genetics, the likelihood of occurrence of disease remains incompletely explained and there appears to be a strong role for the environment in mediating risk of disease. Smoking remains the most widely studied and replicated risk factor, contributin...

  17. Environment and the inflammatory bowel diseases

    Frolkis, Alexandra; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Barkema, Herman W.; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Richard N Fedorak; Madsen, Karen; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which consists of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gas-trointestinal tract. In genetically susceptible individuals, the interaction between environmental factors and normal intestinal commensal flora is believed to lead to an inappropriate immune response that results in chronic inflammation. The incidence of IBD have increased in the past century in developed and developing countries. The purpose of the presen...

  18. Functional findings in irritable bowel syndrome

    Posserud, Iris; Ersryd, Amanda; Simrén, Magnus

    2006-01-01

    The pathophysiology of IBS is complex and still incompletely known. Both central and peripheral factors, including psychosocial factors, abnormal GI motility and secretion, and visceral hypersensitivity, are thought to contribute to the symptoms of IBS. Several studies have demonstrated altered GI motor function in IBS patients and the pattern differs between IBS subgroups based on the predominant bowel pattern. Few studies have so far addressed GI secretion in IBS, but there are some evidenc...

  19. Asian Motility Studies in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Lee, Oh Young

    2010-01-01

    Altered motility remains one of the important pathophysiologic factors in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who commonly complain of abdominal pain and stool changes such as diarrhea and constipation. The prevalence of IBS has increased among Asian populations these days. Gastrointestinal (GI) physiology may vary between Asian and Western populations because of differences in diets, socio-cultural backgrounds, and genetic factors. The characteristics and differences of GI dysmotili...

  20. Breath tests and irritable bowel syndrome

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-01-01

    Breath tests are non-invasive tests and can detect H2 and CH4 gases which are produced by bacterial fermentation of unabsorbed intestinal carbohydrate and are excreted in the breath. These tests are used in the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and for measuring the orocecal transit time. Malabsorption of carbohydrates is a key trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-type symptoms such as diarrhea and/or constipation, bloating, excess flatulence...

  1. Irritable bowel syndrome and food interaction

    Cuomo, Rosario; Andreozzi, Paolo; Zito, Francesco Paolo; Passananti, Valentina; De Carlo, Giovanni; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in Western countries. Despite the high prevalence of this disorders, the therapeutic management of these patients is often unsatisfactory. A number of factors have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of IBS, including impaired motility and sensitivity, increased permeability, changes in the gut microbiome and alterations in the brain-gut axis. Also food seems to play a critical role: the most of ...

  2. Modern MRI of the small bowell

    The radiological diagnostics of diseases of the small intestine have undergone a great change in the last two decades. Through rapid progress with new treatments and an increasing therapeutic focus on transmural healing, a complete evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is now crucial. With the introduction of endoscopy, gastrointestinal imaging with a relatively high radiation exposure had only limited applications. The development of cross-sectional imaging allowed a much broader radiological evaluation of abdominal diseases. Due to rapid investigation techniques, excellent soft tissue contrast and the distinct advantage of eliminating exposure to radiation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the gastrointestinal tract has gained increasing importance. With sufficient filling of the intestinal lumen, simultaneous imaging of all the intestinal wall layers, the perienteric structures and associated abdominal pathologies is now possible. New MR sequences, such as diffusion-weighted sequences, dynamic contrast-enhanced sequences and MR fluoroscopy, enable the detection of morphological changes, with additional characterization of affected bowel loops as well as the assessment of functional pathologies with dynamic information about intestinal motility disturbances. Recent guidelines of European radiological and gastroenterological organizations have confirmed the importance of cross-sectional imaging and particularly of MRI for diagnostics and follow-up in patients with Crohn's disease. Due to the possibility of assessment of all the layers of the intestinal wall and the presence of extramural complications, MRI has a significant impact on further therapeutic treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Especially in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, MR enterography and MR enteroclysis should be the methods of choice for the evaluation of small bowel pathologies because of radiation issues and the great diagnostic value they provide. A

  3. Biologic Concentration Testing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Vaughn, Byron P; Sandborn, William J; Cheifetz, Adam S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Anti-TNF medications have revolutionized the care of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, despite an initial robust effect, loss of response is common and long-term results are disappointing. Much of this lack of durability may be due to inadequate dose optimization, and recent studies suggest a correlation between serum drug concentrations and clinical outcomes. Currently, in clinical practice, measurement of drug concentrations and antibodies to drug are typically pe...

  4. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Holder-Murray, Jennifer; Marsicovetere, Priscilla; Holubar, Stefan D

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Surgical management of inflammatory bowel disease is a challenging endeavor given infectious and inflammatory complications, such as fistula, and abscess, complex often postoperative anatomy, including adhesive disease from previous open operations. Patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis also bring to the table the burden of their chronic illness with anemia, malnutrition, and immunosuppression, all common and contributing independently as risk factors for increased su...

  5. Intestinal epithelial cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Giulia; Roda; Alessandro; Sartini; Elisabetta; Zambon; Andrea; Calafiore; Margherita; Marocchi; Alessandra; Caponi; Andrea; Belluzzi; Enrico; Roda

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) seems to involve a primary defect in one or more of the elements responsible for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and oral tolerance. The most important element is represented by the intestinal barrier, a complex system formed mostly by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs have an active role in producing mucus and regulating its composition; they provide a physical barrier capable of controlling antigen traff ic through the intestinal muco...

  6. Sellar inflammatory mass with inflammatory bowel disease

    Freeman, Hugh J; Maguire, John

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease may be associated with different intracranial disorders. An inflammatory sellar mass is very rare but includes a variety of noninfectious causes including lymphocytic hypophysitis, granulomatous inflammation and Wegener’s granulomatosis. A 32-year-old man was diagnosed with an inflammatory sellar mass associated with an extensive colonic inflammatory process clinically characteristic of Crohn’s disease. The concurrent onset of these inflammatory disorders in distinc...

  7. Case report: Congenital short bowel syndrome

    Palle Lalitha; Reddy Balaji

    2010-01-01

    Congenital short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a relatively rare condition as compared to acquired SBS. It is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Infants usually present with failure to thrive, recurrent vomiting, and diarrhea. It is important to suspect and diagnose this condition promptly, as early initiation of parenteral nutrition or surgery, if necessary, may result in a favorable outcome. We discuss a case of an infant aged 26 days, who presented with failure to thrive, recur...

  8. Irritable bowel syndrome and its psychological management

    Ravikesh Tripathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS is a chronic and disabling gastrointestinal problem that affects psychosocial functioning as well as the quality of life. This case study reports the utility of cognitive behavior therapy as a psychological intervention procedure in a chronic case of IBS. The use of psychological intervention was found to result in a reduction of anxiety; amelioration of the symptoms associated with IBS and improved functioning.

  9. Irritable bowel syndrome: Relations with functional, mental, and somatoform disorders

    Hausteiner-Wiehle, Constanze; Henningsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the conceptual and clinical relations between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), other functional, somatoform, and mental disorders, and points to appropriate future conceptualizations. IBS is considered to be a functional somatic syndrome (FSS) with a considerable symptom overlap with other FSSs like chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia syndrome. IBS patients show an increased prevalence of psychiatric symptoms and disorders, especially depression and anxiety. IBS is largely congruent with the concepts of somatoform and somatic symptom disorders. Roughly 50% of IBS patients complain of gastrointestinal symptoms only and have no psychiatric comorbidity. IBS concepts, treatment approaches, as well as health care structures should acknowledge its variability and multidimensionality by: (1) awareness of additional extraintestinal and psychobehavioral symptoms in patients with IBS; (2) general and collaborative care rather than specialist and separated care; and (3) implementation of “interface disorders” to abandon the dualistic classification of purely organic or purely mental disorders. PMID:24876725

  10. Features of morphological changes of duodenal mucosa in patients with biliary calculosis

    Shcherbinina M.B.; Gladun V.M.; Korolenko A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Today there are up to the end not established mechanisms of pathological changes of a duodenal mucosa at biliary calculosis. Investigation of morphological condition of duodenal mucosa at patients with biliary calculosis was the aim of this work. Histological examination of duodenal mucosa bioptats taken during esophagogastroduodenoscopy of two groups of supervision was carried out. 1-st group included patients with presence in a gallbladder biliary sludge and stones ≤5 mm (n=13). 2-nd group ...

  11. Persistent omphalomesenteric duct causing small bowel obstruction in an adult

    Haridimos Markogiannakis; Dimitrios Theodorou; Konstantinos G Toutouzas; Panagiotis Drimousis; Sotirios Georgios Panoussopoulos; Stilianos Katsaragakis

    2007-01-01

    An extremely rare case of persistent omphalomesenteric duct causing small bowel obstruction is presented. A 20-year-old female patient without medical history presented with colicky abdominal pain, vomiting, absence of passage of gas and feces, and abdominal distension of 24 h duration. Physical examination and blood tests were normal. Abdominal X-ray showed small bowel obstruction.Computed tomography of the abdomen demonstrated dilated small bowel and a band originating from the umbilicus and continuing between the small bowel loops;an omphalomesenteric duct remnant was suspected. In exploratory laparotomy, persistent omphalomesenteric duct causing small bowel obstruction was identified and resected. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged on the 5th postoperative day. Although persistent omphalomesenteric duct is an extremely infrequent cause of small bowel obstruction in adult patients, it should be taken into consideration in patients without any previous surgical history.

  12. The epidemiology of irritable bowel syndrome

    Canavan C

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Canavan, Joe West, Timothy Card Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK Abstract: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional condition of the bowel that is diagnosed using clinical criteria. This paper discusses the nature of the diagnostic process for IBS and how this impacts epidemiological measurements. Depending on the diagnostic criteria employed, IBS affects around 11% of the population globally. Around 30% of people who experience the symptoms of IBS will consult physicians for their IBS symptoms. These people do not have significantly different abdominal symptoms to those who do not consult, but they do have greater levels of anxiety and lower quality of life. Internationally, there is a female predominance in the prevalence of IBS. There is 25% less IBS diagnosed in those over 50 years and there is no association with socioeconomic status. IBS aggregates within families and the genetic and sociological factors potentially underlying this are reviewed. Patients diagnosed with IBS are highly likely to have other functional disease and have more surgery than the general population. There is no evidence that IBS is associated with an increased mortality risk. The epidemiological evidence surrounding these aspects of the natural history is discussed. Keywords: irritable bowel syndrome, epidemiology, prevalence, mortality, natural history

  13. Osteoporosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    The prevalence of osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been accurately established. Using single photon absorptiometry (SPA) and vertebral quantitative computerized tomography (QCT) the authors measured bone mineral content (BMC) in 75 unselected patients with IBD. Osteoporosis was present in 23 (31%). Seven had cortical and trabecular osteoporosis, 11 cortical only and five trabecular only. Three amenorrhoeic premenopausal females had clinically severe osteoporosis and a further 4 had vertebral crush fractures. The median lifetime steroid dose in osteoporotic patients was significantly greater than in patients with normal BMC; most patients with osteoporosis had small bowel IBD with one or more resections. Repeat QCT measurements in 18 patients after one year were unchanged in 12, increased in one and decreased between 10 and 37 mg/ml K2HPO4 in 5 of whom four were receiving steroids. Radial BMC decreased in one patient, increased in one and was unchanged in the remainder. Thus, osteoporosis was present in 30% of these patients, with severe clinical disease in three young females. Rapid spinal trabecular bone loss was demonstrated over the course of one year in some patients. Steroid therapy, amenorrhoe and small bowel IBD with resection appear to be important risk factors

  14. [Irritable bowel syndrome: a functional disorder?].

    Man, Fernando; Bustos Fernández, Luis María

    2013-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a highly prevalent condition responsible for almost one third of visits to the gastroenterologist and huge expenses for diagnosis, treatment and loss of working days. A unique pathophysiologic mechanism has not been elucidated yet and several possibilities have been proposed such as senso-perception and motor disturbances, the effect of stress and anxiety, serotonin receptor failures, activation of abnormal brain areas and pain modulation differences, among others. The absence of a biological marker has led the investigators to consider this syndrome as an exclusion diagnostic condition, once the organic diseases have been discarded The changes in gut microbiota have recently raised great interest among gastroenterologists. The study of the small intestinal bowel overgrowth syndrome, the effect of antibiotics upon the flora, the recognition of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome and the action of probiotics, together with the effect of malabsortion of diet carbohydrates have brought some new light in our knowledge. The present update will focus on the published evidence about the subject, bearing in mind that the mechanisms elicited here are only suitable for a subgroup of patients. PMID:24516961

  15. Can Probiotics Cure Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

    Korada, Siva Kumar; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Bishayee, Anupam; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Aruna Lakshmi, K; Arunasree, M K; Dananajaya, B L; Mishra, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, especially microbial dysbiosis play role in several GI ailments such as irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Role of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial as it involves loss of maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier integrity, increased release of pro-inflammatory molecules, and microbial dysbiosis in gut microflora. Some specific pathogens also play a key role in the IBD development. The origin and causation are still in unfathomable condition and the exact root cause is unknown. Recently probiotic studies have been gaining importance because of their positive responses in their IBD experimental results. According to joint Food and Agricultural Organisation/World Health Organisation working group, probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amount confer health benefit on the host. These live beneficial microorganisms are considered helpful in improving gut colonization and perseverance thereby improves prophylactic effect. In the direction of IBD research, a number of studies are needed to standardize its methodology and its applicability on human usage. The particular review presents an overview of gut microflora and its impact on host health, types of IBD and existing therapies to treat this disorder, mechanism of several probiotic actions, role of probiotics in IBD prevention with their supporting evidences. PMID:26648465

  16. Cell sheet technology for regeneration of esophageal mucosa

    Ryo Takagi; Teruo Okano; Masayuki Yamato; Nobuo Kanai; Daisuke Murakami; Makoto Kondo; Takaaki Ishii; Takeshi Ohki; Hideo Namiki; Masakazu Yamamoto

    2012-01-01

    The progress of tissue-engineering technology has realized development of new therapies to treat various disorders by using cultured cells.Cell-and tissue-based therapies have been successfully applied to human patients,and several tissue-engineered products have been approved by the regulatory agencies and are commercially available.In the review article,we describe our experience of development and clinical application of cell sheet-based regenerative medicine.Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) have been shown to be useful for removal of gastrointestinal neoplasms with less invasiveness compared with open surgery,especially in esophageal surgery.However,postoperative inflammation and stenosis are major complications observed after intensive mucosal resection.Therefore,we have developed novel regenerative medicine to prevent such complications and promote wound healing of esophageal mucosa after EMR or ESD.Transplantable oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets were fabricated from patients' own oral mucosa.Immediately after EMR or ESD,fabricated autologous cell sheets were endoscopically transplanted to the ulcer sites.We performed a preclinical study with a canine model.In human clinical settings,cell culture and cell sheet fabrication were performed in clean rooms according to good manufacturing practice guidelines,and pharmaceutical drugs were used as supplements to culture medium in place of research regents used in animal study.We believe that cell-based regenerative medicine would be useful to improve quality of life of patients after EMR or ESD.

  17. Heterotopic gastric mucosa involving the gallbladder and biliary tree

    Madrid, Carmen; Berrocal, Teresa; Gorospe, Luis; Prieto, Consuelo [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Hospital Infantil ' ' La Paz' ' , Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Gamez, Manuel [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Hospital Infantil ' ' La Paz' ' , Madrid (Spain)

    2003-02-01

    A case of heterotopic gastric mucosa in the common bile duct, cystic duct and gallbladder is reported in a 3-year-old girl with abdominal pain and jaundice. Abdominal US and CT showed dilatation of the biliary tree and a well-defined mass in the common bile duct that narrowed its lumen. The gallbladder was contracted in both examinations. The common bile duct and the gallbladder were resected and a choledochojejunostomy was performed. Although gastric heterotopy has been described throughout the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract, it is a very uncommon finding in the gallbladder and extremely rare in the biliary tree. A firm diagnosis of gastric heterotopia is based on the presence of fundal mucosa replete with parietal and chief cells. To our knowledge, this is the fifth reported case of heterotopic gastric tissue within the common bile duct, and the first to describe the US and CT findings. A relevant literature review and brief outline of the histological and radiological features are included in the discussion. (orig.)

  18. Tomographic mapping of the hard palate and overlying mucosa

    The aim of this study was to measure the thickness of the hard palate and its overlying mucosa using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), for purposes of miniscrew placement. The sample comprised 36 CBCT scans of patients aged 12 to 52 years from a database of the Orthodontics Department of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Paracoronal views of the palatal region were reconstructed at 4, 8, 16 and 24 mm posterior to the incisive foramen. In each reconstruction measurements were taken at the suture, 3 mm and 6 mm bilaterally to it. Wilcoxon's test verified the differences between the selected regions. Total bone height decreased from the anterior to the posterior region. In cross sections 4, 16 and 24, bone height decreased from the suture laterally to the 3 mm region and then increased in the 6 mm region. The cortical thickness does not seem to be a concern because it presented a mean thickness of at least 1 mm at all sites evaluated. The measurements of the mucosa thickness decreased from lateral to median and from anterior to posterior regions. The most suitable areas for miniscrew placement in the palate are located 4 mm posterior to the incisive foramen, in the median or paramedian regions 3 mm adjacent to the suture. (author)

  19. Tomographic mapping of the hard palate and overlying mucosa

    Marquezan, Mariana; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Freitas, Amanda Osorio Ayres de; Baratieri, Carolina; Alves Junior, Matheus; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Goncalves; Araujo, Monica Tirre de Souza, E-mail: marianamarquezan@gmail.com [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    The aim of this study was to measure the thickness of the hard palate and its overlying mucosa using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), for purposes of miniscrew placement. The sample comprised 36 CBCT scans of patients aged 12 to 52 years from a database of the Orthodontics Department of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Paracoronal views of the palatal region were reconstructed at 4, 8, 16 and 24 mm posterior to the incisive foramen. In each reconstruction measurements were taken at the suture, 3 mm and 6 mm bilaterally to it. Wilcoxon's test verified the differences between the selected regions. Total bone height decreased from the anterior to the posterior region. In cross sections 4, 16 and 24, bone height decreased from the suture laterally to the 3 mm region and then increased in the 6 mm region. The cortical thickness does not seem to be a concern because it presented a mean thickness of at least 1 mm at all sites evaluated. The measurements of the mucosa thickness decreased from lateral to median and from anterior to posterior regions. The most suitable areas for miniscrew placement in the palate are located 4 mm posterior to the incisive foramen, in the median or paramedian regions 3 mm adjacent to the suture. (author)

  20. PREPARATION AND IN VITRO ASSESSMENT OF VARIOUS MUCOSA-ADHESIVE FILMS FOR BUCCAL DELIVERY

    SEYED-AL1REZA MORTAZAVI REZA ABOOFAZELI

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine various polymers considered to have mucosa-adhesive properties for the preparation of buccal-adhesive films and their in vitro evaluation. A number of materials, such as cellulose derivatives, carbopols and natural polymers, were employed for the preparation of buccal-adhesive films. Aqueous solutions containing the mucosa-adhesive polymer and a plasticizer were prepared and used to prepare films by the "solvent cast" method. Prepared films were then evaluated in terms of their physical appearance and film forming ability, in vitro mucosa-adhesive strength and duration of mucosa-adhesion. Results showed that among the various materials examined, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC formed very flexible films with the greatest mucosa-adhesive strength. Further studies showed that the combination of carbopols and CMC, along with glycerin as the plasticizer, resulted in the formation of films with desirable appearance and a relatively stronger mucosa-adhesive strength than films containing CMC alone. In vitro studies showed that films containing carbopol 934P, CMC and glycerin gave the greatest mucosa-adhesive strength and longer mucosa-adhesion. In conclusion, this formulation is proposed as a good base for the preparation of buccal-adhesive films and patches. Furthermore, it is suggested that in the development of buccal-adhesive drug delivery systems, and in particular films and patches, duration of mucosa-adhesion determined by in vitro experiments is a critical factor in the selection of the ultimate formulation.

  1. Rifaximin in irritable bowel syndrome: rationale, evidence and clinical use

    Saadi, Mohammed; McCallum, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional bowel disease that affects up to 15% of the US population. The majority of patients with IBS have significant bloating and gas. Recent evidence is beginning to suggest that patients with IBS may have an alteration in the gastrointestinal flora. Specifically, findings suggest that patients with IBS have excessive bacteria in the small bowel, referred to as bacterial overgrowth. Therefore there may be benefits of antibiotic-based ther...

  2. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  3. 18B. Integrative Solutions for the Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Mullin, Gerard; Lee, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Focus Areas: Integrative Approaches to Care, Pediatrics The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel movements. The diagnosis of IBS is established by the Rome III criteria. IBS afflicts 10% to 15% of the US population (30 million Americans) and is the most common digestive disorder seen in the primary care setting. Patients with IBS have an impaired quality of life and high rate of absenteeism from work with diminished pr...

  4. Intestinal microbiota in pathophysiology and management of irritable bowel syndrome

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Lee, Oh Young

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder without any structural or metabolic abnormalities that sufficiently explain the symptoms, which include abdominal pain and discomfort, and bowel habit changes such as diarrhea and constipation. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial: visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, psychosocial factors, genetic or environmental factors, dysregulation of the brain-gut axis, and altered intestinal microbiota have all been proposed as possible cau...

  5. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    Sarwani, N., E-mail: nsarwani@hmc.psu.ed [Department of Radiology, Section of Abdominal Imaging, Penn State Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States); Tappouni, R.; Tice, J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Abdominal Imaging, Penn State Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  6. The Usefulness of Capsule Endoscopy for Small Bowel Tumors

    Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Su; Shim, Ki-Nam; Choi, Myung-Gyu; ,

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has expanded the range of endoscopic examination of the small bowel. The clinical application of VCE is mainly for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and small bowel tumor is one of the clinically significant diagnoses of VCE, often requiring subsequent invasive interventions. Small bowel tumors are detected with a frequency of around 4% with VCE in indications of OGIB, iron deficiency anemia, unexplained abdominal pain, and others. Protruding mass with ble...

  7. The diagnostic role of MDCT enterography in small bowel lesions

    Hasan I. Megally; Hosam eldin Mohamed Elmalah; Gehan S. Seifeldein; Nisreen Adel Abbas; Hussien Ahmed Elamin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of MDCT enterography in the diagnosis of small bowel diseases. Patient and methods: Thirty nine patients suspected to have small bowel diseases were examined with 64 MDCT enterography. Result: MDCT enterography easily diagnosed small intestinal diseases which confirmed with histopathological results, operative data and follow up. Conclusions: MDCT can be used as a front-line imaging and one stop imaging modality for the detection of small bowel diseases....

  8. Effect of cholecystectomy on bowel function: a prospective, controlled study

    Hearing, S; Thomas, L.; HEATON, K; Hunt, L.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Published estimates of the prevalence of postcholecystectomy diarrhoea derive from retrospective or uncontrolled data. They ignore functional bowel syndromes and possible changes in diet and drug use.
AIMS—To determine prospectively whether and how often cholecystectomy leads to changes in bowel function and bowel symptoms, especially to liquid stools, over and above any non-specific effect of laparoscopic surgery.
SUBJECTS—Patients: 106 adults undergoing laparoscopic cholecystecto...

  9. Small bowel obstruction secondary to a liberated Meckel's enterolith

    Demetriou, Vias; McKean, David; Briggs, James; Moore, Niall

    2013-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented with a short history of abdominal pain which rapidly progressed to absolute constipation. An abdominal radiograph demonstrated a paucity of bowel gas and a 4 cm lesion with concentric laminar calcification projected over the pelvis. A CT scan revealed a 4 cm giant Meckel's diverticulum, downstream of which a laminated mass was impacted in the lumen of the distal ileum causing small bowel obstruction. Subsequent surgery confirmed small bowel obstruction secondary ...

  10. Intussusception of the bowel in adults: A review

    Marinis, Athanasios; Yiallourou, Anneza; Samanides, Lazaros; Dafnios, Nikolaos; Anastasopoulos, Georgios; Vassiliou, Ioannis; Theodosopoulos, Theodosios

    2009-01-01

    Intussusception of the bowel is defined as the telescoping of a proximal segment of the gastrointestinal tract within the lumen of the adjacent segment. This condition is frequent in children and presents with the classic triad of cramping abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea and a palpable tender mass. However, bowel intussusception in adults is considered a rare condition, accounting for 5% of all cases of intussusceptions and almost 1%-5% of bowel obstruction. Eight to twenty percent of cases a...

  11. [Differential diagnosis in "undifferentiated" inflammatory diseases and dyskinesias of the large intestine].

    Peleshchuk, A P; Revenok, K M

    2001-01-01

    The majority of foreign gastroenterologists have their doubts whether there exist "undifferentiated" colitisis. They consider these to be a variant of the irritable bowel syndrome. We have examined 173 patients. Of these, 67 percent were less than 45 years of age with significant intestinal disorders caused by chronic colitis. Diagnosis of Crohn's disease and nonspecific ulcerative colitis had been excluded. The main complaints of the patients were constipations alternated sometimes with short-time diarrhea (61%), diarrhea (13%), spasmodic pains in the inferior parts of the abdomen (20%), abdominal distention, and rumbling (74%). In 79% there was tenderness in the sygmoid colon and caecum and spasm thereof. Rectoromanoscopy (RRS) revealed normal mucosa of the rectum and sygmoid colon in 70%, proctosygmoiditis (predominantly catarrhal) in 30 percent of cases. In proctosygmoiditis (vs the normal mucosa) motor dysfunctions, disorders of the contrast mass passage through the intestine, gaustrations were more often seen but the relief of the mucosa was intact. Results of morphological investigations of biopsy specimens of rectal and sygmoidal mucosas were compared with endoscopy findings. No histological changes were revealed in 23% patients with proctosygmoiditis whereas in cases of endoscopically normal mucosa moderate inflammation was rarely detectable. Inflammatory changes in the mucosa were to be seen more frequently by cytologic analysis than by biopsy but more rarely than by RRS. In this way, 25% patients with endoscopical diagnosis of proctosygmoiditis had normal cytological picture. The increased amount of intestinal enzymes (enterokynase, alkaline phosphatase) in stools does not permit differentiating the functional and organic types of the disease, but it significantly contributes to endoscopical, morphological, cytological, and clinical data. Our investigations show that "undifferentiated" colitis is a rarity and that one finds difficulty in differentiating

  12. Recording forces exerted on the bowel wall during colonoscopy: in vitro evaluation.

    Dogramadzi, S; Virk, G S; Bell, G D; Rowland, R S; Hancock, J

    2005-12-01

    A novel system for distributed force measurement between the bowel wall and the shaft of a colonoscope is presented. The system, based on the piezoresistive method, involves the integration of soft miniature transducers to a colonoscope to enable a wide range of forces to be sensed. The attached sensing sheath does not restrict the propulsion of the colonoscope nor notably alter its flexibility. The addition of the sensor sheath increases the colonoscope diameter by 15-20% depending on the type of the colonoscope (adult or paediatric). The transducer's accuracy is +/-20 grammes if it is not subjected to extensive static forces. Under large static force conditions the errors may increase to +/-50 grammes. The tactile force measuring sensors have provided preliminary results from experiments on a model of the large bowel. The force measurements confirm the predictions on the location and magnitude of the forces and that most of the forces are exerted whilst the instrument is looping. PMID:17518409

  13. Pathophysiology of the nodular and micronodular small bowel fold

    The normal small bowel fold is easily seen on conventional studies of the small intestine, but visualization of the small bowel villus is just at the resolution of current roentgenographic technique. When the villi are enlarged, they can be seen radiographically as an irregularity or micronodularity of the small bowel fold. The anatomy of the fold and the pathophysiology of diseases producing fold nodularity (tumor, inflammatory disease, NLH, mastocytosis) and micronodularity (lymphangiectasia, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, Whipple disease) are presented, with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. The radiologist should suggest certain diseases or conditions based on the roentgenographic characteristics of the closely analyzed small bowel fold

  14. Multislice CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of bowel endometriosis

    This prospective study aims to evaluate the efficacy of multislice computed tomography combined with colon distension by water enteroclysis (MSCTe) in determining the presence and depth of bowel endometriotic lesions. Ninety-eight women with symptoms suggestive of colorectal endometriosis underwent MSCTe; locations, number of nodule/s, size of the nodule/s and depth of bowel wall infiltration were determined. Independently from the findings of MSCTe, all women underwent laparoscopy. MSCTe findings were compared with surgical and histological results. Abnormal findings suggestive of bowel endometriotic nodules were detected by MSCTe in 75 of the 76 patients with bowel endometriosis. MSCTe identified 110 (94.8%) of the 116 bowel endometriotic nodules removed at surgery; 6 nodules missed at MSCTe were located on the rectum. MSCTe correctly determined the degree of infiltration of the bowel wall in all of the 34 serosal bowel nodules identified at MSCTe. In six nodules reaching the submucosa, the depth of infiltration was underestimated by MSCTe. MSCTe had a sensitivity of 98.7%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 95.7% in identifying women with bowel endometriosis. MSCTe is effective in determining the presence and depth of bowel endometriotic lesions. (orig.)

  15. Multislice CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of bowel endometriosis

    Biscaldi, Ennio; Rollandi, Gian A. [' ' Duchesse of Galliera' ' -Hospital, Genoa (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Ferrero, Simone; Ragni, Nicola; Remorgida, Valentino [San Martino Hospital and Genoa Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Obstretics and Gynaecology; Fulcheri, Ezio [San Martino Hospital and Genoa Univ. (Italy). Unit of Anatomy and Histopathology

    2007-01-15

    This prospective study aims to evaluate the efficacy of multislice computed tomography combined with colon distension by water enteroclysis (MSCTe) in determining the presence and depth of bowel endometriotic lesions. Ninety-eight women with symptoms suggestive of colorectal endometriosis underwent MSCTe; locations, number of nodule/s, size of the nodule/s and depth of bowel wall infiltration were determined. Independently from the findings of MSCTe, all women underwent laparoscopy. MSCTe findings were compared with surgical and histological results. Abnormal findings suggestive of bowel endometriotic nodules were detected by MSCTe in 75 of the 76 patients with bowel endometriosis. MSCTe identified 110 (94.8%) of the 116 bowel endometriotic nodules removed at surgery; 6 nodules missed at MSCTe were located on the rectum. MSCTe correctly determined the degree of infiltration of the bowel wall in all of the 34 serosal bowel nodules identified at MSCTe. In six nodules reaching the submucosa, the depth of infiltration was underestimated by MSCTe. MSCTe had a sensitivity of 98.7%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 95.7% in identifying women with bowel endometriosis. MSCTe is effective in determining the presence and depth of bowel endometriotic lesions. (orig.)

  16. Multi-detector CT (MDCT in bowel and mesenteric injury

    Vajjalla Ravikumar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate multi-detector CT (MDCT findings in bowel and mesenteric injury due to blunt abdominal trauma.Method: Retrospective evaluation of MDCT scan reports of patients admitted in Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar with bowel and mesenteric injury during the period of January 2005 to April 2008.Results: MDCT, without using oral contrast, clearly demonstrated various specific and less specific findings of bowel and mesenteric injury.Conclusion: Multi-detector CT is an excellent diagnostic modality in bowel and mesenteric injury. Routine administration of oral contrast agent is not mandatory for initial evaluation of these patients.

  17. CT findings of small bowel rupture after abdominal trauma

    The accuracy of CT in the detection of injuries of the solid visceral organ is well established, but the value of CT in diagnosing small bowel rupture after abdominal trauma is controversal. This study was conducted to ascertain CT finding of small bowel rupture result from abdominal trauma. A retrospective analysis of preoperative abdominal CT findings in 40 patients was performed. Small bowel rupture was confirmed by surgery. Precontrast and postcontrast enhanced CT images were obtained in all patients. Diagnostic findings of small bowel rupture including pneumoperitoneum or retroperitoneal air, discontinuity of the bowel wall and extravasation of oral contrast materials were observed in 33 cases(83%). Intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal free air was seen in 31 cases(78%) and intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal free fluid collection was seen in 38 patients(95%). Small bowel wall was thickened in 31 cases(78%), bowel wall was enhanced in 12 cases(30%) and bowel wall discontinuity and extravasation of oral contrast material was seen in 5 cases, respectively. The CT scan is sensitive and effective modality for evaluation of small bowel rupture after abdominal trauma, because of high detectability of diagnostic and suggestive CT findings

  18. The pathophysiology of the nodular and micronodular small bowel fold

    The normal small bowel fold is easily seen on conventional studies of the small intestine, but visualization of the small bowel villus is at the limit of resolution of current roentgenographic technique. When the villi are enlarged, they appear radiographically as an irregularity or micronodularity of the small bowel fold. The anatomy of the fold and the pathophysiology of diseases producing fold nodularity (tumor,inflammatory disease, NLH, mastocytosis) and micronodularity (lymphangiectasia, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, Whipple disease) are presented, with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. The radiologist should suggest certain diseases or conditions based on the roentgenographic characteristics of the closely analyzed small bowel fold

  19. Cytomegalovirus infection in inflammatory bowel disease is not associated with worsening of intestinal inflammatory activity.

    Alexandre Medeiros do Carmo

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus is highly prevalent virus and usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. The pathophysiology and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease often induce a state of immunosuppression. Because this, there are still doubts and controversies about the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease and cytomegalovirus.Evaluate the frequency of cytomegalovirus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and identify correlations.Patients with inflammatory bowel disease underwent an interview, review of records and collection of blood and fecal samples. The search for cytomegalovirus was performed by IgG and IgM blood serology, by real-time PCR in the blood and by qualitative PCR in feces. Results were correlated with red blood cell levels, C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and fecal calprotectin levels for each patient.Among the 400 eligible patients, 249 had Crohn's disease, and 151 had ulcerative colitis. In the group of Crohn's disease, 67 of the patients had moderate or severe disease, but 126 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. In patients with ulcerative colitis, only 21 patients had moderate disease, but 76 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. A large majority of patients had positive CMV IgG. Overall, 10 patients had positive CMV IgM, and 9 patients had a positive qualitative detection of CMV DNA by PCR in the feces. All 400 patients returned negative results after the quantitative detection of CMV DNA in blood by real-time PCR. Analyzing the 19 patients with active infections, we only found that such an association occurred with the use of combined therapy (anti-TNF-alpha + azathioprine.The findings show that latent cytomegalovirus infections are frequent and active cytomegalovirus infection is rare. We did not find any association between an active infection of CMV and inflammatory bowel

  20. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with probiotics: An etiopathogenic approach at last?

    M. Bixquert Jiménez

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is the most common functional digestive disorder, and may affect 11-20% of the adult population in industrialized countries. In accordance with Rome III criteria (2006 IBS involves abdominal pain and bowel habit disturbance, which are not explained by structural or biochemical abnormalities. Several hypotheses attempt to account for the pathophysiology of IBS, but the etiology still remains uncertain or obscure, perhaps multifactorial. Abnormalities in colonic microflora have recently been suggested in such patients, as has abnormal small-intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO, or in particular a significant reduction in the amount of intraluminal Bifidobacteria or Lactobacilli, with consequences like the production of colonic gas, and motility or sensitivity disturbances of the intestinal tract. The disorder is difficult to treat, and the wide spectrum of non-drug and drug treatments shows our ignorance about the cause of the condition. Newer drugs, both pro- and anti-serotonin, have failed to show long-term efficacy or have been withdrawn due to concerns about harmful effects. Recent research has provided increasing support for the idea that disturbances of intestinal microbiota occur in patients with IBS, and that such abnormalities may contribute to IBS symptoms. Studies in Scandinavian countries in the last ten years emphasize the role of probiotics in the modulation of intestinal microbiota, and as a consequence in the regulation of the motility and hypersensitivity of the digestive tract. Although results between studies are difficult to compare because of differences in study design, probiotic dose, strain, and duration of therapy, some studies show symptom improvement. Lactobacilli are found among the normal bacterial flora of the gastrointestinal tract, and Lactobacillus plantarum (Lp is one of the species frequently isolated from the human mucosa, which is capable of surviving the low pH of the stomach and