WorldWideScience

Sample records for laboratory worker knowledge

  1. Knowledge worker training in Malaysia

    Zulkifli, Izyani

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of countries have shifted, or are shifting, towards the knowledge-based economy. For these countries, including Malaysia, the quality of knowledge workers is extremely important in determining the pace and success of such transition. Thus, training is often carried out to improve the skills of knowledge workers at the workplace. But despite its importance, research on knowledge worker training is extremely limited. This study seeks to partially fill this gap in the litera...

  2. Development of an advanced radiation worker laboratory

    Laboratory training is a proven method of providing and evaluating hands on skills and knowledge. In an attempt to maximize the effectiveness of radiation worker training of craft personnel, a program consisting of classroom training coupled with a novel laboratory mock-up was generated utilizing the ingenuity of technical skills trainers while minimizing cost. Program development and the results of trainee feedback are presented

  3. HOLISTIC MODEL OF KNOWLEDGE WORKER AND MARKET KNOWLEDGE VENTURES

    Telemtaev Marat Makhmetovich

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work is the creation of model of knowledge of the worker of the enterprise and the concept of the market of knowledge of the enterprise and the market of knowledge of a society of knowledge. To purpose achievement it is applied complete-approach of Telemtaev M.M. The contradiction between the market in environment of the enterprise and absence of the market in the internal environment of the enterprise is shown. The role of capitalization of knowledge is shown. A number of new results is received. The general model of knowledge of the worker of the enterprise, and three private models of knowledge of the worker entering into it are developed. The Principle of complete-thinking and practice of the worker and the Principle of the organic replenishments of knowledge of the worker are formulated. It is established that a kernel of complete model of knowledge of the worker is set «ability and skill». The concept of technology of the market of knowledge of the enterprise is developed. As a methodological basis of technology of the market of knowledge the Law of industrialization of knowledge, the Law of mechanization of knowledge, the Law technologization knowledge, the Principle of enrichment of knowledge are formulated. Conditions of interaction of the worker and knowledge - PMK-literacy of the worker and FPI-availability of knowledge are established. The received results are sufficient for construction of base models of knowledge of workers and the concept of the market of knowledge of the concrete enterprise that allows the enterprise to create strategy of effective application of knowledge of workers and to develop advancing strategy of occurrence in the market of a society of knowledge.

  4. Managing Knowledge Workers in Global Value Chains

    Brown, Clair; Linden, Greg

    2010-01-01

    Global value chains span national and organizational boundaries in a growing number of industries. Knowledge creation and exchange within these diffuse networks is more complex than in the centralized R&D process of the past. This research, based on extensive fieldwork with engineers and managers in multinational headquarters and subsidiaries in a number of high-tech industries, analyzes alternative modes of managing knowledge workers in this global setting. Strategic human resource ...

  5. Knowledge Workers. Trends and Issues Alert No. 4.

    Brown, Bettina Lankard

    The globalization of work and continuing advances in technology are changing the nature of the work force. Blue-collar workers are being replaced by information specialists who are sometimes called "knowledge workers." Knowledge workers are workers who can think, work with ideas, and use information to solve problems and make decisions. In terms

  6. User Interface Cultures of Mobile Knowledge Workers

    Petri Mannonen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication tools (ICTs have become a major influencer of how modern work is carried out. Methods of user-centered design do not however take into account the full complexity of technology and the user interface context the users live in. User interface culture analysis aims providing to designers new ways and strategies to better take into account the current user interface environment when designing new products. This paper describes the reasons behind user interface culture analysis and shows examples of its usage when studying mobile and distributed knowledge workers.

  7. Motivating & Managing Knowledge Workers: Evidences from Diverse Industries & Cultures

    Ik. Muo

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews existing literature on motivation and knowledge work, and empirical studies in different environments and industries on knowledge work and worker. It also surveys 150 Nigerian knowledge workers with diverse characteristics. It holds that the optimal strategies for managing and motivating knowledge workers are job redesign to increase the intrinsic motivational value of the jobs; competitive financial rewards, empowerment and flexibility, equity, fairness, respect and regard...

  8. Managing the construction worker in a knowledge environment

    Pathirage, C. P.; Amaratunga, Dilanthi; Haigh, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Valuable human and knowledge resources will be wasted unless organisations make better use of these prime resources. Construction knowledge workers and their tacit knowledge in particular is still considered to be relatively unexplored and proper understanding and management of this resource is of immense importance for better organisational performance. The paper stresses the importance of knowledge worker and tacit knowledge in construction and examines the contribution to...

  9. Outdoor Workers and Sun Protection: Knowledge and Behaviour

    Jane Cioffi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor workers are at high risk of developing skin cancer. Primary prevention can potentiallyreduce the incidence of skin cancer in this group. This study aimed to determine theknowledge and sun protective behaviour of outdoor workers towards skin cancer. A shortquestionnaire was used to collect data from workers on construction sites during workinghours. Despite workers having knowledge of the risks of skin cancer their use of sun protectionwas less than satisfactory, particularly considering their cumulative exposure.Workplace health education programs for outdoor workers addressing sun protection areindicated, as is further research to increase understanding of issues workers have withsun protection in the workplace.

  10. Outdoor Workers and Sun Protection: Knowledge and Behaviour

    Jane Cioffi; Lesley Wilkes; Jess O'Brien

    2012-01-01

    Outdoor workers are at high risk of developing skin cancer. Primary prevention can potentiallyreduce the incidence of skin cancer in this group. This study aimed to determine theknowledge and sun protective behaviour of outdoor workers towards skin cancer. A shortquestionnaire was used to collect data from workers on construction sites during workinghours. Despite workers having knowledge of the risks of skin cancer their use of sun protectionwas less than satisfactory, particularly consideri...

  11. Restaurant manager and worker food safety certification and knowledge.

    Brown, Laura G; Le, Brenda; Wong, Melissa R; Reimann, David; Nicholas, David; Faw, Brenda; Davis, Ernestine; Selman, Carol A

    2014-11-01

    Over half of foodborne illness outbreaks occur in restaurants. To combat these outbreaks, many public health agencies require food safety certification for restaurant managers, and sometimes workers. Certification entails passing a food safety knowledge examination, which is typically preceded by food safety training. Current certification efforts are based on the assumption that certification leads to greater food safety knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted this study to examine the relationship between food safety knowledge and certification. We also examined the relationships between food safety knowledge and restaurant, manager, and worker characteristics. We interviewed managers (N=387) and workers (N=365) about their characteristics and assessed their food safety knowledge. Analyses showed that certified managers and workers had greater food safety knowledge than noncertified managers and workers. Additionally, managers and workers whose primary language was English had greater food safety knowledge than those whose primary language was not English. Other factors associated with greater food safety knowledge included working in a chain restaurant, working in a larger restaurant, having more experience, and having more duties. These findings indicate that certification improves food safety knowledge, and that complex relationships exist among restaurant, manager, and worker characteristics and food safety knowledge. PMID:25361386

  12. Knowledge Worker Control: Understanding via Principal and Agency Theory

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Meacheam, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The growing prominence of knowledge workers in contemporary organisations has led to a considerable amount of research into their role and activities, however, despite this growing interest, there remains a lack of clarity regarding the relationship of knowledge workers to management. This paper aims to respond by investigating the…

  13. Corpi di knowledge workers forzatamente a disposizione

    Annalisa Murgia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Nel contesto di analisi delle condizioni di lavoro nell’era della conoscenza e delle tecnologie digitali, il nostro contributo vuole mettere l’attenzione sulle rappresentazioni dei/lle knowledge workers sulla progressiva ridefinizione dell’esperienza corporea, in direzione della perdita di rapporto con il corpo concreto, a favore di un corpo astrattamente inteso. Il discorso si colloca nella logica del “capitalismo tecno-nichilista”, inteso come “un sistema che, sfruttando la sistematica separazione tra le funzioni e i significati, si è progressivamente affermato quale modello di riferimento nel corso degli ultimi decenni”. La domanda di ricerca che ci poniamo in questo contributo è: in qual modo la precarizzazione del lavoro modifica le percezioni dei soggetti, e nello specifico dei lavoratori e delle lavoratrici della conoscenza, nella relazione con il proprio corpo? Nel discutere tale questione, intendiamo concentrarci non solo sugli effetti, ma anche sui processi e sulle relazioni sociali in cui i soggetti – e in varie forme anche le loro esperienze corporee – sono coinvolte.

  14. Sun safety knowledge and practice in UK postal delivery workers

    Houdmont, J.; Davis, S; A. Griffiths

    2016-01-01

    Background: Postal delivery workers spend a large proportion of their work time outdoors, placing them at increased risk for skin cancer. To date, no studies have examined occupational sun safety knowledge and practice within this group in the UK. Aims: To describe the occupational sun safety knowledge and practice of UK postal delivery workers and to investigate the association of demographic, personal and occupational factors with knowledge and practice in order to identify potential str...

  15. Mobile Applications for Knowledge Workers and Field Workers

    Stefan Stieglitz; Christoph Lattemann; Tobias Brockmann

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the diffusion of mobile applications (mobile apps) has risen significantly. Nowadays, mobile business apps are strongly emerging in business, enhancing productivity and employees’ satisfaction, whilst the usage of customized individual enterprise apps is still an exception. Standardized business apps enable basic functionalities, for example, mobile data storage and exchange (e.g., Dropbox), communication (e.g., Skype), and other routine processes, which support mobile worker...

  16. Desired Mobility or Satisfied Immobility? Migratory Aspirations among Knowledge Workers

    Ferro, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Among the aspects discussed within the globalisation process, the international mobility of professional workers assumes considerable relevance. This paper focuses on migratory aspirations among knowledge workers within the context of economic globalisation and market restructuring in Romania. Due to a lack of literature dealing with these issues,

  17. Does workplace advantage program support productivity of knowledge workers?

    Pasila, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Case company, which mainly consist of knowledge workers, have addressed need to determine whether their workplace concept “workplace advantage” (WPA) support the current needs for organization to be productive. This thesis aim is to present indications for this puzzle by analysing customer satisfaction survey responses from years 2012–2014. Research questions for this thesis are: 1) “What are the determinants to support productivity of knowledge worker?” and 2) “Are people more satisfied ...

  18. In Search of Influence - Leading Knowledge Workers with Care

    Ola Edvin Vie

    2012-01-01

    Managers in Research and development (R&D) are in search of influence because knowledge workers valueautonomy and dislike direct supervision. The purpose of this article is to explore if and how leadership support isconnected to influence. Through interviews with knowledge workers, it is evident that they expect their managerto be supportive and take an interest in them as complete persons. Observations and interviews with managersreveal that they fulfill these expectations by engaging in...

  19. Skin cancer in rural workers: nursing knowledge and intervention

    Marta Regina Cezar-Vaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVETo identify the exposure of rural workers to the sun's ultraviolet radiation and pesticides; to identify previous cases of skin cancer; and to implement clinical and communicative nursing actions among rural workers with a previous diagnosis of skin cancer.METHODObservational-exploratory study conducted with rural workers exposed to ultraviolet radiation and pesticides in a rural area in the extreme south of Brazil. A clinical judgment and risk communication model properly adapted was used to develop interventions among workers with a previous history of skin cancer.RESULTSA total of 123 (97.7% workers were identified under conditions of exposure to the sun's ultraviolet radiation and pesticides; seven (5.4% were identified with a previous diagnosis of skin cancer; four (57.1% of these presented potential skin cancer lesions.CONCLUSIONThis study's results enabled clarifying the combination of clinical knowledge and risk communication regarding skin cancer to rural workers.

  20. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of dyeing and printing workers

    Paramasivam Parimalam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Millions of workers are occupationally exposed to dyes in the world, but little is known about their knowledge and attitudes toward the effects of dye on their health. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the fabric dyers? and fabric printers? knowledge, attitude, and practice toward the health hazard of dyes. Materials and Methods: The present study was taken up in the Madurai district which is situated in the Southern Tamil Nadu, India. One hundred and forty-two workers employed in small-scale dyeing and printing units participated in a face-to-face confidential interview . Results: The mean age of fabric dyers and fabric printers was 42 years (?10.7. When enquired about whether dyes affect body organ(s, all the workers agreed that dye(s will affect skin, but they were not aware that dyes could affect other parts of the body. All the workers believed that safe methods of handling of dyes and disposal of contaminated packaging used for dyes need to be considered. It was found that 34% of the workers were using personal protective equipment (PPE such as rubber hand gloves during work. Conclusion: The workers had knowledge regarding the occupational hazards, and their attitudinal approach toward the betterment of the work environment is positive.

  1. Insufficient nutritional knowledge among health care workers?

    Mowe, Morten; Bosaeus, Ingvar; Rasmussen, Henrik Hjgaard; Kondrup, Jens; Unosson, Mitra; Rothenberg, Elisabet; Irtun, ivind; Scandinavian Nutrition Group

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Though a great interest and willingness to nutrition therapy, there is an insufficient practice compared to the proposed ESPEN guidelines for nutrition therapy. The aim of this questionnaire was to study doctors and nurses' self-reported knowledge in nutritional practice, with ...

  2. Character and Effective Leadership of the Knowledge Worker

    Khoury, A E

    2005-04-20

    Ulrich in the forward to the Zenger and Folkman (2002) book, ''The Extraordinary Leader'', wrote about the importance of character in leadership stating, ''Everything about great leaders radiates from character. Character improves the probability of exhibiting strong interpersonal skill. Some of this perceived character is innate . . . but more is driven by the leader's self-awareness and interactions with others'' (p. ix). The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between leadership effectiveness and character using leader-managers of knowledge workers as the subject sample. Findings indicated that character, particularly those factors associated with honesty, setting the example, and valuing and strengthening others, were what set the most effective leader-managers apart from their peers. Technical competence and self-efficacy were found to be common characteristics of the study sample as was a drive for results. Who a leader-manager is, his/her substance, was found in this study to differentiate the ''best'' leader-managers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. By their character, leader-managers establish the environment in which knowledge workers contribute and grow. As found by Pfeiffer (2000), Leaders of companies that experience smaller gaps between what they know and what they do (to turn knowledge into action), understand that their most important task is not necessarily to make strategic decisions, or, for that matter any decisions at all. Their task is to help build systems of practice that produce a more reliable transformation of knowledge into action. Leaders create environments, reinforce norms, and help set expectations through what they do. (p. 261) In other words, as confirmed by this research study, their task is to model the way. Study results also confirmed Ulrich's (1996) supposition that to create the ''air'' in which employees work, leaders have the personal characteristics that engender trust and commitment. In other words, as study results confirmed, the most effective leader-managers establish trusting relationships and strengthen others--they enable others; and, are just, fair, sincere, and recognize contributions--they encourage the heart. Based on study findings, the leadership development model proposed was founded on the premise that character can be developed, particularly if done so through assessment and challenging assignments, with coaching, mentoring, and peer network support. However, development of character requires a shift in our leadership development programs. What causes this shift is a focus on learning by doing through challenging assignments and teaching others rather than learning through event focused assessment and course work. Character cannot be learned in the classroom; it needs to be developed through experience and then learned by feedback, reflection, coaching, and teaching others. Study findings indicated that knowledge workers want to be encouraged, believed in and lead by those they trust to inspire them to accomplish the goals and objectives of the organization. To cause a workforce to generate intellectual capital for the organization, study findings found that the leader-manager's ''character'' does make a difference.

  3. Supplier's sales engineer as a knowledge worker

    Kopecka, J.A.; Santema, S.C.; Hultink, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    The paper forms part of a multiple case study in progress that focuses on information relationships, i.e., the exchange of information and knowledge at the micro-social level between supplier and buyer firms in the fuzzy front end of product development. The micro-social level is made up of dyadic information relationships between the Design Engineer of buyer firms and the Sales Engineer of supplier firms. The case study explores the information relationship through the lens of three theoreti...

  4. Knowledge sharing in electronic working environments - experiences and practices of knowledge workers

    Merilehto, Antti

    2010-01-01

    Objective of the Study The objective of the study was to discover how knowledge workers use electronic working environments (EWEs) to share and communicate knowledge and what are the perceived benefits using EWEs. The case company is a knowledge intensive company operating in sales consulting. Knowledge sharing practices were studied within the case company in order to answer the following research questions 1) How do the employees use EWEs? 2) How do they share knowledge using the EWE...

  5. Combining diverse knowledge: Knowledge workers' experience of specialist and generalist roles

    Kelly, Grainne; Mastroeni, Michele; Monks, Kathy; Conway, Edel; Flood, Patrick; Hannon, Enda

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to understanding the nature of specialist and generalist human capital by exploring the ways in knowledge workers view their experience of working in specialist and generalist roles in pharmaceutical firms in Ireland and the UK. The findings are based on interviews with 55 knowledge workers employed in a range of scientific, technical and managerial positions in four Irish and two UK firms located in the pharmaceutical sector. Interviews were also conduc...

  6. Smallpox Vaccination of Laboratory Workers at US Variola Testing Sites.

    Medcalf, Sharon; Bilek, Laura; Hartman, Teresa; Iwen, Peter C; Leuschen, Patricia; Miller, Hannah; O'Keefe, Anne; Sayles, Harlan; Smith, Philip W

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the need to revaccinate laboratory workers against smallpox, we assessed regular revaccination at the US Laboratory Response Network's variola testing sites by examining barriers to revaccination and the potential for persistence of immunity. Our data do not provide evidence to suggest prolonging the recommended interval for revaccination. PMID:26196153

  7. In Search of Influence - Leading Knowledge Workers with Care

    Ola Edvin Vie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Managers in Research and development (R&D are in search of influence because knowledge workers valueautonomy and dislike direct supervision. The purpose of this article is to explore if and how leadership support isconnected to influence. Through interviews with knowledge workers, it is evident that they expect their managerto be supportive and take an interest in them as complete persons. Observations and interviews with managersreveal that they fulfill these expectations by engaging in listening and chatting. In addition, the data alsoillustrates that managers care about their employees. The analysis shows that manager’s activities of care canindeed be a source of social influence, illustrating close connection between emotion and influence. Thisintertwinement should inspire future research to look deeper and broader for potential sources of influence in theleadership process, but also to acknowledge the importance of leadership in the setting of innovation.

  8. Capturing context and mental state of knowledge workers

    Koldijk, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    We live in an information society, in which effective and efficient interaction with information is crucial. Many people are knowledge workers, whose main job it is to interpret and generate information. Due to their typical working conditions these people often experience stress while working with information [1]. They get overwhelmed by all the available information and often have a fragmented way of working due to inappropriate interruptions, for example by incoming mails with information ...

  9. The Changing Nature of Knowledge Workers in the New Industrial Country: an Industry - Level Analysis

    Chun-Yao Tseng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Academia and industry agree on the importance of knowledge worker workers in emerging economy or new industrial country for economic growth. Understanding the changing nature of knowledge workers in an industry-level analysis is helpful to formulate industry policy. This study aims to investigate the changing of knowledge workers in Taiwan 20 manufacturing industries during 1988-2005. Empirical results are shown as follows. First, there is a trend shift from non- knowledge workers to knowledge workers in all manufacturing industry. Second, based on the shift-share analysis, the within-industry effect on increasing knowledge workers is more than the between-industry effect, especially in electric & electronic machinery industry. Finally, both technological progress and international trade factors positively affect increasing knowledge workers, and the effect of the former is more than that of the later, based on regression analysis of fixed effect model.

  10. The Changing Nature of Knowledge Workers in the New Industrial Country: an Industry - Level Analysis

    Chun-Yao Tseng

    2014-01-01

    Academia and industry agree on the importance of knowledge worker workers in emerging economy or new industrial country for economic growth. Understanding the changing nature of knowledge workers in an industry-level analysis is helpful to formulate industry policy. This study aims to investigate the changing of knowledge workers in Taiwan 20 manufacturing industries during 1988-2005. Empirical results are shown as follows. First, there is a trend shift from non- k...

  11. The Value of Knowledge and the Values of the New Knowledge Worker: Generation X in the New Economy.

    Bogdanowicz, Maureen S.; Bailey, Elaine K.

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge is increasingly a corporate asset, but it poses a challenges human resource development, especially with workers such as those in Generation X who are concerned with their employability. Companies that value knowledge must value knowledge workers. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  12. A Cross-sectional Assessment of Knowledge of ASHA Workers

    Sangeeta Kori

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Government of India launched the th National Rural Health Mission on 5 April 2005. A new band of community based functionaries, named as Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA was proposed to escort and transport the client to reach the hospital and provide referral services in case of complications. A time to time assessment of the knowledge of ASHAs is essential as the success of government's health programmes in rural areas depends on them and hence the present study was undertaken. Material and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in the Barai block rural area of Gwalior district and 88 ASHAs were included in the study as per the eligibility criteria. Results: 88.6 % & 85.2% of ASHAs responded for abdominal pain & bleeding respectively as complications during pregnancy and 88.6% and 85.20 % ASHAs responded for obstructed labor and excessive bleeding as complications during delivery.73.8 % ASHAs responded for antenatal care counseling followed by family planning (70.4%. Conclusion: There is a need to revise and update the knowledge of ASHA workers from time to time. On the job trainings of the ASHAs should be in process to develop necessary knowledge and skills with recent updates. The block level meetings should be utilized for the feedback, enhancing knowledge & solving the problem faced by the ASHAs.

  13. Energy conservation attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors in science laboratories

    Energy use per square foot from science research labs is disproportionately higher than that of other rooms in buildings on campuses across the nation. This is partly due to labs’ use of energy intensive equipment. However, laboratory management and personnel behavior may be significant contributing factors to energy consumption. Despite an apparent increasing need for energy conservation in science labs, a systematic investigation of avenues promoting energy conservation behavior in such labs appears absent in scholarly literature. This paper reports the findings of a recent study into the energy conservation knowledge, attitude and behavior of principle investigators, laboratory managers, and student lab workers at a tier 1 research university. The study investigates potential barriers as well as promising avenues to reducing energy consumption in science laboratories. The findings revealed: (1) an apparent lack of information about options for energy conservation in science labs, (2) existing operational barriers, (3) economic issues as barriers/motivators of energy conservation and (4) a widespread notion that cutting edge science may be compromised by energy conservation initiatives. - Highlights: ► Effective energy conservation and efficiency depend on social systems and human behaviors. ► Science laboratories use more energy per square foot than any other academic and research spaces. ► Time, money, quality control, and convenience overshadow personnel’s desire to save energy. ► Ignorance of conservation practices is a barrier to energy conservation in labs.

  14. An exploratory study on the management of business records by knowledge workers

    Adeline du Toit

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine how knowledge workers could align the creation and management of business records with organisational records management needs. Problem investigated: Knowledge workers are employed by more than one organisation at the same time. This creates problems in managing and preserving the business records created and received by knowledge workers. This article investigates how organisations should manage and preserve their business...

  15. Cancer and workers' compensation at Chalk River nuclear laboratories

    This paper describes the circumstances leading to the notification to the Worker's Compensation Board of Ontario of two cases of cancer, both involving the lymphatic and haematoporetic systems, in employees at Chalk River Nulcear Laboratories. Twenty of these neoplasms are known to have occurred in the CRNL population between 1966 and 1983. The leukemia/lymphoma ratio observed in the twenty neoplasms is similar to that found in populations not occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. The possible relationship between asbestos exposure and lymphoid neoplasms was discussed. 5 refs

  16. Disability Support Workers' Knowledge and Education Needs about Psychotropic Medication

    Donley, Mandy; Chan, Jeffrey; Webber, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    Disability support workers are the predominant workforce employed to support people with an intellectual disability in Australia. Many support workers are required to assist people they support to take psychotropic medications in the form of chemical restraint. Support workers in Australia receive limited education and training in this area and as

  17. Disability Support Workers' Knowledge and Education Needs about Psychotropic Medication

    Donley, Mandy; Chan, Jeffrey; Webber, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    Disability support workers are the predominant workforce employed to support people with an intellectual disability in Australia. Many support workers are required to assist people they support to take psychotropic medications in the form of chemical restraint. Support workers in Australia receive limited education and training in this area and as…

  18. Contributing Knowledge and Knowledge Workers: The Role of Chinese Universities in the Knowledge Economy

    Chen, Shuang-Ye

    2012-01-01

    As China has appeared only recently as an important knowledge producer with growing global economic significance, little is known internationally about how these processes develop and are managed within China. The rapidly expanding Chinese higher education system is playing an increasingly important role in China's knowledge economy and therefore…

  19. Genotoxic damage in pathology anatomy laboratory workers exposed to formaldehyde

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a chemical traditionally used in pathology and anatomy laboratories as a tissue preservative. Several epidemiological studies of occupational exposure to FA have indicated an increased risk of nasopharyngeal cancers in industrial workers, embalmers and pathology anatomists. There is also a clear evidence of nasal squamous cell carcinomas from inhalation studies in the rat. The postulated mode of action for nasal tumours in rats was considered biologically plausible and considered likely to be relevant to humans. Based on the available data IARC, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, has recently classified FA as a human carcinogen. Although the in vitro genotoxic as well as the in vivo carcinogenic potentials of FA are well documented in mammalian cells and in rodents, evidence for genotoxic effects and carcinogenic properties in humans is insufficient and conflicting thus remains to be more documented. To evaluate the genetic effects of long-term occupational exposure to FA a group of 30 Pathological Anatomy laboratory workers was tested for a variety of biological endpoints, cytogenetic tests (micronuclei, MN; sister chromatid exchange, SCE) and comet assay. The level of exposure to FA was evaluated near the breathing zone of workers, time weighted average of exposure was calculated for each subject. The association between the biomarkers and polymorphic genes of xenobiotic metabolising and DNA repair enzymes was also assessed. The mean level of exposure was 0.44 ± 0.08 ppm (0.04-1.58 ppm). MN frequency was significantly higher (p = 0.003) in the exposed subjects (5.47 ± 0.76) when compared with controls (3.27 ± 0.69). SCE mean value was significantly higher (p < 0.05) among the exposed group (6.13 ± 0.29) compared with control group (4.49 ± 0.16). Comet assay data showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) of TL in FA-exposed workers (60.00 ± 2.31) with respect to the control group (41.85 ± 1.97). A positive correlation was found between FA exposure levels and MN frequency (r = 0.384, p = 0.001) and TL (r = 0.333, p = 0.005). Regarding the genetic polymorphisms studied, no significant effect was found on the genotoxic endpoints. The results of the present biomonitoring study emphasize the need to develop safety programs

  20. Knowledge of community care workers about key family practices in a rural community in South Africa

    Ethelwynn Stellenberg; Marjorie van Zyl; Johanna Eygelaar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interventions by community care workers within the context of communitybased integrated management of childhood illness (CIMCI) may have a positive effect on child health if the health workers have adequate knowledge about key family practices.Setting: The study was conducted in rural areas of the West Coast district in the Western Cape, South Africa.Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge of community care workers about five of the 16 key family pra...

  1. The Relationship between Workplace Climate, Motivation and Learning Approaches for Knowledge Workers

    Vanthournout, Gert; Noyens, Dorien; Gijbels, David; Van den Bossche, Piet

    2014-01-01

    Workplace learning is becoming a central tenet for a large proportion of today's employees. This seems especially true for so-called knowledge workers. Today, it remains unclear how differences in the quality of workplace learning are affected by differences in perception of the workplace environment and the motivation of knowledge workers to…

  2. Residential location choice of knowledge-workers: The role of amenities, workplace and lifestyle

    Frenkel, Amnon; Bendit, Edward; Kaplan, Sigal

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the residential location choice of knowledge-workers at the intra-metropolitan level by applying discrete choice models. The models represent housing choices of 833 knowledge-workers in high-technology and financial services and analyze the relative importance of lifestyle...

  3. The Relationship between Transformational Leadership and Knowledge Workers' Self-Directed Learning Readiness

    Aparicio, Ricardo Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The rapid pace of change for knowledge workers competing globally necessitates ongoing continuous learning. Increasingly, knowledge workers will need to be ready--willing and able--to engage in self-directed learning. This makes it important to understand what factors in the work environment might be related to the self-directed learning…

  4. The Relationship between Workplace Climate, Motivation and Learning Approaches for Knowledge Workers

    Vanthournout, Gert; Noyens, Dorien; Gijbels, David; Van den Bossche, Piet

    2014-01-01

    Workplace learning is becoming a central tenet for a large proportion of today's employees. This seems especially true for so-called knowledge workers. Today, it remains unclear how differences in the quality of workplace learning are affected by differences in perception of the workplace environment and the motivation of knowledge workers to

  5. Mortality among workers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted among employees of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Since 1943, this facility has been the site of energy-related research, including uranium and plutonium recovery and radioisotope production. Historical follow-up conducted for the years 1943 to 1977 for 8681 white males who had been employed for at least one month during the period 1943 to 1972. Vital status was ascertained for 90 percent of the cohort. Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) were computed to contrast the workers' mortality experience with that of the US white male population. The observed number of 1017 deaths from all causes was 74 percent of that expected, a finding indicative of the healthy worker effect and the relatively high socioeconomic status of the cohort. The SMR for all cancers was 0.75 (195 observed vs. 261.3 expected). Mortality deficits were seen for non-malignant diseases of all major organ groups and for all site-specific malignancies except prostate cancer (SMR = 1.13), leukemia (SMR = 1.16) and Hodgkin's disease (SMR = 1.28). None of the elevations was statistically significant. There were no consistent trends of cause-specific mortality with either external or internal radiation exposure levels

  6. Childcare Workers' Knowledge about the Brain and Developmentally Appropriate Practice

    Zambo, Debby

    2008-01-01

    Advances in neuroscience are providing information about the brain and its development. Some researchers propose that childcare workers need to understand this information because it confirms their importance and their use of developmentally appropriate practice (DAP). Given the fact that childcare workers could benefit from this insight, it seems

  7. Knowledge workers collaborative learning behavior modeling in an organizational social network

    Rozewski, Przemyslaw; Jankowski, Jaroslaw; Brodka, Piotr; Michalski, Radoslaw

    2015-01-01

    Computations related to learning processes within an organizational social network area require some network model preparation and specific algorithms in order to implement human behaviors in simulated environments. The proposals in this research model of collaborative learning in an organizational social network are based on knowledge resource distribution through the establishment of a knowledge flow. The nodes, which represent knowledge workers, contain information about workers social and...

  8. The knowledge, attitudes and behaviors on immunization of healthcare workers

    Zehra Karacaer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to identify the knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of healthcare workers (HCWs working in our center about Hepatitis B Virus (HBV, seasonal flu (SF and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR vaccinations and reasons not to be vaccinated. Methods: This study was a descriptive survey conducted among HCWs of our hospital between 1 to 31 May 2014. The data were collected by a face-to-face questionnaire form consisting of 41 questions. Collected data were analyzed via SPSS 22,0, p <0.05 was considered significant Results: 219 HCWs participated in the study. The study group included 113 men. A median age of 39 years (minmax: 24-66. The median service duration of HCWs was 17 years (min-max: 1-35. Education levels of personnels were primary (primary -secondary-high school, colleges-university, master's degree-PhD ( respectively 45, 136, 38 people. The median score of correct information, the right attitude and the correct behavior were 7 (min-max: 1-10, 35 (min-max: 27-47, 5 (min-max: 0- 9, respectively. People who never got vaccinated against SF and who got vaccinated every year were calculated 46.6% and 20.1%. H1N1, HBV and measles vaccination rate were 46.6%, 82.6% and 18.3%, respectively. Not believing vaccine's protectiveness for SF (34,9%, concerned about safety for H1N1(44,4%, neglected for HBV (36,8%, got sick before for measles (36,3% were the factors most influential in refusal to get vaccinated. Conclusions: It is important that correct and sufficient information is accessed on issues such as effectiveness, side effects of vaccines in order to increase the rate of vaccination of HCWs [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(5.000: 353-363

  9. Motivation of Knowledge Workers in Chinese Small and Medium-sized High-tech Enterprises

    Du, Huanyu

    2015-01-01

    This thesis deals with the problem of how to motivate the knowledge workers in high technology small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in China. After the introduction of Small and Medium-sized High-technology Enterprises in China, the theory of motivation, and the theory of knowledge workers, the main aim of the research is to find out present situations and existing problems in knowledge workers motivation in Chinese high-tech SMEs. Additionally, there is the aim to figure out the main m...

  10. Radiation safety. Handbook for laboratory workers in the USA

    The aim of the Handbook is to provide a source of information on radiation safety for those who are involved in the use of ionizing radiation in the laboratory. The potential reader may be a laboratory worker in the university or biomedical setting or the safety professional who desires a basic understanding of radiation protection within the research environment. The Handbook may be used as a reference by the radiation protection specialist or Radiation Safety Officer. To this end, liberal use is made of Appendices to make the Handbook a source of reference for a wide spectrum of readership while avoiding complicating the main body of the text. Each chapter or appendix is designed to stand alone. A complete reading of the Handbook will show that topics may be covered more than once. For example, one may read about the hazards and protective measures on handling radioiodine in Chapter 5 on Practical Radiation Protection as well as in Appendix 19 on Safe Handling of 125I. Extensive use of figures, rather than tables has been made to present data, in the belief that these produce a good visual representation to a level of precision which is sufficient for most purposes of radiation protection in laboratories. The reader must remember that this Handbook should be taken as a guide only to the applicable regulations. You must consult the appropriate state or federal regulation directly or receive advice of a qualified radiation safety professional. Also, some information in the Appendices, such as commercially available training institutions or radioactive waste brokers, may change with time. Telephone numbers are given for the reader to call directly and check the services provided

  11. An exploratory study on the management of business records by knowledge workers

    Adeline du Toit

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine how knowledge workers could align the creation and management of business records with organisational records management needs. Problem investigated: Knowledge workers are employed by more than one organisation at the same time. This creates problems in managing and preserving the business records created and received by knowledge workers. This article investigates how organisations should manage and preserve their business records that are created and received by knowledge workers who are employed by more than one organisation. Methodology: The importance of the management of business records in the knowledge economy was discussed and in the empirical survey data was collected through a questionnaire survey of 122 knowledge workers at an investment management company. Findings: The results of the empirical survey revealed that the majority of respondents always save business records that they create on their own personal filing systems and that they are familiar with the concept of records management. The findings provided support for the hypothesis that knowledge workers take control of managing the business records of various organisations, as their careers consist of a series of projects or assignments, irrespective of the organisation employing them. Value of research: The active role that knowledge workers can play in the management of strategic business records, underlines its key position as an information management function in organisations. Further research is needed to clarify the importance of records management in the knowledge economy. Conclusion: Knowledge workers take control of managing the business records of various organisations, as their careers consist of a series of projects or assignments while working at different organisations.

  12. Knowledge Regarding Organ Donation and Willingness to Donate among Health Workers in South-West Nigeria

    Oluyombo, R.; Fawale, M. B.; R. W. Ojewola; Busari, O A; Ogunmola, O. J.; Olanrewaju, T. O.; Akinleye, C. A.; Oladosu, Y. O.; Olamoyegun, M. A.; Gbadegesin, B. A.; Obajolowo, O. O.; Soje, M. O.; Adelaja, A.; Ayodele, L. M.; Ayodele, O. E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Organ transplantation program in developing countries is still significantly dwarfed. Health workers are undeniably important in the success of transplantation. Objective: To assess the knowledge and attitude of health workers toward organ donation in South-West Nigeria with a view to explaining reasons for these shortcomings. Methods: In a cross-sectional study conducted on 850 health care workers, self-administered questionnaires were used to obtain information from participants...

  13. Knowledge Cities and Transport Sustainability: The Link between the Travel Behavior of Knowledge Workers and Car-Related Job Perks

    Frenkel, Amnon; Bendit, Edward; Kaplan, Sigal

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes the linkage between the travel behavior of knowledge workers and car-related job perks. The importance of this issue derives from the tendency of knowledge economy to concentrate in highly populated metropolitan regions. The analyzed data comprise 750 observations, retrieved f...

  14. Education and Knowledge Production in Workers' Struggles: Learning to Resist, Learning from Resistance

    Choudry, Aziz; Bleakney, David

    2013-01-01

    Trade unions and other sites of community-labour organizing such as workers centres are rich, yet contested spaces of education and knowledge production in which both non-formal and informal / incidental forms of learning occur. Putting forward a critique of dominant strands of worker education, the authors ask what spaces exist for social…

  15. Neurolathyrism in Ethiopia: assessment and comparison of knowledge and attitude of health workers and rural inhabitants.

    Getahun, Haileyesus; Lambein, Fernand; Vanhoorne, Michel

    2002-05-01

    A cross sectional community based study was done in the Amhara Regional State of Ethiopia in 1999-2000 to assess and compare knowledge and attitude towards neurolathyrism among health workers and the rural community. A sample of 217 health workers selected by probability proportional to size and randomly selected 589 heads of household from a rural district were interviewed using pre-tested questionnaires. Neurolathyrism was widely known among the health workers and the community. More than half of community respondents associated the disorder with walking or lying on the straw and the stalks of grass pea. In a multivariate analysis. poor neurolathyrism knowledge among the community was associated with illiteracy and with presence of a neurolathyrism patient at home. Among health workers, contact with vapour or steam of grass pea foods was the commonest cause cited. In a multivariate analysis nurses had the poorest knowledge among the health workers. Depending on the subject, health workers and community respondents had more or less knowledge than the other. The prevailing recurrent adverse climatic conditions might promote grass pea as a 'friendly' crop to the poor peasants in marginal areas who otherwise rely on it only during times of food shortages and could increase the incidence of neurolathyrism. The poor knowledge among health workers and the community and the general neglect of neurolathyrism requires urgent intervention. Appropriate strategies for the dissemination of information education, and communication (IEC) are needed. PMID:12061485

  16. Knowledge about childhood autism among health workers (KCAHW) questionnaire: description, reliability and internal consistency

    Agomoh Ahamefule O; Ebigbo Peter O; Bakare Muideen O; Menkiti Nkem C

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Knowledge and awareness about childhood autism is low among health workers and the general community in Nigeria and other Sub-Saharan African countries. Poor knowledge and awareness about childhood autism, especially among health workers can compromise early recognition and interventions which had been known to improve prognosis in children with autism. In formulating policy and designing interventions for these children, there is need to develop a reliable tool that can b...

  17. Motivation of Scandinavian Knowledge Workers : a survey of methods and their effectiveness

    Rasmussen, Frode A S Storesund and Janus G

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to identify and examine contemporary motivational theories and see how they fit to the Scandinavian knowledge worker. Two theories (SDT and 4-drive) were selected for empirical research. One survey of a total of 139 respondents from organisations located in Scandinavia showed that the SDT theory cannot be considered more effective than other motivational theories when it comes to motivation of Scandinavian knowledge workers. It was further shown that 4-drive theory ...

  18. Knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases and condom use among female street sex workers in Padua:

    Gai, Fabiana; Gallina, Pietro; Tarantello, Marco; Veller-Fornasa, Cleto

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and condom use in a population of young female street sex workers from eastern Europe and other non-EU countries basedin the Padua area (north-eastern Italy). To assess whether any aspects oftheir behavior might foster the spread of STDs. Study design: Street sex workers (prostitutes) were approached on the streets or during non-STD medicalappointments, their knowledge of STDs and con...

  19. HIV/AIDS Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors of Construction Workers in China

    Qu, Bo; Guo, Haiqiang; Sun, Gao; Zuo, Tianming; Zhang, Yang; Li, Brandon Y.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to describe HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes, risk behaviors, and sources of information among construction workers in China. A cross-sectional survey of 458 construction workers was conducted among 4 construction sites in Shenyang city in 2006. All 458 participants were individually interviewed in a private setting by a trained team of medical researchers using a structured questionnaire, which included questions on general personal information and the knowledge, ...

  20. Knowledge of Maternal and Newborn Care Among Primary Level Health Workers in Kapilvastu District of Nepal

    Acharya, D; Paudel, R; Gautam, K; Gautam, S; Upadhyaya, T

    2016-01-01

    Background: Higher maternal and neonatal deaths are common in low- and middle-income countries; due to less access to skilled help. Adequate knowledge and skills on maternal and newborn care (MNC) of community health workers can improve maternal and newborn health. Aims: To identify the knowledge of primary level health workers on some components of MNC. Subjects and Methods: Respondents were selected using simple random sampling method. For collecting the data, enumerators visited health institutions for 2 months from 1st October to 31st November 2012, and structured interview schedule was used to gather the information. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a total of one hundred and thirty-seven primary level health workers in Kapilvastu district, Nepal. The Chi-square test was employed to examine the association between the knowledge of health workers on MNC and designation and work experience. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. Results: In a total of 137 primary level health workers, more than half 53.2% (73/137) were senior auxiliary health workers/health assistant. Health workers having correct knowledge on contents of MNC were-registration 32.1% (44/137), major components of antenatal care 57.7% (79/137), danger signs of pregnancy 39.4% (54/137), five cleans 59.1% (81/137), postnatal health problems 54.0% (74/137), majority to health action to newborn care, newborn bath and meaning of exclusive breastfeeding. There was a statistical association between designation of health workers and above-mentioned components of MNC (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The differentials in the knowledge of MNC among primary level health suggest improving knowledge of the grass root level health workers with appropriate training and development programs.

  1. Knowledge, attitude and practice regarding organic solvents among printing workers in Hong Kong.

    Yu, Ignatius Tak-Sun; Lee, Nga Lan; Wong, Tze Wai

    2005-07-01

    To find out the prevalence of good knowledge, appropriate attitude and safe practice among printing workers exposed to organic solvents in Hong Kong, and to see if safe practice was influenced by the knowledge of and the attitude towards the harmful effects of organic solvents as well as other factors. The survey was conducted in a sample of 501 male printing workers from 28 factories in Hong Kong. The knowledge of and attitude towards the harmful effects of organic solvents, as well as the good practices adopted by the workers when handling solvents were explored using a questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify the major factors that influenced the knowledge, attitude and practice of workers. The prevalence of good knowledge, appropriate attitude and safe practice was low, being 20.4%, 38.4% and 22.0% respectively. Good knowledge was positively associated with awareness of the relevant legislation and past drinking behavior and negatively associated with current smoking. Appropriate attitude depended on having good knowledge and younger age. Safe practice did not depend on knowledge and attitude, but was positively associated with being informed of safety precautions and being supplied with chemical information by supervisors. The majority of workers believed that their employers, the Government and other statutory bodies should be responsible for providing information on chemicals, but very few of them actually obtained information from these sources. More workers preferred publications and talks rather than television as the means of obtaining further knowledge on chemicals. Front line supervisors have a pivotal role to play in improving safe practices of workers by informing them of the necessary precautions and supplying the relevant chemical information. PMID:16096355

  2. Passion at work: blogging practices of knowledge workers

    Efimova, LA

    2009-01-01

    While experiments with blogging are underway in many businesses, research that could inform them is limited. In this dissertation early adopters of weblogs are studied to provide an understanding of uses of weblogs in relation to work and insights relevant for introducing blogging in knowledge-intensive environments. The study is guided by the knowledge work framework that integrates task-based and personal knowledge management views on knowledge work, including both tasks, as the essence of ...

  3. Knowledge Of Anganwadi Workers And Their Problems-in Gadwal (rural, Mahabubnagar, Dist. AP

    Haji Ali Baba

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Anganwadi workers and helpers are engaged by the government to work in the state-operated IntegratedChild Development Scheme (ICDS. This scheme caters to the health and pre-school education needs of childrenfrom birth to six years of age and also to the health and nutrition needs of pregnant women, nursing mothers, andadolescent girls, to study the profile of Anganwadi Workers (AWWs .To assess knowledge of AWWs & problemsfaced by them while working. The author discussed on “knowledge of Anganwadi workers and their problems”with special reference to Gadwal (Rural, Mahabubnagar, District .AP.

  4. Knowledge, attitude and practices of Egyptian industrial and tourist workers towards HIV/AIDS.

    El-Sayyed, N; Kabbash, I A; El-Gueniedy, M

    2008-01-01

    This study explored knowledge, attitudes and practices towards HIV/AIDS infection among 1256 Egyptian industrial and tourism workers aged 16-40 years. Compared with industrial workers, tourism workers had a significantly better perception of the magnitude of the HIV/AIDS problem worldwide as well as in Egypt and of the likelihood of the problem worsening. Knowledge of tourism workers was also significantly better about causative agent of AIDS and methods of transmission. Both groups had negative attitudes towards patients living with HIV/AIDS concerning their right to confidentiality and to work. Both groups had a positive attitude towards behaviour change for protection from HIV/AIDS, principally via avoidance of extramarital sexual relations and adherence to religious beliefs. Use of condoms as a way to avoid HIV/AIDS was reported by only 0.4% of workers. PMID:19161085

  5. Knowledge, attitudes and practice of breast cancer screening among female health workers in a Nigerian urban city

    Omuemu Vivian O

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Late presentation has been observed as the hallmark of breast cancer in Nigerian women and an earlier onset has been reported in this population. This study was designed to assess the awareness of female health workers about risk factors and screening methods for early detection of breast cancer. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out among female health workers in the two major government health institutions in Benin City, Edo State capital in Nigeria. Data analysis was by SPSS version 10 and test of significance was done with differences considered significant at p Results Three hundred and ninety-three (393 female health workers out of five hundred and five eligible subjects completed and returned the questionnaires, giving a response rate of 77.8%. One hundred and two (26% were Doctors, two hundred and fifty-four (64.6% Nurses, and thirty-seven (9.4% were Radiographers, Laboratory Scientists and Pharmacists. A high proportion of our respondents had very poor knowledge about risk factors for breast cancer (55%. The awareness of mammography as a diagnostic method was very high (80.7%, but an extremely low knowledge of mammography as a screening method was found. Mammography practice of only 3.1% was found among those above 40 years of age who qualify for routine annual screening. Relatively low knowledge (45.5% about Breast Self Examination (BSE as a screening method was found. Conclusion These female health workers who are expected to act as role models and educate the public had poor knowledge of risk factors for breast cancer and practice of breast cancer screening. There is very urgent need for regular update courses for health workers concerning breast cancer education including screening methods.

  6. Health Workers Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Towards Tuberculosis in Priority Municipalities of the Colombian Pacific Coast

    Roco Carvajal-Barona

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe knowledge, attitudes and practices of health workers of tuberculosis (TBprograms in priority municipalities of the Colombian Pacific coast. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted with 38 health workers, corresponding to the entire population of people working at the TB programs in ten priority municipalities of Nario, Colombia. A structured interview, previously validated trough cognitive interviews, was used. Results: Health workers report to have knowledge about TB and its management according to the established control guidelines. Nevertheless, some risk practices concerning biosecurity standards of infection control were found, that show some stigmatizing attitudes towards the illness. Conclusions: The study provides information about the health workers knowledge, attitudes and practices towards TB in Narino that can be used as input to the design of intervention strategies to strengthen the TB programs with local and cultural approach.

  7. The linkage between car-related fringe benefits and the travel behavior of knowledge workers

    Bendit, Eduard; Frenkel, Amnon; Kaplan, Sigal

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the linkage between car-related fringe benefits and the travel behavior of knowledge workers in commute and leisure trips. Specifically, this study compares the commuting and leisure travel behavior of knowledge workers who receive either a company-car or car allowance with...... the travel behavior of workers who do not receive car-related fringe benefits. Data are based on a revealed-preferences survey among knowledge workers in Israel. Results show that car-related fringe benefits are associated with (i) high car ownership and car use intensity, (ii) long commute distances...... and travel times and non-sustainable transport modes, and (iii) high frequency of long-distance leisure trips. Policy implications include (i) directing policies towards reducing car ownership induced by car-related fringe benefits, (ii) encouraging company-car holders to ‘pay their way’, and (iii...

  8. Organisational design elements and competencies for optimising the expertise of knowledge workers in a shared services centre

    Mark Ramsey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Organisations are still structured according to the Industrial Age control model that restricts optimising the expertise of knowledge workers.Research purpose: The general aim of the research was to explore the organisation design elements and competencies that contribute to optimising the expertise of knowledge workers in a shared services centre.Motivation for the study: Current organisational design methodologies do not emphasise optimising the expertise of knowledge workers. This research addresses the challenge of how an organisation design can improve the creation and availability of the expertise of knowledge workers.Research design/approach method: The researcher followed a qualitative case study research design and collected data in six focus group sessions (N = 25.Main findings: The findings showed that the shared services centre (SSC is not designed to enable its structure, culture and codifying system to optimise the expertise of knowledge workers. In addition, the SSC does not share the knowledge generated with other knowledge workers. Furthermore, it does not use the output of the knowledge workers to improve business processes.Practical/managerial implications: The expertise of knowledge workers is the basis of competitive advantage. Therefore, managers should create an organisational design that is conducive to optimising knowledge work expertise.Contribution/value add: This research highlights the important organisational design elements and supportive organisational structures for optimising the expertise of knowledge workers. The research also proposes a framework for optimising the expertise of knowledge workers and helping an organisation to achieve sustainable competitive advantage.

  9. Assessment Of Knowledge And Skills Of Anganwadi Workers For Conduct Of Preschool Education Activities

    Rajni Dhingra , Iesha Sharma And Priyanka Sharma

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present research was carried out to assess the Knowledge and Skills of Anganwadi workers (the keyfunctionary in the ICDS programme for delivery of services for conduct of preschool education activities inAnganwadi centres. A sample of 105 Anganwadi workers was randomly drawn from three urban blocks of Jammudistrict. The tools used for collecting information were Observation and Rating scales. Rating scale devised byNational Institute of Public Cooperation and Child Development (NIPCCD for “Assessment of PreschoolEducation (PSE skills of Anganwadi workers” and self devised rating scale for “Assessing knowledge level ofAnganwadi workers” were used. The results of the study revealed that majority of the respondents had adequateknowledge regarding their roles and responsibilities in preschool education component of ICDS programme. Theconceptual understanding of respondents on the issues related to growth and development of child, age forpreschool education, teaching method and language to be used for communication was found to be in accordancewith child development theory. On the other hand, knowledge level of Anganwadi workers on the aspect ofimportance of early childhood, concept and need of preschool education were found inadequate. Regarding theskills of Anganwadi worker, it was found that the Anganwadi worker demonstrated good skills for communication,preparation of teaching aids, motivating and organising PSE activities, while they were optimal in other skills likeinteraction between Anganwadi worker and helper and several aspects related to knowledge across the selectedblocks. Knowledge and skills of Anganwadi workers were found to share high positive correlation (0.75 thusdepicting the interdependence of these two factors. The study has important implication for policy makers, trainersand staff of Anganwadi Training Centres (AWTCs particularly for improvement in knowledge and skills ofAnganwadi workers especially in view of large scale expansion of ICDS programme in India.

  10. Knowledge of Normal and Pathological Memory Aging in College Students, Social Workers, and Health Care Professionals

    Cherry, Katie E.; Allen, Priscilla D.; Jackson, Erin M.; Hawley, Karri S.; Brigman, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire (KMAQ) measures laypersons' knowledge of normal memory changes and pathological memory deficits in adulthood. In Experiment 1, undergraduate and graduate social work students and social work practitioners completed the KMAQ. Social workers and graduate students were more accurate on the pathological than…

  11. Living Up to the Code's Exhortations? Social Workers' Political Knowledge Sources, Expectations, and Behaviors.

    Felderhoff, Brandi Jean; Hoefer, Richard; Watson, Larry Dan

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of Social Workers' (NASW's) Code of Ethics urges social workers to engage in political action. However, little recent research has been conducted to examine whether social workers support this admonition and the extent to which they actually engage in politics. The authors gathered data from a survey of social workers in Austin, Texas, to address three questions. First, because keeping informed about government and political news is an important basis for action, the authors asked what sources of knowledge social workers use. Second, they asked what the respondents believe are appropriate political behaviors for other social workers and NASW. Third, they asked for self-reports regarding respondents' own political behaviors. Results indicate that social workers use the Internet and traditional media services to stay informed; expect other social workers and NASW to be active; and are, overall, more active than the general public in many types of political activities. The comparisons made between expectations for others and their own behaviors are interesting in their complex outcomes. Social workers should strive for higher levels of adherence to the code's urgings on political activity. Implications for future work are discussed. PMID:26897996

  12. Level and Determinants of Knowledge of Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis among Railway Workers in Malaysia

    Kurubaran Ganasegeran; J. Michael Menke; Vasudeva Murthy Challakere Ramaswamy; Rizal Abdul Manaf; Alabsi, Aied M; Sami Abdo Radman Al-Dubai

    2014-01-01

    Background. Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, an ancient malady greatly impairing modern population quality of life, has stimulated global attention to find effective modes of prevention and intervention. Purpose. This study aimed to assess factors affecting knowledge of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) among Malaysian railway workers. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 513 railway workers involving eight major states within Peninsular Malaysia using population-based...

  13. Using a Training Video to Improve Agricultural Workers' Knowledge of On-Farm Food Safety

    Mathiasen, Lisa; Morley, Katija; Chapman, Benjamin; Powell, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    A training video was produced and evaluated to assess its impact on the food safety knowledge of agricultural workers. Increasing food safety knowledge on the farm may help to improve the safety of fresh produce. Surveys were used to measure workers' food safety knowledge before and after viewing the video. Focus groups were used to determine…

  14. Using a Training Video to Improve Agricultural Workers' Knowledge of On-Farm Food Safety

    Mathiasen, Lisa; Morley, Katija; Chapman, Benjamin; Powell, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    A training video was produced and evaluated to assess its impact on the food safety knowledge of agricultural workers. Increasing food safety knowledge on the farm may help to improve the safety of fresh produce. Surveys were used to measure workers' food safety knowledge before and after viewing the video. Focus groups were used to determine

  15. Factors associated with biosafety level-2 research workers' laboratory exit handwashing behaviors and glove removal compliance.

    Johnston, James D; Merrill, Ray M; Zimmerman, Grant C; Collingwood, Scott C; Reading, James C

    2016-04-01

    Biosafety level-2 laboratories are designated for work with human-derived samples or moderate-risk microorganisms that transmit primarily by direct contact exposures. Many laboratory procedures generate unseen droplets that contaminate workers' hands, equipment, and work surfaces. Workers' strict adherence to glove removal and handwashing is required prior to laboratory exit to prevent inadvertent transmission of pathogens to self or others. However, little is known about biosafety level-2 workers' compliance with these behaviors. In this article, glove removal and handwashing compliance upon laboratory exit were measured by direct observation of 93 biosafety level-2 research workers from 21 university laboratories. Participants completed a 41-item survey measuring social cognitive theory-based variables related to handwashing, self-reported compliance, and demographic factors. Survey items, observed exit frequency, and laboratory characteristics were evaluated for associations with handwashing compliance. Overall, observed glove removal and handwashing compliance upon laboratory exit were 43.0% (Standard Error [SE] = 2.3%), and 8.2% (SE = 1.2%), respectively, while workers' self-reported glove removal and handwashing compliance were 73.7% (SE = 3.6%) and 35.5% (SE = 4.1%), respectively. The average number of observed laboratory exits per hour was 2.8 for workers with any handwashing compliance vs. 5.4 for workers with no handwashing compliance (p = 0.0013). Among the cognitive variables, behavioral modeling by supervisors and coworkers had the strongest association with workers' compliance (slope = 3.5, SE = 1.3, p = 0.0113). Workers in laboratories with a written handwashing policy had higher compliance (Mean = 14.1%, SE = 5.9%) than workers in laboratories with no written policy (Mean = 1.1%, SE = 1.0%; p = 0.0488). Multi-faceted interventions that encourage modeling of the behavior by supervisors and coworkers, implementation of written handwashing policies, and efforts to reduce exit frequency by furnishing laboratories with necessary equipment and supplies may help improve compliance. PMID:26910856

  16. The relationship between quality of work life and human resource productivity in knowledge workers

    Nahid Hatam

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health care systems depend critically on the size, skill, and commitment of the health workforce. Therefore, researchers have a close observation on the subjects which leads to an increase in the productivity of human resources. This study aims at determining the relationship between the quality of work life and the productivity of knowledge workers of the central field of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, in order to determine the factors effective in the quality of their working life. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 300 individuals selected by stratified random sampling method. On 761 knowledge workers of the central field of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences by using Timossi questionnaire of Quality of Work Life and Knowledge Worker Productivity Assessment questionnaire of Antikainen, during May and June 2011. The collected data were recorded by SPSS version 15 software and then it underwent statistical analysis using Pearson correlation. The P value level for statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: In general, 50% of the knowledge workers were dissatisfied about their quality of work life, and the other 50% had little satisfaction. 18% of the staff were in an unfavorable condition and 82% had a poor productivity. Also, the quality of work life had a positively significant relationship with the productivity of human resources (r=0.568; P>0.001. Conclusion: Most of the knowledge workers in the central field of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences had low productivity and quality of work life. Considering the relationship between the two variables, taking measures to improve the quality of work life can lead to more creative and profound planning in presenting services and, as a result, improving the productivity of the knowledge workers.

  17. Knowledge sharing among workers: a study on their contribution through informal communication in Cyberjaya, Malaysia

    Norizzati Azudin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia, being a multi-racial society, faces the challenges of creating knowledge sharing capability in organisations, as cultural values are often reflected in the workplace by individual employees. For organisations, it is not clear whether this diversity has resulted in any form of competitive advantage. Studies have shown that various communities in Malaysia do not bring their respective cultures to work, and as such the company values prevail. This research is based on the demographic study of Informal Knowledge Sharing in Cyberjaya, Selangor, Malaysia. After twelve years, Cyberjaya is approximately 25% developed, gradually expanding with the establishment of multinational and international organizations. Several flagship applications have been developed in MSC Malaysia to accelerate its growth. However, the expertise and knowledge shared among the workers are doubtful, especially at its initial growth stage. As Knowledge Management (KM developed, Communities of Practice (Wenger, 1998 became popular, even dominant „KM‟ intervention. Soon it was supplemented with story-telling interventions encouraging knowledge workers to use stories to „sell‟ KM internally, share knowledge and facilitate collaboration. This study will focus on knowledge sharing among workers, particularly the approach used to share knowledge through informal communication outside their organizations.

  18. 78 FR 54487 - Abbott Laboratories; Diagnostic-Hematology; Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...

    2013-09-04

    ... on March 8, 2013 (78 FR 15050). At the request of the U.S. Department of Labor, the Department... Employment and Training Administration Abbott Laboratories; Diagnostic--Hematology; Including On-Site Leased... Laboratories, Diagnostic--Hematology division, including on-site leased workers from Manpower Service...

  19. Modelling The Relationship Between Different Typs Of Urban Amenities And Knowledge Workers Using Spatial Panel Data

    Rouwendal, Jan; Dekkers, Jasper; Boter, Jaap

    2013-01-01

    Apart from housing quality and employment accessibility, knowledge workers are relatively strongly attracted by urban amenities such as the presence of shops, a variety of restaurants, recreational public spaces (e.g., parks), and by cultural facilities such as theaters, musea and cinemas. Since the knowledge-intensive and often specialised jobs these people qualify for are only available in a small number of larger metropolitan areas, they also tend to be more mobile (both within and across ...

  20. Sexual Knowledge, attitudes and behaviors among unmarried migrant female workers in China: a comparative analysis

    Tang Jie; Gao Xiaohui; Yu Yizhen; Ahmed Niman; Zhu Huiping; Wang Jiaji; Du Yukai

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In recent years, many studies have focused on adolescent's sex-related issues in China. However, there have been few studies of unmarried migrant females' sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, which is important for sexual health education and promotion. Methods A sample of 5156 unmarried migrant female workers was selected from three manufacturing factories, two located in Shenzhen and one in Guangzhou, China. Demographic data, sexual knowledge, attitudes and behavio...

  1. The linkage between the lifestyle of knowledge workers and their intra-metropolitan residential choice

    Bendit, Eduard; Frenkel, Amnon; Kaplan, Sigal

    contradictory trends of urban sprawl and inner city revitalization. The analysis consists of two stages. First, distinguishable clusters of knowledge-workers according to their lifestyle are identified by means of self-organizing maps (SOM) for pattern recognition and classification of multi-dimensional data...

  2. Localization of Open Educational Resources (OER) in Nepal: Strategies of Himalayan Knowledge-Workers

    Ivins, Tiffany Zenith

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation examines localization of Open Educational Resources (OER) in Himalayan community technology centers of Nepal. Specifically, I examine strategies and practices that local knowledge-workers utilize in order to localize educational content for the disparate needs, interests, and ability-levels of learners in rural villages. This…

  3. Sexual Knowledge, attitudes and behaviors among unmarried migrant female workers in China: a comparative analysis

    Tang Jie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, many studies have focused on adolescent's sex-related issues in China. However, there have been few studies of unmarried migrant females' sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, which is important for sexual health education and promotion. Methods A sample of 5156 unmarried migrant female workers was selected from three manufacturing factories, two located in Shenzhen and one in Guangzhou, China. Demographic data, sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors were assessed by self-administered questionnaires. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the factors associated with premarital sexual intercourse. Results The average age of the unmarried female workers included in the sample was 20.2 years, and majority of them showed a low level of sex-related knowledge. Females from the west of China demonstrated a significant lower level of sex-related knowledge than those from the eastern or central provinces (p p p Conclusion The unmarried migrant female workers lack sexual knowledge and a substantial proportion of them are engaged in premarital sexual behaviors. Interventions aimed at improving their sexual knowledge and related skills are needed.

  4. Knowledge of Hepatitis B Virus Infection, Immunization with Hepatitis B Vaccine, Risk Perception, and Challenges to Control Hepatitis among Hospital Workers in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital

    Adekanle, Olusegun; Ndububa, Dennis A.; Olowookere, Samuel Anu; Ijarotimi, Oluwasegun; Ijadunola, Kayode Thaddeus

    2015-01-01

    Background. Studies had reported high rate of hepatitis B infection among hospital workers with low participation in vaccination programmes, especially those whose work exposes them to the risk of HBV infection. The study assessed knowledge of hepatitis B virus infection, risk perception, vaccination history, and challenges to control hepatitis among health workers. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study. Consenting health care workers completed a self-administered questionnaire that assessed respondents' general knowledge of HBV, vaccination history and HBsAg status, risk perception, and challenges to control hepatitis. Data was analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results. Three hundred and eighty-two health care workers participated in the study. There were 182 males and 200 females. The respondents comprised 94 (25%) medical doctors, 168 (44%) nurses, 68 (18%) medical laboratory technologists, and 52 (14%) pharmacists. Over 33% had poor knowledge with 35% not immunized against HBV. Predictors of good knowledge include age less than 35 years, male sex, being a medical doctor, previous HBsAg test, and complete HBV immunisation. Identified challenges to control hepatitis include lack of hospital policy (91.6%), poor orientation of newly employed health workers (75.9%), and low risk perception (74.6%). Conclusion. Hospital policy issues and low risk perception of HBV transmission have grave implications for the control of HBV infection. PMID:25685549

  5. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Regarding Cervical Cancer and Screening among Haitian Health Care Workers

    Leilah Zahedi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that Haiti has the highest incidence of cervical cancer in the Western Hemisphere. There are currently no sustainable and affordable cervical cancer screening programs in Haiti. The current status of screening services and knowledge of health care professionals was assessed through a Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices survey on cervical cancer screening and prevention. It was distributed to Project Medishare for Haiti health care workers (n = 27 in the Central Plateau. The majority (22/27 of participants stated pre-cancerous cells could be detected through screening, however, only four had ever performed a pap smear. All of the participants felt a screening program should be started in their area. Our data establishes that knowledge is fairly lacking among healthcare workers and there is an opportunity to train them in simple, cost effective “screen-and-treat” programs that could have a great impact on the overall health of the population.

  6. Knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding cervical cancer and screening among Haitian health care workers.

    Zahedi, Leilah; Sizemore, Emma; Malcolm, Stuart; Grossniklaus, Emily; Nwosu, Oguchi

    2014-11-01

    It is estimated that Haiti has the highest incidence of cervical cancer in the Western Hemisphere. There are currently no sustainable and affordable cervical cancer screening programs in Haiti. The current status of screening services and knowledge of health care professionals was assessed through a Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices survey on cervical cancer screening and prevention. It was distributed to Project Medishare for Haiti health care workers (n = 27) in the Central Plateau. The majority (22/27) of participants stated pre-cancerous cells could be detected through screening, however, only four had ever performed a pap smear. All of the participants felt a screening program should be started in their area. Our data establishes that knowledge is fairly lacking among healthcare workers and there is an opportunity to train them in simple, cost effective "screen-and-treat" programs that could have a great impact on the overall health of the population. PMID:25390794

  7. Knowledge, attitude and practices about needle stick injuries in health care workers

    Objectives: To assess knowledge, attitude and practices about needle stick Injuries in health care workers. Study type, settings and duration: Hospital based study carried out at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, from August 2010 to November 2010. Subjects and Methods: A self administered 19 items questionnaire was prepared which contained information about needle stick injuries, its awareness, frequency of injury and the protocols that were followed after an injury had occurred. These questionnaires were given to 500 health care workers working in different wards and theaters of the hospital after obtaining their informed written consent. The health care workers included doctors, nurses and paramedical staff of Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad. The data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 15. Results: A total of 500 health care workers filled the questionnaire and returned it. Out of these 416(83.2%) reported ever experiencing needle stick injuries in their professional life. Health care workers working in Emergency department were most frequently affected (65%) followed by those working in different wards (27%) and operation theatre (8%). Most (93.6%) workers had knowledge about needle stick injuries and only 6.4% were not aware of it. Needle stick injury occurred from a brand new (unused) syringe in 51.2% cases, while in 32.8% cases, the needle caused an injury after it had been used for an injection. In 5% cases, injury occurred with blood stained needles. The commonest reasons for needle injury in stick injuries were heavy work load (36.8%) followed by hasty work (33.6%) and needle recapping (18.6%). About 66% health care workers were already vaccinated against hepatitis B. Only 13% workers followed universal guidelines of needle stick injuries and no case was reported to hospital authorities. Conclusions: Health care workers had inadequate knowledge about the risk associated with needle stick injuries and do not follow standard preventive measures. Policy message: A standard protocol regarding the training and compliance to follow preventive measures should be followed in all health care institutions. (author)

  8. Bilingual, Digital, Audio-Visual Training Modules Improve Technical Knowledge of Feedlot and Dairy Workers

    Christopher D. Reinhardt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Two studies were conducted to determine the effectiveness of digital multimedia modules as training tools for animal care workers.  Employees at a commercial feedlot (n = 17 and a commercial dairy (n = 10 were asked to independently complete a 10-question quiz prior to and following viewing of training modules.  Module topics in the feedlot were proper handling of non-ambulatory animals and humane methods of euthanasia; modules were administered to the workers, as a group, in either English (n = 7 or Spanish (N = 10, depending on previously indicated worker preference.  Modules addressing dairy cattle health practices and dairy cattle handling were presented to the dairy care workers who had a preference for learning in either English (n = 7 or Spanish (n = 3.  For feedlot workers, post-test scores were improved by 28% after viewing the modules compared to pre-test scores (74% vs. 58%; P < 0.01, across language and topic.  There were no interactions (P > 0.30 between language, topic, and between-test variation, indicating that the modules were equally effective at information delivery to both audiences in both languages.  For the dairy workers, test scores improved by 27% from pre-viewing to post-viewing (73% vs. 92%; P < 0.01; there was an interaction between the effect of module and language preference (P < 0.01 indicating that although scores increased for both of the topic areas for the English-speaking workers, only the score for the animal health topic increased for the Spanish-speaking workers.  Regardless of nationality, level of formal education, topic, or preferred language, digital media are effective at improving knowledge transfer to animal care professionals.

  9. KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PERCEPTION TOWARDS JAUNDICE AMONG AYDER REFERAL HOSPITAL HEALTH WORKERS

    Selahudin Alemu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine knowledge, practice and attitude towards jaundice among hospital health workers in Ayder Referral Hospital. Jaundice is a condition in which a person's skin and the whites of the eyes are discolored yellow due to an increased level of bilirubin in blood it is associated with many myth and Misconception. A study, using self administered questionnaire, was conducted from March 2009 to early May 2009.The result of the study showed that 79% respondents were selected, from which only 4(4% of the respondents select all of the correct options namely Dark colour of the urine, Yellowish colour of skin and eye, Aching and convulsion. 10% knew two manifestation of jaundice, 84% of respondent knew only one manifestation of jaundice. 83%of the respondents knew jaundice is due to high blood concentration of billirubin. 5% answered wrong that is jaundice is due to high blood concentration of urea. 76% of the workers prefers modern medicine for the treatment of jaundice and 8% the traditional medicine. The health workers are fairly clear in some aspects of jaundice and inadequate knowledge in other aspects of jaundice. Most of the health workers have positive perception towards jaundice and prefer modern medicine for treating jaundice. They have totally poor knowledge about traditional medicine for the treatment of jaundice. The health workers need an education and training about jaundice to update their knowledge and other study at community level should be conducted to know more about traditional method of treating jaundice.

  10. Records/knowledge management in a nuclear facility's Industrial Hygiene Laboratory

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is operated under the USA's Department of Energy (DOE) and is tasked with developing and applying science and technology to ensure the safety and reliability of U.S. nuclear deterrents and solving national problems in defense, energy, environment, and infrastructure. LANL is divided into numerous groups that accomplish various aspects of these overarching goals. An important aspect of this work is to ensure worker safety. To do this LANL has an on-site Industrial Hygiene (IH) Laboratory that is certified by the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) that follows International Standard ISO/IEC 17025:2005 guidelines. Following these guidelines facilitates appropriate records retention and knowledge management by the laboratory. Field Industrial Hygienists monitor workers for exposure and generate various swipe and personal breathing zone air samples that are analyzed by the IH Laboratory. The laboratory provides legally defensible data on which health, safety, and environmental decisions are based. Such documentation serves to protect the legal and financial rights of the Laboratory and individuals affected by Laboratory activities. The proper maintenance and filing of this documentation also serves to avoid expensive and unnecessary re-sampling and reanalysis if customers lose reports or if results are requested by regulatory agencies. We will explain how the Sample Management Office (SMO) interacts with customers to determine their needs to ensure the appropriate analyses are conducted. Additionally, we will explain our process of sample receipt, sample log in into databases, sample analysis, data validation, and compliance to internal procedures, LANL policies, and DOE regulations. Furthermore, we will outline how the Records Management Custodian processes the laboratory's completed data packages starting from database entry to archival at the Federal Records Center. Many DOE records relating to personnel exposures, contamination, waste, and environmental sampling are kept and are scheduled for long-term retention by National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Records shall include information created and received in the course of conducting Laboratory programs and business. Records management serves to promote the creation, capture, use, and transfer of records and knowledge. It also serves to preserve and protect the Laboratory's archival of historical documents and information. All records are given retention periods of at least 75 years. After outlining some of our various records and documents, we will explain how our records management and document control systems are set up to ensure effective and efficient retrieval of these records for 75 years. In conclusion, we will demonstrate how our and LANL's Records Management Program follows good business practices to ensure the protection of our corporate information assets

  11. GROWTH OF COLLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE BY LINKING KNOWLEDGE WORKERS THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA

    Jaroslava KUBA TOVA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Collective intelligence can be defined, very broadly, as groups of individuals that do things collectively, and that seem to be intelligent. Collective intelligence has existed for ages. Families, tribes, companies, countries, etc., are all groups of individuals doing things collectively, and that seem to be intelligent. However, over the past two decades, the rise of the Internet has given upturn to new types of collective intelligence. Companies can take advantage from the so-called Webenabled collective intelligence. Web-enabled collective intelligence is based on linking knowledge workers through social media. That means that companies can hire geographically dispersed knowledge workers and create so-called virtual teams of these knowledge workers (members of the virtual teams are connected only via the Internet and do not meet face to face. By providing an online social network, the companies can achieve significant growth of collective intelligence. But to create and use an online social network within a company in a really efficient way, the managers need to have a deep understanding of how such a system works.Thus the purpose of this paper is to share the knowledge about effective use of social networks in companies. The main objectives of this paper are as follows: to introduce some good practices of the use of social media in companies, to analyze these practices and to generalize recommendations for a successful introduction and use of social media to increase collective intelligence of a company.

  12. GROWTH OF COLLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE BY LINKING KNOWLEDGE WORKERS THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA

    JAROSLAVA KUBÁTOVÁ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Collective intelligence can be defined, very broadly, as groups of individuals that do things collectively, and that seem to be intelligent. Collective intelligence has existed for ages. Families, tribes, companies, countries, etc., are all groups of individuals doing things collectively, and that seem to be intelligent. However, over the past two decades, the rise of the Internet has given upturn to new types of collective intelligence. Companies can take advantage from the so-called Web-enabled collective intelligence. Web-enabled collective intelligence is based on linking knowledge workers through social media. That means that companies can hire geographically dispersed knowledge workers and create so-called virtual teams of these knowledge workers (members of the virtual teams are connected only via the Internet and do not meet face to face. By providing an online social network, the companies can achieve significant growth of collective intelligence. But to create and use an online social network within a company in a really efficient way, the managers need to have a deep understanding of how such a system works. Thus the purpose of this paper is to share the knowledge about effective use of social networks in companies. The main objectives of this paper are as follows: to introduce some good practices of the use of social media in companies, to analyze these practices and to generalize recommendations for a successful introduction and use of social media to increase collective intelligence of a company.

  13. Knowledge of Hepatitis B Transmission Risks Among Health Workers in Tanzania.

    Debes, Jose D; Kayandabila, Johnstone; Pogemiller, Hope

    2016-05-01

    Healthcare workers are at increased risk of contracting hepatitis B virus (HBV), particularly in settings of high HBV seroprevalence, such as sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated HBV knowledge among health-care workers in rural Tanzania by distributing an HBV paper survey in two northern Tanzanian hospitals. There were 114 participants (mean age 33 years, 67% female). Of the participants, 91% were unaware of their HBV status and 89% indicated they had never received an HBV vaccine, with lack of vaccine awareness being the most common reason (34%), whereas 70% were aware of HBV complications and 60% understood routes of transmission. There was a significant difference in knowledge of HBV serostatus and vaccination between participants with a medical background and others, P = 0.01 and 0.001, respectively. However, only 33% of consultants (senior medical staff) knew their HBV serostatus. There was no significant difference between knowledge of HBV transmission routes and occupation. Our study reveals low knowledge of HBV serostatus and vaccination status among hospital workers in Tanzania. PMID:26928835

  14. [Evaluation of the knowledge and manner of workers of workplaces in Tokat about the ban on restriction of indoor smoking].

    Doruk, Sibel; Celik, Deniz; Etikan, Ilker; Inönü, Handan; Yılmaz, Ayşe; Seyfikli, Zehra

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the knowledge and manner of cafe, pub and restaurant (with/without alcohol) workers in our city center about the ban on restriction of indoor smoking. To determine the preparation about the ban, smoking characteristics of workers, the knowledge on passive smoking. A questionnaire was performed to workers. The type of workplace, the number of workers, existence of a restriction of indoor smoking, any preparation about the ban were asked. The job of worker, whether the worker has a knowledge on the ban or not, the idea of the workers on the necessity and practicability of the ban were asked. Smoking history and the knowledge about passive smoking of workers were recorded. Fagerstrom nicotine dependent test (FNDT) was performed to smokers. Eighty four work places with 568 workers included in the study. The questionnaire was performed to 337 workers whose mean age was 29.1/years. 292 of workers were male. 190 of cases were current smokers. 166 of cases (49.3%) know the meaning of passive smoking. Alcohol offering was made at 8 of workplaces. Smoking was forbidden in 20 of workplaces. A preparation was performed about the ban in 30 of (46.9%) other workplaces. 88.4% of workers have knowledge on the ban, 64.7% of them know the punishment of the noncompliance of the ban. 81.3% of the workers believe the necessity and 45.7% of them believe the practicability of the ban. Smokers and especially who's FNBT > 5 have a stronger belief on the necessity and practicability of the ban. We determined that the preparation about the ban was inadequate although there was an little time for the put into practice the law. So we think that the controls of workplaces should be happened frequent. PMID:21038139

  15. Experiences and Management of Pregnant Radiation Workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Radiation workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are divided into two classes based on whether or not they can encounter radioactive contamination in the normal course of their work. Level I workers primarily handle sealed radioactive materials such as those used to calibrate detectors. Level II workers perform benchtop chemistry. The U.S. Department of Energy has strict guidelines on the management of pregnant radiation workers. Staff members may voluntarily notify their line managers of a pregnancy and be subjected to stringent radiation exposure limits for the developing fetus. The staff member and manager develop a plan to limit and monitor radiation dose for the remainder of the pregnancy. Several examples of dose management plans and case examples of the impact of pregnancy on staff member's technical work and projects will be presented

  16. Food Safety Training Is Associated with Improved Knowledge and Behaviours among Foodservice Establishments' Workers.

    Adesokan, Hezekiah Kehinde; Akinseye, Victor Oluwatoyin; Adesokan, Grace Abiodun

    2015-01-01

    Though several studies have evaluated the association between food safety training and behavior, little has investigated different training components in association with food handlers' performance. Foodservice workers (N = 211) with at least two years' experience were willing to participate and were selected from major foodservice establishments in Ibadan, southwestern Nigeria, and completed a survey to evaluate the association between training, training area, duration, and refresher training and food safety knowledge and practices. We observed an association between training and knowledge (P = 0.000) as well as practices (P = 0.05) of food safety while different training areas contributed similarly to food handlers' knowledge (P = 0.17) and practices (P = 0.08). However, there was a significant decline in knowledge (P = 0.01) and practices (P = 0.001) with an increase in training duration. Furthermore, foodservice employees with refresher training demonstrated significantly higher knowledge (P = 0.000) and practice (P = 0.003) levels than those without, being about 45 and 14 times more likely to, respectively, improve their knowledge (OR = 45; 95% CI: 3.47-584.34) and practice (OR = 13.5; 95% CI: 2.01-90.69). Researchers should always consider varying training components before making assertions regarding effectiveness of training on foodservice workers' behaviour. PMID:26904658

  17. Home-Based Direct Care Workers: Their Reported Injuries and Perceived Training Knowledge.

    Hamadi, Hanadi; Probst, Janice C; Khan, M Mahmud; Bellinger, Jessica; Porter, Candace

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of the study were to profile occupational injury patterns across home health and hospice care (HHC), organization characteristics, and home health aides' (HHAs) individual characteristics, and examine how worker training affects HHAs' risk of reporting an injury using the model of human factors of health care in the home. The authors measured training knowledge using an 11-item scale and conducted univariate and bivariate analyses to describe injury patterns across individual, occupational, and organizational factors using STATA 12.0. The researchers found that work-related injuries and type of injury were associated with increased likelihood of reporting one or more injuries, full-time employment, high hourly pay, and working in an inpatient or mixed setting. Overall, HHAs perceived that they received "excellent" and "good" training on key topics that promoted safety and job knowledge. Furthermore, the results suggested linkages between worker's complex personal, occupational, and organizational characteristics. PMID:27026275

  18. 77 FR 4368 - Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostics Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...

    2012-01-27

    ... published in the Federal Register on March 10, 2011 (76 FR 13232). At the request of the Texas Workforce... Employment and Training Administration Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostics Division, Including On-Site Leased..., Diagnostics Division, including on-site leased workers from Manpower, Comsys, Apex, Fountain Group,...

  19. Effective leadership of knowledge workers: results of an intercultural business study

    Ingo Bildstein; Stefan Gueldenberg; Hora Tjitra

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to link Peter F. Drucker's seminal theoretical conceptions with empirical insights on what constitutes perception of effective knowledge worker leadership in an intercultural environment. Both a fundamental shift of mind in theorizing and much more empirical research is needed, to fully understand the underlying view of leadership as a socially distributed activity. However, in a true Druckerian spirit, to take this new lens on leadership is neither magi...

  20. The relationship between quality of work life and human resource productivity in knowledge workers

    Nahid Hatam; Masoomeh zarif; Mehrzad Lotf; Zahra Kavosi; Ali Tavakoli

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Health care systems depend critically on the size, skill, and commitment of the health workforce. Therefore, researchers have a close observation on the subjects which leads to an increase in the productivity of human resources. This study aims at determining the relationship between the quality of work life and the productivity of knowledge workers of the central field of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, in order to determine the factors effective in the quality ...

  1. KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PERCEPTION TOWARDS JAUNDICE AMONG AYDER REFERAL HOSPITAL HEALTH WORKERS

    Selahudin Alemu; Derbew Fikadu Berhe; Palani, S.; Nisha Mary Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine knowledge, practice and attitude towards jaundice among hospital health workers in Ayder Referral Hospital. Jaundice is a condition in which a person's skin and the whites of the eyes are discolored yellow due to an increased level of bilirubin in blood it is associated with many myth and Misconception. A study, using self administered questionnaire, was conducted from March 2009 to early May 2009.The result of the study showed that 79% respondent...

  2. Evaluating Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Health-Care Workers Regarding Patient Education in Iran

    Sima Garshasbi; Zahra Khazaeipour; Nahid Fakhraei; Maryam Naghdi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the position of patient education measuring knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) among health care workers (HCWs). It is also aimed to emphasize the need for a real position for patient education. This survey was performed among a group of HCWs in Iran. The scores had an acceptable level. However, nurses, females and younger people received higher scores. The staff was already aware of patient education necessity and considered it as the duty of a...

  3. Homilies as knowledge transfer platform for Filipino migrant workers in Taiwan

    Calbay, Francis Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Labor migration has become entrenched in underdeveloped countries as a means to address rampant unemployment and to sustain the local economy. In the Philippines, it is estimated that one in ten Filipinos work abroad. With limited sources to address the information needs of widely dispersed Filipino migrant workers, this study explores how the Catholic Church could steward knowledge transfer, specifically through homilies. Under the framework of Symbolic Convergence theory, thematic content a...

  4. Health Care Workers Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices on Tobacco Use in Economically Disadvantaged Dominican Republic Communities

    Michael G. Prucha; Fisher, Susan G.; Scott McIntosh; Grable, John C.; Heather Holderness; Kelly Thevenet-Morrison; Zahra Quiones de Monegro; Jos Javier Snchez; Arisleyda Bautista; Sergio Daz; Deborah J. Ossip

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco use is increasing globally, particularly in low and middle-income countries like the Dominican Republic (DR) where data have been lacking. Health care worker (HCW) interventions improve quit rates; asking patients about tobacco use at each visit is an evidence-based first step. This study provides the first quantitative examination of knowledge, attitudes and practices of DR HCWs regarding tobacco use. All HCWs (N = 153) in 7 economically disadvantaged DR communities were targeted wit...

  5. A Study of Knowledge and Practices among Commercial Sex Workers Registered Under Jyotisangh STD Clinic, Ahmedabad

    Talsania NJ, Shah Rakesh, Shah Venu, Murugan V

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence about the importance of commercial sex workers (CSWs) and their clients as bridging groups for the HIV epidemic. In India, the role of CSWs is key to the future trajectory of the epidemic. Objective: To determine the level of knowledge and practices regarding STI/ HIV among CSWs. Study design: A Cross-sectional, community based study. Methodology: The study was conducted in December 2005 among CSWs registered under Jyotisangh. Results: The mean age was 27...

  6. Knowledge and occupational exposure to blood and body fluids among health care workers and medical students

    Marković-Denić Ljiljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health workers and medical students are at occupational risk of blood-borne diseases during the accidents, that is, via percutaneous injury or entry of blood or body fluids through the mucosa or injured skin. Objective: to review and analyze the knowledge, attitudes and perception of risks of blood-borne diseases of the clinical course students and health workers as well as the frequency of accidents. Material and methods: Cross-sectional study was carried out among the students of the Faculty of Medicine in Belgrade, and health workers of the Clinical Center of Serbia. The subjects responded anonymously to questionnaire specially designed for the study. Results: Both students and health workers were aware, in a high percentage, of the fact that the risk of hepatitis B spread was about 30%. Significantly more students gave affirmative reply that blood as biological material was a potential hazard of HIV infection spread (p=0.001, and significantly more students knew that HIV would not be spread by sweat (p=0.001. Hepatitis B vaccination was administered only to 24.1% of students and 71.4% of health workers. About 10% of students and 65.5% of health workers experienced some accident. There was no significant difference of accidents between nurses/technicians and physicians (p>0.05, as well as of accidents and a total length of service (p>0.05. The majority of accidents occurred during the use of needle/sharp object (in 27.3% of students and 33.1% of health workers. About 40% of students and slightly over a half of the workers reported the accidents to appropriate authorities. Additional education in this field is considered necessary by 73% of students. Conclusion: During the studies and via continuous medical education it is necessary to upgrade the level of knowledge on prevention of accidents, what would, at least partially, influence their reduction. [Acknowledgment. Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175046

  7. Modification to knowledge on breast cancer in the workers with risk factors for this disease

    An educative intervention of 30 workers with risk factors for breast cancer was carried out in 'Ramon Lopez Penna' University Polyclinic in Santiago de Cuba, from September 2008 to March 2009, in order to increase some knowledge on the topic. Two subgroups with 15 participants each were created to develop the different activities of the educative project, which will be assessed before the instructive action and 6 months after its onset. A Mc Nemar text was used to validate the information and a significant modification to knowledge on the topic was obtained. (author)

  8. Autonomy, trajectories and knowledge of workers and students of Adults and Adolescents Education

    Ivan Livindo de Senna Corrêa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the construction of autonomy, life trajectories and the work, as well as the knowledge of self-employed workers and students of Adult and Adolescents Education (EJA of Colégio de Aplicação from UFRGS. The study also tries to find reasons that made these individuals return to school. The data collecting was done through questions and a semi structured interview. The obtained results were: a the reasons for returning to school were knowledge, personal improvement and job upward; b the autonomy is relative to work conditions and decision making; c the trajectories were fragmented throughout child labor and school exclusion; d the knowledge experience is constituted by the observation, daily relationships and by the autonomously search for information and knowledge.

  9. [Community health workers' knowledge on tuberculosis, control measures, and directly observed therapy].

    Rocha, Gustavo Silva Souto; Lima, Marina Guimaraes; Moreira, Joyce Laura; Ribeiro, Kennedy Crepalde; Ceccato, Maria das Graças Braga; Carvalho, Wânia da Silva; Silveira, Micheline Rosa

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed community health workers' (CHW) knowledge on tuberculosis (TB), TB control measures, and directly observed therapy (DOT) in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. This was a cross-sectional study that applied a questionnaire in a random and representative sample of 489 CHW. The overall proportion of correct answers was 74.6%. The mean proportions of correct answers in the domains for TB, TB control measures, and DOT were 81%, 84.1%, and 59.4%, respectively. The study showed knowledge gaps in the identification of patients with pulmonary TB, the target public for DOT, and adequate technique for treatment supervision. Better knowledge was associated with time working as a CHW (OR = 2.3) and follow-up of cases in the 12 months prior to the interview (OR = 1.7). The study provided new scientific data on level of knowledge among CHW concerning DOT and can support strategies to improve TB control activities. PMID:26248103

  10. HIV prevalence, AIDS knowledge, and condom use among female sex workers in Santiago, Chile.

    Barrientos, Jaime E; Bozon, Michel; Ortiz, Edith; Arredondo, Anabella

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes HIV seroprevalence, knowledge of HIV transmission, and condom use among female sex workers (FSW) attending five specialized sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics in Santiago, Chile. A short questionnaire with socio-demographic, AIDS knowledge, and condom-use variables was administered to 626 FSW. HIV seroprevalence was estimated with a blood test sent to the Chilean Public Health Institute. ELISA was used to confirm HIV in suspected cases. HIV prevalence was 0%. FSW showed adequate overall knowledge of HIV, even better than reported for the Chilean general population on some items. Condom use with clients was high ("always" = 93.4%), although regular use with steady partners was low ("always" = 9.9%). The zero HIV seroprevalence and consistent condom use with clients confirms the positive impact of intervention strategies for FSW, increasing both correct knowledge of AIDS and condom use with clients and helping decrease these women's HIV/AIDS vulnerability. PMID:17653395

  11. Residential location choice of knowledge-workers in a "startup metropolis": the role of amenities, workplace and lifestyle

    Frenkel, Amnon; Bendit, Edward; Kaplan, Sigal

    2013-01-01

    and cultural amenities in addition to classic location factors. Hence, the model bridges the gap between the recent lifestyle-oriented and the classical utility-oriented conceptualizations of the residential choice of knowledge-workers. The most important factors are municipal socioeconomic level......This study investigates the residential location choice of knowledge-workers at the intra-metropolitan level by applying discrete choice models. The models represent housing choices of 833 knowledge-workers in high-technology and financial services and analyze the relative importance of lifestyle......, housing affordability and commuting time, while substantial secondary factors are cultural and educational land-use and culture-oriented lifestyle....

  12. Residential location choice of knowledge-workers in a "startup metropolis": the role of amenities, workplace and lifestyle

    Bendit, Edward; Frenkel, Amnon; Kaplan, Sigal

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge cities (KC) and knowledge-based urban development (KBUD) are rapidly gaining momentum due their potential for inducing economic growth and regional competitiveness. The current study focuses on investigating the location preferences of knowledge-workers at the intra-metropolitan level, ...

  13. The relationship between knowledge of hiv, self-perceived vulnerability and sexual risk behavior among community clinic workers in chile

    Cabieses, Baltica; FERRER, LILIAN; Villarroel, Luis; Tunstall, Helena; Norr, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Objective Testing the hypothesis of an association between knowledge and sexual risk behaviour (SRB) amongst community-clinic workers in Chile, explained by the confounding effect of self-perceived vulnerability to HIV. Methods A cross-sectional survey was analyzed; it was nested within a quasiexperimental study of 720 community-clinic workers in Santiago. The SRB score combined the number of sexual partners and condom use (coded as high/low SRB). Knowledge of HIV (a 25-item index) was co...

  14. Knowledge and attitude of healthcare workers about middle east respiratory syndrome in multispecialty hospitals of Qassim, Saudi Arabia

    Khan, Muhammad Umair; Shah, Shahjahan; Ahmad, Akram; Fatokun, Omotayo

    2014-01-01

    Background With the increase in prevalence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), healthcare workers (HCWs) are at risk of acquiring and subsequently transmitting this lethal virus. In view of this, HCWs were evaluated for their knowledge of and attitude towards MERS in Saudi Arabia. Methods A cross sectional study was performed in two hospitals of Qassim region in Saudi Arabia. A total of 280 healthcare workers were selected to participate in this study. Knowledge and attitude were asse...

  15. Knowledge, attitudes and practice pertaining to depression among primary health care workers in Tanzania

    Shah Ajit

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Examination of consultation data in a variety of primary care settings in Tanzania shows that, while psychoses are routinely diagnosed and treated at primary care level, depression is rarely recorded as a reason for consultation. Since, epidemiological studies elswhere show that depression is a much more common disorder than psychosis, a series of studies were undertaken to elucidate this apparent paradox in Tanzania and inform mental health policy; firstly, a household prevalence study to ascertain the prevalence of common mental disorders at community level in Tanzania; secondly, a study to ascertain the prevalence of common mental disorders in primary care attenders; and thirdly, a study to ascertain the current status of the knowledge, attitude and practice pertaining to depression among primary health care workers. This paper reports the findings of the latter study. Methods All the primary health care workers (N = 14 in four primary health care centres in Tanzania were asked to complete the Depression Attitude Questionnaire, which assesses the health worker's knowledge and attitude towards the causes, consequences and treatment of depression. Results The majority of respondents felt that rates of depression had increased in recent years, believed that life events were important in the aetiology of depression, and generally held positive views about pharmacological and psychological treatments of depression, prognosis and their own involvement in the treatment of depressed patients. However, the majority of respondents felt that becoming depressed is a way that people with poor stamina deal with life difficulties. Conclusion The findings suggest a need to strengthen the training of primary health care workers in Tanzania about the detection of depression, pharmacological and psychological treatments, and psychosocial interventions.

  16. Health Care Workers' Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors Regarding Antineoplastic Drugs: Survey From British Columbia, Canada.

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Teschke, Kay; Shen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Although nurses are knowledgeable regarding the risk of exposure to antineoplastic drugs, they often do not adhere with safe work practices. However, the knowledge, perceptions, and behavior of other health care job categories at risk of exposure has yet to be determined. This study aimed to survey a range of health care workers from British Columbia, Canada about their knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors regarding antineoplastic drugs. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to participants querying the degree of contact with antineoplastics, knowledge of risks associated with antineoplastics, perceptions of personal risk, previous training with respect to antineoplastics, and safe work practices. Subjects were recruited from health care facilities in and around Vancouver. Fisher's exact tests were performed to ascertain whether there were differences in responses between job categories. We received responses from 120 participants representing seven different job categories. Pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and nurses were more knowledgeable regarding risks than other job categories examined (statistically significant difference). Although 80% of respondents were not afraid of working with or near antineoplastics, there were concerns about the suitability of current control measures and practices employed by co-workers. Only half of respondents felt confident that they could handle all situations where there was a potential for exposure. Only one of the perception questions, self-perceived risk of exposure to antineoplastic drugs, differed significantly between job categories. Not all respondents always wore gloves when directly handling antineoplastic drugs. Further, hand hygiene was not regularly practiced after glove usage or after being in an area where antineoplastic drugs are handled. The majority of responses to questions related to safe work practices differed significantly between job categories. Our results suggest that knowledge regarding risks associated with antineoplastic drugs can be improved, especially among job categories that are not tasked with drug preparation or drug administration. There is also a gap between knowledge and compliance with glove usage and hand hygiene.Training is also recommended to improve health care workers' perceptions of the risks associated with antineoplastic drugs. PMID:25897641

  17. Students integrate knowledge acquisition and practical work in the laboratory.

    Agüera, E I; Sánchez-Hermosín, P; Díz-Pérez, J; Tovar, P; Camacho, R; Escribano, B M

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to transfer a wider concept of teamwork and self-learning to the laboratory, encouraging students' capabilities when seeking, acquiring, and processing knowledge. This educational innovation was carried out with a total of 38 students (fourth year of degree in Biology) in the area of physiology (Advances in Reproduction course) at University of Córdoba in Córdoba, Spain. The design of the project's application methodology consisted of establishing a way in which problems would be tackled in the practical classes. For this purpose, the different tasks were set up so that students could relate them to the concepts learned in the theory classes. On the first day of class, the project was presented to the students. Groups of two to three students worked in the laboratory and set up an outline of the protocol of the practical work that they had done. This outline was performed individually and sent to the lecturers through a learning management system (Moodle). The teachers gave feedback and assessed student submissions. Upon finishing the course, students completed a survey. The project-based learning method promotes practical self-learning on the part of students. This methodology demonstrated to us that it stimulates a critical and self-critical capacity in students, both individually and in groups, and that writing didactic practical material helped students to enhance their theory knowledge. The experiment was a success in view of the scores obtained upon finishing the subject. PMID:26330040

  18. Protective effects of green tea on antioxidative biomarkers in chemical laboratory workers.

    Tavakol, Heidary Shayesteh; Akram, Ranjbar; Azam, Sayadi; Nahid, Zadkhosh

    2015-09-01

    Chemical materials are environmental contaminants, are extensively used in laboratories, and may cause various forms of health hazards in laboratory workers. Therefore, this toxicity most likely is a result of the oxidative metabolism of chemical to reactive products. As green tea (GT) possesses antioxidant effects, the objective of this study was to examine any amelioration oxidative stress in chemical laboratory workers drinking one cup (3 g/300 ml water) of freshly prepared tea once daily. Baseline characteristics including age, sex, smoking, fruit consumption, and duration of exposure were recorded via questionnaire to the subjects. Saliva level oxidative stress parameters such as total antioxidant capacity (TAC), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were estimated before and after consumption of GT in these workers. Treatment of subjects with GT induced a significant reduction in saliva GPx activity (406.61 ± 22.07 vs. 238.96 ± 16.26 U/l p = 0.001) and induction in TAC (0.46 ± 0.029 μmol/ml vs. 0.56 ± 0.031, p = 0.016). No statistically significant alteration was found for saliva SOD (0.080 ± 0.0019 vs. 0.079 ± 0.0014, p > 0.05) and CAT (20.36 ± 0.69 vs. 19.78 ± 0.71, p > 0.05) after 28 days treatment by GT. These results demonstrate that drinking GT during chemical exposure can reduce several parameters indicative of oxidative stress. In conclusion, using GT as a dietary supplement can be a rational protocol to control source of hazards in chemical laboratory workers. PMID:23576111

  19. Radiation, work experience, and cause specific mortality among workers at an energy research laboratory.

    Checkoway, H; Mathew, R.M.; Shy, C. M.; Watson, J. E.; Tankersley, W G; Wolf, S H; Smith, J. C.; Fry, S A

    1985-01-01

    A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted among 8375 white male employees who had worked at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for at least one month between 1943 and 1972. This plant has been the site of energy related research, including uranium and plutonium reactor technology and radioisotope production. Radiation doses, primarily from gamma rays, were generally low; the median cumulative exposure for workers was 0.16 rems. Historical follow up was conducted for the years 1943-7...

  20. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of healthcare workers regarding influenza and vaccination in Salerno, Italy

    Maria Grazia Panico

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract
    Background: Influenza vaccination coverage among healthcare workers (HCWs is unacceptably low despite
    the recommendations of health authorities.
    Objective: The aim of the study is to assess the knowledge base of healthcare workers in Local Health Services (LHS regarding influenza vaccination and to identify the factors that inhibit or motivate vaccination among HCWs.
    Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out between July and October 2003 within the five Hospitals of the LHS “Azienda Sanitaria Salerno2”, Salerno, Italy. In July 2003, we prepared a standardized anonymous questionnaire for a sample of 280 healthcare workers aimed at surveying their knowledge base and attitudes
    towards influenza and vaccination. The HCWs were recruited by random selection using the stratified layered sampling method. On the basis of the results of our survey, a hospital vaccination campaign was undertaken. Statistical analysis was carried out using the EpiInfo 6.06 program. Data were analyzed through frequency distribution. Statistical comparison was performed using the Chi-square tests and a p-value <0,05 was considered statistically significant*.
    Results: During the 2003-2004 influenza season, 230 (81% out of 280 employees answered the questionnaire. 31 respondents (13.5% were physicians, 94 (40.9% were nurses and 105 (45.6% were workers employed in supporting services. The vaccination rate among Health Care workers of this Local Health Service (LHS unit was about 15.0%. The reasons most frequently cited by HCWs for noncompliance with vaccination were confidence in their own personal health, the fear of adverse reactions to the vaccine
    and the doubt they had about vaccine efficacy.
    Conclusions: We conclude that those responsible for influenza vaccination programs might consider a specifically tailored intervention strategy aimed at improving coverage. The answers collected can be used to refine the following season’s campaign.

  1. The value of a new idea: knowledge transmission, workers' mobility and market structure

    We model the process of knowledge transmission among firms via workers' mobility as a multi-stage game. In our setup an idea to be realized needs that the agent informed about the idea recruits another agent from a pool of uninformed people. This constraint generates a recursive effect of knowledge transmission via players' mobility across firms which affects simultaneously the players' payoffs and the number of active players engaged in market competition. We provide sufficient conditions for the game to possess a unique symmetric subgame perfect equilibrium in which all incumbent players deter the exit of their collaborators. The equilibrium outcome is shown to depend upon the success of the idea over time, expressed by the behaviour of the market demand and on players' time preferences. A few other intuitions are provided on the interplay between technology, market structure and the market value of an innovative idea

  2. A mental health training program for community health workers in India: impact on knowledge and attitudes

    Armstrong Gregory

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unmet needs for mental health treatment in low income countries are pervasive. If mental health is to be effectively integrated into primary health care in low income countries like India then grass-roots workers need to acquire relevant knowledge and skills to be able to recognise, refer and support people experiencing mental disorders in their own communities. This study aims to provide a mental health training intervention to community health workers in Bangalore Rural District, Karnataka, India, and to evaluate the impact of this training on mental health literacy. Methods A pre-test post-test study design was undertaken with assessment of mental health literacy at three time points; baseline, completion of the training, and three month follow-up. Mental health literacy was assessed using the interviewer-administered Mental Health Literacy Survey. The training intervention was a four day course based on a facilitator's manual developed specifically for community health workers in India. Results 70 community health workers from Doddaballapur, Bangalore Rural District were recuited for the study. The training course improved participants' ability to recognize a mental disorder in a vignette, and reduced participants' faith in unhelpful and potentially harmful pharmacological interventions. There was evidence of a minor reduction in stigmatizing attitudes, and it was unclear if the training resulted in a change in participants' faith in recovery following treatment. Conclusion The findings from this study indicate that the training course demonstrated potential to be an effective way to improve some aspects of mental health literacy, and highlights strategies for strengthening the training course.

  3. Influence of reward preferences in attracting, retaining, and motivating knowledge workers in South African information technology companies

    Mark Bussin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The world of work is evolving and the nature of relationships between knowledge workers and their employers has changed distinctly, leading to a change in the type of rewards they prefer. The nature of these preferences in the South African, industry-specific context is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to deepen understanding of the reward preferences of Information technology (IT knowledge workers in South Africa, specifically as these relate to the attraction, retention and motivation of knowledge workers.Design: The research design included a quantitative, empirical and descriptive study of reward preferences, measured with a self-administered survey and analysed using non-parametric tests for variance between dependent and independent groups and non-parametric analysis of variance.Findings: This study found that there are specific reward preferences in knowledge workers in the IT sector in South Africa and that these preferences apply differently when related to the attraction, retention and motivation of employees. It identified the most important reward components in the competition for knowledge workers and also demonstrated that demographic characteristics play a statistically significant role in determining reward preferences.Practical implications: The study’s findings show that a holistic approach to total rewards is required, failing which, companies will find themselves facing increased turnover and jobhopping. Importantly, the study also highlights that different rewards need to form part of knowledge workers’ relationship with their employer in three different scenarios: attraction, retention and motivation.

  4. Knowledge of and attitudes to influenza vaccination in healthy primary healthcare workers in Spain, 2011-2012.

    Domnguez, Angela; Godoy, Pere; Castilla, Jess; Soldevila, Nria; Toledo, Diana; Astray, Jenaro; Mayoral, Jos Mara; Tamames, Sonia; Garca-Gutirrez, Susana; Gonzlez-Candelas, Fernando; Martn, Vicente; Daz, Jos; Torner, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for healthcare workers, but many do not follow the recommendation. The objective of this study was to investigate the factors associated with seasonal influenza vaccination in the 2011-2012 season. We carried out an anonymous web survey of Spanish primary healthcare workers in 2012. Information on vaccination, and knowledge and attitudes about the influenza vaccine was collected. Workers with medical conditions that contraindicated vaccination and those with high risk conditions were excluded. Multivariate analysis was performed using unconditional logistic regression. We included 1,749 workers. The overall vaccination coverage was 50.7% and was higher in workers aged ? 55 years (55.7%), males (57.4%) and paediatricians (63.1%). Factors associated with vaccination were concern about infection at work (aOR 4.93; 95% CI 3.72-6.53), considering that vaccination of heathcare workers is important (aOR 2.62; 95%CI 1.83-3.75) and that vaccination is effective in preventing influenza and its complications (aOR 2.40; 95% CI 1.56-3.67). No association was found between vaccination and knowledge of influenza or the vaccine characteristics. Educational programs should aim to remove the misconceptions and attitudes that limit compliance with recommendations about influenza vaccination in primary healthcare workers rather than only increasing knowledge about influenza and the characteristics of the vaccine. PMID:24260560

  5. A Study of Knowledge and Practices among Commercial Sex Workers Registered Under Jyotisangh STD Clinic, Ahmedabad

    Talsania NJ, Shah Rakesh, Shah Venu, Murugan V

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is growing evidence about the importance of commercial sex workers (CSWs and their clients as bridging groups for the HIV epidemic. In India, the role of CSWs is key to the future trajectory of the epidemic. Objective: To determine the level of knowledge and practices regarding STI/ HIV among CSWs. Study design: A Cross-sectional, community based study. Methodology: The study was conducted in December 2005 among CSWs registered under Jyotisangh. Results: The mean age was 27.5 years and majorities (64.5% of CSWs were below 35 years. Knowledge on some aspects of the diseases was quite low in the study group. A higher proportion of CSWs (73.5% don’t know the relationship between HIV and STI. About 66.3% of CSWs know one or more male STI symptoms. 58% of CSWs were aware of place for HIV testing. Majority (86.3% of CSWs are attending counseling programme at Jyotisangh. 97.5% CSWs were aware about condom still 50.5% CSWs were regularly using condom with regular partner while nearly one fourth (26.5% never used condom. And also 97% of CSWs never practiced anal intercourse with condom and only 25% reported either rarely/ sometimes non-penetrative sexual practice. Conclusion: High-risk behavior was established in the study sample. Safe sex and use of condom have to be energetically promoted among commercial sex workers.

  6. Knowledge, attitudes and practices on cervical cancer screening among the medical workers of Mulago Hospital, Uganda

    Weiderpass Elisabete

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer is the commonest cancer of women in Uganda. Over 80% of women diagnosed in Mulago national referral and teaching hospital, the biggest hospital in Uganda, have advanced disease. Pap smear screening, on opportunistic rather than systematic basis, is offered free in the gynaecological outpatients clinic and the postnatal/family planning clinics. Medical students in the third and final clerkships are expected to learn the techniques of screening. Objectives of this study were to describe knowledge on cervical cancer, attitudes and practices towards cervical cancer screening among the medical workers of Mulago hospital. Methods In a descriptive cross-sectional study, a weighted sample of 310 medical workers including nurses, doctors and final year medical students were interviewed using a self-administered questionnaire. We measured knowledge about cervical cancer: (risk factors, eligibility for screening and screening techniques, attitudes towards cervical cancer screening and practices regarding screening. Results Response rate was 92% (285. Of these, 93% considered cancer of the cervix a public health problem and knowledge about Pap smear was 83% among respondents. Less than 40% knew risk factors for cervical cancer, eligibility for and screening interval. Of the female respondents, 65% didn't feel susceptible to cervical cancer and 81% had never been screened. Of the male respondents, only 26% had partners who had ever been screened. Only 14% of the final year medical students felt skilled enough to use a vaginal speculum and 87% had never performed a pap smear. Conclusion Despite knowledge of the gravity of cervical cancer and prevention by screening using a Pap smear, attitudes and practices towards screening were negative. The medical workers who should be responsible for opportunistic screening of women they care for are not keen on getting screened themselves. There is need to explain/understand the cause of these attitudes and practices and identify possible interventions to change them. Medical students leave medical school without adequate skills to be able to effectively screen women for cervical cancer wherever they go to practice. Medical students and nurses training curricula needs review to incorporate practical skills on cervical cancer screening.

  7. Are Care Takers of Link WorkerAND#8217;s Scheme of HIV/AIDS Knowledgeable Enouth? Assessment Study of Link Workers Scheme in Surat District

    Parmar Rohit

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gujarat State AIDS Control Society with support from UNICEF Gujarat has initiated as unique project for prevention of HIV /AIDS at rural set up since 2008, which is known as Link Workers scheme. Link Workers (LWs are working in each cluster of villages around a 5,000+ population village which will serve as the node for intervention. They are supported in their work by village level volunteers selected from the available groups in the community. Methodology: 140 Link workers and 70 volunteers from 70 villages of 14 blocks of district Surat were invited for the study. Due to few vacant posts, total 183 participants took part in the study; out of these 117 were link workers (LWs while 66 were volunteers. Their Knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS and STI were assessed on a predesigned pretested semi structured study tool. Result: 96.59% link workers and 93.44% volunteers had knowledge about condom use as a method of preventing HIV infection. The concern issue is that only 11.11% LWs and 13.64% volunteers revealed that HIV testing during ANC check up can also prevent HIV transmission from mother to child, inspite of receiving induction training. Only 74.36% LWs and 68.31% volunteers were able to tell about three or more HIV preventive methods. Recommendations: Refresher training and exposure visit to HIV care centres are needed for these workers to strengthen their knowledge. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(2.000: 173-175

  8. Attitudes, knowledge and practices of healthcare workers regarding occupational exposure of pulmonary tuberculosis

    Lesley T. Bhebhe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare-associated tuberculosis (TB has become a major occupational hazard for healthcare workers (HCWs. HCWs are inevitably exposed to TB, due to frequent interaction with patients with undiagnosed and potentially contagious TB. Whenever there is a possibility of exposure, implementation of infection prevention and control (IPC practices is critical. Objective: Following a high incidence of TB among HCWs at Maluti Adventist Hospital in Lesotho, a study was carried out to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of HCWs regarding healthcare-associated TB infection and infection controls. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study performed in June 2011; it involved HCWs at Maluti Adventist Hospital who were involved with patients and/or sputum. Stratified sampling of 140 HCWs was performed, of whom, 129 (92.0% took part. A self-administered, semi-structured questionnaire was used. Results: Most respondents (89.2% had appropriate knowledge of transmission, diagnosis and prevention of TB; however, only 22.0% of the respondents knew the appropriate method of sputum collection. All of the respondents (100.0% were motivated and willing to implement IPC measures. A significant proportion of participants (36.4% reported poor infection control practices, with the majority of inappropriate practices being the administrative infection controls (> 80.0%. Only 38.8% of the participants reported to be using the appropriate N-95 respirator. Conclusion: Poor infection control practices regarding occupational TB exposure were demonstrated, the worst being the first-line administrative infection controls. Critical knowledge gaps were identified; however, there was encouraging willingness by HCWs to adapt to recommended infection control measures. Healthcare workers are inevitably exposed to TB, due to frequent interaction with patients with undiagnosed and potentially contagious TB. Implementation of infection prevention and control practices is critical whenever there is a possibility of exposure.

  9. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Sawmill Workers Towards Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Kota Bharu, Kelantan.

    Rus, Razman Mohd; Daud, Aziah; Musa, Kamarul Imran; Naing, Lin

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the sawmill workers’ knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) in relation to noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 83 workers from 3 factories in Kota Bharu, Kelantan. Questionnaires were distributed to obtain the socio-demography, knowledge, attitude and practice level in relation to noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). The weak areas identified in the knowledge section were treatment aspects (15.5%), signs a...

  10. Food safety knowledge, attitude, and practice toward compliance with abattoir laws among the abattoir workers in Malaysia

    Abdullahi, Auwalu; Hassan, Azmi; Kadarman, Norizhar; Saleh, Ahmadu; Baraya, Yusha’u Shu’aibu; Lua, Pei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Foodborne diseases are common in the developing countries due to the predominant poor food handling and sanitation practices, particularly as a result of inadequate food safety laws, weak regulatory structures, and inadequate funding as well as a lack of appropriate education for food-handlers. The most frequently involved foods in disease outbreaks are of animal origin. However, in spite of the adequate legislation and laws governing the abattoir operation in Malaysia, compliance with food safety requirements during meat processing and waste disposal is inadequate. Therefore, the present study was designed to assess the food safety knowledge, attitude, and practice toward compliance with abattoir laws among the workers in Terengganu, Malaysia. Materials and methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted using simple random sampling technique in the six districts of Terengganu: two districts were used for the pilot study and the remaining four were used for the main study. One hundred sixty-five abattoir workers from the selected districts were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Results The mean and standard deviation of knowledge, attitude, and practice scores of the workers were 6.02 and 1.954, 45.16 and 4.496, and 18.03 and 3.186, respectively. The majority of the workers (38.8%) had a low level of knowledge and 91.7% had a positive attitude, while 77.7% had a good practice of compliance. Sex had a significant association with the level of knowledge (Pworkers. The females had a higher level of knowledge than the males, while the males had a better practice of compliance than females. Similarly, knowledge also had a significant (P=0.009) association with the level of practice toward compliance with abattoir laws among the workers. Conclusion The abattoir workers had a positive attitude and good practice, but a low level of knowledge toward compliance with the abattoir laws. Therefore, public awareness, workshops, and seminars relevant to the abattoir operations should be encouraged.

  11. Child and youth care workers: profile, nutrition knowledge and food safety and hygiene practices

    Hendrina H., Grobbelaar; Carin E., Napier.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Facilities concerned with children 'in need of care' should not only be considered as a last resort for a child's care, but also as an intervention that requires more than addressing a child's basic physical needs. The nutritional needs of children are particularly important to consider [...] as they are a fundamental part of the care provided. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this descriptive quantitative study was to investigate the profile, nutrition knowledge, food safety and hygiene practices of child and youth care workers (CCWs) in residential care settings in order to guide the development of a food preparation and nutrition manual. METHOD: The residential care settings included in this study were three that were selected randomly in Durban. CCWs (N = 40) employed permanently or part-time were included. Convenience purposive sampling of the CCWs was undertaken. A structured self-administered questionnaire, developed and tested for this purpose, was used to gather information on the profile, nutrition knowledge, food safety and hygiene practices. The data were analysed for descriptive statistics (means and frequencies). RESULTS: The majority of CCWs were women aged 18-34 years. Very few had completed a relevant tertiary qualification. The results indicated that the respondents' knowledge was fair on general nutrition guidelines, but there were areas of concern. Specifically, knowledge on recommended fruit and vegetable intake, correct serving sizes and importance of a variety in the diet were lacking. Some knowledge about food safety and hygiene practices was demonstrated, but not in totality. CONCLUSION: The overall findings supported the development of a comprehensive food preparation and nutrition manual for child residential care facilities.

  12. Community health workers: knowledge and conditions in a city of minas gerais, brazil

    Ceclia Cardoso de Arajo Silva, Daniele Fernanda Rosrio, Nancy Gomes Coelho, Cristiane Aparecida Silveira, Sonia Maria Alves de Paiva

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to examine the knowledge and work conditions of the community health workers from a city of Minas Gerais state. Method: this is about an exploratory and descriptive study from quantitative data analysis. With the help of a structured instrument constructed by the researchers and validated by experts, we investigated the ACS of a local miner. Inclusion criteria were: ACS for more than a year in the city studied, not being on vacation, maternity leave or other absence from work take part in the study and sign the Informed Consent (IC, resulting in 61 ACS studied. The study was approved by the Health Department of the municipality and by the Ethics in Research of the Pontiphical University Catholic of Minas Gerais protocol number 0276.0.213.000-08. Results: most of them have high school degree, live next to the job, do not have the necessaries equipments to make home visits, can recognize an emergency and an urgency situation, know the socioeconomic and cultural reality of the community, have access to homes visited and their mission is the prevention and the promotion of basic health. Conclusions: the development of a more effective policy in this area should promote a process of continued education for the professionals, improving their training related to the family and community approach. Descriptors: family health program; public health, workers.

  13. Allergic rhinitis in laboratory workers caused by occupational exposure to guinea pigs: an immunological and clinical study.

    Hanada, T; Shima, T; Ohyama, M

    1995-01-01

    Occupational exposure in laboratory workers to various animals can result in clinically significant respiratory allergies. We used clinical and immunological methods to study five laboratory workers who exhibited symptoms of nasal allergy upon occupational exposure to guinea pigs. As compared with a control group of ten nonallergic laboratory workers, the symptomatic workers generally had positive skin test reactions for allergens derived from the urine, saliva, and pelts of the guinea pigs. The study group with symptoms also showed high serum levels of specific IgE and demonstrated an immediate, positive reaction to nasal provocation testing with urine-derived antigen. However, specific IgG values in the sera of these patients did not differ significantly from control values. Overall results indicated that a type 1 allergy was involved. PMID:7576589

  14. Evaluating Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Health-Care Workers Regarding Patient Education in Iran.

    Garshasbi, Sima; Khazaeipour, Zahra; Fakhraei, Nahid; Naghdi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the position of patient education measuring knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) among health care workers (HCWs). It is also aimed to emphasize the need for a real position for patient education. This survey was performed among a group of HCWs in Iran. The scores had an acceptable level. However, nurses, females and younger people received higher scores. The staff was already aware of patient education necessity and considered it as the duty of all medical team. Often HCWs cannot include patient education in their routine due to time shortage, lack of staff's financial motivation, fatigue, and loads of work, etc. There is still need for a real training in the educational curriculum. Additionally, the various HCWs-related obstacles should be taken into account. PMID:26853292

  15. Evaluating Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Health-Care Workers Regarding Patient Education in Iran

    Sima Garshasbi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to evaluate the position of patient education measuring knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP among health care workers (HCWs. It is also aimed to emphasize the need for a real position for patient education. This survey was performed among a group of HCWs in Iran. The scores had an acceptable level. However, nurses, females and younger people received higher scores. The staff was already aware of patient education necessity and considered it as the duty of all medical team. Often HCWs cannot include patient education in their routine due to time shortage, lack of staff’s financial motivation, fatigue, and loads of work, etc. There is still need for a real training in the educational curriculum. Additionally, the various HCWs–related obstacles should be taken into account.

  16. The Student‟s Workplace Learning Program as a Strategy to Enhance Knowledge Worker Competency: An Alternative Way to Build Learning Organization

    Worawit Janchai

    2013-01-01

    This research intends to study on knowledge worker competency development which effected from students who work in company through the university workplace learning program. The new leadership roles and skills of managers and leaders according to learning organization principle will be focused. Data were collected from knowledge workers using questionnaires and telephone interviews. The result found that students’ coming can stimulate knowledge workers to use and develop their competencies. C...

  17. A Mapping of an Agile Software Development Method to the Personal Productivity of the Knowledge Worker. A Systematic Review of Self-Help Books

    Helga Guðrún Óskarsdóttir 1987

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the problem of how to increase knowledge worker productivity by performing a systematic literature review of personal productivity self-help books. The assumption was that personal productivity self-help books are based on the same underlying concepts and that these concepts can give insight into the personal productivity of the knowledge worker. The intent was to identify these concepts, compare them to the state-of-the-art on knowledge worker productivity and the software...

  18. Knowledge-workers and the sustainable city: the travel consequences of car-related job-perks

    Bendit, Edward; Frenkel, Amnon; Kaplan, Sigal

    2011-01-01

    Attracting firms in knowledge and technology intensive (KTI) sectors is highly desired at both the national and the regional level as a powerful engine of economic growth. Due to fierce competition in KTI sectors and national taxation policies, KTI firms often attract high-quality employees by offering car-related job perks as additional incentives to wage. In Canada, car allowance is offered by 46% of the employers to attract highly-skilled workers. In Israel, 61% of knowledge-workers in the...

  19. Identification and Classification of Factors Affecting ICT Knowledge Workers Turnover in Irans Mobile Communications Industry

    Mohammad Reza Mehregan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present research is identification and classification of factors affecting ICT knowledge workers turnover in Irans mobile communications industry. After reviewing research literature, seeking experts opinions and doing statistical analyses, 11 variables were identified as the main turnover precedents; then using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, the aforementioned factors were classified in three categories. Results of the research suggest that the personal, job-related and internal/extra-organizational aspects, respectively, explain ICT specialists and knowledge workers turnover in Irans mobile communications industry.

  20. A survey on knowledge and self-reported formula handling practices of parents and child care workers in Palermo, Italy

    Mammina Caterina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Powdered infant formula (PIF is not a sterile product, but this information appears to be poorly diffused among child caregivers. Parents and child care workers may behave in an unsafe manner when handling PIF. Methods This study involved parents and child care workers in the 24 municipal child care centres of Palermo. Knowledge and self-reported practices about PIF handling were investigated by a structured questionnaire. A Likert scale was used to measure the strength of the respondent's feelings. Association of knowledge and self-reported practices with demographic variables was also evaluated. Results 42.4% of parents and 71.0% of child care workers filled in the questionnaire. Significant differences were found between parents and child care workers for age and education. 73.2% of parents and 84.4% of child care workers were confident in sterility of PIF. Generally, adherence to safe procedures when reconstituting and handling PIF was more frequently reported by child care workers who, according to the existing legislation, are regularly subjected to a periodic training on food safety principles and practices. Age and education significantly influenced the answers to the questionnaire of both parents and child care workers. Conclusion The results of the study reveal that parents and child care workers are generally unaware that powdered formulas may contain viable microorganisms. However, child care workers consistently chose safer options than parents when answering the questions about adherence to hygienic practices. At present it seems unfeasible to produce sterile PIF, but the risk of growth of hazardous organisms in formula at the time of administration should be minimized by promoting safer behaviours among caregivers to infants in both institutional settings and home.

  1. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Health Workers in a Tertiary Hospital in Ile-Ife, Nigeria, towards Ebola Viral Disease

    Olowookere, Samuel Anu; Abioye-Kuteyi, Emmanuel Akintunde; Adepoju, Olusegun Kayode; Esan, Oluwaseun Taiwo; Adeolu, Temitope Michael; Adeoye, Tolulope Kola; Adepoju, Adesola Adebayo; Aderogba, Adedayo Titilayo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Health workers are more prone to Ebola viral disease (EVD) than the general population. This study assessed the preparedness of health workers in the control and management of EVD. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study. Consenting 400 health workers completed a semistructured questionnaire that assessed participants' general knowledge, emergency preparedness, and control and management of EVD. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results. The mean age (SD) was 34.5 8.62 years ranging from 20 to 59 years. Most participants were medical doctors (24.6%) and nurses (52.2%). The majority had practised <10 years (73.8%) and were aware of the EVD outbreak in the West African subregion (85.5%). Colleagues (40%) and radio (37.2%) were their major sources of information. Only 42% had good knowledge while 27% knew that there was no vaccine presently to prevent EVD. About one-quarter (24.2%) had low risk perception. The majority (89%) felt the hospital infection control policy was inadequate to protect against EVD. The only predictor of good knowledge was participants' occupation. Conclusion. There is knowledge gap and poor infection control preparedness among respondents. Thus, knowledge and practices of health workers towards EVD need improvement. PMID:26576160

  2. Knowledge, Attitudes, Risk Factors and Practices (KARP that Favor Leptospira Infection among Abattoir Workers in North Central Nigeria

    E.A. Abiayi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zoonoses are common infections when there is close contact between humans and animals. In Nigeria, where safety at work is poorly regulated and enforced, most workers do whatever they consider appropriate safe work place practices. Thus, 263 abattoir workers across five North Central (NC states in Nigeria were evaluated on their knowledge of leptospirosis, work place attitudinal practices and other risks that could favor spread of Leptospira among them. Findings showed that most workers 252 (95.8% were ignorant of leptospirosis. Other identified risk factors for infection included age of workers, occupation, illiteracy and risks within, such as inadequate protective gear and outside the workplace, such as rodents in homes. All these factors gave a prevalence of 226 (89.7% Leptospira antibodies in the abattoir workers which they probably contracted through un-mindful handling of infected animal fluids and tissues. Surveys of Knowledge, Attitudes, Risk Factors and Practices (KARP is a common strategy for collecting information to assess safe work environments among high risk populations and is a good starting point for prevention and control programs for individuals at risk of infection by zoonotic agents, especially Nigerian abattoir workers.

  3. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of health care workers towards clients of sexual health services in Fiji.

    Lui, Paraniala Silas; Sarangapany, Jeganathan; Begley, Kim; Musson, Rachel; Ram, Sharan; Kishore, Kamal

    2012-09-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted to identify the attitudes and behaviours of health care workers (HCWs) in health care settings (HCS) in Fiji involving 369 participants. Self-rated knowledge of HIV and sexually transmissible infections (STIs) varied depending on whether the HCS was divisional or sub-divisional, and varied between the various national divisions. HCWs with experience in HIV, reproductive health and antenatal clinics had higher self-rated HIV knowledge. A high proportion had a fear of catching HIV from HIV-positive clients. This study found high levels of negative attitudes towards clients from vulnerable groups with regards to the transmission and spread of HIV. Study participants also reported observing differential treatment by their colleagues if a client was known to have or was suspected of having HIV. There is a need for further HIV education of HCWs, with training focussed on occupational risk, and on reducing stigma and discrimination of those living with or vulnerable to HIV in Fiji. PMID:22877590

  4. The Impact of Healthcare Access on Knowledge and Willingness for HIV Testing in Chinese Female Entertainment Workers.

    Sio, Terence T; Chang, Kenneth; Jayakrishnan, Ritujith; Amitai, Allon; Xu, He; Zaller, Nickolas D; Fu, Jeannia J; Mayer, Kenneth H; Wu, Lily H

    2015-10-01

    Chinese female entertainment workers are at high risk for HIV. We assessed the impact of healthcare access on HIV knowledge, condom use, and their willingness to receive HIV testing. We surveyed 257 entertainment workers in a cross-sectional study. Demographic, knowledge, and behavioral risk factors were examined. Of 257 women, 107 (42.1%) reported inconsistent condom use. Only 9% had prior HIV testing. Their HIV knowledge was generally poor. Having access to healthcare, being able to obtain condoms, and managers providing health information were associated with consistent condom use (all P knowledge and likelihood of condom use and previous HIV testing. Chinese medical providers can play a significant role in encouraging HIV testing and outreach in migrant women employed at entertainment venues. PMID:25115291

  5. A Study on Knowledge, Attitude And Practice of Laboratory Safety Measures Among Paramedical Staff of Laboratory Services

    Hansa M Goswami, Sumeeta T Soni, Sachin M Patel, Mitesh K Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A lot of accidents occur in the laboratory due to lack of proper knowledge regarding laboratory safety measures, indifferent attitude & improper implementation of safe laboratory practices. In view of this, the present study on knowledge, Attitude & Practice (KAP of laboratory safety measures was carried out among paramedical staff of laboratory services of tertiary care teaching hospital, western India. Method: This was a comparative study which used a standardized, structured self-administered questionnaire to survey knowledge, attitude and practice of paramedical staff. The KAP study enrolled 81 respondents. Results: Regarding knowledge- the majority knew the very important issues related with laboratory safety like Post Exposure Prophylaxis (96.55% & discarding of blood samples (93.10% etc. In regard to attitude towards the scientific process, all are very much aware about importance of protective devices (i.e. Wearing Gloves and Biomedical waste management. In regard to the practice in laboratory, the entire study subject group (100% replied “YES” in each question that shows the good quality work of the laboratory. Conclusion: The induction training on Laboratory safety is very important and motivating exercise for improving the laboratory safety measures.

  6. Knowledge, attitudes and practices related to avian influenza among poultry workers in Nepal: a cross sectional study

    Neupane Dinesh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian influenza is a considerable threat to global public health. Prevention and control depend on awareness and protective behaviours of the general population as well as high risk-groups. This study aims to explore the knowledge, attitudes and practices related to avian influenza among poultry workers in Nepal. Methods The study was based on a cross-sectional study design, using a structured questionnaire administered in face-to-face interviews with 96 poultry workers age 15 and above from the Rupandehi district in Nepal. Results The majority of respondents were male (80%, mean age was 35 (SD = 11.6. Nearly everybody was aware that AI cases had been detected in Nepal and that poultry workers were at risk for infection. The major sources of AI information were radio, TV and newspapers. Knowledge about preventive measures was high with regard to some behaviours (hand washing, but medium to low with regard to others (using cleaning and disinfecting procedures or protective clothing. Poultry workers who got their information from TV and newspapers and those who were more afraid of contracting AI had higher knowledge than those who did not. Being employed as compared to being an owner of a poultry farm as well as having a high level of knowledge was associated with practising more preventive behaviours. While on one hand many specific government control measures found a high degree of acceptance, a majority of study participants also thought that government control and compensation measures as a whole were insufficient. Conclusions The study provides information about knowledge and practices regarding avian influenza among poultry workers in Nepal. It highlights the importance of targeting lack of knowledge as well as structural-material barriers to successfully build preparedness for a major outbreak situation.

  7. Impact of education on knowledge, attitudes and practices among various categories of health care workers on nosocomial infections

    Suchitra.J; Lakshmi Devi N

    2007-01-01

    Purpose : To assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices among the different health care workers (HCWs) on nosocomial infections. Methods : A total of 150 HCWs, doctors (n=50), nurses (n=50) and ward aides (n=50) were included. A questionnaire was administered to the HCWs to assess their knowledge, attitudes and practices on nosocomial infections. A scoring system was devised to grade those (KAP score). They were further subjected to a series of similar questionnaires at intervals of 6, 12 ...

  8. Knowledge, beliefs and attitudes of community health workers about hypertension in the Cape Peninsula, South Africa

    M.J. Sengwana

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the perceptions and attitudes of community health workers (CHWs about hypertension. The level of knowledge of hypertension, as well as their personal attitude towards this is crucial in the style and quality of their interventions. CHWs, whose role in health promotion is being increasingly recognised, can help contain or reduce the prevalence of hypertension by influencing the community to adopt healthy lifestyles. Forty-three CHWs employed by Zanempilo in two study areas, Sites B and C in Khayelitsha in the Cape Peninsula, South Africa, were included in the study. Firstly, focus group discussions were conducted with 17 purposively selected CHWs to explore attitudes, beliefs and perceptions of hypertension. Secondly, interviews were conducted to assess their basic knowledge about causes, prevention and control of hypertension. The focus group discussions revealed that CHWs were uncertain about the causes of hypertension. They also found it difficult to grasp the fact that people without risk factors, such as overweight or a family history of hypertension, could be hypertensive. Many CHWs believe in traditional medicines and home-brewed beer as the best treatment for hypertension. They believe that people who take medical treatment become sicker and that their health deteriorates rapidly. Risk factors of hypertension mentioned during the structured interviews include inheritance, lack of physical activity, consuming lots of salty and fatty food. Conclusions drawn from the findings of the CHWs’ responses highlighted their insufficient knowledge about hypertension as a chronic disease of lifestyle. Meanwhile they are expected to play a role in stimulating community residents’ interest in the broad principle of preventive health maintenance and follow-up. Data obtained from this research can be used for the planning of health-promotion programmes. These should include preventing hypertension and improving primary management of individual sufferers. Because of their working relations and close link with CHWs, community nurses in primary health-care facilities need to recognise these beliefs and attitudes since these may differ from their own.

  9. An Assessment of Instant Messaging Interruptions on Knowledge Workers' Task Performance in E-Learning-Based Training

    Mansi, Gary R.

    2011-01-01

    The modern workplace environment is filled with interruptions due to the necessity of coworkers to communicate with each other. Studies have revealed that interruptions can disrupt the ability of a knowledge worker to concentrate on a task, which can impact task performance (TP). Communication interruptions are due, in part, to the unavoidable…

  10. Bidding for Brains: Intellectual Property Rights and the International Migration of Knowledge Workers. NBER Working Paper No. 15486

    McAusland, Carol; Kuhn, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce international mobility of knowledge workers into a model of Nash equilibrium IPR policy choice among countries. We show that governments have incentives to use IPRs in a bidding war for global talent, resulting in Nash equilibrium IPRs that can be too high, rather than too low, from a global welfare perspective. These incentives…

  11. Development of an Educational Video to Improve HIV-Related Knowledge, Attitudes and Prevention among Company Workers in Ecuador

    del Carmen Cabezas, Mara; Fornasini, Marco; Barmettler, David; Ortuo, Diego; Borja, Teresa; Albert, Adelin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To develop and assess an innovative educational video package for improving HIV knowledge, attitudes and practices among company workers in Ecuador. Methods: The design and development of the HIV prevention educational video was based on the results of a large-scale survey conducted in 115 companies (commerce, manufacturing and real

  12. Development of an Educational Video to Improve HIV-Related Knowledge, Attitudes and Prevention among Company Workers in Ecuador

    del Carmen Cabezas, María; Fornasini, Marco; Barmettler, David; Ortuño, Diego; Borja, Teresa; Albert, Adelin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To develop and assess an innovative educational video package for improving HIV knowledge, attitudes and practices among company workers in Ecuador. Methods: The design and development of the HIV prevention educational video was based on the results of a large-scale survey conducted in 115 companies (commerce, manufacturing and real…

  13. Rural male health workers in Western Jamaica: Knowledge, attitudes and practices toward prostate cancer screening

    Paul Andrew Bourne

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Statistics have shown that since 1988, a significant percentage of males are unwilling to seek medical care. The question is if they had the knowledge, worked in the health system and were educated, would this be any different? Aim: The current study aims to fill this void in the literature by examining the perception of rural male health workers (from the Western Region about prostate examination, and why they are reluctant to inquire about the probability of having, or the likelihood of not having prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: The study utilized primary cross-sectional data that was collected during February and March 2008 from 170 males (ages 29 years and older, health-care workers who were employed in particular rural health institutions in Jamaica (i.e. Western Regional Health Authority. SPSS was used to analyze the data. Results: When the respondents were asked “Have you ever heard about the screening procedure for prostate?” 71.2% indicated yes, but only 27.1% had got their prostate checked by a health practitioner. When respondents were asked to state what influenced their choice of not doing a digital rectal examination, 20.6% indicated comfort level; 9.4% stated the gender of the health practitioner, 5.3% mentioned fear and others did not respond. Of those who had the examination 2 years ago, 96.5% did not state the choice of method. Conclusion: The current study is limited in terms of its generalizability to rural males or rural males in Western Jamaica, but it does provide an insight into the difficulty of men in breaking away from culture.

  14. KP-LAB Knowledge Practices Laboratory -- Specification of the SWKM Knowledge Evolution, Recommendation, and Mining services

    Smrz, Pavel; Sklenak, Vilem; Svatek, Vojtech; Kavalec, Martin; Svihla, Martin; Paralic, Jan; Furdik, Karol; Bednar, Peter; Smatana, Peter; Spyratos, Nicolas; Belhajfrej, Hanen; Nguer, Mamadou; Christophides, Vassilis; Kotzinos, Dimitris; Tzitzikas, Yannis

    2007-01-01

    This deliverable presents the deep-level specification for the second release (M24) of the components responsible for advanced manipulation with the knowledge stored in the KP-Lab Semantic Web Knowledge Middleware (SWKM). The two components were defined in [D5.1] as Knowledge Mediator and Knowledge Matchmaker. The Knowledge Mediator services (change, comparison, versioning and registry) aim at providing functionalities to support evolving ontologies and RDF Knowledge Bases (KBs). Upon a chang...

  15. Characteristics of female sex workers and their HIV/AIDS/STI knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in semi-urban areas in South Africa

    K Peltzer; P Seoka; S. Raphala

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate characteristics of female sex workers and their HIV/AIDS/STI knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in semi-urban areas in South Africa. The sample included 70 female sex workers from the Tzaneen and Phalaborwa area in the Limpopo Province. A modified form of snowball sampling known as “targeted” sampling was used for identifying female sex workers. Results showed an inadequate knowledge of HIV prevention methods and some incorrect beliefs about AIDS trans...

  16. The linkage between the lifestyle of knowledge-workers and their intra-metropolitan residential choice: A clustering approach based on self-organizing maps

    Frenkel, Amnon; Bendit, Edward; Kaplan, Sigal

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the linkage between the lifestyle and the intra-metropolitan residential choice of knowledge-workers in terms of home-ownership, location, dwelling size and building type. Data are retrieved from a revealed-preferences survey among knowledge-workers in the Tel-Aviv metropo...

  17. A Profile of Knowledge and Sexual Behaviours Among Textile Workers in Context of HIV and AIDS in Surat City

    Bhautik Modi, Jay Padodara, Sarita Mangukiya, Vimalkumar Tailor

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available HIV infection and AIDS is more prevalent in India and occurs in all states.2 Today, there are around 2.5 million people living with HIV/AIDS in India.1 Surat city in the western state of Gujarat attracts a very large migrant population. As most of them belong to sexually active age group, their exposure to sex workers or having multiple sexual partnerships is very high. The aim of this study was to explore the sexual behavior among textile factory workers in Surat and assess the knowledge and awareness about mode of transmission of HIV. This cross-sectional study of 250 textile workers reveal that 76.4% worker know that HIV can be transmitted by unsafe sexual route while 43.2% of workers does not know that HIV can be spread through reused injections. 43 worker currently had extra marital or premarital sexual relations and among them 48.8% had used condom during last such intercourse.

  18. Knowledge-workers and the sustainable city: the travel consequences of car-related job-perks

    Bendit, Edward; Frenkel, Amnon; Kaplan, Sigal

    2011-01-01

    Attracting firms in knowledge and technology intensive (KTI) sectors is highly sought by national and regional policy makers as a powerful engine of economic growth. Due to fierce competition in the KTI sector, KTI firms often attract employees by offering car-related job perks in addition to wage....... This study analyzes the impact of company-cars and car-allowance on the travel behavior of knowledge-workers. The importance of this issue derives from the tendency of knowledge-based economy to concentrate in highly populated metropolitan regions. The analyzed data comprise 750 observations, retrieved...... from a revealed-preferences survey among KTI workers in the Tel-Aviv metropolitan region in Israel. Results show that car-related job perks are associated with (i) high annual kilometrage, (ii) high propensity of using the car as main commute mode, (iii) long commute distances and travel times, (iv...

  19. A thyroid measurement method for monitoring laboratory workers exposed to I125

    We describe here the standardization of a technique for the estimation of 125I in the thyroid gland of laboratory workers involved with 125I labelling techniques. It is based on a comparison with a standard curve obtained by placing in a thyroid neck phantom various calibrated standard sources of 125I. Its sensitivity was calculated around 0,8 - 1,7 nCi. The precision of our measurements was avaliated in a range of 1.35 - 310.5 nCi and the coefficient of variation obtained varied from 2,2% to 26,3%. The accuracy of our ''in vivo'' measurements was checked by analyzing the influence of the shape and the size of the thyroid in the neck phantom. (author)

  20. Assessment of knowledge and perception regarding male sterilization (Non-Scalpel Vasectomy among community health workers in Jharkhand, India

    Swati Mahapatra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In India, community health workers are the main source of information for family planning services and male population want to interact and discuss with them to clear their doubts about male oriented family planning methods. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the knowledge and perception of community health workers regarding the modern male sterilization method. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Simdega district of Jharkhand. The target population was the community health workers and randomly selected from four randomly selected from blocks out of total seven in the district. A self-administered quantitative questionnaire was used for data collection comprising questions related to knowledge and perception of community health workers about modern male sterilization method. Results: 43% CHWs didn’t know that this method is different from traditional male sterilization method and around 62% thought man’s sexual performance get affected after NSV and 77% did not have any idea about time required to resume normal work. Conclusions: The poor knowledge and wrong perception could be one of the main reasons for poor male participation in family planning process in India.

  1. A Profile of Knowledge and Sexual Behaviours Among Textile Workers in Context of HIV and AIDS in Surat City

    Bhautik Modi, Jay Padodara, Sarita Mangukiya, Vimalkumar Tailor

    2010-01-01

    HIV infection and AIDS is more prevalent in India and occurs in all states.2 Today, there are around 2.5 million people living with HIV/AIDS in India.1 Surat city in the western state of Gujarat attracts a very large migrant population. As most of them belong to sexually active age group, their exposure to sex workers or having multiple sexual partnerships is very high. The aim of this study was to explore the sexual behavior among textile factory workers in Surat and assess the knowledge and...

  2. Sister chromatid exchange analysis and chromosoma aberration studies in interventional cardiology laboratory workers. One year follow up study

    Invasive cardiology laboratory workers are occupationally exposed to chronic ionizing radiation. It is known that ionizing radiation has a damaging effect on chromosomes. In present study, we investigated the frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations in 11 invasive cardiology laboratory workers and 11 healthy controls. After a vacation period, we took blood samples for chromosome analysis in months 0, 4, 8 and 12 (last two month period was the nonradiation time). The SCE frequencies did not change significantly after exposure to ionizing radiation in any worker. Our study has revealed that non-specific structural chromosome aberrations such as gaps, isogaps, acentric chromosomes, chromatids and chromosome breakage could be in the 4th and 8th months after ionizing radiation exposure in the metaphase plaques. All abnormal chromosomal effects had disappeared by the end of the two month non-exposure period in each worker. In conclusion, the results suggest that SCE frequencies are not significantly affected in invasive cardiology laboratory workers who are exposed occupationally to ionizing radiation, although some degree of reversible chromosomal aberrations did appear. (author)

  3. First-Year Residents' Caring, Medical Knowledge, and Clinical Judgment in Relation to Laboratory Utilization.

    Yarnold, Paul R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of 36 first-year Northwestern University (Illinois) medical residents found that students' medical knowledge was a predictor of increased laboratory test use, that clinical judgment was a predictor of decreased laboratory use, and that level of caring was statistically unrelated to amount of laboratory use. (Author/MSE)

  4. The Effect of Previous Co-Worker Experience on the Survival of Knowledge Intensive Start-Ups

    Timmermans, Bram

    The aim of the paper is to investigate the effect of previous co-worker experience on the survival of knowledge intensive start-ups. For the empirical analysis I use the Danish Integrated Database of Labor Market Research (IDA). This longitudinal employer-employee database allows me to identify co......-worker experience among all members of the firm. In addition, I will make a distinction between ordinary start-ups and entrepreneurial spin-offs. The results show that previous co-worker experience has a positive effect on new firm survival. This effect appears to be valid predominantly for ordinary start-ups than for...

  5. ASSESSMENT OF IMPACT OF TRAINING ON KNOWLEDGE OF ANGANWADI WORKERS OF DISTRICT LUDHIANA, PUNJAB: PRE AND POST TRAINING EVALUATION

    Urvashi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Anganwadi Workers (AWWs are recruited under Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS scheme for a population of 400- 800 in rural/urban areas and 300-800 in tribal areas. The key functions of AWWs include nutrition and health education, growth monitoring, health check-ups, assisting ANMs in provision of health care services, immunization and referral services. The output of the ICDS scheme is to a great extent dependent on the knowledge of AWW. This study is aimed to assess the knowledge of AWWs regarding comprehensive health care of children and to evaluate the impact of the training programme on their knowledge. METHODS The study was carried out at the Urban Health Centre, Shimlapuri, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, Punjab. Anganwadi workers were imparted training regarding various services rendered by them. The impact of training was evaluated by comparing the pre- and post-test knowledge of AWWs. A pre-tested proforma was administered to the AWWs before and after the training. It consisted of 15 questions related to different aspects of functions of AWWs. The data was then analysed using statistical techniques like mean, Standard Deviation and t-test. RESULTS The 15 questions proforma was grouped under 6 categories. The mean pre-test score was observed to be 8.3±2.5 and the mean post test score was 10.6±2.3. (p = 0.000. Improvement in knowledge was seen in all categories of questions, which included health care services, immunization, nutrition and health education, health check-ups, growth monitoring and referral services. CONCLUSIONS The findings of present study suggest that knowledge of AWWs significantly improved after the training. Thus, refresher training programmes should regularly be conducted for improving the knowledge of grass-root level health workers to ensure provision of good quality services

  6. An Empirical Research on the Correlation between Human Capital and Career Success of Knowledge Workers in Enterprise

    Guo, Wenchen; Xiao, Hongjun; Yang, Xi

    Human capital plays an important part in employability of knowledge workers, also it is the important intangible assets of company. This paper explores the correlation between human capital and career success of knowledge workers. Based on literature retrieval, we identified measuring tool of career success and modified further; measuring human capital with self-developed scale of high reliability and validity. After exploratory factor analysis, we suggest that human capital contents four dimensions, including education, work experience, learning ability and training; career success contents three dimensions, including perceived internal competitiveness of organization, perceived external competitiveness of organization and career satisfaction. The result of empirical analysis indicates that there is a positive correlation between human capital and career success, and human capital is an excellent predictor of career success beyond demographics variables.

  7. Knowledge and practices related to bovine brucellosis transmission amongst livestock workers in Yewa, south-western Nigeria

    Hezekiah K., Adesokan; Peter I., Alabi; Judy A., Stack; Simeon I.B., Cadmus.

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is an endemic disease in the animal population in Nigeria and of major public health importance, particularly amongst livestock workers who are ignorant of the risk of Brucella infection. Therefore, to gain insight into the knowledge and practices related to brucellosis transmission amon [...] gst livestock holders (LH) and livestock marketers (LM) in Yewa, an international livestock trading centre in south-western Nigeria, we conducted an interview-based study using a cluster sampling technique. In all, a total of 157 respondents comprising 54 LH and 103 LM were interviewed. Two-thirds (69.5%) of the two groups had poor knowledge of brucellosis with no significant difference between them (p = 0.262). Furthermore, consumption of unpasteurised milk, uncooked meat and its products, co-habitation with animals, and poor hygiene were significant risk practices identified as possible means of transfer of Brucella infection from animals to humans amongst these livestock workers (p

  8. A Cross-Sectional Survey of Healthcare Workers on the Knowledge and Attitudes towards Polio Vaccination in Pakistan

    KHAN, Muhammad Umair; Ahmad, Akram; Aqeel, Talieha; Akbar, Naila; Salman, Saad; Idress, Jawaria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pakistan accounts for 85.2% of the total polio cases reported worldwide. Healthcare workers (HCWs) are an integral part of immunization campaigns and source of education for the general public. This study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitudes towards polio vaccination among HCWs providing immunisation and education to general public in Quetta and Peshawar divisions of Pakistan. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 490 HCWs was conducted in two major referral public teaching ...

  9. Knowledge and practices related to bovine brucellosis transmission amongst livestock workers in Yewa, south-western Nigeria

    Adesokan, Hezekiah K.; Peter I. Alabi; Stack, Judy A.; Simeon I.B. Cadmus

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is an endemic disease in the animal population in Nigeria and of major public health importance, particularly amongst livestock workers who are ignorant of the risk of Brucella infection. Therefore, to gain insight into the knowledge and practices related to brucellosis transmission amongst livestock holders (LH) and livestock marketers (LM) in Yewa, an international livestock trading centre in south-western Nigeria, we conducted an interviewbased study using a cluster sampling...

  10. Knowledge and performance of the Ethiopian health extension workers on antenatal and delivery care: a cross-sectional study

    Medhanyie Araya

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recognition of the critical shortage of human resources within health services, community health workers have been trained and deployed to provide primary health care in developing countries. However, very few studies have investigated whether these health workers can provide good quality of care. This study investigated the knowledge and performance of health extension workers (HEWs on antenatal and delivery care. The study also explored the barriers and facilitators for HEWs in the provision of maternal health care. Methods In conducting this research, a cross-sectional study was performed. A total of 50 HEWs working in 39 health posts, covering a population of approximately 195,000 people, were interviewed. Descriptive statistics was used and a composite score of knowledge of HEWs was made and interpreted based on the Ethiopian education scoring system. Results Almost half of the respondents had at least 5 years of work experience as a HEW. More than half (27 (54% of the HEWs had poor knowledge on contents of antenatal care counseling, and the majority (44 (88% had poor knowledge on danger symptoms, danger signs, and complications in pregnancy. Health posts, which are the operational units for HEWs, did not have basic infrastructures like water supply, electricity, and waiting rooms for women in labor. On average within 6 months, a HEW assisted in 5.8 births. Only a few births (10% were assisted at the health posts, the majority (82% were assisted at home and only 20% of HEWs received professional assistance from a midwife. Conclusion Considering the poor knowledge of HEWs, poorly equipped health posts, and poor referral systems, it is difficult for HEWs to play a key role in improving health facility deliveries, skilled birth attendance, and on-time referral through early identification of danger signs. Hence, there is an urgent need to design appropriate strategies to improve the performance of HEWs by enhancing their knowledge and competencies, while creating appropriate working conditions.

  11. The Impact of an Educational Program on Knowledge and Attitude of Female Sex Workers in Preventing High Risk Sexual Behaviours

    Mona Larki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim:  The most important risk factor for one’s sexual health is high-risk sexual behavior. Implementation of educational programs has been considered as one of the most crucial interventions in the prevention and treatment of these behaviors. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effect of an educational program on the knowledge and attitude of female sex workers toward preventing high-risk sexual behaviors. Methods:This pretest-posttest, one-group study was conducted on 40 female sex workers, imprisoned in Mashhad Vakil Abad prison in 2013. Data were collected using a questionnaire including demographic characteristics, as well as knowledge- and attitude-related data. An educational program was designed after the pretest and conducted in four 70-minute sessions. Immediately and four weeks after the educational program, post-test was performed. Data were analyzed by Friedman and Wilcoxon tests, using SPSS version 16. Results: A positive significant increase was found in the mean scores of knowledge and attitude of female sex workers immediately and four weeks after the program (P

  12. Knowledge and practices related to bovine brucellosis transmission amongst livestock workers in Yewa, south-western Nigeria

    Hezekiah K. Adesokan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is an endemic disease in the animal population in Nigeria and of major public health importance, particularly amongst livestock workers who are ignorant of the risk of Brucella infection. Therefore, to gain insight into the knowledge and practices related to brucellosis transmission amongst livestock holders (LH and livestock marketers (LM in Yewa, an international livestock trading centre in south-western Nigeria, we conducted an interviewbased study using a cluster sampling technique. In all, a total of 157 respondents comprising 54 LH and 103 LM were interviewed. Two-thirds (69.5% of the two groups had poor knowledge of brucellosis with no significant difference between them (p = 0.262. Furthermore, consumption of unpasteurised milk, uncooked meat and its products, co-habitation with animals, and poor hygiene were significant risk practices identified as possible means of transfer of Brucella infection from animals to humans amongst these livestock workers (p < 0.05. In conclusion, our findings revealed that poor knowledge and practices related to the consumption of unpasteurised or unboiled dairy products, contaminated beef, and unhygienic practices are factors that will facilitate Brucella infections amongst livestock workers in Nigeria. Therefore, there is a need for more public health enlightenment programmes, as well as implementation of brucellosis control measures in the cattle populations.

  13. Knowledge and practice of breast self examination and Pap smear screening among a group of electronics women workers.

    Chee, H L; Rashidah, S; Shamsuddin, K; Zainiyah, S Y

    2003-08-01

    A total of 486 Malaysian women electronics workers participated in a study of reproductive health knowledge and cancer screening. The practice of Breast Self Examination (BSE) was found to be related to educational attainment; while ever having had a Pap smear was found to be related to being older than 30 years old, being ever married, living with family or relatives, and not staying in hostels. Knowledge on reproductive health was found to be higher for older women, married women, living with family or relatives, not staying in hostels, ever having done BSE and ever having had a Pap smear. PMID:14750370

  14. (32)P measurment of urine samples and internal dose assessment for radiation workers in life science laboratories.

    Yoon, S; Pak, M-J; Park, S; Yoo, J; Ha, W-H; Jang, H-K; Kim, J K

    2014-12-01

    (32)P measurements of urine samples and internal dose assessments were conducted for workers in life science laboratories. A procedure for sample pre-treatment was established and validation was performed to exclude interference and to detect (32)P levels accurately. The detection conditions for Cherenkov radiation were evaluated and the accuracy of Cherenkov radiation measurements validated. The analytical and measurement procedures were applied to urine samples collected from 11 workers from life sciences laboratories. The results of the measurements generally indicated very low background radiation levels, but daily urine samples from two workers were above the minimum detectable activity. The (32)P concentrations for two of the workers were 29.3  ±  10.4 Bq•d(-1) and 24.1  ±  11.8 Bq•d(-1), respectively, at intake levels of 4.12 kBq and 2.61 kBq. The effective doses for these two workers were 4.6 μSv and 2.9 μSv. Overall, the results indicate very low levels of radioactivity, except for cases related to specific working conditions. PMID:25325199

  15. 32P measurment of urine samples and internal dose assessment for radiation workers in life science laboratories

    32P measurements of urine samples and internal dose assessments were conducted for workers in life science laboratories. A procedure for sample pre-treatment was established and validation was performed to exclude interference and to detect 32P levels accurately. The detection conditions for Cherenkov radiation were evaluated and the accuracy of Cherenkov radiation measurements validated. The analytical and measurement procedures were applied to urine samples collected from 11 workers from life sciences laboratories. The results of the measurements generally indicated very low background radiation levels, but daily urine samples from two workers were above the minimum detectable activity. The 32P concentrations for two of the workers were 29.3  ±  10.4 Bq•d−1 and 24.1  ±  11.8 Bq•d−1, respectively, at intake levels of 4.12 kBq and 2.61 kBq. The effective doses for these two workers were 4.6 μSv and 2.9 μSv. Overall, the results indicate very low levels of radioactivity, except for cases related to specific working conditions. (paper)

  16. A knowledge continuity management program for the energy, infrastructure and knowledge systems center, Sandia National Laboratories.

    Menicucci, David F.

    2006-07-01

    A growing recognition exists in companies worldwide that, when employees leave, they take with them valuable knowledge that is difficult and expensive to recreate. The concern is now particularly acute as the large ''baby boomer'' generation is reaching retirement age. A new field of science, Knowledge Continuity Management (KCM), is designed to capture and catalog the acquired knowledge and wisdom from experience of these employees before they leave. The KCM concept is in the final stages of being adopted by the Energy, Infrastructure, and Knowledge Systems Center and a program is being applied that should produce significant annual cost savings. This report discusses how the Center can use KCM to mitigate knowledge loss from employee departures, including a concise description of a proposed plan tailored to the Center's specific needs and resources.

  17. Trade Union-based Workplace Learning: A Case Study in Workplace Reorganization and Worker Knowledge Production.

    Sawchuk, Peter H.

    2001-01-01

    A case study of Canada's telecommunications industry found the union engaged in education and research that helped build the potential for workplace democracy. However, scarce resources for these activities and management concerns about worker empowerment constrained progressive change. (SK)

  18. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors about Breast Self-Examination and Mammography among Female Primary Healthcare Workers in Diyarbakır, Turkey.

    Erdem, Özgür; Toktaş, İzzettin

    2016-01-01

    Aim. This study aims to determine the knowledge level of the female primary healthcare workers about breast cancer and to reveal their attitude and behaviors about breast self-examination and mammography. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted on female primary healthcare workers who work in family health centres. 91% (n = 369) of female primary healthcare workers agreed to participate in the study. The questionnaire consisted of three parts: sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge about breast self-examination, and actual practice of breast self-examination. Results. The mean (SD) age of the female primary healthcare workers was 33.1 ± 6.8 (range, 20-54 years). The healthcare workers who practiced breast self-examination had significantly higher knowledge level (P = 0.001) than those who had not. The respondents had high knowledge level of breast self-examination; however, the knowledge level of breast cancer and mammography screen was low. Conclusions. While the female primary healthcare workers in this study had adequate knowledge of breast self-examination, this is not reflected in their attitudes and practices. Emphasis should be laid on breast self-examination in undergraduate and postgraduate courses for primary healthcare workers, since they are mostly involved in patient education. PMID:27123449

  19. A Social-Learning Approach to Hazard-Related Knowledge Exchange: Boundary Workers at the Geoscience-Humanitarian Interface

    Quinn, Keira; Hope, Max; McCloskey, John

    2014-05-01

    A Social-Learning Approach to Hazard-Related Knowledge Exchange: Boundary Workers at the Geoscience-Humanitarian Interface Keira Quinn (1), Dr Max Hope (1), Professor John McCloskey (1). (1)University of Ulster Peer-reviewed science has the potential to guide policy-makers and practitioners in developing robust responses to social problems and issues. Despite advances in hazard-related science, it can often be a challenge to translate findings into useful social applications. With natural hazards affecting 2.9 billion people between 2000 and 2012 the need for hazard science to be effectively communicated is undeniable. This is particularly so in humanitarian contexts as non-governmental organisations (NGOs) play a key role in the poorer nations most affected by natural disasters. Past methods of 'knowledge transfer' have tended to lead to misinterpretations and misrepresentations of science to the extent that it is often used incorrectly or not at all. 'Knowledge exchange' is currently heralded as a more effective means of bringing about successful communication and understanding, and is characterised by the presence of shared learning. Central to a knowledge exchange approach is an understanding of the social and organisational contexts within which learning takes place. Here we use Etienne Wenger's social-learning approach to analyse selected aspects of the social context influencing knowledge exchange across the geoscience-humanitarian interface. For Wenger (2000) Communities of Practice (CoP) are bounded organisational and social groups united by their own distinct values, goals and ways of working. The boundaries surrounding CoPs can act as barriers to knowledge exchange but can also create opportunities for new shared learning by challenging existing perspectives and practice. Drawing on the findings of ongoing qualitative research into communication and learning between earthquake scientists and humanitarian NGOs in UK/Ireland, this paper outlines a number of key features of geoscience and humanitarian Communities of Practice. It focuses on the barriers to and enablers of learning on the boundaries between CoPs and explores the important role played by boundary workers/brokers at this interface. Wenger's (2000) typology of knowledge brokers is used to analyse the different forms this role can take and identify the challenges that hinder it. For example, boundary workers often find themselves in a 'no man's land' between CoP, where their efforts are not recognised or rewarded by either community of practice. We conclude by drawing out wider conclusions on the potential for boundary workers to bridge the science-policy-practice interface particularly ways of developing appropriate boundary infrastructure (for example, recognised career paths, funding mechanisms and organisational support structures).

  20. Knowledge of Hepatitis B Virus Infection, Immunization with Hepatitis B Vaccine, Risk Perception, and Challenges to Control Hepatitis among Hospital Workers in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital

    Olusegun Adekanle; Ndububa, Dennis A.; Samuel Anu Olowookere; Oluwasegun Ijarotimi; Kayode Thaddeus Ijadunola

    2015-01-01

    Background. Studies had reported high rate of hepatitis B infection among hospital workers with low participation in vaccination programmes, especially those whose work exposes them to the risk of HBV infection. The study assessed knowledge of hepatitis B virus infection, risk perception, vaccination history, and challenges to control hepatitis among health workers. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study. Consenting health care workers completed a self-administered questionnaire that as...

  1. PERFECTION OF ACTIVITY OF MEASURING (TESTING LABORATORIES WITH THE USE OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    K. A. Pavlov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The question of necessity of development and implementation of the Knowledge management system within the accredit measuring (testing laboratory is being discussed. The conception offered is the methodlogy of expert system creation based upon ontologies for subjective areas of activities in the measuring (testing laboratory, built on the base of process approach with the module principle. 

  2. Knowledge & Perceptions of ICDS Anganwadi Workers with Reference To Promotion of Community Based Complementary Feeding Practices in Semi Tribal Gujarat

    Purvi Parikh, Kavita Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess ICDS anganwadi workers’ knowledge and perception regarding promotion and enhance community based complementary feeding practices. Methodology: Total 17 anganwadi workers’ (AWWs from one semi tribal sector (covering approximately 850 children under three two years of Vadodara district in Gujarat state, India were purposely selected. This study employed interview with AWWs as a principal method of data collection using a pretested semi-structured interview schedule. The entire interview was divided into 8 themes. Results: The knowledge of AWWs with regard to key IYCF practices was average. None of the AWWs knew the complete rationale for promoting breastfeeding till 2 years and beyond. Merely 65% AWWs recommended food with thick consistency while 47% recommended liquid diets for children. These practices in fact are one of the primary reasons which can be attributed to low energy and protein intake during complementary feeding. As low as 18% AWWs advised giving small frequent feeds during illness and only 6% advised additional meal after illness. None of the AWWs recommended persistence in feeding the child with required quantity of food. Total 41% listed sickness as key reason for child not feeling hungry, missing out on the other two imperative reasons i.e. micronutrient deficiency and mouth lesion. Conclusion: Overall knowledge and perceptions for promoting of community based CF practices was average amongst the ICDS AWWs with a percent score of 40%. The AWWs were aware of key IYCF practices, however the AWWs perceptions and knowledge with regard to the rationale applicable to the appropriate recommended CF practices being promoted was rather poor. This is noted to be a critical gap and needs to be addressed for equipping the ICDS frontline workers for effectively promoting successful adoptions of CF practices by community.

  3. The linkage between the lifestyle of knowledge-workers and their intra-metropolitan residential choice: A clustering approach based on self-organizing maps

    Frenkel, Amnon; Bendit, Edward; Kaplan, Sigal

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the linkage between the lifestyle and the intra-metropolitan residential choice of knowledge-workers in terms of home-ownership, location, dwelling size and building type. Data are retrieved from a revealed-preferences survey among knowledge-workers in the Tel-Aviv metropolitan area and are analyzed with self-organizing maps for pattern recognition and classification. Five clusters are identified: nest-builders, bon-vivants, careerists, entrepreneurs and laid-back. Bon...

  4. Paying for health care in retirement: workers' knowledge of benefits and expenses.

    Schur, Claudia L; Berk, Marc L; Wilensky, Gail R; Gagnon, Jean Paul

    2004-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence of retirees returning to the workforce to obtain health coverage has appeared against a backdrop of rising health insurance premiums and cutbacks in employer health benefit offerings to both current and future retirees. We present findings from a survey of workers ages forty-five to sixty-four concerning their attitudes toward and plans for health care coverage and expenses during retirement. We find a mismatch between workers' expectations about the benefits that are likely to be available to them and their planning as to how they will pay for health care in retirement. PMID:15451954

  5. Knowledge and Awareness Regarding Needle Stick Injuries Among Helath Care Workers in Tertiary Care Hospital in Ahmedabad, Gujarat

    Rakesh Shah, HK Mehta, Manish Fancy, Sunil Nayak, Bhavesh N. Donga

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Health care professionals are exposed to variety of dangers like infections, cuts and needle stick injuries, exposure to anesthetic gases, radiations, dermatitis causing substances, vaccines, serums etc. This study focuses on issues related to some of these risks and possible ways and means on how to overcome these risks. Objective: To assess the knowledge, attitude and practices among health care workers about needle stick injury. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a teaching hospital in June 2008. Results: Mean age of Health care workers was 33.5 years, majority (50% in the age group of 20-30 years. 61% HCWs had less than 5 year of work experience. 67% HCWs had received hepatitis B vaccination of which only 17.9% had carried out Anti HBs antibody check up. Knowledge about disease transmitted by NSIs was satisfactory. Though 36% had suffered Needle stick injury (NSIs, only 8.3% reported the incident of NSIs. 81% HCWs know about universal precaution guidelines. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for strengthening skills, developing newer competencies and broadening our knowledge in occupational health and safety and disaster management.

  6. Exploring AIDS-Related Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors of Female Mexican Migrant Workers.

    Organista, Pamela Balls; Organista, Kurt C.; Soloff, Pearl R.

    1998-01-01

    AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors were assessed among female migrant laborers (N=32). Results are reported regarding knowledge and beliefs about AIDS transmission, knowledge and beliefs about condom use, and actual use of condoms. Needs for health education and services, sexual power, and other implications of findings are

  7. Knowledge, attitude and practice of pharmacists and health-care workers regarding oral contraceptives correct usage, side-effects and contraindications.

    Sattari, M; Mokhtari, Z; Jabari, H; Mashayekhi, S O

    2013-06-01

    Despite the success of the Iranian family planning programme, the number of unwanted pregnancies remains high. To investigate whether health workers in Tabriz are providing correct information and counselling about OCP use, the current study was planned to examine the level of knowledge, attitude and practice of OCP providers. A sample of 150 health-care workers in health houses and 150 community/hospital pharmacists answered a questionnaire about knowledge of correct use of OCP, side-effects, contraindications, danger signs/symptoms and non-contraceptive benefits, and whether they counselled patients about these subjects. Knowledge of pharmacists and health workers was not as high as expected and in many topics they were counselling patients even when they had incorrect knowledge and in other areas they were not providing information to patients despite having the correct knowledge. Better continuing education for OCP providers and especially for pharmacists seems necessary. PMID:24975184

  8. The Impact of an Educational Program on Knowledge and Attitude of Female Sex Workers in Preventing High Risk Sexual Behaviours

    Mona Larki; Mahin Taffazoli; Robab Latifnejad Roudsari; Ali Babaee

    2015-01-01

    Background & aim:  The most important risk factor for one’s sexual health is high-risk sexual behavior. Implementation of educational programs has been considered as one of the most crucial interventions in the prevention and treatment of these behaviors. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effect of an educational program on the knowledge and attitude of female sex workers toward preventing high-risk sexual behaviors. Methods:This pretest-posttest, one-group study was conducted on 4...

  9. KNOWLEDGE AND PERCEPTION OF HEALTH CARE WORKERS TOWARDS CLEAN CARE PRACTICES IN A TERTIARY CARE HO SPITAL

    Payghan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Ten to thirty percent of the patients admitted to hospitals in India acquire nosocomial infections as against 5% i n the developed world. The first and foremost principle of Universal Safety Precaution is “HANDWASHING”. But the Health Care Workers often forget to wash their hands before int eracting with the patient. Such contaminated hands plays major role in transmitting infections. HCWs are also at an increased risk of needle stick injuries. According to data fr om EPINet system, hospital workers incur approximately 30 needle stick injuries per 100 beds per year on average – an alarming figure by no exaggeration. (5 OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge and perception of HCWs toward s hand hygiene and to know the incident of NSI and the fac tors associated with it. STUDY METHOD: Cross sectional study with purposive sampling was car ried out in a tertiary care hospital. Out of 275 participants 55 were doctors, 143 nurses and 77 i nterns. Self administered questionnaire was used to collect information. RESULTS : Ninety one percent doctors, 86% interns and 81% nurses had good knowledge about hand hygiene. 73% d octors, 61% interns and 56% nurses knew the duration required for hand rub. The main h indrance for not practicing hand hygiene was due to lack of resources (37%. Knowledge abou t recapping of the needle was poor and incident of injury due to needle stick was 50% amon g nurses. CONCLUSIONS : Study demonstrated adequate knowledge regarding hand hygi ene. The knowledge should be converted into practice. There is a need for educati onal programme about universal precautions especially about handling of the sharps

  10. Socio-economic status may suppress the effect of knowledge on sexual risk among female sex workers

    Shervin Assari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Socio-economic status (SES, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV knowledge and self-efficacy influence risky behaviors and female sex workers (FSWs are not exception. Aims: This study was aimed to investigate if SES, HIV knowledge and self-efficacy predict frequency of unprotected sex with injecting drug users (IDUs among a sample of FSWs in Iran. Setting and Design: Universal Network for Health Information Dissemination and Exchange HIV Risk Study was a survey of IDUs and FSWs, conducted in eight different provinces of Iran, 2009. Materials and Methods: A total of 55 FSWs were entered in this study. Frequency of unprotected sex with IDUs during the past 6 months was the dependent variable. Number of sexual partners during the past 6 month, SES, HIV Knowledge, self-efficacy, perceived HIV risk and intention for change were predictors. Statistical Analysis: We used hierarchical regression for data analysis. In each step, a block of predictors were added to the model. SES block composed of education level, owning a house and living alone. Results: In the absence of SES in the model, HIV knowledge and self-efficacy were not significantly associated with the frequency of unprotected sex with IDUs during the past 6 months, However, with adding SES block to the model, HIV knowledge became significant predictor of the outcome. Thus, among our sample of Iranian FSWs, SES has a suppressor effect for the effect of HIV knowledge on frequency of unprotected sex with IDUs during the past 6 months. Conclusion: Studies which wish to understand the role of theory-based psychological constructs such as HIV knowledge on high risk behaviors need to include SES an essential contextual factor. This finding may also explain why literature is mixed on the effect of HIV knowledge on HIV risk behaviors.

  11. A Cross-Sectional Survey of Healthcare Workers on the Knowledge and Attitudes towards Polio Vaccination in Pakistan

    Khan, Muhammad Umair; Ahmad, Akram; Aqeel, Talieha; Akbar, Naila; Salman, Saad; Idress, Jawaria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pakistan accounts for 85.2% of the total polio cases reported worldwide. Healthcare workers (HCWs) are an integral part of immunization campaigns and source of education for the general public. This study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitudes towards polio vaccination among HCWs providing immunisation and education to general public in Quetta and Peshawar divisions of Pakistan. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 490 HCWs was conducted in two major referral public teaching hospitals of Quetta and Peshawar divisions. During February to April, 2015, a random sample of 490 HCWs was invited to participate in this study. Knowledge and attitudes were assessed by using self-administered, anonymous and pretested questionnaire. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were used to express the results. Results A total of 468 participants responded to the questionnaire, giving a response rate of 95.5%. Overall, participants demonstrated good knowledge and positive attitudes towards polio vaccination. The mean knowledge score of HCWs about polio was 13.42±2.39 (based on 18 knowledge questions) while the mean attitude score was 28.75±5.5 (based on 9 attitudes statements). Knowledge gaps were identified about the incubation period of poliovirus (19.5%), management issues (31.9%), use of polio vaccine in mild illnesses (34.7%) and the consequences of the polio virus (36.9%). The majority of participants agreed that all children should be vaccinated for polio (95.1%), while reservations were noted about the need of a booster (38.9%), and sterility issues associated with polio vaccines (43.6%). Internet (n = 167, 37%) and Posters (n = 158, 35%) were the main sources used by HCWs to educate themselves about polio. Conclusion Participants in this study had good knowledge and positive attitudes towards polio vaccination. Although the data are indicative of gaps in the knowledge of HCWs, the findings may not be generalized to other hospitals in Pakistan. PMID:26559184

  12. Contestations over knowledge production or ideological bullying?: a response to Legassick on the workers' movement

    Jabulani Sithole

    2009-01-01

    The key characteristic of the vast amount of literature on the South African workers' movement in the post-1973 period is the denial that the class and national struggles were closely intertwined. This denial is underpinned by a strong 'antinationalist current' which dismisses the national liberation struggle as 'populist and nationalist' and therefore antithetical to socialism. This article cautions against uncritical endorsement of these views. It argues that they are the work of partisan a...

  13. Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management of radiation workers in medical institutions

    Radiation safety managements in medical institutions are needed to protect certain radiation damages as a part of National Coalition. This study investigates the characteristics of self-efficacy that become the major factor on the knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the radiation safety management of radiation workers as an approach of educational aspects and analyzes the relationship between such factors to provide basic materials for improving the activity level of radiation safety managements. In order to implement the goal of this study, a survey was performed for 1,200 workers who were engaged in radiation treatments in medical centers, such as general hospital, university hospital, private hospital, and public health center for 42 days from July 23, 2006. Then, the results of the analysis can be summarized as follows: 1. Average scores on knowledge, attitude, and behavior in the radiation safety management were presented as 75.76±11.20, 90.55±8.59, 80.58±11.70, respectively. Also, the average score of self-efficacy was recorded as 73.55±9.82. 2. Knowledge levels in the radiation safety management showed significant differences according to the sex, age, marriage, education, and experience. Also, males of married, older, highly educated, and largely experienced represented high knowledge levels. Attitude levels in the radiation safety management showed certain significant differences according to the type of medical centers in which private hospitals showed a relatively low level compared to that of high levels in university hospitals. Behavior levels in the radiation safety management also represented significant differences according to the age, marriage, education, experience, and types of medical centers. Factors in married, general hospital, older, highly educated, and largely experienced showed high behavior levels. In addition, the self-efficacy showed certain differences according to the marriage and types of medical centers. Factors in married and general hospital demonstrated high self-efficacy levels. 3. Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management showed statistical differences according to the relationship between the knowledge and the attitude, the knowledge and the behavior, the attitude and the behavior, the attitude and the self-efficacy, and the behavior and the self-efficacy. The relationship between the behavior and the self-efficacy was represented as γ = 0.482, which was the strongest relationship in such factors. Also, the knowledge and self-efficacy didn't show certain relationships

  14. Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management of radiation workers in medical institutions

    Han, Eun Ok [Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    Radiation safety managements in medical institutions are needed to protect certain radiation damages as a part of National Coalition. This study investigates the characteristics of self-efficacy that become the major factor on the knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the radiation safety management of radiation workers as an approach of educational aspects and analyzes the relationship between such factors to provide basic materials for improving the activity level of radiation safety managements. In order to implement the goal of this study, a survey was performed for 1,200 workers who were engaged in radiation treatments in medical centers, such as general hospital, university hospital, private hospital, and public health center for 42 days from July 23, 2006. Then, the results of the analysis can be summarized as follows: 1. Average scores on knowledge, attitude, and behavior in the radiation safety management were presented as 75.76{+-}11.20, 90.55{+-}8.59, 80.58{+-}11.70, respectively. Also, the average score of self-efficacy was recorded as 73.55{+-}9.82. 2. Knowledge levels in the radiation safety management showed significant differences according to the sex, age, marriage, education, and experience. Also, males of married, older, highly educated, and largely experienced represented high knowledge levels. Attitude levels in the radiation safety management showed certain significant differences according to the type of medical centers in which private hospitals showed a relatively low level compared to that of high levels in university hospitals. Behavior levels in the radiation safety management also represented significant differences according to the age, marriage, education, experience, and types of medical centers. Factors in married, general hospital, older, highly educated, and largely experienced showed high behavior levels. In addition, the self-efficacy showed certain differences according to the marriage and types of medical centers. Factors in married and general hospital demonstrated high self-efficacy levels. 3. Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management showed statistical differences according to the relationship between the knowledge and the attitude, the knowledge and the behavior, the attitude and the behavior, the attitude and the self-efficacy, and the behavior and the self-efficacy. The relationship between the behavior and the self-efficacy was represented as {gamma} = 0.482, which was the strongest relationship in such factors. Also, the knowledge and self-efficacy didn't show certain relationships.

  15. Dose constraints to the individual annual doses of exposed workers in nuclear medicine laboratories

    The study deals with the analysis of dose distribution records of the occupationally exposed workers in the field of nuclear medicine in Greece and the establishment of constraints to their individual annual doses (IAD) within the process of optimization in radiation protection. The exposed workers were grouped according to their specialties (medical doctors, technicians, others), the kind of services provided (diagnosis or diagnosis plus I-131 therapy) and the sector they belonged (public or private). Dose constraints (DC) were set at the level below which the IAD of the 75% of the exposed workers per specialty were included. Our results showed that DC levels were exceeded by the 13% of the exposed workers in the public and the 30% in the private sector respectively. Further investigation indicated that the reasons leading to the exceeding of DCs, may be attributed to the workload of the exposed workers which is greater in the private than in the public sector as well as, to possible difference in the specific tasks of workers between the two sectors. (author)

  16. Blood collection procedures in hematology: knowledge and practice among laboratory personnel.

    Chaturvedi, Sujata; Suri, Vaishali; Pant, Ishita; Rusia, Usha

    2006-07-01

    Blood collection is an important preanalytical component of haematological testing. This questionnaire based study was conducted on laboratory personnel to elicit their knowledge and practice regarding blood collection procedures for haematological testing. Questionnaire comprised of 37 multiple choice questions, of which 10 questions each were related to essential and desirable knowledge, 10 to practice and 7 to educational and job profile. Ninety four laboratory personnel participated in the study. Analysis was done on SPSS software. Percentages of unsatisfactory scores were 42.6%, 4.3%, 17% and 6% in the essential knowledge, desirable knowledge, practice and total scoring respectively. 91.5%, however, had a satisfactory total score. Importance needs to be given to blood collection procedures both, individually and collectively. The study highlights the deficient areas which need to addressed by all laboratorians. Such studies should also be conducted among nursing and resident staff- the other groups concerned with blood collection. PMID:17001890

  17. Physicians', nurses' and community health workers' knowledge about physical activity in Brazil: A cross-sectional study?

    Burdick, Laura; Mielke, Gregore I.; Parra, Diana C.; Gomes, Grace; Florindo, Alex; Bracco, Mario; Lobelo, Felipe; Simoes, Eduardo J.; Pratt, Michael; Ramos, Luiz R.; Moura, Lenildo; Brownson, Ross C.; Hallal, Pedro C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To measure knowledge of current recommendations of physical activity and consequences of physical inactivity among healthcare providers throughout Brazil. Methods A phone survey of 1600 randomly selected primary healthcare units in Brazil was conducted between January and July 2011. At each unit, a physician, nurse or community healthcare worker (n=798) responded to a 40-minute survey, eliciting information about demographics, knowledge, and health behaviors pertaining to physical activity. Results Among nurses and community healthcare workers, >95% reported needing more information on physical activity guidelines. Among physicians this proportion was 80%. Nearly 40% of the professionals incorrectly believed 90-min of moderate-intensity physical activity per week is the recommended amount for health benefits; nearly 30% believed that 90-min of vigorous-intensity activity per week is needed for the same purpose. More than 75% of all groups reported that type II diabetes, hypertension, depression, and coronary heart disease might result from physical inactivity, but on average only 60% from each group are aware of osteoporosis as a possible consequence of physical inactivity. Conclusions Training health professionals in how to convey all relevant information about physical activity to their patients is critical for health promotion within the primary care system in Brazil. PMID:26844104

  18. Knowledge, attitudes, and poultry-handling practices of poultry workers in relation to avian influenza in India

    Sudhir C Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza (AI is a viral disease of domestic and wild birds. The recent pandemics caused by highly pathogenic AIA (H5N1 in domestic poultry is currently rated phase 3 by the World Health Organization on the pandemic alert scale. Materials and Methods: A pretested and semistructured survey instrument was administered to both live bird market and poultry farm workers in two most populous cities in Karnataka in South India to collect data on demographics, knowledge, attitude, and practices among them. Results: The mean age was similar among both population groups (31.5 years. There was a higher level of biosecurity practices adopted in poultry farms compared with those adopted in live bird market. Knowledge regarding AI was acceptable but poorly correlated with actual biosecurity practices. Discussion: Live bird market and poultry farm workers have been identified as the weakest link in the prevention and control of the spread of AI in the two most populous cities studied in Karnataka. Conclusion: Risk reduction models of behavior change targeting these groups are important toward the control and prevention of AI spread.

  19. Discourse, Power, and Knowledge in the Management of "Big Science": The Production of Consensus in a Nuclear Fusion Research Laboratory.

    Kinsella, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Extends a Foucauldian view of power/knowledge to the archetypical knowledge-intensive organization, the scientific research laboratory. Describes the discursive production of power/knowledge at the "big science" laboratory conducting nuclear fusion research and illuminates a critical incident in which the fusion research "discipline" imposes…

  20. Company-Wiki as a knowledge transfer instrument for reducing the shortage of skilled workers

    Schulz, Judith

    2009-01-01

    The problem of the shortage of skilled workers in the manufacturing sector of the metal and electrical industry is a central topic in many areas in Europe. Different factors and impacts cause the specialist situation, which gradually has manifested itself on the skilled work level. These circumstances are described in detail in a synthesis report as well as in a good-practice report (ITB research reports 36/2008 and 37/2008). The available report is based on the necessity of SMEs for a knowle...

  1. Knowledge of hepatitis B and vaccination status of some expatriate ethnic groups of blue collar workers in Northern Saudi Arabia

    Abdul Sattar Khan

    2008-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B (HBV infection is relatively common throughout the world, but more prevalent in low socioeconomic and underprivileged classes. The chronic infection may lead to severe consequences including Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Method: A cross-sectional, community-based survey of some ethnic expatriate groups of blue color workers (n=665 living in four main areas along the Northern Borders of Saudi Arabia was completed in 2005. We examined knowledge of HBV and vaccination status and compared them with some socio-demographic factors. Results: The mean age of the participants was 45.61 years (8.44, 53% of whom were Non-Arabs (Non Arabic speaking. Of the total, 41.6% gave seven or more correct answers out of 12 questions addressing knowledge about the transmission and sequelae of HBV. Almost 40% of the respondents had not been vaccinated while the remaining respondents had had three full doses of vaccination. A high level of knowledge (? 7 correct answers was significantly associated (p0.05 with level of knowledge. However, vaccination status was associated (p<0.05 with almost all socio-demographic factors. Conclusion: Hepatitis screening programs for expatriates in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia started 10 years ago and are expected to have a great impact on the combat against HBV infections and their complications. However, beyond screening, health promotion, vaccination campaigns, and access to vaccine for the underprivileged classes are some necessary measures towards achieving success.

  2. Facility-specific radiation exposure risks and their implications for radiation workers at Department of Energy laboratories

    Davis, Adam Christopher

    This research develops a new framework for evaluating the occupational risks of exposure to hazardous substances in any setting where As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) practices are mandated or used. The evaluation is performed by developing a hypothesis-test-based procedure for evaluating the homogeneity of various epidemiological cohorts, and thus the appropriateness of the application of aggregate data-pooling techniques to those cohorts. A statistical methodology is then developed as an alternative to aggregate pooling for situations in which individual cohorts show heterogeneity between them and are thus unsuitable for pooled analysis. These methods are then applied to estimate the all-cancer mortality risks incurred by workers at four Department-of-Energy nuclear weapons laboratories. Both linear, no-threshold and dose-bin averaged risks are calculated and it is further shown that aggregate analysis tends to overestimate the risks with respect to those calculated by the methods developed in this work. The risk estimates developed in Chapter 2 are, in Chapter 3, applied to assess the risks to workers engaged in americium recovery operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The work described in Chapter 3 develops a full radiological protection assessment for the new americium recovery project, including development of exposure cases, creation and modification of MCNP5 models, development of a time-and-motion study, and the final synthesis of all data. This work also develops a new risk-based method of determining whether administrative controls, such as staffing increases, are ALARA-optimized. The EPA's estimate of the value of statistical life is applied to these risk estimates to determine a monetary value for risk. The rate of change of this "risk value" (marginal risk) is then compared with the rate of change of workers' compensations as additional workers are added to the project to reduce the dose (and therefore, presumably, risk) to each individual.

  3. Evaluation of Knowledge of Emergency Healthcare Workers Regarding Approach to Emergency Patients

    Özgür Tanr›verdi; Oben Duman

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Emergency units constitute the most important part of all hospitals. The aim of this study was to evaluate practitioners’ and healthcare providers’ knowledge and experience regarding emergency first aid in a hospital with insufficient facilities. Methods: 17 physicians and 25 assistant staff working at our hospital were evaluated in terms of their knowledge about and experience in “emergency medicine and trauma” by a questionnaire and by observations. Results: The...

  4. Assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice of dengue in factory workers of Amritsar, Punjab

    Deepika Tikoo; Geeta Sharma; Meenakshi Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dengue, a mosquito borne, arboviral disease has become a major cause of health concern in the recent times throughout the world. In India, we have been witnessing annual outbreaks for the past few years and lack of knowledge about prevention and treatment of dengue among majority of the population leads to increased mortality. Apart from Delhi, many cases of dengue have been reported from Punjab. In spite of this fact, very few studies have been done to know about the knowledge of...

  5. Characteristics of female sex workers and their HIV/AIDS/STI knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in semi-urban areas in South Africa.

    Peltzer, K; Seoka, P; Raphala, S

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate characteristics of female sex workers and their HIV/AIDS/STI knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in semi-urban areas in South Africa. The sample included 70 female sex workers from the Tzaneen and Phalaborwa area in the Limpopo Province. A modified form of snowball sampling known as "targeted" sampling was used for identifying female sex workers. Results showed an inadequate knowledge of HIV prevention methods and some incorrect beliefs about AIDS transmission. Most sex workers reported condom use with their last sex client, inconsistent condom use with paying partners, and had poor condom use with regular partners. One third were drinking alcohol daily, one quarter had had voluntary HIV tests, and three quarters had been exposed to HIV interventions. Findings are discussed and implications for HIV interventions outlined. PMID:15168620

  6. Characteristics of female sex workers and their HIV/AIDS/STI knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in semi-urban areas in South Africa

    K. Peltzer

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate characteristics of female sex workers and their HIV/AIDS/STI knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in semi-urban areas in South Africa. The sample included 70 female sex workers from the Tzaneen and Phalaborwa area in the Limpopo Province. A modified form of snowball sampling known as “targeted” sampling was used for identifying female sex workers. Results showed an inadequate knowledge of HIV prevention methods and some incorrect beliefs about AIDS transmission. Most sex workers reported condom use with their last sex client, inconsistent condom use with paying partners, and had poor condom use with regular partners. One third were drinking alcohol daily, one quarter had had voluntary HIV tests, and three quarters had been exposed to HIV interventions. Findings are discussed and implications for HIV interventions outlined.

  7. Characteristics of female sex workers and their HIV/AIDS/STI knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in semi-urban areas in South Africa

    K. Peltzer

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate characteristics of female sex workers and their HIV/AIDS/STI knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in semi-urban areas in South Africa. The sample included 70 female sex workers from the Tzaneen and Phalaborwa area in the Limpopo Province. A modified form of snowball sampling known as targeted sampling was used for identifying female sex workers. Results showed an inadequate knowledge of HIV prevention methods and some incorrect beliefs about AIDS transmission. Most sex workers reported condom use with their last sex client, inconsistent condom use with paying partners, and had poor condom use with regular partners. One third were drinking alcohol daily, one quarter had had voluntary HIV tests, and three quarters had been exposed to HIV interventions. Findings are discussed and implications for HIV interventions outlined.

  8. Sexually transmitted infection screening uptake and knowledge of sexually transmitted infection symptoms among female sex workers participating in a community randomised trial in Peru.

    Kohler, Pamela K; Campos, Pablo E; Garcia, Patricia J; Carcamo, Cesar P; Buendia, Clara; Hughes, James P; Mejia, Carolina; Garnett, Geoff P; Holmes, King K

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate condom use, sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening, and knowledge of STI symptoms among female sex workers in Peru associated with sex work venues and a community randomised trial of STI control. One component of the Peru PREVEN intervention conducted mobile-team outreach to female sex workers to reduce STIs and increase condom use and access to government clinics for STI screening and evaluation. Prevalence ratios were calculated using multivariate Poisson regression models with robust standard errors, clustering by city. As-treated analyses were conducted to assess outcomes associated with reported exposure to the intervention. Care-seeking was more frequent in intervention communities, but differences were not statistically significant. Female sex workers reporting exposure to the intervention had a significantly higher likelihood of condom use, STI screening at public health clinics, and symptom recognition compared to those not exposed. Compared with street- or bar-based female sex workers, brothel-based female sex workers reported significantly higher rates of condom use with last client, recent screening exams for STIs, and HIV testing. Brothel-based female sex workers also more often reported knowledge of STIs and recognition of STI symptoms in women and in men. Interventions to promote STI detection and prevention among female sex workers in Peru should consider structural or regulatory factors related to sex work venues. PMID:25941053

  9. Contestations over knowledge production or ideological bullying?: a response to Legassick on the workers' movement

    Jabulani Sithole

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The key characteristic of the vast amount of literature on the South African workers' movement in the post-1973 period is the denial that the class and national struggles were closely intertwined. This denial is underpinned by a strong 'antinationalist current' which dismisses the national liberation struggle as 'populist and nationalist' and therefore antithetical to socialism. This article cautions against uncritical endorsement of these views. It argues that they are the work of partisan and intolerant commentators who have dominated the South African academy since the 1970s and who have a tendency to suppress all versions of labour history which highlight these linkages in favour of those which portray national liberation and socialism as antinomies. The article also points out that these commentators use history to mobilise support for their rigidly held ideological positions and to wage current political struggles under the pretext of advancing objective academic arguments.

  10. Assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice of dengue in factory workers of Amritsar, Punjab

    Deepika Tikoo

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: The present study shows that literacy status of an individual is not associated with adequate knowledge and its application. The study population had insufficient information about dengue while the preventive measures which were known to them for limiting the spread of dengue was not satisfactorily practiced. We as health care professionals should undertake more of these studies to know about the knowledge status of the community and hold health awareness camps. The government should also adopt frequent measures to spread such information through television, newspapers, posters and campaigns. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(1.000: 38-44

  11. Emergency contraceptive pills: Exploring the knowledge and attitudes of community health workers in a developing Muslim country

    Azeem Sultan Mir

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unsafe abortion is a major Public health problem in developing countries, where women make several unsafe attempts at termination of the unintended pregnancy before turning to health services. Community health workers can act as a bridge between the community and their health facilities and can use Emergency Contraceptive Pills to significantly reduce the mortality and morbidity related to unsafe abortions. Aims: This study explores the knowledge, attitudes and practices of the Lady Health Supervisor of the National Program for Family Planning, district Rawalpindi, regarding emergency contraception pills. Materials and Methods: The cross sectional survey was conducted during the monthly meeting of Lady Health Supervisors. Self administered, anonymous and voluntary questionnaire consisting of 17 items, regarding demographic profile, awareness, knowledge, attitudes and practices, was used. Results: Insufficient knowledge, high misinformation and strongly negative attitudes were revealed. More than half did not know that emergency contraceptive pills do not cause abortion. About four fifths believed that emergency contraceptive pills will lead to evil practices in society. More than four fifths recognized that the clients of National Program for Family Planning need emergency contraceptive pills. The attitudes were significantly associated with knowledge (P=0.034, Fishers Exact Test. Conclusion: The awareness of emergency contraceptive pills is high. Serious gaps in knowledge have been identified. There is a clear recognition of the need of emergency contraceptive pills for the clients of National Program for Family Planning. However, any strategy to introduce emergency contraceptive pills must cater for the misplaced beliefs of the work force.

  12. Emergency contraceptive pills: Exploring the knowledge and attitudes of community health workers in a developing Muslim country

    Azeem Sultan Mir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unsafe abortion is a major Public health problem in developing countries, where women make several unsafe attempts at termination of the unintended pregnancy before turning to health services. Community health workers can act as a bridge between the community and their health facilities and can use Emergency Contraceptive Pills to significantly reduce the mortality and morbidity related to unsafe abortions. Aims: This study explores the knowledge, attitudes and practices of the Lady Health Supervisor of the National Program for Family Planning, district Rawalpindi, regarding emergency contraception pills. Materials and Methods: The cross sectional survey was conducted during the monthly meeting of Lady Health Supervisors. Self administered, anonymous and voluntary questionnaire consisting of 17 items, regarding demographic profile, awareness, knowledge, attitudes and practices, was used. Results: Insufficient knowledge, high misinformation and strongly negative attitudes were revealed. More than half did not know that emergency contraceptive pills do not cause abortion. About four fifths believed that emergency contraceptive pills will lead to ′evil′ practices in society. More than four fifths recognized that the clients of National Program for Family Planning need emergency contraceptive pills. The attitudes were significantly associated with knowledge (P=0.034, Fisher′s Exact Test. Conclusion: The awareness of emergency contraceptive pills is high. Serious gaps in knowledge have been identified. There is a clear recognition of the need of emergency contraceptive pills for the clients of National Program for Family Planning. However, any strategy to introduce emergency contraceptive pills must cater for the misplaced beliefs of the work force.

  13. Impact of education on knowledge, attitudes and practices among various categories of health care workers on nosocomial infections

    Suchitra J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices among the different health care workers (HCWs on nosocomial infections. Methods : A total of 150 HCWs, doctors (n=50, nurses (n=50 and ward aides (n=50 were included. A questionnaire was administered to the HCWs to assess their knowledge, attitudes and practices on nosocomial infections. A scoring system was devised to grade those (KAP score. They were further subjected to a series of similar questionnaires at intervals of 6, 12 and 24 months after an education module. Subjects in each category of staff (n=10 were observed for compliance to hand washing practices in the ward in the post-education period. Statistical analysis was done using statistical software. Results : The study showed an increase in the number of subjects in each category scoring good and excellent in the post-education questionnaire; however this declined with the progress of time. It was observed that the compliance level to hand washing practices differed among the different HCWs. Total compliance was 63.3% and ward aides were most compliant 76.7% (adjusted Wald 95% CI= 58.80-88.48. Conclusions : Education has a positive impact on retention of knowledge, attitudes and practices in all the categories of staff. There is a need to develop a system of continuous education for all the categories of staff. In order to reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections, compliance with interventions are mandatory.

  14. Hospital Bioethics: A Beginning Knowledge Base for the Neonatal Social Worker.

    Silverman, Ed

    1992-01-01

    Notes that life-saving advances in medicine have created difficult ethical and legal dilemmas for health care professionals. Presents beginning knowledge base for bioethical practice, especially in hospital neonatal units. Outlines key elements of bioethical decision making and examines potential social work role from clinical and organizational…

  15. An evaluation of skill and knowledge in delivery of reproductive and child health services by female health workers in Jamnagar District and corporation area, Gujarat state, India

    Naresh R Makwana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infant mortality rate and maternal mortality rate are key indicators of Health situation in India and also reflect the degree of achievement of Reproductive and Child Health (RCH Program. Female health worker (FHW is a grass-root worker and has key role to provide quality service and success of RCH Program. This study was designed to assess the skill and knowledge of FHW in delivery of RCH services. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Jamnagar district during October 2008 to March 2009. All female health workers (FHWs (n = 63 of 10 randomly selected Primary Health Center, one primary health care (PHC from each Talukas and Corporation area, were selected and their skills and knowledge were assessed by observing and interviewing by the pretested oral questionnaire method. Results: Antenatal care achieve impressive coverage of more than 95% with regards to antenatal registration, tetanus toxoid to pregnant women, and iron-folic acid (IFA tablet prescription to expectant mothers. Distressingly only half of the workers knew about "Five Cleans" and Resuscitation of new born child. Skills and knowledge regarding postnatal services and Family Planning services was variable among FHWs. Immunization service found to be good among all FHWs. Conclusion: Quality of services needs to be improved by train and re-train the workers on different aspects of the RCH program, so that their skills and knowledge can be utilized well. Support system of supervision and monitoring of activities of FHWs should be strengthened.

  16. The Relationship between Pro-Innovation Organizational Climate, Leader-Member Exchange and Innovative Work Behavior: A Study among the Knowledge Workers of the Knowledge Intensive Business Services in Malaysia

    Yeoh Khar Kheng; Rosli Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between pro-innovation organizational climate, leader-member exchange and innovative work behavior among the knowledge workers of the knowledge intensive business services in Malaysia. The innovative work behavior has a central role in the development of knowledge-intensive business services in Malaysia. It was previously reported that pro-innovation organizational climate and leader-member exchange to have a significant relationship ...

  17. Assessment of knowledge attitude and practice towards hepatitis B among health care workers in a tertiary care hospital

    Farhana Siraj

    2016-01-01

    Results: This cross sectional prospective study was conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Govt. Medical College Srinagar from January to June 2015. 150 health care professionals were taken for the study. Knowledge regarding disease and transmission was fairly good. Regarding vaccination status 42.02% of medical and 29.60% of paramedical staff was fully vaccinated, the most common reason for non compliance being ignorance of importance of vaccination. Awareness of patients' vaccination status was also low. Conclusions: Due to low vaccine-compliance, Health care workers (HCW continue to be at the risk of occupational HBV infection. Regular Health education highlighting occupational risk of HBV, accessibility of vaccine, and mandatory vaccination of HCW is recommended to prevent Hepatitis B infection. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(1.000: 58-61

  18. INFLUENCE OF KNOWLEDGE WORKERS ON THE PROCESS OF CREATING OF INNOVATIVE SERVICES IN ENTERPRISES FROM THE BALTIC SEA REGION

    Micha? Igielski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century systematic processes should be a basic task of contemporary enterprises aiming at raising the competitive edge on the global market. It is effect of functioning in the era of the forming oneself of the economy based on the knowledge. It is extorting on all participants being functional on the market, pointing main reserves to such immaterial sources, which cooperating with the economy will be answering too faster their economic development. It means that still the changing market is putting new requirements before enterprises in delivering to customers new services. Without appropri-ately of qualified and appropriate employees the enterprise isn't able even to initiate of the implementation of strategies based on such a destination. Companies would become more competing and have provided better services every now and then, for the worker I must perform my work still more creatively. Features and capacities to work of crucial employees constitute most important and most valuable capital of every company however which is often undervalued, not to say wasted. Additionally the economic policy in various parts is pointing world oneself with own laws, like for example in the sea region Baltic, where is extorting on entrepreneurs additional pressure - this region is supposed to constitute the antidote extending to the dominance of area from south-eastern coasts of Great Britain until north Italy in the nearest years. Therefore showing the role they are performing which, in studied subjects is a main purpose of the present article identified knowledge workers, in the process creating and delivering innovative services to the market.

  19. Knowledge sharing among workers: a study on their contribution through informal communication in Cyberjaya, Malaysia

    Norizzati Azudin; Mohd Nor Ismail; Zainab Taherali

    2009-01-01

    Malaysia, being a multi-racial society, faces the challenges of creating knowledge sharing capability in organisations, as cultural values are often reflected in the workplace by individual employees. For organisations, it is not clear whether this diversity has resulted in any form of competitive advantage. Studies have shown that various communities in Malaysia do not bring their respective cultures to work, and as such the company values prevail. This research is based on the demographic s...

  20. Prevalence of natural rubber latex allergy (type I and type IV) in laboratory workers in The Netherlands.

    de Groot, H; de Jong, N W; Duijster, E; Gerth van Wijk, R; Vermeulen, A; van Toorenenbergen, A W; Geursen, L; van Joost, T

    1998-03-01

    The objective of the study was to study the prevalence of Type IV and Type I allergy to natural rubber latex (NRL) in a population at risk in the Netherlands. Laboratory workers regularly using gloves were invited to complete a questionnaire and to be tested. We performed patch tests with standard contact allergens, rubber additives, glove powder and pieces of 4 gloves; prick tests with inhalant allergens, glove extracts, glove powder and fruit extracts; and RASTs. Glove-related hand dermatitis was reported in 36.9% of the individuals interviewed. A positive patch test result for rubber additives was seen in only 6.6%. Glove-related urticaria, rhinoconjunctivitis and/or asthma were reported in 24.6% of all cases. Confirmation of an IgE-mediated reaction was achieved in 8.3% by prick test with glove extracts and 5.0% by RAST. No reaction to glove powder was noticed in patch testing or in prick testing. A high prevalence rate of glove-related symptoms and NRL Type I allergy was found in laboratory workers exposed to rubber gloves. Surprisingly, there was no co-existence of Type I and Type IV allergy in this population. PMID:9536409

  1. A Laboratory Study Designed for Reducing the Gap between Information Security Knowledge and Implementation

    Revital Elitzur

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Companies often have the knowledge on procedures to prevent or mitigate against information technology security risks. Yet these companies may not take adequate measures to implement these procedures, and instead, leave themselves vulnerable to security breaches. Potential reasons for this gap between information security knowledge and implementation are provided based on interviews with information technology managers at a global automobile sales and marketing company. Four mechanisms to reduce this gap are proposed, along with a new approach to conduct a laboratory experiment to evaluate the effectiveness of these mechanisms, applied independently and in combinations.

  2. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding cervical cancer and screening among Ethiopian health care workers

    Kress CM

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Catherine M Kress,1 Lisa Sharling,2 Ashli A Owen-Smith,3 Dawit Desalegn,4 Henry M Blumberg,2 Jennifer Goedken1 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 4Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Addis Ababa University School of Medicine, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Background: Though cervical cancer incidence has dramatically decreased in resource rich regions due to the implementation of universal screening programs, it remains one of the most common cancers affecting women worldwide and has one of the highest mortality rates. The vast majority of cervical cancer-related deaths are among women that have never been screened. Prior to implementation of a screening program in Addis Ababa University-affiliated hospitals in Ethiopia, a survey was conducted to assess knowledge of cervical cancer etiology, risk factors, and screening, as well as attitudes and practices regarding cervical cancer screening among women’s health care providers.Methods: Between February and March 2012 an anonymous, self-administered survey to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to cervical cancer and its prevention was distributed to 334 health care providers at three government hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and three Family Guidance Association clinics in Awassa, Adama, and Bahir Dar. Data were analyzed using SPSS software and chi-square test was used to test differences in knowledge, attitudes, and practices across provider type.Results: Overall knowledge surrounding cervical cancer was high, although awareness of etiology and risk factors was low among nurses and midwives. Providers had no experience performing cervical cancer screening on a routine basis with <40% having performed any type of cervical cancer screening. Reported barriers to performing screening were lack of training (52% and resources (53%; however the majority (97% of providers indicated cervical cancer screening is an essential part of women’s health care.Conclusion: There is a clear need among women’s health care providers for education regarding cervical cancer etiology, risk factors and for training in low-tech, low-cost screening methods. Meeting these needs and improving the infrastructure necessary to implement appropriate screening programs is essential to reduce the burden of cervical cancer in Ethiopia. Keywords: cervical cancer, visual inspection, acetic acid, cryotherapy, Ethiopia

  3. Ontology-Based Knowledge Representation and Information Management in a Biological Light Fieldable Laboratory

    Vybornova, Olga; Fonteyne, Pierre-Alain; Gala, Jean-Luc; 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management ISCRAM

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive ontology has been developed to model the operational domain knowledge and provide information management for a light fieldable laboratory (LFL) performing molecular microbiological analyses. LFL is considered as a toolbox where all operational functions and tools used to execute these functions are incorporated into a single system. The ontology is used to facilitate the LFL mission preparation and management, to provide technical compatibility of sharable information between ...

  4. KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND SMOKING PATTERNS AMONG NURSING AND LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY STUDENTS, DAMMAM, SAUDI ARABIA

    Mandil, Ahmed M.; Bahnassy, Ahmed A.; Aboul-Azm, Shadia M.; Bashawri, Laila A.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the reported practices of knowledge about and attitude towards smoking among nursing and medical laboratory technology (MLT) students, College of Medicine, King Faisal University at Dammam and Al-Khobar. Setting: College of Medicine, Dammam and King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia Methods: A cross-sectional approach involving a sample of 266 students and interns (152 nursing and 114 MLT), which included all enrolled students in the academic year (1...

  5. Infant and Young Child Feeding Knowledge and Practices of ASHA workers of Doiwala Block, Dehradun District

    Vartika Saxena

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Promotion and support of breastfeeding is a global priority and an important child-survival intervention. Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs can play a significant role in the promotion of breast-feeding. Present research paper reviews their knowledge & practices with respect to Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF issues. Further, it also analyzes difficulties being faced by them in promoting positive IYCF practices so that necessary support can be provided for carrying out their desired role. Material and Methods: It was a descriptive, cross-sectional study conducted in the block Doiwala of Dehradun district, Uttarakhand. All 168 ASHAs were included in the study for the assessment of knowledge and practices by interview technique based on predesigned and pre-tested questionnaire. Results: 98% ASHAs had complete and correct information about exclusive breast feeding, however only 38% ASHAs were aware that breastfeeding should be started within 4 hours in children delivered by caesarean section. Only 18% ASHAs reported to be able to motivate mothers to practice exclusive breast feeding. Insufficient mothers milk (55.4%, Caesarean sections (20.2%, coercion from elders in the family to start top milk were among the important factors attributed for failure of exclusive breastfeeding. Regarding complementary feeding, only 45% ASHAs knew the correct timing of initiation of complementary feeding; however 58% ASHAs had introduced the complementary feeding at 7th month in their children. 83.9% ASHAs knew that complementary food should be semisolid in consistency, while 87.5% and 32.7% ASHAs were aware that egg and non-vegetarian food items can be given as complementary food to the child. Bottle feeding had been practiced by about 33% of ASHAs in the past; however no ASHA had reported bottle feeding currently. Conclusion: Present research paper concludes that although knowledge level of ASHAs is high regarding IYCF practices but it does not match with the actual practices. They require skill building especially in the area of breastfeeding options for working women as well as complementary feeding.

  6. Personal and Network Dynamics in Performance of Knowledge Workers: A Study of Australian Breast Radiologists

    Tavakoli Taba, Seyedamir; Hossain, Liaquat; Heard, Robert; Brennan, Patrick; Lee, Warwick; Lewis, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Materials and Methods In this paper, we propose a theoretical model based upon previous studies about personal and social network dynamics of job performance. We provide empirical support for this model using real-world data within the context of the Australian radiology profession. An examination of radiologists’ professional network topology through structural-positional and relational dimensions and radiologists’ personal characteristics in terms of knowledge, experience and self-esteem is provided. Thirty one breast imaging radiologists completed a purpose designed questionnaire regarding their network characteristics and personal attributes. These radiologists also independently read a test set of 60 mammographic cases: 20 cases with cancer and 40 normal cases. A Jackknife free response operating characteristic (JAFROC) method was used to measure the performance of the radiologists’ in detecting breast cancers. Results Correlational analyses showed that reader performance was positively correlated with the social network variables of degree centrality and effective size, but negatively correlated with constraint and hierarchy. For personal characteristics, the number of mammograms read per year and self-esteem (self-evaluation) positively correlated with reader performance. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that the combination of number of mammograms read per year and network’s effective size, hierarchy and tie strength was the best fitting model, explaining 63.4% of the variance in reader performance. The results from this study indicate the positive relationship between reading high volumes of cases by radiologists and expertise development, but also strongly emphasise the association between effective social/professional interactions and informal knowledge sharing with high performance. PMID:26918644

  7. Respiratory allergy in laboratory animal workers: a retrospective cohort study using pre-employment screening data.

    Kruize, H.; Post, W; Heederik, D.; Martens, B.; Hollander, A; Beek, E., van

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the role of exposure, atopy, and smoking in the development of laboratory animal allergy (LAA) in a retrospective cohort study. METHODS: Between 1977 and 1993, 225 people received a pre-employment screening when they started a job at a Dutch research institute where they were going to work with laboratory animals. After active follow up 136 of them (60.4%) could be traced and were sent a questionnaire with extensive questions on allergic symptoms, smoking habits, and job ...

  8. Quality knowledge of science through virtual laboratory as an element of visualization

    Rizman Herga, Natasa

    Doctoral dissertation discusses the use of virtual laboratory for learning and teaching chemical concepts at science classes in the seventh grade of primary school. The dissertation has got a two-part structure. In the first theoretical part presents a general platform of teaching science in elementary school, teaching forms and methods of teaching and among modern approaches we highlight experimental work. Particular emphasis was placed on the use of new technologies in education and virtual laboratories. Scientific findings on the importance of visualization of science concepts and their triple nature of their understanding are presented. These findings represent a fundamental foundation of empirical research presented in the second part of the doctoral dissertation, whose basic purpose was to examine the effectiveness of using virtual laboratory for teaching and learning chemical contents at science from students' point of view on knowledge and interest. We designed a didactic experiment in which 225 pupils participated. The work was conducted in the experimental and control group. Prior to its execution, the existing school practice among science and chemistry teachers was analysed in terms of: (1) inclusion of experimental work as a fundamental method of active learning chemical contents, (2) the use of visualization methods in the classroom and (3) the use of a virtual laboratory. The main findings of the empirical research, carried out in the school year 2012/2013, in which 48 science and chemistry participated, are that teachers often include experimental work when teaching chemical contents. Interviewed science teachers use a variety of visualization methods when presenting science concepts, in particular computer animation and simulation. Using virtual laboratory as a new strategy for teaching and learning chemical contents is not common because teachers lack special-didactic skills, enabling them to use virtual reality technology. Based on the didactic experiment, carried out over a period of two school years (2012/2013 and 2013/2014) in ten primary schools, the effectiveness of teaching carried out with the support of a virtual laboratory was analyzed. The obtained empirical findings reveal that the use of virtual laboratory has great impact on the pupils' knowledge and interest. At the end of the experiment, pupils in the experimental group had an advantage according to knowledge of chemical contents in science. Also, the use of virtual laboratory had an impact on the sustainability of the acquired knowledge of science contents and pupils' interest at the end of the experiment, because the pupils in the experimental group had a higher interest for learning science contents. The didactic experiment determined, that the use of virtual laboratory enables quality learning and teaching chemical contents of science, because it allows: (1) experimental work as an active learning method, (2) the visualization of abstract concepts and phenomena, (3) dynamic sub micro presentations (4) integration of all three levels of the chemical concept as a whole and (5) positively impacts pupils' interest, knowledge and sustainability of the acquired knowledge.

  9. [Blood exposure accidents: knowledge and practices of hospital health workers in Mali].

    Koné, M C; Mallé, K K

    2015-12-01

    This is a prospective study conducted in December 2012 among 128 at the Nianankoro Fomba Hospital in Segou in order to assess their knowledge and practices on Blood Exposure Accidents (BEA). The average age of caregivers was 35.4 ± 9 years (range: 22-59 years). The nurses were predominant with 37.5%. The definition of BEA was mastered by 43.8%. The main transmissible infectious agents (HIV, HBV and HCV) were ignored by 76.6%. Questioning revealed that during the treatment, 78.9% wore gloves and 36.0% recapped needles after use. The concept of washing and disinfection after BEA was known by 68.8%. The disinfectant applied was correct for 21.9% of the cases, the time of application for 69.5%. Consulting a referring physician after BEA was mandatory for 32% of them. The time limit of 48 hours delay for the declaration of BEA was experienced by 51.3%. Among staff interviewed 82 caregivers (64.1%) experienced at least one BEA. Students and nursing students were most at risk. Needle pricks were the most frequent (73.2%). BEA is a major problem in the Segou Nianankoro Fomba Hospital. Compliance with standard precautions is not of common practice. Post-exposure care is not widely known. The experienced cases show poor management of BEA in the structure. PMID:26419484

  10. Covert leadership: notes on managing professionals. Knowledge workers respond to inspiration, not supervision.

    Mintzberg, H

    1998-01-01

    The orchestra conductor is a popular metaphor for managers today--up there on the podium in complete control. But that image may be misleading, says Henry Mintzberg, who recently spent a day with Bramwell Tovey, conductor of the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, in order to explore the metaphor. He found that Tovey does not operate like an absolute ruler but practices instead what Mintzberg calls covert leadership. Covert leadership means managing with a sense of nuances, constraints, and limitations. When a manager like Tovey guides an organization, he leads without seeming to, without his people being fully aware of all that he is doing. That's because in this world of professionals, a leader is not completely powerless--but neither does he have absolute control over others. As knowledge work grows in importance, the way an orchestra conductor really operates may serve as a good model for managers in a wide range of businesses. For example, Mintzberg found that Tovey does a lot more hands-on work than one might expect. More like a first-line supervisor than a hands-off executive, he takes direct and personal charge of what is getting done. In dealing with his musicians, his focus is on inspiring them, not empowering them. Like other professionals, the musicians don't need to be empowered--they're already secure in what they know and can do--but they do need to be infused with energy for the tasks at hand. This is the role of the covert leader: to act quietly and unobtrusively in order to exact not obedience but inspired performance. PMID:10187244

  11. Knowledge management

    Jarošová, Milena

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical part: Basic terms of knowledge management, knowledge worker, knowledge creation and conversion process, prerequisites and benefits of knowledge management. Knowledge management and it's connection to organizational culture and structure, result measurements of knowledge management, learning organization and it's connection to knowledge management. Tacit knowledge management tools -- stories -- types, how to create, practical use, communities, coaching. Value Based Organization. Pr...

  12. Use of Chemical Pesticides in Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Comparative Study on Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Farmers and Farm Workers in Three Farming Systems.

    Negatu, Beyene; Kromhout, Hans; Mekonnen, Yalemtshay; Vermeulen, Roel

    2016-06-01

    Chemical pesticides, regardless of their inherent hazard, are used intensively in the fast changing agricultural sector of Ethiopia. We conducted a cross-sectional pesticide Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) survey among 601 farmers and farm workers (applicators and re-entry workers) in three farming systems [large-scale closed greenhouses (LSGH), large-scale open farms (LSOF), and small-scale irrigated farms (SSIF)]. Main observations were that 85% of workers did not attain any pesticide-related training, 81% were not aware of modern alternatives for chemical pesticides, 10% used a full set of personal protective equipment, and 62% did not usually bath or shower after work. Among applicators pesticide training attendance was highest in LSGH (35%) and was lowest in SSIF (4%). None of the female re-entry farm workers had received pesticide-related training. Personal protective equipment use was twice as high among pesticide applicators as among re-entry workers (13 versus 7%), while none of the small-scale farm workers used personal protection equipment. Stockpiling and burial of empty pesticide containers and discarding empty pesticide containers in farming fields were reported in both LSOF and by 75% of the farm workers in SSIF. Considerable increment in chemical pesticide usage intensity, illegitimate usages of DDT and Endosulfan on food crops and direct import of pesticides without the formal Ethiopian registration process were also indicated. These results point out a general lack of training and knowledge regarding the safe use of pesticides in all farming systems but especially among small-scale farmers. This in combination with the increase in chemical pesticide usage in the past decade likely results in occupational and environmental health risks. Improved KAP that account for institutional difference among various farming systems and enforcement of regulatory measures including the available occupational and environmental proclamations in Ethiopia are urgently needed. PMID:26847604

  13. Healthcare workers and health care-associated infections: knowledge, attitudes, and behavior in emergency departments in Italy

    Marinelli Paolo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This survey assessed knowledge, attitudes, and compliance regarding standard precautions about health care-associated infections (HAIs and the associated determinants among healthcare workers (HCWs in emergency departments in Italy. Methods An anonymous questionnaire, self-administered by all HCWs in eight randomly selected non-academic acute general public hospitals, comprised questions on demographic and occupational characteristics; knowledge about the risks of acquiring and/or transmitting HAIs from/to a patient and standard precautions; attitudes toward guidelines and risk perceived of acquiring a HAI; practice of standard precautions; and sources of information. Results HCWs who know the risk of acquiring Hepatitis C (HCV and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV from a patient were in practice from less years, worked fewer hours per week, knew that a HCW can transmit HCV and HIV to a patient, knew that HCV and HIV infections can be serious, and have received information from educational courses and scientific journals. Those who know that gloves, mask, protective eyewear, and hands hygiene after removing gloves are control measures were nurses, provided care to fewer patients, knew that HCWs' hands are vehicle for transmission of nosocomial pathogens, did not know that a HCW can transmit HCV and HIV to a patient, and have received information from educational courses and scientific journals. Being a nurse, knowing that HCWs' hands are vehicle for transmission of nosocomial pathogens, obtaining information from educational courses and scientific journals, and needing information were associated with a higher perceived risk of acquiring a HAI. HCWs who often or always used gloves and performed hands hygiene measures after removing gloves were nurses, provided care to fewer patients, and knew that hands hygiene after removing gloves was a control measure. Conclusions HCWs have high knowledge, positive attitudes, but low compliance concerning standard precautions. Nurses had higher knowledge, perceived risk, and appropriate HAIs' control measures than physicians and HCWs answered correctly and used appropriately control measures if have received information from educational courses and scientific journals.

  14. The challenge of knowledge management in a newly-formed national laboratory

    Full text: Introduction. In the autumn of 2006, the UK government made a commitment to establish a National Nuclear Laboratory based around Nexia Solutions and its 'state of the art' facility at Sellafield in Cumbria. The initial phase of the work to establish the laboratory is now complete and it has a remit for the following roles: to play a key role in supporting the UK's strategic R and D requirements; to operate world-class facilities; to ensure key skills are safeguarded and enhanced; to play a key role in the development of the UK's R and D supply base. It is evident that to be successful the National Nuclear Laboratory will need a strong capability in knowledge management to underpin its activities. Our origins in the R and D communities of BNFL and UKAEA have given us a broad portfolio of capabilities which range from reactor technology through fuel cycle technology to waste management and the knowledge held by our people is one of our major strengths. However, the capabilities and knowledge do need to be maintained and developed, for which we have a four part strategy: Strengthen internal systems and processes; Undertake strategic R and D programmes; Build networks with the nuclear industry across the world; Build links and partnerships with academic institutions. Systems and Processes. Internal systems and processes need to be strengthened to make the capture and sharing of knowledge and information more efficient. A key element will be succession planning for more experienced technologists. R and D programmes. Work is proceeding to develop a robust portfolio of R and D programmes. As well as fulfilling our remit to play a key role in the UK's strategic R and D requirements, this will also ensure that skills maintenance goes beyond formal training. Involvement in R and D programmes will develop capabilities in our younger scientists and engineers, particularly, to generate solutions relevant to the industrial-scale application of nuclear technology. We aim to use our R and D programmes to facilitate skills transfer from experienced practitioners across a wide range of disciplines. Industry Networks. Building networks across the nuclear industry needs to complement the R and D portfolio. We recognise that a creative approach is needed, and one example is that Nexia Solutions has created roles called Senior Fellows. Senior Fellows are leading technologists who are expected to 'act as ambassadors'. That is to say that they will develop links between technologists inside the laboratory with those in academia or other industries. In this context, knowledge management is to work with the 'tacit' knowledge held by experts in a variety of organisations. Establishing the correct links ensures the knowledge is more complete than it would otherwise be and enables it to be focused more effectively on real issues. Each senior fellow role is based around a fundamental technical discipline which provides the theme for the development of technical links. Currently we have roles in the following areas:- Materials behaviour; Corrosion; Actinide chemistry; Criticality; Reactor Systems. Senior Fellows are nationally and internationally known and respected in their field and are expected to maintain their specialist support role within Nexia Solutions in addition to interacting extensively with key research organisations, academia and relevant other industries. Academic links. The National Nuclear Laboratory will aim to maximise the value of its work for the UK and therefore must find ways of increasing the synergies between its own capabilities and those in universities. One example of how the National Laboratory may work is Nexia Solutions' existing initiative called University Research Alliances (URA). The knowledge management aspect is similar to that for industrial networks, i.e. dealing with 'tacit' knowledge. Academic and industrial knowledge can complement each other if the right links are established. Equally, important is the role that universities can play in renewing the knowledge base, through formal education pr ogrammes and training in research through MSc and PhD projects. University Research Alliances are an initiative to help replenish the UK's academic base in nuclear technology. Four URAs have been established: Radiochemistry - at the University of Manchester; Particle Technology - at the University of Leeds; Waste Immobilisation - at the University of Sheffield; Materials Performance - at the University of Manchester. Also in the university context, the senior fellow role is helping the national laboratory to develop a concept of 'seamless' teams, in which university departments are able to contribute to a given R and D project in a more direct and powerful way than the traditional ways of working. In summary, the UK national nuclear laboratory is adopting a four-part strategy towards knowledge management. It aims to build from its current strong base and to use a number of innovative approaches. (author)

  15. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Among Quarry Workers in a North-Eastern State of Malaysia: A Study on Knowledge, Attitude and Practice

    Ahmad Filza Ismail; Aziah Daud; Zaliha Ismail; Baharudin Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Noise is known to be one of the environmental and occupational hazards listed in the Factory and Machinery Act 1967. Quarries with loud deafening sounds from trucks and machineries pose the risk of noise-induced hearing loss to workers. This study was designed to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice towards noise-induced hearing loss and to determine the prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss and its associated factors among quarry workers in a north-eastern state of Mala...

  16. A cross-sectional study of the knowledge and attitude of medical laboratory personnel regarding continuing professional development

    Ekwempu Adaobi Ifeoma; Ede Folashade Rebecca; Ojo Oyekunle Ezekiel; Ofojekwu Mary-Jane; Essien Cosmas Uyime; Obiageri, Edeh N.; Adeshiyan Tola; Damen James

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuing professional development (CPD) in Medical Laboratory Scientists (MLS) is aimed at equipping laboratory professionals with the necessary skills to enhance practice. The laboratory scientists are usually the first contact between the patient and health care system in aspects of diagnosis and monitory of diseases. As such, it becomes imperative to assess the knowledge of laboratory personnel regarding CPD. Materials and Methods: Self-administered questionnaires were distri...

  17. Studies of transformer repair workers exposed to PCBs. II. Results of clinical laboratory investigations

    Emmett, E.A.; Maroni, M.; Jefferys, J.; Schmith, J.; Levin, B.K.; Alvares, A.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-eight transformer repairmen currently exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 17 former transformer repairmen, and 56 comparison workers not known to be exposed to PCBs were studied. Measurements were made of serum liver function tests, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), lipid profile, thyroid function tests, and other serum biochemistry; hemoglobin; white cell count; 24-hour excretion of delta-aminolevulinic acid, porphyrins, 17-hydroxycorticosteriods and 17-ketosteroids; sperm count; spirometry; and antipyrine half-life to evaluate microsomal mixed function oxidase induction. The total exposed group differed significantly from the comparison group in albumin, LDH, T4, T4-RT3 index, and actual/predicted FEV1. Significant differences among all three exposure groups were seen for albumin, T4, T4-RT3 index, and 17-hydroxycorticosteroid excretion. Differences in FEV1 were attributable to smoking. Significant correlations between serum PCBs and serum lipids were removed by adjustment for confounding variables. After adjustment for confounding variables, there was a statistically significant positive correlation between serum PCBs and GGT and a negative correlation between adipose PCBs and 17-hydroxycorticosteroid excretion. These may reflect subtle metabolic effects of PCBs.

  18. Implementation of Proper Hand Hygiene among Microbiological Laboratory Workers Respectively to WHO Guidelines

    Popovska, Katja; Zdravkovska, Milka; Blazevska, Bozhica; Icev, Konstantin; Eftimovski, G

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hand hygiene has a fundamental role in the prevention of one of the most challenging problems in the management of modern hospitals: nosocomial infections and occupational diseases. Aim: This survey presents the experience of laboratorians in the Microbiology Department in the Clinical Center in Skopje in promoting proper hand hygiene by participating in a training course and implementation of WHO guidelines among laboratory staff. Material and Methods: The group of 36 Healt...

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory?s Book of Minimum Detectable Activity for Direct Measurement of Internally Deposited Radionuclides in Radiation Workers

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory maintains an in vivo measurement program designed to identify and evaluate the activity of radionuclides deposited in the body. Two types of systems are primarily used for the routine monitoring of radiation workers, the lung counting system and the scanning bed whole body counting system. The lung counting system is comprised of two Canberra ACTII detector sets. Each ACTII set contains two planar germanium detectors with carbon composite end windows optimized to measure low energy photon emitting radionuclides. The ACTII detectors are placed on the upper torso over the lungs for the direct measurement of internally deposited radionuclides in the lungs that emit low energy photons. A correction for the thickness of the chest wall is applied to the efficiency. Because the thickness of the chest wall is a key factor in the measurement of low energy photon emitting radionuclides in the lung, the minimum detectable activity is a function of the chest wall thickness. The scanning bed whole body counting system is comprised of a thin air mattress on top of a carbon fiber bed that slowly scans over four high purity germanium detectors. The scanning system is designed to minimize variations in detected activity due to radionuclide distribution in the body. The scanning bed detection system is typically used for the measurement of internally deposited radionuclides that emit photons above 100 to 200 keV. MDAs have been generated for radionuclides that provide energies above 80 keV since the lowest calibration energy for the system is approximately 86 keV. The following charts and table provide best determination of minimum detectable activity using human subjects as controls for the background contributions. A wide variety of radionuclides are used throughout the laboratory and the following pages represent several of the radionuclides that have been encountered at the Whole Body and Spectroscopy Laboratories within Hazards Control

  20. Knowledge and skills of primary health care workers trained on integrated management of neonatal and childhood illness: Follow-up assessment 3 years after the training

    J Venkatachalam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary health care workers of a district in northern India were trained in the year 2006 for Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI using two different training methods: conventional 8-day training and new interrupted 5-day training. Knowledge and skills may decline over a period of time. Rate of decline may be associated with the type of training. A study was thus conducted to see the retention of knowledge and skills in the two training groups, 3 years after the initial training. Materials and Methods: This study was done in the Panchkula district of Haryana state in northern India. In the year 2006, 50 primary health care workers were given new interrupted 5-day training and another 35 workers were given conventional 8-day training on IMNCI. Knowledge and skills of the same workers were evaluated in the year 2009, using the same methodology and tools as were used in the year 2006. Data analysis was done to see the extent of decline in knowledge and skills in these 3 years and whether decline was more in any particular training group. Results: Compared to post-training score in the year 2006, composite knowledge and skill scores for Auxilliary Nurse Midwives (ANMs and Anganwari workers (AWWs together declined significantly in the year 2009 from 74.6 to 58.0 in 8-day training group and from 73.2 to 57.0 in 5-day training group (P < 0.001. Follow-up composite scores in the two training groups were similar. Whereas the decline was more for knowledge scores in 8-day training group and for skill score in 5-day training group, the pattern of decline was inconsistent for different health conditions and among ANMs and AWWs. Conclusion: Long-term retention of knowledge and skills in 5-day group was equivalent to that in 8-day training group. Refresher trainings may boost up the decline in the knowledge and skills.

  1. [Production of knowledge and an inter-sectoral approach vis-à-vis living and health conditions of workers in the sugarcane sector].

    Minayo-Gomez, Carlos

    2011-08-01

    This article presents some dimensions of inter-sectoral action aimed at improving working and living conditions of workers in the sugarcane and alcohol industry. The dynamics of the implementation of certain forms of given intersectoral practices established in a region of the State of São Paulo are analyzed. The important role played by sectors of the Labor Prosecution Office and the Legislative Authority in the articulation of institutional actors and civil society is stressed. They give greater impetus to the work of each public sector responsible for addressing the issues of workers'healthcare. This study was produced from analysis of documents and material provided by institutions and discussion forums with proposals for intervention. The results show that the appropriation of strategic knowledge produced by researchers of the sugarcane industry in the instrumental resources used in legal actions, monitoring and surveillance generates important advances in the health of workers and the environment. PMID:21860934

  2. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Voluntary Blood Donation among Healthcare Workers at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria.

    Nwogoh, Benedict; Aigberadion, Usimenahon; Nwannadi, Alexander Ikenna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Adequate and safe blood supply has remained a challenge in developing countries like ours. There is a high dependency on family replacement and remunerated blood donors in our environment which carries an attendant increased risk of transfusion transmissible infection. Objectives. The objectives of this study were to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of voluntary blood donation among healthcare workers (nonphysicians) and to identify and recruit potential voluntary blood donors. Methodology. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried out at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City. A total of 163 staffs were recruited. Pretest questionnaires were used to assess their knowledge, attitude, and practice of voluntary blood donation. Statistical Analysis. The responses were collated and analyzed with the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 16. The association between blood donation practice and gender of respondents, category of staff, and level of education was tested using Chi-square and Fisher's tests where appropriate. P knowledge and positive attitude towards donation; however, only 22.1% (36) have donated blood with 41.7% (15) of these being voluntary. Male workers were more likely to donate (P blood donation and level of education. Conclusion. There is a strong disparity between the knowledge, attitude, and practice of voluntary donation amongst healthcare workers. PMID:24222890

  3. Attitudes, Skills and Knowledge Change in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Workers Following AOD Screening and Brief Intervention Training

    Christie, Grant; Black, Stella; Dunbar, Lucy; Pulford, Justin; Wheeler, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent mental health workers are generally poor at identifying and treating co-existing alcohol and other drug (AOD) disorder. This study aimed to evaluate the utility and acceptability of an AOD screening and brief intervention (BI) training package delivered to child and adolescent mental health workers and its impact on relevant attitudes,…

  4. Knowledge and attitudes of health care workers from the Primary Health Centre in In?ija, Serbia on professional exposures to blood-borne infections.

    Gaji?, Zdenko; Raj?evi?, Smiljana; Duri?, Predrag; Ili?, Svetlana; Dugandija, Tihomir

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to blood-borne infections (HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C) poses a serious risk to health care workers (HCWs). The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the level of knowledge and attitudes on occupational exposure in primary health care. In 2009, a total of 100 health care workers from the Primary Health Care Centre in In?ija, Autonomous Province of Vojvodina, Serbia were included in the study. The results suggested that the health care workers who participated in the survey possess basic knowledge about blood-borne virus transmission routes. Most incorrect answers were related to the transmission of blood-borne viruses by tears, saliva, urine and stool. This study also demonstrated that health workers tend to unrealistically estimate the risk of HIV infections. As for the level of education about the prevention and control of blood-borne infections, 49 % of the participants had never had any education on this topic, while 22 % had been educated during the last five years. Around 75 % consider education on blood-borne infection and protective measures at work unnecessary. PMID:23585167

  5. Sexual and reproductive health knowledge, contraception uptake, and factors associated with unmet need for modern contraception among adolescent female sex workers in China

    Lim, Megan SC; Zhang, Xudong; Kennedy, Elissa; Li, Yan; Yang, Yin; Li, Lin; Li, Yun-Xia; Temmerman, Marleen; Lüchters, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Objective : In China, policy and social taboo prevent unmarried adolescents from accessing sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services. Research is needed to determine the SRH needs of highly disadvantaged groups, such as adolescent female sex workers (FSWs). This study describes SRH knowledge, contraception use, pregnancy, and factors associated with unmet need for modern contraception among adolescent FSWs in Kunming, China. Methods : A cross-sectional study using a one-stage cluster ...

  6. A Study into the Motivation of Knowledge Workers: Using an adapted version of the MOCC model of motivation to explain the motivational tendencies of project managers and engineers

    Hammond, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    There is a general need across organisations to better understand the motivation of knowledge workers. Based on our own empirical findings, research into early and contemporary motivation theories and use of Sharp et al.’s (2009) Motivators, Outcomes, Context, and Characteristics (MOCC) motivational model we adapted our own model. Through adapting the content of the model but keeping the framework intact, we were able to explain the various aspects of motivation in project management and engi...

  7. Effect of improving the knowledge, attitude and practice of reproductive health among female migrant workers: a worksite-based intervention in Guangzhou, China.

    Gao, Xue; Xu, Longchang; Lu, Ciyong; Wu, Jie; Wang, Zhijin; Decat, Peter; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Chen, Yimin; Moyer, Eileen; Wu, Shizhong; Minkauskiene, Meile; Van Braeckel, Dirk; Temmerman, Marleen

    2014-12-01

    Background The sexual and reproductive health (SRH) knowledge and attitudes of female migrant workers are far from optimum in China. A worksite-based intervention program on SRH-related knowledge, attitude and practice (SRH KAP) modification may be an effective approach to improve the SRH status among migrant workers. This study aimed to identify better intervention approaches via the implementation and evaluation of two intervention packages. Methods: A worksite-based cluster-randomised intervention study was conducted from June to December 2008 in eight factories in Guangzhou, China. There were 1346 female migrant workers who participated in this study. Factories were randomly allocated to the standard package of interventions group (SPIG) or the intensive package of interventions group (IPIG). Questionnaires were administered to evaluate the effect of two interventions. Results: SRH knowledge scores were higher at follow up than at baseline for all participants of the SPIG; the knowledge scores increased from 6.50 (standard deviation (s.d.) 3.673) to 8.69 (s.d. 4.085), and from 5.98 (s.d. 3.581) to 11.14 (s.d. 3.855) for IPIG; SRH attitude scores increased among unmarried women: the attitude scores changed from 4.25 (s.d. 1.577) to 4.46 (s.d. 1.455) for SPIG, and from 3.99 (s.d. 1.620) to 4.64 (s.d. 1.690) for IPIG; most SRH-related practice was also modified (PConclusions: The interventions had positive influences on improvements in SRH knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. Additionally, IPIs were more effective than SPIs, indicating that a comprehensive intervention may achieve better results. PMID:25469517

  8. International mobility trends of highly skilled workers: an analysis of the transnational migration of highly skilled immigrants for both receiving and sending countries and their role on innovation in a knowledge-based economy

    Yan, Victor Andrew

    2009-01-01

    In a knowledge-based economy, innovation has become a key driver of economic growth. The return migration of highly skilled workers to traditional sending countries such as Taiwan, China, and India has increased the international mobility of highly skilled workers in the Science and Technology sector. As a result, this will change transnational migration patterns of highly skilled workers in the future and will affect recruitment strategies of traditional receiving countries such as Canada. T...

  9. Worker Safety and Health Issues Associated with the DOE Environmental Cleanup Program: Insights From the DOE Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public health Standards Steering Group

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public Health Standards Steering Group (or ''SSG'') was formed in 1990. It was felt then that ''risk'' could be an organizing principle for environmental cleanup and that risk-based cleanup standards could rationalize clean up work. The environmental remediation process puts workers engaged in cleanup activities at risk from hazardous materials and from the more usual hazards associated with construction activities. In a real sense, the site remediation process involves the transfer of a hypothetical risk to the environment and the public from isolated contamination into real risks to the workers engaged in the remediation activities. Late in its existence the SSG, primarily motivated by its LANL representative, Dr. Harry Ettinger, actively investigated issues associated with worker health and safety during environmental remediation activities. This paper summarizes the insights noted by the SSG. Most continue to be pertinent today

  10. Interdisciplinary Laboratory Course Facilitating Knowledge Integration, Mutualistic Teaming, and Original Discovery.

    Full, Robert J; Dudley, Robert; Koehl, M A R; Libby, Thomas; Schwab, Cheryl

    2015-11-01

    Experiencing the thrill of an original scientific discovery can be transformative to students unsure about becoming a scientist, yet few courses offer authentic research experiences. Increasingly, cutting-edge discoveries require an interdisciplinary approach not offered in current departmental-based courses. Here, we describe a one-semester, learning laboratory course on organismal biomechanics offered at our large research university that enables interdisciplinary teams of students from biology and engineering to grow intellectually, collaborate effectively, and make original discoveries. To attain this goal, we avoid traditional "cookbook" laboratories by training 20 students to use a dozen research stations. Teams of five students rotate to a new station each week where a professor, graduate student, and/or team member assists in the use of equipment, guides students through stages of critical thinking, encourages interdisciplinary collaboration, and moves them toward authentic discovery. Weekly discussion sections that involve the entire class offer exchange of discipline-specific knowledge, advice on experimental design, methods of collecting and analyzing data, a statistics primer, and best practices for writing and presenting scientific papers. The building of skills in concert with weekly guided inquiry facilitates original discovery via a final research project that can be presented at a national meeting or published in a scientific journal. PMID:26238867

  11. RH-TRU Waste Characterization by Acceptable Knowledge at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Schulz, C.; Givens, C.; Bhatt, R.; Whitworth, J.

    2003-02-24

    Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is conducting an effort to characterize approximately 620 drums of remote-handled (RH-) transuranic (TRU) waste currently in its inventory that were generated at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) Alpha Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF) between 1971 and 1995. The waste was generated at the AGHCF during the destructive examination of irradiated and unirradiated fuel pins, targets, and other materials from reactor programs at ANL-West (ANL-W) and other Department of Energy (DOE) reactors. In support of this effort, Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure (formerly IT Corporation) developed an acceptable knowledge (AK) collection and management program based on existing contact-handled (CH)-TRU waste program requirements and proposed RH-TRU waste program requirements in effect in July 2001. Consistent with Attachments B-B6 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) and th e proposed Class 3 permit modification (Attachment R [RH-WAP] of this permit), the draft AK Summary Report prepared under the AK procedure describes the waste generating process and includes determinations in the following areas based on AK: physical form (currently identified at the Waste Matrix Code level); waste stream delineation; applicability of hazardous waste numbers for hazardous waste constituents; and prohibited items. In addition, the procedure requires and the draft summary report contains information supporting determinations in the areas of defense relationship and radiological characterization.

  12. Knowledge about childhood autism and opinion among healthcare workers on availability of facilities and law caring for the needs and rights of children with childhood autism and other developmental disorders in Nigeria

    Igwe Monday N; Onwukwe Jojo U; Okonkwo Kevin O; Onyeama Gabriel M; Eaton Julian; Agomoh Ahamefule O; Ebigbo Peter O; Bakare Muideen O; Orovwigho Andrew O; Aguocha Chinyere M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In designing programs to raise the community level of awareness about childhood autism in sub-Saharan Africa, it is logical to use the primary healthcare workers as contact point for education of the general public. Tertiary healthcare workers could play the role of trainers on childhood autism at primary healthcare level. Assessing their baseline knowledge about childhood autism to detect areas of knowledge gap is an essential ingredient in starting off such programs that...

  13. The Relationship between Pro-Innovation Organizational Climate, Leader-Member Exchange and Innovative Work Behavior: A Study among the Knowledge Workers of the Knowledge Intensive Business Services in Malaysia

    Yeoh Khar Kheng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between pro-innovation organizational climate, leader-member exchange and innovative work behavior among the knowledge workers of the knowledge intensive business services in Malaysia. The innovative work behavior has a central role in the development of knowledge-intensive business services in Malaysia. It was previously reported that pro-innovation organizational climate and leader-member exchange to have a significant relationship with innovative work behavior of employees in various business sectors. However, not all support the notion that organizational climate and leader-member exchange correlates with innovative work behavior. Some of the researchers concluded the relationship is rather weak. This makes it even more interesting to include organizational climate and leader-member exchange in the research framework of the model of innovative work behavior in Malaysia. A quantitative method was utilized and data were collected using mail survey. A total of 1520 questionnaires were distributed and 310 deemed usable for analysis using SPSS, resulted in 20.6 % response rate. The results revealed that there was a significant relationship between pro-innovation organizational climates, leader-member exchange with the innovative work behavior of knowledge workers. Discussions of the results and its implications are discussed.

  14. Assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice towards post exposure prophylaxis for HIV among health care workers in Gondar, North West Ethiopia

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV/AIDS infection in health care facility has become a major health problem. Especially in resource poor setting health care workers are managing huge number of HIV infected patients that made them to be more exposed to HIV infection. This situation makes the use of post exposure prophylaxis for HIV very important. Therefore the aim of the study was to assess knowledge, attitude and practice of health care workers towards post exposure prophylaxis for HIV. Methods Cross-sectional study was conducted among 195 health care workers from February 15 to June 20, 2012. Data was collected using self-administered questionnaire and entered and analyzed using SPSS-20 version. Results were summarized in percentages and presented in tables. Results Significant proportions of respondents, 72 (36.9%), were found to have inadequate knowledge about post exposure prophylaxis for HIV. However the majority of respondent 147 (75.4%) had good attitude toward the PEP and significant number of the respondents, 66 (33.8%), had been exposed to blood, body fluids, needles or sharp objects once or more times while giving care for patients. Among these exposed, 49 (74.2%) took PEP but the rest 17 (25.7%) didnt take PEP. From these exposed respondents that took PEP, 23 (46.9%) correctly started taking of PEP at exact initiation time, but the rest started after the recommended initiation time. Among those who took PEP, 39 (79 .6%) completed taking the drug, however 10 (20.4%) didnt complete the PEP regimen. Conclusion As a conclusion, significant proportion of study subjects had less knowledge and practice even though the majority of respondents had favorable attitude towards PEP. Therefore, a formal training for all HCWs regarding PEP for HIV and also establishing a 24hour accessible formal PEP centre with proper guideline is recommended. PMID:23705668

  15. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of oral health care workers in Lesotho regarding the management of patients with oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS.

    Ramphoma, K J; Naidoo, S

    2014-11-01

    Lesotho has the third highest prevalence of HIV in the world with an estimated 23% of the adult population infected. At least 70% of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) have presented with oral manifestation of HIV as the first sign of the disease. Oral health workers regularly encounter patients presenting with oral lesions associated with HIV disease and therefore need to have adequate knowledge of these conditions for diagnosis and management. The aim of the present study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of oral health care workers (OHCW) of Lesotho regarding the management of oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on all 46 OHCW in 26 public and private care facilities in all ten districts of Lesotho. A self-administered questionnaire was used to gather information. The response rate was 100%. Nearly all (94.7%) agreed that oral lesions are common in people living with HIV and/or AIDS. The majority (91.3%) named oral candidiasis (OC) as the most common lesion found in PLWHA while Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS) (34.7%) and Oral Hairy Leukoplakia (OHL) (32.6%) were mentioned as the least common oral lesions of HIV. Most correctly identified the images of oral candidiasis (97.8%), angular cheilitis (86.9%) and herpes zoster (80.4%). Only 16.7% felt they had comprehensive knowledge of oral HIV lesions, although 84.8% reported having previously received training. Almost three quarters (71%) reported that there was no need to treat HIV positive patients differently from HIV negative patients. OHCW in Lesotho demonstrated high confidence levels in their competence in managing dental patients with oral lesions associated with HIV, however, they lacked an in-depth knowledge in this regard. Amongst this group there is a need for comprehensive training with regards to diagnosis and management of oral lesions of HIV including the training of other cadres of health care workers together with nurses and community health workers. PMID:26506796

  16. Sociology of scientific knowledge and science education part 2: Laboratory life under the microscope

    Slezak, Peter

    1994-10-01

    This article is the second of two that examine some of the claims of contemporary sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) and the bearing of these claims upon the rationale and practice of science teaching. In the present article the celebrated work Laboratory Life of Latour and Woolgar is critically examined. Its radical, iconoclastic view of science is shown to be not merely without foundation but an extravagant deconstructionist nihilism according to which all science is fiction and the world is said to be socially constructed by negotiation. On this view, the success of a theory is not due to its intellectual merits or explanatory plausibility but to the capacity of its proponents to extract compliance from others. If warranted, such views pose a revolutionary challenge to the entire Western tradition of science and the goals of science education which must be misguided and unrealizable in principle. Fortunately, there is little reason to take these views seriously, though their widespread popularity is cause for concern among science educators.

  17. A study to evaluate the knowledge of ASHA workers on antenatal and postnatal care in Bijapur district

    Shashank KJ; Mahabaleshwar Mahantappa Angadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The discourse on the ASHA's role centres around three typologies - ASHA as an activist, ASHA as a link worker or facilitator, and ASHA as a community level health care provider. She will counsel women on birth preparedness, importance of safe delivery, breastfeeding and complementary feeding, immunization, contraception and prevention of common infections including reproductive tract infection/sexually transmitted infection (RTIs/STIs) and care of the young child. Hence this study...

  18. KNOWLEDGE AND PERCEPTION OF HEALTH CARE WORKERS TOWARDS CLEAN CARE PRACTICES IN A TERTIARY CARE HO SPITAL

    Payghan; Kadam; Prashant,; Sridevi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Ten to thirty percent of the patients admitted to hospitals in India acquire nosocomial infections as against 5% i n the developed world. The first and foremost principle of Universal Safety Precaution is “HANDWASHING”. But the Health Care Workers often forget to wash their hands before int eracting with the patient. Such contaminated hands plays major role in transmitting infections. HCWs are also at an increased risk of needle stick i...

  19. Assessment of knowledge attitude and practice towards hepatitis B among health care workers in a tertiary care hospital

    Farhana Siraj; Perveena Fareed; Neha Mahajan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B is caused by infection with hepatitis B virus and is a major global health burden. In India, the prevalence of Hepatitis B in general population is 2-10%, which place India in an intermediate endemic zone and second largest global pool of chronic hepatitis B infection. Among health care workers Hepatitis B prevalence is two to four folds higher than that of the general population. Transmission of hepatitis B occurs from infected person through blood transfusion; needle...

  20. Knowledge and Attitude toward Smoke-Free Legislation and Second-Hand Smoking Exposure among Workers in Indoor Bars, Beer Parlors and Discotheques in Osun State of Nigeria

    Olanrewaju Olusola Onigbogi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background One of the requirements of the Osun State smoke-free legislation is to ensure smoke-free enclosed and partially enclosed workplaces. This survey was conducted to assess the knowledge and attitude of workers in indoor bars, beer parlors and discotheques to smoke-free legislation in general and the Osun State smoke-free law in particular. Methods A convenience sampling of 36 hospitality centers was conducted. Interviewer-administered questionnaires were used to elicit responses about the objectives from non-smoking workers. The questionnaires had sections on knowledge of the Osun State smoke-free law, attitude toward the law and smoke-free legislation in general and exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke by the workers. Questions were also asked about the secondhand tobacco smoking status of these workers. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 15.0. Results We had 154 participants recruited into the study. There were 75 males (48.0% and 79 females (52.0%. On the overall, respondents had a good knowledge of the effects of second-hand smoke on health (70.2% with 75.0% of them being aware of the general smoke-free law and 67.3% being aware of the Osun State smoke-free law although none of them had ever seen a copy of the law. A high proportion (60.0% was in support of the Osun smoke-free law although all of them think that the implementation of the law could reduce patronage and jeopardize their income. Attitude toward second-hand smoking was generally positive with 72.0% of them having no tolerance for second-hand tobacco smoke in their homes. Most participants (95.5% had been exposed to tobacco smoke in the workplace within the past week. Conclusion Despite the high level of awareness of the respondents about the dangers of second hand smoke and their positive attitude to smoke-free laws, nearly all were constantly being exposed to second hand smoke at work. This calls for policy level interventions to improve the implementation of the smoke-free law.

  1. XML Comparison of Knowledge and Practice of Private Clinical Laboratories and Educational Centers Staff in Shiraz about AIDS,2011

    Rezaei MA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Acquired immune deficiency syndrome(AIDS is one of the most well-known disease in the world .It is not only A heaththrapeutic problem but also with politic ,social, cultural and economic aspects. Paying attention to high-risk groups such as Lab staff is important. we decided to study and compare the knowledge of public and private Laboratories staff. Material and Methods: This cross sectional study, descriptive-analytic,was conducted on 350 personnel of private laboratories and educational centers of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences,2011.We collected Information by using a questionnaire including three parts of demographic characteristic questions, questions about knowledge in different fields of AIDS and those related to the performance of personnel. The results were reported as tables and graphs and analyzed by ANOVA,t-test and square. Results: The data, in different areas of AIDS, in public and private laboratories are similar and the difference statistically is not significant. Regarding to symptoms and treatment, the knowledge of privale Lab staff is higher than stste ones and this difference is significant (P=0.01.As a whole,the results show the knowledge of staff about the transmission modes(92.7%,the pathologic agent(99.2%,at risk people (61.2%and preventive measure (53.1%.both group have good practice in wearing gloves and using disposable syringes.Regarding to disposing infectious waste material,private and state center practice are 92.6% and 77%,respectively. Conclusion: Based on the result,the knowledge relating to preventive procedures and at risk people of AIDS is not enough.Therefore;it is a necessity to hold in service training for Lab staff,stressing on disposing infectious waste materials. Key words: AIDS, laboratory personnel, knowledge, practice

  2. Knowledge and anticipated behavior of health care workers in response to an outbreak of pandemic influenza in Georgia

    Maia Butsashvili,1 Wayne Triner,2 George Kamkamidze,1 Maia Kajaia,1 Louise-Anne McNutt.2

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Avian influenza has been documented in over 331 humans since 2003 with 203 associated deaths. Health Care Workers (HCWs have been shown to be at personal risk during other highly virulent outbreaks with a high attack rate. This study aimed to determine the magnitude and factors associated with absenteeism of hospital based health care workers (HCWs in Georgia associated with a potential highly virulent influenza pandemic.Methodology: This was a cross-sectional study of how HCWs responded to a potentially highly virulent influenza pandemic in two urban hospitals in Georgia. Hospital based physicians and nurses were studied. Data was collected utilizing a survey instrument. The survey was either self-administered or interviewer administered based upon the preference of the respondent.Results: There were 288 HCWs surveyed. The study suggested a 23% rate of worker absenteeism, predominately among women and nurses. The majority of the respondents (58.1%, mostly HCWs less than age 35, were opposed to forced isolation or quarantine of staff during a highly virulent influenza pandemic. Seventy-six percent of respondents correctly reported that the strain of virus that was responsible for the outbreaks in the neighboring countries was H5N1. Only 15.5% of respondents, however, correctly identified influenza as the culprit virus.Conclusions: The rate of work absenteeism suggested by this study represents a significant workforce reduction. There are specific groups who would choose not to attend work in the face of a flu pandemic. This information may allow planners to target these specific groups for education and social support services to encourage greater inclination to attend to clinical duties.

  3. Knowledges

    Berling, Trine Villumsen

    Scientific knowledge in international relations has generally focused on an epistemological distinction between rationalism and reflectivism over the last 25 years. This chapter argues that this distinction has created a double distinction between theory/reality and theory/practice, which works a...

  4. Does community emergency care initiative improve the knowledge and skill of healthcare workers and laypersons in basic emergency care in India?

    Sanjeev Bhoi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to lack of training in emergency care, basic emergency care in India is still in its infancy. We designed All India Institute of Medical Sciences basic emergency care course (AIIMS BECC to address the issue. Aim: To improve the knowledge and skill of healthcare workers and laypersons in basic emergency care and to identify impact of the course. Materials and Methods: Prospective study conducted over a period of 4 years. The target groups were medical and nonmedical personnel. Provider AIIMS BECC is of 1 day duration including lectures on cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, choking, and special scenarios. Course was disseminated via lectures, audio-visual aids, and mannequin training. For analysis, the participants were categorized on the basis of their education and profession. A pre- and a post-course evaluation were done and individual scores were given out of 20 and compared among all the groups and P value was calculated. Results: A total of 1283 subjects were trained. 99.81% became providers and 2.0% were trained as instructors. There was a significant improvement in knowledge among all the participants irrespective of their education level including medicos/nonmedicos. However, participants who had higher education (graduates and postgraduates and/or belonged to medical field had better knowledge gain as compared to those who had low level of education (≤12th standard and were nonmedicos. Conclusion: BECC is an excellent community initiative to improve knowledge and skill of healthcare and laypersons in providing basic emergency care.

  5. Knowledge and beliefs among health care workers regarding hepatitis B infection and needle stick injuries at a tertiary care hospital, Karachi

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a recognized occupational risk for health care workers (HCWs). This study aimed to assess the knowledge and beliefs of HCWs regarding HBV transmission and needle stick injuries (NSIs). A cross-sectional questionnaire based KAP study was conducted at Civil Hospital, Karachi, during the period of January to September 2006. HCWs were inquired about possible modes of HBV transmission and association with NSIs. Data were entered using EpiInfo 6.04d software. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 12.5 software. A total of 343 HCWs participated, and those answered at least 5 correct modes of HBV transmission were considered knowledgeable. Knowledgeable group was more likely to report NSIs (p < 0.006), more vaccinated (p < 0.001) and were also more likely to attend awareness session (p < 0.009). Overall knowledge were inadequate and behaviour and attitude towards clinical practices were found compromised. To reduce the occupational risk, effort should be focused to establish effective infection control program and training of staff. (author)

  6. IMPACT OF EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON THE KNOWLEDGE OF BIO-MEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT AMONG HEALTH CARE WORKERS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL AT BAGALKOT CITY

    Mannapur

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The waste generated from medical activities can be hazardous, toxic and even lethal because of their high potential for diseases transmission and injury that also results in environmental degradation. An adequate and appropriate knowledge of health care waste management among the health care workers is the first step towards developing favourable attitude and practices thereby ensuring safe disposal of hazardous hospital waste. OBJECTIVES: To determine the knowledge regarding the bio-medical waste management among health care workers. To evaluate the effect of the intervention program given to health care workers. METHODS: TYPE OF STUDY: A cross-sectional study. STUDY PERIOD: May-December 2013. STUDY SETTING & STUDY SUBJECTS: The present study was conducted at S. Nijalingappa Medical College and HSK Hospital & Research center in Bagalkot city among paramedical workers which includes all the nursing staff and lab-technicians of the hospital (n =122. An identical pre and post-training questionnaire was designed which is pre-tested & structured and given to the above mentioned paramedical staff before and after the training session. The study variables include general information and questions regarding the knowledge about the health hazards, segregation, storage, personal protective devices, prophylactic vaccination, treatment, disposal and the rule of bio-medical waste management. A series of training sessions were conducted by trained community medicine staff along with PGs and training included knowledge about all aspects of biomedical waste with power point presentation and demonstration. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The data was tabulated by using Microsoft Excel 2010 and analyzed by using Openepi software and chi-square test was used. RESULTS: Among 122 participants, 94 (77.05% were males and 28 (22.95% were females. Most of them 94 (77.05% belongs to the age group of 20-29yrs and 24 (19.67% to the age group of 30-39 years. Majority i.e., 105 (86.07% were nursing staff and 17 (13.93% lab technician by occupation. 74 (60.65% of the study participants belongs to class IV & 31 (25.4% to class III of socio-economic status. In the present study, there was a highly statistical significant increase in the knowledge in all aspects (segregation, storage, personal protective devices, prophylactic vaccination, treatment, disposal and the rule except health hazards of bio-medical waste management after training compared to before training. In case of health hazard, there is increase in knowledge, but it is not statistically significant (X2= 1.048, p=0.307. CONCLUSION: Awareness regarding bio-medical waste management can be increased by conducting interventional training programs periodically by the persons trained in the field of bio-medical waste management.

  7. Older workers

    Ybema, J.F.; Giesen, F.

    2014-01-01

    Due to an ageing population and global economic competition, there is a societal need for people to extend their working lives while maintaining high work productivity. This article presents an overview of the labour participation, job performance, and job characteristics of older workers in the European Union. The way in which several factors, including health, working conditions, skills and knowledge, and social and financial factors influence sustainable employability and the early retirem...

  8. Study of status of safe injection practice and knowledge regarding injection safety among primary health care workers in Baglung district, western Nepal

    Gyawali Sudesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unsafe injection practices and injection overuse are widespread in developing countries harming the patient and inviting risks to the health care workers. In Nepal, there is a dearth of documented information about injection practices so the present study was carried out: a to determine whether the selected government health facilities satisfy the conditions for safe injections in terms of staff training, availability of sterile injectable equipment and their proper disposal after use and b to assess knowledge and attitudes of healthcare workers in these health care facilities with regard to injection safety. Methodology A descriptive cross-sectional mixed type (qualitative and quantitative survey was carried out from 18th May to 16th June 2012. In-depth interviews with the in-charges were conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire. Observation of the health facilities using a structured observation tool was done. The data were analysed manually by summarizing, tabulating and presenting in various formats. Results The in-charges (eight males, two females who participated in the study ranged in age from 30 to 50 years with a mean age of 37.8 years. Severe infection followed by pain was the most important cause for injection use with injection Gentamicin being most commonly prescribed. New single use (disposable injections and auto-disable syringes were used to inject curative drugs and vaccines respectively. Sufficient safety boxes were also supplied to dispose the used syringe. All health care workers had received full course of Hepatitis B vaccine and were knowledgeable about at least one pathogen transmitted through unsafe injection practices. Injection safety management policy and waste disposal guideline was not available for viewing in any of the facilities. The office staff who disposed the bio-medical wastes did so without taking any safety measures. Moreover, none of these staff had received any formal training in waste management. Conclusions Certain safe injection practices were noticed in the studied health care facilities but there remain a number of grey areas where unsafe practices still persists placing patient and health workers at risk of associated hazards. Training concentrating on injection safety, guidelines to dispose biomedical waste and monitoring of the activity is needed.

  9. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Among Quarry Workers in a North-Eastern State of Malaysia: A Study on Knowledge, Attitude and Practice

    Ahmad Filza Ismail

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Noise is known to be one of the environmental and occupational hazards listed in the Factory and Machinery Act 1967. Quarries with loud deafening sounds from trucks and machineries pose the risk of noise-induced hearing loss to workers. This study was designed to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice towards noise-induced hearing loss and to determine the prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss and its associated factors among quarry workers in a north-eastern state of Malaysia.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at six quarries in a north-eastern state of Malaysia, with 97 consented respondents who answered a validated version of a questionnaire and underwent pure tone audiogram. The respondents were male, aged between 18 to 50 years, working in the quarry area for at least 6-months duration with no family history of ear diseases.Results: The mean percentage scores of knowledge, attitude and practice were 44 (11, 70 (10 and 28 (16 percent, respectively. The prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss was found to be 57 (95% CI: 47, 67 with 46 (84% having mild and moderate noise-induced hearing loss, and 34 (62% involved both ears. Multiple logistic regressions showed that age and practice score were the associated factors with odd ratios of 1.1 (95% CI: 1.1, 1.2; p<0.001 and 0.9 (95% CI: 0.8, 1.0; p=0.008, respectively.Conclusion: The knowledge, attitude and practice scores of the respondents were poor and the high prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss was contributed by factors such as poor practice and old age.

  10. Healthcare workers and prevention of hepatitis C virus transmission: exploring knowledge, attitudes and evidence-based practices in hemodialysis units in Italy

    Bianco Aida

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence exists regarding the full prevention of HCV transmission to hemodialysis patients by implementing universal precaution. However, little information is available regarding the frequency with which hospitals have adopted evidence-based practices for preventing HCV infection among hemodialysis patients. A cross-sectional survey has been conducted among nurses in Calabria region (Italy in order to acquire information about the level of knowledge, the attitudes and the frequencies of evidence-based practices that prevent hospital transmission of HCV. Methods All 37 hemodialysis units (HDU of Calabria were included in the study and all nurses were invited to participate in the study and to fill in a self-administered questionnaire. Results 90% of the nurses working in HDU participated in the study. Correct answers about HCV pattern of transmission ranged from 73.7% to 99.3% and were significantly higher in respondents who knew that isolation of HCV-infected patients is not recommended and among those who knew that previous bloodstream infections should be included in medical record and among nurses with fewer years of practice. Most correctly thought that evidence-based infection control measures provide adequate protection against transmission of bloodborne pathogens among healthcare workers. Positive attitude was significantly higher among more knowledgeable nurses. Self-reporting of appropriate handwashing procedures were significantly more likely in nurses who were aware that transmission of bloodborne pathogens among healthcare workers may be prevented through adoption of evidence-based practices and with a correct knowledge about HCV transmission patterns. Conclusions Behavior changes should be aimed at abandoning outdated practices and adopting and maintaining evidence-based practices. Initiatives focused at enabling and reinforcing adherence to effective prevention practices among nurses in HDU are strongly needed.

  11. To Enhance Collaborative Learning and Practice Network Knowledge with a Virtualization Laboratory and Online Synchronous Discussion

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Kongcharoen, Chaknarin; Ghinea, Gheorghita

    2014-01-01

    Recently, various computer networking courses have included additional laboratory classes in order to enhance students' learning achievement. However, these classes need to establish a suitable laboratory where each student can connect network devices to configure and test functions within different network topologies. In this case, the Linux

  12. Designing eLearning courses to meet the digital literacy needs of healthcare workers in lower- and middle-income countries: Experiences from the Knowledge for Health Project

    Rupali J. Limaye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional conceptualizations of knowledge management fail to incorporate the social aspects in which knowledge management work operates. Social knowledge management places people at the center of all knowledge management, including placing the end user at the center when developing eLearning packages, particularly within the context of digital health literacy. As many health professionals working in lower-resource settings face the digital divide, or experience unequal patterns of access and usage capabilities from computer-based information and communication technologies (ICTs, ensuring that eLearning packages are tailored for their specific needs is critical. Grounded in our conceptualization of social knowledge management, we outline two of our experiences with developing eLearning packages for health professionals working primarily in lower- and middle-income countries. The Global Health eLearning Center provides eLearning courses to health professionals primarily working in the lower- and middle-income country context. The courses have robust and exhaustive mechanisms in place to ensure that issues related to digital health literacy are not barriers to taking the courses and subsequently, applying the course material in practice. In Bangladesh, we developed a digital health package for frontline community fieldworkers that was loaded on netbook computers. To develop this package, community fieldworkers were provided support during the implementation phase to ensure that they were able to use the netbooks correctly with their clients. As new digital technologies proliferate, guaranteeing that global health workers have the prerequisite skills to utilize and apply digital health tools is essential for improving health care.

  13. KP-LAB Knowledge Practices Laboratory -- Specifications and Prototype of the Knowledge Repository (V.3.0) and the Knowledge Mediator (V.3.0)

    Andreou, Dimitris; Christophides, Vassilis; Flouris, Giorgos; Kotzinos, Dimitris; Pediaditis, Panagiotis; Tsialiamanis, Petros

    2009-01-01

    This deliverable reports the technical and research development performed until M36 (January 2009) within tasks T5.2 and T5.4 of WP5 in the KP-Lab project, per the latest Description of Work (DoW) 3.2 [DoW3.2]. The described components are included in the KP-Lab Semantic Web Knowledge Middleware (SWKM) Prototype Release 3.0 software that takes place in M36. This release builds on the Prototype Release 2.0 that was presented in [D5.4]. The present deliverable includes both the specification, a...

  14. Reported changes in sexual behaviour and human papillomavirus knowledge in Peruvian female sex workers following participation in a human papillomavirus vaccine trial.

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Heidari, O; Carcamo, C; Halsey, N A

    2013-07-01

    Limited data exist on the effect of clinical trial participation on sexual behavioural change. Two hundred female sex workers working in Lima, Peru received human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in either the standard (0, 2, 6 months) or modified (0, 3, 6 months) schedule. Participants received comprehensive screening and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), counselling on safe sex practices, education about HPV and the HPV vaccine, contraceptives (oral and condoms) and family planning at each visit. We assessed vaccine completion rates, change in sexual practices, and changes in HPV knowledge before and after participation in the vaccine trial. There were high rates of vaccine completion, 91% overall. The estimated number of reported new and total clients over a 30-day period decreased significantly (P disease increased among all participants. In addition, all participants listed at least one preventive strategy during the month 7 follow-up survey. PMID:23970767

  15. Influence of toxic bait type and starvation on worker and queen mortality in laboratory colonies of Argentine ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Mathieson, Melissa; Toft, Richard; Lester, Philip J

    2012-08-01

    The efficacy of toxic baits should be judged by their ability to kill entire ant colonies, including the colony queen or queens. We studied the efficacy of four toxic baits to the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). These baits were Xstinguish that has the toxicant fipronil, Exterm-an-Ant that contains both boric acid and sodium borate, and Advion ant gel and Advion ant bait arena that both have indoxacarb. Experimental nests contained 300 workers and 10 queen ants that were starved for either 24 or 48 h before toxic bait exposure. The efficacy of the toxic baits was strongly influenced by starvation. In no treatment with 24-h starvation did we observe 100% worker death. After 24-h starvation three of the baits did not result in any queen deaths, with only Exterm-an-Ant producing an average of 25% mortality. In contrast, 100% queen and worker mortality was observed in colonies starved for 48 h and given Xstinguish or Exterm-an-Ant. The baits Advion ant gel and Advion ant bait arena were not effective against Argentine ants in these trials, resulting in bait uptake, control efficacy may be maximized by applying bait when ants are likely to be starved. Our results suggest queen mortality must be assessed in tests for toxic bait efficacy. Our data indicate that of these four baits, Xstinguish and Exterm-an-Ant are the best options for control of Argentine ants in New Zealand. PMID:22928290

  16. Knowledge about childhood autism and opinion among healthcare workers on availability of facilities and law caring for the needs and rights of children with childhood autism and other developmental disorders in Nigeria

    Igwe Monday N

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In designing programs to raise the community level of awareness about childhood autism in sub-Saharan Africa, it is logical to use the primary healthcare workers as contact point for education of the general public. Tertiary healthcare workers could play the role of trainers on childhood autism at primary healthcare level. Assessing their baseline knowledge about childhood autism to detect areas of knowledge gap is an essential ingredient in starting off such programs that would be aimed at early diagnosis and interventions. Knowledge of the healthcare workers on availability of facilities and law that would promote the required interventions is also important. This study assessed the baseline knowledge about childhood autism and opinion among Nigerian healthcare workers on availability of facilities and law caring for the needs and rights of children with childhood autism and other developmental disorders. Method A total of one hundred and thirty four (134 consented healthcare workers working in tertiary healthcare facilities located in south east and south-south regions of Nigeria were interviewed with Socio-demographic, Knowledge about Childhood Autism among Health Workers (KCAHW and Opinion on availability of Facilities and Law caring for the needs and rights of children with Childhood Autism and other developmental disorders (OFLCA questionnaires. Results The total mean score of participated healthcare workers on KCAHW questionnaire was 12.35 ± 4.40 out of a total score of 19 possible. Knowledge gap was found to be higher in domain 3 (symptoms of obsessive and repetitive pattern of behavior, followed by domains 1 (symptoms of impairments in social interaction, 4 (type of disorder autism is and associated co-morbidity and 2 (symptoms of communication impairments of KCAHW respectively among the healthcare workers. Knowledge about childhood autism (KCA as measured by scores on KCAHW questionnaire was significantly associated with age group distribution of the healthcare workers, with those age group of fourth decades and above more likely to have higher mean score (p = 0.004 and previous experience of managing children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD (p = 0.000. KCA showed near significant association with area of specialty, with those healthcare workers in psychiatry compared to pediatrics having higher mean score (p = 0.071 and also with years of working experience of the healthcare workers (p = 0.056. More than half of the healthcare workers subscribed to the opinion that facilities and law caring for the needs and rights of children with childhood autism and other developmental disorders are lacking in Nigeria. Conclusion The correlates of KCA may help in selection of those tertiary healthcare workers that would best fit the role of trainers. It is important to update the knowledge gaps of those healthcare workers who scored low in different domains of KCAHW questionnaire. It is imperative for policy makers in Nigeria to advocate and implement multidisciplinary healthcare service system that would ensure early diagnosis and interventions. Nationally representative baseline epidemiological data that would guide policy and planning are also desirable.

  17. Low Influenza Vaccination Rates Among Child Care Workers in the United States: Assessing Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors

    de Perio, Marie A.; Wiegand, Douglas M.; Evans, Stefanie M.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza can spread quickly among children and caregivers in child day care settings. Vaccination is the most effective method to prevent influenza. We determined 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) (pH1N1) and seasonal influenza vaccination rates during the 20092010 influenza season among child care center employees, assessed knowledge and attitudes regarding the vaccines, and determined factors associated with vaccine receipt. Using a cross-sectional study design, from January 30March 1, 20...

  18. To Enhance Collaborative Learning and Practice Network Knowledge with a Virtualization Laboratory and Online Synchronous Discussion

    Wu-Yuin Hwang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, various computer networking courses have included additional laboratory classes in order to enhance students’ learning achievement. However, these classes need to establish a suitable laboratory where each student can connect network devices to configure and test functions within different network topologies. In this case, the Linux operating system can be used to operate network devices and the virtualization technique can include multiple OSs for supporting a significant number of students. In previous research, the virtualization application was successfully applied in a laboratory, but focused only on individual assignments. The present study extends previous research by designing the Networking Virtualization-Based Laboratory (NVBLab, which requires collaborative learning among the experimental students. The students were divided into an experimental group and a control group for the experiment. The experimental group performed their laboratory assignments using NVBLab, whereas the control group completed them on virtual machines (VMs that were installed on their personal computers. Moreover, students using NVBLab were provided with an online synchronous discussion (OSD feature that enabled them to communicate with others. The laboratory assignments were divided into two parts: Basic Labs and Advanced Labs. The results show that the experimental group significantly outperformed the control group in two Advanced Labs and the post-test after Advanced Labs. Furthermore, the experimental group’s activities were better than those of the control group based on the total average of the command count per laboratory. Finally, the findings of the interviews and questionnaires with the experimental group reveal that NVBLab was helpful during and after laboratory class.

  19. A worker perspective on nuclear safety

    The majority of the 15,000 members of the Power Workers Union (PWU) are employed in electricity production at Ontario Power Generation's nuclear generating stations and in nuclear technology research at the Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Our members therefore have an obvious vested interest in any discussion related to their jobs. Workers in nuclear power plants have a clearly defined responsibility to ensure a safe working environment for themselves and their fellow workers. They have an overwhelming vested interest in ensuring that the plants are constructed, maintained, and operated safely. As will be detailed in the presentation to the CNS, all workers are required to learn and demonstrate knowledge of the hazards as an integral part of employment initiation and subsequent training. As their union, the PWU has a responsibility to ensure conditions of employment that not only permit workers to refuse work they perceive to be unsafe but require them to bring safety concerns forward for resolution to the satisfaction of both management and workers' representatives. The PWU has accomplished this through the development of workplace structures to ensure worker input is sought and acted on. The paper will describe the next steps required to improve workplace safety at Ontario Power Generation, which could be adapted to other facilities and workgroups. (author)

  20. Conhecimento e atitudes dos profissionais de sade em relao violncia de gnero Knowledge and attitudes of healthcare workers towards gender based violence

    Elisabeth Meloni Vieira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Vrias so as polticas pblicas no Brasil para o enfrentamento da violncia contra a mulher. Registra-se na literatura que os profissionais de sade acham o tema de difcil abordagem. Para melhorar o atendimento no SUS em Ribeiro Preto, realizou-se um estudo para avaliar o conhecimento e a atitude dos profissionais de sade em relao violncia de gnero. MTODOS: Contataram-se 278 profissionais de sade, dos quais 221 foram entrevistados utilizando-se um questionrio estruturado. RESULTADOS: 51 (23,0% eram enfermeiras e 170 (77,0% mdicos; 119 (53,8% homens e 102 (46,2% mulheres, com idade mdia de 38,6 anos; 200 (90,5% consideravam-se brancos ou asiticos e 21 (9,5% pretos e pardos. Tinham em mdia 12,5 anos de vida profissional e 158 (68,8% eram oriundos de universidade pblica. Apenas pouco mais da metade (58,7% mostrou conhecimento geral adequado (bom e alto sobre a violncia de gnero, o que indica a necessidade de capacitar os profissionais para este atendimento. Em relao s barreiras para averiguar a violncia, os profissionais citaram a falta de uma poltica institucional e o silncio da mulher que no revela a violncia. Os entrevistados, em particular as mulheres jovens, apresentaram atitudes mais favorveis para o acolhimento da mulher em situao de violncia. CONCLUSES: A maioria dos entrevistados demonstrou atitudes positivas e podemos inferir que h bom potencial para o manejo adequado dos casos, se receberem capacitao.OBJECTIVES: There are several public policies to deal with violence against women in Brazil. The literature has reported that healthcare workers find this subject difficult to approach. To improve care in the public health system (SUS of Ribeiro Preto, a study was conducted aiming to assess knowledge and attitudes of healthcare workers regarding gender violence. METHODS: A total 278 healthcare workers were contacted and 221 were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. RESULTS: 51 (23.0% were nurses and 170 (77.0% physicians, 119 (53.8% males and 102 (46.2% females, with a mean age of 38.6 years; 200 (90.5% considered themselves to be white or Asian and 21 (9.5% black or mulattos. They had an average of 12.5 years of professional practice and 158 (68.8% had graduated from a public university. About 58.7% had an adequate general knowledge (good and high about gender violence, which indicates the need to train healthcare workers. Regarding the barriers to identify violence, healthcare workers mentioned the lack of an institutional policy and the silence of women who do not reveal violence. Respondents, especially young women, presented more favorable attitudes towards women living in violence situation. CONCLUSIONS: Therefore, most of them show positive attitudes toward women living in violence and we infer that they present good potential for appropriate case management if they receive training.

  1. Agentes comunitrios de sade: mapeamento de conhecimento antes e aps oficinas de instrumentalizao / Community health workers: mapping of knowledge before and aftertraining workshops

    Nathlia de Carvalho, Lopes; Gleice Ane Scariot Silva, Vieira; Suelle Regina Bese, Pena; Stela Maris Aguiar, Lemos.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: mapear o conhecimento de agentes comunitrios de sade antes e aps participao em oficinas de instrumentalizao sobre aspectos fonoaudiolgicos e verificar as mudanas de percepo segundo o tempo de trabalho na Estratgia de Sade da Famlia. MTODOS: o estudo foi realizado em um mun [...] icpio a 170 km da capital de Minas Geraise com 74.409 habitantes. A rede de Ateno Primria a Sade do municpio composta por 10 unidades de Estratgia de Sade da Famlia que alocam 60 agentes de sade. Os dados foram coletados em todas as unidades e consistiu em trs etapas: a) aplicao de questionrio auto-aplicvel acerca de aspectos fonoaudiolgicos; b) processo de instrumentalizao; c) reaplicao do questionrio. RESULTADOS: participaram do estudo 51 agentes de sade. Aps a instrumentalizao, tornou-se maior o nmero de agentes de sade que deram relevncia a fatores que sugerem a ocorrncia de distrbio da comunicao nas diferentes faixas etrias e que passaram a conhecer as quatro reas que englobam a atuao fonoaudiolgica. No houve relao estatstica entre o desempenho dos agentes nas respostas e a unidade de trabalho. Quanto ao tempo de trabalho Estratgia de Sade da Famlia, na pr-instrumentalizao, o melhor desempenho nas respostas foi dos agentes que trabalham h menos de um ano na ateno primria. CONCLUSO: ainstrumentalizao favoreceu as respostas dos agentes comunitrios de sade. Houve relao entre o processo de instrumentalizao e o tempo de atuao no Programa de Sade da Famlia. Abstract in english PURPOSE: to map the knowledge of community health workers before and after the participation in training workshops on phonoaudiological aspects and to verify changes in the perception according to the working time in the Family Health Strategy. METHODS: the study was conducted in a municipality wit [...] h 74,409 inhabitants, 170 km from Belo Horizonte, the capital of the State of Minas Gerais. Its Primary Health Care network is composed of 10 units of Family Health Strategy that allocate 60 health workers. The information was collected from all units and the process consisted of three stages: a) application of a questionnaire about phonoaudiological aspects; b) training process; c) reapplication of the questionnaire. RESULTS: 51 health workers participated in the study. After the training, the number of health workers who started to give importance to factors that may indicate communication disorders in different age groups and that became aware of the four areas of the phonoaudiology became greater. There was no statistical relationship between the answers of the workers and the work unit. Regarding the working time in the Family Health Strategy, those who work for less than a year in the primary care gave the best answers before the training. CONCLUSION: the training favored the responses of the community health workers. There was a relationship between the training process and the working time in the Family Health Program.

  2. Documentation of acceptable knowledge for Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility TRU waste stream

    Characterization of transuranic waste from the LANL Plutonium Facility for certification and transportation to WIPP includes the use of acceptable knowledge as specified in the WIPP Quality Assurance Program Plan. In accordance with a site specific procedure, documentation of acceptable knowledge for retrievably stored and currently generated transuranic waste streams is in progress at LANL. A summary overview of the TRU waste inventory is complete and documented in the Sampling Plan. This document also includes projected waste generation, facility missions, waste generation processes, flow diagrams, times, and material inputs. The second part of acceptable knowledge documentation consists of assembling more detailed acceptable knowledge information into auditable records and is expected to require several years to complete. These records for each waste stream must support final assignment of waste matrix parameters, EPA hazardous waste numbers, and radionuclide characterization. They must also include a determination whether waste streams are defense waste streams for compliance with the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act. The LANL Plutonium Facility's mission is primarily plutonium processing in basic special nuclear material (SNM) research activities to support national defense and energy programs. It currently has about 100 processes ranging from SNM recovery from residues to development of plutonium 238 heat sources for space applications. Its challenge is to characterize and certify waste streams from such diverse and dynamic operations using acceptable knowledge. This paper reports the progress on the certification of the first of these waste streams to the WIPP WAC

  3. Laboratory of alternative energies and hydrogen in ESPOL. Coupling needs and knowledge

    Mendieta, E. [Escuela Superior Politecnica del Litoral, Campus Gustavo Galindo, Guayaquil (Ecuador)

    2009-07-01

    The Ecuadorian problems with electricity and oil for the near future are shortly assessed in this paper. The main Ecuadorian universities contribution towards a real solution is also mentioned here. Projected Knowledge Park of ESPOL (PARCON) and its 7 integrated research centers is presented briefly. The integration of multidisciplinary research being developed in ESPOL is one foundation for this Knowledge Park. The results of previous researches like the Hydrogen project will be used to set the first stage database for future R and D initiatives. The University of Applied Science of Stralsund is one formal partner for ESPOL in Alternative Energies and Hydrogen utilization. (orig.)

  4. Human papillomavirus knowledge, vaccine acceptance, and vaccine series completion among female entertainment and sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia: the Young Women's Health Study.

    Wadhera, Priya; Evans, Jennifer L; Stein, Ellen; Gandhi, Monica; Couture, Marie-Claude; Sansothy, Neth; Sichan, Keo; Maher, Lisa; Kaldor, John; Page, Kimberly; Kien

    2015-10-01

    Human papillomavirus is a common sexually transmitted infection and the causative agent for cervical cancer, a frequently occurring malignant disease among women in developing countries. We assessed human papillomavirus awareness prior to the delivery of a brief information and education intervention, and human papillomavirus vaccine provision to female entertainment and sex workers (N = 220). At baseline, only 23.6% of women had heard of human papillomavirus. Following the educational intervention, 90% answered all the human papillomavirus knowledge questions correctly. Of 192 participants attending the first quarterly cohort visit where vaccine was offered, 149 (78%) were eligible for vaccination; HIV-positive (n = 32) and pregnant (n = 11) women were excluded. Acceptance of vaccine among eligible women was universal, and 79.2% completed the three-dose vaccination series. Women who reported use of amphetamine-type stimulants had significantly and independently lower odds of vaccine completion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.24; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.08, 0.69). New pregnancies also had an impact on vaccine completion: 5.4% (8/149 5.4%) who started the series had to stop due to new pregnancy. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of a simple education intervention designed to increase human papillomavirus knowledge and the feasibility of successful human papillomavirus vaccine in a population that is often difficult to engage in preventive health care. PMID:25505042

  5. A cross-sectional study of the knowledge and attitude of medical laboratory personnel regarding continuing professional development

    Ekwempu Adaobi Ifeoma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Continuing professional development (CPD in Medical Laboratory Scientists (MLS is aimed at equipping laboratory professionals with the necessary skills to enhance practice. The laboratory scientists are usually the first contact between the patient and health care system in aspects of diagnosis and monitory of diseases. As such, it becomes imperative to assess the knowledge of laboratory personnel regarding CPD. Materials and Methods: Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 200 laboratory personnel's attending the maiden CPD workshop organized by the Association of MLS in Jos the Plateau state capital. Results: One hundred and thirty-five (82 males and 53 females of the 200 administered questionnaires were returned. Only 32 of them (23.7% attended CPD program in the last 1 year with 10 (7.5% engaging in online CPD. Five (3.7% of the respondents had the privilege to attend an international CPD. Majority (95.2% of the respondents identified CPD as an essential component of professional career development. Lack of sponsorship was identified as a major setback in CPD efficiency by 93.8% of respondents. About 58 (46.4% noted that poor attendance in CPD workshops was due to unavailability of policy guideline for CPD. One hundred and twenty (95.2% of respondents had an aim of improving their skills after attending CPD workshops. Conclusion: The overall attitude of Nigerian MLS toward attending CPD workshop is poor; however, the knowledge regarding the importance of CPD is adequate. There exists a gap between sponsorship for CPD by various institutions and MLS.

  6. Child Development Laboratory Schools as Generators of Knowledge in Early Childhood Education: New Models and Approaches

    McBride, Brent A.; Groves, Melissa; Barbour, Nancy; Horm, Diane; Stremmel, Andrew; Lash, Martha; Bersani, Carol; Ratekin, Cynthia; Moran, James; Elicker, James; Toussaint, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: University-based child development laboratory programs have a long and rich history of supporting teaching, research, and outreach activities in the child development/early childhood education fields. Although these programs were originally developed in order to conduct research on children and families to inform policy and…

  7. Ergonomics for the inclusion of older workers in the knowledge workforce and a guidance tool for designers.

    Gonzalez, I; Morer, P

    2016-03-01

    The ageing of the population and the inverted population pyramid is bringing important changes to society as a whole. These changes are associated with the inclusion of an older workforce in knowledge work and the challenge they represent in adapting the work environment accordingly. In order to approach a more universal design of the work environment, industrial designers need support from user-sensitive inclusive design studies. While there are plenty of guidelines and tools containing relevant information, there is a need to develop more appropriate tools for Industrial Designers that cover the initial phase of the design process. This study provides a review of the available tools and guidelines and proposes a theoretical framework intended for developing a design guidance tool for inclusive workstation design. PMID:26454819

  8. HIV prevalence, AIDS knowledge, and condom use among female sex workers in Santiago, Chile Prevalencia del VIH, conocimientos sobre el SIDA, y uso del condn en trabajadoras sexuales de Santiago, Chile

    Jaime E. Barrientos; Michel Bozon; Edith Ortiz; Anabella Arredondo

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes HIV seroprevalence, knowledge of HIV transmission, and condom use among female sex workers (FSW) attending five specialized sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics in Santiago, Chile. A short questionnaire with socio-demographic, AIDS knowledge, and condom-use variables was administered to 626 FSW. HIV seroprevalence was estimated with a blood test sent to the Chilean Public Health Institute. ELISA was used to confirm HIV in suspected cases. HIV prevalence was 0%. FSW ...

  9. Conhecimento e atitudes dos profissionais de sade em relao violncia de gnero / Knowledge and attitudes of healthcare workers towards gender based violence

    Elisabeth Meloni, Vieira; Gleici de Castro Silva, Perdona; Ana Maria de, Almeida; Ana Mrcia Spano, Nakano; Manoel Antnio dos, Santos; Daniela, Daltoso; Fernanda Garbelini De, Ferrante.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Vrias so as polticas pblicas no Brasil para o enfrentamento da violncia contra a mulher. Registra-se na literatura que os profissionais de sade acham o tema de difcil abordagem. Para melhorar o atendimento no SUS em Ribeiro Preto, realizou-se um estudo para avaliar o conhecimento [...] e a atitude dos profissionais de sade em relao violncia de gnero. MTODOS: Contataram-se 278 profissionais de sade, dos quais 221 foram entrevistados utilizando-se um questionrio estruturado. RESULTADOS: 51 (23,0%) eram enfermeiras e 170 (77,0%) mdicos; 119 (53,8%) homens e 102 (46,2%) mulheres, com idade mdia de 38,6 anos; 200 (90,5%) consideravam-se brancos ou asiticos e 21 (9,5%) pretos e pardos. Tinham em mdia 12,5 anos de vida profissional e 158 (68,8%) eram oriundos de universidade pblica. Apenas pouco mais da metade (58,7%) mostrou conhecimento geral adequado (bom e alto) sobre a violncia de gnero, o que indica a necessidade de capacitar os profissionais para este atendimento. Em relao s barreiras para averiguar a violncia, os profissionais citaram a falta de uma poltica institucional e o silncio da mulher que no revela a violncia. Os entrevistados, em particular as mulheres jovens, apresentaram atitudes mais favorveis para o acolhimento da mulher em situao de violncia. CONCLUSES: A maioria dos entrevistados demonstrou atitudes positivas e podemos inferir que h bom potencial para o manejo adequado dos casos, se receberem capacitao. Abstract in english OBJECTIVES: There are several public policies to deal with violence against women in Brazil. The literature has reported that healthcare workers find this subject difficult to approach. To improve care in the public health system (SUS) of Ribeiro Preto, a study was conducted aiming to assess knowle [...] dge and attitudes of healthcare workers regarding gender violence. METHODS: A total 278 healthcare workers were contacted and 221 were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. RESULTS: 51 (23.0%) were nurses and 170 (77.0%) physicians, 119 (53.8%) males and 102 (46.2%) females, with a mean age of 38.6 years; 200 (90.5%) considered themselves to be white or Asian and 21 (9.5%) black or mulattos. They had an average of 12.5 years of professional practice and 158 (68.8%) had graduated from a public university. About 58.7% had an adequate general knowledge (good and high) about gender violence, which indicates the need to train healthcare workers. Regarding the barriers to identify violence, healthcare workers mentioned the lack of an institutional policy and the silence of women who do not reveal violence. Respondents, especially young women, presented more favorable attitudes towards women living in violence situation. CONCLUSIONS: Therefore, most of them show positive attitudes toward women living in violence and we infer that they present good potential for appropriate case management if they receive training.

  10. Professionalising the asphalt construction process: aligning information technologies, operators' knowledge and laboratory practices

    Bijleveld, Frank Roland

    2015-01-01

    This research addresses the need to professionalise the asphalt construction process. A distinctive action research strategy is designed and carried out to progressively improve operational strategies of asphalt teams from technological, human (operator) and laboratory perspectives. Using information technologies, such as GPS, a laser-linescanner, and infrared cameras, the on-site construction process in made explicit. More than thirty asphalt construction projects are systematically monitore...

  11. Operational comparison of bubble (super heated drop) dosimetry with routine albedo TLD for a selected group of Pu-238 workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Romero, L.L.; Hoffman, J.M.; Foltyn, E.M.; Buhl, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    Personnel neutron dosimetry continues to be a difficult science due to the lack of availability of robust passive dosimeters that exhibit tissue- or near-tissue- equivalent response. This paper is an operational study that compares the use of albedo thermoluminescent dosimeters with bubble dosimeters to determine whether bubble dosimeters do provide a useful daily ALARA tool that can yield measurements close to the dose-of-record. A group of workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) working on the Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) for the NASA Cassini space mission wore both bubble dosimeters and albedo dosimeters over a period from 1993 through 1996. The personal albedo dosimeter was processed on a monthly basis and used as the dose-of-record. The results of this study indicated that cumulative daily bubble dosimetry results agreed with whole-body albedo dosimetry results within about 37% on average.

  12. Scoring CT/HRCT findings among asbestos-exposed workers: effects of patient's age, body mass index and common laboratory test results

    Vehmas, T.; Huuskonen, M.S. [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Department of Radiology, Helsinki (Finland); Kivisaari, L. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, Helsinki (Finland); Jaakkola, M.S. [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Department of Radiology, Helsinki (Finland); University of Birmingham, Institute of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-01

    We studied the effects of age, body mass index (BMI) and some common laboratory test results on several pulmonary CT/HRCT signs. Five hundred twenty-eight construction workers (age 38-80, mean 63 years) were imaged with spiral and high resolution CT. Images were scored by three radiologists for solitary pulmonary nodules, signs indicative of fibrosis and emphysema, ground glass opacities, bronchial wall thickness and bronchiectasis. Multivariate statistical analyses were adjusted for smoking and asbestos exposure. Increasing age, blood haemoglobin value and erythrocyte sedimentation rate correlated positively with several HRCT signs. Increasing BMI was associated with a decrease in several signs, especially parenchymal bands, honeycombing, all kinds of emphysema and bronchiectasis. The latter finding might be due to the suboptimal image quality in obese individuals, which may cause suspicious findings to be overlooked. Background data, including patient's age and body constitution, should be considered when CT/HRCT images are interpreted. (orig.)

  13. Present knowledge about Laboratory Testing of Axial Loading on Suction Caissons

    Manzotti, E.; Vaitkunaite, Evelina; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    Offshore wind turbines are increasing in both efficiency and size. More economical foundations for such light structures are under investigation, and suction caisson was shown to be particularly suitable for this purpose. In multi-pod foundation configuration, the overturning moment given by loads...... on the structure is resisted by push-pull loads on the vertical axis of each suction caisson. Relevant works where this situation is examined by means of laboratory testing are summarized in this article, then different conclusions are followed by discussion and comparison. In the initial theoretical...

  14. Developing a Behavioral Health Screening Program for BSL-4 Laboratory Workers at the National Institutes of Health

    Skvorc, Casey; Wilson, Deborah E.

    2011-01-01

    To ensure that biomedical research is performed in the safest and most responsible manner possible, the NIH established the Biological Surety Program (BSP) in 2006 to reflect the unique human and security factors associated with biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) laboratories. The program sets forth control measures to ensure there is a trained, responsible, and reliable workforce, with rigorous procedures to protect employee health and maintain a safe work environment.

  15. Exposure of workers to nickel, copper and lead in a base metal recovery plant and laboratory / Chrisna Stapelberg

    Stapelberg, Chrisna

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to establish the extent of dermal and respiratory exposure at selected locations at a South African platinum mine. The study included exposure to lead oxide fumes in an assay laboratory, nickel sulfate powder at a nickel sulfate crystallizer circuit and packing site and metallic copper dust whilst executing copper stripping. Methods: In an availability study, the dermal metal exposures were measured before, during and at the end of ...

  16. Knowledge and attitudes of health care workers from intensive care units regarding nosocomial transmission of influenza: a study on the immediate pre-pandemic period

    CR Fortaleza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of influenza in health care settings is a major threat to patients, especially those with severe diseases. The attitude of health care workers (HCWs may influence the transmission of countless infections. The current study aimed to quantify knowledge and identify attitudes of HCWs involved in intensive care units (ICUs regarding the risk of nosocomial influenza transmission. A questionnaire was applied through interviews to HCWs who worked in one of the five ICUs from a teaching hospital. Questions about influenza were deliberately dispersed among others that assessed several infectious agents. Forty-two HCWs were interviewed: nine physicians, ten nurses and 23 nursing technicians or auxiliaries. Among the 42 HCWs, 98% were aware of the potential transmission of influenza virus in the ICUs, but only 31% would indicate droplet precautions for patients with suspected infection. Moreover, only 31% of them had been vaccinated against influenza in the last campaign (2008. Nursing technicians or auxiliaries were more likely to have been vaccinated, both by univariate and multivariable analysis. When asked about absenteeism, only 10% of the study subjects stated that they would not go to work if they had an influenza-like illness. Those findings suggest that, in non-pandemic periods, influenza control in hospitals requires strategies that combine continuous education with changes in organizational culture.

  17. A STUDY TO ASSESS THE KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THE BIO MEDICAL WASTE (MANAGEMENT & HANDLING RULES 2011 AMONG THE PARAMEDICS AND LABORATORY TECH N ICIANS OF A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN NORTH WEST INDIA

    Mitasha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bio Medical Waste (BMW refers to the waste generated in a health care facility. It carries a high potential for infection and injury , both to the health care workers and the public. The Government of India framed the Bio Medical Waste (Management and Handling Rules in the year 1998 and subsequently amended , the last amendments being in 2011. OBJECTIVE : To Assess the Knowledge with respect to the Biomedical Waste (Management &Handling rules , 2011 among paramedical staff and interns of a tertiary care centre in North West India. MATERIALS& METHODS : It was a cross sectional study conducted at a tertiary care centre of North West India in the month of September and October 2014 through a self - administered questionnaire using convenience sampling on Paramedical staff and interns. RES ULTS : Two hundred twenty questionnaires were distributed. Two hundred workers responded with a response rate of 91%. Out of the total 200 participants , 47% were laboratory technicians and 53% nursing staff and interns. Out of 72% who were trained in BMW ma nagement , 17% were laboratory technicians against 83% of nursing staff and interns. Knowledge about the new guidelines was seen among 72% but only 13 % knew it correctly. Majority of the participants (77% were aware of hand washing as basic and important universal work precaution. CONCLUSION: The different categories of paramedical staff were aware about the importance of BMW but they were not fully aware with the latest guidelines of BMW rules. Lack of training was found to be one of the most important an d common constraint for the paramedical staff.

  18. The role biomedical science laboratories can play in improving science knowledge and promoting first-year nursing academic success

    Arneson, Pam

    The Role Biomedical Science Laboratories Can Play In Improving Science Knowledge and Promoting First-Year Nursing Academic Success The need for additional nursing and health care professionals is expected to increase dramatically over the next 20 years. With this in mind, students must have strong biomedical science knowledge to be competent in their field. Some studies have shown that participation in bioscience laboratories can enhance science knowledge. If this is true, an analysis of the role bioscience labs have in first-year nursing academic success is apposite. In response, this study sought to determine whether concurrent enrollment in anatomy and microbiology lecture and lab courses improved final lecture course grades. The investigation was expanded to include a comparison of first-year nursing GPA and prerequisite bioscience concurrent lecture/lab enrollment. Additionally, research has indicated that learning is affected by student perception of the course, instructor, content, and environment. To gain an insight regarding students' perspectives of laboratory courses, almost 100 students completed a 20-statement perception survey to understand how lab participation affects learning. Data analyses involved comparing anatomy and microbiology final lecture course grades between students who concurrently enrolled in the lecture and lab courses and students who completed the lecture course alone. Independent t test analyses revealed that there was no significant difference between the groups for anatomy, t(285) = .11, p = .912, but for microbiology, the lab course provided a significant educational benefit, t(256) = 4.47, p = .000. However, when concurrent prerequisite bioscience lecture/lab enrollment was compared to non-concurrent enrollment for first-year nursing GPA using independent t test analyses, no significant difference was found for South Dakota State University, t(37) = -1.57, p = .125, or for the University of South Dakota, t(38) = -0.46, p = .651. Student perception survey examination included computation of means and standard deviations for statements related to the educational importance of lab courses, the value of lab experimentation, and the usefulness of concurrent lecture/lab enrollment. Independent t test analyses sought to determine differences within the courses of anatomy lab and microbiology lab as well as differences between the instructors involved. Results suggested that student perceptions may be dependent on the course, the instructor, and possibly the content.

  19. Knowledge management

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Mahnke, Volker

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge management has emerged as a very successful organization practice and has beenextensively treated in a large body of academic work. Surprisingly, however, organizationaleconomics (i.e., transaction cost economics, agency theory, team theory and property rightstheory) has played no role in...... the development of knowledge management. We argue thatorganizational economics insights can further the theory and practice of knowledge managementin several ways. Specifically, we apply notions of contracting, team production,complementaries, hold-up, etc. to knowledge management issues (i.......e., creating and integrationknowledge, rewarding knowledge workers, etc.) , and derive refutable implications that are novelto the knowledge management field from our discussion....

  20. Operational comparison of bubble (super heated drop) dosimetry with routine albedo thermoluminescent dosimetry for a selected group of Pu-238 workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    This paper is an operational study that compares the use of albedo thermoluminescent dosimeters with bubble dosimeters to determine whether bubble dosimeters do provide a useful daily ALARA tool that can yield measurements close to the dose-of-record. A group of workers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) working on the Radioactive Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) for the NASA Cassini space mission wore both bubble dosimeters and albedo dosimeters over a period from 1993 through 1996. The bubble dosimeters were issued and read on a daily basis and the data were used as an ALARA tool. The personnel albedo dosimeter was processed on monthly basis and used as the dose-of-record. The results of this study indicated that cumulative bubble dosimetry results agreed with whole-body albedo dosimetry results within about 37% on average. However it was observed that there is a significant variability of the results on an individual basis both month-to-month and from one individual to another

  1. Operational comparison of bubble (super heated drop) dosimetry results with routine albedo thermoluminescent dosimetry for a selected group of Pu-238 workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Romero, L.L.; Hoffman, J.M.; Foltyn, E.M.; Buhl, T.E.

    1999-03-01

    This paper is an operational study that compares the use of albedo thermoluminescent dosimeters with bubble dosimeters to determine whether bubble dosimeters do provide a useful daily ALARA tool that can yield measurements close to the dose-of-record. A group of workers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) working on the Radioactive Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) for the NASA Cassini space mission wore both bubble dosimeters and albedo dosimeters over a period from 1993 through 1996. The bubble dosimeters were issued and read on a daily basis and the data were used as an ALARA tool. The personnel albedo dosimeter was processed on monthly basis and used as the dose-of-record. The results of this study indicated that cumulative bubble dosimetry results agreed with whole-body albedo dosimetry results within about 37% on average. However it was observed that there is a significant variability of the results on an individual basis both month-to-month and from one individual to another.

  2. Health and safety in medical laboratories*

    Harrington, J M

    1982-01-01

    There has been a large increase in the number of persons employed in medical laboratories in the last 25 years. These workers are exposed to a variety of infective agents in the course of their work, the most important being Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Salmonella typhi, Brucella spp., and serum hepatitis virus. Chemical and physical hazards include toxic chemicals, lacerations, skin disease, and possibly cancer. Current knowledge of safe working practice in laboratories leaves much to be desi...

  3. A Text Analysis Approach to Motivate Knowledge Sharing via Microsoft SharePoint

    Patton, Robert M [ORNL; McNair, Wade [ORNL; Symons, Christopher T [ORNL; Treadwell, Jim N [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Creating incentives for knowledge workers to share their knowledge within an organization continues to be a challenging task. Strong, innate behaviors of the knowledge worker, such as self-preservation and self- advancement, are difficult to overcome, regardless of the level of knowledge. Many incentive policies simply focus on providing external pressure to promote knowledge sharing. This work describes a technical approach to motivate sharing. Utilizing text analysis and machine learning techniques to create an enhanced knowledge sharing experience, a prototype system was developed and tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that reduces the overhead cost of sharing while providing a quick, positive payoff for the knowledge worker. This work describes the implementation and experiences of using the prototype in a corporate production environment.

  4. Worker Participation

    Shepherd, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    The philosophy and workability of the concept of worker participation in management decisions is discussed in the context of British society. It is recommended that four interests be represented in any kind of Workers' Council: management, workers, shareholders, and consumers. (AG)

  5. KNOWLEDGE WORKERS’ MANAGEMENT

    Ramona TODERICIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The empirical research of this paper deals with knowledge workers in Romanian organizations from different fields of activity, with the purpose of distinguishing them from other types of employees and clarifying their profile and individual characteristics. Also, the paper presents the most important challenges concerning the knowledge workers’ management: identifying, developing and evaluating knowledge workers, motivating and rewarding them, as well as describing specific structure of the organizations that rely mostly on knowledgeable workforce. The findings of the research represent an important factor in developing future efficient human resources strategies and practices regarding workers that fuel the knowledge economy.

  6. Designing eLearning courses to meet the digital literacy needs of healthcare workers in lower- and middle-income countries: Experiences from the Knowledge for Health Project

    Limaye, Rupali J.; Sidhartha Deka; Naheed Ahmed; Lisa Mwaikambo

    2015-01-01

    Traditional conceptualizations of knowledge management fail to incorporate the social aspects in which knowledge management work operates. Social knowledge management places people at the center of all knowledge management, including placing the end user at the center when developing eLearning packages, particularly within the context of digital health literacy. As many health professionals working in lower-resource settings face the digital divide, or experience unequal patterns of access an...

  7. Process Knowledge Characterization of Radioactive Waste at the Classified Waste Landfill Remediation Project Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    This paper discusses the development and application of process knowledge (PK) to the characterization of radioactive wastes generated during the excavation of buried materials at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Classified Waste Landfill (CWLF). The CWLF, located in SNL/NM Technical Area II, is a 1.5-acre site that received nuclear weapon components and related materials from about 1950 through 1987. These materials were used in the development and testing of nuclear weapon designs. The CWLF is being remediated by the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Project pursuant to regulations of the New Mexico Environment Department. A goal of the CWLF project is to maximize the amount of excavated materials that can be demilitarized and recycled. However, some of these materials are radioactively contaminated and, if they cannot be decontaminated, are destined to require disposal as radioactive waste. Five major radioactive waste streams have been designated on the CWLF project, including: unclassified soft radioactive waste--consists of soft, compatible trash such as paper, plastic, and plywood; unclassified solid radioactive waste--includes scrap metal, other unclassified hardware items, and soil; unclassified mixed waste--contains the same materials as unclassified soft or solid radioactive waste, but also contains one or more Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents; classified radioactive waste--consists of classified artifacts, usually weapons components, that contain only radioactive contaminants; and classified mixed waste--comprises radioactive classified material that also contains RCRA constituents. These waste streams contain a variety of radionuclides that exist both as surface contamination and as sealed sources. To characterize these wastes, the CWLF project's waste management team is relying on data obtained from direct measurement of radionuclide activity content to the maximum extent possible and, in cases where direct measurement is not technically feasible, from accumulated PK of the excavated materials

  8. Examining the effects of technology-enhanced, inquiry-based laboratories on graphing skills, content knowledge, science reasoning ability and attitudes of community college chemistry students

    Dantley, Scott Jackson

    This study investigated the effects of inquiry-based technology-enhanced, laboratories with the use of Microcomputer Based Laboratory (MBL) activities on graphing skills, content knowledge, science reasoning skills, and attitudes of introductory general chemistry community college students. The study employed a quasi-experimental pretest posttest comparison and treatment group design. The treatment group received a MBL technology. Inquiry-based laboratory activities were used for each. Four major research questions were explored in my study. The following instruments were used: the Modified Lawson Test of Scientific Reasoning; the Test of Graphing in Science (TOGS); the modified laboratory instrument ("Behavior of Gases" and "Lights, Color and Absorption" with accompanies content questions, validated by a panel of chemists, as well as an attitude survey. Mean scores from the Lawson, TOGS, Behavior of Gases and Lights, Color and Absorption labs, content knowledge questions were analyzed using t-tests to determine if a statistical significance exists between their mean scores. Basic statistics were used to analyze the attitude survey. The results from the Lawson revealed that students' mean score performance were not statistically significant between treatment and comparison groups. The t-test results indicated that each group had similar reasoning ability. The TOGS t-test results revealed that the mean scores were not statistically significant between each group. The results suggest that each group had similar graphing abilities. However, significant differences in the mean scores were found on their performance for the "Behavior of Gases" and "Lights, Color and Absorption" laboratories. Conducting a follow-up assessment of content knowledge for Behavior of Gases and Lights, Color and Absorption, revealed that no statistically significant difference exists on their mean scores, suggesting that though treatment students' performance was improved in the laboratory by using MBL; their content knowledge did not increase. Each group was positive about the use of technology.

  9. Using a mHealth tutorial application to change knowledge and attitude of frontline health workers to Ebola virus disease in Nigeria: a before-and-after study

    Otu, Akaninyene; Ebenso, Bassey; Okuzu, Okey; Osifo-Dawodu, Egbe

    2016-01-01

    Background The Ebola epidemic exposed the weak state of health systems in West Africa and their devastating effect on frontline health workers and the health of populations. Fortunately, recent reviews of mobile technology demonstrate that mHealth innovations can help alleviate some health system constraints such as balancing multiple priorities, lack of appropriate tools to provide services and collect data, and limited access to training in health fields such as mother and child health, HIV...

  10. Occupational exposures to blood and body fluids (BBF): Assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice among health care workers in general hospitals in Lebanon

    Ibtissam Sabbah; Hala Sabbah; Sanaa Sabbah; Hussein Akoum; Nabil Droubi

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) who are employed in traditional health care workplaces face a serious danger that may threaten their life; it is their exposure to blood and body fluids (BBF). In Lebanon, the introduction of a hospital accreditation system has put a particular emphasis on staff safety, and on the evaluation of professional practice (EPP) programs. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted amongst 277 HCWs working in 4 general hospitals in South Lebanon. Objective: 1) describe...

  11. Theatre and laboratory workers’ awareness of and safety practices against hepatitis B and C infection in a suburban university teaching hospital in Nigeria

    Okwara, Emmanuel Chidiebere; Enwere, Oguamanam Okezie; Diwe, Chiekulie Kevin; Azike, Jerome Emeka; Chukwulebe, Alexander Emeka

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The consistent use of barrier protection among theatre workers is low in this region, so also is hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination. We assessed the level of awareness of HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV), HBV vaccination and adoption of safety measures by theatre and laboratory workers. Methods Structured questionnaires were administered to these workers which assessed level of knowledge of the viruses, practice of barrier protection and level of HBV vaccination. Results Of 169 p...

  12. KNOWLEDGE WORKERS’ MANAGEMENT

    TODERICIU Ramona; Alexandra STANIT; Anca SERBAN

    2014-01-01

    The empirical research of this paper deals with knowledge workers in Romanian organizations from different fields of activity, with the purpose of distinguishing them from other types of employees and clarifying their profile and individual characteristics. Also, the paper presents the most important challenges concerning the knowledge workers’ management: identifying, developing and evaluating knowledge workers, motivating and rewarding them, as well as describing specific structure of the o...

  13. Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward

    Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

    2010-09-01

    The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50–100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

  14. Exploring and exploiting knowledge : research on knowledge processes in knowledge-intensive organizations

    Mki, Eerikki

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge, and how it is utilized, is the most important source of competitive advantage for a growing number of companies and organizations. Knowledge workers predominantly work from knowledge, with knowledge, and for knowledge. This study explores how employees in knowledge-intensive organizations actually utilize information and knowledge. The study has three research questions: 1) How do employees in knowledge-intensive organizations operate with information and knowledge? 2) How are orga...

  15. Radiological Worker Training: Radiological Worker 2 study guides

    Upon completion of this training course, the participant will have the knowledge to work safely in areas controlled for radiological purposes using proper radiological practices. Radiological Worker H Training, for the worker whose job assignment involves entry into Radiological Buffer Areas and all types of Radiation Contamination and Airborne Radioactivity Areas. This course is designed to prepare the worker to work safely in and around radiological areas and present methods to use to ensure individual radiation exposure is maintained As Low As Reasonably Achievable

  16. Knowledge level estimation of medical workers participating in rendering of emergency medical aid to children at a pre-hospital stage

    V.M. Popkov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Estimation of qualifying preparation of the doctors participating in rendering of emergency medical aid to children. Material: On the basis of the developed test cards the analysis of doctors' knowledge level of the first help on the basic questions of emergency medicine is carried out. 120 doctors are interrogated. Results compared depending on age, work experience and presence of a qualifying professional category. Results: As a whole answers of respondents were distributed as follows: unsatisfactorily - 2,6 %; satisfactorily - 7,9 %; well - 18,4 %; perfectly - 71,1 %. Distinctions in a dale of right answers on separate sections of knowledge depending on the experience and a qualifying professional category are established. The conclusion: The weakest places in preparation of experts of the first help on which it is necessary to pay special attention in courses of postdegree preparation are revealed

  17. Age of Menarche and Knowledge about Menstrual Hygiene Management among Adolescent School Girls in Amhara Province, Ethiopia: Implication to Health Care Workers & School Teachers

    Gultie, Teklemariam; Hailu, Desta; Workineh, Yinager

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective menstrual hygiene has direct and indirect effect on achieving millennium development goals two (universal education), three (gender equality and women empowerment) and, five (improving maternal health). However, in Ethiopiait is an issue which is insufficiently acknowledged in the reproductive health sector. The objective of this study therefore, is to assess the age of menarche and knowledge of adolescents about menstrual hygiene management in Amhara province. Method Sch...

  18. Modificación de conocimientos sobre cáncer de mama en trabajadoras con factores de riesgo de la enfermedad Modification to knowledge on breast cancer in the workers with risk factors for this disease

    Susel Pardo Montañez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una intervención educativa en 30 trabajadoras con factor de riesgo de cáncer de mamas en el Policlínico Universitario "Ramón López Peña" de Santiago de Cuba, desde septiembre del 2008 hasta marzo del 2009, con vista a incrementar algunos conocimientos al respecto. Se conformaron 2 subgrupos con 15 participantes cada uno para desarrollar las diferentes actividades del proyecto educativo, las cuales serían valoradas antes de la acción instructiva y 6 meses después de efectuada. Para validar la información se usó la prueba de Mc Nemar y se obtuvo una modificación significativa de los conocimientos sobre el tema.An educative intervention of 30 workers with risk factors for breast cancer was carried out in "Ramón López Peña" University Polyclinic in Santiago de Cuba, from September 2008 to March 2009, in order to increase some knowledge on the topic. Two subgroups with 15 participants each were created to develop the different activities of the educative project, which will be assessed before the instructive action and 6 months after its onset. A Mc Nemar text was used to validate the information and a significant modification to knowledge on the topic was obtained.

  19. Conocimiento y uso de métodos anticonceptivos en mujeres que ejercen la prostitución en Asturias Knowledge and use of contraceptive methods in female sex workers in Asturias [Spain

    Domingo Ojer Tsakiridu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir el conocimiento de los métodos contraceptivos y el uso que hacen de ellos las mujeres que ejercen la prostitución en Asturias. Métodos: Estudio transversal mediante cuestionario autoadministrado a 212 mujeres. Resultados: El 61,2% refería tener información suficiente sobre métodos contraceptivos, aunque el conocimiento real es menor. En su última relación comercial en un 2,4% no tuvo una actitud eficaz para prevenir el embarazo y en la última privada, el 20,4%. El método más usado fue el preservativo y el 52,2% de quienes lo usaron en la última relación comercial añadieron otro método eficaz. En caso de rotura, el 40% de las encuestadas no tuvo una actitud eficaz para evitar el embarazo. Conclusiones: El conocimiento contraceptivo en estas mujeres es menor del que cabría esperar por la actividad que realizan. El uso de otro método eficaz asociado al preservativo es escaso para evitar embarazos no deseados. Muchas mujeres no tienen una actitud eficaz para evitarlos en caso de rotura del preservativo.Objective: To describe the knowledge and use of contraceptive methods among female sex workers in Asturias (Spain. Methods: We performed a descriptive cross-sectional study of 212 female sex workers by means of a self-completed questionnaire. Results: 61.2% of the women claimed to have sufficient information about contraceptive methods, although the real knowledge measured was much lower. Effective contraception was not used by 2.4% of the women in their last commercial relationship and by 20.4% in their private relationships. The most commonly employed method was the condom, but only 52.2% of the women who had used one in their previous commercial relationships did so together with another effective method. In the event of breakage, 40% of women did not have an attitude that would be effective in avoiding pregnancy. Conclusions: Knowledge about contraceptive methods among these women is lower than might be expected from their occupation. The use of another effective method together with the condom is insufficient to avoid unwanted pregnancies. Many of the women do not have an attitude that would be effective in avoiding pregnancy in the event of condom breakage.

  20. A STUDY TO ASSESS THE KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THE BIO MEDICAL WASTE (MANAGEMENT & HANDLING) RULES 2011 AMONG THE PARAMEDICS AND LABORATORY TECH N ICIANS OF A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN NORTH WEST INDIA

    Mitasha; Abhilash; Ashok Kumar(Panjab University)

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bio Medical Waste (BMW) refers to the waste generated in a health care facility. It carries a high potential for infection and injury , both to the health care workers and the public. The Government of India framed the Bio Medical Waste (Management and Handling) Rules in the year 1998 and subsequently amended , the last amendments being in 2011. OBJECTIVE : To Assess the Knowledge with respect to the Biomedical Waste (Management &Handling)...

  1. The Knowledge Retrieval Matrix

    Gammelgaard, Jens; Ritter, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    AbstractPrevious discussions of knowledge transfer within multinational corporations tended tofocus on the process as an isolated phenomenon and on the factors that impede the process.Less attention has been given to how the individual knowledge worker retrieves or identifies,and then decodes...... knowledge accessed from the corporate memory. We suggest thatmultinational companies (MNCs) solve knowledge retrieval problems by implementingvirtual communities of practice - intranet-based collaborative forums. Codification andpersonalization strategies have previously been emphasized as an either...

  2. Knowledge assessment of Cienfuegos´ health workers on human toxocariasis. Evaluación de los conocimientos sobre la toxocariosis humana del personal médico del municipio de Cienfuegos.

    Martina S. Jiménez Suárez

    Full Text Available Background: Human toxocariasis is one of the most worldwide extended zoonosis. It mainly affects children and it is not always well known by medical staff. Objective: To assess knowledge of Cienfuegos´s health workers on human toxocariasis. Method: A descriptive cross-sectional study was developed from May to September 2005 and a survey was applied to a total sample of 51 doctors through a randomized, stratified sampling. In addition to consider professional category, years of experience and knowledge on zoonosis, we analyzed different aspects the form the variable general knowledge on human toxocariasis. Findings: We could develop a knowledge assessment on toxocariasis in Cienfuegos´ doctors. These findings were compared with surveys in other countries. There is not history of this kind of research in Cuba. Conclusions: Cienfuegos´ doctors knowledge on toxocariasis diagnosis, transmission, and prevention and not satisfactory except for clinic and treatment.Fundamento: La toxocariosis humana es una de las zoonosis más extendidas a escala mundial. Afecta principalmente a la población infantil y no siempre es bien conocida por el personal médico. Objetivo: Evaluar los conocimientos sobre toxocariosis humana del personal médico del municipio Cienfuegos. Método: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal de mayo a septiembre del 2005 y se aplicó una encuesta a una muestra total de 51 médicos a través de un muestreo aleatorio y estratificado por los diferentes consejos populares. Además de considerar categoría profesional, años de experiencia de la especialidad y capacitación o no sobre zoonosis, se analizaron varios aspectos que conforman la variable conocimiento general sobre toxocariosis humana. Resultados: Se logró con esta investigación realizar una evaluación del conocimiento sobre toxocariosis que tienen los médicos de diferentes categorías del municipio de Cienfuegos. Estos resultados fueron comparados con encuestas de otros países y no hay antecedentes de este tipo trabajo en Cuba. Conclusiones: Los conocimientos que tienen los médicos del municipio Cienfuegos, relacionados con la transmisión, diagnóstico y prevención de la toxocariosis son insuficientes, excepto en la clínica y en el tratamiento.

  3. VOLUNTARY LIFESTYLE CHANGES AND KNOWLEDGE ABOUT HEALTHY LIFESTYLES OF CHILEAN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE WORKERS CAMBIOS DE ESTILO DE VIDA Y CONOCIMIENTOS SOBRE ALIMENTACIÓN SALUDABLE Y ACTIVIDAD FÍSICA EN PROFESIONALES DE ATENCIÓN PRIMARIA EN CHILE

    Svenja Jungjohann

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at assessing life style changes and knowledge regarding healthy diet and physical activity among Chilean primary health care (PHC professionals. The sample of 194 PHC workers was composed of physicians, nurses, nutritionists, midwives and social workers, of which 86% were women.The majority reported to have made positive changes in their lifestyle: more than 80% stated that they consumed less fat and ate more vegetables; two-thirds said they ate less sugar; around half reported that they drank less alcohol and 45% that they were more physically active. Negative changes like increasing the consumption of soft drinks, alcohol and tobacco were highest in the youngest of all the age groups. Eighty percents correctly answered the knowledge questions about healthy diet and physical activity. Significant differences among the professionals could be identified. Most of the PHC professionals show a positive change in their lifestyle and have a high knowledge level about healthy diet and physical activity. It has to be emphasized that good teamwork among nutritionists, physicians, nurses and other PHC workers is a necessary pre-condition to improve the effectiveness of a heath care team dealing with non-communicable disease preventionSe evaluaron los cambios en los estilos de vida y conocimientos en alimentación saludable y actividad física en profesionales de atención primaria de salud. Se aplicó una encuesta a 194 profesionales (médicos, enfermeras, nutricionistas, matronas y asistentes sociales, de los cuales el 86% eran mujeres. Se observó que durante el último año, la mayoría de los profesionales modificó sus hábitos hacia estilos de vida mas saludables. Alrededor del 80% señalaron que consumen menos grasas y consumen mas verduras, dos tercios indicaron consumir menos azúcar, alrededor de la mitad menos alcohol y un 45% hacen más actividad física. La gente mas joven es la que ha hecho las mayores modificaciones, a pesar que aumentaron el consumo de bebidas gaseosas, alcohol y tabaco. Un 80% de los profesionales respondió correctamente las preguntas relacionadas con alimentación y actividad física. Se encontró diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre los diferentes grupos de profesionales. Se concluye que muchos profesionales han efectuado cambios hacia estilos de vida mas saludable, tienen un buen conocimiento de hábitos alimentarios y actividad física. Estos resultados indican la importancia del trabajo en equipo para contribuir a la prevención de las enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles

  4. HIV/AIDS and Croatian Migrant Workers

    TULHOFER, Aleksandar; Brouillard, Pamela; Nikoli?, Neboja; Greiner, Nina

    2006-01-01

    Due to their geographical mobility and long periods of separation from intimate partners, migrant workers are at increased risk for a variety of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV/AIDS. This study sought to investigate patterns in HIV/AIDS related knowledge, attitudes and sexual behaviour in migrant workers in Croatia. In 2003, 566 male migrant workers were recruited during regular required medical examinations and surveyed at seven locations throughout the count...

  5. Bringing Theory into Practice: A Study of Effective Leadership at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Khoury, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Leadership development, a component of HRD, is becoming an area of increasingly important practice for all organizations. When companies such as Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory rely on knowledge workers for success, leadership becomes even more important. This research paper tests the hypothesis that leadership credibility and the courage

  6. Preparing the radiation protection worker to meet multiple needs

    At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the radiation protection worker aids in protecting personnel and their surrounding environment from the hazards of radiation. These individuals use their technical knowledge, skills, and abilities to survey and monitor various project-related activities. They must also provide guidance in project design, development, and implementation. These combined efforts assure that protective measures are taken in accordance with applicable standards. The ORNL performance-based training program enhances the skills of the worker. The program incorporates job specific information on the diverse facilities and activities monitored with basic fundamentals of radiation protection. Successful completion of this program includes passing both a qualification exam and an on-the-job skills review. This paper details the structure of such a program and explains the strategies taken to reach the program's goals. 4 refs., 2 tabs

  7. Migrant Workers and the Changing Psychological Contract

    Morgan, Arthur; Finniear, Jocelyn

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The influx of migrant workers in the UK has widespread interest. This group's experience of the British work place has evoked considerable debate ranging from the potential to be exploited through unscrupulous practices to allegations about taking away jobs from British workers. The purpose of this paper is to extend knowledge about the…

  8. Turning Blue-Collar Workers into Knowledge Workers.

    Cusimano, James M.

    1995-01-01

    A training approach developed by Management Technology Strategies makes blue-collar employees responsible for their own learning. The adaptable system follows three phases: (1) data and design; (2) documentation; and (3) training. The organization provides trainers, tools, and resources, but employees must be proactively involved in using them.…

  9. HIV prevalence, AIDS knowledge, and condom use among female sex workers in Santiago, Chile Prevalencia del VIH, conocimientos sobre el SIDA, y uso del condn en trabajadoras sexuales de Santiago, Chile

    Jaime E. Barrientos

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes HIV seroprevalence, knowledge of HIV transmission, and condom use among female sex workers (FSW attending five specialized sexually transmitted disease (STD clinics in Santiago, Chile. A short questionnaire with socio-demographic, AIDS knowledge, and condom-use variables was administered to 626 FSW. HIV seroprevalence was estimated with a blood test sent to the Chilean Public Health Institute. ELISA was used to confirm HIV in suspected cases. HIV prevalence was 0%. FSW showed adequate overall knowledge of HIV, even better than reported for the Chilean general population on some items. Condom use with clients was high ("always" = 93.4%, although regular use with steady partners was low ("always" = 9.9%. The zero HIV seroprevalence and consistent condom use with clients confirms the positive impact of intervention strategies for FSW, increasing both correct knowledge of AIDS and condom use with clients and helping decrease these women's HIV/AIDS vulnerability.Este artculo examina la prevalencia del VIH, los conocimientos respecto a su infeccin y, adems, describe el uso del condn en mujeres que ejercen el comercio sexual en Santiago de Chile y que son atendidas en cinco centros especializados de enfermedades de transmisin sexual. Se aplic una encuesta que indagaba sobre las caractersticas sociodemogrficas, el conocimiento sobre el VIH/SIDA y el uso del condn a 626 mujeres. La prevalencia del VIH fue evaluada mediante un examen de ELISA. La prevalencia del VIH fue 0. El conocimiento del VIH fue bueno e, incluso, mejor que en poblacin general, en algunos indicadores. El uso del condn con los clientes fue alto, aunque su uso regular con las parejas estables fue bajo. La prevalencia cero del VIH y el uso consistente de condones con los clientes confirma el impacto positivo que han tenido las estrategias de intervencin implementadas para estos grupos, incrementando el conocimiento adecuado sobre el SIDA y el uso del condn con los clientes, contribuyendo a la disminucin de la vulnerabilidad de estas mujeres hacia el.

  10. Educação ambiental e o conhecimento do trabalhador em saúde sobre situações de risco Environmental education and health workers' knowledge on risk situations

    Miriam Maraninchi Alam

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Este texto trata da análise, no processo de trabalho em saúde, das características do conhecimento adquirido e produzido pelos trabalhadores, acerca da prevenção e controle de acidentes com materiais perfurocortantes e fluidos biológicos no ambiente hospitalar. Verifica a presença ou não de uma visão integrada de saúde entre trabalhador e instituição. Caracteriza-se como uma pesquisa quantitativa, com progressiva análise contextualizada e, portanto, com um enfoque qualitativo do problema, apoiada em conceitos de educação ambiental, trabalho e saúde. Um total de 130 trabalhadores, em dois Hospitais Universitários da Região Sul do extremo sul do Rio Grande do Sul, em setores de clínica médica, cirúrgica e de pronto atendimento. A análise dos dados foi realizada por meio do cruzamento dos ambientes institucionais e das categorias profissionais com variáveis que caracterizam o processo de trabalho. Entre os dois ambientes institucionais estudados, o Ambiente Institucional "B" apresentou um trabalho educativo, de prevenção e controle mais atuante do que no Ambiente Institucional "A" e, conseqüentemente, uma maior aderência de seus trabalhadores sobre a necessidade de trabalharem com mais segurança.This work intents to analyse, on the health-care work environment, the characteristics of the knowledge acquired and produced by the workers, about accidents prevention and control with cutting material and biological fluids in the hospital environment. It verifies the presence or not of an integrated vision of health between the worker and the institution. It can be described as a quantitative research, in combination with a progressive and contextualized analysis that, therefore, brings a qualitative approach of the problem, supported in concepts as ambiental education, work and health. A total of 130 workers, in two college hospitals situated on the extreme south of the South region of the Rio Grande do Sul, of medical pratice, cirurgical clinic and emergency take part on this research. The data analysis was made through and the "cross tabulation" between the institutional environments and the professional cathegories together with variables, which characterize the health-care work. As a matter of fact, we can see that in the Institutional Environment "B" we see the existence of an educational work, the more active presence of control procedures on accidents preventions than in the Institutional Environment "A" and consequently a major educational level of its workers about the necessity of working with more safety.

  11. Prticas e nvel de conhecimento sobre doena cerebrovascular em um hospital universitrio: Parte 1. Educao do corpo de enfermagem: prioridade para o tratamento do infarto cerebral Knowledge and attitudes regarding stroke in a Brazilian teaching hospital: Part 1. Results in health care workers and non-health care workers

    Charles Andr

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO E OBJETIVOS: Em um hospital universitrio, entrevista direta de amostras estratificadas dos 3587 funcionrios, visando determinar o nvel de conhecimento e a conduta prtica do corpo social diante do acidente vascular cerebral ou enceflico (AVE. Estabelecer prioridades para esforos educacionais. MTODO: Pr-teste para otimizao do instrumento e clculo amostrai. Entrevista de 309 funcionrios sorteados. Inqurito consistindo em 32 questes sobre fisiopatologia, epidemiologia e mortalidade, clnica, fatores de risco, evoluo e tratamento, comportamento pessoal diante da doena. Teste de Kruskal-Wallis para mltiplas comparaes de dados no-paramtricos. RESULTADOS: O corpo social do hospital exibiu baixo nvel de conhecimento terico sobre o AVE e atitudes errneas diante da doena. A performance dos enfermeiros foi superior de auxiliares, tcnicos e atendentes de enfermagem. O corpo de enfermagem, apesar de pontuar melhor na entrevista que a populao leiga, mantm-se desinformado sobre as novas possibilidades teraputicas e dissemina mitos sobre a doena. Entre os grupos profissionais leigos, o nvel de educao formal no influenciou a performance na entrevista. CONCLUSES: A comunidade leiga e de sade do HUCFF no reconhece adequadamente os sintomas tpicos, a evoluo provvel dos pacientes e a necessidade de intervir rapidamente diante da doena cerebrovascular. O corpo de enfermagem no est preparado para a tarefa de difundir conceitos corretos sobre a doena. Somente programas especficos de educao continuada podem reverter este quadro, e devem ser considerados prioritrios.BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study was undertaken to evaluate professionals working at a university hospital as to their knowledge and attitudes towards stroke. METHODS: Individuals working in the hospital were divided in two groups, health care workers (HCW and non-health care workers (NHCW, and further subdivided according to level of schooling, resulting in seven strata. A closed questionnaire addressing epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, typical symptoms, treatment, clinical course and personal attitudes towards smoking and blood pressure control, was applied to a random sample of each stratum (total n = 309. Kruskal-Wallis test for multiple comparisons of non-parametric data was used. RESULTS: Significant differences between the seven groups were found. Knowledge was strongly associated with being a HCW and with level of formal education (p<0.001, even after excluding physicians from the analysis (p<0.001. In NHCW groups, knowledge was not associated with level of education (p=0.421. In these groups, personal fear of suffering a stroke was the only variable predictive of knowledge. Smoking and poor monitoring of blood pressure levels were also more common in strata with the lowest levels of education and among NHCW. CONCLUSION: Poor knowledge and wrong attitudes towards stroke are frequent among individuals working in a Brazilian university hospital. Although these results are not necessarily applicable to the general population, they will certainly be useful for the development of educational programs on stroke.

  12. Of Knowledge and Work

    Dankbaar, B; Vissers, G.A.N. (Gerardus)

    2009-01-01

    The idea of the knowledge economy has brought with it a new paradigm of work that espouses the professionalization of all work. This new paradigm is now affecting the organization of work throughout the economy. However, not all work is knowledge work, whatever definition is used. The number of “professionals” may rise, but many workers still face rather traditional working conditions. Moreover, we argue, the expected growth in the share of knowledge work may be less than expected: along with...

  13. Knowledge Workers' Perceptions of Performance Ratings

    Smith, Alan D.; Rupp, William T.

    2004-01-01

    One major purpose of performance appraisals is to determine individual merit, especially where pay for performance systems are employed. Based upon expectancy theory, high performance ratings should entail high merit increases while low performance ratings result in low merit increases. However, it appears that decoupling performance ratings and

  14. Conhecimento e estereótipo de trabalhadores acerca da hipertensão Conocimiento y estereotipo de trabajadores respecto a la hipertensión Knowledge and stereotypes of workers concerning hypertension

    Maria Euridéa de Castro

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A prevenção da hipertensão arterial torna-se difícil devido às dificuldades de acesso ao sistema de saúde. Foram objetivos deste estudo: averiguar o conhecimento dos trabalhadores acerca da pressão arterial, da hipertensão e, ainda, a prática da verificação da pressão arterial. Trata-se de um estudo descritivo, realizado em uma Universidade Pública Estadual em Fortaleza-Ceará, Brasil. O universo do estudo foi constituído por 35 trabalhadores a partir de uma amostra aleatória simples. Depreendeu-se que há déficit de conhecimento acerca da pressão arterial e da hipertensão e que as questões culturais entre profissionais e usuários do sistema de saúde estão em desacordo com o processo ensino-aprendizagem. Concluiu-se que urgem estratégias que permitam maior adesão aos programas e às campanhas de hipertensão. O início dessa mudança tem como fundamento a atenção primária, que leve a população, dentro de uma posição crítica, a tomar atitudes que possibilitem adequar-se a uma condição de vida saudável.La prevención de la hipertensión arterial es difícil por el acceso al sistema de salud. El objetivo fue: averiguar el conocimiento de trabajadores sobre la tensión arterial y de la hipertensión y, además, la práctica de la verificación de la tensión arterial. Se trata de un estudio descriptivo, realizado en la Universidad Pública en Fortaleza-Ceará-Brasil. Fueron seleccionados 35 individuos. Se concluyó que hay déficit de conocimiento de la tensión arterial y de la hipertensión, que los planteamientos culturales entre profesionales y usuarios del sistema están en desacuerdo con el proceso enseñanza/aprendizaje. Urgen estrategias que permitan una mayor adhesión al programa y comunicación efectiva al nivel de entendimiento de las personas. El inicio de ese cambio tiene como fundamento la atención primaria, llevando a la población, dentro de una posición crítica, tomar actitudes que posibiliten adecuarse a una condición de vida sana.The prevention of arterial hypertension has not been an easy task, due to the difficulties of access to the health system. The objectives of this study were to ascertain the amount of worker's knowledge concerning blood pressure and hypertension as well as about the practice of measuring blood pressure. This descriptive study was done at the State University in Fortaleza-Ceará. The universe was a simple random sample of 35 workers. A lack of knowledge about blood pressure and hypertension was found, as well as cultural issues between professionals and system users not being in agreement with the teaching-learning process. It was concluded that strategies which allow for a wider participation in the program and in hypertension campaigns are needed. The beginning of this change has as a basis primary care, which allows the population to make choices which fit a healthy life-style, from a critical position.

  15. Knowledge Management: Usefulness of Knowledge to Organizational Managers

    Klein, Roy L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of knowledge-usefulness to organizational managers. The determination of the level of usefulness provided organizational managers with a reliable measure of their decision-making. Organizational workers' perceptions of knowledge accessibility, quality of knowledge content, timeliness, and user…

  16. The Foreign Workers and Foreign Workers' German.

    Blackshire-Belay, Carol

    Foreign Workers' German (FWG) refers to the acquired German language skills of workers from various countries who were recruited to West Germany between 1955 and 1973 to fill menial, undesirable jobs. Contact between these workers and native German speakers was limited because of the nature of the foreigners' work, the tendency toward residential…

  17. Scientific literacy in hospital workers

    Full text: Previous studies realized by our group have demonstrated radio-induction of genotoxic damage in peripheral blood of hospital workers exposed to chronic X-ray. The cytogenetic and cytomolecular damage was significant in the radiologists evaluated. Accordingly, we have researched the knowledge of risk radiation in 57 workers to different health centres, private and public, in La Plata city. Most of respondents (96.4%) answered to know the risk of working with radiation ionizing, but a large portion do not carry out with the appropriate safety rules. The workers have not interest in this rules, it is evidenced by negligence in the use of protective clothing and personal dosimeters. These results suggested that individuals could be sensitising to minimize their risk. For this purpose we are working in scientific literacy conferences which are organized by 'Asociacion de Tecnicos Radiologos y de Diagnostico por Imagenes de La Plata (ASTEDIRLP)'. (author)

  18. Metaphors for Knowledge in Knowledge Intensive Groups

    Greve, Linda

    2016-01-01

    metaphorical concept in groups of knowledge workers from creative start-ups. The research question of the dissertation is: How is knowledge conceptualized metaphorically in groups? This question is investigated from two methodological angles: through the analysis of metaphors in dynamic conversations and...... through analysis of how a shared metaphorical concept emerges in a group. Combined these two angles on analysis provide a deeper understanding of the complexity and diversity of the concept of knowledge. Further it provides a foundation for implementing appropriate knowledge-sharing strategies. The...... group conversed on the concept of knowledge. The purpose of this process was to provide more than words as a mode for communication between the participants in each group. Thus increasing the opportunity for the group to co-create a metaphorical concept of knowledge as the result of a distributed...

  19. Interlaboratory comparison of EPR dose reconstruction results for russian nuclear workers

    We have conducted an EPR dose reconstruction study using tooth enamel of 24 teeth from Russian nuclear workers (Mayak Production Association) with known occupational exposure records. Mayak Production Association began operation in 1948 as the first industrial nuclear reactor of former Soviet Union and as a processing plant of spent nuclear fuels. Each tooth under present investigation was divided into two parts that were shared by at least two laboratories. Dose reconstruction was performed independently in 4 different laboratories located in Japan, Germany and Russia (2 laboratories) without prior knowledge on the recorded dose (double blind intercomparison). The results suggested the mean difference between EPR estimated dose of the paired samples of each tooth shared by the two laboratories in best agreement was 0.02 ± 0.15 Gy. Comparison of EPR results with dose from official records seemed to disclose the presence of at least two groups: one is modern workers (after 1961) who have reliable dosimetric information and can be used for the purposes of the verification of the dose reconstruction methods; the other is nuclear workers with high radiation doses (up to 5 Gy) that were received mainly before 1961. For the latter group, EPR doses tended to be lower than official dose indicating that cancer risk evaluations on this second group might be underestimated. (author)

  20. Worker participation - the Netherlands

    Kwantes, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Worker participation relates to the involvement of workers in the management decision-making processes. In this article attention is focused on worker participation related to occupational safety and health in the Netherlands. Worker participation can refer either to direct or indirect participation by the worker. Indirect participation involves employee representation, while direct participation relates to individual involvement in management’s decision-making processes. In the Framework Dir...

  1. Workers influence royal reproduction

    Gill, Richard J; Hammond, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding which parties regulate reproduction is fundamental to understanding conflict resolution in animal societies. In social insects, workers can influence male production and sex ratio. Surprisingly, few studies have investigated worker influence over which queen(s) reproduce(s) in multiple queen (MQ) colonies (skew), despite skew determining worker-brood relatedness and so worker fitness. We provide evidence for worker influence over skew in a functionally monogynous population of t...

  2. Interactive, Computer-Based Training Program for Radiological Workers

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is redesigning its Computer-Based Training (CBT) program for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort to produce a single, highly interactive and flexible CBT program that will meet the training needs of a wide range of radiological workers--from researchers and x-ray operators to individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The new CBT program addresses the broad diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. When a training audience is homogeneous in terms of education level and type of work performed, it is difficult to duplicate the effectiveness of a flexible, technically competent instructor who can tailor a course to the express needs and concerns of a course's participants. Unfortunately, such homogeneity is rare. At LLNL, they have a diverse workforce engaged in a wide range of radiological activities, from the fairly common to the quite exotic. As a result, the Laboratory must offer a wide variety of radiological worker courses. These include a general contamination-control course in addition to radioactive-material-handling courses for both low-level laboratory (i.e., bench-top) activities as well as high-level work in tritium, uranium, and plutonium facilities. They also offer training courses for employees who work with radiation-generating devices--x-ray, accelerator, and E-beam operators, for instance. However, even with the number and variety of courses the Laboratory offers, they are constrained by the diversity of backgrounds (i.e., knowledge and experience) of those to be trained. Moreover, time constraints often preclude in-depth coverage of site- and/or task-specific details. In response to this situation, several years ago LLNL began moving toward computer-based training for radiological workers. Today, that CBT effort includes a general radiological safety course developed by the Department of Energy's Hanford facility and a contamination-control program developed by LLNL. A comprehensive study guide and a post-training practical exam supplement the CBT effort. The ''hands-on'' practical is particularly important in that it gives participants not only the opportunity to demonstrate what they've learned, but to ask questions about their individual work situations. The challenge is how to make the CBT program more facility- and task-specific while, at the same time, making the program more in tune with the education and/or experience levels of individual trainees. To that end, they have designed a CBT program, which they refer to as an ''onion''. That is, the course is layered, going from the general to the more and more specific

  3. Radium dial workers

    The population of radium dial workers who were exposed to radium 30 to 50 years ago are currently being followed by the Center for Human Radiobiology at the Argonne National Laboratory. It is not clear that radium has induced additional malignancies in this population, other than the well-known bone sarcomas and head carcinomas, but elevated incidence rates for multiple myeloma and cancers of the colon, rectum, stomach, and breast suggest that radium might be involved. Continued follow-up of this population may resolve these questions. Finally, the question of the effect of fetal irradiation on the offspring of these women remains to be resolved. No evidence exists to suggest that any effects have occurred, but there is no question that a chronic irradiation of the developing fetus did take place. No formal follow-up of these children has yet been initiated

  4. Knowledge management: implications for human service organizations.

    Austin, Michael J; Claassen, Jennette; Vu, Catherine M; Mizrahi, Paola

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge management has recently taken a more prominent role in the management of organizations as worker knowledge and intellectual capital are recognized as critical to organizational success. This analysis explores the literature of knowledge management including the individual level of tacit and explicit knowledge, the networks and social interactions utilized by workers to create and share new knowledge, and the multiple organizational and managerial factors associated with effective knowledge management systems. Based on the role of organizational culture, structure, leadership, and reward systems, six strategies are identified to assist human service organizations with implementing new knowledge management systems. PMID:19064454

  5. Knowledge about knowledge

    Technology and knowledge make up the knowledge capital that has been so essential to the oil and gas industry's value creation, competitiveness and internationalization. Report prepared for the Norwegian Oil Industry Association (OLF) and The Norwegian Society of Chartered Technical and Scientific Professionals (Tekna), on the Norwegian petroleum cluster as an environment for creating knowledge capital from human capital, how fiscal and other framework conditions may influence the building of knowledge capital, the long-term perspectives for the petroleum cluster, what Norwegian society can learn from the experiences in the petroleum cluster, and the importance of gaining more knowledge about the functionality of knowledge for increased value creation (author) (ml)

  6. HIV/AIDS and Croatian migrant workers.

    Stulhofer, Aleksandar; Brouillard, Pamela; Nikoli?, Nebojga; Greiner, Nina

    2006-12-01

    Due to their geographical mobility and long periods of separation from intimate partners, migrant workers are at increased risk for a variety of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV/AIDS. This study sought to investigate patterns in HIV/AIDS related knowledge, attitudes and sexual behaviour in migrant workers in Croatia. In 2003, 566 male migrant workers were recruited during regular required medical examinations and surveyed at seven locations throughout the country. Each participant was asked to complete a self-administered KABP (sexual knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practices) questionnaire. The average age of respondents was 38.2 years and the majority worked as seafarers (77.3%) and construction workers (20.5%). Only 18.5% of respondents were able to correctly answer all 13 questions assessing knowledge of HIV/AIDS. Seafarers reported higher levels of knowledge than did construction workers. The average respondent reported having had two sexual partners in the last 12 months, with slightly over half of the respondents (55.3%) reporting condom use at their last intercourse with a casual partner. One fifth of the respondents (20.3%) who reported having had intercourse with a sex worker during the last year reported not using condoms at last intercourse. The number of sexual partners was correlated with age, marital status, faith in God, and personal HIV risk assessment. Attitudes toward condom use, co-workers' HIV/AIDS concerns and the duration of migrant status (within the last two years) were shown to be significant correlates of condom use at last intercourse with a casual partner. The effect of HIV/AIDS related knowledge on analyzed behaviors did not reach statistical significance. Inadequate patterns of migrant workers' condom use, gaps in knowledge about HIV transmission and modes of protection, as well as widespread ignorance regarding available anonymous HIV testing found by this study suggest a critical need for expert intervention to avert the potential for an increase in new HIV/AIDS cases. A coordinated, systematic campaign for HIV/AIDS prevention among Croatian migrant workers should focus on increasing peer communication about HIV/AIDS, especially among younger migrant workers, and on reducing the frequency of sexual risk taking. PMID:17508483

  7. Personal Knowledge Management for Employee Commoditization

    Schild, Susie A.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge management thinking has resulted in the perception that the organization is the relevant beneficiary of knowledge. Individual approaches to and experiences with personal knowledge management are not well documented in empirical studies, which uncovered the specific problem that the situatedness of knowledge worker contemporaries within

  8. Personal Knowledge Management for Employee Commoditization

    Schild, Susie A.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge management thinking has resulted in the perception that the organization is the relevant beneficiary of knowledge. Individual approaches to and experiences with personal knowledge management are not well documented in empirical studies, which uncovered the specific problem that the situatedness of knowledge worker contemporaries within…

  9. Metallurgical Research Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to increase basic knowledge of metallurgical processing for controlling the microstructure and mechanical properties of metallic aerospace alloys and...

  10. Center of Psychosocial Attention (CAPS: workers mental health

    Ceclia Helena Glanzner

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The professional that is facing changes in the mental health attention has been constituted himself in the confront of Psychiatric Reform discourse, which defends that the medical/psychiatric knowledge must change its place for the multidisciplinarity, it must start using the notion health instead of using illness, citys circulation instead of asylum, person in psychic suffering instead of person with mental illness, citizen instead of incapable one. This shock can be characterized as a factor of stress in the mental health teams work. This is a qualitative research, case study, and has the purpose of evaluating the strategies used by a CAPS (Center of Psychosocial Attention health team in promoting the workers mental health. Data collection was carried through during November and December 2006, in Foz do Iguau City, Parana State, Brazil. Data treatment will be done from the thematic analysis.

  11. Safety and Mission Assurance Knowledge Management Retention

    Johnson, Teresa A.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the issues surrounding the management of knowledge in regards to safety and mission assurance. The JSC workers who were hired in the 1960's are slated to retire in the next two to three years. The experiences and knowledge of these NASA workers must be identified, and disseminated. This paper reviews some of the strategies that the S&MA is developing to capture that valuable institutional knowledge.

  12. Chosen aspects of knowledge management in enterprises

    Kania, A; Spilka, M

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this article the important role of knowledge management in enterprises was presented. The knowledge and workers skills are the wealth and success source of organizations on the market.Design/methodology/approach: The paper shows definitions and types of knowledge, systems and models of knowledge management and directions of knowledge acquirement and development.Findings: In this article the analysis of role and function of knowledge management in modern enterprise on the basis of ...

  13. How Knowledge Organizations Work: The Case of Detectives

    Gottschalk, Petter; Holgersson, Stefan; Karlsen, Jan Terje

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize detectives in police investigations as knowledge workers. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a literature review covering knowledge organizations, police organizations, police investigations, and detectives as knowledge workers. Findings: The paper finds that the changing role…

  14. Conhecimentos, prticas e percepes de profissionais de sade sobre o tratamento de malria no complicada em municpios de alto risco da Amaznia Legal Uncomplicated malaria treatment in the Brazilian Amazon: knowledge, practices and perceptions of health workers in high-incidence municipalities

    Claudia Garcia Serpa Osorio-de-Castro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O controle da malria no Brasil conta com diagnstico precoce e tratamento adequado e oportuno como estratgia para cura rpida e duradoura. Consequncias clnicas e resistncia aos antimalricos podem resultar de falhas na prescrio, dispensao e aceitao dos profissionais aos esquemas teraputicos propostos. Objetivou-se avaliar conhecimentos, prticas, percepes e atitudes de profissionais envolvidos na assistncia farmacutica malria, frente ao protocolo oficial e a possveis falhas na teraputica. Entrevistaram-se profissionais em seis municpios na Amaznia Legal. Utilizou-se tcnica de anlise do discurso para determinao de categorias analticas e sistematizao. Dos 63 entrevistados, houve apenas um mdico. Os demais, de nvel mdio, atuavam no diagnstico, indicao e dispensao do tratamento antimalrico. O tempo de formao e de treinamento foi varivel. Houve falhas na adeso ao protocolo nacional, perpassando indicao, dispensao e orientao aos pacientes. Os profissionais carecem de conhecimento para lidar com as especificidades da doena e do tratamento. A responsabilizao de profissionais que no possuem o preparo necessrio para a ateno sugere necessidade de polticas para a adequada capacitao e incorporao de recursos humanos.Malaria control in Brazil is based on early diagnosis and adequate and timely treatment as strategies for a rapid and long-lasting cure. Clinical consequences and resistance to antimalarials may arise from problems in prescribing, dispensing and in acceptance of therapeutic regimens by healthcare workers. We studied knowledge and practices, perceptions and attitudes of health workers participating in pharmaceutical services for malaria, regarding the official protocol and the possible flaws in therapy. Health workers from six municipalities in the Brazilian Amazon were interviewed. Speech analysis was employed as a technique to determine analytical categories and to organize data. There was only 1 physician among the 63 interviewees, the others were health technicians carrying out diagnosis, therapy indication and dispensing of antimalarial treatment. Training time and period since course completion varied. Flaws in the adherence to the national protocol included therapy indication, dispensing and counseling. Health workers need knowledge to face disease and treatment specificities. Holding accountable health workers that are unprepared and unfit for the job may indicate the need for adequacy in policies regarding adequate training and hiring of human resources.

  15. Radiation Safety among Workers in Health Services.

    Jones, Eric; Mathieson, Kathleen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey health service workers regarding their radiation safety knowledge and practice. Participants were health service workers (n = 721) who received an anonymous online survey by email to test their radiation safety knowledge. A knowledge test of 15 questions was completed by 412 respondents. The overall average percent correct was 77.9%. Health physicists/medical physicists had the highest average percent score (93.5%), while physician assistants scored the lowest (60.0%). Of all the respondents, only 64.0% reported they participated in periodic radiation safety training at their place of employment. The most common topic selected where participants wanted additional training was in biological effects of radiation (41.0%). In conclusion, radiation safety training and education needs to be developed and planned effectively. Areas or specialties with poor radiation safety knowledge need to be addressed with corresponding safety measures. PMID:27023151

  16. Monitoring of workers exposed to neutrons. Information note

    This document briefly indicates who are the workers exposed to neutrons in nuclear facilities, what is the peculiarity of neutron radiation, what is the evolution of scientific knowledge about neutrons, which are the technical evolutions in neutron dosimetry, which are the regulatory evolutions about neutron dosimetry, and how the monitoring of workers exposed to neutrons has been performed in 2011

  17. O processo de reestruturação produtiva e o jovem trabalhador: conhecimento e participação The process of productive restructuring and the young worker: knowledge and participation

    Heloisa Helena T. de Souza Martins

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available O artigo tem como objetivo analisar as percepções de jovens trabalhadores metálurgicos, entre 18 a 25 anos, sobre as mudanças organizacionais e tecnológicas que estão sendo introduzidas no processo produtivo de oito indústrias dos setores metalúrgico e eletroeletrônico do município de Osasco. Considerando que essas mudanças no trabalho redefinem o perfil do trabalhador e colocam novas exigências quanto à escolaridade, formação profissional, participação e compromisso com os objetivos da empresa, o texto discute a relação dos jovens com a escola, o trabalho, a empresa e o sindicato. Na análise do jovem trabalhador é retomada a perspectiva de autores europeus que acentua a heterogeneidade da juventude. Portanto, mesmo com identidade comum definida pela condição operária, os jovens entrevistados avaliam e interpretam de diversas maneiras as condições de trabalho e situam-se diferentemente diante das modificações feitas.The aim of this article is to analyze the perceptions of young metal workers, between 18 and 25 years of age, of organizational and technological changes being introduced in the productive process in eight industries of the metal works and electro-electronic sectors in the Osasco area. Considering that these changes in labor redefine the profile of the worker and bring about new demands as to schooling, professional development, participation and commitment to the companies' objectives, the text discusses the young workers' relationship with school, work, industry and union. In the analysis of the young laborer, the perspective of European authors that accentuate youth heterogeneity is taken up. Thus, in spite of the common identity defined by the condition of being a worker, the young workers interviewed evaluate and interpret differently working conditions and situate themselves in a diverse manner in face of the changes.

  18. Developing Community Health Worker Diabetes Training

    Ferguson, W. J.; Lemay, C. A.; Hargraves, J. L.; Gorodetsky, T.; Calista, J.

    2012-01-01

    We designed, implemented and evaluated a 48-hour training program for community health workers (CHWs) deployed to diabetes care teams in community health centers (CHCs). The curriculum included core knowledge/skills with diabetes content to assist CHWs in developing patient self-management goals. Our qualitative evaluation included

  19. Developing Community Health Worker Diabetes Training

    Ferguson, W. J.; Lemay, C. A.; Hargraves, J. L.; Gorodetsky, T.; Calista, J.

    2012-01-01

    We designed, implemented and evaluated a 48-hour training program for community health workers (CHWs) deployed to diabetes care teams in community health centers (CHCs). The curriculum included core knowledge/skills with diabetes content to assist CHWs in developing patient self-management goals. Our qualitative evaluation included…

  20. Virtual Laboratories

    Hut, P

    2006-01-01

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simul...

  1. Theatre and laboratory workers’ awareness of and safety practices against hepatitis B and C infection in a suburban university teaching hospital in Nigeria

    Okwara, Emmanuel Chidiebere; Enwere, Oguamanam Okezie; Diwe, Chiekulie Kevin; Azike, Jerome Emeka; Chukwulebe, Alexander Emeka

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The consistent use of barrier protection among theatre workers is low in this region, so also is hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination. We assessed the level of awareness of HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV), HBV vaccination and adoption of safety measures by theatre and laboratory workers. Methods Structured questionnaires were administered to these workers which assessed level of knowledge of the viruses, practice of barrier protection and level of HBV vaccination. Results Of 169 participants 32.5% were laboratory workers, 67.5% were theatre workers; 29.6% males, 70.4% females. Most 94% (159) were aware that HBV and HCV are viral infections, while 77% (127) and 72.1% (119) knew HBV and HCV are transmitted through blood transfusion and needle stick injuries; a correct knowledge was significantly better among respondents with tertiary education (OR 2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.3 and OR 2.3; 95%CI 1.0-5.1 respectively). Although 49.1% (80) were aware unprotected sex was a route of transmission, laboratory staff was twice as likely to have this knowledge (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.08-4.08). Only 67.5% (114) use safety measures consistently, while 86 (54.8%) had received the vaccine of which only 48 (29.78% of total respondents) had completed three (3) doses; more likely among those with tertiary education (OR 2.6; 95%CI 1.2-5.8). Conclusion Most (94%) workers were aware of the risk of HBV and HCV and HBV vaccine (92.9%) but only few (29.78%) completed vaccination. Unfortunately, only 2/3 use protective measures consistently. There is need to make vaccination of health care workers against HBV infection a firm policy and ensure complete and consistent adherence to work standard safety measures. PMID:23308310

  2. Assessment of cardiometabolic risk among shift workers in Hungary

    Jermendy György

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Shift workers may be at risk of different diseases. In order to assess cardiometabolic risk in shift workers, a cross-sectional study was performed among active workers. Methods A total of 481 workers (121 men, 360 women were investigated; most of them were employees in light industry (58.2% or in public services (23.9%. Past medical history was recorded and physical examination was performed. Questionnaires were used to characterize daily activity. Fasting venous blood sample was collected for measuring laboratory parameters. Data from shift workers (n = 234, age: 43.9 ± 8.1 years were compared to those of daytime workers (n = 247, age: 42.8 ± 8.5 years, men and women were analyzed separately. Results In men, systolic blood pressure was higher in shift workers compared to daytime workers (133 ± 8 vs 126 ± 17 mmHg; p vs 67.7 ± 13.2 kg; p vs 13.4%; p vs 21.7%; p vs 1.68 ± 0.36 mmol/l; p Conclusion Middle-aged active shift workers, especially women, have a less healthy lifestyle and are at higher cardiometabolic risk as compared to daytime workers. Our study highlights the importance of measures for identifying and preventing cardiometabolic risk factors in shift workers.

  3. Fair Trade & Worker Organizations

    Riisgaard, Lone

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores the potential of Fairtrade in hired labour situations in terms of improving conditions for agricultural workers. The chapter will address various aspects including the contentious issue of Fairtrade and trade union organisation as well as on issues of worker empowerment. At a...... local level, analysis focuses on the implications of Fairtrade certification for large enterprises and workers, drawing on a field-based studies of certified flower farms in Ecuador and Kenya....

  4. The level of knowledge and radiation safety practice amongst cardiovascular technology, medical assistant, nursing and diagnostic radiography students and dose monitoring in radiography laboratory of Kolej Islam Sains dan Teknologi, Kelantan

    Full-text: This study investigated the knowledge level and practices regarding radiation safety among the cardiovascular technology, medical assistant nursing and radiography diagnostic students of Kolej Islam Sains dan Teknologi (KIST). The objectives of this study are to monitor the dose rate at radiography lab and to propose the guideline on radiation safety topics to improve the syllabus. 274 respondents including 30 psychology students acting as the control group were asked to answer questions from the questionnaires which cover the topics of basic knowledge of radiation and radiation safety practice. There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) between the correct answers and courses for 18 questions except for the question 4. There was a significant different (p < 0.05) between the correct answers and year of study for the questions 4, 5, 7, 12 to 15 and 18 to 20. There was a significance different (p < 0.05) between the correct answers and gender for questions 7, 11 and 19. For area dose monitoring in the radiography diagnostic lab, the assessment report on film batches of 4 walls in the lab were recorded and Victoreen451-RYR survey meter was used to monitor the dose rate for 7 selected areas with the exposure factors set for the chest, abdomen, upper extremity, lower extremity and skull radiography examinations. The dose rates at area 1 to 4, area 5 during the examination of chest, abdomen and skull, area 6 during the examination of abdomen and area 7 during the examination of abdomen, had exceeded the dose limit for radiation worker. The dose rate at the area 1 and 4 are slightly higher than the other areas. The contributing factors are the distance, tube potential, collimation and X-ray tube angulation. This study had shown that the cardiovascular technology and diagnostic radiography students have better knowledge and radiation safety practice level than the medical assistant and nursing students. In general, the level of knowledge and radiation safety practices were below satisfactory with the mean values of correct answers percentage was 42.74 % ± 0.91. As a result, a guideline to improve the syllabus is proposed because of the needs for the students to have better basic knowledge on radiation safety. (author)

  5. The Ability of Tacit Knowledge Sharing as the Competence Needed in the Knowledge Economy

    Ciechanowska, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    In recent years groves the importance of competence in the process of seeking employment and to adapt education systems. Competence of employees builds and improves the organization. In the knowledge-based economy, intellectual ability of workers in particular tacit knowledge is necessary to build the company's capital. Tacit knowledge, in contrast to explicit knowledge is knowledge of individual people, not the organization as a whole. It is practical knowledge stems from an u...

  6. Epidemiology of plutonium workers

    Workers at several U.S. plutonium (Pu) processing or research facilities are subjects of the National Plutonium Workers Study. Mortality from all causes and all cancers has not been elevated in these cohorts compared with rates in the general U.S. population. Mortality from all causes and blood cell neoplasms was statistically elevated in Pu-exposed workers at Rocky Flats compared with those not exposed to Pu. Linear dose-response trends were not observed. Bone sarcoma in a Los Alamos Pu exposed worker is noteworthy because bone tumors are an important cancer found in Pu exposed dogs. (author)

  7. Organizing marginalized workers.

    Taylor, A K

    1999-01-01

    Figures from the U.S. Department of Labor show that low-wage or marginalized workers are more likely to be injured on the job and suffer more work-related medical conditions than better-paid workers. Despite an increasingly hostile organizing climate, market globalization, and corporate downsizing, significant progress has been made in organizing marginalized workers. A multifaceted, comprehensive organizing strategy, incorporating union-building strategies that include (but are not limited to) safety and health, must be used by unions to successfully organize marginalized workers and obtain the first contract. PMID:10378982

  8. "Tacit Knowledge" versus "Explicit Knowledge"

    Sanchez, Ron

    2004-01-01

    This paper explains two fundamental approaches to knowledge management. The tacit knowledge approach emphasizes understanding the kinds of knowledge that individuals in an organization have, moving people to transfer knowledge within an organization, and managing key individuals as knowledge creators and carriers. By contrast, the explicit knowledge approach emphasizes processes for articulating knowledge held by individuals, the design of organizational approaches for creating...

  9. Advanced worker protection system

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D ampersand D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D ampersand D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project will result in the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS will be built around a life support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack will be combined with advanced protective garments, advanced liquid cooling garment, respirator, communications, and support equipment to provide improved worker protection, simplified system maintenance, and dramatically improve worker productivity through longer duration work cycles. Phase I of the project has resulted in a full scale prototype Advanced Worker Protection Ensemble (AWPE, everything the worker will wear), with sub-scale support equipment, suitable for integrated testing and preliminary evaluation. Phase II will culminate in a full scale, certified, pre-production AWPS and a site demonstration

  10. Advanced worker protection system

    Caldwell, B.; Duncan, P.; Myers, J.

    1995-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D&D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D&D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project will result in the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS will be built around a life support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack will be combined with advanced protective garments, advanced liquid cooling garment, respirator, communications, and support equipment to provide improved worker protection, simplified system maintenance, and dramatically improve worker productivity through longer duration work cycles. Phase I of the project has resulted in a full scale prototype Advanced Worker Protection Ensemble (AWPE, everything the worker will wear), with sub-scale support equipment, suitable for integrated testing and preliminary evaluation. Phase II will culminate in a full scale, certified, pre-production AWPS and a site demonstration.

  11. The effect of a laboratory-based, in-context, constructivist teaching approach on preservice teachers' science knowledge and teaching efficacy

    Thompson, Ruthanne

    This study began with a concern about elementary teachers, as a whole, avoiding the teaching of science in the elementary classroom. The three main factors noted as reasons for this avoidance were: (1) minimum science requirements to reach certification, leading to a lack of preparedness; (2) lack of exposure to science in elementary school; and (3) general dislike for and understanding of science leading to a low self-efficacy in science teaching. The goal of the Environmental Science Lab for Elementary Educators (ESLEE) was to conduct an intervention. The intervention was lab-based and utilized in-context, constructivist approaches to positively influence participants' abilities to retain science content knowledge and to affect their belief in themselves as teachers. This intervention was created to respond to all three of the main avoidance factors noted above. The research utilized a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest control group design. Two pretests and two posttests (science teaching efficacy and content knowledge) were given to all 1,100 environmental science lab students at the participating institution over two long semesters. Three experimental/control groups were formed from this population. The Experimental Group was comprised of 46 students who participated in the ESLEE Intervention. Control Group 1 was comprised of 232 self-described preservice educators (SDPEEs) in "regular" labs. Control Group 2 was comprised of 62 nonSDPEEs taught by ESLEE instructors in "regular" lab settings. A DM MANOVA was used to analyze the data. The results demonstrated that the ESLEE Intervention was statistically significant at the p > .05 level for science teaching efficacy between the Experimental Group and Control Group 1, and was statistically significant for both content knowledge and efficacy between the Experimental Group and Control Group 2. More notably, the effect size (delta) results ranged from .19 to .71 and .06 to .55 (partial eta squared) and demonstrated the practical significance of implementing the ESLEE Intervention.

  12. Epidemiological study of health hazards among workers handling engineered nanomaterials

    Liou, Saou-Hsing, E-mail: shliou@nhri.org.tw; Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Wang, Shu-Li; Li, Lih-Ann; Chiang, Hung-Che; Li, Wan-Fen; Lin, Pin-Pin [National Health Research Institutes, Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, Taiwan (China); Lai, Ching-Huang [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Public Health, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hui-Ling [Fu Jen Catholic University, Department of Chemistry, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ming-Hsiu; Hsu, Jin-Huei; Chen, Chiou-Rong [Council of Labor Affairs, Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Taiwan (China); Shih, Tung-Sheng [College of Public Health, China Medical University and Hospital, Institute of Environmental Health, Taiwan (China); Liao, Hui-Yi; Chung, Yu-Teh [National Health Research Institutes, Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-15

    The aim of this study was to establish and identify the health effect markers of workers with potential exposure to nanoparticles (20-100 nm) during manufacturing and/or application of nanomaterials. For this cross-sectional study, we recruited 227 workers who handled nanomaterials and 137 workers for comparison who did not from 14 plants in Taiwan. A questionnaire was used to collect data on exposure status, demographics, and potential confounders. The health effect markers were measured in the medical laboratory. Control banding from the Nanotool Risk Level Matrix was used to categorize the exposure risk levels of the workers. The results showed that the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD) in risk level 1 (RL1) and risk level 2 (RL2) workers was significantly (p < 0.05) lower than in control workers. A significantly decreasing gradient was found for SOD (control > RL1 > RL2). Another antioxidant, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), was significantly lower only in RL1 workers than in the control workers. The cardiovascular markers, fibrinogen and ICAM (intercellular adhesion molecule), were significantly higher in RL2 workers than in controls and a significant dose-response with an increasing trend was found for these two cardiovascular markers. Another cardiovascular marker, interleukin-6, was significantly increased among RL1 workers, but not among RL2 workers. The accuracy rate for remembering 7-digits and reciting them backwards was significantly lower in RL2 workers (OR = 0.48) than in controls and a significantly reversed gradient was also found for the correct rate of backward memory (OR = 0.90 for RL1, OR = 0.48 for RL2, p < 0.05 in test for trend). Depression of antioxidant enzymes and increased expression of cardiovascular markers were found among workers handling nanomaterials. Antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD and GPX, and cardiovascular markers, such as fibrinogen, ICAM, and interluekin-6, are possible biomarkers for medical surveillance of workers handling engineered nanomaterials.

  13. Are workers of Atta leafcutter ants capable of reproduction?

    Dijkstra, Michiel Bendert; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    2006-01-01

    ovaries. Workers of Atta leafcutter ants only lay trophic eggs in queenright colonies. Although Atta colonies are commonly kept at universities, museums, and zoos, no reports of worker sons in orphaned colonies exist, suggesting that Atta workers are infertile. To explicitly test this, we created eleven...... orphaned laboratory nests of Atta cephalotes, A. sexdens, and A. colombica, and maintained them for 3-6months after queen loss. Eight colonies did not produce any brood, but three nests produced 1-4 worker-derived male larvae and pupae. Microsatellite genotyping indicated that these were worker sons...... fertility is low compared to the sister genus Acromyrmex, where workers routinely produce normally-size males after queen loss in the laboratory. We hypothesize that worker reproduction in orphaned Atta field colonies is almost never successful because the last workers die before their sons can be raised to...

  14. Knowledge Sharing in Workplace: Motivators and Demotivators

    Oye.N.D

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an overview of knowledge sharing in workplace. Based on the review of critical literaturesby the authors, they infer that knowledge sharing in workplace can be influenced by motivators anddemotivators. Activities of knowledge sharing in organizations may be on organization level or individuallevel. Knowledge sharing of both levels is critical to the success or failure of knowledge management insideand outside of organizations. Age, culture, and industry were all found to affect knowledge sharing amongworkers. A common stereotype is that older workers hoard knowledge because they are more insecure andfeel threatened by younger workers. Since older workers have more valuable knowledge, younger workersneeded to entice their older colleagues to share their valuable knowledge with them. The paper focus onmotivators and demotivators to sharing Knowledge in workplace. Theories and research pertaining to whyworkers share knowledge are reviewed. While all industry need knowledge and innovation, it is also truethat the pace of change and the need to innovate differs from industry to industry. Technology wasacknowledged to have a high important role in increasing productivity of knowledge sharing. It plays acritical role in creating, storing and distributing explicit knowledge in an accessible and expeditiousmanner.

  15. Triggering meaningful change : human resource management and health worker performance in an AIDS-endemic setting

    Dieleman, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis intends to contribute to building evidence and expanding the knowledge base in the field of Human Resource Management (HRM) and health worker performance in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC). It identifies the impact of HIV/AIDS on health workers, explores the factors influencing motivation of health workers, and examines the evidence on the effectiveness of HRM on health workers motivation and performance. In addition, it discusses whether HRM could contribute effectively t...

  16. Knowledge crash and knowledge management

    Ermine, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    This article, by including the problem of “Knowledge Crash” in the more general framework of “Knowledge Management”, enlarges the concepts of knowledge, generation and knowledge transfer. It proposes a global approach, starting from a strategic analysis of a knowledge capital and ending in the implementation of socio-technical devices for inter-generational knowledge transfer.

  17. Dimensions of knowledge sharing and reuse.

    Musen, M A

    1992-10-01

    Many workers in medical informatics are seeking to reuse knowledge in new applications and to share encoded knowledge across software environments. Knowledge reuse involves many dimensions, including the reapplication of lexicons, ontologies, inference syntax, tasks, and problem-solving methods. Principal obstacles to all current work in knowledge sharing involve the difficulties of achieving consensus regarding what knowledge representations mean, of enumerating the context features and background knowledge required to ascribe meaning to a particular knowledge representation, and of describing knowledge independent of specific interpreters or inference engines. Progress in the area of knowledge sharing will necessitate more practical experience with attempts to interchange knowledge as well as better tools for viewing and editing knowledge representations at appropriate levels of abstraction. The PROTEGE-II project is one attempt to provide a knowledge-base authoring environment in which developers can experiment with the reuse of knowledge-level problem-solving methods, task models, and domain ontologies. PMID:1395522

  18. Asthma among mink workers

    Grøntved, Berit; Carstensen, Ole; Petersen, Rolf; Lee Sherson, David

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases of asthma among mink workers. The first case is about a mink farmer who had asthma that was difficult to treat. In the medical history there was no clear relation to work, and no conclusive work relation with peak flow monitoring. He had a positive histamine release test to mink...... urine. The second case is about a mink farm worker, who had an asthma attack when handling mink furs. Peak flow monitoring showed a clear relation to this work, but there were no signs of allergy. We conclude that these two cases suggest an increased risk of asthma among mink workers....

  19. Epidemiological study of health hazards among workers handling engineered nanomaterials

    The aim of this study was to establish and identify the health effect markers of workers with potential exposure to nanoparticles (20100 nm) during manufacturing and/or application of nanomaterials. For this cross-sectional study, we recruited 227 workers who handled nanomaterials and 137 workers for comparison who did not from 14 plants in Taiwan. A questionnaire was used to collect data on exposure status, demographics, and potential confounders. The health effect markers were measured in the medical laboratory. Control banding from the Nanotool Risk Level Matrix was used to categorize the exposure risk levels of the workers. The results showed that the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD) in risk level 1 (RL1) and risk level 2 (RL2) workers was significantly (p RL1 > RL2). Another antioxidant, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), was significantly lower only in RL1 workers than in the control workers. The cardiovascular markers, fibrinogen and ICAM (intercellular adhesion molecule), were significantly higher in RL2 workers than in controls and a significant doseresponse with an increasing trend was found for these two cardiovascular markers. Another cardiovascular marker, interleukin-6, was significantly increased among RL1 workers, but not among RL2 workers. The accuracy rate for remembering 7-digits and reciting them backwards was significantly lower in RL2 workers (OR = 0.48) than in controls and a significantly reversed gradient was also found for the correct rate of backward memory (OR = 0.90 for RL1, OR = 0.48 for RL2, p < 0.05 in test for trend). Depression of antioxidant enzymes and increased expression of cardiovascular markers were found among workers handling nanomaterials. Antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD and GPX, and cardiovascular markers, such as fibrinogen, ICAM, and interluekin-6, are possible biomarkers for medical surveillance of workers handling engineered nanomaterials.

  20. Serum PCB levels and congener profiles among US construction workers

    Altshul Larisa

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of PCB in caulking (sealant material found in masonry buildings has been well-documented in several countries. A recent investigation of 24 buildings in the greater Boston area found that 8 buildings had high PCB levels in caulking materials used around window frames and in joints between masonry blocks. Workers removing caulking material have been shown to have elevated serum PCB levels. Methods This project compared serum PCB levels among male workers who installed and/or removed PCB-containing caulking material from buildings in the greater Boston area with reference serum PCB levels from 358 men from the same area. Serum PCB levels were measured in the same laboratory by liquid-liquid extraction, column chromatography clean-up and dual capillary column GC/microECD analysis. Results When the congener profiles were compared between the reference population and the construction workers, the serum levels of the more volatile, lighter PCBs (di-, tri-and tetrachloro, sum of IUPAC# 674 were substantially higher among the construction workers. One of the youngest workers had the lowest total serum PCB levels (sum of 57 congeners of all 6 workers, but the contribution of more volatile (less chlorinated PCB congeners (#16, 26,28,33,74,66, and 60 was markedly higher than in other 5 workers and reference men. Only this worker was working on a job that involved removing PCB caulking at the time of the blood sampling. Conclusion While the results of this pilot study are based upon small numbers (6 construction workers who handled PCB caulking, the serum PCB levels among the construction workers exceed the referents. Comparison of the congener profiles suggests that there are substantial differences between the construction workers and the general population samples. These differences, and the similarities of profiles among the construction workers strongly suggest that occupational contact with caulking material can be a major source of PCB exposure for construction workers.

  1. Knowledge Translation in Developing Countries

    Santesso, Nancy; Tugwell, Peter

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the application of knowledge in developing countries is failing. One reason is the woeful shortage of health workers, but as this is redressed, it is also crucial that we have an evidence base of what works to minimize the "know-do gap." The World Health Organization and other international organizations are

  2. Capturing Tacit Knowledge for Assessing Employees' Competency and Productivity

    M. A. Jabar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Organization has to evaluate the competencies of their workers to improve organizational productivity. However, this is difficult because organizations have difficulties to capture and retain knowledge especially tacit knowledge of their employees. Approach: The study reviewed selected literature on management knowledge and employers competencies. It also reviewed existing frameworks in knowledge management focusing on the capturing and storing tacit knowledge. Results: Results of this study will include theoretical concept for capturing tacit knowledge and storing them besides developing a model for measuring employee’s competencies in the organization. Conclusion/Recommendation: This study contributes in assessing knowledge workers performance to improve their productivity in an organization.

  3. The current status of radiopharmacy laboratories in Turkey, conveniences to good radiopharmacy practice (GRP) and quality management systems (ISO)

    This study ha been conducted in the Radiopharmacy Laboratories of Nuclear Medicine departments of various hospitals and private nuclear medicine laboratories. A total of 35 laboratories from 7 regions of Turkey have been selected by layered sampling method from 131 Radiopharmacy Laboratories located in 30 different cities. During the study, a GRP investigation list with 67 questions and direct communication technique have been used. The aim was determine the current status of the Radiopharmacy Laboratories in general and the administration of radiopharmaceuticals on patients, and good practices in radiopharmacy and conformance with quality assurance systems. In this respect, questions have been asked to determine a) General status, b) Information level of lab workers regarding to the GRP and ISO concepts (i-Status of lab managers, ii- Responsibilities and knowledge of lab workers and iii- regarding to GRP and ISO-9000), c) Conditions of infrastructure, and lab services and its quality, d) Status of organizations. Results showed that only two of the 35 managers of laboratories were radiopharmacists, the rest were Nuclear Medicine specialists. There were less knowledge on GRP than ISO, the labs holding ISO certificate were in minority even though ISO is known concept, radiopharmacist were more knowledgeable in GRP while nuclear medicine specialists were in ISO, the labs with better GRP knowledge have better infrastructure, the GRP knowledge were better in the university and armed forces hospitals while ISO knowledge and certificates were more in private labs and hospitals, the armed forces hospitals better paraphernalia, practically almost all radiopharmaceutical kits were imported goods and there were important problems in quality control

  4. Health of radiation workers

    Radiation workers are healthier than the average person in the general population and appear to be as healthy as workers in other ΣsafeΣ industries. It is, however, assumed that there is no safe dose of radiation and that any exposure to radiation will cause a small increase in the incidence of cancer, this increase being directly proportional to the total radiation dose. On the basis of the risk estimates given by ICRP, radiation exposures up to 1 rem per year for 47 years are predicted to cause fewer work-related deaths than expected for the average worker in Canadian industry. Radiation exposures of 5 rem per year from age 18 to 65 would result in predicted risk which is about four times higher than that for most workers in Canada and might increase the chances of death before age 75 to nearly the same level as for the average member of the general public. (auth)

  5. Views of the workers

    As the nuclear industry has matured, workers are now regularly required to keep to just a fraction of the legal authorized limit. In addition, where higher doses are possible careful use of worker rotation will reduce the risk. However, it is interesting to note that workers undertaking industrial radiography can incur high doses because they may be poorly supervised. There are also hazards in decommissioning experimental reactors where, after a period of long operation, records or the memory of operators may be incomplete or not available. There is also a risk in reprocessing and handling the waste stream where exit routes previously thought to be available have been closed because of developing environmental concerns. In all this, trust is needed between workers and employing organizations to provide the best protection

  6. The workers radiation protection

    This file gathers contributions and points of view from different actors of the workers radiation protection, included two foreign contributions making reference to Spanish and British practices. (N.C.)

  7. Ergonomics and the older worker: an overview.

    Garg, A

    1991-01-01

    Several studies have shown that an individual's capacity for physical and mental work tends to decrease with advancing age. Different capacities begin to deteriorate at different ages and at different rates. However, important bench marks appear to occur in the twenties, forties, and sixties. Ergonomics is the science of fitting the task to the worker. It offers the potential of compensating for the decrease in an individual's functional capacities that occur with age through appropriate job design. Without proper ergonomic job design, older workers could well find themselves at a disadvantage due to compromised productivity and health. This overview will cover the history of ergonomics and its importance in workplace design. The effects of age-related declines on various physical and mental capacities will be reviewed and ergonomic recommendations to accommodate these declines will be presented. To remain competitive in an international marketplace the skills and knowledge of the older worker must be used advantageously. The knowledge required to keep the older worker employed safely and productively can only be acquired through a carefully designed longitudinal study patterned after the Baltimore Longitudinal Study. PMID:1810742

  8. Worker in nuclear activity

    Juridical aspects with respect to the workers in nuclear activity are presented. Special emphasis is given to the clauses of the statute of workers (Consolidacao das Leis do Trabalho) the rules of the Ministerio do Trabalho and the rules of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear. The performance of the international authorities is also emphasized such as the International Labour Organization, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the International Radiological Protection Commission. (Author)

  9. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom

  10. Advanced worker protection system

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D ampersand D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D ampersand D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project describes the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS) which will include a life-support backpack with liquid air for cooling and as a supply of breathing gas, protective clothing, respirators, communications, and support equipment

  11. Advanced worker protection system

    Caldwell, B.; Duncan, P.; Myers, J. [Oceaneering Space Systems, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D&D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D&D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project describes the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS) which will include a life-support backpack with liquid air for cooling and as a supply of breathing gas, protective clothing, respirators, communications, and support equipment.

  12. A comparative analysis of two cross-sectional surveys of healthcare workers' hand hygiene knowledge, intentions, access and product preferences between two university hospitals, one in Norway and one in Canada

    Mediå, Anne Kristine

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Vancouver General Hospital (VGH) and The University Hospital of Northern Norway in Tromsø (UNN-Tromsø) were compared for self-reported differences in level of knowledge and intentions to comply with the hand hygiene guidelines. Hand hygiene products were also assessed for preference of use, access, gentleness and promotion of hand hygiene compliance. Methods: A cross-sectional quality assurance staff survey was made available at UNN- Tromsø and at VGH in both print and in electroni...

  13. A comparative analysis of two cross-sectional surveys of healthcare workers' hand hygiene knowledge, intentions, access and product preferences between two university hospitals, one in Norway and one in Canada

    Mediå, Anne Kristine

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Vancouver General Hospital (VGH) and The University Hospital of Northern Norway in Tromsø (UNN-Tromsø) were compared for self-reported differences in level of knowledge and intentions to comply with the hand hygiene guidelines. Hand hygiene products were also assessed for preference of use, access, gentleness and promotion of hand hygiene compliance. Methods: A cross-sectional quality assurance staff survey was made available at UNN- Tromsø and at VGH in both print and in electr...

  14. Predicting Worker Exposure from a Glovebox Leak

    It is difficult to predict immediate worker radiological consequences from a hypothetical accident. This is recognized in DOE safety analysis guidance and the reason such guidance does not call for quantitative determinations of such consequences. However, it would be useful to at least have a means of systematically and formally quantifying worker dose to be able to identify the relative risks of various processes and to provide an order-of-magnitude impression of absolute consequences. In this report, we present such a means in the form of a simple calculation model that is easily applied and generates reasonable, qualitative dose predictions. The model contains a scaling parameter whose value was deduced from extensive laboratory ventilation flow rate measurements performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) over the last several years and from recent indoor radioactive contamination dispersion measurements, also at LANL. Application of the model is illustrated with the aid of two example calculations

  15. Knowledge Sharing via Social Networking Platforms in Organizations

    Kettles, Degan

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge Management Systems have been actively promoted for decades within organizations but have frequently failed to be used. Recently, deployments of enterprise social networking platforms used for knowledge management have become commonplace. These platforms help harness the knowledge of workers by serving as repositories of knowledge as well…

  16. Knowledge Sharing via Social Networking Platforms in Organizations

    Kettles, Degan

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge Management Systems have been actively promoted for decades within organizations but have frequently failed to be used. Recently, deployments of enterprise social networking platforms used for knowledge management have become commonplace. These platforms help harness the knowledge of workers by serving as repositories of knowledge as well

  17. Origin of a Musculoskeletal Guideline: Caring for Older Workers.

    Delloiacono, Nancy

    2016-06-01

    Today's employers are hiring a more age-diverse workforce. As Americans work longer, age-related changes often create activity limitations. Musculoskeletal disorders affect many older workers heightening their risk of workplace injury. Compounded by multiple comorbidities, older workers will need occupational health nurses with expert knowledge to maintain safe and productive workplaces. Older workers do not experience as many injuries as younger workers, but when they are injured, recovery is longer. The author developed and conducted a survey of New Jersey occupational health nurses. The results showed that overexertion injuries are the most frequently treated injuries in employee health offices. For occupational health nurses to keep employees safe, best practices must be delineated; this musculoskeletal safety guideline provides recommendations for evidence-based care of older workers. PMID:27154746

  18. "Tacit Knowledge" versus "Explicit Knowledge"

    Sanchez, Ron

    2004-01-01

    This paper explains two fundamental approaches to knowledge management. The tacitknowledge approach emphasizes understanding the kinds of knowledge that individualsin an organization have, moving people to transfer knowledge within an organization,and managing key individuals as knowledge creators...... organization. The relative advantages and disadvantages of bothapproaches to knowledge management are summarized. A synthesis of tacit andknowledge management approaches is recommended to create a hybrid design for theknowledge management practices in a given organization....... and carriers. By contrast, theexplicit knowledge approach emphasizes processes for articulating knowledge held byindividuals, the design of organizational approaches for creating new knowledge, andthe development of systems (including information systems) to disseminate articulatedknowledge within an...

  19. Nuclear knowledge preservation

    The nuclear technology has encouraged the world development and brought a number of benefits to society. These benefits occurred in important social sectors such as Agriculture, Industry, Health Sciences, Environmental Sciences and the production of energy. The research in the nuclear area is justified, accordingly, as an important factor for science development, technology and innovation. Despite the importance of nuclear energy, there is a collapse in the generation, transmission and sharing of nuclear knowledge. The threat of regression in this area is evidenced by the difficulty of generating new knowledge and practices regarding the maintenance of some critical areas. This project focuses its attention on studying, specifically, the lack of young engineers and technical professionals to replace the older, considered this, an alarming situation. Therefore, it is necessary to identify and record the key skills of experienced workers, through a set of tools to elicitation (capture) this knowledge, as expertise is mainly with people, and is lost when they leave the organization. Against, the Knowledge Management provides methodologies for the process of stimulating the creation, collection and knowledge dissemination process, in order to achieve strategic objectives. This study aims to contribute to the building of a model for the Brazilian nuclear knowledge preservation and, therefore, contributes to the maintenance and innovation of activities in this area. (author)

  20. Chelation therapy in workers with lead exposure.

    Royce, S; Rosenberg, J

    1993-01-01

    Occupational lead overexposure remains a major problem. To evaluate the settings in which physicians appropriately prescribe chelation therapy for lead exposure, 7 cases were identified from physician phone calls and mandatory laboratory reporting of elevated blood lead levels to the California Department of Health Services. In the 2 workers with the highest blood lead levels (both of whom had severe symptoms), treatment was indicated. Physicians inappropriately prescribed chelating agents to...

  1. Knowledge Management.

    1999

    The first of the four papers in this symposium, "Knowledge Management and Knowledge Dissemination" (Wim J. Nijhof), presents two case studies exploring the strategies companies use in sharing and disseminating knowledge and expertise among employees. "A Theory of Knowledge Management" (Richard J. Torraco), develops a conceptual framework for…

  2. Knowledge Management.

    1999

    The first of the four papers in this symposium, "Knowledge Management and Knowledge Dissemination" (Wim J. Nijhof), presents two case studies exploring the strategies companies use in sharing and disseminating knowledge and expertise among employees. "A Theory of Knowledge Management" (Richard J. Torraco), develops a conceptual framework for

  3. Knowledge Management

    Gerami, Mohsen

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the important process of knowledge and its management, and differences between tacit and explicit knowledge and understanding the culture as a key issue for the successful implementation of knowledge management, in addition to, this paper is concerned with the four-stage model for the evolution of information technology (IT) support for knowledge management in law firms.

  4. Culture in global knowledge societies : knowledge cultures and epistemic cultures

    Knorr-Cetina, Karin D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the concepts of knowledge culture and epistemic culture against the background of contemporary transformations in global society. Studies of knowledge culture came to prominence in the 1970s, with the trend towards laboratory fieldwork and direct observation in the new sociology of science. If the focus in such early studies was on knowledge construction, the focus in an epistemic culture approach by contrast is on the construction of the machineries of knowledge construct...

  5. Sound knowledge

    Kauffmann, Lene Teglhus

    research is to investigate what is considered to ‘work as evidence’ in health promotion and how the ‘evidence discourse’ influences social practices in policymaking and in research. From investigating knowledge practices in the field of health promotion, I develop the concept of sound knowledge as...... alternative, reflexive basis for policy making, which I call ‘sound knowledge’. Sound knowledge is an approach to knowledge that takes the reflexive considerations of actors in policymaking processes as well as in research about what knowledge is into account. Seeing knowledge as sound makes connections...... between different ideas, concepts and ideologies explicit. Furthermore, in relation to an anthropology of knowledge, sound knowledge also offers a reconsideration of the way anthropologists study knowledge, as it specifies that studying knowledge for anthropologists means studying what people consider as...

  6. Conocimientos sobre tuberculosis en trabajadores de la salud en una localidad de Bogotá D. C Conhecimentos sobre tuberculose entre trabalhadores da saúde em uma localidade de Bogotá D.C Knowledge on tuberculosis In health workers in a sector of Bogotá D.C

    Óscar Andrés Cruz Martínez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo es producto de una monografía de pre-grado para la obtención del título de enfermero-a profesional, el cual tuvo como objetivo identificar los conocimientos sobre tuberculosis en 117 trabajadores de la salud de 12 instituciones de salud públicas y privadas vinculadas al programa de prevención y control de tuberculosis, de la Secretaría Distrital de Salud, en una localidad de Bogotá. Para la recolección de datos se diseñó un instrumento de evaluación, el cual se aplicó a los trabajadores previa lectura y aceptación de participación mediante su consentimiento informado. Se realizó una caracterización general de los trabajadores y se evaluaron conocimientos básicos sobre tuberculosis. Los resultados evidenciaron que un 34% de trabajadores alcanzó un nivel de conocimientos medio, un 32% nivel inferior, un 27% nivel bajo y solo un 7% alcanzó el nivel alto. Se evidenció, en general, déficit de conocimientos sobre la enfermedad, principalmente en temas como diagnóstico, tratamiento, periodo de transmisibilidad y medidas de bioseguridad. Se verifica la necesidad de orientar acciones que amplíen los conocimientos sobre tuberculosis en los trabajadores de la salud, mediante la formación académica, la facilitación de espacios para capacitación, el mejoramiento de las condiciones de trabajo y la articulación de actividades de investigación y extensión entre la academia y el Programa Distrital de Control de Tuberculosis.Este artigo é produto duma monografia de pré-graduação para a obtenção do título de enfermeiro(a profissional, que objetivou identificar os conhecimentos sobre tuberculose em 177 trabalhadores da saúde de 12 instituições de saúde públicas e particulares vinculadas ao programa de prevenção e controle de tuberculose, da Secretaria Distrital de Saúde, em uma localidade de Bogotá. Para reunir os dados, desenhou-se um instrumento de avaliação que foi administrado entre os trabalhadores com a leitura prévia e aceitação de participação mediante consentimento informado. Realizou-se uma caracterização geral dos trabalhadores e avaliaram-se os conhecimentos básicos sobre tuberculose. Os resultados evidenciaram que um 34% de trabalhadores atingiu um nível de conhecimento médio, um 32% nível inferior, um 27% nível baixo e só um 7% conseguiu um nível alto. Verificou-se, em geral, um déficit de conhecimentos sobre a doença, principalmente, em temas como diagnóstico, tratamento, período de transmissibilidade e medidas de biosseguridade. Verifica-se a necessidade de orientar ações que ampliem os conhecimentos sobre tuberculose nos trabalhadores da saúde, mediante a formação acadêmica, a facilitação de espaços para capacitação, o melhoramento das condições de trabalho e a articulação de atividades de pesquisa e extensão entre a academia e o Programa Distrital de Controle de Tuberculose.This article comes from a pre-graduate monograph to obtain the title of Professional Nurse, whose purpose was to identify the knowledge on tuberculosis in 117 health workers from 12 public and private health institutions connected to the tuberculosis prevention and control program of the District Health Secretariat (Secretaría Distrital de Salud, in a sector of Bogotá. To collect data, an evaluation instrument was designed and applied to workers prior reading and accepting participation through informed consent. A general characterization of workers was carried out and basic knowledge on tuberculosis was assessed. Results showed that 34% of the workers reached a mid level of knowledge, 32% reached a lower level and 27% a low level and only 7% reached the high level. In general, a deficit in knowledge on the disease could be observed, mainly in subjects such as diagnosis, treatment, transmission period and bio-safety measures. The need to take actions to increase the knowledge on tuberculosis among health workers through academic training, facilitating training spaces, improving work conditions and articulating research and extension activities between the academy and the District Tuberculosis Control Program was verified.

  7. Manpower Development for Workers in Tertiary Institutions: Distance Learning Approach

    Hassan, Moshood Ayinde

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which workers patronize distance learning approach to further their education. Other purposes include: determine problems facing workers in the process of improving their knowledge and skills through distance learning approach; establish the level of attainment of manpower development objectives of Adekunle Ajasin University Akungba-Akoko and Rufus Giwa Polytechnic, both in Ondo State, Nigeria; and find out the relationship between manpo...

  8. Semantic knowledge representation for information retrieval

    Gödert, Winfried; Nagelschmidt, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the basics of semantic web technologies and indexing languages, and describes their contribution to improve languages as a tool for subject queries and knowledge exploration. The book is relevant to information scientists, knowledge workers and indexers. It provides a suitable combination of theoretical foundations and practical applications.

  9. Uncovering Tacit Knowledge: A Pilot Study to Broaden the Concept of Knowledge in Knowledge Translation

    Edwards Nancy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All sectors in health care are being asked to focus on the knowledge-to-practice gap, or knowledge translation, to increase service effectiveness. A social interaction approach to knowledge translation assumes that research evidence becomes integrated with previously held knowledge, and practitioners build on and co-create knowledge through mutual interactions. Knowledge translation strategies for public health have not provided anticipated positive changes in evidence-based practice, possibly due in part to a narrow conceptualization of knowledge. More work is needed to understand the role of tacit knowledge in decision-making and practice. This pilot study examined how health practitioners applied tacit knowledge in public health program planning and implementation. Methods This study used a narrative approach, where teams from two public health units in Ontario, Canada were conveniently selected. Respondents participated in individual interviews and focus groups at each site. Questions were designed to understand the role of tacit knowledge as it related to the program planning process. Data were analyzed through a combination of content analysis and thematic comparison. Results The findings highlighted two major aspects of knowledge that arose: the use of tacit knowledge and the integration of tacit and explicit knowledge. Tacit knowledge included: past experiences, organization-specific knowledge, community contextual knowledge, and the recognition of the tacit knowledge of others. Explicit knowledge included: research literature, the Internet, popular magazines, formal assessments (surveys and interviews, legislation and regulations. Participants sometimes deliberately combined tacit and explicit knowledge sources in planning. Conclusions This pilot demonstrated that front-line public health workers draw upon both tacit knowledge and explicit knowledge in their everyday lived reality. Further, tacit knowledge plays an important role in practitioners' interpretation and implementation of explicit research findings. This indicates a need to broaden the scope of knowledge translation to include other forms of knowledge beyond explicit knowledge acquired through research. Strategies that recognize and support the use of tacit knowledge, such as communities of practice or networks, may be important components of a comprehensive approach to knowledge translation. This study provides support for further investigation of the role of tacit knowledge in the planning and delivery of effective public health services.

  10. Produção de conhecimento e intersetorialidade em prol das condições de vida e de saúde dos trabalhadores do setor sucroalcooleiro Production of knowledge and an inter-sectoral approach vis-à-vis living and health conditions of workers in the sugarcane sector

    Carlos Minayo-Gomez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, são apresentadas algumas dimensões da atuação intersetorial com vistas à melhoria das condições de trabalho e de vida dos trabalhadores na área de saúde do trabalhador do setor sucroalcooleiro. É analisada a dinâmica seguida na construção de formas de intersetorialidade em determinadas práticas desenvolvidas a esse respeito numa região do Estado de São Paulo. Destaca-se o importante papel desempenhado por setores do Ministério Público do Trabalho e do Poder Legislativo na articulação de atores institucionais e da sociedade civil que potencializa uma atuação de maior alcance de cada órgão público responsável, envolvido na solução das questões de saúde do trabalhador. O estudo foi produzido a partir da análise documental do material produzido pelas instituições e por fóruns de debates com propostas de intervenção. Os resultados mostram que a apropriação de conhecimentos estratégicos produzidos por pesquisadores no setor canavieiro, nos recursos utilizados do instrumental jurídico e nas ações de fiscalização e vigilância, propicia importantes avanços na saúde do trabalhador e no meio ambiente.This article presents some dimensions of inter-sectoral action aimed at improving working and living conditions of workers in the sugarcane and alcohol industry. The dynamics of the implementation of certain forms of given intersectoral practices established in a region of the State of São Paulo are analyzed. The important role played by sectors of the Labor Prosecution Office and the Legislative Authority in the articulation of institutional actors and civil society is stressed. They give greater impetus to the work of each public sector responsible for addressing the issues of workers'healthcare. This study was produced from analysis of documents and material provided by institutions and discussion forums with proposals for intervention. The results show that the appropriation of strategic knowledge produced by researchers of the sugarcane industry in the instrumental resources used in legal actions, monitoring and surveillance generates important advances in the health of workers and the environment.

  11. Larval regulation of worker reproduction in the polydomous ant Novomessor cockerelli

    Ebie, Jessica D.; Hölldobler, Bert; Liebig, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Although workers in many ant species are capable of producing their own offspring, they generally rear the queen's offspring instead. There are various mechanisms that regulate worker reproduction including inhibitory effects of ant brood. Colonies of the ant Novomessor cockerelli are monogynous and polydomous resulting in a large portion of nest workers being physically isolated from the queen for extended periods of time. Some workers experimentally isolated from the queen in laboratory nests lay viable eggs, which develop into males. We investigate the mechanism that regulates worker fertility in subnests separated from the queen by giving queenless worker groups queen-produced larvae, queen-produced eggs, or no brood. Our findings show that larvae delay the time to worker egg-laying, but eggs have no effect. Larval inhibition is a likely mechanism that contributes to the regulation of worker reproduction in N. cockerellli because larvae are easily transported to subnests that do not contain a queen.

  12. Knowledge translation and indigenous knowledge

    Smylie, Janet; Martin, Carmel Mary; Kaplan-Myrth, Nili; Steele, Leah; Tait, Caroline; Hogg, William

    2004-01-01

    Objective. We wanted to evaluate the interface between knowledge translation theory and Indigenous knowledge. Design. Literature review supplemented by expert opinion was carried out. Method. Thematic analysis to identify gaps and convergences between the two domains was done. Results. The theoretical and epistemological frameworks underlying Western scientific and Indigenous knowledge systems were shown to have fundamental differences. Conclusion. Knowledge translation methods for health sci...

  13. Knowledge Management of E-Government in Jordan

    Tamara Almarabeh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available nowadays, knowledge management is considered an essential part of any organization to prepare and develop its vision for the future. Knowledge management allows better utilization of the organization expertise, resources, and bright ideas. The science of knowledge management started when the technology revolution reached every organization. The ease and availability of information, major advancements in communication technologies, the emergence of knowledge worker, and the knowledge economy are the reasons of knowledge management development.

  14. Knowledge Sharing for the Islamic Banking Sector in Malaysia

    Abdusalam A. A. Abuazoum; Nurdiana Azizan; Nursilah Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the causes of resistance or support by knowledge workers to the sharing of knowledge. Today, banks are starting to understand the relevance and importance of knowledge sharing. They are also beginning to appreciate knowledge as the most significant and valued asset that leads to organizational performance. Hence, promising motivational factors are expected to be helpful in emphasizing the need for employees to share not only crucial knowledge but also new knowledge to ...

  15. Knowledge Sharing

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    The concept of knowledge management has, indeed, become a buzzword that every single organization is expected to practice and live by. Knowledge management is about managing the organization's knowledge for the common good of the organization -but practicing knowledge management is not as simple as...... that. This article focuses on knowledge sharing as the process seeking to reduce the resources spent on reinventing the wheel.The article introduces the concept of time sensitiveness; i.e. that knowledge is either urgently needed, or not that urgently needed. Furthermore, knowledge sharing is...... considered as either a push or pull system. Four strategies for sharing knowledge - help, post-it, manuals and meeting, and advice are introduced. Each strategy requires different channels for sharing knowledge. An empirical analysis in a production facility highlights how the strategies can be practiced....

  16. The relationship between knowledge of HIV, self-perceived vulnerability and sexual risk behavior among community clinic workers in Chile Relación entre conocimientos sobre VIH, percepción de vulnerabilidad y conductas sexuales de riesgo en trabajadores de salud primaria en Chile

    Baltica Cabieses

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Testing the hypothesis of an association between knowledge and sexual risk behaviour (SRB amongst community-clinic workers in Chile, explained by the confounding effect of self-perceived vulnerability to HIV. Methods A cross-sectional survey was analyzed; it was nested within a quasiexperimental study of 720 community-clinic workers in Santiago. The SRB score combined the number of sexual partners and condom use (coded as "high"/"low" SRB. Knowledge of HIV (a 25-item index was coded as "inadequate"/"adequate" knowledge. Self-perceived vulnerability to HIV was categorised as being "high"/ "moderate"/"low". Control variables included socio-demographics, religiousness and educational level. Percentages/averages, Chi-square tests and logistic regression (OR-estimations were used for descriptive, association and confounding analysis. Results Respondents were 78.2 % female, 46.8 % married and 67.6 % Catholic. Mean age was 38.9 (10.5 SD and 69 % had university/diploma level. Self-perceived HIV vulnerability was "low" in 71.5 % cases. A negative association between knowledge and SRB was found (OR=0.55;CI=0.35-0.86, but self-perceived vulnerability did not have a confounding effect on this relationship. This relationship also persisted after being adjusted for multiple control variables (e.g. age, sex, type of primary centre, educational level, and religiousness. Conclusions Some community-clinic workers had inaccurate knowledge of HIV, which was associated with SRB. Self-perceived vulnerability did not have a confounding effect; however, future studies should further analyze occupational risk of HIV as a possible driving factor in health workers' perception of their risk. Focused training programmes should be developed to enhance basic knowledge of HIV in this group.Objetivo Probar la asociación entre conductas sexuales de riesgo (CSR y conocimiento de VIH en trabajadores de salud primaria en Chile, y el posible efecto de confusión de auto-percepción de vulnerabilidad hacia VIH en dicha relación. Métodos Estudio transversal anidado en estudio cuasi-experimental de 720 trabajadores de salud de Santiago. Score de CSR combinó número de parejas sexuales y uso de condón. Conocimiento de VIH fue medido mediante índice de 25 preguntas. Percepción de vulnerabilidad hacia VIH fue medida como "alta"/"moderada"/ "baja". Variables socio-demográficas, religiosidad y nivel educativo sirvieron de control. Análisis descriptivo, de asociación y confusión fueron desarrollados mediante estimación de proporciones/medias, prueba de Chi-cuadrado y regresión logística. Resultados El 78,2 % de encuestados era mujer, el 46,8 % estaba casado y el 67,6 % era católico. Promedio de edad de 38,9 años (DS=10,5 y el 69 % tenía formación universitaria/técnica. La auto-percepción de vulnerabilidad fue "baja" en el 71,5 % de los trabajadores. Se observó una asociación negativa entre conocimiento y CSR (OR=0,55, IC=0,35-0,86 y la vulnerabilidad percibida no fue factor de confusión. La asociación se mantuvo tras ajustar por edad, sexo, tipo de centro primario, educación y religiosidad. Conclusiones Algunos trabajadores de salud comunitaria tenían conocimiento inadecuado de VIH, que se asoció a CSR. La auto-percepción de vulnerabilidad no fue factor de confusión, pero estudios futuros podrían analizar riesgos laborales de VIH como posible mediador en la percepción de riesgo. Programas de entrenamiento en conocimientos básicos de VIH y CSR debieran implementarse en trabajadores de salud primaria.

  17. Migration of health workers.

    Buchan, James

    2008-01-01

    The discussion and debate stimulated by these papers focused across a range of issues but there were four main areas of questioning: "measuring" and monitoring migration (issues related to comparability, completeness and accuracy of data sets on human resources); the impact of migration of health workers on health systems; the motivations of individual health workers to migrate (the "push" and "pull" factors) and the effect of policies designed either to reduce migration (e.g "self ufficiency") or to stimulate it (e.g active international recruitment). It was recognised that there was a critical need to examine migratory flows within the broader context of all health care labour market dynamics within a country, that increasing migration of health workers was an inevitable consequence of globalisation, and that there was a critical need to improve monitoring so as to better inform policy formulation and policy testing in this area. PMID:18561695

  18. Knowledge Sharing is Knowledge Creation

    Greve, Linda

    2015-01-01

    -creation strategies. Confronted with the results, the group completely altered their approach to knowledge sharing and let it become knowledge co-creation. The conclusions are, that knowledge is and can only be a diverse and differentiated concept, and that groups are able to embrace this complexity. Thus rather than...... personal or tacit knowledge, the recommended approach is to co-create new knowledge by use of joint epistemic action....

  19. Why should I share my knowledge? A multiple foci of commitment perspective

    Swart, Juani; Kinnie, Nicholas; van Rossenberg, Yvonne Gerarda Theodora; Yalabik, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge-intensive firms need to leverage their individual knowledge assets via knowledge sharing to create collective knowledge resources. This process is, however, in the control of the knowledge worker. We explore this personal and emotive quality of knowledge sharing by asking: ‘How does...

  20. [Cholangiocarcinoma among printing workers].

    Kumagai, Shinji

    2014-02-01

    By June 2013, seventeen workers had suffered from intrahepatic or extrahepatic bile duct cancer (cholangiocarcinoma) in an offset proof-printing company in Osaka and nine of the workers had died. Ages at diagnosis were 25 to 45 years old. Known risk factors for cholangiocarcinoma were not found in the patients. All of the patients were exposed to 1,2-dichloropropane at high level for long-term and were diagnosed with cholangiocarcinoma 7 to 20 years after the first exposure. Twelve of the patients were also exposed to dichloromethane. The Japan Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare recognized the cancer to be an occupational disease. PMID:24605532

  1. Chosen aspects of knowledge management in enterprises

    A. Kania

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this article the important role of knowledge management in enterprises was presented. The knowledge and workers skills are the wealth and success source of organizations on the market.Design/methodology/approach: The paper shows definitions and types of knowledge, systems and models of knowledge management and directions of knowledge acquirement and development.Findings: In this article the analysis of role and function of knowledge management in modern enterprise on the basis of workers opinion poll, documentation review and conducted an interview in organization was carried out.Research limitations/implications: Knowledge management in contemporary enterprise is one of the key factors. It decides about its economic success. Because of that continuous learning, improvement and forming of system functioning in organization are the priority of enterprise.Practical implications: implications Nowadays, organisations achieve competitive supremacy through skilful knowledge management. For knowledge it was the strategic attribute to fulfil three properties. It must be: unique, possible for continuous improvement and difficult to fast copying and imitating.Originality/value: In this article it was shown that knowledge management was the important field in organisation management. It is worth taking steps forward to improve information flow, arrange workers for job completion, work conditions and organisation image and efficiency.

  2. Knowledge Management

    Knowledge management is an evolving subject area based on two notions: - That knowledge is a fundamental aspect of effective organizational performance; - That specific steps need to be actively taken to promote knowledge creation and use. Two common approaches to knowledge management that are often used in combination include: - Knowledge management focused on the capture of explicit knowledge and sharing this via technology; - Knowledge management focused on managing tacit knowledge without necessarily making it explicit, and creating new knowledge as well as sharing existing knowledge. In the context of human resources development, knowledge management is strongly tied to strategy and is activity oriented. Properly applied knowledge management improves organizational efficiency and productivity through reducing process times, introducing technology to assist finding relevant information and instituting techniques to remedy poor quality outputs. Knowledge management also promotes innovations, which can result from initiatives such as developing social networks for knowledge exchange, providing leadership to encourage risk taking and capturing the lessons learned from past activities. Both of these benefits require openness to change and a drive for continual improvement. Other benefits of knowledge management include improved decision making, retaining organizational memory and organizational learning, as well as improving morale. Knowledge management can be used on its own or in collaboration with other management disciplines and tools to establish an environment that will enable the organization to realize these benefits. Summarizing the effective management of nuclear knowledge includes ensuring the continued availability of qualified personnel. As the nuclear workforce ages and retires, and with support uncertain for university programmes in nuclear science and engineering, this issue has become critical to ensuring safety and security, encouraging innovation and making certain that the benefits of nuclear energy related to different applications including electricity supply remain available for future generations

  3. Artisanal knowledge

    Raven, Diederick

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay is about the ensuing problem that in general it is nothelpful to talk about non-standard knowledge practices as modeled after our Western ideas of what knowledge is. It negotiates this problem by arguing that artisanal knowledge is an independent and self-contained mode of knowledge and is arranged in three parts. In the first part an outline is given of the key assumptions of the interactionist conception of knowledge that needs to be put in place as an alternative to the basically Kantian mixture of empiricist and rationalist assumptions of the folk model of Western academic thinking about knowledge. In this interactionist conception of knowledgeartisanal knowledge gets center stage. In the second part, the notion of craftknowledge is opened up as much as possible. The third and final part takes upthe question whether craft knowledge is a cultural universal.

  4. Accessible Knowledge - Knowledge on Accessibility

    Kirkeby, Inge Mette

    2015-01-01

    Although serious efforts are made internationally and nationally, it is a slow process to make our physical environment accessible. In the actual design process, architects play a major role. But what kinds of knowledge, including research-based knowledge, do practicing architects make use of when...... designing accessible environments? The answer to the question is crucially important since it affects how knowledge is distributed and how accessibility can be ensured. In order to get first-hand knowledge about the design process and the sources from which they gain knowledge, 11 qualitative interviews...... were conducted with architects with experience of designing for accessibility. The analysis draws on two theoretical distinctions. The first is research-based knowledge versus knowledge used by architects. The second is context-independent knowledge versus context-dependent knowledge. The practitioners...

  5. Test your troubleshooting knowledge.

    Snyder, E

    2001-01-01

    While troubleshooting and repairing medical instrumentation may be all that BMETs would like to do, it's just too limited in scope to perform the job effectively. Flattened organizations can require greater responsibility for BMETs--and lead to greater ambiguity. Besides electronic troubleshooting skills, mechanical ability, and the knowledge of how medical equipment normally operates, additional skills are required of the BMET to effectively facilitate a repair--such as knowledge of pertinent codes and standards, job safety laws and guidelines, politeness, and empathy for the equipment user. You will notice that many of these relate to interpersonal relations. The ability to interact with fellow health care workers in a non-threatening manner and to have an appreciation for their perspectives are valuable customer service skills--potentially more valuable than being able to do component-level troubleshooting! PMID:11668951

  6. Knowledge Technologies

    Milton, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Several technologies are emerging that provide new ways to capture, store, present and use knowledge. This book is the first to provide a comprehensive introduction to five of the most important of these technologies: Knowledge Engineering, Knowledge Based Engineering, Knowledge Webs, Ontologies and Semantic Webs. For each of these, answers are given to a number of key questions (What is it? How does it operate? How is a system developed? What can it be used for? What tools are available? Wha...

  7. Knowledge management

    Nádvorník, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to describe implementation of the information system that will support knowledge management using KM-Beat-it methodology in Helpdesk department of the Wincor Nixdorf, Ltd. company. Due to lack of knowledge management principles usage this system will support procedures and processes of knowledge management. Setup and implementation of this system was performed using and combining of two methodologies, methodology for knowledge management implementation KM-Beat-...

  8. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory The Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose...

  9. Training "Expendable" Workers: Temporary Foreign Workers in Nursing

    Taylor, Alison; Foster, Jason; Cambre, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the experiences of Temporary Foreign Workers in health care in Alberta, Canada. In 2007-2008, one of the regional health authorities in the province responded to a shortage of workers by recruiting 510 health-care workers internationally; most were trained as Registered Nurses (RNs) in the Philippines.…

  10. Immigrants and Native Workers

    Foged, Mette; Peri, Giovanni

    increased supply of non-EU low skilled immigrants pushed native workers to pursue more complex occupations. This reallocation happened mainly through movement across firms. Immigration increased mobility of natives across firms and across municipalities but it did not increase their probability of...

  11. Women Workers Today.

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This booklet is an overview of female employment today. The profile of the woman worker is changing, in terms of personal characteristics such as age, marital family status, education, race, and family income, and also in terms of employment characteristics, such as occupation, income, and unemployment patterns. The report predicts a continuing

  12. The Impaired Social Worker.

    Reamer, Frederic G.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses concept of the impaired professional; reviews research on various types of impairment (personality disorders, depression and other emotional problems, marital problems, and physical illness), prevalence and causes of impairment, and responses to it; and outlines model assessment and action plan for social workers who encounter an…

  13. Healthy radiation workers

    A recent study of health records of the workforce at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), has shown that radiation workers have lower mortality rates from all causes and from all cancers than the general population. The Lucas Heights data cover more than 7000 past and present employees, from 1957-1998. This study was part of a research programme being carried out in conjunction with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in France and its results add to the much larger pool of data already held by IARC. This finding of the Australian study is similar to the findings of epidemiological studies of the health of workers who have been exposed to low levels of ionising radiation in the course of their occupations elsewhere in the world, and has often been explained as the healthy worker effect. According to this argument, it is reasonable to expect that any group of workers should be more healthy than an average group (with the same age and sex distribution) from the general population. After all, they must at least be healthy enough to get out of bed regularly and go to work. The purpose of the present paper is to ask whether this is the whole story

  14. Exploiting technical terminology for knowledge management

    Rinaldi, F; Yuste, E.; Schneider, G.; M. Hess; Roussel, D

    2005-01-01

    In the world of globalization, it is essential for companies to be able to effectively manage their knowledge capital. Being capable to effectively create, store and retrieve institutional information is a crucial competitive advantage. Readily accessible Knowledge is needed in many business aspect and tasks: support decision making, profile work processes, empower in-house knowledge workers (as well as external partners and clients). In this paper we focus on the importance of terminology m...

  15. Recommended Vaccines for Healthcare Workers

    ... click "GO" or visit Healthmap Vaccine Finder . Recommended Vaccines for Healthcare Workers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... 60. ACIP Immunization Recommendations by specific disease State Immunization Laws State Immunization Laws for Healthcare Workers and ...

  16. Nuclear knowledge management strategies in Canada

    Full text: The Canadian Nuclear Industry recognizes the importance of nuclear knowledge management and has already implemented a number of initiatives to maintain competency, capture and preserve existing knowledge, advance the nuclear technology, develop future nuclear workers, and maintain a critical R and D capability. Although this paper addresses the Canadian scene in general, it will focus on knowledge management from a technology development point of view. Therefore, special emphasis will be placed on activities underway at present at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). Maintaining competency is a high priority issue. With the on-going retirement of nuclear workers, resource management, succession planning and technical training programs are all in place at AECL. For example, a comprehensive assessment was recently completed to identify critical core competencies and the potential and timing of future retirements. Using a risk-based approach, the technology disciplines were prioritized and a plan was developed to address the requirements. The plan is now being implemented to hire, train, mentor and develop a new core of technical experts. Collaboration and knowledge sharing are important success factors in that regard. This is being achieved through cross-functional teamwork, consolidation of expertise, on-going work on nuclear power plant projects (e.g., the just completed units in China and ongoing work on unit 2 at the Romanian Cernavoda site), developing and designing new products (Advanced CANDU Reactor, ACR-700), adopting and improving Quality Management Systems (e.g., ISO 9001:2000 Global Certification and pursuing business excellence through the adoption of the Canadian Framework for Business Excellence). Capturing and preserving existing knowledge as well as advancing nuclear technology have also received significant attention. Fully computerized engineering tools have been developed and used to document the complete design of CANDU plants, and this methodology is being used for the recent build projects. This encompasses all plant design, analysis and licensing knowledge including engineering drawings, design manuals, design reviews, analysis reports and all licensing documentation. The same system is being used today for the development of the ACR. In addition, a comprehensive feedback of experience system documents all operational issues to ensure lessons learned from operating plants are shared widely within AECL and with CANDU owners. AECL has also developed smart technology that transfers knowledge from highly specialized technical experts working in our laboratories to computer systems that can be accessed by plant operators. Such technology enables nuclear operators in monitoring station conditions, converting measured data into useful information, analyzing the information intelligently and providing recommendations to support decision making. In this way, specialized knowledge can be used throughout the nuclear industry. Another essential element in AECL's strategy for preserving knowledge is the on-going design and development of advanced CANDU systems over the years. In this approach, each generation of CANDU reactor is firmly based on incremental advancements in technology, which ensures that future expertise is maintained and based on an extensive existing knowledge base. Development of future nuclear workers received a boost through the University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE) program. This is an alliance of Canadian universities, nuclear power utilities, research and regulatory agencies. The purpose of UNENE is to assure a sustainable supply of qualified nuclear engineers and scientists to meet the current and future needs of the Canadian nuclear industry. In addition to full-time undergraduate and graduate degrees, UNENE, through 5 major Canadian universities also offers part-time programs designed for students already employed in the industry. Courses are offered in flexible formats, generally at nuclear sites for the convenience of the students. More information on UNENE will be presented at this conference in a different paper. In addition to UNENE programs, the nuclear industry also started a new graduates hiring program to balance the demography of nuclear workers and ensure continuity. New graduates are rotated through a few different areas before they are assigned a specific position. The industry also encourages university students to choose a nuclear career by hiring and training many summer and coop students. Maintaining Research and Development capabilities is the backbone of any overall program to maintain competency and advance the nuclear technology. As reported in the IAEA meeting on knowledge management in June 2002, the CANDU Owners Group (COG) undertook a review of R and D capability and issued a recommendation that 'the industry must implement, in the near term, an increase in funding to R and D programs to ensure that adequate core capability is maintained in key areas'. The appropriate level of R and D funding is under discussion. In conclusion, there is much awareness in the Canadian nuclear industry of the importance of knowledge management to the sustainability of nuclear energy as a major source of energy. Many issues are been addressed but additional measures will be required in the future to ensure smooth transition of knowledge to a new generation. (author)

  17. Knowledge spaces

    Doignon, Jean-Paul

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge spaces offer a rigorous mathematical foundation for various practical systems of knowledge assessment. An example is offered by the ALEKS system (Assessment and LEarning in Knowledge Spaces), a software for the assessment of mathematical knowledge. From a mathematical standpoint, knowledge spaces generalize partially ordered sets. They are investigated both from a combinatorial and a stochastic viewpoint. The results are applied to real and simulated data. The book gives a systematic presentation of research and extends the results to new situations. It is of interest to mathematically oriented readers in education, computer science and combinatorics at research and graduate levels. The text contains numerous examples and exercises and an extensive bibliography.

  18. Conhecimentos e opiniões dos trabalhadores sobre o uso e abuso de álcool Conocimientos y opiniones de los trabajadores sobre el uso y abuso de alcohol Knowledge and opinions of the workers about the use and abuse of alcohol

    Fernanda Ferreira da Fonseca

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um estudo descritivo-exploratório, desenvolvido e fundamentado na abordagem qualitativa. O estudo tem como objetivo analisar o conhecimento e as opiniões dos trabalhadores acerca do uso e abuso de álcool, visando à elaboração de um programa de promoção da saúde no trabalho e prevenção de acidentes relacionados ao uso abusivo dessa substância. Para coleta de dados, foram realizadas entrevistas semi-estruturadas com 15 trabalhadores que buscaram atendimento em uma Unidade de Saúde da Família através da consulta de enfermagem. Por meio destas entrevistas, chegou-se à conclusão de que, em geral, os trabalhadores têm pouco conhecimento acerca dos perigos provocados pelo uso abusivo de álcool no trabalho e que é preciso investir em programas de prevenção de acidentes de trabalho causados pelo uso excessivo desta substância, levando-se em consideração o número cada vez maior de casos ocorridos.Estudio descriptivo, exploratorio, desarrollado y basado en el abordaje cualitativo. El estudio tiene como objetivo para analizar el conocimiento y las opiniones de los trabajadores referentes al uso y abuso del alcohol, visando la elaboración de un programa de promoción de salud en el trabajo y prevención de accidentes relacionados al uso abusivo de esta sustancia. La colecta de datos envolvió entrevistas semiestructuradas con 15 trabajadores que habían buscado atención en una Unidad de Salud de la Familia a través de la consulta de enfermería. Por medio de estas entrevistas, se llegó a conclusión de que, en general, los trabajadores tienen poco conocimiento referente a los peligros provocados por el uso abusivo del alcohol en el trabajo y que es necessario invertir en programas de prevención de los accidentes de trabajo causados por el uso extremo de esta sustancia, llevandose en consideración el numero cada vez mayor de casos ocurridos.Descriptive and exploratory study developed and based on the qualitative approach. The study has as objective to analyze the knowledge and opinions of the workers concerning the use and abuse of alcohol, aiming at the elaboration of a program of promotion of the health in the work and prevention of related accidents to the abusive use of this substance. For the collection of data, was made a half-structuralized interview with 15 workers who had searched attendance in a Unit of Health of the Family through the nursing consultation. By these interviews it was concluded that in general the workers have little knowledge about the danger provoked by the abusive alcohol use in the work and that is necessary to invest in programs of prevention of accidents caused by the extreme use of this substance, taking in consideration the large number of cases occurred.

  19. Knowledge Management

    Shariq, Syed Z.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The emergence of rapidly expanding technologies for distribution and dissemination of information and knowledge has brought to focus the opportunities for development of knowledge-based networks, knowledge dissemination and knowledge management technologies and their potential applications for enhancing productivity of knowledge work. The challenging and complex problems of the future can be best addressed by developing the knowledge management as a new discipline based on an integrative synthesis of hard and soft sciences. A knowledge management professional society can provide a framework for catalyzing the development of proposed synthesis as well as serve as a focal point for coordination of professional activities in the strategic areas of education, research and technology development. Preliminary concepts for the development of the knowledge management discipline and the professional society are explored. Within this context of knowledge management discipline and the professional society, potential opportunities for application of information technologies for more effectively delivering or transferring information and knowledge (i.e., resulting from the NASA's Mission to Planet Earth) for the development of policy options in critical areas of national and global importance (i.e., policy decisions in economic and environmental areas) can be explored, particularly for those policy areas where a global collaborative knowledge network is likely to be critical to the acceptance of the policies.

  20. Personalized laboratory medicine

    Pazzagli, M.; Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.; Brandslund, I.; Vermeersch, P.; Schwab, M.; Marc, J.; Theodorsson, E.; Van Schaik, R.; Di Resta, C.

    Developments in "omics" are creating a paradigm shift in Laboratory Medicine leading to Personalised Medicine. This allows the increasing in diagnostics and therapeutics focused on individuals rather than populations. In order to investigate whether Laboratory Medicine is able to implement new...... diagnostic tools and expertise and commands proper state-of-the-art knowledge about Personalized Medicine and Laboratory Medicine in Europe, the joint Working Group "Personalized Laboratory Medicine" of the EFLM and ESPT societies compiled and conducted the Questionnaire "Is Laboratory Medicine ready for the...... era of Personalized Medicine?". 48 laboratories from 18 European countries participated at this survey. The answers of the participating Laboratory Medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that Personalized Medicine can represent a new and promising health model. Whereas they are aware that...

  1. Workers' marginal costs of commuting

    van Ommeren, Jos; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    This paper applies a dynamic search model to estimate workers' marginal costs of commuting, including monetary and time costs. Using data on workers' job search activity as well as moving behaviour, for the Netherlands, we provide evidence that, on average, workers' marginal costs of one hour of...

  2. Educational Advantage - E-learning helps companies capture the knowledge of retiring employees and gain competitive edge

    Tischelle, G

    2003-01-01

    NASA has discovered that 60% of aerospace workers will reach retirement age over the next few years so needed to find a way to capture knowledge from exiting workers and make it available to remaining and future staff (1 page).

  3. Workers of Acromyrmex echinatior leafcutter ants police worker-laid eggs, but not reproductive workers

    Dijkstra, M.B.; van Zweden, J.S.; Dirchsen, M.; Boomsma, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Nonreproductive workers of many eusocial Hymenoptera 'police' the colony, that is, they attack reproductive sister workers or destroy their eggs (unfertilized; developing into haploid males). Several ultimate causes of policing have been proposed, including (1) an increase in colony productivity,...... reproductive workers. We infer that relatedness incentives are the most likely ultimate cause of the evolutionary maintenance of worker-egg policing in A. echinatior. (C) 2010 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved...

  4. Instrumentation for the individual dosimetry of workers

    Thévenin, J C

    2003-01-01

    The control of the radiation dose exposure of workers and personnel exposed to ionizing radiations (nuclear industry, nuclear medicine, army, university laboratories etc..) is ensured by individual dosemeters. This dosimetry is mandatory for all workers susceptible to be exposed to more than 30% of the regulatory dose limit. dosemeters are worn on the chest and in some particular cases, on the finger (dosemeter rings) or on the wrist. Passive dosemeters allow to measure the dose a posteriori, while electronic dosemeters allow a direct reading and recording of the dose. This article presents successively: 1 - the general principles of individual dosimetry: situations of exposure, radiation detection, operational data, standardization, calibration and quality assurance, measurement uncertainties; 2 - goals and regulatory framework of individual dosimetry: regulation and recommendations, optimization, respect of dose limits, accidental situations; 3 - passive dosemeters: film, thermoluminescent, radio-photolumin...

  5. Knowledge brokering

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    in strong tie collaborations a knowledge brokering organization can reduce the risk of unwanted knowledge spill-over. The risks and opportunities of knowledge spill-over furthermore rely on the nature of the technology involved and to what extent technological boundaries are crossed. Practical...... implications – An organization that can span both technological boundaries and weak ties is in a unique knowledge brokering position. The findings indicate how the barriers of an open transfer of complex knowledge across weak ties can be partially overcome by letting an R&D department be the networking......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine how the spanning of inter-organizational weak ties and technological boundaries influences knowledge brokering. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on original fieldwork and employs a case study research design, investigating a Danish...

  6. Advanced Worker Protection System

    The Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS) is a liquid-air-based, self-contained breathing and cooling system with a duration of 2 hrs. AWPS employs a patented system developed by Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS), and was demonstrated at their facility in Houston, TX as well as at Kansas State University, Manhattan. The heart of the system is the life-support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack is combined with advanced protective garments, an advanced liquid cooling garment (LCG), a respirator, and communications and support equipment. The prototype unit development and testing under Phase 1 has demonstrated that AWPS has the ability to meet performance criteria. These criteria were developed with an understanding of both the AWPS capabilities and the DOE decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities protection needs

  7. Knowledge Management

    Mohsen Gerami

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of European Union is "to become the most competitive and dynamic world economy based on knowledge, capable for viable economic growth with better work places and greater social cohesion". Competitive advantage in "new economy" has passed from material and financial assets on (to) non-material and non-financial belongings. The key challenge for 21st century companies is knowledge defining, measuring, advancing, valuing and controlling. Characteristics of economy based on knowledge...

  8. Knowledge management.

    Tarabová, Nina

    2008-01-01

    My thesis is focused on knowledge management and its quality in Czech companies. The issue is one of the most current and very important topic since the interest in knowledge and namely in its management and utilisation by as large as possible number of employees has been rapidly growing worldwide. The main objective of my thesis is to evaluate the level of knowledge management in Czech companies and suggest procedures leading to elimination of most frequent errors therein. The introduction o...

  9. Governing Knowledge

    Foss, Nicolai J.; Minbaeva, Dana B.

    2009-01-01

    SHRM increasingly emphasizes HRM practices as means to build strategic knowledge resources such as superior capabilities. While the knowledge-based view increasingly pays attention to micro-foundations, the SHRM field neglects these and emphasizes collective constructs such as “human capital pools,” “HRM architectures”, etc. As a result, causal links between HRM practices, knowledge and organizational performance are black-boxed. We propose a program for research and identify s...

  10. Knowledge management

    2015-01-01

    The Fraunhofer Competence Center Knowledge Management presents in this second edition its up-dated and extended research results on business-process oriented knowledge management, pro-active change management, KM strategy, knowledge structuring and KM audit, reviews the latest advancements in measuring intellectual capital and classifies more than 100 KM tools. Best Practices in KM are described by the Swiss Benchmarking Center TECTEM at University St. Gallen and in case studies from price-wi...

  11. Hiring By Knowledge-intensive Firms in China

    Roome, Edward Steven

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge-intensive firms (KIFs) depend on their workers’ knowledge assets more than capital- and labour-intensive firms. Knowledge assets, such as human and social capital, enable KIFs to innovate, solve problems, and build relationships. But managing a highly skilled and well-connected workforce presents several HRM challenges – perhaps none more so than hiring. In tight labour markets, workers’ knowledge assets are strategically valuable and rare. To attract knowledge workers, KIFs must si...

  12. Knowledge Management of E-Government in Jordan

    Tamara Almarabeh

    2011-01-01

    nowadays, knowledge management is considered an essential part of any organization to prepare and develop its vision for the future. Knowledge management allows better utilization of the organization expertise, resources, and bright ideas. The science of knowledge management started when the technology revolution reached every organization. The ease and availability of information, major advancements in communication technologies, the emergence of knowledge worker, and the knowledge economy a...

  13. Knowledge Transfer Process Cycle: Between Factory Floor and Middle Management

    Andreas Riege; Michael Zulpo

    2007-01-01

    Factory floor workers can add value to their firm from new knowledge they may discover whilst performing their daily tasks. The transfer of that knowledge to middle managers can improve process efficiencies, if they can utilise it. Researchers and practitioners perceive value in understanding a range of knowledge transfer strategies and initiatives, yet there is little empirical evidence on ground level knowledge discovery and bottom-up knowledge transfers in a manufacturing environment. Our ...

  14. Worker and public safety

    Nuclear regulatory controls have been in place for many years in Canada to ensure that the risk for the safety of workers and members of the public is as low as reasonably possible. The Atomic Energy Control Board implements these controls by virtue of a broadly based Act of Parliament, rigorous regulations and compliance procedures. The Canadian experience with nuclear practices involves about 1 million person-years at risk without a fatality due to acute exposure to radiation

  15. Kill the Workers!

    Kerbel, Janice

    2011-01-01

    Solo exhibition at Chisenhale Gallery, 2011; touring as solo exhibition to Badischer Kunstverein, Karlsruhe, Walter Phillips Gallery, Banff Centre (2012), Canada, and Project Art Centre, Dublin (2012). Kill the Workers! is a play written for stage lights, in isolation of any other theatrical elements. Employing traditional stage lights marked by changes in intensity, colour, direction and location the lighting design itself will be made autonomous in the gallery to comprise the work itsel...

  16. Worker Injury Prevention Strategies

    Ferreira-Diaz, Carlos A.; Torres-Zapata, Alma; Nanovic, Christopher A.; Abraham, Dulcy M.

    2009-01-01

    As the trend of increased highway construction and/or rehabilitation continues to grow, the public often demands that delays in work zones be kept to a minimum. Thus, the flow of traffic through the construction zone must be maintained while performing pavement maintenance/ repair/ reconstruction activities. At the same time, the safety of personnel and property in highway construction work zones must be ensured. Three types of risks are encountered by construction and maintenance workers in ...

  17. Knowledge Economy

    Kerr, Aphra; O Riain, Sean

    2009-01-01

    We examine a number of key questions regarding this knowledge economy. First, we look at the origin of the concept as well as early attempts to define and map the knowledge economy empirically. Second, we examine a variety of perspectives on the socio-spatial organisation of the knowledge economy and approaches which link techno-economic change and social-spatial organisation. Building on a critique of these perspectives, we then go on to develop a view of a knowledge economy that is conteste...

  18. Project-Based Learning and the Limits of Corporate Knowledge.

    Rhodes, Carl; Garrick, John

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of management discourses, especially project-based learning and knowledge management, indicates that such terms as human capital, working knowledge, and knowledge assets construe managerial workers as cogito-economic subjects. Although workplace learning should develop economically related capabilities, such discourses imply that these…

  19. Project-Based Learning and the Limits of Corporate Knowledge.

    Rhodes, Carl; Garrick, John

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of management discourses, especially project-based learning and knowledge management, indicates that such terms as human capital, working knowledge, and knowledge assets construe managerial workers as cogito-economic subjects. Although workplace learning should develop economically related capabilities, such discourses imply that these

  20. Molecular screening of Plasmodium infections among migrant workers in Thailand

    Kanyanan Kritsiriwuthinan , Warunee Ngrenngarmlert

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objective: A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Plasmodiuminfections among migrant workers in Thailand.Methods: A total of 241 migrants at Kanchanaburi, Pathumthani and Nakornpathom provinces of Thailand wererecruited in our surveillance. Blood samples were examined for human malaria parasites by using microscopyand semi-nested multiplex PCR (SnM-PCR.Results: Laboratory diagnosis revealed 6.2% total positive rate. As compared to microscopy (26.7%, SnM-PCRwas more sensitive (93.3% for malaria. Plasmodium falciparum was predominant than P. vivax (53% : 40%,respectively. The majority of positive cases were from Myanmar workers who had low parasitaemia and withoutsymptoms. The highest prevalence (13.7% was found among migrant workers from Kanchanaburi province inwestern Thailand.Conclusion: These findings indicate risk of malaria transmission from migrant workers. Malaria surveillanceshould be included in the health-screening program for migrants in Thailand to manage this health risk.

  1. Healthy worker effect

    Full text: In his letter published in the previous issue of the Journal (pages 71-2), Barrie Skelcher recognises the fact that radiation workers are not a true cross section of the general population because they are selected, and that they have to pass a medical examination. He then infers, despite his own experience of staff recruitment, that it is the medical examination that is responsible 'for weeding out those unfortunate enough to die of cancer in the coming decades'. Typically, the reject percentage from pre-medicals is between 1% and 5%. Thus, in a statistical sense, rejection on medical grounds is unusual, and this concurs with the experience of Barrie Skelcher. One would be rightly sceptical that this in itself could be the explanation for the 'healthy worker effect' so often cited. Though Barrie Skelcher mentions selection he does not consider this aspect further. Three different aspects of the selection process may be considered: (i) self-selection by the employee to apply for work; (ii) employer selection of those that apply; and (iii) selection out of work. An individual will apply for a job that he or she is physically capable of pursuing. As William Ogle observed in 1885, 'Some occupations may repel, while others attract, the unfit at the age of starting work.' Radiation work may repel the unfit; those that apply to work in this industry are self-selected fit. The employer then selects from this self-selected pool of potential recruits. This selection process includes the pre-medical. However, as the pool of recruits are already self-selected fit, the reject percentage is small. Having been selected into the workforce, there is then a selection process that removes people from the workforce. Whilst in employment, the occupational health departments monitor the employees' health. If an individual's health has deteriorated then 'those occupations that attract the unfit' may appear attractive. Others may take ill-health retirement. Workers that remain in employment tend to be healthier than those that leave. The occupational health departments also promote healthy lifestyles. The reduction in the number of cancers and heart diseases may also be a consequence of the effective promotion of these healthy lifestyles (such as encouraging smokers to refrain) to those in employment. In summary, the pre-medical has only a minor effect and the other components of the selection process dominate the 'healthy worker effect'. Assuming that employees are not exposed to health hazards in their working environment then, whilst employees are in employment, they benefit health-wise from employment and this further reinforces the 'healthy worker effect'. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  2. Knowledge Management

    Deepak

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge Management (KM) is the process through which organizations generate value from their intellectual and knowledge-based assets. Frequently generating value from such assets means sharing them among employees, divisions and even with other companies in order to develop best practices. This article discusses three basic aspects of…

  3. Knowledge Management

    Deepak

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge Management (KM) is the process through which organizations generate value from their intellectual and knowledge-based assets. Frequently generating value from such assets means sharing them among employees, divisions and even with other companies in order to develop best practices. This article discusses three basic aspects of

  4. Knowledge Alive

    Perkins, David

    2004-01-01

    The strategies that expose learners to the large volume of knowledge, enables them for creative thinking, self-management and deep reading. The different ways of creating knowledge with the help of creativity, communication, organization, problem solving and decision-making are discussed.

  5. Sharing knowledge

    2009-07-01

    The workshop on Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Strategies for Arctic Indigenous Communities is one stage in developing positions and providing input from the perspectives of Arctic Peoples in preparation for the Indigenous Peoples' Global Summit on Climate Change that will take place in April, 2009, in Anchorage, Alaska. The Summit, organized by the Inuit Circumpolar Council with oversight of an International Steering Committee, will bring together hundreds of indigenous Peoples around the world. This Workshop intended to bring together Arctic Indigenous Peoples to deliver and to share information, academic research, case studies based on traditional knowledge and researchers knowledgeable in traditional knowledge and/or policy issues drawn from traditional knowledge. The following themes were discussed: 1) Traditional knowledge research and education; 2) Laws and lawmaking; 3) Food and health; 4) Organisation; 5) Communications and advocacy. (ln)

  6. A theoretical foundation for building Knowledge-work Support Systems

    Laha, Arijit

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel approach aimed at building a new class of information system platforms which we call the "Knowledge-work Support Systems" or KwSS. KwSS can play a significant role in enhancing the IS support for knowledge management processes, including those customarily identified as less amenable to IS support. In our approach we try to enhance basic functionalities provided by the computer-based information systems, namely, that of improving the efficiency of the knowledge workers in accessing, processing and creating useful information. The improvement, along with proper focus on cultural, social and other aspects of the knowledge management processes, can enhance the workers' efficiency significantly in performing high quality knowledge works. In order to build the proposed approach, we develop several new concepts. The approach analyzes the information availability and usage from the knowledge workers and their works' perspectives and consequently brings forth more transparency in vario...

  7. Is the High-Involvement Worker Precarious or Opportunistic?

    Ekman, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    to expand the focus on workers as objects of control to exercisers of control. Drawing on ethnographic material from the creative knowledge work sector, the article argues that structural and discursive developments in late capitalism generate a specific form of ambiguity which is mobilized by both...

  8. Influence of Outplacement on the Protection of Workers Competencies

    Andrzej, Klimczuk; Magdalena, Klimczuk-Kochańska

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the problem of workers lay off and loss along with their exit from the organization its key competencies - skills and knowledge. Importance of management of key competencies was described. The paper also presents outplacement as a way to maintain core competencies even during reducing the human resources within the enterprises.

  9. Clinical nursing informatics. Developing tools for knowledge workers.

    Ozbolt, J G; Graves, J R

    1993-06-01

    Current research in clinical nursing informatics is proceeding along three important dimensions: (1) identifying and defining nursing's language and structuring its data; (2) understanding clinical judgment and how computer-based systems can facilitate and not replace it; and (3) discovering how well-designed systems can transform nursing practice. A number of efforts are underway to find and use language that accurately represents nursing and that can be incorporated into computer-based information systems. These efforts add to understanding nursing problems, interventions, and outcomes, and provide the elements for databases from which nursing's costs and effectiveness can be studied. Research on clinical judgment focuses on how nurses (perhaps with different levels of expertise) assess patient needs, set goals, and plan and deliver care, as well as how computer-based systems can be developed to aid these cognitive processes. Finally, investigators are studying not only how computers can help nurses with the mechanics and logistics of processing information but also and more importantly how access to informatics tools changes nursing care. PMID:8516182

  10. One Ring to Rule Them All? Globalization of Knowledge and Knowledge Creation

    Freeman, Richard Barry

    2013-01-01

    This paper directs attention at the globalization of knowledge and knowledge creation as the fundamental global driver of economic outcomes in today's information economy. It documents the globalization of knowledge and spread of scientific research from advanced to developing countries and argues that these developments undermine trade models in which advanced countries invariably have comparative advantage in high tech goods and services; determine the immigration of skilled workers; boosts...

  11. Modificación de conocimientos sobre medio ambiente en jóvenes del Laboratorio de Anticuerpos y Biomodelos Experimentales Modification to knowledge of environment in young people from Laboratory of Antibodies and Experimental Biomodels

    Rosa Iris García Céspedes

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio de intervención educativa para modificar los conocimientos sobre la conservación del medioambiente en 16 jóvenes del Laboratorio de Anticuerpos y Biomodelos Experimentales de Santiago de Cuba, seleccionados mediante un muestreo aleatorio simple desde abril hasta junio del 2008. Para lograr ese objetivo, la población escogida participó en un programa de clases con 4 sesiones de trabajo, luego de las cuales se comprobó que la insuficiente o errónea información que poseían sobre la necesidad de cuidar responsablemente el entorno por su influencia sobre la salud y calidad de vida, fue modificada favorablemente mediante técnicas participativas y discusiones grupales, de modo que hubo una gran diferencia entre lo que sabían antes del estudio y lo que aprendieron en favor del ambiente después de su ejecución.A study on educational intervention was conducted to modify the knowledge of the environment conservation in 16 young people from Laboratory of Antibodies and Experimental Biomodels in Santiago de Cuba, selected by means of a simple random sampling from April to June, 2008. To achieve that goal the chosen population participated in a program of classes with 4 working sessions, after which it was verified that their inadequate or erroneous information about the necessity of taking care of the environment responsibly because of its influence on the health and quality of life, was modified favorably by means of participatory techniques and group discussions, so that there was a great difference between what they knew before the study and what they learned in favor of the enviroment after it.

  12. Preventing the loss of knowledge in nuclear power plants

    Preventing the loss of nuclear knowledge has become an important concern for the atomic energy industry. A great number of nuclear workers are getting close to the retirement age and there are not enough young qualified people to replace them. It is necessary to identify the key skills to replace senior engineers, managers and experienced workers. This paper proposes a matrix for capturing the strategic nuclear knowledge obtained from plants operation in the past decades. (author)

  13. Rehumanising Knowledge Work through Fluctuating Support Networks: A grounded theory

    Judith A. Holton, Ph.D.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Through the basic social structural process of fluctuating support networks, knowledge workers self-organise to overcome the dehumanising impact of a rapidly changing workplace context. Such networks operate outside the formal organisation. They are epiphenomenal self-emerging, self-organising, and selfsustaining. Participation is voluntary and intuitive. The growth of fluctuating support networks facilitates a rehumanising process which serves to counterbalance the dehumanisation that knowledge workers experience in the face of persistent and unpredictable change.

  14. Hazards to workers health: a literature review

    Jorgana Fernanda Soares

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Workers Health, a new field in Public Health, requires professionals capable of dealing with the hazards workers are exposed to in their environment. These professionals in the health area, mainly nurses, need to understand the meaning of the concept of hazard to the workers health. An interdisciplinary work with the workers may effectively change the work and health conditions of the Brazilian people. Therefore, this paper aims at providing better understanding of the concept of hazard to the workers health for professionals in health, mainly for nurses. This is done through a literature review based on all journals on health published in the Scientific Eletronic Library Online (SciELO Brazil and some books whose authors approach the theme hazard. A hazard is something uncertain, a possibility, a socio-historical construct, thus, it is fundamental that professionals in health, including nurses, know what a hazard to workers health is and how it can be minimized.

  15. Individual dose monitoring of workers in Tunisia

    One of the charges of the 'Centre National de Radio-Protection, CNRP' is the evaluation of external radiation dosimetry. The CNRP's dosimetry laboratory monitor approximately 3000 workers periodically. 70% of the dosimeters used are film dosimeters, the remaining thermoluminescent dosimeters. The operational quantities Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) are usually used in practice. Hp(3) is provided for TLD measurements. Our perspective are now towards the establishment of performance tests, harmonisation and quality assurance program. Also, a committee of expert directed by the ministry of health is now actively working to accommodate the national legislation to the new basic safety standards. (author)

  16. Health Risk Assessment of Hydrogen Sulfide Exposure among Workers in a Thai Rubber Latex Industry

    Cheerawit Rattanapan; Thunwadee Tachapattaworakul Suksaroj; Jiraporn Chumpikul; Thitiworn Choosong

    2014-01-01

    The research objective was to assess health risk from exposure to hydrogen sulfide among rubber latex workers. The results showed that the hydrogen sulfide concentrations of fifteen sample air sample were the rage between 0.0537-0.0610 ppm and avenge of 0.0612 ppm. Secondly, levels of knowledge, attitude and preventive behavior among rubber latex workers about exposure to hydrogen sulfide located in moderate. In additional, the receiving training and the knowledge were the strong predictor fo...

  17. Would primary health care workers give appropriate dietary advice after cholesterol screening?

    Francis, J.; Roche, M.; Mant, D.; Jones, L; Fullard, E.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain information on the dietary knowledge of primary health care workers and on their ability to apply this knowledge in practice. A total of 128 primary health care workers (53 general practitioners and 61 nurses) in 12 practices and 14 primary care facilitators were surveyed by questionnaire between December 1987 and June 1988. All of the practices were participating in a project to promote prevention in primary care and offered health checks designed to i...

  18. Radiological protection of the worker in medicine and dentistry

    The first three sections of this report concern general understanding of radiation protection, basic concepts for all workers, and practical problems common to all users of radiation in medicine and dentistry. The remaining sections cover specialist topics covering practical aspects in diagnostic radiology, dental radiography, the use of unsealed radionuclides (in the laboratory, diagnostic and therapeutic uses) balneotherapy, brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. (author)

  19. Radiological protection of the worker in medicine and dentistry

    1990-01-01

    The first three sections of this report concern general understanding of radiation protection, basic concepts for all workers, and practical problems common to all users of radiation in medicine and dentistry. The remaining sections cover specialist topics covering practical aspects in diagnostic radiology, dental radiography, the use of unsealed radionuclides (in the laboratory, diagnostic and therapeutic uses) balneotherapy, brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. (author).

  20. Integrating The Non-Electrical Worker Into The Electrical Safety Program

    Mills, T. David; McAlhaney, John H.

    2012-08-17

    The intent of this paper is to demonstrate an electrical safety program that incorporates all workers into the program, not just the electrical workers. It is largely in response to a paper presented at the 2012 ESW by Lanny Floyd entitled "Facilitating Application of Electrical Safety Best Practices to "Other" Workers" which requested all attendees to review their electrical safety program to assure that non-electrical workers were protected as well as electrical workers. The referenced paper indicated that roughly 50% of electrical incidents involve workers whose primary function is not electrical in nature. It also encouraged all to "address electrical safety for all workers and not just workers whose job responsibilities involve working on or near energized electrical circuits." In this paper, a program which includes specific briefings to non-electrical workers as well as to workers who may need to perform their normal activities in proximity to energized electrical conductors is presented. The program uses a targeted approach to specific areas such as welding, excavating, rigging, chart reading, switching, cord and plug equipment and several other general areas to point out hazards that may exist and how to avoid them. NFPA 70E-2004 was incorporated into the program several years ago and with it the need to include the "other" workers became apparent. The site experience over the years supports the assertion that about half of the electrical incidents involve non-electrical workers and this prompted us to develop specific briefings to enhance the knowledge of the non-electrical worker regarding safe electrical practices. The promotion of "May is Electrical Safety Month" and the development of informative presentations which are delivered to the general site population as well as electrical workers have greatly improved the hazards awareness status of the general worker on site.

  1. Conventionalized knowledge

    Buus, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Mental health nurses routinely hand over clinical knowledge at intershift reports. In the present study, field descriptions from prolonged fieldwork and transcripts of audio recordings of handovers were analysed discursively drawing on ethnomethodology and conversation analysis. The analysis...... identified linguistic and social conventions for handing over clinical knowledge; in particular, differences were identified between non-interactional and interactional handovers. The interactional handovers were relatively more substantial but did also bring forth obvious signs of uncertainty regarding...... exact clinical situations. Handing over caused a silencing of the least powerful nurses' voices, generated uncertainty, and promoted knowledge about the patients' clinical situation that was not necessarily precise or up-to-date....

  2. Radiological worker training

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance

  3. Radiological worker training

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  4. Healthy radiation workers

    A recent study of health records of the workforce at ANSTO's Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (formerly the AAEC Research Establishment) has shown that radiation workers have lower mortality rates from all causes and from all cancers than the general population. The Lucas Heights data cover more than 7000 past and present employees, from 1957-1998. This study was part of a research programme being carried out in conjunction with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in France and its results add to the much larger pool of data already held by IARC. Copyright (2002) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  5. Etiological explanation, treatability and preventability of childhood autism: a survey of Nigerian healthcare workers' opinion

    Okonkwo Kevin O

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of their peculiar sociocultural background, healthcare workers in sub-Saharan African subcultures may have various conceptions on different aspects of autism spectrum disorders (ASD, such as etiology, treatment and issues of prognosis. These various conceptions, if different from current knowledge in literature about ASD, may negatively influence help-seeking behavior of parents of children with ASD who seek advice and information from the healthcare workers. This study assessed the opinions of healthcare workers in Nigeria on aspects of etiology, treatability and preventability of childhood autism, and relates their opinions to the sociodemographic variables. Methods Healthcare workers working in four tertiary healthcare facilities located in the south-east and south-south regions of Nigeria were interviewed with a sociodemographic questionnaire, personal opinion on etiology, treatability and preventability of childhood autism (POETPCA questionnaire and knowledge about childhood autism among health workers (KCAHW questionnaire to assess their knowledge and opinions on various aspects of childhood autism. Results A total of 134 healthcare workers participated in the study. In all, 78 (58.2%, 19 (14.2% and 36 (26.9% of the healthcare workers were of the opinion that the etiology of childhood autism can be explained by natural, preternatural and supernatural causes, respectively. One (0.7% of the healthcare workers was unsure of the explanation of the etiology. Knowledge about childhood autism as measured by scores on the KCAHW questionnaire was the only factor significantly associated with the opinions of the healthcare workers on etiology of childhood autism. In all, 73 (54.5% and 43 (32.1%, of the healthcare workers subscribed to the opinion that childhood autism is treatable and preventable respectively. Previous involvement with managing children with ASD significantly influenced the opinion of the healthcare workers in subscribing to treatability of childhood autism, while working experience of less than 6 years among the healthcare workers significantly influenced the opinion of the healthcare workers in admitting to believing in the preventability of childhood autism. Conclusion In designing policies and programs to change negative opinions or beliefs of healthcare workers about childhood autism, there is a need for baseline information such as this survey. Changing the negative opinions or beliefs of the healthcare workers about childhood autism should encourage appropriate help-seeking behavior among parents of children with ASD who may be seeking advice or information from the healthcare workers. This would encourage early interventions, which are essential to prognosis of childhood autism.

  6. Physical activity of office workers

    E Biernat; P. Tomaszewski; K Milde

    2010-01-01

    Inactivity or insufficient physical activity is risk factor for metabolic or cardiovascular diseases. In most of cases the nature of work of office employees does not require high physical efforts and consists mostly of sitting but the reports on leisure activity of office workers are still lacking. Thus, the aim of the study was to assess physical activity of civil and local administration workers and bank officials. 293 randomly selected office workers took part in the study. They were recr...

  7. Visual status of industrial workers

    Desai Rajiv; Desai Sanjiv; Desai Navin; Kumar K

    1990-01-01

    Two hundred and eighty four industrial workers were screened to determine their visual acuity. Significant visual impairment was observed in 21.8% individuals and moderate impairment in 34.5% of cases. Convergence insufficiency was a problem in 9.86% of the workers. Since uncorrected refractive errors are a prelude to disastrous workplace related eye injuries, it is recommended that prior to job placement all workers undergo visual acuity screening and get their refractiv...

  8. Visual status of industrial workers

    Desai Rajiv

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and eighty four industrial workers were screened to determine their visual acuity. Significant visual impairment was observed in 21.8% individuals and moderate impairment in 34.5% of cases. Convergence insufficiency was a problem in 9.86% of the workers. Since uncorrected refractive errors are a prelude to disastrous workplace related eye injuries, it is recommended that prior to job placement all workers undergo visual acuity screening and get their refractive errors rectified.

  9. Cancer mortality in metal workers.

    Gallagher, R. P.; Threlfall, W J

    1983-01-01

    Age-standardized proportional mortality ratios (PMRs) were calculated for 10 036 metal workers in British Columbia with the use of information on cause of death and occupation recorded in death registrations from 1950 to 1978. Metal workers were found to have a significantly increased risk of death from lung cancer (PMR = 134). In addition, certain occupational groups of metal workers were found, for the first time, to be at increased risk of death from other types of cancer; these included l...

  10. Statistical Analysis of the Worker Engagement Survey Administered at the Worker Safety and Security Team Festival

    Davis, Adam Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-25

    The Worker Safety and Security Team (WSST) at Los Alamos National Laboratory holds an annual festival, WSST-fest, to engage workers and inform them about safety- and securityrelated matters. As part of the 2015 WSST-fest, workers were given the opportunity to participate in a survey assessing their engagement in their organizations and work environments. A total of 789 workers participated in the 23-question survey where they were also invited, optionally, to identify themselves, their organization, and to give open-ended feedback. The survey consisted of 23 positive statements (i.e. “My organization is a good place to work.”) with which the respondent could express a level of agreement. The text of these statements are provided in Table 1. The level of agreement corresponds to a 5-level Likert scale ranging from “Strongly Disagree” to “Strongly Agree.” In addition to assessing the overall positivity or negativity of the scores, the results were partitioned into several cohorts based on the response meta-data (self-identification, comments, etc.) to explore trends. Survey respondents were presented with the options to identify themselves, their organizations and to provide comments. These options suggested the following questions about the data set.

  11. Knowledge Management

    Hald Nielsen, Bo; Nicolajsen, Katrine

    For Økonomistyrelsen opstilles en teoretisk model over forudsætningerne for, at mmah er kan anvende knowledge management. Praksis vurderes dernæst i forhold til denne model.......For Økonomistyrelsen opstilles en teoretisk model over forudsætningerne for, at mmah er kan anvende knowledge management. Praksis vurderes dernæst i forhold til denne model....

  12. Vertical knowledge transfer in Czech organizations

    Hana Urbancová

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available For organizations the losing key employees is the greatest threat; if the organizations lose the key workers, they cannot use their premises, data, information and other resources. The article aims at evaluation of the level of vertical knowledge transfer in organizations in the Czech Republic. The partial goals of this article are to determine dependencies between the examined qualitative features. The article has been drawn up using scientific methods, in particular logical methods, such as analysis, synthesis, induction, deduction and comparison. The results were obtained from longitudinal quantitative research in organizations in the Czech Republic from 2010 to 2014. The article identifies the factors affecting vertical knowledge transfer and presents a method of eliminating the risk of losing key knowledge workers. Vertical knowledge transfer is a new supporting factor of organizations’ productivity and business continuity.

  13. Violence against women migrant workers in Thailand.

    Chaiyanukij, Charnchao

    2004-10-01

    A paper on "Violence against Women Migrant Workers in Thailand" will show the situation of women migrant workers in Thailand, why they have to come to Thailand, what kind of job they do, how they are abused and exploited by employer in many types of violence and how the Thai government manages to solve the problems and assist them. The term or definition of "violence against women-VAW" and "discrimination against women" is provided and based on the definition stated in the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Readers will see that violence against women is a form of discrimination committed on a basis of sex. In other words, VAW is a clear violation of women's inherent human rights including the rights to life, liberty, and security of person, equality, equal protection under the law and freedom from all forms of discrimination. More than one hundred thousands of women illegal migrant workers work in Thailand. They come from countries in the Mekong Sub-region namely Myanmar Lao PDR, Cambodia, Vietnam and China (Yunnan province). As they come illegally and have low level of education and working skills, they are vulnerable to exploitation, abuse or face violence. In general, they work in small factories, domestic work and restaurant. They are forced begging, forced prostitution or work in a slavery-like condition. Root causes of illegal migration and VAW are interrelated and occur in both sending and receiving countries of migrant workers. Poverty, demand and supply sides of labor, level of education, no knowledge of their own rights, impact of capitalism and gender issues, are mentioned as original factors of migration and VAW. The Thai government has national policy, plan, instrument and measures to cope with in- migration of illegal workers. Not only government agencies are active to solve the problems and assist the women migrant workers, but also non-government and international organizations as well as the UN agencies are working seriously to assist them and protect their rights. PMID:21218599

  14. Views of the workers

    Full text: I hope that it is not symptomatic of the radiological protection business that I am making a last minute unscheduled intervention of behalf of the workers. I wonder too whether the Conference should consider the fact that there are no facilities for organized labour or indeed the public to comment during the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) consultation process regarding its recommendations. I have just a few points to make. As a non-scientific participant I can see that we have available accurate dosimetry which can be applied everywhere. This is a most important point. But a problem for the Conference is the different position of developed and developing countries and I would say straight away that I could not accept lower national standards of radiological protection simply to allow that State to catch up economically. We have heard a lot during the Conference about the application of ALARA. Perhaps I could introduce something different, that standards should be 'AHARA' - as high as reasonably achievable. There is no point, however, in imposing criteria that will be ignored, so there may have to be a period of optimization between developing and developed countries. There is every evidence to show that we are here at this Conference to help each other and this may provide an example. But I did not see the causation probability calculations yesterday distinguishing between developing and non-developed countries in relation to the effect of dosages on the human being. Those same calculations also made no distinction between human-made and what I have come to recognize this week as NORM radiation exposure, so it follows again that the worker in a western State's nuclear power plant should have the same standards as underground workers in other countries. This is just an example but at least the same philosophy driving those standards should be applied. No one will argue against the protection of the unborn child and I am not sure that we have a complete answer to this - providing equal opportunities and at the same time ensuring that there is no harm even before a pregnancy is noticed let alone reported. I think more work is needed on this particular subject. I liked the comment made earlier this week that few managers - or even chief executives - expect to receive a radiation dose in their office. I don't think anything was intended here by my scientific colleague but the need to consult, listen and take note of the radiation worker should be obvious. If it is not, then it should be written into the regulatory procedure as being necessary. After all, for each pair of hands engaged by an employer or an operator there is a free brain as well. If the intention is to 'simplify' and to 'unify' the present system of ICRP recommendations and to 'focus on real problems' we can finish here today satisfied only if the situation of the worker, worldwide, in coal mine, nuclear plant, hospital, or wherever, is such that they leave their family at home and go to work and return to them safely day after day after day and without harm whatsoever. If that then needs major changes to the ICRP recommendations then so be it. (author)

  15. ADVANCED WORKER PROTECTION SYSTEM

    From 1993 to 2000, OSS worked under a cost share contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS is a protective ensemble that provides the user with both breathing air and cooling for a NIOSH-rated duration of two hours. The ensemble consists of a liquid air based backpack, a Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG), and an outer protective garment. The AWPS project was divided into two phases. During Phase 1, OSS developed and tested a full-scale prototype AWPS. The testing showed that workers using the AWPS could work twice as long as workers using a standard SCBA. The testing also provided performance data on the AWPS in different environments that was used during Phase 2 to optimize the design. During Phase 1, OSS also performed a life-cycle cost analysis on a representative clean up effort. The analysis indicated that the AWPS could save the DOE millions of dollars on D and D activities and improve the health and safety of their workers. During Phase 2, OSS worked to optimize the AWPS design to increase system reliability, to improve system performance and comfort, and to reduce the backpack weight and manufacturing costs. To support this design effort, OSS developed and tested several different generations of prototype units. Two separate successful evaluations of the ensemble were performed by the International Union of Operation Engineers (IUOE). The results of these evaluations were used to drive the design. During Phase 2, OSS also pursued certifying the AWPS with the applicable government agencies. The initial intent during Phase 2 was to finalize the design and then to certify the system. OSS and Scott Health and Safety Products teamed to optimize the AWPS design and then certify the system with the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH). Unfortunately, technical and programmatic difficulties prevented us from obtaining NIOSH certification. Despite the inability of NIOSH to certify the design, OSS was able to develop and successfully test, in both the lab and in the field, a prototype AWPS. They clearly demonstrated that a system which provides cooling can significantly increase worker productivity by extending the time they can function in a protective garment. They were also able to develop mature outer garment and LCG designs that provide considerable benefits over current protective equipment, such as self donning and doffing, better visibility, and machine washable. A thorough discussion of the activities performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 is presented in the AWPS Final Report. The report also describes the current system design, outlines the steps needed to certify the AWPS, discusses the technical and programmatic issues that prevented the system from being certified, and presents conclusions and recommendations based upon the seven year effort

  16. ADVANCED WORKER PROTECTION SYSTEM

    Judson Hedgehock

    2001-03-16

    From 1993 to 2000, OSS worked under a cost share contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS is a protective ensemble that provides the user with both breathing air and cooling for a NIOSH-rated duration of two hours. The ensemble consists of a liquid air based backpack, a Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG), and an outer protective garment. The AWPS project was divided into two phases. During Phase 1, OSS developed and tested a full-scale prototype AWPS. The testing showed that workers using the AWPS could work twice as long as workers using a standard SCBA. The testing also provided performance data on the AWPS in different environments that was used during Phase 2 to optimize the design. During Phase 1, OSS also performed a life-cycle cost analysis on a representative clean up effort. The analysis indicated that the AWPS could save the DOE millions of dollars on D and D activities and improve the health and safety of their workers. During Phase 2, OSS worked to optimize the AWPS design to increase system reliability, to improve system performance and comfort, and to reduce the backpack weight and manufacturing costs. To support this design effort, OSS developed and tested several different generations of prototype units. Two separate successful evaluations of the ensemble were performed by the International Union of Operation Engineers (IUOE). The results of these evaluations were used to drive the design. During Phase 2, OSS also pursued certifying the AWPS with the applicable government agencies. The initial intent during Phase 2 was to finalize the design and then to certify the system. OSS and Scott Health and Safety Products teamed to optimize the AWPS design and then certify the system with the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH). Unfortunately, technical and programmatic difficulties prevented us from obtaining NIOSH certification. Despite the inability of NIOSH to certify the design, OSS was able to develop and successfully test, in both the lab and in the field, a prototype AWPS. They clearly demonstrated that a system which provides cooling can significantly increase worker productivity by extending the time they can function in a protective garment. They were also able to develop mature outer garment and LCG designs that provide considerable benefits over current protective equipment, such as self donning and doffing, better visibility, and machine washable. A thorough discussion of the activities performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 is presented in the AWPS Final Report. The report also describes the current system design, outlines the steps needed to certify the AWPS, discusses the technical and programmatic issues that prevented the system from being certified, and presents conclusions and recommendations based upon the seven year effort.

  17. PVC WORKERS AND THEIR CYTOGENETIC EFFECTS

    Harikrishnan A and Leena Grace B*

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The industry categories identified vinyl chloride is the chemical used in synthesis for the plastics industry. It is an industrial intermediate chemical that is converted to polyvinyl chloride (PVC polymer and associated copolymers. It is also used for production of chlorinated solvents, primarily 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane. PVC is used in most industrial sectors and accounts for around one fifth of plastic material usage worldwide. Vinyl chloride liquid is fed to polymerization reactors where it is converted from a monomer to a polymer PVC. The final product of the polymerization process is PVC in either a flake or pellet form. The manufacturing plastics often create large quantities of toxic chemical pollutants such as dioxin, hydrochloric acid, and vinyl chloride. This poses a severe health risks to humans during the PVC life cycle. These toxins can produce severe illness like cancer, diabetes, neurological damage, reproductive and birth defects. Dioxin is a persistent Organic Pollutant (POP, these are chemical substances that persist in the environment, bio-accumulate through the food chain, and pose a risk of causing adverse effects to human health and the environment. The focal aim of the present study was to identify the genetic effect of PVC workers who were chronically exposed to PVC manufacturing industry in Coimbatore & Tirupur districts. The exposed workers were categorized based on the duration of exposure to PVC chemicals. Moreover, both the exposed subjects and controls were divided according to age wise manner. The groups were divided into four categories namely group. To the best of our knowledge; this is the first kind of study in PVC industry workers in Coimbatore and Tirupur district. The present investigation will definitely gain the consequence of the better resolution to prevent the effects from chemicals entering into the occupationally exposed workers with protection and prevention strategies.

  18. Immigrant workers and worker's compensation: the need for reform.

    Rebecca Smith, J D

    2012-06-01

    Foreign-born workers in the United States suffer high rates of workplace injuries and accidents. Both for workers who are unauthorized to work in the United States and for those who are present legally under guest worker programs, access to workers' compensation benefits presents nearly insurmountable barriers. Some of these are longstanding, such as employer retaliation and aggressive litigation of claims. Some are more recent and related to the increasingly transnational character of the workforce and to barriers put in place by administrators. This is a legal overview of the cases, statutes, and policies that act as barriers to access for immigrant workers, conducted by reviewing case law and basic compensation statutes in all fifty states. Where these are known, policies that keep workers locked out of workers' compensation are also discussed. It concludes that reform of the system is needed in order to ensure its standing as an insurance program with universal application. As part of that reform, further state by state research and advocacy would discover specific administrative practices in each state that keep immigrant workers from receiving the benefits to which they are entitled. PMID:22457221

  19. Organising migrant workers locally: British Jobs for British Workers?

    Fitzgerald, Ian

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the xenophobic headlines of ‘British jobs for British workers'. It identifies how these inadvertently bought together old and new Europe and the tension between national regulation and a single European market. Highlighting why this occurred, how British workers have often been inclusive and what challenges remain in the future.

  20. Knowledge typology for imprecise probabilities.

    Wilson, G. D. (Gregory D.); Zucker, L. J. (Lauren J.)

    2002-01-01

    When characterizing the reliability of a complex system there are often gaps in the data available for specific subsystems or other factors influencing total system reliability. At Los Alamos National Laboratory we employ ethnographic methods to elicit expert knowledge when traditional data is scarce. Typically, we elicit expert knowledge in probabilistic terms. This paper will explore how we might approach elicitation if methods other than probability (i.e., Dempster-Shafer, or fuzzy sets) prove more useful for quantifying certain types of expert knowledge. Specifically, we will consider if experts have different types of knowledge that may be better characterized in ways other than standard probability theory.