WorldWideScience

Sample records for laboratory experimental investigation

  1. Laboratory investigations

    Our task is to design mined-repository systems that will adequately secure high-level nuclear waste for at least 10,000 yr and that will be mechanically stable for 50 to 100-yr periods of retrievability during which mistakes could be corrected and a valuable source of energy could be reclaimed, should national policy on the reprocessing of spent fuel ever change. The only credible path for the escape of radionuclides from the repository to the biosphere is through ground-water, and in hard rock, bulk permeability is largely governed by natural and artificial fracture systems. Catastrophic failure of an excavation in hard rock is likely to occur at the weakest links - the discontinuities in the rock mass that is perturbed first by mining and then by radiogenic heating. The laboratory can contribute precise measurements of the pertinent thermomechanical, hydrological and chemical properties and improve our understanding of the fundamental processes through careful experiments under well controlled conditions that simulate the prototype environment. Thus laboratory investigations are necessary, but they are not sufficient, for conventional sample sizes are small relative to natural defects like joints - i.e., the rock mass is not a continuum - and test durations are short compared to those that predictive modeling must take into account. Laboratory investigators can contribute substantially more useful data if they are provided facilities for testing large specimens(say one cubic meter) and for creep testing of all candidate host rocks. Even so, extrapolations of laboratory data to the field in neither space nor time are valid without the firm theoretical foundations yet to be built. Meanwhile in-situ measurements of structure-sensitive physical properties and access to direct observations of rock-mass character will be absolutely necessary

  2. Experimental Investigation of Multibunch, Multipass Beam Breakup in the Jefferson Laboratory Free Electron Laser Upgrade Driver

    Christopher Tennant; David Douglas; Kevin Jordan; Nikolitsa Merminga; Eduard Pozdeyev; Haipeng Wang; Todd I. Smith; Stefan Simrock; Ivan Bazarov; Georg Hoffstaetter

    2006-03-24

    In recirculating accelerators, and in particular energy recovery linacs (ERLs), the maximum current can be limited by multipass, multibunch beam breakup (BBU), which occurs when the electron beam interacts with the higher-order modes (HOMs) of an accelerating cavity on the accelerating pass and again on the energy recovering pass. This effect is of particular concern in the design of modern high average current energy recovery accelerators utilizing superconducting RF technology. Experimental characterization and observations of the instability at the Jefferson Laboratory 10 kW Free Electron Laser (FEL) are presented. Measurements of the threshold current for the instability are made under a variety of beam conditions and compared to the predictions of several BBU simulation codes. This represents the first time in which the codes have been experimentally benchmarked. With BBU posing a threat to high current beam operation in the FEL Driver, several suppression schemes were developed.

  3. Laboratory experimental investigations of braid theory using the rotor-oscillator flow

    Filippi, Margaux; Atis, Séverine; Allshouse, Michael; Jacobs, Gustaaf; Budišić, Marko; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Peacock, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Interpreting ocean surface dynamics is crucial to many areas of oceanography, ranging from marine ecology to pollution management. Motivated by this, we investigated the braid theory method to detect transport barriers bounding coherent structures in two-dimensional flows. Whereas most existing techniques rely on an extensive spatiotemporal knowledge of the flow field, we sought to identify these structures from sparse data sets involving trajectories of a few tracer particles in a two-dimensional flow. We present the results from our laboratory experiments, which were based on investigations using the rotor-oscillator flow, as a stepping stone towards oceanic applications.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Beam Breakup in the Jefferson Laboratory 10 kW FEL Upgrade Driver

    Tennant, Chris; Douglas, David; Hoffstaetter, Georg Heinz; Jordan, Kevin; Merminga, Lia; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Simrock, Stefan; Smith, Todd I; Wang, Haipeng

    2005-01-01

    In recirculating accelerators, and in particular energy recovery linacs (ERLs), the maximum current has been limited by multipass, multibunch beam breakup (BBU), which occurs when the electron beam interacts with the higher-order modes (HOMs) of an accelerating cavity on the accelerating pass and again on the energy recovered pass. This effect is of particular concern in the design of modern high average current energy recovery accelerators utilizing superconducting technology. Experimental observations of the instability at the Jefferson Laboratory 10 kW Free-Electron Laser (FEL) are presented. Measurements of the threshold current for the instability are presented and compared to the predictions of several BBU simulation codes. To further characterize the instability, beam based measurements were made to determine the orientation of the dangerous HOMs. With BBU posing a threat to high current beam operation in the FEL, several suppression schemes were developed. These include direct damping of the dangerous...

  5. Experimental Investigation of Beam Breakup in the Jefferson Laboratory 10 kW FEL Upgrade Driver

    Christopher Tennant; David Douglas; Kevin Jordan; Nikolitsa Merminga; Eduard Pozdeyev; Haipeng Wang; Ivan Bazarov; Georg Hoffstaetter; Stefan Simrock; T.I. Smith

    2005-05-01

    In recirculating accelerators, and in particular energy recovery linacs (ERLs), the maximum current has been limited by multipass, multibunch beam breakup (BBU), which occurs when the electron beam interacts with the higher-order modes (HOMs) of an accelerating cavity on the accelerating pass and again on the energy recovered pass. This effect is of particular concern in the design of modern high average current energy recovery accelerators utilizing superconducting RF technology. Experimental observations of the instability at the Jefferson Laboratory 10 kW Free-Electron Laser (FEL) are presented. Measurements of the threshold current for the instability are presented and compared to the predictions of several BBU simulation codes. With BBU posing a threat to high current beam operation in the FEL Driver, several suppression schemes were developed. These include direct damping of the dangerous HOMs and appropriately modifying the electron beam optics. Preliminary results of their effectiveness in raising the threshold current for stability are presented.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Beam Breakup in the Jefferson Laboratory 10 kW FEL Upgrade Driver

    In recirculating accelerators, and in particular energy recovery linacs (ERLs), the maximum current has been limited by multipass, multibunch beam breakup (BBU), which occurs when the electron beam interacts with the higher-order modes (HOMs) of an accelerating cavity on the accelerating pass and again on the energy recovered pass. This effect is of particular concern in the design of modern high average current energy recovery accelerators utilizing superconducting RF technology. Experimental observations of the instability at the Jefferson Laboratory 10 kW Free-Electron Laser (FEL) are presented. Measurements of the threshold current for the instability are presented and compared to the predictions of several BBU simulation codes. With BBU posing a threat to high current beam operation in the FEL Driver, several suppression schemes were developed. These include direct damping of the dangerous HOMs and appropriately modifying the electron beam optics. Preliminary results of their effectiveness in raising the threshold current for stability are presented

  7. Experimental investigation of multibunch, multipass beam breakup in the Jefferson Laboratory Free Electron Laser Upgrade Driver

    Douglas, David R.; Jordan, Kevin C.; Merminga, Lia; Pozdeyev, Eduard G.; Tennant, Christopher D.; Wang, Haipeng; Smith, Todd I.; Simrock, Stefan; Bazarov, Ivan V.; Hoffstaetter, Georg H.

    2006-06-01

    In recirculating accelerators, and, in particular, energy-recovery linacs, the maximum current can be limited by multipass, multibunch beam breakup (BBU), which occurs when the electron beam interacts with the higher-order modes (HOMs) of an accelerating cavity on the accelerating pass and again on the energy recovering pass. This effect is of particular concern in the design of modern high average current energy-recovery accelerators utilizing superconducting rf technology. Experimental characterization and observations of the instability at the Jefferson Laboratory 10 kW free electron laser (FEL) are presented. Measurements of the threshold current for the instability are made under a variety of beam conditions and compared to the predictions of several BBU simulation codes. This represents the first time in which the codes have been experimentally benchmarked. With BBU posing a threat to high current beam operation in the FEL driver, several suppression schemes were developed. These include direct damping of the dangerous HOM using cavity feedback and modifying the electron beam optics so as to reduce the coupling between the beam and mode. Both methods were shown to increase the threshold current for stability. Beam optical suppression techniques, in particular, have proved to be so effective that they are routinely used in the normal operations of the FEL Upgrade Driver.

  8. A Laboratory Investigation of Supersonic Clumpy Flows: Experimental Design and Theoretical Analysis

    Poludnenko, A Y; Drake, R P; Frank, A; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Furnish, M; Asay, J R

    2004-01-01

    We present a design for high energy density laboratory experiments studying the interaction of hypersonic shocks with a large number of inhomogeneities. These ``clumpy'' flows are relevant to a wide variety of astrophysical environments including the evolution of molecular clouds, outflows from young stars, Planetary Nebulae and Active Galactic Nuclei. The experiment consists of a strong shock (driven by a pulsed power machine or a high intensity laser) impinging on a region of randomly placed plastic rods. We discuss the goals of the specific design and how they are met by specific choices of target components. An adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic code is used to analyze the design and establish a predictive baseline for the experiments. The simulations confirm the effectiveness of the design in terms of articulating the differences between shocks propagating through smooth and clumpy environments. In particular, we find significant differences between the shock propagation speeds in a clumpy medium comp...

  9. A Remote Laboratory Experimentation Network.

    Schmid, C.; Eikaas, T. I.; Foss, B.; Gillet, D.

    2001-01-01

    This contribution presents a remote laboratory project with a new business model that aims at bringing physical experimentation back into the learning arena, where remotely operable laboratory experiments used in advanced education and training schemes are made available to a global market. This is done via the Internet using a set of e-commerce and advanced information and communication technology solutions. The project will add online remote experimentation to distance learning techniques. ...

  10. Suppression pool testing at the SIET laboratory (1). Experimental investigation of critical phenomena expected in the Fukushima Daiichi suppression chamber

    In the unlikely event of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) long duration station black-out, as in the Fukushima Daiichi (1F) severe accident (SA), it was recognized that the Suppression Chamber (S/C) functions of heat sink and Fission Product (FP) scrubbing will degrade, resulting in the S/C pressure increase, reduction of the scrubbing efficiency and subsequent necessity of venting operations. Consequently, a relatively large amount of fission products is likely to be dispersed into the environment. As a method to evaluate the degradation of the pool characteristics under typical conditions expected at the 1F NPP, an experimental campaign was recently started at the SIET research laboratory in Italy. Three different sparger geometries and several combinations of steam and air mass flow rates were tested to scale down the most critical phenomena that occurred during the 1F SA, such as steam condensation and water thermal stratification. In addition, iron oxide powder is employed to simulate the water capability to scrub the FPs depending on the pool temperature evolution. Measurements of pool water temperature in different points, visualization with high-speed camera and concentrations of the oxides carryover, represent the main outcome of the experimental activity. The preliminary experimental results have demonstrated that spargers inducing large chugging and steam jetting at the bottom of the pool are effective to avoid and break the temperature stratification, thanks to the large water recirculation and vertical mixing within the pool. Differently, spargers with holes disposed in the vertical direction, as in the RCIC exhaust pipe of the 1F unit 3, are not able to produce water vertical mixing, thus resulting in intense stratification that drastically reduces the condensation efficiency of the S/C pool. From the experimental results of the scrubbing simulation with the iron oxide powder it was extrapolated that the FP carry-over rates in subcooled condition was about 30% while it increased up to around 50% during boiling. The ongoing experimental activity aims at constructing a database based on the high-speed filming, measurements of major quantities such as water temperature, steam pressure and fission products concentration to foster the development of physical models for both lumped parameter SA codes and detailed computational fluid dynamics softwares, in an effort to enhance the understanding of the complex phenomena following the Fukushima Daiichi accident. (author)

  11. Experimental investigation of the formation and propagation of plasma jets created by a power laser: application to laboratory astrophysics

    Plasma jets are often observed in the polar regions of Young Stellar Objects (YSO). For a better understanding of the whole processes at the origin of their formation and evolution, this research thesis aims at demonstrating the feasibility of a plasma jet generation by a power laser, and at investigating its characteristics. After a detailed description of Young Stellar Objects jets and an overview of theoretical models, the author describes some experiments performed with gas guns, pulsed machines and power lasers. He describes means of generation of a jet by laser interaction via strong shock propagation. He reports experimental work, describing the target, laser operating conditions and the determination of jet parameters: speed, temperature, density. Then, he introduces results obtained for plasma jet propagation in vacuum, describes their evolution with respect to initial conditions (target type, laser operating conditions), and identifies optimal conditions for generating a jet similar to that in astrophysical conditions. He considers their propagation in ambient medium like for YSO jets in interstellar medium. Two distinct cases are investigated: collision of two successive shocks in a gaseous medium, and propagation of a plasma jet in a gas jet

  12. An Experimental Investigation of the Role of Radiation in Laboratory Bench-Top Experiments in Thermal Physics

    Twomey, Patrick; O'Sullivan, Colm; O'Riordan, John

    2009-01-01

    A simple undergraduate experiment designed to study cooling purely by radiation and cooling by a combination of convection and radiation is described. Results indicate that the contribution from radiative cooling in normal laboratory experiments is more significant than students often realize, even in the case of forced cooling. (Contains 1

  13. Experimental investigations on desiccant wheels

    Experimental investigations on several commercially available and newly fabricated rotors are conducted in two different laboratories to evaluate performance trends. Experimental uncertainties are analysed and the parameters determining the rotor performance are investigated. It is found that the optimal rotation speed is lower for lithium chloride or compound rotors than for silica gel rotors. Higher regeneration air temperatures lead to higher dehumidification potentials at almost equal dehumidification efficiencies, but with increasing regeneration specific heat input and enthalpy changes of the process air. The influence of the regeneration air humidity was also notable and low relative humidities increase the dehumidification potential. Finally, the measurements show that rising water content in the ambient air causes the dehumidification capacity to rise, while the dehumidification efficiency is not much affected and both specific regeneration heat input and latent heat change of the process air decrease. For desiccant cooling applications in humid climates this is a positive trend. - Highlights: ► New experimental results on a range of desiccant wheels. ► High dehumidification capacities and low enthalpy changes for process air high water content. ► Higher regeneration temperature increases capacity, but lowers energy efficiency.

  14. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Experimental Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Experimental Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, gives researchers access to models and simulations that predict how solid oxide fuel cells...

  15. Transformative geomorphic research using laboratory experimentation

    Bennett, Sean J.; Ashmore, Peter; Neuman, Cheryl McKenna

    2015-09-01

    Laboratory experiments in geomorphology is the theme of the 46th annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium (BGS). While geomorphic research historically has been dominated by field-based endeavors, laboratory experimentation has emerged as an important methodological approach to study these phenomena, employed primarily to address issues related to scale and the analytical treatment of the geomorphic processes. Geomorphic laboratory experiments can result in transformative research. Several examples drawn from the fluvial and aeolian research communities are offered as testament to this statement, and these select transformative endeavors often share very similar attributes. The 46th BGS will focus on eight broad themes within laboratory experimentation, and a diverse group of scientists has been assembled to speak authoritatively on these topics, featuring several high-profile projects worldwide. This special issue of the journal Geomorphology represents a collection of the papers written in support of this symposium.

  16. Experimental investigation of wave boundary layer

    Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2003-01-01

    A review is presented of experimental investigation of wave boundary layer. The review is organized in six main sections. The first section describes the wave boundary layer in a real-life environment and its simulation in the laboratory in an oscillating water tunnel and in a water tank with an...... oscillating seabed. A brief account is given of measured quantities, measurement techniques (LDA, PIV, flow visualization) and limitations/constraints in the experimental investigation of the wave boundary layer in the laboratory. The second section concentrates on uniform oscillating boundary layers with a....... Results of recent research on wave boundary layers over a bed with large roughness (such as a/ks = O(1)) are also included in the review. The fourth section describes the effect of superimposed current on the wave boundary layer. The entire ¿spectrum¿, namely from the wave-dominated regime to the current...

  17. Investigation of the effects of fractured porous media on hydraulic tests—an experimental study at laboratory scale using single well methods

    Leven, C.; Sauter, M.; Teutsch, G.; Dietrich, P.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, a study of detailed pneumatic tests at laboratory scale is presented. The study comprises two different test methods, which were conducted on an unsaturated fractured sandstone block of about 1 m 3 volume. First, a steady-state flow field with constant gas injection pressure and consequently constant gas flow rates was applied to the fractured sandstone block via a vertical borehole. The discharge of the injected gas was measured at the block surface. Second, a constant gas pressure was injected over the borehole and the transient pressure buildup was recorded at the block surface. It was the objective of the study to investigate the effects of the fractured porous system on pneumatic measurements and to provide an insight into processes occurring during flow and pressure buildup in fractured porous media. This is an essential prerequisite for a reliable validation of different modeling approaches, and it can further assist to improve techniques for the determination of the heterogeneity of hydraulic parameters in fractured porous media. The analysis of the distribution of the flow field and the temporal and spatial evolution of pressure buildup during the hydraulic tests shows that the direction and contribution of the flow field is highly depending on the spatial distribution and the characteristics of the fracture network as well as on the position of the observation points with respect to highly conductive structures. Finally, the introduced test methods are suitable tools for the characterization of the heterogeneous nature of fractured porous media and for the interpretation of the effects of the heterogeneous system on hydraulic tests.

  18. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Emissions from waste combustion. An application of statistical experimental design in a laboratory-scale boiler and an investigation from large-scale incineration plants

    Zhang Xiaojing

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this thesis is a study of the emissions from the combustion of household refuse. The experiments were both on a laboratory-scale boiler and on full-scale incineration plants. In the laboratory, an artificial household refuse with known composition was fed into a pilot boiler with a stationary grate. Combustion was under non-optimum conditions. Direct sampling with a Tenax adsorbent was used to measure a range of VOCs. Measurements were also made of incompletely burnt hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxygen and flue gas temperature. Combustion and emission parameters were recorded continuously by a multi-point data logger. VOCs were analysed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The full-scale tests were on seven Swedish incineration plants. The data were used to evaluate the emissions from large-scale incineration plants with various type of fuels and incinerators, and were also compared with the laboratory results. The response surface model developed from the laboratory experiments was also validated. This thesis also includes studies on the gasification of household refuse pellets, estimations of particulate and soot emissions, and a thermodynamic analysis of PAHs from combustion flue gas. For pellet gasification, experiments were performed on single, well characterised refuse pellets under carefully controlled conditions. The aim was to see if the effects of pellets were different from those of untreated household refuse. The results from both laboratory and full-scale tests showed that the main contributions to emissions from household refuse are plastics and moisture. 142 refs, 82 figs, 51 tabs

  20. Laboratory Investigations into the Extreme Universe

    Chen, P

    2003-01-01

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in our understanding of the extreme universe, which in turn points to even deeper questions to be further addressed. History has shown that the symbiosis between direct observations and laboratory investigations is instrumental in the progress of astrophysics. Current frontier astrophysical phenomena related to particle astrophysics and cosmology typically involve one or more of the following conditions: (1) extremely high energy events;(2) very high density, high temperature processes; (3) super strong field environments. Laboratory experiments using high intensity lasers and particle beams can calibrate astrophysical observation or detection processes, investigate the underlying dynamics of astrophysical phenomena, and probe fundamental physics in extreme limits. We give examples of possible laboratory experiments that investigate into the extreme universe.

  1. Experimental investigations of ICRF effects

    The goal of the Phaedrus program is to establish the relative efficiency of helicity and momentum current drive for rf near and below omegaci and compare to theory. This paper discusses major accomplishments in the rf program; extension of operating parameters; facility improvements; and additional experimental activities

  2. Laboratory Experimental Design of Molecular Cloud Implosions

    Keiter, Paul; Stone, James; Trantham, Matt; Malamud, Guy; Klein, Sallee

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of ionizing radiation with its surrounding medium is a ubiquitous issue in astrophysics. Although the interaction can occur in many environments, the interaction of an ionization front with a molecular cloud is of particular interest. Material ablated form the cloud can form turbulent structure [Peters et al, 2008] and coupled with the radiatively-driven implosion of the cloud can have important consequences in stellar formation. Our understanding of stellar formation is based on computer simulations and models. To improve our understanding of these models, data is required. We present the design of an experiment to study the interaction of an ionization front with a high density sphere, which acts as a surrogate for the molecular cloud. Irradiating a high-Z foil with laser beams generates the ionization front. The ionization front will propagate in a low density medium before interacting with the sphere. We will present our experimental design along with initial simulations. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548.

  3. Contest Design: An Experimental Investigation

    Sheremeta, Roman

    2009-01-01

    This paper experimentally compares the performance of four simultaneous lottery contests: a grand contest, two multiple prize settings (equal and unequal prizes), and a contest which consists of two subcontests. Consistent with the theory, the grand contest generates the highest effort levels among all simultaneous contests. In multi-prize settings, equal prizes produce lower efforts than unequal prizes. The results also support the argument that joint contests generate higher efforts than an...

  4. Experimental Investigations on Market Behavior

    ??akelj, Bla??

    2012-01-01

    Esta tesis consta de tres ensayos sobre las expectativas de inflaci??n, la incertidumbre de la predicci??n, y la importancia de la incertidumbre en subastas secuenciales. Todos ellos utilizan un m??todo experimental. El cap??tulo 1 estudia c??mo los individuos predicen la inflaci??n en la econom??a ficticia y analiza el efecto de las reglas de pol??tica monetaria en sus decisiones. Los resultados revelan la heterogeneidad en las reglas de predicci??n de la inflaci??n y demuestran la importanc...

  5. Laboratory investigation of constitutive property scaling behavior

    Because many constitutive rock properties must be measured at one scale but applied at another, scaling behavior is an issue facing many applied disciplines, including the petroleum industry. A research program has been established to investigate and a quantify scaling behavior through systematic physical experimentation, with the aim of developing and testing models that describe scaling behavior in a quantitative manner. Scaling of constitutive rock properties is investigated through physical experimentation involving the collection of gas-permeability data measured over a range of discrete scales. The approach is to systematically isolate those factors that influence property scaling and investigate their relative contributions to overall scaling behavior. Two blocks of rock, each exhibiting differing heterogeneity structure. have recently been examined. The two samples were found to yield different scaling behavior, as exhibited by changes in the distribution functions and semi-variograms. Simple models have been fit to the measured scaling behavior that are of similar functional form but of different magnitude

  6. Laboratory Investigations of Stratospheric Halogen Chemistry

    Wine, Paul H.; Nicovich, J. Michael; Stickel, Robert E.; Hynes, Anthony J.

    1997-01-01

    A final report for the NASA-supported project on laboratory investigations of stratospheric halogen chemistry is presented. In recent years, this project has focused on three areas of research: (1) kinetic, mechanistic, and thermochemical studies of reactions which produce weakly bound chemical species of atmospheric interest; (2) development of flash photolysis schemes for studying radical-radical reactions of stratospheric interest; and (3) photochemistry studies of interest for understanding stratospheric chemistry. The first section of this paper contains a discussion of work which has not yet been published. All subsequent chapters contain reprints of published papers that acknowledge support from this grant.

  7. Quantifying the accuracy of laboratory SIP experimental set ups

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade the spectral induced polarization (SIP) method has reemerged as a promising method for subsurface investigations. The sensitivity of SIP to bulk and interfacial physicochemical properties permits a wider range of hydrogeophysical and environmental applications, including monitoring of subsurface biogeochemical transformations. Improvements in instrumentation and experimental designs, along with faster acquisition capabilities and easy access to processing routines are encouraging novel applications of the method, and support quantitative interpretation of the data acquired. Motivated by recent research that focus on small scale changes, over large frequency ranges, we performed a series of experiments to identify the accuracy of common laboratory SIP experimental set ups. We performed measurements on resistor - capacitor (RC) networks, to identify the instrumentation accuracy, and also on standard laboratory columns filled with materials of known SIP response, primarily on well characterized fluids of different conductivity. Early results show small errors in the low frequency range, attributed to electrode polarization; in higher frequencies, typically above 1000 Hz, the errors may become significant limiting the meaningful interpretation of small phase angles at these frequencies. The data will be compared with published data using comparable experimental set ups, and could be used to set realistic expectations on future SIP experiments and applications. With this work we aim at developing a best practices document that can aid the SIP user in collecting meaningful and repeatable results.

  8. Investigating Coccolithophorid Biology in the Sedimentary Laboratory

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Barbarin, N.; Beaufort, L.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2014-12-01

    Coccolithophores are the ocean's dominant calcifying phytoplankton; they play an important, but poorly understood, role in long-term biogeochemical climatic feedbacks. Calcite producing marine organisms are likely to calcify less in a future world where higher carbon dioxide concentrations will lead to ocean acidification (OA), but coccolithophores may be the exception. In coccolithophores calcification occurs in an intracellular vesicle, where the site of calcite precipitation is buffered from the external environment and is subject to a uniquely high degree of biological control. Culture manipulation experiments mimicking the effects of OA in the laboratory have yielded empirical evidence for phenotypic plasticity, competition and evolutionary adaptation in asexual populations. However, the extent to which these results are representative of natural populations, and of the response over timescales of greater than a few hundred generations, is unclear. Here we describe a new sediment-based proxy for the PIC:POC (particulate inorganic to particulate organic carbon ratio) of coccolithophore biomass, which is equivalent to the fractional energy contribution to calcification at constant pH, and a biologically meaningful measure of the organism's tendency to calcify. Employing the geological record as a laboratory, we apply this proxy to sedimentary material from the southern Pacific Ocean to investigate the integrated response of real ancient coccolithophore populations to environmental change over many thousands of years. Our results provide a new perspective on phenotypic change in real populations of coccolithophorid algae over long timescales.

  9. Experimental investigation into Quaternary badland geomorphic development

    Kasanin-Grubin, Milica; Kuhn, Nikolaus; Yair, Aaron; Bryan, Rorke; Schwanghart, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Badland morphology is commonly linked to lithological properties of the bedrock. However, recent investigations indicate that the geomorphic development is sensitive to climate and in particular to precipitation characteristics. In this study, the precipitation characteristics that are critical for the Quaternary landscape development in the Dinosaur Badlands in Alberta, Canada, and Zin Valley Badlands, Negev Desert, Israel are investigated. Runoff, erosion and weathering were simulated in the field and the laboratory to determine rates for modeling different precipitation regimes. Currently, the geomorphic development in the Dinosaur badlands is characterized by weathering/supply limited conditions, leading to slope retreat independent of lithology. In the Negev, transport limited conditions cause frequent runoff discontinuity, creating a pattern of areas dominated by erosion or deposition. The results of the weathering and erosion experiments show that the balance between snowmelt induced weathering in the spring and summer rainfall and erosion determine the rate of slope retreat in the Dinosaur Badlands. In the Zin Valley, on the other hand, the magnitude of the individual rainstorms determines whether a slope section is eroded or acts as a sediment sink. The experiments illustrate that the badland slopes experienced an auto-stabilization during the Quaternary in the Zin Valley. In the Dinosaur Badlands Holocene climatic variations have not caused a permanent differentiation of patterns of erosion and deposition. Based on these results the reaction of badland slopes to changing precipitation characteristics was modeled. In their current state, both badland slope systems appear to be fairly stable against climate change in the range of those occurring during the Holocene. However, the stability is achieved in different ways. In the Dinosaur Badlands, weathering rates are low compared to erosion capacity, maintaining continuous evacuation of sediment from slopes to the flood planes of the Red Deer River system. Only a very pronounced contrast between winter weathering and drier summers would generate a colluvium and thus change slope hydrology. In the Zin Valley the development of a thick colluvium at the foot of the slopes has increased infiltration capacity, reducing runoff and sediment yield into the floodplain. Here, only an increase in rainfall magnitude would improve runoff continuity and induce the erosion of the colluvium. This would in turn reduce infiltration capacity and thus initiate a positive feedback on runoff and sediment yield into the Zin River. Overall, Holocene climate change appears to be insufficient to change the geomorphic development in both badlands. However, this stability is achieved not despite of climate, but because of the specific history of geomorphic development. In addition, the combination of erosion and weathering experiments with numerical modeling demonstrates the versatility of Experimental Geomorphology in landscape evolution studies.

  10. Experimental investigations of the nuclear structure

    The problem of experimental investigation into atomic nucleus structure is discussed. Examples of studying the properties of low-lying nucleus states using cyclotron-type accelerators for their production are presented. The consideration is conducted on the base of the Idisol experimental complex created at the Finland. Results of measuring masses of neutron-redundant rubidium nuclei are presented. Schemes of 160Er and 108In decay are presented. 12 refs.; 6 figs

  11. Experimental Investigation of Wave Attenuation Through Vegetation

    Ozeren, Y.; Wren, D. G.

    2011-12-01

    Wetlands and coastal vegetation can reduce the surge and wave impact on coastal areas. Yet, the primary mechanisms of wave mitigation by vegetation are still unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate and quantify the attenuation of waves through vegetation using laboratory experiments. The wave attenuation properties of artificial vegetation and live and dormant S. alterniflora and J. roemerianus were investigated under monochromatic and irregular wave conditions at full scale in a wave tank facility at the USDA-ARS-National Sedimentation Laboratory in Oxford, Mississippi. Water level sensors and a video camera were used to record water level data. Drag coefficients were estimated for artificial and natural plants and regression equations were derived for the drag coefficients as functions of both Reynolds and Keulegan-Carpenter number. It was observed that vertical variation of vegetation density had an important effect on the drag coefficient.

  12. Preliminary rock mechanics laboratory: Investigation plan

    This document presents the rationale for rock mechanics laboratory testing (including the supporting analysis and numerical modeling) planned for the site characterization of a nuclear waste repository in salt. This plan first identifies what information is required for regulatory and design purposes, and then presents the rationale for the testing that satisfies the required information needs. A preliminary estimate of the minimum sampling requirements for rock laboratory testing during site characterization is also presented. Periodic revision of this document is planned

  13. Experimental investigation of quadrupole virtual photon spectrum

    To test experimentally the quadrupole virtual photon spectrum calculation, the (e,α) excitation function of an isolated 2+ level at 20.14 MeV in 24Mg was measured. The most recent calculations in DWBA, including nuclear size effects, are compared to this experimental curve. The differential cross section d2σ/dΩdE was measured 480, 900, 1320 in the laboratory system, for total electron energies of 20.0, 20.8, 21.5, 24.0, 26.0, 28.0, 30.0, 32.0, 36.0, and 40.0 MeV. The reduced matrix element B(E2) of the 20,14 MeV level is extracted as a secondary product of this work. (author)

  14. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Tidal Current Energy Extraction

    Sun, Xiaojing

    2008-01-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations of tidal current energy extraction have been conducted in this study. A laboratory-scale water flume was simulated using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. In the numerical model, the tidal current turbine is represented with an actuator disk, which produces a pressure drop associated with energy loss. The free water surface is considered in the model using a volume of fluid method and is allowed to deform fre...

  15. Experimental investigation of rubble mound breakwaters for wave energy conversion

    Luppa, C.; Contestabile, P.; Cavallaro, L.; Foti, E.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Vicinanza, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes recent laboratory investigation on the breakwater integrated device named “OBREC” (Overtopping BReakwater for Energy Conversion). This technology recently appeared on the wave energy converter scene as an executive outcome of improving composite seawalls by including overtopping...... type wave energy converters [1]. Two complementary experimental campaigns were carried out, in 2012 and in 2014. Several geometries and wave conditions were examined. Preliminary comparison of hydraulic behaviour has been summarized, focusing on reflection analysis and overtopping flow rate...

  16. Investigating Optimal Foraging Theory in the Laboratory

    Harden, Siegfried; Grilliot, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    Optimal foraging theory is a principle that is often presented in the community ecology section of biology textbooks, but also can be demonstrated in the laboratory. We introduce a lab activity that uses an interactive strategy to teach high school and/or college students about this ecological concept. The activity is ideal because it engages…

  17. A Meaningful Experience in Laboratory Investigation

    Szinai, S. S.; Szinai, N.

    1976-01-01

    The framework of the course "Problems in Pharmaceutical Chemistry" was used to give second- and third-year pharmacy students at the University of Florida an opportunity to obtain an insight into the workings of laboratories dealing with drug-related problems. Goals, outline, and an illustrative project for the course are described. (LBH)

  18. The European Network of Analytical and Experimental Laboratories for Geosciences

    Freda, Carmela; Funiciello, Francesca; Meredith, Phil; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Troll, Valentin R.; Willingshofer, Ernst

    2013-04-01

    Integrating Earth Sciences infrastructures in Europe is the mission of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS).The integration of European analytical, experimental, and analogue laboratories plays a key role in this context and is the task of the EPOS Working Group 6 (WG6). Despite the presence in Europe of high performance infrastructures dedicated to geosciences, there is still limited collaboration in sharing facilities and best practices. The EPOS WG6 aims to overcome this limitation by pushing towards national and trans-national coordination, efficient use of current laboratory infrastructures, and future aggregation of facilities not yet included. This will be attained through the creation of common access and interoperability policies to foster and simplify personnel mobility. The EPOS ambition is to orchestrate European laboratory infrastructures with diverse, complementary tasks and competences into a single, but geographically distributed, infrastructure for rock physics, palaeomagnetism, analytical and experimental petrology and volcanology, and tectonic modeling. The WG6 is presently organizing its thematic core services within the EPOS distributed research infrastructure with the goal of joining the other EPOS communities (geologists, seismologists, volcanologists, etc...) and stakeholders (engineers, risk managers and other geosciences investigators) to: 1) develop tools and services to enhance visitor programs that will mutually benefit visitors and hosts (transnational access); 2) improve support and training activities to make facilities equally accessible to students, young researchers, and experienced users (training and dissemination); 3) collaborate in sharing technological and scientific know-how (transfer of knowledge); 4) optimize interoperability of distributed instrumentation by standardizing data collection, archive, and quality control standards (data preservation and interoperability); 5) implement a unified e-Infrastructure for data analysis, numerical modelling, and joint development and standardization of numerical tools (e-science implementation); 6) collect and store data in a flexible inventory database accessible within and beyond the Earth Sciences community(open access and outreach); 7) connect to environmental and hazard protection agencies, stakeholders, and public to raise consciousness of geo-hazards and geo-resources (innovation for society). We will inform scientists and industrial stakeholders on the most recent WG6 achievements in EPOS and we will show how our community is proceeding to design the thematic core services.

  19. Experimental investigation on road vehicle active suspension:

    Jayaraj, Jancirani; John, Dennie; Krishnasamy, Prabu

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation report for an electronically controlled pneumatic suspension system. The performance improvement in the passengers comfort and attitude behaviour are evaluated for a proportional integral derivative (PID) controlled pneumatic suspension design. An appropriate mathematical model is developed for a single wheel suspension with the passenger seat system. The simulation is accomplished through LABVIEW and lab-based experimental analysis is conducted. Based on ...

  20. Experimental investigation on road vehicle active suspension

    Krishnasamy, Prabu; Jayaraj, Jancirani; John, Dennie

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation report for an electronically controlled pneumatic suspension system. The performance improvement in the passengers comfort and attitude behaviour are evaluated for a proportional integral derivative (PID) controlled pneumatic suspension design. An appropriate mathematical model is developed for a single wheel suspension with the passenger seat system. The simulation is accomplished through LABVIEW and lab-based experimental analysis is conducted. Based on ...

  1. Theoretical and experimental investigations on lyoluminescence

    Investigations on lyoluminescence, a process which emits light when certain substances irradiated with ionizing radiations are dissolved in suitable solvent, have been undertaken to understand the basic physico-chemical mechanism of the process. A theoretical model has been developed utilizing existing schemes and postulates of lyoluminescence for organic substances. To the best knowledge of the authors, no such model exists in the literature. The model is tested for saccharides and is found to fit well with experimental results. (author)

  2. Essays on Experimental Investigation of Lottery Contests

    Sheremeta, Roman

    2009-01-01

    A contest is a situation in which individuals or groups expend costly resources while competing to win a specific prize. The variety of economic situations that can be described as contests has attracted enormous attention from economic theorists. Despite the extensive theoretical research of contests, very little empirical research has been done to evaluate the theory. This dissertation uses experimental methods to provide empirical investigation of different aspects of contest theory. The d...

  3. Laboratory investigation on super-Earths atmospheres

    Erculiani, M. S.; Claudi, R. U.; Lessio, L.; Farisato, G.; Giro, E.; Cocola, L.; Billi, D.; D'alessandro, M.; Pace, E.; Schierano, D.; Benatti, S.; Bonavita, M.; Galletta, G.

    2014-04-01

    In the framework of Atmosphere in a Test Tube, at the Astronomical Observatory of Padova (INAF) we are going to perform experiments aimed to understand the possible modification of the atmosphere by photosynthetic biota present on the planet surface. This goal can be achieved simulating M star planetary environmental conditions. The bacteria that are being studied are Acaryochloris marina, Chroococcidiopsis spp. and Halomicronema hingdechloris. Tests will be performed with LISA or MINI-LISA ambient simulator in the laboratory of the Padova Astronomic Observatory. In this paper we describe the whole road map to follow in order to perform experiments and to obtain useful data to be compared with the real ones that will be obtained by the future space missions. Starting by a fiducial experiment we will modify either environmental and thermodynamical properties in order to simulate both real irradiation by an M star and gas mixture mimicing super earths atmospheres. These laboratory tests could be used as a guideline in order to understand whether chemical disequilibrium of O2, CO2 and CH4 could be ascribed to biotic life forms.

  4. The Locust Jump: An Integrated Laboratory Investigation

    Scott, Jon

    2005-01-01

    The locust is well known for its ability to jump large distances to avoid predation. This class sets out a series of investigations into the mechanisms underlying the jump enabling students to bring together information from biomechanics, muscle physiology, and anatomy. The nature of the investigation allows it to be undertaken at a number of…

  5. The Locust Jump: An Integrated Laboratory Investigation

    Scott, Jon

    2005-01-01

    The locust is well known for its ability to jump large distances to avoid predation. This class sets out a series of investigations into the mechanisms underlying the jump enabling students to bring together information from biomechanics, muscle physiology, and anatomy. The nature of the investigation allows it to be undertaken at a number of

  6. Laboratory investigations of volatile trapping in comets

    Owen, Tobias (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This research program consists of laboratory studies of the formation of ice at low temperatures to simulate the formation of comets in the outer solar nebula. The ice is condensed in the presence of various mixtures of gases at a given temperature, and then warmed to see at what temperatures the gases are released and how much gas was actually trapped. Our results to date indicate that the trapping of argon, krypton, and xenon in ice formed at approximately 50 K fractionates these gase in a way that fits the relative abundances found in the atmospheres of Mars and Earth. This is markedly different from the situation in chondritic meteorites, where the abundance of xenon is about equal to that of krypton. It appears that comets represent a better source for planetary volatiles than do the meteorites.

  7. An experimental investigation of parasitic microstrip arrays

    Lee, Richard Q.; Acosta, Roberto; Dahele, J. S.; Lee, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of a parasitic microstrip antenna array with a center-fed patch are experimentally investigated. The parasitic array is composed of identical parasitic patches which are symmetrically arranged and electromagnetically coupled to a center-fed patch. The shape and dimensions of the parasitic patches and their positions relative to the center-fed patch are parameters in the study. To show mutual coupling effects between radiating and nonradiating edges of adjacent patches, the impedance and radiation characteristics of a three-element parasitic array excited with (0.1) mode are examined, and compared to that of a single patch. Experimental data indicate that the presence of parasitic patches has significant effects upon the gain, resonant frequency, and impedance bandwidth of the array.

  8. A Novel Experimental Technique to Simulate Pillar Burst in Laboratory

    He, M. C.; Zhao, F.; Cai, M.; Du, S.

    2015-09-01

    Pillar burst is one type of rockburst that occurs in underground mines. Simulating the stress change and obtaining insight into the pillar burst phenomenon under laboratory conditions are essential for studying the rock behavior during pillar burst in situ. To study the failure mechanism, a novel experimental technique was proposed and a series of tests were conducted on some granite specimens using a true-triaxial strainburst test system. Acoustic emission (AE) sensors were used to monitor the rock fracturing process. The damage evolution process was investigated using techniques such as macro and micro fracture characteristics observation, AE energy evolution, and b value analysis and fractal dimension analysis of cracks on fragments. The obtained results indicate that stepped loading and unloading simulated the pillar burst phenomenon well. Four deformation stages are divided as initial stress state, unloading step I, unloading step II, and final burst. It is observed that AE energy has a sharp increase at the initial stress state, accumulates slowly at unloading steps I and II, and increases dramatically at peak stress. Meanwhile, the mean b values fluctuate around 3.50 for the first three deformation stages and then decrease to 2.86 at the final stage, indicating the generation of a large amount of macro fractures. Before the test, the fractal dimension values are discrete and mainly vary between 1.10 and 1.25, whereas after failure the values concentrate around 1.25-1.35.

  9. Experimental investigation of a solar bamboo dryer

    Ong, K.S. [Univ. Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Engineering Faculty

    1996-05-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on the performance of a solar box dryer for drying bamboo operating under tropical weather conditions. The dryer is a greenhouse-type designed for multi-crop solar drying. Air circulation was by electrically-operated fan. The results showed that the moisture content of the bamboo could be brought down to about 19% from an initial value of nearly 90% in 17 days by operating the dryer over 8 hours each day. Under natural drying conditions, the final moisture content reached was only 22%. Although solar drying of bamboo was only marginally faster than natural drying, nonetheless, final moisture content was lower.

  10. Experimental investigation of Reykjavik city footbridge

    Zivanovic, Stana; Ingólfsson, Einar Thór; Pavic, Aleksandar; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur Valur

    2011-01-01

    This study describes experimental investigation of a 160 m long footbridge in Reykjavik. The bridge is a continuous post tensioned concrete beam spanning eight spans, the longest being 27.1 m. In plan, the structure has eye-catching spiral shape. Modal testing of the structure was conducted to...... scenarios such as: single person either walking or jumping, group of people walking, jogging or jumping and stream of pedestrians. The severity of vibration responses of the bridge for different scenarios was then evaluated against vibration serviceability criteria defined in a guideline. It was found that...

  11. Preparation of bentonites for laboratory investigations

    A project study on behalf of Nagra for high radioactive waste disposal in deep geological formations as well as literature studies have shown that bentonite could be a suitable filling and sealing material. The Institute for Foundation and Soil Mechanics of the Swiss Institute of Technology has been given a contract by Nagra to investigate different bentonites. The investigations concentrate on the Na-bentonite MX-80 from Wyoming, which is foreseen by the Swedes, and on the geographically more favorable Ca-bentonite Montigel from Bavaria. Montigel powder and granulate, which show certain manufacturing advantages, were investigated. The quality of the bentonites was examined especially to ascertain whether the bentonites were homogeneous with respect to composition and properties. Montmorillonite, carbonate, oxidizing substances and exchangeable ions were quality content criteria for bentonite. The investigations showed that these bentonites are typical Na- and Ca-bentonites. A representative sample of 500 kg weight (250 kg for Montigel K) was largely homogeneous. The samples were analysed by x-rays and thermoanalysis. Additionally grain size, carbonate content, methylene blue value, yield point, exchange capacity and exchangeable ions were determined. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Experimental and numerical investigations of plasma turbulence

    Turbulence in plasmas has been investigated experimentally and numerically. The work described here is divided into four parts: - experiments on edge turbulence in a single-ended Q-machine. Convective cells are investigated in detail together with the anomalous transport caused by them. - Numerical simulation of the edge turbulence in the Q-machine. This simulation uses spectral methods to solve Euler's equation in a cylindrical geometry. - Measurements on wave propagation and the ion beam instability in an unmagnetized plasma with an ion beam with a finite diameter. - Development of software for the automated acquisition of data. This program can control an experiment as well as make measurements. It also include a graphics part. (author) 66 ills., 47 refs

  13. Failure investigations in the nuclear materials laboratory

    A report is given of damage to hydrostatic floating seals (with a single-stage pressure drop of 155 bar) from pressurized water reactors. The seals were manufactured from the steel X 22 CrNi 17 and plasmacoated with a layer of Cr2O3. The types of damage occurring (green discoloration and hump formation) are discussed in terms of their mechanistic causes. A further investigation involved metallographic examination with optical and scanning electron microscopes of seven specimens from thin-walled piping made of the finegrained, structural steel 17 MnMoV 6,4 in which cracking had occurred in weld regions, in particular, crack growth and the form of cracking at the weld root were investigated. (orig.)

  14. Experimental investigation of magnetically confined plasma loops

    Arch-shaped magnetic flux tubes generated in a pulsed-power plasma experiment were investigated with a variety of diagnostics concerning their expansion properties. Specifically, the expansion velocity was of interest, which is observed as constant for a wide range of experimental parameters. An MHD transport mechanism is investigated as possible cause of a uniform arch cross section: Axial transport of poloidal magnetic flux along the plasma may cause a pinch force leading to a uniform diameter along the arch. Despite numerous experimental findings at a very similar experimental setup, no indication for the relevance of this process could be found. Instead, magnetic probe data showed that the plasma current in the apex region is constant. A constant expansion velocity was observed for considerably different experimental conditions. This included different plasma source designs with fundamentally different toroidal magnetic field topology and variation of the working gas, which lead to plasma densities lower by an order of magnitude. Inside the current channel of the arch, Alfven velocities were estimated. To this end, plasma density profiles obtained from interferometry were inverted to obtain local densities, which were in turn verified by means of Stark broadening of hydrogen Balmer lines. Furthermore, measurements of multiple components of the magnetic field of the plasma arch were performed. An estimate for the conductivity was obtained from Spitzer's formula for fully ionized plasma using electron temperatures obtained from elementary optical emission spectroscopy. From the presented data of ccd imaging, magnetic field probes, and to lesser extent, interferometry, the underlying assumption of residual plasma (and considerable plasma currents through it) below the actual arch structure is very plausible. Rough estimates of the electric field strength along the arch and results of the magnetic field measurements showed, that the detected expansion velocities could be caused by these fields. Ccd images showed little dynamics along the rest of the arch till it detaches at the electrodes. The presented results clearly show that the argon discharges under investigation cannot be described in terms of ideal MHD. The magnetic Reynolds number of the order of unity suggests considerable influence of resistive effects on the plasma, which are observed for instance in terms of the diffusion of the magnetic field. It was shown that the apex plasma current is considerably reduced as compared to the externally measured discharge current. Inside the arch, preliminary measurements of the potential difference between two floating probe tips at close distance inside the main current channel showed promising results for the electric field along the arch.

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigations of falling film evaporation

    Pehlivan, Hüseyin; Özdemir, Mustafa

    2012-06-01

    In this study, a mathematical model was developed for falling film evaporation in vacuum using heat transfer relations. An experimental device was designed. experimental set-up which was used was equipped with a triangular weir distribution device and it had the ability to record data up to 3 m. Experiments were performed in a single-effect process with sucrose-water solution varying from 3 to 20% concentration rate of sucrose and we used a vertical tube evaporator with the dimensions of laboratory scale. The model that was developed considers convection, shear stress, viscosity and conjugate heat transfer while most of the previous works ignored these factors. The main factors influencing the heat transfer mechanism performance of the unit were investigated and analyzed. We concluded that the experimental studies are verified by the developed model. Furthermore, it was also concluded that, the heat transfer is affected by the mass flow rate, sucrose concentration rate in solution, film thickness and pressure.

  16. Investigating intertemporal choice through experimental evolutionary robotics.

    Paglieri, Fabio; Parisi, Domenico; Patacchiola, Massimiliano; Petrosino, Giancarlo

    2015-06-01

    In intertemporal choices, subjects face a trade-off between value and delay: achieving the most valuable outcome requires a longer time, whereas the immediately available option is objectively poorer. Intertemporal choices are ubiquitous, and comparative studies reveal commonalities and differences across species: all species devalue future rewards as a function of delay (delay aversion), yet there is a lot of inter-specific variance in how rapidly such devaluation occurs. These differences are often interpreted in terms of ecological rationality, as depending on environmental factors (e.g., feeding ecology) and the physiological and morphological constraints of different species (e.g., metabolic rate). Evolutionary hypotheses, however, are hard to verify in vivo, since it is difficult to observe precisely enough real environments, not to mention ancestral ones. In this paper, we discuss the viability of an approach based on evolutionary robotics: in Study 1, we evolve robots without a metabolism in five different ecologies; in Study 2, we evolve metabolic robots (i.e., robots that consume energy over time) in three different ecologies. The intertemporal choices of the robots are analyzed both in their ecology and under laboratory conditions. Results confirm the generality of delay aversion and the usefulness of studying intertemporal choice through experimental evolutionary robotics. PMID:25721533

  17. Experimental investigations of MFCI in Russia

    This report contains a review of the experimental investigations of MFCI which are carried out as applied to the safety problems of LMFBR, mainly in IPPE. Until the present time these investigations have been performed in out of pile conditions, using different substances for molten fuel simulation. A brief description of the experimental installations and results obtained in the course of experimental program realization is given. In particular the results are presented on the study of MFCI phenomenology with regards to the influence on the interaction energy release of such factors as: type of molten fuel-coolant contact, temperature conditions, ratio of interacted masses, scale factor. Simulation experiments have been effectuated using the following pairs of interaction media: low-melting metals (Lead, Tin, Bismuth, Aluminium)/water; molten Titan and Stainless steel/water; molten Titan and Stainless steel/sodium, eutectic alloy potassium-sodium; alumina/sodium; thermite mixture (Zr + Fe2O3)/water, sodium. The experiments were carried out mainly with the melts masses below 1 kg, except for some series of the experiments on molten Lead-water interaction, where the melt masses as big as 40 kg were used. Initial temperatures of low-melting metals have not exceeded 800 deg. C, while for the Stainless steel, Titan melts and alumina they were equal to 2200 deg. and 2500 deg. C respectively. The temperature of the melt, obtained by combustion of the thermite mixture Zr + Fe2O3, was about 3000 deg. C. The first part of the MFCI investigation program has been completed for the present time. A set of the data on the dynamical characteristics of interactions (time delays, amplitudes and shape of interaction pressure pulses, duration of interaction stage) and conversion coefficients of melt thermal energy into mechanical one was obtained. Analysis of these results has shown an essentially milder interaction energetics in the case of alkali metals coolants as compared with water. Some review is given on the further program of the MFCI study. (author)

  18. Storage of high-level wastes, investigations in underground laboratories

    This article reviews the different collaborations made by ANDRA (national agency for the management of radioactive wastes) in the fields of underground radioactive waste storage. ANDRA has taken part in various experimental research programs performed in laboratories such as Mol in Belgium, Aspo in Sweden, Pinawa in Canada and Grimsel in Switzerland. This article details the experiments led at Mol since 1984. ANDRA is commissioned by the 30.12.91 decree to study the possibility of storage in deep geological layers. A thorough knowledge of the matter requires the building of underground laboratories in order to test and validate technological choices on a real scale. 6 themes will have to be investigated: 1) the capacity to seal up the storage facility after its use in order to assure the protection of man and environment, 2) the effects of geological perturbations on the confining properties of the site, 3) the confining ability of the Callovian-Oxfordian geological formation, 4) the transfer of radionuclides from the geological formation to the biosphere, 5) the constructing possibility of an underground storage facility, and 6) the possibility of retrieving the stored packages. (A.C.)

  19. Mars Science Laboratory Mission and Science Investigation

    Grotzinger, John P.; Crisp, Joy; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Anderson, Robert C.; Baker, Charles J.; Barry, Robert; Blake, David F.; Conrad, Pamela; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Ferdowski, Bobak; Gellert, Ralf; Gilbert, John B.; Golombek, Matt; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hassler, Donald M.; Jandura, Louise; Litvak, Maxim; Mahaffy, Paul; Maki, Justin; Meyer, Michael; Malin, Michael C.; Mitrofanov, Igor; Simmonds, John J.; Vaniman, David; Welch, Richard V.; Wiens, Roger C.

    2012-09-01

    Scheduled to land in August of 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission was initiated to explore the habitability of Mars. This includes both modern environments as well as ancient environments recorded by the stratigraphic rock record preserved at the Gale crater landing site. The Curiosity rover has a designed lifetime of at least one Mars year (˜23 months), and drive capability of at least 20 km. Curiosity's science payload was specifically assembled to assess habitability and includes a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer and gas analyzer that will search for organic carbon in rocks, regolith fines, and the atmosphere (SAM instrument); an x-ray diffractometer that will determine mineralogical diversity (CheMin instrument); focusable cameras that can image landscapes and rock/regolith textures in natural color (MAHLI, MARDI, and Mastcam instruments); an alpha-particle x-ray spectrometer for in situ determination of rock and soil chemistry (APXS instrument); a laser-induced breakdown spectrometer to remotely sense the chemical composition of rocks and minerals (ChemCam instrument); an active neutron spectrometer designed to search for water in rocks/regolith (DAN instrument); a weather station to measure modern-day environmental variables (REMS instrument); and a sensor designed for continuous monitoring of background solar and cosmic radiation (RAD instrument). The various payload elements will work together to detect and study potential sampling targets with remote and in situ measurements; to acquire samples of rock, soil, and atmosphere and analyze them in onboard analytical instruments; and to observe the environment around the rover. The 155-km diameter Gale crater was chosen as Curiosity's field site based on several attributes: an interior mountain of ancient flat-lying strata extending almost 5 km above the elevation of the landing site; the lower few hundred meters of the mountain show a progression with relative age from clay-bearing to sulfate-bearing strata, separated by an unconformity from overlying likely anhydrous strata; the landing ellipse is characterized by a mixture of alluvial fan and high thermal inertia/high albedo stratified deposits; and a number of stratigraphically/geomorphically distinct fluvial features. Samples of the crater wall and rim rock, and more recent to currently active surface materials also may be studied. Gale has a well-defined regional context and strong evidence for a progression through multiple potentially habitable environments. These environments are represented by a stratigraphic record of extraordinary extent, and insure preservation of a rich record of the environmental history of early Mars. The interior mountain of Gale Crater has been informally designated at Mount Sharp, in honor of the pioneering planetary scientist Robert Sharp. The major subsystems of the MSL Project consist of a single rover (with science payload), a Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator, an Earth-Mars cruise stage, an entry, descent, and landing system, a launch vehicle, and the mission operations and ground data systems. The primary communication path for downlink is relay through the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The primary path for uplink to the rover is Direct-from-Earth. The secondary paths for downlink are Direct-to-Earth and relay through the Mars Odyssey orbiter. Curiosity is a scaled version of the 6-wheel drive, 4-wheel steering, rocker bogie system from the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) Spirit and Opportunity and the Mars Pathfinder Sojourner. Like Spirit and Opportunity, Curiosity offers three primary modes of navigation: blind-drive, visual odometry, and visual odometry with hazard avoidance. Creation of terrain maps based on HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) and other remote sensing data were used to conduct simulated driving with Curiosity in these various modes, and allowed selection of the Gale crater landing site which requires climbing the base of a mountain to achieve its primary science goals. The Sample Acquisition, Processing, and Handling (SA/SPaH) subsystem is responsible for the acquisition of rock and soil samples from the Martian surface and the processing of these samples into fine particles that are then distributed to the analytical science instruments. The SA/SPaH subsystem is also responsible for the placement of the two contact instruments (APXS, MAHLI) on rock and soil targets. SA/SPaH consists of a robotic arm and turret-mounted devices on the end of the arm, which include a drill, brush, soil scoop, sample processing device, and the mechanical and electrical interfaces to the two contact science instruments. SA/SPaH also includes drill bit boxes, the organic check material, and an observation tray, which are all mounted on the front of the rover, and inlet cover mechanisms that are placed over the SAM and CheMin solid sample inlet tubes on the rover top deck.

  20. Intergranular attack of alloy 600: laboratory investigations

    In some steam generators, intergranular attack (IGA) has occurred on Alloy 600 tubes in the tube-tubesheet crevice region. In order to evaluate the physico-chemical parameters which influence this type of corrosion, electrochemical tests and pressurized capsule tests were implemented on Alloy 600. Electrochemical tests consisted of polarizing Alloy 600 C-rings at various potential values during 120 hours in 10% caustic solutions eventually additioned with carbonate, sulfate, phosphate or silicate. In capsule tests, concentration of the sodium hydroxide was also investigated. In these cases, redox potential was changed by addition of various metallic oxides. Test durations were up to 2600 hours at 320 and 350 deg C. IGA is observed in caustic media and is a stress assisted phenomenon; on mill annealed Alloy 600 it occurs in a potential range around the reversible hydrogen potential. If the potential is increased by few tens of mV, only SCC is observed. Intergranular corrosion is often more important with addition of carbonate or sulfate but is not strongly affected by the caustic concentration; silicate has an inhibiting effect. The corrosion depth along the grain boundaries increases with test temperature. After thermal treatment at 700 deg C, with or without chromium depletion, Alloy 600 is more resistant to IGA but not immune. (author)

  1. Experimental Investigation of Pseudospark generated electron beam

    Kumar, Niraj; Verma, D. K.; Prajapati, J.; Kumar, M.; Meena, B. L.; Tyagi, M. S.; Srivastava, V.; Pal, U. N.

    2012-11-01

    The pseudospark (PS) discharge is, however, more recently recognized as a different type of discharge which is capable of generating electron beams with the highest combined current density and brightness of any known type of electron source. PS discharge is a specific type of gas discharge, which operates on the left-hand side of the hollow cathode analogy to the Paschen curve with axially symmetric parallel electrodes and central holes on the electrodes. The PS discharge generated electron beam has tremendous applications in plasma filled microwave sources where normal material cathode cannot be used. Analysis of the electron beam profile has been carried out experimentally for different applied voltages. The investigation has been done at different axial and radial location inside the drift tube in argon atmosphere. This paper represents experimentally derived axial and radial variation of the beam current inside the plasma filled drift tube of PS discharge based plasma cathode electron (PCE) gun. With the help of current density estimation the focusing and defocusing point of electron beam in axial direction can be analyzed. It has been further confirmed the successful propagation of electron beam in confined manner without any assistance of external magnetic field.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Pseudospark generated electron beam

    The pseudospark (PS) discharge is, however, more recently recognized as a different type of discharge which is capable of generating electron beams with the highest combined current density and brightness of any known type of electron source. PS discharge is a specific type of gas discharge, which operates on the left-hand side of the hollow cathode analogy to the Paschen curve with axially symmetric parallel electrodes and central holes on the electrodes. The PS discharge generated electron beam has tremendous applications in plasma filled microwave sources where normal material cathode cannot be used. Analysis of the electron beam profile has been carried out experimentally for different applied voltages. The investigation has been done at different axial and radial location inside the drift tube in argon atmosphere. This paper represents experimentally derived axial and radial variation of the beam current inside the plasma filled drift tube of PS discharge based plasma cathode electron (PCE) gun. With the help of current density estimation the focusing and defocusing point of electron beam in axial direction can be analyzed. It has been further confirmed the successful propagation of electron beam in confined manner without any assistance of external magnetic field.

  3. Experimental investigation of passive pool mixing

    After the initial blow-down phase of a hypothetical design basis accident or severe accident in the General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR), heat is added to the suppression pool by gas-vapor flow through the isolation condenser (IC) and passive containment cooler (PCC) vent lines. The exit of the vent lines is fairly shallow (on the order of 0.75 meters) in order to enhance IC/PCC operation. The surface temperature of a pool increases when heat is injected. The magnitude of increase depends on the amount of the pool involved in heat absorption and thermal gradients in the absorbing region. Thermal stratification occurs because a rising plume carries the energy of the vented gas-vapor to the pool surface and, as a result, only the region of the pool above the injection point is involved in heat absorption. This experimental investigation demonstrated the feasibility of using the IC/PCC vent flow to drive pool mixing. A passive mixer was designed and constructed on the basis of buoyancy and momentum utilization. The mixer was sized to represent one in a system of several mixers which could be implemented in the SBWR. The experimental results show that the potential exists to involve a significant amount of the suppression pool in heat absorption using a passive mixer

  4. Propane hydrate nucleation: Experimental investigation and correlation

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    In this work the nucleation kinetics of propane gas hydrate has been investigated experimentally using a stirred batch reactor. The experiments have been performed isothermally recording the pressure as a function of time. Experiments were conducted at different stirring rates, but in the same...... supersaturation region. The experiments showed that the gas dissolution rate rather than the induction time of propane hydrate is influenced by a change in agitation. This was especially valid at high stirring rates when the water surface was severely disturbed.Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to the...... aqueous phase was found to reduce the gas dissolution rate slightly. However the induction times were prolonged quite substantially upon addition of PVP.The induction time data were correlated using a newly developed induction time model based on crystallization theory also capable of taking into account...

  5. Experimental investigation on reflooding of debris beds

    Highlights: • A downcomer can significantly improve the beds’ coolability. • The perforated downcomer was occupied by steam and thus without effect. • Comparable quenching times in DEBRIS and PRELUDE. • Good agreement of MEWA calculation with the experiment in case of open downcomer. - Abstract: In case of a severe accident, continuous unavailability of cooling water to the core may result in over heating of the fuel elements and the loss of core integrity. Under such conditions a structure of heated particles of different sizes and shapes (debris) may be formed by fragmentation of core material inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). To avoid any damage to the RPV the reflooding is of great importance in order to establish long-term coolability. In the framework of an GRS R and D project and the SARNET network, specific experimental investigations on the coolability of debris beds with different bed contents (e.g. mono-/polydispersed bed of stainless steel balls with 6/3/2 mm in diameter, irregularly shaped particles from PREMIX experiments – KIT) and various initial bed temperatures at ambient pressure (1 bar) were carried out at IKE using the DEBRIS test facility and the small DEBRIS test set-up. In both experimental configurations the particles are volumetrically heated by an electromagnetic induction coil to predefined temperatures and then flooded with subcooled water from top (top-flooding) or from bottom (bottom-flooding). Depending on the flooding situation the cooling down (quenching) behaviour of the beds varies significantly due to the change of co- and counter-current liquid–vapour flow and respective heat transfer between solid and generated two-phase flow. This paper presents the main experimental results of systematic quenching studies at IKE. Furthermore, some representative results of benchmark experiments performed by IKE and IRSN (PRELUDE test facility) in the frame of the SARNET joint work are demonstrated. Finally, exemplary comparisons between experimental data and numerical results of simulations with IKE’s code MEWA-2D are shown

  6. Modelling and laboratory investigation of microbial enhanced oil recovery

    Desouky, S.M. [King Saud University, College of Engineering, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Abdel-Daim, M.M.; Sayyouh, M.H.; Dahab, A.S. [Cairo University, College of Engineering and Petroleum Engineering Department, Giza (Egypt)

    1996-08-15

    A one-dimensional model was developed to simulate the process of enhanced oil recovery by microorganisms. The model involves five components (oil, water, bacteria, nutrient and metabolites), with adsorption, diffusion, chemotaxis, growth and decay of bacteria, nutrient consumption, permeability damage and porosity reduction effects. Experiments were conducted to identify the parameters affecting the transport and growth of three bacterial strains: Streptococcus, Staphylococcus and Bacillus in porous media. Several correlations were developed from the experimental laboratory data and were used in the simulator. Comparison between the experimental and simulated results emphasized the validity of the developed simulator and determined its degree of accuracy (average absolute relative error=8.323%). The simulator was used to investigate the effects of indigenous bacteria, slug size, incubation time, residual oil saturation, absolute permeability, and injection flow rate on oil recovery. Results show that more oil can be recovered by using Streptococcus with molasses as a medium. Oil recovery is sensitive to variation in concentration of injected indigenous bacteria, size of bacterial culture slug, incubation time and residual oil saturation. The change of absolute permeability, or injection flow rate, has no effect on oil recovery efficiency by bacteria

  7. Numerical and Experimental Investigation on Root Anchorage

    Ali, F.; Osman, N.; Hashim, R.; Khalilnejad, A.

    2012-04-01

    In more recent times, the roles played by vegetation in some specific geotechnical processes have been recognized. Vegetation may affect slope stability in many ways. The stability of slopes is governed by the load, which is the driving force that causes failure, and the resistance, which is the strength of the soil-root system. The weight of trees growing on a slope adds to the load but the roots of trees serve as a soil reinforcement and increase the resistance. In order to ensure that the weight of the trees on the slope help to enhance its stability it is required that they are planted down-slope of the neutral point. Maximum contribution is produced if the trees are located at the slope toe. Considering a typical slip circle, at this location the direction of shear force acting on the trees may be considered as close-to-vertical for the purpose of analysis. In this study, 3D numerical simulations of root anchorage have been performed to study the mechanism and the factors influencing the pull out capacity of tree roots. The investigation was performed using ABACUS finite element program. Field pull-out tests were also carried out on Melastoma malabathricum which been shown to be very suitable to be grown on slope, and the results are compared with numerical simulations. Parametric studies were also done to study the effects of factors such as root pattern, angle of inclination as well as soil properties. The results show that the 3D finite element analyses are able to approximately simulate the experimental tests. The results of the field tests, simulations and the parametric studies will be presented and discussed in more details in this paper.

  8. An Investigative, Cooperative Learning Approach to the General Microbiology Laboratory

    Seifert, Kyle; Fenster, Amy; Dilts, Judith A.; Temple, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Investigative- and cooperative-based learning strategies have been used effectively in a variety of classrooms to enhance student learning and engagement. In the General Microbiology laboratory for juniors and seniors at James Madison University, these strategies were combined to make a semester-long, investigative, cooperative learning experience…

  9. An Investigative, Cooperative Learning Approach to the General Microbiology Laboratory

    Seifert, Kyle; Fenster, Amy; Dilts, Judith A.; Temple, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Investigative- and cooperative-based learning strategies have been used effectively in a variety of classrooms to enhance student learning and engagement. In the General Microbiology laboratory for juniors and seniors at James Madison University, these strategies were combined to make a semester-long, investigative, cooperative learning experience

  10. Experimental Investigation on Caisson Breakwater Sliding

    Ruol, Piero; Martin, Paolo; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Martinelli, Luca

    This note presents wave flume experiments, carried out at Aalborg University, measuring the horizontal sliding distance of a vertical breakwater in 1:40 scale. Horizontal and uplift wave induced pressures were accurately measured simultaneously with the caisson movements. Caissons of different we...... endorses other previous experimental results. Conversely, when the actual measured input force is used as input, the analytical Shimosako formula fit quite well the experimental sliding distance....

  11. Experimental Investigation of Flow Condensation in Microgravity

    Lee, Hyoungsoon; Park, Ilchung; Konishi, Christopher; Mudawar, Issam; May, Rochelle I.; Juergens, Jeffery R.; Wagner, James D.; Hall, Nancy R.; Nahra, Henry K.; Hasan, Mohammed M.; Mackey, Jeffery R.

    2013-01-01

    Future manned missions to Mars are expected to greatly increase the space vehicle's size, weight, and heat dissipation requirements. An effective means to reducing both size and weight is to replace single-phase thermal management systems with two-phase counterparts that capitalize upon both latent and sensible heat of the coolant rather than sensible heat alone. This shift is expected to yield orders of magnitude enhancements in flow boiling and condensation heat transfer coefficients. A major challenge to this shift is a lack of reliable tools for accurate prediction of two-phase pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in reduced gravity. Developing such tools will require a sophisticated experimental facility to enable investigators to perform both flow boiling and condensation experiments in microgravity in pursuit of reliable databases. This study will discuss the development of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) for the International Space Station (ISS), which was initiated in 2012 in collaboration between Purdue University and NASA Glenn Research Center. This facility was recently tested in parabolic flight to acquire condensation data for FC-72 in microgravity, aided by high-speed video analysis of interfacial structure of the condensation film. The condensation is achieved by rejecting heat to a counter flow of water, and experiments were performed at different mass velocities of FC-72 and water and different FC-72 inlet qualities. It is shown that the film flow varies from smooth-laminar to wavy-laminar and ultimately turbulent with increasing FC-72 mass velocity. The heat transfer coefficient is highest near the inlet of the condensation tube, where the film is thinnest, and decreases monotonically along the tube, except for high FC-72 mass velocities, where the heat transfer coefficient is enhanced downstream. This enhancement is attributed to both turbulence and increased interfacial waviness. One-ge correlations are shown to predict the average condensation heat transfer coefficient with varying degrees of success, and a recent correlation is identified for its superior predictive capability, evidenced by a mean absolute error of 21.7%.

  12. Experimental investigation of a coaxial gyrotron oscillator

    Advani, Rahul N.

    1999-09-01

    This thesis presents experimental results of a megawatt power level, 140 GHz coaxial gyrotron oscillator. The coaxial gyrotron has the potential to transport very high power electron beams and thus achieve higher microwave output power levels than conventional gyrotrons. A TE21,13 coaxial gyrotron was designed to operate at 95 kV, 76 A. This tube was tested to high power with the first high power Inverted Magnetron Injection Gun (IMIG). The IMIG electron gun was tested to 10 MW (105 kV, 93 A), which is the highest power level for a non-relativistic gyrotron gun. Operation of the coaxial gyrotron oscillator yielded power levels of greater than 1 MW in two different configurations: with the coaxial conductor (at 92kV, 70 A, and 16% efficiency) and without the coaxial conductor (85 kV, 65 A, and 18% efficiency). We also successfully operated this tube in three configurations (empty cavity, radial output, and axial output) with no beam interception. We observed regimes of dominant single mode and multi-mode operation. We also identified electron beam asymmetries and tube alignment as two major issues, which can limit the performance of a coaxial gyrotron. An unexpected source of magnetic field error was found in the magnetization of the stainless steel parts. All these results have led to techniques for improving not only coaxial gyrotrons but also other gyrotron tubes. We also investigated a ferroelectric cathode, which has the potential to achieve higher currents than thermionic cathodes in a simpler, low cost gun. We report the first results on a ferroelectric cathode gun in a magnetron injection gun configuration suitable for use in a gyrotron. It had an annular emitter shape with a diameter of 11.4 cm and a width of 0.25 cm and operated at currents of up to 10 A (1.1 A/cm2) at 8 kV, in 5 μs flat-top pulses. This result (along with the kiloampere beam obtained at Integrated Applied Physics) demonstrate the scalability of ferroelectric cathodes to large diameter electron beams. Also, the first ever microwaves from a ferroelectric cathode were generated in a collaboration experiment at Tel Aviv University. Finally, we developed a theory to explain the emission process from ferroelectric cathodes. The experiments reported have shown the suitability of ferroelectric cathodes for future microwave generation experiments. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  13. Experimental investigation of the plasma focus discharge

    One reports the main experimental results obtained on low current level Focus discharges: 200 kA and 50 kA. Neutron and X-ray scaling laws from 50 kA up to 2500 kA have been established by taking into account all the results obtained at the Centre d'Etudes de Limeil. These scaling laws show the great interest of a 10 MA Plasma Focus device. To achieve this high current level, one present the experimental study of an explosive current generator driven plasma Focus

  14. Structural failures and experimental investigations of lightweightstructures

    Drdácký, Miloš

    Varšava : Wydawnictwo naukowe, 2002 - (Obrebski, J.), s. 613-622 ISBN 83-908867-6-6. [Lightweight structures in civil engineering . Varšava (PL), 24.06.2002-28.06.2002] R&D Projects: GA MK PK99P04OPP006 Keywords : structural failures, forensic engineering , experimental mechanics Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering

  15. An Experimental Investigation of Cognitive Defusion

    Pilecki, Brian C.; McKay, Dean

    2012-01-01

    The current study compared cognitive defusion with other strategies in reducing the impact of experimentally induced negative emotional states. Sixty-seven undergraduates were assigned to one of three conditions (cognitive defusion, thought suppression, or control) and instructed in standardized approaches relevant to each condition before viewing

  16. Experimental investigation of gas aerostatic bearings

    Steinbauer, P.; Šika, Z.; Kozánek, Jan; Šimek, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2008), s. 769-776. ISSN 1335-2393 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/06/1787 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : aerostatic bearing * experimental identification * measurement Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  17. Overall control architecture of the European tritium handling experimental laboratory

    The overall control architecture serving the European Tritium Handling Experimental Laboratory (ETHEL) consists of two types of apparatus: (1) Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), Personal Computers (PCs), networks which constitute the so-called Distributed Digital Control System (DDCS); (2) Fail-safe hard-wiring which operates independently of the DDCS. This paper deals with the first type of apparatus; its hardware and software are described. The computerized system, defined by a four-level hierarchical and modular architecture, is a large distributed Real-time Control System. The operation is mainly centralised in the Control Room through a fully programmable man-machine interface (graphic displays, trends, etc.). 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  18. Experimental analysis of nonlinear oscillations in the undergraduate physics laboratory

    In this paper, we present a simple experiment to introduce the nonlinear behaviour of oscillating systems in the undergraduate physics laboratory. The transverse oscillations of a spring allow reproduction of three totally different scenarios: linear oscillations, nonlinear oscillations reducible to linear for small displacements, and intrinsically nonlinear oscillations. The chosen approach consists of measuring the displacements using video photogrammetry and computing the velocities and the accelerations by means of a numerical differentiation algorithm. In this way, one can directly check the differential equation of the motion without having to integrate it, or perform an experimental study of the potential energy in each of the analysed scenarios. This experiment allows first year students to reflect on the consequences and the limits of the linearity assumption for small displacements that is so often made in technical studies. (paper)

  19. Numerical and experimental investigations on cavitation erosion

    A method is proposed to predict cavitation damage from cavitating flow simulations. For this purpose, a numerical process coupling cavitating flow simulations and erosion models was developed and applied to a two-dimensional (2D) hydrofoil tested at TUD (Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany) [1] and to a NACA 65012 tested at LMH-EPFL (Lausanne Polytechnic School) [2]. Cavitation erosion tests (pitting tests) were carried out and a 3D laser profilometry was used to analyze surfaces damaged by cavitation [3]. The method allows evaluating the pit characteristics, and mainly the volume damage rates. The paper describes the developed erosion model, the technique of cavitation damage measurement and presents some comparisons between experimental results and numerical damage predictions. The extent of cavitation erosion was correctly estimated in both hydrofoil geometries. The simulated qualitative influence of flow velocity, sigma value and gas content on cavitation damage agreed well with experimental observations.

  20. Experimental investigation of bifurcation induced bandgap reconfiguration

    Bernard, Brian P.; Mazzoleni, Michael J.; Garraud, Nicolas; Arnold, David P.; Mann, Brian P.

    2014-08-01

    By applying an asymmetric on-site restoring force in a 1D chain of oscillators, we demonstrate experimentally that a morphing in the bandgap structure or passive bandgap reconfiguration can be triggered by an increase in environmental excitation amplitude. Recent studies on wave propagation have focused on new capabilities and behaviors resulting from intrinsic nonlinearities. This paper details a bistable experimental design that achieves amplitude dependent filtering through passive bandgap reconfiguration, which is triggered by a bifurcation. The system studied comprises a 1D chain of axially aligned pendulums in dimer unit cells with geometrically nonlinear nearest neighbor coupling where bistability is induced through repulsive magnets. When the bistability is asymmetric, each potential well has a different linear spectra. Though this paper uses mechanically coupled oscillators as an example, the phenomenon itself could be used in any wave propagation media where asymmetric bistability can be implemented.

  1. Experimental investigation of radiation temperature in hohlraums

    Radiation temperature in hohlraums is diagnosed by using two soft X-ray spectrometers and a multi-pinhole soft X-ray streak camera. Taking plasma closure effects of the diagnostic hole into consideration, the accuracy has been improved. 2D-images and processes of the hole closure and radiation temperature in the hohlraums vs time have been obtained. A preliminary model of the closure effect of diagnostic hole is proposed based on the experimental data

  2. Experimental investigation of a control synthetic jet

    Němcová, L.; Kordík, Jozef; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Kopecký, V.

    Vol. 1. Liberec : TU Liberec, 2011 - (Vít, T.; Dančová, P.; Novotný, P.), s. 315-322 ISBN 978-80-7372-784-0. [Experimental Fluid Mechanics 2011. Jičín (CZ), 22.11.2011-25.11.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/1959 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : flow control * synthetic jet * jet flow Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  3. A Vodcasted, Cross-Disciplinary, Behavioral Neuroscience Laboratory Exercise Investigating the Effects of Methamphetamine on Aggression

    Shanks, Ryan A.; Southard, E. Megan; Tarnowski, Laura; Bruster, Matthew; Wingate, Stacia W.; Dalman, Nancy; Lloyd, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a laboratory experience utilizing videos to engage students in hypothesis-driven experimentation in behavioral neuroscience. It provides students with an opportunity to investigate the effects of chronic methamphetamine exposure on aggression in adult mice using a resident-intruder paradigm. Instructors and students only

  4. Experimental facilities for plate-out investigations and future work

    The safety of HTR under normal operation and accident conditions, the possibility of inspection, maintenance and repair or decontamination of single primary components as well as the safety of maintenance personnel are essentially determined by the transport- and deposition behaviour of the non gaseous fission - and activation products in the primary loop of the reactor. A comprehensive program has been started in 1969 in KFA in collaboration with various industrial firms and foreign institutions to investigate these problems. The program includes in-pile and out-pile experiments, simulating reactor conditions and also different laboratory experiments and extensive theoretical investigations. The aim of these efforts is to test experimentally the models and computercodes, which are used for prediction of transport and deposition behaviour of fission products for HTR's as well under normal as under accident conditions. Further more a verified dataset is to be established. In this paper a survey is given of the experimental facilities carried out by KFA or in cooperation with KFA

  5. Theoretical and experimental investigations of Chinese evacuated tubular solar collectors

    Qin, Lin; Furbo, Simon

    1999-01-01

    Four different marketed Chinese evacuated tubular solar collectors have been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The advantages of the investigated solar collectors compared to normal flat plate collectors were elucidated.......Four different marketed Chinese evacuated tubular solar collectors have been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The advantages of the investigated solar collectors compared to normal flat plate collectors were elucidated....

  6. A Research-Inspired Laboratory Sequence Investigating Acquired Drug Resistance

    Taylor, Elizabeth Vogel; Fortune, Jennifer A.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we present a six-session laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a high impact research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Students express a Gleevec-resistant mutant of the Abelson tyrosine kinase domain, the active domain of an oncogenic

  7. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE WITH STEELFIBER

    Fatih ALTUN

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Dramix RC-80/60-BN steel fiber was added into lightweight concrete of 400 cement dosage in the amounts of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60. The specimens were tested 28 days later to find the measured apparent specific gravity, concrete strength, modulus of elasticity and toughness value experimentally. Our study concluded that the addition of steel fiber has not changed the concrete strength and modulus of elasticity while it has increased the toughness of lightweight concrete of fixed cement dosage.

  8. Experimental investigation of PCM cold storage

    Stritih, Uroš; Butala, Vincenc

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an experimental analysis of cooling buildings using nighttime cold accumulation in a phase change material (PCM), otherwise known as the "free-cooling principle". Studies of the ceiling and floor free-cooling principle, as well as passive cooling, are presented. The free-cooling principle is explained and some of the types of PCMs suitable forsummer cooling are listed. An experiment was conducted using paraffin with a melting point of 22 °C as the PCM to store cold durin...

  9. Experimental investigation of quantum Simpson's paradox

    Li, Yu-Long; Tang, Jian-Shun; Wang, Yi-Tao; Wu, Yu-Chun; Han, Yong-Jian; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can; Yu, Ying; Li, Mi-Feng; Zha, Guo-Wei; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2013-07-01

    The well-known Simpson's paradox, or Yule-Simpson (YS) effect, is often encountered in social-science and medical-science statistics. It occurs when the correlations present in different groups are reversed if the groups are combined. Simpson's paradox also exists in quantum measurements. In this Brief Report, we experimentally realized two analogous effects: the quantum-classical YS effect and the quantum-quantum YS effect in the quantum-dot system. We also compared the probability of obtaining those two effects under identical quantum measurements and found that the quantum-quantum YS effect is more likely to occur than the quantum-classical YS effect.

  10. The experimental investigation of supersymmetry breaking

    If Nature is supersymmetric at the weak interaction scale, what can we hope to learn from experiments on supersymmetric particles? The most mysterious aspect of phenomenological supersymmetry is the mechanism of spontaneous supersymmetry breaking. This mechanism ties the observable pattern of supersymmetric particle masses to aspects of the underlying unified theory at very small distance scales. In this article, I will discuss a systematic experimental program to determine the mechanism of supersymmetry breaking. Both pp and e+e- colliders of the next generation play an essential role

  11. Experimental research of soil erosion using laboratory rainfall simulator

    Laburda, Tomáš; Schwarzová, Pavla; Krása, Josef

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion has been an important part of research at the Department of Irrigation, Drainage and Landscape Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague since the 50s of the 20th century. Bigger emphasis was put later on practical methods resulting in acquisition of laboratory rainfall simulator in 1999. This article compares data from simulations done at the laboratory rainfall simulator which is used for experimental measurement of rainfall-runoff processes on soil samples (typical soil type groups) from agriculture land in the Czech Republic. Total 10 soil sets have been tested within 255 simulations (247 rainfall-runoff hours in total) from 2002 to 2014. These soil sets cover wide range of soil types from silty clay loam to sandy loam soils or from impervious to pervious soils. Setting values of rainfall intensity (40 to 60 mm/hr), inclination (longitudinal slope from 4° to 8°) and initial condition of surface runoff (crusted or loosened) present primary parameters of every experiment. On the basis of different combinations of setting, 2 representative evaluation states of the minimum (min LC) and maximum (max LC) load conditions were established. The most important data obtained at the Simulator are soil moisture content, progression of surface runoff, soil loss and infiltration. Results clearly show dependence of initial moisture content on physical properties, when impervious soils with high fraction of clay reach over 30 % wt., pervious soils with high fraction of sand achieve initial average moisture content only about 20 % wt. Results of steady-state values of surface runoff and soil loss for minimum and maximum load conditions and its ratio show that highest increase of values due to higher load conditions reach silt loamy soil (Horomerice), silt clay loamy soil (Klapy) and loamy soil (Vsetaty), while the lowest increase reach silt loamy soil (Trebsin I) and sandy loamy soil (Trebesice I). General trend in all cases is obviously to increase both values, but while the average values of surface runoff increased 2.1-times, in the case of soil loss steady state values increased even 5.6-times. During these 12 years of experimental research, large sets of data were collected and used for comparison of behaviour of different soils under extreme conditions and also as input parameters for recalibration of SMODERP (Simulation Model for Determination of Surface Runoff and Erosion Processes) which has been developed at the same departement since 1989. This research is supported by grant: SGS14/180/OHK1/3T/11 Rainfall-runoff, erosion and transport processes - experimental research.

  12. Numerical and experimental investigations on catalytic recombiners

    Numerous containments of European light water reactors (LWR) are equipped with passive auto-catalytic recombiners (PAR). These devices are designed for the removal of hydrogen generated during a severe accident in order to avoid serious damage caused by a detonation. PARs make use of the fact that hydrogen and oxygen react exothermally on catalytic surfaces generating steam and heat even below conventional ignition concentrations and temperatures. Activities at ISR aim at overcoming existing limitations of today's systems. These are e.g. limited conversion capacity or unintended ignition of the gaseous mixture due to overheating of the catalyst elements caused by strong reaction heat generation. Experiments at the REKO facilities are conducted in order to achieve a profound understanding of the processes inside a recombiner, such as reaction kinetics or heat and mass transfer. Innovative PAR designs which may overcome existing limitations can be developed based on the knowledge obtained from these experiments. For the analysis of the processes inside a PAR the numerical code REKO-DIREKT is being developed. The code calculates the local catalyst temperatures and the concentration regression along the catalyst plates. For the validation of the model numerous experiments have been performed with different types of coating and different plate arrangements. The first calculations fit well with the experimental results indicating a proper understanding of the fundamental processes. The paper describes the experiments as well as the numerical model and presents model calculations in comparison with experimental results. (authors)

  13. Environmental epidemiology applied to urban atmospheric pollution: a contribution from the Experimental Air Pollution Laboratory (LPAE)

    André Paulo Afonso de; Braga Alfésio Luis Ferreira; Lin Chin An; Conceição Gleice Margarete de Souza; Pereira Luiz Alberto Amador; Miraglia Simone Georges El Khouri; Böhm György Miklos

    2000-01-01

    Systematic investigation on the effects of human exposure to environmental pollution using scientific methodology only began in the 20th century as a consequence of several environmental accidents followed by an unexpected mortality increase above expected mortality and as a result of observational epidemiological and toxicological studies conducted on animals in developed countries. This article reports the experience of the Experimental Air Pollution Laboratory at the School of Medicine, Un...

  14. Biomass granular screw feeding: An experimental investigation

    Dai, Jianjun; Grace, John R. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, 2360 East Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6 T 1Z3 (Canada)

    2011-02-15

    Successful feeding is critical to biomass utilization processes, but difficult due to the heterogeneity, physical properties and moisture content of the particles. The objectives of the present study were to find the mechanisms of blockage in screw feeding and to determine the effects of particle mean size (0.5-15 mm), size distribution, shape, moisture content (10-60%), density and compressibility on biomass particle feeding at room temperature. Wood pellets, sawdust, hog fuel and wood shavings were tested in a screw feeder/lock hopper system previously employed to feed sawdust into a pilot-scale circulating fluidized-bed gasifier. Experimental results showed that large particles, wide size distributions, large bulk densities and high moisture contents generally led to larger torque requirements for screw feeding. The ''choke section'' and seal plug play important roles in determining the torque requirements. (author)

  15. Experimental investigations of active air bearings

    Santos, Ilmar; Morosi, Stefano

    Along with traditional oil lubrication, increasing demand for high-speed applications has renewed attention to gas bearings technology. Traditional aerostatic and aerodynamic gas lubrication has been widely used in a variety of applications, ranging from high-speed spindles to micro and meso......-scale turbomachinery. The present paper deals with experimental rotordynamic testing of a flexible rotor supported by hybrid aerostaticaerodynamic gas journal bearing equipped with an electronic radial air injection system. From a rotordynamic point of view there are two phenomena that limit the widespread of...... traditional gas lubrication: 1) Low damping makes operation across critical speed dangerous, as even low level of unbalance can generate large vibration responses. This is especially problematic for gas bearing applications, which often operate in the supercritical region. Moreover, 2) An upper bound to...

  16. On-site laboratory support of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory remedial investigation/feasibility study

    In 1987, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) was begun at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL had established a number of waste area groupings (WAGs), each of which was to be studied and characterized separately. Although the nature and extent of contamination at the WAGs vary widely, samples from each WAG might be radiologically and/or chemically contaminated. To comply with Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations regarding the shipment of hazardous and radioactive materials, all samples are screened for radioactivity before shipment to independent laboratories for further analysis. In 1989 a Close Support Laboratory (CSL) was established at the RI/FS Field Operations Facility at ORNL. The CSL began as a screening facility and has evolved into a laboratory where high-quality analytical results on a number of different parameters are usually available within 24 hours of sampling. CSL capabilities include three basic areas: radiochemistry, volatile organic analysis (VOA), and wet chemistry

  17. Experimental investigation of turbine-structure interaction

    Fabre, Romain

    2015-01-01

    This project concerns the fast growing sector of tidal energy. It is carried out with the company Sustainable Marine Energy Ltd currently developing a new concept of tidal turbines. The main purpose of the research is to investigate a phenomenon that was noticed in previous researches: the increase of performances of the turbine due to the presence of the turbine support structure. For this purpose, a physical model was manufactured; it is design to recreate the turbine-p...

  18. Investigation of Appropriate Refractory Material for Laboratory Electritic Resistrance Furnance

    J.B Agboola

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous efforts to increase the local content of furnaces; hence the choice of appropriate refractory material for lining of locally manufactured furnaces has remained a major concern. This research work investigates the choice of appropriate local refractory material for the lining of laboratory electric resistance furnace.Electric resistance furnaces are extensively used in the laboratory for heat treatment of metals and alloys. Refractory binders such as silicon carbide were experimented upon for strength and resistance to high temperature.The results obtained showed that Kankara fireclay containing 15% SiC ( 5.70 % linear shrinkage , 46.2% apparent porosity, 1.77gkm³ Bulk density, 18 cycles of spalling tests at 1300°C, 5.253KN/m² of cold strength has appropriate properties for producing grooved bricks for lining of laboratory electric resistance Furnace.

  19. Experimental investigation of hydrogen peroxide RF plasmas

    Barni, R.; Decina, A.; Zanini, S.; D'Orazio, A.; Riccardi, C.

    2016-04-01

    This work reports a detailed experimental study of the plasma properties in low pressure RF discharges in hydrogen peroxide and a comparison with argon under the same operating conditions. H2O2 plasmas have been proposed for sterilization purposes. Electrical properties of the discharge were shown to be similar, as for the RF and DC voltages of the driving electrode. Bulk plasma volume remains stable, concentrated in an almost cylindrical region between the two facing electrodes. It was found that the electron temperature is almost uniform across the plasma and independent of the power level. This is higher than in argon discharges: T e  =  4.6  ±  0.9 eV versus T e  =  3.3  ±  1.1 eV. The plasma density increases almost linearly with the power level and a substantial negative ion component has been ruled out in hydrogen peroxide. Dissociation in the plasma gas phase was revealed by atomic hydrogen and hydroxyl radical emission in the discharge spectra. Emission from hydroxyl and atomic oxygen demonstrates that oxidizing radicals are produced by hydrogen peroxide discharges, revealing its usefulness for plasma processing other than sterilization, for instance to increase polymer film surface energy. On the other hand, argon could be considered as a candidate for the sterilization purposes due to the intense production of UV radiation.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Thruster Cathode Physics

    Crofton, Mark

    2004-11-01

    Advanced ion propulsion technologies are being developed under the Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System (NEXIS) program for use in outer planet exploration. A revolutionary approach to thruster cathode design is dictated by the very high lifetime and propellant throughput requirements for nuclear electric applications. In conventional dispenser hollow cathodes used in thrusters, processes leading to depletion, inadequate transport, or insufficient production of barium are among those limiting the lifetime. A reservoir hollow cathode is being developed to address each of these failure mechanisms, exploiting four design variables - matrix material, source material, geometry, and thermal design - to essentially eliminate established failure modes. The very long anticipated lifetime necessitates new life validation methods to augment or replace the conventional lifetest approach. One important tool for quickly evaluating design changes is the ability to measure barium density inside a hollow cathode and/or in the plume. The dependence of barium density on temperature and other factors is an extremely important indicator of cathode health, particularly if the ratio Ba:BaO is also obtained. Comparison of barium production for reservoir and conventional cathodes will enable an assessment of the efficacy of reservoir designs and the goal of reducing barium consumption at a given emission current level. This study describes benchmark measurements made on a conventional cathode previously operated in a 20-kW NEXIS laboratory engine. Data on cathode operation and life-limiting processes were obtained through direct, real-time monitoring of atoms and molecules. A high-resolution, tunable laser system was employed to detect absorption of the low-density barium atoms inside the cathode. The plume was monitored also, using a quadrupole mass spectrometer to monitor multiple species and measure ion charge ratios. Data obtained with retarding potential analyzers or other means are available for comparison. Detection of other important species associated with cathode function, including Ba+ and BaO, and oxides of tungsten such as WO3 or WO3-, is of great interest for reasons to be discussed.

  1. Experimental investigation of wing with vortex generators

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    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea of research of the organized vortex flow of a wing for the purpose of perfection of aerodynamic characteristics on the big angels of attack develops. The wing with vortex generators in the form of flows on a forward edge in low velocity wind tunnel was with that end in view investigated. It is shown, that the organized vortex flow of a wing with vortex generators on a forward edge practically does not change aerodynamic characteristics at small angels of attack and strongly influences on the big angels of attack, increasing the maximum elevating force and improving momentum characteristics at small change of drag.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Particle Deagglomeration using Turbulence

    The effect of turbulence on powder aerosol deagglomeration was investigated. Two impinging jets were used to generate turbulence. Lactose particles, whose fully dispersed fine particle fraction (FPF) - number percentage of the particles whose diameter smaller than 5 μm- is above 90 %, were applied as aerosol powder. The particle size distribution after the dispersion unit were measured by using phase Doppler anemometer (PDA) and turbulence level were quantified at the impingement point of two jets with laser Doppler anemometer. As the turbulence level increases turbulent time and length scales decrease, and the ratio of fine particle fraction (FPF) increases from 36% to 86%.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Using Fuel Additives - Alcohol

    S.M. Fayyad

    2010-01-01

    This research presents an investigation of the effects of ethanol addition to low octane numbergasoline, on the fuel octane number and on the performance of the engine. In this study, the tested gasoline(octane number = 90) is blended with five different percentages of ethanol, namely 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15% onvolume basis. Then these fuel blends, as well as the base gasoline fuel, w ere burnt in the tested engine. It isfound that the octane number of gasoline increases continuously and linearly ...

  4. Geoengineering characterization of welded tuffs from laboratory and field investigations

    Welded tuff beneath Yucca Mountain adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is being considered for development as a high-level radioactive waste repository by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Because access into Yucca Mountain has been limited to borehole explorations, early geoengineering materials characterizations have been derived from laboratory tests on cores from Yucca Mountain and from laboratory and field tests on welded tuffs located in G-Tunnel on the NTS. G-Tunnel contains welded tuffs that have similar properties and stress states to those at Yucca Mountain and has been the location for in situ rock mechanics testing. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the geoengineering material property data obtained to date and to compare appropriate laboratory and field data from G-Tunnel to findings from Yucca Mountain. Geomechanical and thermal data are provided and are augmented by limited geological and hydrological data. A comparison of results of laboratory measurements on tuffs from Yucca Mountain and G-Tunnel indicates good agreement between the bulk densities, saturations, moduli of elasticity, Poisson's ratios, and P-wave velocities. The G-Tunnel tuff has slightly lower thermal conductivity, tensile strength, compressive strength and slightly higher matrix permeability than does the welded tuff near the proposed repository horizon at Yucca Mountain. From a laboratory-to-field scaling perspective, the modulus of deformation shows the most sensitivity to field conditions because of the presence of the joints found in the field. 14 references, 1 table

  5. Investigation of Ag in the king scallop Pecten maximus using field and laboratory approaches

    Metian, Marc; Bustamante, Paco; Cosson, Richard,; Hédouin, Laetitia; Warnau, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The bioaccumulation, tissue and subcellular distributions of Ag were investigated in the king scallop Pecten maximus from the Bay of Seine fishery area (France) in laboratory and in field conditions. Experimental investigations with the radiotracer 110mAg showed that the scallop readily concentrated Ag when exposed via seawater and to a much lower extent when exposed via sediment. Retention of the metal incorporated via all tested contamination pathways was shown to be very strong, but the as...

  6. Computational and experimental investigation of magnetized target fusion

    In Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), a preheated and magnetized target plasma is hydrodynamically compressed to fusion conditions. Because the magnetic field suppresses losses by electron thermal conduction in the fuel during the target implosion heating process, the compression may be over a much longer time scale than in traditional inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Bigger targets and much lower initial target densities than in ICF can be used, reducing radiative energy losses. Therefore, 'liner-on-plasma' compressions, driven by relatively inexpensive electrical pulsed power, may be practical. Potential MTF target plasmas must meet minimum temperature, density, and magnetic field starting conditions, and must remain relatively free of high-Z radiation-cooling-enhancing contaminants. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, computational and experimental research is being pursued into MTF target plasmas, such as deuterium-fiber-initiated Z-pinches, and the Russian-originated 'MAGO' plasma. In addition, liner-on-plasma compressions of such target plasmas to fusion conditions are being computationally modeled, and experimental investigation of such heavy liner implosions has begun. The status of the research will be presented. 9 refs., 4 figs

  7. Experimental and theoretical investigation of electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    Contamination of concrete by radionuclides and metals is a widespread problem throughout the nuclear power industry and the Department of Energy. Electrokinetic decontamination appears to be an attractive technology for application to this problem due to the possibility for decontamination without removal of concrete and limited labor requirements; however, further experimental and theoretical work is necessary to fully understand the process and to define the capabilities and limitations of the technology. This paper presents details of experimental and theoretical studies of the process and their implications for field demonstrations. Preliminary results of these studies indicate that electroosmosis is not likely to be the dominant transport mechanism in most cases; rather, most species will be transported by electromigration. Batch equilibration tests have shown that removal of each contaminant will be governed largely by the chemistry of the concrete, contaminant, and lixiviant; in particular, precipitation of species such as cobalt and uranium will limit transport in the normally high-pH concrete pore solution. It is recommended that laboratory determination of site-specific isotherms be made prior to demonstrations of this technology. Dynamic experiments indicate that it is possible to transport non-precipitating species. The results of a computational model have been shown to be in good agreement with dynamic experiments; therefore, this model will provide a valuable tool for the further investigation and optimization of electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

  8. Experimental investigation of a flapping wing model

    Hubel, Tatjana Y.; Tropea, Cameron [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Fachgebiet Stroemungslehre und Aerodynamik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    The main objective of this research study was to investigate the aerodynamic forces of an avian flapping wing model system. The model size and the flow conditions were chosen to approximate the flight of a goose. Direct force measurements, using a three-component balance, and PIV flow field measurements parallel and perpendicular to the oncoming flow, were performed in a wind tunnel at Reynolds numbers between 28,000 and 141,000 (3-15 m/s), throughout a range of reduced frequencies between 0.04 and 0.20. The appropriateness of quasi-steady assumptions used to compare 2D, time-averaged particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements in the wake with direct force measurements was evaluated. The vertical force coefficient for flapping wings was typically significantly higher than the maximum coefficient of the fixed wing, implying the influence of unsteady effects, such as delayed stall, even at low reduced frequencies. This puts the validity of the quasi-steady assumption into question. The (local) change in circulation over the wing beat cycle and the circulation distribution along the wingspan were obtained from the measurements in the tip and transverse vortex planes. Flow separation could be observed in the distribution of the circulation, and while the circulation derived from the wake measurements failed to agree exactly with the absolute value of the circulation, the change in circulation over the wing beat cycle was in excellent agreement for low and moderate reduced frequencies. The comparison between the PIV measurements in the two perpendicular planes and the direct force balance measurements, show that within certain limitations the wake visualization is a powerful tool to gain insight into force generation and the flow behavior on flapping wings over the wing beat cycle. (orig.)

  9. Experimental Investigation of Turbine Vane Heat Transfer for Alternative Fuels

    Nix, Andrew Carl [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-03-23

    The focus of this program was to experimentally investigate advanced gas turbine cooling schemes and the effects of and factors that contribute to surface deposition from particulate matter found in coal syngas exhaust flows on turbine airfoil heat transfer and film cooling, as well as to characterize surface roughness and determine the effects of surface deposition on turbine components. The program was a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary collaborative effort between aero-thermal and materials faculty researchers and the Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The primary technical objectives of the program were to evaluate the effects of combustion of syngas fuels on heat transfer to turbine vanes and blades in land-based power generation gas turbine engines. The primary questions to be answered by this investigation were; What are the factors that contribute to particulate deposition on film cooled gas turbine components? An experimental program was performed in a high-temperature and pressure combustion rig at the DOE NETL; What is the effect of coal syngas combustion and surface deposition on turbine airfoil film cooling? Deposition of particulate matter from the combustion gases can block film cooling holes, decreasing the flow of the film coolant and the film cooling effectiveness; How does surface deposition from coal syngas combustion affect turbine surface roughness? Increased surface roughness can increase aerodynamic losses and result in decreased turbine hot section efficiency, increasing engine fuel consumption to maintain desired power output. Convective heat transfer is also greatly affected by the surface roughness of the airfoil surface; Is there any significant effect of surface deposition or erosion on integrity of turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings (TBC) and do surface deposits react with the TBC in any way to decrease its thermal insulating capability? Spallation and erosion of TBC is a persistent problem in modern turbine engines; and What advancements in film cooling hole geometry and design can increase effectiveness of film cooling in turbines burning high-hydrogen coal syngas due to the higher heat loads and mass flow rates of the core flow? Experimental and numerical investigations of advanced cooling geometries that can improve resistance to surface deposition were performed. The answers to these questions were investigated through experimental measurements of turbine blade surface temperature and coolant coverage (via infrared camera images and thermocouples) and time-varying surface roughness in the NETL high-pressure combustion rig with accelerated, simulated surface deposition and advanced cooling hole concepts, coupled with detailed materials analysis and characterization using conventional methods of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), 3-D Surface Topography (using a 3-D stylus profilometer). Detailed surface temperatures and cooling effectiveness could not be measured due to issues with the NETL infrared camera system. In collaboration with faculty startup funding from the principal investigator, experimental and numerical investigations were performed of an advanced film cooling hole geometry, the anti-vortex hole (AVH), focusing on improving cooling effectiveness and decreasing the counter-rotating vortex of conventional cooling holes which can entrain mainstream particulate matter to the surface. The potential benefit of this program is in gaining a fundamental understanding of how the use of alternative fuels will effect the operation of modern gas turbine engines, providing valuable data for more effective cooling designs for future turbine systems utilizing alternative fuels.

  10. Experimental study of driven magnetic relaxation in a laboratory plasma

    Hsu, S. C.; Tang, X. Z.

    2008-11-01

    The Driven Relaxation Experiment (DRX) has been built at LANL to investigate the possibility of exploiting resonances in the nonlinear force-free equation [1] to optimize magnetic flux amplification and current multiplication for driven-relaxed spheromak-like plasmas, and to explore the application of these ideas to plasma astrophysics problems [2]. It is also our goal to see whether relaxed states with ?> ?1 can be formed and sustained. The experiment uses a planar magnetized coaxial gun (100--180 kA, 1--7 mWb) to generate driven- relaxed plasmas within a cylindrical flux-conserving boundary (0.9 m diameter). Unique features of DRX include high ?gun up to 3?1, and a continuously adjustable boundary elongation. The gun is powered by a 3- stage capacitor bank to form (10 kV, 500 ?F) and sustain (5 kV, 8 mF) the plasma for up to 500 ?s, corresponding to >10 Sweet-Parker times which allows the plasma to reach a quasi-steady-state. The primary diagnostic is a 48- channel 2D magnetic probe array that will map out a poloidal cross-section of the magnetic field configuration at one toroidal position. The full equilibrium magnetic field will be constructed using a combination of the experimental data and a nonlinear force-free equilibrium solver. We will present details of the experimental setup and the first experimental data. Supported by LANL LDRD. [1] Tang & Boozer, PRL 94, 225004 (2005); PRL 98, 175001 (2007) [2] Tang, ApJ 679, 1000 (2008).

  11. Experimental Investigation of the Trigger Problem in Magnetic Reconnection

    Egedal, Jan

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection releases magnetic energy not only in steady-state, but also in time-dependent and often explosive events requiring a transition from slow reconnection to fast. The question of what causes this transition is known as the ``trigger problem'' and is not well understood. We address the trigger problem using the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at MIT. We observe spontaneous reconnection events [1] with exponentially growing reconnection rates, and we characterize the 3D dynamics of these events using multiple internal probes. The observed reconnection is asymmetric: it begins at one toroidal location and propagates around in both directions. The spontaneous onset is facilitated by an interaction between the x-line current channel and a global mode in the electrostatic potential. It is this mode which breaks axisymmetry and enables a localized decrease in x-line current. We model the onset using an empirical Ohm's law and current continuity, which is maintained by ion polarization currents associated with the mode. The model reproduces the exponential growth of the reconnection electric field, and the model growth rate agrees well with the experimentally measured growth rate. The onset location is likely determined by small asymmetries in the in-vessel coils. To further investigate this conjecture new coils have been installed, which allow for controlled changes in toroidal asymmetry. The observations are suggestive of solar flare dynamics and are relevant to tokamak research [3]. [1] Egedal, J. et al. Laboratory Observations of Spontaneous Magnetic Reconnection. Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 015003 (2007). [2] Katz, N. et al. Laboratory Observation of Localized Onset of Magnetic Reconnection. Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 255004 (2010). [3] Park, H.K. et al. Self-organized Te redistribution during driven reconnection processes in high-temperature plasmas. Phys. Plasmas 13, 055907 (2006).

  12. Experimental methods for laboratory-scale ensilage of lignocellulosic biomass

    Anaerobic fermentation is a potential storage method for lignocellulosic biomass in biofuel production processes. Since biomass is seasonally harvested, stocks are often dried or frozen at laboratory scale prior to fermentation experiments. Such treatments prior to fermentation studies cause irreversible changes in the plant cells, influencing the initial state of biomass and thereby the progression of the fermentation processes itself. This study investigated the effects of drying, refrigeration, and freezing relative to freshly harvested corn stover in lab-scale ensilage studies. Particle sizes, as well as post-ensilage drying temperatures for compositional analysis, were tested to identify the appropriate sample processing methods. After 21 days of ensilage the lowest pH value (3.73 0.03), lowest dry matter loss (4.28 0.26 g. 100 g-1DM), and highest water soluble carbohydrate (WSC) concentrations (7.73 0.26 g. 100 g-1DM) were observed in control biomass (stover ensiled within 12 h of harvest without any treatments). WSC concentration was significantly reduced in samples refrigerated for 7 days prior to ensilage (3.86 0.49 g. 100 g?1 DM). However, biomass frozen prior to ensilage produced statistically similar results to the fresh biomass control, especially in treatments with cell wall degrading enzymes. Grinding to decrease particle size reduced the variance amongst replicates for pH values of individual reactors to a minor extent. Drying biomass prior to extraction of WSCs resulted in degradation of the carbohydrates and a reduced estimate of their concentrations. The methods developed in this study can be used to improve ensilage experiments and thereby help in developing ensilage as a storage method for biofuel production. -- Highlights: ? Laboratory-scale methods to assess the influence of ensilage biofuel production. ? Drying, freezing, and refrigeration of biomass influenced microbial fermentation. ? Freshly ensiled stover exhibited the most preferable characteristics. ? Frozen biomass was statistically similar to freshly ensiled stover. ? Modified phenol-sulfuric method provides appropriate results and better resolution.

  13. A global remote laboratory experimentation network and the experiment service provider business model and plans

    Tor Ivar Eikaas; Christian Schmid(Karl Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany); Foss, Bjarne A.; Denis Gillet

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results from the IST KAII Trial project ReLAX - Remote LAboratory eXperimentation trial (IST 1999-20827), and contributes with a framework for a global remote laboratory experimentation network supported by a new business model. The paper presents this new Experiment Service Provider business model that aims at bringing physical experimentation back into the learning arena, where remotely operable laboratory experiments used in advanced education and training schemes are m...

  14. Reduction of friction in fluid transport: experimental investigation

    G., Aguilar; K., Gasljevic; E.F., Matthys.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available La reduccin de friccin o de arrastre (DR) mediante el uso de soluciones polimricas o surfactantes es sin duda alguna la tcnica de reduccin de friccin para flujos turbulentos en tuberas mas efectiva (es posible obtener reducciones de hasta un factor de 8 en los coeficientes de friccin en segm [...] entos de tuberas rectas). Desde el punto de vista fundamental, el estudio del fenmeno de DR ofrece la oportunidad de comprender mejor flujos turbulentos; desde el punto de vista prctico, la DR puede ser usada con propositos de ahorro en potencia de bombeo. La implementacin comercial de estos aditivos se ha llevado a cabo con xito en el transporte de petrleo, y la investigacin necesaria para la implementacin de estas soluciones en muchas otras aplicaciones sigue en proceso, p.ej., en sistemas centrales de calefaccin y aire acondicionado, sistemas hidrnicos en edificios, desages, irrigacin, procesos industriales, etc. Nuestros esfuerzos se han enfocado en dos reas principales: (A) investigacin experimental sobre la transferencia de momentum y calor para soluciones reductoras de friccin, y (B) la implementacin de estas soluciones en sistemas hidrnicos de enfriamiento en edificios con el propsito de ahorrar energa. Este documento pretende dar una nocin general de la investigacin experimental que llevamos a cabo en nuestro laboratorio de dinmica de fluidos no-Newtonianos, reologa, y transferencia de calor en la UCSB. Abstract in english Drag reduction (DR) by the use of polymer and surfactant solutions is by far the most effective drag-reducing technique for turbulent flows (up to 8-fold reduction in friction coefficients is possible on straight pipes). From a fundamental point of view, the study of the DR phenomenon offers an oppo [...] rtunity for a better understanding of turbulence in general; from a practical point of view, DR can be used to save pumping power. Commercial implementation of drag-reducing fluids has proved successful for oil pipeline transportation, and looks promising for many other applications that are still under investigation, e.g. district heating or cooling systems, hydronic systems in buildings, sewers, irrigation, industrial processes, etc. Our efforts have focused on two main areas: (A) experimental research on momentum and heat transfer of turbulent flows of drag-reducing solutions, and (B) implementation of these solutions in hydronic cooling systems in buildings for energy conservation purposes. This paper describes an overview of the typical experimental research that we conduct in our non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, rheology, and heat transfer laboratory at UCSB.

  15. Laboratory investigation of the loading rate effects in sand:

    Huy, N.Q.; Van Tol, A.F.; Hlscher, P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve the interpretation of the quasi-static (e.g. Statnamic) pile load tests, a research project has been started to investigate effects of the loading rate on the bearing capacity of a pile in sand. A series of laboratory tests has been carried out. The testing program consists of a series of triaxial tests for sand and a series of load tests on a model pile embedded in sand in a large calibration chamber. The research pointed at answering two fundamental questions: - Th...

  16. Children's recantation of adult wrongdoing: An experimental investigation.

    Malloy, Lindsay C; Mugno, Allison P

    2016-05-01

    Child maltreatment cases often hinge on a child's word versus a defendant's word, making children's disclosures crucially important. There is considerable debate concerning why children recant allegations, and it is imperative to examine recantation experimentally. The purpose of this laboratory analogue investigation was to test (a) how often children recant true allegations of an adult's wrongdoing after disclosing and (b) whether children's age and caregiver supportiveness predict recantation. During an interactive event, 6- to 9-year-olds witnessed an experimenter break a puppet and were asked to keep the transgression a secret. Children were then interviewed to elicit a disclosure of the transgression. Mothers were randomly assigned to react supportively or unsupportively to this disclosure, and children were interviewed again. We coded children's recantations (explicit denials of the broken puppet after disclosing) and changes in their forthcomingness (shifts from denial or claims of lack of knowledge/memory to disclosure and vice versa) in free recall and in response to focused questions about the transgression. Overall, 23.3% of the children recanted their prior disclosures (46% and 0% in the unsupportive and supportive conditions, respectively). No age differences in recantation rates emerged, but 8- and 9-year-olds were more likely than 6- and 7-year-olds to maintain their recantation throughout Interview 2. Children whose mothers reacted supportively to disclosure became more forthcoming in Interview 2, and those whose mothers reacted unsupportively became less forthcoming. Results advance theoretical understanding of how children disclose negative experiences, including sociomotivational influences on their reports, and have practical implications for the legal system. PMID:26771375

  17. Sprite discharges on Venus and Jupiter-like planets: a laboratory investigation

    Dubrovin, S.; Nijdam, S.; van Veldhuizen, E M; Ebert, U.; Y. Yair; Price, C.

    2010-01-01

    Large sprite discharges at high atmospheric altitudes have been found to be physically similar to small streamer discharges in air at sea level density. Based on this understanding, we investigate possible sprite discharges on Venus or Jupiter-like planets through laboratory experiments on streamers in appropriate CO2-N2 and H2-He mixtures. First, the scaling laws are experimentally confirmed by varying the density of the planetary gasses. Then streamer diameters, velocities and overall morph...

  18. Laboratory Investigations on Estuary Salinity Mixing: Preliminary Analysis

    F. H. Nuryazmeen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Estuaries are bodies of water along the coasts that are formed when fresh water from rivers flows into and mixes with salt water from the ocean. The estuaries serve as a habitat to some aquatic lives, including mangroves. Human-induced activities such as dredging of shipping lanes along the bottom estuarine, the disposal of industrial wastes into the water system and shoreline development influence estuarine dynamics which include mixing process. These activities might contribute to salinity changes and further adversely affect the estuarine ecosystem. In order to study at the characteristics of the mixing between salt water (estuary and freshwater (river, a preliminary investigation had been done in the laboratory. Fresh water was released from one end of the flume and overflowing at weir at the other end. Meanwhile, salt water was represented by the red dye tracer released through a weir and intruded upstream as a gravity current. The isohalines are plotted to see the salinity patterns. Besides, to examine the spatial and temporal salinity profiles along the laboratory investigations, the plotted graphs have been made. The results show that the changes in salinity level along the flume due to mixing between fresh water and salt water. This showed typical salt-wedge estuary characteristics.

  19. Numerical and experimental investigation of a gully under surcharge conditions

    Lopes, Pedro; Leandro, Jorge; Carvalho, Rita Fernandes; Pscoa, Patrcia; Martins, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with numerical and experimental investigation of a gully under exceptional situations after the sewer system becomes pressurized. These results are useful for the calibration and validation of the linking elements found in Dual Drainage (DD) models. The experimental results were obtained in the MLE (Multiple-Linking-Element) experimental installation that allows the simulation of full surcharge flow through a gully. The installation consists of an 8 m long and 0.5 m wide chan...

  20. An experimental investigation of untriggered film boiling collapse

    Film boiling has been investigated in a stagnant pool, using polished brass or anodised aluminium alloy rods in water. Experimental boiling curves were obtained, and pronounced ripples on the vapour/liquid interface were photographed. A criterion for untriggered film boiling collapse is proposed, consistent with experimental results. Application of the results to molten fuel coolant interaction studies is discussed. (U.K.)

  1. Experimental investigation on the discomfort of safety belt handling

    Monnier, G.; Wang, X.; Dolivet, C.; VERRIEST,JP; Lino, F.; DUFOUR, F

    2002-01-01

    Reaching and handling the safety belt were investigated in this work. A preliminary study was first performed by filming 27 car drivers buckling the safety belt up in their own cars. Based on this pilot study, a protocol for a laboratory investigation on the use of the seat belt was defined and conducted. For the laboratory experiment, a mock-up was built enabling the variation of the upper and lower anchorage point locations as well as the buckle position along the belt. Twenty four subjects...

  2. Attachment theory and paranoid cognitions: An experimental investigation

    Owens, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This thesis has been prepared in paper based format. The thesis focusses of the use of experimental manipulations in the investigation of paranoia and extends the use of these to an empirical investigation of the role of attachment theory in paranoia. Papers 1 and 2 have been prepared for submission to Clinical Psychology Review and Schizophrenia Bulletin respectively. Paper 1 provides a comprehensive overview of experimental paradigms that aim to induce or manipulate paranoid thinking in ...

  3. Randomized block experimental designs can increase the power and reproducibility of laboratory animal experiments.

    Festing, Michael F W

    2014-01-01

    Randomized block experimental designs have been widely used in agricultural and industrial research for many decades. Usually they are more powerful, have higher external validity, are less subject to bias, and produce more reproducible results than the completely randomized designs typically used in research involving laboratory animals. Reproducibility can be further increased by using time as a blocking factor. These benefits can be achieved at no extra cost. A small experiment investigating the effect of an antioxidant on the activity of a liver enzyme in four inbred mouse strains, which had two replications (blocks) separated by a period of two months, illustrates this approach. The widespread failure to use these designs more widely in research involving laboratory animals has probably led to a substantial waste of animals, money, and scientific resources and slowed down the development of new treatments for human and animal diseases. PMID:25541548

  4. On the Use of Chicks as Experimental Laboratory Subjects.

    Rowland, David L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Chickens, instead of rats, were used in an upper-level laboratory course on animal learning. To help other instructors interested in using chickens for a lab course, a discussion of the physical and behavioral characteristics of chickens is provided. Student reaction to the course is also discussed. (RM)

  5. Experimental Investigation and Modeling of Integrated Tri-generation Systems

    Cetinkaya, Eda

    Energy demand in the world is increasing with population growth and higher living standards. Today, the need for energy requires a focus on renewable sources without abandoning fossil fuels. Efficient use of energy is one of the most important tasks in modern energy systems to achieve. In addition to the energy need, growing environmental concerns are linked with energy is emerged. Multi-purpose energy generation allows a higher efficiency by generating more outputs with the same input in the same system. Tri-generation systems are expected to provide at least three commodities, such as heating, cooling, desalination, storable fuel production and some other useful outputs, in addition to power generation. In this study, an experimental investigation of gasification is presented and two integrated tri-generation systems are proposed. The first integrated tri-generation system (System 1) utilizes solar energy as input and the outputs are power, fresh water and hot water. It consists of four sub-systems, namely solar power tower system, desalination system, Rankine cycle and organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The second integrated tri-generation system (System 2) utilizes coal and biomass as input and the outputs are power, fuel and hot water. It consists of five sub-systems: gasification plant, Brayton cycle, Rankine cycle, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis plant and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC). Experimental investigation includes coal and biomass gasification, where the experimental results of synthesis gas compositions are utilized in the analysis of the second systems. To maximize efficiency, heat losses from the system should be minimized through a recovery system to make the heat a useful commodity for other systems, such as ORCs which can utilize the low-grade heat. In this respect, ORCs are first analyzed for three different configurations in terms of energy and exergy efficiencies altering working fluids to increase the power output. Among two types of coal and one type biomass tried in the laboratory scale experimental set-up, Tuncbilek-Omerler is found to be superior to Konya-Ilgin coal in terms of the highest amount of hydrogen in the synthesis gas composition. As biomass, wheat straw is gasified, which shows higher exergetic efficiency in comparison to Konya-Ilgin coal. Based on theoretical analysis conducted for the integrated systems, System 2 is found to be more efficient in terms of energy and exergy in comparison with System 1. However, when local needs are taken into account, fresh water can be a desirable useful output where solar irradiation is high. Both systems are compared to conventional and co-generation systems having the same inputs to quantify the improvement in efficiency. System 1 has an energy efficiency of 69% and an exergy efficiency of 58%, whereas System 2 has an energy efficiency of 71% and an exergy efficiency of 73%. When single generation is obtained from the same inputs, it is observed that the energy and exergy efficiencies drop drastically down to 34% and 42% for System 1; 33% and 42% for System 2, respectively.

  6. Experimental econophysics properties and mechanisms of laboratory markets

    Huang, Ji-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Experimental Econophysics describes the method of controlled human experiments, which is developed by physicists to study some problems in economics or finance, namely, stylized facts, fluctuation phenomena, herd behavior, contrarian behavior, hedge behavior, cooperation, business cycles, partial information, risk management, and stock prediction. Experimental econophysics together with empirical econophysics are two branches of the field of econophysics. The latter one has been extensively discussed in the existing books, while the former one has been seldom touched. In this book, the author will focus on the branch of experimental econophysics. Empirical econophysics is based on the analysis of data in real markets by using some statistical tools borrowed from traditional statistical physics. Differently, inspired by the role of controlled experiments and system modelling (for computer simulations and/or analytical theory) in developing modern physics, experimental econophysics specially relies on controlle...

  7. Experimental Investigations on a Novel Chemical Looping Combustion Configuration

    Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is a promising novel combustion technology involving inherent separation of carbon dioxide with minimum energy penalty. An oxygen carrier is employed to continuously transfer oxygen from the air reactor to the fuel reactor where the oxygen is delivered to the fuel. Consequently, direct contact between the air and fuel is prevented. The resulting flue gas is CO2-rich, without N2 dilution. The reduced oxygen carrier is then transported back to the air reactor for re-oxidation purposes, hence forming a chemical loop. Various CLC configurations have already been developed and tested on laboratory scales. However, more investigations are required to achieve feasible CLC processes. Among the different points to address, control of the solid circulation rate between the two reactors is of the highest importance regarding its effect on achievement of an appropriate oxygen transfer rate and solid oxidation degrees. Moreover, minimization of gas leakage between the fuel and air reactors is another important issue to be considered. A novel CLC configuration is proposed where reactions are carried out in two interconnected bubbling fluidized beds. Solid circulation rate control is achieved independently of gas flow rate in the reactors through use of pneumatic non-mechanical valves (L-valves). Moreover, loop-seals are employed to minimize gas leakage while transferring solids. Experimental results from operation of a 10 kWth equivalent cold prototype are presented in this paper. The effect of operating variables on the solid circulation rate, gas leakage between the two beds and the pressure balance on all of the process elements is studied. The results demonstrate stable solid circulation with efficient control of the solid flow rate and effective gas tightness of the system. (authors)

  8. Experimental investigation of mixtures of bentonite and dredged sediments from Chorfa dam in Algeria

    LABIOD-ALOUI, Zehour; TROUZINE, Habib; GHEMBAZA, Moulay Smaïne; NOUIOUA, Tahar; SEBAIBI, Yahya

    2014-01-01

    Geotechnical properties of dredged sediment from Chorfa dam in Algeria and their mixtures (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%) with bentonite were investigated through a series of laboratory experimental tests in order to investigate possibilities of their usage as a barrier against the spread out of the Sebkha of Oran in the northwest of Algeria. Grain size and Atterberg limits tests, chemical and mineral analyses, and compaction, vertical swelling, and horizontal and vertical permeability tests wer...

  9. Experimental and Analytical Investigations of Piles and Abutments of Integral Bridges

    Sami Arsoy; Barker, Richard M; J. Michael Duncan

    2002-01-01

    This research investigated, through experimental and analytical studies, the complex interactions that take place between the structural components of an integral bridge and the adjoining soil. The ability of piles and abutments to withstand thermally induced cyclic loads was investigated by conducting large-scale cyclic load tests. Three pile types and three integral abutments with hinges were tested in the laboratory. Experiments simulated 75 years of bridge life. Numerical analyses were co...

  10. Numerical and experimental investigation of geometric parameters in projection welding

    Kristensen, Lars; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Resistance projection welding is widely used for joining of workpieces with almost any geometric combination. This makes standardization of projection welding impossible. In order to facilitate industrial applications of projection welding, systematic investigations are carried out on the geometr...... the numerical and experimental investigations of the geometric parameters in projection welding, guidelines for selection of the geometry and material combinations in product design are proposed. These will be useful and applicable to industry.......Resistance projection welding is widely used for joining of workpieces with almost any geometric combination. This makes standardization of projection welding impossible. In order to facilitate industrial applications of projection welding, systematic investigations are carried out on the geometric...... parameters by numerical modeling and experimental studies. SORPAS, an FEM program for numerical modeling of resistance welding, is developed as a tool to help in the phase of product design and process optimization in both spot and projection welding. A systematic experimental investigation of projection...

  11. PLACE: an open-source python package for laboratory automation, control, and experimentation.

    Johnson, Jami L; Tom Wrden, Henrik; van Wijk, Kasper

    2015-02-01

    In modern laboratories, software can drive the full experimental process from data acquisition to storage, processing, and analysis. The automation of laboratory data acquisition is an important consideration for every laboratory. When implementing a laboratory automation scheme, important parameters include its reliability, time to implement, adaptability, and compatibility with software used at other stages of experimentation. In this article, we present an open-source, flexible, and extensible Python package for Laboratory Automation, Control, and Experimentation (PLACE). The package uses modular organization and clear design principles; therefore, it can be easily customized or expanded to meet the needs of diverse laboratories. We discuss the organization of PLACE, data-handling considerations, and then present an example using PLACE for laser-ultrasound experiments. Finally, we demonstrate the seamless transition to post-processing and analysis with Python through the development of an analysis module for data produced by PLACE automation. PMID:25304874

  12. Experimental Methods in Neuroscience: An Undergraduate Neuroscience Laboratory Course for Teaching Ethical Issues, Laboratory Techniques, Experimental Design, and Analysis

    Hall, Adam C.; Mary E. Harrington

    2003-01-01

    We have developed and recently taught a 200 level undergraduate course entitled, Experimental Methods in Neuroscience. This is a required course in an increasingly popular Neuroscience major at Smith College. Students are introduced initially to issues of animal ethics and experimentation, and are familiarized with our Animal Care Facility. Using an open field and rotarod apparatus, and the elevated plus and Barnes mazes, they conduct behavioral testing of two strains of mice, C57/BL/6J and...

  13. Laboratory studies of pre-solar grains: experimental astrophysics

    Hsu, W. B.

    2006-01-01

    Primitive meteorites contain microscopic pre-solar grains that originated from stellar outflows and supernova ejecta. Identified phases include nano-diamond, graphite, silicon carbide, corundum, spinel, hibonite, and silicates. Their stellar origin was manifested by enormous isotopic compositions compared to solar materials. They are the solid samples from various stellar sources, including red giant stars, AGB stars, novae, and supernovae. Laboratory isotopic analyses of these grains provide a deeper understanding of stellar evolution, nucleo-synthesis and mixing processes, dust formation in stellar environments, and galactic chemical evolution. Pre-solar grains open a new observational window for astrophysical researches.

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Reactor Experimenters' Guide

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates six research reactors dedicated to research and development work as well as radioisotope production. These reactors are used by ORNL and qualified non-ORNL research and development groups. The purpose of this report is to provide information to research personnel concerning the facilities and the ORNL research and services groups available to assist in the design, fabrication, operation, and post-operation examination of irradiation assemblies. Safety and operability reviews and quality assurance requirements are also described

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Reactor Experimenters' Guide

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has three multipurpose research reactors which accommodate testing loops, target irradiations, and beam-type experiments. Since the experiments must share common or similar facilities and utilities, be designed and fabricated by the same groups, and meet the same safety criteria, certain standards for these have been developed. These standards deal only with those properties from which safety and economy of time and money can be maximized and do not relate to the intent of the experiment or quality of the data obtained. The necessity for, and the limitations of, the standards are discussed; and a compilation of general standards is included

  16. Experimental investigation of vitiation effects on supersonic combustor performance

    Li, Jianping; Song, Wenyan; Luo, Feiteng; Shi, Deyong

    2014-03-01

    A significant problem for use of combustion heated facilities in ground laboratory studies of scramjet propulsion is that the resulting high enthalpy test air are seriously vitiated by several species, for example, H2O, CO2, CO, H, OH, O, and NO, which are not of representative or very few in actual atmosphere, so-called vitiation air relative to pure air. Combustion in such vitiation air stream can be influenced by chemical and physical effects due to the different species from actual atmosphere. Therefore, the ground-test results from such vitiated facilities should be properly analyzed and corrected before extrapolated to atmospheric flight condition. The primary goal of the present efforts is to assess the net effects of vitiation air on combustion process in a supersonic combustor. Based on the direct-connected test facility of Northwestern Polytechnical University, an experimental system is developed for comparative investigation of supersonic combustion in vitiation airstream and clean airstream, respectively. Specific species at well-controlled concentration are added to the clean airstream generated from resistance heater to synthesize the vitiation airstream, duplicating the test media in a combustion heated facility. The air total temperature at combustor entrance is about 850 K, typically simulating the Mach 4 flight condition. Details of the experiment system are present in this paper. With the newly constructing system, hydrogen, ethylene and kerosene fueled supersonic combustions with clean air and vitiation air stream are investigated. Individual and combined influences of H2O and CO2 at various concentrations are considered over a range of experiment condition. The combustion characteristics with clean and vitiation air stream are compared, and the influences of H2O and H2O/CO2 on supersonic combustion processes are discussed. Results show that, the combustion induced pressure rise can be significantly inhibited by H2O and/or CO2 vitiation . The direct extrapolation of vitiated test results to flight condition may possibly result in over-fueling combustion, even inlet unstart. The H2O and/or CO2 vitiation also influence the shock waves in the isolator, resulting in the tendency of supersonic combustion mode.

  17. Experimental investigations of thermal interaction between corium and coolants

    Zagorul'ko, Yu. I.; Zhmurin, V. G.; Volov, A. N.; Kovalev, Yu. P.

    2008-03-01

    We present a generalized analysis of the experimental results from investigations of thermal interaction in corium simulators (melts of thermite mixtures U + Mo3 and Zr + Fe2O3)-coolant (Na and H2O) systems. We also present the results from experimental assessments of the kinematic characteristics pertinent to the displacement of materials during the thermal interaction process and the coefficients for conversion of the corium thermal energy into mechanical work.

  18. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Dynamic Positioning in Discontinuous Ice

    Metrikin, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    This thesis studies dynamic positioning (DP) operations of a conceptual Arctic drillship in discontinuous sea ice conditions. The stationkeeping behaviour of the vessel under the influence of dynamic ice actions is investigated in both intact and managed ice environments, with an emphasis on DP operations in broken ice. The problem is approached by a combination of experimental and numerical methods. The experimental work was performed in the large ice tank of the Hamburg Ship ...

  19. Investigation of Sulfate Attack by Experimental and Thermodynamic Means

    Kunther, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates sulfate attack in complex sulfate environments by exposing different binder types to various sulfate solutions and comparing predicted phase and volume changes with experimental data. The most important aspects of this work can be grouped in three topics: The comparison of the predicted volume increase with the experimentally observed length changes. This part of the work shows that volume increase cannot be linked direct...

  20. Possible experimental investigation of the phenomenon of anomalous ionization

    We discuss the possibility of investigating experimentally in the upper ionosphere the critical velocity phenomenon. This occurs when a cloud of neutral gas interacts with plasma in a transverse magnetic field. We determine the region in experimental parameter space (flow rate of the gas, plasma density, etc.) where we might anticipate the occurrence of a self-sustaining beam-plasma discharge. We consider quantitatively the dynamics of the discharge process

  1. Russian fast research reactor BOR-60 reactor: Experimental investigations

    Experimental fast reactor BOR-60 is one of the leading experimental facilities in Russia used to test a large of number fuel pins, fuel assemblies, and control rods of different designs, fuel compositions and structural materials. It is also widely used for trying out the elements of closed fuel cycle, transmutation of actinides and plutonium utilization. BOR-60 reactor and high-capacity experimental base available at RIAR allow various experimental investigations to be performed. Since the BOR-60 startup (in 1969), a large scope of experiments have been done at RIAR practically in all directions that are of interest for the nuclear power engineering and related areas of science and engineering. In addition, a wide experience has been gained in calculation support of experimental investigations. During its 40-year operation, the BOR-60 core underwent multiple changes. There were more than 120 micro-runs, each micro-run being a reactor state different from others. The experimental investigations performed in different periods of time may be of interest for a researcher. Results obtained at this reactor contributed greatly to the development of the nuclear power engineering and made a basis for a successful startup and operation of reactors BN-350 and BN-600 as well as for long and safe operation of BOR-60 itself. At present, both the reactor and experiment gained at it are widely used for justification of promising fast reactors

  2. New experimental tools for bioassays with whitefly in laboratory

    Thiago Luis Martins Fanela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to develop an experimental kit for assessments of repellency, deterrence for oviposition, and insecticidal activity on adults of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci biotype B. The kit, which consisted of arenas and nebulizer, was effective for conducting bioassays, and the application of aqueous extracts by inhaler was adequate. The techniques are simple, cheap, and may contribute to research on this insect.

  3. Minimum Experimental Standards in the Laboratory Search for Gravity Effects

    Peer-reviewed reports of experimental modifications of gravity over rotating superconductors (Podkletnov, 1992), or of a weight increase during cool-down of superconductors (Reiss, 2003), have stimulated considerable recent discussion. Precise descriptions of sample composition, ancillary apparatus and balance specifications were not given by Podkletnov. Accordingly, a carefully-designed replication (Hathaway, 2003) could not confirm the experimental findings possibly because detailed information was unavailable. On the other hand Tajmar et al. (Tajmar, 2005) failed to replicate previous results due to lack of serious analysis of weight measurements of solids in atmosphere and subject to buoyancy and wetting forces. Also an acceptable measuring technique and a detailed analysis of the sample's temperature excursions versus time were not performed. Both examples clearly indicate that minimum standards of experimental precision, accounting for boundary conditions, error analysis and thorough reporting of the experiment are necessary to distinguish a true anomaly from prosaic explanations and artefacts. We will discuss some types of errors that can occur and how standards of analysis and reporting should be improved to allow others a thorough physical understanding

  4. An open microcomputer-based laboratory system for perceptional experimentality

    Hamalainen, Ari

    A computer, equipped with hardware for acquiring data about the properties of a physical system and programs for processing that data, is a powerful tool for physics research and instruction. There is strong evidence that utilizing microcomputer-based laboratories (MBLs) in instruction can lead to significantly improved learning. The perceptional approach is a method for physics instruction, developed at the Department of Physics, University of Helsinki. Its main arguments are that the meanings of the concepts must be learnt before their formal definitions and adoption, and that learning and research are fundamentally similar concept formation processes. Applying the perceptional approach requires the ability to perform quantitative experiments, either as students' laboratory exercises or as lecture demonstrations, and to process their results. MBL tools are essential for this. In student's laboratory exercises, they reduce the routine work and leave more time for the actual learning. In lecture demonstrations, they make it possible to perform the experiments in the tight time limits. At a previous stage of the research, a set of requirements was found that the perceptional approach places on MBL systems. The primary goal of this thesis is to build a prototype of a MBL system that would fulfil these requirements. A secondary goal is to describe technical aspects of a computerized measurement system from the standpoint of educational use. The prototype was built using mostly commercial sensors and data acquisition units. The software was written with a visual programming language, designed for instrumentation applications. The prototype system was developed and tested with a set of demonstrations of various topics in the Finnish high school physics curriculum, which were implemented according to the perceptional approach. Limited usability tests were also performed. The prototype was improved, until it could perform the test demonstrations. It was found to meet the formulated requirements quite well, although not fully. It was also found that a visual programming language for instrumentation might have wider use in science education. The public domain programs of the prototype are available via Internet, in .

  5. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF AN AIR CHARGED LOW POWERED STIRLING ENGINE

    Can ÇINAR

    2004-01-01

    In this study, an air charged, low powered manufactured ? type Stirling engine was investigated experimentally. Tests were conducted at 800, 900 and 1000 °C hot source temperatures, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5 bars air charge pressure. The variation of engine power depending on the charge pressure and hot source temperature for two different heat transfer area was investigated experimentally. Maximum output power was obtained at 1000 °C and 3 bars charge pressure as 58 W at 441 rpm. Engine speed w...

  6. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF AN AIR CHARGED LOW POWERED STIRLING ENGINE

    Can ÇINAR

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an air charged, low powered manufactured ? type Stirling engine was investigated experimentally. Tests were conducted at 800, 900 and 1000 °C hot source temperatures, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5 bars air charge pressure. The variation of engine power depending on the charge pressure and hot source temperature for two different heat transfer area was investigated experimentally. Maximum output power was obtained at 1000 °C and 3 bars charge pressure as 58 W at 441 rpm. Engine speed was reached at 846 rpm without load.

  7. Investigating the Site of Newton's Laboratory in Trinity College, Cambridge

    Spargo, P. E.

    2005-01-01

    It is not generally known that over the course of some thirty years, Isaac Newton carried out around four hundred chemical experiments in a private laboratory located in the walled garden immediately below his rooms in Trinity College, Cambridge. The exact location of his laboratory has long been a source of conjecture and this article describes a survey undertaken to determine both the possible site of the laboratory as well as that of the rubbish pit in which ...

  8. Laboratory investigation of antenna signals from dust impacts on spacecraft

    Collette, A.; Meyer, G.; Malaspina, D.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2015-07-01

    We describe laboratory experiments which reproduce characteristic signals observed on spacecraft, believed to be caused by dust impact. A simulated spacecraft, including an antenna system using a facsimile of the preamplifier electronics from the STEREO/WAVES instrument, was bombarded by 10 km/s submicron-sized dust at the University of Colorado Institute for Modeling Plasma, Atmospheres, and Cosmic Dust accelerator facility. Signal variation was investigated as a function of the DC potentials of both the spacecraft and the antennas. We observed (1) signals corresponding to modification of the spacecraft body potential, an important process believed to be responsible for the so-called "triple hit" antenna signals on STEREO, (2) a few-eV energy distribution for the electrons and ions released in the impact leading to (3) signals corresponding to direct recollection of a substantial fraction of the impact charge by the spacecraft antennas, even at modest antenna bias potentials. We also observe (4) an unexpected class of fast antenna signals, which do not appear to be caused by charge recollection by either the spacecraft or the antennas and may be induced by charge separation in the expanding plasma cloud. Similar signals are also commonly observed by the STEREO/WAVES instrument but have not previously been analyzed.

  9. Laboratory investigations of arcing on W-coated graphite components

    Laux, M., E-mail: michael.laux@ipp.mpg.de [Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr. 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Siemroth, P.; Marx, M. [Arc Precision Sources, Coatings and Analysis GmbH, Bahnhofstr. 1, D-15745 Wildau (Germany); Neu, R.; Rohde, V.; Balden, M.; Endstrasser, N. [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Results of laboratory experiments of arcing on graphite tiles coated by a W-layer are reported. The samples have been taken from coated tiles manufactured for ASDEX Upgrade (AUG). The motion of the arcs was observed by high-speed cameras. Additionally, sample plates have been exposed to collect macro-particles emitted by the arc. The eroded surfaces of the cathodes were investigated after experiment to characterize surface changes, tracks, and re-deposited particles. On the cathode strongly radiating immobile spots are observed by the cameras acting as sources of numerous macro-particles. At the surface large holes (diameter 17 ?m) are found that perforate the W-layer and extend into the graphite bulk. Subsequent arcs tend to locate at the pre-existing holes. Hence, locally the W-coating is quickly and effectively broken, the W erosion is enhanced as compared to bulk W, and carbon is locally liberated despite the existence of an undamaged W-coating outside the arcing region.

  10. Investigating Systematic Uncertainty and Experimental Design with Projectile Launchers

    Orzel, Chad; Marr, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The proper choice of a measurement technique that minimizes systematic and random uncertainty is an essential part of experimental physics. These issues are difficult to teach in the introductory laboratory, though: because most experiments involve only a single measurement technique, students are often unable to make a clear distinction between random and systematic uncertainties, or to compare the uncertainties associated with different techniques. In this paper, we describe an experiment suitable for an introductory college level (or advanced high school) course that uses velocity measurements to clearly show students the effects of both random and systematic uncertainties.

  11. Experimental investigations of overvoltages in neutral isolated networks

    Vukelja, P.I.; Naumov, R.M.; Vucinic, M.M.; Budisin, P.B. (Electrotechnicki Inst. ' Nikola Tesla' , Belgrade (Yugoslavia))

    1993-09-01

    For more than a decade, the Nikola Tesla Institute has worked intensively on experimental investigations of transient voltages and currents in neutral isolated networks, usually at 6 kV. The paper presents the results of investigations of overvoltages at the instant of appearance of an earth fault and during its interruption, the earth-fault currents and overvoltages during ferroresonance. Investigations were performed on cable station service networks in hydro- and thermal-power plants, industrial and similar installations in Yugoslavia. On the basis of these investigations, some measures are suggested for improving the reliability of operation of neutral isolated networks. (author)

  12. An Experimental Investigation of Secure Communication With Chaos Masking

    Dhar, Sourav

    2007-01-01

    The most exciting recent development in nonlinear dynamics is realization that chaos can be useful. One application involves "Secure Communication". Two piecewise linear systems with switching nonlinearities have been taken as chaos generators. In the present work the phenomenon of secure communication with chaos masking has been investigated experimentally. In this investigation chaos which is generated from two chaos generators is masked with the massage signal to be transmitted, thus makes communication is more secure.

  13. An investigation into stent expansion using numerical and experimental techniques

    Toner, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Extensive finite element analyses have been carried out by researchers to investigate the difference in the mechanical loading induced in vessels stented with various different stent designs and the influence of this loading on restenosis outcome. This study investigates the experimental validation of these numerical stent expansions using compliant mock arteries. The development of this in-vitro validation test has the prospect of providing a fully validated preclinical testing tool which ca...

  14. AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF STOPPING DISTANCE OF AUTOMOBILES

    DÜZGÜN, Mesut; ALTINPARMAK, Duran; BAYRAKÇEKEN, Hüseyin

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACTBrake system performance is determined by stopping distance which is the function of vehicle velocity at the start of braking and deceleration. Brake performance parameters are investigated by applying various braking tests. These tests are carried out either for the purpose of certification at the production stage or the purpose of braking fault detection. In this experimental study, various braking test techniques have been investigated. A new method has been developed to determine ...

  15. The role of laboratory investigations in evaluating abdominal tuberculosis

    Sherwani Rana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Tuberculosis (TB continues to be a major health problem in developing countries like India. Abdominal TB is defined as an infection of the peritoneum, or hollow or solid abdominal organs with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. The gastrointestinal tract is one of the most frequent sites of extrapulmonary involvement in TB. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the role of laboratory investigations in the diagnosis of abdominal TB. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 300 patients admitted to various departments of our hospital from November 2005 to October 2007. Detailed histories and thorough clinical examinations together with relevant hematological, biochemical, cytological, radiological, and histopathological investigations were carried out in suspected cases of Koch′s abdomen. Results: Erythrocyte sedimentation rates with positive results were seen in 79.3% patients. Serological test enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed on only 30 patients and was found to be positive for IgG, and IgM in 25 cases with a sensitivity of 83%. Thirteen out of 15 cases were positive for adenosine deaminase done on ascitic fluid. The results of the two patients who underwent Mtb polymerase chain reaction (PCR were consistent with TB. Out of 21 image-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC cases, 10 (48% of the positive cases showed caseating necrosis while 7 (33% had noncaseous necrosis. Stain for acid-fast bacilli (AFB was performed on all cases and was positive in 42 cases (38.8%. Lymph node biopsy was done in 95% of the cases. Conclusions: Serological investigations have a limited value, while PCR is a highly specific test. Since cost restricts its use, only two patients in our study could afford it. BACTEC is more sensitive and faster than culture techniques for the diagnosis of mycobacterial infections. FNAC is a reliable, cost effective alternative, and 81% diagnostic yield in the present study suggests that ultrasound guidance is a useful tool. Histopathological evaluation with positive AFB staining remains the gold standard for diagnosing abdominal TB. However, although the demonstration of AFB in aspirates and tissue sections is a definitive diagnostic method for TB, the positivity for AFB is variable.

  16. Scaled Laboratory Experimental Design of Radiation-Driven Cloud Implosions

    Keiter, Paul; Stone, James; Trantham, Matt; Malamud, Guy; Klein, Sallee

    2014-10-01

    When hot, massive stars form they ionize and heat the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM), forming an expanding region of hot, high-radiation-pressure, ionized hydrogen gas called an H II region. The H II region itself can then induce further star formation. The two main mechanisms of star formation involving H II regions are collect and collapse [Elmegreen 1977] and radiation-driven implosions [Axford, 1964, Lefloch and Lazareff 1994]. Two persistent questions for this mechanism are when in the compression process and where in the cloud does star formation occur? Our understanding of stellar formation is based on computer simulations and models. To improve our understanding of these models, data are required. We present the design of a scaled experiment to study the interaction of an ionization front with a high-density sphere, which acts as a surrogate for the molecular cloud. Irradiating a high-Z foil with laser beams generates the ionization front. The ionization front will propagate in a low-density medium before interacting with the sphere. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0001840.

  17. Experimental investigation of stimulated Brillouin scattering in an amplified medium

    Zel' dovich, B.Y.; Izotov, A.N.; Kapitskii, Y.E.; Krivoshchekov, V.A.; Mamaev, A.V.; Mel' nikov, N.A.; Pilipetskii, N.F.; Tabrin, V.N.; Shevelevich, R.S.; Shkunov, V.V.

    1985-09-01

    An experimental investigation was made of stimulated Brillouin scattering (STBS) in Nd/sup 3 +/-activated glass fibers. Optical pumping of these fibers at the wavelength of 1.06 ..mu.. resulted in amplification. Linear amplification in these fibers lowered the STBS threshold and increased the gain of conversion into a reflected Stokes wave.

  18. Experimental investigation of stimulated Brillouin scattering in an amplifying medium

    Zeldovich, B.IA.; Izotov, A.N.,; Kapitskii, IU.E.; Krivoshchekov, V.A.; Mamaev, A.V.

    1985-09-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in Nd/sub 3/(+)-activated glass fibers has been investigated experimentally. Amplification in the medium at a wavelength of 1.86 microns was observed under optical pumping. It is shown that linear amplification in the medium reduced the SBS threshold and increased the gain into the reflected Stokes wave. 6 references.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Piston Rings for Internal Combustion Engines

    Christiansen, Jens; Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders; Hwang, Jong-Hyun

    conditions, but this is not the case in real life operation. These problems forms the basis for the experimental investigation. In large two-stroke engines the cylinder oil is supplied to the bearing at discrete locations on the cylinder liner at a specific rate at a certain time. The shifting in lubrication...

  20. Experimental and numerical investigation on two-phase flow instabilities

    Ruspini, Leonardo Carlos

    2013-03-01

    Two-phase flow instabilities are experimentally and numerically studied within this thesis. In particular, the phenomena called Ledinegg instability, density wave oscillations and pressure drop oscillations are investigated. The most important investigations regarding the occurrence of two-phase flow instabilities are reviewed. An extensive description of the main contributions in the experimental and analytical research is presented. In addition, a critical discussion and recommendations for future investigations are presented. A numerical framework using a hp-adaptive method is developed in order to solve the conservation equations modelling general thermo-hydraulic systems. A natural convection problem is analysed numerically in order to test the numerical solver. Moreover, the description of an adaptive strategy to solve thermo-hydraulic problems is presented. In the second part of this dissertation, a homogeneous model is used to study Ledinegg, density wave and pressure drop oscillations phenomena numerically. The dynamic characteristics of the Ledinegg (flow excursion) phenomenon are analysed through the simulation of several transient examples. In addition, density wave instabilities in boiling and condensing systems are investigated. The effects of several parameters, such as the fluid inertia and compressibility volumes, on the stability limits of Ledinegg and density wave instabilities are studied, showing a strong influence of these parameters. Moreover, the phenomenon called pressure drop oscillations is numerically investigated. A discussion of the physical representation of several models is presented with reference to the obtained numerical results. Finally, the influence of different parameters on these phenomena is analysed. In the last part, an experimental investigation of these phenomena is presented. The designing methodology used for the construction of the experimental facility is described. Several simulations and a non-dimensional similitude analysis are used to support the design, regarding the occurrence of two-phase flow instabilities. Some experimental results are presented in order to validate the current design. A full characterisation of the pressure drop losses in the facility is presented. Both, distributed and local pressure drop losses are investigated and the experimental results are compared with the main correlations used in the literature for the analysis of pressure drop in two-phase flow systems. Finally, pressure drop and density wave oscillations are studied experimentally, with main focus on the interaction of these two oscillation modes. In addition, the influence of compressibility volumes on the stability limits for the density wave phenomenon is analysed.(Author)

  1. Choice of experimental venue matters in ecotoxicology studies: Comparison of a laboratory-based and an outdoor mesocosm experiment.

    Mik, Zsanett; Ujszegi, Jnos; Gl, Zoltn; Imrei, Zoltn; Hettyey, Attila

    2015-10-01

    The heavy application of pesticides and its potential effects on natural communities has attracted increasing attention to inadvertent impacts of these chemicals. Toxicologists conventionally use laboratory-based tests to assess lethal concentrations of pesticides. However, these tests often do not take into account indirect, interactive and long-term effects, and tend to ignore different rates of disintegration in the laboratory and under natural conditions. Our aim was to investigate the importance of the experimental venue for ecotoxicology tests. We reared tadpoles of the agile frog (Rana dalmatina) in the laboratory and in outdoor mesocosms and exposed them to three initial concentrations of a glyphosate-based herbicide (0, 2 and 6.5 mg a.e./L glyphosate), and to the presence or absence of caged predators (dragonfly larvae). The type of experimental venue had a large effect on the outcome: The herbicide was less lethal to tadpoles reared in outdoor mesocosms than in the laboratory. Further, while the herbicide had a negative effect on development time and on body mass in the laboratory, tadpoles exposed to the herbicide in mesocosms were larger at metamorphosis and developed faster in comparison to those reared in the absence of the herbicide. The effect of the herbicide on morphological traits of tadpoles also differed between the two venues. Finally, in the presence of the herbicide, tadpoles tended to be more active and to stay closer to the bottom of laboratory containers, while tadpole behaviour shifted in the opposite direction in outdoor mesocosms. Our results demonstrate major discrepancies between results of a classic laboratory-based ecotoxicity test and outcomes of an experiment performed in outdoor mesocosms. Consequently, the use of standard laboratory tests may have to be reconsidered and their benefits carefully weighed against the difficulties of performing experiments under more natural conditions. Tests validating experimentally estimated impacts of herbicides under natural conditions and studies identifying key factors determining the applicability of experimental results are urgently needed. PMID:26254767

  2. Numerical and experimental investigation of vortical flow-flame interaction

    Najm, H.N.; Schefer, R.W.; Milne, R.B.; Mueller, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Devine, K.D.; Kempka, S.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-02-01

    A massively parallel coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian low Mach number reacting flow code is developed and used to study the structure and dynamics of a forced planar buoyant jet flame in two dimensions. The numerical construction uses a finite difference scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for solving the scalar conservation equations, and the vortex method for the momentum equations, with the necessary coupling terms. The numerical model construction is presented, along with computational issues regarding the parallel implementation. An experimental acoustically forced planar jet burner apparatus is also developed and used to study the velocity and scalar fields in this flow, and to provide useful data for validation of the computed jet. Burner design and laser diagnostic details are discussed, along with the measured laboratory jet flame dynamics. The computed reacting jet flow is also presented, with focus on both large-scale outer buoyant structures and the lifted flame stabilization dynamics. A triple flame structure is observed at the flame base in the computed flow, as is theoretically expected, but was not observable with present diagnostic techniques in the laboratory flame. Computed and experimental results are compared, along with implications for model improvements.

  3. The Influence of Laboratory-Generated Tides on Experimental Deltas

    Baumgardner, S. E.; Abeyta, A.; Cazanacli, D.; Paola, C.

    2013-12-01

    Due to their ecological and economic importance, deltas are widely studied but the controls on the processes that create and shape them are incompletely understood. The most prominent downstream control on a delta is the input of basinal energy from (wind-driven) waves and tides. Studies of the response of field-scale deltas to changing basinal energy conditions are limited by their large size and long response time. Laboratory-generated deltas allow control over upstream inputs (sediment and water) and base level, and enable the generation of a high-resolution record of topography and planform morphology of the deposit throughout the experiment. We include the effects of tides by imposing cyclic changes in base level with a period that is long compared to ordinary gravity waves but short compared to time scales of morphologic evolution; here we used periods of generated knickpoints, which led to channel deepening. These results suggest that basinal energy can affect deltaic processes far upstream of the coastline. We introduce waves to the system through the use of a generator; this generator produces waves with a single, user-defined period (here, ~1-2 seconds) and amplitude (2-3 cm) . The orientation of the incoming wave crests is set by the position of the generator. The addition of wave energy led to rapid shoreline retreat and straightening and the formation and migration of shore parallel barrier bars similar to what is observed in wave-influenced field-scale systems. Analysis of overhead imagery shows that wave transport of sediment occurs over a much shorter timescale than tidally-driven transport, leads to the formation of a continuous, coarse berm parallel to the shoreline and plays a major role in determining the configuration of channel mouths.

  4. Laboratory investigation of crushed salt consolidation and fracture healing

    A laboratory test program was conducted to investigate the consolidation behavior of crushed salt and fracture healing in natural and artificial salt. Crushed salt is proposed for use as backfill in a nuclear waste repository in salt. Artificial block salt is proposed for use in sealing a repository. Four consolidation tests were conducted in a hydrostatic pressure vessel at a maximum pressure of 2500 psi (17.2 MPa) and at room temperature. Three 1-month tests were conducted on salt obtained from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and one 2-month test was conducted on salt from Avery Island. Permeability was obtained using argon and either a steady-state or transient method. Initial porosities ranged from 0.26 to 0.36 and initial permeabilities from 2000 to 50,000 md. Final porosities and permeabilities ranged from 0.05 to 0.19 and from -5 md to 110 md, respectively. The lowest final porosity (0.05) and permeability (-5 md) were obtained in a 1-month test in which 2.3% moisture was added to the salt at the beginning of the test. The consolidation rate was much more rapid than in any of the dry salt tests. The fracture healing program included 20 permeability tests conducted on fractured and unfractured samples. The tests were conducted in a Hoek cell at hydrostatic pressures up to 3000 psi (20.6 MPa) with durations up to 8 days. For the natural rock salt tested, permeability was strongly dependent on confining pressure and time. The effect of confining pressure was much weaker in the artificial salt. In most cases the combined effects of time and pressure were to reduce the permeability of fractured samples to the same order of magnitude (or less) as the permeability measured prior to fracturing

  5. Laboratory investigation of crushed salt consolidation and fracture healing

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory test program was conducted to investigate the consolidation behavior of crushed salt and fracture healing in natural and artificial salt. Crushed salt is proposed for use as backfill in a nuclear waste repository in salt. Artificial block salt is proposed for use in sealing a repository. Four consolidation tests were conducted in a hydrostatic pressure vessel at a maximum pressure of 2500 psi (17.2 MPa) and at room temperature. Three 1-month tests were conducted on salt obtained from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and one 2-month test was conducted on salt from Avery Island. Permeability was obtained using argon and either a steady-state or transient method. Initial porosities ranged from 0.26 to 0.36 and initial permeabilities from 2000 to 50,000 md. Final porosities and permeabilities ranged from 0.05 to 0.19 and from <10/sup -5/ md to 110 md, respectively. The lowest final porosity (0.05) and permeability (<10/sup -5/ md) were obtained in a 1-month test in which 2.3% moisture was added to the salt at the beginning of the test. The consolidation rate was much more rapid than in any of the dry salt tests. The fracture healing program included 20 permeability tests conducted on fractured and unfractured samples. The tests were conducted in a Hoek cell at hydrostatic pressures up to 3000 psi (20.6 MPa) with durations up to 8 days. For the natural rock salt tested, permeability was strongly dependent on confining pressure and time. The effect of confining pressure was much weaker in the artificial salt. In most cases the combined effects of time and pressure were to reduce the permeability of fractured samples to the same order of magnitude (or less) as the permeability measured prior to fracturing.

  6. Field and Laboratory Investigations of Organic Photochemistry on Urban Surfaces

    Styler, S. A.; Baergen, A.; van Pinxteren, D.; Donaldson, D. J.; Herrmann, H.

    2014-12-01

    In polluted urban environments, windows and building surfaces rapidly become coated with a complex film of chemicals, which enhances the dry deposition of particles and the partitioning of semi-volatile organic species to the surface. Despite its high surface-to-volume ratio and direct exposure to sunlight, few studies have directly investigated the role that this "urban film" may play in promoting the photooxidative processing of semi-volatile organics contained within it. The present study represents a comprehensive field- and laboratory-based investigation of the film-phase photochemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), here used as proxies for light-absorbing semi-volatile organics present within the film. Urban film sampling was conducted using a custom-built three-stage sampler housing, which was deployed in a central, high-traffic area in Leipzig, Germany. The sampler itself employs small glass beads as surrogate window surfaces and is designed such that only its uppermost stage is exposed to sunlight. Each stage is subdivided into 16 compartments, which allows for the study of film formation and evolution. In the first phase of the study, the role of urban film as a photochemical sink for reactive organic species was determined by measuring total film PAH content and PAH abundance ratios as a function of atmospheric exposure time under both light and dark conditions. In the second, more general, phase of the study, the organic and inorganic composition of collected film samples was compared to that of co-located PM10 samples, and differences between the two sample types were used to gain insight into the relative importance of heterogeneous photochemical oxidation within the particle and film phases. In the third phase of the study, film samples grown under dark conditions were exposed to gas-phase ozone in an atmospheric-pressure flat-bed reactor, and the kinetics of ozone-induced PAH loss were studied under both dark and illuminated conditions. Since previous work from our group has shown that the heterogeneous photooxidation of PAH occurs at different rates and via different mechanisms depending on its immediate environment, this in situ study of PAH reactivity provides substantial insight into the photochemical processing of this class of compounds in urban environments.

  7. Integrating Laboratory and Numerical Decompression Experiments to Investigate Fluid Dynamics into the Conduit

    Spina, Laura; Colucci, Simone; De'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2015-04-01

    The study of the fluid dynamics of magmatic melts into the conduit, where direct observations are unattainable, was proven to be strongly enhanced by multiparametric approaches. Among them, the coupling of numerical modeling with laboratory experiments represents a fundamental tool of investigation. Indeed, the experimental approach provide invaluable data to validate complex multiphase codes. We performed decompression experiments in a shock tube system, using pure silicon oil as a proxy for the basaltic melt. A range of viscosity comprised between 1 and 1000 Pa s was investigated. The samples were saturated with Argon for 72h at 10MPa, before being slowly decompressed to atmospheric pressure. The evolution of the analogue magmatic system was monitored through a high speed camera and pressure sensors, located into the analogue conduit. The experimental decompressions have then been reproduced numerically using a multiphase solver based on OpenFOAM framework. The original compressible multiphase Openfoam solver twoPhaseEulerFoam was extended to take into account the multicomponent nature of the fluid mixtures (liquid and gas) and the phase transition. According to the experimental conditions, the simulations were run with values of fluid viscosity ranging from 1 to 1000 Pa s. The sensitivity of the model has been tested for different values of the parameters t and D, representing respectively the relaxation time for gas exsolution and the average bubble diameter, required by the Gidaspow drag model. Valuable range of values for both parameters are provided from experimental observations, i.e. bubble nucleation time and bubble size distribution at a given pressure. The comparison of video images with the outcomes of the numerical models was performed by tracking the evolution of the gas volume fraction through time. Therefore, we were able to calibrate the parameter of the model by laboratory results, and to track the fluid dynamics of experimental decompression.

  8. Experimental investigation on the natural convection flow in pool boiling

    Kim, Seok, E-mail: seokim@kaeri.re.kr [Thermal Hydraulics Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111 Daedeok-daero989beongil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Eok [Department of Precision Mechanical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, 386 Gajang-dong, Sangju, Gyeongsangbuk-do 742-711 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Sung Uk; Lee, Seung Tae; Euh, Dong-Jin [Thermal Hydraulics Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111 Daedeok-daero989beongil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: The velocity field measurements conducted on the subject of a single and two-phase natural convection flow. Experimental results show a large natural convection flow at the region above the heater rod. The thermal stratification is shown at the region below the heater rod. The results contribute to provide the benchmark data of a thermal hydraulic system analysis code. - Abstract: In the present study, the key thermal hydraulic phenomena within a passive condensate cooling tank (PCCT) of a small-scale pool test rig with a single heater rod are experimentally investigated. The volumetric scaling ratio of the test rig is 1/910 the size of the passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS) condensing heat removal assessment loop (PASCAL), which is a PAFS performance evaluation test facility. The two-dimensional velocity vector fields that occur as the water level decreases are experimentally investigated in a pool that contains a horizontal heater rod. The 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement technique is adopted to determine the velocity vector field of the natural convection flow. The experimental results indicate that a large natural convection flow occurs above the heater rod and that thermal stratification occurs below the heater rod. The thermal stratification and the stagnant region begin to disappear when the pool temperature reaches approximately 90 C. The experimental results can provide benchmark data to validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations of thermal hydraulic phenomena that occur in a pool with a heat source.

  9. METHODS OF EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF STEINER THEOREM IN PHYSICAL PRACTICUM AND LABORATORY WORK

    Zharilkasin Iskakov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the technique of laboratory work on experimental verification of Steiner’s Theorem in laboratory conditions is developed. To do this, specially designed experimental device was used. The main part of such device is a simple physical pendulum, swinging freely about the axis of suspension, consisting of a cylindrical disc set on a thin rod. To determine the moment of inertia of cylindrical body about the axis of vibrations, property of a physical quantity additivity was used. When processing experimental results, functional approximation by a least squares method was applied; as a result, the empirical expression of Steiner’s Theorem was achieved. Results of experimental studies were very close to the results of theoretical calculations. Laboratory work can be easily repeated for a body of arbitrary shape. The methodology used can be recommended for physical practicum in universities as an effective and easy way of experimental verification of Steiner’s theorem.

  10. Investigation of high purity beryllium for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), Task 002. Final report

    The report includes a description of experimental abilities of Solid Structure Research Laboratory of IAE NNC RK, a results of microstructural characterization of A-4 grade polycrystal Beryllium produced at the Ulba metal plant and a technical project-for irradiation experiments. Technical project contains a detailed description of five proposed experiments, clearing behavior of Beryllium materials under the influence of irradiation, temperature, helium and hydrogen accumulation. Complex irradiation jobs, microstructural investigations and mechanical tests are planned in the framework of these experiments

  11. Experimental Investigation for the Analysis of Cold-Recycled Bituminous Mixtures

    Riviera, Pier Paolo; Chiappinelli, Giuseppe; Santagata, Ezio

    2007-01-01

    The Authors present the results obtained in a experimental investigation carried out to provide technical support to the construction of a cold-recycled bituminous sub-base layer of a major Italian motorway. Compliance of the employed materials and of the resulting recycled mixture to requirements set in Technical Specifications and to the adopted job-mix formula were verified by means of laboratory tests. Field observations focused on the evaluation of the void content of the compacted sub-b...

  12. Investigating Electromagnetic Induction through a Microcomputer-Based Laboratory.

    Trumper, Ricardo; Gelbman, Moshe

    2000-01-01

    Describes a microcomputer-based laboratory experiment designed for high school students that very accurately analyzes Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction, addressing each variable separately while the others are kept constant. (Author/CCM)

  13. Theoretical and experimental investigation of electron collisions with acetone

    Homem, M. G. P.; Iga, I.; da Silva, L. A.; Ferraz, J. R.; Machado, L. E.; de Souza, G. L. C.; da Mata, V. A. S.; Brescansin, L. M.; Lucchese, R. R.; Lee, M.-T.

    2015-09-01

    We report a joint theoretical-experimental investigation on elastic electron scattering by acetone in the low- and intermediate-energy regions. More specifically, experimental differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections are given in the 30-800 eV and 10?-120? ranges. Theoretical cross sections are reported in the 1-500 eV interval. The experimental differential cross sections were determined using a crossed electron-beam-molecular-beam geometry, whereas the absolute values of the cross sections were obtained using the relative-flow technique. Theoretically, a complex optical potential derived from a Hartree-Fock molecular wave function was used to represent the collision dynamics, and a single-center expansion method combined with the Pad approximant technique was used to solve the scattering equations. Our experimental cross-section data are in generally good agreement with the present calculated data. Also, our calculated grand-total and total absorption cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental results reported in the literature. Nevertheless, our calculations have revealed a strong shape resonance in the 2B2 scattering channel not clearly seen in the experimental results. Possible reasons for this fact are also discussed.

  14. Experimental aspects of an investigation of macroscopic ductile failure criteria

    Soo Hoo, M.S.; Benzley, S.E.; Priddy, T.G.

    1981-03-01

    Experimental results for the ductile failure of 7075-T651 aluminum are presented. Four separate shapes were tested to investigate the importance that macroscopic effective shear stress, hydrostatic stress, and plastic strain play in describing ductile failure of materials. The specimens used were: thin wall torsion tubes to create a state of pure shear, uniform hollow tubes to create a state of uniaxial stress; hour-glass shaped hollow tubes to create a state of biaxial stress; and notched round bars to create a state of triaxial stress. Two proposed ductile failure criteria are discussed in conjunction with the experimental results presented.

  15. Experimental investigations on dynamic effects in impact notch bending tests

    The dynamic behaviour of three point bending samples under impact stresses is examined experimentally. Various measuring processes, above all the shadow optics etching process are used. A quasi-static analysis is made by a simple spring/mass model to describe the stress behaviour quantitatively. Based on this, the dynamic effects in model experiments are measured quantitatively with dynamic correction functions and are discussed with reference to the wave processes in the sample. A systematic view of the effect of the many system parameters on the dynamic stress behaviour is obtained. Finally, examples show that the results of this model investigation can be transferred to other experimental conditions. (orig./HP)

  16. Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome: experimental and clinical investigations

    Hsing I Chen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS can be associated with various disorders. Recent investigation has involved clinical studies in collaboration with clinical investigators and pathologists on the pathogenetic mechanisms of ALI or ARDS caused by various disorders. This literature review includes a brief historical retrospective of ALI/ARDS, the neurogenic pulmonary edema due to head injury, the long-term experimental studies and clinical investigations from our laboratory, the detrimental role of NO, the risk factors, and the possible pathogenetic mechanisms as well as therapeutic regimen for ALI/ARDS.

  17. The hot cell laboratories for material investigations of the Institute for Safety Research

    Viehrig, H.W.

    1998-10-01

    Special facilities for handling and testing of irradiated specimens are necessary, to perform the investigation of activated material. The Institute for Safety Research has two hot cell laboratories: - the preparation laboratory and - the materials testing laboratory. This report is intended to give an overview of the available facilities and developed techniques in the laboratories. (orig.)

  18. Experimental investigation of the role of ions in aerosol nucleation

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker

    The role of ions in producing aerosols in Earth’s atmosphere is an area of very active research. Atmospheric and experimental observations have shown that the nucleation of aerosol particles can occur under conditions that cannot be explained by classical nucleation theory. Several ideas have been...... put forward to solve this nucleation problem, e.g. Ion-Induced Nucleation and Ternary Nucleation. Experimental investigations exploring the role of ions in particle production are scarce, and often at conditions far removed from those relevant for the lower part of the atmosphere. Recent experimental...... work demonstrated that ions, produced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere, are likely to play an important role in the production of new aerosol particles. The mechanism whereby energetic cosmic rays can promote the production of cloud condensation nuclei at low altitudes constitutes a link between cosmic...

  19. Experimental techniques for the investigation of coupled phenomena in geomaterials

    Romero E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes different experimental setups and techniques used to investigate coupled stress, fluid (water and air and temperature effects on geomaterials. Two temperature controlled cells are described: a a constant volume cell in which thermal pulses can be performed under controlled hydraulic conditions to induce pore pressure build-up during quasi-undrained heating and later dissipation; and b an axisymmetric triaxial cell with controlled suction and temperature to perform drained heating and cooling paths under partially saturated states. The paper also presents an experimental setup to perform controlled flow-rate gas injection experiments on argillaceous rocks using a high-pressure triaxial cell. This cell is used to study gas migration phenomena and the conditions under which gas breakthrough processes occur. Selected test results are presented, which show the capabilities of the different experimental setups described to capture main behavioural features.

  20. Experimental investigations of thermal radiation from potassium atoms and design applications

    Wang, C. S.; Chow, L. S. H.

    Theoretical models of thermal radiation from potassium-laden combustion gases show that thermal radiation from potassium atoms can contribute significantly to the radiant heat flux in radiant furnaces of steam generating systems. The potassium radiation is being investigated experimentally at Argonne National Laboratory. Experimental data were interpreted by a radiant heat transfer model that calculates the total gas emissivity and absorptivity from the spectral properties of CO2, H2O, and potassium atoms. The model was applied to provide design data for radiant furnaces of coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation systems, where considerable amount of potassium atoms would be present.

  1. COMPARATIVE FIELD EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF DIFFERENT FLAT PLATE SOLAR COLLECTORS

    Guangming Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Full-scale traditional metal solar collectors and solar collector specimens fabricated from polymeric materials were investigated in the present study. A polymeric collector is 67.8% lighter than a traditional metal solar collector, and a metal solar collector with transparent plastic covering is 40.3% lighter than a traditional metal solar collector. Honeycomb multichannel plates made from polycarbonate were chosen to create a polymeric solar collector. A test rig for the natural circulation of the working fluid in a solar collector was built for a comparative experimental investigation of various solar collectors operating at ambient conditions. It was shown experimentally that the efficiency of a polymeric collector is 8–15% lower than the efficiency of a traditional collector.

  2. Experimental investigation of contact resistance across pressed lead and aluminum

    In the proposed production of Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket module, lead will be encased in aluminum cladding. Energy transfer rate from the lead to the cooling water will be a function of the contact resistance between lead and aluminum. No data for contact resistance for this application exists in the literature. An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine thermal contact resistance between lead and aluminum in vacuum environment and also investigate the effect of pressure, surface roughness, and interface temperature on the contact resistance. The contact resistance decreases with the increase in contact pressure. Interface temperature and surface roughness do not affect the contact resistance significantly. There is slight increase in contact conductance with increasing temperature. The experimental results are generally well within acceptable accuracy and the data should be a good reference for the APT model

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigation of high gradient acceleration

    This report contains a technical progress summary of the research conducted under the auspices of DOE Grant No. DE-FG0291ER-40648. ''Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of High Gradient Acceleration.'' This grant supports three research tasks: Task A consists of the design and fabrication of a 17GHz of photocathode gun, Task B supports the testing of high gradient acceleration using a 33GHz structure, and Task C comprises theoretical investigations, both in support of the experimental tasks and on critical physics issues for the development of high energy linear colliders. This report is organized as follows. The development of an rf gun design and research progress on the picosecond laser system is summarized in Sec. 2, the status of the studies of the LBL/Haimson high gradient structure, using a 50 MW free-electron laser is summarized in Sec. 3, and theoretical research progress is described in Sec. 4. Supporting material is contained in Appendices A-G

  4. Experimental and theoretical investigation of high gradient acceleration

    This report contains a technical progress summary of the research conducted under the auspices of DOE Grant No. DE-AC02-91-ER40648, ''Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of High Gradient Acceleration''. This grant supports three research tasks: Task A consists of the design, fabrication and testing of a 17GHz RF photocathode gun, which can produce 2ps electron pulses with up to 1nC of charge at 2MeV energy and at a 1OHz repetition rate. Task B supports the testing of high gradient acceleration at 33GHz structure, and Task C comprises theoretical investigations, both in support of the experimental tasks and on critical physics issues for the development of high energy linear colliders

  5. Experimental Investigation On Design Of High Pressure Steam Turbine Blade

    SUBRAMANYAM PAVULURI, DR. A. SIVA KUMAR

    2013-01-01

    The Experimental investigation on design of high pressure steam turbine blade addresses the issue of steam turbine efficiency. A specific focus on aerofoil profile for high pressure turbine blade, and it evaluates the effectiveness of certain Chromium and Nickel in resisting creep and fracture in turbine blades. The capable of thermal and chemical conditions in blade substrate from to prevent the corrosion when exposed to wet steam. The efficiency of the steam turbine is a key factor in both ...

  6. Modelling, Simulation and Experimental Investigation of a Rammer Compactor Machine

    Jönsson, Anders

    2001-01-01

    This licentiate thesis considers the modelling, simulation and experimental investigation of a rammer compactor machine. The purpose is to develop an efficient and verified method for simulation of rammer compactor machines to be used in the product development process. The experience gained through this work is also intended to be useful for studying other types of dynamic compactor machines. Rammer compactor machines perform impact soil compaction. This is more efficient than static compact...

  7. Experimental investigation of efficiency of a novel conical solar collector

    MORAVEJ, M

    2015-01-01

    One of the methods to improvement of solar-to-thermal energy conversion is the design of geometry in solar collectors. In this paper, the new solar collector which is called solar conical collector has been designed and tested. The efficiency of solar conical collector was experimentally investigated by use of ASHRAE standard. Experiments were performed with water as a working fluid in the outdoor condition of Ahvaz city in the south of Iran. The results show that the average efficiency of a ...

  8. Hydrogen gas explosions in pipelines - modeling and experimental investigations

    Knudsen, Vegeir

    2007-01-01

    Gas explosions in closed pipes with a single obstacle have been investigated both numerically and experimentally. Most of the work is related to hydrogen and air mixtures, but other fuels have also been used. At the present time there does not exist a software tool or a numerical method that single-handedly can cover the whole range of phenomena in gas explosions. Computational fluid dynamics is also a developing field, even for fluid flow without chemical reactions. The objective of this wor...

  9. Experimental investigation of the serum albumin fascia microstructure

    Buzoverya, M. E.; Shcherbak, Yu. P.; Shishpor, I. V.

    2012-09-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of biological liquids are reported. Structural effects observed in fascias are considered with account of the molecular features of albumin and the concept of supramolecular organization of polymers. It is revealed that the morphology of human serum albumin fascias depends on the concentration and quality of the solvent. It is shown that the water-salt fascias of albumin are more structured than water solutions with the same concentration.

  10. Experimental investigation of streamer affinity for dielectric surfaces

    Trienekens, D.J.M.; Nijdam, S; Akkermans, G.; Plompen, I.; Christen, T; Ebert, U.

    2015-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the affinity of streamers for dielectric surfaces using stroboscopic imaging and stereo photography. Affinity of streamers for dielectric surfaces was found to depend on a wide set of parameters, including pressure, voltage, dielectric material and discharge gap geometry. Our results show that higher relative permittivity, higher pressure, lower voltage, an d asymmetrical sample placement increase the chance of the streamer followi...

  11. An experimental investigation of flow control for supersonic inlets

    Titchener, Neil

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the control of shock wave / boundary layer interactions (SWBLIs) in supersonic inlets. The overall aim of this study is to determine to what extent vortex generators (VGs) can mitigate flow separations within supersonic inlets. To achieve this, an experimental investigation was undertaken in a small-scale wind tunnel, because small-scale wind tunnels are much more amenable to numerous measurement techniques than real inlets. A new geometry was designed and developed...

  12. Experimental investigation on SPS casing treatment with bias flow

    Dong Xu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Generally, casing treatment (CT is a passivity method to enhance the stall margin of fan/compressor. A novel casing treatment based on the small disturbance theory and vortex and wave interaction suggestion is a method combining passive control and active control, which has been proved effective at enhancing the stall margin of fan/compressor in experiment. In order to investigate the mechanism of this kind of casing treatment, an experimental investigation of a stall precursor-suppressed (SPS casing treatment with air suction or blowing air is conducted in the present paper. The SPS casing treatment is designed to suppressing stall precursors to realize stall margin enhancement in turbomachinery. The experimental results show that the casing treatment with blowing air of small quantity can improve the stall margin by about 8% with about 1% efficiency loss. By contrast, the SPS casing treatment with micro-bias flow does not improve the stall margin much more than that without bias flow, even worse. Meanwhile, the present investigation has also attempted to reveal the mechanism of stall margin improvement with the casing treatment. It is found that the stall margin improvements vary with the modification of the unsteady shedding flow and the unsteady wall boundary impedance. The experimental results agree fairly well with the theoretical prediction using a flow stability model of rotating stall.

  13. LABORATORY INVESTIGATION AND ANALYSIS OF A GROUND-WATER FLOWMETER

    The ground-water flowmeter system, model 30L, manufactured by K-V Associates, Inc., Falmouth, Massachusetts was tested under controlled laboratory conditions. The influence of slotted pipe schedule, slot orientation, backfill materials, endcap bags, isolated regions of high hydra...

  14. Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase Investigations for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Jewett, Kathy; Sandwick, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme ribose 5-phosphate isomerase (RpiA) has many features that make it attractive as a focal point of a semester-long, advanced biochemistry laboratory for undergraduate students. The protein can easily and inexpensively be isolated from spinach using traditional purification techniques. Characterization of RpiA enzyme activity can be…

  15. Students' Written Arguments in General Chemistry Laboratory Investigations

    Choi, Aeran; Hand, Brian; Greenbowe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the written arguments developed by college freshman students using the Science Writing Heuristic approach in inquiry-based general chemistry laboratory classrooms and its relationships with students' achievement in chemistry courses. Fourteen freshman students participated in the first year of the study while 19

  16. Laboratory prototype for experimental validation of MR-guided radiofrequency head and neck hyperthermia

    Clinical studies have established a strong benefit from adjuvant mild hyperthermia (HT) to radio- and chemotherapy for many tumor sites, including the head and neck (H and N). The recently developed HYPERcollar allows the application of local radiofrequency HT to tumors in the entire H and N. Treatment quality is optimized using electromagnetic and thermal simulators and, whenever placement risk is tolerable, assessed using invasively placed thermometers. To replace the current invasive procedure, we are investigating whether magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry can be exploited for continuous and 3D thermal dose assessment. In this work, we used our simulation tools to design an MR compatible laboratory prototype applicator. By simulations and measurements, we showed that the redesigned patch antennas are well matched to 50 ? (S11laboratory applicator provides the possibility for experimental assessment of the feasibility of hybrid MR-HT in the H and N region. This versatile design allows rigorous analysis of MR thermometry accuracy in increasingly complex phantoms that mimic patients' anatomies and thermodynamic characteristics. (paper)

  17. Laboratory prototype for experimental validation of MR-guided radiofrequency head and neck hyperthermia

    Paulides, M. M.; Bakker, J. F.; Hofstetter, L. W.; Numan, W. C. M.; Pellicer, R.; Fiveland, E. W.; Tarasek, M.; Houston, G. C.; van Rhoon, G. C.; Yeo, D. T. B.; Kotek, G.

    2014-05-01

    Clinical studies have established a strong benefit from adjuvant mild hyperthermia (HT) to radio- and chemotherapy for many tumor sites, including the head and neck (H&N). The recently developed HYPERcollar allows the application of local radiofrequency HT to tumors in the entire H&N. Treatment quality is optimized using electromagnetic and thermal simulators and, whenever placement risk is tolerable, assessed using invasively placed thermometers. To replace the current invasive procedure, we are investigating whether magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry can be exploited for continuous and 3D thermal dose assessment. In this work, we used our simulation tools to design an MR compatible laboratory prototype applicator. By simulations and measurements, we showed that the redesigned patch antennas are well matched to 50 ? (S11fat/muscle phantom. Temperature measurements using the MR scanner confirmed the focused heating capabilities and MR compatibility of the setup. We conclude that the laboratory applicator provides the possibility for experimental assessment of the feasibility of hybrid MR-HT in the H&N region. This versatile design allows rigorous analysis of MR thermometry accuracy in increasingly complex phantoms that mimic patients' anatomies and thermodynamic characteristics.

  18. An experimental investigation of two-phase liquid oxygen pumping

    Gross, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental program to explore the feasibility of pumping two-phase oxygen (liquid and gas) at the pump inlet are reported. Twenty-one cavitation tests were run on a standard J-2 oxygen pump at the MSFC Components Test Laboratory. All tests were run with liquid oxygen 5 to 10 K above the normal boiling point temperature. During ten tests run at approximately at the pump inlet were noted before complete pump performance 50 percent of the nominal operating speed, two phase conditions were achieved. Vapor volumes of 40 to 50 percent at the pump inlet were noted before complete pump performance loss. The experimental results compared to predictions. Nine cavitation tests run at the nominal pump speed over a 5 K temperature range showed progressively lower net positive suction head (NPSH) requirements as temperature was increased. Two-phase operation was not achieved. The temperature varying NPSH data were used to calculate thermodynamic effects on NPSH, and the results were compared to existing data.

  19. Experimental investigations on fiber laser color marking of steels

    Highlights: • We develop an experimental approach with the aim to bring a contribution to the comprehension of the occurring phenomena during laser color marking of steels. • We have used a home-made marking device composed of a pulsed fiber laser and galvanometric mirrors. • Both commercial and elaborated in laboratory steels have been used as samples. • The experiments have been performed for different laser beam operating parameters, under normal atmospheric conditions. • The treated samples were analyzed either by optical and scanning electronic microscopy, as well as by energy dispersion spectroscopy. - Abstract: We develop an experimental approach with the aim to bring a contribution to the comprehension of the occurring phenomena during laser color marking of steels. A home-made marking device using a pulsed fiber laser has been used to treat steel samples under different laser beam operating parameters, for different compositions of the processed steel, and at normal atmospheric conditions. The treated samples were analyzed either by optical and scanning electronic microscopy, as well as by energy dispersion spectroscopy. The results show the influence of the operating parameters on the obtained colors

  20. Experimental investigation of defect criticality in FRP laminate composites

    Joyce, Peter James

    1999-11-01

    This work examines the defect criticality of fiber reinforced polymer Composites. The objective is to determine the sensitivity of the finished composite to various process-induced defects. This work focuses on two different classes of process-induced defects; (1) fiber waviness in high performance carbon-fiber reinforced unidirectional composites and (2) void volume in low cost glass-fabric reinforced composites. The role of fiber waviness in the compressive response of unidirectional composites has been studied by a number of other investigators. Because of difficulties associated with producing real composites with varying levels of fiber waviness, most experimental studies of fiber waviness have evaluated composites with artificially induced fiber waviness. Furthermore, most experimental studies have been concentrated on the effects of out-of-plane fiber waviness. The objective of this work is to evaluate the effects of in-plane fiber waviness naturally occurring in autoclave consolidated thermoplastic laminates. The first phase of this project involved the development of a simple technique for measuring the resulting fiber waviness levels. An experimental investigation of the compression strength reduction in composites with in-plane fiber waviness followed. The experimental program included carbon-fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites manufactured from prepreg tape by hand layup, and carbon-fiber and glass-fiber reinforced composites manufactured from an experimental powder towpreg by filament winding and autoclave consolidation. The compression specimens exhibited kink band failure in the prepreg composite and varying amounts of longitudinal splitting and kink banding in the towpreg composites. The compression test results demonstrated the same trend as predicted by microbudding theory but the overall quantitative correlation was poor. The second thrust of this research evaluated void effects in resin transfer molded composites. Much of the existing literature in this area has focused on composites with unidirectional fiber reinforcement. In this program, the influence of void volume on the mechanical behavior of RTM composites with plain weave reinforcement was investigated. The experimental program demonstrated that the effects of void volume are negligible in terms of the fiber dominated properties. Interlaminar shear strength tests on the other hand demonstrated a linear dependence on void volume in the range tested.

  1. Experimental investigation of transient thermoelastic effects in dynamic fracture

    Thermoelastic effects in fracture are generally considered to be negligible at the benefit of the conversion of plastic work into heat. For the case of dynamic crack initiation, the experimental and theoretical emphasis has been put on the temperature rise associated with crack-tip plasticity. Nevertheless, earlier experimental work with polymers has shown that thermoelastic cooling precedes the temperature rise at the tip of a propagating crack (Fuller et al., 1975). Transient thermoelastic effects at the tip of a dynamically loaded crack have been theoretically assessed and shown to be significant when thermal conductivity is initially neglected. However, the fundamental question of the relation between crack initiation and thermal fields, both of transient nature, is still open. In this paper, we present an experimental investigation of the thermoelastic effect at the tip of fatigue cracks subjected to mixed-mode (dominant mode 1) dynamic loading. The material is commercial polymethylmethacrylate as an example of 'brittle' material. The applied loads, crack-tip temperatures and fracture time are simultaneously monitored to provide a more complete image of dynamic crack initiation. The corresponding evolution of the stress intensity factors is calculated by a hybrid-experimental numerical model. The results show that substantial crack-tip cooling develops initially to an extent which corroborates theoretical estimates. This effect is followed by a temperature rise. Fracture is shown to initiate during the early cooling phase, thus emphasizing the relevance of the phenomenon to dynamic crack initiation in this material as probably in other materials. (author)

  2. Experimental Investigation into Electrical Discharge Machining of Stainless Steel 304

    M.M. Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the experimental investigation of the machining characteristics of austenitic stainless steel 304 through electric discharge machining. The effectiveness of the EDM process with stainless steel is evaluated in terms of the removal rate (MRR, the Tool Wear Rate (TWR and the surface roughness of the work-piece produced. The experimental work is conducted utilizing Die Sinking electrical discharge machine of AQ55L model. Cylindrical copper electrode having a size of 19x37 mm and positive polarity for electrode (reverse polarity is used to machine austenitic stainless steel 304 materials. The work material holds tensile strength of 580 and 290 MPa as yield strength. The size of the work-piece was 22x30 mm. Investigations indicate that increasing the peak current increases the MRR and the surface roughness. The TWR increases with peak ampere until 150 ? sec pulse-on time. From the experimental results no tool wear condition is noted for copper electrode at long pulse-on time with reverse polarity. The optimal pulse-on time is changed with high ampere.

  3. A Computational and Experimental Investigation of Shear Coaxial Jet Atomization

    Ibrahim, Essam A.; Kenny, R. Jeremy; Walker, Nathan B.

    2006-01-01

    The instability and subsequent atomization of a viscous liquid jet emanated into a high-pressure gaseous surrounding is studied both computationally and experimentally. Liquid water issued into nitrogen gas at elevated pressures is used to simulate the flow conditions in a coaxial shear injector element relevant to liquid propellant rocket engines. The theoretical analysis is based on a simplified mathematical formulation of the continuity and momentum equations in their conservative form. Numerical solutions of the governing equations subject to appropriate initial and boundary conditions are obtained via a robust finite difference scheme. The computations yield real-time evolution and subsequent breakup characteristics of the liquid jet. The experimental investigation utilizes a digital imaging technique to measure resultant drop sizes. Data were collected for liquid Reynolds number between 2,500 and 25,000, aerodynamic Weber number range of 50-500 and ambient gas pressures from 150 to 1200 psia. Comparison of the model predictions and experimental data for drop sizes at gas pressures of 150 and 300 psia reveal satisfactory agreement particularly for lower values of investigated Weber number. The present model is intended as a component of a practical tool to facilitate design and optimization of coaxial shear atomizers.

  4. Laboratory Investigations of the Assessment and Preconcentration of Coastal Sillimanite

    Rao, R. Bhima

    1998-01-01

    India has a high demand for refractory minerals. Sillimanite is one of the minerals having high refractory characteristics. In this paper, the availability of sillimanite along the coastal belt of Orissa coast and its laboratory beneficiation tests are discussed. The results indicate that +0.5 mm contain shell, 2.8 s.g. floats contain quartz, magnetic heavies contain ilmenite and garnet and the non—magnetic heavies contain mainly sillimanite. The raw sand contains 4% sillimanite and the preco...

  5. Assessment of experimental research techniques for the investigation of radionuclide migration in aquifers

    The objectives of this work have been to contribute to a better understanding of the transport behaviour of the actinides using Eu as a homologue and, in addition, to compare the different laboratory techniques used in migration studies - batch, column and diffusion tests. The experimental work was focused on the radioisotopes of (Na), (Ca), Sr, Zr, (Nb), Tc, Eu and (Pu) and investigated the essential influences on the transport behaviour, exerted by redox conditions, the formation of complexes with natural humic acid as well as the formation and/or presence of colloids. Samples from the Gorleben and Drigg sites were investigated

  6. Numerical and laboratory investigations of transient and steady-state flow in a fractured core

    Kwicklis, E.M.; Thamir, F.; Healy, R.W.; Boughton, C.J. [Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (United States); Anderton, S. [SAIC, Golden, CO (United States)

    1993-06-01

    An improved understanding of the ability of fractures to transmit water at matric potentials less than zero is essential for evaluating the ability of the rocks of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to safely isolate nuclear waste. Numerical and experimental investigations of this subnuclear waste. Numerical and experimental investigations of this subject will help substantiate flux estimates of both liquid water and water vapor at Yucca Mountain, aid in assessing the effectiveness of capillary barriers at the contact between nonwelded and fractured welded units, and may provide insight as to the manner in which flow may become concentrated along specific pathways through a network of fractures under conditions of partial saturation. This paper summarizes some of the numerical and laboratory investigations that have been conducted at the US Geological Survey in Denver on a core of welded tuff containing a single fracture parallel to the core axis. The objectives of these investigations were to (1) explore the possibility that the unsaturated hydrologic properties of a fracture could be estimated by applying inverse techniques to the results of transient imbibition experiments, and (2) evaluate the accuracy of estimates of unsaturated fracture hydrologic properties derived from transient tests or numerical modeling through direct steady-state measurements. The core examined in these experiments is 0.0699 m long and has a radius of 0.0208 m. It was obtained from the {open_quotes}columnar zone{close_quotes} of the Tiva Canyon member of the Paintbrush Tuff near Wren Wash on Yucca Mountain. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  7. Experimental Investigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    White, Jeremy

    2011-12-01

    A series of experiments have been carried out to study the behavior of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The experiments cover a wide range of Atwood (A = (rho2-rho1)/(rho 2-rho1)) numbers, 0.28 ≤ A ≤ 1 using immiscible fluids, with Reynolds numbers spanning four orders of magnitude, ˜ 10 ≤ Re ≤ 10000. Multiple 2D interface shapes have been studied along with a single 3D configuration. The unique properties of magnetorheological fluids are exploited to generate well defined, static initial conditions for both single and multi-mode sinusoidal perturbations as well as isolated wavelengths of single-mode perturbations protruding from flat interfaces. The magnetic properties of the fluid are used to hold these shapes static prior to running, as well as to suspend them above a lighter fluid to allow gravity to provide acceleration to drive the mixing. The 2D experimental results corroborate some of the limitations of the non-linear analytical models, which have been recently investigated numerically, as well as observed in 3D experiments, but not reported in 2D experiments before. The unbounded growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor spikes at late times has been experimentally confirmed for both the 3D condition, where this is predicted to occur for all Atwood numbers, and for the A = 1 limit in the 2D configuration. Preliminary testing with multi-mode interface shapes with high viscosity, high surface tension MR fluids demonstrate the feasibility of extending this unique experimental technique to the more complicated multi-mode/broadband initial conditions more commonly present in applications. Further extension to lower viscosity and surface tension MR fluids for higher Reynolds number flows has proven difficult with the experimental design, yet has revealed the future changes that will be needed to apply this unique experimental idea to the study of the turbulent mix regime. Finally, 3D simulations using the 2D experimental conditions have demonstrated the importance of surface tension in the present experimental design in minimizing 3D flow effects, in addition to its role in creating stable interfaces as observed experimentally.

  8. Theoretical and experimental investigation of the thermoacoustic process

    Babaei, Hadi

    This thesis presents a study of thermoacoustic processes. Thermoacoustic science, which can serve as a renewable and sustainable source of energy, involves thermoacoustic, acoustics and their interactions. This research investigated the thermoacoustic phenomenon through theoretical and experimental investigations. The theoretical study is comprised of two parts. The first part focused on the development of a comprehensive algorithm for the design, development and performance evaluation of thermoacoustic devices. The developed algorithm is capable of designing and optimizing individual thermoacoustic heat engines and refrigerators and coupled engine-refrigerator systems. In the second part of the theoretical study, the theoretical model of thermoacoustic couples predicting stack temperature difference was modified by incorporating more realistic physical processes that were consistent with practical applications. Significant improvement in the accuracy of the stack temperature difference predictions was observed with the modified model as compared to the previous models through experimental validation. Detailed experimental investigations were conducted to enhance the fundamental understanding of the thermo-fluid behavior in thermoacoustic couples. The first part of the experimental study was focused on the investigation of the influence of drive ratio and stack position on the stack temperature field. The results provided the first evidence of the two-dimensional temperature distribution on both end faces of the stack. A physical explanation for the change in the stack temperature difference profile from sinusoidal to sawtooth form with an increase in the drive ratio was provided.˙1t is concluded that the acoustic dissipation in the stack which influenced the stack cold-end temperature was responsible for this behavior. In the second part, experiments were conducted to investigate streaming velocity fields in a thermoacoustic device using a synchronized PIV technique. The results showed that not only the presence of a stack but also the type and geometrical characteristics of a stack can significantly change the structure and magnitude of acoustic streaming. For both stacks, the streaming velocity field in the region adjacent to the hot-end of the stack was stronger with higher spatio-temporal variations as compared to that adjacent to the cold-end of stack, at almost all the drive ratios. Key Words: thermoacoustic, energy, design, procedure, stack, streaming, temperature, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), performance.

  9. Experimental investigations and modelling of sodium-concrete interaction

    The use of sodium as a coolant in liquid metal fast breeder reactors, fusion reactors, and solar plants requires special consideration of its chemical reactivity and related safety problems in the case of sodium leckage. On contact between hot sodium and concrete an interaction takes place resulting in energy release and hydrogen generation, which may contribute to containment loading by pressurization in a hypothetical accident situation. For this reason, sodium-concrete interactions were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experiments revealed important effects of quartzitic material within the concrete and of the sodium temperature on the interaction mechanisms, the energy release and the consequent hydrogen production. The numerical model shows good agreement with the experimental results. (orig.)

  10. Experimental investigation of cyclic hygrothermal aging of hybrid composite

    El Yagoubi, Jalal

    2013-04-05

    This work provides an experimental investigation of the cyclic hygrothermal aging of a hybrid composites. We aimed to propose a general framework in the view to further optimize polymer-based composites. It reports experimental data and relevant observations collected during an aging campaign (up to 2000 cycles) where anhydride-cured epoxy samples as well as composites samples are exposed to environmental conditions. The data gathered during the whole campaign reveals that (1) the polymer displays a non-classical sorption behavior (2) the volume change is correlated to the mass uptake (3) the elastic modulus is correlated to the glass transition temperature. Matrix and interface degradation of the hybrid composite is monitored by means of microstructural observations. © 2013 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Unconventional superconductors. Experimental investigation of the order-parameter symmetry

    This book offers a comprehensive summary of experiments that are especially suited to reveal the order-parameter symmetry of unconventional superconductors. It briefly introduces readers to the basic theoretical concepts and terms of unconventional superconductivity, followed by a detailed overview of experimental techniques and results investigating the superconducting energy gap and phase, plus the pairing symmetry. This review includes measurements of specific heat, thermal conductivity, penetration depth and nuclearmagnetic resonance and muon-spin rotation experiments. Further, point-contact and tunnelling spectroscopy and Josephson experiments are addressed. Current understanding is reviewed from the experimental point of view. With an appendix offering five tables with almost 200 references that summarize the present results from ambient pressure heavy-fermion and noncopper-oxide superconductors, the monograph provides a valuable resource for further studies in this field. (orig.)

  12. Theoretical and Experimental Investigations of DNA Open States

    Shigaev, A S; Lakhno, V D

    2014-01-01

    This research is a review and assay of literature data on the properties of DNA open states. The states result from large fluctuations of a duplex and have a great influence on a wide range of biochemical processes, including electric charge transfer in DNA. A comparative analysis of kinetic and thermodynamic experimental data on DNA open states has been performed for a wide temperature range. Apparent contradictions between the data of different experiments have been explained. Based on differences in thermodynamic properties and other characteristics three different types of DNA open states have been identified; a modern definition of the term "open state" has been given. A brief review of simple mathematical models of DNA has been presented; in most of the models the state of every base pair is defined by one or two variables. The central problems of investigation of heterogeneous DNA within the approaches of the level considered are examined. The roles of every model group in experimental data interpretat...

  13. Environmental epidemiology applied to urban atmospheric pollution: a contribution from the Experimental Air Pollution Laboratory (LPAE

    André Paulo Afonso de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Systematic investigation on the effects of human exposure to environmental pollution using scientific methodology only began in the 20th century as a consequence of several environmental accidents followed by an unexpected mortality increase above expected mortality and as a result of observational epidemiological and toxicological studies conducted on animals in developed countries. This article reports the experience of the Experimental Air Pollution Laboratory at the School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, concerning the respiratory system and pathophysiological mechanisms involved in responses to exposure to pollution using toxicological and experimental procedures, complemented by observational epidemiological studies conducted in the city of São Paulo. It also describes these epidemiological studies, pointing out that air pollution is harmful to public health, not only among susceptible groups but also in the general population, even when the concentration of pollutants is below the limits set by environmental legislation. The study provides valuable information to support the political and economic decision-making processes aimed at preserving the environment and enhancing quality of life.

  14. Antirelaxation coatings in coherent spectroscopy: Theoretical investigation and experimental test

    Nasyrov, K.; Gozzini, S.; Lucchesini, A.; Marinelli, C.; Gateva, S.; Cartaleva, S.; Marmugi, L.

    2015-10-01

    We describe a theoretical model, based on a density matrix and the Liouville equation, for the investigation of magneto-optical resonances in alkali-metal atomic vapor, in particular in the case of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the presence of antirelaxation coatings. The influence of the coating is parametrized with an empirical coefficient describing its efficiency; the calculations are extended to a broad range of coating quality, contrary to previous works, and to uncoated cells. The model takes into account also different configurations for the EIT formation and different efficiency of optical pumping, as determined by the coating characteristics and the atomic energy structure. The model is validated by investigating the EIT with degenerate Zeeman levels in 39K D1 and Cs D2 lines, which exhibit respectively an almost negligible and a relevant impact of hyperfine optical pumping. The results are compared to experimental data, exhibiting good agreement; in particular, for the 39K D1 line, recent findings are shown here in the case of degenerate and nondegenerate EIT with amplitude-modulated light. Our results demonstrate an effective approach for the investigation of antirelaxation coatings and their contribution in the formation of magneto-optical resonances in alkali-metal atoms, in different regimes and with largely different efficiencies. This sheds new light on well-known but not yet entirely clarified phenomena and their behavior as a function of experimental parameters.

  15. Counter-Top Thermoacoustic Refrigerator- An Experimental Investigation

    Thermoacoustic phenomenon is a new alternative refrigeration technology. Though design and fabrication is complex for getting the desired effect, it is environmentally friendly and successful system showed that it is relatively easy to run compared to the traditional vapor compression refrigeration system. Currently, theories supporting the thermoacoustic refrigeration systems are yet to be comprehensive to make them commercially viable. Theoretical, experimental, and numerical studies are being done to address the thermodynamics-acoustics interactions. In this study, experimental investigations were completed to test the feasibility of the practical use of a thermoacoustic refrigerator in its counter-top form for future specific application. The system was designed and fabricated based on linear acoustic theory. Acoustic power was given by a loud speaker and thermoacoustic effects were measured in terms of the cooling effects produced at resonanance. Investigations showed that discrepancies between designed and working resonance frequency exist. Thermoacoutic cooling improved at a certain frequency, achieved when the working frequency was varied away from the design frequency. A cooling effect of 4.8 K below the ambient temperature of 23.3 deg. C was obtained from the counter-top thermoacoustic system. This system uses no refrigerants and no compressor to generate the cooling effect, a potential to be further investigated for a practical system.

  16. Investigation of impact crater processes using experimental and numerical techniques

    Baldwin, Emily Clare

    2008-12-01

    Impact events throughout the history of the Solar System have occurred at all scales, from craters produced by the hypervelocity impact of cosmic dust observed on lunar return samples, to the giant planet-sculpting impacts that have shaped the solid bodies of the Solar System. Investigating the impact process in the laboratory allows us to understand crater formation at a small scale where strength effects dominate however, it is difficult to scale directly to planetary sized impacts because gravity governs the cratering process at this large scale. Through computer modeling, it is possible to bridge the gap from small to large scale impact events. The influence of target porosity, saturation and an overlying water layer on crater morphology is investigated in the laboratory using a two-stage light gas gun to fire 1 mm diameter stainless steel projectiles at 5 km s"1 into sandstone targets. Larger craters were formed in the higher porosity targets and saturated targets. A critical water depth of 11.6 0.5 times the projectile diameter was required to prevent cratering in an unsaturated target, compared with 12.7 0.6 for saturated targets. The sensitivity of this critical water depth to impact velocity, projectile diameter and density is examined through use of the AUTODYN numerical code, for both laboratory and planetary scale impact events. Projectile survivability into water and sand targets is investigated in the lab for stainless steel and shale projectiles impacting at 2-5 km s"1 up to 30% of the projectile is found to survive. AUTODYN simulations show that basalt or sandstone meteorites impacting a simulated lunar surface survive the impact at velocities SMART-1 spacecraft into the Moon. Finally, lunar and terrestrial impact events are simulated in order to quantify the depth' of excavation as a function of transient crater diameter for a range of crater and basin sizes. The output is found to lie in the range 0.08-0.15, with the South Pole Aitken basin excavating material to a depth comparable to the thickness of the farside crust.

  17. Investigations of Solar Prominence Dynamics Using Laboratory Simulations

    Laboratory experiments simulating many of the dynamical features of solar coronal loops have been carried out. These experiments manifest collimation, kinking, jet flows, and S-shapes. Diagnostics include high-speed photography and x-ray detectors. Two loops having opposite or the same magnetic helicity polarities have been merged and it is found that counter-helicity merging provides much greater x-ray emission. A non-MHD particle orbit instability has been discovered whereby ions going in the opposite direction of the current flow direction can be ejected from a magnetic flux tube.

  18. Experimental Investigation of a Novel Blast Wave Mitigation Device

    Zhenbi Su; Wen Peng; Zhaoyan Zhang; George Gogos; Reed Skaggs; Bryan Cheeseman; Chian Fong Yen

    2009-01-01

    A novel blast wave mitigation device was investigated experimentally in this paper. The device consists of a piston-cylinder assembly. A shock wave is induced within the cylinder when a blast wave impacts on the piston. The shock wave propagates inside the device and is reflected repeatedly. The shock wave propagation process inside the device lengthens the duration of the force on the base of the device to several orders of magnitude of the duration of the blast wave, while it decreases the ...

  19. Experimental Investigation on Admittance-Based Piezoelectric Sensor Diagnostic Process

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques based on the use of active-sensing piezoelectric (PZT) materials have received considerable attention. The validation of the PZT functionality during SHM operation is critical to successfully implementing a reliable SHM system. In this study, we investigated several parameters that affect the admittance-based sensor diagnostic process. We experimentally identified the temperature dependency of the active-sensor diagnostic process. We found that the admittance-based sensor diagnostic process can differentiate the adhesion conditions of bonding materials that are used to install a PZT on a structure, which is important when designing a sensor diagnostic process for an SHM system

  20. Experimental investigation of system effects in stressed-skin elements

    Dela Stang, B.; Isaksson, T.; Hansson, M.

    What kind of behaviour can be expected from stressed-skin elements at failure? To answer this question was a primary objective of the experimental investigation presented in this report. Systems of 3 roof units, each made of 5 parallel beams, have been tested for load-carrying capacity and...... behaviour at failure. Test results are compared with analytical calculations estimating the load-bearing capacity from predicted bending strength of each beam used in the system. The test results show that failure of one beam does not necessarily lead to failure of the whole system. This is an important...

  1. Preliminary experimental investigation of boundary layer in decelerating flow

    P?hoda J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of characteristics of turbulence inside boundary layer under decelerating flow were studied by means of constant temperature anemometer. The decelerating flow was simulated in the closed circuit wind tunnel 0.9 m 0.5 m at IT AS CR. The free stream turbulence was either natural o risen up by square mesh plane grid. The details of experimental settings and measurement procedures of the instantaneous longitudinal velocity component are described and the distributions of intensity, skewness and kurtosis of turbulent fluctuations are discussed in the contribution.

  2. Experimental investigation of edge localised modes in JET

    Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) in the JET tokamak have been studied experimentally, using density profile and fluctuation data from a multichannel reflectometer and temperature profile data from an ECE heterodyne radiometer. The following topics have been investigated: The radial extent and localisation of the density and temperature profile perturbations caused by the ELMs. Fluctuations in the density and magnetic field in connection with the ELMs. The correlation between the repetition frequency of the L-H transition ELMs, and the plasma edge temperature and density. Trajectories in n-T space prior to ELMs later in the H-mode. (au) (39 refs.)

  3. Experimental Investigation on Strength Characteristics of Binary Blended Concrete

    MD. Hashmath; Toufeeq Anwar

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to assess the behavior of concrete beams blended with steel crimped fiber and flyash subjected to combined torsion-bending-shear with longitudinal reinforcement. The concrete is binary blended with 15% of fly ash by weight of cement as partial replacement of cement and addition of 0%, 0.5%, 0.75%, 1% of crimped steel fibers with aspect ratio of 80 are used for the study purpose. Compressive strength of concrete is measured by test...

  4. Experimental investigation of fast ion dynamics in TORPEX toroidal plasmas

    Roulet, Boris

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present diploma work is to experimentally investigate the fast ion physics in TORPEX plasmas, in which interchange modes with flute characteristics and intermittent transport events, i.e. blobs, are observed to dominate the plasma dynamics. During the first part of the diploma, the Candidate will test different fast ion emitters on a test bench, which will be then mounted into the BN casing to form the fast ion source. In parallel, the Candidate will design an innovative in-ve...

  5. The colloid investigations conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2000-2004

    In 2000, SKB decided to initiate an international colloid project at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The objectives of the colloid project are to: (i) study the role of bentonite as a colloid source, (ii) verify the background colloid concentration at Aespoe HRL and, (iii) investigate the potential for colloid formation/transport in natural groundwater concentrations. The experimental concepts for the colloid project are: laboratory experiments with bentonite, background field measurements of natural colloids, borehole specific bentonite colloid stability experiments and a fracture specific transport experiment. The activities concerning the laboratory experiments and background field measurements are described in this work; the other activities are ongoing or planned. The following conclusions were made: The bentonite colloid stability is strongly dependent on the groundwater ionic strength. Natural colloids are organic degradation products such as humic and fulvic acids, inorganic colloids (clay, calcite, iron hydroxide) and microbes. Microbes form few but large particles and their concentration increase with increasing organic carbon concentrations. The small organic colloids are present in very low concentrations in deep granitic groundwater. The concentrations can be rather high in shallow waters. The colloid concentration decreases with depth and salinity, since colloids are less stable in saline waters. The colloid content at Aespoe is less than 300 ppb. The colloid content at repository level is less than 50 ppb. The groundwater variability obtained in the boreholes reflects well the natural groundwater variability along the whole HRL tunnel

  6. The colloid investigations conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2000-2004

    Laaksoharju, Marcus [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Wold, Susanna [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry] (eds.)

    2005-12-15

    In 2000, SKB decided to initiate an international colloid project at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The objectives of the colloid project are to: (i) study the role of bentonite as a colloid source, (ii) verify the background colloid concentration at Aespoe HRL and, (iii) investigate the potential for colloid formation/transport in natural groundwater concentrations. The experimental concepts for the colloid project are: laboratory experiments with bentonite, background field measurements of natural colloids, borehole specific bentonite colloid stability experiments and a fracture specific transport experiment. The activities concerning the laboratory experiments and background field measurements are described in this work; the other activities are ongoing or planned. The following conclusions were made: The bentonite colloid stability is strongly dependent on the groundwater ionic strength. Natural colloids are organic degradation products such as humic and fulvic acids, inorganic colloids (clay, calcite, iron hydroxide) and microbes. Microbes form few but large particles and their concentration increase with increasing organic carbon concentrations. The small organic colloids are present in very low concentrations in deep granitic groundwater. The concentrations can be rather high in shallow waters. The colloid concentration decreases with depth and salinity, since colloids are less stable in saline waters. The colloid content at Aespoe is less than 300 ppb. The colloid content at repository level is less than 50 ppb. The groundwater variability obtained in the boreholes reflects well the natural groundwater variability along the whole HRL tunnel.

  7. Experimental investigation of a unique airbreathing pulsed laser propulsion concept

    Myrabo, L. N.; Nagamatsu, H. T.; Manka, C.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Investigations were conducted into unique methods of converting pulsed laser energy into propulsive thrust across a flat impulse surface under atmospheric conditions. The propulsion experiments were performed with a 1-micron neodymium-glass laser at the Space Plasma Branch of the Naval Research Laboratory. Laser-induced impulse was measured dynamically by ballistic pendulums and statically using piezoelectric pressure transducers on a stationary impulse surface. The principal goal was to explore methods for increasing the impulse coupling performance of airbreathing laser-propulsion engines. A magnetohydrodynamic thrust augmentation effect was discovered when a tesla-level magnetic field was applied perpendicular to the impulse surface. The impulse coupling coefficient performance doubled and continued to improve with increasing laser-pulse energies. The resultant performance of 180 to 200 N-s/MJ was found to be comparable to that of the earliest afterburning turbojets.

  8. The Monotonicity Puzzle: An Experimental Investigation of Incentive Structures

    Jeannette Brosig

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-monotone incentive structures, which - according to theory - are able to induce optimal behavior, are often regarded as empirically less relevant for labor relationships. We compare the performance of a theoretically optimal non-monotone contract with a monotone one under controlled laboratory conditions. Implementing some features relevant to real-world employment relationships, our paper demonstrates that, in fact, the frequency of income-maximizing decisions made by agents is higher under the monotone contract. Although this observed behavior does not change the superiority of the non-monotone contract for principals, they do not choose this contract type in a significant way. This is what we call the monotonicity puzzle. Detailed investigations of decisions provide a clue for solving the puzzle and a possible explanation for the popularity of monotone contracts.

  9. Experimentally investigate ionospheric depletion chemicals in artificially created ionosphere

    A new approach for investigating ionosphere chemical depletion in the laboratory is introduced. Air glow discharge plasma closely resembling the ionosphere in both composition and chemical reactions is used as the artificially created ionosphere. The ionospheric depletion experiment is accomplished by releasing chemicals such as SF6, CCl2F2, and CO2 into the model discharge. The evolution of the electron density is investigated by varying the plasma pressure and input power. It is found that the negative ion (SF6?, CCl2F2?) intermediary species provide larger reduction of the electron density than the positive ion (CO2+) intermediary species. The negative ion intermediary species are also more efficient in producing ionospheric holes because of their fast reaction rates. Airglow enhancement attributed to SF6 and CO2 releases agrees well with the published data. Compared to the traditional methods, the new scheme is simpler to use, both in the release of chemicals and in the electron density measurements. It is therefore more efficient for investigating the release of chemicals in the ionosphere.

  10. Experimental investigation of active loads control for aircraft landing gear

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Dreher, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Aircraft dynamic loads and vibrations resulting from landing impact and from runway and taxiway unevenness are recognized as significant in causing fatigue damage, dynamic stress on the airframe, crew and passenger discomfort, and reduction of the pilot's ability to control the aircraft during ground operations. One potential method for improving operational characteistics of aircraft on the ground is the application of active control technology to the landing gears to reduce ground loads applied to the airframe. An experimental investigation was conducted which simulated the landing dynamics of a light airplane to determine the feasibility and potential of a series hydraulic active control main landing gear. The experiments involved a passive gear and an active control gear. Results of this investigation show that a series hydraulically controlled gear is feasible and that such a gear is very effective in reducing the loads transmitted by the gear to the airframe during ground operations.

  11. Drag reduction by dimples? - A complementary experimental/numerical investigation

    The paper is concerned with an experimental and numerical investigation of the turbulent flow over dimpled surfaces. Shallow dimples distributed regularly over the wall of a plane channel with large aspect ratio are used to study their effect on the friction drag. The resulting pressure drop in the channel was measured for smooth and dimpled walls. In addition to these investigations on internal flows, an external flow study was performed and boundary-layer profiles were measured using a Pitot-tube rake. Complementary to the measurements, direct numerical simulations for the internal flow configuration with and without dimples were carried out for two different grid resolutions and analyzed in detail. The objective was to clarify whether or not dimples cause reduction of the skin-friction drag

  12. Experimental Investigation of Sulphur Removal from LPG: New Aspect

    Mohammad Reza Memar Kazerooni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano catalytic sulphur removal process is surveyed in this research, experimentally. Qualification of sulphur removal from liquefied natural gas process is investigated due to catalytic bed geometries which contains nano ferrite oxide and operation conditions. The purpose of experiments is finding the conditions which lead to the lowest amount of sulphur content in the out stream. Fraction of sulphur content in the outlet to the amount of sulphur in the inlet is considered as the operation criteria in this work. The effects of operating conditions such as operating temperature and pressure, the amount of sulphur concentration in feed stream, size of nano catalyst, the bed diameter and bed height are investigated. The different correlations with high confidence factor are introduced in this paper. Results show the diameter changes from 1-2 cm and the ratio of C/C0 changes from 0.05-0.03.

  13. Experimental investigation and model development for a harmonic drive transmission

    Harmonic drive transmissions (HDTs) are compact, low-backlash, high-ratio, high-resolution rotary motion transmissions. One application to benefit from these attributes is the revolute joint robot. Engineers at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are investigating the use of this type of robot for the positioning of an x-ray detector; understanding the properties of the robot components is crucial to modeling positioner behavior. The robot bearing elements had been investigated previously, leaving the transmission as the missing component. While the benefits of HDTs are well known, the disadvantages, including fluctuating dissipation characteristics and nonlinear stiffness, are not understood as well. These characteristics can contribute uncontrolled dynamics to the overall robot performance. A dynamometer has been constructed at the APS to experimentally measure the HDT's response. Empirical torque and position data were recorded for multiple transmission load cases and input conditions. In turn, a computer model of the dynamometer HDT system was constructed to approximate the observed response.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Piston Rings for Internal Combustion Engines

    Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2008-01-01

    conditions, but this is not the case in real life operation. These problems forms the basis for the experimental investigation. In large two-stroke engines the cylinder oil is supplied to the bearing at discrete locations on the cylinder liner at a specific rate at a certain time. The shifting in lubrication...... assembly. The aim of this paper is to investigate the tribological condition between a piston ring and cylinder. A test apparatus is used to study the interaction between a piston ring and a cylinder liner. In large two stroke engines with cross head bearings the piston height is small compared to smaller...... four stroke engines where the skirt transfers the guide forces to the cylinder liner. The power loss due to piston skirt friction is estimated by comparing two different piston designs. The piston ring experiences hydrodynamic, mixed and boundary lubrication and the squeeze effect of the piston ring is...

  15. Experimental investigation of transitional flow in a toroidal pipe

    Kühnen, J; Hof, B; Kuhlmann, H

    2015-01-01

    The flow instability and further transition to turbulence in a toroidal pipe (torus) with curvature (tube-to-coiling diameter) 0.049 is investigated experimentally. The flow inside the toroidal pipe is driven by a steel sphere fitted to the inner pipe diameter. The sphere is moved with constant azimuthal velocity from outside the torus by a moving magnet. The experiment is designed to investigate curved pipe flow by optical measurement techniques. Using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler velocimetry and pressure drop measurements, the flow is measured for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1000 to 15000. Time- and space-resolved velocity fields are obtained and analysed. The steady axisymmetric basic flow is strongly influenced by centrifugal effects. On an increase of the Reynolds number we find a sequence of bifurcations. For Re=4075 a supercritical bifurcation to an oscillatory flow is found in which waves travel in the streamwise direction with a phase velocity slightly faster than the mean...

  16. Experimental investigation of effects of external loads on erosive wear

    H. Imrek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to investigate effects of external loads on erosive wear.Design/methodology/approach: In this experimental study, specimens were placed on specially designed a specimen holder and then, external tensile loads corresponding to 0%, 20%, 40% and 60% of the specimen’s yield strength were applied on the specimens. For every load step, the specimens were subjected to 15º, 30º, 45º, 60º, 75º and 90º of erodent impact angles. At the end of the tests, effects of external loads and impingement angles on erosive wear were studied. In the experimental set, dry and compressed air was used to impinge erodents onto the test specimens and subsequent wear was investigated. During the tests, the impingement angles were adjusted by turning the specimen holder around its axis. Erodent particles used were SAE G40 having internal uniform martensitic structure and angular geometry. Determination of erodents speed was achieved with the help of the Rotating Double Disc Method. The speed used in the tests was 30 m/s.Findings: At the end of the tests, erosive wear rates were obtained as functions of stresses and impingement angles. Graphs showing variations of erosive wear rates for load values obtained against every impingement angle and yield stress were drawn. Critical impingement angle and load values at which maximum erosion rate was obtained were determined.Research limitations/implications: In researches made on erosive wears so far; there are only few studies dealing with the effects of external loads on the specimens subjected to erosive wear. By considering that stresses may affect the erosive wear, the stress state around contact area as well as material properties, this experimental study has thus, investigated likely effects of stresses on the erosive wear. With the help of the designed special specimen holder, the specimens were subjected to tensile stresses that are lower than the yield strength of the material and then the erosive wear was investigated.Originality/value: The investigations of effects of external loads on erosive wear.

  17. An experimental investigation of Kernberg's and Kohut's theories of narcissism.

    Shulman, D G; Ferguson, G R

    1988-05-01

    This article presents data from a double-blind experimental study of the comparative validity of specific premises of Kernberg's and Kohut's theories of narcissism. The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) was administered to 70 undergraduates. Thirteen of the 14 most narcissistic subjects (from the NPI data) participated in three experimental sessions during which the subject was exposed to one of three subliminal stimuli administered tachistoscopically. Each of the experimental stimuli represented an aspect of Kernberg's or Kohut's clinical theory of narcissism. A third stimulus contained neutral content and served as a control. After each tachistoscopic administration, the Narcissism-Projective (N-P) and the Self Focus Sentence Completion (SFSC), measures designed to assess narcissism and egocentricity, were administered. Results indicate that the Kernberg stimulus demonstrated a significant effect on the subject's narcissism and egocentricity (p less than .01). The stimulus that represented Kohut's theory did not demonstrate any statistically significant effect. It is concluded that methodologically rigorous investigations of psychoanalytical questions of theoretical and clinical significance are possible and necessary. PMID:3384975

  18. Experimental investigation of streamer radius and length in SF6

    Bujotzek, M.; Seeger, M.; Schmidt, F.; Koch, M.; Franck, C.

    2015-06-01

    SF6 has for decades been widely used in high voltage insulation and switching applications, e.g. in gas insulated switchgear. Despite its widespread use some important parameters, like the properties of streamers, are still not sufficiently understood. Since breakdown in SF6 always occurs via the streamer-leader transition the streamer properties are decisive for leader inception and, therefore, breakdown of the insulation. Important parameters are, for example, the streamer radius and the streamer propagation length of arrested streamers. Such properties enter in breakdown prediction models. In the present study the streamer radius and the propagation length were investigated experimentally at 50 and 100?kPa for both polarities using strongly and weakly non-uniform background fields. No experimental information was available so far for negative polarity. The resulting streamer radius scaling agrees with previous experimental results for positive polarity and with expectations from breakdown models for negative polarity. These results were similar for strongly non-uniform and weakly non-uniform background fields. A difference between the two setups was observed for the streamer lengths. It was found that for strongly non-uniform fields the streamer length scales as expected with the critical electric field but with a different field for weakly non-uniform background fields. This was similar for both polarities.

  19. Experimental investigation on microbubble emission boiling heat transfer

    Microbubble emission boiling (MEB) is a phenomenon that the heat flux increases more rapidly compared to the critical heat flux (CHF) with a little increase of the heating surface superheat. A subcooled pool boiling experimental setup was built up to investigate the bubble behaviors of MEB under the atmospheric condition at different liquid subcooling with the help of high-speed video camera. The heating element of the experimental setup is a copper block with its upper part of a 10 mm diameter cylinder. The experimental results show that, in MEB regime, an unsteady vapor film spreads on the heating surface. Numerous microbubbles are emitted into subcooled liquid continuously with an extremely high speed from the interface. Along with the rise of heat flux, the oscillation period of vapor film along its thickness gets shorter and the maximum thickness also becomes smaller. The microbubble diameter under higher power heating is much smaller than that under low heating flux. The maximum heat flux in the experiment is about 9 MW/m2 at 60 K subcooling. (authors)

  20. Baseline experimental investigation of an electrohydrodynamically assisted heat pipe

    Duncan, A. B.

    1995-07-01

    The increases in power demand and associated thermal management requirements of future space programs such as potential Lunar/Mars missions will require enhancing the operating efficiencies of thermal management devices. Currently, the use of electrohydrodynamically (EHD) assisted thermal control devices is under consideration as a potential method of increasing thermal management system capacity. The objectives of the currently described investigation included completing build-up of the EHD-Assisted Heat Pipe Test bed, developing test procedures for an experimental evaluation of the unassisted heat pipe, developing an analytical model capable of predicting the performance limits of the unassisted heat pipe, and obtaining experimental data which would define the performance characteristics of the unassisted heat pipe. The information obtained in the currently proposed study will be used in order to provide extensive comparisons with the EHD-assisted performance observations to be obtained during the continuing investigation of EHD-Assisted heat transfer devices. Through comparisons of the baseline test bed data and the EHD assisted test bed data, accurate insight into the performance enhancing characteristics of EHD augmentation may be obtained. This may lead to optimization, development, and implementation of EHD technology for future space programs.

  1. Experimental investigation of a dual purpose solar heating system

    Highlights: A dual purpose water and air heating system experimentally investigated. This system can be used to heat water and air simultaneously. Water can be used as a PCM material for heating air through the night. Dual purpose systems achieve greater efficiency and lower heat dissipation. Average efficiency of dual purpose system is 4% higher than single purpose system. - Abstract: In this study, a dual purpose water and air heating system is experimentally investigated. The system consists of a dual purpose flat solar collector and a vertical water storage tank. Water and air have natural and forced convection in the collector, respectively. The reason why dual purpose systems are used is to achieve greater efficiency and lower heat dissipation. Furthermore, high temperature and high performance can be obtained using this solar collector. These systems can be used to heat water and air simultaneously or separately. The hot water can be utilized for domestic applications or as a PCM material for heating air through the night. Besides, the hot air can be used in air conditioning systems, industrial processes and dryers. Therefore, using these collectors brings high energy savings. Absorber plate temperature variation, storage tank average temperature, system efficiency and air velocity effects are presented. Moreover, hourly efficiency is compared for single purpose and dual purpose systems. The results indicate that the efficiency of the dual purpose system is 3 to 5% higher than a single purpose system

  2. Experimental investigation of 2D flexible plunging hydrofoil

    Tian, Ruijun; Mitchell, Robert; Shu, Fangjun

    2012-11-01

    It is believed that both birds and insects benefit from their wing flexibility during the flapping flight. One of the possible benefits is higher lift force generation capability than that of rigid wing models. Both experimental and computational work has discovered that the leading edge vortex (LEV) plays an important role in this advantage of high lift force generating efficiency. In the present work, flow physics related to high lift-generating flexible wings are investigated experimentally. Both flexible and rigid hydrofoils (NACA0012) were actively plunged in glycerol-water solution with various amplitude, frequency and Reynolds number combinations. Phase-locked Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to investigate the generation and evolution of the LEVs. Lift and drag forces during plunging were also measured to uncover the relationship between the force response and the surrounding flow field development. The overall results were also compared between flexible and rigid hydrofoils to provide qualitative data for validation of computational work. Supported by Army High Performance Computing Center.

  3. Experimental investigation of a packed bed thermal energy storage system

    Cascetta, Mario; Cau, Giorgio; Puddu, Pierpaolo; Serra, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    In this work experimental investigations on a thermal energy storage system with a solid material as storage media and air as heat transfer fluid will be presented. The experimental test rig, installed at the DIMCM of the University of Cagliari, consists of a carbon steel tank filled with freely poured alumina beads that allows investigations of heat transfer phenomena in packed beds. The aim of this work is to show the influence of the operating conditions and physical parameters on thermocline formation and, in particular, the thermal behaviour of the thermal energy storage for repeated charging and discharging cycles. Better charging efficiency is obtained for lower values of mass flow rate and maximum air temperature and for increasing aspect ratio. A decreasing influence of the metal wall with continuous operation is also highlighted. In conclusion, the analysis focuses on the thermal hysteresis phenomenon, which causes degradation of the thermocline and the reduction of the energy that can be stored by the accumulator as the repeated number of cycles increases.

  4. Alternate Methods to Experimentally Investigate Shock Initiation Properties of Explosives

    Svingala, Forrest; Lee, Richard; Sutherland, Gerrit; Samuels, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Reactive flow models are desired for many new explosives early in the formulation development stage. Traditionally, these models are parameterized by carefully-controlled 1-D shock experiments, including gas-gun testing with embedded gauges and wedge testing with explosive plane wave lenses (PWL). These experiments are easy to interpret, due to their 1-D nature, but are generally expensive to perform, and cannot be performed at all explosive test facilities. We investigate alternative methods to probe shock-initiation behavior of new explosives using widely-available pentolite gap test donors and simple time-of-arrival type diagnostics. These methods can be performed at a low cost at virtually any explosives testing facility, which allows experimental data to parameterize reactive flow models to be collected much earlier in the development of an explosive formulation. However, the fundamentally 2-D nature of these tests may increase the modeling burden in parameterizing these models, and reduce general applicability. Several variations of the so-called modified gap test were investigated and evaluated for suitability as an alternative to established 1-D gas gun and PWL techniques. At least partial agreement with 1-D test methods was observed for the explosives tested, and future work is planned to scope the applicability and limitations of these experimental techniques.

  5. Laboratory investigation of enhanced oil recovery methods by chemical solutions

    Sayyouh, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    Results of an extensive laboratory study of the enhanced oil recovery methods, employing carbonated and caustic waterflooding, carbonated waterflooding with gas injection, polymer flooding, and surfactant-polymer flooding, are discussed. A series of the experiments were conducted in homogeneous and stratified sandpacks, while another series of runs were conducted in linear sandstone cores. Although caustic solutions markedly improved oil recovery, a higher recovery was obtained by using carbonated water, explained in terms of the dependence of oil recovery on pH of displacing water used. Using polymer solutions improved the mobility control of the displacement process. Polymer solutions were affected by thermal variations. The recovery ratio was increased with temperature. 25 references.

  6. Laboratory investigation for estimation of seismic response of the ground

    Laboratory measurements of soil properties can be used to supplement or confirm the results of field measurements. They are necessary to establish values of damping and modulus at strains larger than those that can be obtained in the field or to measure the properties of materials that do not exist in the field, such as soils to be compacted. The Dynamic Deformation Characteristics of the soil are used in order to calculate seismic response of ground, earth structures and structure-ground response. The improved cyclic triaxial equipment installed at CNRRS is used, when the dynamic properties of the soil must be obtained. In this test a cyclic load is applied to a column of soil over a number of cycles slowly enough that inertial effects do not occur. They are also used to express phenomenon that make soil to fail under seismic loading. Comparison of the obtained results with the well known international ones is presented. (authors)

  7. Experimental investigation of turbulent mixing by Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    A key feature of compressible turbulent mixing is the generation of vorticity via the ∇px ∇(1/ρ) term. This source of vorticity is also present in incompressible flows involving the mixing of fluids of different density, for example Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flows. This paper gives a summary of an experimental investigation of turbulent mixing at a plane boundary between two fluids, of densities ρ1, and ρ2. (ρ1 > ρ2) due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The two fluids are near incompressible and mixing occurs when an approximately constant acceleration, g, is applied normal to the interface with direction from fluid 2 to fluid 1. Full details of the experimental programme are given in a set of three reports. Some of the earlier experiments are also described by Read. Previous experimental work and much of the theoretical research has concentrated on studying the growth of the instability from a single wavelength perturbation rather than turbulent mixing. Notable exceptions are published in the Russian literature. A related process, turbulent mixing induced by the passage of shock waves though an interface between fluids of different density is described by Andronov et al. The major purpose of the experiments described here was to study the evolution of the instability from small random perturbations where it is found that large and larger structures appear as time proceeds. A novel technique was used to provide the desired acceleration. The two fluids were enclosed in a rectangular tank, the lighter fluid 2 initially resting on top of the denser fluid 1. One or more rocket motors were then used to drive the tank vertically downwards. The aim of the experimental programme is to provide data for the calibration of a turbulence model used to predict mixing in real situations

  8. Laboratory astrophysics: Investigation of planetary and astrophysical maser emission

    Bingham, R.; Speirs, D. C.; Kellett, B. J.; Vorgul, I.; McConville, S. L.; Cairns, R. A.; Cross, A. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Ronald, K.

    This paper describes a model for cyclotron maser emission applicable to planetary auroral radio emission, the stars UV Ceti and CU Virginus, blazar jets and astrophysical shocks. These emissions may be attributed to energetic electrons moving into convergent magnetic fields that are typically found in association with dipole like planetary magnetospheres or shocks. It is found that magnetic compression leads to the formation of a velocity distribution having a horseshoe shape as a result of conservation of the electron magnetic moment. Under certain plasma conditions where the local electron plasma frequency ω pe is much less than the cyclotron frequency ω ce the distribution is found to be unstable to maser type radiation emission. We have established a laboratory-based facility that has verified many of the details of our original theoretical description and agrees well with numerical simulations. The experiment has demonstrated that the horseshoe distribution produces cyclotron emission at a frequency just below the local electron cyclotron frequency, with polarisation close to X-mode and propagating nearly perpendicularly to the electron beam motion. We discuss recent developments in the theory and simulation of the instability including addressing radiation escape problems, and relate these to the laboratory, space, and astrophysical observations. The experiments showed strong narrow band EM emissions at frequencies just below the cold-plasma cyclotron frequency as predicted by the theory. Measurements of the conversion efficiency, mode and spectral content were in close agreement with the predictions of numerical simulations undertaken using a particle-in-cell code and also with satellite observations confirming the horseshoe maser as an important emission mechanism in geophysical/astrophysical plasmas. In each case we address how the radiation can escape the plasma without suffering strong absorption at the second harmonic layer.

  9. Laboratory investigation on backfill and rock salt within the BAMBUS II Project

    The project 'Backfill and Material Behaviour in Underground Salt Repositories, Phase II' (BAMBUS II) addressed the behaviour of backfill and Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) in a geological repository for heat generating radioactive waste in rock salt. The project was a joint undertaking of nine partners from five countries: France, Germany, Netherlands, Spain, USA. It started on 1 August 2000 and lasted 33 months till 30 April 2003. Its objective was to increase the knowledge on important phenomena and processes in and around backfilled repository drifts and to strengthen the scientific basis required for repository design and performance assessments. The project consisted of four major parts: in-situ investigations, laboratory studies including tests on crushed salt and rock salt, modelling studies, and desk studies (BECHTHOLD et al. 2003). A major part in the project was to evaluate the large-scale experiment 'Thermal Simulation of Drift Emplacement (TSDE)' which was carried out in the Asse salt mine from 1990 to 1999. In one of the two experimental drifts, backfill, heater casks, and instruments were removed and crushed salt samples as well as solid rock salt samples were taken to analyse how the backfill porosity and permeability decrease over time as a consequence of heat and rock pressure, how the backfill is compacted and its mechanical properties develop over time, and how these processes can be predicted by model calculations. These calculations require the laboratory investigations on crushed salt and solid rock salt. (authors)

  10. Experimental investigation of dispersion phenomenon in a fractured porous medium

    Ali Sanati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dispersion of fluids flowing through porous media is an important phenomenon in miscible displacement. Dispersion causes instability of miscible displacement flooding; therefore, to obtain and maintain the miscibility zone, the porous medium dispersivity should be considered in displacing fluid volume calculation. Many works have been carried out to investigate the dispersion phenomenon in porous media in terms of theory, laboratory experiments and modeling. What is still necessary is to study the effects of presence of fracture in a porous medium on dispersion coefficient or dispersivity. In this work dispersion phenomenon in a fractured porous medium has been investigated through a series of miscible displacement tests on homogeneous sandstone core samples. Tests were repeated on the same core samples with induced fracture in the flow direction. The effects of fracture on miscible displacement flooding have been studied by comparison of the results of dispersion tests in the absence and presence of fracture. In the presence of fracture, breakthrough time reduced and the tail of effluent S-shaped curve smeared. Moreover, the slope of S-shaped curve at 1 pore volume of injected fluid was lower than homogeneous case which means dispersion coefficient increased. The results presented in this work provide an insight to the understanding of dispersion phenomenon for modeling of miscible displacement process through naturally fractured reservoirs.

  11. Quality assurance plan for the Close Support Laboratory for the remedial investigation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    The primary purpose of the Close Support Laboratory (CSL) is to provide rapid radiological screening of investigation-derived samples before they are shipped to off-site laboratories for more detailed analyses. Analyses for volatile organic compounds and miscellaneous water quality parameters are also performed at the CSL. CSL data are also used to select samples for off-site laboratory analysis, for rapid qualitative and quantitative determinations, and for other processes when off-site analysis is not needed and/or is impractical. This plan specifies methods of implementing analytical and radiological protocols and procedures for the documentation, handling, control, and analysis of samples and describes the levels of authority and responsibility for laboratory operation. Specific quality control methods used by the CSL for individual analyses are described in project procedures

  12. Contact pressure distribution during the polishing process of ceramic tiles: A laboratory investigation

    Sani, A. S. A.; Sousa, F. J. P.; Hamedon, Z.; Azhari, A.

    2016-02-01

    During the polishing process of porcelain tiles the difference in scratching speed between innermost and peripheral abrasives leads to pressure gradients linearly distributed along the radial direction of the abrasive tool. The aim of this paper is to investigate such pressure gradient in laboratory scale. For this purpose polishing tests were performed on ceramic tiles according to the industrial practices using a custom-made CNC tribometer. Gradual wear on both abrasives and machined surface of the floor tile were measured. The experimental results suggested that the pressure gradient tends to cause an inclination of the abraded surfaces, which becomes stable after a given polishing period. In addition to the wear depth of the machined surface, the highest value of gloss and finest surface finish were observed at the lowest point of the worn out surface of the ceramic floor tile corresponding to the point of highest pressure and lowest scratching speed.

  13. Experimental Study of Drag Resistance using a Laboratory Scale Rotary Set-Up

    Weinell, Claus Erik; Olsen, Kenneth N.; Christoffersen, Martin W.; Kiil, Søren

    This work covers an experimental study of the drag resistance of different painted surfaces and simulated large-scale irregularities, viz. dry spraying, weld seams, barnacle fouling and paint remains. A laboratory scale rotary set-up was used to determine the drag resistance, and the surface...

  14. Biodiesel from soybean oil: experimental procedure of transesterification for organic chemistry laboratories

    The transesterification procedure of triacylglycerides from soybean oil (in natura and waste oil) to give biodiesel was adapted to semi-micro laboratory scale as an additional experimental technique of nucleophilic acyl substitution for undergraduate courses in Chemistry and related areas. (author)

  15. Experimental investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

    Weber, Christopher R. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI)

    2011-09-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using several different initial conditions and with a range of diagnostics. First, a broadband initial condition is created using a shear layer between helium+acetone and argon. The post-shocked turbulent mixing is investigated using planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF). The signature of turbulent mixing is present in the appearance of an inertial range in the mole fraction energy spectrum and the isotropy of the late-time dissipation structures. The distribution of the mole fraction values does not appear to transition to a homogeneous mixture, and it is possible that this effect may be slow to develop for the RMI. Second, the influence of the RMI on the kinetic energy spectrum is investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The influence of the perturbation is visible relatively far from the interface when compared to the energy spectrum of an initially flat interface. Closer to the perturbation, an increase in the energy spectrum with time is observed and is possibly due to a cascade of energy from the large length scales of the perturbation. Finally, the single mode perturbation growth rate is measured after reshock using a new high speed imaging technique. This technique produced highly time-resolved interface position measurements. Simultaneous measurements at the spike and bubble location are used to compute a perturbation growth rate history. The growth rates from several experiments are compared to a new reshock growth rate model.

  16. An Investigative Laboratory Course in Human Physiology Using Computer Technology and Collaborative Writing

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65…

  17. Experimental investigations in turbulent buoyant jets of sodium

    Axisymmetric, turbulent buoyant jets are investigated in the sodium test section TEFLU. The character of the flow is divided into three regimes depending on the densimetric Froude number: the pure jet, the buoyant jet in the transition regime and the pure plume. By means of a temperature compensated Miniature Permanentmagnet Flowmeter Probe the mean velocity, mean temperature and intensity of temperature fluctuations are measured simultaneously at axial distances between 3 and 40 initial jet diameters from the orifice. The functional principle of the Miniature Permanentmagnet Flowmeter Probe which allows velocity measurements to be made in the presence of a temperature gradient is described in detail. For all three regimes both the decay laws of the quantities measured along the axis of the containment pipe and the radial profiles are indicated and discussed. With the help of the radial profiles of the mean quantities the axial development of the half-width radii and the axial development of the momentum, buoyancy and volume fluxes are calculated. In addition, the time history of the temperature fluctuations is recorded at several radial positions. The data are analysed according to characteristic values of statistical signal analysis such as minimum value, maximum value, skewness, flatness and according to characteristic functions such as probability density function, autopower spectrum density and autocorrelation function. The experimental results for the axisymmetric, turbulent buoyant jets of sodium are compared with experimental results from the literature and with fluids of molecular Prandtl numbers greater than or equal to 0.7. The basic differences betwen the experimental results obtained for water and for sodium are outlined. Statements are formulated which allow thermo- and fluiddynamic diffusion processes to be transferred from water to sodium. (orig.)

  18. Experimental investigation of bond strength under high loading rates

    Michal, Mathias; Keuser, Manfred; Solomos, George; Peroni, Marco; Larcher, Martin; Esteban, Beatriz

    2015-09-01

    The structural behaviour of reinforced concrete is governed significantly by the transmission of forces between steel and concrete. The bond is of special importance for the overlapping joint and anchoring of the reinforcement, where rigid bond is required. It also plays an important role in the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, where a ductile bond behaviour is preferable. Similar to the mechanical properties of concrete and steel also the characteristics of their interaction changes with the velocity of the applied loading. For smooth steel bars with its main bond mechanisms of adhesion and friction, nearly no influence of loading rate is reported in literature. In contrast, a high rate dependence can be found for the nowadays mainly used deformed bars. For mechanical interlock, where ribs of the reinforcing steel are bracing concrete material surrounding the bar, one reason can be assumed to be in direct connection with the increase of concrete compressive strength. For splitting failure of bond, characterized by the concrete tensile strength, an even higher dynamic increase is observed. For the design of Structures exposed to blast or impact loading the knowledge of a rate dependent bond stress-slip relationship is required to consider safety and economical aspects at the same time. The bond behaviour of reinforced concrete has been investigated with different experimental methods at the University of the Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw) and the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra. Both static and dynamic tests have been carried out, where innovative experimental apparatuses have been used. The bond stress-slip relationship and maximum pull-out-forces for varying diameter of the bar, concrete compressive strength and loading rates have been obtained. It is expected that these experimental results will contribute to a better understanding of the rate dependent bond behaviour and will serve for calibration of numerical models.

  19. Experimental investigations on vessel-hole ablation during severe accidents

    This report presents experimental results, and subsequent analyses, of scaled reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure site ablation tests conducted at the Royal Institute of Technology, Division of Nuclear Power Safety (RIT/NPS). The goal of the test program is to reduce the uncertainty level associated with the phase-change-ablation process, and, thus, improve the characterization of the melt discharge loading on the containment. In a series of moderate temperature experiments, the corium melt is simulated by the binary oxide CaO-B2O3 or the binary eutectic and non-eutectic salts NaNO3-KNO3, while the RPV head steel is represented by a Pb, Sn or metal alloys plate. A complementary set of experiments was conducted at lower temperatures, using water as melt and salted ice as plate material. These experiments scale well to the postulated prototypical conditions. The multidimensional code HAMISA, developed at RIT/NPS, is employed to analyze the experiments with good pre- and post-test predictions. The effects of melt viscosity and crust surface roughness, along with failure site entrance and exit frictional losses on the ablation characteristics are investigated. Theoretical concept was proposed to describe physical mechanisms which govern the vessel-hole ablation process during core melt discharge from RPV. Experimental data obtained from hole ablation tests and separate-effect tests performed at RIT/NPS were used to validate component physical models of the HAMISA code. It is believed that the hole ablation phenomenology is quite well understood. Detailed description of experiments and experimental data, as well as results of analyses are provided in the appendixes

  20. Laboratory investigations of the survivability of bacteria in hypervelocity impacts.

    Burchell, M J; Shrine, N R; Mann, J; Bunch, A W; Brandao, P; Zarnecki, J C; Galloway, J A

    2001-01-01

    It is now well established that material naturally moves around the Solar System, even from planetary surface to planetary surface. Accordingly, the idea that life is distributed throughout space and did not necessarily originate on the Earth but migrated here from elsewhere (Panspermia) is increasingly deemed worthy of consideration. If life arrived at the Earth from space, its relative speed will typically be of order many km s-1, and the resulting collision with the Earth and its atmosphere will be in the hypervelocity regime. A mechanism for the bacteria to survive such an impact is required. Therefore a programme of hypervelocity impacts in the laboratory at (4.5 +/- 0.6) km s-1 was carried out using bacteria (Rhodococcus) laden projectiles. After impacts on a variety of target materials (rock, glass and metal) attempts were made to culture Rhodococcus from the surface of the resulting craters and also from the target material ejected during crater formation. Control shots with clean projectiles yielded no evidence for Rhodococcus growth from any crater surface or ejecta. When projectiles doped with Rhodococcus were used no impact crater surface yielded colonies of Rhodococcus. However, for four shots of bacteria into rock (two on chalk and two on granite) the ejecta was afterwards found to give colonies of Rhodococcus. This was not true for shots onto glass. In addition, shots into aerogel (density 96 kg m-3) were also carried out (two with clean projectiles and two with projectiles with Rhodococcus). This crudely simulated aero-capture in a planetary atmosphere. No evidence for Rhodococcus growth was found from the projectiles captured in the aerogel from any of the four shots. PMID:11803976

  1. Laboratory Investigation of Noise-Canceling Headphones Utilizing ``Mr. Blockhead''

    Koser, John

    2013-09-01

    While I was co-teaching an introductory course in musical acoustics a few years ago, our class investigated several pieces of equipment designed for audio purposes. One piece of such equipment was a pair of noise-canceling headphones. Our students were curious as to how these devices were in eliminating background noise and whether they indeed block low-frequency sounds as advertised.

  2. Experimental investigation of pyrolysis process of woody biomass mixture

    Kosanić, Tijana R.; Ćeranić, Mirjana B.; Đurić, Slavko N.; Grković, Vojin R.; Milotić, Milan M.; Brankov, Saša D.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of pyrolysis of woody biomass mixture. The mixture consists of oak, beech, fir, cherry, walnut and linden wood chips with equal mass fractions. During the experiment, the sample mass inside the reactor was 10 g with a particle diameter of 5-10 mm. The sample in the reactor was heated in the temperature range of 24-650°C. Average sample heating rates in the reactor were 21, 30 and 54 °C/min. The sample mass before, during and after pyrolysis was determined using a digital scale. Experimental results of the sample mass change indicate that the highest yield of pyrolytic gas was achieved at the temperature slightly above 650°C and ranged from 77 to 85%, while char yield ranged from 15 to 23%. Heating rate has significant influence on the pyrolytic gas and char yields. It was determined that higher pyrolysis temperatures and heating rates induce higher yields of pyrolytic gas, while the char mass reduces. Condensation of pyrolytic gas at the end of the pyrolysis process at 650°C produced 2.4-2.72 g of liquid phase. The results obtained represent a starting basis for determining material and heat balance of pyrolysis process as well as woody biomass pyrolysis equipment.

  3. Experimental investigation of thermal neutron analysis based landmine detection technology

    Background: Recently, the prompt gamma-rays neutron activation analysis method is wildly used in coal analysis and explosive detection, however there were less application about landmine detection using neutron method especially in the domestic research. Purpose: In order to verify the feasibility of Thermal Neutron Analysis (TNA) method used in landmine detection, and explore the characteristic of this technology. Methods: An experimental system of TNA landmine detection was built based on LaBr3 (Ce) fast scintillator detector and 252Cf isotope neutron source. The system is comprised of the thermal neutron transition system, the shield system, and the detector system. Results: On the basis of the TNA, the wide energy area calibration method especially to the high energy area was investigated, and the least detection time for a typical mine was defined. In this study, the 72-type anti-tank mine, the 500 g TNT sample and several interferential objects are tested in loess, red soil, magnetic soil and sand respectively. Conclusions: The experimental results indicate that TNA is a reliable demining method, and it can be used to confirm the existence of Anti-Tank Mines (ATM) and large Anti-Personnel Mines (APM) in complicated condition. (authors)

  4. Experimental Investigation on the Viscosity of Nano fluids

    In this study, the effect of adding SiO2 nanoparticles on the viscosity of base fluid is investigated experimentally. Base fluids are chosen among common heat transfer fluids such as ethylene glycol, transformer oil and water. In addition different volume percentages of ethylene glycol in water are used as ethylene glycol-water solution. In every base fluid different volume fractions of SiO2 nanoparticles is added. It is shown that the viscosity of solution enhance by adding nanoparticles. The effect of cooling and heating process on the viscosity of nano fluid is also discussed. The presented data show that as the temperature increases the viscosity of base fluid and nano fluid decrease. It is also revealed that there are very little differences between the viscosity of nano fluid in a specific temperature at cooling and heating cycles. According to the experimental results new correlations for predicting the viscosity of nano fluids is presented. These correlations relate the viscosity of nano fluid to the particle volume fraction and temperature.

  5. Experimental investigation on the performance of a lithium chloride wheel

    Rabah A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work has investigated the influence of change in operation conditions on the performance of a Lithium Chloride (LiCl wheel. A rigorous experimental rig that facilitates the measurement of temperature, pressure, pressure drop, relative humidity, airflow rate and rotational speed is used. The measurements covered balanced flow at a wide range of rotational speeds (0 - 9.8 rpm, regeneration temperatures (50-70C, airflow rates (280-540 kg/h and relative humidities (30-65% at ambient condition. The influence of those operation conditions on the wheel sensible effectiveness and coefficient of performance (COP are analyzed. The result revealed that a maximum COP occurs at a rotational speed of 0.2 rpm (12 rph. The results also concluded that Kays and London correlation is sufficient in the prediction of the effectiveness of the LiCl wheel. It represents the experimental data with an average absolute percent deviation (AAPD of 2.16 and a maximum absolute percent deviation (APDmax of about 6.00.

  6. Experimental investigation of the Mg-Al-Ca system

    This work focuses on the experimental investigation of the ternary Mg-Al-Ca system using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and metallographic techniques. DSC has permitted real time measurement of the temperature and enthalpy of the phase transformations. One of the invariant transformations predicted by thermodynamic modeling was verified experimentally and found to occur at 513 oC with composition close to 10.8 at.% Ca, 79.5 at.% Mg and 9.7 at.% Al. Three binary compounds are found to have an extended solid solubility into the ternary system: (Mg2Ca) where Al substitute Mg in the binary compound Mg2Ca (Al2Ca) and (Al3Ca8) where Mg substitute Al in the binary compounds Al2Ca and Al3Ca8, respectively. Two morphologies of eutectic structure were observed in the micrographs and supported by solidification curves; a coarse and fine eutectic microstructures due to the existence of Al2Ca and Mg2Ca, respectively

  7. Experimental Investigation of Exhaust Thermoelectric System and Application for Vehicle

    Liu, X.; Deng, Y. D.; Wang, W. S.; Su, C. Q.

    2015-06-01

    In this case study, an energy harvesting system using a thermoelectric power generator (TEG) has been constructed. Experimental investigation of the hot and cold sides of the thermoelectric modules (TMs) in this system has been undertaken to assess the feasibility for automotive applications. Two test benches have been developed to analyze the TM performance and the TEG system characteristics, especially the temperature difference, open-circuit voltage, and maximum power output of the TM and TEG system. As the performance of a TM is most influenced by the applied pressure and the temperature difference, a thermostatic heater, thermostatic water tank, and clamping devices are used in our experimental apparatus, increasing the output power of the TEG system. Based on the test bench, a new system called the "four-TEGs" system was designed and assembled into a prototype vehicle called "Warrior," and the characteristics of the system such as the maximum power output have been studied in road tests. The results show great potential for application of this technology in future vehicles.

  8. Experimental investigation of a two-phase nozzle flow

    Stationary two-phase flow experiments with a convergent nozzle are performed. The experimental results are appropriate to validate advanced computer codes, which are applied to the blowdown-phase of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The steam-water experiments present a broad variety of initial conditions: the pressure varies between 2 and 13 MPa, the void fraction between 0 (subcooled) and about 80%, a great number of critical as well as subcritical experiments with different flow pattern is investigated. Additional air-water experiments serve for the separation of phase transition effects. The transient acceleration of the fluid in the LOCA-case is simulated by a local acceleration in the experiment. The layout of the nozzle and the applied measurement technique allow for a separate testing of blowdown-relevant, physical models and the determination of empirical model parameters, respectively. The measured quantities are essentially the mass flow rate, quality, axial pressure and temperature profiles as well as axial and radial density/void profiles obtained by a γ-ray absorption device. Moreover, impedance probes and a pitot probe are used. Observed phenomena like a flow contraction, radial pressure and void profiles as well as the appearance of two chocking locations are described, because their examination is rather instructive about the refinement of a program. The experimental facilities as well as the data of 36 characteristic experiments are documented. (orig.)

  9. Numerical and experimental investigation of the TRIP strain

    In the first part a comprehensive experimental program is presented involving differential thermo-analyses (DTA) as well as dilatation tests under various non-proportional mechanical as well as thermal loading paths with the objective to measure the additional inelastic strain contribution due to transformation induced plasticity (TRIP). A maraging steel exhibiting complete martensitic transformation in a temperature interval ranging from around 150 oC down to about 70 oC is chosen as an appropriate testing material, since its comparatively low martensite start temperature (MS) facilitates measuring and precludes undesirable creep effects. A concept on how to isolate the TRIP strain contribution from the overall strain monitored by the multiaxial testing device is discussed. Particular attention is paid to the evolution of the martensite fraction during transformation and its dependence on the type and the magnitude of the applied mechanical load. The second part deals with the numerical simulation of the thermo-mechanical material behavior using an elastic predictor - radial return algorithm based on the underlying thermodynamic principles as the starting point. A user supplied subroutine has been developed that provides a commercial finite element solver with the proper material response to a given strain increment. The behavior of a three dimensional unit cell consisting of a regular array of cubic elements, each representing a single, arbitrarily oriented grain of a polycrystal is investigated. The good agreement of the numerical results with the experimental data backs the notion of a transformation related backstress is proposed. Refs. 3 (author)

  10. Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Flow in Transition Duct

    Hasan GL

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted to investigate turbulent flow through from rectangular cross-sectional area to rectangular transition duct. Three kinds of channels with different length, side angle and geometrical dimensions were designed and then flow characteristic of them were all tested. The transition duct have different inlet and outlet cross-sectional areas, outlet section is double than inlet sectional area. Measurements were made at several station along the channel and at various flow-rates, Reynolds numbers ranging from 2.105 to 6.105, in which the twodimensional mean, local velocity and pressure were measured at the x/l = 0.20, 0.40, 0.60, 0.80, 1.00 ratio, inlet by using hot wire anemometer. Based on experimental results, different flow characteristics were obtained. According to mean and local velocity and pressure drop values, each section point of the transition duct showed various values. Friction coefficient was lowered with increasing pipe length and increasing Reynolds number. Cross flows was shown in the short pipe along length at the low Reynolds.

  11. Experimental investigation into scaling models of methane hydrate reservoir

    Highlights: • The scaling criteria for methane hydrate reservoir are built. • The scaling criteria are verified by the experiments in two 3-D simulators. • The scaling criteria are used for predicting gas production of real hydrate reservoir. • Methane of 1.168 × 106 m3 is produced from the hydrate reservoir after 13.9 days. - Abstract: The Cubic Hydrate Simulator (CHS), a three-dimensional 5.8 L cubic pressure vessel, and the Pilot-Scale Hydrate Simulator (PHS), a three-dimensional 117.8 L pressure vessel, are used for investigating the production processes of hydrate. The gas production behaviors of methane hydrate in the porous media using the thermal stimulation method with a five-spot well system are studied. The experimental conditions are designed by a set of scaling criteria for the gas hydrate reservoir. The experimental results verify that the scaling criteria for gas hydrate production are reliable. The scaling criteria are used for predicting the production behavior of the real-scale hydrate reservoir. In the model of the real-scale hydrate reservoir with the size of 36 m × 36 m × 36 m, methane of 1.168 × 106 m3 (STP) is produced from the hydrate reservoir during 13.9 days of gas production. It is obtained that the gas recovery is 0.73, and the final energy efficiency is 9.5

  12. An experimental investigation of the dielectric properties of electrorheological fluids

    A home-made electrorheological (ER) fluid, known as ETSERF, has been created with suspension-based powders dispersed in silicone oil. Because of the special structure of their particles, ETSERF suspensions present a complex behavior. In the absence of an electric field, the ETSERF fluid manifests a near-Newtonian behavior, but when an electric field is applied, it exhibits a pseudoplastic behavior with yield stress. The ER effect under DC electric fields has been experimentally investigated using both hydrous and anhydrous ER fluids. The ER properties are strongly dependent on the dielectric properties of ETSERF suspensions, and hydrous ER fluids have a high dielectric constant and a high relaxation frequency which show a strong electrorheological effect. The relationship between the electrorheological effect and the permittivity of ER fluids has also been extensively studied. Experimental results show that the interfacial polarization plays an important role in the electrorheological phenomenon. The ageing of ETSERF fluids was also studied and it was found that the dielectric properties (mainly the dielectric loss tangent) and ER properties are strongly related to the duration of ageing. A fresh ETSERF suspension exhibits high relaxation frequency and high dielectric constant. These results are mainly explained by the effect of interfacial polarizations

  13. Border Collision Route to Quasiperiodicity: Numerical Investigation and Experimental Confirmation

    Zhusubaliyev, Zhanybai; Mosekilde, Erik; Maity, S.; Mohanan, S.; Banerjee, S.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical studies of higher-dimensional piecewise-smooth systems have recently shown how a torus can arise from a periodic cycle through a special type of border-collision bifurcation. The present article investigates this new route to quasiperiodicity in the two-dimensional piecewise-linear normal...... periodicity, e.g., a period-5 focus. This article also contains a discussion of torus destruction via a homoclinic bifurcation in the piecewise-linear normal map. Using a dc–dc converter with two-level control as an example, we report the first experimental verification of the direct transition to...... quasiperiodicity through a border-collision bifurcation. ©2006 American Institute of Physics...

  14. Experimental investigation on critical heat flux in vertical tubes

    An experimental study on critical heat flux of forced convection boiling in uniformly heated vertical tubes was performed in the KRISTA test facility at the Institute for Applied Thermo-and Fluid dynamics Karlsrule Research Center, using Freon-12 as the working fluid. Critical heat flux qc was measured in a 16 mm and a 2 mm diameter circular tubes. The effect of pressure, steam quality and mass velocity on CHF has been investigated. The results obtained were found to be essentially consistent in trend with the CHF data measured by other author. However, at lower pressure and mass velocity an anomalous phenomenon appeared: CHF decreased with decreasing inlet quality Xin in 2 mm diameter tube. The effect of pressure on CHF was complex. It was coupled with mass velocity and steam quality. At high mass velocity an inversion point was found out

  15. Experimental Investigation of Ternary Alloys for Fusion Breeding Blankets

    Choi, B. William [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chiu, Ing L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    Future fusion power plants based on the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel cycle will be required to breed the T fuel via neutron reactions with lithium, which will be incorporated in a breeding blanket that surrounds the fusion source. Recent work by LLNL proposed the used of liquid Li as the breeder in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Subsequently, an LDRD was initiated to develop alternatives ternary alloy liquid metal breeders that have reduced chemical reactivity with water and air compared to pure Li. Part of the work plan was to experimentally investigate the phase diagrams of ternary alloys. Of particular interest was measurement of the melt temperature, which must be low enough to be compatible with the temperature limits of the steel used in the construction of the chamber and heat transfer system.

  16. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Charged Phospholipid Bilayers.

    Graham, Ian Stanley

    1987-09-01

    Lipid systems containing charged species are examined by both experiment and theory. Experimental studies of the mixing of phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine with phosphatidic acid show that calcium induces fast ( <=q1s) phase separation of these otherwise miscible systems, and that this can occur in an isolated bilayer. Ionogenic behaviour is theoretically investigated using a new electrolyte model which explicitly includes both the solvent and particle sizes, and a binding model which uses Guggenheim combinatorics to treat non 1-1 binding stoichiometries. This work predicts a reduced dielectric constant near charged surfaces and strong repulsive forces between closely spaced (<15A) surfaces. A reanalysis of data from charged monolayers experiments indicates (1) that the new electrolyte model describes double layer behaviour at high surface charge densities better than the traditional Derjaguin - Landau - Verwey - Overbeek (DLVO) theory, (2) that calcium and magnesium bind to phosphatidylserine monolayers with a 1-1 stoichiometry.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Turbulence Specifications of Turbidity Currents

    B Firoozabadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the turbulence characteristic of turbidity current experimentally. The three-dimensional Acoustic-Doppler Velocimeter (ADV was used to measure the instantaneous velocity and characteristics of the turbulent flow. The experiments were conducted in a three-dimensional channel for different discharge flows, concentrations, and bed slopes. Results are expressed at various distances from the inlet, for all flow rates, slopes and concentrations as the distribution of turbulence energy, Reynolds stress and the turbulent intensity. It was concluded that the maximum turbulence intensity happens in both the interface and near the wall. Also, it was observed that the turbulence intensity reaches its minimum where maximum velocity occurs.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Ternary Alloys for Fusion Breeding Blankets

    Future fusion power plants based on the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel cycle will be required to breed the T fuel via neutron reactions with lithium, which will be incorporated in a breeding blanket that surrounds the fusion source. Recent work by LLNL proposed the used of liquid Li as the breeder in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Subsequently, an LDRD was initiated to develop alternatives ternary alloy liquid metal breeders that have reduced chemical reactivity with water and air compared to pure Li. Part of the work plan was to experimentally investigate the phase diagrams of ternary alloys. Of particular interest was measurement of the melt temperature, which must be low enough to be compatible with the temperature limits of the steel used in the construction of the chamber and heat transfer system.

  19. A review of experimental investigations on blast resistance of structures

    Investigations on blast resistance of structures received a lot of importance during and after the second world war. In recent years, this has assumed importance, in view of the rise in terrorist attack, accidents and sabotage. Development of computers and sophisticated instrumentation has led to more accurate mathematical modelling of the blast and response phenomena and more accurate validation of the mathematical model by experiments, bringing the analysis of this class of problems within the reach of the theoretical analyst. An attempt is made to review some recent trends in modelling, instrumentation and experimental procedures adopted by researchers working in the area of blast resistance of structures. (author). 32 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  20. Cracking in autoclaved aerated concrete: Experimental investigation and XFEM modeling

    Ferretti, D., E-mail: daniele.ferretti@unipr.it [Department of Civil, Environmental, Land Management Engineering and Architecture, University of Parma, P.co Area delle Scienze 181/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Michelini, E. [Department of Civil, Environmental, Land Management Engineering and Architecture, University of Parma, P.co Area delle Scienze 181/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Rosati, G. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    The paper aims to investigate and model cracking development in beams and deep-beams made of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC). Fracture mechanics of AAC has been first studied by performing three-point bending tests on beams, similar to those commonly used for ordinary concrete elements. In some of these tests, crack growth has been also monitored by using ESPI laser technique. In this way, it has been possible to calibrate the main parameters of a proper cohesive law by means of extended finite element inverse analysis. Subsequently, cracking tests have been also performed on deep-beams, whose behavior is more representative of full scale walls. To validate the proposed cohesive law, deep-beam experimental behavior has been finally simulated through XFEM.

  1. Experimental investigation of turbulent flows in pipe junctions

    Branching, three-dimensional, incompressible internal flows are examined in detail in circular pipe configurations at an experimental plant for water and at a test bench for air. Laminar and turbulent flows are made visible in water for Re4. Typical phenomena are described in detail, e.g. separations, secondary flows and locally non-stationary behavior under stationary inflow conditions and outflow conditions. Wall pressure distributions for turbulent flows up to Re=105 measured at the same test bench supply a good explanation for a number of observed effects. A quantitative investigation of turbulent velocity fields of selected flow cases up to outflow lengths of 10D is carried out in air with the aid of hot-wire anemometry. (orig./DG)

  2. Experimental and theoretical investigation of anaerobic fluidized bed biofilm reactors

    M. Fuentes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of anaerobic fluidized bed reactors (AFBRs. The bioreactors are modeled as dynamic three-phase systems. Biochemical transformations are assumed to occur only in the fluidized bed zone. The biofilm process model is coupled to the system hydrodynamic model through the biofilm detachment rate; which is assumed to be a first-order function of the energy dissipation parameter and a second order function of biofilm thickness. Non-active biomass is considered to be particulate material subject to hydrolysis. The model includes the anaerobic conversion for complex substrate degradation and kinetic parameters selected from the literature. The experimental set-up consisted of two mesophilic (36±1ºC lab-scale AFBRs (R1 and R2 loaded with sand as inert support for biofilm development. The reactor start-up policy was based on gradual increments in the organic loading rate (OLR, over a four month period. Step-type disturbances were applied on the inlet (glucose and acetic acid substrate concentration (chemical oxygen demand (COD from 0.85 to 2.66 g L-1 and on the feed flow rate (from 3.2 up to 6.0 L d-1 considering the maximum efficiency as the reactor loading rate switching. The predicted and measured responses of the total and soluble COD, volatile fatty acid (VFA concentrations, biogas production rate and pH were investigated. Regarding hydrodynamic and fluidization aspects, variations of the bed expansion due to disturbances in the inlet flow rate and the biofilm growth were measured. As rate coefficients for the biofilm detachment model, empirical values of 3.73⋅10(4 and 0.75⋅10(4 s² kg-1 m-1 for R1 and R2, respectively, were estimated.

  3. A review of geophysical investigations at the site of Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, Ontario

    The site of the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories was one of the first research areas located on crystalline rocks to be extensively investigated under the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. A large contribution to meeting the geoscientific objectives of the program has been made using a suite of geophysical techniques. Many of them are standard, though sometimes modified in terms of instrumentation and/or experimental and/or analytical procedures, to meet the particular needs of the waste management program. Relatively new techniques have also been employed. Much of the early evaluation and development of the various techniques took place at the Chalk River site. Standard methods such as gravity, magnetics and seismic sounding have been used to investigate bedrock structure, and the seismic method has also been used to estimate overburden thickness. Standard geophysical borehole logging has been used to obtain in situ estimates of physical properties, to locate fracture zones and to make hole to hole correlations that have helped define local structure. Several standard electrical (e.g. resitivity) and electromagnetic (e.g. VLF-EM) techniques have proven successful in identifying water-filled fractures and faults. Relatively new techniques introduced into the geophysics at Chalk River were: ground probing radar; to investigate overburden; borehole TV and acoustic televiewer and VLF-EM, to locate fractures; studies of seismic tube-waves, well tides and temperature logs, to investigate fracture location and permeability. Most of these methods have been successful and are now routinely employed at other research sites

  4. Experimental investigations on airborne gravimetry based on compressed sensing.

    Yang, Yapeng; Wu, Meiping; Wang, Jinling; Zhang, Kaidong; Cao, Juliang; Cai, Shaokun

    2014-01-01

    Gravity surveys are an important research topic in geophysics and geodynamics. This paper investigates a method for high accuracy large scale gravity anomaly data reconstruction. Based on the airborne gravimetry technology, a flight test was carried out in China with the strap-down airborne gravimeter (SGA-WZ) developed by the Laboratory of Inertial Technology of the National University of Defense Technology. Taking into account the sparsity of airborne gravimetry by the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), this paper proposes a method for gravity anomaly data reconstruction using the theory of compressed sensing (CS). The gravity anomaly data reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem, which can be transformed into a sparse optimization problem. This paper uses the zero-norm as the objective function and presents a greedy algorithm called Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) to solve the corresponding minimization problem. The test results have revealed that the compressed sampling rate is approximately 14%, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by OMP is 0.03 mGal and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 56.48 dB. In contrast, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by the existing nearest-interpolation method (NIPM) is 0.15 mGal and the SNR is 42.29 dB. These results have shown that the OMP algorithm can reconstruct the gravity anomaly data with higher accuracy and fewer measurements. PMID:24647125

  5. Experimental investigation of filtered epithermal-photoneutron Beams for BNCT

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been investigating the feasibility of a concept for an accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons for BNCT that is based on the use of a two-stage photoneutron production process driven by an electron accelerator. In this concept, relativistic electron beams impinge upon heavily-shielded tungsten targets located at the outer radius of a small cylindrical tank of circulating heavy water (D20). A fraction of the energy of the electrons is converted in the tungsten targets into radially-inward-directed bremsstrahlung radiation. Neutrons subsequently generated by photodisintegration of deuterons in the D2O within the tank are directed to the patient through a suitable beam tailoring system. Initial proof-of-principal tests using a low-current benchtop prototype of this concept have been conducted. Testing has included extensive measurements of the unfiltered photoneutron source as well as initial measurements of filtered epithermal-neutron spectra produced using two different advanced neutron filtering assemblies, as described here

  6. Experimental investigation of the acceleration of deflagration in wake flow

    In gas cloud explosions, turbulence is produced by the flow-field induced by the combustion process. But turbulence can also be produced by an initial flow field, due to atmospheric wind or technical devices. This turbulence may lead to an increased rate of chemical reaction, inducing high pressure levels. The influence of an initial flow field must be taken into account, in connection with safety aspects of nuclear power plants. The reported laboratory-scale experiments were designed to investigate the influence of a flow field, present at the moment of ignition inside a partially-confined hydrocarbon-air cloud. These experiments used a flow channel capable of producing an unsteady flow-field of combustible gas independently of the combustion process itself. The parameters which varied in these tests are: initial flow velocity, gas-mixture composition and geometry. The tests were carried out with stochiometric ethylene-air and propane-air mixtures. The measured quantities are: pressure time history inside the test section. CH-radical radiation. High-speed photographs were also taken. The results show that initial flow speed and reactivity of the mixture have a strong influence on the maximum overpressure and duration of the positive pressure phase, but quenching effects may become important for high flow velocities and mixtures of low reactivity

  7. Experimental Investigations on Airborne Gravimetry Based on Compressed Sensing

    Yapeng Yang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gravity surveys are an important research topic in geophysics and geodynamics. This paper investigates a method for high accuracy large scale gravity anomaly data reconstruction. Based on the airborne gravimetry technology, a flight test was carried out in China with the strap-down airborne gravimeter (SGA-WZ developed by the Laboratory of Inertial Technology of the National University of Defense Technology. Taking into account the sparsity of airborne gravimetry by the discrete Fourier transform (DFT, this paper proposes a method for gravity anomaly data reconstruction using the theory of compressed sensing (CS. The gravity anomaly data reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem, which can be transformed into a sparse optimization problem. This paper uses the zero-norm as the objective function and presents a greedy algorithm called Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP to solve the corresponding minimization problem. The test results have revealed that the compressed sampling rate is approximately 14%, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by OMP is 0.03 mGal and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR is 56.48 dB. In contrast, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by the existing nearest-interpolation method (NIPM is 0.15 mGal and the SNR is 42.29 dB. These results have shown that the OMP algorithm can reconstruct the gravity anomaly data with higher accuracy and fewer measurements.

  8. Experimental investigation of spray characteristics of alternative aviation fuels

    Highlights: • Physical properties of GTL fuel are different from those of conventional jet fuels. • Spray characteristics of GTL and Jet A-1 fuels are experimentally investigated using phase Doppler anemometry. • Regions near the nozzle are influenced by differences in fuel physical properties. • Spray characteristics of GTL can be predicted by empirical relations developed for conventional jet fuels. - Abstract: Synthetic fuels derived from non-oil feedstock are gaining importance due to their cleaner combustion characteristics. This work investigates spray characteristics of two Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) synthetic jet fuels from a pilot-scale pressure swirl nozzle and compares them with those of the conventional Jet A-1 fuel. The microscopic spray parameters are measured at 0.3 and 0.9 MPa injection pressures at several points in the spray using phase Doppler anemometry. The results show that the effect of fuel physical properties on the spray characteristics is predominantly evident in the regions close to the nozzle exit at the higher injection pressure. The lower viscosity and surface tension of GTL fuel seems to lead to faster disintegration and dispersion of the droplets when compared to those of Jet A-1 fuel under atmospheric conditions. Although the global characteristics of the fuels are similar, the effects of fuel properties are evident on the local spray characteristics at the higher injection pressure

  9. An Experimental Investigation on Inclined Negatively Buoyant Jets

    Raed Bashitialshaaer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was performed to investigate the behavior of inclined negatively buoyant jets. Such jets arise when brine is discharged from desalination plants. A turbulent jet with a specific salinity was discharged through a circular nozzle at an angle to the horizontal into a tank with fresh water and the spatial evolution of the jet was recorded. Four different initial jet parameters were changed, namely the nozzle diameter, the initial jet inclination, the jet density and the flow rate. Five geometric quantities describing the jet trajectory that are useful in the design of brine discharge systems were determined. Dimensional analysis demonstrated that the geometric jet quantities studied, if normalized with the jet exit diameter, could be related to the densimetric Froude number. Analysis of the collected data showed that this was the case for a Froude number less than 100, whereas for larger values of the Froude number the scatter in the data increased significantly. As has been observed in some previous investigations, the slope of the best-fit straight line through the data points was a function of the initial jet angle (?, where the slope increased with ? for the maximum levels (Ym studied, but had a more complex behavior for horizontal distances.

  10. Theoretical and experimental investigation of multispectral photoacoustic osteoporosis detection method

    Steinberg, Idan; Hershkovich, Hadas Sara; Gannot, Israel; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a widespread disorder, which has a catastrophic impact on patients lives and overwhelming related to healthcare costs. Recently, we proposed a multispectral photoacoustic technique for early detection of osteoporosis. Such technique has great advantages over pure ultrasonic or optical methods as it allows the deduction of both bone functionality from the bone absorption spectrum and bone resistance to fracture from the characteristics of the ultrasound propagation. We demonstrated the propagation of multiple acoustic modes in animal bones in-vitro. To further investigate the effects of multiple wavelength excitations and of induced osteoporosis on the PA signal a multispectral photoacoustic system is presented. The experimental investigation is based on measuring the interference of multiple acoustic modes. The performance of the system is evaluated and a simple two mode theoretical model is fitted to the measured phase signals. The results show that such PA technique is accurate and repeatable. Then a multiple wavelength excitation is tested. It is shown that the PA response due to different excitation wavelengths revels that absorption by the different bone constitutes has a profound effect on the mode generation. The PA response is measured in single wavelength before and after induced osteoporosis. Results show that induced osteoporosis alters the measured amplitude and phase in a consistent manner which allows the detection of the onset of osteoporosis. These results suggest that a complete characterization of the bone over a region of both acoustic and optical frequencies might be used as a powerful tool for in-vivo bone evaluation.

  11. Experimental investigation of water sprayed finned heat exchanger tube bundles

    Experimental investigations have been made to study the performance of two finned tube-bundle heat exchangers (FORGO type) when wetted by water sprays. The heat exchangers are designed to cool water in a dry cooling tower. The test-elements had a frontal area of 1 m2. The water sprays were created by 20 nozzles, 200 mm in front of the heat exchangers. Air velocities at the inlet of the coolers were in the range 0,8 m/s to 12 m/s and initial temperature differences ITD reached 45 degrees C. The test facility was designed to determine the combined latent and sensible heat fluxes in the wetted heat exchanger, the airside pressure drop and the air humidity and temperature at the exchanger inlet and outlet, and to measure the weight of the water wetting the cooler's surface. The sprayed test elements were investigated in different positions, but most of the experiments were carried out in the position with the fins horizontal

  12. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Liquid Metal MHD Power Generation

    Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation for space is studied. Closed- loop circulation of liquid metal without moving mechanical parts, and generation of electric power from the circulating metal, have been investigated analytically and experimentally, and the attainable cycle efficiencies have been calculated. Recent literature has pointed out the possibility of efficient a.c. generators with liquid metal as the working fluid, and this type of generator is under study. Analysis indicates that efficiencies up to 65% are attainable in a travelling-wave induction generator at the available liquid metal velocities of 100-200 m/sec, provided the generator has a length/gap ratio of no more than 50 for low friction loss, has an electrical length of no more than three wavelengths for low winding loss, and has end-effect compensation for cancelling finite-length effects in the power-generating region. The analysis leading to these conclusions is presented. The type of end-effect correction being studied is the ''compensating-pole'' technique in which an oscillating magnetic field is applied to the fluid entering and leaving the generator to make the flux linkages within the generator the same as those in a rotating or ''infinite'' generator. An experimental one-wavelength generator employing compensating poles has been fabricated, and empty-channel magnetic field measurements have been completed in preparation for tests with NaK. Two types of field measurements were made: d.c. measurements to determine the field profile as a function of phase angle and a.c. measurements to investigate the synchronization of the compensating poles with the travelling wave. The d.c. results showed that the flux linkages in the power generating region can be held close to those in a rotating machine, and the a.c. results showed that the compensating poles can be accurately synchronized with the travelling wave through transformer coupling. The component efficiencies from the analyses and experiments were combined to predict the cycle efficiencies possible in space applications. The calculations included the different liquid MHD cycles and working fluids that have been proposed in the literature, and these cycles are reviewed and compared. A possible limitation on lifetime at the 1100-1500°K temperatures needed for a space power plant is erosion by the high velocity liquid metal, and this problem is being investigated in a 70 m/sec lithium loop. (author)

  13. A Global Remote Laboratory Experimentation Network and the Experiment Service Provider Business Model and Plans

    Tor Ivar Eikaas

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from the IST KAII Trial project ReLAX - Remote LAboratory eXperimentation trial (IST 1999-20827, and contributes with a framework for a global remote laboratory experimentation network supported by a new business model. The paper presents this new Experiment Service Provider business model that aims at bringing physical experimentation back into the learning arena, where remotely operable laboratory experiments used in advanced education and training schemes are made available to a global education and training market in industry and academia. The business model is based on an approach where individual experiment owners offer remote access to their high-quality laboratory facilities to users around the world. The usage can be for research, education, on-the-job training etc. The access to these facilities is offered via an independent operating company - the Experiment Service Provider. The Experiment Service Provider offers eCommerce services like booking, access control, invoicing, dispute resolution, quality control, customer evaluation services and a unified Lab Portal.

  14. Combined Experimental and Numerical Investigations into Laser Propulsion Engineering Physics

    Kenoyer, David Adam

    The RPI pulsed Laser Propulsion (LP) research effort focuses on the future application of launching nano- and micro-satellites (1-10 kg payloads) into Low Earth Orbit (LEO), using a remote Ground Based Laser (GBL) power station to supply the required energy for flight. This research program includes both experimental and numerical studies investigating the propulsive performance of several engine geometries (constituting a lightcraft family). Using the Lumonics twin K-922m TEA pulsed laser system, axial and lateral thrust, C m, Isp, and η measurements were made for these engine geometries, examining the effects of several critical factors including: engine orientation (e.g. lateral and angular offset), laser pulse energy, pulse repetition frequency, pulse duration, propellant type, and engine size-scaling effects. Investigation into the origins of lateral "beam riding" forces was of particular interest. Lateral impulse measurements and high speed Schlieren photography were utilized to provide an understanding of laser beam-riding/propulsive physics. The acquired lightcraft database was used to further develop an existing 7-Degree Of Freedom (DOF) flight dynamics model extensively calibrated against 16 actual trajectories of small scale model lightcraft flown at White Sands Missile Range, NM on a 10 kW pulsed CO2 laser called PLVTS. The full system 7-DOF model is comprised of updated individual aerodynamics, engine, laser beam propagation, variable vehicle inertia, reaction controls system, and dynamics models, integrated to represent all major phenomena in a consistent framework. This flight dynamics model and associated 7-DOF code provide a physics-based predictive tool for basic research investigations into laser launched lightcraft for suborbital and orbital missions. Simulations were performed to demonstrate the flight capabilities of each engine geometry using the updated lightcraft propulsion database, the results of which further demonstrate that autonomous beam riding capability is an essential component for a stable launch to orbit and the future of LP.

  15. Experimental investigation of a PVT system performance using nano ferrofluids

    Highlights: • The effects of a ferrofluid on the efficiency of a PVT system were investigated. • Both thermal and electrical efficiencies of a PVT system were studied. • The ferrofluids were placed under constant and alternating magnetic fields. • Maximum improvement gained by applying alternating magnetic fields on ferrofluids. • The experiments showed 79% improvement in the overall efficiency of the system. - Abstract: In this paper, the effects of ferrofluids as a coolant on the overall efficiency of a PVT (photovoltaic thermal unit) system are experimentally investigated. The fluids considered in the experiment are distilled water and a ferrofluid (Fe3O4-water) with 1% and 3% concentrations by weight (wt%). The experiments were performed in indoor conditions under two constant solar radiations (1100 W/m2 and 600 W/m2) using a solar simulator. Due to the unique characteristic behavior of ferrofluids, their rheological and thermophysical properties can be changed under an external magnetic field. The ferrofluids in this study were placed under constant and alternating magnetic fields in the cooling section in order to investigate the effect of both types of magnetic fields on the overall efficiency of a PVT system. The results show that by using a 3 wt% ferrofluid, the overall efficiency of the system improved by 45% and when an alternating magnetic field with 50 Hz frequency was applied, the overall efficiency increased to about 50% compared to that of the distilled water as coolant fluid. The overall exergy output of the system with and without ferrofluids, was also compared with that of the PV system with no collector. It was observed that by adding a thermal collector to a PV system and using a 3 wt% ferrofluid under an alternating magnetic field, the total exergy can be increased as high as 48 W

  16. Laboratory investigation of wind wave breaking modulation in the inhomogeneous current field

    Bakhanov, Victor; Bogatov, Nikolai; Ermoshkin, Alexei; Kemarskaya, Olga

    2015-10-01

    A experimental laboratory study of the effect of a horizontally inhomogeneous current on breaking statistics of wind waves was carried out. Were creating a current having the same direction as wind waves with positive and negative gradients and a current of the counter direction with a negative gradient. The wind speed varied from 10.4 to 20.1 m/s based on a standard height of 10 m. The maximum current velocity near the surface was 27 cm/s. The maximum current gradient was equal to 0.09 1/s. The codirected current reduces the wind wave amplitude for all wind speeds, while the frequency of the spectral density maximum of wind waves remains the same. The frequency of the recorded by radar wind-wave breaking also decreases for positive, negative, and zero gradients. In the case of counter directions, for light winds in the presence of a current the wind wave amplitude reduces, the wind wave spectrum displaces in the direction of lower frequencies. At higher wind speeds, there were neither differences in the surface wave spectra in the presence and absence of a current, however, an increase in the frequency of the recorded by radar wind-wave breaking is observed. These laboratory investigations are carried out in the interests of the remote diagnostics methods development of inhomogeneous currents at higher wind speeds.

  17. Site Safety Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations

    Bainer, R.; Duarte, J.

    1993-07-01

    The safety policy of LLNL is to take every reasonable precaution in the performance of work to protect the environment and the health and safety of employees and the public, and to prevent property damage. With respect to hazardous agents, this protection is provided by limiting human exposures, releases to the environment, and contamination of property to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). It is the intent of this Plan to supply the broad outline for completing environmental investigations within ALARA guidelines. It may not be possible to determine actual working conditions in advance of the work; therefore, planning must allow the opportunity to provide a range of protection based upon actual working conditions. Requirements will be the least restrictive possible for a given set of circumstances, such that work can be completed in an efficient and timely fashion. Due to the relatively large size of the LLNL Site and the different types of activities underway, site-specific Operational Safety Procedures (OSPs) will be prepared to supplement activities not covered by this Plan. These site-specific OSPs provide the detailed information for each specific activity and act as an addendum to this Plan, which provides the general plan for LLNL Main Site operation.

  18. Laboratory and Theoretical Investigations on Mechanical Behavior of PLFG Mixture

    Wang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphogypsum-lime-flyash-gravel Mixture (PLFG is usually used to strengthen road foundation of geotechnical engineering. It is important to correctly understand its mechanical behavior before corresponding design. In this present paper, compaction test, one-dimensional compression test and dry-shrinkage test were conducted to determine optimum mixture ration of PLFG. compression test on PLFG with optimum ration was carried out in order to investigate its stress-strain curve. Experiment data show that PLFG is with high bearing capacity and good stiffness. A new composite-exponent model was established, which is available for both hardening and softening type strain-stress curves of PLFG. Mathematical behavior of the presented model is far better than others to describe PLFGs structural property. Finally, comparison between PLFG tested data and new model simulation was performed and good agreements have been found. This research is helpful for engineering sustainable utilization of to bring economy and to reduce environmental pollution.

  19. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact with divalent ions present at the surface of the shale. Also, silicates prevent the dispersion and washouts when drilling soft chalk by reacting with the Ca2+ ions present on chalk surfaces of cutting and wellbore to form a protective film. The silicate-based drilling fluid can be used during drilling hole section through shale interbeded anhydrite formations because of its superior shale stabilizing characteristics. However, drilling through the anhydrite can decrease the silicate concentration and change rheological and filtration fluid properties. So, the critical concentration of calcium ions should be investigated by lab tests. This paper details the mechanism of shale inhibition using silicate-based drilling fluid, and presents results of lab tests conducted to ascertain the effect of Ca2+ ions on silicate level in the fluid and the fluid properties.

  20. Experimental investigation on compaction properties of sandy soils

    In this research, an effort has been made to develop a correlation between standard and modified proctor compaction test parameters, i.e., maximum dry unit weight (gamma dmax) and optimum moisture content (OMC) of sandy soils. Standard and modified proctor along with classification tests were carried out on hundred and twenty sandy soil samples with different grain size distributions. Based on the test results, the soil samples were classified into various groups of medium to fine sand with non-plastic fines up to 45%. Regression analyses were performed on the experimental data and correlations were proposed to express modified Proctor parameters (gamma dmod and OMC mod) in term of standard Proctor test parameters (gamma dstd and OMC std). The validation of the proposed predictive correlations was done by using test results of another set of sandy soil samples not used in the development of the correlations. The results of the analyses showed that variation between experimental and predicted values of gamma dmod is within +- 4 % confidence interval and that of OMC mod is within +- 2.0 %. Further, based on the test results, an effort has been made to investigate the effect of fines (finer than 75 mu m) on compaction characteristics. It was observed that gamma dmax both in case of standard and modified proctor increases with increase in fines content up to 35% and beyond that it decreases. However, the value of OMC in both the cases decreases with increase in fine content. The correlations proposed in this paper may be very useful during the project preliminary/ pre-feasibility stages in the field of Geotechnical Engineering. (author)

  1. Calculation and experimental investigation of multi-component ceramic systems

    This work shows a way to combine thermodynamic calculations and experiments in order to get useful information on the constitution of metal/non-metal systems. Many data from literature are critically evaluated and used as a basis for experiments and calculations. The following multi-component systems are treated: 1. Multi-component systems of 'ceramic' materials with partially metallic bonding (carbides, nitrides, oxides, borides, carbonitrides, borocarbides, oxinitrides of the 4-8th transition group metals) 2. multi-component systems of non-metallic materials with dominant covalent bonding (SiC, Si3N4, SiB6, BN, Al4C3, Be2C) 3. multi-component systems of non-metallic materials with dominant heteropolar bonding (Al2O3, TiO2, BeO, SiO2, ZrO2). The interactions between 1. and 2., 2. and 3., 1. and 3. are also considered. The latest commercially available programmes for the calculation of thermodynamical equilibria and phase diagrams are evaluated and compared considering their facilities and limits. New phase diagrams are presented for many presently unknown multi-component systems; partly known systems are completed on the basis of selected thermodynamic data. The calculations are verified by experimental investigations (metallurgical and powder technology methods). Altogether 690 systems are evaluated, 126 are calculated for the first time and 52 systems are experimentally verified. New data for 60 ternary phases are elaborated by estimating the data limits for the Gibbs energy values. A synthesis of critical evaluation of literature, calculations and experiments leads to new important information about equilibria and reaction behaviour in multi-component systems. This information is necessary to develop new stable and metastable materials. (orig./MM)

  2. Experimental and modelling investigation of surface EMG spike analysis.

    Gabriel, David A; Christie, Anita; Inglis, J Greig; Kamen, Gary

    2011-05-01

    A pattern classification method based on five measures extracted from the surface electromyographic (sEMG) signal is used to provide a unique characterization of the interference pattern for different motor unit behaviours. This study investigated the sensitivity of the five sEMG measures during the force gradation process. Tissue and electrode filtering effects were further evaluated using a sEMG model. Subjects (N=8) performed isometric elbow flexion contractions from 0 to 100% MVC. The sEMG signals from the biceps brachii were recorded simultaneously with force. The basic building block of the sEMG model was the detection of single fibre action potentials (SFAPs) through a homogeneous, equivalent isotropic, infinite volume conduction medium. The SFAPs were summed to generate single motor unit action potentials. The physiologic properties from a well-known muscle model and motor unit recruitment and firing rate schemes were combined to generate synthetic sEMG signals. The following pattern classification measures were calculated: mean spike amplitude, mean spike frequency, mean spike slope, mean spike duration, and the mean number of peaks per spike. Root-mean-square amplitude and mean power frequency were also calculated. Taken together, the experimental data and modelling analysis showed that below 50% MVC, the pattern classification measures were more sensitive to changes in force than traditional time and frequency measures. However, there are additional limitations associated with electrode distance from the source that must be explored further. Future experimental work should ensure that the inter-electrode distance is no greater than 1cm to mitigate the effects of tissue filtering. PMID:21146442

  3. Field and laboratory emission cell automation and control system for investigating surface chemistry reactions.

    Flemmer, Michael M; Ham, Jason E; Wells, J R

    2007-01-01

    A novel system [field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) automation and control system] has been developed to deliver ozone to a surface utilizing the FLEC to simulate indoor surface chemistry. Ozone, humidity, and air flow rate to the surface were continuously monitored using an ultraviolet ozone monitor, humidity, and flow sensors. Data from these sensors were used as feedback for system control to maintain predetermined experimental parameters. The system was used to investigate the chemistry of ozone with alpha-terpineol on a vinyl surface over 72 h. Keeping all other experimental parameters the same, volatile organic compound emissions from the vinyl tile with alpha-terpineol were collected from both zero and 100 ppb (parts per 10(9)) ozone exposures. System stability profiles collected from sensor data indicated experimental parameters were maintained to within a few percent of initial settings. Ozone data from eight experiments at 100 ppb (over 339 h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.65 ppb and a 95% tolerance of 3.3 ppb. Humidity data from 17 experiments at 50% relative humidity (over 664 h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.38% and a 95% tolerance of 2.77%. Data of the flow rate of air flowing through the FLEC from 14 experiments at 300 ml/min (over 548 h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 3.02 ml/min and a 95% tolerance range of 6.03 ml/min. Initial experimental results yielded long term emissions of ozone/alpha-terpineol reaction products, suggesting that surface chemistry could play an important role in indoor environments. PMID:17503934

  4. Sesame seed allergy: Clinical manifestations and laboratory investigations

    Fazlollahi MR.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plant-origin foods are among the most important sources of food allergic reactions. An increase in the incidence of sesame seed allergy among children and adults has been reported in recent years. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate the prevalence, importance and clinical manifestations of sesame allergy among Iranian patients.Methods: In a cross-sectional survey, 250 patients with suspected IgE-mediated food allergies completed a questionnaire and underwent skin prick tests with sesame extract as well as cross-reacting foods (walnut, soya and peanut. Total IgE and sesame-specific IgE levels were measured. Patients with positive skin test reactions and/or IgE specific for sesame without clinical symptoms were considered sensitive to sesame. The patients who also had clinical symptoms with sesame consumption were diagnosed as allergic to sesame.Results: Of the 250 patients enrolled in this study, 129 were male and 121 female, with a mean age of 11.7 years. The most common food allergens were cow's milk, egg, curry, tomato and sesame. Sesame sensitivity was found in 35 patients (14.1%. Only five patients (2% had sesame allergy. Sesame-sensitive patients had a significantly higher frequency of positive prick test to cross-reacting foods when compared to non-sensitized patients (p=0.00. The type of symptom was independent of gender and age of the patients, but urticaria and dermatitis-eczema were significantly more frequent in sensitized patients (p=0.008.Conclusions: This is the first study addressing the prevalence of sesame seed allergy in Iranian population. We found sesame to be a common and important cause of food allergy. The panel of foods recommended for use in diagnostic allergy tests should be adjusted.

  5. Geophysical investigation: New Production Reactor Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Filipkowski, F.; Blackey, M.; Davies, D.; Levine, E.N.; Murphy, V. [Weston Geophysical Corp., Westboro, MA (US)

    1991-12-01

    Seismic crosshole and downhole velocity measurements were performed for two borehole arrays approximately 300 feet deep in conjunction with verticality measurements and geophysical logging of borehole WO-2 (to a depth of 4,960 feet) at the NPR site of the INEL. Past studies show that the site area is covered by a thin layer of soil which overlies numerous basalt flows interrupted by sandy and clayey interbeds. Compressional and shear wave velocities computed for these arrays revealed low velocity zones at the following elevation ranges for crosshole array No. 1: 4,893 feet to 4,873 feet (basalt rubble zone) and 4,705 feet to 4,686 feet (sediment interbed). Corresponding elevation ranges for crosshole array No. 2 include: 4,830 feet to 4,815 feet (sediment interbed), 4,785 feet to 4,765 feet (highly vesicular and fractured basalt), 4,715 feet to 4,705 feet (basalt rubble zone), and 4,672 feet to 4,667 feet (sediment interbed). In general, crosshole velocity data correlated between arrays with velocity differences possibly explained by localized lithologic changes. Due to scatter in the downhole velocity data, only velocity averages were computed. However, these downhole velocities correlated to the approximate mean crosshole velocity values and therefore independent confirmed the crosshole data. Geophysical logging of well WO-2 included natural gamma, neutron, and compensated density logs to a depth of 4,960 feet at which a viscous borehole fluid inhibited further investigation. Second runs of small sections of these logs were repeated satisfactorily for confirmation of certain anomalous areas.

  6. Accelerator laboratories: development centers for experimental physics and technology in Mexico

    Three years ago in this Nuclear Center the author and Professor Graef expounded the inception and development of experimental physics and new techniques centered about laboratories and equipped in our country with positive ion accelerators. Extracted here is the information on the laboratories that have allowed professional training as well as the furtherance of scientific productivity in each group. An additional proposal as to how the technical groups knowledgeable in advanced technology might contribute significantly to adequate preparation of youth at the intermediate level able to generate innocuous micro industries in their own neighbourhood. (Author). 5 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  7. Advanced Laboratory at Texas State University: Error Analysis, Experimental Design, and Research Experience for Undergraduates

    Ventrice, Carl

    2009-04-01

    Physics is an experimental science. In other words, all physical laws are based on experimentally observable phenomena. Therefore, it is important that all physics students have an understanding of the limitations of certain experimental techniques and the associated errors associated with a particular measurement. The students in the Advanced Laboratory class at Texas State perform three detailed laboratory experiments during the semester and give an oral presentation at the end of the semester on a scientific topic of their choosing. The laboratory reports are written in the format of a ``Physical Review'' journal article. The experiments are chosen to give the students a detailed background in error analysis and experimental design. For instance, the first experiment performed in the spring 2009 semester is entitled Measurement of the local acceleration due to gravity in the RFM Technology and Physics Building. The goal of this experiment is to design and construct an instrument that is to be used to measure the local gravitational field in the Physics Building to an accuracy of 0.005 m/s^2. In addition, at least one of the experiments chosen each semester involves the use of the research facilities within the physics department (e.g., microfabrication clean room, surface science lab, thin films lab, etc.), which gives the students experience working in a research environment.

  8. REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES INVESTIGATING THE RATE OF STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE ADSORPTION BY MONOSODIUM TITANATE

    Hobbs, D.

    2010-10-01

    A number of laboratory studies have been conducted to determine the influence of mixing and mixing intensity, solution ionic strength, initial sorbate concentrations, temperature, and monosodium titanate (MST) concentration on the rates of sorbate removal by MST in high-level nuclear waste solutions. Of these parameters, initial sorbate concentrations, ionic strength, and MST concentration have the greater impact on sorbate removal rates. The lack of a significant influence of mixing and mixing intensity on sorbate removal rates indicates that bulk solution transport is not the rate controlling step in the removal of strontium and actinides over the range of conditions and laboratory-scales investigated. However, bulk solution transport may be a significant parameter upon use of MST in a 1.3 million-gallon waste tank such as that planned for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program. Thus, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommends completing the experiments in progress to determine if mixing intensity influences sorption rates under conditions appropriate for this program. Adsorption models have been developed from these experimental studies that allow prediction of strontium (Sr), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np) and uranium (U) concentrations as a function of contact time with MST. Fairly good agreement has been observed between the predicted and measured sorbate concentrations in the laboratory-scale experiments.

  9. Experimental study of non-capture breakup reactions at the TANDAR Laboratory

    Breakup reactions play a distinctive role among the processes that occur in nuclear collisions induced by weakly bound projectiles. The motivation for the study of these reactions recognizes various origins, that range from their usefulness as an indirect tool to determine cross sections of the corresponding inverse capture processes of astrophysical interest, to the questions that arise from their connection to other reaction channels such as complete and incomplete fusion. For the investigation of these and other aspects it is desirable to have a detailed experimental knowledge of the process and of the underlying mechanisms. In this talk we will review the details and main results of the experiments that are being carried on at the TANDAR Laboratory for the investigation of non-capture breakup reactions, i.e., those for which the breakup products manage to escape from being subsequently absorbed by the target-like nucleus. The measurements involve the coincident detection of the emitted light particles, from which one can obtain an unambiguous and complete characterization of the reaction by means of the identification of the fragment that undergoes breakup (either the projectile or a projectile-like transfer product) and the determination of the total Q value, relative energy of the breakup products, and the angular distribution of their emission in the relevant rest frame. We will describe the tools that are used for the discrimination of resonant processes from those presumably originated in the direct population of the continuum and the conditions for their application. The absolute differential and total cross sections of breakup reactions that have been obtained for 6Li + 144Sm will be presented and discussed, taking as a reference for comparison the corresponding cross sections of competing channels in the same system

  10. An experimental investigation of pump as turbine for micro hydro application

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of a centrifugal pump working as turbine (PAT). An end suction centrifugal pump was tested in turbine mode at PAT experimental rig installed in the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory of Universiti Tenaga Nasional. The pump with specific speed of 15.36 (m, m3/s) was used in the experiment and the performance characteristic of the PAT was determined. The experiment showed that a centrifugal pump can satisfactorily be operated as turbine without any mechanical problems. As compared to pump operation, the pump was found to operate at higher heads and discharge values in turbine mode. The best efficiency point (BEP) in turbine mode was found to be lower than BEP in pump mode. The results obtained were also compared to the work of some previous researchers.

  11. Experimental investigation of hydraulic criteria in the fishways

    Migratory Fish travel downstream to reach larger body of water where the food is available. When they grows, migrate upstream to the place of their birth to spawn. In areas where fish have a commercial value and to keep alive these species as a part of environment, care must be done not to stop such migration specially by constructing the dams across the rivers. Diversion dams usually built across the river to divert some portion of the river flow for irrigation lands. In such dams, the engineers must provide a passage called 'FISHWAY'; for fish in order that fish can travel from down stream to the upstream of the dam. Of course, if such structure is not considered, the fish can not travel upstream to spawn, therefore in the long term these species will diminish. In this study a hydraulic model was conducted to investigate the hydraulic conditions of a vertical-slot type of fishway which has been considered for Ramhormoz diversion dam in the province of Khouzestan, Iran. The Froudian hydraulic model with the scale of 1:5 was constructed at the hydraulic laboratory of Shahid Chamran University. Tests were performed for the original design and two other alternatives slot-opening angles. Another fishway called Denil, also was tested. From the observation and data obtained from these tests, it was found that 90-degree slot opening provide suitable hydraulic conditions. Denil fishway also was found to satisfy the hydraulic criteria and due its simplicity and rapid construction was recommended to be used in this diversion dam. (author)

  12. Ozone decomposition on Saharan dust: an experimental investigation

    F. Hanisch

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous reaction between O3 and authentic Saharan dust surfaces was investigated in a Knudsen reactor at approx 296 K. O3 was destroyed on the dust surface and O2 was formed with conversion efficiencies of 1.0 and 1.3 molecules O2 per O3 molecule destroyed for unheated and heated samples, respectively. No O3 desorbed from exposed dust samples, showing that the uptake was irreversible. The uptake coefficients for the irreversible destruction of O3 on (unheated Saharan dust surfaces depended on the O3 concentration and varied between 3.5 x10-4 and 5.5 x10-6 for the initial uptake coefficient (g0 approx 3 x10-5 at 30 ppbv O3 STP and between 4.8 x10-5 and 2.2 x10-6 for the steady-state uptake coefficient (gss approx 7 x10-6 at 30 ppbv O3 STP. At very high O3 concentrations the surface was deactivated, and O3 uptake ceased after a certain exposure period. Sample re-activation (i.e. de-passivation was found to occur over periods of hours, after exposure to O3 had ceased, suggesting that re-activation processes play a role both in the laboratory and in the atmosphere.

  13. Experimental Investigation of the NASA Common Research Model

    Rivers, Melissa B.; Dittberner, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    An experimental aerodynamic investigation of the NASA Common Research Model has been conducted in the NASA NTF (National Transonic Facility). Data have been obtained at chord Reynolds numbers of 5, 19.8 and 30 million for the WB and WBT0 configurations. Data have also been obtained at a chord Reynolds number of 5 million for the WBNP, WBT+2 and WBT-2 configurations. Force and moment, surface pressure and surface flow visualization data were obtained but only the force and moment data are presented herein. Model deformation measurements, aeroelastic, nacelle/pylon Reynolds number and tail effects have been assessed. The model deformation measurements showed more twist as you go out the wing span, with a break in the high q(sub infinity) data close to CL = 0.6 which is consistent with separation near the tip. Increases in dynamic pressure give an increase in pitching moment and drag and a decrease in lift for the WB and WBT0 configuration at Mach = 0.7, 0.85 and 0.87. The addition of a nacelle/pylon gave an increase in drag, decrease in lift and a less nose down pitching moment around the design lift condition of 0.5. Increases in chord Reynolds number have been found to follow the normal Reynolds number trends except at the 19.8 million low q(sub infinity) cases. The abnormality of the 19.8 million low q(sub infinity) cases is being investigated. The tail effects also follow the expected trends. All of the data shown fall within the 2-sigma limits for repeatability.

  14. Experimental investigations of atmospheric pressure surface wave discharges

    This work deals with microwave atmospheric pressure discharges sustained by surface waves in dielectric tubes. In such type of discharge the wave guiding structure for the traveling wave sustaining the plasma column is created by the wave itself, as the surface wave propagates along the interface between the plasma and the dielectric tube enclosing it. The aim of this work is to present results of experimental investigations of atmospheric pressure discharges in argon and neon, sustained in tubes of small (less than 5 mm) inner diameter. The discharge tubes were located within the cooling bath, and were enclosed in a cylindrical metal shield. Cooling of the discharge tube gives us the possibility of operation with the microwave power level of up to 4 kW. The plasma column length was measured versus absorbed microwave power for different discharge conditions. We also observed plasma column axial structure. This gives us a view on the wave propagation characteristics. Moreover, we present results of spectroscopic investigations of both the electron density and neutral gas temperature. The electron density in the surfaguide plasma was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of Hb spectral line. The neutral gas temperature in the surfaguide plasma was determined by comparing measured and calculated spectra of the OH radicals. A small amount (about 0.2 % vol.) of water vapour was added to the working gas as a source of H atoms and OH radicals. The spectroscopic results we shall use developing of a model of propagation of surface wave. Propagation characteristics of the wave were calculated using two-temperature model of a microwave discharge. The dependence of the plasma column length on absorbed power is determined. (author)

  15. Experimental investigation and mechanistic modelling of dilute bubbly bulk boiling

    During evaporation the geometric shape of the vapour is not described using thermodynamics. In bubbly flows the bubble shape is considered spheric with small diameters and changing into various shapes upon growth. The heat and mass transfer happens at the interfacial area. The forces acting on the bubbles depend on the bubble diameter and shape. In this work the prediction of the bubble diameter and/or bubble number density in bulk boiling was considered outside the vicinity of the heat input area. Thus the boiling effects that happened inside the nearly saturated bulk were under investigation. This situation is relevant for nuclear safety analysis concerning a stagnant coolant in the spent fuel pool. In this research project a new experimental set-up to investigate was built. The experimental set-up consists of an instrumented, partly transparent, high and slender boiling container for visual observation. The direct visual observation of the boiling phenomena is necessary for the identification of basic mechanisms, which should be incorporated in the simulation model. The boiling process has been recorded by means of video images and subsequently was evaluated by digital image processing methods, and by that data concerning the characteristics of the boiling process were generated for the model development and validation. Mechanistic modelling is based on the derivation of relevant mechanisms concluded from observation, which is in line with physical knowledge. In this context two mechanisms were identified; the growth/-shrink mechanism (GSM) of the vapour bubbles and sudden increases of the bubble number density. The GSM was implemented into the CFD-Code ANSYS-CFX using the CFX Expression Language (CEL) by calculation of the internal bubble pressure using the Young-Laplace-Equation. This way a hysteresis is realised as smaller bubbles have an increased internal pressure. The sudden increases of the bubble number density are explainable by liquid super-heating. The liquid super-heating is only possible if the heat and mass transfer between the phases is slower than the saturation temperature reduction by hydrostatic pressure decreases along the height of the boiling container or due to bubble growth. By activation of the so far inactive micro-bubbles in the liquid bulk volume the bubble number density quickly increases. This effect is modelled by an algebraic function that uses a constant bubble number density in the vicinity of the saturation temperature and applies an exponentially increased bubble number density depending on the liquid super-heating. Based on modelling a local and variable bubble number density numerical flow simulations were performed. The simulations showed that this approach is a suitable model to describe the mechanisms found in the experiments. Model parameters were determined and verified by correlation with the experimental data.

  16. Numerical and experimental investigations on unsteady aerodynamics of flapping wings

    Yu, Meilin

    The development of a dynamic unstructured grid high-order accurate spectral difference (SD) method for the three dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations and its applications in flapping-wing aerodynamics are carried out in this work. Grid deformation is achieved via an algebraic blending strategy to save computational cost. The Geometric Conservation Law (GCL) is imposed to ensure that grid deformation will not contaminate the flow physics. A low Mach number preconditioning procedure is conducted in the developed solver to handle the bio-inspired flow. The capability of the low Mach number preconditioned SD solver is demonstrated by a series of two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) simulations of the unsteady vortex dominated flow. Several topics in the flapping wing aerodynamics are numerically and experimentally investigated in this work. These topics cover some of the cutting-edge issues in flapping wing aerodynamics, including the wake structure analysis, airfoil thickness and kinematics effects on the aerodynamic performances, vortex structure analysis around 3D flapping wings and the kinematics optimization. Wake structures behind a sinusoidally pitching NACA0012 airfoil are studied with both experimental and numerical approaches. The experiments are carried out with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and two types of wake transition processes, namely the transition from a drag-indicative wake to a thrust-indicative wake and that from the symmetric wake to the asymmetric wake are distinguished. The numerical results from the developed SD solver agree well with the experimental results. It is numerically found that the deflective direction of the asymmetric wake is determined by the initial conditions, e.g. initial phase angle. As most insects use thin wings (i. e., wing thickness is only a few percent of the chord length) in flapping flight, the effects of airfoil thickness on thrust generation are numerically investigated by simulating the flow fields around a series of plunging NACA symmetric airfoils with thickness ratio ranging from 4.0% to 20.0% of the airfoil chord length. The contribution of viscous force to flapping propulsion is accessed and it is found that viscous force becomes thrust producing, instead of drag producing, and plays a non-negligible role in thrust generation for thin airfoils. This is closely related to the variations of the dynamics of the unsteady vortex structures around the plunging airfoils. As nature flyers use complex wing kinematics in flapping flight, kinematics effects on the aerodynamic performance with different airfoil thicknesses are numerically studied by using a series of NACA symmetric airfoils. It is found that the combined plunging and pitching motion can outperform the pure plunging or pitching motion by sophisticatedly adjusting the airfoil gestures during the oscillation stroke. The thin airfoil better manipulates leading edge vortices (LEVs) than the thick airfoil (NACA0030) does in studied cases, and there exists an optimal thickness for large thrust generation with reasonable propulsive efficiency. With the present kinematics and dynamic parameters, relatively low reduced frequency is conducive for thrust production and propulsive efficiency for all tested airfoil thicknesses. In order to obtain the optimal kinematics parameters of flapping flight, a kinematics optimization is then performed. A gradient-based optimization algorithm is coupled with a second-order SD Navier-Stokes solver to search for the optimal kinematics of a certain airfoil undergoing a combined plunging and pitching motion. Then a high-order SD scheme is used to verify the optimization results and reveal the detailed vortex structures associated with the optimal kinematics of the flapping flight. It is found that for the case with maximum propulsive efficiency, there exists no leading edge separation during most of the oscillation cycle. In order to provide constructive suggestions to the design of micro-air-vehicles (MAVs), 3D simulations of the flapping wings are carrie

  17. Experimental Investigation On Design Of High Pressure Steam Turbine Blade

    SUBRAMANYAM PAVULURI, DR. A. SIVA KUMAR

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Experimental investigation on design of high pressure steam turbine blade addresses the issue of steam turbine efficiency. A specific focus on aerofoil profile for high pressure turbine blade, and it evaluates the effectiveness of certain Chromium and Nickel in resisting creep and fracture in turbine blades. The capable of thermal and chemical conditions in blade substrate from to prevent the corrosion when exposed to wet steam. The efficiency of the steam turbine is a key factor in both the environmental and economical impact of any coal-fired power station. To increasing the efficiency of a typical 500MW turbine by 1% reduces emissions of CO2 from the turbine station, with corresponding reductions in NOx and SOx. In this connection an attempt is made on steam turbine blade performance is important criterion for retrofit coal fired power plant. Based on the research presented modifications to high pressure high pressure steam turbine blades can be made to increase turbine efficiency of the turbine. The results and conclusions are presented for a study concerning the durability problems experienced with steam turbine blades.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Three Machine Learning Algorithms for ITS Dataset

    Yearwood, J. L.; Kang, B. H.; Kelarev, A. V.

    The present article is devoted to experimental investigation of the performance of three machine learning algorithms for ITS dataset in their ability to achieve agreement with classes published in the biologi cal literature before. The ITS dataset consists of nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences, where rather sophisticated alignment scores have to be used as a measure of distance. These scores do not form a Minkowski metric and the sequences cannot be regarded as points in a finite dimensional space. This is why it is necessary to develop novel machine learning ap proaches to the analysis of datasets of this sort. This paper introduces a k-committees classifier and compares it with the discrete k-means and Nearest Neighbour classifiers. It turns out that all three machine learning algorithms are efficient and can be used to automate future biologically significant classifications for datasets of this kind. A simplified version of a synthetic dataset, where the k-committees classifier outperforms k-means and Nearest Neighbour classifiers, is also presented.

  19. Experimental investigations of the ''Angara-5'' facility module

    The description and results of experimental investigation of the head module of the ''Angara-5'' facility are presented. The module represents and energy storage consisting of the Arkadiev-Marx generator and double shaping line (DSL). The intermediate DSL electrode is conneeted with the generator by two conductors passing through the separating section with four dielectric partitions. In the course of DSL commutation realized by five gass-filled commutators internal electrode charging is performed through the cantilever being isolation induction. Basic DSL characteristics are given. In the process of operation on increasing charge module voltage about 180 pulses with DSL charge voltage-1 MV, 80 pulses with charge voltage 1,6 MV and 10 pulses with 2,1 MV voltage have been performed. In all module operation conditions no break-down in water have been observed. Time spread of commutators switch on not exceeding +- 2,6 ns. Gas discharge channel losses are given. The module power balance under capacitor charging voltage +- 80 kV is presented

  20. Experimental Investigation on Effect of Adhesives on Thermoelectric Generator Performance

    Singh, Baljit; Remeli, Muhammad Fairuz; Chet, Ding Lai; Oberoi, Amandeep; Date, Abhijit; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar

    2015-06-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) convert heat energy into electricity. Currently, these devices are attached to heat exchangers by means of mechanical devices such as clamps or fixtures with nuts and bolts. These mechanical devices are not suitable for use in harsh environments due to problems with rusting and maintenance. To eliminate the need for such mechanical devices, various kinds of adhesives used to attach thermoelectric generators to heat exchangers are investigated experimentally in this work. These adhesives have been selected based on their thermal properties and also their stability to work in harsh environments to avoid damage to the integrity of the attachment over long periods of time. Stainless-steel plates were attached to a thermoelectric generator using the adhesives. The introduction of the adhesive as a means of attachment for thermoelectric generators contributes to increase the thermal resistance to heat transfer across the TEG. The adhesive layers increased the thermal resistance of the thermoelectric generator by 16% to 109%. This work examines the effect of the adhesives on the thermal performance and power output of a single thermoelectric generator for various heat inputs.

  1. Experimental investigation of premixed combustion within highly porous media

    This paper reports on an experimental investigation of premixed methane/air combustion stabilized within a reticulated partially stabilized zirconia foam burner that was performed. A flame holder was used to extend the stability range to allow a stable flame to be maintained for a variety of flow rate and equivalence ratio combinations. The stability range, temperature distributions, and emissions were examined over a range of equivalence ratios and flow rates. The flame was found to be axisymmetric for all conditions in which the reactants were sufficiently well mixed and the flow distribution was sufficiently uniform. Burning speeds were measured that were well in excess of the laminar flame speed. The axial temperature distribution (measured around the burner annulus) in the postflame zone was found to be relatively insensitive to flow rate but dependent upon the burner core length. Very low concentrations of NOx were found for fuel/air equivalence ratios of less than about 0.9. Measured O2 concentrations followed the equilibrium trend relatively well

  2. Experimental investigation of fatigue in a cantilever energy harvesting beam

    Avvari, Panduranga Vittal; Yang, Yaowen; Liu, Peiwen; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2015-03-01

    Over the last decade, cantilever energy harvesters gained immense popularity owing to the simplicity of the design and piezoelectric energy harvesting (PEH) using the cantilever design has undergone considerable evolution. The major drawback of a vibrating cantilever beam is its vulnerability to fatigue over a period of time. This article brings forth an experimental investigation into the phenomenon of fatigue of a PEH cantilever beam. As there has been very little literature reported in this area, an effort has been made to scrutinize the damage due to fatigue in a linear vibrating cantilever PEH beam consisting of an aluminum substrate with a piezoelectric macro-fiber composite (MFC) patch attached near the root of the beam and a tip mass attached to the beam. The beam was subjected to transverse vibrations and the behavior of the open circuit voltage was recorded with passing time. Moreover, electro-mechanical admittance readings were obtained periodically using the same MFC patch as a Structural health monitoring (SHM) sensor to assess the health of the PEH beam. The results show that with passing time the PEH beam underwent fatigue in both the substrate and MFC, which is observed in a complimentary trend in the voltage and admittance readings. The claim is further supported using the variation of root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the real part of admittance (conductance) readings. Thus, this study concludes that the fatigue issue should be addressed in the design of PEH for long term vibration energy harvesting.

  3. Experimental investigation on laser removal of carbon and tungsten particles

    During the operation of the ITER fusion facility, particles with size from 10 nm to 100 ?m, mainly composed of carbon, beryllium, and tungsten, will be produced. Since dust could lead to safety issues, it must be periodically removed from the facility in order to keep their quantity below the safety limit requirements. In this context, laser cleaning appeared as a very promising technique, and investigations have to be done to understand the physical processes and optimize the procedure. Several experiments were carried out to improve the understanding of the phenomena involved during the laser-induced removal of Carbon particles. The ejection mechanisms have been experimentally studied for different irradiation conditions with nanosecond laser pulses. The removal efficiency and the fluence threshold were determined by optical microscopy. The influence of the substrate was studied for the dry laser cleaning configuration. This study presents scanning electronic microscopy pictures which show that the particle removal leads to a damage of the substrate. These damages give evidences on the ablation mechanism. The laser shock cleaning was also studied. In this configuration, the laser-induced shock wave can be used to push the particles away from the surface. This technique appears to be very useful to clean shadowed areas

  4. Experimental and theoretical investigations of a 17 GHz RF gun

    Brown, W J; Kreischer, K E; Pedrozzi, M; Shapiro, M A; Temkin, R J

    1999-01-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical investigations of a 17 GHz RF photocathode electron gun. This is the first photocathode electron gun to operate at a frequency above 2.856 GHz. The 1.5 cell, pi mode, copper cavity was tested with 50 ns pulses from a 17.150 GHz klystron amplifier built by Haimson Research Corp. A Bragg filter was used at the RF gun to reduce the reflection of parasitic modes back into the klystron. Coupling hole theory in conjunction with cold test measurements was used to determine the field profile in the RF gun. The particle in cell code MAGIC as well as coupled envelope equations were used to simulate the beam dynamics in the RF gun. With power levels of 4 MW, the on axis electric field at the cathode exceeds 300 MV/m, corresponding to an average accelerating gradient of 200 MV/m over the first half cell of the gun. Breakdown was observed at power levels above 5 MW. Electron bunches were produced by 20 mu J, 1 ps UV laser pulses impinging on the RF gun copper photocathode and were...

  5. Numerical and experimental investigation of thermosyphon solar water heater

    Highlights: • We studied a thermosyphon solar water heater composed of high-performance components. • A differential equations solution technique is investigated. • The influences of the collector and storage losses on the system performance were examined. • The storage losses have more influence on the long-term performance. - Abstract: A glassed flat plate collector with selective black chrome coated absorber and a low wall conductance horizontal storage are combined in order to set up a high performance thermosyphon system. Each component is tested separately before testing the complete system in spring days. During the test period, effect of different inlet water temperatures on the collector performance is studied and results have shown that the collector can reach a high efficiency and high outlet water temperature even for elevated inlet water temperatures. Subsequently, long term system performance is estimated by using a developed numerical model. The proposed model, accurate and gave a good agreement with experimental results, allowed to describe the heat transfer in the storage. It has shown also that the long-term performances are strongly influenced by losses from the storage than losses from the collector

  6. Experimental Investigation on Airfoil Shock Control by Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation

    An experimental investigation on airfoil (NACA64—215) shock control is performed by plasma aerodynamic actuation in a supersonic tunnel (Ma = 2). The results of schlieren and pressure measurement show that when plasma aerodynamic actuation is applied, the position moves forward and the intensity of shock at the head of the airfoil weakens. With the increase in actuating voltage, the total pressure measured at the head of the airfoil increases, which means that the shock intensity decreases and the control effect increases. The best actuation effect is caused by upwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, and then downwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, while the control effect of aerodynamic actuation without a magnetic field is the most inconspicuous. The mean intensity of the normal shock at the head of the airfoil is relatively decreased by 16.33%, and the normal shock intensity is relatively reduced by 27.5% when 1000 V actuating voltage and upwind-direction actuation are applied with a magnetic field. This paper theoretically analyzes the Joule heating effect generated by DC discharge and the Lorentz force effect caused by the magnetic field. The discharge characteristics are compared for all kinds of actuation conditions to reveal the mechanism of shock control by plasma aerodynamic actuation

  7. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation Induced Feedline Instability from an Orifice

    Hitt, Matthew A.; Lineberry, David M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Frederick, Robert A,

    2012-01-01

    This paper details the results of an experimental investigation into the cavitation instabilities created by a circular orifice conducted at the University of Alabama in Huntsville Propulsion Research Center. This experiment was conducted in concert with a computational simulation to serve as a reference point for the simulation. Testing was conducted using liquid nitrogen as a cryogenic propellant simulant. A 1.06 cm diameter thin orifice with a rounded inlet was tested in an approximately 1.25 kg/s flow with inlet pressures ranging from 504.1 kPa to 829.3 kPa. Pressure fluctuations generated by the orifice were measured using a high frequency pressure sensor located 0.64 tube diameters downstream of the orifice. Fast Fourier Transforms were performed on the high frequency data to determine the instability frequency. Shedding resulted in a primary frequency with a cavitation related subharmonic frequency. For this experiment, the cavitation instability ranged from 153 Hz to 275 Hz. Additionally, the strength of the cavitation occur red as a function of cavitation number. At lower cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 2.4 % to 7 % of the inlet pressure. However, at higher cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 0.6 % to 1 % of the inlet pressure.

  8. Experimental investigation of mesoscale crack front triple line

    Budzik, Michal K.; Jumel, Julien; Shanahan, Martin E. R.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the mesoscale behavior and structure of an adhesive near the fracture front of an asymmetric joint consisting of carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites bonded with a relatively soft, epoxy adhesive. A single cantilever beam fracture test at constant separation rate gave steady-state crack propagation, details of which were followed by digital image correlation (DIC). A deformed, triple line region was found between the adhesive, air, and the composite, somewhat resembling a "wetting ridge," as found with a liquid meniscus in contact with a soft solid. Importantly, the partially separated bondline layer took part in (non-unidirectional) load transfer between adherends (and thus energy dissipation), contrary to common assumptions where the separated bondline is assumed no longer to play a structural role. A simple model, based on the Flamant contact mechanics approach, is proposed and compared with both a finite element solution and experimental data extracted from image correlation. The model points out the importance of two length scales: process zone extent and adhesive thickness, both being known to affect global properties of bonded structures.

  9. Experimental investigation of supersonic flow over elliptic surface

    Zhang, Qinghu; Yi, Shihe; He, Lin; Zhu, Yangzhu; Chen, Zhi

    2013-11-01

    The coherent structures of flow over a compression elliptic surface are experimentally investigated in a supersonic low-noise wind tunnel at Mach Number 3 using nano-tracer planar laser scattering (NPLS) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques. High spacial resolution images and the average velocity profiles of both laminar inflow and turbulent inflow over the testing model were captured. From statistically significant ensembles, spatial correlation analysis of both cases is performed to quantify the mean size and orientation of large structures. The results indicate that the mean structure is elliptical in shape and structure angles in separated region of laminar inflow are slightly smaller than that of turbulent inflow. Moreover, the structure angle of both cases increases with its distance away from from the wall. POD analysis of velocity and vorticity fields is performed for both cases. The energy portion of the first mode for the velocity data is much larger than that for the vorticity field. For vorticity decompositions, the contribution from the first mode for the laminar inflow is slightly larger than that for the turbulent inflow and the cumulative contributions for laminar inflow converges slightly faster than that for turbulent inflow

  10. Experimental investigation on bolting assemblies submitted to cyclic loads

    Design considerations may lead to the use of bolting or screwed connexions to join particular in sodium components of L.M.F.B. reactors. In these reactors, bolting connexions are to be chosen on criteria that may differ from those used in pressure vessel construction. For example in this case differential pressure is relatively low but thermal loads are cyclic and of large amplitude. Another particular problem is the often use of high strength materials for screws. These materials have higher elastic stress limit than strain hardening materials of the assembled components made often of austenitic steel. Because of thermal cycling the preload imposed during initial tightening can relaxe in some extent. Satisfactory operability of these components requires a minimal preload of the bolting connexion to be obtained during life time of the reactor. An experimental investigation on a representative H.M.20 bolting assembly was performed to document this behavior and to verify the applicability of design rules available in construction codes like RCC-MR (1). (orig.)

  11. Experimental investigation on light propagation through apple tissue structures

    Askoura, Mohamed Lamine; Piron, Vianney; Vaudelle, Fabrice; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre; Madieta, Emmanuel; Mehinagic, Emira

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of light with biological materials, such as fruits and vegetables, is a complex process which involves both absorption, and scattering events at different scales. Measuring the optical properties of a fruit allows understanding the physical and chemical characteristics. In this paper, an optical bench based on the use of a continuous laser source and a CCD camera was developed to study the light diffusion inside apple tissue structures. The method refers to the well-known steady-state spatially resolved method. First, the optoelectronics system was tested with a tissue phantom in order to show the optimal sensing range required to obtain the best estimated optical properties. Second, experimental results were obtained using peeled and unpeeled apples as interrogated tissues. The data were confronted with a diffusion model in order to extract the optical properties at two wavelengths of 633, and 852 nm. To better understand the effect of the apple tissue structures, investigations into the propagation of light through a half cut apple were also performed.

  12. Experimental investigation of debris sedimentation behaviour on bed formation characteristics

    Investigation on sedimentation behaviour of fragmented debris of molten core materials is important to evaluate the sequence of core disruptive accident in sodium cooled fast reactors. In the present study, to clarify this behaviour, a series of experiments was performed by gravity driven discharge of solid debris from a nozzle into a quiescent water pool. The discharged debris with a maximum amount of 10 L finally accumulates on the debris tray at the vessel's bottom, forming either a Gaussian-type convex or ring-type concave mound depending on the experiment parameters. Currently, three types of spherical debris, namely Al2O3, ZrO2 and stainless steel with diameter 2, 4, or 6 mm are employed to study the effect of nozzle diameter, debris density as well as debris diameter and debris volume on mound height of debris bed. During debris sedimentation experiments, mound height becomes decreasing with nozzle diameter and increasing with debris volume, which exhibits descending tendency in asymmetrical fashion with density variation and an unalike variations in mound height were observed with debris diameter. Based on the data obtained in experimental observations, an empirical correlation was developed applying dimensional analysis to predict the variation in mound height of debris bed during sedimentation process. (author)

  13. Controlling Flexible Manipulators, an Experimental Investigation. Ph.D. Thesis

    Hastings, Gordon Greene

    1986-01-01

    Lightweight, slender manipulators offer faster response and/or greater workspace range for the same size actuators than tradional manipulators. Lightweight construction of manipulator links results in increased structural flexibility. The increase flexibility must be considered in the design of control systems to properly account for the dynamic flexible vibrations and static deflections. Real time control of the flexible manipulator vibrations are experimentally investigated. Models intended for real-time control of distributed parameter system such as flexible manipulators rely on model approximation schemes. An linear model based on the application of Lagrangian dynamics to a rigid body mode and a series of separable flexible modes is examined with respect to model order requirements, and modal candidate selection. Balanced realizations are applied to the linear flexible model to obtain an estimate of appropriate order for a selected model. Describing the flexible deflections as a linear combination of modes results in measurements of beam state, which yield information about several modes. To realize the potential of linear systems theory, knowledge of each state must be available. State estimation is also accomplished by implementation of a Kalman Filter. State feedback control laws are implemented based upon linear quadratic regulator design.

  14. An experimental investigation of performance of photovoltaic modules in Pakistan

    Bashir Muhammad Anser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An outdoor experimental study was carried out to investigate and compare the performance of three commercially available photovoltaic modules (monocrystalline, polycrystalline and single junction amorphous silicon under the weather of Pakistan for the month of January. Power output efficiency, module efficiency, and performance ratio are calculated for each module and comparison is presented. Results have shown that mono-crystalline and poly-crystalline modules perform better at high irradiance and show poor performance in low irradiance conditions. Amorphous solar module has shown better light absorption characteristic and performs better in low irradiance i.e. in cloudy and diffuse sunshine conditions. Monocrystalline photovoltaic module is found to be more efficient, having module efficiency of 13.5% which is higher than the other two modules. Furthermore the power output of mono-crystalline and poly-crystalline modules has shown a higher decrement at higher module temperatures compared to the amorphous solar module. Because of better performance in low solar irradiance, amorphous solar module has shown monthly average performance ratio of 1.07 which is higher than other photovoltaic modules under study.

  15. Theoretical and experimental investigation of coupled Ar-ion lasers

    Jelonek, Mark P.

    1989-10-01

    A single mode laser theory was applied to two coupled Ar-ion lasers in Fabry-Perot resonators and the equations were solved numerically to predict intensity tuning curves and locking ranges for various types of mirror translations. The same theory was extended to model two modes in each cavity, which predicted a decrease in locking range as well as a mutually-reinforced hole burning minimum. With a single, uncoupled two mode He-Ne laser, the existence of the minimum was verified experimentally. Two multiline/multimode Ar-ion lasers were coupled through a common end mirror and the effect of coupling strength on phase locking was investigated by varying the reflectivity of that mirror. To mode coupling, interference fringe visibilities, output power, and the frequency and RF mode beat spectra were measured. The optimal phase locking occurred at about 25 percent coupling as determined by the maximum fringe visibilities produced by laser phase locking. That 25 percent coupling was the optimum coupling strength was also substantiated by fact that the maximum power output was also achieved at this point, and the appearance of the super cavity mode spacing verified that the behavior was due to phase locking. A passive cavity mode analysis of the three mirror Fabry-Perot resonator showed the system oscillated on the composite resonator frequency as well as the frequencies of both sub-resonators.

  16. Testing geochemical models of bentonite pore water evolution against laboratory experimental data

    Savage, David; Arthur, Randy; Watson, Claire; Wilson, James; Strömberg, Bo

    The determination of a bentonite pore water composition and understanding its evolution with time underpins many radioactive waste disposal issues, such as buffer erosion, canister corrosion, and radionuclide solubility, sorption, and diffusion, inter alia. Previous modelling approaches have tended to ignore clay dissolution-precipitation reactions, a consequence of which is that montmorillonite is theoretically preserved indefinitely in the repository system. Here, we investigate the applicability of an alternative clay pore fluid evolution model, that incorporates clay dissolution-precipitation reactions as an integral component and test it against well-characterised laboratory experimental data, where key geochemical parameters, Eh and pH, have been measured directly in compacted bentonite. Simulations have been conducted using different computer codes (Geochemist’s Workbench, PHREEQC, and QPAC) to test the applicability of this model. Thermodynamic data for the Gibb’s free energy of formation of MX-80 smectite used in the calculations were estimated using two different methods (‘Polymer’ and ‘Vieillard’ Models). Simulations of ‘end-point’ pH measurements in batch bentonite-water slurry experiments showed different pH values according to the complexity of the system studied. The most complete system investigated revealed pH values were a strong function of partial pressure of carbon dioxide, with pH increasing with decreasing PCO 2 (with log PCO 2 values ranging from -3.5 to -7.5 bars produced pH values ranging from 7.9 to 9.6). A second set of calculations investigated disequilibrium between clay and pore fluid in laboratory squeezing cell tests involving pure water (pH = 9.0) or a 1 M NaOH solution (pH = 12.1). Simulations carried out for 100 days (the same timescale as the experiments) showed that smectite remained far from equilibrium throughout, and that the lowering of pH due to smectite hydrolysis was trivial. However, extending the duration of the simulations to that required for clay-fluid equilibrium, necessitated timescales of 7 and 65 years for pure water and 1 M NaOH, respectively, but again produced relatively minor reduction in pH (in the order of 0.1-0.2 pH units). If the (equilibrium) precipitation of secondary minerals was included in the simulations, then not only was the clay-fluid equilibration period extended dramatically (from 7 to 360 years for pure water, and from 65 to 2600 years for 1 M NaOH), but concomitant changes in pH were significant, decreasing from 9.0 to 8.6 (pure water) and from 12.1 to 9.0 (1 M NaOH). Repetition of these latter calculations using an alternative method for ΔGf0 smectite produced an increase in equilibration time for reaction with 1 M NaOH from 2600 to 5000 years, highlighting the potential effects of the uncertainty in thermodynamic data for smectite. A final set of calculations was carried out to investigate both the time- and space-dependent variations in pore fluid composition in laboratory in-diffusion experiments conducted for over 1200 days, initially with pure water and ‘spiked’ after 271 days with a Na-Ca-OH-Cl solution (pH = 11.7). Here, the sensitivity of the results to both variations in a number of parameters/conditions (porosity, reaction rate of secondary minerals, the degree of mixing of the external fluid reservoirs in the experiments, the effective diffusion coefficient) and the inclusion/exclusion of key processes (clay hydrolysis, secondary mineral precipitation, ion exchange, clay edge protonation-deprotonation reactions) was investigated. These calculations confirmed that smectite dissolution-precipitation reactions alone have an insignificant impact upon pH buffering over laboratory timescales and that the pH buffering observed is most likely controlled by clay protonation-deprotonation reactions, and kinetic secondary mineral (brucite + tobermorite) precipitation. Ion exchange reactions were found to have little effect on pH. Alternative data for the kinetic dissolution of smectite produced no observable differences, and the adoption of a reduced diffusion coefficient produced a poorer fit to experiment results. In conclusion, modelling predicts that the effects of smectite dissolution on the chemistry of bentonite pore waters would be essentially undetectable over experimental time scales, but when the model is combined with plausible constraints on the precipitation of secondary minerals, significant changes in solution chemistry and mineralogy are predicted to occur over time scales that are relevant to repository near-field evolution (hundreds to thousands of years). There are remaining fundamental uncertainties related to the variable chemistry of the smectite clays, the nature of porosity in highly compacted buffer materials, the reactive surface area of smectite, and the thermodynamic properties of these clay minerals.

  17. Testing geochemical models of bentonite pore water evolution against laboratory experimental data

    The determination of a bentonite pore water composition and understanding its evolution with time underpins many radioactive waste disposal issues, such as buffer erosion, canister corrosion, and radionuclide solubility, sorption, and diffusion, inter alia. Previous modelling approaches have tended to ignore clay dissolution-precipitation reactions, a consequence of which is that montmorillonite is theoretically preserved indefinitely in the repository system. Here, we investigate the applicability of an alternative clay pore fluid evolution model, that incorporates clay dissolution-precipitation reactions as an integral component and test it against well-characterised laboratory experimental data, where key geochemical parameters, Eh and pH, have been measured directly in compacted bentonite. Simulations have been conducted using different computer codes (Geo-chemist's Workbench, PHREEQC, and QPAC) to test the applicability of this model. Thermodynamic data for the Gibb's free energy of formation of MX-80 smectite used in the calculations were estimated using two different methods ('Polymer' and 'Vieillard' Models).Simulations of 'end-point' pH measurements in batch bentonite-water slurry experiments showed different pH values according to the complexity of the system studied. The most complete system investigated revealed pH values were a strong function of partial pressure of carbon dioxide, with pH increasing with decreasing PCO2 (with log PCO2 values ranging from -3.5 to -7.5 bars produced pH values ranging from 7.9 to 9.6). A second set of calculations investigated disequilibrium between clay and pore fluid in laboratory squeezing cell tests involving pure water (pH = 9.0) or a 1 M NaOH solution (pH = 12.1). Simulations carried out for 100 days (the same timescale as the experiments) showed that smectite remained far from equilibrium throughout, and that the lowering of pH due to smectite hydrolysis was trivial. However, extending the duration of the simulations to that required for clay-fluid equilibrium, necessitated timescales of 7 and 65. years for pure water and 1 M NaOH, respectively, but again produced relatively minor reduction in pH (in the order of 0.1-0.2 pH units). If the (equilibrium) precipitation of secondary minerals was included in the simulations, then not only was the clay-fluid equilibration period extended dramatically (from 7 to 360 years for pure water, and from 65 to 2600. years for 1 M NaOH), but concomitant changes in pH were significant, decreasing from 9.0 to 8.6 (pure water) and from 12.1 to 9.0 (1 M NaOH). Repetition of these latter calculations using an alternative method for ΔGf0 smectite produced an increase in equilibration time for reaction with 1 M NaOH from 2600 to 5000 years, highlighting the potential effects of the uncertainty in thermodynamic data for smectite. A final set of calculations was carried out to investigate both the time- and space-dependent variations in pore fluid composition in laboratory in-diffusion experiments conducted for over 1200 days, initially with pure water and 'spiked' after 271 days with a Na-Ca-OH-Cl solution (pH = 11.7). Here, the sensitivity of the results to both variations in a number of parameters/conditions (porosity, reaction rate of secondary minerals, the degree of mixing of the external fluid reservoirs in the experiments, the effective diffusion coefficient) and the inclusion/exclusion of key processes (clay hydrolysis, secondary mineral precipitation, ion exchange, clay edge protonation-deprotonation reactions) was investigated. These calculations confirmed that smectite dissolution-precipitation reactions alone have an insignificant impact upon pH buffering over laboratory timescales and that the pH buffering observed is most likely controlled by clay protonation-deprotonation reactions, and kinetic secondary mineral (brucite + tobermorite) precipitation. Ion exchange reactions were found to have little effect on pH. Alternative data for the kinetic dissolution of smectite produced no observable differences, and the adoption of a reduced diffusion coefficient produced a poorer fit to experiment results. In conclusion, modelling predicts that the effects of smectite dissolution on the chemistry of bentonite pore waters would be essentially undetectable over experimental time scales, but when the model is combined with plausible constraints on the precipitation of secondary minerals, significant changes in solution chemistry and mineralogy are predicted to occur over time scales that are relevant to repository near-field evolution (hundreds to thousands of years). There are remaining fundamental uncertainties related to the variable chemistry of the smectite clays, the nature of porosity in highly compacted buffer materials, the reactive surface area of smectite, and the thermodynamic properties of these clay minerals. (authors)

  18. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Experimental Hygrothermal Performance. Cloquet Residential Research Facility Laboratory Results

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Harmon, Anna C. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-04-09

    This project was funded jointly by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL focused on developing a full basement wall system experimental database to enable others to validate hygrothermal simulation codes. NREL focused on testing the moisture durability of practical basement wall interior insulation retrofit solutions for cold climates. The project has produced a physically credible and reliable long-term hygrothermal performance database for retrofit foundation wall insulation systems in zone 6 and 7 climates that are fully compliant with the performance criteria in the 2009 Minnesota Energy Code. These data currently span the period from November 10, 2012 through May 31, 2014 and are anticipated to be extended through November 2014. The experimental data were configured into a standard format that can be published online and that is compatible with standard commercially available spreadsheet and database software.

  19. Investigating the Effect of Argument-Driven Inquiry in Laboratory Instruction

    Demircioglu, Tuba; Ucar, Sedat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of argument-driven inquiry (ADI) based laboratory instruction on the academic achievement, argumentativeness, science process skills, and argumentation levels of pre-service science teachers in the General Physics Laboratory III class. The study was conducted with 79 pre-service science teachers.

  20. Analysis of Verbal Interactions during an Extended, Open-Inquiry General Chemistry Laboratory Investigation

    Krystyniak, Rebecca A.; Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores effects of participation by second-semester college general chemistry students in an extended, open-inquiry laboratory investigation. Verbal interactions among a student lab team and with their instructor over three open-inquiry laboratory sessions and two non-inquiry sessions were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Coding…

  1. Golden oldies in a laboratory course in the experimental analysis of behavior

    Zuriff, G E

    2005-01-01

    A common problem in teaching undergraduate courses in the experimental analysis of behavior (EAB) is that the contemporary research literature is largely not comprehensible to most undergraduates. A suggested solution is the use of research articles from the early days of EAB. These are not only easy to understand but provide additional educational benefits. A reading list and an organizational structure for an undergraduate laboratory course in EAB are suggested.

  2. "Golden oldies" in a laboratory course in the experimental analysis of behavior.

    Zuriff, G E

    2005-01-01

    A common problem in teaching undergraduate courses in the experimental analysis of behavior (EAB) is that the contemporary research literature is largely not comprehensible to most undergraduates. A suggested solution is the use of research articles from the early days of EAB. These are not only easy to understand but provide additional educational benefits. A reading list and an organizational structure for an undergraduate laboratory course in EAB are suggested. PMID:22478440

  3. Solute transport in subsurface drained soil: Numerical modelling and laboratory experimental approach comparison.

    Tournebize, J.; Paris, T; Chaumont, C.; C Kao

    2005-01-01

    Artificial drainage has been subject to widespread criticism because of its impact on water quality. In particular, observations converge to show drainage is suspected to accelerate pollutants transfer through soil. However, there are some unknowns about the actual mechanisms for such observations. The present work aims at describing and understanding the processes of bi-dimensional solute transfer in subsurface drained soil, using tracer monitoring in a metric size experimental laboratory mo...

  4. Application of Different Mixing Systems for the Batch Cultivation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Part I: Experimental Investigations and Modelling

    Andrejs Berzins

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations in different mixing conditions (impulse and vibromixing in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae batch cultivation are presented in this paper. The investigation is carried out in a 5 l laboratory bioreactor (working volume 3 l. Mathematical models of the process for the two mixing systems are developed. The obtained results have shown that the models are adequate and will be used for process optimisation for the two mixing systems.

  5. Experimental investigation and mechanical modelling of zircaloy-4 stress corrosion cracking

    In Pressurised Water Reactor fuel assemblies, cladding tubes constitute the first safety barriers against the fission product dissemination. It is therefore essential to ensure their integrity under all the reactor operating conditions. During an important loading, resulting from severe reactor power transients, clad failures can be induced by a Stress Corrosion Cracking phenomenon (SCC) due to the combined action of mechanical loading and gaseous fission products generated by the fuel pellets. The aim of our work is to study the role played by different parameters on the SCC phenomenon of Zircaloy-4 claddings. It is made up of three complementary parts: - the modelling of local mechanical fields applied during laboratory tests; - the design of specific SCC experiments to investigate the influence of several mechanical parameters; - the observation of the damage mechanisms occurring during these different experiments. Coupling mechanical modelling and laboratory tests allowed to obtain some local information which cannot be obtained experimentally. A hierarchical approach was then used to develop accurate constitutive laws of the stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 alloy. The constitutive equations derived from this approach were fitted to the mechanical loading applied during the experiments. The specific SCC tests results and SEM observations proved the existence of a time incubation period, which lasts for an important part of the lifetime measured in the SCC pressurization tests. This incubation period is closely related to the experimental conditions of the laboratory tests. However the incubation period must be distinguished from the actual SCC mechanisms and corresponds to the time required for the metal surface to strip of its oxide layer by mechanical cracking and/or attack of zircon. First results obtained on pre-cracked samples showed that this stage, which introduces an artefact in the experimental test analysis, can be suppressed. Moreover, we have borne out that initiation and propagation of SCC cracks can be very fast when metal is laid bare and when iodine is present. (author)

  6. Experimental and theoretical investigations of a 17 GHz RF gun

    We report on experimental and theoretical investigations of a 17 GHz RF photocathode electron gun. This is the first photocathode electron gun to operate at a frequency above 2.856 GHz. The 1.5 cell, π mode, copper cavity was tested with 50 ns pulses from a 17.150 GHz klystron amplifier built by Haimson Research Corp. A Bragg filter was used at the RF gun to reduce the reflection of parasitic modes back into the klystron. Coupling hole theory in conjunction with cold test measurements was used to determine the field profile in the RF gun. The particle in cell code MAGIC as well as coupled envelope equations were used to simulate the beam dynamics in the RF gun. With power levels of 4 MW, the on axis electric field at the cathode exceeds 300 MV/m, corresponding to an average accelerating gradient of 200 MV/m over the first half cell of the gun. Breakdown was observed at power levels above 5 MW. Electron bunches were produced by 20 μJ, 1 ps UV laser pulses impinging on the RF gun copper photocathode and were measured with a Faraday cup to have up to 0.1 nC of charge. This corresponds to a peak current of about 100 A, and a density at the cathode of 8.8 kA/cm2. Multiple output electron bunches were obtained for multiple laser pulses incident on the cathode. Phase scans of laser-induced electron emission reveal an overall phase stability of better than ±20 deg. , corresponding to ±3 ps synchronization of the laser pulses to the phase of the microwave field. A Browne-Buechner magnetic spectrometer indicated that the RF gun generated 1 MeV electrons with a single shot rms energy spread of less than 2.5%, in good agreement with theoretical predictions

  7. Significance of different animal species in experimental models for in vivo investigations of hematopoiesis

    Kovačević-Filipović Milica

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous discoveries in medicine are results of experiments on different animal species. The most frequently used animals in hematopoiesis investigations are laboratory mice and rats, but so-called big animals, such as pigs, sheep, cats, dogs, and monkeys, evolution-wise closer to humans have a place in experimental hematology as well. The specific problematics of a certain animal specie can lead to fundamental knowledge on certain aspects of the process of hematopoiesis end the biology of stem cells in hematopoiesis. Furthermore, comparative investigations of certain phenomena in different species help in the recognition of the general rules in the living world. In the area f preclinicalinvesti- gations, animal models are an inevitable step in studies of transplantation biology of stem cells in hematopoiesis, as well as in studies of biologically active molecules which have an effect on the hematopoietic system. Knowledge acquired on animal models is applied in both human and veterinary medicine.

  8. Analyzing "Real-World" Anomalous Data after Experimentation with a Virtual Laboratory

    Toth, Eva Erdosne

    2016-01-01

    Developing effective pedagogies to help students examine anomalous data is critical for the education of the next generation of scientists and engineers. By definition anomalous data do not concur with prior knowledge, theories and expectations. Such data are the common outcome of empirical investigation in hands-on laboratories (HOLs). These…

  9. Experimental investigations for uncertainty quantification in brake squeal analysis

    Renault, A.; Massa, F.; Lallemand, B.; Tison, T.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to improve the correlation between the experimental and the numerical prediction of unstable frequencies for automotive brake systems considering uncertainty. First, an experimental quantification of uncertainty and a discussion analysing the contributions of uncertainty to a numerical squeal simulation are proposed. Frequency and transient simulations are performed considering nominal values of model parameters, determined experimentally. The obtained results are compared with those derived from experimental tests to highlight the limitation of deterministic simulations. The effects of the different kinds of uncertainty detected in working conditions of brake system, the pad boundary condition, the brake system material properties and the pad surface topography are discussed by defining different unstable mode classes. Finally, a correlation between experimental and numerical results considering uncertainty is successfully proposed for an industrial brake system. Results from the different comparisons reveal also a major influence of the pad topography and consequently the contact distribution.

  10. Experimental investigations of biomass gasification with carbon-dioxide

    Sircar, Indraneel

    A sustainable energy cycle may include enhanced utilization of solar energy and atmospheric CO2 to produce biomass and enhanced utilization of exhaust CO2 from power plants for synthetic gas production. The reaction of carbon with CO2 is potentially one of the important processes in a future sustainable carbon cycle. Reactions involving carbon and CO2 are also relevant to the chemical process and metal industries. Biomass char has been recognized as a present and future alternative to fossil-fuels for energy production and fuel synthesis. Therefore, biomass char gasification with CO2 recycling is proposed as a sustainable and carbon-neutral energy technology. Biomass char is a complex porous solid and its gasification involves heat and mass transfer processes within pores of multiple sizes from nanometer to millimeter scales. These processes are coupled with heterogeneous chemistry at the internal and external surfaces. Rates for the heterogeneous carbon gasification reactions are affected by inorganic content of the char. Furthermore, pore structure of the char develops with conversion and influences apparent gasification rates. Effective modeling of the gasification reactions has relied on the best available understanding of diffusion processes and kinetic rate property constants from state of the art experiments. Improvement of the influences of inorganic composition, and process parameters, such as pressure and temperature on the gasification reaction rates has been a continuous process. Economic viability of gasification relies on use of optimum catalysts. These aspects of the current status of gasification technologies have motivated the work reported in this dissertation. The reactions between biomass chars and CO2 are investigated to determine the effects of temperature and pressure on the reaction rates for large char particles of relevance to practical gasification technologies. An experimental apparatus consisting of a high-pressure fixed-bed reactor with product gas sampling for tracking the reaction progress, supported by independent gravimetric measurements of mass loss, is described. The effects of pressure and temperature on the char-CO2 reaction are investigated at elevated pressures up to 10 atm. Measurements of reaction rates at multiple temperatures and pressures for a low-ash pinewood char are presented. Kinetic rate parameters for the char-CO2 reaction are reported with detailed uncertainty calculations and discussed in the context of the structural changes of the char with mass loss. The effects of pressure and temperature on the internal mass transfer processes and the intrinsic reaction rates are assessed using Thiele analysis for non-isothermal particles with the nth order and the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic rate models. The effects of potassium, calcium and iron catalysts on the CO2 gasification rates of an activated coconut char are investigated. A catalyst treatment method for obtaining high catalyst loadings (~12 wt. %) is described. The effects of the catalysts on the surface reaction rates and the activation energies are reported. The results of this study are encouraging in the context of potential future discovery of a viable low-temperature catalytic gasification process for sustainable use of biomass as a renewable energy resource. Utilization of plant based substances such as citric acid to provide higher catalytic activity and the potential for utilizing the high initial activity of iron by using rust proofing compounds for maintaining high reactivity are recommended for further development.

  11. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Flows in Expanding Channels

    Vorobieff, Peter; Putkaradze, Vakhtang

    2008-10-24

    We present an experimental realization of the classical Jeffery-Hamel flows inside a wedge-shaped channel. We compare the measured velocity fields with the predictions of Jeffery-Hamel theory. A detailed experimental study of bifurcation diagrams for the solutions reveals the absolute stability of the pure outflow solution and an interesting hysteretic structure for bifurcations. We also observe a multiple vortex flow regime predicted earlier numerically and analytically. Experimental studies of the stability of the flow to perturbations at the channel exit are also conducted.

  12. [Can a laboratory investigation be called anything? "The NPU system" sorts out the concepts and gives systematic stringency].

    Nordin, Gunnar; Klinteberg, Barbro; Persson, Birgitta; Forsum, Urban

    When communicating results from laboratory investigations from the laboratory to the requesters and further between different information systems, it is important that the value as well as the unique identity and name of the laboratory investigation are correctly cited. A committee under the International Federation for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) and International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has developed a systematic nomenclature for the correct classification of laboratory investigations. Each generic laboratory investigation is provided with a unique NPU code. The system is in use among approximately 30 different clinical laboratories in Sweden, and has capacity to be the common denominator of all laboratory investigations, and to be used as the identifier in various information systems. The NPU system for the Swedish laboratories is currently administered by EQUALIS and partly financed by the participating laboratories. Other ways of funding, of benefit for the whole health care sector, will be investigated. PMID:15921106

  13. Bond behaviour of reinforcing bars in UHPFRC: Experimental investigation

    MARCHAND, Pierre; BABY, Florent; KHADOUR, Aghiad; BATTESTI, Thomas; RIVILLON, Philippe; Quiertant, Marc; Nguyen, Hong-Hai; GENEREUX, Grégory; DEVEAUD, Jean-Paul; Simon, Alain; TOUTLEMONDE, François

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the bond behaviour between ultra-high performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) and reinforcing bars (rebars). An experimental campaign has been carried out to assess the bond behaviour considering different rebar diameters, different embedment lengths and different concrete covers. A relationship between bond strength, compressive strength and rebar diameter has been drawn from the results of this campaign and results found in the ...

  14. Experimental Investigation of Low Pressure Audio Frequency Discharge in Argon

    Experimental data obtained on audio frequency (100–10000 Hz) discharge in argon at four pressures 50, 60, 70, and 80 mTorr are presented. The data show significant changes of the discharge current waveform with frequency. These changes seem to be associated with the glow discharge profile and colour. An empirical model based on the assumption of a frequency-dependent breakdown voltage is used to describe the experimental data

  15. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Circulation in Short Cylinders

    Kageyama, Akira; Ji, Hantao; Goodman, Jeremy; Chen, Fei; Shoshan, Ethan

    2004-01-01

    In preparation for an experimental study of magnetorotational instability (MRI) in liquid metal, we explore Couette flows having height comparable to the gap between cylinders, centrifugally stable rotation, and high Reynolds number. Experiments in water are compared with numerical simulations. Simulations show that endcaps corotating with the outer cylinder drive a strong poloidal circulation that redistributes angular momentum. Predicted azimuthal flow profiles agree well with experimental ...

  16. Experimental Investigation on Strength Characteristics of Binary Blended Concrete

    MD. Hashmath

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation has been carried out to assess the behavior of concrete beams blended with steel crimped fiber and flyash subjected to combined torsion-bending-shear with longitudinal reinforcement. The concrete is binary blended with 15% of fly ash by weight of cement as partial replacement of cement and addition of 0%, 0.5%, 0.75%, 1% of crimped steel fibers with aspect ratio of 80 are used for the study purpose. Compressive strength of concrete is measured by testing standard cubes (150mm x 150mm x 150mm at the age of 28 days, the combined torsion-bending-shear strength is measured by testing beams of size 100x100mm and length 1200mm with a bracket attached at center of size 100x100x300mm.This bracket is adequately reinforced to avoid any failure at joint. The tests were conducted on 12 beams for varying percentages of steel fibers and studied for their behavior under combined torsion-bending-shear. The study involved the influence of fiber addition on the ultimate torsion-bending-shear strength of beams.Test results indicated that fibrous concrete beams exhibited improved overall performance with respect to corresponding non-fibrous beams. Flyash with steel fiber has shown considerable improvement in the compressive and torsion-bending-shear strength of concrete. From the test results it is observed that the concrete mix with 15% fly ash replacement of cement of M30 grade concrete mixture has shown maximum compressive strength of 47 MPa at 28 days. Concrete mixture with 15% fly ash replacement of cement along with 0.75% of crimped steel fibers has shown significant improvement in various properties at the age 0f 28 days indicated by 38% increase in compressive strength and 58% increase in the combined torsion-bending-shear strength of concrete. Hence binary blended crimped steel fiber reinforced concrete with 15% fly ash with 0.75 % steel fibers is a novel material having superior performance characteristics compared with conventional concrete.

  17. Experimental investigation of two-dimensional antiferromagnetic systems

    Woodward, Frank Matthew

    Quantum fluctuations have a profound effect on the bulk properties of magnetic systems, particularly in low spatial dimension. For example, 1D chains with half integral spins have a gapless excitation spectrum while whole integer spin chains have a (Haldane) gap. The quantum critical behavior of the S = 1/2 2D system is thought to be the origin of high TC superconductivity. Molecular magnets are engineered materials where spin, interaction strength, or dimensionality can be tuned for experimental exploration of magnetism. A conscious effort was made to pick chemical motifs known to generate a quasi two dimensional Heisenberg system and attempt to exploit these motifs by designing classes of compounds based upon them. Creating many similar systems and observing changes in magnetism as a result in changes of chemical structure provides for the development of a phenomenological model of magnetostructural correlations which can then be verified by calculation. This dissertation discusses two distinct classes of antiferromagnetic systems, each based upon entirely different chemical motifs, both exhibiting the desired two dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. One class is based upon copper tetrabromide: (5gammaAP)2CuBr4 where 5gammaAP = 2-amino-5-gamma-pyridinium with gamma = chloro, bromo, or methyl substituents. These materials are shown, by bulk magnetization and calorimetry studies to possess an exchange strength on the order of J ? -7 to -9 K and ordering temperatures in the range of TN ? 3.5 to 5 K. In the ordered state, these materials are shown to possesses a weak 3D exchange interaction, and exhibit a spin-flop transition to long range order in the magnetism. The other class under investigation is based upon copper pyrazine: Cu(pz) 2(ClO4)2, Cu(pz)2(BF6) 2, and [Cu(pz)2(NO3)](PF6). By bulk magnetic measurements of powder and single crystal samples they are shown to be a very good approximation of the 2D QHAF model. The two dimensional magnetic exchange, J, ranges from -10 K to -20 K while the observed magnetic ordering temperatures, TN range from 4.1 K to 3 K. The nature of the ordering transition in these materials, unlike the copper bromides, has yet to be determined and is fertile ground for further research.

  18. An experimental investigation of flow-induced cavity oscillations

    Kegerise, Michael Aaron

    1999-11-01

    The flow over a cavity is characterized by a complex feedback process that leads to large-amplitude, self-sustaining oscillations of the pressure, velocity, and density in and around the cavity. These oscillations are undesirable in a number of engineering applications (e.g., aircraft landing gear and weapons bays) as they can induce structural fatigue and vibration, noise radiation, and drag on bodies possessing the cavity. In light of the strong current interest in active control of cavity oscillations, research focused on improving the understanding and modeling of the cavity flow physics is critical and timely. Research on cavity flowfields during the past 40 years has concentrated primarily on the acoustic environment in and around the cavity. Few investigations have been focused specifically at the cavity shear-layer physics and the mechanisms for noise generation at the cavity trailing edge. Flow-field data are particularly scarce at moderate subsonic Mach numbers. Therefore, detailed measurements of the cavity shear layer, the internal region of the cavity, and the acoustic near field were performed in this dissertation. Cavity length-to-depth ratios of 2 and 4 were considered in these surveys at freestream Mach numbers of 0.25 and 0.4, and 0.6, respectively. Two experimental techniques were used in this investigation: a quantitative schlieren technique known as "optical deflectometry" and hot-wire anemometry (normal and cross wires). The amplitudes and phases of the modal disturbances in the cavity flow field were studied using these high frequency response, high spatial resolution data. The modal disturbances (amplitude and phase components) were extracted from the unsteady flow-field signals using the pressure signal acquired from a transducer embedded in the cavity rear wall and cross-spectral analysis. A secondary objective in this dissertation was to apply joint time-frequency methods and schlieren visualization of the instantaneous cavity shear-layer structure to determine whether "mode switching" occurs between the multiple cavity modes. The detailed flow-field measurements have increased the current understanding of the cavity flow-field physics that cause and maintain the self-sustaining oscillations. Disturbance measurements in the shear layer and internal region of the shallow cavities considered in this study indicate that the wave field is comprised of an upstream-traveling acoustic wave and a downstream-traveling instability wave, both at the same frequency. Disturbance-field measurements in the trailing-edge region of the cavity have provided insight to the nature of the shear-layer/corner interaction. This interaction gives rise to a sound source that provides the feedback necessary to maintain the cavity oscillations. These measurements are expected to aid in the development of theories concerning the sound source and future design of control systems for the suppression of self-sustaining oscillations.

  19. Laboratory experiments investigating magnetic field production via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    Huntington, Channing; Fiuza, Frederico; Ross, James Steven; Zylstra, Alex; Pollock, Brad; Drake, R. Paul; Froula, Dustin; Gregori, Gianluca; Kugland, Nathan; Kuranz, Carolyn; Levy, Matthew; Li, Chikang; Meinecke, Jena; Petrasso, Richard; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Sakawa, Youichi; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Takabe, Hideke; Turnbull, David; Park, Hye-Sook

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are often associated with the presence of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow. The magnetic fields required for shock formation may either be initially present, for example in supernova remnants or young galaxies, or they may be self-generated in systems such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In the case of GRB outflows, the intense magnetic fields are greater than those seeded by the GRB progenitor or produced by misaligned density and temperature gradients in the plasma flow (the Biermann-battery effect). The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of sufficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability efficiently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. This result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Numerical and experimental investigation of leaks in viscoelastic pressurized pipes

    S. Meniconi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends the analysis concerning the importance in numerical models of unsteady friction and viscoelasticity to transients in plastic pipes with an external flow due to a leak. In fact recently such a benchmarking analysis has been executed for the cases of a constant diameter pipe (Duan et al., 2010, a pipe with a partially closed in-line valve (Meniconi et al., 2012a, and a pipe with cross-section changes in series (Meniconi et al., 2012b. The analysis is based on laboratory tests carried out at the Water Engineering Laboratory (WEL of the University of Perugia, Italy, and numerical experiments by means of different 1-D numerical models. The results show that it is crucial to take into account the viscoelasticity to simulate the main characteristics of the transients, also in the case of a damaged pipes.

  1. Flame propagation in dust clouds. Numerical simulation and experimental investigation

    Skjold, Trygve

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation describes the development and validation of a methodology for estimating the consequences of accidental dust explosions in complex geometries. The approach adopted entails the use of results from standardized tests in 20-litre explosion vessels as input to the combustion model in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, and the subsequent validation of the model system by comparing with results from laboratory and large-scale experiments. The PhD project includes...

  2. Experimental Investigation of Use of Microsilica in Self Compacting Concrete

    Mr.Ashok P. Kalbande; Prof. R.V.R.K. Prasad

    2012-01-01

    This paper is described Project in detail and presents laboratory observation. Microsilica is used as a 10% replacement of cement by weight. Various test were conducted on fine aggregate & coarse aggregate, to determine specific gravity, bulk density, fineness modulus of aggregate, concrete mix proportion design using this parameter..For conventional concrete water cement ratio of 0.4 and for microsilica concrete is increased water contain about 20liter/m3. Water demand increases in ...

  3. Exploratory experimental investigations on post-tensioned structural glass beams

    Christian Louter; Jagoda Cupac; Jean-Paul Lebet

    2014-01-01

    Corresponding author: Dr. ir. Christian Louter, Steel Structures Laboratory (ICOM), School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering (ENAC), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), GC B3 505, Station 18, Lausanne CH-1015, Switzerland. Tel.: +41 21 6932427; Fax: +41 21 6932868; E-mail: The mechanical response of post-tensioned glass beams is explored in this paper. This is done through bending experiments on post-tensioned glass beam specimens with ...

  4. Interleaved Carbon Minibeams: An experimental Method of Radiosurgery Developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Despite recent major innovations in radiation therapy and radiosurgery, there are limitations in treating certain tumors and neurological targets while assuring acceptable damage to the surrounding tissues. These encompass certain tumors in the brain, spinal cord, spinal column, and head-and-neck. This paper describes an experimental radiosurgery, “Interleaved carbon minibeams”1 being developed at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The method uses arrays of parallel, thin (∼0.3 mm incident beam thickness) planes of carbon ion beams, called carbon minibeams, that “interleave” to produce a solid radiation field at the target . Therefore, the method delivers a solid field of carbon radiation to the target while exposing the surrounding tissues to single arrays of carbon minibeams, which are well tolerated by tissues

  5. Study on clinical and laboratory diagnostic of Lyme disease in dogs after experimental infection

    Savić Sara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental infection was done on 13 dogs, with B. burgdorferi s.l., in the epitzootiological area where Lyme disease in dogs and humans is present. Prior to the experimental infection, dogs in the experiment had no contact with B. burgdorferi, and they were kept in isolation. Serological methods used in the study were complement fixation and ELISA test. Biochemical blood analysis was done, also. The experimental infection of dogs was done with a referent ATCC B. burgdorferi s.l. culture, and with the isolates of B. burgdorferi s.l. previousely gained from Ixodes ricinus ticks collected on selected locations of the observed region in the northern part of Serbia (Vojvodina province. After the experimental infection, clinical symptoms were not seen in dogs and positive serological results were found in 70% of experimentally infected dogs. Immunodiagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of Lyme disease in dogs are established. In dogs without clinical symptoms for Lyme disease, when clarifying the laboratory results, one must have in mind the epizootiological situation of the region and also the possibility of former contact of the dog with B. burgdorferi s.l. For epizootiological surveys, CF can be used as an approximate screening method, with obligatory conformation with ELISA in the case of positive findings.

  6. Experimental investigation of the information entropic Bell inequality

    Cao, Lian-Zhen; Zhao, Jia-Qiang; Liu, Xia; Yang, Yang; Li, Ying-De; Wang, Xiao-Qin; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Lu, Huai-Xin

    2016-04-01

    Inequalities of information entropic play a fundamental role in information theory and have been employed effectively in finding bounds on optimal rates of various information-processing tasks. In this paper, we perform the first experimental demonstration of the information-theoretic spin-1/2 inequality using the high-fidelity entangled state. Furthermore, we study the evolution of information difference of entropy when photons passing through different noisy channels and give the experimental rules of the information difference degradation. Our work provides an new essential tool for quantum information processing and measurement, and offers new insights into the dynamics of quantum correlation in open systems.

  7. Experimental investigation of the role of ions in aerosol nucleation

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker

    removed from those relevant for the lower part of the atmosphere (Bricard et al. 1968). Recent experimental work (Svensmark et al. 2007) demonstrated that ions, produced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere, are likely to play an important role in the production of new aerosol particles. The mechanism whereby......The role of ions in producing aerosols in Earth’s atmosphere is an area of very active research. Atmospheric (Clarke et al. 1998) and experimental (Berndt et al. 2005) observations have shown that the nucleation of aerosol particles can occur under conditions that cannot be explained by classical...

  8. Experimental study of a laboratory stationary plasma thruster in the Pivoine French test facility

    Perot, C.; Gascon, N.; Hauser, A.; Bechu, S.; Lasgorceix, P.; Dudeck, M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Lab. d' Aerothermique, 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France)

    1999-07-01

    During several years, CNES (French Space Agency) and SEP-division de SNECMA have appraised Russian electric propulsion technologies, which have the potential to increase the performance of Western spacecraft. They have been particularly interested in the Russian Hall thruster technology, called Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT), which has several advantages: for a typical SPT100 (discharge chamber diameter of 100 mm), a specific impulse (thrust/propellant flow) of 1400-1500 s, an efficiency of 45-50%, a long lifetime (up to 7000 h) and a large number of on/off cycles. using this type of thruster for the orbit control of geostationary satellites leads to a great decrease in the launch mass or, for a fixed launch mass, to a great increase in the payload mass. Though the functioning principle of an SPT is simple, a lot of the physical processes that occur in this type of thruster are not yet fully understood. To contribute to the development of the researches on the physical processes of ion thruster and the design of the next generation of thrusters, a French Research Group 'Plasma Propulsion for Orbital Systems' has been created, a new test facility and a laboratory model Hall thruster have been manufactured. The laboratory thruster was tested in the new test facility for electric thrusters research, recently assembled at Orleans in the Laboratoire d'Aerothermique. The laboratory model experimental studies were conducted as part of a program to evaluate the operating characteristics of Stationary Plasma Thruster. This thruster, intended to serve to study the Hall thrusters, was operated at various values of the discharge voltage, propellant mass flow and coils current. Electrical properties were measured at various operating points. After the review of the experimental apparatus and the thruster, the results of the first set of operating characteristics measurements of the laboratory model thruster are summarised. (authors)

  9. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Overview of the investigations 1986-1990

    In order to prepare for the siting and licensing of a spent fuel repository SKB has decided to construct a new underground research laboratory. The pre-investigations for the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory started in late 1986. This report gives a comprehensive compilation of the different investigations performed during the pre-investigation phase (1986-1990). The information is mainly compiled in CAD-generated maps and illustrations in which the reader can gather information concerning the scope of work as well as references to more detailed reports for further study. (au)

  10. Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project. Investigation report for the 2012 fiscal year

    The Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory Project is planned to extend over a period 20 years. The investigations will be conducted in three phases, namely 'Phase 1: Surface-based investigations', 'Phase 2: Construction Phase' (investigations during construction of the underground facilities) and 'Phase 3: Operation phase' (research in the underground facilities). This report summarizes the results of the investigations for the 2012 fiscal year (2012/2013). The investigations, which are composed of 'Geoscientific research' and R and D on geological disposal technology', were carried out according to 'Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory Project Investigation Program for the 2012 Fiscal year'. The results of these investigations, along with the results which were obtained in other departments of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), are properly offered to the implementations and the safety regulations. For the sake of this, JAEA has proceeded with the project in collaboration with experts from domestic and overseas research organisations. (author)

  11. Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project. Investigation report for the 2011 fiscal year

    The Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory Project is planned to extend over a period 20 years. The investigations will be conducted in three phases, namely Phase 1: Surface-based investigations, Phase 2: Construction Phase (investigations during construction of the underground facilities) and Phase 3: Operation phase (research in the underground facilities). This report summarizes the results of the investigations for the 2011 fiscal year (2011/2012). The investigations, which are composed of Geoscientific research and R and D on geological disposal technology, were carried out according to Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory Project Investigation Program for the 2011 Fiscal year. The results of these investigations, along with the results which were obtained in other departments of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), are properly offered to the implementations and the safety regulations. For the sake of this, JAEA has proceeded with the project in collaboration with experts from domestic and overseas research organisations. (author)

  12. Valorization of rehydrated Deglet-Nour dates by an experimental investigation of solar drying processing method

    Highlights: A laboratory scale direct solar dryer was constructed and investigated. The solar drying of hard date palm fruits, Deglet-Nour variety, was studied. Three improvements in the dryer operating modes were proposed and compared. Combination drying mode has been selected as the most adequate process. Selected mode ensures a high quality of product and allows short duration of treatment. - Abstract: In objective to valorize hard Deglet-Nour dates, a new postharvest processing method was proposed and investigated using a laboratory scale direct solar dryer. Date samples were soaked in distilled water then dried by solar drying mean. In order to improve the quality and consumer acceptance of this date variety, three proposed drying enhancements: drying under shade (DUS), drying with photovoltaic powered ventilation (DSV) and combination drying mode (DCM) were tested and compared with the basis case of natural ventilation drying (DNV). The obtained experimental results classified the drying with solar ventilation drying mode (DSV) and combination drying mode (DCM) in favorable operating conditions needed for the studied case. Measured air drying temperatures ranged between 41.8 and 56.0 C and 39.3 and 51.2 C respectively for the two above techniques. The drying duration to obtain the standard moisture content (0.35 kg/kg DM) was respectively 5.25 and 8 h. Regarding quality criteria and processing time, the combination drying mode was selected as the most adequate process

  13. Experimental investigation of hydraulic characteristics of tank reactor model

    Experiments for studying the hydraulic characteristics of a vessel reactor model at the MR stand described. The hydraulic model of a two-loop reactor of the vessel type is described. The experimental data are obtained in the wide range of the stand operating parameters, including the emergency modes of the reactor model operation with the total shut-down of one feed pump

  14. Experimental investigations of the dipolar interactions between single Rydberg atoms

    Browaeys, Antoine; Lahaye, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes experimental works performed over the last decade by several groups on the manipulation of a few individual interacting Rydberg atoms. These studies establish arrays of single Rydberg atoms as a promising platform for quantum state engineering, with potential applications to quantum metrology, quantum simulation and quantum information.

  15. Experimental investigation of temperature fields in a synthetic jet

    Dančová Petra; Doleček Roman; Lédl Vít

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the measurement of temperature fields in a synthetic jet. This type of experiment presents several challenges; therefore, to ensure the best precision possible, two experimental methods were used – digital holographic interferometry (DHI) and thermo-anemometry in constant current mode as an auxiliary method to verify DHI.

  16. Laboratory experimental development for the study of transuranic migration in porous media

    A laboratory development for the study of transuranic migration in porous media is presented. The experimental system consits of a water pathway which flows over the actinide bearing glass and then through columns containing samples of typical deep soils. The column outlets are continuously monitored and the soil contamination profiles are measured at the end of several months experiments. Parallel to these experiments an ultrafiltration system and ion exchange resins are used in order to give an indication of the size and charge of chemical species of actinides liberated from the leached glass. Preliminary results and future developments are reported

  17. Experimental Investigation of Two-Phase Flow in Rock Salt

    Malama, Bwalya; Howard, Clifford L.

    2014-07-01

    This Test Plan describes procedures for conducting laboratory scale flow tests on intact, damaged, crushed, and consolidated crushed salt to measure the capillary pressure and relative permeability functions. The primary focus of the tests will be on samples of bedded geologic salt from the WIPP underground. However, the tests described herein are directly applicable to domal salt. Samples being tested will be confined by a range of triaxial stress states ranging from atmospheric pressure up to those approximating lithostatic. Initially these tests will be conducted at room temperature, but testing procedures and equipment will be evaluated to determine adaptability to conducting similar tests under elevated temperatures.

  18. Experimental investigations of void dynamics in a dusty discharge

    The first electrical and spectroscopic characterizations of an instability, usually called the 'heartbeat' instability, occurring in a laboratory dusty plasma are reported. The heartbeat instability consists of successive contractions and expansions of the central dust free region observed in a dense cloud of dust particles. This cloud is formed in a radio-frequency plasma by sputtering polymer material deposited on the electrodes. The evolution of the discharge current reveals the relatively complex shape of the instability and allows one to measure its evolution as a function of gas pressure and radio-frequency power

  19. Seismic and geologic investigations of the Sandia Livermore Laboratory site and structural investigations of the Tritium Research Facility

    1978-09-01

    This report consists of two parts. Part I, Seismic and Geologic Investigations of the Sandia Livermore Laboratory Site, covers the review and investigation of existing data as well as the acquisition and analysis of new data from field explorations and field examinations of the site. Part II, Structural Investigations of the Tritium Research Facility, covers: (a) the structural evaluation of the existing buildings and vital systems of the facility, and (b) concept studies of various schemes to strengthen the buildings and systems. Separate abstracts were prepared for each part.

  20. Facts and Figuring: An Experimental Investigation of Network Structure and Performance in Information and Solution Spaces

    Shore, Jesse; Lazer, David

    2014-01-01

    Using data from a large laboratory experiment on problem solving in which we varied the structure of 16-person networks we investigate how an organization's network structure may be constructed to optimize performance in complex problem-solving tasks. Problem solving involves both search for information and search for theories to make sense of that information. We show that the effect of network structure is opposite for these two equally important forms of search. Dense clustering encourages members of a network to generate more diverse information, but it also has the power to discourage the generation of diverse theories: clustering promotes exploration in information space, but decreases exploration in solution space. Previous research, tending to focus on only one of those two spaces, had produced inconsistent conclusions about the value of network clustering. By adopting an experimental platform on which information was measured separately from solutions, we were able to reconcile past contradictions an...

  1. Experimental investigations of melt spreading and scaling analysis

    This paper presents results of experimental studies conducted at the Royal Institute of Technology, Division of Nuclear Power Safety (RIT/NPS) on melt spreading. A series of low and intermediate temperature experiments were performed, using different pairs of simulant fluids for melt and coolant. Significant results were obtained from three high-temperature experiments conducted with the corium melt simulant, CaO-B2O3, in a 3.5 meter long by 0.2 meter wide channel. The basemat upon which the melt spread was in one case concrete and in the other two cases a 10mm thick steel plate. Roughly 12 liters of the binary oxide melt at ≅1200degC was employed. A scaling relationship between dimensionless spread depth and characteristic spreading time was derived. Experimental measurements from simulant material experiments are presented along with comparisons to the scaling analysis. (author)

  2. Experimental investigation and modeling of scale effects in jet ejectors

    Three microscale jet ejectors were designed and tested to induce a suction draft using a supersonic micronozzle. Each axisymmetric nozzle was fabricated using three-dimensional electro-discharge machining to create throat diameters of 64, 187 and 733 µm with design expansion ratios of 2.5:1 and design ejector area ratios of 8. The experimental data using nitrogen gas for the motive fluid indicate that the ejector can produce a sufficient suction draft to enable its substitution for high-speed turbomachinery in micro engine applications. A pumping power density of 308 kW L−1 is observed experimentally, which agrees well with a theoretical model including losses associated with the suction flow inlet and viscous effects in the motive nozzle and mixing regions. The present theoretical model further predicts a maximum achievable power density of 1 MW L−1 for microscale ejectors with a throat diameter of 10 µm and throat Reynolds number of 1300.

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigation of innovative broadband microwave devices

    1991-05-01

    The general scope of the work performed under this contract was quite broad and included both theoretical and experimental work related to the general problem of microwave and millimeter wave sources. The principal concepts which were of interest at the outset of the contract were the Two-Stream-Amplifier and the Cerenkov Maser. However, general theory and simulation of the Ubitron/Free-Electron Laser was also performed along with specific theoretical support for the Ubitron development program in the Vacuum Electronics Branch. In addition, a great deal of interest developed in the application of Field-Emission Arrays to RF source technology, and the experimental phase of the program shifted to encompass testing, design, and evaluation of several different approaches of this technology. The remainder of this report is devoted to a specific discussion of each phase of the program.

  4. Experimental investigation of radiative thermal rectifier using vanadium dioxide

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) exhibits a phase-change behavior from the insulating state to the metallic state around 340 K. By using this effect, we experimentally demonstrate a radiative thermal rectifier in the far-field regime with a thin film VO2 deposited on the silicon wafer. A rectification contrast ratio as large as two is accurately obtained by utilizing a one-dimensional steady-state heat flux measurement system. We develop a theoretical model of the thermal rectifier with optical responses of the materials retrieved from the measured mid-infrared reflection spectra, which is cross-checked with experimentally measured heat flux. Furthermore, we tune the operating temperatures by doping the VO2 film with tungsten (W). These results open up prospects in the fields of thermal management and thermal information processing

  5. Experimental and Computational Investigations of Flow past Spinning Cylinders

    Carlucci, Pasquale; Mehmedagic, Igbal; Buckley, Liam; Carlucci, Donald; Thangam, Siva

    2011-11-01

    Experiments are performed in a low speed subsonic wind tunnel to analyze flow past spinning cylinders. The sting-mounted cylinders are oriented such that their axis of rotation is aligned with the mean flow. Data from spinning cylinders with both rear-mounted and fore-mounted stings are presented for a Reynolds numbers of up to 260000 and rotation numbers of up to 1.2 (based on cylinder diameter). Computations are performed using a two-equation turbulence model that is capable of capturing the effects of swirl and curvature. The model performance was validated with benchmark experimental flows and implemented for analyzing the flow configuration used in the experimental study. The results are analyzed and the predictive capability of the model is discussed. Funded in part by U. S. Army, ARDEC.

  6. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Circulation in Short Cylinders

    Kageyama, A; Goodman, J; Chen, F; Shoshan, E; Kageyama, Akira; Ji, Hantao; Goodman, Jeremy; Chen, Fei; Shoshan, Ethan

    2004-01-01

    In preparation for an experimental study of magnetorotational instability (MRI) in liquid metal, we explore Couette flows having height comparable to the gap between cylinders, centrifugally stable rotation, and high Reynolds number. Experiments in water are compared with numerical simulations. Simulations show that endcaps corotating with the outer cylinder drive a strong poloidal circulation that redistributes angular momentum. Predicted azimuthal flow profiles agree well with experimental measurements. Spin-down times scale with Reynolds number as expected for laminar Ekman circulation; extrapolation from two-dimensional simulations at $Re\\le 3200$ agrees remarkably well with experiment at $Re\\sim 10^6$. This suggests that turbulence does not dominate the effective viscosity. Further detailed numerical studies reveal a strong radially inward flow near both endcaps. After turning vertically along the inner cylinder, these flows converge at the midplane and depart the boundary in a radial jet. To minimize th...

  7. Experimental investigation on bubble characteristics entrained by surface vortex

    The cover gas entrainment at the free surface of sodium coolant becomes one of the significant issues according to the compact sizing of reactor vessel in the latest reactor design. In the present study, some basic experiments for the gas entrainment due to the surface vortex were performed in order to obtain the fundamental knowledge about the entrained bubble size. Distributions of entrained bubble diameters in several experimental conditions were obtained from bubble images using an image processing technique. Velocity fields around vortices and surface dimple shapes (gas cores) due to surface vortices were measured to grasp those influences on bubble shapes. The result showed that mean equivalent diameters of bubbles were varied from 1.3 to 2.1 mm in the range of present experimental conditions. The bubble sizes were influenced by the thickness of gas core.

  8. Confined granular flow in silos experimental and numerical investigations

    Tejchman, Jacek

    2013-01-01

      During confined flow of bulk solids in silos some characteristic phenomena can be created, such as: —         sudden and significant increase of wall stresses, —         different flow patterns, —         formation and propagation of wall and interior shear zones, —         fluctuation of pressures and, —         strong autogenous dynamic effects. These phenomena have not been described or explained in detail yet. The main intention of the experimental and theoretical research presented in this book is to explain the above mentioned phenomena in granular bulk solids and to describe them with numerical FE models verified by experimental results.

  9. Experimental investigation of radiative thermal rectifier using vanadium dioxide

    Ito, Kota, E-mail: kotaito@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Nishikawa, Kazutaka; Iizuka, Hideo [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan)

    2014-12-22

    Vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) exhibits a phase-change behavior from the insulating state to the metallic state around 340 K. By using this effect, we experimentally demonstrate a radiative thermal rectifier in the far-field regime with a thin film VO{sub 2} deposited on the silicon wafer. A rectification contrast ratio as large as two is accurately obtained by utilizing a one-dimensional steady-state heat flux measurement system. We develop a theoretical model of the thermal rectifier with optical responses of the materials retrieved from the measured mid-infrared reflection spectra, which is cross-checked with experimentally measured heat flux. Furthermore, we tune the operating temperatures by doping the VO{sub 2} film with tungsten (W). These results open up prospects in the fields of thermal management and thermal information processing.

  10. Experimental investigation and modeling of scale effects in jet ejectors

    Gardner, W. G.; Wang, I.; Jaworski, J. W.; Brikner, N. A.; Protz, J. M.

    2010-08-01

    Three microscale jet ejectors were designed and tested to induce a suction draft using a supersonic micronozzle. Each axisymmetric nozzle was fabricated using three-dimensional electro-discharge machining to create throat diameters of 64, 187 and 733 µm with design expansion ratios of 2.5:1 and design ejector area ratios of 8. The experimental data using nitrogen gas for the motive fluid indicate that the ejector can produce a sufficient suction draft to enable its substitution for high-speed turbomachinery in micro engine applications. A pumping power density of 308 kW L-1 is observed experimentally, which agrees well with a theoretical model including losses associated with the suction flow inlet and viscous effects in the motive nozzle and mixing regions. The present theoretical model further predicts a maximum achievable power density of 1 MW L-1 for microscale ejectors with a throat diameter of 10 µm and throat Reynolds number of 1300.

  11. Final Report: Experimental Investigation of Nonlinear Plasma Wake-Fields

    We discuss the exploration of the newly proposed blowout regime of the plasma wakefield accelerator and advanced photoinjector technology for linear collider applications. The plasma wakefield experiment at ANL produced several ground-breaking results in the physics of the blowout regime. The photoinjector R and D effort produced breakthroughs in theoretical, computational, and experimental methods in high brightness beam physics. Results have been published

  12. Experimental Investigation of Flow Through an Asymmetrical Plane Diffuser

    Buice, Carl U.; Eaton, John K.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide careful qualification and detailed measurements in a re-creation of the Obi experiment. The work will include extensive documentation of the flow two-dimensionality and detailed measurements required for testing of flow computations. Also important to this study is the close interaction of the experimental and computational groups to improve the utility of the data obtained and the accuracy of computation.

  13. Experimental investigation of dynamic pressure loads during dam break

    Lobovský, Libor; Castellana, Filippo; Mas-Soler, Jordi; Souto-Iglesias, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to revisit the experimental measurements on dam break flow over a dry horizontal bed and to provide a detailed insight into the dynamics of the dam break wave impacting a vertical wall downstream the dam, with emphasis on the pressure loads. The measured data are statistically analyzed and critically discussed. As a result, an extensive set of data for validation of computational tools is provided.

  14. Experimental investigation of dynamic pressure loads during dam break

    Lobovský, L.; Botia-Vera, E.; Castellana, F.; Mas-Soler, J.; Souto-Iglesias, A.

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of this work are to revisit the experimental measurements on dam break flow over a dry horizontal bed and to provide a detailed insight into the dynamics of the dam break wave impacting a vertical wall downstream the dam, with emphasis on the pressure loads. The measured data are statistically analyzed and critically discussed. As a result, an extensive set of data for validation of computational tools is provided.

  15. Analytical and experimental investigation of the Paks NPP building structures

    The buildings of the four Paks WWER-440/V-213 type reactors are evaluated from their seizmic safety aspects, with the view of preparation of seismic safety upgrading measures. Capacity evaluation of the main reactor building is presented through a structural modelling study and its experimental verification. The results are compared with analytical data and conclusions are discussed. (N.T.) 2 refs.; 11 figs.; 3 tabs

  16. Experimental Investigation of In Situ Cleanable HEPA Filters

    Hatcher, S.A.

    2001-04-11

    Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) located at Westinghouse Savannah River Site (WSRS) is currently conducting research and development experimentation to develop a replacement of the conventional high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system currently used by commercial industry and DOE facilities. It has been determined that a cleanable or regenerable HEPA filter system may be the most cost effective and efficient HEPA filter system to be considered for use in a more safe and reliable work environment.

  17. Investigations in Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics

    Krennrich, Frank [Iowa State University

    2013-07-29

    We report on the work done under DOE grant DE-FG02-01ER41155. The experimental tasks have ongoing efforts at CERN (ATLAS), the Whipple observatory (VERITAS) and R&D work on dual readout calorimetry and neutrino-less double beta decay. The theoretical task emphasizes the weak interaction and in particular CP violation and neutrino physics. The detailed descriptions of the final report on each project are given under the appropriate task section of this report.

  18. Experimental investigation of ship-bank interaction forces

    Vantorre, M.; Delefortrie, G.; Eloot, K.; LAFORCE, E

    2008-01-01

    A review of literature on ship-bank interaction is given, with the emphasis on experimental data and empirical formulae. The results of a systematic captive model test program carried out in the Towing Tank for Manoeuvres in Shallow Water (co-operation Flanders Hydraulics - Ghent University) in Antwerp (Belgium) arc used for discussing the influence of the main parameters determining the hydrodynamic forces and moments. The test series were carried out with three ship models in parallel cours...

  19. Experimental Performance Investigation of Digital Beamforming on Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Kim, Junghyo; Younis, Marwan; Wiesbeck, Werner

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present the experimental results of a Digital Beam Forming (DBF) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance on the purpose of the High- Resolution Wide-Swath (HRWS) SAR concept. A ground-based SAR system successfully demonstrated the DBF SAR operation. The demonstrator acquired SAR raw data with very dense spatial sampling rate in order to obtain various sampling rates. We evaluate DBF performance with respect to the image quality factor with two d...

  20. Precise Experimental Investigation of Eigenmodes in a Planar Ion Crystal

    Kaufmann H.; Ulm S.; Jacob G; Poschinger U.; Landa H.; Retzker A.; Plenio M.B.; Schmidt-Kaler F.

    2012-01-01

    The accurate characterization of eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies of two-dimensional ion crystals provides the foundation for the use of such structures for quantum simulation purposes. We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of two-dimensional ion crystals. We demonstrate that standard pseudopotential theory accurately predicts the positions of the ions and the location of structural transitions between different crystal configurations. However, pseudopotential theory is insu...

  1. Experimental investigation of coarse particle conveying in pipes

    Vlasák, Pavel; Chára, Zdeněk; Konfršt, Jiří; Krupička, Jan

    Liberec : Technical university of Liberec, 2014 - (Dančová, P.; Vít, T.), s. 712-719 ISSN 2100-014X. - (EPJ Web of Conferences). [Experimental Fluid Mechanics 2014. Český Krumlov (CZ), 18.11.2014-21.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP105/10/1574 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : transport pipelines * Coulomb friction * coarse-grained mixtures * coarse particle Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  2. Experimental investigation of coarse particle conveying in pipes

    Vlasák, Pavel; Chára, Zdeněk; Konfršt, Jiří; Krupička, Jan

    Vol. 92. Les Ulis : EDP Sciences, 2015 - (Dančová, P.; Vít, T.), 02111-p.1-02111-p.8 ISSN 2100-014X. [Experimental Fluid Mechanics 2014. Český Krumlov (CZ), 18.11.2014-21.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP105/10/1574 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : particles motion * mixture flow behaviour * coarse particles Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  3. Experimental investigation of the variability of concrete durability properties

    AÏT MOKHTAR, Karim; Torrenti, Jean Michel; BENBOUDJEMA, Farid; Capra, Bruno; CARCASSES, M; COLLIAT, Jean-Baptiste; CUSSIGH, François; DE LARRARD, Thomas; LATASTE, JF; Poyet, Stéphane; ROUGEAU, Patrick; Sellier, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Turcry, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    One of the main objectives of the APPLET project was to quantify the variability of concrete properties to allow for a probabilistic performance-based approach regarding the service lifetime prediction of concrete structures. The characterization of concrete variability was the subject of an experimental program which included a significant number of tests allowing the characterization of durability indicators or performance tests. Two construction sites were selected from which concrete spec...

  4. Manufacturing and experimental investigation of green composite materials

    ????????????????, ?????????

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis is to explore sustainable low cost environmentally friendly composite materials. It is a step by step experimental research. Firstly, taking under consideration the so far commercial available non-organic materials used as reinforcement and the petroleum based resins used as matrices, composite materials were fabricated and mechanically characterized. Different components in micro- and nano- scale were combined. Afterwards, the non-organic materials used a...

  5. Experimental Investigation of Piston Rings for Internal Combustion Engines

    Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2008-01-01

    One of the major prerequisites for calculating piston ring friction is a good description of the tribological situation. A very important condition for describing the frictional behavior of a piston ring correctly is knowledge about the amount of lubricant present. For piston rings the external...... significant. Experimental results are presented and the influence from speed, number of piston rings, lubrication oil type and supply oil is discussed....

  6. Experimental investigation of the 61?+ shelf' state of KCs

    Szczepkowski, J.; Grochola, A.; Jastrzebski, W.; Kowalczyk, P.

    2014-10-01

    We report the first experimental observation of the 61?+ state in the KCs molecule. Polarization labelling spectroscopy technique was applied to determine energies of about 1000 rovibrational levels in this state, most of them strongly perturbed by the neighbouring 43? state levels. The inverted perturbation approach was used to construct the irregular potential energy curve of the 61?+ state. It is compared with the recent theoretical calculations to show that Hund's coupling case (a) is proper for description of this state.

  7. Experimental investigation into infrasonic emissions from atmospheric turbulence.

    Shams, Qamar A; Zuckerwar, Allan J; Burkett, Cecil G; Weistroffer, George R; Hugo, Derek R

    2013-03-01

    Clear air turbulence (CAT) is the leading cause of in-flight injuries and in severe cases can result in fatalities. The purpose of this work is to design and develop an infrasonic array network for early warning of clear air turbulence. The infrasonic system consists of an infrasonic three-microphone array, compact windscreens, and data management system. Past experimental efforts to detect acoustic emissions from CAT have been limited. An array of three infrasonic microphones, operating in the field at NASA Langley Research Center, on several occasions received signals interpreted as infrasonic emissions from CAT. Following comparison with current lidar and other past methods, the principle of operation, the experimental methods, and experimental data are presented for case studies and confirmed by pilot reports. The power spectral density of the received signals was found to fit a power law having an exponent of -6 to -7, which is found to be characteristics of infrasonic emissions from CAT, in contrast to findings of the past. PMID:23464000

  8. Experimental and numerical investigation of hydro power generator ventilation

    Improvements in ventilation and cooling offer means to run hydro power generators at higher power output and at varying operating conditions. The electromagnetic, frictional and windage losses generate heat. The heat is removed by an air flow that is driven by fans and/or the rotor itself. The air flow goes through ventilation channels in the stator, to limit the electrical insulation temperatures. The temperature should be kept limited and uniform in both time and space, avoiding thermal stresses and hot-spots. For that purpose it is important that the flow of cooling air is distributed uniformly, and that flow separation and recirculation are minimized. Improvements of the air flow properties also lead to an improvement of the overall efficiency of the machine. A significant part of the windage losses occurs at the entrance of the stator ventilation channels, where the air flow turns abruptly from tangential to radial. The present work focuses exclusively on the air flow inside a generator model, and in particular on the flow inside the stator channels. The generator model design of the present work is based on a real generator that was previously studied. The model is manufactured taking into consideration the needs of both the experimental and numerical methodologies. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results have been used in the process of designing the experimental setup. The rotor and stator are manufactured using rapid-prototyping and plexi-glass, yielding a high geometrical accuracy, and optical experimental access. A special inlet section is designed for accurate air flow rate and inlet velocity profile measurements. The experimental measurements include Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and total pressure measurements inside the generator. The CFD simulations are performed based on the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox, and the steady-state frozen rotor approach. Specific studies are performed, on the effect of adding ''pick-up'' to spacers, and the effects of the inlet fan blades on the flow rate through the model. The CFD results capture the experimental flow details to a reasonable level of accuracy

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation of hydro power generator ventilation

    Jamshidi, H.; Nilsson, H.; Chernoray, V.

    2014-03-01

    Improvements in ventilation and cooling offer means to run hydro power generators at higher power output and at varying operating conditions. The electromagnetic, frictional and windage losses generate heat. The heat is removed by an air flow that is driven by fans and/or the rotor itself. The air flow goes through ventilation channels in the stator, to limit the electrical insulation temperatures. The temperature should be kept limited and uniform in both time and space, avoiding thermal stresses and hot-spots. For that purpose it is important that the flow of cooling air is distributed uniformly, and that flow separation and recirculation are minimized. Improvements of the air flow properties also lead to an improvement of the overall efficiency of the machine. A significant part of the windage losses occurs at the entrance of the stator ventilation channels, where the air flow turns abruptly from tangential to radial. The present work focuses exclusively on the air flow inside a generator model, and in particular on the flow inside the stator channels. The generator model design of the present work is based on a real generator that was previously studied. The model is manufactured taking into consideration the needs of both the experimental and numerical methodologies. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results have been used in the process of designing the experimental setup. The rotor and stator are manufactured using rapid-prototyping and plexi-glass, yielding a high geometrical accuracy, and optical experimental access. A special inlet section is designed for accurate air flow rate and inlet velocity profile measurements. The experimental measurements include Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and total pressure measurements inside the generator. The CFD simulations are performed based on the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox, and the steady-state frozen rotor approach. Specific studies are performed, on the effect of adding "pick-up" to spacers, and the effects of the inlet fan blades on the flow rate through the model. The CFD results capture the experimental flow details to a reasonable level of accuracy.

  10. Applicability of laboratory experimental data (solubilities and sorption coefficients) to natural aquifier systems, for example, the Gorleben aquifer system

    The main objective of the research project is to elucidate the migration behaviour of long-lived radionuclides, especially actinides and technetium, in natural aquifer systems. Particular emphasis is directed to answer the question whether or not the experimental data obtained in laboratory can be applied without restriction to natural aquifer systems. For this purpose, the Gorleben aquifer system is taken as an example. As the subject encompasses a wide variety of geochemical reactions of long-lived radionuclides of divers elements, experiments have been confined to notable examples selected with regard to chemical nature of each element. Common reactions of geochemical importance, which are not well or poorly understood in the literature, are given priority in the present investigation. Laboratory experiments have been conducted on hydrolysis, carbonate complexation, humate complexation, redox reaction and colloid generation. Column experiments were performed for the elucidation of the migration behaviour of colloid-borne actinides. The applicability of laboratory data has been examined by comparison of thermodynamic speciation with direct spectroscopic speciation for given actinides in natural aquatic solution. Whenever the colloid generation is involved, either formation of 'real' or 'pseudo' colloids, the application of thermodynamic speciation becomes failed. In this case a new approach to appraisal of the actinide migration behaviour appears indispensable. This fact has aspired us to develop a novel method for the quantification of aquatic colloids of nanosize (10-100 nm) in very dilute concentrations (ppt range). (orig.)

  11. Experimental and climical investigations of a TSH radioimmunoassay

    The system hypothalamus-pitnitary-thyroid was studied in 427 patients by radioimmunological TSH determination prior to i.v. injection of 600 μg of synthetic TSH and 30 min p.i. Different commercial TSH test kits were used. The RIA was found to be a sensitive indicator of the functional state of the system. Higher accuracy can be achieved by observing certain criteria. The TSH-RIA is a valuable tool for diagnosis and therapy control of thyroid diseases. With some slight methodological modifications, it has become part of the routine programme of the Giessen thyroid laboratory. The RIA is best suited for early detection of disturbances in the pitnitary-thyroid system; it is less efficient in course control of thyroid diseases. It can be carried out within 30 minutes and, except for two withdrawals of blood, imposes no strain on the patient. (orig./MG)

  12. Experimental Investigation of Use of Microsilica in Self Compacting Concrete

    Mr.Ashok P. Kalbande

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is described Project in detail and presents laboratory observation. Microsilica is used as a 10% replacement of cement by weight. Various test were conducted on fine aggregate & coarse aggregate, to determine specific gravity, bulk density, fineness modulus of aggregate, concrete mix proportion design using this parameter..For conventional concrete water cement ratio of 0.4 and for microsilica concrete is increased water contain about 20liter/m3. Water demand increases in proportion to the amount of microsilica added. Mixing the concrete and various test are conducted on fresh concrete i.e. Slump flow, V- Funnel, L-Box, U-Box and result are obtained. Using this concrete cube specimen are cast for testing different hardened properties of concrete. i.e. 3 Days, 7 Days, 14 Days, 28 Days Compressive strength of concrete.

  13. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Experimental Hygrothermal Performance: Cloquet Residential Research Facility Laboratory Results

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Harmon, Anna C. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Thermal and moisture problems in existing basements create a unique challenge because the exterior face of the wall is not easily or inexpensively accessible. This approach addresses thermal and moisture management from the interior face of the wall without disturbing the exterior soil and landscaping. the interior and exterior environments. This approach has the potential for improving durability, comfort, and indoor air quality. This project was funded jointly by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL focused on developing a full basement wall system experimental database to enable others to validate hygrothermal simulation codes. NREL focused on testing the moisture durability of practical basement wall interior insulation retrofit solutions for cold climates. The project has produced a physically credible and reliable long-term hygrothermal performance database for retrofit foundation wall insulation systems in zone 6 and 7 climates that are fully compliant with the performance criteria in the 2009 Minnesota Energy Code. The experimental data were configured into a standard format that can be published online and that is compatible with standard commercially available spreadsheet and database software.

  14. The Origin of Mercury's Surface Composition, an Experimental Investigation

    Boujibar, A.; Righter, K.; Rapp, J. F.; Ross, D. K.; Pando, K. M.; Danielson, L. R.; Fontaine, E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Results from MESSENGER spacecraft have confirmed the reduced nature of Mercury, based on its high core/mantle ratio and its FeO-poor and S-rich surface. Moreover, high resolution images revealed large volcanic plains and abundant pyroclastic deposits, suggesting major melting stages of the Mercurian mantle. In addition, MESSENGER has provided the most precise data to date on major elemental compositions of Mercury's surface. These results revealed considerable chemical heterogeneities that suggested several stages of differentiation and re-melting processes. This interpretation was challenged by our experimental previous study, which showed a similar compositional variation in the melting products of enstatite chondrites, which are a possible Mercury analogue. However, these experimental melts were obtained over a limited range of pressure (1 bar to 1 gigapascal) and were not compared to the most recent elemental maps. Therefore, here we extend the experimental dataset to higher pressures and perform a more quantitative comparison with Mercury's surface compositions measured by MESSENGER. In particular, we test whether these chemical heterogeneities result from mixing between polybaric melts. Our experiments and models show that the majority of chemical diversity of Mercury's surface can result from melting of a primitive mantle compositionally similar to enstatite chondrites in composition at various depths and degrees of melting. The high-Mg region's composition is reproduced by melting at high pressure (3 gigapascals) (Tab. 1), which is consistent with previous interpretation as being a large degraded impact basin based on its low elevation and thin average crust. While low-Mg NVP (North Volcanic Plains) are the result of melting at low pressure (1 bar), intermediate-Mg NVP, Caloris Basin and Rachmaninoff result from mixing of a high-pressure (3 gigapascals) and low-pressure components (1 bar for Rachmaninoff and 1 gigapascal for the other regions) (Tab. 1). Moreover, all compositions suggest mixing between low and high degree melts that indicate important differentiation processes.

  15. Experimental investigation on self-leveling behavior in debris beds

    Research highlights: → The first application of the depressurization method on self-leveling study. → Introduce the equivalent power density to evaluate the driving effect. → The experimental data presented cover a large parameter range. → Discuss the dependency of self-leveling on various parameters. - Abstract: During a hypothetical core-disruptive accident in a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor, degraded core materials can form debris beds on the core-support structure and/or in the lower inlet plenum of the reactor vessel from rapid quenching and fragmentation of core material pool. Coolant boiling may lead ultimately to leveling of the debris bed that is crucial to the relocation of molten core and heat-removal capability of the debris bed. In the present study, we elected to use depressurization boiling to simulate an axially increasing void distribution in the debris bed. Bottom-heating boiling was also chosen to confirm that characteristics of the self-leveling process do not depend on the boiling mode. Particle size (between 0.5 and 6 mm), shape (spherical and non-spherical), bed volume (between 5 and 8 l) and density (namely of alumina, zirconia, lead and stainless steel) along with boiling intensity and total volume were taken as experimental parameters to obtain the general characteristics of the self-leveling process. A series of experiments with simulant materials were conducted and analyzed in detail. The good concordance of the transient processes obtained from the different boiling methods sufficiently demonstrates that the present results obtained using the depressurization boiling method exhibit these general self-leveling characteristics. Detailed comparisons of deduced time variations of the inclination angle provides qualitative tendencies based on the experimental parameters considered influential to self-leveling behavior. The rationale behind the definition introduced for equivalent power density is also presented.

  16. Experimental investigation of the transverse SBS excitation in anisotropic crystals

    Bel`kov, S.A.; Dolgopolov, Yu.V.; Kochemasov, G.G.; Kulikov, S.M.; Solov`eva, M.N.; Sukharev, S.A.; Voronich, I.N. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, Arzamas (Russian Federation). Inst. of Experimental Physics

    1995-12-31

    One of the factors which should be taken into account in creating high-power broad-aperture neodymium laser facilities is the possibility of generating the backward and transverse stimulated Brillouin scattering(SBS) in optical elements of the facility. Here, transverse SBS characteristics of the KDP crystal were determined by the method of SBS generation excitation in the transverse resonator. Fused silica was utilized as the test medium. Experimental oscillograms of Stokes pulses were processed by the method of pulse form approximation using the four-parametric function of time.

  17. Experimental investigation of the transverse SBS excitation in anisotropic crystals

    One of the factors which should be taken into account in creating high-power broad-aperture neodymium laser facilities is the possibility of generating the backward and transverse stimulated Brillouin scattering(SBS) in optical elements of the facility. Here, transverse SBS characteristics of the KDP crystal were determined by the method of SBS generation excitation in the transverse resonator. Fused silica was utilized as the test medium. Experimental oscillograms of Stokes pulses were processed by the method of pulse form approximation using the four-parametric function of time

  18. Experimental investigations on ejector refrigeration system with ammonia

    Sankarlal, T.; Mani, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2007-07-15

    A vapor ejector refrigeration system has been designed and developed to operate with ammonia. In this paper, performance of ejector refrigeration system has been experimentally studied with three different area ratio ejectors by varying operational parameters namely generator, condenser and evaporator temperatures. Effect of non-dimensional parameters like compression ratio, expansion ratio and area ratio on the system performance is studied. Entrainment ratio and coefficient of performance of the system increase with increase in ejector area ratio and expansion ratio and they increase with decrease in compression ratio. (author)

  19. Experimental Investigation of Tesla Turbine and its Underlying Theory

    Kartikeya Awasthi; Aman Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Nikola Tesla is widely known for his outstanding achievements in generation transmission and utilization of power. The object of this paper is to experimentally verify one such method of extracting electrical power from fluid energy; devised by Tesla in his 1913 patent; known as Tesla Turbine. It is to be noted that almost no work has been done using water as the working fluid for the turbine so an attempt to reconstruct the turbine as per Nikola Tesla’s patent has been made with positive res...

  20. Experimental investigations on the four-loop test facility ROCOM

    For the analysis of the core behaviour during boron dilution transients and main steam line breaks, coupled neutron kinetic/thermal hydraulic codes are necessary. These codes must contain models of the coolant mixing on its way from the inlet nozzles to the core entrance, because the reactivity insertion strongly depends on the distribution of temperature and boron concentration at the core inlet. To model the coolant mixing the ROCOM test facility was built, a fluid dynamic 1:5 scaled model of the Konvoi reactor. The experimental results at steady state flow conditions are presented in a survey form. (orig.)

  1. Experimental investigation of heat losses at the PACTEL facility

    Some methods are described in the present study for determining heat losses of experimental test facilities. Two different methods were chosen to be applied for the PACTEL. The experiment based on the transient method was performed in June, 1990, while results of earlier natural circulation tests could serve as a comparison between two procedures. Calculated results and plots show that the formation and values of heat losses have come up to the expectations however additional experiment is needed to obtain information about the distribution of heat losses throughout the facility. (orig.). (4 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.)

  2. Experimental investigation of the variability of concrete durability properties

    One of the main objectives of the APPLET project was to quantify the variability of concrete properties to allow for a probabilistic performance-based approach regarding the service lifetime prediction of concrete structures. The characterization of concrete variability was the subject of an experimental program which included a significant number of tests allowing the characterization of durability indicators or performance tests. Two construction sites were selected from which concrete specimens were periodically taken and tested by the different project partners. The obtained results (mechanical behavior, chloride migration, accelerated carbonation, gas permeability, desorption isotherms, porosity) are discussed and a statistical analysis was performed to characterize these results through appropriate probability density functions. (authors)

  3. Experimental Investigation of Aerodynamic Instability of Iced Bridge Cable Sections

    Koss, Holger; Lund, Mia Schou Møller

    2013-01-01

    The accretion of ice on structural bridge cables changes the aerodynamic conditions of the surface and influences hence the acting wind load process. Full-scale monitoring indicates that light precipitation at moderate low temperatures between zero and -5°C may lead to large amplitude vibrations of...... bridge cables under wind action. This paper describes the experimental simulation of ice accretion on a real bridge cable sheet HDPE tube segment (diameter 160mm) and its effect on the aerodynamic load. Furthermore, aerodynamic instability will be estimated with quasi-steady theory using the determined...

  4. Development and experimental investigation of new seals for cryoalternators

    One of the vital problems in developing high-speed cryogenically cooled electrical machines with a cryostat common to rotor and stator is availability of reliable shaft seals. Depending on the electric machine design, reliable rotary seals are required both for working media sealing and for maintaining vacuum in rotating cryostats. Newly designed rotary seals employ the principles of radial hydrodynamic sealing. Tentative experimental studies proved the advantages of the new design over the traditional radial hydrodynamic seals. Pressure difference withstood by the new seals with no obvious sealed media leaks is about 1.5 times greater than that provided by a conventional seal

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation of gas phase freeboard combustion

    Andersen, Jimmy; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Hvid, S.L.; Glarborg, Peter

    2009-01-01

    modeling approaches, including global schemes and analytically reduced mechanisms, were tested in the CFD calculations. In addition, the simplified schemes were compared to reference calculations with a detailed mechanism under isothermal plug flow reactor conditions. While none of the global ammonia...... approach with the De Soete global scheme and the combination of a skeletal combustion mechanism with the analytically reduced N scheme provided it reasonable agreement with the experimental data. Most of the tested ammonia oxidation schemes were able to qualitatively predict the trends in NO formation...

  6. The experimental investigation of bounce characteristics of ACV responsive skirt

    Zhou, W. L.; Ma, T.

    This paper presents some experimental results on the bounce characteristics of the bag-finger responsive skirt and on skirt frequency response under cushion pressure excitation obtained in a large-scale box facility. The influence of some parameters on the amplitude and frequency of the skirt bounce motion and the amplitude of the cushion pressure oscillation were explored, and the corresponding bounce boundary curves are given. Some interesting nonlinear phenomena related to the skirt instability in the time domain response are presented. The mechanism for skirt bounce and the important parameters affecting skirt dynamic stability are examined, and some means for eliminating skirt bounce are introduced.

  7. Experimental investigation on ducted counter-rotating axial flow fans

    Nouri, Hussain; Ravelet, Florent; Bakir, Farid; Sarraf, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study on counter-rotating axial-flow fans was carried out. The fans of diameter D = 375 mm were designed using an inverse method. The counter-rotating fans operate in a ducted-flow configuration and the overall performances are measured in a normalized test bench. The rotation rate of each fan is independently controlled. The axial spacing between the fans can vary from 10 to 50 mm by steps of 10 mm. The results show that the efficiency is strongly increased compared to a conv...

  8. Impact performance of specimens subjected to fatigue loading - experimental investigation

    Gringer, Jakub; Foglar, Marek; Ji??ek, Pavel

    2015-09-01

    The impact performance of reinforced concrete specimens subjected to fatigue loading has not been quantified properly yet. This topic is significant in the field of vehicle impact or similar applications. The paper aims to fill this gap by presenting the on-going experimental program. The paper presents outcomes of the experiments focused on the performance of RC beams subjected to drop-weight impact loading. The behaviour of the beams which were prior to the impact testing subjected to cyclic loading was compared to the behaviour of the beams which were not subjected to cyclic loading.

  9. Experimental investigation of natural convection losses from open cavities

    Experimental results for natural convection in a cavity are reported. Both constrained andd unconstrained cavity geometries were studied. Detailed velocity profiles were obtained using Laser doppler velocimetry for Rayleigh numbers between 3 x 1010 and 2 x 1011, corresponding to a constant elevated wall temperature boundary condition. Characteristics of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows obtained with dye flow visualization are discussed, including boundary layer transition to turbulence, flow patterns in the cavity, and flow outside of the cavity. Local Nusselt number is correlated with local Rayleigh number for constrained and unconstrained cavities

  10. Experimental Investigation on Thermoelectric Chiller Driven by Solar Cell

    Yen-Lin Chen; Zi-Jie Chien; Wen-Shing Lee; Ching-Song Jwo; Kun-Ching Cho

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental explorations on cooling performance of thermoelectric chillers being driven by solar cells, as well as comparison results to the performance being driven by fixed direct current. Solar energy is clear and limitless and can be collected by solar cells. We use solar cells to drive thermoelectric chillers, where the cold side is connected to the water tank. It is found that 250 mL of water can be cooled from 18.5C to 13C, where the corresponding coefficient of ...

  11. Control strategies for friction dampers: numerical assessment and experimental investigations.

    Coelho H.T.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of friction dampers has been proposed in a wide variety of mechanical systems for which it is not possible to apply viscoelastic materials, fluid based dampers or others viscous dampers. An important example is the application of friction dampers in aircraft engines to reduce the blades vibration amplitudes. In most cases, friction dampers have been studied in a passive way, however, a significant improvement can be achieved by controlling the normal force in the dampers. The aim of this paper is to study three control strategies for friction dampers based on the hysteresis cycle. The first control strategy maximizes the energy removal in each harmonic oscillation cycle, by calculating the optimum normal force based on the last displacement peak. The second control strategy combines the first one with the maximum energy removal strategy used in the smart spring devices. Finally, is presented the strategy which homogenously modulates the friction force. Numerical studies were performed with these three strategies defining the performance metrics. The best control strategy was applied experimentally. The experimental test rig was fully identified and its parameters were used for the numerical simulations. The obtained results show the good performance for the friction damper and the selected strategy.

  12. Incipient Transient Detection in Reactor Systems: Experimental and Theoretical Investigation

    Lefteri H. Tsoukalas; S.T. Revankar; X Wang; R. Sattuluri

    2005-09-27

    The main goal of this research was to develop a method for detecting reactor system transients at the earliest possible time through a comprehensive experimental, testing and benchmarking program. This approach holds strong promise for developing new diagnostic technologies that are non-intrusive, generic and highly portable across different systems. It will help in the design of new generation nuclear power reactors, which utilize passive safety systems with a reliable and non-intrusive multiphase flow diagnostic system to monitor the function of the passive safety systems. The main objective of this research was to develop an improved fuzzy logic based detection method based on a comprehensive experimental testing program to detect reactor transients at the earliest possible time, practically at their birth moment. A fuzzy logic and neural network based transient identification methodology and implemented in a computer code called PROTREN was considered in this research and was compared with SPRT (Sequentially Probability Ratio Testing) decision and Bayesian inference. The project involved experiment, theoretical modeling and a thermal-hydraulic code assessment. It involved graduate and undergraduate students participation providing them with exposure and training in advanced reactor concepts and safety systems. In this final report, main tasks performed during the project period are summarized and the selected results are presented. Detailed descriptions for the tasks and the results are presented in previous yearly reports (Revankar et al 2003 and Revankar et al 2004).

  13. Experimental investigations of the hydraulics of PFBR steam generator

    The 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) being constructed at Kalpakkam in India, employ liquid sodium as the coolant. Steam generator units are shell and tube heat exchangers with sodium flowing on the shell side and water/steam on the tube side. Liquid sodium enters into the shell side through a side nozzle rises up in the annular space, enters into the window of tube bundle and then flows down along the tubes exchanging heat. The crossflow at tube bundle window has major influence on the flow-induced vibration (FIV) of the tubes and on the temperature profile of the steam exiting from the tubes. A near uniform flow distribution at the inlet of the tube bundle and optimum crossflow velocity are vital for the above mentioned. A scaled down model of the prototype of size 3/5 with velocity similitude was used to conduct hydraulic studies in water to determine the flow distribution and flow distribution devices were employed to achieve flow uniformity. A 60-degree sector of the PFBR SG was tested in water to establish the velocity profile and to monitor the flow induced vibration characteristics. The results of the experiments were compared with the predictions of the analysis arrived using computational tools. From the experimental studies and the theoretical analysis on the sector model an acceptable velocity distribution for the SG tubes against failure due to FIV has been established. This paper discusses the experimental study, the measurements and the analysis of the results. (author)

  14. Experimental investigation two phase flow in direct methanol fuel cells

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) have received many attentions specifically for portable electronic applications since it utilize methanol which is in liquid form in atmospheric condition and high energy density of the methanol. Thus it eliminates the storage problem of hydrogen. It also eliminates humidification requirement of polymeric membrane which is a problem in PEM fuel cells. Some electronic companies introduced DMFC prototypes for portable electronic applications. Presence of carbon dioxide gases due to electrochemical reactions in anode makes the problem a two phase problem. A two phase flow may occur at cathode specifically at high current densities due to the excess water. Presence of gas phase in anode region and liquid phase in cathode region prevents diffusion of fuel and oxygen to the reaction sites thus reduces the performance of the system. Uncontrolled pressure buildup in anode region increases methanol crossover through membrane and adversely effect the performance. Two phase flow in both anode and cathode region is very effective in the performance of DMYC system and a detailed understanding of two phase flow for high performance DMFC systems. Although there are many theoretical and experimental studies available on the DMFC systems in the literature, only few studies consider problem as a two-phase flow problem. In this study, an experimental set up is developed and species distributions on system are measured with a gas chromatograph. System performance characteristics (V-I curves) is measured depending on the process parameters (temperature, fuel ad oxidant flow rates, methanol concentration etc)

  15. Investigating Climate Change and Reproduction: Experimental Tools from Evolutionary Biology

    Oliver Y. Martin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It is now generally acknowledged that climate change has wide-ranging biological consequences, potentially leading to impacts on biodiversity. Environmental factors can have diverse and often strong effects on reproduction, with obvious ramifications for population fitness. Nevertheless, reproductive traits are often neglected in conservation considerations. Focusing on animals, recent progress in sexual selection and sexual conflict research suggests that reproductive costs may pose an underestimated hurdle during rapid climate change, potentially lowering adaptive potential and increasing extinction risk of certain populations. Nevertheless, regime shifts may have both negative and positive effects on reproduction, so it is important to acquire detailed experimental data. We hence present an overview of the literature reporting short-term reproductive consequences of exposure to different environmental factors. From the enormous diversity of findings, we conclude that climate change research could benefit greatly from more coordinated efforts incorporating evolutionary approaches in order to obtain cross-comparable data on how individual and population reproductive fitness respond in the long term. Therefore, we propose ideas and methods concerning future efforts dealing with reproductive consequences of climate change, in particular by highlighting the advantages of multi-generational experimental evolution experiments.

  16. Investigating climate change and reproduction: experimental tools from evolutionary biology.

    Grazer, Vera M; Martin, Oliver Y

    2012-01-01

    It is now generally acknowledged that climate change has wide-ranging biological consequences, potentially leading to impacts on biodiversity. Environmental factors can have diverse and often strong effects on reproduction, with obvious ramifications for population fitness. Nevertheless, reproductive traits are often neglected in conservation considerations. Focusing on animals, recent progress in sexual selection and sexual conflict research suggests that reproductive costs may pose an underestimated hurdle during rapid climate change, potentially lowering adaptive potential and increasing extinction risk of certain populations. Nevertheless, regime shifts may have both negative and positive effects on reproduction, so it is important to acquire detailed experimental data. We hence present an overview of the literature reporting short-term reproductive consequences of exposure to different environmental factors. From the enormous diversity of findings, we conclude that climate change research could benefit greatly from more coordinated efforts incorporating evolutionary approaches in order to obtain cross-comparable data on how individual and population reproductive fitness respond in the long term. Therefore, we propose ideas and methods concerning future efforts dealing with reproductive consequences of climate change, in particular by highlighting the advantages of multi-generational experimental evolution experiments. PMID:24832232

  17. Experimental investigation of the steam condensation with air and helium

    Su, Jiqiang; Sun, Zhongning; Fan, Guangming; Ding, Ming

    2013-07-01

    Condensation of steam coming out from the coolant pipe during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) plays a key role in removing heat from the primary containment of the nuclear reactor. The presence of air and helium reduces the overall heat transfer coefficient substantially. Condensation experiments in the presence of non-condensable gases (e.g. air, helium) were conducted to evaluate the heat removal capacity of a vertical mounted smooth tube. The influences of various parameters, especially the wall subcooling, on the steam condensation heat transfer with non-condensable gases have been obtained for the wall subcooling ranging from 20 to 70C, total pressure ranging from 2.0105 Pa to 7.0105 Pa and air mass fraction ranging from 0.10 to 0.95. The empirical correlations for the heat transfer coefficient, consisting of the mass fraction of the non-condensable gases (air/air helium), total pressure, wall subcooling, and helium mole fraction in non-condensable gases, have been developed based on the experimental results. The relative error of proposed correlations with experimental data is less than 10%. The helium stratification on the condensation has been researched from the distribution of helium fraction and the bulk temperature at different axial positions. It shows that the helium stratification can be ignored when the helium mole fraction in non-condensable gases is less than 35%.

  18. An international multi-laboratory investigation of carbon-based hydrogen sorbent materials

    Hurst, Katherine E.; Parilla, Philip A.; O'Neill, Kevin J.; Gennett, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    New materials are needed to achieve the hydrogen storage targets set out by the US Department of Energy for fuel cell vehicular applications. In order to enable the pathway toward this discovery, precise and accurate characterization of the hydrogen storage performance of these materials is needed. Determining the precise and accurate hydrogen storage capacity of materials requires rigorous attention to detailed experimental parameters and methodology. Slight errors in even small experimental details can result in a large deviation in the determination of the material's true characteristics. Here, we compare measurements of the gravimetric excess hydrogen uptake capacities for two different carbon sorbent materials measured by different laboratories at ambient and liquid N2 temperatures. The participants for this study consist of research laboratories led by experienced scientists in the hydrogen storage field. This collaborative evaluation of standard sorbents illustrated considerable reproducibility over a broad range of materials' hydrogen sorption gravimetric capacities.

  19. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Instability within a Heated Meniscus

    Garcia, Michel

    The behaviour of heated, evaporating menisci in capillary tubes was experimentally observed and theoretically predicted. Testing was performed with n-pentane as a working fluid evaporating in both ambient air (multicomponent, multiphase environment) and a chamber filled with its saturated vapour (single-component, multiphase environment). Capillary tubes with both thin and thick walls with comparable internal diameters were tested. Thermocouples were embedded inside the thick tubes and epoxied onto the thin tubes. A carbon composite resistive element was deposited onto each tube for electrical heating. A meniscus was positioned between tube thermocouples and electrical heating was provided until the meniscus was observed to oscillate in the axial direction, at which time it was considered destabilised. The experimental temperature gradient at the onset of instability was found to be significantly different for thin and thick tubes of comparable inner diameters. Thin tube results were determined to be more representative of the axial temperature gradient at the tube inner wall. Oscillations were observed and recorded using a microscope-camera assembly. Meniscal instability occurred at a higher temperature gradient for testing while exposed to ambient air than for testing in a pure n-pentane environment. A meniscus inside a smaller inner diameter tube was found to be capable of sustaining a larger temperature gradient than that for a meniscus inside a larger inner diameter tube. A leading-order scaled equation describing the evolution of the thin film was derived and a perturbation analysis was applied to obtain a stability criterion. A characteristic height was chosen as the height at which the evaporative mass flux was a maximum. The meniscus half channel width was chosen as the characteristic length normal to the characteristic height. A numerical thin film model was created to obtain the characteristic height from the thin film solution profile together with the calculated value of the stability criterion. Comparison with experimental results showed that the model has some predictive ability in determining the onset of evaporating meniscal instability in a heated capillary tube. Results of this study can be used to design and characterise the operational limits of phase change heat transfer devices using evaporation from a meniscus as would occur in heat pipes.

  20. Experimental investigation of the Fast-SAGD process

    Shin, H. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Polikar, M. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    High pressure and high temperature experiments were conducted to provided insight into the operation of the steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process and its modified Fast-SAGD process. A mechanism for the steam chamber's collapse and recovery was suggested. Steam chamber growth is accelerated sideways in this enhanced recovery method which uses offset wells operated with cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) beside the SAGD well. The enhanced thermal efficiency offered by Fast-SAGD results in better production performance compared to conventional SAGD. The application of the Fast-SAGD process in Alberta's oil sands areas has resulted in higher net present values (NPV) for the low permeability type reservoirs of Cold Lake and Peace River because of lower steam requirements and higher productivity. In this study, the Fast SAGD process was evaluated using an automated process control system for a scaled physical model which represented a bituminous reservoir near Cold Lake being operated at high temperature and high pressure conditions. A suitable permeability of 1.25 Darcy was chosen for the prototype based on numerical simulations. Experimental results revealed that, for the Fast-SAGD process, the overall cumulative oil production is larger and the end-point cumulative steam to oil ratio (CSOR) is higher than for the SAGD process. The authors deduced that for the Fast-SAGD experiment, the steam chamber collapsed because the boiler did not produce a sufficient volume of high quality steam. Numerical simulation results confirmed this assumption. The steam chamber was then restored by modifying the experimental procedure. Best history matches showed the steam quality was 30 per cent during the SAGD and then 15 per cent after starting the CSS. It was concluded that if the same quality of steam were injected into the Fast- SAGD model as in the SAGD case, the experimental results of the Fast-SAGD case would be improved, cumulative production by 70 per cent and the CSOR by 52 per cent. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 24 figs.

  1. Experimental Investigation of a Helicopter Rotor Hub Wake

    Reich, David; Elbing, Brian; Schmitz, Sven

    2013-11-01

    A scaled model of a notional helicopter rotor hub was tested in the 48'' Garfield Thomas Water Tunnel at the Applied Research Laboratory Penn State. The main objectives of the experiment were to understand the spatial- and temporal content of the unsteady wake downstream of a rotor hub up to a distance corresponding to the empennage. Primary measurements were the total hub drag and velocity measurements at three nominal downstream locations. Various flow structures were identified and linked to geometric features of the hub model. The most prominent structures were two-per-revolution (hub component: scissors) and four-per-revolution (hub component: main hub arms) vortices shed by the hub. Both the two-per-revolution and four-per-revolution structures persisted far downstream of the hub, but the rate of dissipation was greater for the four-per-rev structures. This work provides a dataset for enhanced understanding of the fundamental physics underlying rotor hub flows and serves as validation data for future CFD analyses.

  2. Exploratory experimental investigations on post-tensioned structural glass beams

    Christian Louter

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Corresponding author: Dr. ir. Christian Louter, Steel Structures Laboratory (ICOM, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering (ENAC, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL, GC B3 505, Station 18, Lausanne CH-1015, Switzerland. Tel.: +41 21 6932427; Fax: +41 21 6932868; E-mail: christian.louter@epfl.ch The mechanical response of post-tensioned glass beams is explored in this paper. This is done through bending experiments on post-tensioned glass beam specimens with either mechanically anchored or adhesively bonded steel tendons by which a beneficial pre-stress is inflicted on the glass beams. In addition, reference beams with identical geometry but without tendons are tested. From the results of the bending experiments it can be seen that the post-tensioned glass beams reach higher initial fracture loads than the reference glass beams. Furthermore, the post-tensioned glass beams develop a significant post-fracture reserve. From this it is concluded that post-tensioning a glass beam is a feasible concept, which provides increased initial fracture strength and enhanced post-fracture performance.

  3. Experimental investigation of AC interference on cathodically protected gas pipelines

    AllahKaram, S.R.; Shamani, R. [Metallurgy and Materials Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran)

    2004-07-01

    Due to the expansion of high voltage AC power transmission lines and cathodically protected gas pipelines corresponding to the increases in energy demand, it is more difficult to construct them with enough distances between them. Thus, the pipelines are exposed to AC interference, which results in perturbation of cathodic protection and AC corrosion risk. The monitoring system used the instant-off method, with steel probes simulating coating defects. IR free potential monitoring under AC conditions is difficult to measure. The ohmic drop error due to AC current can be much more important than the error due to DC cathodic protection currents. By increasing the data acquisition rate, it has been possible to determine the polarization of the metal surface within a few milliseconds after disconnecting the coupon from the AC and DC power source. Some of the conclusions of these studies are that: - AC polarization can decay some of the protective films. - The electrochemical surface reactions and therefore the interpretation of the instantaneous off potential measurements depend strongly on the composition of the soil. The details of the method, the equipment, the results of laboratory studies, the interpretation of the data and the identification of conditions for AC corrosion have been presented. (authors)

  4. An experimental investigation into the behavior of glassfiber reinforced polymer elements at elevated temperatures

    Qian, Kenny Zongxi

    This thesis presents a literature review and results of an experimental study about the effects of high temperatures and cyclic loading on the physical and mechanical properties of pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) square tubes used in civil engineering structural applications. Most laboratory researches have focused mainly on the effect of elevated temperature on the compressive strength of the GFRP square tubes. Limited research has focused on the tensile strength of GFRP coupons under elevated temperatures. Dynamic Mechanical Analyses (DMA) was performed to assess the viscoelastic behavior including the glass transition temperature of GFRP. Sixteen GFRP coupons were tested under elevated temperatures to investigate the tensile strength and the effect of elevated temperatures to the tensile strength of GFRP. The results of an experimental program performed on fifty GFRP square tubes with different designs in 1.83m at normal temperatures were discussed to investigate compression performance. Another experimental program was performed on 20 GFRP square tubes with different designs in 1.22m under elevated temperatures. The experiments results were discussed and showed that the compressive strength of GFRP material was influenced by several factors including the glass transition v temperature and the connection bolts. Failure modes under 25°C and 75°C were crushing and the failure modes with the temperatures above 75°C were not typical crushing due to the glass transition of GFRP. Sixteen GFRP square tubes with length of 0.61m were tested with the same experimental program under elevated temperatures as the control group. Twelve GFRP square tubes with the same size were subjected to cyclic loading under elevated temperatures to investigate the effect of the cyclic loading to the compression properties of GFRP material. According to the experimental results and the discussion, the stiffness was reduced by the cyclic loading. On the contrary, the influence of the cyclic loading was not obvious compared to the GFRP specimens subjected to normal displacement control loading. The higher temperature made the stiffness of GFRP more sensitive to the cyclic loading.

  5. Experimental investigation of interaction processes between diesel-sprays

    Pawlowski, Adam Zbigniew

    2009-07-01

    This thesis addresses some fundamental questions about spray-spray interaction. The combination of the employed measurement techniques allows comprehensive insights into this phenomena. The sprays from the investigated set of cluster nozzles behave considerably different than sprays from a conventional nozzle. This is expected to be true for all diverging cluster nozzles with a significant angle between the sprays. Diverging cluster sprays offer an additional possibility for engine designers to influence the fuel distribution inside the combustion chamber. However, the sprays investigated here behave so different, that other engine parameters like piston geometry may need to be modified to use the full potential of such nozzles. Contrary to the large differences between the investigated conventional and cluster nozzles, no significant effect has been noted for conventional multi-hole nozzles in terms of entrainment between the sprays. For the currently employed number of orifices per nozzle (6-8); increasing the number of orifices alone seems to have no significant impact on the flow field between the sprays and therefore on the entrainment. This finding is supported by a simple integral entrainment model. The investigations presented here indicate that in engines these processes are governed by the geometry and probably also by the interaction with charge motion. Therefore, studying these processes in greater detail in pressurized chambers seems unreasonable. (orig.)

  6. An experimental investigation of interaction between projectiles and flames

    Baryshnikov, A. S.; Basargin, I. V.; Bobashev, S. V.; Monakhov, N. A.; Popov, P. A.; Sakharov, V. A.; Chistyakova, M. V.

    2015-12-01

    This investigation is devoted to the influence of a heated area of gas on model stability with the supersonic motion during free-flying operation. The conditions of the maximum influence on aerodynamics of body flight in an inhomogeneous heated area are ascertained.

  7. Experimental investigation of in situ cleanable HEPA filters

    Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), High Level Waste Division, Tanks Focus Area, and the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) have been investigating high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters which can be regenerated or cleaned in situ as an alternative to conventional disposable HEPA filters. This technical report documents concerns pertaining to conventional HEPA filters

  8. Investigation of the fast neutron induced (n, ?) reaction. (Experimental techniques)

    For investigation of the fast neutron induced (n, ?)-reaction, two grid-type gas-filled twin ionization chambers were developed and tested. Using the ionization chambers, the energy spectra, angular distributions and cross sections of the (n, ?)-reaction were measured around En=5 MeV for 40Ca, 58Ni and 64Zn. 27 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab

  9. Laboratory analyses of micron-sized solid grains: Experimental techniques and recent results

    Morphological and spectrophotometric investigations have been extensively applied in the past years to various kinds of micron and/or submicron-sized grains formed by materials which are candidate to be present in space. The samples are produced in the laboratory and then characterized in their physio-chemical properties. Some of the most recent results obtained on various kinds of carbonaceous materials are reported. Main attention is devoted to spectroscopic results in the VUV and IR wavelength ranges, where many of the analyzed samples show typical fingerprints which can be identified also in astrophysical and cometary materials. The laboratory methodologies used so far are also critically discussed in order to point out capabilities and present limitations, in the view of possible application to returned comet samples. Suggestions are given to develop new techniques which should overcome some of the problems faced in the manipulation and analysis of micron solid samples

  10. Theoretical and experimental investigation of thermohydrologic processes in a partially saturated, fractured porous medium

    The performance of a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste will be influenced to a large degree by thermohydrologic phenomena created by the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste. The importance of these phenomena is manifest in that they can greatly affect the movement of moisture and the resulting transport of radionuclides from the repository. Thus, these phenomena must be well understood prior to a definitive assessment of a potential repository site. An investigation has been undertaken along three separate avenues of analysis: (i) laboratory experiments, (ii) mathematical models, and (iii) similitude analysis. A summary of accomplishments to date is as follows. (1) A review of the literature on the theory of heat and mass transfer in partially saturated porous medium. (2) A development of the governing conservation and constitutive equations. (3) A development of a dimensionless form of the governing equations. (4) A numerical study of the importance and sensitivity of flow to a set of dimensionless groups. (5) A survey and evaluation of experimental measurement techniques. (6) Execution of laboratory experiments of nonisothermal flow in a porous medium with a simulated fracture

  11. Theoretical and experimental investigation of thermohydrologic processes in a partially saturated, fractured porous medium

    Green, R.T.; Manteufel, R.D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Dodge, F.T.; Svedeman, S.J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1993-07-01

    The performance of a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste will be influenced to a large degree by thermohydrologic phenomena created by the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste. The importance of these phenomena is manifest in that they can greatly affect the movement of moisture and the resulting transport of radionuclides from the repository. Thus, these phenomena must be well understood prior to a definitive assessment of a potential repository site. An investigation has been undertaken along three separate avenues of analysis: (i) laboratory experiments, (ii) mathematical models, and (iii) similitude analysis. A summary of accomplishments to date is as follows. (1) A review of the literature on the theory of heat and mass transfer in partially saturated porous medium. (2) A development of the governing conservation and constitutive equations. (3) A development of a dimensionless form of the governing equations. (4) A numerical study of the importance and sensitivity of flow to a set of dimensionless groups. (5) A survey and evaluation of experimental measurement techniques. (6) Execution of laboratory experiments of nonisothermal flow in a porous medium with a simulated fracture.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Tesla Turbine and its Underlying Theory

    Kartikeya Awasthi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nikola Tesla is widely known for his outstanding achievements in generation transmission and utilization of power. The object of this paper is to experimentally verify one such method of extracting electrical power from fluid energy; devised by Tesla in his 1913 patent; known as Tesla Turbine. It is to be noted that almost no work has been done using water as the working fluid for the turbine so an attempt to reconstruct the turbine as per Nikola Tesla’s patent has been made with positive results obtained by generation of useful electrical power using water as the medium which provides a new outlook towards our understanding of the turbines and the ways by which mechanical energy of the motive fluid can be converted into useful electrical output. .

  13. Experimental Investigation of Hypersonic Flow and Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation Interaction

    For hypersonic flow, it was found that the most effective plasma actuator is derived from an electromagnetic perturbation. An experimental study was performed between hypersonic flow and plasma aerodynamic actuation interaction in a hypersonic shock tunnel, in which a Mach number of 7 was reached. The plasma discharging characteristic was acquired in static flows. In a hypersonic flow, the flow field can affect the plasma discharging characteristics. DC discharging without magnetic force is unstable, and the discharge channel cannot be maintained. When there is a magnetic field, the energy consumption of the plasma source is approximately three to four times larger than that without a magnetic field, and at the same time plasma discharge can also affect the hypersonic flow field. Through schlieren pictures and pressure measurement, it was found that plasma discharging could induce shockwaves and change the total pressure and wall pressure of the flow field

  14. Experimental, quantum chemical and NBO/NLMO investigations of pantoprazole

    Rajesh, P.; Gunasekaran, S.; Gnanasambandan, T.; Seshadri, S.

    2015-02-01

    The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of pantoprazole (PPZ) was carried out using the experimental FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis data and quantum chemical studies. The observed vibrational data were compared with the wavenumbers derived theoretically for the optimized geometry of the compound from the DFT-B3LYP gradient calculations employing 6-31G (d, p) basis set. Thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity and enthalpy have been calculated for the molecule. HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The intramolecular contacts have been interpreted using natural bond orbital (NBO) and natural localized molecular orbital (NLMO) analysis. Important non-linear properties such as electric dipole moment and first hyperpolarizability of PPZ have been computed using B3LYP quantum chemical calculation. Finally, the Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges of the title compound has been calculated.

  15. Experimental investigation on phase change spray cooling with R22

    Li, Mengjing; Liu, Jionghui; Liu, Xiufang; Hou, Yu

    2013-07-01

    Great quantities of experiments were performed to study the effects of two-phase spray cooling with high heat flux used R22 as refrigerant. A detailed research of the performance of spray cooling at different subcooling temperature was conducted. The experimental results show that the critical heat flux can reach 272.04Wṡcm-2 with R22 as the working medium, and the corresponding surface temperature is 21.11°C These figures prove that the spray cooling has the advantages of high heat flux as well as lower surface temperature. With increasing overcooling degree of refrigerant at the entrance of nozzle, CHF rises at first and goes to stable then. Which means the CHF can be developed by adding the overcooling of refrigerant. However, the development is limited to a certain degree according to the characteristics of the system; namely, the overmuch increment plays a little role to improve CHF value.

  16. Experimental Investigations of Space Shuttle BX-265 Foam

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a variety of experimental studies on the polyurethane foam, BX-265. This foam is used as a close-out foam insulation on the space shuttle external tank. The purpose of this work is to provide a better understanding of the foam s behavior and to support advanced modeling efforts. The following experiments were performed: Thermal expansion was measured for various heating rates. The in situ expansion of foam cells was documented by heating the foam in a scanning electron microscope. Expansion mechanisms are described. Thermogravimetric analysis was performed at various heating rates and for various environments. The glass transition temperature was also measured. The effects of moisture on the foam were studied. Time-dependent effects were measured to give preliminary data on viscoelastoplastic properties.

  17. Experimental investigation of different configurations in a flexible heliac

    The effect of varying the magnetic field configuration by adding an l=1 helical winding to the standard heliac has been studied experimentally. Equilibrium plasma configurations in the range 0.7 ? t(0) ? 1.86 have been obtained. Analyses of the plasma pressure profiles measured by Langmuir probes in this range show good agreement between the plasma isobars and the computed vacuum magnetic surfaces; for configurations with a rotational transform t(0) close to unity it is necessary to take known error fields into account. When low-order rational surfaces are present, a deterioration of the plasma confinement is clearly observed. Magnetic islands, resulting from the resonance between the low-order rational surface t = 3/2 and the m=2, n=3 vacuum field harmonics inherent in the geometry, are identified with features observed in both the plasma pressure and the floating potential profiles. (author). 8 refs, 13 figs, 1 tab

  18. An experimental investigation of double beta decay of 100Mo

    New limits on half-lives for several double beta decay modes of 100Mo were obtained with a novel experimental system which included thin source films interleaved with a coaxial array of windowless silicon detectors. Segmentation and timing information allowed backgrounds originating in the films to be studied in some detail. Dummy films containing 96Mo were used to assess remaining backgrounds. With 0.1 mole years of 100Mo data collected, the lower half-life limits at 90% confidence were 2.7 /times/ 1018 years for decay via the two-neutrino mode, 5.2 /times/1019 years for decay with the emission of a Majoron, and 1.6 /times/ 1020 years and 2.2 /times/ 1021 years for neutrinoless 0+ → 2+ and 0+ → 0+ transitions, respectively. 50 refs., 38 figs., 11 tabs

  19. Experimental Investigation of Dynamic Behavior of Viaducts by Shock Loading

    Adrian Leopa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The viaducts are constructions designed to provide ground communication over different geographical barriers such as examples valleys (depressions. To avoid partial or total destruction that may occur after dynamic stress from road (or railroad or seismic activity, in viaducts structure is placed systems for dynamic isolation. Thus, the viaduct deck is mounted on viscoelastic type systems designed to provide protection from the shock loading. Over time, due to an intensive and varied of dynamic loadings, these isolation systems suffer degradation of viscoelastic links, something that leads to uncontrolled movements of the system. In this work, are established and quantified on experimental way, kinematics parameters of the vibration of the viaduct deck loading by shocks, which will be monitored over time to establish the degree of normality in the functioning of viscoelastic systems.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Supersonic Coplanar Jets within Ejectors

    Papamoschou, Dimitri

    2001-01-01

    This experimental and theoretical work involved reduction of supersonic jet noise using Mach Wave Elimination (MWE), a method that suppresses noise by means of a gaseous layer that envelops the supersonic jet. Also explored was a new method for mixing enhancement in which an axial, secondary flow enhances mixing in a primary flow. The research is relevant to the advent of future supersonic transports that must adhere to the same take-off and landing restrictions as ordinary subsonic aircraft. To reduce noise, one needs to understand the fundamental fluid mechanics of the jet, namely its turbulent structure and mean-flow characteristics, and to perform high-quality noise measurements. The results generated are applicable to free jets as well as to jets within ejectors.

  1. Experimental investigation of nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation

    In this paper we report on an experimental study of the characteristics of nanosecond pulsed discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation. The N2 (C3Πu) rotational and vibrational temperatures are around 430 K and 0.24 eV, respectively. The emission intensity ratio between the first negative system and the second positive system of N2, as a rough indicator of the temporally and spatially averaged electron energy, has a minor dependence on applied voltage amplitude. The induced flow direction is not parallel, but vertical to the dielectric layer surface, as shown by measurements of body force, velocity, and vorticity. Nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation is effective in airfoil flow separation control at freestream speeds up to 100 m/s. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  2. Experimental Investigation on Terahertz Spectra of Amphetamine Type Stimulants

    Sun, Jin-Hai; Shen, Jing-Ling; Liang, Lai-Shun; Xu, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2005-12-01

    The spectral absorption features of three amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) belonging to illicit drugs have been studied with terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and the characteristic absorption spectra (fingerprint spectra) are obtained in the range from 0.2 to 2.5 THz. Fingerprint spectra of illicit drugs in terahertz band are bases to detect and to inspect nondestructively illicit drugs with terahertz technique. With fingerprint spectra of illicit drugs and strong penetrability for cloths, paper bags and leathered or plastic luggage terahertz technique would be better than other techniques in illicit drugs detection and inspection. Thus, this work would contribute to the building of corresponding fingerprint spectra database of illicit drugs and provide experimental bases for using of terahertz detection apparatus in drugs nondestructive detection and inspection in the future.

  3. Experimental investigation of cavitation behavior in valveless micropumps

    Recently, there have been several reports on the observation of cavitation in microfluidics and in micropumps. Though cavitation is a common occurrence in micropumping, this is one of the least understood of all micropumping phenomena, and very limited progress has been made to study the behavior of cavitation in micropumps. Hence, a dedicated study on cavitation in micropumps and its effects on the performance of the micropump would be very useful. This work presents an experimental study on the behavior of cavitation in valveless micropump. The mechanism of cavitation occurrence in valveless micropumps has been explained by applying macroscale pumping principles to suit micropumping. The different stages of micropump cavitation have been defined through suitably conducted experiments and the results have been presented. (paper)

  4. Experimental investigation of dynamic properties of chemical control analyzers

    Egoshina, O. V.; Voronov, V. N.; Makarishcheva, N. A.; Latt, Aie Min; Rogov, A. S.

    2015-05-01

    General data on dynamical characteristics of chemical control analyzers under nonstationary conditions are represented. The concise description of an experimental bench modeling the operation of a chemical-engineering monitoring system with the technical specifications of analyzers is given. Basic principles for determining dynamic characteristics of the analyzers are formulated. Results of computations of mathematical models for different types of disturbances that imitate a violation in water chemistry and the failure of single equipment components in systems for chemical control of the quality of a heat-transfer agent using in HPPs and NPPs are given. Conclusions are drawn regarding the necessity in the mandatory consideration of the dynamic characteristics during the construction of automatic systems for dozing correction reagents.

  5. Back scattering interferometry revisited – A theoretical and experimental investigation

    Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Jepsen, S. T.; Sørensen, Henrik Schiøtt; K. di Gennaro, A.; Kristensen, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    A refractive index based detector based on so called back scattering interferometry (BSI) has been described in the literature as a unique optical method for measuring biomolecular binding interactions in solution. In this paper, we take a detailed look at the optical principle underlying this...... technique to understand fully the constituents and behaviour of the fringe patterns generated. The simulated results are compared and validated with experimental measurements. Hereby, we show that BSI does not operate as a resonant cavity as often stated in the literature. Recently, we have questioned the...... claims made that BSI in general can be used to measure molecular bindings. Here we explore this topic further in three cases using fluorescence spectroscopy as a reference method. Finally, we explore whether refractive index sensing can be used to measure the enzymatic phosphorylation of glucose to...

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation of gas phase freeboard combustion

    Andersen, J.; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Meyer, K.E.; Hvid, S.L.; Glarborg, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Experimental data for velocity field, temperatures, and gas composition have been obtained from a 50 kW axisymmetric non-swirling natural gas fired combustion setup under two different settings. The reactor was constructed to simulate the conditions in the freeboard of a grate-fired boiler but...... tested the four-step global mechanism by Jones and Lindstedt (Combust. Flame 1988, 73, 233-249), and the 16 species and 41 reaction skeletal mechanism by Yang and Pope (Combust. Flame 1998, 112 16-32). The CFD model captured the main features of the combustion process and flow patterns. The application...... of more advanced chemical mechanisms did not improve the prediction of the overall combustion process but did provide additional information about species (especially H(2) and radicals), which is desirable for postprocessing pollutant formation....

  7. Experimental Investigation on Sandstone Rock Permeability of Pakistan Gas Fields

    Raza, Arshad; Bing, Chua Han; Nagarajan, Ramasamy; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    Permeability is the ability of formation to produce hydrocarbon which is affected by compaction, pore size, sorting, cementation, layering and clay swelling. The effect of texture on permeability in term of grain size, sorting, sphericity, degree of cementing has been reported in literature. Also, the effect of permeability on capillary pressure, irreducible water saturation, displacement pressure and pore geometry constant has been studied separately. This preliminary study presents the experimental results of eight samples to understand the effect of similar factors of texture on permeability. With the knowledge of the results, it can be said that the effect of grain size, cementation, texture material, sphericity, and porosity can't be observed on permeability except sorting when less than ten samples are considered from different depositional environment. The results also show the impact of permeability on capillary pressure, irreducible water saturation, and displacement pressure and pore geometry index as similar as published in the literature.

  8. Experimental, analytical and computational investigation of bimodal elastomer networks

    von Lockette, Paris Robert

    Advances in the synthesis of macromolecular materials have led to the creation of special classes of elastomers called bimodal because of their bimodal distributions of linear starting oligomers. Numerous studies on these materials have documented anomalous increases in ultimate strength and toughness at certain mixture combinations of the constituents but have not yet identified a cause for this behavior. In addition, the ability to predict optimal mixtures still eludes polymer chemists. Constitutive models for the behavior of bimodal materials are also unable to predict material behavior, but instead tend to capture results using complicated curve fitting and iterative schemes. This thesis uncovers topological and micromechanical sources of these enhanced properties using periodic, topological simulations of chain-level network formation and develops a constitutive model of the aggregate bimodal network. Using a topological framework, in conjunction with the eight-chain averaging scheme of Arruda and Boyce, this work develops optical and mechanical constitutive models for bimodal elastomers whose results compare favorably with data in the literature. The resulting bimodal network theory is able to predict material response for a range of bimodal compositions using only two sets of data, a direct improvement over previous models. The micromechanics of elastomeric deformation and chain orientation as described by the eight-chain model are further validated by comparing optical and mechanical data generated during large deformation shear tests on unimodal materials with finite element simulations. In addition, a newly developed optical anisotropy model for the Raman tensor of polymeric materials, generated using an eight-chain unit cell model, is shown to compare favorably with tensile data in the literature. Results generated using NETSIM, a computer program developed in this thesis, have revealed naturally occurring, self-reinforcing topological features associated with experimentally observed increases in ultimate strength and toughness. The ability to predict increases in the populations of these topologies allows for the prediction of optimal bimodal mixtures and the definition of a metric of network optimality. The sol and gel fraction predictions from NETSIM also compare well with results obtained from experimental network synthesis and previous computational simulations. After formation, each molecular chain is assigned a modified entropic force-stretch law and the undeformed network is annealed, clearly illustrating how initial chain length distributions in bimodal materials deviate from the r.m.s. assumption. The results of computational annealing also highlight several structural features that have been observed experimentally in the literature. Results of the computational deformation of simulated, three dimensional networks show enhancements to strain hardening in networks with compositions similar to those which exhibited enhanced toughness in experiments. These enhanced, simulated networks also show increases in the orientation versus stretch response over compositionally similar networks. Orientation response results support previous experimental results. Increased occurrence of the doubled connection topology is found to enhance strain hardening in simulated networks and to be a positive factor in enhanced strain energy seen in experiments. The density of single cyclics, while having a positive correlation in the enhanced strain energy seen in experiments appears to negate the effect of increased populations of doubled connections in simulations.

  9. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION & NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF COMPOSITE LEAF SPRING

    K. K. JADHAO,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Automobile Industry has shown keen interest for replacement of steel leaf spring with that of glass fiber composite leaf spring, since the composite material has high strength to weight ratio, good corrosion resistance and tailor-able properties. The objective of present study was to replace material for leaf spring. In present study the material selected was glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP and the polyester resin (NETPOL 1011 can be used which was more economical this will reduce total cost of composite leaf spring. A spring with constant width and thickness was fabricated by hand lay-up technique which was very simple and economical. The experiments were conducted on UTM and numerical analysis was done via (FEA using ANSYS software. Stresses and deflection results were verified for analytical and experimental results. Result shows that, the composite spring has stresses much lower than steel leaf spring and weight of composite spring was nearly reduced up to 85%.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Gas-Lift Use in Nuclear Reactors

    This work briefly describes the selection of type of a two-phase flow, suitable for intensifying of a natural flow of nuclear reactors with liquid fuel – cooling mixture molten salts and the description of a „Two-phase flow demonstrator“ (TFD) used for experimental study of the „gas-lift“ system, and its influence on the support of natural convection. The experimental device works with water and the air is used as a gas. The used perspex limits the temperature to 60°C. There are stated relations for the description of a natural flow in model device and relations for determination of suitable liquid/gas ratio of the gas-lift in the study. There is described the measuring device and the application of the TFD sensor. The flow rate of water is measured by the induction flow meter that gives a voltage signal, which is brought into a computer for processing. Measuring of the velocity distribution and the size of the bubbles is performed by using the PIV method (Particle Image Velocimetry). There was created a model of dispersive bubble flow for application in nuclear reactors. The basic calculation is performed by using the homogeneous flow, where is considered, that the velocity of the fluid and the gas is equal and there is measured the relative share of the gas in homogeneous mixture with the fluid for this case. There are considered the temperature, pressure and flow rate velocity changes of the fluid and gas in the gas-lift cylinder and their influence on the size and velocity of the bubbles for the heat and mass transport of this mixture by the gas-lift cylinder. (author)

  11. Experimental investigation on air leakage characteristics of containments

    Facilities such as nuclear power plants have containments as atomic reactor which are subjected to high internal pressure. The internal pressure induces tensile stress in the containments. The tensile stress can cause generation and propagation of cracks through which the gas contaminated radioactively may leak. Supposing that a potential leakage accident happened, an experimental study on air leakage characteristics of containments was carried out. Two reinforced concrete specimens which reflect a wall of the containment were manufactured. Then the specimens were subjected to tensile load to generate cracks and air penetration tests were performed. During the air leakage test, the air pressure of inlet and outlet, the flow rate of outlet and the sum of crack widths were measured. The individual factors of the specific crack shape, the wall roughness and the flow coefficient, could be estimated from these experimental data. The factors are expressed as functions in terms of the sum of crack widths by regression analysis. The measured flow rates were compared with the predictive values obtained using the regression curves. Then flow rates according to pressure gradient and crack width were estimated. It was verified that the predicted flow rates agree with the measured flow rates statistically, that is, the estimated functions predicting the wall roughness and the flow coefficient are suitable. Once the sum of crack widths and inlet pressure of concrete wall are known, thus, the air flow rate can be predicted. The relationship among crack width, pressure and flow rate will serve as a criterion for air leakage characteristics of containments. (authors)

  12. Experimental performance and acoustic investigation of modern, counterrotating blade concepts

    Hoff, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic, acoustic, and aeromechanical performance of counterrotating blade concepts were evaluated both theoretically and experimentally. Analytical methods development and design are addressed. Utilizing the analytical methods which evolved during the conduct of this work, aerodynamic and aeroacoustic predictions were developed, which were compared to NASA and GE wind tunnel test results. The detailed mechanical design and fabrication of five different composite shell/titanium spar counterrotating blade set configurations are presented. Design philosophy, analyses methods, and material geometry are addressed, as well as the influence of aerodynamics, aeromechanics, and aeroacoustics on the design procedures. Blade fabrication and quality control procedures are detailed; bench testing procedures and results of blade integrity verification are presented; and instrumentation associated with the bench testing also is identified. Additional hardware to support specialized testing is described, as are operating blade instrumentation and the associated stress limits. The five counterrotating blade concepts were scaled to a tip diameter of 2 feet, so they could be incorporated into MPS (model propulsion simulators). Aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performance testing was conducted in the NASA Lewis 8 x 6 supersonic and 9 x 15 V/STOL (vertical or short takeoff and landing) wind tunnels and in the GE freejet anechoic test chamber (Cell 41) to generate an experimental data base for these counterrotating blade designs. Test facility and MPS vehicle matrices are provided, and test procedures are presented. Effects on performance of rotor-to-rotor spacing, angle-of-attack, pylon proximity, blade number, reduced-diameter aft blades, and mismatched rotor speeds are addressed. Counterrotating blade and specialized aeromechanical hub stability test results are also furnished.

  13. Reduction of friction in fluid transport: experimental investigation

    G. Aguilar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available La reducción de fricción o de arrastre (DR mediante el uso de soluciones poliméricas o surfactantes es sin duda alguna la técnica de reducción de fricción para flujos turbulentos en tuberías más efectiva (es posible obtener reducciones de hasta un factor de 8 en los coeficientes de fricción en segmentos de tuberías rectas. Desde el punto de vista fundamental, el estudio del fenómeno de DR ofrece la oportunidad de comprender mejor flujos turbulentos; desde el punto de vista práctico, la DR puede ser usada con propósitos de ahorro en potencia de bombeo. La implementación comercial de estos aditivos se ha llevado a cabo con éxito en el transporte de petróleo, y la investigación necesaria para la implementación de estas soluciones en muchas otras aplicaciones sigue en proceso, p.ej., en sistemas centrales de calefacción y aire acondicionado, sistemas hidrónicos en edificios, desagües, irrigación, procesos industriales, etc. Nuestros esfuerzos se han enfocado en dos áreas principales: (A investigación experimental sobre la transferencia de momentum y calor para soluciones reductoras de fricción, y (B la implementación de estas soluciones en sistemas hidrónicos de enfriamiento en edificios con el propósito de ahorrar energía. Este documento pretende dar una noción general de la investigación experimental que llevamos a cabo en nuestro laboratorio de dinámica de fluídos no-Newtonianos, reología, y transferencia de calor en la UCSB

  14. Experimental investigation of heat transfer in the transition region

    An experimental study of forced convective boiling heat transfer for upflow of water in a circular tube has been performed using a heat transfer system with temperature-controlled indirect Joule heating. By this way, complete boiling curves from incipience of boiling to fully established film boiling could be measured including the transition boiling regime. The boiling curves were traversed in a quasi-steady mode, usually by increasing the set-point wall temperature average at a constant time rate of 3.5 K/min. The vast majority of results covers the pressure range from 0.1 to 1.0 MPa, mass flux range from 25 to 200 kg/(m2s) and inlet subcooling from 5 to 30 K. The experimental results of transition boiling heat transfer obtained in the centre of the test section were correlated in terms of a heat flux/surface superheat relationship that was normalized by the maximum heat flux (local CHF) and its associated wall superheat, respectively, to anchor the transition boiling curve to its low temperature limit. The upper surface temperature limit of the transition boiling regime was determined by inspection of measured axial distributions of surface heat flux and corresponding wall temperature. The critical heat flux (CHF) and its corresponding wall superheat has been measured, too. These temperature-controlled results were compared also with power-controlled experiments. The data are presented in terms of a table and accurate empirical correlations following Katto's generalized correlation scheme. Taking into account previous CHF data at L/D ≤ 100 and same range of flow conditions the length effect was found to further depend on pressure and mass flux. The data for the critical wall superheat show a distinct dependence upon pressure, mass flux and inlet quality that has not been observed before with comparable clarity

  15. Experimental investigations of helium cryotrapping by argon frost

    At the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre (KfK) cryopumping techniques are being investigated by which the gaseous exhausts from the NET/ITER reactor can be pumped out during the burn-and dwell-times. Cryosorption and cryotrapping are techniques which are suitable for this task. It is the target of the investigations to test the techniques under NET/ITER conditions and to determine optimum design data for a prototype. They involve measurement of the pumping speed as a function of the gas composition, gas flow and loading condition of the pump surfaces. The following parameters are subjected to variations: Ar/He ratio, specific helium volume flow rate, cryosurface temperature, process gas composition, impurities in argon trapping gas, three-stage operation and two-stage operation. This paper is a description of the experiments on argon trapping techniques started in 1990. Eleven tests as well as the results derived from them are described

  16. Experimental investigations of production of glueballs and meson resonant states

    The major efforts reported have been directed toward investigating glueballs and non-strange mesons. The g/sub T/(2050), g/sub T'/(2300), and g/sub T''/(2350) have been observed in the OZI forbidden reaction π-p → phi phi n. Their characteristics are explained within the context of quantum chromodynamics as being produced by 1 to 3 primary glueballs. It is proposed to increase the present statistics in order to reduce the effective partial wave analysis resolution, and to begin to study the high vertical bar t' vertical bar region. It is further planned to pursue coupled channel analysis of high precision π-p → K/sub s/0K/sub s/0n data and other relevant world data in the 2++, 0++, and 4++ channels. A program is planned to investigate K-p and p anti p interactions at 8 GeV/c

  17. Experimental investigation of current free double layers in helicon plasmas

    Sahu, B. B. [Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Dronacharya College of Engineering, Gurgaon 123506 (India); Tarey, R. D. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India); Ganguli, A. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-02-15

    The paper presents investigations of current free double layer (CFDL) that forms in helicon plasmas. In contrast to the other work reporting on the same subject, in the present investigations the double layer (DL) forms in a mirror-like magnetic field topology. The RF compensated Langmuir probe measurements show multiple DLs, which are in connection with, the abrupt fall of densities along with potential drop of about 24 V and 18 V. The DLs strengths (e ΔV{sub p})/(k T{sub e}) are about 9.5 and 6, and the corresponding widths are about 6 and 5 D lengths. The potential drop is nearly equal to the thermal anisotropies between the two plasma regions forming the DL, which is present in the plateau region of mirror, unlike the earlier studies on the DL formation in the region of strong gradients in the magnetic field. Also, it presents a qualitative discussion on the mechanism of DL formation.

  18. A laboratory experimental setup for photo-absorption studies using synchrotron radiation

    Shastri, A; Saraswati, P; Sunanda, K

    2002-01-01

    The photophysics beamline, which is being installed at the 450 MeV Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS), Indus-l, is a medium resolution beamline useful for a variety of experiments in the VUV region viz. 500-2000 A. One of the major applications of this beamline is gas-phase photo-absorption studies. An experimental set up to be used for these experiments was designed, developed and tested in our laboratory. The setup consists of a high vacuum absorption cell, 1/4 m monochromator and detection system. For the purpose of testing, xenon and tungsten continuum sources were used and absorption spectra were recorded in the UV region. This setup was used to record the absorption spectrum of a few molecules like acetone, ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in order to evaluate the performance of the experimental system which will subsequently be used with the photophysics beamline. Details of the design, fabrication and testing of the absorption cell and experimental procedures are presented in this repor...

  19. Experimental investigation of ion-ion recombination under atmospheric conditions

    Franchin, A.; Ehrhart, S.; Lepp, J.; Nieminen, T.; Gagn, S.; Schobesberger, S.; Wimmer, D.; Duplissy, J.; Riccobono, F.; Dunne, E. M.; Rondo, L.; Downard, A.; Bianchi, F.; Kupc, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Lehtipalo, K.; Manninen, H. E.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Wagner, P. E.; Hansel, A.; Kirkby, J.; Krten, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Makhmutov, V.; Mathot, S.; Metzger, A.; Petj, T.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Sipil, M.; Stozhkov, Y.; Tom, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Carslaw, K.; Curtius, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-07-01

    We present the results of laboratory measurements of the ion-ion recombination coefficient at different temperatures, relative humidities and concentrations of ozone and sulfur dioxide. The experiments were carried out using the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber at CERN, the walls of which are made of conductive material, making it possible to measure small ions. We produced ions in the chamber using a 3.5 GeV c-1 beam of positively charged pions (?+) generated by the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS). When the PS was switched off, galactic cosmic rays were the only ionization source in the chamber. The range of the ion production rate varied from 2 to 100 cm-3 s-1, covering the typical range of ionization throughout the troposphere. The temperature ranged from -55 to 20 C, the relative humidity (RH) from 0 to 70 %, the SO2 concentration from 0 to 40 ppb, and the ozone concentration from 200 to 700 ppb. The best agreement of the retrieved ion-ion recombination coefficient with the commonly used literature value of 1.6 10-6 cm3 s-1 was found at a temperature of 5 C and a RH of 40 % (1.5 0.6) 10-6 cm3 s-1. At 20 C and 40 % RH, the retrieved ion-ion recombination coefficient was instead (2.3 0.7) 10-6 cm3 s-1. We observed no dependency of the ion-ion recombination coefficient on ozone concentration and a weak variation with sulfur dioxide concentration. However, we observed a more than fourfold increase in the ion-ion recombination coefficient with decreasing temperature. We compared our results with three different models and found an overall agreement for temperatures above 0 C, but a disagreement at lower temperatures. We observed a strong increase in the recombination coefficient for decreasing relative humidities, which has not been reported previously.

  20. Experimental investigation of ion-ion recombination at atmospheric conditions

    A. Franchin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of laboratory measurements of the ion-ion recombination coefficient at different temperatures, relative humidities and concentrations of ozone and sulfur dioxide. The experiments were carried out using the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD chamber at CERN, the walls of which are made of conductive material, making it possible to measure small ions. We produced ions in the chamber using a 3.5 GeV c?1 beam of positively-charged pions (?+ from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS and with galactic cosmic rays, when the PS was switched off. The range of the ion production rate varied from 2 to 100 cm?3s?1, covering the typical range of ionization throughout the troposphere. The temperature ranged from ?55 to 20 C, the relative humidity from 0 to 70%, the SO2 concentration from 0 to 40 ppb, and the ozone concentration from 200 to 700 ppb. At 20 C and 40% RH, the retrieved ion-ion recombination coefficient was (2.3 0.7 10?6cm3s?1. We observed no dependency of the ion-ion recombination coefficient on ozone concentration and a weak variation with sulfur dioxide concentration. However, we found a strong dependency of the ion-ion recombination coefficient on temperature. We compared our results with three different models and found an overall agreement for temperatures above 0 C, but a disagreement at lower temperatures. We observed a strong dependency of the recombination coefficient on relative humidity, which has not been reported previously.

  1. Yorkshire Assimilation: An Experimental Investigation of Gradient Phonological Alternation

    Zee, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigates Yorkshire Assimilation (YA) in relation to both the phonology-phonetics and the categoricality-gradience distinction. Importantly, it is not assumed that the distinction between phonology and phonetics is based on that between categoricality and gradience. Firstly, regarding the phonology-phonetics distinction, it is argued on articulatory phonetic grounds that if YA is cued by segmental duration, this must be the result of a phonological process. Secondly, regarding ...

  2. Sensorimotor incongruence and body perception: an experimental investigation

    Foell, Jens; Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; McCabe, Candida S.; Flor, Herta

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Several studies have shown that mirrored arm or leg movements can induce altered body sensations. This includes the alleviation of chronic pain using congruent mirror feedback and the induction of abnormal sensation in healthy participants using incongruent mirror feedback. Prior research has identified neuronal and conceptual mechanisms of these phenomena. With the rising application of behavior-based methods for pain relief, a structured investigation of these reported effects s...

  3. Sensorimotor incongruence and body perception: an experimental investigation

    Jens Foell; McCabe, Candida S.; Herta Flor

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Several studies have shown that mirrored arm or leg movements are related to altered body sensations. This includes the alleviation of chronic pain using congruent mirror feedback and the induction of abnormal sensation in healthy participants using incongruent mirror feedback. Prior research has identified neuronal and conceptual mechanisms of these phenomena. With the rising application of behavior-based methods for pain relief, a structured investigation of these reported effec...

  4. Experimental investigation of laminar turbulent intermittency in pipe flow

    Samanta, Devranjan; Lozar, Alberto; Hof, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    In shear flows turbulence first occurs in the form of localized structures (puffs/spots) surrounded by laminar fluid. We here investigate such spatially intermittent flows in a pipe experiment showing that turbulent puffs have a well defined interaction distance, which sets the minimum spacing of puffs as well as the maximum observable turbulent fraction. Two methodologies are employed here. Starting from a laminar flow puffs can be created by locally injecting a jet of fluid through the pipe...

  5. Gait biometrics under spoofing attacks: an experimental investigation

    Hadid, Abdenour; Ghahramani, Mohammad; Kellokumpu, Vili; Feng, Xiaoyi; Bustard, John; Nixon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Gait is a relatively biometric modality which has a precious advantage over other modalities, such as iris and voice, in that it can be easily captured from a distance. Although it has recently become a topic of great interest in biometric research, there has been little investigation into gait spoofing attacks where a person tries to imitate the clothing or walking style of someone else. We recently analyzed for the first time the effects of spoofing attacks on silhouette-based gait biometric systems and showed that it was indeed possible to spoof gait biometric systems by clothing impersonation and the deliberate selection of a target that has a similar build to the attacker. To gain deeper insight into the performance of current gait biometric systems under spoofing attacks, we provide a thorough investigation on how clothing can be used to spoof a target and evaluate the performance of two state-of-the-art recognition methods on a gait spoofing database recorded at the University of Southampton. Furthermore, we describe and evaluate an initial solution coping with gait spoofing attacks. The obtained results are very promising and point out interesting findings which can be used for future investigations.

  6. Experimental investigation of colloidal and microbiological effect for geological disposal

    In order to know the characteristics of nuclide transfer in bentonites, which are taking attraction as a buffering material it seems essential to clarify the structure of compressed bentonites. Since the movements of various colloids and microorganisms in bentonite are greatly influenced by its pore size, the size is thought to be closely related to the transfer of nuclides in it. In this study, the effects of pore size were investigated in respect of the permeabilities for microorganisms and colloids. Gold colloids (grain size; 15 mm) were not transferred in a compressed bentonite with dry density of 1000 kg/m3, whereas those were permeable to the bentonite mixed with silica sand at 50% (w/w) for the dry density of 1000 kg/m3 but not permeable to that for 1800 kg/m3. Microbial resistance of compressed bentonite was studied in a deep geologic environment. The growths of sulfate-reducing bacteria and methane-producing bacteria were investigated in a fermenter, showing that the environment similar to actual conditions for geological disposal is habitable for these bacteria. But, it is assumed these bacteria larger than the gold colloid can not move in the environment. Therefore, it seems necessary in future to investigate bacterial effects outside of the bentonite. (M.N.)

  7. Laboratory experiments investigating entrainment by debris flows and associated increased mobility

    Moberly, D.; Maki, L.; Hill, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    As debris flows course down a steep hillside they entrain bed materials such as loose sediments. The entrainment of materials not only increases the size of the debris flows but the mobility as well. The mechanics underlying the particle entrainment and the associated increased mobility are not well-understood. Existing models for the entrainment process include those that explicitly consider stress ratios, the angle of inclination, and the particle fluxes relative to those achieved under steady conditions. Others include an explicit consideration of the physics of the granular state: the visco-elastic nature of particle flows and, alternatively, the role of macroscopic force chains. Understanding how well these different approaches account for entrainment and deposition rates is important for accurate debris flow modeling, both in terms of the rate of growth and also in terms of the increased mobility associated with the entrainment. We investigate how total and instantaneous entrainment and deposition vary with macroscopic stresses and particle-scale interactions for different particle sizes and different fluid contents using laboratory experiments in an instrumented experimental laboratory debris flow flume. The flume has separate, independent water supplies for the bed and "supply" (parent debris flow), and the bed is instrumented with pore pressure sensors and a basal stress transducer. We monitor flow velocities, local structure, and instantaneous entrainment and deposition rates using a high speed camera. We have found that systems with a mixture of particle sizes are less erosive and more depositional than systems of one particle size under otherwise the same conditions. For both mixtures and single-sized particle systems, we have observed a relatively linear relationship between total erosion and the slope angle for dry flows. Increasing fluid content typically increases entrainment. Measurements of instantaneous entrainment indicate similar dependencies on particle size and fluid content and further reveal an interdependence between local flow velocities and entrainment rates. We present the details of these results and comment how they may be applied to models for the relationship between mobility and bed entrainment.

  8. Experimental investigation of dynamic performance of a prototype hybrid tuned mass damper under human excitation

    Noormohammadi, Nima; Reynolds, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Current sport stadia designs focus mainly on maximizing audience capacity and providing a clear view for all spectators. Hence, incorporation of one or more cantilevered tiers is typical in these designs. However, employing such cantilevered tiers, usually with relatively low damping and natural frequencies, can make grandstands more susceptible to excitation by human activities. This is caused by the coincidence between the activity frequencies (and their lowest three harmonics) and the structural natural frequencies hence raising the possibility of resonant vibration. This can be both a vibration serviceability and a safety issue. Past solutions to deal with observed or anticipated vibration serviceability problems have been mainly passive methods, such as tuned mass dampers (TMDs). These techniques have exhibited problems such as lack of performance and offtuning caused by human-structure interaction. To address this issue, research is currently underway to investigate the possible application of hybrid TMDs (HTMDs), which are a combination of active and passive control, to improve the vibration serviceability of such structures under human excitation. The work presented here shows a comparative experimental investigation of a passive TMD and a prototype HTMD applied on a slab strip structure. The most effective control algorithm to enhance the performance of the HTMD and also deal with the off-tuning problem is investigated. The laboratory structure used here is an in-situ cast simply-supported post-tensioned slab strip excited by forces from a range of human activities.

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation of HyperVapotron heat transfer

    The divertor first wall and neutral beam injection (NBI) components of tokamak devices require high heat flux removal up to 2030MWm?2 for future fusion reactors. The water cooled HyperVapotron (HV) structure, which relies on internal grooves or fins and boiling heat transfer to maximize the heat transfer capability, is the most promising candidate. The HV devices, that are able to transfer large amounts of heat (120MWm?2) efficiently, have therefore been developed specifically for this application. Until recently, there have been few attempts to observe the detailed bubble characteristics and vortex evolvement of coolant flowing inside their various parts and understand of the internal two-phase complex heat transfer mechanism behind the vapotron effect. This research builds the experimental facilities of HyperVapotron Loop-I (HVL-I) and Pressure Water HyperVapotron Loop-II (PWHL-II) to implement the subcooled boiling principle experiment in terms of typical flow parameters, geometrical parameters of test section and surface heat flux, which are similar to those of the ITER-like first wall and NBI components (EAST and MAST). The multiphase flow and heat transfer phenomena on the surface of grooves and triangular fins when the subcooled water flowed through were observed and measured with the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and high-speed photography (HSP) techniques. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was selected to reveal vortex formation, the flow structure that promotes the vapotron effect during subcooled boiling. The coolant flow data for contributing to the understanding of the vapotron phenomenon and the assessment of how the design and operational conditions that might affect the thermal performance of the devices were collected and analysed. The subcooled flow boiling model and methods of HV heat transfer adopted in the considered computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code were evaluated by comparing the calculated wall temperatures with the experimentally measured values. It was discovered that the bubble and vortex characteristics in the HV are clearly heavily dependent on the internal geometry, flow conditions and input heat flux. The evaporation latent heat is the primary heat transfer mechanism of HV flow under the condition of high heat flux, and the heat transfer through convection is very limited. The percentage of wall heat flux going into vapour production is almost 70%. These relationships between the flow phenomena and thermal performance of the HV device are essential to study the mechanisms for the flow structure alterations for design optimization and improvements of the ITER-like devices' water cooling structure and plasma facing components for future fusion reactors. (paper)

  10. Experimental and numerical investigation of HyperVapotron heat transfer

    Wang, Weihua; Deng, Haifei; Huang, Shenghong; Chu, Delin; Yang, Bin; Mei, Luoqin; Pan, Baoguo

    2014-12-01

    The divertor first wall and neutral beam injection (NBI) components of tokamak devices require high heat flux removal up to 20-30 MW m-2 for future fusion reactors. The water cooled HyperVapotron (HV) structure, which relies on internal grooves or fins and boiling heat transfer to maximize the heat transfer capability, is the most promising candidate. The HV devices, that are able to transfer large amounts of heat (1-20 MW m-2) efficiently, have therefore been developed specifically for this application. Until recently, there have been few attempts to observe the detailed bubble characteristics and vortex evolvement of coolant flowing inside their various parts and understand of the internal two-phase complex heat transfer mechanism behind the vapotron effect. This research builds the experimental facilities of HyperVapotron Loop-I (HVL-I) and Pressure Water HyperVapotron Loop-II (PWHL-II) to implement the subcooled boiling principle experiment in terms of typical flow parameters, geometrical parameters of test section and surface heat flux, which are similar to those of the ITER-like first wall and NBI components (EAST and MAST). The multiphase flow and heat transfer phenomena on the surface of grooves and triangular fins when the subcooled water flowed through were observed and measured with the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and high-speed photography (HSP) techniques. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was selected to reveal vortex formation, the flow structure that promotes the vapotron effect during subcooled boiling. The coolant flow data for contributing to the understanding of the vapotron phenomenon and the assessment of how the design and operational conditions that might affect the thermal performance of the devices were collected and analysed. The subcooled flow boiling model and methods of HV heat transfer adopted in the considered computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code were evaluated by comparing the calculated wall temperatures with the experimentally measured values. It was discovered that the bubble and vortex characteristics in the HV are clearly heavily dependent on the internal geometry, flow conditions and input heat flux. The evaporation latent heat is the primary heat transfer mechanism of HV flow under the condition of high heat flux, and the heat transfer through convection is very limited. The percentage of wall heat flux going into vapour production is almost 70%. These relationships between the flow phenomena and thermal performance of the HV device are essential to study the mechanisms for the flow structure alterations for design optimization and improvements of the ITER-like devices' water cooling structure and plasma facing components for future fusion reactors.

  11. Experimental and modeling investigation on structure H hydrate formation kinetics

    Highlights: • Applying affinity model for the formation kinetics of sH hydrate and two stage kinetics. • Performing the experiments of hydrate formation of sH with MCP. • A unique path for the SH hydrate formation. - Abstract: In this work, the kinetics of crystal H hydrate and two stage kinetics formation is modeled by using the chemical affinity model for the first time. The basic idea is that there is a unique path for each experiment by which the crystallization process decays the affinity. The experiments were performed at constant temperatures of 274.15, 275.15, 275.65, 276.15 and 277.15 K. The initial pressure of each experiment is up to 25 bar above equilibrium pressure of sI. Methylcyclohexane (MCH), methylcyclopentane (MCP) and tert-butyl methyl ether (TBME) are used as sH former and methane is used as a help gas. The parameters of the affinity model (Ar and tk) are determined and the results show that the parameter of (Ar)/(RT) has not a constant value when temperature changes in each group of experiments. The results indicate that this model can predict experimental data very well at several conditions

  12. Experimental investigation on ejecting low-temperature cooling superconducting magnets

    Highlights: The cooling temperature of the superconducting materials can be adjusted by the ejecting refrigeration. The result shows that the temperature of liquid nitrogen can be reduced to 70 K by controlling the inlet water pressure of the ejector. The refrigeration performance of ejector is affected by the different structure and system pressure. -- Abstract: With the development of the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials and refrigeration technologies, using ejecting refrigeration to cool the superconducting materials becomes the direction of HTS applications. In this paper, an experimental study has been carried out on the basis of the theory of analyzing the ejecting low-temperature cooling superconducting magnet. The relationship between area ratios and refrigeration performance at different system pressures was derived. In addition, the working fluid flow and suction chamber pressure of the ejector with different area ratios at various inlet pressures have been examined to obtain the performance of ejectors under different working conditions. The result shows that the temperature of liquid nitrogen can be reduced to 70 K by controlling the inlet water pressure when the pressurized water at 20 C is used to eject the saturated liquid nitrogen, which can provide the stable operational conditions for the HTS magnets cooling

  13. Experimental investigation on ejecting low-temperature cooling superconducting magnets

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Qiang, E-mail: 6266798@qq.com; Tong, Ming-wei; Hu, Peng; Wu, Shuang-ying; Cai, Qin; Qin, Zeng-hu

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: The cooling temperature of the superconducting materials can be adjusted by the ejecting refrigeration. The result shows that the temperature of liquid nitrogen can be reduced to 70 K by controlling the inlet water pressure of the ejector. The refrigeration performance of ejector is affected by the different structure and system pressure. -- Abstract: With the development of the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials and refrigeration technologies, using ejecting refrigeration to cool the superconducting materials becomes the direction of HTS applications. In this paper, an experimental study has been carried out on the basis of the theory of analyzing the ejecting low-temperature cooling superconducting magnet. The relationship between area ratios and refrigeration performance at different system pressures was derived. In addition, the working fluid flow and suction chamber pressure of the ejector with different area ratios at various inlet pressures have been examined to obtain the performance of ejectors under different working conditions. The result shows that the temperature of liquid nitrogen can be reduced to 70 K by controlling the inlet water pressure when the pressurized water at 20 C is used to eject the saturated liquid nitrogen, which can provide the stable operational conditions for the HTS magnets cooling.

  14. An experimental investigation of Fang's Ag superlens suitable for integration

    Jeppesen, Claus; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Asger; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Kristensen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    We report on experimental realization of the Fang Ag superlens structure [1] suitable for further processing and integration in bio-chips by replacing PMMA with a highly chemical resistant cyclo-olefin copolymer, mr-I T85 (Micro Resist Technology, Berlin, Germany). The superlens was able to resolve...... 80 nm half-pitch gratings when operating at a free space wavelength of 365 nm. Fang et al. used PMMA since it enables the presence of surface plasmons at the PMMA/Ag interface at 365 nm and because it planarizes the quartz/chrome mask. If the superlens is to be integrated into a device where further...... processing is needed involving various organic polar solvents, PMMA cannot be used. We propose to use mr-I T85, which is highly chemically resistant to acids and polar solvents. Our superlens stack consists of a quartz/chrome grating mask, a 40 nm layer of mr-I T85, 35 nm Ag, and finally 70 nm of the...

  15. Numerical and experimental investigations into Tailored Welded Blanks formability

    A Tailor welded blank (TWB) technology gives automotive designers the ability to selectively vary body panel thickness and alloy to optimize the use of material. TWBs offer several notable benefits including decreased part weight, reduced manufacturing costs, increased environmental friendliness, and improved dimensional consistency. In order to take advantage of these benefits, however, designers need to overcome the formability of TWBs and be able to accurately predict unique characteristics related to TWB forming early in the design process. In this paper, a numerical model to predict the forming height dome and a specific forming curve of TWBs is presented. Finite element analyses of standard TWB forming tests (Nakazima) were performed in Arcelor Mittal Auto Application Research Center to determine the interaction between the weaker and the stronger materials. To measure the critical strain at necking a numerical method is used. A comparison of numerical and experimental results highlights a good agreement. The numerical approach offers a considerable gain to obtain specific FLC for all configurations

  16. Numerical and experimental investigations into Tailored Welded Blanks formability

    Gaied, Sadok; Roelandt, Jean-Marc; Pinard, Fabrice; Schmit, Francis; Balabane, Mikhael

    2007-05-01

    A Tailor welded blank (TWB) technology gives automotive designers the ability to selectively vary body panel thickness and alloy to optimize the use of material. TWBs offer several notable benefits including decreased part weight, reduced manufacturing costs, increased environmental friendliness, and improved dimensional consistency. In order to take advantage of these benefits, however, designers need to overcome the formability of TWBs and be able to accurately predict unique characteristics related to TWB forming early in the design process. In this paper, a numerical model to predict the forming height dome and a specific forming curve of TWBs is presented. Finite element analyses of standard TWB forming tests (Nakazima) were performed in Arcelor Mittal Auto Application Research Center to determine the interaction between the weaker and the stronger materials. To measure the critical strain at necking a numerical method is used. A comparison of numerical and experimental results highlights a good agreement. The numerical approach offers a considerable gain to obtain specific FLC for all configurations.

  17. Experimental investigation on a high subsonic compressor cascade flow

    Zhang Haideng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of deepening the understanding of high-speed compressor cascade flow, this paper reports an experimental study on NACA-65 K48 compressor cascade with high subsonic inlet flow. With the increase of passage pressurizing ability, endwall boundary layer behavior is deteriorated, and the transition zone is extended from suction surface to the endwall as the adverse pressure gradient increases. Cross flow from endwall to midspan, mixing of corner boundary layer and the main stream, and reversal flow on the suction surface are caused by corner separation vortex structures. Passage vortex is the main corner separation vortex. During its movement downstream, the size grows bigger while the rotating direction changes, forming a limiting circle. With higher incidence, corner separation is further deteriorated, leading to higher flow loss. Meanwhile, corner separation structure, flow mixing characteristics and flow loss distribution vary a lot with the change of incidence. Compared with low aspect-ratio model, corner separation of high aspect-ratio model moves away from the endwall and is more sufficiently developed downstream the cascade. Results obtained present details of high-speed compressor cascade flow, which is rare in the relating research fields and is beneficial to mechanism analysis, aerodynamic optimization and flow control design.

  18. Design and experimental investigation of portable solar thermoelectric refrigerator

    Abdul-Wahab, Sabah A.; Al-Habsi, Is' haq A.; Al-Rubai' ey' , Hilal S.; Al-Battashi, Abdulaziz K.; Al-Tamimi, Ali R.; Al-Mamari, Khamis H. [Sultan Qaboos University, College of Engineering, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, P.O. Box 33, Al Khoud P.C. 123, Muscat (Oman); Elkamel, Ali; Chutani, Muhammad U. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue Wes, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Al-Damkhi, Ali M. [Department of Environmental Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Public Authority for Applied Education and Training (PAAET) (Kuwait)

    2009-01-15

    The main objective of this study is to design and build an affordable solar thermoelectric refrigerator for the Bedouin people (e.g. deserts) living in remote parts of Oman where electricity is still not available. The refrigerator could be used to store perishable items and facilitate the transportation of medications as well as biological material that must be stored at low temperatures to maintain effectiveness. The design of the solar-powered refrigerator is based on the principles of a thermoelectric module (i.e., Peltier effect) to create a hot side and a cold side. The cold side of the thermoelectric module is utilized for refrigeration purposes; provide cooling to the refrigerator space. On the other hand, the heat from the hot side of the module is rejected to ambient surroundings by using heat sinks and fans. The designed solar thermoelectric refrigerator was experimentally tested for the cooling purpose. The results indicated that the temperature of the refrigeration was reduced from 27 C to 5 C in approximately 44 min. The coefficient of performance of the refrigerator (COP{sub R}) was calculated and found to be about 0.16. (author)

  19. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Flow Structures During Insect Flight

    Badrya, Camli; Baeder, James D.

    2015-11-01

    Insect flight kinematics involves complex interplay between aerodynamics structural response and insect body control. Features such as cross-coupling kinematics, high flapping frequencies and geometrical small-scales, result in experiments being challenging to perform. In this study OVERTURNS, an in-house 3D compressible Navier-Stokes solver is utilized to simulate the simplified kinematics of an insect wing in hover and forward flight. The flapping wings simulate the full cycle of wing motion, i.e., the upstroke, downstroke, pronation and supination.The numerical results show good agreement against experimental data in predicting the lift and drag over the flapping cycle. The flow structures around the flapping wing are found to be highly unsteady and vortical. Aside from the tip vortex on the wings, the formation of a prominent leading edge vortex (LEV) during the up/down stroke portions, and the shedding of a trailing edge vortex (TEV) at end of each stroke were observed. Differences in the insect dynamics and the flow features of the LEV are observed between hover and forward flight. In hover the up and downstroke cycles are symmetric, whereas in forward flight, these up and downstroke are asymmetric and LEV strength varies as a function of the kinematics and advance ratio. This work was supported by the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) CTA at the Univer- sity of Maryland.

  20. Combine experimental and theoretical investigation on an alkaloid-Dimethylisoborreverine

    Singh, Swapnil; Singh, Harshita; Karthick, T.; Agarwal, Parag; Erande, Rohan D.; Dethe, Dattatraya H.; Tandon, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    A combined experimental (FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical approach is used to study the structure and properties of antimalarial drug dimethylisoborreverine (DMIB). Conformational analysis, has been performed by plotting one dimensional potential energy curve that was computed using density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP/6-31G method and predicted conformer A1 as the most stable conformer. After full geometry optimization, harmonic wavenumbers were computed for conformer A1 at the DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,P) level. A complete vibrational assignment of all the vibrational modes have been performed on the bases of the potential energy distribution (PED) and theoretical results were found to be in good agreement with the observed data. To predict the solvent effect, the UV-Vis spectra were calculated in different solvents by polarizable continuum model using TD-DFT method. Molecular docking studies were performed to test the biological activity of the sample using SWISSDOCK web server and Hex 8.0.0 software. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) was plotted to identify the reactive sites of the molecule. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was performed to get a deep insight of intramolecular charge transfer. Thermodynamical parameters were calculated to predict the direction of chemical reaction.