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Sample records for intermolecular electron transfer

  1. Intra- and intermolecular electron transfer reactions in covalently linked donor-acceptor molecules

    We synthesized a homologous series of molecules (MVnn'Q) where a methylviologen (MV2+) and an amino-chloronaphthoquinone (Q) are linked to each other via a flexible chain. Using the electron pulse radiolysis technique, we have measured time-resolved spectra and determined rate constants for intra- and intermolecular electron transfer (ET) between donor and acceptor site of the MVnn'Q molecules in water and in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micellar solution. For comparison, we also irradiated a solution containing a 1:1 mixture of methylviologen and amino-chloronaphthoquinone and measured spectra and intermolecular ET reactions between the separated electron donor and acceptor molecules. We found a remarkably slow intramolecular electron transfer from the reduced methylviologen moiety to the quinone site of all MVnn'Q molecules both in water and in aqueous SDS micellar suspensions. The intramolecular rate constants measured in water increase with the number of intervening bonds, leading to the conclusion that electron transfer occurs by a through-space rather than through-bond mechanism. The intramolecular rate constants virtually lose their chain length dependence in SDS suspensions where, because of an extended configuration of the micellized MVnn'Q molecules, through-space interaction is not favored. (orig.)

  2. Rates of intra- and intermolecular electron transfers in hydrogenase deduced from steady-state activity measurements.

    Dementin, Sébastien; Burlat, Bénédicte; Fourmond, Vincent; Leroux, Fanny; Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Abou Hamdan, Abbas; Léger, Christophe; Rousset, Marc; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Bertrand, Patrick

    2011-07-01

    Electrons are transferred over long distances along chains of FeS clusters in hydrogenases, mitochondrial complexes, and many other respiratory enzymes. It is usually presumed that electron transfer is fast in these systems, despite the fact that there has been no direct measurement of rates of FeS-to-FeS electron transfer in any respiratory enzyme. In this context, we propose and apply to NiFe hydrogenase an original strategy that consists of quantitatively interpreting the variations of steady-state activity that result from changing the nature of the FeS clusters which connect the active site to the redox partner, and/or the nature of the redox partner. Rates of intra- and intermolecular electron transfer are deduced from such large data sets. The mutation-induced variations of electron transfer rates cannot be explained by changes in intercenter distances and reduction potentials. This establishes that FeS-to-FeS rate constants are extremely sensitive to the nature and coordination of the centers. PMID:21615141

  3. Intermolecular electron transfer from intramolecular excitation and coherent acoustic phonon generation in a hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer solid.

    Rury, Aaron S; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M

    2016-03-14

    Organic materials that produce coherent lattice phonon excitations in response to external stimuli may provide next generation solutions in a wide range of applications. However, for these materials to lead to functional devices in technology, a full understanding of the possible driving forces of coherent lattice phonon generation must be attained. To facilitate the achievement of this goal, we have undertaken an optical spectroscopic study of an organic charge-transfer material formed from the ubiquitous reduction-oxidation pair hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone. Upon pumping this material, known as quinhydrone, on its intermolecular charge transfer resonance as well as an intramolecular resonance of p-benzoquinone, we find sub-cm(-1) oscillations whose dispersion with probe energy resembles that of a coherent acoustic phonon that we argue is coherently excited following changes in the electron density of quinhydrone. Using the dynamical information from these ultrafast pump-probe measurements, we find that the fastest process we can resolve does not change whether we pump quinhydrone at either energy. Electron-phonon coupling from both ultrafast coherent vibrational and steady-state resonance Raman spectroscopies allows us to determine that intramolecular electronic excitation of p-benzoquinone also drives the electron transfer process in quinhydrone. These results demonstrate the wide range of electronic excitations of the parent of molecules found in many functional organic materials that can drive coherent lattice phonon excitations useful for applications in electronics, photonics, and information technology. PMID:26979698

  4. Photoinduced intermolecular electron transfer and off-resonance Raman characteristics of Rhodamine 101/N,N-diethylaniline

    Highlights: • Mechanism of PIET reaction process for the Rh101+/DEA system is investigated. • The significant geometrical changes of the charge–transfer complex are explained. • Forward Electron transfer from DEA to Rh101+∗ occurs with lifetime of 425–560 fs. • Backward electron transfer occurs with a time constant of 46.16–51.40 ps. • Intramolecular vibrational relaxation occurs with lifetime of 2.77–5.39 ps. - Abstract: The ultrafast photoinduced intermolecular electron transfer (PIET) reaction of Rhodamine 101 (Rh101+) in N,N-diethylaniline (DEA) was investigated using off-resonance Raman, femtosecond time-resolved multiplex transient grating (TG) and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopies. The Raman spectra indicate that the C=C stretching vibration of the chromophore aromatic ring is more sensitive to ET compared with the C-C stretching mode. The ultrafast photoinduced intermolecular forward ET (FET) from DEA to Rh101+∗ occurs on a time scale of τFET = 425–560 fs. The backward ET (BET) occurs in the inverted region with a time constant of τBET = 46.16–51.40 ps. The intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR) process occurs on the excited state potential energy surface with the time constant of τIVR = 2.77–5.39 ps

  5. Studies on intra-supramolecular and intermolecular electron-transfer processes between zinc naphthalocyanine and imidazole-appended fullerene.

    el-Khouly, Mohamed E; Rogers, Lisa M; Zandler, Melvin E; Suresh, Gadde; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Ito, Osamu; D'Souza, Francis

    2003-04-14

    Spectroscopic, computational, redox, and photochemical behavior of a self-assembled donor-acceptor dyad formed by axial coordination of zinc naphthalocyanine, ZnNc, and fulleropyrrolidine bearing an imidazole coordinating ligand (2-(4'-imidazolylphenyl)-fulleropyrrolidine, C60Im) was investigated in noncoordinating solvents, toluene and o-dichlorobenzene, and the results were compared to the intermolecular electron transfer processes in a coordinating solvent, benzonitrile. The optical absorption and ab initio B3 LYP/3-21G(*) computational studies revealed self-assembled supramolecular 1:1 dyad formation between the ZnNc and C60Im entities. In the optimized structure, the HOMO was found to be entirely located on the ZnNc entity while the LUMO was found to be entirely on the fullerene entity. Cyclic voltammetry studies of the dyad exhibited a total of seven one-electron redox processes in o-dichlorobenzene, with 0.1 M tetrabutylammonium perchlorate. The excited-state electron-transfer processes were monitored by both optical-emission and transient-absorption techniques. Direct evidence for the radical-ion-pair (C60Im.-:ZnNC.+) formation was obtained from picosecond transient-absorption spectral studies, which indicated charge separation from the singlet-excited ZnNc to the C60Im moiety. The calculated rates of charge separation and charge recombination were 1.4 x 10(10) s-1 and 5.3 x 10(7) s-1 in toluene and 8.9 x 10(9) s-1 and 9.2 x 10(7) s-1 in o-dichlorobenzene, respectively. In benzonitrile, intermolecular electron transfer from the excited triplet state of ZnNc to C60Im occurs and the second-order rate constant (kqtriplet) for this quenching process was 5.3 x 10(8)M-1s-1. PMID:12785261

  6. Electronic transitions and intermolecular forces

    This thesis describes two different subjects - electronic transitions and intermolecular forces - that are related mainly by the following observation: The wavenumber at which an electronic transition in an atom or molecule occurs, depends on the environment of that atom or molecule. This implies, for instance, that when a molecule becomes solvated its absorption spectrum may be shifted either to the blue or to the red side of the original gasphase spectrum. In part I attention is paid to the experimental aspects of VUV spectroscopy, both in the gasphase and in the condensed phase. In part II a series of papers are presented, dealing with the calculation of intermolecular forces (and some related topics) both for the ground state and for the excited state interactions, using different non-empirical methods. The calculations provide, among other results, a semiquantitative interpretation of the spectral blue shifts encountered in our experiments. (Auth.)

  7. Potassium ion controlled switching of intra- to intermolecular electron transfer in crown ether appended free-base porphyrin-fullerene donor-acceptor systems.

    D'Souza, Francis; Chitta, Raghu; Gadde, Suresh; Zandler, Melvin E; McCarty, Amy L; Sandanayaka, Atula S D; Araki, Yasuyaki; Ito, Osamu

    2006-04-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer in intramolecularly interacting free-base porphyrin bearing one or four 18-crown-6 ether units at different positions of the porphyrin macrocycle periphery and pristine fullerene was investigated in polar benzonitrile and nonpolar o-dichlorobenzene and toluene solvents. Owing to the presence of two modes of binding, stable dyads were obtained in which the binding constants, K, were found to range between 4.2 x 10(3) and 10.4 x 10(3) M(-1) from fluorescence quenching data depending upon the location and number of crown ether entities on the porphyrin macrocycle and the solvent. Computational studies using the B3LYP/3-21G() method were employed to arrive at the geometry and electronic structure of the intramolecular dyads. The energetics of the redox states of the dyads were established from cyclic voltammetric studies. Under the intramolecular conditions, both the steady-state and time-resolved emission studies revealed efficient quenching of the singlet excited free-base porphyrin in these dyads, and the measured rates of charge separation, k(CS), were found to be in the 10(8)-10(9) s(-1) range. Nanosecond transient absorption studies were performed to characterize the electron-transfer products and to evaluate the charge-recombination rates. Shifting of the electron-transfer pathway from the intra- to intermolecular route was achieved by complexing potassium ions to the crown ether cavity(ies) in benzonitrile. This cation complexation weakened the intramolecular interactions between fullerene and the crown ether appended free-base porphyrin supramolecules, and under these conditions, intermolecular type interactions were mainly observed. Reversible inter- to intramolecular electron transfer was also accomplished by extracting the potassium ions of the complex with the addition of 18-crown-6. The present study nicely demonstrates the application of supramolecular methodology to control the excited-state electron-transfer path in donor

  8. Mechanistic information from the first volume profile analysis for a reversible intermolecular electron-transfer reaction involving pentaammine(isonicotinamide)ruthenium and cytochrome c

    Baensch, B.; Meier, M.; Martinez, P. [Univ. of Witten/Herdecke (Germany)] [and others

    1994-10-12

    The reversible intermolecular electron-transfer reaction between pentaammine(isonicotinamide)ruthenium(II/III) and horse-heart cytochrome c iron(III/II) was subjected to a detailed kinetic and thermodynamic study as a function of temperature and pressure. Theoretical calculations based on the Marcus-Hush theory were employed to predict all rate and equilibrium constants as well as activation parameters. There is an excellent agreement between the kinetically and thermodynamically determined equilibrium constants and associated pressure parameters. These data are used to construct a volume profile for the overall process, from which it follows that the transition state lies halfway between the reactant and product states on a volume basis. The reorganization in the transition state has reached a similar degree in both directions of the electron-transfer process and corresponds to a {lambda}{sup {double_dagger}} value of 0.44 for this reversible reaction. This is the first complete volume profile analysis for a reversible intermolecular electron-transfer reaction.

  9. Resonant intermolecular transfer of vibrational energy in liquid water

    Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J.

    1999-12-01

    Many biological, chemical and physical processes involve the transfer of energy. In the case of electronic excitations, transfer between molecules is rapid, whereas for vibrations in the condensed phase, resonant energy transfer is an unlikely process because the typical timescale of vibrational relaxation (a few picoseconds) is much shorter than that of resonant intermolecular vibrational energy transfer. For the OH-stretch vibration in liquid water, which is of particular importance due to its coupling to the hydrogen bond, extensive investigations have shown that vibrational relaxation takes place with a time constant of 740 +/- 25 femtoseconds (ref. 7). So for resonant intermolecular energy transfer to occur in liquid water, the interaction between the OH-stretch modes of different water molecules needs to be extremely strong. Here we report time-resolved pump-probe laser spectroscopy measurements that reveal the occurrence of fast resonant intermolecular transfer of OH-stretch excitations over many water molecules before the excitation energy is dissipated. We find that the transfer process is mediated by dipole-dipole interactions (the Förster transfer mechanism) and additional mechanisms that are possibly based on intermolecular anharmonic interactions involving hydrogen bonds. Our findings suggest that liquid water may play an important role in transporting vibrational energy between OH groups located on either different biomolecules or along extended biological structures. OH groups in a hydrophobic environment should accordingly be able to remain in a vibrationally excited state longer than OH groups in a hydrophilic environment.

  10. Broadband visible light-harvesting naphthalenediimide (NDI) triad: study of the intra-/intermolecular energy/electron transfer and the triplet excited state.

    Wu, Shuang; Zhong, Fangfang; Zhao, Jianzhang; Guo, Song; Yang, Wenbo; Fyles, Tom

    2015-05-21

    A triad based on naphthalenediimides (NDI) was prepared to study the intersystem crossing (ISC), the fluorescence-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET), as well as the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) processes. In the triad, the 2-bromo-6-alkylaminoNDI moiety was used as singlet energy donor and the spin converter, whereas 2,6-dialkylaminoNDI was used as the singlet/triplet energy acceptor. This unique structural protocol and thus alignment of the energy levels ensures the competing ISC and FRET in the triad. The photophysical properties of the triad and the reference compounds were studied with steady-state UV-vis absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, nanosecond transient absorption spectra, cyclic voltammetry, and DFT/TDDFT calculations. FRET was confirmed with steady-state UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Intramolecular electron transfer was observed in polar solvents, demonstrated by the quenching of both the fluorescence and triplet state of the energy acceptor. Nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy shows that the T1 state of the triad is exclusively localized on the 2,6-dialkylaminoNDI moiety in the triad upon selective photoexcitation into the energy donor, which indicates the intramolecular triplet state energy transfer. The intermolecular triplet state energy transfer between the two reference compounds was investigated with nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The photophysical properties were rationalized by TDDFT calculations. PMID:25919420

  11. Inter-molecular electronic transfer

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    Warrendale, PA: Materials Research Society, 2010 - (Steckel, J.; Kotov, N.; Norris, D.; Bawendi, M.; Kuno, M.), 1207N0905-1-7. ( MRS Symposium Proceedings. 1207). ISBN 9781617387623. [ MRS Fall Meeting 2009. Boston (US), 30.11.2009-04.12.2009] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 866; GA ČR GA202/07/0643 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : zero-dimensional nanostructures * quantum dots * DNA molecule * electric conduction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://dx.doi.org/10.1557/PROC-1207-N09-05

  12. Intermolecular Phosphoryl Transfer Between Serine and Histidine Residues

    Yu Qian SU; Ming Yu NIU; Shu Xia CAO; Jian Chen ZHANG; Yu Fen ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    A novel intermolecular phosphoryl transfer from O-trimethylsilyl-N-(O, O-diisopropyl) phosphoryl serine trimethylsilyl ester to N, N'-bis(trimethylsilyl) histidine trimethylsilyl ester was studied through electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). It was proposed that the transfer reaction went through penta-coordinated phosphorus intermediate.

  13. Nanophotonic boost of intermolecular energy transfer

    de Roque, P M; Sapienza, R

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for efficient long-range energy transfer between two distant light emitters separated by more than one wavelength of light, i.e. much beyond the classical Forster radius. A hybrid nanoantenna-waveguide system mediates the transmission of energy, showing enhancements up to 10^8 as compared to vacuum. Our model shows how energy transfer in nanostructured media can be boosted, beyond the simple donor Purcell enhancement, and in particular for large donor-acceptor separations. The scheme we propose connects realistic emitters and could lead to practical on-chip implementations.

  14. A New Intermolecular Phosphoryl Transfer between Serine and Histidine Residues

    SU,Yu-Qian; NIU,Ming-Yu; CAO,Shu-Xia; ZHANG,Jian-Chen; QU,Ling-Bo; LIAO,Xin-Cheng; ZHAO,Yu-Fen

    2004-01-01

    @@ Phosphoryl transfer constitutes one of the most important reactions in functionalized molecules, bioorganic chemistry and biochemistry.[1] The transformations are involved in diverse processes, such as activated state change of phosphorus, DNA/RNA synthesis, energy metabolism and signal transduction. So, phosphoryl transfer reaction which can be performed by either intramolecular or intermolecular phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanism has been investigated by many scientists in wide fields.

  15. Intermolecular Hydrogen Transfer in Isobutane Hydrate

    Takeshi Sugahara

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron spin resonance (ESR spectra of butyl radicals induced with γ-ray irradiation in the simple isobutane (2-methylpropane hydrate (prepared with deuterated water were investigated. Isothermal annealing results of the γ-ray-irradiated isobutane hydrate reveal that the isobutyl radical in a large cage withdraws a hydrogen atom from the isobutane molecule through shared hexagonal-faces of adjacent large cages. During this “hydrogen picking” process, the isobutyl radical is apparently transformed into a tert-butyl radical, while the sum of isobutyl and tert-butyl radicals remains constant. The apparent transformation from isobutyl to tert-butyl radicals is an irreversible first-order reaction and the activation energy was estimated to be 35 ± 3 kJ/mol, which was in agreement with the activation energy (39 ± 5 kJ/mol of hydrogen picking in the γ-ray-irradiated propane hydrate with deuterated water.

  16. Ultrafast photoinduced intra- und intermolecular charge transfer and solvation

    Bizjak, Tanja

    2004-01-01

    Intra- and intermolecular charge transfer as well as internal conversion processes are studied in various molecular systems. The dynamics of these fundamental photoinduced processes are investigated by pump-probe femtosecond spectroscopy and steady-state fluorescence. Transient spectra are obtained using white light continuum as probe, while time resolved measurements are performed by probing at specific wavelengths with non dispersive detec-tion. Noncollinearly phase matched optical parametr...

  17. Intermolecular electron transfer between coumarin dyes and aromatic amines in Triton-X-100 micellar solutions: Evidence for Marcus inverted region

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) between coumarin dyes and aromatic amines has been investigated in Triton-X-100 micellar solutions and the results have been compared with those observed earlier in homogeneous medium. Significant static quenching of the coumarin fluorescence due to the presence of high concentration of amines around the coumarin fluorophore in the micelles has been observed in steady-state fluorescence studies. Time-resolved studies with nanosecond resolutions mostly show the dynamic part of the quenching for the excited coumarin dyes by the amine quenchers. A correlation of the quenching rate constants, estimated from the time-resolved measurements, with the free energy changes (ΔG0) of the ET reactions shows the typical bell shaped curve as predicted by Marcus outer-sphere ET theory. The inversion in the ET rates for the present systems occurs at an exergonicity (-ΔG0) of ∼0.7-0.8 eV, which is unusually low considering the polarity of the Palisade layer of the micelles where the reactants reside. Present results have been rationalized on the basis of the two dimensional ET model assuming that the solvent relaxation in micellar media is much slower than the rate of the ET process. Detailed analysis of the experimental data shows that the diffusional model of the bimolecular quenching kinetics is not applicable for the ET reactions in the micellar solutions. In the present systems, the reactions can be better visualized as equivalent to intramolecular electron transfer processes, with statistical distribution of the donors and acceptors in the micelles. A low electron coupling (Vel) parameter is estimated from the correlation of the experimentally observed and the theoretically calculated ET rates, which indicates that the average donor-acceptor separation in the micellar ET reactions is substantially larger than for the donor-acceptor contact distance. Comparison of the Vel values in the micellar solution and in the donor-acceptor close

  18. Theoretical study of intermolecular energy transfer involving electronically excited molecules: He(1S) + H2(B 1Σ/sub u/+)

    To further understanding of gas phase collision dynamics involving electronically-excited molecules, a fully quantum mechanical study of He + H2(B 1Σ/sub u/+) was undertaken. Iterative natural orbital configuration interaction (CI) calculations were performed to obtain the interaction potential between He and H2(B 1Σ/sub u/+). The potential energy surface (PES) is highly anisotropic and has a van der Waals well of about 0.03 eV for C/sub 2v/ approach. Avoided PES crossings occur with He + H2(E,F 1Σ/sub g/+) and with He + H2(X 1Σ/sub g/+) and cause a local maximum and a deep minimum in the He + H2(B 1Σ/sub u/+) PES, respectively. The crossing with He + H2(X 1Σ/sub g/+) provides a mechanism for fluorescence quenching. The computed CI energies were combined with previous multi-reference double excitation CI calculations and fit with analytic functions for convenience in scattering calculations. Accurate dipole polarizabilities and quadrupole moment of H2(B 1Σ/sub u/+) were computed for use in the multipole expansion, which is the analytic form of the long-range PES. 129 refs., 28 figs., 35 tabs

  19. Intermolecular nonradiative energy transfer in clusters with plasmonic nanoparticles

    Kucherenko, M. G.; Stepanov, V. N.; Kruchinin, N. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of carbon (fullerenes, nanotubes) and metal (Ni, Co, Cu, Ag) nanoparticles on the nonradiative electronic excitation energy transfer between the molecules of organic dyes (acrylic orange as a donor and Nile blue as an acceptor) in alcohol solutions of polyvinylbutyral is studied. It is found that, at particular concentrations of the mixture components, plasmonic nanoparticles affect the nonradiative electronic excitation energy transfer, which is manifested in an increase in the intensity of sensitized fluorescence of acceptors with simultaneous quenching of the fluorescence of donors. A very simple model is proposed to illustrate the observed redistribution of luminescence intensity between the spectral bands of the general spectrum. Molecular-dynamic calculations of the structure of nanocomposites performed for the same purpose confirmed the formation of associated molecular plasmonic complexes fixed by macrochain links.

  20. Description of cross peaks induced by intermolecular vibrational energy transfer in two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    Villaeys, Albert A

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, the analytical description of an intermolecular vibrational energy transfer, analyzed by two dimensional infrared spectroscopy, is established. The energy transfer process takes place between the dark combination states of low frequency modes pertaining to different molecules. The appearance of the cross peaks results from coherent transfer between these combination states and an optically active state of the acceptor molecule. Such a process has recently been observed experimentally between the nitrile groups of acetonitrile-d3 and benzonitrile molecules. This molecular system will be used as a model for the simulations of their two-dimensional infrared spectra. The dependence of the cross-peak growth, which is a signature of the intermolecular energy transfer, will be discussed in detail as a function of the molecular dynamical constants.

  1. Keto-enol tautomerization and intermolecular proton transfer in photoionized cyclopentanone dimer in the gas phase

    Time-of-flight mass spectra of cyclopentanone and its clusters cooled in a supersonic jet expansion have been measured following 4-, 3-, and 2-photon ionizations by the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th harmonic wavelengths, respectively, of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The mass spectra reveal signatures of energetically favored keto to enol tautomerization of the molecular ion leading to intermolecular proton transfer, and this observation is found sharply dependent on the ionization wavelengths used. Electronic structure calculation predicts that in spite of the energetic preference, keto-enol conversion barrier of isolated molecular ion is high. However, the barrier is significantly reduced in a CH⋯O hydrogen-bonded dimer of the molecule. The transition states associated with tautomeric conversion of both cyclopentanone monomer and dimer cations have been identified by means of intrinsic reaction co-ordinate calculation. In a supersonic jet expansion, although a weakly bound dimer is readily generated, the corresponding cation and also the protonated counterpart are observed only for ionization by 532 nm. For other two ionization wavelengths, these species do not register in the mass spectra, where the competing reaction channels via α-cleavage of the ring become dominant. In contrast to the report of a recent study, we notice that the intact molecular ion largely survives fragmentations when ionized from the 2-photon resonant 3p Rydberg state as intermediate using nanosecond laser pulses, and the corresponding resonant 3-photon ionization spectrum has been recorded probing the intact molecular ion

  2. Electron transfer reactions

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  3. Magneto-Dielectric Effects Induced by Optically-Generated Intermolecular Charge-Transfer States in Organic Semiconducting Materials

    Zang, Huidong; Yan, Liang; Li, Mingxing; He, Lei; Gai, Zheng; Ivanov, Ilia; Wang, Min; Chiang, Long; Urbas, Augustine; Hu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, magneto-dielectric effects have been developed by combining ferroelectric and magnetic materials. Here, we show a magneto-dielectric effect from optically-generated intermolecular charge-transfer states in an organic semiconducting donor:acceptor (PVK:TCNB) system. We observe in magnetic field effects of photoluminescence that a magnetic field can change singlet/triplet population ratio in intermolecular charge-transfer states. Furthermore, our theoretical analysis and experime...

  4. Energy Decomposition Analysis with a Stable Charge-Transfer Term for Interpreting Intermolecular Interactions.

    Lao, Ka Un; Herbert, John M

    2016-06-14

    Many schemes for decomposing quantum-chemical calculations of intermolecular interaction energies into physically meaningful components can be found in the literature, but the definition of the charge-transfer (CT) contribution has proven particularly vexing to define in a satisfactory way and typically depends strongly on the choice of basis set. This is problematic, especially in cases of dative bonding and for open-shell complexes involving cation radicals, for which one might expect significant CT. Here, we analyze CT interactions predicted by several popular energy decomposition analyses and ultimately recommend the definition afforded by constrained density functional theory (cDFT), as it is scarcely dependent on basis set and provides results that are in accord with chemical intuition in simple cases, and in quantitative agreement with experimental estimates of the CT energy, where available. For open-shell complexes, the cDFT approach affords CT energies that are in line with trends expected based on ionization potentials and electron affinities whereas some other definitions afford unreasonably large CT energies in large-gap systems, which are sometimes artificially offset by underestimation of van der Waals interactions by density functional theory. Our recommended energy decomposition analysis is a composite approach, in which cDFT is used to define the CT component of the interaction energy and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) defines the electrostatic, polarization, Pauli repulsion, and van der Waals contributions. SAPT/cDFT provides a stable and physically motivated energy decomposition that, when combined with a new implementation of open-shell SAPT, can be applied to supramolecular complexes involving molecules, ions, and/or radicals. PMID:27049750

  5. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P;

    2002-01-01

    -induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations...

  6. Electron transfer in proteins

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition to the......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  7. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics. PMID:24420248

  8. Resonance Raman spectra of organic molecules absorbed on inorganic semiconducting surfaces: Contribution from both localized intramolecular excitation and intermolecular charge transfer excitation

    Ye, ChuanXiang [Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhao, Yi, E-mail: yizhao@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Liang, WanZhen, E-mail: yizhao@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2015-10-21

    The time-dependent correlation function approach for the calculations of absorption and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of organic molecules absorbed on semiconductor surfaces [Y. Zhao and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044108 (2011)] is extended to include the contribution of the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) excitation from the absorbers to the semiconducting nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the bidirectionally interfacial CT significantly modifies the spectral line shapes. Although the intermolecular CT excitation makes the absorption spectra red shift slightly, it essentially changes the relative intensities of mode-specific RRS and causes the oscillation behavior of surface enhanced Raman spectra with respect to interfacial electronic couplings. Furthermore, the constructive and destructive interferences of RRS from the localized molecular excitation and CT excitation are observed with respect to the electronic coupling and the bottom position of conductor band. The interferences are determined by both excitation pathways and bidirectionally interfacial CT.

  9. Resonance Raman spectra of organic molecules absorbed on inorganic semiconducting surfaces: Contribution from both localized intramolecular excitation and intermolecular charge transfer excitation

    The time-dependent correlation function approach for the calculations of absorption and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of organic molecules absorbed on semiconductor surfaces [Y. Zhao and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044108 (2011)] is extended to include the contribution of the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) excitation from the absorbers to the semiconducting nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the bidirectionally interfacial CT significantly modifies the spectral line shapes. Although the intermolecular CT excitation makes the absorption spectra red shift slightly, it essentially changes the relative intensities of mode-specific RRS and causes the oscillation behavior of surface enhanced Raman spectra with respect to interfacial electronic couplings. Furthermore, the constructive and destructive interferences of RRS from the localized molecular excitation and CT excitation are observed with respect to the electronic coupling and the bottom position of conductor band. The interferences are determined by both excitation pathways and bidirectionally interfacial CT

  10. Evidence of pressure induced intermolecular proton transfer via mutarotation: the case of supercooled d-fructose.

    Cecotka, Adam; Tripathy, Satya N; Paluch, Marian

    2015-07-15

    This paper describes a systematic investigation on the role of pressure in mutarotation kinetics of supercooled d-fructose using dielectric spectroscopy. The structural relaxation time acts as a suitable dynamical observable to monitor the mutarotation process that enables the construction of the kinetic curves. The reaction kinetic shapes have been analyzed using the Avrami model. At low temperature, sigmoidal kinetic curves are noted, which correspond to the high concentration of furanosidic forms. The magnitude of activation energy of the process significantly decreases with increasing pressure and is comparable to the solvated systems at 100 MPa. A potential connection between cooperative motion and the origin of intermolecular proton transfer via mutarotation at elevated pressure is also discussed. These experimental observations have fundamental significance on theoretical explanation of the mechanism involving mutarotation in sugars. PMID:26144525

  11. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds: From temperature-driven proton transfer in molecular crystals to denaturation of DNA

    Mark Johnson

    2008-11-01

    We have combined neutron scattering and a range of numerical simulations to study hydrogen bonds in condensed matter. Two examples from a recent thesis will be presented. The first concerns proton transfer with increasing temperature in short inter-molecular hydrogen bonds [1,2]. These bonds have unique physical and chemical properties and are thought to play a fundamental role in processes like enzymatic catalysis. By combining elastic and inelastic neutron scattering results with ab initio, lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations, low frequency lattice modes are identified which modulate the potential energy surface of the hydrogen bond proton and drive proton transfer. The second example concerns base-pair opening in DNA which is the fundamental physical process underlying biological processes like denaturation and transcription. We have used an emprical force field and a large scale, all-atom phonon calculation to gain insight into the base-pair opening modes and the apparent `energy gap' between the accepted frequencies for these modes (∼ 100 cm-1 or ∼ 140 K) and the temperature of the biological processes (room temperature to 100° C) [3]. Inelastic neutron scattering spectra on aligned, highly crystalline DNA samples, produced at the ILL, provide the reference data for evaluating the precision of these simulation results.

  12. Electron transfer in proteins.

    Gray, H B; Winkler, J R

    1996-01-01

    Electron-transfer (ET) reactions are key steps in a diverse array of biological transformations ranging from photosynthesis to aerobic respiration. A powerful theoretical formalism has been developed that describes ET rates in terms of two parameters: the nuclear reorganization energy (lambda) and the electronic-coupling strength (HAB). Studies of ET reactions in ruthenium-modified proteins have probed lambda and HAB in several metalloproteins (cytochrome c, myoglobin, azurin). This work has shown that protein reorganization energies are sensitive to the medium surrounding the redox sites and that an aqueous environment, in particular, leads to large reorganization energies. Analyses of electronic-coupling strengths suggest that the efficiency of long-range ET depends on the protein secondary structure: beta sheets appear to mediate coupling more efficiently than alpha-helical structures, and hydrogen bonds play a critical role in both. PMID:8811189

  13. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1993-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 3 presents studies that discuss findings in the various aspects of electron chemistry. The book is comprised of four chapters; each chapter reviews a work that tackles an issue in electron transfer chemistry. Chapter 1 discusses the photoinduced electron transfer in flexible biaryl donor-acceptor molecules. Chapter 2 tackles light-induced electron transfer in inorganic systems in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. The book also covers internal geometry relaxation effects on electron transfer rates of amino-centered systems. The sequential elec

  14. Frenkel and Charge-Transfer Excitons in Quasi-One-Dimensional Molecular Crystals with Strong Intermolecular Orbital Overlap

    Hoffmann, Michael

    2000-01-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study on the lowest electronically excited states in quasi-one-dimensional molecular crystals. The specific calculations and the experiments are performed for the model compounds MePTCDI (N-N'-dimethylperylene-3,4:9,10-dicarboximide) and TCDA(3,4:9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride). The intermolecular interactions between nearest neighbors are quantum chemically analyzed on the basis of semi-empirical (ZINDO/S) Hartree-Fock calculations and a si...

  15. Electron transfer interactome of cytochrome C.

    Alexander N Volkov

    Full Text Available Lying at the heart of many vital cellular processes such as photosynthesis and respiration, biological electron transfer (ET is mediated by transient interactions among proteins that recognize multiple binding partners. Accurate description of the ET complexes - necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the cellular signaling and metabolism - is compounded by their short lifetimes and pronounced binding promiscuity. Here, we used a computational approach relying solely on the steric properties of the individual proteins to predict the ET properties of protein complexes constituting the functional interactome of the eukaryotic cytochrome c (Cc. Cc is a small, soluble, highly-conserved electron carrier protein that coordinates the electron flow among different redox partners. In eukaryotes, Cc is a key component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, where it shuttles electrons between its reductase and oxidase, and an essential electron donor or acceptor in a number of other redox systems. Starting from the structures of individual proteins, we performed extensive conformational sampling of the ET-competent binding geometries, which allowed mapping out functional epitopes in the Cc complexes, estimating the upper limit of the ET rate in a given system, assessing ET properties of different binding stoichiometries, and gauging the effect of domain mobility on the intermolecular ET. The resulting picture of the Cc interactome 1 reveals that most ET-competent binding geometries are located in electrostatically favorable regions, 2 indicates that the ET can take place from more than one protein-protein orientation, and 3 suggests that protein dynamics within redox complexes, and not the electron tunneling event itself, is the rate-limiting step in the intermolecular ET. Further, we show that the functional epitope size correlates with the extent of dynamics in the Cc complexes and thus can be used as a diagnostic tool for protein mobility.

  16. Coherent electron transfer in polyacetylene

    Psiachos, D., E-mail: dpsi@physics.uoc.gr

    2014-06-03

    Highlights: • We study electron–ion dynamics in a donor–acceptor system. • We find two distinct electron-transfer regimes: hopping and tunnelling. • We establish conditions for achieving ballistic electron transfer. • Lattice vibrations can dramatically affect the rate of electron transfer. • Decoherence due to lattice vibrations is limited in the tunnelling regime. - Abstract: We examine, using mixed classical-quantum electron–ion dynamics, electron transfer in a donor–acceptor-like molecular junction system based on polyacetylene. We identify two qualitatively-different transfer regimes: hopping and tunnelling. We discuss the criteria for achieving each one and for minimising inelastic scattering and decoherence arising from the coupling to the ions, and we connect our main results to quantities derived from electron dynamics involving simpler, three-state model systems. We identify the requirements to have near-ballistic transfer.

  17. Coherence in electron transfer pathways

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Beratan, David N.; Waldeck, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Central to the view of electron-transfer reactions is the idea that nuclear motion generates a transition state geometry at which the electron/hole amplitude propagates coherently from the electron donor to the electron acceptor. In the weakly coupled or nonadiabatic regime, the electron amplitude tunnels through an electronic barrier between the donor and acceptor. The structure of the barrier is determined by the covalent and noncovalent interactions of the bridge. Because the tunneling bar...

  18. Intramolecular photo-switching and intermolecular energy transfer as primary photoevents in photoreceptive processes: The case of Euglena gracilis

    In this paper we report the results of measurements performed by FLIM on the photoreceptor of Euglenagracilis. This organelle consists of optically bistable proteins, characterized by two thermally stable isomeric forms: A498, non fluorescent and B462, fluorescent. Our data indicate that the primary photoevent of Euglena photoreception upon photon absorption consists of two contemporaneous different phenomena: an intramolecular photo-switch (i.e., A498 becomes B462), and a intermolecular and unidirectional Forster-type energy transfer. During the FRET process, the fluorescent B462 form acts as donor for the non-fluorescent A498 form of the protein nearby, which acts as acceptor. We hypothesize that in nature these phenomena follow each other with a domino progression along the orderly organized and closely packed proteins in the photoreceptor layer(s), modulating the isomeric composition of the photoreceptive protein pool. This mechanism guarantees that few photons are sufficient to produce a signal detectable by the cell.

  19. Skeletal Isomerization and Inter-molecular Hydrogen Transfer Reactions in Catalytic Cracking

    Gao Yongcan; Zhang Jiushun; Xie Chaogang; Long Jun

    2002-01-01

    Bimolecular hydrogen transfer and skeletal isomerization are the important secondary reac tions among catalytic cracking reactions, which affect product yield distribution and product quality.Catalyst properties and operating parameters have great impact on bimolecular hydrogen transfer and skeletal isomerization reactions. Bimolecular hydrogen transfer activity and skeletal isomerization activity of USY-containing catalysts are higher than that of ZSM-5-containing catalyst. Coke deposition on the active sites of catalyst may suppress bimolecular hydrogen transfer activity and skeletal isomerization activity of catalyst in different degrees. Short reaction time causes a decrease of hydrogen trans fer reaction, but an increase of skeletal isomerization reaction compared to cracking reaction in catalytic cracking process.

  20. Electronic fund transfer & the "unbanked"

    Luxman Nathan

    1998-01-01

    As the Federal Government moves to switch most federal payments from paper check delivery to Direct Deposit by January 2, 1999, the Electronic Fund Transfer Initiative (EFT) attempts to educate consumers and serve the "unbanked."

  1. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1995-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 4 presents the reaction mechanisms involving the movement of single electrons. This book discusses the electron transfer reactions in organic, biochemical, organometallic, and excited state systems. Organized into four chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the photochemical behavior of two classes of sulfonium salt derivatives. This text then examines the parameters that control the efficiencies for radical ion pair formation. Other chapters consider the progress in the development of parameters that control the dynamics and reaction p

  2. Coherence in electron transfer pathways.

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N; Waldeck, David H

    2011-01-01

    Central to the view of electron-transfer reactions is the idea that nuclear motion generates a transition state geometry at which the electron/hole amplitude propagates coherently from the electron donor to the electron acceptor. In the weakly coupled or nonadiabatic regime, the electron amplitude tunnels through an electronic barrier between the donor and acceptor. The structure of the barrier is determined by the covalent and noncovalent interactions of the bridge. Because the tunneling barrier depends on the nuclear coordinates of the reactants (and on the surrounding medium), the tunneling barrier is highly anisotropic, and it is useful to identify particular routes, or pathways, along which the transmission amplitude propagates. Moreover, when more than one such pathway exists, and the paths give rise to comparable transmission amplitude magnitudes, one may expect to observe quantum interferences among pathways if the propagation remains coherent. Given that the effective tunneling barrier height and width are affected by the nuclear positions, the modulation of the nuclear coordinates will lead to a modulation of the tunneling barrier and hence of the electron flow. For long distance electron transfer in biological and biomimetic systems, nuclear fluctuations, arising from flexible protein moieties and mobile water bridges, can become quite significant. We discuss experimental and theoretical results that explore the quantum interferences among coupling pathways in electron-transfer kinetics; we emphasize recent data and theories associated with the signatures of chirality and inelastic processes, which are manifested in the tunneling pathway coherence (or absence of coherence). PMID:23833692

  3. Communication: Modeling of concentration dependent water diffusivity in ionic solutions: Role of intermolecular charge transfer

    The translational diffusivity of water in solutions of alkali halide salts depends on the identity of ions, exhibiting dramatically different behavior even in solutions of similar salts of NaCl and KCl. The water diffusion coefficient decreases as the salt concentration increases in NaCl. Yet, in KCl solution, it slightly increases and remains above bulk value as salt concentration increases. Previous classical molecular dynamics simulations have failed to describe this important behavior even when polarizable models were used. Here, we show that inclusion of dynamical charge transfer among water molecules produces results in a quantitative agreement with experiments. Our results indicate that the concentration-dependent diffusivity reflects the importance of many-body effects among the water molecules in aqueous ionic solutions. Comparison with quantum mechanical calculations shows that a heterogeneous and extended distribution of charges on water molecules around the ions due to ion-water and also water-water charge transfer plays a very important role in controlling water diffusivity. Explicit inclusion of the charge transfer allows us to model accurately the difference in the concentration-dependent water diffusivity between Na+ and K+ ions in simulations, and it is likely to impact modeling of a wide range of systems for medical and technological applications

  4. Communication: Modeling of concentration dependent water diffusivity in ionic solutions: Role of intermolecular charge transfer

    Yao, Yi; Berkowitz, Max L., E-mail: maxb@unc.edu, E-mail: ykanai@unc.edu; Kanai, Yosuke, E-mail: maxb@unc.edu, E-mail: ykanai@unc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    The translational diffusivity of water in solutions of alkali halide salts depends on the identity of ions, exhibiting dramatically different behavior even in solutions of similar salts of NaCl and KCl. The water diffusion coefficient decreases as the salt concentration increases in NaCl. Yet, in KCl solution, it slightly increases and remains above bulk value as salt concentration increases. Previous classical molecular dynamics simulations have failed to describe this important behavior even when polarizable models were used. Here, we show that inclusion of dynamical charge transfer among water molecules produces results in a quantitative agreement with experiments. Our results indicate that the concentration-dependent diffusivity reflects the importance of many-body effects among the water molecules in aqueous ionic solutions. Comparison with quantum mechanical calculations shows that a heterogeneous and extended distribution of charges on water molecules around the ions due to ion-water and also water-water charge transfer plays a very important role in controlling water diffusivity. Explicit inclusion of the charge transfer allows us to model accurately the difference in the concentration-dependent water diffusivity between Na{sup +} and K{sup +} ions in simulations, and it is likely to impact modeling of a wide range of systems for medical and technological applications.

  5. Communication: Modeling of concentration dependent water diffusivity in ionic solutions: Role of intermolecular charge transfer

    Yao, Yi; Berkowitz, Max L.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2015-12-01

    The translational diffusivity of water in solutions of alkali halide salts depends on the identity of ions, exhibiting dramatically different behavior even in solutions of similar salts of NaCl and KCl. The water diffusion coefficient decreases as the salt concentration increases in NaCl. Yet, in KCl solution, it slightly increases and remains above bulk value as salt concentration increases. Previous classical molecular dynamics simulations have failed to describe this important behavior even when polarizable models were used. Here, we show that inclusion of dynamical charge transfer among water molecules produces results in a quantitative agreement with experiments. Our results indicate that the concentration-dependent diffusivity reflects the importance of many-body effects among the water molecules in aqueous ionic solutions. Comparison with quantum mechanical calculations shows that a heterogeneous and extended distribution of charges on water molecules around the ions due to ion-water and also water-water charge transfer plays a very important role in controlling water diffusivity. Explicit inclusion of the charge transfer allows us to model accurately the difference in the concentration-dependent water diffusivity between Na+ and K+ ions in simulations, and it is likely to impact modeling of a wide range of systems for medical and technological applications.

  6. Intramolecular photo-switching and intermolecular energy transfer as primary photoevents in photoreceptive processes: The case of Euglena gracilis

    Mercatelli, Raffaella; Quercioli, Franco [Istituto Sistemi Complessi, CNR, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Barsanti, Laura; Evangelista, Valter [Istituto di Biofisica, CNR, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Coltelli, Primo [ISTI, CNR, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Passarelli, Vincenzo; Frassanito, Anna Maria [Istituto di Biofisica, CNR, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Gualtieri, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.gualtieri@pi.ibf.cnr.it [Istituto di Biofisica, CNR, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2009-07-24

    In this paper we report the results of measurements performed by FLIM on the photoreceptor of Euglenagracilis. This organelle consists of optically bistable proteins, characterized by two thermally stable isomeric forms: A{sub 498,} non fluorescent and B{sub 462}, fluorescent. Our data indicate that the primary photoevent of Euglena photoreception upon photon absorption consists of two contemporaneous different phenomena: an intramolecular photo-switch (i.e., A{sub 498} becomes B{sub 462}), and a intermolecular and unidirectional Forster-type energy transfer. During the FRET process, the fluorescent B{sub 462} form acts as donor for the non-fluorescent A{sub 498} form of the protein nearby, which acts as acceptor. We hypothesize that in nature these phenomena follow each other with a domino progression along the orderly organized and closely packed proteins in the photoreceptor layer(s), modulating the isomeric composition of the photoreceptive protein pool. This mechanism guarantees that few photons are sufficient to produce a signal detectable by the cell.

  7. Evidence for alkali metal induced intermolecular acetylenic hydrogen atom transfer between hydrogen-bonded alkyne complexes in solid argon

    Condensation of acetylene, propyne, and 2-butyne/acetylene mixtures with heavy alkali metal atoms (Na, K, Cs) in an argon matrix at 15 K has led to the appearance of infrared absorptions due to ethylene, propylene, and trans-2-butene, respectively. These results stand in sharp contrast with the products obtained with lithium. Isotopic studies have shown that ethylene formation involved three different acetylene molecules and evidenced a difference in the product yield with hydrogen vs. deuterium as well as a preference for trans- vs. cis-C2H2D2 formation, which is discussed and rationalized by differences in the zero point energies for the different mixed deuterium isotopes of the intermediate vinyl radical. This trend is amplified by methyl substitution. Spectroscopic evidence was found in these experiments for cesium acetylide (Cs+C2H-) and a cesium-acetylene π complex, which are involved in the intermolecular acetylenic hydrogen atom transfer process. 26 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  8. The electronic couplings in electron transfer and excitation energy transfer.

    Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2009-04-21

    The transport of charge via electrons and the transport of excitation energy via excitons are two processes of fundamental importance in diverse areas of research. Characterization of electron transfer (ET) and excitation energy transfer (EET) rates are essential for a full understanding of, for instance, biological systems (such as respiration and photosynthesis) and opto-electronic devices (which interconvert electric and light energy). In this Account, we examine one of the parameters, the electronic coupling factor, for which reliable values are critical in determining transfer rates. Although ET and EET are different processes, many strategies for calculating the couplings share common themes. We emphasize the similarities in basic assumptions between the computational methods for the ET and EET couplings, examine the differences, and summarize the properties, advantages, and limits of the different computational methods. The electronic coupling factor is an off-diagonal Hamiltonian matrix element between the initial and final diabatic states in the transport processes. ET coupling is essentially the interaction of the two molecular orbitals (MOs) where the electron occupancy is changed. Singlet excitation energy transfer (SEET), however, contains a Frster dipole-dipole coupling as its most important constituent. Triplet excitation energy transfer (TEET) involves an exchange of two electrons of different spin and energy; thus, it is like an overlap interaction of two pairs of MOs. Strategies for calculating ET and EET couplings can be classified as (1) energy-gap-based approaches, (2) direct calculation of the off-diagonal matrix elements, or (3) use of an additional operator to describe the extent of charge or excitation localization and to calculate the coupling value. Some of the difficulties in calculating the couplings were recently resolved. Methods were developed to remove the nondynamical correlation problem from the highly precise coupled cluster

  9. Intermolecular interactions and proton transfer in the hydrogen halide-superoxide anion complexes.

    Lee, Sebastian J R; Mullinax, J Wayne; Schaefer, Henry F

    2016-02-17

    The superoxide radical anion O2(-) is involved in many important chemical processes spanning different scientific disciplines (e.g., environmental and biological sciences). Characterizing its interaction with various substrates to help elucidate its rich chemistry may have far reaching implications. Herein, we investigate the interaction between O2(-) (X[combining tilde] (2)Πg) and the hydrogen halides (X[combining tilde] (1)Σ) with coupled-cluster theory. In contrast to the short (1.324 Å) hydrogen bond formed between the HF and O2(-) monomers, a barrierless proton transfer occurs for the heavier hydrogen halides with the resulting complexes characterized as long (>1.89 Å) hydrogen bonds between halide anions and the HO2 radical. The dissociation energy with harmonic zero-point vibrational energy (ZPVE) for FHO2(-) (X[combining tilde] (2)A'') → HF (X[combining tilde] (1)Σ) + O2(-) (X[combining tilde] (2)Πg) is 31.2 kcal mol(-1). The other dissociation energies with ZPVE for X(-)HO2 (X[combining tilde] (2)A'') → X(-) (X[combining tilde] (1)Σ) + HO2 (X[combining tilde] (2)A'') are 25.7 kcal mol(-1) for X = Cl, 21.9 kcal mol(-1) for X = Br, and 17.9 kcal mol(-1) for X = I. Additionally, the heavier hydrogen halides can form weak halogen bonds H-XO2(-) (X[combining tilde] (2)A'') with interaction energies including ZPVE of -2.3 kcal mol(-1) for HCl, -8.3 kcal mol(-1) for HBr, and -16.7 kcal mol(-1) for HI. PMID:26852733

  10. Benchmark Calculations of Three-Body Intermolecular Interactions and the Performance of Low-Cost Electronic Structure Methods.

    Řezáč, Jan; Huang, Yuanhang; Hobza, Pavel; Beran, Gregory J O

    2015-07-14

    Many-body noncovalent interactions are increasingly important in large and/or condensed-phase systems, but the current understanding of how well various models predict these interactions is limited. Here, benchmark complete-basis set coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) calculations have been performed to generate a new test set for three-body intermolecular interactions. This "3B-69" benchmark set includes three-body interaction energies for 69 total trimer structures, consisting of three structures from each of 23 different molecular crystals. By including structures that exhibit a variety of intermolecular interactions and packing arrangements, this set provides a stringent test for the ability of electronic structure methods to describe the correct physics involved in the interactions. Both MP2.5 (the average of second- and third-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory) and spin-component-scaled CCSD for noncovalent interactions (SCS-MI-CCSD) perform well. MP2 handles the polarization aspects reasonably well, but it omits three-body dispersion. In contrast, many widely used density functionals corrected with three-body D3 dispersion correction perform comparatively poorly. The primary difficulty stems from the treatment of exchange and polarization in the functionals rather than from the dispersion correction, though the three-body dispersion may also be moderately underestimated by the D3 correction. PMID:26575743

  11. Electron Transfer to Vinylaromatic Polymers

    Aromatic polymers accept electrons from alkali metals to form polyradicalanions. These undergo chain scission as a result of electronic interaction between aromatic rings. Spectrophotometric and chemical evidence led to the conclusion that during the chain-breaking process polymeric fragments were formed which had the properties of ''living polymers'', i.e. the characteristic visible spectra and the capability of initiating the polymerization of a number of vinyl monomers. It was possible to follow the rate of chain scission in the case of poly (4-vinyl biphenyl) and poly(α-vinyl naphthalene) by means of viscosity and spectrophotometric measurements. The postulated mechanism was found to be consistent with the slow decrease in free spin concentration measured by means of the electron spin resonance technique. Chain scission in polyacenaphthalene takes place at a much faster rate than in poly (4-vinyl biphenyl) and this fact is in good agreement with simple LCAO MO calculations. Preliminary experiments indicate that electron transfer to poly-N-vinyl carbazole produces little if any degradation. These investigations led to the examination of the temperature effect on the electron-transfer reaction from sodium to some substituted aromatic hydrocarbons. The details of this effect are discussed. (author)

  12. Electron transfer in helical polyaromatics

    Pospíšil, Lubomír; Gál, Miroslav; Horáček, Michal; Teplý, Filip; Adriaenssens, Louis; Severa, Lukáš

    Xi´an: International Society of Electrochemistry, 2009. O06-O06. [International Symposium on Frontiers of Electrochemical Science and Technology . 12.08.2009-15.08.2009, Xi´an] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/1157; GA MŠk OC 140; GA ČR GA203/09/0705; GA ČR GP203/09/P502; GA MŠk ME09114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : electron transfer * helical polyaromatics Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  13. Heterostructure Intervalley Transferred Electron Effects

    XUE Fang-Shi

    2001-01-01

    A Gunn active layer is used as an X electron probe to detect the X tunnelling current in the GaAs-AlAs heterostructure, from which a new heterostructure intervalley transferred electron (HITE) device is obtained. In the 8 mm band, the highest pulse output power of these diodes is 2.65 W and the highest conversion efficiency is 18%. The dc and rf performance of the HITE devices was simulated by the band mixing resonant tunnelling theory and Monte Carlo transport simulation. The HITE effect has transformed the transit-time dipole-layer mode in the Gunn diode into a relaxation oscillation mode in the HITE device. From the comparison of simulated results to the measured data, the HITE effect is demonstrated straightforwardly

  14. Spectroscopic study on the intermolecular double proton transfer in 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-6-octyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-amine with acid

    Li Zongyao [Key Lab for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Research Institute of Henan Coal and Chemical Industry Group, Zhengzhou 450046 (China); Li Chunli [Key Lab for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Zhao Chunmei [Key Lab for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, Huanghe Science and Technology College, Zhengzhou 450000 (China); Wu Wei [Key Lab for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Wang Hua, E-mail: hwang@henu.edu.cn [Key Lab for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2012-10-15

    With 2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-triazine as starting material, a functionalized triazine derivative, 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-6-octyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-amine (NOTA) was synthesized in 14% yield through three steps: Kumada cross-coupling, Suzuki coupling and amination. Intermolecular double proton transfer of NOTA with acetic acid (HOAc) and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in chloroform was investigated by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence emission. It is found that both NOTA/HOAc and NOTA/TFA undergo excited state double proton transfer, resulting in amino-imino tautomerization emission in excited state. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A functionalized triazine derivative, 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-6-octyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-amine (NOTA) was synthesized in 14% yield through three steps: Kumada cross-coupling, Suzuki coupling and amination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intermolecular double proton transfer of NOTA with acetic acid (HOAc) and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in chloroform was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both NOTA/HOAc and NOTA/TFA undergo excited state double proton transfer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amino-imino tautomerization emission in excited state are proposed.

  15. The inclusion of electron correlation in intermolecular potentials: Applications to the formamide dimer and liquid formamide

    Brdarski, S.; Åstrand, P.-O.; Karlström, G.

    2000-01-01

    dipole moment is 11% lower at the MP2 level than at the Hartree-Fock (HF) level, whereas the isotropic part of the polarizability is increased by 36% by adding electron correlation and using a considerably larger basis set. The atomic charges, dipole moments and polarizabilities obtained at the HF level...

  16. Conformational analysis, inter-molecular interactions, electronic properties and vibrational spectroscopic studies on cis-4-hydroxy-d-proline

    Ambrish Kumar Srivastava

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with a non-native amino acid, cis-4-hydroxy-d-proline (CHDP using density functional theory at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p level. The potential energy surface scan reveals the global minimum structure of CHDP along with two potential conformers. Highest occupied molecular orbital, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces are used to explain the chemical reactivity of title molecule. The atomic charge analysis has been carried out using Mulliken and natural population schemes. The equilibrium geometry of CHDP dimer has been obtained and inter-molecular interactions are explored using QTAIM and Natural bonding orbital analyses. Vibrational spectroscopic analysis has been performed on CHDP monomer and dimer at the same level of theory. Assignments to all vibrational modes up to 400 cm−1 have been offered along with their potential energy distribution to the maximum possible accuracy. The calculated frequencies are scaled by an equation, rather than by a constant factor and then compared with experimental FT-IR frequencies obtained by KBr disc and Nujol mull techniques. A number of electronic and thermodynamic parameters have also been evaluated for CHDP monomer and dimer.

  17. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems

    Sjulstok, Emil Sjulstok; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling...... quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to...

  18. Dynamic NMR studies of base-catalyzed intramolecular single vs. intermolecular double proton transfer of 1,3-bis(4-fluorophenyl)triazene

    In this paper, we explore the mechanisms of degenerate base-catalyzed intra- and intermolecular proton transfer using dynamic liquid state NMR. For this purpose, the model compound 1,3-bis(4-fluorophenyl)[1,3-15N2]triazene (1) was studied with and without the presence of dimethylamine (2), trimethylamine (3) and water, using tetrahydrofuran-d 8 and methylethylether-d 8 as solvents, down to 130 K. Compound 1 represents an analog of carboxylic acids and of diarylamidines forming cyclic dimers in which a fast double proton transfer takes place. By contrast, the structure of 1 was chosen in such a way that this double proton transfer is suppressed, thus revealing the base catalyzed transfer by dynamic 1H and 19F NMR. Surprisingly, both 2 and 3 can pick up the mobile proton of 1 at one nitrogen atom and carry it to the other nitrogen atom of 1, resulting in an intramolecular transfer process catalyzed each time by a different base molecule. Even more surprising is that the intramolecular transfer catalyzed by 2 is faster than the superimposed intermolecular double proton transfer. In the absence of added bases, a 1 is subject to a slow proton exchange with 2-amino-5,4'-difluoro-diphenyl-diazene (4) which is formed in small quantities from 1 in the presence of acid impurities. This process can be minimized by a proper sample preparation technique. The kinetic H/D isotope effects are small, especially in the catalysis by 2, indicating a major heavy atom rearrangement and absence of tunneling. Semi-empirical PM3 and ab initio DFT calculations indicate a reaction pathway via a hydrogen bond switch of the protonated amine representing the transition state. The Arrhenius curves of all processes exhibit strong convex curvatures. This phenomenon is explained in terms of the hydrogen bond association of 1 with the added bases, preceding the proton transfer. At low temperatures, all catalysts are in a hydrogen bonded reactive complex with 1, and the rate constants observed equal

  19. Dynamic NMR studies of base-catalyzed intramolecular single vs. intermolecular double proton transfer of 1,3-bis(4-fluorophenyl)triazene

    Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Männle, Ferdinand; Detering, Carsten; Denisov, Gleb S.

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, we explore the mechanisms of degenerate base-catalyzed intra- and intermolecular proton transfer using dynamic liquid state NMR. For this purpose, the model compound 1,3-bis(4-fluorophenyl)[1,3- 15N 2]triazene ( 1) was studied with and without the presence of dimethylamine ( 2), trimethylamine ( 3) and water, using tetrahydrofuran- d8 and methylethylether- d8 as solvents, down to 130 K. Compound 1 represents an analog of carboxylic acids and of diarylamidines forming cyclic dimers in which a fast double proton transfer takes place. By contrast, the structure of 1 was chosen in such a way that this double proton transfer is suppressed, thus revealing the base catalyzed transfer by dynamic 1H and 19F NMR. Surprisingly, both 2 and 3 can pick up the mobile proton of 1 at one nitrogen atom and carry it to the other nitrogen atom of 1, resulting in an intramolecular transfer process catalyzed each time by a different base molecule. Even more surprising is that the intramolecular transfer catalyzed by 2 is faster than the superimposed intermolecular double proton transfer. In the absence of added bases, a 1 is subject to a slow proton exchange with 2-amino-5,4'-difluoro-diphenyl-diazene ( 4) which is formed in small quantities from 1 in the presence of acid impurities. This process can be minimized by a proper sample preparation technique. The kinetic H/D isotope effects are small, especially in the catalysis by 2, indicating a major heavy atom rearrangement and absence of tunneling. Semi-empirical PM3 and ab initio DFT calculations indicate a reaction pathway via a hydrogen bond switch of the protonated amine representing the transition state. The Arrhenius curves of all processes exhibit strong convex curvatures. This phenomenon is explained in terms of the hydrogen bond association of 1 with the added bases, preceding the proton transfer. At low temperatures, all catalysts are in a hydrogen bonded reactive complex with 1, and the rate constants observed

  20. Role of intermolecular interactions on the electronic and geometric structure of a large Pi-conjugated molecule adsorbed on a metal surface

    Kilian, L.; Hauschild, A.; Temirov, R.; Soubatch, S.; Schoell, A.; Bendounan, A.; Reinert, F.; Lee, T. L.; Tautz, F. S.; Sokolowski, M.; Umbach, E

    2008-01-01

    The organic semiconductor molecule 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) exhibits two adsorption states on the Ag(111) surface: one in a metastable disordered phase, prepared at low temperatures, the other in the long-range ordered monolayer phase obtained at room temperature. Notably, the two states differ substantial in their vertical bonding distances, intramolecular distortions, and electronic structures. The difference is explained by intermolecular interactions, which ar...

  1. Effects of inter-molecular charge-transfer excitons on the external quantum efficiency of zinc-porphyrin/C60 heterojunction photovoltaic cells

    Ryuzaki, Sou; Kai, Toshihiro; Toda, Yasunori; Adachi, Satoru; Onoe, Jun

    2011-04-01

    We have examined the structural effects of zinc-octaethylporphyrin [Zn(OEP)] films used as a donor on the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of organic heterojunction photovoltaic (OPV) cells [ITO/Zn(OEP)/C60/Al], and investigated what exactly causes the improvement of EQE. When the structure of the Zn(OEP) films changed from amorphous to crystalline, the maximum EQE increased from 36% to 42%, which is greater than that of around 35% for previously reported OPV cells using buffer materials (Peumans and Forrest 2001 Appl. Phys. Lett. 79 126). The crystallization of Zn(OEP) films is found to increase the number of inter-molecular charge-transfer (IMCT) excitons and to enlarge the mobility of carriers and IMCT excitons, thus significantly improving the EQE of the photoabsorption band under illumination due to the IMCT excitons.

  2. Hierarchical control of electron-transfer

    Westerhoff, Hans V.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Egger, Louis;

    1997-01-01

    In this chapter the role of electron transfer in determining the behaviour of the ATP synthesising enzyme in E. coli is analysed. It is concluded that the latter enzyme lacks control because of special properties of the electron transfer components. These properties range from absence of a strong...... back pressure by the protonmotive force on the rate of electron transfer to hierarchical regulation of the expression of the gens that encode the electron transfer proteins as a response to changes in the bioenergetic properties of the cell.The discussion uses Hierarchical Control Analysis...... as a paradigm. This allows one to analyse a complex system of regulatory interactions in terms of the importance of the contributing factors....

  3. Photoselected electron transfer pathways in DNA photolyase

    Prytkova, Tatiana R.; Beratan, David N.; Skourtis, Spiros S.

    2007-01-01

    Cyclobutane dimer photolyases are proteins that bind to UV-damaged DNA containing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesions. They repair these lesions by photo-induced electron transfer. The electron donor cofactor of a photolyase is a two-electron-reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH−). When FADH− is photo-excited, it transfers an electron from an excited π → π* singlet state to the pyrimidine dimer lesion of DNA. We compute the lowest excited singlet states of FADH− using ab initio (time-de...

  4. Advances in electron transfer chemistry, v.6

    Mariano, PS

    1999-01-01

    It is clear that electron transfer chemisty is now one of the most active areas of chemical study. Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry has been designed to allow scientists who are developing new knowledge in this rapidly expanding area to describe their most recent research findings. This volume will serve those interested in learning about current breakthroughs in this rapidly expanding area of chemical research.

  5. Heat Transfer Augmentation for Electronic Cooling

    Suabsakul Gururatana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The performance of electronic devices has been improving along with the rapid technology development. Cooling of electronic systems is consequently essential in controlling the component temperature and avoiding any hot spot. The study aims to review the present electronic cooling methods which are widely used in electronic devices. Approach: There are several methods to cool down the electronics components such as the pin-fin heat sink, confined jet impingement, heat pipe, micro heat sink and so on. Results: The cooling techniques can obviously increase heat transfer rate. Nonetheless, for active and passive cooling methods the pressure drop could extremely rise, when the heat transfer rate is increased. Conclusion: When the cooling techniques are used, it is clearly seen that the heat transfer increases with pressure drop. To avoid excessive expense due to high pressure drop, optimization method is required to obtain optimum cost and cooling rate.

  6. Electron transfer patterns of the di-heme protein cytochrome c(4) from Pseudomonas stutzeri

    Raffalt, Anders Christer; Schmidt, L.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager;

    2009-01-01

    We report kinetic data for the two-step electron transfer (ET) oxidation and reduction of the two-domain di-heme redox protein Pseudomonas stutzeri cytochrome (cyt) c(4) by [Co(bipy)(3)](2- 3-) (bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Following earlier reports, the data accord with both bi- and tri......-exponential kinetics. A complete kinetic scheme includes both "cooperative" intermolecular ET between each heme group and the external reaction partner, and intramolecular ET between the two heme groups. A now data analysis scheme shows unequivocally that two-ET oxidation and reduction of P. stutzeri cyt c(4) is...... entirely dominated by intermolecular ET between the heme groups and the external reaction partner in the ms time range, with virtually no contribution from intramolecular interheme ET in this time range. This is in striking contrast to two-ET electrochemical oxidation or reduction of P. stutzeri cyt c(4...

  7. Imaging the electrons from transfer ionization collisions

    The electrons emitted into the continuum in transfer ionization of He2+ on helium collisions in the energy range of 75 - 400 keV were imaged using reaction microscope. The electron emission patterns show big difference for projectile velocity lower and upper than 1 a.u. in the present studies.

  8. Low Temperature Electronic Transport and Electron Transfer through Organic Macromolecules

    Zimbovskaya, N A

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that at low temperatures and moderate electron dephasing the electron transmission function reveales a structure containing information about donor/acceptor sites effectively participating in the electron transfer (ET) processes and primary pathways of electrons tunneling through molecular bridges in macromolecules. This important information can be obtained as a result of analysis of experimental low temperature current-voltage characteristics for chosen molecules.

  9. Electron transfer across a thermal gradient.

    Craven, Galen T; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-08-23

    Charge transfer is a fundamental process that underlies a multitude of phenomena in chemistry and biology. Recent advances in observing and manipulating charge and heat transport at the nanoscale, and recently developed techniques for monitoring temperature at high temporal and spatial resolution, imply the need for considering electron transfer across thermal gradients. Here, a theory is developed for the rate of electron transfer and the associated heat transport between donor-acceptor pairs located at sites of different temperatures. To this end, through application of a generalized multidimensional transition state theory, the traditional Arrhenius picture of activation energy as a single point on a free energy surface is replaced with a bithermal property that is derived from statistical weighting over all configurations where the reactant and product states are equienergetic. The flow of energy associated with the electron transfer process is also examined, leading to relations between the rate of heat exchange among the donor and acceptor sites as functions of the temperature difference and the electronic driving bias. In particular, we find that an open electron transfer channel contributes to enhanced heat transport between sites even when they are in electronic equilibrium. The presented results provide a unified theory for charge transport and the associated heat conduction between sites at different temperatures. PMID:27450086

  10. Photoinduced electron transfer in ordered polymers

    Jones, G. II.

    1991-12-01

    Long range photoinduced electron transfer between electron donor and acceptor groups is of considerable current interest in terms of strategies for artificial photosynthesis and studies regarding the redox properties of proteins. As part of an extensive study of long range electron transfer involving biopolymers, we have carried out this year investigations of the assembly of electron transfer agents in a system of model short peptides. Also studied is a polyelectrolyte that can adopt a helical conformation when electrostatically complexed with organic dye counter-ions. The principal interest in these systems has to do with the well ordered secondary structures adopted by peptide polymers, and the capabilities for synthetic modification of peptide side chains and end groups with chromophores or electroactive substituents. The present report gives a brief account of the following elements of work related to photochemical electron transfer themes: (1) the synthesis and photochemical characterization of chromophore-bound peptides and amino acid model compounds based on the amino acids, tryptophan and the spacer residue, alanine (Ala); (2) the study of binding of the cationic organic dye to a peptide electrolyte, for which cooperative dye loading and helix formation is important; and (3) completion of the synthesis of a new series of acridinium chromophores that have rod-like'' arrangements of inked aryl rings for assembly of electron donor-acceptor systems that will exhibit especially long lived charge separation.

  11. Unusual distance dependences of electron transfer rates.

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-07-28

    Usually the rates for electron transfer (kET) decrease with increasing donor-acceptor distance, but Marcus theory predicts a regime in which kET is expected to increase when the transfer distance gets longer. Until recently, experimental evidence for such counter-intuitive behavior had been very limited, and consequently this effect is much less well-known than the Gaussian free energy dependence of electron transfer rates leading to the so-called inverted driving-force effect. This article presents the theoretical concepts that lead to the prediction of electron transfer rate maxima at large donor-acceptor distances, and it discusses conditions that are expected to favor experimental observations of such behavior. It continues with a consideration of specific recent examples in which electron transfer rates were observed to increase with increasing donor-acceptor distance, and it closes with a discussion of the importance of this effect in the context of light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:27353891

  12. Resonant electron transfer between quantum dots

    Openov, Leonid A.

    1999-01-01

    An interaction of electromagnetic field with a nanostructure composed of two quantum dots is studied theoretically. An effect of a resonant electron transfer between the localized low-lying states of quantum dots is predicted. A necessary condition for such an effect is the existence of an excited bound state whose energy lies close to the top of the barrier separating the quantum dots. This effect may be used to realize the reversible quantum logic gate NOT if the superposition of electron s...

  13. Facilitating electron transfer in bioelectrocatalytic systems

    Sekretaryova, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrocatalytic systems are based on biological entities, such as enzymes, whole cells, parts of cells or tissues, which catalyse electrochemical processes that involve the interaction between chemical change and electrical energy. In all cases, biocatalysis is implemented by enzymes, isolated or residing inside cells or part of cells. Electron transfer (ET) phenomena, within the protein molecules and between biological redox systems and electronics, enable the development of various bioe...

  14. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    Chunhai Fan; Shiping Song; Haiping Wu; Lihua Wang; Xiaofang Hu; Runguang Sun; Bo Zhou

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb) and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN) on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated...

  15. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    Chunhai Fan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated Polymers

  16. DFT study of isocyanate chemisorption on Cu(100): Correlation between substrate-adsorbate charge transfer and intermolecular interactions

    Belelli, Patricia G.; Garda, Graciela R.; Ferullo, Ricardo M.

    2011-07-01

    The adsorption of isocyanate (- NCO) species on Cu(100) was studied using the density functional theory (DFT) and the periodic slab model. The calculations indicate that at low and intermediate coverages NCO adsorbs preferentially on bridge and hollow sites. Work function and dipole moment changes show a significant negative charge transfer from Cu to NCO. The resulting charged NCO species interact repulsively among themselves being these dipole-dipole interactions particularly intensive when they are adsorbed in adjacent sites. Consequently, isocyanates tend to be separated from each other generating the vacant sites required for the dissociation to N and CO. This condition for NCO dissociation has been suggested in the past from experimental observations. A comparison was also performed with the NCO adsorption on Pd(100). In particular, the calculated minimal energy barrier for NCO dissociation was found to be higher on Cu(100) than on Pd(100) in accord with the well known higher NCO stability on Cu(100).

  17. Electron transfer in dinucleoside phosphate anions

    The electron transfer reaction within various dinucleoside phosphate radical anions has been investigated by ESR spectroscopy and pulse radiolysis. In the ESR work electrons are produced by photolysis of K4Fe(CN)6 in a 12 M LiCl glass at 770K. Upon photobleaching the electrons react with the dinucleoside phosphate to form the anion radical. The anions of the four DNA nucleosides were also produced and their ESR spectra were appropriately weighted and summed by computer to simulate the spectra found for the dinucleoside phosphate anions. From the analysis the relative amounts of each of the nucleoside anions in the dinucleoside phosphate anion were determined. Evidence suggests the electron affinity of the pyrimidine bases are greater than the purine bases; however, the results are not sufficient to distinguish between the individual purine or pyrimidine. When dinucleoside phosphate anions containing thymidine are warmed, protonation occurs only on thymine to produce the well known ''thymyl'' spectrum. Pulse radiolysis experiments on individual nucleotides (TMP, dAMP), mixtures of these nucleotides and the dinucleoside phosphate, TdA, in aqueous solution at room temperature show that in the TdA anion electron transfer occurs from adenine to thymine, whereas no electron transfer is found for mixtures of individual nucleotides. Protonation is found to occur only on thymine in the TdA anion in agreement with the ESR results

  18. Photoinduced electron transfer in ordered polymers

    Jones, G. II.

    1990-10-20

    Photochemical studies on organic polymers or biopolymers (particularly synthetic peptides) that have been modified by covalent attachment (or other means of binding) of organic chromophores and electron transfer agents are described. Specific projects involve are: peptide conjugates bearing electroactive residues such as tryptophan and specifically labeled at the N- or C-terminus of peptide chains; the electrostatic binding of organic dyes to poly-electrolytes (polyacrylates) for which the formation of dimeric aggregates of bound dye that display unusual photophysical and electron transfer properties is important; a study of the binding of dyes and electron transfer agents to the protein mimic,'' polyvinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (PVP), in hydrophobic domains that depend on specific H-bond interaction; and completion of an earlier study having to do with the triplet state properties of charge-transfer (CT) complexes of a high potential quinone and various electron donors (investigation of the properties of triplet (contact) radical-ion pairs). 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Quantum effects in biological electron transfer

    de la Lande, A.; Babcock, N. S.; Řezáč, Jan; Levy, B.; Sanders, B. C.; Salahub, D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 17 (2012), s. 5902-5918. ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : electron transfer * tunnelling * decoherence * semi-classical molecular dynamics * density functional theory Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.829, year: 2012

  20. Energy of the quasi-free electron in H2, D2, and O2: Probing intermolecular potentials within the local Wigner-Seitz model

    We present for the first time the quasi-free electron energy V0(ρ) for H2, D2, and O2 from gas to liquid densities, on noncritical isotherms and on a near critical isotherm in each fluid. These data illustrate the ability of field enhanced photoemission (FEP) to determine V0(ρ) accurately in strongly absorbing fluids (e.g., O2) and fluids with extremely low critical temperatures (e.g., H2 and D2). We also show that the isotropic local Wigner-Seitz model for V0(ρ) — when coupled with thermodynamic data for the fluid — can yield optimized parameters for intermolecular potentials, as well as zero kinetic energy electron scattering lengths

  1. Domain motions and electron transfer dynamics in 2Fe-superoxide reductase.

    Horch, Marius; Utesch, Tillmann; Hildebrandt, Peter; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Zebger, Ingo

    2016-08-17

    Superoxide reductases are non-heme iron enzymes that represent valuable model systems for the reductive detoxification of reactive oxygen species. In the present study, we applied different theoretical methods to study the structural dynamics of a prototypical 2Fe-superoxide reductase and its influence on electron transfer towards the active site. Using normal mode and essential dynamics analyses, we could show that enzymes of this type are capable of well-defined, electrostatically triggered domain movements, which may allow conformational proofreading for cellular redox partners involved in intermolecular electron transfer. Moreover, these global modes of motion were found to enable access to molecular configurations with decreased tunnelling distances between the active site and the enzyme's second iron centre. Using all-atom classical molecular dynamics simulations and the tunnelling pathway model, however, we found that electron transfer between the two metal sites is not accelerated under these conditions. This unexpected finding suggests that the unperturbed enzymatic structure is optimized for intramolecular electron transfer, which provides an indirect indication of the biological relevance of such a mechanism. Consistently, efficient electron transfer was found to depend on a distinct route, which is accessible via the equilibrium geometry and characterized by a quasi conserved tyrosine that could enable multistep-tunnelling (hopping). Besides these explicit findings, the present study demonstrates the importance of considering both global and local protein dynamics, and a generalized approach for the functional analysis of these aspects is provided. PMID:27491757

  2. Electronic transfer between low-dimensional nanosystems

    Král, Karel

    Hoboken: Wiley, 2011 - (Nair, K.; Priya, S.; Jia, Q.), s. 33-40. (Ceramic Transactions. vol. 226). ISBN 9781118059999. [Materials Science and Technology meeting 2010 (MS&T'10). Dielectric Ceramic Materials and Electronic Devices.. Houston (US), 17.10.2010-21.10.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : electron transfer * nanostructures quantum dots Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118059999,descCd-tableOfContents.html

  3. Electron transfer theory revisit: Quantum solvation effect

    Han, P; Cui, P; Mo, Y; He, G; Yan, Y J; Han, Ping; Xu, Rui-Xue; Cui, Ping; Mo, Yan; He, Guozhong; Yan, YiJing

    2006-01-01

    The effect of solvation on the electron transfer (ET) rate processes is investigated on the basis of the exact theory constructed in J. Phys. Chem. B Vol. 110, (2006); quant-ph/0604071. The nature of solvation is studied in a close relation with the mechanism of ET processes. The resulting Kramers' turnover and Marcus' inversion characteristics are analyzed accordingly. The classical picture of solvation is found to be invalid when the solvent longitudinal relaxation time is short compared with the inverse temperature.

  4. Electron Transfer Phenomena in Interfacial Bioelectrochemistry

    Baier, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Biomolecules at the solid-liquid interface have been investigated using electrochemical measurement techniques such as cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical scanning probe microscopies. Structure and function of the biomolecules, depending on the electron transfer and the used electrode material could be studied down to a single molecule level. Besides investigating natural electroactive proteins, e.g. the metalloprotein azurin or the iron storage protein ferritin, a method has been develope...

  5. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation. PMID:27472379

  6. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical prediction of transport and optical properties of protein-pigment complexes is of significant importance when aiming at understanding the structure versus function relationship in such systems. Electronic energy transfer (EET) couplings represent a key property in this respect since...... such couplings provide important insight into the strength of interaction between photo-active pigments in protein-pigment complexes. Recently, attention has been payed to how the environment modifies or even controls the electronic couplings. To enable such theoretical predictions, a fully polarizable embedding...... of transition densities in the calculation of the electronic couplings - also when including the explicit environment contribution - can be replaced by a much simpler transition point charge description without comprising the quality of the model predictions....

  7. Promoting interspecies electron transfer with biochar

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla;

    2014-01-01

    attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why......Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar...... to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were...

  8. Education and solar conversion. Demonstrating electron transfer

    Smestad, Greg P. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, ICP-2, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1998-07-23

    A simplified solar cell fabrication procedure is presented that uses natural anthocyanin or chlorophyll dyes extracted from plants. This procedure illustrates how interdisciplinary science can be taught at lower division university and upper division high school levels for an understanding of renewable energy as well as basic science concepts. Electron transfer occurs on the Earth in the mitochondrial membranes found in living cells, and in the thylakoid membranes found in the photosynthetic cells of green plants. Since we depend on the results of this electron and energy transfer, e.g. in our use of petroleum and agricultural products, it is desirable to understand and communicate how the electron transfer works. The simplified solar cell fabrication procedure, based on nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells, has therefore been developed so that it can be inexpensively reproduced and utilized in the teaching of basic principles in biology, chemistry, physics, and environmental science. A water-based solution of commercial nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) powder is used to deposit a highly porous semiconductor electron acceptor. This acceptor couples the light-driven processes occurring at an organic dye to the macroscopic world and an external electrical circuit. Materials science and semiconductor physics are emphasized during the deposition of the sintered TiO{sub 2} nanocrystalline ceramic film. Chelation, complexation and molecular self-assembly are demonstrated during the attachment of the dye molecule to the surface of the TiO{sub 2} semiconductor particles. Environmental chemistry and energy conversion can be linked to these concepts via the regenerative oxidation and reduction cycle found in the cell. The resulting device, made in under 3 h, can be used as a light detector or power generator that produces 0.4-0.5 V at open circuit, and 1-2 mA per square cm under solar illumination

  9. Heat transfer in high density electronics packaging

    2001-01-01

    In order to get an insight into the thermal characteristic and to evaluate the thermal reliability of the "System in Packaging"(SIP), a new solution of electronics packaging, a heat transfer model of SIP was developed to predict the heat dissipation capacity and to investigate the effect of different factors on the temperature distribution in the electronics. The affecting parameters under consideration include the thermophysical properties of the substrates, the coefficient of convection heat transfer, the thickness of the chip, and the density of power dissipation. ALGOR, a kind of finite element analysis software,was used to do the model simulation. Based on the sinulation and analysis of the heat conduction and convection resistance, criteria for the thermal design were established and possible measurement for enhancing power dissipation was provided, The results show that the heat transfer model provides a new and effective way to the thermal design and thermal analysis of SIP and to the mechanical analysis for the further investigation of SIP.

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of elementary act of electron transfer in alcohol radicals oxidation by hydrated trivalent iron ions

    The method of competing reactions has been employed to measure the velocity constants of one-electron oxidation of oxyalkyl radicals by Fe(3) ions upon γ-radiolysis of aqueous methanol, ethanol and isopropanol in the presence of Fe(3) ions and tetranitromethane. It is shown that if such factors as non-adiabaticity, reorganization of intermolecular degrees of freedom, core tunnelling effects and spin effects are taken into account, the quantum theory of outerspheric electron transfer in polar media provides for quantitative agreement of the measured velocity constants with experimental results

  11. Variation of geometries and electron properties along proton transfer in strong hydrogen-bond complexes

    Pacios, L. F.; Gálvez, O.; Gómez, P. C.

    2005-06-01

    Proton transfer in hydrogen-bond systems formed by 4-methylimidazole in both neutral and protonated cationic forms and by acetate anion are studied by means of MP2/6-311++G(d,p) ab initio calculations. These two complexes model the histidine (neutral and protonated)-aspartate diad present in the active sites of enzymes the catalytic mechanism of which involves the formation of strong hydrogen bonds. We investigate the evolution of geometries, natural bond orbital populations of bonds and electron lone pairs, topological descriptors of the electron density, and spatial distributions of the electron localization function along the process N-H ⋯O→N⋯H⋯O→N⋯H-O, which represents the stages of the H-transfer. Except for a sudden change in the population of electron lone pairs in N and O at the middle N...H...O stage, all the properties analyzed show a smooth continuous behavior along the covalent → hydrogen bond transit inherent to the transfer, without any discontinuity that could identify a formation or breaking of the hydrogen bond. This way, the distinction between covalent or hydrogen-bonding features is associated to subtle electron rearrangement at the intermolecular space.

  12. 14 CFR 1260.69 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    2010-01-01

    ... Government by electronic funds transfer through the Treasury Fedline Payment System (FEDLINE) or the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.69 Electronic funds transfer payment...

  13. Copper(II)-Mediated Intermolecular C(sp(2))-H Amination of Benzamides with Electron-Rich Anilines.

    Singh, Bijaya Kumar; Polley, Arghya; Jana, Ranjan

    2016-05-20

    Despite significant progress, copper-catalyzed/mediated C-H amination reactions with electron-rich anilines remain an unsolved problem due to catalyst deactivation and deleterious side reactions. Herein, we report a copper(II)-mediated C(sp(2))-H amination of benzamides with electronically neutral or electron-rich anilines. A dramatic influence of silver(I) and tetrabutylammonium bromide was observed on the reaction outcome. The present protocol also demonstrates the synthesis of a number of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:27148754

  14. Electron transfer in branched expanded pyridinium molecules

    Hromadová, Magdaléna; Lachmanová, Štěpánka; Pospíšil, Lubomír; Fortage, J.; Dupeyre, G.; Perruchot, Ch.; Lainé, P. P.

    Aveiro: DEMAC - Universidade de Aveiro, 2014. s. 99-99. [Meeting of the Portuguese Electrochemical Society /19./. Iberian Meeting of Electrochemistry /16./. 30.06.2014-02.07.2014, Aveiro] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05180S Grant ostatní: Rada Programu interní porpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR M200401202 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electron transfer * electrochemistry * pyridinium Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  15. Direct heterogeneous electron transfer of theophylline oxidase

    Christenson, Andreas; Dock, Eva; Gorton, Lo; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2004-01-01

    Direct electron transfer (DET) was shown between the heme containing enzyme theophylline oxidase (ThO) and the surface of both graphite and gold electrodes. As proof on graphite a steady state current for theophylline was recorded using the electrode modified with adsorbed ThO. The electrode showed a Michaelis–Menten-like response to theophylline with a detection limit of 0.2 mM and a Michaelis–Menten constant equal to 3.2 mM. These initial results open up a possibility for the development of...

  16. Theory of intermolecular forces

    Margenau, H; Ter Haar, D

    1971-01-01

    Theory of Intermolecular Forces deals with the exposition of the principles and techniques of the theory of intermolecular forces. The text focuses on the basic theory and surveys other aspects, with particular attention to relevant experiments. The initial chapters introduce the reader to the history of intermolecular forces. Succeeding chapters present topics on short, intermediate, and long range atomic interactions; properties of Coulomb interactions; shape-dependent forces between molecules; and physical adsorption. The book will be of good use to experts and students of quantum mechanics

  17. An isotopic mass effect on the intermolecular potential

    Herman, Michael F.; Currier, Robert P.; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-10-01

    The impact of isotopic variation on the electronic energy and intermolecular potentials is often suppressed when calculating isotopologue thermodynamics. Intramolecular potential energy surfaces for distinct isotopologues are in fact equivalent under the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, which is sometimes used to imply that the intermolecular interactions are independent of isotopic mass. In this communication, the intermolecular dipole-dipole interaction between hetero-nuclear diatomic molecules is considered. It is shown that the intermolecular potential contains mass-dependent terms even though each nucleus moves on a Born-Oppenheimer surface. The analysis suggests that mass dependent variations in intermolecular potentials should be included in comprehensive descriptions of isotopologue thermodynamics.

  18. Electron transfer pathways in microbial oxygen biocathodes

    Freguia, Stefano, E-mail: stefano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Tsujimura, Seiya, E-mail: seiya@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Kano, Kenji, E-mail: kkano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    The ability of some bacteria to enhance the rate of cathodic oxygen reduction to water has been recently discovered, opening the way to an entirely renewable and environmentally friendly concept of biocathode. In this study we reveal that several mechanisms may induce catalytic effects by bacteria. These comprise mechanisms that are putatively beneficial to the bacteria as well as mechanisms which are merely side effects, including quinone autoxidation and direct O{sub 2} reduction by heme compounds. Here we showed that 1 muM of ACNQ is able to generate a significant catalytic wave for oxygen reduction, with onset at approximately 0 V vs. SHE. Similarly, adsorption of hemin on a carbon surface catalyses O{sub 2} reduction to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with an onset of +0.2 V vs. SHE. To evaluate the catalytic pathways of live cells on cathodic oxygen reduction, two species of electrochemically active bacteria were selected as pure cultures, namely Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Shewanella putrefaciens. The former appears to exploit a self-excreted redox compound with redox characteristics matching those of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) for extracellular electron transfer. The latter appears to utilise outer membrane-bound redox compounds. Interaction of quinones and cytochromes with the membrane-bound electron transfer chain is yet to be proven.

  19. INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS

    Bartoloni, Fernando Heering; Monteiro Leite Ciscato, Luiz Francisco; Augusto, Felipe Alberto; Baader, Wilhelm Josef

    2010-01-01

    INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS. Chemiluminescence properties of the peroxyoxalate reaction in the presence of activators bearing electron withdrawing substituents were studied, to evaluate the possible occurrence of an inverse electron tr

  20. Electron transfer in gas surface collisions

    In this thesis electron transfer between atoms and metal surfaces in general is discussed and the negative ionization of hydrogen by scattering protons at a cesiated crystalline tungsten (110) surface in particular. Experimental results and a novel theoretical analysis are presented. In Chapter I a theoretical overview of resonant electron transitions between atoms and metals is given. In the first part of chapter II atom-metal electron transitions at a fixed atom-metal distance are described on the basis of a model developed by Gadzuk. In the second part the influence of the motion of the atom on the atomic charge state is incorporated. Measurements presented in chapter III show a strong dependence of the fraction of negatively charged H atoms scattered at cesiated tungsten, on the normal as well as the parallel velocity component. In chapter IV the proposed mechanism for the parallel velocity effect is incorporated in the amplitude method. The scattering process of protons incident under grazing angles on a cesium covered surface is studied in chapter V. (Auth.)

  1. Activation entropy of electron transfer reactions

    Milischuk, A A; Newton, M D; Milischuk, Anatoli A.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.; Newton, Marshall D.

    2005-01-01

    We report microscopic calculations of free energies and entropies for intramolecular electron transfer reactions. The calculation algorithm combines the atomistic geometry and charge distribution of a molecular solute obtained from quantum calculations with the microscopic polarization response of a polar solvent expressed in terms of its polarization structure factors. The procedure is tested on a donor-acceptor complex in which ruthenium donor and cobalt acceptor sites are linked by a four-proline polypeptide. The reorganization energies and reaction energy gaps are calculated as a function of temperature by using structure factors obtained from our analytical procedure and from computer simulations. Good agreement between two procedures and with direct computer simulations of the reorganization energy is achieved. The microscopic algorithm is compared to the dielectric continuum calculations. We found that the strong dependence of the reorganization energy on the solvent refractive index predicted by conti...

  2. Devices which transfer electrons one-by-one

    An introduction is given to the field of single-electron devices, which are electronic circuits across which electrons may be transferred one by one. Experiments are described on the single-junction box and the four-junction box, devices in which electrons were transferred to a metallic island and their presence detected using a single-electron electrometer. The single-junction box, the simpler of the two devices, allows one to control the thermally-averaged number of excess electrons on the metallic island, whereas with the four-junction box one can actually control the transfer of individual electrons. (author) 11 refs.; 5 figs

  3. Path integral approach to non-relativistic electron charge transfer

    A path integral approach has been generalized for the non-relativistic electron charge transfer processes. The charge transfer - the capture of an electron by an ion passing another atom, or more generally the problem of rearrangement collisions - is formulated in terms of influence functionals. It has been shown that the electron charge transfer process can be treated either as an electron transition problem or as ion and atom elastic scattering in the effective potential field. The first-order Born approximation for the electron charge transfer reaction cross section has been reproduced to prove the adequacy of the path integral approach for this problem. (author)

  4. Respiratory electron transfer in Escherichia coli : components, energetics and regulation

    M. Bekker

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory chain that is housed in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, generally transfers electrons from NADH to oxygen; in the absence of oxygen it can use several alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate. Transfer of electrons through this chain is usually coupled to the

  5. 48 CFR 18.123 - Electronic funds transfer.

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.123 Section 18.123 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES EMERGENCY ACQUISITIONS Available Acquisition Flexibilities 18.123 Electronic funds transfer. Electronic funds...

  6. Theoretical aspects of electron transfer reactions of complex molecules

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Features of electron transfer involving complex molecules are discussed. This notion presently refers to molecular reactants where charge transfer is accompanied by large molecular reorganization, and commonly used displaced harmonic oscillator models do not apply. It is shown that comprehensive ...

  7. Transcriptomic and genetic analysis of direct interspecies electron transfer

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Summers, Zarath M;

    2013-01-01

    The possibility that metatranscriptomic analysis could distinguish between direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) and H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) in anaerobic communities was investigated by comparing gene transcript abundance in cocultures in which Geobacter sulfurreducens was the elect...

  8. Electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress in the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins. Significant achievements in the relevant fields are summarized including the direct electron transfer between proteins and electrodes, the thermodynamic and kinetic properties, catalytic activities and activity regulation of the redox proteins. It has been demonstrated that the electrochemical technique is an effective tool for protein studies, especially for probing into the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins.

  9. The Liability of banks in electronic fund transfer transaction

    Algudah, Fayyad

    1993-01-01

    The liability of banks in electronic fund transfer (EFT) transactions is discussed in this thesis under the British and the United States law. The thesis covers banks’ liability in electronic credit and debit transfers. It covers banks’ liability in Electronic Fund Transfer at the Point Of Sale (EFTPOS), Automatic Teller Machines (ATM) and home and office banking. Liability of banks in credit card transactions and cheque truncation falls outside the scope of this thesis. In ...

  10. Internal electron transfer within mitochondrial succinate-cytochrome C reductase

    Internal electron transfer within succinate-cytochrome C reductase from pigeon breast muscle mitochondria was followed by the pulse radiolytic technique. The electron equivalent is transferred from an unknown donor to b type cytochrome(s), in a first order process with a rate constant of: 660 +- 150s-1. This process might be the rate determining step of electron transfer in mitochondria, since it is similar in rate to the turnover number of the mitochondrial respiratory chain

  11. Intermolecular and surface forces

    Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2011-01-01

    This reference describes the role of various intermolecular and interparticle forces in determining the properties of simple systems such as gases, liquids and solids, with a special focus on more complex colloidal, polymeric and biological systems. The book provides a thorough foundation in theories and concepts of intermolecular forces, allowing researchers and students to recognize which forces are important in any particular system, as well as how to control these forces. This third edition is expanded into three sections and contains five new chapters over the previous edition.· starts fr

  12. Activation entropy of electron transfer reactions

    We report microscopic calculations of free energies and entropies for intramolecular electron transfer reactions. The calculation algorithm combines the atomistic geometry and charge distribution of a molecular solute obtained from quantum calculations with the microscopic polarization response of a polar solvent expressed in terms of its polarization structure factors. The procedure is tested on a donor-acceptor complex in which ruthenium donor and cobalt acceptor sites are linked by a four-proline polypeptide. The reorganization energies and reaction energy gaps are calculated as a function of temperature by using structure factors obtained from our analytical procedure and from computer simulations. Good agreement between two procedures and with direct computer simulations of the reorganization energy is achieved. The microscopic algorithm is compared to the dielectric continuum calculations. We found that the strong dependence of the reorganization energy on the solvent refractive index predicted by continuum models is not supported by the microscopic theory. Also, the reorganization and overall solvation entropies are substantially larger in the microscopic theory compared to continuum models

  13. Electronic transfer of sensitive patient data.

    Detterbeck, A M W; Kaiser, J; Hirschfelder, U

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop decision-making aids and recommendations for dental practitioners regarding the utilization and sharing of sensitive digital patient data. In the current environment of growing digitization, healthcare professionals need detailed knowledge of secure data management to maximize confidentiality and minimize the risks involved in both archiving patient data and sharing it through electronic channels. Despite well-defined legal requirements, an all-inclusive technological solution does not currently exist. The need for a preliminary review and critical appraisal of common practices of data transfer prompted a search of the literature and the Web to identify viable methods of secure data exchange and to develop a flowchart. A strong focus was placed on the transmission of datasets both smaller than and larger than 10 MB, and on secure communication by smartphone. Although encryption of patient-related data should be routine, it is often difficult to implement. Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) and Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (S/MIME) are viable standards for secure e-mail encryption. Sharing of high-volume data should be accomplished with the help of file encryption. Careful handling of sensitive patient data is mandatory, and it is the end-user's responsibility to meet any requirements for encryption, preferably by using free, open-source (and hence transparent) software. PMID:25911828

  14. Intermolecular spectroscopy of gases

    Spectroscopic techniques have been very successfully applied to the study of individual molecules. The same techniques can also be used to investigate intermolecular interactions. Collision-induced absorption (CIA) and collision-induced light scattering (CILS) are important examples of intermolecular interactions. These effects can be described by the dynamical information contained in the general intermolecular correlation functions. One of the aims of this review is to stress the central role of these correlation functions in the field of intermolecular spectroscopy. Because they have a well-defined physical meaning, they are very suitable for the purpose of introducing new physical approximations, particularly in the case of liquids. Some aspects of the theory of CIA will be discussed, mainly as applied to gases. References to similar situations in CILS will occasionally be made, but no comprehensive review will be attempted. One of the basic quantities in CIA is the absorption coefficient. The question is investigated wether it can be expanded in powers of the density. Finally, the moments of the spectrum, interference effects and line shapes are discussed. (KBE)

  15. Electric-field-driven electron-transfer in mixed-valence molecules

    Blair, Enrique P.; Corcelli, Steven A.; Lent, Craig S.

    2016-07-01

    Molecular quantum-dot cellular automata is a computing paradigm in which digital information is encoded by the charge configuration of a mixed-valence molecule. General-purpose computing can be achieved by arranging these compounds on a substrate and exploiting intermolecular Coulombic coupling. The operation of such a device relies on nonequilibrium electron transfer (ET), whereby the time-varying electric field of one molecule induces an ET event in a neighboring molecule. The magnitude of the electric fields can be quite large because of close spatial proximity, and the induced ET rate is a measure of the nonequilibrium response of the molecule. We calculate the electric-field-driven ET rate for a model mixed-valence compound. The mixed-valence molecule is regarded as a two-state electronic system coupled to a molecular vibrational mode, which is, in turn, coupled to a thermal environment. Both the electronic and vibrational degrees-of-freedom are treated quantum mechanically, and the dissipative vibrational-bath interaction is modeled with the Lindblad equation. This approach captures both tunneling and nonadiabatic dynamics. Relationships between microscopic molecular properties and the driven ET rate are explored for two time-dependent applied fields: an abruptly switched field and a linearly ramped field. In both cases, the driven ET rate is only weakly temperature dependent. When the model is applied using parameters appropriate to a specific mixed-valence molecule, diferrocenylacetylene, terahertz-range ET transfer rates are predicted.

  16. Probing the Mechanism of Electron Capture and Electron Transfer Dissociation Using Tags with Variable Electron Affinity

    Sohn, Chang Ho; Chung, Cheol K.; Yin, Sheng; Ramachandran, Prasanna; Loo, Joseph A; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of doubly protonated electron affinity (EA)-tuned peptides were studied to further illuminate the mechanism of these processes. The model peptide FQpSEEQQQTEDELQDK, containing a phosphoserine residue, was converted to EA-tuned peptides via β-elimination and Michael addition of various thiol compounds. These include propanyl, benzyl, 4-cyanobenzyl, perfluorobenzyl, 3,5-dicyanobenzyl, 3-nitrobenzyl, and 3,5-dinitrobenz...

  17. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    NONE

    1993-03-01

    This project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic some of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. This research project is leading to a better understanding of the energy conserving steps of photosynthesis via the study of synthetic model systems which abstract features of the natural photosynthetic apparatus. The knowledge gained from these studies will aid in the design of artificial photosynthetic reaction centers which employ the basic chemistry and physics of photosynthesis to help meet mankind`s energy needs. The approach to artificial photosynthesis employed in this project is to use synthetic pigments, electron donors, and electron acceptors similar to those found in biological reaction centers, but to replace the protein component with covalent bonds. These chemical linkages determine the electronic coupling between the various moieties by controlling separation, relative orientation, and overlap of electronic orbitals. The model systems are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited single state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they mimic carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  18. Microbial extracellular electron transfer and its relevance to iron corrosion

    Kato, Souichiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a microbial metabolism that enables efficient electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials. Microorganisms harbouring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, including bioleaching and bioelectrochemical systems. On the other hand, recent research revealed that microbial EET potentially induces corrosion of iron structures. It has been well known that corr...

  19. 14 CFR 1274.931 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    2010-01-01

    ... cooperative agreement will be made by the Government by electronic funds transfer through the Treasury Fedline... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.931...

  20. Inelastic electron scattering at low momentum transfer

    Recent advances of high energy resolution (ΔE approx. 30 keV FWHM) inelastic electron scattering at low momentum transfer (q -1) using selected experimental data from the Darmstadt electron linear accelerator are discussed. Strong emphasis is given to a comparison of the data with theoretical nuclear model predictions. Of the low multipolarity electric transitions investigated, as examples only E1 transitions to unnatural parity states in 11B and E2 transitions of the very fragmented isoscalar quadrupole giant resonance in 208Pb are considered. In 11B the role of the Os hole in the configuration of the 1/2+, 3/2+ and 5/2+ states is quantitatively determined via an interference mechanism in the transition probability. By comparison of the high resolution data with RPA calculations the E2 EWSR in 208Pb is found to be much less exhausted than anticipated from previous medium energy resolution (e,e) and hadron scattering experiments. In the case of M1 transitions it is shown that the simplest idealized independent particle shell-model prediction breaks down badly. In 28Si, ground-state correlations influence largely the detected M1 strength and such ground-state correlations are also responsible for the occurence of a strong M1 transition to a state at Ex = 10.319 MeV in 40Ca. In 90Zr only about 10% of the theoretically expected M1 strength is seen in (e,e) and in 140Ce and 208Pb none (detection limit 1-2 μ2K). In the case of 208Pb high resolution spectra exist now up to an excitation energy of Ex = approx. 12MeV. The continuous decrease of the M1 strength with mass number is corroborated by the behaviour of strong but very fragmented M2 transitions which are detected in 28Si, 90Zr, 140Ce and 208Pb concentrated at an excitation energy E x approx. 44A-1/3MeV. In 90Zr, the distribution of spacings and widths of the many Jπ = 2 states are consistent with a Wigner and Porter-Thomas distribution, respectively. (orig.) 891 KBE/orig. 892 ARA

  1. Electron Transfer Pathways in Cholesterol Synthesis.

    Porter, Todd D

    2015-10-01

    Cholesterol synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum requires electron input at multiple steps and utilizes both NADH and NADPH as the electron source. Four enzymes catalyzing five steps in the pathway require electron input: squalene monooxygenase, lanosterol demethylase, sterol 4α-methyl oxidase, and sterol C5-desaturase. The electron-donor proteins for these enzymes include cytochrome P450 reductase and the cytochrome b5 pathway. Here I review the evidence for electron donor protein requirements with these enzymes, the evidence for additional electron donor pathways, and the effect of deletion of these redox enzymes on cholesterol and lipid metabolism. PMID:26344922

  2. Respiratory electron transfer in Escherichia coli : components, energetics and regulation

    Hellingwerf, K.J.; Teixeira De Mattos, M.J.; Bekker, M.

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory chain that is housed in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, generally transfers electrons from NADH to oxygen; in the absence of oxygen it can use several alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate. Transfer of electrons through this chain is usually coupled to the translocation of protons across the membrane. The resulting gradient of protons is then used for the generation of ATP by the F0F1-ATPase, and for other free energy requiring processes such as solu...

  3. Ultrafast Charge Transfer Visualized by Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    Mančal T.; Milota F.; Hauer J; Christensson N.; Bixner O.; Lukeš V.; Kauffmann H. F.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) is used to investigate ultrafast excited-state dynamics in a lutetium bisphthalocyanine dimer. Following optical excitation, a chain of electron and hole transfer steps gives rise to characteristic cross-peak dynamics in the electronic 2D spectra. The combination of density matrix propagation and quantum chemical calculations results in a molecular view of the charge transfer dynamics and highlights the role of the counter-ion in providing an en...

  4. Photoinduced electron transfers with carbon dots

    Wang, Xin; Cao, Li; Lu, Fushen; Meziani, Mohammed J.; Li, Heting; Qi, Gang; Zhou, Bing; Harruff, Barbara A.; Kermarrec, Fabien; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2009-01-01

    The photoluminescence in carbon dots (surface-passivated small carbon nanoparticles) could be quenched efficiently by electron acceptor or donor molecules in solution, namely that photo-excited carbon dots are both excellent electron donors and excellent electron acceptors, thus offering new opportunities for their potential uses in light energy conversion and related applications.

  5. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Mitina, E. A. [Photochemistry Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, 7a, Novatorov ul., Moscow (Russian Federation); Odinokov, A. V. [Photochemistry Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, 7a, Novatorov ul., Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” 31, Kashirskoye shosse, Moscow (Russian Federation); Titov, S. V. [Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry, 3-1/12, Building 6, Obuha pereulok, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ{sub 0}=ℏω{sub 0}/k{sub B}T where ω{sub 0} is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ{sub 0} < 1 − 3) and for low (ξ{sub 0}≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T→ 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the

  6. Electron transfer and decay processes of highly charged iodine ions

    In the present experimental work we have investigated multi-electron transfer processes in Iq+ (q=10, 15, 20 and 25) + Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe collisions at 1.5q keV energy. The branching ratios between Auger and radiative decay channels have been measured in decay processes of multiply excited states formed by multi-electron transfer collisions. It has been shown that, in all the multi-electron transfer processes investigated, the Auger decays are far dominant over the radiative decay processes and the branching ratios are clearly characterized by the average principal quantum number of the initial excited states of projectile ions. We could express the branching ratios in high Rydberg states formed in multi-electron transfer processes by using the decay probability of one Auger electron emission. (author)

  7. Ultrafast Charge Transfer Visualized by Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    Mančal T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES is used to investigate ultrafast excited-state dynamics in a lutetium bisphthalocyanine dimer. Following optical excitation, a chain of electron and hole transfer steps gives rise to characteristic cross-peak dynamics in the electronic 2D spectra. The combination of density matrix propagation and quantum chemical calculations results in a molecular view of the charge transfer dynamics and highlights the role of the counter-ion in providing an energetic perturbation which promotes charge transfer across the complex.

  8. Electronic and vibronic properties of a discotic liquid-crystal and its charge transfer complex

    Discotic liquid crystalline (DLC) charge transfer (CT) complexes combine visible light absorption and rapid charge transfer characteristics, being favorable properties for photovoltaic (PV) applications. We present a detailed study of the electronic and vibrational properties of the prototypic 1:1 mixture of discotic 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexakishexyloxytriphenylene (HAT6) and 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone (TNF). It is shown that intermolecular charge transfer occurs in the ground state of the complex: a charge delocalization of about 10−2 electron from the HAT6 core to TNF is deduced from both Raman and our previous NMR measurements [L. A. Haverkate, M. Zbiri, M. R. Johnson, B. Deme, H. J. M. de Groot, F. Lefeber, A. Kotlewski, S. J. Picken, F. M. Mulder, and G. J. Kearley, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13098 (2012)], implying the presence of permanent dipoles at the donor-acceptor interface. A combined analysis of density functional theory calculations, resonant Raman and UV-VIS absorption measurements indicate that fast relaxation occurs in the UV region due to intramolecular vibronic coupling of HAT6 quinoidal modes with lower lying electronic states. Relatively slower relaxation in the visible region the excited CT-band of the complex is also indicated, which likely involves motions of the TNF nitro groups. The fast quinoidal relaxation process in the hot UV band of HAT6 relates to pseudo-Jahn-Teller interactions in a single benzene unit, suggesting that the underlying vibronic coupling mechanism can be generic for polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Both the presence of ground state CT dipoles and relatively slow relaxation processes in the excited CT band can be relevant concerning the design of DLC based organic PV systems

  9. 76 FR 29901 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    2011-05-23

    ... Board anticipates that final rules on remittance transfers will be issued by the Bureau. \\26\\ 75 FR... recipient of the funds. For instance, a consumer may add his daughter, who is studying abroad, as an...'' made by foreign-born residents in the United States to households abroad totaled $37.6 billion in...

  10. Electron-Transfer Acceleration Investigated by Time Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy

    Vlček Jr., Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, M.; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2015), s. 868-876. ISSN 0001-4842 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electron transfer * infrared spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 22.323, year: 2014

  11. Theory of interrelated electron and proton transfer processes

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    A simple theory of elementary act of interrelated reactions of electron and proton transfer is developed. Mechanisms of synchronous and multistage transfer and coherent transitions via a dynamically populated intermediate state are discussed. Formulas for rate constants of adiabatic and nonadiaba...

  12. 77 FR 6310 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    2012-02-07

    ... numbers of transactions as being outside the normal course of business. Nor did they suggest other means... the first transaction in a series of preauthorized remittance transfers the same as all other... electronic transfers of funds sent by consumers in the United States to recipients in other countries....

  13. Analysis of transmission efficiency of SSRF electron beam transfer lines

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the main factors which influence transmission efficiency of the SSRF electron beam transfer lines are described, including physical requirements for magnet system, vacuum system, beam diagnostic system,trajectory correction system, etc. The dynamic simulation calculation and transmission efficiency analysis of the SSRF electron beam transfer lines are presented, and the studies show that the design purpose of efficient beam transmission and injection will be achieved.

  14. A role for microbial palladium nanoparticles in extracellular electron transfer.

    Wu, X; Zhao, F; Rahunen, N; Varcoe, JR; Avignone-Rossa, C.; Thumser, AE; Slade, RC

    2011-01-01

    Herein we have demonstrated a DET mechanism used by D. desulfuricans; where the periplasmic cytochromes and hydrogenases play an important role, and Pd nanoparticles bound to the microbes may participate in the electron transfer process. The present work is of importance not only for the fundamental studies of electron transfer processes in microbial physiology and ecology, but also for increased understanding and improvement of the performance of bioelectrochemical techniques e.g. precious m...

  15. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions with Photometric Bases Reveal Free Energy Relationships for Proton Transfer.

    Eisenhart, Thomas T; Howland, William C; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2016-08-18

    The proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) oxidation of p-aminophenol in acetonitrile was initiated via stopped-flow rapid-mixing and spectroscopically monitored. For oxidation by ferrocenium in the presence of 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline proton acceptors, both the electron transfer and proton transfer components could be optically monitored in the visible region; the decay of the ferrocenium absorbance is readily monitored (λmax = 620 nm), and the absorbance of the 2,4-substituted 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives (λmax = 370-392 nm) red-shifts substantially (ca. 70 nm) upon protonation. Spectral analysis revealed the reaction proceeds via a stepwise electron transfer-proton transfer process, and modeling of the kinetics traces monitoring the ferrocenium and quinolinium signals provided rate constants for elementary proton and electron transfer steps. As the pKa values of the conjugate acids of the 2,4-R-7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives employed were readily tuned by varying the substituents at the 2- and 4-positions of the quinoline backbone, the driving force for proton transfer was systematically varied. Proton transfer rate constants (kPT,2 = (1.5-7.5) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), kPT,4 = (0.55-3.0) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) were found to correlate with the pKa of the conjugate acid of the proton acceptor, in agreement with anticipated free energy relationships for proton transfer processes in PCET reactions. PMID:27500804

  16. Intramolecular photoinduced electron-transfer in azobenzene-perylene diimide

    This paper studies the intramolecular photoinduced electron-transfer (PET) of covalent bonded azobenzene-perylene diimide (AZO-PDI) in solvents by using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy together with ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopic techniques. Fast fluorescence quenching is observed when AZO-PDI is excited at characteristic wavelengths of AZO and perylene moieties. Reductive electron-transfer with transfer rate faster than 1011 s−1 is found. This PET process is also consolidated by femtosecond transient absorption spectra

  17. Mathematics and electronics - the conceptual transfer problem

    Waks, S.

    1988-07-01

    The article deals with the gap between the technological-school student's mastery of pure mathematical principles and his/her competence in their implementation in electronics and suggests a means for narrowing this, using a case study. A cooperative effort by mathematics and electronics teachers, involving coordination of content, teaching strategies and timing, was implemented on two groups (treatment and control). The treatment group achieved significantly higher average scores in tests in those questions where the mathematical reinforcement provided in the treatment process could be used - and this in spite of the group's weaker standing in the electronics course. Moreover, it was establised that treatment students adopted a more analytical approach in their solution strategies, while control students tended to rely more on recall and 'ready-made' formulae. The main conclusion of our case study is that mastery of mathematical theory and principles is a prerequisite to efficient tackling of technological problems, but is not always enough. Cooperation between the maths and electronics teachers contributes to improvement of the teaching-learning process in a technological discipline.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Transient Moisture Transfer into an Electronic Enclosure

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    inside the enclosures to be able to protect the electronic systems.In this work, moisture transfer into a typical electronic enclosure is numerically studied using CFD. In order to reduce theCPU-time and make a way for subsequent factorial design analysis, a simplifying modification is applied in which...

  19. Electron transfer rates and equilibrium within cytochrome c oxidase

    Farver, O; Einarsdóttir, O; Pecht, I

    2000-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the CuA center and heme a in bovine cytochrome c oxidase was investigated by pulse radiolysis. CuA, the initial electron acceptor, was reduced by 1-methyl nicotinamide radicals in a diffusion-controlled reaction, as monitored by absorption changes at...

  20. Photoinduced electron transfer in model systems of photosynthesis.

    Hofstra, U.

    1988-01-01

    This Thesis describes Investigations on photoinduced electron transfer (ET) for several compounds, serving as model systems of the natural photosynthesis. In addition, the properties of the systems, e.g. the conformation in solution and the electronic properties of the photoexcited states are treate

  1. A tetrastable naphthalenediimide: anion induced charge transfer, single and double electron transfer for combinational logic gates.

    Ajayakumar, M R; Hundal, Geeta; Mukhopadhyay, Pritam

    2013-09-11

    Herein we demonstrate the formation of the first tetrastable naphthalenediimide (NDI, 1a) molecule having multiple distinctly readable outputs. Differential response of 1a to fluoride anions induces intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), single/double electron transfer (SET/DET) leading to a set of combinational logic gates for the first time with a NDI moiety. PMID:23752683

  2. Lewis Acid Coupled Electron Transfer of Metal-Oxygen Intermediates.

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-12-01

    Redox-inactive metal ions and Brønsted acids that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the redox reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates, such as metal-oxo and metal-peroxo complexes. The mechanisms of the oxidative CH bond cleavage of toluene derivatives, sulfoxidation of thioanisole derivatives, and epoxidation of styrene derivatives by mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complexes in the presence of triflic acid (HOTf) and Sc(OTf)3 have been unified as rate-determining electron transfer coupled with binding of Lewis acids (HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 ) by iron(III)-oxo complexes. All logarithms of the observed second-order rate constants of Lewis acid-promoted oxidative CH bond cleavage, sulfoxidation, and epoxidation reactions of iron(IV)-oxo complexes exhibit remarkably unified correlations with the driving forces of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and metal ion-coupled electron transfer (MCET) in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer when the differences in the formation constants of precursor complexes were taken into account. The binding of HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 to the metal-oxo moiety has been confirmed for Mn(IV) -oxo complexes. The enhancement of the electron-transfer reactivity of metal-oxo complexes by binding of Lewis acids increases with increasing the Lewis acidity of redox-inactive metal ions. Metal ions can also bind to mononuclear nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complexes, resulting in acceleration of the electron-transfer reduction but deceleration of the electron-transfer oxidation. Such a control on the reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates by binding of Lewis acids provides valuable insight into the role of Ca(2+) in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II. PMID:26404482

  3. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation atomic collisions

    Basic atomic-collision processes at intermediate and high energies are being studied theoretically at Penn State by Alston and Winter. In the high velocity regime, single-electron capture is treated using a high order multiple-scattering approach; extensive comparison with experiment and analysis of mechanisms have been made. Fitting the calculated amplitude with a simple analytic form, the asymptotic velocity dependence of the cross section is obtained. The effect on the capture amplitude of altering the inner part of the internuclear potential has also been explored. In the intermediate velocity regime, earlier work on collisions between protons and hydrogenic-ion targets using a coupled-state approach is being extended to the two-electron helium target. 29 refs

  4. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    such couplings provide important insight into the strength of interaction between photo-active pigments in protein-pigment complexes. Recently, attention has been payed to how the environment modifies or even controls the electronic couplings. To enable such theoretical predictions, a fully polarizable...... higher-order multipole moments. We use this extended model to systematically examine three different ways of obtaining EET couplings in a heterogeneous medium ranging from use of the exact transition density to a point-dipole approximation. Several interesting observations are made including that...... explicit use of transition densities in the calculation of the electronic couplings - also when including the explicit environment contribution - can be replaced by a much simpler transition point charge description without comprising the quality of the model predictions....

  5. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions: Progress report

    The fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom collisions are being studied at Penn State by Winter. (The related work of Alston, who recently came to Penn State, is not described here since he is not at present funded by DOE.) These collision processes are treated in the context of simple one- or two-electron systems in order to provide unambiguous results and reveal more clearly the collisional mechanisms. Three coupled-state calculations are being carried out over the present three-year period and are discussed here: a Sturmian-pseudostate study of electron transfer in collisions between protons and the hydrogenic ions He+, Li2+, Be3+, ...; a triple-center, atomic-state study of ionization in collisions between α particles and H(ls) atoms and between protons and He+(ls) ions; and a coupled-state study of electron transfer and excitation in collisions between protons and neutral He atoms

  6. Numerical modeling of fast electron energy transfer

    In this paper methods of calculating energy transport by fast electrons that are currently used in the ''Diana'' program are described; this program is intended to address issues in laser thermonuclear fusion. A method is proposed for solving a kinetic equation which has the following properties: conservativeness, the absence of constraints on the grid spacing relation, monitonicity, and second order approximation. The applicability of a ''front-back'' approximation is analyzed

  7. Noise-assisted quantum electron transfer in photosynthetic complexes

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Berman, Gennady P.; Martínez, José Manuel Sánchez; Sayre, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) between primary electron donors and acceptors is modeled in the photosystem II reaction center (RC). Our model includes (i) two discrete energy levels associated with donor and acceptor, interacting through a dipole-type matrix element and (ii) two continuum manifolds of electron energy levels ("sinks"), which interact directly with the donor and acceptor. Namely, two discrete energy levels of the donor and acceptor are embedded in their independent sinks through the co...

  8. Computational Approach to Electron Charge Transfer Reactions

    Jónsson, Elvar Örn

    The step from ab initio atomic and molecular properties to thermodynamic - or macroscopic - properties requires the combination of several theoretical tools. This dissertation presents constant temperature molecular dynamics with bond length constraints, a hybrid quantum mechanics...... show general (or expected) properties. Properties such as in the physical and (semi-)chemical interface between classical and quantum systems and the effects of molecular bond length constraints on the temperature during simulations. As a second step the methodology is applied to the symmetric and...... asymmetric charge transfer reactions between several first-row transition metals in water. The results are compared to experiments and rationalised with classical analytic expressions. Shortcomings of the methods are accounted for with clear steps towards improved accuracy. Later the analysis is extended to...

  9. Electron transfer through rigid organic molecular wires enhanced by electronic and electron-vibration coupling

    Sukegawa, Junpei; Schubert, Christina; Zhu, Xiaozhang; Tsuji, Hayato; Guldi, Dirk M.; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2014-10-01

    Electron transfer (ET) is a fundamental process in a wide range of biological systems, photovoltaics and molecular electronics. Therefore to understand the relationship between molecular structure and ET properties is of prime importance. For this purpose, photoinduced ET has been studied extensively using donor-bridge-acceptor molecules, in which π-conjugated molecular wires are employed as bridges. Here, we demonstrate that carbon-bridged oligo-p-phenylenevinylene (COPV), which is both rigid and flat, shows an 840-fold increase in the ET rate compared with the equivalent flexible molecular bridges. A 120-fold rate enhancement is explained in terms of enhanced electronic coupling between the electron donor and the electron acceptor because of effective conjugation through the COPVs. The remainder of the rate enhancement is explained by inelastic electron tunnelling through COPV caused by electron-vibration coupling, unprecedented for organic molecular wires in solution at room temperature. This type of nonlinear effect demonstrates the versatility and potential practical utility of COPVs in molecular device applications.

  10. Electron transfer from nucleobase electron adducts to 5-bromouracil: a radiation chemical study

    Electron transfer to 5-bromouracil from their nucleobase electron adducts and their protonated forms has been studied by product analysis. When an electron is transferred to 5-bromouracil, the ensuing 5-bromouracil radical anion rapidly loses a bromide ion. The uracilyl radical thus formed reacts with added t-butanol, yielding uracil. From the uracil yields measured as a function of (N)/(5-BrU) after γ-radiolysis of Ar-saturated solutions it is concluded that the hetero atom protonated forms transfer electron quantitatively to 5-bromouracil. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig

  11. Plugging in or Going Wireless: Strategies for Interspecies Electron Transfer

    Pravin Malla Shrestha

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Interspecies exchange of electrons enables a diversity of microbial communities to gain energy from reactions that no one microbe can catalyze. The first recognized strategies for interspecies electron transfer were those that relied on chemical intermediates that are recycled through oxidized and reduced forms. Well-studied examples are interspecies H2 transfer and the cycling of sulfur intermediates in anaerobic photosynthetic communities. Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET in which two species establish electrical contacts is an alternative. Electrical contacts documented to date include electrically conductive pili, as well as conductive iron minerals and conductive carbon moieties such as activated carbon and biochar. It seems likely that there are additional alternative strategies for interspecies electrical connections that have yet to be discovered. Interspecies electron transfer is central to the functioning of methane-producing microbial communities. The importance of interspecies H2 transfer in many methanogenic communities is clear, but under some circumstances DIET predominates. It is expected that further mechanistic studies and broadening investigations to a wider range of environments will help elucidate the factors that favor specific forms of interspecies electron exchange under different environmental conditions.

  12. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    Fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom and ion-ion collisions are studied. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-ion core can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. At intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He+ collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), many electronic states are strongly coupled during the collision, a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. At higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies) the coupling is weaker with, however, many more states being coupled together, so that high-order perturbation theory is essential

  13. Optimization of Plasmon Decay Through Scattering and Hot Electron Transfer

    DeJarnette, Drew

    Light incident on metal nanoparticles induce localized surface oscillations of conductive electrons, called plasmons, which is a means to control and manipulate light. Excited plasmons decay as either thermal energy as absorbed phonons or electromagnetic energy as scattered photons. An additional decay pathway for plasmons can exist for gold nanoparticles situated on graphene. Excited plasmons can decay directly to the graphene as through hot electron transfer. This dissertation begins by computational analysis of plasmon resonance energy and bandwidth as a function of particle size, shape, and dielectric environment in addition to diffractive coupled in lattices creating a Fano resonance. With this knowledge, plasmon resonance was probed with incident electrons using electron energy loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope. Nanoparticles were fabricated using electron beam lithography on 50 nanometer thick silicon nitride with some particles fabricated with a graphene layer between the silicon nitride and metal structure. Plasmon resonance was compared between ellipses on and off graphene to characterize hot electron transfer as a means of plasmon decay. It was observed that the presence of graphene caused plasmon energy to decrease by as much as 9.8% and bandwidth to increase by 25%. Assuming the increased bandwidth was solely from electron transfer as an additional plasmon decay route, a 20% efficiency of plasmon decay to graphene was calculated for the particular ellipses analyzed.

  14. Distance dependence of intramolecular electron transfer through rigid hydrocarbon spacers

    The effects of energy, distance and molecular structure on rates of electron transfer between molecules are the subjects of continuing investigations in the authors laboratory. The use of rigid molecular spacers between electron donor and acceptor groups facilitates study of the above questions, and is a promising method to obtain energy storage with directed charge separation. Here they present recent results focusing principally on the effects of distance through rigid hydrocarbon spacers. Through-bond interaction is the dominant source of the electronic coupling which enables electron transfer to occur in a series of molecules of the type D-S-A. Pulse radiolysis measurements used molecules D (donor) = biphenyl and A (acceptor) = naphthalene attached to a series of spacer molecules, S, having 3,4,6,7 or 10 saturated hydrocarbon bonds between the D and A groups. The spacer groups were 1,3-cyclohexane (three bonds), 1,4-cyclohexane (four bonds), 2,7-decalin (six bonds), 2,6-decalin (seven bonds) and 3,16-androstance (ten bonds). They attached electrons to these molecules using Argonne's picosecond Linac and measured electron transfer rates (ET) from 3.5 x 109s-1 across three bonds to 1.5 x 106s-1 across ten bonds. The clearest understanding of the rates is obtained by comparing the electronic-coupling interactions. The electronic interactions decrease regularly with increasing number of bonds, but do not correlate very well with either edge-to-edge or center-to-center distance

  15. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Blattmann, Christoph O.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer.Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon

  16. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases.

    Bartocci, Alessio; Belpassi, Leonardo; Cappelletti, David; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-05-14

    experiments actually reflect two chemically meaningful contributions, namely, a stabilizing interaction arising from the anisotropy of the charge distribution around the Cl atom in CCl4 and a stereospecific electron transfer that occurs at the intermolecular distances mainly probed by the experiments. Our model calculations suggest that the largest effect is for the vertex geometry of CCl4 while other geometries appear to play a minor to negligible role. PMID:25978888

  17. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases

    Bartocci, Alessio; Cappelletti, David; Pirani, Fernando [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, Perugia 06123 (Italy); Belpassi, Leonardo [Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari del CNR, Perugia 06123 (Italy); Falcinelli, Stefano [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile ed Ambientale, Università degli Studi di Perugia, 06125 Perugia (Italy); Grandinetti, Felice [Dipartimento per la Innovazione nei sistemi Biologici, Agroalimentari e Forestali (DIBAF), Università della Tuscia, 01100 Viterbo (Italy); Tarantelli, Francesco [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, Perugia 06123 (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari del CNR, Perugia 06123 (Italy)

    2015-05-14

    suggested by the analysis of the experiments actually reflect two chemically meaningful contributions, namely, a stabilizing interaction arising from the anisotropy of the charge distribution around the Cl atom in CCl{sub 4} and a stereospecific electron transfer that occurs at the intermolecular distances mainly probed by the experiments. Our model calculations suggest that the largest effect is for the vertex geometry of CCl{sub 4} while other geometries appear to play a minor to negligible role.

  18. Distance-dependent electron transfer in DNA hairpins

    Lewis, F.D.; Wu, T.; Zhang, Y. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The distance dependence of photoinduced electron transfer in duplex DNA was determined for a family of synthetic DNA hairpins in which a stilbene dicarboxamide forms a bridge connecting two oligonucleotide arms. Investigation of the fluorescence and transient absorption spectra of these hairpins established that no photoinduced electron transfer occurs for a hairpin that has six deoxyadenosine-deoxythymidine base pairs. However, the introduction of a single deoxyguanosine-deoxycytidine base pair resulted in distance-dependent fluorescence quenching and the formation of the stilbene anion radical. Kinetic analysis suggests that duplex DNA is somewhat more effective than proteins as a medium for electron transfer but that it does not function as a molecular wire.

  19. Electron transfer statistics and thermal fluctuations in molecular junctions

    Goswami, Himangshu Prabal; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-02-01

    We derive analytical expressions for probability distribution function (PDF) for electron transport in a simple model of quantum junction in presence of thermal fluctuations. Our approach is based on the large deviation theory combined with the generating function method. For large number of electrons transferred, the PDF is found to decay exponentially in the tails with different rates due to applied bias. This asymmetry in the PDF is related to the fluctuation theorem. Statistics of fluctuations are analyzed in terms of the Fano factor. Thermal fluctuations play a quantitative role in determining the statistics of electron transfer; they tend to suppress the average current while enhancing the fluctuations in particle transfer. This gives rise to both bunching and antibunching phenomena as determined by the Fano factor. The thermal fluctuations and shot noise compete with each other and determine the net (effective) statistics of particle transfer. Exact analytical expression is obtained for delay time distribution. The optimal values of the delay time between successive electron transfers can be lowered below the corresponding shot noise values by tuning the thermal effects.

  20. Electron transfer statistics and thermal fluctuations in molecular junctions

    Goswami, Himangshu Prabal; Harbola, Upendra [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-02-28

    We derive analytical expressions for probability distribution function (PDF) for electron transport in a simple model of quantum junction in presence of thermal fluctuations. Our approach is based on the large deviation theory combined with the generating function method. For large number of electrons transferred, the PDF is found to decay exponentially in the tails with different rates due to applied bias. This asymmetry in the PDF is related to the fluctuation theorem. Statistics of fluctuations are analyzed in terms of the Fano factor. Thermal fluctuations play a quantitative role in determining the statistics of electron transfer; they tend to suppress the average current while enhancing the fluctuations in particle transfer. This gives rise to both bunching and antibunching phenomena as determined by the Fano factor. The thermal fluctuations and shot noise compete with each other and determine the net (effective) statistics of particle transfer. Exact analytical expression is obtained for delay time distribution. The optimal values of the delay time between successive electron transfers can be lowered below the corresponding shot noise values by tuning the thermal effects.

  1. Energy of the quasi-free electron in H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}: Probing intermolecular potentials within the local Wigner-Seitz model

    Evans, C. M., E-mail: cherice.evans@qc.cuny.edu; Krynski, Kamil [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Queens College – CUNY, Flushing, New York 11367 (United States); Streeter, Zachary; Findley, G. L., E-mail: findley@ulm.edu [School of Sciences, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, Louisiana 71209 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    We present for the first time the quasi-free electron energy V{sub 0}(ρ) for H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} from gas to liquid densities, on noncritical isotherms and on a near critical isotherm in each fluid. These data illustrate the ability of field enhanced photoemission (FEP) to determine V{sub 0}(ρ) accurately in strongly absorbing fluids (e.g., O{sub 2}) and fluids with extremely low critical temperatures (e.g., H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}). We also show that the isotropic local Wigner-Seitz model for V{sub 0}(ρ) — when coupled with thermodynamic data for the fluid — can yield optimized parameters for intermolecular potentials, as well as zero kinetic energy electron scattering lengths.

  2. High-pressure effects on intramolecular electron transfer compounds

    He Li Ming; Li Hong; Zhang Bao Wen; Li Yi; Yang Guo Qiang

    2002-01-01

    We explore the effect of pressure on the fluorescence spectra of the intramolecular electron transfer compound N-(1-pyrenylmethyl), N-methyl-4-methoxyaniline (Py-Am) and its model version, with poly(methyl methacrylate) blended in, at high pressure up to 7 GPa. The emission properties of Py-Am and pyrene show distinct difference with the increase of pressure. This difference indicates the strength of the charge transfer interaction resulting from the adjusting of the conformation of Py-Am with increase of pressure. The relationship between the electronic state of the molecule and pressure is discussed.

  3. PHOTOINDUCED CHARGE TRANSFER POLYMERIZATION OF STYRENE INITIATED BY ELECTRON ACCEPTOR

    CAO Weixiao; ZHANG Peng; FENG Xinde

    1995-01-01

    Photoinduced charge transfer polymerization of styrene(St) with electron acceptor as initiator was investigated. In case of fumaronitrile (FN) or maleic anhydride (MA) as initiator the polymerization takes place regularly, whereas the tetrachloro-1, 4-benzenequinone (TCQ), 2, 3-dichloro-5, 6-dicyano-1, 4-benzenequinone (DDQ) . or tetracyano ethylene (TCNE) as initiator the polymerization proceeds reluctantly only after the photoaddition reaction. A mechanism was proposed that free radicals would be formed following the charge and proton transfer in the exciplex formed between St and electron acceptors.

  4. Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry of Hemoglobin on Clinical Samples

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Lescuyer, Pierre; Clerici, Lorella; Tsybin, Yury O.; Hartmer, Ralf; Meyer, Markus; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Scherl, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A mass spectrometry-based assay combining the specificity of selected reaction monitoring and the protein ion activation capabilities of electron transfer dissociation was developed and employed for the rapid identification of hemoglobin variants from whole blood without previous proteolytic cleavage. The analysis was performed in a robust ion trap mass spectrometer operating at nominal mass accuracy and resolution. Subtle differences in globin sequences, resulting with mass shifts of about one Da, can be unambiguously identified. These results suggest that mass spectrometry analysis of entire proteins using electron transfer dissociation can be employed on clinical samples in a workflow compatible with diagnostic applications.

  5. Numerical simulation of transient moisture transfer into an electronic enclosure

    Nasirabadi, P. Shojaee; Jabbari, M.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Electronic systems are sometimes exposed to harsh environmental conditions of temperature and humidity. Moisture transfer into electronic enclosures and condensation can cause several problems such as corrosion and alteration in thermal stresses. It is therefore essential to study the local climate inside the enclosures to be able to protect the electronic systems. In this work, moisture transfer into a typical electronic enclosure is numerically studied using CFD. In order to reduce the CPU-time and make a way for subsequent factorial design analysis, a simplifying modification is applied in which the real 3D geometry is approximated by a 2D axial symmetry one. The results for 2D and 3D models were compared in order to calibrate the 2D representation. Furthermore, simulation results were compared with experimental data and good agreement was found.

  6. 12 CFR 205.15 - Electronic fund transfer of government benefits.

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic fund transfer of government benefits... RESERVE SYSTEM ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) § 205.15 Electronic fund transfer of government... consumer for use in initiating an electronic fund transfer of government benefits from an account,...

  7. Ab initio study of long-range electron transfer between biphenyl anion radical and naphthalene

    李象远; 肖顺清; 何福城

    1999-01-01

    After the separation of the donor, the aeceptor, and the σ-type bridge from the π-σ-π system, the geometries of biphenyl, biphenyl anion radical, naphthalene, and naphthalene anion radical are optimized, and then the reorganization energy for the intermolecular electron transfer (ET) at the levels of HF/4-31G and HF/DZP is calculated. The ET matrix elements of the self-exchange reactions of the π-σ-π systems have been calculated by means of both the direct calculation based on the variational principle, and the transition energy between the molecular orbitals at the linear coordinate R=0.5. For the cross reactions, the ET matrix element and the geometry of the transition state are determined by searching the minimum energy splitting △min along the reaction coordinate. In the evaluation of the solvent reorganization energy of the ET in solution, the Marcus’ two-sphere model has been invoked. A few of ET rate constants for the intramolecular ET reactions for the π-σ-π systems, which contain

  8. Electron-Wavepacket Reaction Dynamics in Proton Transfer of Formamide

    Nagashima, Kengo; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-10-01

    We apply the semiclassical Ehrenfest theory, which provides electron wavepacket dynamics coupled to nuclear motion, to a study of water-assisted proton relay in formamide compared with a forced proton transfer in gas phase, both of which are associated with the tautomerization. We start with the enol (imidic acid) form HO-CH═NH and track its proton transfer process to the keto (amide) form O═CH-NH2. Identifying the fact that this is indeed a "proton transfer process" rather than hydrogen-atom migration in terms of radical character on the proton, we show a collective quantum flux of electrons, which flows backward against the proton motion. This backward flux compensates the electrons tightly covering the proton, as represented in the Mulliken charge. The enol form formamide is one of the simplest species in the group O═CR1-NHR2, which is a unit of polypeptide. In the gas phase, the nitrogen atom may have a pyramidal structure as in the ammonium molecule; therefore, the C-N bond may allow low barrier rotation along it. This rotation is strongly prohibited by the formation of the double bond C═N induced by the proton transfer. Not only the dynamical process of proton transfer itself but also the electronic structures left behind are greatly affected by the presence of water molecule(s) and polar solvents. In discussing the relative stability of the formamide after the proton transfer, the following resonance structures are frequently mentioned, O--CH═N+H2 ↔ O═CH-NH2. Here we address the dynamical manifestation of the resonance structures in terms of our dynamical electron theory.

  9. Carboxylate Shifts Steer Interquinone Electron Transfer in Photosynthesis*

    Chernev, Petko; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Dau, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of electron transfer (ET) in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) may inspire novel catalysts for sunlight-driven fuel production. The electron exit pathway of type II RCs comprises two quinone molecules working in series and in between a non-heme iron atom with a carboxyl ligand (bicarbonate in photosystem II (PSII), glutamate in bacterial RCs). For decades, the functional role of the iron has remained enigmatic. We tracked the iron site using microsecond-resolu...

  10. Role of direct microbial electron transfer in corrosion of steels

    Mehanna, Maha; Basséguy, Régine; Délia, Marie-Line; Bergel, Alain

    2009-01-01

    It has recently been discovered that many microbial species have the capacity to connect their metabolism to solid electrodes, directly exchanging electrons with them through membrane-bound redox compounds,nevertheless such a direct electron transfer pathway has been evoked rarely in the domain of microbial corrosion. Here was evidenced for the first time that the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is able to increase the free potential of 304 L stainless steel up to 443 mV in only a few hour...

  11. Combining UV photodissociation with electron transfer for peptide structure analysis

    Shaffer, C. J.; Marek, Aleš; Pepin, R.; Slováková, K.; Tureček, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2015), s. 470-475. ISSN 1076-5174 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : electron transfer dissociation * laser photodissociation * peptide ions * cation radical * chromophores * isomer distinction Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.379, year: 2014

  12. Intramolecular electron transfer in single-site-mutated azurins

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; Pascher, T; Karlsson, B G; Nordling, M; Lundberg, L G; Vänngård, T; Pecht, I

    1993-01-01

    apparently only marginally involved in electron transfer in wild-type azurin. Pathway calculations also suggest that a longer, through-backbone path is more efficient than the shorter one involving Trp48. The former pathway yields an exponential decay factor, beta, of 6.6 nm-1. Another mutation, raising the...

  13. Electron transfer flavoprotein deficiency: Functional and molecular aspects

    Schiff, M; Froissart, R; Olsen, Rikke Katrine Jentoft; Acquaviva, C; Vianey-Saban, C

    2006-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is a recessively inherited metabolic disorder that can be due to a deficiency of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or its dehydrogenase (ETF-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). ETF is a mitochondrial matrix protein consisting of alpha- (30kDa) and beta...... mutations in the ETFB gene. Nine novel disease-causing ETF mutations are reported....

  14. 31 CFR 208.3 - Payment by electronic funds transfer.

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment by electronic funds transfer. 208.3 Section 208.3 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE MANAGEMENT OF FEDERAL...

  15. CORRELATING ELECTRONIC AND VIBRATIONAL MOTIONS IN CHARGE TRANSFER SYSTEMS

    Khalil, Munira

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this research program was to measure coupled electronic and nuclear motions during photoinduced charge transfer processes in transition metal complexes by developing and using novel femtosecond spectroscopies. The scientific highlights and the resulting scientific publications from the DOE supported work are outlined in the technical report.

  16. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule’s permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory

  17. Nanoscale and single-molecule interfacial electron transfer

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik;

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical science and technology in the 21st century have reached high levels of sophistication. A fundamental quantum mechanical theoretical frame for interfacial electrochemical electron transfer (ET) was introduced by Revaz Dogonadze. This frame has remained for four decades as a basis f...

  18. Photoinduced Reductive Electron Transfer in LNA:DNA Hybrids

    Wenge, Ulrike; Wengel, Jesper; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2012-01-01

    Lock it, but not too much: LNA units (locked or bridging nucleic acids) in LNA:DNA hybrids lead to a negative effect on electron transfer (ET), but they also force the nucleic acid structure in the A-type double helix, which allows a better base stacking than the normal B-type and thus positively...

  19. 76 FR 81019 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    2011-12-27

    ... this rule. See 76 FR 43569 (July 21, 2011). \\4\\ Public Law 111-203, section 1002(14) (defining... response to a notice published at 76 FR 75825 (Dec. 5, 2011) concerning its efforts to identify priorities... that provide electronic fund transfer services jointly may contract among themselves to comply with...

  20. Electron transfer reactions involving porphyrins and chlorophyll a

    Electron transfer reactions involving porphyrins (P) and quinones (Q) have been studied by pulse radiolysis. The porphyrins used were tetraphenylporphyrin (H2TPP), its tetracarboxy derivative (H2TCPP), the sodium and zinc compounds (Na2TPP and ZnTPP), and chlorophyll a (Chl a). These compounds were found to be rapidly reduced by electron transfer from (CH3)2CO-. Reduction by (CH3)2COH was rapid in aqueous solutions but relatively slow in i-PrOH solutions. Transient spectra of the anion radicals were determined and, in the case of H2TCPP-., a pK = 9.7 was derived for its protonation. Electron-transfer reactions from the anion radical of H2TCPP to benzoquinone, duroquinone, 9,10-anthraquinone 2-sulfonate, and methylviologen occur in aqueous solutions with rate constants approx. 107-109 M-1 s-1 which depend on the pH and the quinone reduction potential. Reactions of Na2TPP-., ZnTPP-., and Chl a-. with anthraquinone in basic i-PrOH solutions occur with rate constants approx. 109 M-1 s-1. The spectral changes associated with these electron-transfer reactions as observed over a period of approx. 1 ms indicated, in some cases, the formation of an intermediate complex [P...Q-.]. 8 figures, 2 tables

  1. Electronic excitation energy transfer between quasi-zero-dimensional systems

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    Ostrava : Tanger, 2013. ISBN 978-80-87294-44-4. [International Conference NANOCON 2013 /5./. Brno (CZ), 16.10.2013-18.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12236; GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : quantum dots * energy transfer * electron-phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  2. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  3. Electron transfer activity of a de novo designed copper center in a three-helix bundle fold.

    Plegaria, Jefferson S; Herrero, Christian; Quaranta, Annamaria; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we characterized the intermolecular electron transfer (ET) properties of a de novo designed metallopeptide using laser-flash photolysis. α3D-CH3 is three helix bundle peptide that was designed to contain a copper ET site that is found in the β-barrel fold of native cupredoxins. The ET activity of Cuα3D-CH3 was determined using five different photosensitizers. By exhibiting a complete depletion of the photo-oxidant and the successive formation of a Cu(II) species at 400nm, the transient and generated spectra demonstrated an ET transfer reaction between the photo-oxidant and Cu(I)α3D-CH3. This observation illustrated our success in integrating an ET center within a de novo designed scaffold. From the kinetic traces at 400nm, first-order and bimolecular rate constants of 10(5)s(-1) and 10(8)M(-1)s(-1) were derived. Moreover, a Marcus equation analysis on the rate versus driving force study produced a reorganization energy of 1.1eV, demonstrating that the helical fold of α3D requires further structural optimization to efficiently perform ET. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics - the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26427552

  4. Photoinduced electron transfer of chlorophyll in lipid bilayer system

    D K Lee; K W Seo; Y S Kang

    2002-12-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer from chlorophyll- through the interface of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) headgroup of the lipid bilayers was studied with electron magnetic resonance (EMR). The photoproduced radicals were identified with electron spin resonance (ESR) and radical yields of chlorophyll- were determined by double integration ESR spectra. The formation of vesicles was identified by changes in measured max values from diethyl ether solutions to vesicles solutions indirectly, and observed directly with SEM and TEM images. The efficiency of photosynthesis in model system was determined by measuring the amount of chlorophyll-a radical yields which were obtained from integration of ESR spectra.

  5. Toward transferable interatomic van der Waals interactions without electrons: The role of multipole electrostatics and many-body dispersion

    Bereau, Tristan; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2014-01-01

    We estimate polarizabilities of atoms in molecules without electron density, using a Voronoi tesselation approach instead of conventional density partitioning schemes. The resulting atomic dispersion coefficients are calculated, as well as many-body dispersion effects on intermolecular potential energies. We also estimate contributions from multipole electrostatics and compare them to dispersion. We assess the performance of the resulting intermolecular interaction model from dispersion and e...

  6. Protein dynamics modulated electron transfer kinetics in early stage photosynthesis.

    Kundu, Prasanta; Dua, Arti

    2013-01-28

    A recent experiment has probed the electron transfer kinetics in the early stage of photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides for the reaction center of wild type and different mutants [Science 316, 747 (2007)]. By monitoring the changes in the transient absorption of the donor-acceptor pair at 280 and 930 nm, both of which show non-exponential temporal decay, the experiment has provided a strong evidence that the initial electron transfer kinetics is modulated by the dynamics of protein backbone. In this work, we present a model where the electron transfer kinetics of the donor-acceptor pair is described along the reaction coordinate associated with the distance fluctuations in a protein backbone. The stochastic evolution of the reaction coordinate is described in terms of a non-Markovian generalized Langevin equation with a memory kernel and Gaussian colored noise, both of which are completely described in terms of the microscopics of the protein normal modes. This model provides excellent fits to the transient absorption signals at 280 and 930 nm associated with protein distance fluctuations and protein dynamics modulated electron transfer reaction, respectively. In contrast to previous models, the present work explains the microscopic origins of the non-exponential decay of the transient absorption curve at 280 nm in terms of multiple time scales of relaxation of the protein normal modes. Dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway due to protein conformational fluctuations which occur on time scales slower than or comparable to the electron transfer kinetics explains the microscopic origin of the non-exponential nature of the transient absorption decay at 930 nm. The theoretical estimates for the relative driving force for five different mutants are in close agreement with the experimental estimates obtained using electrochemical measurements. PMID:23387626

  7. Ultrafast proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) dynamics in 9-anthranol-aliphatic amine system

    Nibbering Erik T.J.; Dreyer Jens; Verma Sandeep; Ghosh Hirendra N.; Adamczyk Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Femtosecond infrared absorption studies strongly suggest that photoexcited 9-anthranol takes part in an ultrafast electron transfer (ET) reaction in electron-donating triethylamine solvent, but that ultrafast proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) occurs in diethylamine solvent.

  8. Ultrafast proton coupled electron transfer (PCET dynamics in 9-anthranol-aliphatic amine system

    Nibbering Erik T. J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond infrared absorption studies strongly suggest that photoexcited 9-anthranol takes part in an ultrafast electron transfer (ET reaction in electron-donating triethylamine solvent, but that ultrafast proton coupled electron transfer (PCET occurs in diethylamine solvent.

  9. 76 FR 35219 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Payment by Electronic Fund Transfer

    2011-06-16

    ... contract by electronic fund transfer (EFT). The information necessary to make the EFT transaction is... Regulation; Information Collection; Payment by Electronic Fund Transfer AGENCY: Department of Defense (DOD... extension of a previously approved information collection requirement concerning payment by electronic...

  10. Electromicrobiology: Electron Transfer via Biowires in Nature and Practical Applications

    Lovley Derek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most exciting developments in the field of electromicrobiology has been the discovery of electrically conductive pili (e-pili in Geobacter species that transport electrons with a metallic-like mechanism. The e-pili are essential for extracellular electron transport to Fe(III oxides and longrange electron transport through the conductive biofilms that form on the anodes of microbial fuel cells. The e-pili also facilitate direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter and Methanosaeta or Methanosarcina species. Metatranscriptomic studies have demonstrated that Geobacter/Methanosaeta DIET is an important process in anaerobic digesters converting brewery wastes to methane. Increasing e-pili expression through genetic modification of regulatory systems or adaptive evolution yields strains with enhanced rates of extracellular electron transfer. Measurement of the conductivity of individual e-pili has demonstrated that they have conductivities higher than those of a number of synthetic conducting organic polymers. Multiple lines of evidence have demonstrated that aromatic amino acids play an important role in the electron transport along e-pili, suggesting opportunities to tune e-pili conductivity via genetic manipulation of the amino acid composition of e-pili. It is expected that e-pili will be harnessed to improve microbe-electrode processes such as microbial electrosynthesis and for the development of novel biosensors. Also, e-pili show promise as a sustainable ‘green’ replacement for electronic materials that contain toxic components and/or are produced with harsh chemicals.

  11. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions]: Progress report

    The fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom collisions are being studied. These collision processes are treated in the context of simple one- or two-electron systems in order to provide unambiguous results and reveal more clearly the collisional mechanisms. As outlined in the original proposal, three coupled-state calculations are being carried out over the present three-year period: a Sturmian-pseudostate study of ionization in collisions between protons and the hydrogenic ions He+, Li2+, Be3+, ...; a triple-center, atomic-state study of ionization in collisions between α particles and H(ls) atoms and between protons and He+(ls) ions; and an atomic-state study of electron transfer and excitation in collisions between protons and neutral He atoms. 12 refs

  12. New type of dual solid-state thermochromism: modulation of intramolecular charge transfer by intermolecular pi-pi interactions, kinetic trapping of the aci-nitro group, and reversible molecular locking.

    Naumov, Pance; Lee, Sang Cheol; Ishizawa, Nobuo; Jeong, Young Gyu; Chung, Ihn Hee; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2009-10-22

    by intramolecular proton transfer of one amino proton to the nitro group, whereupon an aci-nitro form is thermally populated. Contrary to the numerous examples of solid thermochromic molecules based on either pericyclic reactions or keto-enol tautomerism, this system appears to be the first organic thermochromic family where the thermochromic change appears as an effect of intermolecular pi-pi interactions and thermal intramolecular proton transfer to aromatic nitro group. PMID:19780605

  13. New Type of Dual Solid-State Thermochromism: Modulation of Intramolecular Charge Transfer by Intermolecular π-π Interactions, Kinetic Trapping of the Aci-Nitro Group, and Reversible Molecular Locking

    Naumov, Panče; Lee, Sang Cheol; Ishizawa, Nobuo; Jeong, Young Gyu; Chung, Ihn Hee; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2009-09-01

    intramolecular proton transfer of one amino proton to the nitro group, whereupon an aci-nitro form is thermally populated. Contrary to the numerous examples of solid thermochromic molecules based on either pericyclic reactions or keto-enol tautomerism, this system appears to be the first organic thermochromic family where the thermochromic change appears as an effect of intermolecular π-π interactions and thermal intramolecular proton transfer to aromatic nitro group.

  14. Syntrophic Growth via Quinone-Mediated Interspecies Electron Transfer

    Jessica A Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS. A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Cocultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require

  15. Ab Initio Study of the Electron Transfer in an Ionized Stacked Complex of Guanines

    Cauët, Emilie; Liévin, Jacques

    2009-08-01

    The charge transfer process in an ionized stacking of two consecutive guanines (G5'G3')+ has been studied by means of state-averaged CASSCF/MRCI and RASSCF/RASPT2 calculations. The ground and two first excited states of the radical cation have been characterized, and the topology of the corresponding potential energy surfaces (PESs) has been studied as a function of all intermolecular geometrical parameters. The results demonstrate that the charge transfer process in (G5'G3')+ is governed by the avoiding crossing between the ground and first excited states of the complex. Relative translation motions of both guanines in their molecular planes are shown to lead to the charge migration between G5' and G3'. Five stationary points (three minima and two saddle points) have been characterized along the reaction path describing the passage of the positive charge from G5' to G3'. The global minimum on the PES is found to correspond to the charge configuration G5'+G3'. The existence of an intermediate minimum along the reaction path has been established, characterizing a structure where the positive charge is equally distributed between the two guanines. The calculated energy profile allowed us to determine the height of the potential energy barrier (7.33 kcal/mol) and to evaluate the electronic coupling at a geometry close to the avoiding crossing (3.6 kcal/mol). Test calculations showed that the topology of the ground state PES of the complex GG+ is qualitatively conserved upon optimization of the intramolecular geometrical parameters of the stationary points.

  16. Electron Transfer Mechanisms of DNA Repair by Photolyase

    Zhong, Dongping

    2015-04-01

    Photolyase is a flavin photoenzyme that repairs two DNA base damage products induced by ultraviolet (UV) light: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts. With femtosecond spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, investigators have recently made significant advances in our understanding of UV-damaged DNA repair, and the entire enzymatic dynamics can now be mapped out in real time. For dimer repair, six elementary steps have been characterized, including three electron transfer reactions and two bond-breaking processes, and their reaction times have been determined. A unique electron-tunneling pathway was identified, and the critical residues in modulating the repair function at the active site were determined. The dynamic synergy between the elementary reactions for maintaining high repair efficiency was elucidated, and the biological nature of the flavin active state was uncovered. For 6-4 photoproduct repair, a proton-coupled electron transfer repair mechanism has been revealed. The elucidation of electron transfer mechanisms and two repair photocycles is significant and provides a molecular basis for future practical applications, such as in rational drug design for curing skin cancer.

  17. Efficiency of intramolecular electron transfer from the second excited state of the donor in molecular triads D-A1-A2

    Feskov, S. V.; Ivanov, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    It is found that intramolecular and intermolecular electron transfer from the second singlet excited state of the donor in all molecular dyads studied up to now is accompanied by ultrafast recombination into the first excited state, resulting in a low quantum yield of the thermalized state with separated charges. The ultrafast photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer in donor‒acceptor 1‒acceptor 2 molecular triads is studied to ascertain the possibilities of increasing the quantum yield of ionic state. It is demonstrated that nonthermal (hot) electron transfer from the primary acceptor to the secondary acceptor can, in parallel with relaxation of a polar solvent, efficiently suppress the ultrafast recombination of charges into the first excited state of the donor and increase the yield of the ionic state. It is established that the angle between the directions of reaction coordinates corresponding to the electron transfer from the donor to the primary acceptor and from the primary acceptor to the secondary acceptor play the most important role in describing these processes. It is concluded that the value of this angle is governed by the ratio between the reorganization energies of the three possible electron transfers in the triad and can vary within wide limits. The parametric regions with maximum quantum yield of the thermalized ionic state are revealed. The strong effect the geometry of a studied triad has on charge separation efficiency is observed.

  18. Electron transfer, decoherence, and protein dynamics: insights from atomistic simulations.

    Narth, Christophe; Gillet, Natacha; Cailliez, Fabien; Lévy, Bernard; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2015-04-21

    Electron transfer in biological systems drives the processes of life. From cellular respiration to photosynthesis and enzymatic catalysis, electron transfers (ET) are chemical processes on which essential biological functions rely. Over the last 40 years, scientists have sought understanding of how these essential processes function in biology. One important breakthrough was the discovery that Marcus theory (MT) of electron transfer is applicable to biological systems. Chemists have experimentally collected both the reorganization energies (λ) and the driving forces (ΔG°), two parameters of Marcus theory, for a large variety of ET processes in proteins. At the same time, theoretical chemists have developed computational approaches that rely on molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry calculations to access numerical estimates of λ and ΔG°. Yet another crucial piece in determining the rate of an electron transfer is the electronic coupling between the initial and final electronic wave functions. This is an important prefactor in the nonadiabatic rate expression, since it reflects the probability that an electron tunnels from the electron donor to the acceptor through the intervening medium. The fact that a protein matrix supports electron tunneling much more efficiently than vacuum is now well documented, both experimentally and theoretically. Meanwhile, many chemists have provided examples of the rich physical chemistry that can be induced by protein dynamics. This Account describes our studies of the dynamical effects on electron tunneling. We present our analysis of two examples of natural biological systems through MD simulations and tunneling pathway analyses. Through these examples, we show that protein dynamics sustain efficient tunneling. Second, we introduce two time scales: τcoh and τFC. The former characterizes how fast the electronic coupling varies with nuclear vibrations (which cause dephasing). The latter reflects the time taken by the system

  19. Nile blue can photosensitize DNA damage through electron transfer.

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Ota, Kazuhiro; Hirayama, Junya; Oikawa, Shinji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2014-04-21

    The mechanism of DNA damage photosensitized by Nile blue (NB) was studied using (32)P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments. NB bound to the DNA strand was possibly intercalated through an electrostatic interaction. Photoirradiated NB caused DNA cleavage at guanine residues when the DNA fragments were treated with piperidine. Consecutive guanines, the underlined G in 5'-GG and 5'-GGG, were selectively damaged through photoinduced electron transfer. The fluorescence lifetime of NB was decreased by guanine-containing DNA sequence, supporting this mechanism. Single guanines were also slightly damaged by photoexcited NB, and DNA photodamage by NB was slightly enhanced in D2O. These results suggest that the singlet oxygen mechanism also partly contributes to DNA photodamage by NB. DNA damage photosensitized by NB via electron transfer may be an important mechanism in medicinal applications of photosensitizers, such as photodynamic therapy in low oxygen. PMID:24576317

  20. Promoting direct interspecies electron transfer with activated carbon

    Liu, Fanghua; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin M.;

    2012-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is added to methanogenic digesters to enhance conversion of wastes to methane, but the mechanism(s) for GAC’s stimulatory effect are poorly understood. GAC has high electrical conductivity and thus it was hypothesized that one mechanism for GAC stimulation of...... methanogenesis might be to facilitate direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between bacteria and methanogens. Metabolism was substantially accelerated when GAC was added to co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens grown under conditions previously shown to require DIET. Cells...... were attached to GAC, but did not aggregate as they do when making biological electrical connections between cells. Studies with a series of gene deletion mutants eliminated the possibility that GAC promoted electron exchange via interspecies hydrogen or formate transfer and demonstrated that DIET in...

  1. Large scale oil lease automation and electronic custody transfer

    Typically, oil field production operations have only been automated at fields with long term production profiles and enhanced recovery. The automation generally consists of monitoring and control at the wellhead and centralized facilities. However, Union Pacific Resources Co. (UPRC) has successfully implemented a large scale automation program for rapid-decline primary recovery Austin Chalk wells where purchasers buy and transport oil from each individual wellsite. This project has resulted in two significant benefits. First, operators are using the system to re-engineer their work processes. Second, an inter-company team created a new electronic custody transfer method. This paper will describe: the progression of the company's automation objectives in the area; the field operator's interaction with the system, and the related benefits; the research and development of the new electronic custody transfer method

  2. Electron transfer between quasi-zero-dimensional nanostructures

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    Munich : IEEE, 2010, s. 1-5. ISBN 978-1-4244-7799-9. [International Conference on Transparent Optical Networks /12./. Mnichov (DE), 27.06.2010-01.07.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10007; GA MŠk ME 866 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : electron transfer * quantum dots * electron -phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICTON.2010.5548991

  3. Two-photon electron transfer between quantum dots

    The effective Hamiltonian of a system describing electrons of two quantum dots in a two-frequency electromagnetic field upon Raman resonance of the field with a pair of the electronic levels of different dots is obtained by the method of equivalent transformation. The states of the continuous spectrum (conduction bands) are correctly taken into account. The role of the terms describing the dynamic Stark effect in a two-body system is analysed. A new mechanism of particle transfer between quantum wells in a non-resonance electromagnetic field is proposed, which is free from disadvantages of previous models. (fourth seminar to the memory of d.n. klyshko)

  4. The Electron Transfer Reaction between p-Nitrobenzoates and β-N, N-Dimethylaminonaphthalene

    2003-01-01

    A few of p-nitrobenzoates were synthesized, and the electron transfer of them with β-N, N-dimethylaminonaphthalene (DMAN) in methanol solution was studied. Steady-state fluore-scence results showed the cyclodextrin moiety in p-nitrobenzoyl-β-cyclodextrin would block the electron transfer pathway from DMAN compared with other electron acceptors, thus, reduced the electron transfer efficiency.

  5. [Electron transfer, ionization and excitation in atomic collisions

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental atomic-collision processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation. Winter has focussed attention on intermediate and, more recently, higher collision energies -- proton energies of at least about 50 keV -- for which coupled-state approaches are appropriate. Alston has concentrated on perturbative approaches to symmetric ion-ion/atom collisions at high energies and to asymmetric collisions at intermediate to high energies

  6. Heterogeneous electron transfer of pesticides. Current trends and applications

    Sokolová, Romana; Hromadová, Magdaléna; Pospíšil, Lubomír

    Kerala: Transworld Research Network, 2008 - (Colombini, M.; Tassi, L.), s. 43-76 ISBN 978-81-7895-343-4 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400505; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk OC 140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : heterogeneous electron transfer * pesticides * redox reactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  7. Crossed Andreev reflection versus electron transfer in graphene nanoribbons

    Haugen, Håvard; Huertas-Hernando, Daniel; Brataas, Arne; Waintal, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the transport properties of three-terminal graphene devices, where one terminal is superconducting and two are normal metals. The terminals are connected by nanoribbons. Electron transfer (ET) and crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) are identified via the non-local signal between the two normal terminals. Analytical expressions for ET and CAR in symmetric devices are found. We compute ET and CAR numerically for asymmetric devices. ET dominates CAR in symmetric devices, but CAR can...

  8. Electron transfer reactions in chemistry. Theory and experiment

    Marcus, Rudolph A.

    1997-01-01

    Since the late 1940s, the field of electron transfer processes has grown enormously, both in chemistry and biology. The development of the field, experimentally and theoretically, as well as its relation to the study of other kinds of chemical reactions, represents to us an intriguing history, one in which many threads have been brought together. In this lecture, some history, recent trends, and my own involvement in this research are described.

  9. Marcus wins nobel prize in chemistry for electron transfer theory

    Levi, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Rudolf Marcus of Caltech leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry [open quotes]for his contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems.[close quotes] Applications of Marcus' theory include such diverse phenomena as photosynthesis, electrically conducting polymers, chemiluminescence, and corrosion. Historical aspects of his career are given. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Marcus wins nobel prize in chemistry for electron transfer theory

    This article describes the work of Rudolf Marcus of Caltech leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry open-quotes for his contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems.close quotes Applications of Marcus' theory include such diverse phenomena as photosynthesis, electrically conducting polymers, chemiluminescence, and corrosion. Historical aspects of his career are given. 10 refs., 1 fig

  11. Electron Transfer rate between a electrode and a bridged redox

    Cruz, A. V. B.; Mishra, A. K.; Schmickler, W.

    2009-01-01

    We derive an explict bias dependent expression for electron transfer reaction rate from a solvated redox to a electrode through a bridged molecule of arbitrary length. The interaction of the solvated redox with the solvent is modelled as a classical harmonic oscillator bath. The effect of competing process, namely resonance tunneling between redox and bridge and the solvation of the redox is investigated. Plots were produced for the case of 5 atom bridge. Our analysis shows that for certain s...

  12. Electron transfer processs with excited molecules at semiconductor electrodes

    Memming, R.

    In the first part of the paper, energy levels used in solid-state physics, in electrochemistry and in photochemistry are introduced and combined in a l- electron energy concept. This is also applied to excited molecules being adsorbed at semiconductor electrodes. On the basis of this concept, theoretical models concerning electron-transfer processes between molecules in their ground and excited state and semiconductor electrodes are then developed. In the last part of the paper, a number of typical results are presented and discussed. It is shown that the primary step is an electron-transfer reaction between an excited molecule and the semiconductor, whereas energy transfer plays only a minor role, which leads mostly to quenching. Most processes can be interpreted on the basis of the theoretical model mentioned above. Various phenomena, such as quantum yield, supersensitization, quenching, and influence of pH and doping of the semiconductor are discussed in detail. Finally, a brief outlook at the applications in solar-energy conversion systems is given.

  13. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  14. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  15. Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria.

    Wegener, Gunter; Krukenberg, Viola; Riedel, Dietmar; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Boetius, Antje

    2015-10-22

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. In marine sediments, AOM is performed by dual-species consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) inhabiting the methane-sulfate transition zone. The biochemical pathways and biological adaptations enabling this globally relevant process are not fully understood. Here we study the syntrophic interaction in thermophilic AOM (TAOM) between ANME-1 archaea and their consortium partner SRB HotSeep-1 (ref. 6) at 60 °C to test the hypothesis of a direct interspecies exchange of electrons. The activity of TAOM consortia was compared to the first ANME-free culture of an AOM partner bacterium that grows using hydrogen as the sole electron donor. The thermophilic ANME-1 do not produce sufficient hydrogen to sustain the observed growth of the HotSeep-1 partner. Enhancing the growth of the HotSeep-1 partner by hydrogen addition represses methane oxidation and the metabolic activity of ANME-1. Further supporting the hypothesis of direct electron transfer between the partners, we observe that under TAOM conditions, both ANME and the HotSeep-1 bacteria overexpress genes for extracellular cytochrome production and form cell-to-cell connections that resemble the nanowire structures responsible for interspecies electron transfer between syntrophic consortia of Geobacter. HotSeep-1 highly expresses genes for pili production only during consortial growth using methane, and the nanowire-like structures are absent in HotSeep-1 cells isolated with hydrogen. These observations suggest that direct electron transfer is a principal mechanism in TAOM, which may also explain the enigmatic functioning and specificity of other methanotrophic ANME-SRB consortia. PMID:26490622

  16. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom (and ion-ion) collisions. The focus is on intermediate- and higher-energy collisions, corresponding to proton energies of about 25 kilo-electron-volts (keV) or larger. At intermediate energies, where the transition probabilities are not small, many states must be coupled in a large calculation, while at higher energies, perturbative approaches may be used. Several studies have been carried out in the current three-year period; most of these treat systems with only one or two electrons, so that fewer approximations need be made and the basic collisional mechanisms can be more clearly described

  17. Noise-assisted quantum electron transfer in photosynthetic complexes

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Martínez, José Manuel Sánchez; Sayre, Richard T

    2013-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) between primary electron donors and acceptors is modeled in the photosystem II reaction center (RC). Our model includes (i) two discrete energy levels associated with donor and acceptor, interacting through a dipole-type matrix element and (ii) two continuum manifolds of electron energy levels ("sinks"), which interact directly with the donor and acceptor. Namely, two discrete energy levels of the donor and acceptor are embedded in their independent sinks through the corresponding interaction matrix elements. We also introduce classical (external) noise which acts simultaneously on the donor and acceptor (collective interaction). We derive a closed system of integro-differential equations which describes the non-Markovian quantum dynamics of the ET. A region of parameters is found in which the ET dynamics can be simplified, and described by coupled ordinary differential equations. Using these simplified equations, both sharp and flat redox potentials are analyzed. We analytically and nu...

  18. 77 FR 34127 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account...

    2012-06-08

    ... Account (ETA) Financial Agency Agreement AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury... Financial Management Service solicits comments concerning form FMS-111, ``Electronic Transfer Account (ETA...: Electronic Transfer Account (ETA) Financial Agency Agreement. OMB Number: 1510-0073. Form Number: FMS...

  19. Low activation barriers characterize intramolecular electron transfer in ascorbate oxidase

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1992-01-01

    Anaerobic reduction kinetics of the zucchini squash ascorbate oxidase (AO; L-ascorbate:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.10.3.3) by pulse radiolytically produced CO2- radical ions were investigated. Changes in the absorption bands of type 1 [Cu(II)] (610 nm) and type 3 [Cu(II)] (330 nm) were monitored...... transfer to type 3 [Cu(II)]. The observed specific rates are similar to values reported for the limiting-rate constants of AO reduction by excess substrate, suggesting that internal electron transfer is the rate-determining step of AO activity. The temperature dependence of the intramolecular electron...... transfer rate constants was measured from 275 to 308 K at pH 5.5 and, from the Eyring plots, low activation enthalpies were calculated--namely, 9.1 +/- 1.1 and 6.8 +/- 1.0 kJ.mol-1 for the fastest and slowest phases, respectively. The activation entropies observed for these respective phases were -170...

  20. Electron-transfer reactions of tryptophan and tyrosine derivatives

    Oxidation of tryptophan, tyrosine, and derivatives by oxidizing radicals was studied by pulse radiolysis in aqueous solutions at 20 0C. Rate constants for the oxidation of tryptophan derivatives with .N3 and Br2-. radicals vary from 8 x 108 to 4.8 and 109 M-1 s-1 and oxidation goes to completion; no pH dependence was observed. Oxidation rate constants for tyrosine derivatives increase upon deprotonation of the phenolic residue at higher pH. Redox potentials for the indolyl and phenoxyl radicals were derived from the measured equilibrium constants by using p-methoxyphenol (E/sub 7.5/ = 0.6 and E13 = 0.4 V), bisulfite (E3 = 0.84 V), and guanosine (E7 = 0.91 V) redox couples as reference systems. Redox potentials of tryptophan derivatives were found to be in dependent on the nature of the side chain and higher than the redox potentials of tryptophan derivatives. Electron transfer from tyrosine to tryptophyl radical was found to be slow in neutral media and is suggested to proceed via multiple steps, one of which is proton transfer from tyrosine to tryptophyl radical followed by electron transfer. 26 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  1. Electronic Energy transfer in light-harvesting antenna complexes

    Hossein-Nejad, Hoda

    The studies presented in this thesis explore electronic energy transfer (EET) in light-harvesting antenna complexes and investigate the role of quantum coherence in EET. The dynamics of energy transfer are investigated in three distinct length scales and a different formulation of the exciton transport problem is applied at each scale. These scales include: the scale of a molecular dimer, the scale of a single protein and the scale of a molecular aggregate. The antenna protein phycoerythrin 545 (PE545) isolated from the photosynthetic cryptophyte algae Rhodomonas CS4 is specifically studied in two chapters of this thesis. It is found that formation of small aggregates delocalizes the excitation across chromophores of adjacent proteins, and that this delocalization has a dramatic effect in enhancing the rate of energy transfer between pigments. Furthermore, we investigate EET from a donor to an acceptor via an intermediate site and observe that interference of coherent pathways gives a finite correction to the transfer rate that is sensitively dependent on the nature of the vibrational interactions in the system. The statistical fluctuations of a system exhibiting EET are investigated in the final chapter. The techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics are applied to investigate the steady-state of a typical system exhibiting EET that is perturbed out of equilibrium due to its interaction with a fluctuating bath.

  2. Microbial extracellular electron transfer and its relevance to iron corrosion.

    Kato, Souichiro

    2016-03-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a microbial metabolism that enables efficient electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials. Microorganisms harbouring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, including bioleaching and bioelectrochemical systems. On the other hand, recent research revealed that microbial EET potentially induces corrosion of iron structures. It has been well known that corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions is mostly caused by microbial activities, which is termed as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Among diverse MIC mechanisms, microbial EET activity that enhances corrosion via direct uptake of electrons from metallic iron, specifically termed as electrical MIC (EMIC), has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. The EMIC-inducing microorganisms initially identified were certain sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea isolated from marine environments. Subsequently, abilities to induce EMIC were also demonstrated in diverse anaerobic microorganisms in freshwater environments and oil fields, including acetogenic bacteria and nitrate-reducing bacteria. Abilities of EET and EMIC are now regarded as microbial traits more widespread among diverse microbial clades than was thought previously. In this review, basic understandings of microbial EET and recent progresses in the EMIC research are introduced. PMID:26863985

  3. Controlling time scales for electron transfer through proteins

    Scot Wherland

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Electron transfer processes within proteins constitute key elements in biological energy conversion processes as well as in a wide variety of biochemical transformations. Pursuit of the parameters that control the rates of these processes is driven by the great interest in the latter reactions. Here, we review a considerable body of results emerging from investigation of intramolecular electron transfer (ET reactions in two types of proteins, all done by the use of the pulse-radiolysis method: first are described results of extensive studies of a model system, the bacterial electron mediating protein azurin, where an internal ET between the disulfide radical ion and the Cu(II is induced. Impact of specific structural changes introduced into azurin on the reaction rates and the parameters controlling it are discussed. Then, the presentation is extended to results of investigations of intra-protein ET reactions that are part of catalytic cycles of multi-copper containing enzymes. Again, the rates and the parameters controlling them are presented and discussed in the context of their efficacy and possible constraints set on their evolution.

  4. A stochastic reorganizational bath model for electronic energy transfer

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The fluctuations of optical gap induced by the environment play crucial roles in electronic energy transfer dynamics. One of the simplest approaches to incorporate such fluctuations in energy transfer dynamics is the well known Haken-Strobl-Reineker model, in which the energy-gap fluctuation is approximated as a white noise. Recently, several groups have employed molecular dynamics simulations and excited-state calculations in conjunction to take the thermal fluctuation of excitation energies into account. Here, we discuss a rigorous connection between the stochastic and the atomistic bath models. If the phonon bath is treated classically, time evolution of the exciton-phonon system can be described by Ehrenfest dynamics. To establish the relationship between the stochastic and atomistic bath models, we employ a projection operator technique to derive the generalized Langevin equations for the energy-gap fluctuations. The stochastic bath model can be obtained as an approximation of the atomistic Ehrenfest equ...

  5. Overpotential-induced lability of the electronic overlap factor in long-range electrochemical electron transfer: charge and distance dependence

    Kornyshev, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. M.; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik;

    2000-01-01

    Long-distance electrochemical electron transfer exhibits approximately exponential dependence on the electron transfer distance. On the basis of a jellium model of the metal surface we show that the slope of the logarithm of the current vs. the transfer distance also depends strongly on the elect...

  6. 77 FR 24667 - TANF Assistance and Electronic Benefit Transfer Transactions; Request for Public Comment

    2012-04-25

    ... state for entertainment.'' The law defines an electronic benefit transfer transaction as ``the use of a... Electronic Benefit Transfer Transactions; Request for Public Comment AGENCY: Department of Health and Human... States have implemented policies and practices to prevent electronic benefit transfer...

  7. Extracellular electron transfer from cathode to microbes: application for biofuel production

    Choi, Okkyoung; Sang, Byoung-In

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer in microorganisms has been applied for bioelectrochemical synthesis utilizing microbes to catalyze anodic and/or cathodic biochemical reactions. Anodic reactions (electron transfer from microbe to anode) are used for current production and cathodic reactions (electron transfer from cathode to microbe) have recently been applied for current consumption for valuable biochemical production. The extensively studied exoelectrogenic bacteria Shewanella and Geobacter ...

  8. Charge-sharing and electron-transfer characteristics of a gas electron multiplier (GEM)

    The charge sharing and electron-transfer process of a gas electron multiplier (GEM) with a high density of holes (60 μm in diameter at 100 μm of pitch) were examined. The GEM operated at a lower applied voltage due to the smaller size of the GEM holes; thus, a higher electric field is seen in the multiplication channels. The electron collection efficiency and the charge sharing were found to depend on the external field, as well as on the GEM voltage. The electron collection efficiency approached 90 % with a full collection of primary electrons under optimized GEM field conditions, and the range of the drift field for efficient electron collection to reach a plateau increased with the GEM voltage. The positive-ion feedback is also estimated

  9. Charge-sharing and electron-transfer characteristics of a gas electron multiplier (GEM)

    Han, Sang Hyo; Kang, Hee Dong [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Kyun; Moon, Byung Soo; Chung, Chong Eun [KAERI, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyo Sung; Kang, Sang Mook [Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-05-01

    The charge sharing and electron-transfer process of a gas electron multiplier (GEM) with a high density of holes (60 {mu}m in diameter at 100 {mu}m of pitch) were examined. The GEM operated at a lower applied voltage due to the smaller size of the GEM holes; thus, a higher electric field is seen in the multiplication channels. The electron collection efficiency and the charge sharing were found to depend on the external field, as well as on the GEM voltage. The electron collection efficiency approached 90 % with a full collection of primary electrons under optimized GEM field conditions, and the range of the drift field for efficient electron collection to reach a plateau increased with the GEM voltage. The positive-ion feedback is also estimated.

  10. Local operator partitioning of electronic energy for electronic energy transfer: An efficient algorithm

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul

    2013-01-01

    An efficient computational algorithm to implement a local operator approach to partitioning electronic energy in general molecular systems is presented. This approach, which rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule, gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. We apply the technique to the $9-$(($1-$naphthyl)$-$methyl)-anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH$_2-$naphthyl groups as subsystems, and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using Configuration Interaction Singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety of different behaviors amongst these excited electronic states.

  11. Suppression of Electron Transfer to Dioxygen by Charge Transfer and Electron Transfer Complexes in the FAD-dependent Reductase Component of Toluene Dioxygenase*

    Lin, Tzong-Yuan; Werther, Tobias; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dobbek, Holger

    2012-01-01

    The three-component toluene dioxygenase system consists of an FAD-containing reductase, a Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, and a Rieske-type dioxygenase. The task of the FAD-containing reductase is to shuttle electrons from NADH to the ferredoxin, a reaction the enzyme has to catalyze in the presence of dioxygen. We investigated the kinetics of the reductase in the reductive and oxidative half-reaction and detected a stable charge transfer complex between the reduced reductase and NAD+ at the end of the reductive half-reaction, which is substantially less reactive toward dioxygen than the reduced reductase in the absence of NAD+. A plausible reason for the low reactivity toward dioxygen is revealed by the crystal structure of the complex between NAD+ and reduced reductase, which shows that the nicotinamide ring and the protein matrix shield the reactive C4a position of the isoalloxazine ring and force the tricycle into an atypical planar conformation, both factors disfavoring the reaction of the reduced flavin with dioxygen. A rapid electron transfer from the charge transfer complex to electron acceptors further reduces the risk of unwanted side reactions, and the crystal structure of a complex between the reductase and its cognate ferredoxin shows a short distance between the electron-donating and -accepting cofactors. Attraction between the two proteins is likely mediated by opposite charges at one large patch of the complex interface. The stability, specificity, and reactivity of the observed charge transfer and electron transfer complexes are thought to prevent the reaction of reductaseTOL with dioxygen and thus present a solution toward conflicting requirements. PMID:22992736

  12. Suppression of electron transfer to dioxygen by charge transfer and electron transfer complexes in the FAD-dependent reductase component of toluene dioxygenase.

    Lin, Tzong-Yuan; Werther, Tobias; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dobbek, Holger

    2012-11-01

    The three-component toluene dioxygenase system consists of an FAD-containing reductase, a Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, and a Rieske-type dioxygenase. The task of the FAD-containing reductase is to shuttle electrons from NADH to the ferredoxin, a reaction the enzyme has to catalyze in the presence of dioxygen. We investigated the kinetics of the reductase in the reductive and oxidative half-reaction and detected a stable charge transfer complex between the reduced reductase and NAD(+) at the end of the reductive half-reaction, which is substantially less reactive toward dioxygen than the reduced reductase in the absence of NAD(+). A plausible reason for the low reactivity toward dioxygen is revealed by the crystal structure of the complex between NAD(+) and reduced reductase, which shows that the nicotinamide ring and the protein matrix shield the reactive C4a position of the isoalloxazine ring and force the tricycle into an atypical planar conformation, both factors disfavoring the reaction of the reduced flavin with dioxygen. A rapid electron transfer from the charge transfer complex to electron acceptors further reduces the risk of unwanted side reactions, and the crystal structure of a complex between the reductase and its cognate ferredoxin shows a short distance between the electron-donating and -accepting cofactors. Attraction between the two proteins is likely mediated by opposite charges at one large patch of the complex interface. The stability, specificity, and reactivity of the observed charge transfer and electron transfer complexes are thought to prevent the reaction of reductase(TOL) with dioxygen and thus present a solution toward conflicting requirements. PMID:22992736

  13. The intramolecular electron transfer between copper sites of nitrite reductase

    Farver, O; Eady, R R; Abraham, Z H;

    1998-01-01

    The intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 Cu(I) and the type 2 Cu(II) sites of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans dissimilatory nitrite reductase (AxNiR) has been studied in order to compare it with the analogous process taking place in ascorbate oxidase (AO). This internal process is......(I) and the trinuclear copper centre in ascorbate oxidase, and the characteristics of the internal ET processes of these enzymes are compared. The data are consistent with the faster ET observed in nitrite reductase arising from a more advantageous entropy of activation when compared with ascorbate...

  14. Parton models of high momentum transfer electron-nuclear scattering

    High-energy electron-nuclear scattering processes are discussed from the point of view of a parton model description. The light-cone formalism is introduced in a schematic presentation emphasizing: (i) the connection to relativistic dynamics, (ii) the phenomenological construction of the far off-shell components of wave functions, and (iii) asymptotic scaling laws. A survey is made of some of the recent calculations based on a nucleon constituent parton model and their comparison with data for momentum transfers Q22. A prospective discussion is also made on multiquark nuclear components and the quark parton model in QCD

  15. Photoinduced electron transfer from phycoerythrin to colloidal metal semiconductor nanoparticles

    Kathiravan, A.; Chandramohan, M.; Renganathan, R.; Sekar, S.

    2009-04-01

    Phycoerythrin is a water soluble pigment which absorbs in the visible region at 563 nm. The interaction of phycoerythrin with colloidal metal semiconductors was studied by absorption, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopy. Phycoerythrin adsorbed strongly on the surface of TiO 2 nanoparticles, the apparent association constant for the association between colloidal metal-TiO 2 nanoparticles and phycoerythrin was determined from fluorescence quenching data. The free energy change (Δ Get) for electron transfer process has been calculated by applying Rehm-Weller equation.

  16. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed

  17. Photoinduced electron transfer in singly labeled thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate azurin derivatives

    Borovok, N; Kotlyar, A B; Pecht, I; Skov, L K; Farver, O

    1999-01-01

    (II) and the back reaction from Cu(I) to the oxidized dye. For all singly labeled derivatives, the rate constants of copper ion reduction were one or two orders of magnitude larger than for its reoxidation, consistent with the larger thermodynamic driving force for the former process. Using 3-D coordinates...... efficiency. TUPS derivatives of azurin, singly labeled at specific lysine residues, were prepared and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange HPLC. Transient absorption spectroscopy was used to directly monitor the rates of the electron transfer reaction from the photoexcited triplet state of TUPS to Cu...

  18. Electronic excitation energy transfer between quasi-zero-dimensional systems

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav; Mao, H.

    Tokyo : The Surface Science Society of Japan, 2014, s. 11-17. ISSN 1348-0391. [International Conference on Atomically Controlled Surfaces, Interfaces and Nanostructures /12/ - International Colloquium on Scanning Probe Microscopy /21./. Tsukuba (JP), 04.11.2013-08.11.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12236; GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : quantum dots * energy transfer * electron -phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/result?item1=4&word1=Atomically+Controlled+Surfaces+ AND +kral

  19. Human ceruloplasmin. Intramolecular electron transfer kinetics and equilibration

    Farver, O; Bendahl, L; Skov, L K;

    1999-01-01

    Pulse radiolytic reduction of disulfide bridges in ceruloplasmin yielding RSSR(-) radicals induces a cascade of intramolecular electron transfer (ET) processes. Based on the three-dimensional structure of ceruloplasmin identification of individual kinetically active disulfide groups and type 1 (T1...... with a rate constant of 3.9 +/- 0.8. No reoxidation of T1B Cu(I) could be resolved. It appears that the third T1 center (T1C of domain 2) is not participating in intramolecular ET, as it seems to be in a reduced state in the resting enzyme....

  20. Electronic state selectivity in dication-molecule single electron transfer reactions: NO+ + NO

    Parkes, M. A.; Lockyear, J. F.; Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, J.; Price, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 41 (2011), s. 18386-18392. ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1223 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : coincidence experiments * dications * electron transfer * energy partitioning * state selectivity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.573, year: 2011

  1. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca;

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity is...... controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...

  2. The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a motor role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

  3. Electron transfer pathway analysis in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center

    Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    A new computational scheme to analyze electron transfer (ET) pathways in large biomolecules is presented with applications to ETs in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. It consists of a linear combination of fragment molecular orbitals and an electron tunneling current analysis, which enables an efficient first-principles analysis of ET pathways in large biomolecules. The scheme has been applied to the ET from menaquinone to ubiquinone via nonheme iron complex in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. It has revealed that not only the central Fe$^{2+}$ ion but also particular histidine ligands are involved in the ET pathways in such a way to mitigate perturbations that can be caused by metal ion substitution and depletion, which elucidates the experimentally observed insensitivity of the ET rate to these perturbations.

  4. Molecular Models for Conductance in Junctions and Electrochemical Electron Transfer

    Mazinani, Shobeir Khezr Seddigh

    This thesis develops molecular models for electron transport in molecular junctions and intra-molecular electron transfer. The goal is to identify molecular descriptors that afford a substantial simplification of these electronic processes. First, the connection between static molecular polarizability and the molecular conductance is examined. A correlation emerges whereby the measured conductance of a tunneling junction decreases as a function of the calculated molecular polarizability for several systems, a result consistent with the idea of a molecule as a polarizable dielectric. A model based on a macroscopic extension of the Clausius-Mossotti equation to the molecular domain and Simmon's tunneling model is developed to explain this correlation. Despite the simplicity of the theory, it paves the way for further experimental, conceptual and theoretical developments in the use of molecular descriptors to describe both conductance and electron transfer. Second, the conductance of several biologically relevant, weakly bonded, hydrogen-bonded systems is systematically investigated. While there is no correlation between hydrogen bond strength and conductance, the results indicate a relation between the conductance and atomic polarizability of the hydrogen bond acceptor atom. The relevance of these results to electron transfer in biological systems is discussed. Hydrogen production and oxidation using catalysts inspired by hydrogenases provides a more sustainable alternative to the use of precious metals. To understand electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of a collection of Fe and Ni mimics of hydrogenases, high-level density functional theory calculations are described. The results, based on a detailed analysis of the energies, charges and molecular orbitals of these metal complexes, indicate the importance of geometric constraints imposed by the ligand on molecular properties such as acidity and electrocatalytic activity. Based on model calculations of

  5. Determination of the electronics transfer function for current transient measurements

    Scharf, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We describe a straight-forward method for determining the transfer function of the readout of a sensor for the situation in which the current transient of the sensor can be precisely simulated. The method relies on the convolution theorem of Fourier transforms. The specific example is a planar silicon pad diode connected with a 50 $\\Omega $ cable to an amplifier followed by a 5 GS/s sampling oscilloscope. The charge carriers in the sensor were produced by picosecond lasers with light of wavelengths of 675 and 1060 nm. The transfer function is determined from the 1060 nm data with the pad diode biased at 1000 V. It is shown that the simulated sensor response convoluted with this transfer function provides an excellent description of the measured transients for the laser light of both wavelengths, at voltages 50 V above the depletion voltage of about 90 V up to the maximum applied voltage of 1000 V. The method has been developed for the precise measurement of the dependence of the drift velocity of electrons an...

  6. Interfacial Electron Transfer and Transient Photoconductivity Studied with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    Milot, Rebecca Lee

    Terahertz spectroscopy is distinguished from other far infrared and millimeter wave spectroscopies by its inherent phase sensitivity and sub-picosecond time resolution making it a versatile technique to study a wide range of physical phenomena. As THz spectroscopy is still a relatively new field, many aspects of THz generation mechanisms have not been fully examined. Using terahertz emission spectroscopy (TES), THz emission from ZnTe(110) was analyzed and found to be limited by two-photon absorption and free-carrier generation at high excitation fluences. Due to concerns about the continued use of fossil fuels, solar energy has been widely investigated as a promising source of renewable energy. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been developed as a low-cost alternative to conventional photovoltaic solar cells. To solve the issues of the intermittency and inefficient transport associated with solar energy, researchers are attempting to adapt DSSCs for water oxidation and chemical fuel production. Both device designs incorporate sensitizer molecules covalently bound to metal oxide nanoparticles. The sensitizer, which is comprised of a chromophore and anchoring group, absorbs light and transfers an electron from its excited state to the conduction band of the metal oxide, producing an electric current. Using time-resolved THz spectroscopy (TRTS), an optical pump/THz probe technique, the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides was evaluated as a function of the chromophore, its anchoring group, and the metal oxide identity. Experiments for studying fully functioning DSSCs and water oxidation devices are also described. Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrin chromophores have been designed and synthesized for use in photoelectrochemical water oxidation cells. Influences on the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from the chromophores into TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles due to changes in both the central substituent to

  7. Cluster PEACE observations of electrons during magnetospheric flux transfer events

    C. J. Owen

    Full Text Available During the first quarter of 2001 the apogees of the Cluster spacecraft quartet precessed through midday local times. This provides the first opportunity for 4 spacecraft studies of the bow shock, magnetosheath and the dayside magnetopause current layer and boundary layers. In this paper, we present observations of electrons in the energy range ~ 10 eV–26 keV made by the Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE located just inside the magnetopause boundary, together with supporting observations by the Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM. During these observations, the spacecraft have separations of ~ 600 km. This scale size is of the order or less than the typical size of flux transfer events (FTEs, which are expected to be observed following bursts of reconnection on the dayside magnetopause. We study, in detail, the 3-D configuration of electron populations observed around a series of enhancements of magnetosheath-like electrons which were observed within the magnetosphere on 2 February 2001. We find that individual spacecraft observe magnetic field and electron signatures that are consistent with previous observations of magnetospheric FTEs. However, the differences in the signatures between spacecraft indicate that these FTEs have substructure on the scale of the spacecraft separation. We use these differences and the timings of the 4 spacecraft observations to infer the motions of the electron populations and thus the configuration of these substructures. We find that these FTEs are moving from noon towards dusk. The inferred size and speed of motion across the magnetopause, in one example, is ~ 0.8 RE and ~ 70 km s-1 respectively. In addition, we observe a delay in and an extended duration of the signature at the spacecraft furthest from the magnetopause. We discuss the implications of these 4 spacecraft observations for the structure of these FTEs. We suggest that these may include a compression of the closed

  8. ATP-induced electron transfer by redox-selective partner recognition

    Hennig, Sandra E.; Goetzl, Sebastian; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Bommer, Martin; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Hildebrandt, Peter; Dobbek, Holger

    2014-08-01

    Thermodynamically unfavourable electron transfers are enabled by coupling to an energy-supplying reaction. How the energy is transduced from the exergonic to the endergonic process is largely unknown. Here we provide the structural basis for an energy transduction process in the reductive activation of B12-dependent methyltransferases. The transfer of one electron from an activating enzyme to the cobalamin cofactor is energetically uphill and relies on coupling to an ATPase reaction. Our results demonstrate that the key to coupling is, besides the oxidation state-dependent complex formation, the conformational gating of the electron transfer. Complex formation induces a substitution of the ligand at the electron-accepting Co ion. Addition of ATP initiates electron transfer by provoking conformational changes that destabilize the complex. We show how remodelling of the electron-accepting Co2+ promotes ATP-dependent electron transfer; an efficient strategy not seen in other electron-transferring ATPases.

  9. Coherent Transfer of Electronic Wavepacket Motion Between Atoms

    Zhou, Tao; Richards, B. G.; Jones, R. R.

    2016-05-01

    We have shown that electron correlations, induced by controlled dipole-dipole (DD) interactions, can enable the coherent transfer of electronic wavepacket motion from atoms to their neighbors. In the experiment, a 5 ns tunable dye laser excites Rb atoms in a MOT to the 25s state in a weak static electric field for which the tunable 25s 33 s 24p34p DD interaction is resonant. A picosecond THz pulse then further excites each Rydberg atom into a coherent superposition, of 25s and 24p states. The evolution of this mixed-parity wavepacket is characterized by time-dependent oscillations in the electric dipole moment, with a period of 2.9 ps. Approximately 5 ns after the wavepacket creation, a second 5 ns dye-laser promotes a second set of atoms from the 5p level into the 33s state. Because of the DD interaction, the second dye laser actually creates atom pairs whose electronic states are correlated via the resonant DD coupling. A 33 s + 34p wavepacket, oscillating with the same 2.9 ps period as the 25 s + 24p wavepacket, develops on the second set of atoms as a result of the correlation. A second, time-delayed ps THz pulse enables the detection of the coherent wavepacket motion on the two sets of atoms. This research has been supported by the NSF.

  10. Local Intermolecular Order Controls Photoinduced Charge Separation at Donor/Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Semiconductors

    Feier, Hilary M.; Reid, Obadiah G.; Pace, Natalie A.; Park, Jaehong; Bergkamp, Jesse J.; Sellinger, Alan; Gust, Devens; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-03-23

    How free charge is generated at organic donor-acceptor interfaces is an important question, as the binding energy of the lowest energy (localized) charge transfer states should be too high for the electron and hole to escape each other. Recently, it has been proposed that delocalization of the electronic states participating in charge transfer is crucial, and aggregated or otherwise locally ordered structures of the donor or the acceptor are the precondition for this electronic characteristic. The effect of intermolecular aggregation of both the polymer donor and fullerene acceptor on charge separation is studied. In the first case, the dilute electron acceptor triethylsilylhydroxy-1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxyphthalocyaninatosilicon(IV) (SiPc) is used to eliminate the influence of acceptor aggregation, and control polymer order through side-chain regioregularity, comparing charge generation in 96% regioregular (RR-) poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with its regiorandom (RRa-) counterpart. In the second case, ordered phases in the polymer are eliminated by using RRa-P3HT, and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) is used as the acceptor, varying its concentration to control aggregation. Time-resolved microwave conductivity, time-resolved photoluminescence, and transient absorption spectroscopy measurements show that while ultrafast charge transfer occurs in all samples, long-lived charge carriers are only produced in films with intermolecular aggregates of either RR-P3HT or PC61BM, and that polymer aggregates are just as effective in this regard as those of fullerenes.